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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 25, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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right now, i'm actually feeling for the first time today real rays of sunshine. the morning session really took place underneath grey skies, overcast conditions, classic english conditions. beautiful those are for the likes ofjimmy anderson. ping lin will be finishing off their lunch knowing they have south africa five down. good so far but they would aspire perhaps to have south africa all out by t. it's a reasonable aspiration. play resumes here for certain minutes. thank you, joe wilson reporting there. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. the weather at old trafford is not too bad. they got off not badly because look at what the rest of us have had, this to the east of london, the day started with some quite vicious thunderstorms in places and with that across parts of the south and east of a lead, huge amounts of
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rain. this is what happened through the small hours, these thunderstorms developed to the south, pushed northwards. we've seen around 5000 lightning strikes so far today and a lot of rain as you can see from the radar picture. in some places but not in all places. however, where it has been wet, take this figure, bury saint edmonds, above 70 millimetres of rain so far, that is more than that place would normally expect in the whole month of august, so it has been an exceptionally wet day so far but this rain is now starting to clear eastwards, taking a while to do so i have to say but generally improving through the midlands and eastern england this afternoon. sunny spells elsewhere although cloud bringing showers for northern ireland and western scotland and asked that rain clears through a fresh feel than we have had of late and certainly cooler and fresher overnight. with all the moisture on the ground, could see some fog patches developing across parts of the midlands and south—east. more cloud and some showers into the west. those are the temperatures in
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the towns and cities, some places in the towns and cities, some places in the countryside into single digits. a cooler, fresher start tomorrow morning. tomorrow, not a bad —looking day for many, drier across to east anglia and the south—east, some sunny spells. a band of cloud bringing some showers eastwards across northern ireland, scotland and parts of wales at the south—west. temperature 17—24. then we head into the weekend. it's a bank holiday weekend for most of us, not in scotland, but elsewhere a bank holiday at the weather not too bad if you have outdoor plants. sunny spells but always the chance of a few showers. saturday, one or two showers here and there, most places find. this area of rain probably won't make much of an impact and in the sunshine generally speaking pleasantly warm. however, as we move into sunday with high pressure to the north of us we will see the breeze strengthening a little closer to some north sea coasts and that will make it feel quite cool close to the east coast of scotland and eastern england. it could generate the odd shower as
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well. sunshine further west. that's where we will see the highest of the temperatures, up to 2a degrees. monday, mainly dry, spells of sunshine, pleasantly warm when you get to see the sun. certainly drier thanit get to see the sun. certainly drier than it has been this morning for some of us. that's all from the bbc news at 0ne. it's goodbye from me. 0n bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. good afternoon, i'm laura mcghie. it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. england have made a strong start to the second test against south africa at old trafford. they took five wickets before lunch. captain ben stokes promised his team would be more aggressive after losing the opening test by an innings last week and have been impressive with the ball so far today.
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there's live coverage on bbc radio 5 live sports extra right now and later you can see highlights on bbc two as well as bbc iplayer from 7 o'clock. newcastle are set to sign real sociedad striker alexander isak for a club record fee of around £60 million. the sweden international would boost the magpies attacking options given the injury record of callum wilson, who is awaiting results of a hamstring scan. isak has scored a total of 44 goals over the last four seasons for sociedad and the signing of the 22—year—old would double newcastle's spending this summer to just short of £120 million. they have already recruited matt targett, sven botman and nick pope. rangers are eagerly awaiting this afternoon's champions league draw after sealing their return to european football's top table for the first time in more than a decade. following their 1—0
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defeat of psv eindhoven last night, they'll nowjoin rivals celtic in pot four. manchester city, liverpool, chelsea and tottenham are the four english sides to look out for. there'll be live text commentary on the bbc sport website from 5pm. rangersjoin rivals celtic in pot four. tom pidcock is british cycling's newest superstar. he's won 0lympic gold in mountain biking, followed that up with the cyclocross world championship and on the road, he won the famous alpe d'huez stage in his first tour de france. matt warwick has been to france to meet him as he prepares to add the mountain bike world championship to his collection this weekend. cycling's biggest race, the tour de france, returned to its dramatic best this year — thanks in part to the arrival of a british superstar. pidcock�*s win on the famously twisty tarmac of alpe d'huez was historic, descending as he did at 105 kilometres an hour. he joins the greats of the sport now, including geraint thomas, and five—time winner bernard
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hinault. i remember more the crowds than the win itself because it was just unbelievable. i mean, my ears were properly ringing that night — fighting to win a stage at the tour de france, and my brother's there, screaming at the top of his voice, cheering me on. it's... yeah, ijust filled up with emotion. pidcock is in les gets for the mountain bike world championships — a discipline he says could require more skill than the road. judging by the sheer drops on this course, he could well be right. road cycling has the highest physical level. cyclo—cross and mountain bike don't have as high a physical level, but you're more of a rounded athlete. skill and balance and general athleticism. i am a daredevil, but i'm not stupid. i know... i know my limits, i know my capabilities, and i ride, drive — whatever — within them. pidcock has proven himself on a mountain bike before,
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of course — having won olympic gold last year — but this represents something unique. he's already won the cyclo—cross world title injanuary, so victory here and a win in september's road world championships in australia, and he will be the first male rider to win three of cycling's world titles in a single season. if he does it, he will make history. and with history comes legacy — if not for a while. if someone asks you the best cyclists in the world, i want to say my name, you know? and it doesn't mean that i need to win five tour de frances, you know? if i win one, i'll be happy. maybe i want to go and try and win again, you know? but if i win a tour, 0lympic mountain bike gold, world champs in three disciplines, classics — no—one else has ever done that. it's a pride a whole country will feel if pidcock continues to enthral on anything with two wheels. matt warwick, bbc news, les gets. that's all the sport for now.
