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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  June 24, 2022 3:15pm-6:01pm BST

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who has johnson for lying and a man who has presumably taken that advice of the most you've got nothing good to say say nothing. this is the first time he has said anything like this which makes it quite in itself surprising. let me ask finally, what you make of the letter from the former party chairman and the fact he did not at any point pledges loyalty to boris johnson? and you think it is possible other cabinet ministers are contemplating following suit? i will contemplating following suit? i will answer the last _ contemplating following suit? i will answer the last bit _ contemplating following suit? i will answer the last bit first. _ contemplating following suit? i ll answer the last bit first. nobody knows. and, if they do, i suspect this will be over in fairly short order but i don't think there is any guarantee in that but what is interesting about the letter, through things. he says he remains loyal to the conservative party, not the prime minister. he said someone has to take responsibility for that of the clear inference as he is taking responsibility but others should. here is the key point. he said activists are distressed and disappointed. and i think that is the most important thing. what they are finding notjust
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the most important thing. what they are finding not just tory voters sitting on their hands but tory activists, unable to defend the prime minister. unable to leafleting campaign in quite the way they used to and i think, if that is what is the driving force, then it is going to be very difficult for boris johnson's cabinet colleagues and other senior tories, johnson's cabinet colleagues and otherseniortories, in johnson's cabinet colleagues and other senior tories, in spite of what they might say in public to look at this and than, they are heading to an election defeat. i think it is possible but unlikely. yes or no, should he stay or should he go? yes or no, should he stay or should he no? ., yes or no, should he stay or should he io? ., ., yes or no, should he stay or should he no? ., ., , ., ., ., he go? not a question for me, a auestion he go? not a question for me, a question for _ he go? not a question for me, a question for them _ he go? not a question for me, a question for them to _ he go? not a question for me, a question for them to be - he go? not a question for me, a question for them to be will - he go? not a question for me, a | question for them to be will stick questionnaires will others get rid of him? . ., ., ~ ,, , of him? nice one. thank you very much. of him? nice one. thank you very much- let's _ of him? nice one. thank you very much- let's go — of him? nice one. thank you very much. let's go back _ of him? nice one. thank you very much. let's go back to _ of him? nice one. thank you very much. let's go back to the - of him? nice one. thank you very| much. let's go back to the studio. thank you. ijust much. let's go back to the studio. thank you. i just want to bring some breaking news now that has come in. the us supreme court has overturned the landmark though the wade ruling
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that legalised abortion nationwide in that country so what you're now are live pictures from outside the supreme court where people have gathered on this landmark ruling and this is overturning the 1973 ruling that recognise a women's constitutional right to an abortion and legalised it nationwide. of the decade since then there were some restrictions on abortion that were introduced in that time but today is a landmark ruling and what you are seeing now is people campaigning outside the supreme court. thousands of people have rallied for abortion rights in washington and other cities because there was a bit of a leak that this was something that the supreme court were considering. that link was made public last month which is when we first mentioned this. this was something that people were aware of and expecting. and so
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those are the images you are seeing there. but what we're going to do now is we're going to join there. but what we're going to do now is we're going tojoin our colleagues, bbc world news, to get more on this breaking news story so thatjoin bbc world now. president may be can—do something. the breaking news here is that the supreme court has overturned roe vs wade, the landmark ruling which guaranteed a woman's federal right to an abortion now being returned to the states so access to abortion in america will depend on where she lives in this country. let's go to the supreme court, tell us more about thejudgment. this the supreme court, tell us more about the judgment.— about the 'udgment. this is a seminal about the judgment. this is a seminal moment _ about the judgment. this is a seminal moment in _ about the judgment. this is a seminal moment in a - about the judgment. this is a seminal moment in a medic i about the judgment. this is a l seminal moment in a medic at when it comes to women's rights
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but many americans knew this would happen ever since the draft opinion was leaked in early may which showed the intention of the supreme court to overturn roe vs wade and since then we have been huge security outside the supreme court, there offences all way around, entrance points marked by police, at the moment they are trying to keep separate the protesters that have been coming everyday in anticipation of the ruling. the anti—abortion groups who are hopeful that the justices would stick to the draft opinion which they have and then the pro—choice groups who are hoping that by protesting they would be able to change the
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justices�* mines to change course but they have not, the draft opinion is that was leaked and may, the official ruling is very similar to the draft opinion which has decided that roe vs wade is not constitutional and in the ruling and says the majority opinion in the ruling of 6—3 that the right is not deeply rooted in the nation�*s yesterday. pro—abortion rights protesters are saying women are not property of the state, this court is a legitimate. —— illegitimate. it is important to emphasise this does not mean that abortion is now going to become a legal across america, roe vs wade was all about changing the way states are regulated abortion so when the
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1973 ruling came in, before then states had largely banned abortion on her different views but the ruling established the federal guidance, a baseline which said that women had a constitutional right to have an abortion up to 2a weeks, it established the right to privacy. over the decades it has been a hugely challenged, never left alone by anti—abortion activists and they have chipped at it and then an aspect of the ruling that have been subjected to more regulation particularly in the second and third trimesters and that has moved states to move forward to restrict abortion from that so that are already parts of america with it is hard to get an abortion but it has never been banned, states have never been able to buy that outline because of the constitutional ruling but this opinion that has come down now
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by the supreme court gets rid of that baseline and has said to the 50 states of america it is up to you, you decide to be will see the states almost in three categories, those that will ban abortion, those that will ban abortion, those that will protect rights and those that are somewhere in between which will restrict abortion but not ban it outright so there will be a cascade of laws, a patchwork of laws and it all depends where you live and pro—rights groups say about 40 and pro—rights groups say about a0 million women live and the hostile states that will become much harderfor them hostile states that will become much harder for them to access abortion services whether the procedure are the medicated abortion which is pills and is the most common form taken in this country. what we will see as the political battles that will play out, the likes of which the country has not seen
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since the days of slavery when two camps that seemingly could not be to eye but this means the rights women have had for nearly half a century have gone, we do not exactly know when the ruling welcome and but we know there are about 26 states that will move in the end to ban abortion, nearly half the country.— end to ban abortion, nearly half the country. the setup who is a leading _ half the country. the setup who is a leading advocate _ half the country. the setup who is a leading advocate for- is a leading advocate for women�*s right to choose has called this a devastating day for all americans, called this a devastating day forallamericans, it called this a devastating day for all americans, it is interesting that the chief justice voted with a majority but said he would have taken a more measured course stopping short of ruling it out rate. irate short of ruling it out rate. we have et short of ruling it out rate. we have yet to — short of ruling it out rate. we have yet to read a more detail of what the senior justice john roberts has decided, it is worth remembering he does not
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really considered himself a conservative judge, really considered himself a conservativejudge, he is a centrist, and institutional list and in the past have been attempts to overturn roe vs wade he has sided with the liberals because he believes in the president set by the supreme court in 1973. he is a huge target for a lot of conservatives who are quite critical about the fact he is not a conservative justice that they want him to be. in anticipation of this ruling there were suggestions that may be mr roberts could convince the justices, be mr roberts could convince thejustices, the be mr roberts could convince the justices, the strong conservative majority to perhaps have some sort of compromise but it is worth remembering that the three justices that are on the bench were put there by donald trump and he said when he was
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president that he would only putjustices on the bench who were anti—abortion. it is probably fair to say that the fall of roe vs wade is very much part of donald trump�*s legacy. much part of donald trump's lea . ~ , much part of donald trump's le.a _ . , , legacy. well this ruling test the jetta missy _ legacy. well this ruling test the jetta missy of _ legacy. well this ruling test the jetta missy of the - legacy. well this ruling test - the jetta missy of the supreme thejetta missy of the supreme court given that opinion polls suggest a large majority of americans support a woman�*s legal right to an abortion. appleby interesting to see because the polling and even recent polling has shown most americans, about six to percent think that roe vs wade should be upheld, —— about 66% that it should be allowed in almost all cases but there are other polls and surveys that suggest it is not as black and white as that, there is some new ones that when you ask people certainly when you ask people certainly when i have done it around
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america, the reason why they think women should be and allowed an abortion changes, most people would say the woman�*s health is at risk of pregnancy is a the salt of sexual abuse that she has the right to a termination but if it is issues like marital status on poverty then that is something they are the support us like that are just moving forward national polling will not matter as much any more, i think what people see as pose at state level boat of the most because abortion is now going to be a war of geography and it will be something that will play out at state level moving forward. �* , play out at state level moving forward. 3 ., ., ~' play out at state level moving forward. �*, ., forward. let's look at the seismic _ forward. let's look at the seismic ruling _ forward. let's look at the seismic ruling by - forward. let's look at the seismic ruling by the -
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forward. let's look at the seismic ruling by the us l seismic ruling by the us supreme court which has just landed in the last few minutes, they have ruled to overturn roe vs wade which is almost 50 years old and the justices found essentially the ruling to be unconstitutional and have declared that now the decision as to whether or not a woman may have an abortion is one thatis may have an abortion is one that is being returned to the state. it is fascinating because all these newjustices on the court, during the confirmation hearings neighbour asked about roe vs wade and whether it was what is called a super president because it has lasted for almost 50 years and they were all careful to dodge they were all careful to dodge the answer. —— a super precedent. i the answer. -- a super precedent.— the answer. -- a super recedent. ~ , ., precedent. i think whenever you look at these _ precedent. i think whenever you look at these confirmation - look at these confirmation hearings they are always a bit
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vague about what they believe and there are senators that have expressed disdain about the fact that during the hearings they did not say either way but i think the fact they were vague as quite typical of supreme court justices when they are going through their hearings. let�*s through their hearings. let's talk about — through their hearings. let's talk about the _ through their hearings. let's talk about the practical - through their hearings. let�*s talk about the practical impact of this, if you are a woman who lives in the deep south in alabama or mississippi, what will be the neatest state to you where you can get an abortion? will you have to drive 1000 miles? if abortion? will you have to drive 1000 miles?- abortion? will you have to drive 1000 miles? if you live in any one — drive 1000 miles? if you live in any one of— drive 1000 miles? if you live in any one of those - drive 1000 miles? if you live in any one of those states i in any one of those states obviously you cannot get an abortion they are, you cannot drive to any neighbouring states like kentucky or tennessee or anywhere and the
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south circular hostile state, you are surrounded by states that are hostile, it really will have to go more than 50 miles to a state that permits, perhaps in the noi, illinois said they would expand abortion rates and expect to get an influx of up to 1a,000 extra women per year wanting to use the services. that is pursuing you have the money to go and do that. if you are a woman who is poor you are not likely to do that and they say this ruling will affect poor women specifically, after african—american and hispanic women who will not be able to drive to another state or fly and there ourselves that suggest that if a woman has to drive more than 50 miles to a clinic near her she is twice as
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likely to either read think getting an abortion or abandon the idea altogether and force herself into parenthood. an herself into parenthood. sift anti—abortion group has herself into parenthood. fifty anti—abortion group has said this decision means equality begins in the womb. are there fears it could mean a return to backstreet abortions are there fears it could mean a return to backstreet abortions when people who did not have access to abortion found that their lives were in jeopardy when they tried to get rid of unwanted children? thea;a in jeopardy when they tried to get rid of unwanted children? they are the fears that _ rid of unwanted children? they are the fears that pro-choice - rid of unwanted children? they are the fears that pro-choice groups . the fears that pro—choice groups have, that you�*ve got women who live in these states that are hostile to abortion, can�*t do anything about it, don�*t have the money or support to do it. there are so many questions about what is possible for them. something
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worth remembering is that one of the most common forms of abortion is medicated abortion, involving two pills to end your pregnancy, and this happens in the first ten weeks of pregnancy, which is where the majority of women get an abortion. so, what you have to do, with the first pill, you need to get permission to have the pill. you need to have an appointment with your doctor. you need to go physically in person and pick it up. the rule was relaxed during the pandemic because people could go out and catch the virus. you could phone your doctor, something called telemedicine and get the pill. what about texas, one of the states that is a trigger law state, meaning that when roe v. wade is overturned they would automatically ban abortion. can you ring the doctor? would somebody be checking your mail? would you have to going a card to another state and stow in a hotel and they would send the pill to you
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there? these are huge challenges that women are now facing in terms of what to do. there are no ready available answers. the fear is that my pro—choice groups that women maybe resorting to drastic actions in order to end their pregnancies. barack obama has tweeted that the supreme court reverted 50 years of precedent and left the most personal decisions to politicians and ideologues. this is going to be a hugely animating issue, isn�*t it, in the mid—term elections in the us in november? it the mid-term elections in the us in november?— the mid-term elections in the us in november? it certainly seems to be as far as president _ november? it certainly seems to be as far as president biden _ november? it certainly seems to be as far as president biden is - as far as president biden is concerned. i�*m not sure if he�*s released a statement about it but we know he�*s talked about roe v. wade being overturned because that was the anticipation, that it would happen, and just recently he gave an interview to a late—night talk show
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host and in it he said that this was going to create a mini revolution. he said that this could propel many republicans out of office in the mid—term elections. so he clearly seesit mid—term elections. so he clearly sees it as an issue that voters may take to the polls. when the draft was leaked in may i had gone to report on a pro—choice rally that was happening in florida and i spoke to a lawmaker there who is running in the florida governorship and she said to me, nikki freed, she said to me that abortion would be the absolute number one issue that she was going to present to the voters in the midterms, that she is going to fight to keep abortion rights. florida next month is going to ban abortion at 15 weeks. we don�*t know if they will go all the way yet. that remains to be seen if they are going to ban outright. going by what president biden has said previously, it�*s very likely that this will be
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an issue that will come up hugely in the mid—term elections in november. the former vice president, mike pence, hasjust tweeted, to the former vice president, mike pence, has just tweeted, to date life won and he has commended the conservative justices for what he called their courage. it�*s important to note that this project of overturning roe versus wade has been one that has been 50 years in the making and the importance of conservative judicial appointments to the republican party is something that�*s been prioritised, hasn�*t it? president trump appointed three conservative justices to the court and now we see the results. the conservative _ and now we see the results. tue: conservative movement and now we see the results. tte: conservative movement has and now we see the results. t'te: conservative movement has been waiting for this moment for a long, long time. when the ruling came in 1973 there were many states that were unhappy about it. they already had these pre—roe v. wade laws on their books, waiting to be made
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constitutional, if roe v. wade was ever overturned. and it was mentioned earlier, the ruling has never had any peace in this country. since 9073 it has been chipped away at my anti—abortion —— since 1973 it has been chipped away at my anti—abortion groups. there was a case in 1992 regarding planned parenthood. we�*ve seen states bring in rules that bypass state laws involving citizens trying to stop people from having an abortion, reporting anyone who wants an abortion. but this, this moment is a huge victory for conservatives. of course this is a loss for those who are pro—choice. i�*ll repeat the quotation that came down from pro—abortion rights, they said that
