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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 28, 2022 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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this is bbc news. florida is being battered by the force of hurricane ian which has now made landfall. there are warnings of life—threatening storm surges and heavy rain expected to cause flooding. the hurricane has already left a trail of destruction across cuba. after accusations of sabotage of nord stream's baltic sea pipelines, europe's biggest gas supplier norway is beefing up security at its energy installations, which experts have singled out as vulnerable targets. after more turmoil in the uk economy, the bank of england is intervening to buy government bonds. it's trying to calm
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financial markets spooked by downing street's economic plan. us vice president kamala harris is set to travel to south korea as she continues her asian tour. she's expected to visit the demilitarised zone hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the writer and broadcaster mihir bose and the sun's political and environment correspondent — natasha clark. welcome back. same stories still dominating come of that for us us to look a0 minutes ago, different papers this time, though. squeaky fun time is the main headline mayor you can see and the sun, which reports that
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britain's pension funds nearly saved from having to sell many of their assets by the bank of england's intervention. xpress it was a day of turmoil on the markets again, quoting ministers who say the tax cut budget was still the right plan. the eft focuses on the bank of england £65 billion plan to buy government debt and has a chart showing how that move brought the market under control, but for how long? that i is concerned that the tax cuts in the last week's many budget will not have to be balanced by spending cuts while the independent takes personal gain at the prime minister asking why liz truss hasn't been more visible in the last few days. the daily mirror also attacks liz truss calling her blunder liz truss and believes britain is on the brink. the metro reports on tory unease, saying farmer leadership contender, rishi sunak and i want to be going to the party conference this weekend,
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allowing liz truss, according to sources, to on the moment. while the daily star picture is chancellor kwasi kwarteng meeting top bankers earlier today. kwasi kwarteng meeting top bankers earliertoday. does kwasi kwarteng meeting top bankers earlier today. does anybody have a clue what i'm doing? let's look through some different papers now. let's start with you. 65 billion to protect pensions and day of turmoil. well, an emergency intervention and seems to have done the trick certainly in the short term. yes, absolutely- _ certainly in the short term. yes, absolutely. if _ certainly in the short term. yes, absolutely. if you _ certainly in the short term. yes, absolutely. if you look _ certainly in the short term. yes, absolutely. if you look at - certainly in the short term. yes, absolutely. if you look at the - absolutely. if you look at the pound, if you look at the market today, they all seem to be moving at what the bank of england would say it's the right direction. only time will tell whether this well continue to be stable. we have seen the markets and the pound be incredible and volatile in the last few days
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since the announcement of this many budget, which i don't think we should collect any more. since that happened over the weekend and they have markets reopened again on monday, all of that turmoil has absolutely continued, the daily express front page today, we've got a breakdown of it the £65 billion plan and how that will all work. it's crazy, actually, considering the bank of england were saying they were going to do exactly the opposite of this just a few days ago, they announced they were going to have plans, now they are putting more money in. it is a bit of a u—turn for them, but they decided earlier today making this emergency statement that that they couldn't not stepping otherwise there was a real risk that pension funds could completely collapse. there are really stark economic warnings that we've been seeing and it reminds us and takes us back to the days of the
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financial crisis, and we could've seen that earlier today had the bank of england not chosen to step in step with the final salary pensions, and they, which i think are most at risk. can you just help us all and explain why they particularly where address? because _ explain why they particularly where address? because what _ explain why they particularly where address? because what they - explain why they particularly where address? because what they do - explain why they particularly where address? because what they do is. address? because what they do is they actually _ address? because what they do is they actually buy _ address? because what they do is they actually buy and _ address? because what they do is they actually buy and sell - address? because what they do is they actually buy and sell in - address? because what they do is they actually buy and sell in the i they actually buy and sell in the ghost _ they actually buy and sell in the ghost markets, the bonds they buy, they use _ ghost markets, the bonds they buy, they use as— ghost markets, the bonds they buy, they use as collaterals to buy more. and therefore if the prices are falling. — and therefore if the prices are falling, then of course they don't have _ falling, then of course they don't have the — falling, then of course they don't have the cash to pay for their collaterals, and they are doing this because _ collaterals, and