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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 4, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. our headlines. another change to the government's financial plans — after reversing a cut to the top rate of tax, now the chancellor is bringing forward an announcement on cutting the uk's debts. a public inquiry into the covid—19 pandemic begins today — it's likely to last more than two years and hearfrom bereaved families as well as senior politicians and scientists. fears that the most vulnerable will suffer after a drop in food donations from supermarkets. a charity tells us people needing help with the cost of living could lose out because businesses
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are cutting back on waste. one for the history books as two british sides meet for the first time this evening as liverpool host rangers in the champions league. i can't believe this is happening. driverless taxis arrive on the streets of san francisco — but how ready are they to deal with big city traffic? good morning, a mile start. some are starting at 17 degrees. we have heavy rain across scotland and northern ireland currently which is moving south across england and wales. to all but the south—east. todayit wales. to all but the south—east. today it will be windy. all the details later. it's tuesday, the 11th of october. our main story. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng is to make a further change to his financial plans and bring forward an announcement on the uk's debts. he was facing mounting criticism for insisting the details would not
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be published until late november. a new date is expected to be confirmed today. it follows yesterday's dramatic u—turn on the top rate of income tax, as our political correspondent helen catt reports. it's fantastic to be here with you this evening. the prime minister was out at events on the conference fringe last night, rallying supporters. so too was the chancellor. but the night before, they had had a meeting that ended in a major u—turn when they backtracked on a headline pledged to scrap the 45p top rate of tax for the highest earners. in her first interview since, liz truss told the bbc that the government was listening. we are also a listening government, nick. that do listen to people. that do reflect on where we could have done things better, and i have said that about laying the groundwork, i have said that about the specific feedback we have had on the 45p tax rate. now there has been a new reversal.
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just yesterday on this programme, the chancellor committed to when he would set out his debt plan. we are going to have a medium—term plan that is going to come out, as i've said, at the end of november. and all those plans will be set out in fuller detail there. sources have told the bbc he will now do it sooner than the end of november. he had been under pressure to speed the statement up to help calm the markets. but there could be fresh trouble brewing about benefits. under borisjohnson, there was a pledge to raise them in line with inflation. liz truss won't commit to that. we are working very closely with the obr. it's important that we have a forecast to go with that plan, and that is something the chancellor is working on. but you would bring it forward if you could? i i am a very clear that we have committed to having a proper obr forecast to reducing debt as a proportion of gdp over time. a number of conservative mps have already said they have concerns.
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and the immediate criticisms haven't quite gone away, either. the former home secretary, priti patel, is expected to weigh in later, and warned that the conservatives will live or die by their economic credibility. helen catt, bbc news, birmingham. chief political correspondent nick eardley is at the conservative party conference for us this morning. another day, another change in government policy. what is the mood like a there this morning? it is fascinating _ like a there this morning? it is fascinating because _ like a there this morning? it 3 fascinating because if you had gone to bed on sunday night, you would have expected the government to continue with its pretty stubborn approach to fiscal plan saying we are not being moved from this, we totally believe in it, we think this plan is going to work, we are sticking to the timetable, it is not going to change. wake up this morning and they have junked the 45p
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rate that the chancellor spoke about yesterday, and now they have bowed to pressure to bring forward the plan to set out how they are going to bring debt down in the medium term. senior conservatives were saying that plan needed to be set out earlier to calm the markets. and there were many economists who said we need to get those answers sooner. so the government says it is listening, being pragmatic, it will do what it needs to do. but here is the thing. one rebellion that is successful does not mean more rebellion is coming, if anything it encourages more rebellions —— it does not stop more. as you heard, the one to watch out for is benefits. at the moment they are due to go up in april at the rate of inflation. some in government have talked about potentially changing that so it goes up in line with the
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average increase in salaries which would be a lot less. there are many conservative mps who think at the time of the cost of living crisis that would be another own goal. so expect a big battle on that if it does not want to go ahead with plans as they stand. {lila does not want to go ahead with plans as they stand-— the first preliminary hearing of the uk covid public inquiry will begin later today to examine the uk's response to coronavirus and the impact of the pandemic. the hearing had originally been scheduled for last month, but was delayed after the death of the queen. our health correspondent jim reed reports. on a long wall in westminster, relatives of those who lost their lives to covid have left their marks and memories. sylvia jackson died in the first wave of the pandemic. like so many others, her daughter wants to know if the right decisions were taken at the time. so all kinds of questions
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and the fact that none of them have been answered yet is precisely the reason why we need this inquiry. i don't know who is responsible for my mum's death. and i want to know. and if they behaved wrongly, i want them held to account. that's only right, that's only right. today, in this room in west london, the process of finding those answers gets under way. the uk covid inquiry is so wide—ranging, it will have to be split into separate sections. the first tackling preparations for a pandemic starts this morning. next month sees the start of the second section on political decision—making, including the timing of lockdowns. preliminary hearings this autumn will be followed by full public hearings next year, where ministers and other decision—makers will be called to give evidence. this all matters to people
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like abby williams. the care home she runs lost residents in the first wave of covid. it is important for us to...for lessons learned, really. we want to know what went wrong, how can it be better handled, and we want to learn from it and to be more prepared in future. covid is still with us, of course. though the fast roll—out of vaccines across the world has cut the risk of hospitalisation and death. doctors say learning lessons now is vital to better understand what happened and to better protect ourselves against any future pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. a woman has died after being attacked by dogs at a house in liverpool. merseyside police are invesitgating the incident. they say the victim — who was in her 60s — was pronounced dead at around 4.25 yesterday afternoon at an address in kirkdale.
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ukrainian troops have broken through russian positions near kherson, a strategic city in a part of southern ukraine annexed by moscow last week. the advance was reported by the russian military who say there is heavy russian defensive fire. our correspondent hugo bachega joins us now from kyiv. hugo, how significant is this for ukraine? good morning, it is very significant, the most significant breakthrough for the ukrainian since the start of the counteroffensive in the start of the counteroffensive in the south. for weeks we have watched developments in kherson with heavy fighting there, but all —— almost no movement. ukrainian forces have managed to advance along the dnipro river, and they have managed to
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recapture several villages along the river. this ukrainian progress threaten the supply lines for thousands of russian troops positioned in that part of the country, so it is significant for ukraine. this is happening in the south and in the east, the ukrainians are going ahead with the counteroffensive, reinforcing possessions after reclaiming a key town, a major logistics and transport hub in the donetsk region. and now they are moving up to the luhansk region. president zelensky said heavy fighting was happening in many parts of the front line last night. but president putin said this is happening in regions that have been annexed so important gains for ukraine in parts of the country. north korea has fired a ballistic missile overjapan for the first time in five years.
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the launch is the fifth in recent days by pyongyang. japan has accused north korea of threatening the security of the region. tougher rules for migrants are expected to be set out by the new home secretary suella braverman later today when she addresses the tory party conference. more than 32,000 people have crossed the english channel in small boats so far this year. our paris correspondent lucy williamson has been speaking to people in northern france about the growing popularity of this route into the uk. it is sam and this french patrol are tracking their target. two people smugglers spotted by a uk—funded drone. they are half a mile away, swiftly preparing a boat to take migrants across the channel. a uk—funded buggy gets the patrol there in minutes. the smugglers have already fled. but they have lost their boat, their fuel and their motor to the patrol. this journey tonight is over.
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french patrols are now stopping around half these crossings, but they are still attracting more migrants and new, more efficient smuggling networks run by albanians. translation: i don't know if it is the albanian mafia i in the uk, but there are a lot of albanian smugglers organising crossings. with prices of 3,000 to 4,000 euros per person and a0 people in a boat, do the maths. it is even more lucrative than drug trafficking and with lighter criminal charges. albanian customers have been filling cafes and hotels around the station in dunkirk. i see a lot of albanian people come here. more and more. maybe double or triple compared to last year. and year after year, there are people and people coming and coming who say there are no people in albania any more. smugglers have extended their operations along this coastline to avoid daily patrols
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from land, sea and air. this coastline has pulled in resources year after year — vehicles, technology, foot patrols. politicians change, strategies shift and, still, the number of people crossing this channel rises. and here in the camps, the uk government's latest deterrent, deportation to rwanda, isn't working. this crossing is sold to the solution to insurmountable problems and that trumps any kind of risk. lucy williamson, bbc news, calais. donald trump has launched a libel action against cnn, accusing the us broadcaster of comparing him to hitler. the former president is seeking $475 million in damages. mr trump accuses cnn of carrying out a slanderous campaign against him because it fears he will stand again for the presidency. the network has not responded.
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we will be speaking later to some people who are swapping the uk for the antarctic. very cold. and a lot of daylight. it will not get dark much the next five months. unlike here. what is the weather doing? it is a mile start. 17 degrees in murray and in west sussex and in between, most in west sussex and in between, most in double figures. for the next few days it will be more windy and we will see rain. large rainfall totals building, especially in western scotland. we have heavy rain moving across scotland and northern ireland at the moment, sinking south. it has to macro fronts and one stops in scotland and northern ireland and the other move south but does not get into the south—east, where it remains dry. behind it it will
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brighten up in the far north of scotland and northern isles. a windy day. temperatures 13—20. tonight, if anything that rain moves north. it looks like it is a developing area of low pressure. heavy rain, wind picking up. and another weather front coming in from the west and another mild night. tomorrow, low pressure pushes off into the north sea. the front pushes down to the south—east. behind it, blustery showers and across england and wales, a windy day. temperatures down on today but still looking at 11-18 down on today but still looking at 11—18 north to south. here on breakfast we've brought you the story of tony hickmott — a man with autism and a learning disability who's been held in a secure hospital for 22 years. he was just 23 when he was first
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detained in a mental health crisis and has been largely held in solitary confinement ever since. now, at last, there's good news, as tony has been found a new for ever home. breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin reports. we're coming home. a new house is taking shape in brighton. dream come true. a dream come true. a new home for pam and roy's son, tony. it's happening now. tony's going to come home. yeah. you've waited so long. yeah. decades. this is tony hickmott. last year, we had to go to court to be able to report how he had been detained in a secure hospitalfor 21 years — not because he's a criminal, but because he's autistic. who do you love? mum. that's it — who's boy are you? mum's. put yourthumb up. last november, his parents' long
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fight to bring their son home ended in the court of protection, where a judge said authorities must act. and now, finally, pam and roy are about to welcome tony back to brighton. it's his home for life, right? this is his home for life. a real home. a real home, his home. he hasn't got to share with anybody. without the noise, the screaming and the banging of doors, the alarms. just get him home and every day's going to be a bonus. i know he's going to do well. is this tony's old room? tony was born and raised here. he's going to have his big tv. but he was sectioned in a mental health crisis when he was 23. tony's clothes all in here. they were told it would likely be for nine months. it's now been more than two decades. last year, two whistle—blowers spoke to the bbc, revealing the trauma of many of those years.
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i don't even know how they do it — the patients, i mean. _ i don't know how they cope. it was almost like a solitary confinement prisoner. a very basic daily life. just 24/7 in that room. i do believe tony was probably the loneliest person living in that hospital — definitely. since they spoke out, tony has celebrated yet another birthday inside. his cards on top of a tv behind a perspex screen. he isn't allowed the remote control. a life with no autonomy in a room which became his world. he's just stuck in a time warp. he's got so much to learn and catch up on. he's going to have choices back. when people ask about my son, they ask where he is, i tell them. and they say, "why is he there for 20 years? what was he done?" and i say he's done nothing. they say, "he must have committed a crime. he must have done something."
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i say he's done nothing. they say, "why is he there?" i say, "because he's autistic." it's not bad behaviour, it needs not met. a team is being recruited to support tony here in brighton. they'll be trained in autism and carefully manage his environment. among them, chris. i listen to pam and roy a lot and can't even- comprehend it, really. from day one, when i met him, ijust knew that he wasn't - the person that maybe some people had made him out to be. _ so i felt completely- relaxed and kind of ready to build that relationship. you're going to give him his whole new life? yeah. i think his world is quite small at the moment, you know. . i think there's so much opportunity for him. i i think there's a whole world out there that can really help him i become the person that he can be. he was always meant to be? yeah. the nhs admits £11 million has been spent keeping tony detained, and he's just one of around 2000
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people held in such institutions. a select committee report last year called for them all to be closed and replaced with more appropriate support in the community. but that has to be paid for by local authorities. it has taken far too long. it's complicated to try and get all the different elements in place. yet we have a responsibility. absolutely, as a society, we have a responsibility to look after these people to the optimal level we can. and the funding is really challenging to find to achieve that. so, at last, tony's for ever home is taking shape. so deserves it, pam. yeah _ it's just a short drive from his mum and dad. you can't wait for tony to be able to make his own cup of tea. yeah. freedom. get up when he wants to. yeah _ it is a world away from a life in solitary confinement 100 miles from home. it should never be this|
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hard, jayne, should it? you know, i don't think tony should have ever really gone away. - he's been forgotten. not forgotten now, pam. no, he's not. no. you never gave up hope? no. never. no. i think if we had given up hope, i don't think tony would be alive. i think he would have done himself in. he wants to go with me down to the beer garden. i'll have a pint and he'll have a half and a cheese roll. that's what he talks about? that's what he wants, yeah, and a cheese roll. you've got so much to look forward to now. it'll be like heaven. it will be. jayne mccubbin will be here later to talk about tony and other cases around the uk. let's take a look at today's papers. many of them lead with reaction to the government's u—turn. "what a day" — the metro uses the words of the chancellor
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who admitted to having a "tough day", but insisted he can now get on with the job of turning round the economy. the picture of him making his speech. the daily mail urges the prime minister to "get a grip", saying her u—turn on the tax rate has left supporters worried about her determination. liz truss has urged readers of the daily express to stick with her government, saying she will "reward their trust". the times reports on some potential relief to energy bills. according to the paper, an early forecast for this winter has found that it should be milder than usual, which could save homes and businesses millions of pounds. that was what carroll was saying. it is not as cold this morning. warmer than a week ago. i wonder how the hedgehogs are feeling about this. in the telegraph today, hedgehogs in nottinghamshire will be happy because they have a
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hedgehog street in the village after 30 neighbours cut holes in garden fences, like a semicircle, so they can travel between the gardens instead of perhaps trying to cross the road. that is very cute. i was talking to my kids, who are teenagers, and they have never seen a hedgehog. because our garden is completely sealed. we have a wall, so we cannot knock through but you do not see hedgehogs like you used to. you need to go to hedgehog street in nottinghamshire. there are lots, trundling up and down gardens. look at this. this is fantastic. this is steve, who kept bidding for his own spitfire. as you do, in auctions. he was outbid and he decided to build his own spitfire. he bought a kit. apparently it can
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fly and he will take it above the channel. chocks away. what an achievement. that is very top gun. i am not sure he looks terribly top gun. i think he does. maverick. he looks very much like our own tom cruise. it took in years. 11,250 hours piecing it together in a barn. a lot of work. how about not driving your own car? do you fancy that? i went in a self drive car on a track in bedfordshire last year. but this is taking it to a whole new level. in san francisco, a futuristic pilot is taking place — fully driverless robo—taxis are being permitted at night time for paying customers. on the streets with other cars. cruise, the company behind them, says the cars will revolutionise transport. but critics say putting fully
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autonomous taxis on urban streets is premature and dangerous. north america technology reporter james clayton has more. wow, i think there is no one in there. it's incredible. on san francisco streets, something straight out of a sci—fi film is happening. people are able to hail cabs with no driver — fully autonomous robo—taxis. some love it. i cannot believe this is happening. but is the tech ready? there's only one way to find out. get into one of these cars ourselves. the bbc was one of the first media organisations in the world to try it. car: buckle up and get ready to ride. - it's really, really weird. it not like a race track or a testing facility. we are fully in the centre of san francisco. the car is totally driverless. it's amazing, unnerving, surreal, all mixed into one.
