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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  August 4, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the bank of england predicts that the uk will enter a recession this autumn lasting more than a year. the bank says inflation is likely to peak at 13% later this year, adding to concerns over the cost of living. gdp growth in the uk has slowed and the economy is forecast to enter a recession later this year. and the bank of england today raised interest rates by 0.5% to 1.75%. some businesses voice concern at the change. it is crippling. interest rate rises are something that could really stop a small business like us. in our other main news this lunchtime... china launches several ballistic missiles into waters around taiwan
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in response to a us senator's visit to the island. the family of archie battersbee seek permission to move him to a hospice — doctors warn this carries significant risk. and how disposable facemasks are blighting birdlife in 23 countries around the world. and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... england's anna henderson wins the first home nations medal on day seven at the commonwealth games, taking silver in the women's cycling time trial. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the bank of england has predicted that the uk is set to enter a recession this autumn lasting more than a year. it says inflation
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is likely to peak at 13% later this year and today it has announced the largest rise in interest rates for 27 years. the 0.5% hike means that interest rates now stand at i.75%. the move is part of attempts to curb spiralling inflation, by making borrowing more expensive and discouraging spending. but it makes mortgages and loans more expensive for millions of people. andy verity reports. ra rely rarely has the bank of england given that an economic morning the sun settling. not only forecast in the worst inflation in a0 years, hitting 13%, but a full—blown recession starting this autumn. it means it expects buying and selling activity to start shrinking and carry on for the whole of next year. the to start shrinking and carry on for the whole of next year.— to start shrinking and carry on for the whole of next year. the risks of the full costs _ the whole of next year. the risks of the full costs of _ the whole of next year. the risks of the full costs of exceptionally - the full costs of exceptionally large at present. the source of the
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risks and the driver of most of the revisions to the full costs since the may report is overwhelmingly energy prices and the consequences of the actions of russia. the rise in energy prices has exacerbated the fall in real incomes and led to another significant deterioration in the outlook for activity in the uk, and in the rest of europe. gdp growth in the uk has slowed and the economy is now forecast to enter recession later this year.- recession later this year. these were what _ recession later this year. these were what prices _ recession later this year. these were what prices look - recession later this year. these were what prices look like - recession later this year. these were what prices look like the l recession later this year. these i were what prices look like the last time the official interest rate rose by as much, 28 years ago. back then they were rising more slowly, barely one third as quickly. the official interest rate is higher than it has been for 13 years, but only because rates have been so low for so long. if you look back further to the last time the rates went up by 0.5% in 1995, the rates were three times what they are now. i 1995, the rates were three times what they are now.— 1995, the rates were three times what they are now. i recognise the si . nificant what they are now. i recognise the significant impact _ what they are now. i recognise the significant impact this _ what they are now. i recognise the significant impact this will - what they are now. i recognise the significant impact this will have . significant impact this will have and how difficult the cost of living challenge will continue to be for
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many people in the uk. inflation hits the least well off hardest. but if we do not act to prevent inflation becoming persistent, the consequences later will be worse. and that will require larger increases in interest rates. the bank of england's _ increases in interest rates. the bank of england's hope is raising interest rates and making it more expensive to borrow will discourage firms and households from borrowing to buy and invest dampening down demand for goods and cooling the economy. small businesses like this manufacture of specialised toys in north wales say ongoing hikes in interest rates could slow down business, hitting growing businesses like this, making any recession worse. it like this, making any recession worse. , . , , , worse. it is crippling, interest rate rises— worse. it is crippling, interest rate rises are _ worse. it is crippling, interest rate rises are something - worse. it is crippling, interest rate rises are something that| worse. it is crippling, interest - rate rises are something that really stop a _ rate rises are something that really stop a small business like us. we are ambitious, timely, doing our absolute — are ambitious, timely, doing our absolute best. it could stop this
