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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 10, 2022 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news, i'm david eades. our top stories: senior republicans condemn the unprecedented search of donald trump's florida home. the white house insists it only learned of the fbi's action from media reports. record rainfall leaves homes and roads submerged in the south korean capital. at least eight people were killed. away were killed. from the glitzy and upmarket away from the glitzy and upmarket neighbourhoods nearby, there are still hundreds of koreans who are living in these basement apartments that are not safe. after dominating womens�* tennis for a quarter of a century, 23—time grand slam champion, serena williams suggests she's planning to retire. and iconicjapanese fashion designer issey miyake has died at the age of 8a. he's known as
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the king of pleats. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. senior republicans in the us have condemned the fbi's unprecedented search of donald trump's florida home on monday as an abuse of power. the former vice president mike pence called for the us attorney general to give a full public account of why it happened, saying it caused him deep concern. the former president, who was not at mar—a—lago at the time, said a number of agents had occupied the compound and broken into his safe. the white house says president biden learned about the search from media reports. our north america correspondent john sudworth reports from washington.
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cars beeping their horns. save america! the trump bandwagon is fuelled by conspiracy, and news of the search brought supporters to his florida resort even more convinced of their theories of stolen elections and deep—state plots. you feel like you might be in venezuela or china, or russia. we feel the fbi's doing a political hitjob on president trump. it's a two—tiered justice system, so we're out here just gathering and showing support. the american people see the state of this country. | they see what's going on. so, yeah, this is all. about stopping trump from running in 2024. they are views that match the former president's own. in a statement, he spoke of his home being under siege, raided and occupied by the fbi, describing the action as "prosecutorial misconduct" and the weaponisation of the justice system in an attempt to stop him run for president again. there's been no comment from the fbi here, but their search is thought to relate to official records
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and the possibility that mr trump, who's already been forced to return some documents since leaving office, may have squirrelled away more. but it's worth pointing out, of course, that to execute that search, they will have needed to convince and obtain a warrant from a federaljudge. now, the authorisation did not come from the department ofjustice. it came from a lifetime appointee, federaljudge, a third branch of government, and that's the huge difference, and that's the checks and balances that we have in our united states constitution that are so important. trump: we are a nation in decline... but within hours of the search, donald trump released this video. but soon, we will have greatness again. he hasn't yet officially announced a 2024 presidential bid, but this is now a man increasingly looking to be in full campaign mode. we need back—up! as the investigations into his attempt to cling to power continue, there's a danger here for his opponents. the more serious the congressional committees
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or criminal inquiries become, the more republicans can claim he's being persecuted. the fbi, when it comes to trump, has lost their way. this unending desire to destroy trump and his family is frustrating. the legal implications are farfrom certain. even if he's charged, it may not bar him from office. the political implications seem clearer, though. if anything, it's galvanising him to run again. john sudworth, bbc news, washington. gary abernathy is a contributing columnist for the washington post. he's worked in republican party politics in the past, and until 2018 as publisher and editor of the times—gazette in hillsboro, ohio, one of the few newspapers to endorse donald trump for president in 2016. thank you forjoining us. i wonder what you make of it, we
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are hearing a lot about this whole episode if anything backfiring if people want to see the back of donald trump. i think that's right. i wonder if it didn't get out of control as far as the doj it didn't get out of control as far as the d0] is concerned. this was announced yesterday by donald trump, this whole raid, no—one knew anything about it all day long until around seven o'clock last night, something like that. trump put out a press release announcing the raid. he is in new york, he is not even in florida. you have to think in some way he revels in this. in fact, naive and go to wondering, he knew they wanted these documents, he knew he had turned over some documents but he knew they wanted others. and he didn't give them to them knowing that they would eventually come and take them and knowing when they did he would play the aggrieved