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you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. thank you very much, we will see you later on. merseyside police have given an update on their investigation into the fatal shooting of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel in liverpool. detective chief superintendent mark kameen said 35—year—old joseph nee, who was the target of the attack in knotty ash in which she was killed, remained in hospital for treatment. he also said the man who was with the 35—year—old at the time of the shooting had been identified. poor 0livia was murdered brutally, in her own home on the 22nd august. 0ur officers continue to carry out extensive inquiries, and i can confirm there are a number
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of very positive lines of inquiry that we are pursuing. in my previous appeal, i asked for the man responsible for this brutal, callous, thoughtless attack to surrender himself to the police. unfortunately, that individual has failed to do that. but my message to him remains the same. we will not rest until we find you, and we will find you. again, as i've said, with the appeals around both sam and ashley, i cannot stress enough the importance of community engagement in solving each of these crimes. we have had a wealth of information and engagement, and i am incredible grateful for that.
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i can confirm that the 35—year—old man who was the target of this attack remains in hospital, seeking treatment. i can also confirm that merseyside police, working with its partners, have caused that male's license to be revoked, and he will be returned to prison once his treatment has been finalised. i can also confirm and ask directly for communities to give us information for the second man that was in company with that 35—year—old man. again, i can now confirm that we have identified that male. i have repeatedly asked for any information and help from our communities, and as i've said already in this conference, i am incredibly grateful for the sheer levels and volume
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of information that we have received so far. this level of engagement, this level of cooperation and this level of working together simply must continue. a jury has ordered los angeles county to pay damages of $16 million to vanessa bryant, the widow of the basketball star kobe bryant over graphic photos taken by first responders to the helicopter crash that killed him in 2020. sheriff's deputies and firefighters on the scene had taken pictures of the wreckage, including the remains of the los angeles lakers player and their thirteen year old daughter. with more, here's gareth barlow. as she left court in los angeles on wednesday, vanessa bryant, seen here in white, cut a silent and sombre figure. inside court last week,
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she sobbed as she recalled reading an la times article that claimed images had been taken of the remains of her husband and 13—year—old daughter. mrs bryant told jurors she was blindsided, devastated, hurt and betrayed, and that she lived in fear of having the images appear on social media. kobe bryant and his daughter gianna, and six family friends, died when their helicopter crashed in california in january 2020. among them were sarah chester and her 13—year—old daughter peyton, whose father christopher was a co—plaintiff in the case and was awarded $15 million. the court heard how as distraught fans express their love for the basketball superstar, sheriffs deputies and firefighters took gruesome photos of the accident site, later showing them in a bar and gala event. a lawyer for the county tried to argue that such photography is essential, and that the photos hadn't been posted anywhere publicly. butjurors disagreed and said the county must pay vanessa bryant
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$16 million for emotional distress. a figure that might reflect the roles of county employees but will never heal the pain of such tragic loss. gareth barlow, bbc news. now it is time for some of the stories making the news across the united kingdom. harvest is well under way for many, but in shropshire the world's most advanced robot combine harvester is bringing in the wheat and barley. it's the culmination of more than five years of work at harper adams university to develope self driving farm vehicles including tractors and combines. the aim is to bring products to the market and also help everyone from insurers to the government understand how to make the robot future work. here's rural affairs correspondent,