they are doing this because final salary schemes mean that at— because final salary schemes mean that at a _ because final salary schemes mean that at a certain date you have to pay the _ that at a certain date you have to pay the pensions when the people retire _ pay the pensions when the people retire so — pay the pensions when the people retire. so these pension funds are trying _ retire. so these pension funds are trying to— retire. so these pension funds are trying to build up funds of a particular time when they are needed~ _ particular time when they are needed. suddenly they won't have the funds _ needed. suddenly they won't have the funds 50 _ needed. suddenly they won't have the funds. so they want to be able to pay the _ funds. so they want to be able to pay the pensions, and that is really the huge _ pay the pensions, and that is really the huge risk they were running. natasha — the huge risk they were running. natasha is— the huge risk they were running. natasha is right, it is studying the market. _ natasha is right, it is studying the market, but the question is if you remember, — market, but the question is if you remember, a few days ago, the bank was saying _
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remember, a few days ago, the bank was saying that it's main problem is inflation and the question was there's— inflation and the question was there's going to be a committee meeting — there's going to be a committee meeting of the bank to decide monetary policy committee when interest _ monetary policy committee when interest rates, what the next interest— interest rates, what the next interest rates, what the next interest rate would be, the bank rate would be in november, so we will have _ rate would be in november, so we will have to — rate would be in november, so we will have to see if this policy of buying — will have to see if this policy of buying it — will have to see if this policy of buying it is going to raise inflation, so when november comes or even before, _ inflation, so when november comes or even before, the bank may well have to raise _ even before, the bank may well have to raise its _ even before, the bank may well have to raise its bank rate again, and what _ to raise its bank rate again, and what impact would that have on mortgages? | what impact would that have on mortgages?— what impact would that have on mortauaes? , ., ., _ mortgages? i 'ust wonder also, by this mortgages? ijust wonder also, by this intervention _ mortgages? ijust wonder also, by this intervention now, _ mortgages? ijust wonder also, by this intervention now, doesn't- mortgages? i just wonder also, by i this intervention now, doesn't mean that the is trying to stop having to raise interest rates to the predicted 6% next summer by doing this because? so basically that isn't part of their plan, or are they still stick egg to that original statement to do whatever is necessary to stop the slide? i original statement to do whatever is necessary to stop the slide?- necessary to stop the slide? i think a lot of peeple _ necessary to stop the slide? i think a lot of people didn't _ necessary to stop the slide? i think a lot of people didn't expect - necessary to stop the slide? i think a lot of people didn't expect there l a lot of people didn't expect there to be a rate rise. i think these two issues obviously, are completely
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linked i think reading into what it looks like from that very lengthy statement that we've got from the bank of england earlier, it did seem arranged specifically to pension funds and to these guilds, not quite in the same way of interest rates rising and obviously the battle about inflation. it's clear to anybody and i don't pretend to be an expert in any way, they're pulling these levers in different directions, seeming a bit contradictory to anyone that is looking at this plan and going, actually one of these things are putting lots of money into it den underwriting this debt by the government going to make inflation where us, and actually risks putting it up again, so that would obviously lead the bank to look again at interest rates, so it's of a contradictory policy at the moment that we are seeing. it's really paramount to be exactly the situation that we are in. let's look
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inside the times. _ situation that we are in. let's look inside the times. cabinet - situation that we are in. let's look inside the times. cabinet raises i inside the times. cabinet raises doubts as tory as a key of madness. i suppose it's worth pointing out and repeating that in the first ballot of mps, liz trusted in the first ballot of mps, liz truss didn't score nearly as highly as rishi that is now her own cabinet raising doubts about what is going on. how big a problem is this at such an early stage of this government? i'mjust trying such an early stage of this government? i'm just trying to remember she was appointed by the queen two days before the queen died, so three weeks and one day she has been prime minister. bud died, so three weeks and one day she has been prime minister.— has been prime minister. and it obviously isn't _ has been prime minister. and it obviously isn't indicate - has been prime minister. and it obviously isn't indicate the - obviously isn't indicate the cabinets are saying that, you know, raising _ cabinets are saying that, you know, raising questions about how long she can survive _ raising questions about how long she can survive it the chairman of select — can survive it the chairman of select committees and so on which shows— select committees and so on which shows that — select committees and so on which shows that there is disquiet within the party— shows that there is disquiet within the party and how much this disquiet will surface _ the party and how much this disquiet will surface and lead to anything. there _ will surface and lead to anything.
