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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 30, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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playing the sixth seed, karolina pliskova. that looks a very difficult match on paper but katie boulter will be buoyed by the fact she beat carolina pliskova last week. the other brits are jack draper, liam broady and harriet dart, so plenty to try to lift the mood of the home fans here but it's not only about the brits. the other stars on show today are rafael nadal, coco gauff and the most dominant player in tennis right now, eavis were intact. lets see what the weather is doing at wimbledon and for the rest of us with matt taylor. a good swathes of europe is currently searing under an unusually strong heatwave for this stage in june, all the way from north africa through to the arctic circle. we've got temperatures well above average, june records have been broken far and wide, for some as much as 20 degrees where it would be normally at this stage. the extent of that
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exceptional heat is shown here by the red colours and orange colours on the chart. france, spain, blue colours showing temperatures at the moment for many are below normal for the time of year because we are on the time of year because we are on the western side of this strip of cloud, the weather front that divides the heat from cooler atlantic air, and it's an atlantic air we are atlantic air, and it's an atlantic airwe are seeing atlantic air, and it's an atlantic air we are seeing showers break out today. they will be heavy thundery across parts of wales in the south—west especially, the rumble possible elsewhere. many places will stay dry. a few showers in eastern england. temperatures like recent days mid—to high teens for most, one or two spots and that the low 20s. this evening and overnight most of the showers will fade away but some will continue across the heart of england trust bedding up to the north—east where they could be thundery. the weather front i mentioned getting closer and closer getting closer to shetland. top temperatures in single figures... the weather front temperatures in single figures... the weatherfront which temperatures in single figures... the weather front which will bring persistent rain towards northern
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ireland, shetland, sorry, and approaching weather front for ireland and that doesn't mean it's another showery day, passing showers at wimbledon, a greater chance potentially tomorrow but a lot of dry weather too and most places will stay dry. heavy thundering north—east england and persistent rain across shetland and shallow clouds get going into the afternoon. unlike today, where heavy showers are in the west, tomorrow, northern and eastern parts showers will be frequent and thundery. western areas, fewer showers until we look to northern ireland later in the day when we start to see that more persistent rain pushed its way in and under is this where the system here that works its way in through friday night and into the start of the weekend. if you have plans on saturday there will be a fair bit of cloud around, more persistent rain across scotland and northern ireland for a time, heavy and thundery rain sweeping southwards and eastwards, not reaching south—east until later in the day but it should brighten up, some sunshine at times. feeling fresh and with breezy conditions, temperatures mid to high teens. into sunday the brighter and drier of the
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two weekend days, a few showers still across scotland and northern ireland, one or two elsewhere. staying cool across scotland and northern ireland into next week but in cardiff and london signs of things turning drier and warmer. a reminder of our top story. is ukrainian troops undergo training here in the uk, britain promises another £1 billion to ukraine to help it fight the war against russia. and ukraine claims to have driven russian troops from a key island in the black sea. russia says it has simply withdrawn its forces from there as a gesture of goodwill. that's all from the bbc news that one, it's goodbye from me and on bbc one we willjoin the bbc news teams 0ne we willjoin the bbc news teams where you are. have a very good afternoon.