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on any of our cruise avs, we have lidar, we have radar and we have cameras. and what we do is all those together using machine learning and that gives us this amazing understanding of the world around us. but it didn't always feel like that. this is interesting. there is a bus in our lane and there are cars to our left. so what is it going to do? 0h. ok, it's pulling out left. oh, another bus is coming out. it really doesn't know what to do. 0h. there is a car behind us. like this isjust bad driving. i was ready to love this and i'm definitely... i'm definitely nervous. cruise has been involved in a number of accidents in san francisco this year, most of the minor. however, after a collision injune, its software was recalled. some believe it's too soon for real passengers to be driven around without a driver on urban streets. these vehicles are still somewhat in the test phase. we believe that manufacturers need to provide the public with some sort of transparent evidence that these
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vehicles aren't going to cause problems, deaths or injuries on the road. we are six months into deploying this product — brand—new, game—changing product — and, with that, comes some early teething problems. we are really proud of our safety record and we report continuously to our regulators, and safety is absolutely the top priority at cruise. despite safety concerns, cruise's vision is to expand, and quickly. and if they get their way, these kinds of rides will become the new normal. bye. james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. iam not i am not sure he was entirely sure about that. and you? not currently, i don't think so. maybe in america with a grid system with rules. most of the accidents have been minor. let us know what you think, whether
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you would hail an automated taxi in the uk. time to get the news where you are. hello, good morning, this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. many applicants to the windrush compensation scheme are still waiting for payments four years after the government wrongly classified them as illegal immigrants. one of those is auckland elwaldo romeo who's lived in the uk since he was four years old. he says trying to get the compensation he's owed has been devastating. they in the home office turned round and said, you've got no right of abode. it was rather puzzling and it was devastating for me. living in this country, being educated in this country. it needs to be resolved so at least you can breathe, and carry on a life without this big distraction.
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the home office says its continuing to work with those affected to pay as much as possible as soon as it can. london air ambulance is launching an urgent fundraising appeal to raise £15 million to replace two helicopters. the aircraft are used on average about five times a day. the charity says without public donations, some of the most urgent patients wouldn't be reached in time. prince william is to deliver his first speech since king charles gave him the new title prince of wales. he'll address the united for wildlife global summit at the science museum, where he's expected to highlight illegal wildlife crime and its damaging impact on biodiversity and local communities. a new theatre school's going be created as part of a £1.3 billion regeneration project at olympia. the wetherby arts school will open in 2025, for children aged 11—18. the new west london cultural
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and entertainment district is also going to include a live music venue, theatre, restaurants, bars and two hotels. a quick look at the travel situation now. and there's a good service all round so far. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a very mild start this morning. there is quite a bit of cloud around but that should start to thin and break. a couple of cold fronts sinking south but they fall short of bringing us rain through today. and you can see those isobars quite close together, it is going to be very windy. we will see the cloud lifting and breaking, some sunny spells mixed in there. there is the chance of an isolated shower, largely dry, and the wind gusting 30 to 35 mph. temperature is very warm, 20 celsius the maximum which is above average for the time of year. overnight, it stays very windy. we are still going to see the cloud but again one or two clearer spells in there. should be largely dry, the minimum temperature exceptionally mild, 15 celsius in central london. tomorrow the cold front finally sinks south but it is going
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to start stay very windy. it will be a dry start but then the rain will move through. through the middle part of the day, wind gusting 40 to 45 mph potentially but that clears, we will get sunshine to end the day and temperature reaching again 19, potentially 20 celsius. it is going to be a cooler night as we head into thursday, but plenty of dry weather in the forecast. few showers around and the temperature stays mild. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. coming up on breakfast this morning. we'll meet the women who beat thousands of other applicants to work counting penguins in the wilds of antarctica. ralph and katie, characters from the popular the a word drama are back in a new series about their life as a married couple with down syndrome.
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# leaving with the boy next door, can you fill me in? believe it or not it's been 22 years since craig david burst onto the music scene. he'll be joining us on the sofa just before nine o'clock to talk about his upcoming memoir and new album. i feel old! i feel even older! with the squeeze on the cost of living getting tighter, there's concern a fall in food donations from supermarkets could really hit people struggling to make ends meet. ben's here to tell us more. it really is. the warning has come from fareshare. fareshare collects surplus products from the food industry, and redistributes them
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across the country to other charities. they then provide food parcels and meals to people who need help. so it has two main aims: to reduce food poverty, and also to reduce food waste, by making sure that unwanted and unused produce doesn't end up in landfill when it's still good to eat. in 2020, it provided 55,000 tonnes of food to help vulnerable people. that equals around 2.5 million meals every week and it says around two—thirds of what it distributes goes to children and families. but in recent months, fareshare says the donations from retailers are down around 200 tonnes per month, on average. they've actually dropped by a quarter compared with this time last year. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith visited one of the charity's warehouses. the supermarket contribution is incredibly important because it's
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the supermarkets at the moment are more willing to send wonky fruit and veg to their stores than previously would have done, and that food may have come to us, for example. and food is going into stores with slightly less life than would have previously done, and that food again might have traditionally come to fareshare. so supply chain challenges, supermarkets trying to reduce waste, is resulting in less food coming to us. what's caused the drop in donations? fareshare said there was less food going spare, due to a number of issues in food production and the supply chain. at the same time, supermarkets are trying to be more efficient and waste less, to keep prices for their customers as low as possible at a time of surging bills. and it's notjust the supermarkets themselves with less to donate. fareshare also works with farmers and manufacturers and they are facing similar pressures. one of those is kelloggs. they told colletta that
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being a responsible business means trying to be efficient and limit waste, which can have a knock—on effect. where we are at the moment is, like every business, wanting to be as efficient as possible and look at our costs. so we are trying to manage down the amount of food we give which causes a problem because as we try and do that, there is demand for fareshare and other food banks like never before. so we try to manage that demand, make sure that we can manage our efficiency so we don't waste food because no one wants to waste any food, but at the same time trying to meet that need for fareshare. what's the response from supermarkets? tesco, sainsbury�*s, morrisons, asda and waitrose all told us their donations were steady. sainsbury�*s and asda said they were also committed to reducing food waste with sainsburys acknowledging this could affect donations. the bbc understands
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fareshare has now written to supermarkets and major brands, asking for further contributions. the charity says it is working to make sure it can access as much surplus food as possible, right across the food industry, so they can continue to support people who can't afford quality food. interesting because during the pandemic, the use of the food banks and fareshare went up and up, throughout all of that time,. if people rely on it for the essentials, and the food is in there, it creates a problems. thank ou.
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there, it creates a problems. thank yom liverpool— there, it creates a problems. thank you. liverpool against _ there, it creates a problems. thank you. liverpool against rangers i you. liverpool against rangers tonight. that is a big game. it tonight. that isa bi came. , that is a big game. it is intriguing because they _ that is a big game. it is intriguing because they have _ that is a big game. it is intriguing because they have not _ that is a big game. it is intriguing because they have not played i that is a big game. it is intriguing| because they have not played each other before.— other before. that is a surprising. it is in other before. that is a surprising. it is in eumpe. — other before. that is a surprising. it is in europe, the _ other before. that is a surprising. it is in europe, the champions i it is in europe, the champions league, very exciting. it rangers win, they will be talking about it for the while! this the first time liverpool and rangers have faced each other in a competitive match and should the scottish side get a win at anfield, it's a result that will live long in the memory. chris mclaughlin reports. it's a world famous club with scots woven through the very heart of its history. and yet, liverpool have never played a competitive match against one of scotland's biggest clubs in rangers. the scene is set for what could be a cracker. it's going to be very difficult, it's a team who perform really well in the premier league, they were in three finals in the last five years. it is, i think, still,
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one of the best teams in europe. so, if you look at all our opponents we face, the last season in europe and also this season, probably this is the strongest side. looking around earlier, this is a rangers squad who are back into champions league action after two heavy defeats at ajax and napoli. but domestic form is on the up. we don't want to just take part in this competition. we want to establish ourselves in the competition and go toe to toe with the giants of europe and that requires us to be competing in every aspect of the game, especially the way we played against napoli. the home side have tasted recent success in european club football's biggest competition, and the man in charge knows scottish football is improving. yeah, rangers and celtic are obviously the stand—out teams in the league, that's not news. but they do, and probably the best
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you can get is how they did in europe and the rangers run last year in the european league was exceptional. the games against dortmund, for example, just really good. and a home game, you can see how atmosphere can give the edge in the game and that was really impressive. just looking at the game in the individual match, it probably means a bit more to rangers that it does to liverpool. but in the context of liverpool's season, they can't afford any more slip—ups because if they lose ground in the champions league group, that's something that, for a team that's reached the final three times in the last five years to not get out of the group stage is unthinkable. on match day three, anfield awaits a resurgent rangers. chris mclaughlin, bbc news, liverpool. liverpool hoping to shake off their poor domestic form at the moment but
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it will not be easy against rangers. leicester city moved off the bottom of the premier league with a 4—0 thrashing of their east midlands rivals nottingham forest. it means forest now prop up the league, despite those 22 new summer signings, with manager steve cooper under pressure. joe lynskey reports. they're a team who won this league six years ago. now leicester faced their local rivals at the bottom of it. such was the form of both these teams, some called this match el sackico. sometimes a coach's job comes down to nick on the ball. to a nick on the ball. and it's deflected in byjames maddison. leicester's liftoff came through a deflection, but then they made their own luck. harvey barnes took the ball and found the corner, 2—0, and while for leicester it was ecstasy, for forest, it was bleak. and getting worse. james maddison�*s free kick made it three by half—time. he wants an england world cup spot. now leicester's internationals were stepping forward. their zambian striker, patson daka,
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flicked in a fourth. leicester's first win of the season moves them up just one place and forest to the foot. with this defeat in the east midlands, their season is going south. joe lynskey, bbc news. one of the stars from the euros, alessia russo, will be a notable absentee at a sell out wembley on friday. as england test themselves against the world champions the united states, the manchester united forward is out through injury, she didn't play for her club side last weekend, ahead what is set to be an intriguing match against the world's best side, with the world cup to come next year. after a freak injury, england batsmanjonny bairstow has confirmed he won't play again this year after having surgery on a broken leg and dislocated ankle. he was in the form of his life this summer, but slipped on a tee box playing golf. he's already been ruled out of this month's t20 world cup and also missed the final test of england's home summer series with south africa.