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growth — absolute best. it could stop this growth or— absolute best. it could stop this growth or stymie it, curtail it, at a time _ growth or stymie it, curtail it, at a time when _ growth or stymie it, curtail it, at a time when we need to be making changes _ a time when we need to be making chan . es. , a time when we need to be making chances. , ., ' ' ., changes. only about 1.9 million households. — changes. only about 1.9 million households, less _ changes. only about 1.9 million households, less than - changes. only about 1.9 million households, less than a - changes. only about 1.9 million households, less than a tenth, | changes. only about 1.9 million - households, less than a tenth, have mortgages with variable rates. if they have a typical mortgage of £200,000, they will pay £59 more a month. a further 1.3 mortgage borrowers —— 1.3 million mortgage borrowers —— 1.3 million mortgage borrowers will move off fixed rate deals this year and they are also likely to pay more. if raising interest rates is aiming to curb household spending, energy bills are doing that leading to a rare and nasty combination of soaring inflation and impending recession. andy verity reporting. a rare combination, you were saying. there is this thing — combination, you were saying. there is this thing where _ combination, you were saying. there is this thing where you _ combination, you were saying. there is this thing where you have - combination, you were saying. there is this thing where you have the - is this thing where you have the economy stagnating at the same time as prices soaring, the term coined in the late 1970s, stagflation. now
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the economy is stagnating and the bank of england is predicting it will shrink for the whole of next year. normally if you have high inflation, the economy is booming. in some respects, as it is now. but what is predicted is higher energy bills called by the booming world economy will hit us so hard as households and businesses that we will rein in spending. when you raise interest rates, what you are trying to do is curb spending, making it more expensive to borrow and therefore more expensive to spend and you discourage further spending, trying to cool down things. here you are already having the effect, from the higher energy bills and higher energy bills are like raising interest rates ten times over. that is what the bank of england is predicting will push us into recession.— england is predicting will push us into recession. ~ . ., , , into recession. what extent was this exected? into recession. what extent was this exoeeted? we _ into recession. what extent was this expected? we have _ into recession. what extent was this expected? we have heard _ into recession. what extent was this expected? we have heard the - into recession. what extent was this expected? we have heard the r - into recession. what extent was this| expected? we have heard the r word before, it expected? we have heard the r word before. it has — expected? we have heard the r word before, it has been _ expected? we have heard the r word before, it has been predicted - expected? we have heard the r word before, it has been predicted high . before, it has been predicted high energy bills would curb consumer
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spending and tip us into recession, so economic activity recedes, but it has not been said before it could last this long and the idea we'll household incomes will fall as well is quite unsettling. —— real household incomes. is quite unsettling. -- real household incomes. , ., ., ., �* .,~ household incomes. jonathan blake “oins us household incomes. jonathan blake joins us now- _ household incomes. jonathan blake joins us now. the _ household incomes. jonathan blake joins us now. the warnings - household incomes. jonathan blake joins us now. the warnings about i household incomes. jonathan blake l joins us now. the warnings about the recession by the end of the year, it gives politicians even more to think about. , ., . , gives politicians even more to think about. , ., ., , , ., , about. they do and they will prompt auestions about. they do and they will prompt questions about _ about. they do and they will prompt questions about what _ about. they do and they will prompt questions about what the _ about. they do and they will prompt l questions about what the government is going _ questions about what the government is going to _ questions about what the government is going to do. in downing street, boris _ is going to do. in downing street, borisjohnson is on holiday this week, — borisjohnson is on holiday this week, less than five weeks left in the job, _ week, less than five weeks left in the job, they will soon be a new incumbent — the job, they will soon be a new incumbent in number10. the job, they will soon be a new incumbent in number 10. whether that has rishi _ incumbent in number 10. whether that has rishi sunak or liz truss. they will take — has rishi sunak or liz truss. they will take office at a time of a really— will take office at a time of a really difficult economic situation that we _ really difficult economic situation that we have been hearing about and also real— that we have been hearing about and also real financial difficulty if not crisis _ also real financial difficulty if not crisis for households up and down _ not crisis for households up and down the — not crisis for households up and down the uk. what will they do about it? rishi _ down the uk. what will they do about it? rishi sunak has been repeating his argument about his approach to
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the economy, saying he will prioritise _ the economy, saying he will prioritise gripping inflation, growing the economy and cutting taxes _ growing the economy and cutting taxes li2— growing the economy and cutting taxes. liz truss denies cutting taxes — taxes. liz truss denies cutting taxes to— taxes. liz truss denies cutting taxes to the extent she wants to do immediately would actually make the problem _ immediately would actually make the problem worse, causing higher inflation, — problem worse, causing higher inflation, saying that you cannot tax your— inflation, saying that you cannot tax your way out of a recession. also _ tax your way out of a recession. also saying _ tax your way out of a recession. also saying her plans would not be inflationary. labour say the whole situation — inflationary. labour say the whole situation is — inflationary. labour say the whole situation is further proof of the mess— situation is further proof of the mess the — situation is