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david gregory—kumar. we are here in newport in shropshire and this field has been planted and then harvested by autonomous vehicles, what you might like to think of as robots, basically, and this is the man in charge. what are these physicals —— vehicles doing? we have a tractor and trailer and combine harvester, small scale machines you will find on any farm in the uk but these drive themselves. we have systems on board that will operate them and we do them autonomously. they are out in them autonomously. they are out in the field, following routes, cutting the field, following routes, cutting the crops. we the field, following routes, cutting the cros. ~ , ::' ~ the crops. we first met you in 2016, it was one hectare _ the crops. we first met you in 2016, it was one hectare you _ the crops. we first met you in 2016, it was one hectare you are _ the crops. we first met you in 2016, it was one hectare you are trying - the crops. we first met you in 2016, it was one hectare you are trying to | it was one hectare you are trying to raise a crop on using these machine. how much have things changed since then? we how much have things changed since then? ~ ., ., g; how much have things changed since then? ~ ., ., q; . ., , ., then? we are now 35 hectares of land, five — then? we are now 35 hectares of land, five different _ then? we are now 35 hectares of land, five different fields - then? we are now 35 hectares of land, five different fields and - then? we are now 35 hectares ofl land, five different fields and they are all differentiates, sizes, we have trees and power lines and all
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the obstacles and intricacies you would find on a commercial farm, unlike ourfirst would find on a commercial farm, unlike our first perfectly square field. a much more challenging environment.— field. a much more challenging environment. . ., ., environment. what have you learnt since 2016? — environment. what have you learnt since 2016? we — environment. what have you learnt since 2016? we have _ environment. what have you learnt since 2016? we have been - environment. what have you learnt since 2016? we have been trying . environment. what have you learnt| since 2016? we have been trying to net these since 2016? we have been trying to get these machines _ since 2016? we have been trying to get these machines into _ since 2016? we have been trying to| get these machines into commercial readiness and that is going from that first prototype system to now a commercially ready system and that has taken a lot of work but it is getting really close and some of our competitors in the market are starting to come to market as well and you now see autonomous systems on farms. ~ ., , ., ~ on farms. when do you think we will see robots combine _ on farms. when do you think we will see robots combine harvesters - see robots combine harvesters question mark is that the hardest thing to do? it is question mark is that the hardest thing to do?— question mark is that the hardest thing to do? it is the pinnacle and the furthest _ thing to do? it is the pinnacle and the furthest thing _ thing to do? it is the pinnacle and the furthest thing that _ thing to do? it is the pinnacle and the furthest thing that will - thing to do? it is the pinnacle and | the furthest thing that will happen but between now and then, there will be all sorts of operations on farms that can be automated very soon and already happening. that can be automated very soon and already happening-— already happening. thank you for talkin: to already happening. thank you for talking to us- _ already happening. thank you for talking to us. the _ already happening. thank you for talking to us. the wheat - already happening. thank you for talking to us. the wheat and - already happening. thank you for l talking to us. the wheat and barley coming from here goes to animal feed, so it is possible you could be
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eating a steak that was harvested by a robot! south east wales and parts of mid wales are moving into drought status from today, joining parts of west wales. it comes as plans to tap into a welsh reservoir are being considered by thames water to help drought—stricken parts of england. some claim revenue from water sales could be invested back into local communities. 0ur environment correspondent, steffan messenger, reports. across the south—east of england, water companies have warned of severe pressure on resources. this summer's challenge is clear to see from space, raising questions again about whether water could be moved from rainy regions like wales. thames water, which supplies 50 million customers in and around london is already in talks about how feasible it would be to access supplies from the river severn, as well as this reservoir in powys.