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party. it’s did he would play the aggrieved .a . �* , ., , party. it's an interesting situation _ party. it's an interesting situation because - party. it's an interesting situation because if - party. it's an interesting situation because if it i party. it's an interesting situation because if it is| party. it's an interesting i situation because if it is for real, this is a proper investigation being carried out by the federal bureau of investigation. it should not be a pr exercise for them orfor donald trump. a pr exercise for them or for donald trump.— donald trump. right. but everything _ donald trump. right. but everything is— donald trump. right. but everything is a _ donald trump. right. but everything is a pr - donald trump. right. butl everything is a pr exercise donald trump. right. but - everything is a pr exercise for donald trump. frankly, let's be honest, we live in a world, in our social media world, in our 20 47 news world where weather controls the narrative has a big advantage. as a people say, the narrative should not have anything to do with the evidence of what is right or wrong, no, ina evidence of what is right or wrong, no, in a perfect world it shouldn't but guess what, it really does. trump has gotten out in front of this. what is interesting today is that we are at a time where a lot of republicans were starting to separate a little bit from trump. starting to talk about other candidates for the future and then this happens, the greatest gift trump can have because all of a sudden what happened today as you are reporting, republicans have coalesced back around him, built a wall around him. and
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it'sjust the built a wall around him. and it's just the greatest boost he could have at this point in time. it could have at this point in time. . . , , ~ time. it certainly feels like the white _ time. it certainly feels like the white house _ time. it certainly feels like the white house is - time. it certainly feels like the white house is on - time. it certainly feels like the white house is on the | time. it certainly feels like - the white house is on the back foot as well in terms of having to say, it didn't come from us. we owed about it through you on the media. that said, this will blow over in some respects, one would imagine, if donald trump stands, he will probably use it as he might very legitimately do in terms of the way he is being treated. but will it matter? will it persuade anyone that we should stick with donald trump again rather than democrats?— democrats? good question. i think it really _ democrats? good question. i think it really depends. - democrats? good question. i think it really depends. it - democrats? good question. i think it really depends. it is l think it really depends. it is very early. i want to leave the door open to see what really did they come out of there with last night. did they really come out of that maybe with some kind of smoking gun that nobody really can imagine right now because i cannot believe that the doj, the now because i cannot believe that the 00], the fbi, now because i cannot believe that the doj, the fbi, signed off on going in there forjust
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these documents, these unclassified or sorry, classified documents that they say were at issue. i have to believe there is more than that to take the unprecedented step of basically raiding the home of basically raiding the home of a former president no—one can ever remember any such thing being done before. i have to believe something bigger but if not, if not you are exactly right, this will play two trump's favour.- right, this will play two trump's favour. right, this will play two trum - 's favour. ~ , trump's favour. where there is something _ trump's favour. where there is something there _ trump's favour. where there is something there or— trump's favour. where there is something there or not, - trump's favour. where there is something there or not, do - trump's favour. where there is | something there or not, do you believe that the doj, the department ofjustice, has been as trump's camp will put it, weaponised?— as trump's camp will put it, weaponised? as trump's camp will put it, weaonised? �* ., ., weaponised? i'm not here to say that. i weaponised? i'm not here to say that- i don't _ weaponised? i'm not here to say that. i don't want _ weaponised? i'm not here to say that. i don't want to _ weaponised? i'm not here to say that. i don't want to believe - that. i don't want to believe that, and it's going to take more for me to believe that. i will say they didn't do anything to shoot down that perception. they played right into the hands of those that want to claim that. and frankly, it seems to me they should be smarter than that because we do need to trust our institutions, we do need to get back to having faith in them. this, right now, seems like a
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very politicised event last night. it very politicised event last niuht. . . , very politicised event last niuht. . ., , night. it certainly does, doesn't _ night. it certainly does, doesn't it. _ night. it certainly does, doesn't it. thank - night. it certainly does, doesn't it. thank you i night. it certainly does, i doesn't it. thank you very night. it certainly does, - doesn't it. thank you very much indeed. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines: vote counting is under way in kenya where a new president is being chosen to succeed uhuru kenyatta. polling day was largely peaceful. however, voting was suspended in one constituency in the volatile northern region. kenyans are eagerly waiting to find out if the next leader is the former prime minister, raila odinga or the vice president, william ruto. police in new mexico have arrested a primary suspect in the killings of four muslim men. muhammad syed was held on monday and is charged with the murders of two of the men. police say they are working with investigators to charge the afghan with the other two deaths. a grand jury in the us state of mississippi has chosen not to indict a white woman whose accusations of assault against a 14—year—old black boy led to his brutal murder nearly 70 years ago.
