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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  August 25, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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gcse results are out today, with grades down on last year but above pre—covid levels. for the first time since the pandemic, the results in england, wales and northern ireland were based on exams rather than teacher assessments. yeah, i didn't expect to get what i did get, considering the year we've all had before, with the pandemic and stuff, but then why opened my envelope it was a really good shock. what we are seeing in these results today is, yes, a return to examinations, but albeit with a number of adaptations reflecting the disruption that young people have faced over the past couple of years, so results are higher than they were when we last had exams in 2019, but lower than under teacher—assessed grades in 2021. today's results also show a north/south divide in england with the southeast doing best. also this lunchtime...
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the shooting of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel — merseyside police say the suspected gunman has not handed himself in despite repeated appeals. we will not rest until we find you, and we will find you. a police chief in uvalde, texas is sacked after failing to send officers in to stop the gunman who killed 19 pupils and two teachers. how bad is flying for the planet? google is accused of airbrushing the answer. england make a great start to the second test against south africa at old trafford, as they try to level the series. and coming up on the bbc news channel... we'll have the latest from the second test between england and south africa, where the hosts made a strong start.
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good afternoon. students in england, wales and northern ireland have been getting their gcse results after the first exams in three years. grades are lower than during the pandemic when they were based on teacher assessments, but higher than pre—covid. the government say that's "part of the plan" in the transition back to exams. there are strong regional variations in today's results, with a north/south divide in england. vocational and technical awards are also out, with some delays for btecs. here's our education correspondent sean dilley. talk us through the significance of the results today is. the? talk us through the significance of the results today is.— the results today is. they are very significant. _ the results today is. they are very significant, the _ the results today is. they are very significant, the government - the results today is. they are veryi
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significant, the government would say, with the exam board returning to pre—pandemic examination is all part of the plan. if you are trying to compare your results this year with last year's much higher one, you shouldn't do that. and the same way you shouldn't do it to 2019 because the circumstances are not exactly the same, but it is the road map to improving. briefly, there has been a big regional disparity with, for instance, wales, 25.1% getting capital a and a*, 37 in northern ireland and a disparity that is significant between london and the north—east. significant between london and the north-east. �* , ., ., north-east. let's get more on those gcse results — north-east. let's get more on those gcse results today. _ success summed up. i felt like i was missin: success summed up. i felt like i was missing out — success summed up. i felt like i was missing out but _ success summed up. i felt like i was missing out but i _ success summed up. i felt like i was missing out but i feel— success summed up. i felt like i was missing out but i feel better - success summed up. i felt like i was missing out but i feel better now- missing out but i feel better now that i got my results. mat missing out but i feel better now that i got my results.— that i got my results. not really nervous at _ that i got my results. not really nervous at all. _ that i got my results. not really nervous at all. i _ that i got my results. not really nervous at all. i knew _ that i got my results. not really nervous at all. i knew plenty . that i got my results. not really nervous at all. i knew plenty of| nervous at all. i knew plenty of people — nervous at all. i knew plenty of people that were nervous but you can't _ people that were nervous but you can't change what's on the paper. | can't change what's on the paper. i did can't change what's on the paper. did not can't change what's on the paper. i did not expect to get what i did get, _ did not expect to get what i did get, considering _ did not expect to get what i did get, considering the _ did not expect to get what i did get, considering the year- did not expect to get what i did i get, considering the year we've did not expect to get what i did i get, considering the year we've all had before —
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get, considering the year we've all had before the _ get, considering the year we've all had before the pandemic- get, considering the year we've all had before the pandemic and - get, considering the year we've alli had before the pandemic and stuff, but when _ had before the pandemic and stuff, but when i — had before the pandemic and stuff, but when i opened _ had before the pandemic and stuff, but when i opened the _ had before the pandemic and stuff, but when i opened the envelope . had before the pandemic and stuff, but when i opened the envelope iti but when i opened the envelope it was a _ but when i opened the envelope it was a really— but when i opened the envelope it was a really good _ but when i opened the envelope it was a really good shock. - but when i opened the envelope it was a really good shock. the - but when i opened the envelope it was a really good shock. the truth is they have _ was a really good shock. the truth is they have done _ was a really good shock. the truth is they have done better— was a really good shock. the truth is they have done better than - was a really good shock. the truth is they have done better than they might think. this is the first year since 2019, before the pandemic, that traditional exams have taken place. if you have achieved top marks compared with the previous two years when teacher assessments determined grades but that, says the government, was the plan. what determined grades but that, says the government, was the plan.