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good afternoon, it's just after 1.30pm. this is your latest sports news. straight to wimbledon, where it's another huge day of action with two—time champion rafa nadal and world number one iga swiatek both in action later. there's also six british players on court throughout the day as they try to join british men's number one cameron norrie in round three. to bring us up to date on everything, we can speak to chetan pathak now. chetan, six british players at the start of the day, but it's bad news for one of them already? yes, of them already? we are one down already. in the last yes, we are one down already. in the last few moments, alistair gray, the wild card, has gone out in straight sets to taylor fritz, the american. this was the shot of the match for the second set, where the 11th seed fritz, 14th in the world, alistair gray thought he had won this one but he hadn't. fritz got the job done gray thought he had won this one but he hadn't. fritz got thejob done in straight sets. credit to alistair gray, the first two sets in
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particular he played really well. he just lost his way in the third. fritz looks like a contender and could potentially play rafael nadal in the quarterfinals. as alistair gray �*s wimbledon comes to an end, what of liam broady? he is under way on court three, and these are life teachers. liam broady up a break against his opponent, who beat him in exactly this round of the modern last year. liam brady, who is 28 now, is the third time he is playing in the second round, up a break and we know what a good player diego is, but can liam broady �*s wimbledon continue? we'll keep you up—to—date. and later on we have still got jack draper to come and heather watson needs to finish her second—round match which was held over from last
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night because of bad light. and harriet dart is to play her second—round match, too. you mentioned the big names coming up, yes, we have got iga swiatek coming up yes, we have got iga swiatek coming up on court number one, and roughly on the dial on centre court. but before that, on centre court with the roof closed because we are expecting rain, katie boulter is playing karolina pliskova. she beat karolina pliskova last week almost to the day at eastbourne. she is a former finalist here at the championship, karolina pliskova. boulter has had a horrible time with injuries. but she beat two players injuries. but she beat two players in birmingham, and beat karolina pliskova a week ago. so why not now? can she make it to round three this time is we have got roughly nadal to come, he will be playing berankis. and iga swiatek is an action as well. we will keep you updated
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across the day. thanks, chetan. away from wimbledon, rain is frustrating england's women as they try to win their one and only test against south africa in taunton. the final day resumed on 55—3, still 78 runs behind england's first innings total a17. at lunch they were on 140—5, so just ahead of england. the weather has been affecting play, with the rain expected throughout the afternoon at the venue. and the men's team are back in action tomorrow in the delayed fifth test against india. england have recalled james anderson ahead of the match at edgbaston — he replaces jamie 0verton, who played in the final test against new zealand. sam billings stays as wicketkeeper, as ben foakes has failed to recover from coronavirus. and there's a familar face returning too for because all the sport for now. reminders of all those golden matches are on the bbc sports website, as well as all the other of the date was news. —— wimbledon
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matches. we have got some breaking news coming in. three people sentence for the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi and for perverting the course ofjustice. his mother was sentenced to life in prison and his stepfather has been sentenced to life in prison, and a 14—year—old boy who can't be named for legal reasons has been detained for a minimum of 15 years. logan natalie mcgarry, whose body was dumped in a river near his home in bridgend. —— logan mwangi. 0ur correspondent is at cardiff crown court. bring us up to date on what has happened. yes, the three have been sentenced here at cardiff crown court. this dates back to the 31st ofjuly last year, when a 999 call was made by
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williamson to the police and she is heard to be crying in hysterics because her five—year—old heard to be crying in hysterics because herfive—year—old boy, logan mwangi was missing. when the police came to the property later that day, it appeared as though the family was in crisis, but all of that was a facade. all of it was a lie. williamson, and a 14—year—old had beaten, and locked logan in his room and killed him, and then dumped his body in a local riverjust a few hundred metres away. it took less than a few hours for the jury to come back with their guilty verdicts, and as you have heard today, thejudge has sentenced verdicts, and as you have heard today, the judge has sentenced all three to 28 years. his mother, stepfather, and a unnamed iii—year—old. when the young boy �*s body was found, it was found with 56
