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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 5, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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here's tomasz schafernaker. that weekend is looking reliably sunny. the rainfall has been unreliable for such a long time. a bit of rainfall in the forecast but thatis bit of rainfall in the forecast but that is mostly for western scotland. let's skip to the forecast straightaway with the morning temperatures on saturday. ranging from around 8 degrees up to 12, a bit of a nip in the air particularly in rural spots. the forecast for saturday, cloudy for northern ireland, scotland, the north of northern england, some rain earlier but the sun should come through the clouds. elsewhere, england and wales, sunny and very warm with temperatures up to 25 in london but a fresher 17 in glasgow and edinburgh. more of the same on sunday, reliably sunny across england and wales. a little bit more clout across scotland and northern ireland, may be some spots of rain but are starting to turn warmer. 27
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in london and the mid 20s across parts of yorkshire. the big picture across our neck of the woods and how the weather systems will pass over the weather systems will pass over the next week or so. notice how this rain and wind at superhighway shoots off towards the north—east, completely missing most of the uk. that's because we have an area of high pressure here that is basically steering the weather fronts away from us and that's why we have that sunny and very dry weather. not only that, as we head into next week and the end of next week, we will draw in a hot air from the end of next week, we will draw in a hot airfrom the near the end of next week, we will draw in a hot air from the near continent and it looks like it'll come from the east and south—east and we will see hot weather across parts of wales and the south—west of england. looking at some of the major towns and cities. cardiff, hot weather, 30. london probably mid 30s possible. warming up in edinburgh and belfast and a lot of dry weather. thanks, tomasz.
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and that's bbc news at ten. there's more analysis of the day's main stories on newsnight, which isjust getting underway on bbc two. the news continues here on bbc one, as now it's time to join our colleagues across the nations and regions for the news where you are. but from the ten team, it's goodnight. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. wa nt to want to bring you some breaking news, this is about ah chee it is coming from a charity that has been working with the battersby family, the organisation, christian concern. they have told the bbc that the family have been told by the
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hospital, the royal london where he is being treated, that their son, archie, he was 12, the life support will be withdrawn tomorrow, saturday. christian concern say it follows the exhaustion of all legal roots. the royal london hospital, where he has been treated since april when he was found unconscious at home, has not confirmed if over an life—support treatment will be ended. christian concern told the bbc the family are devastated and are spending precious time with archie. that is the latest, it is unconfirmed by the hospital. they say that patient confidentiality, which means they do not discuss individual cases. this has come from the organisation, christian concern have been working with archie's family. let's move on and look at what is in the papers tomorrow. with me are anna mikhailova, the deputy political editor for the mail on sunday,
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and aubrey allegretti, who's the political correspondent at the guardian. we are beginning with the mirror. dust bowl uk, as this is amid the drought fears,. the ft — liz truss rejects �*handouts' as the best way to help households through the worst income squeeze in 60 years. she promises instead tax cuts and radical eco—nomic reform. in the i — business chief criticises "vacuum" at heart of the government with the prime minister and chancellor missing, as uk braces for an economic storm amid cost of living crisis. the telegraph says that the nhs111 system has been crippled by a cyber attack that has left patients struggling to get urgent appointments. according to the express — archie battersbee's family prepares to say their final goodbyes as their battle to keep him alive may be reaching the end.