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women are not property in the states, they will refuse to go back and the court is illegitimate. it remains to see what president biden will do. he has talked about some executive action. i want to read to you the liberal dissenting opinion. three justices you the liberal dissenting opinion. threejustices on the you the liberal dissenting opinion. three justices on the bench dissented, the liberaljustices and they�*ve said, as of today this court holds that a state can force a woman to give birth, prohibiting even the earliest abortions. states can thus transform what, when freely undertaken, is a wonder into what, when forced them and maybe a nightmare. that�*s what the liberal justices on the bench... the attorney — justices on the bench... the attorney general _ justices on the bench... the attorney general of - justices on the bench... the attorney general of missouri, the new york times is reporting, has already issued an opinion that activates their trigger law, effectively ending abortion in the state. so, missouri becomes the first state in the nation to effectively outlaw abortion, following the supreme court�*s decision and more states will
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follow, won�*t they? how many states do we expect will outlaw abortion after this estimate it�*s thought there will be about 13 states that have these so—called trigger laws where they will now move to completely ban abortion and these aren�*t states that are largely in the deep south, texas, alabama, kentucky, mississippi, where the case originated, the case that has... . ., case originated, the case that has... , , case originated, the case that has... , ~ ., has... cake places like missouri and omin: has... cake places like missouri and wyoming -- — has... cake places like missouri and wyoming -- -- _ has... cake places like missouri and wyoming -- -- places— has... cake places like missouri and wyoming -- -- places like - has... cake places like missouri and wyoming -- -- places like missouri| wyoming —— —— places like missouri and wyoming. i want to make a point about missouri as well. this is the thing that many pro—choice groups are worried about. they don�*t think that overturning roe v. wade is the endgame. they think the final frontier is to ban abortion outright in this country, either to ban it
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outright or make it very difficult. missouri had legislation earlier this year which would allow individuals to sue anybody who was crossing state lines to go to another state to try and get an abortion. the law was blocked in the state legislature but given that roe v. wade has been over attained and they —— has been overturned, it is likely that that particular law, that suggestion may crop up again. mitch mcconnell, d senate minority leader, said in a statement that millions of americans have spent half a century praying, marching and working towards today�*s historic victories for the rule of law and innocent life. mitch mcconnell, as majority leader in the senate, really made this conservative dominated court happen, didn�*t he, because he shepherded through the nomination of residential�*s three conservative justices, who have nomination of residential�*s three conservativejustices, who have been pivotal in making the ruling. he
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did. pivotal in making the ruling. he: did. that caused much anger among the democratic party because if you remember, when president obama wanted to put food —— makka through merrick garland, the attorney general, it was blocked by mitch mcconnell because they said it was too close to the election. amy kony barrett, one of the justices who backed roe v. wade being overturned, was put on the bench, very close to the election in 2020. as i mentioned before, for donald trump, this is a huge win for him. he isn�*t president right now but it�*s part of his legacy. he had the chance to put three justices on the bench in one term, a pretty extraordinary opportunity for him. you could argue that to the president puts on the supreme court is one of the most important decisions they will ever make because thejustices on the
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bench have life appointments. you have justices that were appointed by reagan, george w bush, who can leave, retirement ever they want. the decisions they want and make will last for a generation, and they outlast the president to put them on the bench. we havejust got reaction from the house speaker nancy pelosi. a member of the democratic party. she is condemned, calling it cruel, the cruel supreme court ruling, she says that women�*s rights are on the ballot in november. we were talking before about how much this will play in the mid—term elections. as far as nancy pelosi is concerned, women�*s rights are on the ballot, november. we�*re seeing development already with companies in states where abortion is about to be illegal, saying that they will pay travel abortion expenses for women who want
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to seek an abortion but cannot get one in the state where they live and work. so it�*s going to be quite extraordinary, isn�*t it, the impact of the ruling and it�*s going to be even more divisive, isn�*t it, with corporations being drawn into the fray. tt corporations being drawn into the fra . , . v corporations being drawn into the fra . , ., �*, ., corporations being drawn into the fra . , ., 2 ., ., corporations being drawn into the fra. 2 ., fray. it is and it's going to be fascinating — fray. it is and it's going to be fascinating to _ fray. it is and it's going to be fascinating to see _ fray. it is and it's going to be fascinating to see how - fray. it is and it's going to be fascinating to see how it - fray. it is and it's going to be i fascinating to see how it works. already in illinois, private employers will guarantee you can access abortion. but if you live in texas, that would go against the state laws. what if there is a big company that has a branch in texas and has a branch in illinois? they could be able to guarantee that you can access abortion but can�*t do it in another state. that�*s the problem, it is a patchwork of laws, a cascade of laws that�*s going to cause such confusion and prompt so many questions. there are no answers
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yet on what happens next. bind many questions. there are no answers yet on what happens next.— yet on what happens next. and for president biden, _ yet on what happens next. and for president biden, what _ yet on what happens next. and for president biden, what can - yet on what happens next. and for president biden, what can he - president biden, what can he actually do? he was asked by reporters early in the week, what are you going to do, if the court overtones roe versus wade and he said we are looking at executive actions. but really, what can he do? it's actions. but really, what can he do? it�*s interesting because late last year the democratic party past a house bill which would protect abortion rights across america but it went nowhere in the senate because they don�*t have the numbers to make it the law. and so congress has the ability to make laws for the whole of the country but when it comes to abortion rights, that�*s not an option for the democratic party. president biden has talked about executive actions and there is some suggestion that he could make it easierfor a woman to suggestion that he could make it easier for a woman to travel to another state, to receive abortion. how that will work, not sure,
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exactly. they could expand access to medicated abortion via the mail. there are some advocates that suggest leasing federal land so that abortion clinics can operate on federal land, bypassing state laws, but this is incredibly complicated, not sure how that will work. so he and his press secretary have said, in recent weeks, that they will look to try and put forward some action that will help women, but we haven�*t received any details of that yet. and i guess... thank you so much for that. let�*s get more now on the seismic, landmark ruling by the united states supreme court. we can
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go to chris doig now, a journalist. he is the deputy editor of... give us your assessment of this seismic ruling by the supreme court. thanks for havin: ruling by the supreme court. thanks for having me- _ ruling by the supreme court. thanks for having me. as _ ruling by the supreme court. thanks for having me. as you _ ruling by the supreme court. thanks for having me. as you said, - ruling by the supreme court. thanks for having me. as you said, it - ruling by the supreme court. thanks for having me. as you said, it is - for having me. as you said, it is truly a seismic ruling, it is a right that the court recognised back in 1970, in the 70s, and it�*s been around for almost 50 years now. it�*s been reaffirmed by the court repeatedly and now today, with a single ruling, this precedent is overturned and we are now going to have this fallout across the country, as you�*ve been discussing, where we are thinking about what the rights are in individual states, what states will do to try to either further restrict abortion rights in their state or to try and protect
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and expand abortion rights in other states. , ., , �* ., , states. so, this doesn't really settled the — states. so, this doesn't really settled the abortion - states. so, this doesn't really settled the abortion question | states. so, this doesn't really l settled the abortion question at all, doesn�*t it? hot settled the abortion question at all, doesn't it?— settled the abortion question at all, doesn't it?_ it - settled the abortion question at| all, doesn't it?_ itjust all, doesn't it? not at all. it 'ust nets rid all, doesn't it? not at all. it 'ust gets rid offi all, doesn't it? not at all. it 'ust gets rid of the i all, doesn't it? not at all. it 'ust gets rid of the federal �* all, doesn't it? not at all. it 'ust gets rid of the federal right h all, doesn't it? not at all. itjust gets rid of the federal right to l all, doesn't it? not at all. itjust i gets rid of the federal right to one but now it goes back to the states. it goes back to the states but it doesn�*t even reallyjust go back to the states because you�*re going to have a multitude of challenges that p0p up have a multitude of challenges that pop up from these changes across the country, as states implement new changes, there will be federal challenges, state supreme court challenges, state supreme court challenges based on state constitutions and state law, and so what we�*ve really done... often we talk about the supreme court setting a floor for certain rights. talk about the supreme court setting a floorfor certain rights. and by cutting the floor out today, what the supreme court has done is made
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it a complete upheaval across the country. it a complete upheaval across the count . �* , , ., country. it's interesting that the chief country. it's interesting that the chiefjustice. — country. it's interesting that the chief justice, jon _ country. it's interesting that the chiefjustice, jon robertson, - country. it's interesting that the i chiefjustice, jon robertson, ruled chief justice, jon robertson, ruled with chiefjustice, jon robertson, ruled with the majority but said essentially he wouldn�*t have gone quite as far. and yet he did, by joining the majority. it�*s a bit of a confusing position, isn�*t it? well, hejoined thejudgment a confusing position, isn�*t it? well, he joined the judgment of the court. even in oral arguments he had made it clear that he was ok with striking down this specific law at issue but he had real questions about how the court was going to resolve the case. he often talks about the court as taking minimalist steps, doing as little as it needs to do to resolve a given case. obviously here the court went a lot further than it needed to go in resolving this case. all that was at issue here is a 15 week ban which
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obviously went a lot further, than other bans in the past but not as far as other bans in other states like texas, the six—week ban that they�*ve got past. so he asked why they�*ve got past. so he asked why the court did more than it needed to do here? but because of the current make—up of the court, they didn�*t need his vote. there were five justices willing to go further and today, they did. justices willing to go further and today. they did-— justices willing to go further and today, they did. what do you think this means — today, they did. what do you think this means for _ today, they did. what do you think this means for a _ today, they did. what do you think this means for a country _ today, they did. what do you think this means for a country that's - this means for a country that�*s already so politically divided, as we head towards the mid—term elections in november. what�*s the impact going to be politically? tt�*s impact going to be politically? it's alwa s impact going to be politically? tt�*s always hard tojudge how the supreme always hard to judge how the supreme court is going to end up playing in
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elections, because people end up worrying about so many other things in their lives. but the republicans have traditionally been very good at especially turning out their base on supreme court issues and particularly overturning roe v. wade. now that�*s happened, it�*s unclear, one, if republicans can keep up their base on that same level, but also on the contrary, whether or not now the democrats are going to have an issue that they can actually rally their base around, turning out to the polls, to offset this ruling today.— this ruling today. thanks for 'oinin: this ruling today. thanks for joining us- _ this ruling today. thanks for joining us. let's _ this ruling today. thanks for joining us. let's get - this ruling today. thanks for joining us. let's get some . this ruling today. thanks for - joining us. let's get some more joining us. let�*s get some more context on this landmark ruling by the us supreme court with our north america correspondent, anthony zarco, who is in our dc studio. the
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leaked opinion a month or so ago, it turned out to be just right, leaked opinion a month or so ago, it turned out to bejust right, didn�*t it? tt turned out to be 'ust right, didn't it? ,, , ., it? it did. the supreme court essentially. _ it? it did. the supreme court essentially, through - it? it did. the supreme court essentially, through the - it? it did. the supreme court l essentially, through the leaked opinion, telegraphed the punch. people wondered if they really would and why, but when you look at the opinion, it is the same basic holding, that roe v. wade and the case of the planned parenthood, which upheld it, is in the ballot, that they were poorly decided from the get go and that the state legislatures should determine the legality of abortion and not the judiciary. legality of abortion and not the 'udicia . ~ . , legality of abortion and not the 'udicia . ~ ., , , ., ., judiciary. what is this going to mean in practical _ judiciary. what is this going to mean in practical terms - judiciary. what is this going to mean in practical terms for . judiciary. what is this going to mean in practical terms for a i mean in practical terms for a woman�*s ability to get abortion in america? will it depend on where she
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lives? . �* , . america? will it depend on where she lives? ., �*, ., ., , , lives? that's what will happen. 22 states, lives? that's what will happen. 22 states. right _ lives? that's what will happen. 22 states, right now, _ lives? that's what will happen. 22 states, right now, because - lives? that's what will happen. 22 states, right now, because they i lives? that's what will happen. 22 i states, right now, because they have abortion bans, trigger laws, that ban abortion as soon as roe v. wade was reversed, which is what happened today, in those 22 states it is going to be very difficult or impossible. millions of americans in places like missouri, oklahoma, various levels of restrictions but in many of these places there are outright bans. some have exceptions, for in�*s health and in cases of rape and incest. zouma bidet could go to other states and obtain abortions like california and new york, which have robust protections, but we are looking at states trying to prevent women from even crossing borders to get an abortion, to stop people
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providing financial or transportation support for women to go across borders to get an abortion in other places and that�*s going to be a very big legal battle in the years ahead. it�*s something we haven�*t really seen since slavery, pre—civil war, when their work free states and slave states and the three states were trying to impose their views on the highly contested moral issue on the national stage and on each other. —— slave states and on each other. —— slave states and free states were trying to oppose their views. itaste and free states were trying to oppose their views.— oppose their views. we were discussing — oppose their views. we were discussing with _ oppose their views. we were discussing with your - oppose their views. we were i discussing with your colleague, the state of missouri has already enacted its trigger law following the ruling, so abortion is effectively illegal in missouri and this will happen very quickly, won�*t it? tt this will happen very quickly, won't it? , ~ ., this will happen very quickly, won't it? , .,. ., it? it is. abortion clinics could t and it? it is. abortion clinics could try and stay — it? it is. abortion clinics could try and stay open, _ it? it is. abortion clinics could try and stay open, they i it? it is. abortion clinics could try and stay open, they could | it? it is. abortion clinics could i try and stay open, they could try and challenge it in court but the reality is that if they do that they could face very serious legal consequences and i think for most of these clinics, the potentialfor
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criminal liability is going to outweigh the decision to try and stay open and fight this. you�*re going to see the landscape in this country, in about half the country, change almost instantaneously. something to keep in mind is how quickly all of this changed. back in 2016 the supreme court had a majority striking down the texas law that restricted regulation of abortion clinics, that doctors had to be certified in, to perform abortions. that was a different supreme court. injust abortions. that was a different supreme court. in just six years, three of those justices have been replaced and all three of those justices were replaced by individuals who are against abortion rights. that�*s why we see a majority at this point, fivejustices rights. that�*s why we see a majority at this point, five justices willing to totally undercut roe v. wade, abandon it and return it to the states and of course justicejohn robertson, who would have reversed
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mississippi law but not totally undermined roe v. wade. nicola sturgeon. _ undermined roe v. wade. nicola sturgeon. of _ undermined roe v. wade. nicola sturgeon, of course, _ undermined roe v. wade. nicola sturgeon, of course, the - undermined roe v. wade. nicola| sturgeon, of course, the scottish leader, is saying that this is one of the darkest days for women in her lifetime but remind us how this is a decades long vindication of a republican project to put conservative justice on the court. actually we are going to stop you and go to nancy pelosi, speaker of the house, in washington. ithiith and go to nancy pelosi, speaker of the house, in washington. with roe and their attempt _ the house, in washington. with roe and their attempt to _ the house, in washington. with roe and their attempt to destroy - the house, in washington. with roe and their attempt to destroy it i and their attempt to destroy it republicans are charging ahead with their crusade to criminalise health freedom. in the congress, be aware of this, the republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban. they cannot be allowed to have majority in the congress to do that.