— government, was the plan. what we are seeinr government, was the plan. what we are seeing these _ government, was the plan. what we are seeing these results _ government, was the plan. what we are seeing these results today - government, was the plan. what we are seeing these results today is, i are seeing these results today is, yes, he returned to examinations, albeit with a number of adaptations reflecting the disruption in people have faced over the past couple of years so results are higher than they were when we last had exams in 2019, but lowerthan they were when we last had exams in 2019, but lower than under teacher assessed grades in 2021. iretinitis 2019, but lower than under teacher assessed grades in 2021. while some ma look assessed grades in 2021. while some may look enviously _ assessed grades in 2021. while some may look enviously at _ assessed grades in 2021. while some may look enviously at those - may look enviously at those receiving higher teacher assessed grades in 2020 and 2021 additional help was given this year as well. grade boundaries were set more generously than in 2019 and advanced exam content information for me the sheets were available for some subjects to compensate for disruption. he is what this year's gcse figures look like was up 73.2%
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of gcses were marked at great four or above in england, the broad equivalent of c or above. in wales and northern ireland, this is down from 77.1% last year but much higher than 2019 when the figure was 67.3%. those achieving top grades of seven or above in england, or letter a or a1. or above in england, or letter a or a* in wales and northern ireland, fell to 26.3% from 28.9% last year. in 2019 the figure was 28.8%. the exams watchdog for england says its aim for results to sit between pre—pandemic levels and last year's high was set with fairness in mind. similar plans were put in place in wales and northern ireland. scotland also saw fewer students land top marks in its exams earlier this month. concerns have been raised about regional differences in top grades. in england, the attainment gap between north and south is significant. in london, 32.6% of
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gcses were marked at seven or above compared with 22.4% in the north—east of england. the compared with 22.4% in the north-east of england. the gap between the — north-east of england. the gap between the highest _ north-east of england. the gap between the highest and - north-east of england. the gap| between the highest and lowest performing regions has actually closed slightly, particularly in comparison to last year, so what we are seeing is a kind of mixed and complex picture. it has been a complicated few years with teacher assessed grades. the complicated few years with teacher assessed grades.— complicated few years with teacher assessed grades. the message from the government _ assessed grades. the message from the government is _ assessed grades. the message from the government is that _ assessed grades. the message from the government is that pupils - assessed grades. the message from| the government is that pupils should be proud of what they have achieved in an extraordinary year. the message from 92—year—old derek skipper, who is believed to be one of the oldest people to sit a gcse, is, it's never too late to set another. i is, it's never too late to set another-— is, it's never too late to set another. ., , , , ., ., another. i opened up this morning to find i another. i opened up this morning to findi not another. i opened up this morning to find i not a another. i opened up this morning to find i got a five. _ another. i opened up this morning to find i got a five, which _ another. i opened up this morning to find i got a five, which is _ another. i opened up this morning to find i got a five, which is as - another. i opened up this morning to find i got a five, which is as high - find i got a five, which is as high as i could get on the very basic maths gcse course i took. so i'm delighted to have got it. seen delighted to have got it. sean dilley with — delighted to have got it. sean dilley with that _ delighted to have got it. sean dilley with that report. - well, our education correspondent, elaine dunkley, has spent the morning at a school in wigan to find out how pupils there have got on. this is a day of celebration. you have come through an awful lot.
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you have shown massive fortitude, and we are really, really proud of you. this is how today started. a pep talk to settle nerves ahead of finding out their grades. we followed the pupils here, at the deanery church of england high school in wigan. it is essential we have a good revision programme. from revision through to results day. the pandemic, missing school, people going off, i think it was really stressful and hard for everyone. for chelsea, callum and esther, the end of exams also marks the end of their time at this school, as they prepare to head off in different directions. off we go. for callum, there has been little rest this summer, as he pursues his dream of becoming a professional footballer, alongside doing a vocational qualification with wigan athletic. it's equivalent to three a—levels, it's a btec in sport. being able to pursue the start of a career in sport and then also being able to do education about sport on the side, that's where it's amazing. today he picked up his gcse results. all the hard work has paid off.