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injuries across his body. some of the injuries were so severe they were akin to as if he had been in a road traffic collision, or been dropped from a great height. the jury dropped from a great height. the jury here during the trial heard some horrific things, so much so that one has actually come out and spoken to the bbc about how much the evidence has impacted on them, calling for more help forjurors. so, those three centres today. thomas, thank you very much. well, the trial lasted two months, and throughout it, all 12 jurors sat and listened two weeks and weeks of evidence, which was, as thomas was just saying, pretty distressing. 0ne just saying, pretty distressing. one of them was doctorjocelyn and he has been —— she has been speaking about her experiences and said she has been left traumatised. i would cry most days until i got to
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court, and i would be sat in my car thinking, i don't want to go in. with every fibre of my being, i don't want to go in. but i knew i had to, and i had a duty to do that. for two months earlier this year, jocelyn �*s life came to a standstill. she was a juror in a harrowing case, the murder of logan mwangi, along with 11 others, just normal people like me and you, she had to listen to weeks of evidence of how the little boy was cruelly punished, brutally beaten, and how his body was then dumped in a river. when i first heard the opening prosecution, i was distressed. the hardest day was the following day with the clinical evidence from a paediatrician, when she described how logan would have been in life, and how his final hours would have been. your imagination will take you to very dark places when you hear that kind of evidence.— that kind of evidence. jocelyn is a psychologist. _ that kind of evidence. jocelyn is a psychologist, trained _
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that kind of evidence. jocelyn is a psychologist, trained to - that kind of evidence. jocelyn is a psychologist, trained to help - that kind of evidence. jocelyn is a i psychologist, trained to help people with their mental well—being. but through all of this, she could not talk about the case with anyone. it is something thatjurors are told right at the start of any case. i felt as if my normal life was completely hijacked. i am a single parent, i live with my 15—year—old daughter. there were several times that she was studying for her gcse mocks, but several times she was sat holding me while i cried inconsolably. nightmares, all sorts. difficulty sleeping. difficulty getting to sleep and waking up. i still get taken back when i hear children. it still get taken back when i hear children. , , ., ., ., still get taken back when i hear children. , ., ., ., children. it is unusual for a “uror to seak children. it is unusual for a “uror to speak out i children. it is unusual for a “uror to speak out about i children. it is unusual for a “uror to speak out about their _ to speak out about their experiences, but the impact of what jocelyn heard here at cardiff crown court means she wants things to change. she has written to the court, telling them that the support she received was wholly inadequate and inappropriate. mil it she received was wholly inadequate and inappropriate.—
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and inappropriate. all it would take would be one _ and inappropriate. all it would take would be one person, _ and inappropriate. all it would take would be one person, one - and inappropriate. all it would take l would be one person, one therapist, one person who is trained in trauma therapy, who is able to understand therapy, who is able to understand the nature of that kind of evidence. and to expectjurors to be able to make those kinds of decisions when you are in a state of secondary trauma, i think it's really unfair. deeply unfair. in a statement, a spokesman for her majesty �*s courts and tribunals service said:. after the verdict, the judge told jurors they would never have to do jury jurors they would never have to do jury service again because of the traumatic nature of the case. jocelyn is relieved about that, but hopes that by speaking out, she can make a change for others in the future. it's the day when we get a glimpse into the inner workings of the royalfamily, and theirfinances. the annual report into what's
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known as the sovereign grant has been published. this is a single payment given to the the queen by the government every year. the monarchy cost the taxpayer 102.4 million during 2021/22 — an increase of {14.9 million, or i7% on the previous financial year. let's speak to dr laura clancy of lancaster university, author of "running the family firm: how the monarchy manages its image and our money." how do you think it is managing our money? there is an increase there, as i mentioned. are we getting value for money, would you say? melt as i mentioned. are we getting value for money, would you say?— for money, would you say? well no, and there is — for money, would you say? well no, and there is also _ for money, would you say? well no, and there is also an _ for money, would you say? well no, and there is also an and _ for money, would you say? well no, and there is also an and accuracy - for money, would you say? well no, and there is also an and accuracy in | and there is also an and accuracy in some of the reports. that is not the only money they get. security is paid for the home office —— paid for by the home office. even that kind of bigger package of increased money does not cover all the costs. ghee