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but that�*s their goal. and if you�*ve read... we are studying this but if you�*ve read, it is very clear, one of the justices had you�*ve read, it is very clear, one of thejustices had his you�*ve read, it is very clear, one of the justices had his own statement, it�*s about contraception and in vitro fertilisation, family planning. that�*s all that will spring from their decision that they made today. it�*s such a contradiction. yesterday they said the states cannot make laws governing the constitutional right to bear arms. today, they�*re saying the exact reverse, that the states can overturn a constitutional right, for 50 years, a constitutional right
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for 50 years, a constitutional right for a woman having a right to choose. the hypocrisy is raging, but the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult, it�*s a slap in the face to women about using their ownjudgment slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom, and again,... the termination of pregnancy is just the opening act. but behind it, and for years i�*ve seen in this congress opposition to any family planning, domestic or global, when we�*ve had those discussions and those debates and those votes on the floor of the house. this is deadly serious. but we are not going to let this pass. a
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woman�*s right to choose, reproductive freedom, is on the ballot in november. we cannot allow them to take charge so that they can institute their goal, which is to criminalise reproductive freedom, to criminalise reproductive freedom, to criminalise it. right now they are saying in states that they can arrest doctors and all the rest, what is happening here? what�*s happening? a woman�*s fundamental health decisions are her own to make in consultation with her doctor, her face, herfamily, not some right—wing politicians that donald trump and mitch mcconnell packed the court with. republicans are seeking to punish and control women but democrats keep fighting ferociously to enshrine roe v. wade and the law of the land. this is outrageous and
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heart—wrenching but make no mistake, again, it is all on the ballot in november. the supreme court has ended a constitutional right. this is 50 years, proclaimed a constitutional right. what happened today was historic in many respects. historic in that it had not granted, recognised a constitutional right and then reversed it. this is a first. and again, just before it imposed a constitutional right to allow for concealed weapons. how about those justices coming before the senators and saying that they respect it. the president of the court. that they respect the right of privacy in the constitution of
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the united states. did you hear that? were they not telling the truth, then? again... just getting to the gun issue because really in preparation for this morning, in an exalted state about what happened in the us senate yesterday. counterpoint to the dangerous decision of this drug supreme court that they made yesterday —— this trump. the bipartisan safer communities act. right now, and i have to leave momentarily, we will be debating the bill on the floor and we expect a bipartisan vote on it in the house. we congratulate the
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senate on the work they have done, and the timeliness of it to be passed in the senate in a bipartisan way on the day that the court made such a dangerous decision. house democrat proposals are included in the package. to keep deadly weapons out of dangerous hand by encouraging states to establish extreme risk protection otherwise known as red flag laws. close the boyfriend loophole. so many good things are in there. it�*s not everything we wanted. we must keep moving towards background checks universal background checks universal background checks, which will save most lives, but this will save lives. and to listen to lucy magara and otherfamily members of lives. and to listen to lucy magara and other family members of those who have lost loved ones, this is a
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giant step forward. maybe not so much a giant, but a strong step forward, and if it�*s good enough for them, then we rejoice in passing it. as i say to members all the time with legislation, do notjudge it for what isn�*t in it, but respect it for what isn�*t in it, but respect it for what isn�*t in it, but respect it for what it is. there�*s much to be respected in this legislation. on a happier note yesterday we celebrated 50 years of title nine, which has transformed equality and opportunity in our country. are you familiar with the words of title nine? yesterday we had billiejean king celebrating title nine, unveiling a portrait of the author, in the house, working in the senate to make this the law of the land. this is what it says. no person in the united states shall on the basis of
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sex be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of or be subjected to dissemination under any education programme or activity receiving federalfinancial assistance. in honour of this anniversary we unveiled a portrait which will hang in the holes. the first woman of colour to serve in the congress —— hang in the halls. she will be an up for what she accomplished. new we are lowering cost and lower families cost, strengthening
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america�*s competitiveness now and in the future. we seem to be able to find agreement where we have some negotiating to do and some things we may have to save for another day. the real question is, to the republicans in the senate really want america to be independent? do they really want to bring backjobs, to make it in america and allocate the resources to make sure that happens? especially with what is so important to our manufacturing in our country so that is a very important. it is a pillar of our work to lower cost and we are proud of other steps we are taking. lowering gas prices by cracking down on big oil�*s price gouging and the consumerfuel price on big oil�*s price gouging and the consumer fuel price gouging prevention act. lowering food costs and taking further action to lower gas cost with the labour food and
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fuel and fertiliser costs for farmers. produces me stun poultry prices forfamilies by farmers. produces me stun poultry prices for families by increasing competition there and lowers cost with cheaper, cleaner american unleaded. i�*m very proud of the work of our members who are so responsible for this in lowering the cost of everyday goods bypassing the open shipping reform act. and everyone of these categories where we have taken action, corporate america, and i don�*t paint them with the same brush, but corporate america, some, have been to exploit the consumer. america, some, have been to exploit the consumer-— the consumer. that is nancy below sea, the speaker _ the consumer. that is nancy below sea, the speaker of _ the consumer. that is nancy below sea, the speaker of the _ the consumer. that is nancy below sea, the speaker of the house i sea, the speaker of the house updating reporters and everything that she is doing and as part of that, she has said that this united states court decision to overturn the federal constitutional right to abortion which has existed for almost 50 years, she described that as criminalising health freedoms. she described it as a cruel ruling. she described it as a cruel ruling. she called it outrageous and
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heart—wrenching. for more, let�*s bring in our senior north america correspondent in our dc studio. you heard the speaker of the house they are saying that republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban. that is what she is accusing them of, saying that actually, this was going to be about contraceptive rights, ivf, even family planning. is that really true? all of those things could be at risk as a result of this abortion ruling by the court? $5 of this abortion ruling by the court? �* , ., ., ., ., ., court? as as a nationwide abortion ban, and court? as as a nationwide abortion ban. and i — court? as as a nationwide abortion ban, and i abortion _ court? as as a nationwide abortion ban, and i abortion activists i court? as as a nationwide abortion ban, and i abortion activists would | ban, and i abortion activists would want that and in their view, a lot of the arguments have been framed as retaining the decision to the states. they would like to see every single state ban abortion. under federal law that could be passed banning abortion.— banning abortion. were going to break away _ banning abortion. were going to break away from _ banning abortion. were going to break away from that _ banning abortion. were going to break away from that story i banning abortion. were going to. break away from that story briefly because we�*re going to go live with the prime minister borisjohnson has been questioned byjournalists about the conservative party by—election
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defeats last night so that�*s listening now. perhaps you are part of the problem? you�*re the man i think that, of course, people are going to want to look at, you know, political impacts and impacts on party politics of these by—elections but i just party politics of these by—elections but ijust remind you of this context in which we are operating. the world, as i havejust said, the uk, the parts of the world are facing the price shocks caused by notjust facing the price shocks caused by not just supply chain facing the price shocks caused by notjust supply chain problems. we have seen. but also by the war in ukraine. and we are dealing with those with a huge amount of the school firepower. £1200 for the 8 million vulnerable households coming into peoples bank accounts next month. tax cuts for the vast majority of people paying national insurance contributions and also, of course, focusing to bear down on peoples costs more generally. look, i�*m not going to pretend these are brilliant results. it got to listen.
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we�*ve got to learn but it was not that long ago, had onlyjust over a year ago that we won a spectacular by—election victory. when people are finding it tough, they send messages to politicians. and politicians have got to respond. and that is what we are doing. i think the fundamentals in the uk economy are good but we�*ve got to recognise that times are tough for people right now. i think we have the right programme, the right plan for a stronger economy to get our country through it and comes out stronger the other side. thank ou, out stronger the other side. thank you. prime — out stronger the other side. thank you, prime minister. _ out stronger the other side. thank you, prime minister. you - out stronger the other side. thank you, prime minister. you are i out stronger the other side. ’t�*tag�*taz you, prime minister. you are defiant in defeat today but your opponent say you are delusional, that you are now putting your own interests ahead of the party and the country. your biggest asset was that you were a winner. now that you�*ve started losing, what is borisjohnson�*s big
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asset? losing, what is boris johnson's big asset? ., ., ~' ~' losing, what is boris johnson's big asset? ~ ., ., asset? look, i think that what --eole asset? look, i think that what people is _ asset? look, i think that what people is a — asset? look, i think that what people is a government i asset? look, i think that what people is a government that l asset? look, i think that what i people is a government that focuses 100% on their concerns. and not on political consequences in westminster. and i have absolutely no doubt that this is a government thatis no doubt that this is a government that is not only achieved remarkable things, done some very great things, is going to continue to do some great things for the people of this country. and we�*re going to a tough time right now. we have inflationary pressures that i have talked about. i understand peoples feelings. but we are going to get through them and i willjust remind you that still we have got people in payroll employment, 600 and 50,000 more than when the pandemic began. what we have got to do is make sure that we continue with the work that we are doing to help people in the short—term with the pressures they are facing but also deal with the
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issues in our supply chains. issues in our transport system, in our housing market, in our energy market, perform those things so that we can bear down on costs and make things easierfor people we can bear down on costs and make things easier for people and make our economy more productive. it is a massive agenda for change and we are going to get on with it. kate ferguson. going to get on with it. kate ferguson-— going to get on with it. kate feruuson. . ,, ., ferguson. thank you. two quick questions _ ferguson. thank you. two quick questions if _ ferguson. thank you. two quick questions if i — ferguson. thank you. two quick questions if i may. _ ferguson. thank you. two quick questions if i may. a _ ferguson. thank you. two quick questions if i may. a tough i ferguson. thank you. two quick questions if i may. a tough day| ferguson. thank you. two quick i questions if i may. a tough day for you today, is there any point you considered resigning and the main question, if possible, obviously, the unions are going on strike and the unions are going on strike and the airports inevitably think they are wrecking people summer holidays? are you considering bringing the military and to help staff airports now and do you think brits should have a stay vacation? the now and do you think brits should have a stay vacation?— have a stay vacation? the airlines like the railways _ have a stay vacation? the airlines like the railways have _ have a stay vacation? the airlines like the railways have got - have a stay vacation? the airlines like the railways have got very i like the railways have got very substantial sum of public money and support during the pandemic. i think
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it was 8 billion for the airlines. 16 billion for the railways from memory. i don�*t think there are justifications for the strikes but what i want is for people to get round the table and sort it out. and you look at what is happening on the railways, as i said, repeatedly, i think there is an overwhelming case for change and reform and improvement. this is a government thatis improvement. this is a government that is putting huge sums into our railways. huge sums of taxpayer money going into the railways. 96 billionjust into the money going into the railways. 96 billion just into the integrated rail plan for railways in the north and the midlands. i think taxpayers and the midlands. i think taxpayers and their payers have right to demand improvements in the way those railways operate. for that investment. and that is what we going to get. martin brown. thank ou, going to get. martin brown. thank you. prime — going to get. martin brown. thank you, prime minister. _ going to get. martin brown. thank you, prime minister. a _ going to get. martin brown. thank you, prime minister. a much i you, prime minister. a much anticipated meeting with prince charles to david did you manage to speak to about your reminder asylum
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policy and could you just describe how your relationship is with the air to the throne? t�*m how your relationship is with the air to the throne?— how your relationship is with the air to the throne? i'm not going to to into air to the throne? i'm not going to go into what _ air to the throne? i'm not going to go into what happened, _ air to the throne? i'm not going to go into what happened, the i go into what happened, the conversation that took place. obviously, you know it did take place little better and discuss conversations either with her majesty the queen all with the air to the throne. you wouldn�*t expect that. but it was a good old chin wag and we covered a lot of ground and there is no doubt that, you know, when you look at, when you can certainly take away from what the prince had to say in his opening address to the summit is that everyone can see the huge, huge progress that rwanda has made. thank you, prime minister. cabinet has been rather quiet today into eating their support for you. are you confident you still have the backing question mark and also, you
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disappointed about the baroness scotland via election?— disappointed about the baroness scotland via election? thank you. look, i scotland via election? thank you. look. i mean. — scotland via election? thank you. look, i mean, festival, _ scotland via election? thank you. look, i mean, festival, the i look, i mean, festival, the government... i am look, i mean, festival, the government... iam here look, i mean, festival, the government... i am here in rwanda getting on with the summit which is incredibly important for our country and our world and i hope that in london, i know that in london, ministers of all descriptions, cabinet or otherwise are getting on with the job of sorting out the cost of living pressures that people face in delivering on our agenda for change and reform and improvement and that is what i would hope that they are doing. on the... the secretary—general of the commonwealth, look, you know, i think it is a good day for democracy. what, what, what is the commonwealth? it is an amazing group of 50 four countries that share values in particular the idea of
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democracy and i work well with baroness scotland, have done for long time since i became foreign secretary, i think, long time since i became foreign secretary, ithink, and i long time since i became foreign secretary, i think, and i look forward to working well with her in the next couple of years. this is a crucial time for the commonwealth. i think there�*s... people are looking more and more to this institution, more and more to this institution, more and more countries want to join it. to see the value of it. and so we will be doing everything we can, simultaneously, to help strengthen the commonwealth secretariat and really deliver value for commonwealth members. . ,, , ., commonwealth members. thank you, prime minister. _ commonwealth members. thank you, prime minister. you _ commonwealth members. thank you, prime minister. you are _ commonwealth members. thank you, prime minister. you are now- commonwealth members. thank you, prime minister. you are now out i commonwealth members. thank you, prime minister. you are now out of. prime minister. you are now out of the country into next thursday put a value worried mps from your own party are going to be plotting to get rid of you while you�*re away? and second, you�*ve just lost what was a really safe tory seat, how are you going to stop blue world voters across the country voting lib dems
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in the next general election? thanks. i think the answer, the answer to the first question is never stop the answer to the second question, what you have in this government is a reforming government thatis government is a reforming government that is going to, that has taken all sorts of very difficult and tough decisions and if you look at what we did during covid, it wasn�*t easy. we got some big decisions right. you had the first vaccine, the first approved vaccine, i think of any country in the world that of the pastas vaccine roll—out in europe. we came out of covid faster than anybody else. as i have told you, we know how very low unemployment by historic standards and we are getting some big things done. first european country to see the vital importance of helping the ukrainians. but what people are going to get from this government and they are going to get from me is just an absolutely undivided attention on fixing the issues in the uk economy and that cause
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unnecessary cost not just for consumers but for people who need childcare, for businesses as well. the uk is attracting huge, huge sums of investment bank now. much more tech investment than any other country, much more in europe and much more venture capital investment in china. there are some things that are going very, very well. there are some parts of our system that need change and reform. energy market is one. the housing market is one. our transport system is another. all these have impacts on peoples cost of living and we can do things that will really help and of course the biggest thing is expenditure that people have. that households have come as taxation. that is the biggest chunk that they contribute. we want to get to, and we had the party that believes in cutting taxes but we had a government that
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believes in cutting taxes and want to get into a situation where, sensibly, and responsibly, we can turbo—charge the attractions of the uk as a place to come and invest by having the best possible tax framework as well for businesses and families. . ., framework as well for businesses and families. ., ,, , ., , framework as well for businesses and families. . ~' , ., , . families. thank you very much, prime minister. families. thank you very much, prime minister- are — families. thank you very much, prime minister. are you _ families. thank you very much, prime minister. are you in _ families. thank you very much, prime minister. are you in denial, _ families. thank you very much, prime minister. are you in denial, then, i minister. are you in denial, then, about the election results? i mean, in the sense that most voters, lots of tory mps don�*t think that this is simply about government policy but it is about you, that you are a drag to some on the conservative vote? do at least accept impart that narrative is true? on second bulk on rwanda and the migrant scheme, we heard from the rwandan government yesterday that they had received and spent £120 million in the british government. have they received the money and second of all, even though migrants are centre, chemical that
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money back or is that £120 million essentially gone for good? thanks. look, first essentially gone for good? thanks. look. first of _ essentially gone for good? thanks. look, first of all, _ essentially gone for good? thanks. look, first of all, on _ essentially gone for good? thanks. look, first of all, on my _ essentially gone for good? thanks. look, first of all, on my attitude i look, first of all, on my attitude to by—elections. it governments crumpled because of by—election results in the whole of the post—war period would not have had many post—war governments. i am a fade, of course we need to listen to the messages that we are getting and we need to learn. but in the end, we have got to get on and deliver for the british people and that is what we are doing. and on your point about the rwanda economic partnership, economic development partnership, economic development partnership, it has many facets. i am confident that the migration aspect will work very well. i think that it aspect will work very well. i think thatitis aspect will work very well. i think that it is notable that so far, no uk court has found it to be
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unlawful. and no international court has found it to be unlawful. so i�*m confident that we will be able to go ahead and develop a solution that i think his time has come. if you look at the problem is the world faces with illegal migration, you can see other countries, it is notjust as in the uk. other countries are trying this. and you see whatjoe biden has been doing in the us. an idea for people coming from mexico to go to spain. you see the danes are doing something very similar. you�*ve got to find a way of breaking the model of the people smugglers. and people smugglers, people traffickers are giving a profoundly evil and dangerous thing and how to find a way to stop that. and going to continue with the policy. and you know, you can talk about getting a refund. i�*m confident that it will