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the lynching of the teenager, emmett till, galvanised the civil rights movement in the united states in the 19505. in what's thought to be one of the largest ever dog rescue efforts in the us, homes are being sought for 4,000 beagles that had been bred for drug experiments. animal rescue organisations are removing the dogs from a virginia facility that's being closed down for animal welfare violations. marine experts have launched an operation to rescue an ailing beluga whale which swam up the seine river in france. the four—metre whale is now in a lock, more than 100 kilometres up—river. rescuers will try to lift it onto a refrigerated truck that will take it back out to sea. south korea has experienced its heaviest rainfall in 80 years, with floodwaters submerging roads in the capital seoul.
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at least eight people have died, including three who were living in a basement apartment. our correspondent, jean mackenzie, reports from seoul. flood water cascades down into the heart of seoul, filling the city from the underground up. the rain is relentless, the flooding sudden. streets submerged, then cars and buses. this morning, people struggled to make sense of the destruction that scatters the city, as if part of a film set. but this is the scene of a real tragedy. living underground behind these tiny windows were two sisters and one of their 13—year—old daughters. as water submerged their home, they were trapped and drowned. these semi—basement apartments were made famous by the oscar—winning film parasite. the lead family tried desperately to funnel water out of their home during a torrential downpour.
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today's outcome is far worse. this man has lived above the family for ten years. by the time he arrived home last night, their home was covered. translation: i feel devastated about this tragedy. _ if i had come home earlier, perhaps i could have saved them. i have a lot of regrets. earlier, the country's president visited the apartment. it flooded so fast, the residents tell him, injust ten minutes. the fact that south korea's president visited this apartment this morning shows how significant these deaths are. they're a reminder that away from the glitzy and upmarket neighbourhoods nearby, there are still hundreds of koreans who are living in these basement apartments that are not safe. heavy rains are common during the summer here, but this year, they've lasted longer than usual — a consequence of climate
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change, its suggested. with more on the way, seoul and its people are vulnerable. jean mckenzie, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: after dominating womens' tennis for a quarter of a century serena williams suggests she's planning to retire after the us open. we speak to tennis legend pam schriver. the big crowds became bigger as the time of the funeral approached. as the lines of fans became longer, the police prepared for a hugejob of crowd control. idi amin, uganda's brutal former dictator, has died at the age of 80. he's been buried in saudi arabia where he lived in exile since being overthrown in 1979.
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two billion people around i the world have seen the last total eclipse of the sun to i take place in this millennium. it began itsjourney off the coast of canada, . ending three hours later, when the sun set over the bay of bengal. i this is bbc news, the latest headlines: senior republicans have condemned the unprecedented search of donald trump's mar—a—lago home. the white house insists it only learned of the fbi's action from media reports.
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torrential rainfall has left homes and roads submerged in the south korean capital of seoul. a least eight people known to have died. tennis star serena williams has announced plans to retire from the sport she's dominated for much of her career. in an article for vogue magazine, the american, 23 time grand slam champion, said, she didn't like the word retirement, but would be �*evolving away from tennis' after the us open, which starts later his month. in an instagram post she said: "there comes a time in life, when we have to decide to move in a different direction." she also went on to say: "now, the countdown has begun. i have to focus on being a mum, my spiritual goals and finally discovering a different, butjust exciting serena. i'm gonna relish these next few weeks." the ao—year—old won her latest match at the toronto open on monday. afterwards she was asked about her motivations to carry on playing. this is how she answered.