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there have — will surface and lead to anything. there have been reports that already letters _ there have been reports that already letters calling for a vote of no—confidence have gone in to the chairman— no—confidence have gone in to the chairman of— no—confidence have gone in to the chairman of the 1922 committee, whether— chairman of the 1922 committee, whether that is true or not, natasha will probably know more on that. it seems _ will probably know more on that. it seems extraordinary that these letters— seems extraordinary that these letters would going so soon. anyway, the conservative party rules would not allow — the conservative party rules would not allow another motion of no—confidence. but clearly it shows the uneasiness within the conservative ranks, and what highlights is the feeling within conservative mp is that this could be conservative mp is that this could he the _ conservative mp is that this could be the equivalent ofjohn major's biack— be the equivalent ofjohn major's black wednesday moment, and if you recall that, _ black wednesday moment, and if you recall that, that was a disaster. the major— recall that, that was a disaster. the major government actually recovered economically, it was having — recovered economically, it was having quite a little boom, but the public _ having quite a little boom, but the public never forgot black wednesday, and that _ public never forgot black wednesday, and that was one of many factors and not the _ and that was one of many factors and not the oniy— and that was one of many factors and not the only factor, but many —— one of many— not the only factor, but many —— one of many that— not the only factor, but many —— one of many that tony blair used brilliantly to bring labour back to power. _ brilliantly to bring labour back to power, whether cara starmer will be able to _ power, whether cara starmer will be able to do— power, whether cara starmer will be able to do that in or not is debatable. that we will have to see. but the _ debatable. that we will have to see. but the fact that if the public
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feels — but the fact that if the public feels that the conservative party can't _ feels that the conservative party can't manage the economy and that has always— can't manage the economy and that has always been the great driving force _ has always been the great driving force of— has always been the great driving force of the conservative party, that it _ force of the conservative party, that it is — force of the conservative party, that it is the party of sound money. if that it is the party of sound money. if that _ that it is the party of sound money. if that goes. — that it is the party of sound money. if that goes, then that is a very bil if that goes, then that is a very big loss — if that goes, then that is a very bi loss. ~ ., ., ,, ., ., big loss. we are not locked into an exchanre big loss. we are not locked into an exchange rate _ big loss. we are not locked into an exchange rate mechanism - big loss. we are not locked into an exchange rate mechanism this - big loss. we are not locked into an l exchange rate mechanism this time, so we have a free—floating currency, don't be? natasha, what are you hearing? how much disquiet is there? these two, kwasi kwarteng and liz truss very close allies, but are they listening to other people? they know where they want to go ideologically, but are they listening? i ideologically, but are they listening?— ideologically, but are they listeninu? ~ ., , ., ., listening? i think, to be fair to kwasi kwarteng, _ listening? i think, to be fair to kwasi kwarteng, he _ listening? i think, to be fair to kwasi kwarteng, he did - listening? i think, to be fair to kwasi kwarteng, he did hold i listening? i think, to be fair to i kwasi kwarteng, he did hold the listening? i think, to be fair to - kwasi kwarteng, he did hold the call yesterday with and heard them out, tried to reassure them that this is the right plan, liz truss and himself are in lockstep at the moment, they really do believe that their plan, radical and different as
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it is to the current economic orthodoxy can create growth chemically and create jobs and work in the long—term. we will obviously have to wait and see exactly they are going to do this, we haven't got all the details of their plans yet and exactly whether it works will remain to be seen, that's what she really taking a big gamble on here. at the end of the day, maker planned does work and we do start to see growth, all of these places will mysteriously starts being quiet and follow back in line behind the pay minister, but it's completely fair to say that tonight there is growing disquiet, growing frustration. it's notjust disquiet, growing frustration. it's not just the usual suspects disquiet, growing frustration. it's notjust the usual suspects who like to speak out about everything and anything, there are lots of very sensible moderate tory mps who are worried about the direction this is going and obviously worried about labour and the games they are making in the polls. i've seen quite a successful conference. including former ally. _ successful conference. including former ally, the _ successful conference. including former ally, the standard - successful conference. including | former ally, the standard charter who has been an adviser all the way through the last three or four weeks