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produce value for money. the current cost of the asylum system in our country is 1.5 billion and i think 5 million every day, at least, on hotel bills. so, you know, this is a very, very expensive business already. and i think the rwanda partnership offers a good way forward. . ., partnership offers a good way forward. ., ,, , ., partnership offers a good way forward. ., ,, i. ~ , forward. thank you, prime minister. i was forward. thank you, prime minister. i was wondering _ forward. thank you, prime minister. i was wondering if _ forward. thank you, prime minister. i was wondering if we _ forward. thank you, prime minister. i was wondering if we could - forward. thank you, prime minister. i was wondering if we could get i forward. thank you, prime minister. i was wondering if we could get your reaction to the decision by the supreme court in america to overturn roe v wade and whether you think abortion rights should be protected by the state?— by the state? sorry, yes. look, i would be — by the state? sorry, yes. look, i would be absolutely _ by the state? sorry, yes. look, i would be absolutely clear- by the state? sorry, yes. look, i would be absolutely clear with i would be absolutely clear with everybody. this is not our court. it is anotherjurisdiction. but clearly
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it has massive impacts on people�*s thinking around the world. it is very important decision put up a have gotta tell yeah think it is a big step up is. think it is a big step backwards. i have always believed in a woman�*s right to choose and i stick to that view and thatis choose and i stick to that view and that is why the uk has the law is that is why the uk has the law is that it does and actually, if you we recently took steps to make sure that those laws were enforced throughout the whole of the uk. you were talking — throughout the whole of the uk. ym. were talking earlier, prime minister, about wanting to cut taxes. that is going to been quite hollow not only to the many conservative mps who want you gone but also lots of is the highest it has been a decade so, our tax burden, by the. so can you be a bit more specific question or cut taxes going to start falling for voters next year? let going to start falling for voters next year?— going to start falling for voters next ear? , ., ., , next year? let me tell you what is ha enin: next year? let me tell you what is happening now- — next year? let me tell you what is happening now. and _ next year? let me tell you what is happening now. and festival- next year? let me tell you what is happening now. and festival i i next year? let me tell you what is. happening now. and festival i think most people, you know, i tried to
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speu most people, you know, i tried to spell out context that we are operating in. you know, we went through a really miserable and expensive pandemic. i did need a figures for the amount of money we had put into the railways are aviation that does not grow on trees. a08 billion altogether we had to find to support families, businesses up and down the country. but, time, thanks to the sensible management of the economy the chancellor has been engaged on, we are able now, next month, you asked when. next month, you will see tax cuts of an average of £330 of everybody who pays national insurance contributions. we are already cutting council tax by £150. we have cut fuel duty by record amount. and i say that not in i know that that won�*t slake your thirst for... cgh your appetite for tax
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cuts —— makes 88. it shows the direction we�*re trying to go on but you�*ve got to be sensible and you�*ve got to be responsible at the same time. and we are in a position still where we have to make sure that we look after people through tough times and that is why the £1200 that we giving the most vulnerable households is also very important. let�*s go to my question is about your outgoing role as chair of the commonwealth. you take responsibility for abandoning the developing members of the commonwealth during the pandemic with travel bans, reluctance to share vaccines, reducing the aid budget and, more recently, the uk
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not... sdr results.— not... sdr results. actually, i think, not... sdr results. actually, i think. when — not... sdr results. actually, i think, when you _ not... sdr results. actually, i think, when you look - not... sdr results. actually, i think, when you look at i not... sdr results. actually, i think, when you look at what | not... sdr results. actually, i. think, when you look at what the not... sdr results. actually, i- think, when you look at what the uk did during the pandemic it was pretty remarkable and i know that we would always want to do more but... that was the prime minister boris johnson answering questions mainly about the heavy by—election defeats last night and as you heard from some of his answers that he said i�*m not going to pretend these are brilliant results. he said he was going to listen and learn. but let�*s going to listen and learn. but let�*s go back now. let�*s return to that breaking story that emerged just over an hour ago which is the ruling, the us supreme court which has overturned the roe v wade ruling. we are now showing you the pictures buy from outside the supreme court and as you say, just
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over an hour ago, theirjudgment over an hour ago, their judgment came over an hour ago, theirjudgment came down for the supreme court has overturned rivero the wade which had legalised abortion nationwide in thisjudgment in the legalised abortion nationwide in this judgment in the past hour or so means individual states will be able to ban the procedure. that�*sjoin our colleagues now for continuing coverage on that breaking story. federal and exacted branch may be able to designate certain federally owned facilities or land for places where women can receive abortions but none of thatis receive abortions but none of that is clear right now and that is clear right now and thatis that is clear right now and that is an area where we will see a lot of contentious nurse and undoubtedly a lot of litigation going forward. == litigation going forward. -- contentious _ litigation going forward. —— contentious nurse. tell us about really how this court is reshaping american life. yesterday there was a significant ruling from the court expanding the right to bear arms in public. now the
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court has overturned the constitutional federal right to an abortion that has existed for almost 50 years, this is a pretty extraordinary stuff, isn�*t it, in terms of the supreme court and its impact on america? tt supreme court and its impact on america? , ., ., . , america? it is dramatic. it is dramatic— america? it is dramatic. it is dramatic and _ america? it is dramatic. it is dramatic and i _ america? it is dramatic. it is dramatic and i do _ america? it is dramatic. it is dramatic and i do not - america? it is dramatic. it is dramatic and i do not think l america? it is dramatic. it is i dramatic and i do not think the justices themselves, they want in the majority, fully appreciate the applications not just for the country, but also for the court itself. it places the court squarely in the middle of significant political debates and it is going to lead to people really questioning whether the court is constituted in the way americans think it should be, whether there is some type of court reform. i think it is at triggering a set of reactions that we quite frankly cannot evaluate at this time, we cannot really predict how significant it will be, but
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they can be extremely significant.— they can be extremely significant. they can be extremely siunificant. ., ~ . significant. thank you so much forjoining _ significant. thank you so much forjoining us. _ significant. thank you so much forjoining us. i wouldjust- forjoining us. i would just like to welcome our viewers in the united kingdom. united states supreme court here in america has overturned the constitutional federally guaranteed rights and abortion that been guaranteed for almost 50 years by a case called roe versus wade. we are getting reaction now to this very dramatic ruling and anti—abortion activist here in the united states have been celebrating and saying that this is just the first step for the post that microgeneration. all of you will go back to your states tomorrow and rest your capitals and demand that your legislators... cheering you will go to the streets while the other side are smashing the windows and threatening smashing the windows and threatenin- smashing the windows and threatenin: ., . threatening violence, you will to threatening violence, you will no to the threatening violence, you will go to the streets _ threatening violence, you will go to the streets in _
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threatening violence, you will go to the streets in service i threatening violence, you will go to the streets in service toj go to the streets in service to connect every single woman he was scared and alone, he was being told she had no other choice, that the abortion industry will go in despair, you can tell her you can choose both. friends, this is not the end of the post that microgeneration, this is the next phase. —— post—roe. at such time as this, we will call for this moment. each and every one of us, we were called this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility. to make abortion illegal and unthinkable in this generation... we will be the third microgeneration! ——
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post—roe. third microgeneration! -- post-roe— post-roe. can i ask your reaction _ post-roe. can i ask your reaction to _ post-roe. can i ask your reaction to the _ post-roe. can i ask your reaction to the ruling i post-roe. can i ask your reaction to the ruling by| post-roe. can i ask your i reaction to the ruling by the supreme court?— reaction to the ruling by the supreme court? thank you for havin: supreme court? thank you for having me. — supreme court? thank you for having me, this _ supreme court? thank you for having me, this is _ supreme court? thank you for having me, this is an - having me, this is an absolutely gut—wrenching moment for us. we anticipated this, but it does not take away from the shock and the surreal nature of this moment that this country. nature of this moment that this count . �* , , ., country. and he represent a u-rou country. and he represent a group called _ country. and he represent a group called catholics i country. and he represent a group called catholics for i group called catholics for choice, it is noticeable that a number of catholics on the supreme court are part of this majority decision overturning roe versus wade. perhaps you would like to explain your position, how you get to be both catholic and also pro—choice on abortion? absolutely. this court and it catholics do not represent the majority of catholics in this country. 68% of catholics did not want to see roe versus wade struck down. 58% believe abortion should be legal in all
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or most cases. so this is in no way a reflection of the convictions of catholics and catholics have three very rich traditions, socialjustice, religious freedom and consciouss conscience which allows us to have this collection that everyone should have a right to reproductive freedom. have a right to reproductive freedom-— have a right to reproductive freedom. ~ ., ., ~ , freedom. what do you think this rulina is freedom. what do you think this ruling is going — freedom. what do you think this ruling is going to _ freedom. what do you think this ruling is going to mean - freedom. what do you think this ruling is going to mean across . ruling is going to mean across america, where literally it will depend on where a woman lives as to whether she can have access to abortion? what is that going to look like? it is that going to look like? it is going to look like profound suffering. this is really the outrage for me, because this is the fruits of a religious movement, spearheaded by catholic bishops more than 50 years ago, who claim to have this passion for the unborn, but never think for a moment about the women, what their stories are, how this choice affects the entire trajectory of her life and so this will
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look like profound suffering, especially for people who are already suffering from economic injustice, from racism, from all kinds of poverty, and so it is a very crushing moment, particularly for the most vulnerable in this country. find vulnerable in this country. and it is interesting _ vulnerable in this country. and it is interesting that 50 years ago almost, when the roe versus wade decision came down, the way it was reported was that the right to an abortion would be something that a woman and her doctor discussed within the first three months. how did abortion become such a polarising issue in the united states in the intervening 50 years? it states in the intervening 50 ears? , , . ., states in the intervening 50 ears? ,, . ., ., years? it is such a great question- _ years? it is such a great question. it _ years? it is such a great question. it started - years? it is such a great question. it started as l years? it is such a great question. it started as a catholic idea that the bishops were posing in the late 60s when they saw abortion laws getting liberalised and in the late 70s evangelicals founded is what they would call a respectable issue that they could animate their basin, previously they had been using segregation to animate their base. that became untenable because it was so blatantly
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racist is a very deliberate pivot to abortion as a critical issue and over the decades, made at the litmus test for republicans for whether or not republicans for whether or not republicans could be seen as orthodox to the party, and so thatis orthodox to the party, and so that is how we saw this become this extraordinary place or issue, but it was really started by evangelical christians and catholics. we are going to hearfrom president biden himself, he's going to speak on this. we heard from the democratic speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who said that women's rights are on the ballot in november and that they cannot and l the republicans to criminalise reproductive freedom. do you think this is going to be a politically animating issue on both sides? i politically animating issue on both sides? ~ , , �* , sides? i think it will be but it's alwa s sides? i think it will be but it's always been — sides? i think it will be but it's always been an _ sides? i think it will be but it's always been an animating - sides? i think it will be but it'sl always been an animating issue sides? i think it will be but it's - always been an animating issue for the right wing. people on the left have been lulled into a certain
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complacency that i hope will end today because i think most americans did not think this could happen in the usa. we thought certain freedoms and rights were guaranteed to us for ever and that rights would be expanded, not constricted, so this maybe the tipping point where the left sees that a nationalist agenda is taking over the country and that it must end today.— is taking over the country and that it must end today. we've seen more security being _ it must end today. we've seen more security being put — it must end today. we've seen more security being put up _ it must end today. we've seen more security being put up outside - it must end today. we've seen more security being put up outside the - security being put up outside the united states supreme court. there was an armed man arrested outside the home ofjustice brett kavanagh just over a week ago, so the passions are running incredibly high on the issue, we can see. how do you think this very intense, very inflamed moment, can have some of the passion taken out of it? or can it? j
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the passion taken out of it? or can it? ., �* 4' the passion taken out of it? or can it? ., �* ~ �* , ., the passion taken out of it? or can it? ., �* ~ �*, ., ., it? i don't think it's a time for assion it? i don't think it's a time for passion to — it? i don't think it's a time for passion to be _ it? i don't think it's a time for passion to be taken _ it? i don't think it's a time for passion to be taken out. - it? i don't think it's a time for passion to be taken out. it. it? i don't think it's a time for passion to be taken out. it is| it? i don't think it's a time for- passion to be taken out. it is time for people to reckon with what is happening in the country, a hijacked court and an extreme christian nationalist agenda that's been eroding our rights for years and now has got its crowning achievement. we were complacent, it is time to wake up, so this is a time for passion and to react. lawmakers need to know and to react. lawmakers need to know and need to hearfrom us that and to react. lawmakers need to know and need to hear from us that this is not the country in the future that we want in the united states. thank you for being with us. let us bring in our north american correspondent anthony zircher. you've been studying the judgment by the justices you've been studying the judgment by thejustices overturning roe versus wade. when you read it, what strikes you about it? if wade. when you read it, what strikes you about it?— you about it? if you read it it is remarkably _ you about it? if you read it it is remarkably similar _
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you about it? if you read it it is remarkably similar to - you about it? if you read it it is remarkably similar to the - you about it? if you read it it is i remarkably similar to the opinion that leaked in may byjustice samuel leto, a wholesale reversal of roe v. wade and planned parenthood versus casey. it says the foundations of toast —— of those two decisions were wrong. in the process clause of the 14th amendment passed in the united states, the constitution, after the civil war, states, the constitution, after the civilwar, it states, the constitution, after the civil war, it said that due process, you can't be deprived of life, liberty, etc, without due process of law, that did not provide a right to abortion. so, saying that was invalid therefore all of roe v. wade was invalid and through it back to the states. there are other cases that rely on due process clause, such as the gay marriage reversal, the gay marriage ban,
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contraceptives, those sorts of things. this opinion specifically said that the decision doesn't apply to those types of things but it's interesting, reading justice clarence thomas�*s concurrence, he said all of that must be visited, cases that rely on the 14th amendment to provide some sort of protection, right to privacy etc, that those cases need to be looked at again and maybe they can be upheld, maybe struck down but the fundamental tenets of these cases are called into question, so this was a very broad, sweeping decision. we may not be able to anticipate all the implications of it. we have to watch it play out over the months and years ahead. {line watch it play out over the months and years ahead.— and years ahead. one of the immediate _ and years ahead. one of the immediate implications - and years ahead. one of the immediate implications is i and years ahead. one of the i immediate implications is where women will go if they want to seek an abortion and live in a state where it is illegal. the mayor of new york city has offered haven to
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women seeking abortion, saying you are welcome here but is that something that could be potentially criminalised by the states, if a woman goes outside of a state to seek an abortion?— woman goes outside of a state to seek an abortion? there are states already trying _ seek an abortion? there are states already trying to — seek an abortion? there are states already trying to do _ seek an abortion? there are states already trying to do that. states i already trying to do that. states like texas allow individual citizens to bring lawsuits against people who assist women to obtain abortion, no matter where they obtain it. that's going to be a big legal battle in the months and years ahead. again it is reminiscent of the way the us was prior to the civil war where you had different states with very stark, differing opinions on slavery, the issue of slavery, and were trying to impose their views on other states to get the federal government to go with it. until this point, if you take a military history perspective, abortion was a lot like world war i, where both sides were in the trenches, fighting over narrow strips of land and they can go
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different ways at different points but the battlefield was very limited by roe v. wade and the abortion protections of the supreme court. now we're in a world war ii scenario where the battle is being fought everywhere and is happening on a much largerfield of everywhere and is happening on a much larger field of combat and we are going to see individual battles that we don't anticipate. battles over mail order abortion pills, if the federal government tries to protect the right to order abortion pills even in anti—abortion states via the mail. the interstate women movement of women to get abortions, state constitutions, whether there are provisions that protect the right to abortion. this is an entirely different world that we saw for the last 49 years where there was a fundamental protection in the restitution protecting the right to
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abortion, pre—viability. now that is all open to debate across the country. all open to debate across the count . . .,~ , ., all open to debate across the count . . ., ., ., country. lawmakers are going to 'oin the crowds outside i country. lawmakers are going to 'oin the crowds outside the i country. lawmakers are going to 'oin the crowds outside the supreme i country. lawmakers are going to join | the crowds outside the supreme court and we can see for example alexandria ocasio—cortez, one of the new york state lawmakers. she is most certainly on the site of a woman's right to choose, she has a huge social media following and is very influential on the progressive left and she's apparently been telling the crowd we should look at expanding the supreme court. this was the 6—3 decision, the conservative justices, three appointed by president trump, were in that majority, but expanding the supreme court isn't exactly straightforward, is it? it supreme court isn't exactly straightforward, is it? it isn't, it is an idea _ straightforward, is it? it isn't, it is an idea that's _ straightforward, is it? it isn't, it is an idea that's been _ straightforward, is it? it isn't, it is an idea that's been kicked i straightforward, is it? it isn't, it- is an idea that's been kicked around in the past, in the 2020 presidential election because of steps that republicans in congress used to appoint conservative supreme
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courtjustice by holding open seats until donald trump became president, and acted very fast when justice ruth bader ginsburg, a liberal, died before the 2020 election, and appointed amy coney barrett, who ruled against roe v. wade today on the court. these ideas, well they have support among the base of the democratic party, would be difficult to internet because it would have to past a congressman well democrats control the house of representatives they'd have to overcome the filibuster in the senate and get all 50 democrats to vote to support expanding the supreme court and then find another ten republicans to go along with them and there are not ten republicans, there aren't even 50 democrats to support expanding the supreme court and there certainly aren't ten republicans in favour of that. there aren't ten republicans in the senate who are in favour of protecting abortion rights on the national level. so they would have to change the make—up of the us