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does not cover all the costs. give us an idea _ does not cover all the costs. give us an idea of _ does not cover all the costs. give us an idea of some _ does not cover all the costs. give us an idea of some of— does not cover all the costs. give us an idea of some of what this expenditure is on, because quite a lot of it is the refurbishment of buckingham palace itself, i think. yes, a couple of years ago the sovereign grant went up from 15% of the crown estate income, although those figures are also questionable, and it went up to 25% to cover refurbishment of buckingham palace. it would also cover things like travel, events, and it says it covers official travel but also personal travel for the royals. just talk to us a — personal travel for the royals. just talk to us a bit _ personal travel for the royals. just talk to us a bit about what people feel about whether they are getting value for money. i mean, obviously people who love the royal family will say they are worth every penny and they bring in a huge amount of income for the country in terms of tourism and so on, amongst other things. 0thers tourism and so on, amongst other things. others might say, you know, why is the taxpayer spending so much money on all of that?— money on all of that? well, i think the question _ money on all of that? well, i think the question is, _ money on all of that? well, i think the question is, are _ money on all of that? well, i think the question is, are they _ money on all of that? well, i think the question is, are they bringing l the question is, are they bringing in that money for tourism? if we
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opened up the palaces all year round, ratherthan opened up the palaces all year round, rather than being places for the royals to live, that would bring in more money from tourism. there was no link or evidence between the royals existing with tourism. that has been disputed quite a few times. yes, but surely it is part of the british image, isn't it? it is part of the tradition, the pomp and ceremony, there is some of the reasons that people come to this country every year.— country every year. yes, but buckingham — country every year. yes, but buckingham palace - country every year. yes, but buckingham palace would i country every year. yes, but i buckingham palace would still country every year. yes, but - buckingham palace would still exist. the palace of versailles does not struggle for visitors just because there is not a sitting monarch. all of those things about history and the portraits, those would all still exist, but perhaps without this huge payment every year for the royal family. i think it's important as well to think about the cost of living crisis at the moment, multiple strikes about wages, and yet this public institution is getting an increase in the amount of money they get. imagine if the nhs got an increase, then we might not
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have a social health crisis. you got an increase, then we might not have a social health crisis.- have a social health crisis. you say it is a huge — have a social health crisis. you say it is a huge payment _ have a social health crisis. you say it is a huge payment but _ have a social health crisis. you say it is a huge payment but in - have a social health crisis. you say it is a huge payment but in the - it is a huge payment but in the grand scheme of things, when the government is spending tens and tens of billions of pounds, you know, £100 million is properly not that great a sum of money.— £100 million is properly not that great a sum of money. well, it could -a fora great a sum of money. well, it could pay for a few— great a sum of money. well, it could pay for a few thousand _ great a sum of money. well, it could pay for a few thousand nurses - great a sum of money. well, it could pay for a few thousand nurses or - pay for a few thousand nurses or doctors. ~ . , , ., , doctors. which i desperately needed. all ri . ht. doctors. which i desperately needed. all right- and — doctors. which i desperately needed. all right. and your _ doctors. which i desperately needed. all right. and your position _ doctors. which i desperately needed. all right. and your position then, - all right. and your position then, you don't really think there should be a royalfamily, is you don't really think there should be a royal family, is that right? you don't really think there should be a royalfamily, is that right? i be a royal family, is that right? i think we need to look at it at this moment, when everything has been cut. schools, police, hospitals are being cut. you know, can we say that it is ok to spend this amount of money on the royal family, when there are other models around the world that cost a fraction of the amount but still do the same job in terms of keeping checks and balances on all of those things in terms of our politics. on all of those things in terms of our politics-— on all of those things in terms of our politics. thank you very much indeed for — our politics. thank you very much indeed forjoining _ our politics. thank you very much indeed forjoining us _ our politics. thank you very much indeed forjoining us and - our politics. thank you very much indeed forjoining us and to - our politics. thank you very much indeed forjoining us and to talk l indeed forjoining us and to talk through those latest figures.