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orso through the last three or four weeks or so but saying he warned them about this, and his advice wasn't heated. ~ , , �*, , about this, and his advice wasn't heated. ~ , , h , . about this, and his advice wasn't heated. , �*, , ., ,, , heated. absolutely. he's been a key adviser to the _ heated. absolutely. he's been a key adviser to the liz _ heated. absolutely. he's been a key adviser to the liz truss _ heated. absolutely. he's been a key adviser to the liz truss and - heated. absolutely. he's been a key adviser to the liz truss and her - adviser to the liz truss and her leadership campaign and was a key part of the economic and energy plans as well. saying i would've done things slightly differently. we've got back to locked away and everybody would always say i would've done it like this and hindsight is such a beautiful thing, but we are now analysing all of this in terms of what she has done in the past few weeks and what exactly they have laid out. it's giving everybody a chance to dissect and go should we have done it like that? jared lyons really interesting comments as well from julianjessup really interesting comments as well from julian jessup saying, you really interesting comments as well from julianjessup saying, you know, he's obviously another adviser in that camp as well saying that conservatives, economists are in a doom loop, so there's definitely some disquiet, some dissenting voices saying can actually commence not just the usual suspects
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voices saying can actually commence notjust the usual suspects who you might think would talk down and talk down the prime minister and the leader of the party no matter what, but it's a lot of mps._ but it's a lot of mps. let's move on to the guardian. _ but it's a lot of mps. let's move on to the guardian. sorry _ but it's a lot of mps. let's move on to the guardian. sorry to _ but it's a lot of mps. let's move on to the guardian. sorry to interrupt, but let's move on to the guardian because they are saying that liz stresses facing because from mps to sac kwasi kwarteng herface mutiny. is this overblown close make a lot of mps, again, and anonymous ones quoting a sink he is finished, toast, he can't carry on. what do you think? i suppose it well it depends on whether this crisis is resolved sooner rather than later. yes, it well. i think a test will come — yes, it well. i think a test will come uu _ yes, it well. i think a test will come up. obviously the conservative party— come up. obviously the conservative party conference, but a test will come _ party conference, but a test will come up — party conference, but a test will come up when the finance bill is debated — come up when the finance bill is debated and whether for instance some _ debated and whether for instance some of— debated and whether for instance some of the conservative mps vote against _ some of the conservative mps vote against their remove of the 45 higher— against their remove of the 45
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higher rate of tax. that will be interesting to see. obviously the national— interesting to see. obviously the national insurance, which rishi sunak— national insurance, which rishi sunak had _ national insurance, which rishi sunak had brought in wood a blast through _ sunak had brought in wood a blast through. but it's interesting to see how many— through. but it's interesting to see how many stand up. and as we have discussed. _ how many stand up. and as we have discussed, normally, when prime ministers — discussed, normally, when prime ministers are in an economic trouble _ ministers are in an economic trouble it— ministers are in an economic trouble, it is the chancellor who gets _ trouble, it is the chancellor who gets the — trouble, it is the chancellor who gets the boot. but liz truss and kwasi _ gets the boot. but liz truss and kwasi kwarteng go back a long way. they read _ kwasi kwarteng go back a long way. they read a — kwasi kwarteng go back a long way. they read a book about the sort of economic— they read a book about the sort of economic policy they should follow a lon- economic policy they should follow a long time _ economic policy they should follow a long time ago. they believed for a very long — long time ago. they believed for a very long time that the policy that has been — very long time that the policy that has been followed for the last few years _ has been followed for the last few years were not good. so for liz truss _ years were not good. so for liz truss to — years were not good. so for liz truss to actually sac kwasi kwarteng would _ truss to actually sac kwasi kwarteng would really be almost a mortal blow for herself _ would really be almost a mortal blow for herself. . ., , ., would really be almost a mortal blow for herself. . . , ., . , would really be almost a mortal blow for herself. . ., . , , would really be almost a mortal blow for herself. . ., ., , ., for herself. natasha, politics is a blood sport- _ for herself. natasha, politics is a blood sport. not _ for herself. natasha, politics is a blood sport. not short _ for herself. natasha, politics is a blood sport. not short of- for herself. natasha, politics is a i blood sport. not short of betrayal, is it? ., �* , , , , is it? you've summed it up pretty well there- _ is it? you've summed it up pretty well there. on _ is it? you've summed it up pretty well there. on the _ is it? you've summed it up pretty well there. on the one _