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senate before they could even start to consider changing the make up of us supreme court.— us supreme court. we're going to hear from president _ us supreme court. we're going to hear from president biden - us supreme court. we're going toj hear from president biden himself us supreme court. we're going to i hear from president biden himself in hearfrom president biden himself in about 45 minutes. he of course is a catholic but he is someone who has supported a woman's right to choose. what are his options at the moment? there are a lot of proposals for what he could unilaterally do. he could, according to some, open up abortion clinics on federal property in states that ban abortion. or he could change the regulation of abortion pills to make them easier to get via the mail. he could expand the government health care programmes, perhaps to allow them to cover abortions for women in anti—abortion states, who want to go to abortion rights states to obtain abortions. all of these things will instantly be fought in the court. any kind of move he tries to take
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will be challenged. the opponents will be challenged. the opponents will cite federal law preventing the federal government from spending money on abortion services at all. and now that we've seen how this has played out in the highest court in the land, that there is a clear majority in favour of abortion restrictions or at least sending it back to the states, these legal challenges have a high level of success. they're going to be potentially blocked no matter what joe biden tries to do. i think the feeling is now that he has to do something, he has to at least try because there's so much anger among democrats and the democrat base, that he must take some sort of bold action, push the limits of what he can do to try to protect abortion rights in this country.— can do to try to protect abortion rights in this country. thanks for bein: rights in this country. thanks for being with _ rights in this country. thanks for being with us. _ rights in this country. thanks for being with us. let's _ rights in this country. thanks for being with us. let's go - rights in this country. thanks for being with us. let's go to i rights in this country. thanks for being with us. let's go to our i being with us. let's go to our correspondent outside the supreme court. it seems like there are scenes of celebration and of anger,
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there? , . , there? there is. perfectly illustrating _ there? there is. perfectly illustrating the _ there? there is. perfectly illustrating the huge i there? there is. perfectlyl illustrating the huge divide there? there is. perfectly- illustrating the huge divide when it comes to the issue of abortion access. just to give you a sense of what's happening here, there are more people coming outside the supreme court. a mixture of anti—abortion protectors, —— protesters, po abortion protesters. the police have been trying to keep them apart. there is a fortified fence around the supreme court. this morning every entrance and exit point was marked by the police because ever since the draft was leaked last month there has been huge concern about the security of the justices. huge concern about the security of thejustices. we huge concern about the security of the justices. we don't believe they're actually inside the court but nonetheless just behind the fence there are also police patrolling, heavily armed police, patrolling, heavily armed police, patrolling inside to make sure no one breaks in. you got people continuously coming, some anti—abortion, some of them pro—choice. a group marched through
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wearing red t—shirts saying they had just abolished abortion, about a 25, in that group. and people come here just to see it, to take in the moment. there was a woman just behind us, there was a bank of the press here covering it and she was taking a selfie and she was beaming, saying she wanted to be here to mark the momentous occasion. there is a crowd gathering outside but the police are on standby to make sure it doesn't get out of control. already the texas attorney general ben paxton has announced he has closed his offices on friday and will makejune 2a annual holiday for the agency as a memorial to the unborn, saying almost 70 million babies have been killed in the womb since roe versus wade and that never again should something like this happen in america. if you are a
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woman seeking an abortion in texas now, what are your options? tends now, what are your options? texas has a so-called _ now, what are your options? texas has a so-called trigger— now, what are your options? texas has a so-called trigger law - now, what are your options? is” has a so—called trigger law meaning that now that roe v. wade has been overturned, states like texas will outright ban abortion. it already has a very strict abortion law in place, the heartbeat bill, you can't get an abortion after six weeks because it's thought that's when, texas decided that's when the foetus is viable. the law was in place before roe v. wade and it was enforced through the back door. it empowered citizens to report anyone seeking an abortion, and not prosecute the person themselves but anyone helping them. for instance the friend who might help them to get to the clinic, the person who carries out the clinic, the doctor who prescribes medication, the taxi
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driver. it is worth pointing out, where does america sit in the world right now when it comes to abortion access? more than 70 countries, about 70 allow abortion on request. that means you don't need any justification. there are groups like the centre for reproductive rights advocating abortion rights around the world. before this was overturned they said that if it was overturned they said that if it was overturned that the us would become an outlier when it comes to abortion rights. even in this hemisphere alone, you think about latin america, it goes the other way where you have catholic countries that have moved to decriminalising it like mexico, argentina, even chile, until 2017, the procedure was bad but if the new draft goes to plan it will allow abortion rights in its
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constitution. —— the procedure was banned. it's important to emphasise that the us isn't going to ban abortion nationally. that's not what roe v. wade being overruled is going to do, it has gone back to the states and individual states will decide what they want to do about abortion laws. the justices that voted to remove roe v. wade believe it isn't the courts that should decide that the elected representatives of each state. it is thought about 26 states will ban abortion outright. just a little over half of the country. nomia iabal, over half of the country. nomia iqbal. thank — over half of the country. nomia iqbal, thank you. _ over half of the country. nomia iqbal, thank you. former i over half of the country. nomia i iqbal, thank you. former president donald trump who appointed three conservative justices to the supreme court and help to make the ruling possible has told fox news, this is following the constitution and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago and he says, i think in the end, this is something that will work out for
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everybody. asked whether he played a role in overturning roe v. wade having appointed the justices, trump said, god made the decision. clare murphy is the chief executive of the british pregnancy advisory service. thanks for being with us. what do you see the ripple effects of the ruling as being?— you see the ripple effects of the ruling as being? well, i think it's a really important _ ruling as being? well, i think it's a really important moment i ruling as being? well, i think it's i a really important moment actually for the uk to stand up and condone what happened in america. and make a clear stance on the absolutely fundamental role that reproductive choice, access to abortion, place in women's lives. it is the linchpin of women's lives. it is the linchpin of women's rights. without access to abortion, all the other hard won rights and freedoms fall away, so this is an incredibly significant moment, a devastating moment. we
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knew this was on the cards but to see it happening has shocked us all to the car. it is a very dark days. —— shocked us all to the core. what about the impact on other countries around the world, the impact on abortion? now that abortion is effectively going to be illegal in half of the united states. figs effectively going to be illegal in half of the united states. as your revious half of the united states. as your previous correspondence - half of the united states. as your previous correspondence pointed | half of the united states. as your i previous correspondence pointed out, this really puts america actually end to a very isolated position because the tide has been going in exactly the opposite direction. you look at countries which had actually banned abortion, in south america we've seen countries decriminalising abortion, and closer to home for us in the uk, within our own... next door in ireland, we've seen abortion taken out of the criminal law. in
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northern ireland it was also recently decriminalised. very hard won battles. that's been the direction of travel. so, this really is going into reverse. it is going backwards. i think it sends a clear message to all of us that we can never, ever be complacent. we can never, ever be complacent. we can never take these rights for granted. all of us involved in the pro—choice advocacy need to make sure that the pro—choice voice is always heard. the issue in the states, all of the opinion polls show that this is... you know, it's a pro—choice country, more than 60% of americans fundamentally support abortion, are in favour of women's access to abortion. we always need to make sure that these silent voices are heard, that people stand up and be counted on this. if there's anything for us to learn from this, it is that we can never, ever be complacent on the issue. do you
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think there _ complacent on the issue. do you think there could _ complacent on the issue. do you think there could be _ complacent on the issue. do you think there could be a _ complacent on the issue. do you think there could be a move i complacent on the issue. do you think there could be a move in i think there could be a move in britain to limit a woman's right to an abortion? do you see that happening down the road? no, i think in the uk we have worked very hard to push forward. we haven't been complacent. we've had a very active pro—choice campaign in recent years. if anything it has seen women's rights going forward, it has seen progressive reform. we've seen in the last few months in britain the even greater liberalisation of the 1967 abortion act, giving women access to lawful abortion, as i mentioned previously. in northern ireland in recent years we've seen abortion decriminalised. but it takes work, it takes action. if anything what this shows us is that we've always got to be on the front foot, we've always got to be fighting and pushing forward. and
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you know, at the moment we absolutely stand in solidarity with the women of america. we think it's a devastating day. and we will do all week and to show our support. you know, iam pleased all week and to show our support. you know, i am pleased to see that our prime minister borisjohnson has already condemned, you know, the decision by the supreme court. but yes, it's a time for us all to stand up yes, it's a time for us all to stand up and be counted and a time for us all to be clear that we cannot be complacent. all to be clear that we cannot be complacent-— all to be clear that we cannot be comlacent. �* ., , . , complacent. abortion is the linchpin of women's — complacent. abortion is the linchpin of women's reproductive... - complacent. abortion is the linchpin of women's reproductive... of i of women's reproductive... of women's lives. without access, women cannot participate in society in the way that we should be able to in a 21st—century democracy. iclare way that we should be able to in a 21st-century democracy. clare murphy ofthe 21st-century democracy. clare murphy of the british — 21st-century democracy. clare murphy of the british pregnancy _ 21st-century democracy. clare murphy of the british pregnancy advisory i of the british pregnancy advisory service, thanks forjoining us. less listen to the speaker of the us house of representatives, nancy pelosi, who made a statement following this ruling. the radical
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sureme following this ruling. the radical supreme court _ following this ruling. the radical supreme court is _ following this ruling. the radical supreme court is eviscerating i supreme court is eviscerating americans�*s rights and endangering health and safety. congress will continue to act to overcome this extremism and protect the american people. today the republican—controlled supreme court has achieved their dark, extreme goal of... a woman's right to make their own reproductive health decisions. because of donald trump, mitch mcconnell, the republican party, their super majority in the supreme court, american women today have less freedom than their mothers. with roe and their attempt to destroy it, radical republicans are charging ahead with their crusade to criminalise health freedom. in the congress, be aware of this, the republicans are
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plotting a nationwide abortion ban. they cannot be allowed to have a majority in the congress to do that. but that's their goal. and if you've read, and again we are all studying this, but if you've read what's in the very clear... one of the justices had his own statement, it's about contraception, in vitro fertilisation. family planning. that's all what will spring from their decision that they made today. it's such a contradiction. yesterday, they said the states cannot make laws governing the constitutional right to bear arms. and today, they're saying the exact reverse, that the states can overturn a constitutional right, for
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50 years, a constitutional right, a woman having the right to choose. the hypocrisy is raging. but the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult, it's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment in the face to women about using their ownjudgment to in the face to women about using their own judgment to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. and again, it goes... i always said the termination of the pregnancy, it isjust always said the termination of the pregnancy, it is just their opening act because behind it, and for years i've seen opposition to any family planning, domestic and global, when we've had those discussions and those debates and those votes on the floor of the house. this is deadly
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serious. but we are not going to let this pass. a woman's right to choose, reproductive freedom, is on the ballot in november. we cannot allow them to take charge so that they can institute their goal, which is to criminalise... reproductive freedom, to criminalise it. right now they are saying that they can arrest doctors and all the rest. what is happening, here? what is happening? a woman's fundamental health decisions are her own to make in consultation with her doctor. her face, herfamily. not some right—wing politicians that donald trump and mitch mcconnell packed the court with. republicans seek to punish and control women. democrats will keep fighting ferociously to enshrine roe v. wade in the law of
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the land. this cruel ruling is outrageous and heart—wrenching and make no mistake, again... it's all on the ballot in november. the supreme court has ended a constitutional right. this is 50 years, proclaimed a constitutional right. what happened today was historic in many respects. historic in that it had not granted, recognised the constitutional right, and then reversed it. this is a first. that's nancy pelosi, there, the speaker of the us house of representatives, responding to this dramatic historic, sweeping judgment by the us supreme court overturning roe v. wade. that had guaranteed a
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constitutional, federal right to an abortion for women across america for almost 50 years. but now abortion will in effect be all but outlawed in half of the country. you're watching bbc news. some of us have had blue sky and sunshine today. have a look at east sussex from earlier on. we also had threatening skies and over the last few hours, some thundery downpours as well. we had heavy rain in bradford as the showers passed through. they're fairly isolated but this is where we still have some humidity triggering the thundery downpours which are moving steadily north and that's where they will continue moving over the next few hours. a few isolated showers across the midlands and south—east. more persistent rain into the south—west and that's a weather front moving in. it is a cold front gradually introducing pressure air for all. where we still have the heat and humid that it is going to ease as
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the cold front drifts north, taking showers with it. that means we start saturday morning with some showers into the far north. temperatures widely into double figures but we are going to lose the humidity. a dry, settled, sunny start, some scattered showers drifting up through the day and some of them will filter a bit further inland and certainly stronger wind further west you are, the closest to area of low pressure and into the west of ireland. in terms of the feel of the weather, 16—16— 18 on the exposed coasts, maybe more with sunshine. fingers crossed, the cricket will stay largely dry. can't rule out a shower but mostly fine and dry. there's a greater chance of seeing some showers on saturday for glastonbury, but it's going to beat sunshine and showers, so not a write—off by any means. moving towards sunday, the area of low pressure is still there and we could
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see more persistent rain moving into western fringes and yes, another windy day with it. a spell of wet weather across south—west england and wales, into glastonbury, across west facing coasts. sheltered eastern areas should stayjoyous for longest and maybe east anglia into the south—east, drier altogether with highs of 23 degrees. moving out of sunday into next week, it looks likely it will continue to stay unsettled at times but once again, the driest and brightest weather in the driest and brightest weather in the south.
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the us supreme court and is the constitutional right to have an abortion. it means the landmark roe v wade building dating back nearly 50 years has been overturned. the historicjudgment is set to transform abortion rights in america with individual states now able to ban or restrict the procedure. the ruling is a setback for president joe biden and other senior democrats react. pl. joe biden and other senior democrats react. �* ., ., �*, ., . react. a woman's right to choose, reproductive _ react. a woman's right to choose, reproductive freedom _ react. a woman's right to choose, reproductive freedom is _ react. a woman's right to choose, reproductive freedom is on i react. a woman's right to choose, reproductive freedom is on the i react. a woman's right to choose, i reproductive freedom is on the bow that in november. but reproductive freedom is on the bow that in november.— that in november. but senior republicans _ that in november. but senior republicans including - that in november. but senior republicans including formerj that in november. but senior- republicans including former vice president mike penns welcomed the
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ruling. the us supreme court has ended the constitutional right to an abortion. the decision is a major victory for conservative and religious campaigners who have campaigned against terminations since they were legalised in 1973. the conservative dominated supreme court ruled by six votes to three. the decision to legalise abortion, in the case known as roe v wade was legally wrong we decided, as the us constitution does not specifically mention abortion rights. our correspondent is outside the united states supreme court and either scenes of celebration and also of anger?—
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either scenes of celebration and also of anrer? , ., ., also of anger? yes. there are a mix of protesters _ also of anger? yes. there are a mix of protesters inevitably _ also of anger? yes. there are a mix of protesters inevitably have - also of anger? yes. there are a mix of protesters inevitably have been l of protesters inevitably have been coming here nearly everyday in anticipation of this willing to do before the pro—choice group and the anti—abortion group. they are being kept separate by police. there is an increasing amount of people coming here not all protesters, some are here not all protesters, some are here just to take surreal seminal moment in america. i am joined now by a democratic congresswoman from pennsylvania. thank you for speaking to the bbc. you were there when value the weight was established in 1973. you're now here seeing it overturned. what is your reaction? i overturned. what is your reaction? i am profoundly horrified that up you are right _ am profoundly horrified that up you are right i— am profoundly horrified that up you are right. iwas13 am profoundly horrified that up you are right. i was 13 years old at time — are right. i was 13 years old at time of— are right. i was 13 years old at time of the decision of roe v wade is a entire — time of the decision of roe v wade is a entire youth and adult adult life i_ is a entire youth and adult adult life i have — is a entire youth and adult adult life i have lived under equal rights, _ life i have lived under equal rights, equal rights for women. rights— rights, equal rights for women. rights of— rights, equal rights for women. rights of privacy, rights of trusting _ rights of privacy, rights of trusting women with their own private — trusting women with their own private health care decision. i am
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horrified — private health care decision. i am horrified by— private health care decision. i am horrified by today's decision. i think— horrified by today's decision. i think it — horrified by today's decision. i think it is _ horrified by today's decision. i think it is malpractice by the supreme _ think it is malpractice by the supreme court. this court, which is an extreme — supreme court. this court, which is an extreme far right court which was packed _ an extreme far right court which was packed by— an extreme far right court which was packed by an extraordinarily extreme former— packed by an extraordinarily extreme former president, it is now paying attention— former president, it is now paying attention to the very banner across the top _ attention to the very banner across the top of— attention to the very banner across the top of the building for top equal— the top of the building for top equaljustice under law. this equal justice under law. this decision— equaljustice under law. this decision provides an equaljustice under— decision provides an equaljustice under law~ — decision provides an equaljustice under law. think about my grandchildren. i have three sons but have three _ grandchildren. i have three sons but have three daughters in law. i have called _ have three daughters in law. i have called them. they are horrified. they— called them. they are horrified. they will— called them. they are horrified. they will not enjoy rights to decide when _ they will not enjoy rights to decide when and — they will not enjoy rights to decide when and whether to have children, i have four _ when and whether to have children, i have four grandchildren. i have a ten—year—old grand daughter and to think that _ ten—year—old grand daughter and to think that her right to be minimised and she _ think that her right to be minimised and she becomes a second—class citizen _ and she becomes a second—class citizen not — and she becomes a second—class citizen not trusted with their own health— citizen not trusted with their own health care decisions, it is a horron _ health care decisions, it is a horror. , , health care decisions, it is a horror. , ., ., , ., horror. they say abortion is not constitutional, _ horror. they say abortion is not constitutional, that _ horror. they say abortion is not constitutional, that was - horror. they say abortion is not constitutional, that was the i horror. they say abortion is not i constitutional, that was the opinion handed down to what you say to that?