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and the first players have left worcester after the rugby union side entered administration. the club's season has been suspended after they couldn't provide proof of funds by last week's deadline, with their next two fixtures cancelled. ollie lawrence, ted hill, fergus lee—warner and valery morozov are alljoining bath initially on loan. you imagine more players will probably follow.— you imagine more players will probably follow. such a difficult situation for _ probably follow. such a difficult situation for the _ probably follow. such a difficult situation for the players - probably follow. such a difficult situation for the players and i probably follow. such a difficult| situation for the players and the fans and the club. the situation for the players and the fans and the club.— situation for the players and the fans and the club. the players have been told, fans and the club. the players have been told. if— fans and the club. the players have been told, if you _ fans and the club. the players have been told, if you train, _ fans and the club. the players have been told, if you train, it's - been told, if you train, it's essentially at your own risk. that is a big gamble to take.— essentially at your own risk. that is a big gamble to take. nicky very much. it is a big gamble to take. nicky very much- it is — is a big gamble to take. nicky very much. it is not _ is a big gamble to take. nicky very much. it is not quite _ is a big gamble to take. nicky very much. it is not quite so _ is a big gamble to take. nicky very much. it is not quite so chilly i is a big gamble to take. nicky very much. it is not quite so chilly thisl much. it is not quite so chilly this morning. that's what carol has been hinting at already. good morning, absolutely right. look at these temperatures, if you are
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stepping out it is a mild start for this stage in october, 17 degrees already for some of us. the this stage in october, 17 degrees already for some of us.— this stage in october, 17 degrees already for some of us. the next few da s have already for some of us. the next few days have unsettled _ already for some of us. the next few days have unsettled weather, - already for some of us. the next few| days have unsettled weather, windier thanit days have unsettled weather, windier than it has been and spells of rain. not so much in the south—east but a lot of rain across the north west. you can see in this chart the amount of rainfall we are expecting the next few days. he here not a lot to start with in the south—east, eventually some but not much, whereas we push up towards the north—west of scotland, we will have a thereand deluge. could have some flooding issues with this, we are looking at up to 200 millimetres of rain. some rain is heavy and persistent already this morning in northern ireland and northern scotland, sweeping southwards and getting into parts of england and wales. mostly dry, a fair bit of cloud around and one or two showers. there are two weather fronts, one
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going south—east but the other one grinding to a halt across scotland but it will brighten up in the final. it is windier to date more widely than it was yesterday, temperature 20 degrees, usually the average is 14 to 18 in london. overnight, the weather fronts average is 14 to 18 in london. overnight, the weatherfronts move north, a little area of low pressure developing and some heavy rain. the wind is picking up across england and wales and another two weather fronts coming our way. a mild night as well. here are the weather fronts, both slipping south. second when it's fairly weak. low pressure pushing into the north sea and all of those isobars telling you it will be another windy day. gales in exposure. heavy rain pushing into the north sea, our two weather fronts slip south and we are left with some blustery showers. some
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could be heavy and thundery. gusty winds, this is the strength of the gusts at 5pm but it is going to be a windy day wherever you are temperature wise, cooler in the north but we are still looking at 18 or19 north but we are still looking at 18 or 19 as you push south. after that, you can see we still have areas of low pressure moving across the north of the country and the isobars tell you it is going to be windy. towards thursday and friday, it will feel fresher than it is at the moment but we will also have areas of showers, some merging to give longer spells of rain, especially in the north and east. south and it will be drier but not immune for showers here by the end of the reaching temperatures closer to what they should be by the end of the week for the time of year. end of the week for the time of ear. ., y end of the week for the time of ear. ., , ., ,., end of the week for the time of ear. ., , ., | end of the week for the time of year-_ i would i end of the week for the time of i year._ i would like year. lovely rainbow. iwould like to sa i year. lovely rainbow. iwould like to say i made _ year. lovely rainbow. iwould like to say i made it _ year. lovely rainbow. iwould like
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to say i made it myself! - year. lovely rainbow. iwould like to say i made it myself! i - year. lovely rainbow. iwould like to say i made it myself! i believe| to say i made it myself! i believe ou! the un has issued another urgent appeal for funds to help families in flood hit pakistan as doctors face what it describes as a "public health emergency". more than 1,700 people have died including nearly 600 children and with waters not expected to recede for many months, life threatening water borne diseases are on the rise. our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports from sindh. in pakistan, as fields remain flooded, villages remain isolated. doctors are delivering medical care by boat, with the help here of unicef. we asked if we could follow them as they visited far—flung communities who have been isolated. these remote areas already have very limited access to medical help. now, what this mobile camp is providing today is testing for malnutrition over here,
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over there they are doing malaria tests, in the corner the tests for hepatitis and here, a whole load of medicines available for people, all kinds of things from oral rehydration to antimalarials and there's even soap that they are providing people. fozia approaches the camp with herfour young children. she tells me they are all sick. translation: it's really difficult, there's water everywhere - and we can't get medicines. now, some help has arrived. to treat a rise in waterborne diseases like malaria and diarrhoea, and a spike in malnutrition. as doctors measure her arm, they learned that baby sima is perilously thin. since the floods, her mother has struggled to eat. there is a shortage of clean water and food supplies,
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so mainly there are so many people like this baby, she's nine months old, and she is severely malnourished. these camps provide some relief. but with a shortage of medicines, boats and even doctors, not everyone can get this help. it could take months for the waters to recede, that's many more months of suffering. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. legislation to largely freeze rents and restrict evictions overwinter in the face of cost of living pressures has been introduced by the scottish government. the bill is set to be treated as emergency legislation and fast—tracked in a matter of days. i moved to edinburgh, which is already a more expensive city than glasgow, so i've already seen an increase in my housing costs of about £100 a month or so.
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and i think what we were waiting on is for that to jump up another 100, £150. so i think it means that at least for six months, the only thing we really need to worry about is energy prices and the cost of food and stuff like that so it's a massive weight off the shoulders. let's speak to john blackwood, chief executive of the scottish association of landlords. it isa it is a massive weight loss of the shoulders of the rancher but what about the landlords? it will not. what are your members are saying about the impact of this change? fiur about the impact of this change? our members about the impact of this change?
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and people who have seen their rental prices increased dramatically over the last few years. what rental prices increased dramatically over the last few years.— rental prices increased dramatically over the last few years. what we are seeinu is over the last few years. what we are seeing is an — over the last few years. what we are seeing is an ongoing _ over the last few years. what we are seeing is an ongoing rhetoric, i over the last few years. what we are seeing is an ongoing rhetoric, an i seeing is an ongoing rhetoric, an anti—landlord rhetoric from the scottish government. it's notjust about this one piece of legislation. we have been hearing a lot from the scottish government over the last yearin scottish government over the last year in particular about how they are becoming more and more anti landlord in their turn, and really discouraging future investment. really what we need to see is a well—functioning private rented sector. we want to see tenants supported but we want to see landlords are supported as well. what are your members are saying about how this might change their business models, the way they rent? i think you have to remember landlords are investors, and all investors get nervous in any marketplace from time to time and thatis marketplace from time to time and that is exactly what is happening just now. because when you hear the first minister stand in parliament saying, we are going to stop all
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evictions, put a freeze on rents, of course investors are going to get nervous about that. landlords are going to think, if things get tough, i need to be able to sell my property and quite frankly in the future, that will be incredibly difficult to do so in scotland. there are exceptions as i understand it within the legislation which mean that if left —— if a landlord is facing increasing costs and mortgage payments go up, increase insurance, they won't necessarily be exposed in they won't necessarily be exposed in the same way. so i guess the scottish government would say that the legislation caters for flexibility. it the legislation caters for flexibility.— the legislation caters for flexibili. . ., flexibility. it certainly offering mitigations — flexibility. it certainly offering mitigations for _ flexibility. it certainly offering mitigations for landlords i flexibility. it certainly offering mitigations for landlords and | flexibility. it certainly offering i mitigations for landlords and that is something we welcome of course. it's something we were not expecting in the bill because the first minister did make a blanket statement in parliament saying there would be no elections, banning evictions, and a rent freeze. and there is an exception to both of those things within the bill. we are
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pleased that the minister for housing in the scottish government has listened to landlords but it does not satisfy those landlord investors and encourage them to continue to invest. if investors and encourage them to continue to invest.— continue to invest. if you put ourself continue to invest. if you put yourself in — continue to invest. if you put yourself in the _ continue to invest. if you put yourself in the position i continue to invest. if you put yourself in the position of. continue to invest. if you put i yourself in the position of callum who we have heard from who feels some relief that he will be better protected and his rent will be not going up in the same way, can you understand why he might be feeling this is a good day?— this is a good day? definitely, of course. this is a good day? definitely, of course- at _ this is a good day? definitely, of course. at the _ this is a good day? definitely, of course. at the end _ this is a good day? definitely, of course. at the end of— this is a good day? definitely, of course. at the end of the i this is a good day? definitely, of course. at the end of the day, i course. at the end of the day, landlords have sympathy with tenants, whether some tenants believe that or not is another issue. an affordable rent is not good for tenants but it actually —— when a rent is unaffordable, it is bad for landlords because when a tenant cannot pay the rent it is a problem for the landlord. we all need to work together which is why we as an organisation has been sent to the government that they need to consult with us and work in partnership in the sector to find long—term solutions with these problems. unaffordable rent is not
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good but equally we need to ensure that landlords and tenants work together to find solutions make we have got enough housing to house scotland's population in the future. we have got a housing crisis and the scottish government is not taking it seriously. scottish government is not taking it seriousl . . ., , scottish government is not taking it seriousl. . ., , ., ~ , seriously. landlords had kept rent down and made _ seriously. landlords had kept rent down and made it _ seriously. landlords had kept rent down and made it more _ seriously. landlords had kept rentl down and made it more affordable, may be the legislation would not have been needed.— may be the legislation would not have been needed. there is a range of issues involved, _ have been needed. there is a range of issues involved, market - have been needed. there is a range of issues involved, market forces, l of issues involved, market forces, what we have seen systematically over the last few years, if landlords leave the sector. we have told the government about that and said, we need to redress this, we need to look at why this is happening and encourage new investment orfor happening and encourage new investment or for landlords to continue to stay in the sector. to keep that supply healthy. it's all about supply and demand. that's why rent is going up, quite simply because there is not enough housing to rent. let's address that. we have
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a similar issue in the social housing sector, there is not enough property there either so there is a whole sector problem across scotland. ~ whole sector problem across scotland-— whole sector problem across scotland. ~ ., ., ., scotland. we have to leave it there, thank ou scotland. we have to leave it there, thank you for— scotland. we have to leave it there, thank you forjoining _ scotland. we have to leave it there, thank you forjoining the. _ scotland. we have to leave it there, thank you forjoining the. thank i thank you for “oining the. thank ou. a rover designed and built by british engineers at airbus in stevenage was all set to go to mars until its role in a mission to collect martian rocks was cancelled. so what do you do with a robot that can't go to mars? go somewhere else! now it's a robot on the hunt for a newjob to prevent all of the expertise and work that's taken more than a decade from going to waste. our science editor rebecca morelle reports. one state—of—the—art rover. its skills, it can drive autonomously, negotiate the most difficult terrain and coping extreme environments. and cope in extreme environments. but now it's looking for work. built in the uk, it's being tested in a quarry in bedfordshire. it was heading for mars, until its mission was cancelled.
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its task on the red planet was to pick up samples, but it's been scrapped. mini mars helicopters will do thejob instead. the uk doesn't want to see the technology mothballed, they think this rover has still got a bright future. we have spent a lot of time and a lot of effort on developing this expertise. we don't want to let that go to waste, we want to exploit it to make sure that investment comes to fruition. also, it puts us in a good place to be involved in future space missions which is brilliant for the reputation of the uk. so, where could the rover go instead of mars? one option could be to swap the red martian terrain for the grey lunar landscape. this rover was designed for mars. if it's heading to the moon, it will need some modifications. the lunar surface can get as hot as 120 degrees celsius, and as cold as —230. so this will have to cope with extremes.
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there's also problem with light. the moon gets two weeks of daylight followed by two weeks of darkness, and this will be a challenge for solar power. and then there's the fine lunar dust. it's particularly clingy and abrasive, which could be an issue for the rover�*s moving parts. lunar exploration is having a resurgence right now. nasa's new artemis rocket will soon be heading there and eventually taking astronauts to the moon's surface. the idea is to have a permanent lunar base, and rovers could play a crucial role. they could be used anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, so it could be autonomously moving around rovers for building habitats, or it could be used for going to places that are uninhabitable by humans or an extreme temperature or particularly dangerous. so anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, this rover could still use that technology to do that. for now, the rover is out
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of work, stuck on earth, driving around a quarry. but this isn't just about salvaging a £23 million piece of kit, it's about the people and expertise that goes with it. the hope is the rover gets some new employment soon. rebecca morelle, bbc news. how do you re—purpose a rover? how do you re-purpose a rover? leave it in a bedfordshire _ how do you re-purpose a rover? leave it in a bedfordshire quarry, _ it in a bedfordshire quarry, obviously, what else! wherever you are this morning, mars, moon, bedfordshire. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, good morning, this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. many applicants to the windrush compensation scheme are still waiting for payments four years after the government wrongly classified them as illegal immigrants. one of those is auckland elwaldo romeo, who's lived in the uk since he was four years old. he says that trying to get the compensation he's owed
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has been devastating. hearing the home office turn round and say, you've got no right of abode. it was rather puzzling and it was devastating for me. living in this country, being educated in this country. it needs to be resolved so at least you can breathe, and carry on a life without this big distraction. the home office says its continuing to work with those affected to pay as much as possible as soon as it can. london air ambulance is launching an urgent fundraising appeal to raise £15 million to replace two helicopters. the aircraft are used on average about five times a day. the charity says without public donations, some of the most urgent patients wouldn't be reached in time. prince william is to deliver his first speech since king charles gave him the new title prince of wales. he'll address the united for wildlife global summit
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at the science museum, where he's expected to talk about illegal wildlife crime. a new theatre school is going be created as part of a £1.3 billion regeneration project at olympia. the wetherby arts school will open in 2025. it's part of the new west london cultural district which will also include a live music venue and a theatre. a quick look at the travel situation. there's a good service so far. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a very mild start this morning. there is quite a bit of cloud around but that should start to thin and break. a couple of cold fronts sinking south but they fall short of bringing us rain through today. and you can see those isobars quite close together, it is going to be very windy. we will see the cloud lifting and breaking, some sunny spells mixed in there. there is the chance of an isolated shower, largely dry, and the wind gusting 30 to 35 mph.
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temperatures very warm, 20 celsius the maximum which is above average for the time of year. overnight, it stays very windy. we are still going to see the cloud but again one or two clearer spells in there. should be largely dry, the minimum temperature exceptionally mild, 15 celsius in central london. tomorrow, the cold front finally sinks south but it is going to stay very windy. it will be a dry start but then the rain will move through. through the middle part of the day, wind gusting 40 to 45 mph potentially but that clears, we will get sunshine to end the day and the temperature reaching again 19, potentially 20 celsius. it is going to be a cooler night as we head into thursday, but plenty of dry weather in the forecast. few showers around and the temperature stays mild. that's it from me. plenty more on our website. follow us on social media. i'm back at 7.30. enjoy your morning.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. our headlines today. another change to the government's financial plans after a u—turn on the top rate of tax, now the chancellor is bringing forward an announcement on cutting the uk's debt. a public inquiry into the covid—19 pandemic begins today — it's likely to last more than two years and hearfrom bereaved families as well as senior politicians and scientists. tighter laws on migrants — people who cross the channel illegally could be banned from claiming asylum. one for the history books as two british sides meet for the first time this evening as liverpool host rangers in the champions league. penguins and a post office. we meet the women who have landed dream jobs in a distant corner of the antarctic. good morning. a mile start across
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the board. we also have heavy rain across scotland and northern ireland moving into england and wales to all but the south—east. wherever you are, it will be windy. all the details later. it's tuesday, 4th of october. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng is to make a further change to his financial plans and bring forward an announcement on the uk's debt. he was facing mounting criticism for insisting the details would not be published until late november. now, a new date is expected to be confirmed today. it follows yesterday's dramatic u—turn on the top rate of income tax, as our political correspondent helen catt reports. it's fantastic to be here with you this evening. the prime minister was out at events on the conference fringe last night, rallying supporters. so, too, was the chancellor. but the night before, they had had a meeting that ended in a major u—turn when they backtracked on a headline pledged to scrap the 45p top rate
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of tax for the highest earners. in her first interview since, liz truss told the bbc that the government was listening. we are also a listening government, nick, that do listen to people. that do reflect on where we could have done things better, and i have said that about laying the groundwork, i have said that about the specific feedback we have had on the 45p tax rate. now there has been a new reversal. just yesterday on this programme, the chancellor committed to when he would set out his debt plan. we are going to have a medium—term plan that is going to come out, as i've said, at the end of november. and all those plans will be set out in fuller detail there. sources have told the bbc he will now do it sooner than the end of november. he had been under pressure to speed the statement up to help calm the markets. but there could be fresh trouble brewing about benefits. under borisjohnson, there was a pledge to raise them in line with inflation. liz truss won't commit to that.