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is it? you've summed it up pretty well there. on the one hand, - is it? you've summed it up pretty well there. on the one hand, it's| well there. on the one hand, it's very extraordinary this political cycle, the new prime minister, the new tory leader, at this point we are seeing such intense attacks in comments from even moderate to conservative mps speaking out against government policy very prominently. that is not something that we usually see or what to expect in the first weeks of someone coming into number ten. at the end of the day, there is probably a bit of the day, there is probably a bit of a hangover from the quite dirty leadership contest we had over the summer, both sides sending insults at each other and the party saying they cannot to rein it in. going back to kwasi kwarteng on the front page of the guardian from i think it's unlikely that liz truss well sacked her chancellor. two move in lockstep together. both very much allied and tight together in their beliefs and ideology that this thing will work. really one cannot go without the other.— will work. really one cannot go without the other. let's look at the metro, because _ without the other. let's look at the metro, because the _ without the other. let's look at the metro, because the former- without the other. let's look at the i metro, because the former chancellor isn't going to be attending the conference this weekend. you know,
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rishi sunak, well, headline, isn't a? in the metro.— a? in the metro. absolutely. it's robabl a? in the metro. absolutely. it's probably the _ a? in the metro. absolutely. it's probably the best _ a? in the metro. absolutely. it's probably the best headline - a? in the metro. absolutely. it's probably the best headline of. a? in the metro. absolutely. it's| probably the best headline of the papers _ probably the best headline of the papers we have had. rishi sunak is not, papers we have had. rishi sunak is not. as— papers we have had. rishi sunak is not. as you — papers we have had. rishi sunak is not, as you say, going to the conference, he will be in his yorkshire _ conference, he will be in his yorkshire constituency. he well left, _ yorkshire constituency. he well left, the — yorkshire constituency. he well left, the paper says, liz truss have her moment— left, the paper says, liz truss have her moment and probably take great deiight— her moment and probably take great deiight in— her moment and probably take great delight in watching liz truss have her moments. but watching this, it makes _ her moments. but watching this, it makes me — her moments. but watching this, it makes me feel that the conservative party is— makes me feel that the conservative party is behaving a bit like the labour party of all the years too, of infighting and things like that, you know? labour have differences and they— you know? labour have differences and they were always very open, cara starmer has _ and they were always very open, cara starmer has tried to unite the party and to— starmer has tried to unite the party and to banish the corbyn legacy. but labour— and to banish the corbyn legacy. but labour normally fight a lot, but that conservatives know when power is at stake _ that conservatives know when power is at stake and when to unite maybe the party— is at stake and when to unite maybe the party is — is at stake and when to unite maybe the party is changing, maybe party is becoming so fractious that it
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hide _ is becoming so fractious that it hide its — is becoming so fractious that it hide its rivalries and the fact that it's in— hide its rivalries and the fact that it's in power can to make it to cover— it's in power can to make it to coverup— it's in power can to make it to cover up that basic fault lines within— cover up that basic fault lines within the party. 50, cover up that basic fault lines within the party.— within the party. so, no rishi sunak, treasury _ within the party. so, no rishi sunak, treasury select - within the party. so, no rishi - sunak, treasury select committee, david davis, quite a few big names not going this weekend, natasha. in terms of the absence of the prime minister and the chancellor, we hear they are doing the media around tomorrow and regional radio stations and papers. was that a mistake? obviously, you know, those of us who follow politics quite closely know that during the labour party conference there is this unwritten rule that the conservatives don't do too much trying to make all the headlines. they tend to step back and let the other party let the limelight and the same way as true for the opposite. in a way it's not completely unheard of, we have not seen too much of liz truss and kwasi kwarteng in the last few days. it's
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sort of what we might expect. however, there is definitely this growing body of mps going we really want to see her, we want to hear from her and the chancellor who have set up this policy, we have not heard from them since they've done so, all of this incredible economic turmoil is happening in front of our very eyes, so we are going to see liz truss break cover tomorrow, do around regional interviews, i'm sure all of this will be incredibly high up all of this will be incredibly high up on the agenda for the journalist to ask questions about and kwasi kwarteng will be doing a visit to darling ten we believe to talk about his new investment policy and try to explain what it is and how exactly he plans to grow the economy. i’m he plans to grow the economy. i'm not sure he plans to grow the economy. i'm rrot sure if— he plans to grow the economy. i'm not sure if macro will to our liz truss have pets, dogs in particular, but another page inside the times, stressed, air dogs knows that. boris johnson had done, didn't he, but