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some very moving photographs on the front page. first time we have seen archie, when he was so full of hope and future opportunity. according to the times — as few as six patients in ten will be dealt with by hospital a&e departments within four hours this winter as concern grows that the nhs is heading for an "unprecedented" crisis. and in the daily mail — cyclists who kill pedestrians could be facing tougherjail sentences under a crackdown proposed by the transport secretary. let's plunge in. lovely to see you both, thank you for being here this evening. anna, shall we start with the mirror and striking images to go with these dramatic pronouncements we have had?— with these dramatic pronouncements we have had? yes, dust bowl uk says mirror. we continue _ we have had? yes, dust bowl uk says mirror. we continue to _ we have had? yes, dust bowl uk says mirror. we continue to see the - mirror. we continue to see the driest summerfor mirror. we continue to see the driest summer for absolutely decades and it's only going to get hotter
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next week. so obviously we have got the hosepipe ban already in certain parts of the country. you know, it is a really big problem. one statistic, it is not in the mirror, but i found it quite startling, just how much water the water companies lose by leakages still. i think it is something like a0%, so you hope they are getting that under control as well as all of us trying to minimise the plant watering. you don't use a _ minimise the plant watering. you don't use a hosepipe, i take it? i| don't use a hosepipe, itake it? i don't use a hosepipe, itake it? i don't have a garden. i wish. don't use a hosepipe, i take it? i don't have a garden. i wish. like j don't use a hosepipe, i take it? i. don't have a garden. i wish. like a lot of londoners, _ don't have a garden. i wish. like a lot of londoners, i _ don't have a garden. i wish. like a lot of londoners, i guess, - don't have a garden. i wish. like a lot of londoners, i guess, who - don't have a garden. i wish. like a i lot of londoners, i guess, who dwell in flats on things but a lot of people do have gardens in london and there are those great parks. one of there are those great parks. one of the images is london, and it is the tiny, it is quite hard to see on the
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graphic image, but the tiny photograph on the bottom right hand side, it is hard to believe it is a cricket pitch? side, it is hard to believe it is a cricket pitch ?_ side, it is hard to believe it is a cricket pitch ?— cricket pitch? yes, 'ust talking about the cricket pitch? yes, just talking about the hosepipe _ cricket pitch? yes, just talking about the hosepipe ban, - cricket pitch? yes, just talking about the hosepipe ban, i- cricket pitch? yes, just talking| about the hosepipe ban, i have cricket pitch? yes, just talking - about the hosepipe ban, i have been playing _ about the hosepipe ban, i have been playing rugby over the last few days and the _ playing rugby over the last few days and the whole field is parched apart from the _ and the whole field is parched apart from the square metre where the tap we used _ from the square metre where the tap we used to— from the square metre where the tap we used to fill our drinking bottles .oes we used to fill our drinking bottles goes down into the field and it is this tiny— goes down into the field and it is this tiny little patch of green in a sea of— this tiny little patch of green in a sea of very— this tiny little patch of green in a sea of very parched earth. it looks very much— sea of very parched earth. it looks very much the same. i was quite struck— very much the same. i was quite struck in — very much the same. i was quite struck in terms of the mirror's report— struck in terms of the mirror's report in— struck in terms of the mirror's report in the huge disparity across the country— report in the huge disparity across the country in terms of the amount of rainfatt — the country in terms of the amount of rainfall. in south—east england there _ of rainfall. in south—east england there has— of rainfall. in south—east england there has been an average of 9% of what we _ there has been an average of 9% of what we would expect the july rainfall, — what we would expect the july rainfall, compared to 50% plus in northerh— rainfall, compared to 50% plus in northern england and scotland. closer to — northern england and scotland. closer to 80%. so quite a bit of disparity— closer to 80%. so quite a bit of disparity across the country in terms — disparity across the country in terms of— disparity across the country in terms of what people are seeing. we have been—
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terms of what people are seeing. we have been told to expect an official drought _ have been told to expect an official drought to — have been told to expect an official drought to be declared and it could be very— drought to be declared and it could be very significant. obviously, people — be very significant. obviously, people rely on being able to keep themselves cool and when we saw the temperature is really high, touching 40 on _ temperature is really high, touching 40 on the _ temperature is really high, touching 40 on the previous month, this is going _ 40 on the previous month, this is going to — 40 on the previous month, this is going to be — 40 on the previous month, this is going to be really difficult for people — going to be really difficult for people to struggle through. and i surrpose — people to struggle through. and i suppose the main concern is health. yes, _ suppose the main concern is health. yes, health and all of those adjustments we have to make. i suppose longer term adjustments as well, if we are getting a lot more rainfall in the winter, we are promised a wetter, warmer winter and then very parched and hot summers. we are going to have to find a better way to conserve the water when we get it?— better way to conserve the water when we get it? yes, absolutely. it robabl when we get it? yes, absolutely. it probably needs the _ when we get it? yes, absolutely. it probably needs the government - when we get it? yes, absolutely. it| probably needs the government not being a caretaker government. ah, bit being a caretaker government. a bit of olitics being a caretaker government. a bit of politics in — being a caretaker government. a bit of politics in there. _ being a caretaker government. a bit of politics in there. you _ being a caretaker government. a bit of politics in there. you could even say a subtle bit of politics in the