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we are working very closely with the obr. it's important that we have a forecast to go with that plan, and that is something the chancellor is working on. but you would bring it forward if you could? i i am a very clear that we have committed to having a proper obr forecast to reducing debt as a proportion of gdp over time. a number of conservative mps have already said they have concerns. and the immediate criticisms haven't quite gone away, either. the former home secretary, priti patel, is expected to weigh in later, and warned that the conservatives will live or die by their economic credibility. helen catt, bbc news, birmingham. you heard the prime minister there refer to the obr — that's the office for budget responsibility. ben's here to explain why it's important and why you'll hear it mentioned quite a lot in the coming days. three little letters, but very
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important. it is the independent watchdog that gives a verdict on the health of the economy and the effect government financial plans will have and it gives them weight and credibility. the mini—budget did not include the analysis. it was going to be published alongside other details on november the 23rd which will now happen sooner. the obr was set up by the government in 2010 with thejob of set up by the government in 2010 with the job of assessing economic plans the government comes up with. in a sense, marking the government homework. the obr publishes two forecasts every year, normally ahead of the spring statement and another in the autumn along with the budget. the forecasts give an indication of the health of the economy and how it might perform over the coming five years. it is unusual for a government to make any major economic reforms such as big tax
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cuts without an obr forecast. but the chancellor's mini—budget did not have that analysis which is a major reason markets and investors reacted negatively. they like the watchdog boss mac verdict to reassure them. it is reported the obr offered to write a report that the government declined. after the turmoil with the pound falling and borrowing costs soaring, liz truss met the head of obr, which is an unusual move. we now know we will get the watchdog's verdict before november the 23rd. when exactly is not yet clear. this is part of the government trying to reassure the market still? and steady the ship. the first hearing of the uk covid public inquiry will begin later today to examine the uk's response to coronavirus and the impact of the pandemic. the hearing had originally been scheduled for last month, but was delayed after the death
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of the queen. our health correspondent jim reed reports. on a long wall in westminster, relatives of those who lost their lives to covid have left their marks and memories. sylvia jackson died in the first wave of the pandemic. like so many others, her daughter wants to know if the right decisions were taken at the time. so all kinds of questions and the fact that none of them have been answered yet is precisely the reason why we need this inquiry. i don't know who is responsible for my mum's death. and i want to know. and if they behaved wrongly, i want them held to account. that's only right, that's only right. today, in this room in west london, the process of finding those answers gets under way. the uk covid inquiry is so wide—ranging, it will have to be split into separate sections. the first tackling preparations for a pandemic starts this morning. next month sees the start
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of the second section on political decision—making, including the timing of lockdowns. preliminary hearings this autumn will be followed by full public hearings next year, where ministers and other decision—makers will be called to give evidence. this all matters to people like abi williams. the care home she runs lost residents in the first wave of covid. it is important for us to...for lessons learned, really. we want to know what went wrong, how can it be better handled, and we want to learn from it and to be more prepared in future. covid is still with us, of course. though the fast roll—out of vaccines across the world has cut the risk of hospitalisation and death. doctors say learning lessons now is vital to better understand what happened and to better protect
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ourselves against any future pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. a woman has died after being attacked by dogs at a house in liverpool. it happened yesterday afternoon in the kirkdale area of the city. reporter alison freeman is there. what more can you tell us? merseyside police told us they were called herejust merseyside police told us they were called here just before 4:30pm yesterday to reports a woman aged in her 60s had been attacked by dogs. the force said they were called by the ambulance service and the woman was pronounced dead at the scene. behind me there is a cover across the front of the house. we know the woman died inside the property. she has not yet been named by police to the public although they say her
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next of kin have been told about what happened. the force acted quickly, cordoning off the area to carry out investigations. we understand investigations will be ongoing throughout the day. the police said they are keen to hear from anybody who might have information about what led to the tragedy happening. information about what led to the tragedy happening-— ukrainian troops have broken through russian positions near kherson, a strategic city in a part of southern ukraine annexed by moscow last week. the advance was reported by the russian military our correspondent hugo bachega joins us from kyiv. how significant is this for ukraine? good morning, it is significant because this is the most significant breakthrough for ukrainians in the south since the start of the counteroffensive. after weeks of cou nteroffe nsive. after weeks of fighting counteroffensive. after weeks of fighting and almost no movement in
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military positions in that part of the country. the ukrainians seem to be advancing along the dnipro river, a strategic river. it acts as a natural barrier in that region of kherson. it seems they have recaptured several villages in this area. this progress by the ukrainians threatens supply lines to thousands of russian troops who are positioned in that part of the country. so it is significant. this is what is happening in the south. in the east of the country, the ukrainians are fortifying positions especially around a key town that was being used as a major transport and logistics hub by the russians in the to region. and all these gains
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happening in regions that president putin said would be annexed. it is embarrassing _ putin said would be annexed. it is embarrassing for the russians. very interesting. thank you for the update. north korea has fired a ballistic missile overjapan for the first time in five years. the launch is the fifth in recent days by pyongyang. japan has accused north korea of threatening the security of the region. tougher rules for migrants are expected to be set out by the new home secretary suella braverman later today when she addresses the conservative party conference. so far this year, more than 32,000 people have crossed the english channel on small boats. that's already over 4,000 more than the total for last year. in response, the home secretary will promise to step up efforts to stem the flow of people risking their lives to make the treacherous crossing.
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measures will include working to increase the level of interceptions carried out by the french authorities, providing further british support and co—operation to tackle the criminal gangs responsible and looking at new powers to make it easier to deport those who enter the uk illegally. let's get some reaction from chief executive of the refugee council, enver solomon. good morning. can you explain the scale of this problem?— scale of this problem? there is no doubt this is _ scale of this problem? there is no doubt this is a _ scale of this problem? there is no doubt this is a challenge - scale of this problem? there is no doubt this is a challenge for i scale of this problem? there is no doubt this is a challenge for the i doubt this is a challenge for the government when large numbers of people risk their lives and are being controlled by people smugglers, criminal gangs. it is a serious problem but the question is how we solve it. how do we ensure people are kept safe. these are men, women and children, the majority of whom, through no fault of their own, have lost everything because of war
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and persecution. three quarters who come to the uk seeking safety are granted refugee protection. because these are people in search of safety, we need to come up with solutions that recognise why they come to the uk. the first thing we must do is stop having a war of words with the french and eu and get round the table and negotiate a solution so that people do not have to take dangerous journeys across the channel. i5 to take dangerous “ourneys across the channel._ to take dangerous “ourneys across the channel. is enforcement alone the channel. is enforcement alone the riaht the channel. is enforcement alone the right way? _ the channel. is enforcement alone the right way? i — the channel. is enforcement alone the right way? i do _ the channel. is enforcement alone the right way? i do not— the channel. is enforcement alone the right way? i do not think i the right way? i do not think enforcement _ the right way? i do not think enforcement is _ the right way? i do not think enforcement is the - the right way? i do not think enforcement is the right i the right way? i do not think| enforcement is the right way. the right way? i do not think i enforcement is the right way. if it were, people would stop coming. there have been large amounts of money, multimillions of pounds given to the french to focus on enforcement. an attempt also how to push back. and now the threat of sending people without a fair hearing to rwanda, millions of miles
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away across the globe, treating them no more than human cargo. none of this makes a difference. it is not acting as a deterrent which means the government needs to look at other solutions that recognise the complexity of the challenge which is a global challenge. many people are trying to enter europe across the mediterranean and this is a challenge for the whole of europe because people are seeking safety because people are seeking safety because of wars taking place across the globe. as a result we need to seek solutions with other countries who recognise the nature of the problem as a shared problem with shared solutions to address why people make dangerous journeys. there are reports the new home secretary is planning to stop people who cross the channel from seeking asylum. migrants making thatjourney not being able to claim asylum. i have seen a report in the times newspaper. it is worrying and would mean that this country, a founding
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signatory to the un convention on refugees would effectively be walking away from that convention. imagine that this country, which was a founding signatory of one of the most important international conventions, suddenly says we will walk away. we have not done that to a convention in this way before and i cannot imagine the government would be seriously prepared to do that again. you would be seriously prepared to do that aaain. ., , would be seriously prepared to do thataaain. ., , ., ,, . ., that again. you must appreciate the government — that again. you must appreciate the government has _ that again. you must appreciate the government has to _ that again. you must appreciate the government has to find _ that again. you must appreciate the government has to find a _ that again. you must appreciate the government has to find a route i that again. you must appreciate the government has to find a route outl government has to find a route out of this problem. what is that? absolutely, i recognise that and believe there are solutions. we could have a grown—up conversation with the french, look at providing more safe routes, things like family reunion. if you are an afghan and fleeing the taliban, you cannot get a visa in afghanistan, you have to take a dangerous journey and be controlled by criminal gangs. we
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need safe routes and to work with the french to see if mechanisms for looking at how we assess claims in northern france so they do not need to take dangerous journeys across the channel. i want them to stop as much as the government does. what much as the government does. what can ou much as the government does. what can you tell— much as the government does. what can you tell us _ much as the government does. what can you tell us about _ much as the government does. what can you tell us about the _ much as the government does. what can you tell us about the upsurge in albanian nationals in france at the moment? , . ,, ., , albanian nationals in france at the moment? , . , , ., , ., albanian nationals in france at the moment? , . ,, ., , ., , albanian nationals in france at the moment? ,, ., , ., , ., moment? this appears to be a new trend. moment? this appears to be a new trend- the — moment? this appears to be a new trend. the governments _ moment? this appears to be a new trend. the governments either i moment? this appears to be a new trend. the governments either in i trend. the governments either in london or albania does not fully understand what is going on and do not know if they are albanians from albania or kosovo or other parts. clearly this is something controlled by criminal gangs. we need to ensure the government works with european countries to bear down on the criminal gangs. we also need to remember more than half of those albanians that come to the uk are granted refugee status. and we work with many albanians who were victims
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of trafficking and exploitation and as a result we need to ensure every albanian who comes here is given a fair hearing. at the same time we need to have safe routes. germany had a similar problem and they had managed migration, a short—term visa to allow people to go to germany. that stopped criminal gangs overnight. if this government wants to bring in visas for agricultural workers, they could look at that option with albania.— workers, they could look at that option with albania. thank you very much indeed- _ option with albania. thank you very much indeed. if _ option with albania. thank you very much indeed. if life _ option with albania. thank you very much indeed. if life seems - option with albania. thank you very much indeed. if life seems a i option with albania. thank you very| much indeed. if life seems a dragon this morning and you think you could have a change of scene, newjob, we will bejoined by have a change of scene, newjob, we will be joined by people who are turning that on their heads and having a new start the likes of which he will not believe it. first, let's talk to carol. i am thinking
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red sky in the morning, it is a warning. do we need to be worried? you absolutely still my line. i am sorry! it is a red sky in the morning, taken in the scottish borders. it is ahead of a weather front bringing heavy and persistent rain. already across scotland and northern ireland. through the day it will move south. it will notjust be rain, it is also windy. when you see the green and yellow, it tells you where there are heavy bursts. the rain pushing out of northern ireland. a second front coming will bring more rain. ahead of it, mostly dry in england and wales. a lot of cloud. some bright spells but not too long before the first band of rain arrives and then the second halts over scotland and northern ireland. does not quite get into the
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south—east. scattered showers and blustery. it will be a mild day and also windy. this evening and overnight, if anything the fronts retreat northwards and we see low pressure bringing more heavy rain pushing north. we have two trailing fronts. it will be a mild night, windy. the wind picking up especially in england and wales. tomorrow, the low pressure goes taking the heavy rain. and then we are back into heavy, potentially heavy showers and another windy day. temperatures up to about 19. thanks. do you ever dream about running away? of running away? of course not. very happy here. but everybody thinks what it would be like if they went to do something completely different.
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desert island, sunshine. a nice beach and palm trees. that is not quite the change of scene the next guests are having. they will take remote working to the next level. that's because they are heading off to antarctica to take up jobs that include counting penguins and running the world's most isolated post office. before we talk to them let's find out a little more about their new jobs. music plays.