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proud of you. chelsea's going on to do a—levels. she is happy with her results. the pandemic has been a lesson in resilience. i finally got my results, i have passed. you are not always going to get the grades you want, but i'm still planning to do medicine, no matter what, i'm still going to become a doctor. i just want to do something that will help the community. esther got top marks in every subject, and is going to college. saying goodbye to the teachers who helped get her through the exams will be tough. the teachers have been amazing. in the run—up to exams, the big half—terms, breaks, they had full days of revision. i think it was mostly a confidence thing before going into the exams, just to have that reassurance. chelsea, esther and callum have made the grade, and like thousands of others, they will be moving on to the next phase in their education, and hoping for a future free from the disruption of their time at school. elaine dunkley, bbc news in wigan. this morning it's
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been announced that workers at the exams body the scottish qualifications authority are to go on strike in a row over pay. the unite union says the action on september the 8th, 15th and 16th could lead to 22,000 exam appeals being "severely delayed". the government is facing further calls to to more to help families and businesses with rising energy bills. the british chambers of commerce wants covid—style emergency grants for companies. and british gas says it will donate 10% of its profits to help poorer customers with a new hardship fund. tomorrow, the new domestic energy price cap for england, scotland and wales will be announced. here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. mixing, kneading and baking bread is an energy intensive business, which makes this small independent bakery in sudbury, suffolk, even more vulnerable to the price shock millions of small businesses are now facing. the government's collecting much more tax on the energy they use,
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charging vat at 20% on their soaring energy bills. yet most support has been focused on households, while this bakery is facing a jump in its bill of £1000 a month. at the moment we pay £1800, which, to me, is a lot of money anyway. but then another £1000 on top, so next october we will start paying about £3000. it's frightening, to be perfectly honest. i don't know what we're going to do. i'm just hoping that maybe somebody will offer us a lifeline, maybe the government will help. who knows. customers are trying to spend less amid warnings of a recession. we'll have no businesses left. i think there's so many locally that i speak to that will just close because they can't afford their electricity bills. i'm just hoping we won't be one of them. to stop thousands of firms now feeling the heat from being burnt, business groups say as soon as a new government is formed it must offer much more support. energy prices are disproportionately hitting small and medium—sized businesses.
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we want to see emergency energy grants for smaller businesses, a reduction in vat from 20% to 5%, and more powers to 0fgem to ensure businesses are getting the right fixed rate contracts. right now, liz truss's main proposal is to reverse april's rise in national insurance. labour has proposed freezing the energy price cap so the government, not households, pay any further rises in bills. but the living standards think tank the resolution foundation says both proposals help richer households unnecessarily. instead, the government could spend £23 billion cutting everyone's bill by 30%, with the cost offset by adding 1% to all income tax rates. most urgently in need are customers on prepayment meters, who are expected to face energy costs for next january averaging more than £600. tomorrow's expected announcement of another big jump in bills to three times what they were a year ago is unlikely to be the last. andy verity, bbc news.
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energy prices are rising notjust in the uk — governments in europe are also under pressure to support their citizens with huge sums of money being spent to shield the most vulnerable. 0ur europe correspondent, jessica parker, reports from belgium? veronique often wears a smile. though her money, she says, doesn't go far. she gets a discount on energy bills through a social tariff, along with a million belgian households. but still, she's taking fewer showers and won't heat her flat above 16 degrees this winter. higher energy costs will have consequences. translation: if they're increasing, l then i'll have even less to live on. | i don't know what i'll do then. eventually i'll have to go for food parcels to help me eat. and that's happening to more and more people i know. europe is awash with warnings about hard times ahead,
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and information campaigns on how to cut energy use. it's hitting the news as governments use tax breaks, price caps and lump sum payments to help people with rising prices. how long can this go on for in terms of providing this level of government support? this cannot go on forever. so that means that we have to look for structural measures. we need a price cap at european level. at the same time, we need to accelerate the energy transition because renewable energy is the most affordable form of energy and will bring energy bills down. but moving to a green economy is a long haul. i'm on the north coast of belgium. to the west is france, across the water is the uk. and while countries are taking national measures, this squeeze on supply that's pushing up energy prices is spilling across borders. and governments looking at ways to help face the same question everywhere. will it be enough?