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this is true, we have sort of known, with know how sensitive dogs noses are, but there is a new report, a new study which has shown how they do this. . . , new study which has shown how they do this. , , , .,, new study which has shown how they dothis. ,, , , do this. this study has been carried out usin: do this. this study has been carried out using 36 _ do this. this study has been carried out using 36 people, _ do this. this study has been carried out using 36 people, and _ do this. this study has been carried out using 36 people, and what - out using 36 people, and what they've — out using 36 people, and what they've done is they have taken their— they've done is they have taken their breath and their sweats before and after— their breath and their sweats before and after they had a particularly difficult — and after they had a particularly difficult maths problem to solve. this has — difficult maths problem to solve. this has then been sort of shone to the dogs _ this has then been sort of shone to the dogs and their reaction shows that they— the dogs and their reaction shows that they can, from the sweat, work out when _ that they can, from the sweat, work out when a — that they can, from the sweat, work out when a person is really stressed. _ out when a person is really stressed, and that is a very new development. in the past, dogs can visually— development. in the past, dogs can visually work out, they can be trained — visually work out, they can be trained to— visually work out, they can be trained to work out if a person with his or— trained to work out if a person with his or her— trained to work out if a person with his or her head in the hand, but now this will— his or her head in the hand, but now this will be _ his or her head in the hand, but now this will be the smell that will make them work it out. running out
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of time, make them work it out. running out of time. here _ make them work it out. running out of time, here is _ make them work it out. running out of time, here is their _ make them work it out. running out of time, here is their political - of time, here is their political trivia quiz question, natasha, dogs, kwasi kwarteng or liz truss, do they, names? $5 kwasi kwarteng or liz truss, do they. names?— kwasi kwarteng or liz truss, do they, names? as far as i know, i don't think— they, names? as far as i know, i don't think they _ they, names? as far as i know, i don't think they do. _ they, names? as far as i know, i don't think they do. from - they, names? as far as i know, i don't think they do. from what i | don't think they do. from what i remember i think liz truss said that she was larry the cat because my favourite people in number ten at one point. i don't think they do have cats or dogs and i really can't answer that question but i bet we will find out.— answer that question but i bet we will find out. great to have you on. thank you — will find out. great to have you on. thank you both _ will find out. great to have you on. thank you both very _ will find out. great to have you on. thank you both very much - will find out. great to have you on. thank you both very much indeed. | thank you both very much indeed. that said fire a second look at the paper is this hour. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with chief political correspondent at the guardian, jessica elgot and the author and journalist, emma woolf.do join us then if you can. next it's time for sport — but for now, goodnight.
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good evening. i'm mark edwards with your sport. we start with cricket, and close but not cigar for england they were beaten by six runs in a low scoring match in lahore as pakistan take control of the t20 series with a 3—2 lead in what was ultimately a dissapointing performance it's the batsmen that must shoulder the blame for this one despite a heroic knock from captain moeen ali. joe lynskey was watching this one for us. in this thrilling series, a new part of pakistan is now in play. this is another sell—out, where three games decide it. now at 2—2, england looked to mark wade. they use them carefully. the bowlers on the road back to fitness, but in t20, he takes wickets. and stops rhythym. for pakistan, somewhere unavoidable, somewhere self—inflicted. they last two batters to run out.
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but in the gloom, the mood returned, england, like the home side, this modest chase had become a struggle and england remarkably fell short. in this part of the punjab. for the team, so now it's like being in the semifinal where you have to win to stay in, and i think it's going to be really good for us, and we will see where the boys are at. when you are playing international cricket, there is pressure all the time, pressure on your own performance, as a captain, all of these things. it will be great to see the reaction in the next two games.