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i would not go. joining us now are two of the successful applicants clare ballantyne and natalie corbett. good morning. looking at those pictures, are you sure you want to do this? ., , pictures, are you sure you want to do this? . , . ., ,, do this? really excited now. seeing it on video here. _ do this? really excited now. seeing it on video here. really _ do this? really excited now. seeing it on video here. really excited. i it on video here. really excited. what made _ it on video here. really excited. what made you _ it on video here. really excited. what made you apply? - it on video here. really excited. what made you apply? i i it on video here. really excited. what made you apply? ijust i it on video here. really excited. i what made you apply? ijust thought what made you apply? i 'ust thought antarctica has — what made you apply? i 'ust thought antarctica has amazing i what made you apply? ijust thought antarctica has amazing scenery i what made you apply? ijust thought antarctica has amazing scenery and l antarctica has amazing scenery and wildlife _ antarctica has amazing scenery and wildlife and an amazing opportunity to help _ wildlife and an amazing opportunity to help people engage in antarctic issues _ to help people engage in antarctic issues and to raise awareness of climate — issues and to raise awareness of climate change and how it affects
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the continent. i thought it would be an amazing — the continent. i thought it would be an amazing opportunity to spend time there _ an amazing opportunity to spend time there. ., . ., an amazing opportunity to spend time there. ., _, ., ,., an amazing opportunity to spend time there. ., .., . the an amazing opportunity to spend time | there-— the uk there. how did it come about? the uk antarctic heritage _ there. how did it come about? the uk antarctic heritage trust _ there. how did it come about? the uk antarctic heritage trust do _ there. how did it come about? the uk antarctic heritage trust do this i antarctic heritage trust do this every year. the island has been closed to visitors the last two years. because of covid. this is the first year it has reopened. this is the first year i had heard about it. you are in a specific situation. which one hasjust you are in a specific situation. which one has just got married? i which one hasjust got married? i got married injune. this is my honeymoon. on your own? yes. with three lovely ladies stop i am leaving my husband at home to look after the dogs. what does the husband think of it? he is excited for me. as it gets closer to me going he is getting more nervous. it is a once—in—a—lifetime thing. do you have a plan about what life
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might be like there? i you have a plan about what life might be like there?— you have a plan about what life might be like there? i think it will be bus . might be like there? i think it will be busy- we _ might be like there? i think it will be busy. we expect _ might be like there? i think it will be busy. we expect a _ might be like there? i think it will be busy. we expect a lot - might be like there? i think it will be busy. we expect a lot of- be busy. we expect a lot of tourists _ be busy. we expect a lot of tourists. we have a lot ofjobs to do. tourists. we have a lot ofjobs to do we _ tourists. we have a lot ofjobs to do we are — tourists. we have a lot ofjobs to do. we are running the post office and museum and the penguin survey and museum and the penguin survey and shou _ and museum and the penguin survey and shou i_ and museum and the penguin survey and shop. i think it will be a busy time _ and shop. i think it will be a busy time. do— and shop. i think it will be a busy time. ., ., ., ., , time. do a lot of taurus go? it seems off— time. do a lot of taurus go? it seems off the _ time. do a lot of taurus go? it seems off the beaten - time. do a lot of taurus go? it seems off the beaten track. i time. do a lot of taurus go? it i seems off the beaten track. yes it is one of the _ seems off the beaten track. yes it is one of the most _ seems off the beaten track. yes it is one of the most popular- seems off the beaten track. yes it is one of the most popular tourist| is one of the most popular tourist destinations in antarctica. in antarctica!. it is not the destinations in antarctica. i�*i antarctica!. it is not the beach in benidorm. i antarctica!. it is not the beach in iztenidorm-_ antarctica!. it is not the beach in benidorm. ~' . ., benidorm. i think we will welcome 18,000 visitors. _ benidorm. i think we will welcome 18,000 visitors. more _ benidorm. i think we will welcome 18,000 visitors. more than i i 18,000 visitors. more than i realise. they come in small numbers so as not to disturb the wildlife but that is it over the season. fine but that is it over the season. one of our but that is it over the season. one of yourjobs _ but that is it over the season. one of yourjobs is _ but that is it over the season. one of yourjobs is counting penguins. how does that work? i think we will be counting babies as they hatch. throughout the breeding cycle we
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will count — throughout the breeding cycle we will count nests, eggs, chicks that hatch _ will count nests, eggs, chicks that hatch and — will count nests, eggs, chicks that hatch and there will be a lot of observing _ hatch and there will be a lot of observing throughout the cycle. that is important — observing throughout the cycle. t'isgt is important because i guess one of the most important things is to monitor the effects of climate change and what might be happening. it is part of a 25 year survey of the wildlife there, to make sure the work we are doing is not impacting wildlife and how climate change is affecting it. it will be cool to see first hand, it is so big in the news, to be able to witness it from a first—hand perspective. ittrui’htztt news, to be able to witness it from a first-hand perspective.— a first-hand perspective. what did the application — a first-hand perspective. what did the application process _ a first-hand perspective. what did the application process involve? i the application process involve? interviews, practical is? we had an interview— interviews, practical is? we had an interview online and then we went to a selection _ interview online and then we went to a selection day in cambridge where we met— a selection day in cambridge where we met other applicants. the uk antarctic— we met other applicants. the uk antarctic heritage trust put work into make — antarctic heritage trust put work into make sure the team got on well
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together— into make sure the team got on well together so— into make sure the team got on well together so we performed tasks to see how— together so we performed tasks to see how everyone interacted. it was -ood see how everyone interacted. it was good fun _ see how everyone interacted. it was good fun. we see how everyone interacted. it was tood fun. ~ ., see how everyone interacted. it was tood fun. . ., ., , , ., good fun. we had to put up a tent in airs. good fun. we had to put up a tent in pairs- somebody _ good fun. we had to put up a tent in pairs. somebody was _ good fun. we had to put up a tent in pairs. somebody was blindfolded i good fun. we had to put up a tent in| pairs. somebody was blindfolded and the other wearing oven gloves. iwhich the other wearing oven gloves. which is what it is going _ the other wearing oven gloves. which is what it is going to _ the other wearing oven gloves. which is what it is going to be _ the other wearing oven gloves. which is what it is going to be a _ is what it is going to be a bit like! ., , , ., is what it is going to be a bit like! .,, , ., ., like! hopefully not that extreme, but there will _ like! hopefully not that extreme, but there will be _ like! hopefully not that extreme, but there will be problem i like! hopefully not that extreme, | but there will be problem solving. when they put a blindfold on you when you get there, you will realise why that was. that was assessing how you work as a team and work together. you work as a team and work together-— you work as a team and work totether. . , , ., _ you work as a team and work totether. . , , .,,._ together. that is probably the most im tortant together. that is probably the most important thing _ together. that is probably the most important thing that _ together. that is probably the most important thing that went _ together. that is probably the most important thing that went in, i important thing that went in, getting along. important thing that went in, getting along-— important thing that went in, getting along. important thing that went in, tttettinalon. ., ., ~ ., getting along. you did not know each other before? _ getting along. you did not know each other before? no. _ getting along. you did not know each other before? no. it— getting along. you did not know each other before? no. it is— getting along. you did not know each other before? no. it is a _ getting along. you did not know each other before? no. it is a social i other before? no. it is a social experiment in its own right. weird we will spend _ experiment in its own right. weird we will spend christmas _ experiment in its own right. weird we will spend christmas and i experiment in its own right. - c we will spend christmas and new year together. we will spend christmas and new year totether. ~ ., we will spend christmas and new year totether. . . ,, . ., we will spend christmas and new year totether. t . ,, . ., ., , together. what special treats will ou tack? together. what special treats will you pack? what _ together. what special treats will you pack? what luxuries - together. what special treats will you pack? what luxuries can i together. what special treats will you pack? what luxuries can you | you pack? what luxuries can you take? none?
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we had to provide a list of our favourite treats to the heritage trust and they arranged food for this season to be shipped there so there will be surprised treats, hopefully. i there will be surprised treats, hopefully-— there will be surprised treats, ho-efull. . . , ,., hopefully. i am hoping mince pies at christmas. running _ hopefully. i am hoping mince pies at christmas. running the _ hopefully. i am hoping mince pies at christmas. running the post i hopefully. i am hoping mince pies at christmas. running the post office, | christmas. running the post office, the torus you _ christmas. running the post office, the torus you mention, _ christmas. running the post office, the torus you mention, a _ christmas. running the post office, the torus you mention, a lot - christmas. running the post office, the torus you mention, a lot of - christmas. running the post office, | the torus you mention, a lot of them will want to send something with the antarctic stamp. that will want to send something with the antarctic stamp.— antarctic stamp. that is a lot of the business? _ antarctic stamp. that is a lot of the business? i _ antarctic stamp. that is a lot of the business? i expect- antarctic stamp. that is a lot of the business? i expect to - antarctic stamp. that is a lot of the business? i expect to be i antarctic stamp. that is a lot of i the business? i expect to be hand processing — the business? i expect to be hand processing about 80,000 pieces of “wit _ processing about 80,000 pieces of “wit it _ processing about 80,000 pieces of “wit it is _ processing about 80,000 pieces of maii it is a — processing about 80,000 pieces of mail. it is a popular part of a visit — mail. it is a popular part of a visit |— mail. it is a popular part of a visit. ., mail. it is a popular part of a visit. . , ., visit. i read there is a unique aroma. yes. _ visit. i read there is a unique aroma. yes. it _ visit. i read there is a unique aroma. yes. it is _ visit. i read there is a unique aroma. yes. it is not - visit. i read there is a unique aroma. yes. it is not mince i visit. i read there is a unique - aroma. yes. it is not mince pies. penguins and fish.—
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aroma. yes. it is not mince pies. penguins and fish. yes. the penguins roduce a penguins and fish. yes. the penguins produce a smell. _ penguins and fish. yes. the penguins produce a smell. unfortunately, - penguins and fish. yes. the penguins produce a smell. unfortunately, it. produce a smell. unfortunately, it seems _ produce a smell. unfortunately, it seems like — produce a smell. unfortunately, it seems like we will pick up while we are there — seems like we will pick up while we are there i— seems like we will pick up while we are there. i think we are going to stink— are there. i think we are going to stinka— are there. i think we are going to stink a hit— are there. i think we are going to stink a bit when we come back! | are there. i think we are going to stink a bit when we come back! i was auoin to stink a bit when we come back! i was going to say — stink a bit when we come back! i was going to say when — stink a bit when we come back! i was going to say when you _ stink a bit when we come back! i was going to say when you come - stink a bit when we come back! inn—3 going to say when you come back and talk to us when you return but maybe we will do it online! are you up for that? is the wi—fi good enough? i that? is the wi—fi good enough? i don't think there is any. that? is the wi-fi good enough? i don't think there is any. there i that? is the wi-fi good enough? i don't think there is any. there is | don't think there is any. there is no wi-fi but _ don't think there is any. there is no wi-fi but we _ don't think there is any. there is no wi-fi but we will _ don't think there is any. there is no wi-fi but we will produce - don't think there is any. there is no wi-fi but we will produce a i don't think there is any. there is i no wi-fi but we will produce a blog. no wi—fi but we will produce a blog. that is— no wi—fi but we will produce a blog. that is a _ no wi—fi but we will produce a blog. that is a way— no wi—fi but we will produce a blog. that is a way you can keep up with what _ that is a way you can keep up with what you _ that is a way you can keep up with what you are doing. you that is a way you can keep up with what you are doing.— that is a way you can keep up with what you are doing. you can send a ostcard what you are doing. you can send a postcard from _ what you are doing. you can send a postcard from the _ what you are doing. you can send a postcard from the post _ what you are doing. you can send a postcard from the post office. - what you are doing. you can send a postcard from the post office. if - postcard from the post office. if you want practice counting penguins, we have a lot of pigeons outside. can you practise, and we have to be training? hate can you practise, and we have to be trainina ? ~ ., ., ., training? we have to weeks of trainina training? we have to weeks of training in _ training? we have to weeks of training in cambridge - training? we have to weeks of training in cambridge to - training? we have to weeks of training in cambridge to fully l training in cambridge to fully prepare for life in antarctica. hate
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prepare for life in antarctica. we will work with the british antarctic survey— will work with the british antarctic survey to — will work with the british antarctic survey to learn the methodology we will need _ survey to learn the methodology we will need. �* ., survey to learn the methodology we will need. �* . ., ., will need. brilliant and all the best. it sounds _ will need. brilliant and all the best. it sounds really - will need. brilliant and all the| best. it sounds really exciting. coming up on the programme this morning just before 9 o'clock. # just call me. with 25 top a0 singles, more than 5 billion streams worldwide and ia brit award nominations, it's no wonder craig david. career is still going strong after 22 years in the industry. he'll be joining us here on the sofa to chat about his latest music and writing his memoir. time to get the news travel where you are. hello, good morning, this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. many applicants to the windrush compensation scheme are still
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waiting for payments four years after the government wrongly classified them as illegal immigrants. one of those is auckland elwaldo romeo who's lived in the uk since he was four years old. he says trying to get the compensation he's owed has been devastating. hearing the home office turn round and say, you've got no right of abode. it was rather puzzling and it was devastating for me. living in this country, being educated in this country. it needs to be resolved so at least you can breathe, and carry on a life without this big distraction. the home office says it's continuing to work with those affected to pay as much as possible as soon as it can. the inquest into the death of chris kaba, who was shot by the police last month, is due to be opened and adjourned later.
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the unarmed 24—year—old was driving a carflagged as involved in a firearms incident. the officer involved has been suspended and the police watchdog is investigating as a potential homicide. london air ambulance is launching an urgent fundraising appeal to raise £15 million to replace two helicopters. the charity says without public donations, some of the most urgent patients wouldn't be reached in time. a new theatre school's going be created as part of a £1.3 billion regeneration project at olympia. the wetherby arts school will open in 2025. it's part of the new west london cultural district which will also include a live music venue and a theatre. a quick look at the travel situation now. there's a good service all round so far. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a very mild start this morning. there is quite a bit of cloud around but that should start to thin and break.