further proof of the mess the conservatives have got the economy— mess the conservatives have got the economy into, saying they have lost control _ economy into, saying they have lost control. liberal democrat saying neither— control. liberal democrat saying neither candidate a credible plan to tackle _ neither candidate a credible plan to tackle this. all throughout the leadership campaign, it has felt like the — leadership campaign, it has felt like the debate has been about what happens _ like the debate has been about what happens in the future, but today's warnings — happens in the future, but today's warnings from the bank of indent and the decision— warnings from the bank of indent and the decision on interest rates is a reminder— the decision on interest rates is a reminder whoever wins the contest will face _ reminder whoever wins the contest will face real immediate pressing problems —— the bank of england. they— problems —— the bank of england. they will— problems —— the bank of england. they will face questions about what
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to do— they will face questions about what to do about it this evening in the latest _ to do about it this evening in the latest televised event of the campaign, live interviews and questions from party members on sky news at _ questions from party members on sky news at hpn. —— at eight o'clock. thank— news at hpn. —— at eight o'clock. thank you. — news at hpn. —— at eight o'clock. thank you, jonathan blake. 0fgem has announced that changes to the energy price cap will be made every three months, rather than the current six. the energy regulator says the move will allow prices to reflect changes to wholesale gas and electricity costs more quickly and accurately. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, joins us. why have they done it? it is worth saying the price cap is the maximum amount a supplier can charge for the basic rate, standard variable tally. a lot more households have been moved onto that rate —— standard variable tariff. just over three quarters are now paying this rate that is controlled by the regulator. today what they have announced is essentially that they have decided the important
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thing is for them to protect the energy market, so what they are trying to avoid is another energy supplier going bust this winter. if that happened, we would all be paying for it as customers because as happened last winter to charge for moving all of the customers and for moving all of the customers and for paying the administration gets added on to all of our bills. 0fgem say it is important to make sure companies can change the price more frequently to prevent them from going bust this winter. as a result, for customers, our price will change more frequently, making it harder to budget, and it will mean a change not only in october but also in january. the boss of 0fgem told the bbc today they need to make the changes now to protect the energy market. let's have a look back to last winter and we saw what happens if you have a pricing system that can't keep up with the market supporting it, and that will mean that some suppliers fail and, ultimately, those kind of costs come back to us as customers.
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so, what we've got to do as a regulator is look at every cost that's going to hit customers. the reality is for the customers, the global price wireless is are going to hit our bills sooner —— global price rises. in the years ahead, when wholesale prices are falling, that will be passed on to us as customers quicker as well, thatis us as customers quicker as well, that is definitely a bonus. but in the short term analysts are predicting global price rises are set to continue certainly for the next year, meaning that will be passed on to us soon as customers making this winter which is already predicted to be one of the most difficult for a generation even harder and many charities warn potentially thousands more households will be pushed into fuel poverty because of this move made by 0fgem today. poverty because of this move made by 0fgem today-— ofgem today. colletta smith, thank ou. energy giant shell is to give its workers a one—off 8% bonus
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after the company reported record profits from high oil and gas prices. most of its 82,000 staff worldwide will get the pay award, but senior executives will be excluded. shell says the award reflects its financial success and is not a response to the rising cost of living. taiwan says china has fired several ballistic missiles in the waters around the island, as part of beijing's biggest—ever military exercises in the area. china announced the drills in response to a visit to taiwan by american democrat nancy pelosi. the exercises stop ships and planes from using maritime and air space. taiwan says they amount to a blockade. stephen o'donnell reports. in volley after volley, missiles were fired into the waters off taiwan and, according to the people's liberation army, hit their targets. attack helicopters flew past pingtan island, one of china's closest
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points to taiwan. after assembling for days, china's military has staged massive live fire exercises, in a dramatic escalation of pressure on a place it considers a rogue province. these are normally busy shipping lanes, but in six huge areas surrounding the island, commercial vessels and aircraft are warned not to approach what looks like a dress rehearsal for a blockade of taiwan. some have asked whether the pelosi visit was worth it, given that taiwan's security appears to have deteriorated as a result. but many taiwanese say they are used to such tensions. translation: basically, - i am not afraid of the threats from china because, at least right now, when china says it wants to annex taiwan by force, they have actually said that for quite a while. translation: i think i am already used to the threat from china - and i have accepted it. actually, taiwan cares more about the economy.