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the headlines on bbc news... the uk has promised another £1 billion to ukraine to help fight the war against russia. the russian defence minister has said its forces have withdrawn from the symbolic and strategically important snake island in uk �*s territorial waters. investigation is under way into the charity set up in honour of fundraiser and army veteran sirjohn moore. —— tom moore. now, look at what is happening in our newsrooms around the united kingdom. with just 29 days to go now until the commonwealth games begins in birmingham, the largest security operation in the history of west midlands police is starting
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to ramp up. the force is using ground breaking mapping technology to help keep more than a million spectators, athletes and officials safe during the games, using 3d maps produced by 0rd nance survey. 0ur commonwealth games reporter audrey dias has been to see how it works. eyes in the skies. police drones will play a big part in the operation to keep birmingham safe during the commonwealth games. when you need to protect thousands of spectators, an overview is essential, so the west midlands force has teamed up with britain's mapping agency, the ordnance survey. we've got a combination of aerial imagery, which we've flown over each site, and then our team back at hq have created a 3d mesh model from this imagery, and this has produced a 3d model that you can see here. it gives those in the control room is a really good situational awareness, in terms of what each venue is, the entrances and exits, where fans may be gathering so, as we are deploying and moving officers and colleagues across the emergency services, we can do so with absolute confidence. new technology has its role to play in the policing operation for the games,
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but there will always be a neat —— need for plenty of feet on the street. with more than half a million people expected in the city during the games, protecting them is a massive task. the operation will require 3000 officers from forces across the uk. one of their key tactics is project servator. these are units of highly visible officers deploying in short bursts in city centres. it's nothing to be concerned about. we are using specially trained officers to try and look for levels of criminality. we are also looking to use the members of the public who are there as our extra eyes and ears, and we would urge them to report anything that they see suspicious. it's good to see the police out on the streets and being approachable. if they are going to be around, things will be under control. it's comforting to see the officers. you know you've got safety. this is a security operation that's taken more than three years to plan, and making it work for the 11 days of the commonwealth games will be one of the force's
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toughest tests yet. a shorter school summer holiday may be a step closer after the education minister for wales be a step closer after the education ministerfor wales said be a step closer after the education minister for wales said they would be a public consultation about reform. he ruled out cutting the summer break at less than three weeks, or reducing the overall number of holidays, but he says the public are open to change. education unions say there is no appetite for it. it is our education and family correspondence, beth and lewis. the long summer holiday is on the horizon, but in the future it could be shorter than six weeks. the welsh government is taking the next steps towards changing the pattern of the school year and it is a talking point for parents and grandparents in porthcawl. point for parents and grandparents in porthcawl-_ in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a lona in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time _ in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time to _ in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time to be _ in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time to be off— in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time to be off school- in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time to be off school in - in porthcawl. yes, six weeks is a long time to be off school in the | long time to be off school in the summer. i know my grand kids get bored. they want their friends. i
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think six is fine, kids should get some _ think six is fine, kids should get some break out of their academic life. some break out of their academic life they— some break out of their academic life. they need to go and enjoy their_ life. they need to go and enjoy their summer holidays, spend some time with_ their summer holidays, spend some time with their grandparents, and thals— time with their grandparents, and that's the — time with their grandparents, and that's the perfect time.— that's the perfect time. research for the government _ that's the perfect time. research for the government shows - that's the perfect time. research for the government shows that i for the government shows that overall, people are pretty content with the school year as it is. but the government says when asked to consider options, people are also open to change. the education unions ask, where is the hard evidence to show this would benefit pupils and staff? from porthcawl to aberystwyth, where the head of one primary school can see the pros and cons, and how some pupils could benefit from a shorter summer break. some children would be safer, and they would feel more supported within the school environment having that long summer break of six or seven weeks on some occasions, it can be difficult for some of them. childcare costs are another issue, but there are plenty of arguments on