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a couple of cold fronts sinking south but they fall short of bringing us rain through today. and you can see those isobars quite close together, it is going to be very windy. we will see the cloud lifting and breaking, some sunny spells mixed in there. there is the chance of an isolated shower, largely dry, and the wind gusting 30 to 35 mph. temperatures very warm, 20 celsius the maximum which is above average for the time of year. overnight, it stays very windy. we are still going to see the cloud but again one or two clearer spells in there. should be largely dry, the minimum temperature exceptionally mild, 15 celsius in central london. tomorrow, the cold front finally sinks south but it is going to stay very windy. it will be a dry start but then the rain will move through. through the middle part of the day, wind gusting a0 to 45 mph potentially but that clears, we will get sunshine to end the day and the temperature reaching again
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19, potentially 20 celsius. it is going to be a cooler night as we head into thursday, but plenty of dry weather in the forecast. few showers around and the temperature stays mild. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. exactly this time yesterday we were getting this news. that exactly this time yesterday we were getting this news.— getting this news. that kwasi kwarten: getting this news. that kwasi kwarteng was _ getting this news. that kwasi kwarteng was going - getting this news. that kwasi kwarteng was going to - getting this news. that kwasi| kwarteng was going to change getting this news. that kwasi - kwarteng was going to change his plans in the top rate of tax. and then this morning another change, his statement on debt and how he is going to handle the uk's debt which was going to be at the end of november is now going to be brought forward to. hot november is now going to be brought forward to. ., , , forward to. not sure when but sooner than originally — forward to. not sure when but sooner than originally planned. _ our chief political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster this morning. nick, what can we expect there today? good morning, sally. it has been a
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pretty— good morning, sally. it has been a pretty turbulent conference so far. i pretty turbulent conference so far. i have _ pretty turbulent conference so far. i have actually got the justice secretary with me just now. maybe we can talk about some of this. can i ask you about the broad picture at this conference? when we got here on sunday at the government was sticking to its guns on timing, and policy. in the past 2a hours, you havejunked and policy. in the past 2a hours, you have junked the 45p tax policy and the chancellor is bringing forward his plan on how he is going to bring down debt, has not really undermined the government was my credibility? taste undermined the government was my credibili ? ~ ., undermined the government was my credibili ? ~ . ., , credibility? we have always been in the edition that _ credibility? we have always been in the edition that in _ credibility? we have always been in the edition that in the _ credibility? we have always been in the edition that in the medium - credibility? we have always been in| the edition that in the medium term that the debt to gdp ratio was going to be moving in the the right way, we have got the second lowest in the g7. the chancellor and the prime minister listened to people, we often get criticised for not
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listening but we have listened, he is going to focus on the tax cuts for 30 million people and driving economic growth which ultimately means more money for public services. so i think what they have donein services. so i think what they have done in a good thing, they have shown they are prepared to listen to people. i’m shown they are prepared to listen to eo - le. �* , ., people. i'm interested in how . uickl people. i'm interested in how quickly this— people. i'm interested in how quickly this is _ people. i'm interested in how quickly this is all _ people. i'm interested in how quickly this is all happening. | people. i'm interested in how- quickly this is all happening. this time yesterday the chancellor was still telling us that his medium—term plan was going to be at the end of november. we now think it is going to be this month. do you agree with those ministers telling us privately that the prime minister has been very weakened by this? h0. has been very weakened by this? no, the prime has been very weakened by this? iifr, the prime minister and the chancellor, 95% of the package they set out is in place, a package which will drive economic growth, i fully support it because i think we need to see a different approach, low tax economy that drives growth. taste to see a different approach, low tax economy that drives growth. we have talked about — economy that drives growth. we have talked about that _ economy that drives growth. we have talked about that a _ economy that drives growth. we have talked about that a lot _ economy that drives growth. we have talked about that a lot but _ economy that drives growth. we have talked about that a lot but there - economy that drives growth. we have talked about that a lot but there is i talked about that a lot but there is a big question, the prime minister and chancellor have been in office for a month and already they are having to perform these massive u—turns that they did not want to do, that they were forced to do. that question is really important,
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can the prime minister and chancellor still maintain the authority they need to run the country? authority they need to run the count ? �* , , authority they need to run the count? 2, . ., authority they need to run the count? . ., ,~ country? let's be clear, they have chanced country? let's be clear, they have changed one _ country? let's be clear, they have changed one part _ country? let's be clear, they have changed one part of— country? let's be clear, they have changed one part of a _ country? let's be clear, they have changed one part of a very - changed one part of a very substantial package. within a scheme of the package it is quite a small part. the wider package about supporting businesses and individuals in the most vulnerable individuals in the most vulnerable in society is what we are taking forward, and the ability to focus on those tax cuts for 30 million people, £1200 support for the most vulnerable directly in society, this huge package of support, arguably the biggest package of energy supports to help anywhere in the world, is what the prime minister and chancellor want to focus on. i think that is good that they have made that decision to deal with that so quickly. made that decision to deal with that so ruickl . ~' ., ,., ., made that decision to deal with that so ruickl . ~' ., ., so quickly. thinking to some of your conservative — so quickly. thinking to some of your conservative colleagues _ so quickly. thinking to some of your conservative colleagues right -- - conservative colleagues right —— speaking to some of your conservative colleagues around here, who put pressure on the government to change the 45p u—turn, they think they can now force the government to do other things. how worried are you that the tory backbenches will hold
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the prime minister's vt�*s to the fire and there be more rebellions? we have always had parliamentary democracy in this country, and opposition and backbenchers always hold the feet to the fire, i have taken legislation through parliament and that is what makes our institution strong, parliamentary democracy. so it is right that the chancellor and prime ministers and do notjust parliamentarians but people across the country. let's not get away from the huge package... taste get away from the huge package... we have talked about it a lot. the next big battle seems to be on benefits and how much they should go up by, should it be the rate of inflation or something else? could you justify to the electorate during a cost of living crisis cutting benefit in real terms? i living crisis cutting benefit in real terms?— living crisis cutting benefit in realterms? ~' ., , ., real terms? i think we have shown not 'ust real terms? i think we have shown not just through _ real terms? i think we have shown notjust through protecting - real terms? i think we have shown notjust through protecting the - real terms? i think we have shown l notjust through protecting the most vulnerable from these energy prices
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and global prices but all through a war in ukraine and covid that this government does focus on the most vulnerable in society. i know we will be at the forefront of that, there is a proper process that the work and pensions team go through to decide what the position will be with benefit over the autumn, they are making a statement as they will do in due course and i am not going to be drawn into those decisions, it is for them to do that to work. i had cabinet collective responsibility so i will support the secretary of state.— secretary of state. there is a debate going _ secretary of state. there is a debate going on _ secretary of state. there is a debate going on in _ secretary of state. there is a debate going on in cabinet i secretary of state. there is a - debate going on in cabinet about whether you should raise benefit on the rate of inflation, where do you stand? t the rate of inflation, where do you stand? ., the rate of inflation, where do you stand? . ,. , , ., stand? i have never discussed what is said in cabinet _ stand? i have never discussed what is said in cabinet and _ stand? i have never discussed what is said in cabinet and never- is said in cabinet and never broached... is said in cabinet and never broached. . ._ is said in cabinet and never broached... �* ., , [m broached... are you not tempted? i'm afraid i'm going _ broached... are you not tempted? i'm afraid i'm going to _ broached... are you not tempted? i'm afraid i'm going to resist _ broached... are you not tempted? i'm afraid i'm going to resist that - broached... are you not tempted? i'm afraid i'm going to resist that and - afraid i'm going to resist that and let my colleague to herjob, do that work, and present it to parliament. i would say the underlying principle is that the government have shown is protecting the most vulnerable in
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society. ilet protecting the most vulnerable in socie . ., r' protecting the most vulnerable in socie . ., , ., protecting the most vulnerable in socie . ., i. ., society. let me ask you about something — society. let me ask you about something that _ society. let me ask you about something that the _ society. let me ask you aboutj something that the chancellor society. let me ask you about - something that the chancellor said yesterday which caught people by surprise, hejoked about yesterday which caught people by surprise, he joked about there being a little turbulence in the past ten days. fora a little turbulence in the past ten days. for a lot of people it has not been a little turbulence, mortgage rates have gone up significantly, some people have had house purchases pulled as a result of the increasing rate of borrowing. i did not true that the government has cost them quite a lot of money and this is a lot more than a little turbulence? i lot more than a little turbulence? i think what the chancellor was outlining was the reaction we have seenin outlining was the reaction we have seen in some of the conversations across the media, the conversation we have been having this morning. we have got to be careful about what we assessin have got to be careful about what we assess in the markets, markets do move, the pressure on interest rates, if you look at the economics of it, it is being driven primarily internationally, the interest rates up, the us federal reserve has put the interest rates up to li%, it is a global phenomenon. that puts huge pressure on the markets, we see that
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through the currency movements as well. the bank of england sets interest rates and that isn't independent right for them, rightly. talking about the —— that is an independent right for them. talking about the housing market, the chancellor's changes on stamp duty will help more people onto the housing ladder at lower cost. it housing ladder at lower cost. it will be offset by the increase in the cost of borrowing. fine will be offset by the increase in the cost of borrowing.- will be offset by the increase in the cost of borrowing. one of the thins the cost of borrowing. one of the thin . s we the cost of borrowing. one of the things we see — the cost of borrowing. one of the things we see consistently, - the cost of borrowing. one of the l things we see consistently, people talk about the impact of housing, there is a consistent demand for housing. the housing market is a positive market. we have seen prices rise consistently over the years since the recession that labour brought in at the end of their time in government. the stamp duty change will be good for homeowners and people who want to get onto the housing ladder. the people who want to get onto the housing ladder.— people who want to get onto the housina ladder. ., , , housing ladder. the government seems to be rethinking — housing ladder. the government seems to be rethinking quite _ housing ladder. the government seems to be rethinking quite a _ housing ladder. the government seems to be rethinking quite a lot _ housing ladder. the government seems to be rethinking quite a lot of— housing ladder. the government seems to be rethinking quite a lot of what - to be rethinking quite a lot of what was done when you are northern ireland secretary under boris johnson's government, he ireland secretary under boris johnson's government, be it tax, be it some of its approach to things that benefits. if nadine dorries,
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the former culture secretary, not right that if you want to do all the stuff that was different from boris johnson who won an election, she —— you need to go back to the electorate and ask them to agree with your plans, because they are so different to what you were talking about a few months ago. taste different to what you were talking about a few months ago.- different to what you were talking about a few months ago. we are still deliverin: about a few months ago. we are still delivering on — about a few months ago. we are still delivering on the _ about a few months ago. we are still delivering on the 20 _ about a few months ago. we are still delivering on the 20 19th _ about a few months ago. we are still delivering on the 20 19th manifesto i delivering on the 2019th manifesto certainly in my department. the chancellor _ certainly in my department. the chancellor literally stood up yesterday and said that this government was going to rip up 12 years of slow growth. you government was going to rip up 12 years of slow growth.— years of slow growth. you are talkin: years of slow growth. you are talking about _ years of slow growth. you are talking about tax. _ years of slow growth. you are talking about tax. as - years of slow growth. you are - talking about tax. as conservatives we have all believed in a low tax economy. we have all believed in a low tax econom . �* , ., we have all believed in a low tax economy-— we have all believed in a low tax econom. �*, ., ., ., economy. it's how you do it, you are takin: economy. it's how you do it, you are taking radical— economy. it's how you do it, you are taking radical steps. _ economy. it's how you do it, you are taking radical steps. we _ economy. it's how you do it, you are taking radical steps. we have - economy. it's how you do it, you are taking radical steps. we have got. economy. it's how you do it, you are taking radical steps. we have got an j taking radical steps. we have got an o- ortuni taking radical steps. we have got an opportunity to _ taking radical steps. we have got an opportunity to come _ taking radical steps. we have got an opportunity to come out _ taking radical steps. we have got an opportunity to come out of- taking radical steps. we have got an opportunity to come out of covid - taking radical steps. we have got an | opportunity to come out of covid and looking at the economy growing, getting it going after a long period of stagnation, to drive economic growth and the chancellor has taken the decision to do what the conservatives always believe in to get taxes down and get the economy growing. that is more money in peoples pockets, morejobs for
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peoples pockets, morejobs for people and more taxes to go on public sector payment. i people and more taxes to go on public sector payment.- people and more taxes to go on public sector payment. i think that is no on an — public sector payment. i think that is no on an early _ public sector payment. i think that is no on an early election. - public sector payment. i think that is no on an early election. i - public sector payment. i think that is no on an early election. i don't l is no on an early election. i don't think the public _ is no on an early election. i don't think the public wants _ is no on an early election. i don't think the public wants an - is no on an early election. i don't think the public wants an early i think the public wants an early election, they want us to concentrate on delivering for them at a difficult time globally in terms of inflation. taste at a difficult time globally in terms of inflation.— at a difficult time globally in terms of inflation. we are out of time but i _ terms of inflation. we are out of time but i appreciate _ terms of inflation. we are out of time but i appreciate it. - terms of inflation. we are out of time but i appreciate it. the - time but i appreciate it. the defence of the government saying that, yes, there has been a bit of toing and froing let's say on exactly which part of the growth plan were going to remain, but fundamentally, government ministers are going to insist to us all over the next few days that the majority of the plan is staying and they still think they can make it work. two things i found interesting there, the government is really reluctant to talk about benefits, it does not want to get into the detail of whether or not it is going to put them up by inflation as the last government promised. and brandon lewis does not want an early general
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election, does he? i think this government wants as long as possible to try and get stuff done. and on that topic, liz truss's speech to conference is tomorrow? yes, tomorrow morning, we will get her setting out her grand vision. an interesting backdrop, because i think when you have been prime ministerfor a month, you would expect to come to conference and be on your honeymoon, been a pretty good place, say to the world, here is what i want to do. she is on the back foot going into that speech tomorrow. her big challenge is going tomorrow. her big challenge is going to be to get some of the back when we know a lot of her party are less than happy.— are less than happy. indeed, thank ou ve are less than happy. indeed, thank you very much _ are less than happy. indeed, thank you very much indeed. _ are less than happy. indeed, thank you very much indeed. a _ are less than happy. indeed, thank you very much indeed. a month, . you very much indeed. a month, goodness me! aha, you very much indeed. a month, goodness me!— you very much indeed. a month, goodness me! a lot can happen in a month. goodness me! a lot can happen in a month- four — goodness me! a lot can happen in a month. four weeks _ goodness me! a lot can happen in a month. four weeks ago _ goodness me! a lot can happen in a month. four weeks ago today - goodness me! a lot can happen in a month. four weeks ago today you l goodness me! a lot can happen in a . month. four weeks ago today you were in downing street? incredible. time for the sport. a lot of pressure on this man tonight. i'm just generally liverpool. yes.
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pressure on this man tonight. i'm just generally liverpool.— just generally liverpool. yes, you think about _ just generally liverpool. yes, you think about how _ just generally liverpool. yes, you think about how they _ just generally liverpool. yes, you think about how they are - just generally liverpool. yes, you think about how they are playing | think about how they are playing domestically, they have already lost in europe, in the champions league. no easy fixtures at least when you consider they are playing rangers, they have never played each other before. ., �* , they have never played each other before. . �* , ., ., ., , they have never played each other before-_ big i before. that's extraordinary. big scottish figures _ before. that's extraordinary. big scottish figures have _ before. that's extraordinary. big scottish figures have shaped - before. that's extraordinary. big scottish figures have shaped billj scottish figures have shaped bill shankly and kenny dalglish, they have shaped liverpool. so if you think you can relax into this, think again! two huge british side going head to type. —— had said tonight. for all their history and achievements, this will be the first time liverpool and rangers have faced each other. despite 61 years of rivalry between scottish and english clubs in europe. as we know, rangers and celtic are the two big teams in scottish football. and whilst rangers have faced manchester united in europe previously, celtic taking on manchester city five years ago, this will be a first between these two.
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and one for the history books. it's a huge podium for us to perform, not only for the club but also for the players. as i said before, against a quality side. and it's since many years there was a scottish team playing against an english team. i think the first time in both histories of the club that we are facing each other. so, we are excited to be here and try to get a good result. really good football team, and that's what we have to prepare for. and a team that have had results how they didn't want. so that's what they want to change, definitely. so we expect a proper fight, a real fight so that's what we're prepared for. with the pressure building, results against you, last night's game between leicester and nottingham forest was being dubbed "el sackico".