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i've been working on energy poverty now for the last ten years, and it's never been this bad. it's not only people in poverty that are worrying. it's a big middle class of people who are also worrying about their energy bill. the war in ukraine feels far away from here as families enjoy the last days of summer. but supply cuts from russia are feeding a crisis that could seriously test political and public resolve. jessica parker, bbc news, belgium. live now to our political correspondent, iain watson, at westminster. how much pressure is there now on the two candidates trying to become the two candidates trying to become the next prime minister to make more concrete announcements about how they would help people facing these rising energy costs?—
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rising energy costs? there is certainly pressure _ rising energy costs? there is certainly pressure on - rising energy costs? there is certainly pressure on the - rising energy costs? there is - certainly pressure on the candidates but it is pressure so far that they are resisting. when it comes to the cost of living liz truss has kept a laser—like focus on her commitment to reverse rishi sunak�*s national insurance rise. but her team are insisting we will not get any details on extra help for the least well off households unless and until she is in downing street to stop that said, kwasi kwarteng, the business secretary, tipped to be chancellor if she wins, has been speaking to energy companies who want to see prices frozen. another of her supporters, nadhim zahawi, the current chancellor, says he doesn't believe it will provide targeted enough support. again, no concrete plans for stop when it comes to rishi sunak, apart from taking vat off energy bills he has said he will give direct payments to people on benefits and pensioners but we don't know exactly how big or small the payments will be until after he sees what the new energy price cap is and we are not clear yet how long we will have to wait to get that level of detail. so there
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is pressure on both candidates as the cap gets an ounce to —— as the cap gets announced, to show how much they understand about the announcements. more details have been emerging about the shooting in liverpool in which nine—year—old girl 0livia pratt—korbel was killed. police say they've now identified a second man who was walking with the intended target of the attack. they've also told the gunman that they won't rest until they find him. from liverpool, alison freeman reports. three days since 0livia pratt—korbel was murdered in her own home. the gunman remains at large. police say they have now been given a number of names in the hunt for the killerfor this nine—year—old, fatally shot as her mother tried to stop him entering their home. the force has repeatedly called on the man responsible to give himself up, knowing what he has done. i struggle to find the words _ knowing what he has done. i struggle to find the words to _ knowing what he has done. i struggle to find the words to describe - knowing what he has done. i struggle to find the words to describe that - to find the words to describe that individual and what they have done.
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and the fact that having found out, and they would know what they've done, they still do not have the conscience to come forward and give themselves up. i think that speaks volumes of the individual that we are dealing with.— are dealing with. olivia was the third person — are dealing with. olivia was the third person to _ are dealing with. olivia was the third person to be _ are dealing with. olivia was the third person to be shot - are dealing with. olivia was the third person to be shot dead i are dealing with. olivia was the third person to be shot dead in| third person to be shot dead in liverpool this week, and today the police said they had made three arrests in connection with the death of sam rimmer. they also said they had arrested a man on suspicion of the murder of ashley dale. raids took place across the wirral this morning as officers targeted organised crime gangs. merseyside police saying it was baring its teeth at criminals and actively going after them. the teeth at criminals and actively going after them.— going after them. the full investigative _ going after them. the full investigative resource - going after them. the full - investigative resource available across this country is at mark's and our team of�*s disposal and it is being utilised. it is a direct message to those responsible, to reiterate what mark has said, we will come for you, we will identify
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you, and we will bring you to justice. you, and we will bring you to 'ustice. , .,, , ., , ., justice. joseph nene was the target ofthe justice. joseph nene was the target of the gunman _ justice. joseph nene was the target of the gunman and _ justice. joseph nene was the target of the gunman and today _ justice. joseph nene was the target of the gunman and today police - justice. joseph nene was the target of the gunman and today police sayj of the gunman and today police say they have identified and questioned they have identified and questioned the man who was with him that night as well as another who took him to hospital. police have described the investigation into olivia's death as fast—paced and complex, saying information from the community have been vital. they are saying that nobody should link any information they have will not be of use as they continue to search for this callous killer. alison freeman, bbc news, liverpool. new figures have emerged about the number of foreign nationals deported under the post—brexit immigration rules for asylum seekers. our home editor mark easton is with me now. mark, talk us through the details. so the government, as you may remember, decided that after brexit they had the ability to say if an asylum seeker comes to the uk from what they regard as a safe third country, then their application
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could be deemed inadmissible and they could then be almost immediately removed back to the country from which they came. well, today, we got the figures for the first 18 months of that scheme with those new rules starting injanuary last year when brexit officially began, if you like, up tojune this year, and what it shows is that there were tens of thousands of people applied for asylum of which 1700 were deemed potentially to be inadmissible because they'd come from a safe country. of those, how many do you think actually were sent back to a european country? the answer is 21 people, just 21, and none were sent back to france even though since brexit more than 50,000 people have crossed the channel in small boats, so it does appear that that particular policy is not really working at the moment, nor does it seem that there are a wonder policy, which they had hoped would, although we haven't seen any flights yet, the
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agreement has been in place since may, they hoped that would discourage people from crossing. we are seeing record numbers of people crossing including at the moment record numbers of albanians. there is a plan next week to sign a deal with albania which may mean we can speed up returns there with albanian police operating in kent, but the government does have a huge problem, with 117,000 people still waiting for an initial decision on asylum. mark easton, thank you, our home editor. our top story this lunchtime. gcse results are out today — overall grades down on last year but above pre—covid levels. coming up... pakistan's former prime minister, imran khan, appears in court to face terrorism charges. coming up on the bbc news channel... rangers are one of six british clubs set to discover who they will face in the group stage of the champions league after beating psv eindhoven1—0 last night.