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the chinese government has been encouraging strident nationalist condemnation of nancy pelosi and taiwan. this could, though, lead to calls for more extreme military options, more extreme than it's prepared to consider, and that could bring its own political pressure on beijing. translation: i think this pelosi visit is a good thing. _ it gives us an opportunity to surround taiwan, then use this opportunity to take taiwan by force earlier than expected. i think we should thank comrade pelosi. translation: psychologically, i i think emotions are running high for chinese people when she came, but when we calm down and think about it, we must have faith in our motherland, in that they, the government, have already figured out a solution. for hardliners in china's communist party, the visit has provided the perfect excuse to ramp up military activity around taiwan. now that exercises have been carried out so close to the island,
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could this become a regular event? that would mean even more regional instability in the coming years. stephen mcdonell reporting. more heavy rain is expected in parts of northern pakistan, hit by some of the worst floods in recent years. more than 500 people have been killed in severe flooding and landslides in pakistan since the monsoon season began in june. thousands have been displaced. the government has promised round—the—clock help to affected communities, but it's been criticised for being slow to bring aid to the worst affected areas. a man has appeared in court charged with the murder of a woman who went missing in bristol a decade ago. 32—year—old claire holland has not been seen sincejune, 2012, after leaving a pub in the city centre. a0—year—old darren 0sment was remanded in custody.
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detectives searching for a student nurse, who disappeared nearly a month ago in south london, have arrested a fourth man on suspicion of murder. 2a—year—old 0wami davies from grays in essex was last seen in west croydon on 7thjuly. police say she was recorded on cctv in the company of a man on the night she was last seen alive. they are keen to speak to a van driver seen passing 0wami on the street. the family of archie battersbee have insisted they will fight to get him moved to a hospice, after the european court of human rights rejected their request to postpone the withdrawal of his life support. the 12—year—old has been in a coma since he was found unconscious after an accident at his home in essex in april. for nearly four months, archie battersbee has been at the centre of a lengthy legal battle. now the family has acknowledged it has come to an end, they have one final wish,
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for archie to be moved to a hospice where they can say goodbye privately. where they can say goodbye privately-— where they can say goodbye rivatel . , , ., ., privately. every single day of archie's life, _ privately. every single day of archie's life, i— privately. every single day of archie's life, i have - privately. every single day of archie's life, i have told - privately. every single day of archie's life, i have told him| privately. every single day of| archie's life, i have told him i love him. i have no regrets with archie whatsoever. for love him. i have no regrets with archie whatsoever.— archie whatsoever. for that to ha en, archie whatsoever. for that to happen. they _ archie whatsoever. for that to happen, they need _ archie whatsoever. for that to happen, they need the - archie whatsoever. for that to - happen, they need the permission of the court. earlier archie's family filed an application to the high court. but lawyers for barts health nhs trust which runs this hospital where archie has been treated say any application to transfer to a 12—year—old would be opposed. the trust believes his condition is unstable and moving him even a short distance would create significant risk. archie has been in a coma since he was found unconscious at his home in april. doctors say it is highly likely archie is brain stem dead and there is no hope of recovery. the hospital says it has his best interests at the forefront
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of its care. we his best interests at the forefront of its care-— his best interests at the forefront of its care. ~ , , ,, ., of its care. we refuse permission... in a of its care. we refuse permission... in a series — of its care. we refuse permission... in a series of _ of its care. we refuse permission... in a series of court _ of its care. we refuse permission... in a series of court rulings, - of its care. we refuse permission... in a series of court rulings, ten - in a series of court rulings, ten judges agreed his treatment should be withdrawn. yesterday the european court of human rights refused to intervene in the case after an application by archie's parent's. this is not the first high—profile case where doctors and families have disagreed. fine case where doctors and families have disa . reed. ., case where doctors and families have disaareed. ., , ., disagreed. one would understand archie in the _ disagreed. one would understand archie in the minds _ disagreed. one would understand archie in the minds of _ disagreed. one would understand archie in the minds of the - disagreed. one would understand archie in the minds of the familyl archie in the minds of the family still alive and they don't want to lose their boy. i think sadly that happens. however, those kinds of disconnect prima relatively rare. his parents now face another wait to find out if they will be able to move their son to a hospice where they can say goodbye. helena wilkinson, bbc news, royal london hospital.