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such was the difficulties facing both managers but it's brendan rodgers' leicester who are breathing a sigh of relief after a much needed win. judging by the goals you wouldn't have thought they're in trouble. harvey barnes with their second and james maddison with that one, forest now prop up the league. tonight was a season changing game for us. we felt that if we could perform, so we could get the result this evening in a massive derby game, that could be the shot in the arm for us. but we got the performance as well. the intensity right from the very beginning was outstanding so i'm really happy for the players, really happy for the supporters because they suffered when we played nottingham forest last time and tonight was for them. i'm not looking at these [ads and thinking that they don't care. we are just a really fresh group that are trying to come together and like i said in the previous game, we are going through difficult moments that normally you sort of look at pre—season. and we're having to go through that
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process in the most difficult league in the world. so it's tough at the moment, i won't shy away from that. one of the stars from the euros, alessia russo, will be a notable after a freak injury, england batsmenjonny bairstow has confirmed he won't play again this year after having surgery on a broken leg and dislocated ankle. he was in the form of his life this summer, but slipped on a tee box playing golf. he's already been ruled out of this month's t20 world cup and also missed the final test of england's home summer series with south africa. and when sport is yourjob, and you're having to look after your body, how much sport is too much? world number one iga swiatek has critcised the scheduling of events, after annoucing she'll miss a tournament next month, the billiejean king cup, and won't represent poland in glasgow. the situation that we're put in is not comfortable. yeah, it would be great if they could really cooperate next year because it also happened last year.
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i know this is mainly because of covid and all of the changes in schedule, i know also it's kind of tough business wise to find a proper place, but ijust don't think it's going to help us to perform well and to just make a good show, which is the goal of tennis sometimes, to entertain people, you know? so, yeah, i don't like it, for sure. it's interesting that someone of her stature in the game speaks out. those who run the schedule will certainly take notice especially with tennis, it is essentially all year. with tennis, it is essentially all ear. �* , ., year. and they want her there. absolutely. — year. and they want her there. absolutely, you _ year. and they want her there. absolutely, you want - year. and they want her there. absolutely, you want your- year. and they want her there. absolutely, you want your big | year. and they want her there. - absolutely, you want your big names. if they start to select the tournaments they play at, that will have a massive impact.— have a massive impact. literally, es. have a massive impact. literally, yes- thank _ have a massive impact. literally, yes- thank you — have a massive impact. literally, yes. thank you very _ have a massive impact. literally, yes. thank you very much - have a massive impact. literally, | yes. thank you very much indeed. here on breakfast we've been following the story of former rugby league star rob burrow since he was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in late 2019. we've produced a documentary that will air on bbc two,
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following rob burrow and his family as they've adaped to him living with the disease. let's have a look. my dad, he loved rugby as a kid. this is a sensational try. rob burrow was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. suddenly, life is never going to be the same. i love her so much, she did not sign up for this. so proud of everything he's done. at the end of the days, it's still our rob. i'm determined to get better at looking at all the reasons that i've got to live. that's my dad. really, really lovely film, can't wait for everybody to see it because we have been working with the family for a long we have been working with the family fora longtime now. i hope everybody loves it. you can watch rob burrow: living with mnd at 7pm on tuesday 18th october on bbc two and iplayer.
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i watched an early edit last night, it is the most moving... d0 i watched an early edit last night, it is the most moving. . ._ i watched an early edit last night, it is the most moving... do you like it? goodness _ it is the most moving... do you like it? goodness me, _ it is the most moving... do you like it? goodness me, they _ it is the most moving... do you like it? goodness me, they are - it is the most moving... do you like it? goodness me, they are such - it is the most moving... do you like it? goodness me, they are such a l it? goodness me, they are such a wonderful— it? goodness me, they are such a wonderfulfamily. _ it? goodness me, they are such a wonderful family. it _ it? goodness me, they are such a wonderful family. it is _ it? goodness me, they are such a wonderful family. it is like - wonderful family. it is like affirming, it is sad, obviously, they are very open about their experience but itjust makes you so believe in that family —— it is life affirming. they are an astonishing and lovely bunch. you affirming. they are an astonishing and lovely bunch.— and lovely bunch. you learn a lot from them- _ and lovely bunch. you learn a lot from them. it's _ and lovely bunch. you learn a lot from them. it's not _ and lovely bunch. you learn a lot from them. it's notjust - and lovely bunch. you learn a lot from them. it's notjust about. from them. it's not 'ust about robert living _ from them. it's not 'ust about robert living with _ from them. it's notjust about robert living with mnd - from them. it's notjust about i robert living with mnd commits from them. it's notjust about - robert living with mnd commits the whole family, his mum and dad, his community around him, the clubmates, living with the effect that diagnosis. i living with the effect that diagnosis-— living with the effect that diaunosis. ., _ , living with the effect that diaunosis. ., , ., ., diagnosis. i would say it is a love story because — diagnosis. i would say it is a love story because it _ diagnosis. i would say it is a love story because it absolutely, - story because it absolutely, beautifully done.— story because it absolutely, beautifully done. more on that to come here- _ beautifully done. more on that to come here. carol— beautifully done. more on that to come here. carol gave _ beautifully done. more on that to come here. carol gave us - beautifully done. more on that to come here. carol gave us a - beautifully done. more on that to | come here. carol gave us a lovely sunrise, but that is looking a bit cloudier and murkier? i have taken a sunrise away and replaced with a kind of weather we
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are expecting in the next few days, cloudy, wet and windy. windier than it has been in the last few. you can see the amount of rental that we are expecting as we go through the week, not much initially in the south—east. the key is up here, you can see it is southern areas, not much, but in western scotland, we could get up to 200 millimetres of rainfall before the end of this week. we have already had a deluge this morning, hammering down across scotland and northern ireland, all of this cloud wrapped around an area of this cloud wrapped around an area of low pressure. across england and wales is a mostly dry start and mild wherever you are. you can see the extent of the rain crossing scotland and northern ireland. the first one across england and wales, not getting into the far south—eastern quarter. the second one halts across
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southern scotland and northern ireland, bringing more rain. the far north of scotland should brighten up, blustery with scattered showers, and wherever you are it will be windy, especially england and wales. temperatures 13 to 20 degrees. heading on through the evening and overnight, the two weather fronts start to wave north, and an area of low pressure developing drag on these fronts northwards. you can see these fronts northwards. you can see the tail end of them in the west. another windy night, the wind picking up if anything, especially across england and wales, and it's going to be another mild one, rather like the one we have just had. here are the two weather fronts, the low pressure continuing to pull steadily northwards. second when the front is a fairly weak affair and the isobars tell us we are looking at a windy day with gales tell us we are looking at a windy day with gates and exposure. he was the week when the front heading south, the persistent rain clears
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scotland and we are left with a lot of showers. —— here is the week when the front. some of the showers will be heavy and pantry. it will be windy all day even inland but especially over the coasts. temperature wise, cooler in the north and west, as you push further south,... blustery winds and we have got various weather fronts moving across us as well. it will turn fresher for many of us on thursday and friday. something a little bit drier towards the south—east. it is drier towards the south-east. it is still uuite drier towards the south-east. it is still quite mild? _ drier towards the south-east. it is still quite mild? yes, _ drier towards the south-east. it is still quite mild? yes, average - still quite mild? yes, average temperature _ still quite mild? yes, average temperature is _ still quite mild? yes, average temperature is 14 _ still quite mild? yes, average temperature is 14 to - still quite mild? yes, average temperature is 14 to 17 - still quite mild? yes, average temperature is 14 to 17 in - still quite mild? yes, average temperature is 14 to 17 in the | temperature is 14 to 17 in the south, 18 in london, it is you are right. it's that time of year again —
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children in need is round the corner and preparations are well under way. last year, it raised a massive £50 million. let's remind ourselves of some of the highlights. everybody at home, everybody in the audience, i want you shouting! if you're in the building! all right, this for you. # so lift your hand because i know that you can # there will be fire again in the dark
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comedianjason manford, who is one of the hosts of this year's event, joins us now. no pressure, that is quite a cake! it is huge, i have been watching it certainly most of my life. so to be stepping into the big shoes, really looking forward to being involved. they do some great work and it's always a fun night. it is they do some great work and it's always a fun night.— always a fun night. it is quite emotional— always a fun night. it is quite emotional at _ always a fun night. it is quite emotional at times, - always a fun night. it is quite emotional at times, how - always a fun night. it is quite emotional at times, how are | always a fun night. it is quite - emotional at times, how are you going to... t emotional at times, how are you going to- - -_ going to... i don't know, i was aoian going to... i don't know, i was aoain a going to... i don't know, i was going a minute _ going to... i don't know, i was going a minute ago _ going to... i don't know, i was going a minute ago watching l going to... i don't know, i was i going a minute ago watching that clip from that documentary! you've just got to hold it together and get through it, and be there for the greater good and get everybody through. that's the thing about children in need as you watch it, it is so good at tempering the two. we have a laugh, we are therefore entertainment, but we are also there for a proper reason. eat} entertainment, but we are also there for a proper reason.—
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for a proper reason. 50 million quid last ear. for a proper reason. 50 million quid last year- i — for a proper reason. 50 million quid last year. i know, _ for a proper reason. 50 million quid last year. i know, incredible. - for a proper reason. 50 million quid last year. i know, incredible. evenl last year. i know, incredible. even at a time when _ last year. i know, incredible. even at a time when people _ last year. i know, incredible. even at a time when people were - last year. i know, incredible. even. at a time when people were already starting to suffer with the cost of living. t starting to suffer with the cost of livina. ~' ., starting to suffer with the cost of livina. ~' . ., ._ , starting to suffer with the cost of livina. ~ . ., ._ , , living. i think we have always seen that with the _ living. i think we have always seen that with the public, _ living. i think we have always seen that with the public, haven't - living. i think we have always seen that with the public, haven't we? i that with the public, haven't we? every time you do something, whether it is this or comic relief or unicef, soccer aid, it is this or comic relief or unicef, socceraid, people it is this or comic relief or unicef, soccer aid, people come out and help, that is incredible. i saw it in lockdown, that first lockdown, everyone was worried and scared and yet, communities help to communities, and people made sure the vulnerable were looked after. i think when it hits the fan, as it were, i think this country is there for each other.— were, i think this country is there for each other. brings out the best of all of us- _ for each other. brings out the best of all of us- i— for each other. brings out the best of all of us. i think _ for each other. brings out the best of all of us. i think so, _ for each other. brings out the best of all of us. i think so, yeah. - of all of us. i think so, yeah. let's talk — of all of us. i think so, yeah. let's talk about _ of all of us. i think so, yeah. let's talk about the - of all of us. i think so, yeah. let's talk about the t-shirt l of all of us. i think so, yeah. i let's talk about the t-shirt you of all of us. i think so, yeah. - let's talk about the t-shirt you are let's talk about the t—shirt you are wearing, it's really rather splendid. i wearing, it's really rather splendid-— wearing, it's really rather s-lendid. . ., , splendid. i have never worn t-shirt on television. _ splendid. i have never worn t-shirt on television. you _ splendid. i have never worn t-shirt on television. you are _ splendid. i have never worn t-shirt on television. you are moving - splendid. i have never worn t-shirt i on television. you are moving again!
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sorry! on television. you are moving again! sor ! �* ., on television. you are moving again! sor ! �* . ., , on television. you are moving again! sor ! �* . , on television. you are moving again! sor ! ~ . , , sorry! and that has been designed es-eciall ? sorry! and that has been designed especially? yes, _ sorry! and that has been designed especially? yes, the _ sorry! and that has been designed especially? yes, the artist - sorry! and that has been designed especially? yes, the artist from i sorry! and that has been designed i especially? yes, the artist from the tom gates book, _ especially? yes, the artist from the tom gates book, liz, _ especially? yes, the artist from the tom gates book, liz, i— especially? yes, the artist from the tom gates book, liz, i think i especially? yes, the artist from the tom gates book, liz, i think as i especially? yes, the artist from the tom gates book, liz, i think as the| tom gates book, liz, i think as the selling them. —— is there. i would say that the large is quite snug, so go extra—large! they are being sold at asda. 50 go extra-large! they are being sold at asda. ., , ., ., at asda. so what time slot have you aot, at asda. so what time slot have you rot, and at asda. so what time slot have you got. and who — at asda. so what time slot have you got. and who are — at asda. so what time slot have you got, and who are you _ at asda. so what time slot have you got, and who are you with? - at asda. so what time slot have you got, and who are you with? i i at asda. so what time slot have you got, and who are you with? i am i at asda. so what time slot have you | got, and who are you with? i am with mail, got, and who are you with? i am with mail. which — got, and who are you with? i am with mail. which is— got, and who are you with? i am with mail, which is great. _ got, and who are you with? i am with mail, which is great. -- _ got, and who are you with? i am with mail, which is great. -- i _ got, and who are you with? i am with mail, which is great. -- i am i got, and who are you with? i am with mail, which is great. -- i am with i mail, which is great. —— i am with mel. graham is not doing it this year because of a diary clash so i am in his shoes, the middle slot. he is still going to do something with the big red chair. i was posting about it online yesterday and lots of people are very supportive but people are worried at this time of year. and in general with living costs, how we are going to find even
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a fiver to donate to children in need. nobody is after your fiver. a fiver to donate to children in need. nobody is after yourfiver. if you are worried this winter about your electricity bills, nobody at children in need once yourfiver if you are worried about it. , that is not what they are after. i tried to book center parcs and it is fully booked, so there are still people who have some money. is trying to get some out of those people. you can go online and donate 50p, a pound, if you going past the supermarket through a great income and that is what it is. even if you are struggling and you think you have got nothing, just come and watch the show, it is for everyone.