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an absurdity filter than many things not expressly within the constitution but this was within privacy— constitution but this was within privacy rights, like many other things — privacy rights, like many other things it _ privacy rights, like many other things. it is an absurdity. they're talking _ things. it is an absurdity. they're talking out— things. it is an absurdity. they're talking out of both sides of the mounts — talking out of both sides of the mounts with decisions, some things to the _ mounts with decisions, some things to the states, don't send things to the states — to the states, don't send things to the states. they decided is for all women _ the states. they decided is for all women and girls, putting us a second—class citizens, have of the united _ second—class citizens, have of the united states, so it is nonsense. they're _ united states, so it is nonsense. they're not— united states, so it is nonsense. they're not speaking from very thing that they _ they're not speaking from very thing that they said they honour. what can the democratic _ that they said they honour. what can the democratic party _ that they said they honour. what can the democratic party do? _ that they said they honour. what can the democratic party do? should i that they said they honour. what can j the democratic party do? should you not make abortion part of law? we have passed. it is now up to the senate — have passed. it is now up to the senate to— have passed. it is now up to the senate to do the same. but they won't pass _ senate to do the same. but they won't pass because _ senate to do the same. but they won't pass because you - senate to do the same. but they won't pass because you won't i senate to do the same. but they| won't pass because you won't get senate to do the same. but they i won't pass because you won't get the republicans apart on that?— republicans apart on that? know, we won't. republicans apart on that? know, we won't- shame — republicans apart on that? know, we won't. shame on _ republicans apart on that? know, we won't. shame on them _ republicans apart on that? know, we won't. shame on them but _ republicans apart on that? know, we won't. shame on them but what i republicans apart on that? know, we won't. shame on them but what willl won't. shame on them but what will happen— won't. shame on them but what will happen is— won't. shame on them but what will happen is we will have elections this year— happen is we will have elections this year and these elections will be so _ this year and these elections will be so motivated by women, girls and men who— be so motivated by women, girls and men who respect women and girls will come _ men who respect women and girls will come out _ men who respect women and girls will come out and vote and i promise you, we will— come out and vote and i promise you, we will overturn this majority who won't _ we will overturn this majority who won't do — we will overturn this majority who won't do the right thing. you make
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whatever— won't do the right thing. you make whatever it — won't do the right thing. you make whatever it takes another 50 years? that would — whatever it takes another 50 years? that would be extremely sad. are you confident that _ that would be extremely sad. are you confident that it _ that would be extremely sad. are you confident that it will _ that would be extremely sad. are you confident that it will be _ that would be extremely sad. are you confident that it will be something i confident that it will be something that voters will take to the election given there are so much happening in the country with inflation and the economy, are you confident this is the issue, and gun violence. i confident this is the issue, and gun violence. . , confident this is the issue, and gun violence. ., , �* violence. i was so delighted. i've been working _ violence. i was so delighted. i've been working on _ violence. i was so delighted. i've been working on this _ violence. i was so delighted. i've been working on this issue i violence. i was so delighted. i've been working on this issue for. violence. i was so delighted. i've been working on this issue for 25 years _ been working on this issue for 25 years i'm — been working on this issue for 25 years. i'm so proud the vote we are about— years. i'm so proud the vote we are about to _ years. i'm so proud the vote we are about to pass today but remember, to could take _ about to pass today but remember, to could take 25 years was to get this i’ilht could take 25 years was to get this right foot — could take 25 years was to get this right foot i — could take 25 years was to get this right foot i don't think so. have other— right foot i don't think so. have other mechanisms and legislation we can pass. _ other mechanisms and legislation we can pass, elections to make sure we can pass, elections to make sure we can other— can pass, elections to make sure we can other people who will pass but we also _ can other people who will pass but we also can make modifications to the supreme court especially with such a _ the supreme court especially with such a cynical, corrupt supreme court _ such a cynical, corrupt supreme court. political supreme court. adding — court. political supreme court. adding members to the court as an option. _ adding members to the court as an option, absolutely. will adding members to the court as an option, absolutely.— option, absolutely. will present biden ever _ option, absolutely. will present biden ever did _ option, absolutely. will present biden ever did that _ option, absolutely. will present biden ever did that because i option, absolutely. will present biden ever did that because it i biden ever did that because it involves potentially eliminating filibuster and you don't have support to do that? l filibuster and you don't have support to do that?- filibuster and you don't have support to do that? i don't know of what president _ support to do that? i don't know of what president biden _ support to do that? i don't know of what president biden things i support to do that? i don't know of what president biden things of i support to do that? i don't know ofj what president biden things of that idea. you'll make do think the
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democratic party is women's rights for granted? the republicans have been very— for granted? the republicans have been very focused. this for granted? the republicans have been very focused.— been very focused. this move to overturn roe — been very focused. this move to overturn roe v _ been very focused. this move to overturn roe v wade, _ been very focused. this move to overturn roe v wade, this i been very focused. this move to overturn roe v wade, this is i been very focused. this move to i overturn roe v wade, this is what conservatives have been waiting for for so long. conservatives have been waiting for for so long-— for so long. no, i don't think so. but i will — for so long. no, i don't think so. but i will say. — for so long. no, i don't think so. but i will say, this _ for so long. no, i don't think so. but i will say, this is _ for so long. no, i don't think so. but i will say, this is real - but i will say, this is real chauvinism on the the part of republicans. it is abject chauvinism. democrats have never taken _ chauvinism. democrats have never taken women's rights for granted. my mother— taken women's rights for granted. my mother and _ taken women's rights for granted. my mother and there was a great feminist. _ mother and there was a great feminist, she is now deceased and she grew— feminist, she is now deceased and she grew and my husband terrific democratic feminist so democrats, men and _ democratic feminist so democrats, men and women, do not take it for granted _ men and women, do not take it for ranted. ., ., ., , ., ., granted. you are from the state of pennsylvania. _ granted. you are from the state of pennsylvania, a _ granted. you are from the state of pennsylvania, a very _ granted. you are from the state of pennsylvania, a very key _ granted. you are from the state of pennsylvania, a very key state. i granted. you are from the state of pennsylvania, a very key state. a. pennsylvania, a very key state. a swing state but it is also an incredibly divided how much is this going to be on the ballot now in the mid—term elections? l going to be on the ballot now in the mid-term elections?— going to be on the ballot now in the mid-term elections? i think this and many other— mid-term elections? i think this and many other things. _ mid-term elections? i think this and many other things. pennsylvania, i many other things. pennsylvania, historically, has become old the keystone — historically, has become old the keystone state. we originally held the first _ keystone state. we originally held the first 13 colonies together and
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be proved to be the keystone state and multiple elections recently yet again _ and multiple elections recently yet again i_ and multiple elections recently yet again. i am certain we will be the keystone — again. i am certain we will be the keystone state and i have to tell you. _ keystone state and i have to tell you. my — keystone state and i have to tell you, my own district, montgomery and berks— you, my own district, montgomery and berks county, suburban philadelphia, i believe _ berks county, suburban philadelphia, i believe it— berks county, suburban philadelphia, i believe it will be an extraordinary, i know our turnout will be _ extraordinary, i know our turnout will be off— extraordinary, i know our turnout will be off the charts, as well across — will be off the charts, as well across the state but you're absolutely right. we are quite divided — absolutely right. we are quite divided and that is why the selection could not be more the gentleman who is running on the republican side for governor, who is an election _ republican side for governor, who is an election denier, sold tickets and vented _ an election denier, sold tickets and vented a _ an election denier, sold tickets and vented a bus to come down to the insurrection, tried to put forward a false _ insurrection, tried to put forward a false slate — insurrection, tried to put forward a false slate of electors, he is running _ false slate of electors, he is running for governor. his anti—abortion. his anti—women's rights _ anti—abortion. his anti—women's rights that _ anti—abortion. his anti—women's rights. that is why the selection will matter and we must elect our democratic governor who would do what the _ democratic governor who would do what the governor is doing right now _ what the governor is doing right now he — what the governor is doing right now he is— what the governor is doing right now. he is the backstop women's rights _ now. he is the backstop women's rights because we have republican majorities in both the house and the senate _ majorities in both the house and the senate. . .. majorities in both the house and the senate. ., ,, , ., majorities in both the house and the senate. ., ,, y., . majorities in both the house and the senate. ., ,, . ., senate. thank you so much for your time we really _ senate. thank you so much for your time we really appreciate _ senate. thank you so much for your time we really appreciate you i
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time we really appreciate you speaking to the bbc. the congresswomen giving her the action. she said she is horrified at this ruling. roe v wade overturned. this is now going to be an election issue. it's going to be on the ballot, she when it comes to them mid term elections in november. thank you. for more we are joined by the former republican strategist and, to that point, do republicans want this sweeping dramatic decision of the supreme court overturning though the weight to be on the ballot in november in a country where opinion polls suggest that 60% of americans support a woman's right to choose whether or not to have an abortion. i to choose whether or not to have an abortion. ~ ., , to choose whether or not to have an abortion. ~ . , ., abortion. i think that is a complicated _ abortion. i think that is a complicated question. i. abortion. i think that is a - complicated question. i think that it is one where, whatever doubts republican elected officials have come have long since been quenched by the realisation that this is an
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important issue to tens of millions of voters for whom this is a moral issue. this is a cause, a matter of life and death. and that means it is a battle that, basically, the party is committed to fighting. it is something for people who have worked extensively for the party. it is something that interacts with the values in the messaging that you have done. if you could the special election in texas last week on the border, the young women who one is the first mexican born female member of congress. i mean, she was a democrat growing up and she mentioned she switched parties because she was pro—life. for all these reasons, it is a battle that these reasons, it is a battle that the party is going to have to fight. there is a full understanding it will be a difficult battle. i think there's an understanding that there will be victories and defeats. people have had 50 years of a lot of the latter. and i think people also understand that this is sort of a first step and it is one that if you don't properly respond to, and there
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are a couple of ways to stir it up, you can lose a whole lot of what you gain. this is an opportunity, that it is not an end goal. it is not the end of the story. i think that is true for democrats as well. nancy pelosi, true for democrats as well. nancy pelosi. the _ true for democrats as well. nancy pelosi, the democratic _ true for democrats as well. nancy pelosi, the democratic speaker i true for democrats as well. nancyj pelosi, the democratic speaker of the house is claiming that republicans wanted to pass a nationwide ban on abortion. is that on the cards if republicans were to gain control of congress? i on the cards if republicans were to gain control of congress? hind on the cards if republicans were to gain control of congress?— gain control of congress? i find it unlikely that _ gain control of congress? i find it unlikely that there _ gain control of congress? i find it unlikely that there would - gain control of congress? i find it unlikely that there would be - gain control of congress? i find it unlikely that there would be a - unlikely that there would be a nationwide ban on abortion other think we need to ask how she is defining it. if speaker pelosi is defining it. if speaker pelosi is defining any sort of limitation, say for instance prohibition plans on the little exchange to receive taxpayer money, paying for abortions after weeks, taxpayer money, paying for abortions afterweeks, is taxpayer money, paying for abortions after weeks, is that a ban on abortion or is that a regulation that 70% of the american people
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would be in favour of an don't watch that taxpayer dollars going? part of this we have to look at is that she is conflating any restriction or ban on any type of abortion at any time as banning abortion. so, yes, i think there is a significant chance that there will be efforts to regulate the expenditure of federal funds and to use the federal marketplace is to do ten foot if i don't think there's any intention to actually ban or eliminate the procedure at there is an understanding that is not the proper role and i don't think that is likely to happen regardless of the size of the majorities.— size of the ma'orities. justice clarence size of the majorities. justice clarence thomas _ size of the majorities. justice clarence thomas and - size of the majorities. justice clarence thomas and his - size of the majorities. justice - clarence thomas and his opinions today that he wrote, he suggested that the court could look again at the right to contraception. is that something you think the republican party should be supporting? restricting access, potentially, to contraception, because that is seen as the first stage in preventing
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life? ,, ., ., as the first stage in preventing life? ., ., ., ., life? so, i want to quote from justice kavanagh _ life? so, i want to quote from justice kavanagh and - life? so, i want to quote from justice kavanagh and his - life? so, i want to quote from - justice kavanagh and his concurrence because that was, speaking for himself, not for the court majority... himself, not for the court majority- - -_ himself, not for the court ma'ori . ,, , ., majority... that is pretty radical. the idea that _ majority... that is pretty radical. the idea that family _ majority... that is pretty radical. the idea that family planning - majority... that is pretty radical. . the idea that family planning should be looked at. the idea that family planning should be looked at— be looked at. kavanagh explicitly sa s, first be looked at. kavanagh explicitly says. first is _ be looked at. kavanagh explicitly says, first is the _ be looked at. kavanagh explicitly says, first is the question - be looked at. kavanagh explicitly says, first is the question of - be looked at. kavanagh explicitly says, first is the question of this | says, first is the question of this decision will affect other presidents involving issues such as contraception. in particular in connecticut does make they emphasise what the court today states. overruling roe v wade does not mean the overruling of those presidents cast out of this precedence. that is whatjustice kavanagh wrote and, in both cases, it is onejustice fighting in a concurrence of what they are going to do. i think that there is too much attention being paid to thomas�*s suggestion. it's also worth noting that that would actually require states to ban those
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things or challenge them and i think thatis things or challenge them and i think that is sort of an additional step that is sort of an additional step that isn't necessarily clear they are going to divorce of the court is not going to ban contraception for top will allow a democratically elected legislature to do so. i would vote and against any legislators who did and just as thomas himself said this is a particularly silly law. this was referring to the texas suddenly law. if i could just get you back to the broad sweep of this. does the court's ruling in the end do anything to resolve the very polarising position that abortion has an american life because, now, have the country is going to move to effectively outlaw it and how the country is going to move to shore it up. i country is going to move to shore it u -. ~' country is going to move to shore it u . _ ~ , ., up. i think, in the short run, probably _ up. i think, in the short run, probably not. _ up. i think, in the short run, probably not. i _ up. i think, in the short run, probably not. i think- up. i think, in the short run, probably not. i think people | up. i think, in the short run, i probably not. i think people are up. i think, in the short run, - probably not. i think people are not
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used to solving this in the democratic process as you are europe, eventually it will settle down. there will be a lot of poorly conceived laws passed on both sides in the next 18 months. i think people realise why these laws are bad ideas and hopefully most of them will be struck down by the courts. justice kavanagh's and comes listed a series including a ban on interstate travel, that he will almost certainly strike down. and i think others, voters realise and punish the people for grandstanding. and i think there will some very bad ones in the short—term and i think people will think critically about it and realise we have to seriously engage with a difficult issue that does not have a simple solution. thank you so much forjoining us there. forsome thank you so much forjoining us there. for some more context on this historic ruling by the united states supreme court that spring in our north america correspondent who is nrdc studio. it north america correspondent who is nrdc studio-— nrdc studio. it feels like shock wave, nrdc studio. it feels like shock wave. the _ nrdc studio. it feels like shock wave, the radius _
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nrdc studio. it feels like shock wave, the radius of— nrdc studio. it feels like shock wave, the radius of this - nrdc studio. it feels like shock wave, the radius of this is - wave, the radius of this is expanding at the minute. obviously this move was telegraphed somewhat in advance and we had the draft opinion in may. that was essentially the same as this opinion handed down today but having to draft opinion and the idea this was coming and see it actually out there, announced, the law of the land are two dramatically different things and i think people arejust dramatically different things and i think people are just starting to wrap their head around the breadth of this opinion and the speed by which it is going to affect peoples lives and essentially have the country where states are either banning abortion because they have trigger laws are pre—existing bands, those abortion procedures are already banned. that is something thatjust happened in the blink of a knife. the political process moves slowly in this country when it is a legislative process with elections and implementing policy but i think what today has driven home is that
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when the supreme court speaks it can change the political, the social, the cultural lay of the land in this country almost instantly. belie the cultural lay of the land in this country almost instantly.- country almost instantly. we are already seeing — country almost instantly. we are already seeing that _ country almost instantly. we are already seeing that in _ country almost instantly. we are already seeing that in missouri, | already seeing that in missouri, that state is moving to effectively ban abortion and in georgia, interestingly, the governor is going to do something a bit different. he wants to ban abortion over 15 weeks but is open to may be allowing abortion up to 20 weeks. 50 but is open to may be allowing abortion up to 20 weeks. so we're going to see very different moves in different states, owing to be, anthony? different states, owing to be, anthon ? ., , different states, owing to be, anthony?— different states, owing to be, anthon ? ., , ., ., , anthony? you there is going to be not 'ust a anthony? you there is going to be notjust a black-and-white - anthony? you there is going to be notjust a black-and-white kind i anthony? you there is going to be notjust a black-and-white kind ofj notjust a black—and—white kind of band or protect. you're going to see a kind of a wide range of actions states take based on the politics and those individual states and in states like georgia, that a political battleground like wisconsin and michigan and
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pennsylvania, states that we talk about all the time as being closely contested by both parties, i think you're going to see a lot of give and take a lot of political fighting over what the abortion laws are going to look like, will there be bounds? will there be limited ban is questionable to be attempts to preserve abortion rights? that is why, i think, preserve abortion rights? that is why, ithink, the preserve abortion rights? that is why, i think, the political dynamic is going to play out the most dramatically in the months ahead. although you will also see that are very much anti—abortion with solid conservative control in the legislature, states like texas and in the deep south, and you see states where abortion rights are protected in places like california, new york. also doing things that are going to attempt to influence the national debate and also projected their views on opposing states. this is going to be unpredictable and i think you are going to see fierce battles in swing states but you're