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the time is 1.18. our top story this lunchtime. the bank of england thinks britain will end the recession later this year. a series of earthquakes has triggered a volcano near recce wreck in iceland. coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... scotland's1,500m athletics world championjake wightman wins his heat, as he begins his quest for commonwealth gold in birmingham. disposable facemasks are blighting birdlife in 23 countries around the world. that's the finding from an online project called birds and debris, in which people submitted photos and reports of birds nesting or entangled in rubbish. scientists collecting and studying the images say birds in almost every continent are now living in our litter. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill reports. a grim but familiar sight in many urban waterways. how many different types of plastic
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are just floating here? yeah, i can see easily, one, two, three, four, five, six, seven... seven or eight different kinds of plasticjust here. and it's the wildlife that inhabits these waterways that's living with and living in our rubbish. these images, submitted by members of the public and collected by scientists, show the global extent of the problem. scientists asked people to upload photographs and reports of birds tangled or nesting in rubbish. we've got about a00 reports covering every continent except antarctica, so, yeah, literally everywhere. and then covid happened and all of a sudden we had all of the submissions of facemasks, surgical gloves. is, say, a mask or a ppe item, is that more of an environmental problem than a plastic bag or a plastic bottle? yeah, so masks is not just one thing. you think about you've got the ear loops which are made of elastic, you've got sheeting on them,
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you've got the rigid piece of flexible plastic that, you know, fits over your nose, so you've got a whole bunch of ways that wildlife can seemingly interact with it. bird cheeps. in some cases, like this one in stratford—on—avon, nature lovers have been able to help. hey, come on, buddy. 0h, perfect, well done. there we go. but this project shows the surge in pandemic—related waste that's ending up in our environment. scientists say the systems we have for managing that waste can't cope and that wildlife and wild spaces are bearing the consequences. victoria gill, bbc news. a family who were hit by a bike at the commonwealth games are calling for an urgent review of velodrome safety. a rider went over the safety barrier, following a crash in the track cycling on sunday, colliding with several people in the crowd. 0ur sports news correspondent
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laura scott reports. in the frenetic world of track cycling, high—speed crashes aren't unusual. commentator: big crash. it's brought half the field down. but this one on sunday was, with a momentjust out of shot, making it potentially devastating. as this video from a shocked spectator shows, england's matt walls was catapulted out of the melee and into the stands. fans were soon face—to—face with flying men and bikes, including hugh colvin and his two young children. for his wife, laura, who wasn't there, it's hit home how it grazed my daughter i faced the other way because i turned my head but it must have been within centimetres or millimetres of our heads and close enough to grace my daughter. for his wife, laura, who wasn't there, it's hit home how much worse it could have been. i think what's been quite hard
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for us to get our head around is being able to see from the photographs that were taken of the incident exactly how close this came to being a complete catastrophe, and how close our two younger children came to being seriously injured or killed. with walls needing 1a minutes of treatment in the stands the session was abandoned and the venue cleared. he and two other cyclists were taken to hospital. 0ne he and two other cyclists were taken to hospital. one said he'd never seen anything like what happened to walls. ,., ., .,, ., walls. going over the top of the barriers at _ walls. going over the top of the barriers at 30 _ walls. going over the top of the barriers at 30 miles _ walls. going over the top of the barriers at 30 miles an - walls. going over the top of the barriers at 30 miles an hour- walls. going over the top of the barriers at 30 miles an hour or. barriers at 30 miles an hour or something _ barriers at 30 miles an hour or something as terrifying and he was two beds _ something as terrifying and he was two beds down in the hospital and i was still— two beds down in the hospital and i was still strapped in when he walked round _ was still strapped in when he walked round the _ was still strapped in when he walked round the corner and i could not believe — round the corner and i could not believe that he was on his feet. contrary— believe that he was on his feet. contrary to _ believe that he was on his feet. contrary to earlier statements from the velodrome and games organisers saying no members of the public required hospital treatment, their
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friend seen in red will require surgery on his arm. they have been psychological impacts too. the children were _ psychological impacts too. the children were so _ psychological impacts too. the children were so worried about the cyclists, _ children were so worried about the cyclists, my— children were so worried about the cyclists, my daughter— children were so worried about the cyclists, my daughter in _ children were so worried about the j cyclists, my daughter in particular, was worried — cyclists, my daughter in particular, was worried about _ cyclists, my daughter in particular, was worried about what _ cyclists, my daughter in particular, was worried about what happenedl cyclists, my daughter in particular, i was worried about what happened to matt walls — was worried about what happened to matt walls he — was worried about what happened to matt walls. he was _ was worried about what happened to matt walls. he was very _ was worried about what happened to matt walls. he was very kind - was worried about what happened to matt walls. he was very