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i don't know, i guess there isjust a light at the end of the tunnel. laughs. what is that light? i don't know, i'm getting closer to the light. yeah, lately that's been it for me, i can't wait to get to that light. i know you are joking... i'm notjoking. ok then, so explain what the light is to you, what it represents. freedom. i love playing though, it's amazing, but i can't do this for ever, so it's just like sometimes you just want to try your best to enjoy the moment and do the best that you can. there she is getting closer to the light. pam shriver is a former professional tennis player, a 22 time major doubles champion, olympic gold medalist
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and was also inducted into the international tennis hall of fame. shejoins us now from los angeles. iam i am told you are on sunset boulevard which would be highly appropriate for discussing serena's stepping closer to the light as she put it. she is a0 years old, good decision? i years old, good decision? 1 think it is the right years old, good decision? i think it is the right decision, the right time, she is in the sunset of her career and has been there for a while. it was great to see her play at wimbledon, and 11 minute match, but clearly showing the signs of not playing for a year, but what she has done in the sport since managing herfirst major in 1999 - since managing herfirst major in 1999 — winning herfirst major is truly remarkable, a 25 year professional career, and there are so many things that are off the charts with what she has done and her legacy off the court is onlyjust beginning. the court is only 'ust beginningi the court is only 'ust beaainnin. ., ., ,, ' beginning. you mentioned steffi graf there. _ beginning. you mentioned steffi graf there, we _ beginning. you mentioned steffi graf there, we have _ beginning. you mentioned steffi graf there, we have some i beginning. you mentioned steffi | graf there, we have some grades that you are among this pantheon of grades chris evans,
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steffi graf, where do you put serena williams? i steffi graf, where do you put serena williams?— steffi graf, where do you put serena williams? i think when ou look serena williams? i think when you look at — serena williams? i think when you look at the _ serena williams? i think when you look at the entire - you look at the entire longevity of her career, singles record, doubles record, mixed doubles, majors, four olympic gold, the only thing she is missing from a great star who won 167 to titles, serena has only one about half as many, but during her whole career, it was really about winning majors, and that is what he has focused on, especially the last 1015 years, so when you look at everything, i would say she is the goat, but i know it is tough to compare eras, and it's a time in tennis where we are focused on the majors and she has also been number one for so long but i don't think anyone will ever play for as long and when over as many decades as she did. it's always a bit of a tough
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question, who was the greatest. another very interesting thing, you had two children relatively late in your a05, and serena has said she wants to have another child, and she doesn't want to be pregnant again as an athlete, and i guess you can appreciate where she is coming from our. ., ., from our. yeah, when i read the vouue from our. yeah, when i read the vogue article. — from our. yeah, when i read the vogue article, or _ from our. yeah, when i read the vogue article, or the _ from our. yeah, when i read the vogue article, or the essay i from our. yeah, when i read the vogue article, or the essay she i vogue article, or the essay she wrote, that was the part that really hit home to me, and i actually had two pregnancies, three kids, which means my second pregnancy was tween5, and i had my first at a2, and my second and third at a3, and this is what she is looking at, and to read her e55ay this is what she is looking at, and to read her essay and to see how difficult it was to make the decision and realised that she could not be a champion tennis player and have a sibling for her daughter olympia, who wants a sister so badly, part5 olympia, who wants a sister so badly, parts of the essay were really touching on what she is going through to realise that she needs to give up something she needs to give up something she loves, professional tennis