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the bbc has discovered that google has changed the way it calculates the impact of flying on our climate. the calculator, used by popular online travel sites like skyscanner, now suggests emissions from flights have almost halved. google has been accused of airbrushing out a huge chunk of the aviation industry's impact on climate change. 0ur climate editor, justin rowlatt, joins me now. justin, first of all, tell us more about what you've discovered. 50 about what you've discovered. ’sr aviation has about what you've discovered. sr aviation has a number of impacts on the climate, one of which is c02, but in addition to that releasing pollutants at a high altitude producing those contrails that you see in the air, those have additional impact driving warming even further, and scientists, uncertain science, but scientists say it's probably in the order of
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more or less doubling the impact of aviation. google, in its carbon calculator, used to take these additional factors calculator, used to take these additionalfactors into calculator, used to take these additional factors into account and i've discovered it had taken them out and it's interesting because in the know to post it on the website where the methodology is hosted, it recognised they were critically important, it wanted to bring them back but after discussions with what it calls industry partners it decided it wouldn't include them any more. �* ., , decided it wouldn't include them any more. ~ . , ., �* , more. and as i mentioned, there's been a pretty _ more. and as i mentioned, there's been a pretty angry _ more. and as i mentioned, there's been a pretty angry reaction - more. and as i mentioned, there's been a pretty angry reaction to - been a pretty angry reaction to this. what are google saying about why they have done this?— this. what are google saying about why they have done this? google is sa in: , why they have done this? google is saying. look. _ why they have done this? google is saying. look. we — why they have done this? google is saying, look, we get _ why they have done this? google is saying, look, we get that _ why they have done this? google is saying, look, we get that on - why they have done this? google is saying, look, we get that on a - saying, look, we get that on a global scale this is important and just to give you a sense of how important, we are talking about 1.5% of mankind's total impact on warming, that's how much this additional impact of flying is worth across the whole globe, they say we recognise that's really important but what our tool does is calculate individual flights and it's actually really hard to calculate these other factors on individual flights. really hard to calculate these other factors on individualflights. what environmental campaigners say is, listen, you should be indicating to
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people that effectively what you are saying now is half of what the real impact is. google says we will try and do that in the future, we are talking to academics, we'll try and assess it and address it in the future. , , ., ., assess it and address it in the future. , ., ., ., ,, , ., future. justin rowlatt, thank you, our climate _ future. justin rowlatt, thank you, our climate editor. _ officials in ukraine now say 25 people were killed and 31 wounded in a missile attack yesterday on a railway station and residential area in the east of the country. emergency teams have called off their search for any more survivors in chaplyne. our correspondent, hugo bachega, is in kyiv now. hugo. it's the deadliest attack on civilians in weeks. ukraine says russian missiles struck a residential area at a train station in a small town in the east of the country and these images show the aftermath of the attack. the victims include two boys aged six and 11. ukraine's foreign minister described as terrorism and the us secretary of state said the attack fits a pattern
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of atrocities in his words. but russia has claimed a missile hit a military facility at the train station, killing 200 ukrainian soldiers. now, this attack happened yesterday as ukraine marked independence day. the country was on high alert amid fears russia could launch attacks and that is what happened in some parts of the country. reports of russian shelling in kharkiv in the east, also in the towns of book 11 and nick a pol in the south, which have been under constant bombardment in recent weeks. here, in kyiv, there were no reports of incidents, but a ban on public gatherings continues today. hugo bachega in kyiv, thank you. a school district in the town of uvalde in texas has dismissed its police chief over his handling of a shooting that killed 19 children and two teachers. in may, his officers waited more than an hour to confront the gunman at robb elementary school. our north america correspondent, peter bowes, reports.