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welcome to the principle of sharing resources. fundamental prince was neatly tackled. a quarter of london water is lost through leakages. get your house in order and sort those matters out and then we talk business. in matters out and then we talk business-_ matters out and then we talk business. ., , ., business. in a statement, the company _ business. in a statement, the company said _ business. in a statement, the company said the _ business. in a statement, the company said the idea - business. in a statement, the company said the idea was i business. in a statement, the | company said the idea was one business. in a statement, the - company said the idea was one of a number of possibilities it was consulting on as it developed a water resilience plan for the future. united utilities which owns lake vyrnwy said answering water was under consideration but it would not impact supplies to existing customers. 0ne impact supplies to existing customers. one suggestion was the water could be transported across the country by a network of new canals. borisjohnson is among those to have championed the idea in the past. this expert sees big opportunities for wales if the plans can get off the drawing board. i would see this as wales' oil- for the future in terms of revenue. we should obviously, - if we are supplying water
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to other parts of the uk, outside wales, - it should be paid for. the independence movement, yes cymru, has launched a petition calling for a full debate on the issue in the senedd, but others say suggestions wales could capitalise on its water are problematic. that would stir up the sort of divisions where people elsewhere would say why are we sending nearly £1 billion over to wales for growth deals and why will wales benefit from the electricity that goes on the grid as a result of what happens at hinckley? while there are no firm plans yet, the debate around this issue has well and truly begun. steffan messenger there. it's six months since people across the uk offered homes to ukranians fleeing the invasion of russia. mary and juan were two of their first to arrive in louth in lincolnshire, a town whose generosity far outweighed its size. this week, they will celebrate getting the keys to their first flat. but the couple say family members in odessa, still suffering in the war, should not be forgotten.
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0ur correspondent, linsey smith, has more. making plans for the future. six months ago, mary and juan were escaping their homeland. today, they are looking forward to collecting the keys to their very first flat. the work ethic is second to none. i don't think either of them have missed a day of pottery is working the last six months and they have managed to save money and that is what has enabled them to be independent and move out as well. dancers in their native ukraine, mary and hwan left their dance studio in 0desa. it insured their students had a stacey. it is difficult and _ students had a stacey. it is difficult and the _ students had a stacey. it is difficult and the beginning to adapt and how— difficult and the beginning to adapt and how to continue to live. because
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everythingm — and how to continue to live. because everything... the time for us was frozen _ everything... the time for us was frozen we — everything... the time for us was frozen. we could not think about anything — frozen. we could not think about anything because all of our minds was about— anything because all of our minds was about our families and our country — was about our families and our count . . , , country. once inside, they were in turmoil, country. once inside, they were in turmoil. they _ country. once inside, they were in turmoil, they quickly _ country. once inside, they were in turmoil, they quickly found - country. once inside, they were in turmoil, they quickly found jobs. | turmoil, they quickly found jobs. mary works at a local hotel which allowed her to save for a car. they have also run community dance classes. , ., , ., classes. our friends gave us a second home _ classes. our friends gave us a second home and _ classes. our friends gave us a second home and we - classes. our friends gave us a second home and we are - classes. our friends gave us a second home and we are very| second home and we are very gratefuh _ second home and we are very gratefuh and _ second home and we are very grateful. and thanks - second home and we are very grateful. and thanks for- second home and we are very- grateful. and thanks for everything. yes, grateful. and thanks for everything. yes. true _ grateful. and thanks for everything. yes. true hrhe— grateful. and thanks for everything. yes, true. ~ . , grateful. and thanks for everything. yes, true. ~ ., , ., , _ yes, true. we are very happy here. jasmine says _ yes, true. we are very happy here. jasmine says that _ yes, true. we are very happy here. jasmine says that rather _ yes, true. we are very happy here. jasmine says that rather than - yes, true. we are very happy here. | jasmine says that rather than losing house guests, she has gained two friends. hollywood actor idris elba is in east london for his new film "beast". in it, he battles with a lion. not something he would have done growing up there a few decades ago.
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so far he's had a career that has spanned almost every genre. and, he's been speaking to our reporter, michael mckenzie, about what might come next. what's that? there's something crossing up ahead. it's an action—packed movie set in the bush of south africa, and stars londoner idris elba. it tells the story of a family who find themselves face to face with a lion. it was filmed on location in south africa, in the bush, what was that like? south africa was great, i love working in south africa as a location, as a place, as a country, ijust, very, very have a lot of affection for it. this film needed to shoot in the wilderness, like even for us as a crew, it wasn't easy for us, we were out there. and for his producer will packer, living in the bush was quite an experience. i often second guessed that decision, my friend,
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when i was out deep in the bush, you know, trying to dodge poisonous snakes and hearing nomadic lions growl in the middle of the night, when we were in tents and huts. but you know what, it was all worth it, because i think that it makes the film, it gives the film an authenticity it would not otherwise have. and then for you, idris, you are really busy, what's next? three thousand years of longing is the next film, which comes out in a week. it's a very very different film. i did it with george miller and tilda swinton. then i have luther the movie coming, i am hoping to bring luther back to the big screen with, for a new audience and the existing audience. we're in his territory now. and beast is released in cinemas this friday. michael mckenzie, bbc london.