kind and - matt walls. he was very kind and face timed — matt walls. he was very kind and face timed her— matt walls. he was very kind and face timed her on— matt walls. he was very kind and face timed her on monday- matt walls. he was very kind andl face timed her on monday evening matt walls. he was very kind and - face timed her on monday evening and that was— face timed her on monday evening and that was a _ face timed her on monday evening and that was a big — face timed her on monday evening and that was a big step— face timed her on monday evening and that was a big step forward _ face timed her on monday evening and that was a big step forward for- face timed her on monday evening and that was a big step forward for her. . that was a big step forward for her. what _ that was a big step forward for her. what i _ that was a big step forward for her. what i staggered _ that was a big step forward for her. what i staggered the _ that was a big step forward for her. what i staggered the most - that was a big step forward for her. what i staggered the most is - that was a big step forward for her. what i staggered the most is the l what i staggered the most is the realisation that while incidents like these are incredibly rare cyclists had ended up in the crowd before. if cyclists had ended up in the crowd before. ., ~ ., ., ., ., before. if we had known for a moment that there was — before. if we had known for a moment that there was a _ before. if we had known for a moment that there was a risk _ before. if we had known for a moment that there was a risk that _ before. if we had known for a moment that there was a risk that a _ before. if we had known for a moment that there was a risk that a bike - that there was a risk that a bike with— that there was a risk that a bike with an — that there was a risk that a bike with an adult _ that there was a risk that a bike with an adult male _ that there was a risk that a bike with an adult male going - that there was a risk that a bike with an adult male going at - that there was a risk that a bike j with an adult male going at that speed _ with an adult male going at that speed could _ with an adult male going at that speed could come _ with an adult male going at that speed could come into- with an adult male going at that speed could come into contact. with an adult male going at that. speed could come into contact with my seven—year—old _ speed could come into contact with my seven—year—old daughter, - speed could come into contact with my seven—year—old daughter, my i my seven—year—old daughter, my family— my seven—year—old daughter, my family would _ my seven—year—old daughter, my family would never— my seven—year—old daughter, my family would never have - my seven—year—old daughter, my family would never have been - my seven—year—old daughter, my i family would never have been there. hasn't_ family would never have been there. hasn't put— family would never have been there. hasn't put me — family would never have been there. hasn't put me off— family would never have been there. hasn't put me off sport _ family would never have been there. hasn't put me off sport or— family would never have been there. hasn't put me off sport or watching. hasn't put me off sport or watching track— hasn't put me off sport or watching track cycling but i wouldn't want to be where _ track cycling but i wouldn't want to be where we were, i wouldn't go back to where _ be where we were, i wouldn't go back to where we _ be where we were, i wouldn't go back to where we were again without there bein- to where we were again without there being a _ to where we were again without there being a change to the setup. they want what happened _ being a change to the setup. tie: want what happened on being a change to the setup. he want what happened on sunday being a change to the setup. ttez1 want what happened on sunday to trigger a safety review. sir chris
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hoy has been more bullish, calling it a disgrace there are not screens to protect cyclists and spectators. it has happened before, i don't know how many freak accidents become a normal accident and yeah, ijust think i dread to think if it had been worse, i think it should be a proactive decision to try and make it safer before, you know, before it's a terrible accident. by, it's a terrible accident. a birmingham 2022 spokesperson said they'd been in regular contact with they'd been in regular contact with the colvin family and apologised for any upset the initial wording of their statement had caused. they said a full and detailed accident investigation is under way. meanwhile, the lee valley regional park authority said the velodrome complies with international regulations and that an accident of this kind has never taken place there before. it added, we appreciate that this was a shocking experience for those involved and we offer our heartfelt best wishes to all those involved. with leading
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lights from the sport and those who feel lucky to have averted disaster uniting and calls for change, there is a sense, if not now, when? laura scott, bbc news. now let's get the latest from the commonwealth games. as you can see, england are currently second on the medals table, behind australia. scotland are fifth. and northern ireland won their first gold last night, putting them thirteenth. 0ur sports reporter, jo currie, joins us from birmingham. tell us more about northern ireland's success.— tell us more about northern ireland's success. , ., ., ireland's success. yes, what a night for bethany — ireland's success. yes, what a night for bethany firth. _ ireland's success. yes, what a night for bethany firth. she _ ireland's success. yes, what a night for bethany firth. she was - ireland's success. yes, what a night for bethany firth. she was the i ireland's success. yes, what a night for bethany firth. she was the startj for bethany firth. she was the start of the show as she became northern ireland's first medal at these commonwealth games here in birmingham. infact commonwealth games here in birmingham. in fact it's the country's first ever gold medal in the swimming pool at all, in the women's s 1a category 200 metre freestyle race. this was her message this morning. i've got so many messages from everyone at home and so many words of encouragement.