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also going to see a larger national battles among the that are deeply entrenched in their views on abortion. entrenched in their views on abortion-— entrenched in their views on abortion. , , abortion. just give us some context here. this abortion. just give us some context here- this is— abortion. just give us some context here- this is a _ abortion. just give us some context here. this is a big _ abortion. just give us some context here. this is a big victory _ abortion. just give us some context here. this is a big victory that i abortion. just give us some context here. this is a big victory that has l here. this is a big victory that has been thoughtful for many years by the conservative judicial movement, isn't it? it the conservative 'udicial movement, isn't it? . , ., ,., isn't it? it has full dopamine, re isn't it? it has full dopamine, pretty much _ isn't it? it has full dopamine, pretty much since _ isn't it? it has full dopamine, pretty much since roe i isn't it? it has full dopamine, pretty much since roe v i isn't it? it has full dopamine, l pretty much since roe v wade isn't it? it has full dopamine, i pretty much since roe v wade was handed down in 1973 pro—life activists have been working for their stay. and if i can turn back their stay. and if i can turn back the clock to 1992, planned parenthood was before the supreme court in 1992 and anti—abortion activists thought that was the moment when they were finally going to undo roe v wade. they thought they had a conservative majority on they had a conservative majority on the supreme court in 1992 that would issue a decision like today's decision. the court fractured. some justices who were perceived to be anti—abortion actually voted to affirm abortion rights and all of this continued for another 20 years
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but i have spoken with anti—abortion activist and i was talking to one back on aol last year. and they view this as the culmination of, essentially, a generational struggle to try to change the supreme court, to try to change the supreme court, to change the interpretation of constitutional law. they compared it to the battle to try to eradicate slavery in this country. and so, for them, they have been setbacks along them, they have been setbacks along the way. it's been a long, hard battle to take over the republican party and get to a point pro—life judges and they freely have achieved that goal, although they will tell you right now that the battle is just beginning because they want to get individual states now that don't have abortion bans to pass abortion bans and despite what your last gas that there is going to be a very real push in congress if republicans take control, to pass wider abortion restrictions and maybe even sweeping bands. . ~' , ., restrictions and maybe even sweeping bands. ., ~ i. restrictions and maybe even sweeping bands. ., ~ . ., ., bands. thank you so much for that anal sis. bands. thank you so much for that analysis- we _ bands. thank you so much for that analysis. we are _
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bands. thank you so much for that analysis. we are joined _ bands. thank you so much for that analysis. we are joined by - analysis. we are joined by our guest from washington steps is a democratic strategist and former national political director. if i can just ask for your reaction there, please comment to this dramatic and sweeping ruling by the supreme court. the other market is a very sad day for america and the women of this country to have these freedoms stripped away from us. and as everyone knows, we expected it was coming and now we need to take this sadness and outrage and translate it into what needs to happen in november at our elections and that is notjust for congress although the point that your gas just before sad is well taken. if republicans are in charge, that is what they will do. we need to take this seriously. but it is also in state legislatures... now this fight
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is the... have access to this important health care. nancy pelosi has said that a woman's right to chooseis has said that a woman's right to choose is on the ballot in november. do you worry that, actually, you know, there are 900,000 abortions every year in america, for most americans may be what is on the ballot in november is high inflation just the struggle to get by? look. just the struggle to get by? look, riaht now, just the struggle to get by? look, right now. that — just the struggle to get by? look, right now, that has _ just the struggle to get by? look, right now, that has been - just the struggle to get by? look, right now, that has been what i right now, that has been what americans have said is that top concern. obviously, inflation in gas prices is not something that is going to go away overnight and not be a continued issue for the american voters but this is going to affect people in real time. as one of your gas said, when the supreme court rules like this, lots of states have trigger laws. lots of states have trigger laws. lots of states have trigger laws. lots of states have old laws on the books. the state of michigan has a 1931 law
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that would allow people to prosecute and criminalise women who attempt to have an abortion. this is not something that americans are going to take lightly when you're taking the them. it is going to start affecting lives and it is going to be part of an analysis on the part of the voters as to who they should support in november for various elected officers but it is on the democratic party to continue to present it and put it to the voters. we can'tjust let present it and put it to the voters. we can't just let this present it and put it to the voters. we can'tjust let this happen and then not talk about it and not continually make sure that we are showing there is a difference between that party and this party and what kind of representation you will get for voting for different people. we will get for voting for different --eole. ~ . ., ., will get for voting for different --eole. ~ . ., . ., people. we are due to hear from the president of — people. we are due to hear from the president of the _ people. we are due to hear from the president of the united _ people. we are due to hear from the president of the united states, i people. we are due to hear from the president of the united states, joe l president of the united states, joe biden, and about the next ten minutes. what are you hoping to hear
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from him? ~ ., .,, minutes. what are you hoping to hear from him? ~ ., ., , ., from him? well, i am hoping that he is auoin to from him? well, i am hoping that he is going to show _ from him? well, i am hoping that he is going to show his _ from him? well, i am hoping that he is going to show his outrage - from him? well, i am hoping that he is going to show his outrage at i from him? well, i am hoping that he is going to show his outrage at the l is going to show his outrage at the supreme court ruling, this packed court of justices, supreme court ruling, this packed court ofjustices, many of whom, three of whom were appointed under former president trump, all under oath saying that roe was president and in fact clearly lying. and i hope that he is going to take a look at every single thing that the executive branch can do. there are a lot of different possibilities and ideas out the way women can access the kind of health care the white house need to do everything possible to ensure that as many women in this country that can have access to abortion do. country that can have access to abortion do-— country that can have access to abortion do. �* .,, ., _, abortion do. and as someone, nicole, who worked — abortion do. and as someone, nicole, who worked for _ abortion do. and as someone, nicole, who worked for a _ abortion do. and as someone, nicole, who worked for a pro-choice - abortion do. and as someone, nicole, who worked for a pro-choice group, i who worked for a pro—choice group, what is your concern about who is going to be affected in the wake of this ruling?
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going to be affected in the wake of this rulina ? , ., , , this ruling? yes, the reality is this ruling? yes, the reality is this is going _ this ruling? yes, the reality is this is going to _ this ruling? yes, the reality is this is going to affect - this ruling? yes, the reality is i this is going to affect communities of less economic means which, in reality, in this country, also tends to mean more people of colour. that is what is going to happen. white middle—class suburban women who can afford to get an aeroplane take days off work because they have a job with family leave, because we have to remember most women getting abortions are already mothers. the majority of women accessing abortion care are already mothers and are making this decision for the families. these women of economic means i going to be able to go somewhere and afford it and have a safe procedure. on the problem is going to be that women who cannot afford that, they can drive hundreds of hours, they can take that time off work. they don't have the money to pay for what is needed for
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driving or a hotel and those of the women most affected so we are going to see a really strong economic divide on who had abortion access and who doesn't.— divide on who had abortion access and who doesn't. thank you so much for 'oinin: and who doesn't. thank you so much forjoining us- _ and who doesn't. thank you so much forjoining us. furthermore - and who doesn't. thank you so much forjoining us. furthermore we're i forjoining us. furthermore we're joined now by a former president and ceo of americans united for life. this must be the ruling that you have dreamt of for years. first off, thank ou have dreamt of for years. first off, thank you so _ have dreamt of for years. first off, thank you so much _ have dreamt of for years. first off, thank you so much for— have dreamt of for years. first off, thank you so much for having i have dreamt of for years. first off, thank you so much for having me. | have dreamt of for years. first off, | thank you so much for having me. i appreciate you paying attention to this issue and it is a good day. it is a very good day. and i think that kinda pivots to the point i want to make from an international perspective is that it is important for people to know that this represents the culmination of three decades worth of work at the grassroots level in trying to work to cast common—sense legislation on the abortion issue that the vast majority of american support. i think that point doesn't get made often enough that there are many,
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many, 80% issues that american people have wanted to legislate on for a very long time. informed consent, parental consent, bans on abortion on disabled babies. things like this that, over 80% of americans do thing are reasonable limitations on the right to abortion and, you know, over and over and over again in the decision, the justice wrote i was very careful to write that this is sending the decision back to the american people at the state level so when we hear this inflammatory rhetoric about the overturning of roe, what it really means inside the context of our political system, means inside the context of our politicalsystem, is means inside the context of our political system, is empowering the people. you will still be able to get an abortion in california, new york, connecticut, all of our so—called red states. here in dc. there will be places that will pass
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legislation that has very sweeping... legislation that has very sweeping. . ._ legislation that has very sweeping... legislation that has very sweeinu... �* ., ., legislation that has very sweeinu... ., ., ., ., sweeping... but, if you are a woman who lives in — sweeping... but, if you are a woman who lives in alabama _ sweeping... but, if you are a woman who lives in alabama he _ sweeping... but, if you are a woman who lives in alabama he was - sweeping... but, if you are a woman who lives in alabama he was making j who lives in alabama he was making this tragic decision to seek an abortion for whatever reason, how are you going to get an abortion? are you concerned that a women in the deep south might endanger her health with a back seat procedure simply because otherwise you must drive 1000 miles to the nearest clinic? i drive 1000 miles to the nearest clinic? , , ., clinic? i did it is interesting that ou clinic? i did it is interesting that you characterise _ clinic? i did it is interesting that you characterise it _ clinic? i did it is interesting that you characterise it as _ clinic? i did it is interesting that you characterise it as a - clinic? i did it is interesting that you characterise it as a tragic i you characterise it as a tragic decision and that is what, the pro—life movement, we focus on. we now have,... abs, pro-life movement, we focus on. we now have.---— now have,... a personal decision is erha -s now have,... a personal decision is perhaps what _ now have,... a personal decision is perhaps what i _ now have,... a personal decision is perhaps what i should _ now have,... a personal decision is perhaps what i should have - now have,... a personal decision is perhaps what i should have said. i perhaps what i should have said. would you say to that women who would probably have that right taken away in what concerns you have for the women in that position? element i think right to characterise it as a tragic decision and that is the way a lot of approach this and that is why the pro—life movement has focused very, very deliberately on spreading a network of pregnancy care centres across this country. we now have more pregnancy care centres
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than we do funded health care clinics across this country and so we are working to build a culture of life. we have said for years that the ultimate objective was to have babies defended in law and welcomed in life. and so the pro—life community is very focused on helping women, on seeing that their babies are taking care of. there are resources available to them and so i think that is an important element to factor into this and as you see this play out in the days ahead, i have seen some of your other guests talking about the political consequences. i think you will see that americans are much more pro—life than they have been characterised. and this is a move towards having a common—sense approach to abortion policy. frankly, you are in europe have... we do have slightly more liberal
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rules. seek a major ultimate aim to have a national law in the united states banning abortion?- have a national law in the united states banning abortion? well, if ou don't states banning abortion? well, if you don't mind — states banning abortion? well, if you don't mind my _ states banning abortion? well, if you don't mind my coming i states banning abortion? well, if you don't mind my coming back | states banning abortion? well, if| you don't mind my coming back to states banning abortion? well, if i you don't mind my coming back to the point you just made, in actual fact, a row the wade here in the united states has been much more radical than what you have in europe. and thatis than what you have in europe. and that is one reason why there not been as much of the pro—life movement overseas. and so what you're seeing here is a move back towards common sense and empowering people to legislate the state level and have the values, in their own states reflect what they believe. thank you very much forjoining us there. for more on this we're joined now by our united states special correspondent who is in pittsburgh in pennsylvania and, of course, that is very much a purple state politically. what is the reaction to this dramatic and sweeping ruling there? i
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this dramatic and sweeping ruling there? . , , this dramatic and sweeping ruling there? , ., ~ this dramatic and sweeping ruling there? . , , . ~' ., there? i was 'ust talking to somebody _ there? i wasjust talking to somebody who _ there? i wasjust talking to somebody who actually i there? i wasjust talking to somebody who actually is i there? i wasjust talking to i somebody who actually is the there? i wasjust talking to - somebody who actually is the wife of the man running for senate hearing the man running for senate hearing the democratic side after the ruling came down and she said that this was monumental and showed why a state like pennsylvania is so important, politically, this is a state that voted predominant on the 2016 and voted predominant on the 2016 and voted forjoe biden in 2020. and if republicans were to take back control of the state this could join other states in the country that will set about very quickly to ban abortion so that particularly abortion rights campaigners in this state say, states like pennsylvania matter so much. it is a monumental change in terms of the law in america. it is hard to think of the law at the time in right is taken away. i have had legal commentators compare this only to prohibition on the right to take alcohol are taken away and that is really the only other time that legal scholars in the country point to a moment in american history where the supreme court has taken away a right that people have got
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used to having in the country. and, katty, the survey has already moved to dramatically restrict the access to abortion in the wake of the court ruling. what is that going to mean for state like pennsylvania? does that mean that is why people may come in search of an abortion while they can? —— where people may come. i while they can? -- where people may come. , ., , while they can? -- where people may come. , .,, , ., come. i 'ust saw texas is doing the same come. i just saw texas is doing the same as well- _ come. i just saw texas is doing the same as well. tomorrow _ come. i just saw texas is doing the same as well. tomorrow i - come. i just saw texas is doing the same as well. tomorrow i am i come. i just saw texas is doing the | same as well. tomorrow i am going come. i just saw texas is doing the i same as well. tomorrow i am going to spend the day here because i am on a trip around the country interviewing people and political issues and i am actually spending tomorrow with a doctor who provides abortion in pennsylvania, going to her clinic. i am sure she love there will be big protests outside her clinic she says there are every saturday morning and she will be there tomorrow as well. i was in conversation with her preparing for this ruling and knowing that her clinic, if abortion is upheld in pennsylvania, knowing
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that her clinic will be even busier thanit that her clinic will be even busier than it has been because it will take women who can afford, if they can afford to travel here from other states that ban abortion, so it is going to put a huge amount of pressure on providers in states like pennsylvania whether it is still legal in states like new york where it is still legal. the question is whether women if you were just mentioning, whether women who don't have the financial means to travel orjust have the financial means to travel or just are have the financial means to travel orjust are not able to travel to a state like pennsylvania, what they are going to do now. this is very much an economic issue and then economic divide in the country. president biden is going to speak in washington shortly. what do you think president biden can actually say or do on this? is considered, constrained and doesn't have the majority with congress. you cannot pass a nationwide law making sure there is access to abortion. h0.
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there is access to abortion. no, there is access to abortion. no, there is access to abortion. no, there is nothing _ there is access to abortion. no, there is nothing the _ there is access to abortion. mfr, there is nothing the white house can do now. the only thing the white house could ever do in respect of this kind of ruling is have the ability to appoint supreme court justices. donald trump was historically incredibly lucky that he managed to get three supreme courtjustices and democrats will debate the means by which he got them, but he got three supreme court justices in four years. that is almost unheard of. that is how presidents affect what supreme court justices do once the justices ever in power than it is up to them and there is nothing, really, now the democrats can do the white house can do apart from try to mobilise this as a voting issue in november. the woman i was speaking to this morning said it will be a voting issue and drive up turnout in suburbs of philadelphia or pittsburgh where i am right now, and this, they hope this will mobilise democratic voters, particularly women in
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suburbs who decided the 2020 election. let's see if that happens. it is going to be interesting to see in four months�* time, july, august, september, five months�* time when the mid—term elections are, but it is the rallying issue the democrats today democrats certainly hope it is because that is the only hope the democrats have at the moment and this will drive up turnout and keep control of the house and senate for them and that is a long shot. this is not going to help them today. this reeling from the supreme goal supreme court is here to stay in the consent of the democrats is the last ruling and is this actually going to lead to more restrictions on rights americans enjoyed the last few decades? americans en'oyed the last few decades? ., ,., americans en'oyed the last few decades? ., ., . ., ., decades? your point of the electoral im act of decades? your point of the electoral impact of this _ decades? your point of the electoral impact of this and _ decades? your point of the electoral impact of this and the _ decades? your point of the electoral impact of this and the speaker- decades? your point of the electoral impact of this and the speaker of. impact of this and the speaker of the house said a woman�*s right to chooseis the house said a woman�*s right to choose is on the ballot in november and isn�*t this also motivating the republicans who will see this as a victory that president trump got three justices onto the court and
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this could be motivating for them to. it this could be motivating for them to. . , this could be motivating for them to. ., , this could be motivating for them to. ., to. it has always been the case, and ou know to. it has always been the case, and you know this. _ to. it has always been the case, and you know this, laura, _ to. it has always been the case, and you know this, laura, that - to. it has always been the case, and you know this, laura, that abortion | you know this, laura, that abortion is a single issue voting issue conservative much more than it has been for progressives in this country. that is why you have the ruling that you do today because there has been a block of conservatives in this country who have always voted on the issue of abortion and trying to overturn roe v wade. you just don�*t have that parallel level of defecation and single focus on the democratic side that you do when the conservative side, which is why you�*ve kind of ended up in this position. republicans that did not like donald trump held their noses, as they have said to be met me, held their noses and voted to him in order to get conservative judges and voted to him in order to get conservativejudges to and voted to him in order to get conservative judges to the supreme court. this is a huge victory for those who voted for donald trump in
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order to change laws in the country and in order to affect the supreme court and this is the outcome and it has come even quicker than most democrats that expected it was. this is the direct result of donald trump picking three very conservative supreme courtjudges he managed to get confirmed and who are now sitting on the court and they have changed little girls in the way that democrats fear but if you look at clarence thomas road, the conservative supreme courtjustice wrote in his ruling, if you look at what he said in his ruling then maybe the course is not done yet and that will, of course, and shall stand the spines of democrat and they will use it to try to motivate turnout amongst democrats and the term elections. i�*m just not sure in five months�* time and how much will be the voting issue that drives people to the ponds, pulse. what i have heard from people in pennsylvania is that it is the economy that is a one —— drives people to the polls.