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the other side, too. whether it is the other side, too. whether it is the potential impact on exams and being out of sync with england, or the teaching could be less attractive a career without a long summer break. if there is a shake—up, it would still be the same number of holidays, they willjust be moved to other times of the year. at her coffee shop in porthcawl, louise is worried that moving holidays from the summer to other times of the year could hit business. times of the year could hit business-— times of the year could hit business. ., , ., . ., ., business. families are coming out for the day. _ business. families are coming out for the day. you — business. families are coming out for the day, you know, _ business. families are coming out for the day, you know, parents . business. families are coming out i for the day, you know, parents look to entertain— for the day, you know, parents look to entertain their children during the holidays. it has a huge impact for us _ the holidays. it has a huge impact for us you — the holidays. it has a huge impact for us. you know, when they are in school, _ for us. you know, when they are in school, we — for us. you know, when they are in school, we don't get that trade at all. , ., ., ., all. there will be a lot more talkin: all. there will be a lot more talking before _ all. there will be a lot more talking before any - all. there will be a lot more talking before any decisions all. there will be a lot more - talking before any decisions are made, but a formal consultation in the next academic year will offer a menu of options for changing school terms and holidays. 0n the severn floodplain, vital work to help the recovery of the iconic curlew has seen some encouraging results. the wetland bird's numbers have been decimated in the last 10 years
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but the project led by the wildfowl and wetlands trust has seen more nests this year and it's all thank to farmers. tracey miller reports. these chicks are particularly precious. they are curlews, a highly endangered wetland bird. it is touch and no, endangered wetland bird. it is touch and go. curlews _ endangered wetland bird. it is touch and go, curlews are _ endangered wetland bird. it is touch and go, curlews are such wonderfull and go, curlews are such wonderful birds, wejust can't let and go, curlews are such wonderful birds, we just can't let this go. we have got to do something to save them. . , , , ., them. the curlews nests are incredibly — them. the curlews nests are incredibly difficult _ them. the curlews nests are incredibly difficult to - them. the curlews nests are incredibly difficult to spot. i them. the curlews nests are i incredibly difficult to spot. they are under threat _ incredibly difficult to spot. they are under threat from _ incredibly difficult to spot. they are under threat from a - incredibly difficult to spot. iie: are under threat from a number of factors, especially predators, crows, foxes, ravens, badges. thea;a crows, foxes, ravens, badges. they la their crows, foxes, ravens, badges. they lay their eggs _ crows, foxes, ravens, badges. they lay their eggs in _ crows, foxes, ravens, badges. they lay their eggs in hay _ crows, foxes, ravens, badges. they lay their eggs in hay meadows, and that means farmers harvesting their hay can easily destroy the nests. and just how much of a part do farmers play into this project? it is absolutely essential. unless the farmers were looking after the hay meadows and cutting their hay late in the season, there wouldn't be a
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curlew here. aha, in the season, there wouldn't be a curlew here-— in the season, there wouldn't be a curlew here. a pro'ect to save them is lookin: curlew here. a project to save them is looking hopeful. _ curlew here. a project to save them is looking hopeful. now, _ curlew here. a project to save them is looking hopeful. now, chicks - curlew here. a project to save them is looking hopeful. now, chicks that were ringed a couple of years ago are starting to breed. the trust is hailing the support from farmers as essential. david spent years supporting wetland birds nesting on his ground. we supporting wetland birds nesting on his round. ~ , ., ,. his ground. we built a scrape here, and that would _ his ground. we built a scrape here, and that would have _ his ground. we built a scrape here, and that would have been - his ground. we built a scrape here, and that would have been about. his ground. we built a scrape here, | and that would have been about ten or 15 years — and that would have been about ten or 15 years ago. this is to encourage a wetter area in the early spring, _ encourage a wetter area in the early spring, when all the floods have gone, _ spring, when all the floods have gone, but — spring, when all the floods have gone, but itjust leaves a spring, when all the floods have gone, but it just leaves a wet patch for the _ gone, but it just leaves a wet patch for the breeding waders to enjoy. we share _ for the breeding waders to enjoy. we share the _ for the breeding waders to enjoy. we share the ground with an awful lot of creatures and birds, so we have -ot of creatures and birds, so we have got to— of creatures and birds, so we have got to respect their habitats, as well as— got to respect their habitats, as well as try— got to respect their habitats, as well as try to make a living. the trust want _ well as try to make a living. the trust want to _ well as try to make a living. the trust want to invite _ well as try to make a living. "iie: trust want to invite more well as try to make a living. i“ie: trust want to invite more farmers onto this project, and hope the government will also support them in bringing the curlew out of its endangered status.