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in order to really do something she loves even more, which is to expand herfamily. she to expand her family. she certainly _ to expand her family. she certainly wasn't _ to expand her family. she certainly wasn't saying i to expand her family. she certainly wasn't saying that he is looking forward to., it's obviously going to be a very difficult decision for her. i must ask you one other point though, he was a young woman who came as a black tennis player and very much a world, and i always think tennis fans are quite fickle, they hold onto their champions for a very long time and then they don't like newcomers necessarily coming in and studying the —— stealing the show. it has taken serena a good chunk of those 25 years to become the much loved serena williams.— serena williams. yes, that's true, serena williams. yes, that's true. and — serena williams. yes, that's true, and that's _ serena williams. yes, that's true, and that's true - serena williams. yes, that's true, and that's true for i serena williams. yes, that's true, and that's true for a i serena williams. yes, that's| true, and that's true for a lot dominant athletes. i play double5 with martina for ten years and she was not truly beloved until the end, and the new york crowd, the us open crowd will embrace serena williams and leave nothing on the table, and we saw at wimbledon, 5aid the table, and we saw at wimbledon, said the court when she lost to harmony town and there was more love out there for her then, and people tend
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to appreciate the5e dominant, amazing athletes at the end of their career even more when they are champions, because they are champions, because they often look to the underdog and the quantity the underdog, but i don't think there will be any mixed emotions, it is all in for serena williams, but can you imagine if she plays readers in the us open first round! there could be some crazy stories coming out of the last major of the year. absolutely, venus, who of course is still playing at a2, tho5e 5ister5 5till course is still playing at a2, tho5e 5ister5 still have some more action between them. president zelensky says ukraine will eventually recapture the russian—controlled crimean peninsula but is not taking responsibility for a series of explosions that killed at least one person there on tuesday. moscow says the blasts came from detonations of stored ammunition at a russian military airfield in western crimea, close to seaside re5orts, as mark lobel reports.
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running for cover in russian controlled crimea. children nervously urging their mother to flee the area. homes were hit in a town neighbouring russian airbase where the blast occurred. �* ,, �* ~ occurred. translation: when the ex - losions occurred. translation: when the explosions happened _ occurred. translation: when the explosions happened we _ occurred. translation: when the explosions happened we were i explosion5 happened we were hiding behind barrages. we didn't know where to go. be abandoned the apartment immediately, ran away, just grabbed and was at. immediately, ran away, 'ust grabbed and was at. visiting the airbase, _ grabbed and was at. visiting the airbase, the _ grabbed and was at. visiting the airbase, the head i grabbed and was at. visiting the airbase, the head of- grabbed and was at. visiting the airbase, the head of the| the airbase, the head of the russian appointed regional administration 5aid russian appointed regional administration said one person was killed. administration said one person was killed-— was killed. translation: the situation is _ was killed. translation: the situation is under _ was killed. translation: the situation is under control. i situation is under control. only the houses are next to the military airfield will be evacuated. we will not leave anyone without help.- anyone without help. russia sa s anyone without help. russia says ammunition _ anyone without help. russia says ammunition was i anyone without help. russia i says ammunition was detonated says ammunition wa5 detonated but there are suggestions supporters of ukraine may have
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caused the blast. ukraine's military 5arcastically reminded might ru5h military 5arcastically reminded might rush on facebook that its fire safety rules and the ban on smoking in unsettled places. but an advisor to ukraine's president flatly denied responsibility, though his desire to retake the peninsular remains. �* ,, �* desire to retake the peninsular remains. �* ,, ~ , remains. translation: this russian war _ remains. translation: this russian war against - remains. translation: this russian war against ukraine | remains. translation: this. russian war against ukraine in a free europe 5tarted russian war against ukraine in a free europe started in crimea and has to end in crimea. with his liberation. it is impossible to say when it will happen, but we are getting there. a , happen, but we are getting there. , . there. many fear the consequences i there. many fear the consequences of i there. many fear the i consequences of ukrainian attack in crimea would be severe. over the past two months, russia has accused ukraine of firing on black sea oil drilling platforms in crimea and waters, and of a drone attack on the naval facility in sebastopol. if this latest incident was found to have been a ukrainian attack,