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i'd like to say such a big thank you. i haven't been able to reply to them all yet, but it's definitely on my to—do list. i can't believe it, i'm just so thankful everyone was there and it was such an amazing night. tell us what else has been happening today in birmingham. weill. tell us what else has been happening today in birmingham.— today in birmingham. well, here at the hockey. — today in birmingham. well, here at the hockey, england's— today in birmingham. well, here at the hockey, england's women i today in birmingham. well, here at the hockey, england's women were already through to the semifinals but they've just beaten wales 5—0. england will now take on new zealand in the semifinals tomorrow for a place in the gold medal match. wales' men are about to take on india as well. although this morning england's ella henderson claimed silver in the women's time trial track cycling. she finished 33 seconds behind australia's grace brown. the race took place over a 28.8 kilometre track which started and ended in wolverhampton's west park. the men's time trial gets under way shortly, featuring wales' geraint thomas fresh from his success at the tour de france and the swimming may have finished but the swimming may have finished but the diving gets under way today, keep an eye out for england's jack
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mall and olympic medallist, he goes with high hopes in the men's three metre springboard.— metre springboard. thank you, jo currie, in birmingham. _ in iceland, a volcano has begun to erupt following a series of earthquakes in an uninhabited valley near the capital reykjavik. guy lambert has the story. in the land of fire and ice, another powerful force of mother nature is on display, attracting tourists from all over the world. the volcano erupted on wednesday, a0 kilometres east of the capital of reykjavik, just eight months after its last eruption officially ended. the site is close to mount fagradalsfjall, a volcano that threw out magma for six months in 2021. no one lives in the valley, but since the eruption began more than 1500 curious onlookers have visited the site. we were trekking down here and i was, like, i have to stop, stop, let's sit down and i had a little cry because it's so beautiful and so emotional and this is, like, the raw power of our planet. but there is a danger to visiting sites such as this. when exposed, gases
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from a volcanic eruption, especially sulphur dioxide, may pose a danger to health, and officials have urged people to avoid the site people to avoid the site until a danger assessment has been conducted. today, the icelandic government issued an alert advising that young children should not walk up to the eruption site. it is not known how long it will be until this latest eruption subsides. guy lambert, bbc news. the singer, actress and tv presenter kym marsh and the actor will mellor have been named as the first two contestants for the new bbc series of strictly come dancing. kym marsh says she is nervous about taking part but looking forward to it and will mellor says he wants to do something out of his comfort zone that frightens him a little. may be more than a little, we'll see! time for a look at the weather forecast and chris is here with a very beautiful, serene picture, but is it true we've got another heat coming?
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it could get hot again next week. we've got the hosepipe ban because that's due to start tomorrow across hampshire and the isle of wight, more bands on the way for south—east england next week in parts of wales could be seeing them as well. this is why, really, so far this year we've only had two thirds of the normal rainfall across england. it was even drier back in 1976, but yeah, no rain at the forecast for the next five days and to be honest even next week it looks bone dry across england and wales. those areas that desperately need rain are not going to get any, so things will get worse before they get better. today, lots of sunshine across england and wales to come, a few showers for scotland and northern ireland so the weather a bit more mixed here. a fresh feel to the weather compared to yesterday across east anglia and south—east england where it was very humid, today feels more comfortable, temperature is about 25 in the warmest spots. 0vernight showers become more
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widespread and heavy

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