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mirror's headline, dust bowl uk. it sums up the images of the great depression in the 1930s in the united states and we are heading to the economic reporting which takes us to the financial times and a very long recession, if the governor of the bank of england is to be believed. liz truss insists on tax cuts instead of hand—outs? she believed. liz truss insists on tax cuts instead of hand-outs? she is very much — cuts instead of hand-outs? she is very much trying _ cuts instead of hand-outs? she is very much trying to _ cuts instead of hand-outs? she is very much trying to say _ cuts instead of hand-outs? she is very much trying to say the - cuts instead of hand-outs? she is very much trying to say the way i cuts instead of hand-outs? she is l very much trying to say the way she thinks _ very much trying to say the way she thinks that— very much trying to say the way she thinks that people will be help most over the _ thinks that people will be help most over the next two years is for them to be _ over the next two years is for them to be given — over the next two years is for them to be given tax cuts rather than kind _ to be given tax cuts rather than kind of— to be given tax cuts rather than kind of given payments here and there. _ kind of given payments here and there, sticking plasters, as they are often— there, sticking plasters, as they are often referred to. she is laying out that _ are often referred to. she is laying out that and trying not to be too beaten — out that and trying not to be too beaten down by the gloomy and depressing warnings we had from the bank of— depressing warnings we had from the bank of england this week about the 15 month— bank of england this week about the
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15 month long recession potentially, inflation _ 15 month long recession potentially, inflation getting as high as 13%. the main — inflation getting as high as 13%. the main question for her as the tory— the main question for her as the tory leadership contest continues, how nwch— tory leadership contest continues, how much her argument that she can rely on _ how much her argument that she can rely on the _ how much her argument that she can rely on the £30 billion of fiscal headroom to fill the gap with all of these _ headroom to fill the gap with all of these kind of splurges of money or giving _ these kind of splurges of money or giving people back their own money so the _ giving people back their own money so the government cannot take it off them _ so the government cannot take it off them as— so the government cannot take it off them as predicted, how much of those will hold? _ them as predicted, how much of those will hold? economists quoted in the financiat— will hold? economists quoted in the financial times as saying sharp econonric— financial times as saying sharp economic downturn could wipe that headroom — economic downturn could wipe that headroom out and she will face a lot of questions about that. the interesting _ of questions about that. the interesting thing _ of questions about that. i'is: interesting thing it of questions about that. tis: interesting thing it draws attention to is the growing tension between, assuming it is a liz truss led government and what will be the difference between a liz truss lead treasury might havejohn redman in it who are critics of the consensus between the last 20 years of
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policy—making and those, like andrew bailey, the current governor who has beenin bailey, the current governor who has been in the financial services authority before the bank of england, who are signed up to this agenda and this approach to handling the economy and how independent central bank can be in the future? there are two things, tension with the bank of england is no bad thing, you could argue. considering quite a lot of the situation we are in has been partly down to mishandling and the runes by the bank of england. yes, there has obviously been a geopolitical shock this year, but energy prices were predicted to go up energy prices were predicted to go up a year ago, inflation was predicted to go up off the back of covid and off the back of a decade of easy money. the covid and off the back of a decade of easy money-— of easy money. the fed in united states faces _ of easy money. the fed in united states faces the _ of easy money. the fed in united states faces the same _ of easy money. the fed in united l states faces the same accusations? absolutely and that has been one of
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the criticisms, central banks across the criticisms, central banks across the world have been... after the financial crash they were printing money and printing money and unlike what was predicted by monetarist, it didn't increase inflation. they thought we were in a period of endless low inflation never mind how much money they printed. a lot of people said, you have got to be kidding me? now suddenly we are seeing it is not all that simple and inflation is going up and it is getting out of control. and even since it started to clearly go up, there has been criticism the bank has been too slow in raising its rates. people are saying, even yesterday's rate rise is still too little, too late. that is interesting and the tension will be there. what liz truss is saying
