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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 28, 2022 10:45pm-11:00pm BST

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asl as i say, she was not dealt with. as i say, she was not actually my _ dealt with. as i say, she was not actually my patient _ dealt with. as i say, she was not actually my patient but - dealt with. as i say, she was not actually my patient but i - dealt with. as i say, she was not actually my patient but i did - dealt with. as i say, she was not| actually my patient but i did have the privilege of getting to know her and the work she did and camino, she wasjust a force and the work she did and camino, she was just a force of nature and she will never be forgotten. was just a force of nature and she will never be forgotten. let's talk to professor nicholas van as, medical director at the royal marsden, where dame deborah received her treatment. everyone saying exactly the same thing. public and private dignity butjust a huge insured aviva. what struck you about her. i butjust a huge insured aviva. what struck you about her.— struck you about her. i met when i first started _ struck you about her. i met when i first started as _ struck you about her. i met when i first started as chief— struck you about her. i met when i first started as chief executive - struck you about her. i met when i first started as chief executive of l first started as chief executive of bowel cancer uk turn have years ago and her energy and drive and determination which is sheer warmth and compassion really shone through
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and compassion really shone through and that is very much what deborah has done even in her most difficult personal days, she has never stopped helping other people. she has never stopped shining a light on bowel cancer and she has never stopped raising that awareness and will undoubtedly have saved countless lives. she has never stopped going and i think, you know, we knew she was gravely ill but she will be so very much missed by everyone whose lives that she has touched. ianthem very much missed by everyone whose lives that she has touched.— lives that she has touched. when you first met her — lives that she has touched. when you first met her in _ lives that she has touched. when you first met her in your— lives that she has touched. when you first met her in your capacity - lives that she has touched. when you first met her in your capacity as - first met her in your capacity as head of the charity, did you see to do something about this, tell me how i can help or hurt of the conversation go? the other motive in doing that long before ijoined cancer uk. she did it from day one of her diagnosis and that was over five years ago now. and she has raised awareness. she supported our charity. she became feature of a charity. she became feature of a charity last year. and also, as you heard earlier, supported countless other charities supporting people
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with bowel cancer and she has been, i think, you with bowel cancer and she has been, ithink, you know, her star shone so bright and we talk about people being an inspiration but she really was. she has inspired so many people and i've spoken to them. also affected by bowel cancer. he thought, if she can go out and talk about it i will do the same thing. it is about so many conversations about a disease which he wouldn't talk about very much. and i do think that, you know, one of the things we are determined to make sure is that it does not slip into the dark again. that we keep her remarkable legacy going and keep those conversations going because they are the ones when people talk about things, they act on things and it saves lives. she had that frankness and honesty about her as well discussing things that perhaps other people are embarrassed to discuss
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about diagnosing the cancer in the first place. is that something that was unique to her as well, do you think, on a public stage? i was unique to her as well, do you think, on a public stage?- think, on a public stage? i think she did it really, _ think, on a public stage? i think she did it really, really - think, on a public stage? i think she did it really, really well. - think, on a public stage? i think| she did it really, really well. she always talked about camino, she always talked about camino, she always signed off with check your view. it is not something people are necessarily comfortable with saying that it necessarily comfortable with saying thatitis necessarily comfortable with saying that it is the reality and as he is often said, this is a bit of your boiler day gesture, everybody has it and she has really helped to kind of normalise those conversations and make them easy to have and i think thatis make them easy to have and i think that is hugely, hugely important. it is the fourth most common cancer and yet we don't talk very much about it and she is change that. and i think thatis and she is change that. and i think that is a phenomenal legacy and it is not, you know, that is part of what she has done. so much else that she has achieved. and she has been
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very, very inspiring for the bowel cancer community and beyond and you cancer community and beyond and you can see how she has touched the hearts of so many. just can see how she has touched the hearts of so many.— hearts of so many. just a final thouuht hearts of so many. just a final thought for— hearts of so many. just a final thought for her _ hearts of so many. just a final thought for her family, - hearts of so many. just a final. thought for her family, sebastian her husband, hugo, thought for herfamily, sebastian her husband, hugo, eloise. how should they be remembering their mother, their wife tonight? that is ve much mother, their wife tonight? that is very much for— mother, their wife tonight? that is very much for them. _ mother, their wife tonight? that is very much for them. our _ mother, their wife tonight? that is very much for them. our hearts . mother, their wife tonight? that is i very much for them. our hearts are, you know, hugely with them. this is a time of great sadness and loss for them and we will miss her dreadfully but no more so than her family and our heartfelt condolences go to them tonight. our heartfelt condolences go to them toniaht. . ~ i., , our heartfelt condolences go to them toniaht. . ~ ,, , . tonight. thank you very much indeed s-ueakin to tonight. thank you very much indeed speaking to us- _
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thank you very much indeed speaking to us. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentator, polly mackenzie, and the editor of the house magazine, rosa prince. tomorrow's front pages. starting with. the metro leads with the sentencing of ghislaine maxwell — pointing out she'll be nearly 80 when she finishes her 20 year prison sentence the i focuses on the plan for a new scottish independence referendum — which was announced earlier by nicola sturgeon the guardian says it puts the snp on a collision course with westminster over the legality of the vote the main story in the ft is today's hearing into the riot at the us capitol — and the testimony that donald trump wanted tojoin in, according to one of his aides.