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it would be deemed a significant escalation in an already bitter war. mark lobel, bbc news. that's quite a development, and if you want more, do have a look at the website, because we are covering it there as well on those blasts, which have hit the base there and you can get the base there and you can get the detail, you can see exactly where that fits in the russia ukraine conflict at the moment. tributes have been pouring in for the japanese fashion designer issey miyake, who has died of cancer at the age of eighty—four. he was known for his creative use of technical fabrics and designs used by technology. he designed a new way of pleating fabric by wrapping it in between layers of paper in a heat press, leading to his famous collection. he was born in hiroshima where he witnessed
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the nuclear bombing in 19a5. you have to have a look at theirs, just because you know you were not want to do it yourself. a man has walk 625 metres across alone suspended between two of the tallest buildings in rotterdam in the netherlands, this is young, swaying in the windows can see, he did stop from time to time just to check his balance, little wonder, as he crossed the river. the slack line itself measured two centimetres wide, so think about a postage stamp, that's about two centimetres, and at times it was also on a slope of 2a% or degrees, it is at the start of the crossing was the hardest part in that window, but the walk was finished in all in a9 minutes. well done him! just to remind you, if you go to the website you can get more on all
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the stories in this bulletin and much more besides, not least the analysis on the latest donald trump issue in the us. you are watching bbc news. hello. our spell of largely dry and increasingly hot weather is set to continue for the rest of this week. over the next few days, we see those heatwave conditions building and hardly any rain in the forecast. just the far northwest of scotland, where we see a weather front close by, we'll see a little bit of rain, but for the rest of us, high pressure dominates. as that high pressure shifts its way slightly more towards the east, that will draw in this really hot air from the near continent, so particularly by the time we get to thursday and friday, we'll see those temperatures soaring, particularly across a good part of england and wales. temperatures to start your wednesday morning between about 11—15 in our towns and cities, a touch lower in the countryside first thing. lots of hot sunshine on the cards for wednesday, that weather front bringing a bit more cloud to the far northwest, bit of rain for the western isles, perhaps. but temperatures in england, scotland and northern ireland in the mid—205, but down
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towards the south and southeast, 30—31 degrees pretty widely. then, from thursday onwards, that's when that amber extreme heat warning kicks in across a good part of england and into eastern wales as well. but wherever you are, you can feel the heat and disruption due to the those high temperatures in terms of health problems, potentially transport problems as well. so, thursday, another hot, dry day away from the northwest of scotland, and temperatures widely in the mid—to—high 205 in the north, mid—305 in the south. 3a, possibly 35 degrees on thursday, could be even a degree or so hotter than that as we head on into friday. again, a bit more cloud and rain for the western isles, highlands, northern isles as well where it's a little bit cooler, but most of us baking in that hot sunshine, so the mid—205 to mid—305 during the course of friday. if we zoom into the hottest spots — probably across parts of central and southern england, just into wales as well — somewhere here could see 36 degrees on friday. and looking towards the weekend, perhaps a degree or so hotter than that into saturday. so, warm sunshine once again lasting for many of us through the course of the weekend. we are hopeful that things will start to change a little bit later on sunday, particularly overnight into monday. a few thunderstorms developing across france, which could really do with the rainfall, and then they look like
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they will develop more widely across the uk, but still quite a lot of uncertainty at this stage about exactly when and if those thunderstorms are coming. but we're hopeful that, into next week, things will start to turn cooler with an increasing chance of rain. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: senior us republicans have condemned the fbi's unprecedented search of donald trump's florida home on monday as an abuse of power. the former president was not at mar—a—lago at the time. the white house insists it only learned about the raid from media reports. south korea has experienced its heaviest rainfall in 80 years, with floodwaters submerging roads in the capital seoul. at least eight people have died, including three who were living in a basement apartment. the south korean president has called an emergency meeting to discuss our national strategy for emergency relief and flooding counted measures.
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one of the greatest ever tennis players, serena williams,

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