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economy that is a one -- drives people to the polls.— economy that is a one -- drives people to the polls. katty kay in washington. _ people to the polls. katty kay in washington, thank _ people to the polls. katty kay in washington, thank you - people to the polls. katty kay in washington, thank you very i people to the polls. katty kay in i washington, thank you very much for being with us. we had joined now by a healthy for the guardian us. even though the decision was leaked we now know they were going to overturn roe v wade. how do you address the impact of this dramatic and sweeping ruling on a very politically polarised country? it ruling on a very politically polarised country?- ruling on a very politically polarised country? ruling on a very politically olarised count ? , ., ., ., , polarised country? it is an enormous auestion polarised country? it is an enormous question and — polarised country? it is an enormous question and l— polarised country? it is an enormous question and i think _ polarised country? it is an enormous question and i think this _ polarised country? it is an enormous question and i think this basically i question and i think this basically we can look to the words of people who provide abortions in the united states and their reactions to this decision. they have called it disastrous, heartbreaking, ithink that people really are overwhelmed by the shock of the decision even though it was leaked on the overwhelming majority of experts on theissue overwhelming majority of experts on the issue believed that at roe v wade would be overturned so i think the way that i have taken to over st, describing it is once in many declarations...
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studio: and sorry to interrupt you there because we have to go live to go lighter washington where presidentjoe biden is working at the podium and he is speaking now. today the speaker of the united states expressly took away a constitutional right of the american people that it had already recognised. it didn�*t limit it, it simply took it away. that has never been done to wait right so important to sing the americans. but they did it. it is a sad day for the court and for the country. 50 years ago, roe v wade was decided. it has been the law of the land roe v wade was decided. it has been the law of the [and since then. this landmark case protected women�*s right to choose, right to make intensely personal decisions with their doctor free from interference of politics. to reaffirm basic principles of equality and women had the power to control their own
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destiny and reinforce the fundamental right of privacy right if each of us to choose how to live our lives. now, with rochon, let�*s be very clear that the health and life of women in this nation are now at risk. as chairman and ranking member of thejudiciary committee member of the judiciary committee and member of thejudiciary committee and as vice president and i was president of the united case comics date i have studied this grace carefully —— as vice president and now as president of united states i have studied this case carefully. this case was a waste discussed. believe act one goal roe v wade was a fundamental, correct decision in regards to personal matters of family and personal autonomy. it was a decision on a complex manner atomic matter between a careful balance of a woman�*s right to choose early in the pregnancy in the states
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ability to regulate later in the pregnancy. a decision with broad national consensus. most americans of faith and backgrounds found acceptable and it had been the law of the land for most of a lifetime of the land for most of a lifetime of americans today. it was a constitutional principle upheld by justices appointed by democrat and republican presidents alike. roe v wade was a 7—2 decision written by justice and supported by republican president, richard nixon. in the five decades that followed roe v wade justices appointed by the public and eisenhower to richard in vegan and george w bush were among thejustices vegan and george w bush were among the justices that voted to uphold the justices that voted to uphold the principles set forth in roe v wade. —— richard nixon. it was three justices named by one president donald trump it with a core of
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today�*s decision to balance the scales ofjustice and limit a fundamental right for them in this country —— and balance the scales of justice. —— fundamental right woman in this country. make no mistake, this decision is a deliberate decision over decades of said balance in our law. it is a realisation of extreme ideology and a tragic ever by the supreme court, in my view. the court has done what it is never done before, expressly take away a constitutional rights are so fundamental to so many americans that had already been recognised. of course, decision to do so will have real and immediate consequences. state laws banning abortion are automatically taking effect today. this jeopardises the health of millions of women, some without exceptions. so extreme that women can be punished for protecting their health. so extreme that women and girls were false to bear their
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rapist�*s child. —— forced to bear. the child in consequence... itjust stuns me. so extreme that doctors will be criminalised for fulfilling their duty to care. imagine having... a woman having to carry the child of incest as a consequence of incest. with no option. too often the case. poor women are going to be hit the hardest. it is cool. in fact the court laid out state laws criminalising abortion —— it is cool criminalising abortion —— it is cool. state laws criminalising abortion go back to the 1800s. the court literally taking america back 150 years. it is a sad day for the country, in my view. but it doesn�*t
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mean the fight is over. let me be very clear and unambiguous. the only way we can secure a woman�*s right to choose, the balance that exists, is for congress to restore the protections of a movie weighed as federal law. —— the protections of roe v wade as federal law. no amount of access to other protections can do that and confess, as it appears, it lacks the votes to do it now. —— if congress, as it appears, lacks the votes to do that now voters need to make their voices heard. this full, they must elect more senators and representatives who will codify and representatives who will codify a woman�*s right to choose into federal law once again, like most state leaders to protect this right at the local level. we need to restore the protections of row is law of the land. we need elected officials who will do that —— we need to restore the protections of
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roe. this fall, roe is on the ballot. personal freedom roe. this fall, roe is on the ballot. personalfreedom is on roe. this fall, roe is on the ballot. personal freedom is on the ballot. personal freedom is on the ballot. the right to privacy, liberty, equality, they are all on the ballot. until then, liberty, equality, they are all on the ballot. untilthen, i liberty, equality, they are all on the ballot. until then, iwill do all in my power to protect the women�*s right in states where they will face the consequences of today�*s decision. the court�*s decision cast a large shadow over large swaths of the land in many states in this country still recognise a woman�*s right to choose. so if a woman lives in a state that this tricks abortion, the supreme court�*s decision does not prevent her from travelling from her home state to the state that allows it. it does not prevent a doctor in that state, in that state, from treating her. as the attorney general has made clear, women must remain free to travel safely to another state to seek care they need. my administration will defend that
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bedrock right. any state or local official, high or low, tries to interfere with a woman�*s exercising her basic right to travel, i will do everything in my power to fight that deeply un—american attack. my administration will also protect a woman�*s access to medications that are approved by the food and drug administration, the fda, like contraception, which is essential for preventative health care, another one which was fda approved 20 years ago to safety, safety end pregnancies and is commonly used to treat miscarriages. some states are saying they will try to ban almost severely reduce access to these medications. extremist governors and is state legislators are looking to block the mail such a woman�*s medicine cabinet or track data on
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apps she uses are wrong and how to touch the majority of americans. —— or search a woman�*s medical cabinet. the american medical association, american college of obstetricians and gynaecologists bowed to me and vice president harris stressing that these laws are not based on evidence and asking us to protect access to care. they say by limiting access to these medicines, maternal mortality will climb in america. that is what they say. today, aimed at directing they say. today, aimed at directing the department of health and human services to take steps to ensure these critical medications are available to the fullest extent possible. the politicians cannot interfere with the decisions that should be made between a woman and her doctor. my administration will remain vigilant as the implications of this decision play out. i have warned about how this decision risks
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the broader right to privacy for everyone. that is because roe recognise the fundamental right to privacy that has served as a basis for so many more rights that we have come to take for granted that are ingrained in the fabric of this country. right to make the best decisions for your health. the right to use birth control, a married couple in the privacy of their bedroom, for god sake. the right to marry the person you love. justice thomas said as much today, he explicitly called to reconsider the right of marriage equality, the right of marriage equality, the right of marriage equality, the right of couples to make their choices and contraception. this is an extreme and dangerous pack the course is now taking is on. we close on two points. first, i call on everyone, no matter how deeply they
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care about this decision, to keep all protests peaceful stop peaceful, peaceful, peaceful. no intimidation. violence is never acceptable. the vets and intimidation are not speech. we must stand against violence in any form. , regardless of your rationale. second, i know so many of us are frustrated and disillusioned that the court has taken something away that is so fundamental. i know so many women are now going to face an incredibly difficult situation. i hear you. are now going to face an incredibly difficult situation. i hearyou. i support you. i stand with you. consequences and the consensus of the american people. core principles of equality. and liberty, dignity. and the stability of the rule of law
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and the... should not be overturned. with this decision, the conservative majority supreme court shows how extreme it is, how far the dough might remove they are for the majority of this country and made the united states and outlier among developed nations in the world. but this decision must not be the final word. my administration will use all of its appropriate lawful powers but congress must act. if you vote, you connect. you can have the final word. this is not over. thank you very much. i�*m going to say this in weeks to come. thank you. report mac mr president... studio: president biden they�*re speaking to the american people in the wake of the supreme court overturning roe the weight promising that the fight is not over, saying
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that the fight is not over, saying that a woman�*s right to choose will be in the ballots in america, november, calling the supreme court extreme and sent is out of touch and same for the first time the supreme court is expressly taken away a constitutional right. president biden their saying that a woman�*s right to privacy has been taken away. so for more now and this we arejoined byjessica he was away. so for more now and this we are joined byjessica he was a health reporterfor the are joined byjessica he was a health reporter for the guardian are joined byjessica he was a health reporterfor the guardian us. the smack who is. it was noticeable that president biden was basically just urging people to get out and vote in november so that congress could pass a law codifying roe v wade. he didn�*t have much else to say that he could do in reaction to this ruling, did he?— this ruling, did he? yes, i think that reflects _ this ruling, did he? yes, i think that reflects a _ this ruling, did he? yes, i think that reflects a difficult - this ruling, did he? yes, i think that reflects a difficult position | that reflects a difficult position he is in with the senate where there is an even split between america and republicans and he needs at least 60 votes to pass the kind of protections for abortion rights that he outlined in that speech. in other
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words, what he described as roe v wade but what that decision really means is a woman�*s right to terminate a pregnancy up to the point that a foetus can survive outside the womb. roughly 2a weeks is the consensus among that happens so, as he said, he is really pushing for people to get out and vote, but it is an extremely difficult challenge for him to surmount, given that there are so many rural states where people tend to group conservative. in other words, where people tend to group conservative. in otherwords, it where people tend to group conservative. in other words, it is going to be really difficult for them to find ten senators to pass them to find ten senators to pass the kind of protections that he is talking about the tarmac and the congressional level and that leaves large swath of the united states without any protection for abortion. already we are seeing states being
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able to enact their abortion bans and it is said at least 26 will do so as soon as possible or immediately, as we see in the case of the survey and south dakota, which already has an abortion ban but called a special session to consider more abortion restrictions, so it�*s an incredibly... as he, as president biden put it, sad day for the nation. ,, president biden put it, sad day for the nation. , ,, ., the nation. jessica from the guardian. — the nation. jessica from the guardian, thanks _ the nation. jessica from the guardian, thanks so - the nation. jessica from the guardian, thanks so much l the nation. jessica from the i guardian, thanks so much for the nation. jessica from the - guardian, thanks so much forjoining us. for more, let�*s bring in a north american correspondent anthony nrdc studio. the president there saying that the first time the supreme court has expressly taken away a constitutional right —— who is in our dc studio. what struck you about what the president had to say? 1ng what the president had to say? is you noted, he did not outline many affirmative steps he could take to help protect a woman�*s right to an abortion in states that are banning the procedure. he talked about defending a woman�*s right to travel
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from an abortion banning state to state that allows abortion but, again, that is a costly move and there are going to be women who just cannot afford either with finances or time to do that, and then talked about protecting woman�*s access to contraception and the abortion pill. again, these are legal battles. i�*m sure that democrats will be heartened to know that the administration is going to fight this out in court but i think there are members of the base who would have wanted to hearjoe biden talk about more active steps to try to protect those rights and will be disheartened to hear that he didn�*t outline them, even if they aren�*t likely to succeed, i think there are a lot of people who are angry right now and were hoping for more than just legal briefs and cultivate november. just legal briefs and cultivate november-— just legal briefs and cultivate november. �* ., , , november. anthony, it is a mostly ever since — november. anthony, it is a mostly ever since the _ november. anthony, it is a mostly ever since the us _ november. anthony, it is a mostly ever since the us supreme - november. anthony, it is a mostly ever since the us supreme court l ever since the us supreme court overturned —— a call to vote in
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november, it is almost three hours since the us supreme court overturned roe v wade and sent the descent of the states. picking up we have already seen states who have these so called trigger laws which immediately impose abortion bans if roe v wade would be overturned saying they are enacting those laws. that is states like texas and missouri and in other places whenever abortion laws that already on the books that predate roe v wade their political leaders in the state saying there�*s lots of gone back into effect so you are saying already the battle lines within this country sharply divided between abortion rights states and anti—abortion states and in the days and weeks and months ahead you�*re going to see legislation that all state start to pass to secure those positions and in battleground states like we have talked about in pennsylvania, like katty talked about in georgia, you�*re going to
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see fierce battles in the legislative about what kind of abortion restrictions are protections it has. president biden called the court extreme and out of touch with public opinion. {biden touch with public opinion. given that opinion _ touch with public opinion. given that opinion polls _ touch with public opinion. given that opinion polls suggest i touch with public opinion. given that opinion polls suggest that more than two thirds of americans do support a woman�*s right to choose whether or not she should have an abortion, is there a problem here, a danger the court could be seen out, as out of touch and its legitimacy may be questioned?— as out of touch and its legitimacy may be questioned? there are already -aushin may be questioned? there are already pushing american _ may be questioned? there are already pushing american faith _ may be questioned? there are already pushing american faith in _ may be questioned? there are already pushing american faith in the - pushing american faith in the supreme court is precipitously dropping. before it was a highly respected institution but that is changing now and is full so in theory the idea of abortion and can go down but in fact this is a brand—new reality we are in now where this is actually happening. anthony zurcher, thanks so much for joining us. you�*re watching bbc news on a dramatic day here in america where the united states supreme
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court has overturned roe v wade, ending the federal constitutional protected right to an abortion now, whether you can have an abortion will depend on where in america you lead. thanks for watching. —— where in america you live. not a straightforward out there to tell today. yes, some others have had some blue sky and sunshine and you can take a look at the sussex earlier on but we have also had some threatening skies and in the last few hours a few shout thundering downpours as well. we had some heavy rain in bradford as the shower is passed through. they are fairly isolated but this is where we have got still some humidity triggering off those thundery downpours and they are pushing their way steadily northwards and that is where they will continue to move over the next few hours. if you isolated showers across the midlands and the south—east, more persistent rain into the south—west and that is a weather front that�*s moving on. into the south—west and that is a weatherfront that�*s moving on. it is a cold front that will gradually introduce fresh air for all to where we have still got that heat and
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humidity that will ease is that cold front drifts its way strictly north, taking showers with that as well. so that means that we will start of saturday morning with some showers into the far north. cambridge is that cold front drifts its way strictly north, taking showers with that as well. so that means that we will start of saturday morning with some showers into the far north. temperatures widely into double figures but, as settled, sunny start for many, a few showers drifting up from the south—west of the day and some of those will filter a little bit further inland and certainly stronger winds the further west you are, the closest to the area of low pressure anchored to the west of ireland. in terms of the feel of the weather, 16—18 and exposed west coast, may be highs of 22 with a little more shelter and with the best of the sunshine. now, fingers crossed the cricket will stay largely dry. can�*t rule out a shower but on the whole it will be lightly fine and dry. i think there was a greater chance, however, sinks and showers on saturday for glastonbury but there is going to be sunshine and showers that is not going to be and showers that is not going to be a writer by any means. to move toward sunday, that area of low
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pressure were still there actual fact we could see my persistent rain moving into western fringes and in actual fact we could see my persistent rain moving into western fringes and, yes, another windy day with it as well, so there will be a speu with it as well, so there will be a spell of wet weather perhaps, south—west england, wales, into glastonbury, across west facing credit as well. shelter dictionaries should stay dry for langstone may be sangria down to the south—east corner dry altogether with high tier of 23 degrees. —— down to east anglia. as is going to stay unsettled at times but once again the biters of the weather in the south. —— driest of the weather in the south.
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today at six: a severe blow for borisjohnson, as the conservatives lose two by—elections in the north and south of england. lib dem joy — they overturned a massive tory majority to take the devon seat of tiverton and honiton. the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken for the british people and they�*ve sent a loud and clear message — it�*s time to show boris the door! in wakefield in west yorkshire, it was labour�*s turn to celebrate — they regained the seat they lost to the tories at the general election. now we've had the sort of swing that puts on track not just for a labour government, but a majority labour
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government, so this is hugely significant for the labour party.

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