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it was the deadliest school shooting in the united states in almost a decade. tragically familiar scenes. a rampage in the small town of uvalde, where there's been growing pressure for the police to be held accountable. at approximately 11:32am this morning, there was a mass casualty incident at robb elementary school in uvalde, texas. pete arredondo was in charge of the six—member police force assigned to the school. shortly after the shooting, it emerged that it was 77 minutes before officers at the scene breached a door to the classroom where the massacre happened. eventually, a group of officers from the us border control moved in to kill the 18—year—old gunman. the decision to sack the police chief came at a public meeting of the school board. relatives and friends of those who died spoke of their grief and anger at the way the police responded to the shooting. i'm here today to make a statement. if a law enforcement's job is to protect and serve, why didn't they protect and serve my friends
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and teachers on may 24? i have messages for pete arredondo and all the law enforcements that was there that day. turn in your badge and step down — you don't deserve to wear one. mr arredondo did not attend the meeting and said the vote to dismiss him amounted to a public lynching. his lawyer said he had received death threats. the seven—member school board discussed their decision behind closed doors. do not take this into closed sessions. we deserve to hear it. our babies are dead, our teachers are dead, our parents are dead. the least y'all can do is show us the respect and do this in the public. i move that good cause exists to terminate - the noncertified contract of pete arredondo - effective immediately. when it came, the decision to sack the police chief was unanimous. there was applause from the audience, but in a statement, mr arredondo's lawyer said the school district had failed
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to carry out any investigation establishing evidence supporting the decision to terminate the employment of his client. peter bowes, bbc news. pakistan's former prime minister, imran khan, has appeared in court in the capital, islamabad, to face terrorism charges. he's accused of making threats against state officials at a political rally last saturday. in his speech, he condemned the role of a judge and a senior police officer in the detention of one of his aides. live now to our correspondent pumza fihlani. pumza, imran khan — the cricketer turned prime minister — is an iconic but controversial figure in pakistan. vary, in fact, vary, infact, we vary, in fact, we can add one more description which would be divisive depending on who you speak to about his latest charges against imran khan. you will hear different views. on the one hand you have his
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supporters that are believing what he has been saying, that this is nothing but a political ploy, a way of keeping him away from politics. and on the other you've got people that believe he is simply a victim of his own doing, of not reading the room and not knowing or going camping on fire in his criticism of how things run currently, forgetting he is no longer the man in charge. 0k, he is no longer the man in charge. ok, pumza fihlani, thank you, in islamabad. cricket now. having been utterly outplayed in the first test match, england's cricketers were desperate for a strong start against south africa today. the second test began with england bowling at old trafford, and they had some success. the lunchtime score is 77—5. joe wilson has been watching. when they truly admire you at a cricket ground they name part of it after you, normally when you retire. well, james anderson is forever beginning again. here he comes to try to bowl out south africa. another edge of another bat, another catch
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and another batter baffled. that's the way anderson does it. this is his 100th test match on home soil and that's unique territory. ok, so to stuart broad. well, that's well held byjonny bairstow and south africa's captain was now out, definitely, for 12. keegan petersen had made 21 when he fell on a tricky morning for batting. well, south africa had chosen to bat first. england's captain was happy to be bowling, especially when aidan markram contrived to whack this ball up to the sky and down to the gloves. now, did ben stokes see the fortunes of the series turning? here comes more evidence. stokes desperately wanted this to be given out lbw and look, the umpire agreed. a morning session of south african batters trying and departing was just what england needed.
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well, standing here on the boundary right now, i'm actually feeling for the first time today real rays of sunshine. the morning session really took place underneath grey skies, overcast conditions, classic english conditions. beautiful those are for the likes ofjimmy anderson. ping lin will be finishing off their lunch knowing they have south africa five down. good so far but they would aspire perhaps to have south africa all out by t. it's a reasonable aspiration. play resumes here for certain minutes. thank you, joe wilson reporting there. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. the weather at old trafford is not too bad. they got off not badly because look at what the rest of us have had, this to the east of london, the day started with some quite vicious thunderstorms in places and with that across parts of the south and east of a lead, huge amounts of
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rain. this is what happened

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