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so let's begin. welcome to you both. sorry we came to bed later but we had the sad news of dame deborahjames. can we start with you on the metro? seems quite an old—fashioned headline from the 19705, glenn maxwell cage for 20 years, like something out of old fleet street, isn't it? —— mike d what did you think of the judge's sentencing in light of what the guidelines were? it sentencing in light of what the guidelines were?— sentencing in light of what the guidelines were? it seems about appmpriate- _ guidelines were? it seems about appmpriate- it — guidelines were? it seems about appropriate. it was _ guidelines were? it seems about appropriate. it was harrowing - guidelines were? it seems about appropriate. it was harrowing to | appropriate. it was harrowing to hear the stories of the victims, of epstein and ghislaine maxwell in the sentencing hearing and as she said,
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she called it a harsh sentence. i don't think it is particularly harsh. she hopes it brings them closure or something, at least. i guess, the problem for me is that ghislaine maxwell trafficked women to clients and the clients remain completely missing in action. we know about the accusations that heaven levelled against prince andrew and, you know, he is mentioned on one the front pages is possibly a new target but that is one name. the rest of this kind of mystery of who these women were abused by as a result of the work that epstein and ghislaine maxwell did, remains exactly that, a mystery. justice will not be served until those clients are also brought before the criminaljustice system which i hope the fbi will at least
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begin to address. she which i hope the fbi will at least begin to address. she addressed the court in detail— begin to address. she addressed the court in detail for _ begin to address. she addressed the court in detail for the _ begin to address. she addressed the court in detail for the first _ begin to address. she addressed the court in detail for the first time. - court in detail for the first time. there was an apology. the biggest regret of her life ever meeting jeffrey epstein. do you think it went far enough? a lot of the victim said it wasn't, a hollow apology? say about the result actually an apology. she said she regretted meeting him. that was very much for herself so she said the hoped that it bought the victims closure. she did not say i'm sorry i did this and in fact, she really sought to portray herself as a victim herself. there has been some debate around that. where she herself groomed? was she also a victim? to my that doesn't really stand out. i interviewed one of the victims his sister_ interviewed one of the victims his sister actually testified in court as well— sister actually testified in court as well and she told me in great detail_ as well and she told me in great detail how— as well and she told me in great detail how she would not have been abused _ detail how she would not have been abused were not for ghislaine maxwell— abused were not for ghislaine maxwell being kind of the conduit to him, maxwell being kind of the conduit to him. too _ maxwell being kind of the conduit to him, too epstein. so, no, ithink it does not _ him, too epstein. so, no, ithink it does not go — him, too epstein. so, no, ithink it does not go far enough. the maximum is 55 years. _ does not go far enough. the maximum is 55 years, we should have meant
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obvious— is 55 years, we should have meant obvious that she would have died in 'ail obvious that she would have died in jail and _ obvious that she would have died in jail and i_ obvious that she would have died in jailand i think obvious that she would have died in jail and i think that is what most of the _ jail and i think that is what most of the victims were hoping for. another— of the victims were hoping for. another huge story. indy ref two. sturgeon's new bid to split from the uk. what you make of the mechanism for doing this in the legal route that the lord advocate is going to the supreme court?— that the lord advocate is going to the supreme court? well, i mean, there are in _ the supreme court? well, i mean, there are in the _ the supreme court? well, i mean, there are in the end _ the supreme court? well, i mean, there are in the end asking - the supreme court? well, i mean, there are in the end asking for- the supreme court? well, i mean, there are in the end asking for the| there are in the end asking for the democratic mandate, is what matters to them most of on the supreme court is a united kingdom government. there's a certain i guess, in appealing to the united kingdom government rather than risking anything within the scottish courts. it is clear that, you know, they actually don't have a legal basis for this referendum but they want a focus on the fact that they did win a majority of seats and a majority of the votes at the last scottish elections went to them and the greens who both advocated for a second referendum. it'sjust really depressing for scotland that this is
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all that they focus on is getting out of the uk instead of governing scotland well. and we know that there are huge problems with drug addiction, with underperforms of schools, the underperformance of the nhs and whilst this debate goes on and they get a constitutional fight, does allow the story to continue to focus on scotland's role in the union instead of on the lives of the scottish people. the union instead of on the lives of the scottish people-— scottish people. the same story in the guardian _ scottish people. the same story in the guardian alongside _ scottish people. the same story in the guardian alongside a _ scottish people. the same story in the guardian alongside a picture i scottish people. the same story in j the guardian alongside a picture of deborahjames mo will come to that in a moment if have time. what do you think? the united kingdom, voluntary union of all the different parts. i do think scottish public opinion stands on this? we know that borisjohnson himself is not at all popular in scotland but what about the drive, the clamour for independence now in terms of polling? independence now in terms of ollin: ? , ., �* , independence now in terms of ollina? �*, , polling? the government's response until now was _ polling? the government's response until now was that _ polling? the government's response until now was that they _ polling? the government's response until now was that they would - polling? the government's response until now was that they would not i until now was that they would not consider— until now was that they would not consider a —