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about reforming the bank of england and its mandate is a huge deal. it doesn't, to me, look like a thought through policy, but we shall see and essentially there is a slight difference between what we are hearing now in terms of true blue conservatism from liz truss in trying to win the hearts of conservative members and what she is going to be faced with if she comes into number ten, going to be faced with if she comes into numberten, if going to be faced with if she comes into number ten, if she is presented with the numbers and the reality of the economic crisis, it is going to be very, very hard to start ignoring just how much people are suffering. this thing she is saying about no hand—outs, let'sjust this thing she is saying about no hand—outs, let's just see this thing she is saying about no hand—outs, let'sjust see how this thing she is saying about no hand—outs, let's just see how much that holds? hand-outs, let's 'ust see how much that holds?— hand-outs, let's 'ust see how much that hows?— that holds? particularly if the tublic that holds? particularly if the public mood _ that holds? particularly if the public mood becomes - that holds? particularly if the | public mood becomes difficult that holds? particularly if the - public mood becomes difficult again through by—elections or local elections in the spring and all the other measures of it and the government wants to go to the country possibly next year,
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certainly has two in 2024. does it matter the front of the i, the chancellor and prime minister missing as the country drifts into recession?— missing as the country drifts into recession? ~ .,, ., ., recession? most of the government isn't functioning, _ recession? most of the government isn't functioning, and _ recession? most of the government isn't functioning, and you _ recession? most of the government| isn't functioning, and you mentioned grant shapps as a noble exception, but essentially, there is so much belief that this is all temporary and it's only from the 5th of september that people come and get a thatis september that people come and get a that is being seen from civil servants, understandably and the ministers themselves but to have the two most senior people in government on holiday in a week from that announcement of the bank, it is about optics. the chancellor said he is still working on his holiday, but with politics, it doesn't matter, it
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is presence that is needed. again, the perception _ is presence that is needed. again, the perception of— is presence that is needed. again, the perception of things. - is presence that is needed. again, the perception of things. i - is presence that is needed. again, the perception of things. i think i is presence that is needed. again, the perception of things. i think it| the perception of things. i think it trobabl the perception of things. i think it probably does _ the perception of things. i think it probably does feel _ the perception of things. i think it probably does feel embarrassing l the perception of things. i think it i probably does feel embarrassing for the government and senior ministers to be _ the government and senior ministers to be away — the government and senior ministers to be away. it leads to the sort of criticism — to be away. it leads to the sort of criticism that people at the cbi guoted — criticism that people at the cbi quoted as saying, there is this vacuum — quoted as saying, there is this vacuum at— quoted as saying, there is this vacuum at the heart of government. i have been— vacuum at the heart of government. i have been speaking to civil servants over the _ have been speaking to civil servants over the last few weeks and they are essentially— over the last few weeks and they are essentially getting ready for the new prime minister and looking at the plans— new prime minister and looking at the plans they have both got to make sure that _ the plans they have both got to make sure that when the person comes in on day— sure that when the person comes in on day one. — sure that when the person comes in on day one, they can hit the ground running _ on day one, they can hit the ground running fairly hard. but we still have _ running fairly hard. but we still have four— running fairly hard. but we still have four weeks to go of this contest — have four weeks to go of this contest and there will be a periodm _ contest and there will be a period- - -— contest and there will be a teriod... , ., ., period... gosh, is it that long? it is hard to — period... gosh, is it that long? it is hard to believe, _ period... gosh, is it that long? it is hard to believe, we _ period... gosh, is it that long? it is hard to believe, we have - period... gosh, is it that long? it is hard to believe, we have a - period... gosh, is it that long? it. is hard to believe, we have a three week— is hard to believe, we have a three week period — is hard to believe, we have a three week period for parliament to sit before _ week period for parliament to sit before everyone goes off for recess again~ _ before everyone goes off for recess again it _ before everyone goes off for recess again it is — before everyone goes off for recess again. it is going to feel like a long two— again. it is going to feel like a long two months and with those energy— long two months and with those energy price caps every three months rather— energy price caps every three months rather than _ energy price caps every three months rather than every six, people will feel the —
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rather than every six, people will feel the pinch and the people

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