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one match in the women's super league this evening and reigning champions chelsea had to come from behind to beat london rivals west ham. england star fran kirby fired in chelsea's equaliser before half time. she's now scored in all three of her side's league fixtures this season. and, after sam kerr had made it 2—1, defender millie bright headed in her first wsl goal for two years. chelsea's three one win moves them up to fourth in the table. arsenal are through to the group stage of the women's champions league after vivianne miedema's goal gave them victory over ajax. with the gunners held to a 2—2 draw at meadow park in the first leg rangers will be joining them. looks like they might make it to the group stage for the first time in their history. took their match against benfica to extra time. the portuguese insured it wouldn't go to penalties, with goals of each of the additional hats to win 2—1 on the night and progress 53 on aggregate. the danish national team's third kit for the world cup will be black
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as a protest against qatar and its human rights record. the sports brand hummel, who've designed the kit, said black was "the colour of mourning" and that they wanted to tone down all the details even on the main kits including the logo. they said they didn't wish to be visible during a tournament that has cost thousands of people their lives. the cacti supreme committee who organises the tournament ——the qatar supreme committee who organises the tournament disputed the claims about the death of migrant workers. major changes to rugby league, including scrapping relegation for some clubs, have been proposed by the sports management company img.
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the recommendations come after the most comprehensive piece of consultation ever" in the sport. img proposes that super league has category a and category b clubs in rugby union, the primary shaper type, gloucester held off 29—15 to maintain their winning starts. to. a6 try harlequins denied the london rivals to come back winning 43—31. rory mcilroy has called on liv golfers to take a leading role in mending the fractured relationship between the sport's rivalling tours. the four time major winner, who's been one of the most outspoken critics of the saudi funded series, is getting ready to play on the european tour's alfred dunhill links championship at st andrews.
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when you have had a system in place for so long and someone comes and completely upsets everything and is antagonistic and doesn't want to play by the rules, then, you know, it is hard to accept that. i would just say the ball is and they are correct, and if they want to the table and try to play nicely within the sandbox that's already created committee opportunity is there. sir mo farah has pulled out of running the london marathon this sunday with a hip injury. the four time olympic champion said despite training hard, he had been experiencing "pain and tightness" and that "extensive and that's all the sport for now. from me, mark edwards, and the rest of the team, bye—bye.
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hello. yesterday was a day of sunshine and showers. today, it's a pretty similar theme, but if anything, i think more in the way of sunshine and fewer in the way of showers. still quite a cluster around first thing on thursday on the tail end of this weather front that's sliding off towards the continent, but actually this little finger, a brief finger of high pressure is going to try and settle things down for this thursday. so, there's some showers to start the day across the south—west of england and pembrokeshire, gone through the morning, but winds in off the north sea will feed some scattered showers into northern england, the north midlands, perhaps the north of east anglia through the afternoon, a few across scotland, too. but predominantly, i think, dry and sunny and temperatures upa degree or so on wednesday, 15—17. through the evening and overnight, it's going to turn quite chilly across eastern areas of england, winds fall light light and the skies stay clear. different picture towards north—west, winds kick up, cloud comes in and rain by the end
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of the night for northern ireland and western scotland. so, 10—11 the overnight lows here. perhaps the odd three across the south—east of england. friday, we are going to be dominated by low pressure. we start the day fine with some sunshine across central and eastern england, but wet towards the north—west. and this whole system will swing its way through during the course of the day, brighter but with some showers through the afternoon for scotland and northern ireland. temperatures dipping behind the weather system yet again, and then it's a wet end to the day across eastern england. that whole frontal system, though, does push away quite quickly, and in time for the weekend, we're left with low pressure, yes, but i think more in the way of sunny intervals again. some showers, justthe chance of some more persistent rain running into the south of the uk later on on saturday. so, in comparison to friday, well, yes, it's still quite breezy on saturday, but we shouldn't see so much cloud around and outbreaks of rain will come and go rather than being persistent, aside from potentially this area pushing into southern england later on in the day on saturday.
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and that could linger on overnight saturday into the early part of sunday, too, but sunday daytime, of the two days, perhaps the one offering up less in the way of showers. it's still quite a notable westerly breeze. our greatest chance of getting caught in the rain will be along many of our west coasts, but in the east, with some shelter, it should feel pretty pleasant again. temperatures getting up into the mid—teens.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. millions of residents are told to evacuate florida, as hurricane ian brings dangerous winds and heavy rain. there will be catastrophic flooding and life—threatening storm surge on the gulf coast region. we will hear from the tampa fire rescue department as they try to help those affected. us vice president kamala harris heads for south korea with a visit to the demilitarised zone as tensions run high on the korean peninsula.
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and iran's president accuses

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