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we will be live at cardiff crown court in the next few minutes with police reaction to the news that three people have been sentenced for the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi, and we will bring you the very latest from the court as soon as we hear from the police. very latest from the court as soon as we hearfrom the police. in very latest from the court as soon as we hear from the police. in the meantime, let's get the weather forecast from matt taylor. it has been a pleasant day where the sun has been out so far, but there have been some big downpours around, more to come through today. the thundery showers on the western side, and this area of cloud which is bringing some more persistent rain down to the north sea, the cloud clipping east anglia and the south—east earlier. that will work its way northwards towards shetland overnight, but for most, we finish the day
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with a mixture of sunny spells, scattered, heavy and thundery showers. some of the thundery showers continue into tonight, particularly across parts of central england, towards the north—east of england later. the persistent rain in the north sea creeps ever closer towards shetland. most, though, are at ten to 12 celsius as we start friday morning. the big picture for friday shows that weather front closing in on shetland, bringing heavy rain. another front approaching from the west. we are in between, so still in that showery mix. it does mean there could be a few passing showers at wimbledon. fairly fleeting. a bit breezier as we go through friday. most of the time, though, will be dry. some thundery showers to begin in north—east england, eastern scotland and more persistent rain in shetland. a bright start for the rest of the country. cloud will build in like it has done in recent days, some heavy showers, this time more focused towards the north and east of the country. furtherwest, it looks a little bit drier. a few showers around during the afternoon, although the west and northern ireland more persistent rain later in the day. temperatures like today, around 15 to 21 or 22 celsius. friday night, into the start of the weekend, another area of low pressure with an area of low proud.
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let's ta ke let's take you live to cardiff crown court, where the police are reacting to the sentencing of three people for the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi. for the murder of five-year-old logan mwangi-— logan mwangi. nothing will compensate _ logan mwangi. nothing will compensate for _ logan mwangi. nothing will compensate for the - logan mwangi. nothing will compensate for the grief i logan mwangi. nothing will i compensate for the grief that continues to be felt. the family have demonstrated incredible strength and what they have been through has been hard to comprehend, but they have endured everything with tremendous courage and dignity at this most difficult time. the impact logan �*s death has had, and continues to have, on all those who loved him and knew him within the local community is immeasurable. knowing thatjustice has been done for logan, i hope they can now begin to rebuild their lives and celebrate the joy that he gave them during the precious time they had with him. 0nce precious time they had with him. once again, i would like to pay tribute to the professionalism shown by police officers and emergency service colleagues, who were faced with the most traumatic scenes imaginable injuly last with the most traumatic scenes imaginable in july last year. with the most traumatic scenes imaginable injuly last year. i
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would also like to thank my team of detectives and staff, who have worked tirelessly on this investigation, together with the crown prosecution service and prosecution counsel. the efforts of all involved have contributed to the outcome today. thank you. a statement therefrom police at cardiff crown court, talking about the impact that logan had, and how it was immeasurable, and the relief that no justice has been done. it was immeasurable, and the relief that nojustice has been done. well, three people have been sentenced for the murder of five—year—old logan mwangi and for perverting the course ofjustice. the three people were his mother, aged 31 and she has been sentenced to life in prison with a minimum term in custody of 28 years. logan �*s stepfather, ao—year—old john cole has been sentenced to life in prison with a minimum term in custody of 29 years. and a
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14—year—old boy has also been sentenced but he can't be named for legal reasons and he has been detained for a legal reasons and he has been detained fora minimum legal reasons and he has been detained for a minimum of 15 years. thejudge said logan detained for a minimum of 15 years. the judge said logan was completely defenceless against those who killed him, and that it was impossible to imagine the terror he endured as injuries were inflicted upon him. the trial earlier this year it lasted two months, and throughout it, all 12jurors lasted two months, and throughout it, all 12 jurors sat and listened two weeks and weeks of evidence. at times it was very distressing. 0ne times it was very distressing. one of them was doctorjocelyn, and she has chosen to speak out about her experiences. she said she has been left traumatised by what she has heard. i would cry most days until i got to court and i would be set in my car, thinking i don't want to go in. with every fibre of my being, i don't want to go in. but i knew i had to
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do and i had a duty

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