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until now was that they would not consider a referendum, second referendum following the one in 2014 unless _ referendum following the one in 2014 unless there was a clear majority suggesting that they were in favour in opinion— suggesting that they were in favour in opinion polls and that has not actually— in opinion polls and that has not actually been the case. nicola sturgeon would say the benchmark is deferred _ sturgeon would say the benchmark is deferred that in the local elections, the snp very well and what _ elections, the snp very well and what she — elections, the snp very well and what she hopes to achieve by this cases— what she hopes to achieve by this cases to — what she hopes to achieve by this cases to get the constitutionality question— cases to get the constitutionality question out of the way but she also said today— question out of the way but she also said today that if the supreme court ruled that _ said today that if the supreme court ruled that she did not have the authority— ruled that she did not have the authority to hold a referendum that what she _ authority to hold a referendum that what she would then do is go on to the general— what she would then do is go on to the general election, in 2024, and consider— the general election, in 2024, and consider that almost a referendum that they— consider that almost a referendum that they would, the snp opened a manifesto — that they would, the snp opened a manifesto that literallyjust said, do you _ manifesto that literallyjust said, do you want scotland to remain within— do you want scotland to remain within the — do you want scotland to remain within the uk? so the snp is 100% focused _ within the uk? so the snp is 100% focused on — within the uk? so the snp is 100% focused on this constitutional question and they are going to rein back any— question and they are going to rein back any of— question and they are going to rein back any of their other policies in the next — back any of their other policies in the next couple of years. final thouuht the next couple of years. final thought from _ the next couple of years. final
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thought from the _ the next couple of years. final thought from the guardian. i the next couple of years. f rial thought from the guardian. a the next couple of years. f magi. thought from the guardian. a picture of dame deborahjames. a real impact on the country and indeed on every cancer sufferer even though she was suffering from bowel cancer herself. a phenomenal campaigner and fundraiser. a generous, kind hearted, passionate speaker. i think we all will grieve her last. but she leaves behind an extraordinary though gutsy. that most of us can only dream of. i though gutsy. that most of us can only dream of-_ only dream of. i am sorry this is a much shorter _ only dream of. i am sorry this is a much shorter pay-per-view - only dream of. i am sorry this is a much shorter pay-per-view this i only dream of. i am sorry this is a - much shorter pay-per-view this time. much shorter pay—per—view this time. hopefully a bit longer at 11:30pm but thank you both very much indeed for that first look at the first editions of the papers. there's been some big contrasts weather—wise across the uk during the day today. we've had plenty of sunshine across central and eastern england, and with temperatures into the low—205 felt pleasantly warm. whereas in the west, we had a weather front bringing thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain — heavy rain, at that — for parts of western scotland. the rain tied in with this
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particularly slow—moving area of low pressure that'll be with us, really, through the rest of this week, with rain or showers in the forecast, well, pretty much every day. now overnight tonight, a band of rain will push eastwards across central and eastern england, eastern areas of scotland seeing some wet weather. a few showers in the west, temperatures staying into double figures, so a relatively mild start to the day for tomorrow. we start off with a band of rain, then, moving away quite quickly from eastern scotland, eastern england, and then, essentially, it's a day of sunshine and showers. the showers heavy with some thunderstorms in scotland, and some of the showers will tend to line up into a band across southwest england, so there could be some areas here that see lots of showers. fewer showers and the war.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm monica miller. the headlines... an aide to president trump's chief of staff has told a congressional committee that mr trump knew some of his supporters were armed when he urged them to go to the capitol building to try to overturn the election result. the president reached up towards the front of the vehicle to grab at the steering wheel. mr ingle grabbed his arm, said, "sir, you need to take your hand off "the steering wheel. "we're going back to the west wing, we're not going back to the capitol." also on the programme... in new york, ghislaine maxwell is sentenced to 20 years
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for helping jeffrey epstein abuse young girls.

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