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back now to today's gcse results and it's not just teenagers getting their results today. 92—year old derek skipper from hertfordshire decided he's like to take a gcse maths exam — more than seven decades after he got his first set of qualifications. he's the oldest person ever to sit the test — and earlier he told my colleagues on bbc breakfast, charlie stayt and naga munchety, how he'd got on. well, i opened up this morning to find that i had got a five, which is as high as i could get on the very basic maths gcse course that i took. so i'm delighted to have got it. i was a little bit worried last night, because knowing i was coming on camera, i thought, "boy, oh boy, it's going to be a very short interview if i failed!" but that hasn't happened! so can we be the first to say congratulations?
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thank you! from what you were saying, you got the highest grade you could within the classification of the test you took? yes, i could either get a four or five and i got a five so i am very pleased. why did you decide to do it? i think the answer is, why not? there was an offer by the local authority to have a free course for some maths. and i took it in191l6. it seemed to me that when i took it, i just went through the motions, as all schoolchildren had to do, and i didn't really understand much about it. most people say, "i'm hopeless at maths, i can never do maths, never understood it at school" and this was an opportunity that came through the door to do a zoom meeting, doing the exam again, doing the test, and it seemed to me an ideal opportunity. i have got a few questions.
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it's a great shame more people don't get involved in it. i think maths is a wonderful thing and it is very easy to say you are no good at it, so any opportunity to learn and embrace it, great. did you say 1946? straight after the war. what did you get then? i don't know, but it must have been a very basic pass, i think. i don't think it was very startling. this time around, what was the most stark difference for you, in terms of the exam and what you had to do? i think one of the things was, in my day, we had things called slide rules, i don't know if anybody remembers slide rules. and nowadays you have got something called a calculator. and these are just marvellous things. anybody that gets one of these, it does all of the work for you! that has been... can you show us the slide rule again? charlie was nodding. i never actually used a slide rule.
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i do remember using a slide rule at school. if i'm honest, i never really understood the slide rule. but i remember using them, or pretending to. i think you are not the only person who didn't understand it! you could do things, you can do things and slide them along and you can multiply six by three and get an answer. approximately 18! it is always approximate. didn't you also have to take in a magnifying glass? yes, yes, my eyesight is not very good so i took along a magnifying glass and it was a great help. because numbers like six and eight get a bit mixed up. and you find that the addition sign and the dividing sign, they get a bit mixed up as well. so i wouldn't have been surprised if i failed because i could not see it very well. but with a magnifying glass it worked out well.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. thunderstorms that moved across southern and eastern parts of england made for a noisy and really wet start to today in places. that was the scene in hastings. this is how it looked on the radar picture. this rain piling its way northwards, places in east anglia had a month's worth of rain with plenty of lightning strikes, thousands of lightning strikes. the wet weather is clearing. it is going to be drier through the rest of the day with some cloud here and there. some spells of sunshine. northern ireland and western scotland seeing more cloud and some showers in places. a fresher feel for the end of the day. and a much fresher night to come. clear spells for many. some fog patches. but the cloud will be rolling in through northern ireland and western scotland with the odd shower.
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0vernight, temperatures down to 13 celsius. cooler than that in the countryside. this week frontal system pushing in from the west and it will generate a zone of cloud and some showers through northern ireland, parts of southern scotland, north—west england, wales, south—west, further east, early fog will clear. more cloud developing as the day wears on. top temperatures ranging from 17 degrees in aberdeen to 2a in london with a fresher feel than we have been used to lately. a bank holiday for many. we will see some spells of sunshine. one or two showers. for the most part, it will be dry. on saturday, most places fine with sunshine. this zone of cloud and rain getting perilously close to northern ireland and western scotland. isolated showers elsewhere. and that is a sign of things to come. as we move into sunday, high—pressure to the north, we will start to develop more
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of a breeze along these north sea coasts, just one or two showers but also rather cool conditions for some. the best of the sunshine and indeed the highest temperatures will be out towards the west. cardiff for example up to 2a degrees, newcastle, more like 18. monday, a bank holiday for many, looking mainly dry with spells of sunshine.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: gcse results are out today for pupils in england, wales and northern ireland — the pass rate has fallen since 2021, but remains higher than 2019 before the pandemic. yeah, i didn't expect to get what i did get, considering the year we've all had before, with the pandemic and stuff, but then why opened my envelope it was a really good shock. i'm at this high school in luton where pupils have got some fantastic gcse results this year. we will be talking about what the options are for post—16 education. the shooting of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel. merseyside police say the suspected gunman has not handed himself in despite repeated appeals. we will not rest until we find you, and we will find you.

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