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it's showing you all the great work that children in need do. —— if you are going past the supermarket, you can throw a quid in. i know a lot about the show but i cannot tell you anything. it will be spectacular, it will be great, jon! i love it when you see all of the schoolkids getting involved and people doing mad stuff, that is what i love. look on the website and see what you can do this year. it's a time when we need it the most, some of the charities that we are dealing with, something like four in five charities are saying that not only are they dealing with their core projects, in their communities, they are also having to deal with the essentials, feed kids and clothe kids and sort toiletries out, stuff which is not their mainjob. a lot of them are now dealing with mental health. it might not be their main call think that the charity is doing
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but they are dealing with mental health of children as well. so if you are worried about cost of living and you are a grown up, imagine what it must be like being a kid and hearing these big numbers and your parents being worried. i have been there myself as a kid, i grew up in a below poverty line childhood, and my parents stressed and worried. i wouldn't wish it on anybody, it was awful. ~ ., wouldn't wish it on anybody, it was awful. . ., ., ,, wouldn't wish it on anybody, it was awful. . ., ., ~ , .,~ ., awful. what do your kids make of the fact that you — awful. what do your kids make of the fact that you are _ awful. what do your kids make of the fact that you are doing _ awful. what do your kids make of the fact that you are doing this, - awful. what do your kids make of the fact that you are doing this, on i awful. what do your kids make of the fact that you are doing this, on a i fact that you are doing this, on a dead proud?— fact that you are doing this, on a dead aroud? , ., ., ., ., dead proud? they are over the moon, to be honest- — dead proud? they are over the moon, to be honest. hopefully— dead proud? they are over the moon, to be honest. hopefully they - dead proud? they are over the moon, to be honest. hopefully they are i to be honest. hopefully they are going to come down and watch the show here at media city. it feels like a very big moment, i think. and just i think, when you have been in a career as long as i have, nearly 25 years, there are not many surprises that come along. you just get along with things and do your job and then someone rings you up and says, will you host children in need? and you think, gosh! lguihat
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and says, will you host children in need? and you think, gosh! what a moment to — need? and you think, gosh! what a moment to be _ need? and you think, gosh! what a moment to be part _ need? and you think, gosh! what a moment to be part of. _ need? and you think, gosh! what a moment to be part of. brilliant, i moment to be part of. brilliant, congratulations, we look forward to it. and those t—shirts, very important, are available, modelled byjason. i’m important, are available, modelled b jason. �* ., ., ., ., by jason. i'm glad you have not got one on, by jason. i'm glad you have not got one on. we — by jason. i'm glad you have not got one on, we look— by jason. i'm glad you have not got one on, we look exactly _ by jason. i'm glad you have not got one on, we look exactly the i by jason. i'm glad you have not got one on, we look exactly the same. | one on, we look exactly the same. you look like the after picture! i’m you look like the after picture! i'm much about _ you look like the after picture! i'm much about that! —— i'm not sure about that! much about that! -- i'm not sure about that!— about that! after what, is the question? — about that! after what, is the question? those _ about that! after what, is the question? those t-shirts i about that! after what, is the question? those t-shirts are| question? those t-shirts are available _ question? those t-shirts are available online. _ question? those t-shirts are available online. if— question? those t-shirts are available online. if you i question? those t-shirts are| available online. if you would question? those t-shirts are i available online. if you would like to get fundraising ahead of the appeal show on the 18th of november, go to the website. it is appeal show on the 18th of november, go to the website.— go to the website. it is a now so ou go to the website. it is a now so you have _ go to the website. it is a now so you have got — go to the website. it is a now so you have got time _ go to the website. it is a now so you have got time to _ go to the website. it is a now so you have got time to staggeri go to the website. it is a now so | you have got time to stagger any giving that you are able to provide.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. our headlines today. another change to the government's financial plans — after a u—turn on the top rate of tax, now the chancellor is bringing forward an announcement on cutting the uk's debts. a public inquiry into the covid—19 pandemic begins today.
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it's likely to last more than two years and hearfrom bereaved families as well as senior politicians and scientists. tighter laws on migrants — people who cross the channel illegally could be banned from claiming asylum. one for the history books as two british sides meet for the first time this evening. liverpool host rangers in the champions league. he's the r&b dj with an mbe. craig david on stage shows, a royal performance and 22 years in the industry. he will be here with us. good morning, a mile start. we have heavy rain in scotland and northern ireland which is moving southwards and eastwards to all but the far south—east of england. and it will
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be windy wherever you are. all the details later. it's tuesday, the 4th of october. our main story. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng is to make a further change to his financial plans and bring forward an announcement on the uk's debts. he was facing mounting criticism for insisting the details would not be published until late november. a new date is expected to be confirmed today. it follows yesterday's dramatic u—turn on the top rate of income tax, as our political correspondent helen catt reports. it's fantastic to be here with you this evening. the prime minister was out at events on the conference fringe last night, rallying supporters. so, too, was the chancellor. but the night before, they had had a meeting that ended in a major u—turn when they backtracked on a headline pledge to scrap the 45p top rate of tax for the highest earners. in her first interview since, liz truss told the bbc that the government was listening.
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we are also a listening government, nick, that do listen to people. that do reflect on where we could have done things better, and i have said that about laying the groundwork, i have said that about the specific feedback we have had on the 45p tax rate. now there has been a new reversal. just yesterday on this programme, the chancellor committed to when he would set out his debt plan. we are going to have a medium—term plan that is going to come out, as i've said, at the end of november. and all those plans will be set out in fuller detail there. sources have told the bbc he will now do it sooner than the end of november. he had been under pressure to speed the statement up to help calm the markets. but there could be fresh trouble brewing about benefits. under borisjohnson, there was a pledge to raise them in line with inflation. liz truss won't commit to that. we are working very closely with the obr.
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it's important that we have a forecast to go with that plan, and that is something the chancellor is working on. but you will bring it i forward if you could? i am a very clear that we have committed to having a proper obr forecast to reducing debt as a proportion of gdp over time. a number of conservative mps have already said they have concerns. and the immediate criticisms haven't quite gone away, either. the former home secretary, priti patel, is expected to weigh in later, and warned that the conservatives will live or die by their economic credibility. helen catt, bbc news, birmingham. chief political correspondent nick eardley is at the conservative party conference in birmingham. another day, another u—turn of types on the timing of the announcement. how damaging is this proving to be for the conservatives? i do how damaging is this proving to be for the conservatives?— for the conservatives? i do not think there _ for the conservatives? i do not think there is _ for the conservatives? i do not think there is any _ for the conservatives? i do not think there is any doubt i for the conservatives? i do not think there is any doubt it i for the conservatives? i do not think there is any doubt it is i think there is any doubt it is damaging for the government. a month
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into office the prime minister and chancellor are being forced to do things they did not want to do. let's be clear, the chancellor did not want to u—turn on the 45p tax policy, the income tax cut for people on the highest salaries. he resisted the idea of bringing forward his plan to this month, which was going to set out how he will bring down debt in the longer term. he is being forced to do stuff, mostly by people here, conservative backbenchers making it clear what they are not happy with. what i find interesting is the backbenchers think they can force the government hand on other things. there is a debate coming about benefits and how much they should go up benefits and how much they should go up by. the last government under borisjohnson said they should go up by inflation and that is the current policy. other options are being
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discussed by liz truss which is putting benefits up by the average salary increase which would be less and effectively mean a real terms cut to benefit payments. that is a battle raging. tory backbenchers think they can defeat the government on. we had damien green telling the bbc this morning he thinks the prime minister would lose a vote in parliament on that issue. there is also a feeling that the government is doing a lot of things the last government did not want to do. nadine dorries, former culture secretary, said there should be a general election because this government is ripping up so many plans of the last administration under borisjohnson. we had half an hour ago from thejustice secretary hour ago from the justice secretary brandon lewis and i put to him that idea it was time for an election. taste idea it was time for an election. we are still delivering on the 2019
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manifesto. are still delivering on the 2019 manifesto-— are still delivering on the 2019 manifesto. ., . ., , manifesto. the chancellor stood up esterda manifesto. the chancellor stood up yesterday and _ manifesto. the chancellor stood up yesterday and said _ manifesto. the chancellor stood up yesterday and said the _ manifesto. the chancellor stood up yesterday and said the governmentj yesterday and said the government would rip up 12 years of slow economic growth.— would rip up 12 years of slow economic growth. you are talking about tax- _ economic growth. you are talking about tax- l _ economic growth. you are talking about tax. i have _ economic growth. you are talking about tax. i have been _ economic growth. you are talking about tax. i have been on i economic growth. you are talking i about tax. i have been on broadcasts and media _ about tax. i have been on broadcasts and media as a cabinet minister and believe _ and media as a cabinet minister and believe in _ and media as a cabinet minister and believe in a — and media as a cabinet minister and believe in a low tax economy. it is how ou believe in a low tax economy. it is how you do _ believe in a low tax economy. it is how you do it- _ believe in a low tax economy. it is how you do it. as _ believe in a low tax economy. it is how you do it. as we _ believe in a low tax economy. it is how you do it. as we come i believe in a low tax economy. it is how you do it. as we come out of| how you do it. as we come out of covid and — how you do it. as we come out of covid and look _ how you do it. as we come out of covid and look to _ how you do it. as we come out of covid and look to get _ how you do it. as we come out of covid and look to get the i how you do it. as we come out of| covid and look to get the economy growing _ covid and look to get the economy growing after a period of arguably stagnation in the economy to drive economic— stagnation in the economy to drive economic growth and the chancellor has taken _ economic growth and the chancellor has taken a — economic growth and the chancellor has taken a decision to get taxes down _ has taken a decision to get taxes down and — has taken a decision to get taxes down and growth moving which is good for the _ down and growth moving which is good for the economy. more jobs for people — for the economy. more jobs for people. ultimately more tax to go on public— people. ultimately more tax to go on public services to help people in the future. | public services to help people in the future-— public services to help people in the future. ~ . ., , ., the future. i think that was a way of sa ina the future. i think that was a way of saying no _ the future. i think that was a way of saying no to — the future. i think that was a way of saying no to an _ the future. i think that was a way of saying no to an early - the future. i think that was a way of saying no to an early election. | the future. i think that was a way| of saying no to an early election. i think the public want us focused on delivering — think the public want us focused on delivering them in a difficult time economically with global pressure on inflation _ economically with global pressure on inflation and energy prices. that was the justice _ inflation and energy prices. trust was the justice secretary effectively saying no to an early
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election. what does that mean? two years until the next. in that time, liz truss will try to get some of her controversial policies through. all the while, she knows a lot of mps are opposed to them and will make life difficult for the new prime minister.— the first preliminary hearing of the uk covid public inquiry will begin later today to examine the uk's response to coronavirus and the impact of the pandemic. the hearing had originally been scheduled for last month, but was delayed after the death of the queen. our health correspondent jim reed reports. on a long wall in westminster, relatives of those who lost their lives to covid have left their marks and memories. sylvia jackson died in the first wave of the pandemic. like so many others, her daughter wants to know if the right decisions were taken at the time. so, all kinds of questions and the fact that none of them have
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been answered yet is precisely the reason why we need this inquiry. i don't know who is responsible for my mum's death. and i want to know. and if they behaved wrongly, i want them held to account. that's only right, that's only right. today, in this room in west london, the process of finding those answers gets under way. the uk covid inquiry is so wide—ranging, it will have to be split into separate sections. the first tackling preparations for a pandemic starts this morning. next month sees the start of the second section on political decision—making, including the timing of lockdowns. preliminary hearings this autumn will be followed by full public hearings next year, where ministers and other decision—makers will be called to give evidence. this all matters to people like abi williams. the care home she runs
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lost residents in the first wave of covid. it is important for us to...for lessons learned, really. we want to know what went wrong, how can it be better handled, and we want to learn from it and to be more prepared in future. covid is still with us, of course. though the fast roll—out of vaccines across the world has cut the risk of hospitalisation and death. doctors say learning lessons now is vital to better understand what happened and to better protect ourselves against any future pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. a woman has died after being attacked by dogs at a house in liverpool. it happened yesterday afternoon in the kirkdale area of the city. reporter alison freeman is there. what more can you tell us?
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good morning, merseyside police told us that they were called here yesterday just us that they were called here yesterdayjust before half past four to reports of a woman aged in her 60s having been attacked by dogs. the force said they were called by the ambulance service and the woman was pronounced dead on the scene. you can see the green covering on the house, the house where the woman died. she has not been named yet but we know her next of kin have been informed. in a statement the force said they understand the shark it will have cause to the community and they will be continuing investigations today. they call on anyone with information to come forward to help them with their investigation.— tougher rules for migrants are expected to be set out by the new home secretary suella braverman later today when she addresses the tory party conference.
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more than 32,000 people have crossed the english channel in small boats so far this year. paris correspondent lucy williamson has been speaking to people in northern france about the growing popularity of this route into the uk. it is 3am and this french patrol are tracking their target. two people smugglers spotted by a uk—funded drone. they are half a mile away, swiftly preparing a boat to take migrants across the channel. a uk—funded buggy gets the patrol there in minutes. the smugglers have already fled. but they have lost their boat, their fuel and their motor to the patrol. this journey tonight is over. french patrols are now stopping around half these crossings, but they are still attracting more migrants and new, more efficient smuggling networks run by albanians. translation: i don't know if it is the albanian mafia i
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in the uk, but there are a lot of albanian smugglers organising crossings. with prices of 3,000 to 4,000 euros per person and 40 people in a boat, do the maths. it is even more lucrative than drug trafficking and with lighter criminal charges. albanian customers have been filling cafes and hotels around the station in dunkirk. i see a lot of albanian people come here. more and more. maybe double or triple compared to last year. and year after year, there are people and people coming and coming who say there are no people in albania any more. smugglers have extended their operations along this coastline to avoid daily patrols from land, sea and air. this coastline has pulled in resources year after year — vehicles, technology, foot patrols. politicians change, strategies shift and, still, the number of people crossing this channel rises.
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and here in the camps, the uk government's latest deterrent, deportation to rwanda, isn't working. this crossing is sold to the solution to insurmountable problems and that trumps any kind of risk. lucy williamson, bbc news, calais. here's carol. it was not quite so cold this morning. that is right, many started in double figures. some starting at 17 degrees. it will be a mild day and the next few days, more windy, and looking at rain. heavy rain currently across scotland and northern ireland will move south. the second front behind that will also bring rain which. across parts of scotland and northern ireland in the afternoon. rain does not get to
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the afternoon. rain does not get to the far south—east. it clears the far north of scotland where we have showers. a windy day wherever you are. this evening, showers in the south—west. the south—eastern quarter largely dry, and then we run into rain in wales, northern england, northern ireland, central and southern scotland with scattered showers in far north of scotland. overnight, these weather fronts migrate northwards if anything. tangled up in low pressure that also is heading north. and you can see further rain coming into the west. the wind is picking up especially in england and wales. it will be a mild night. a mild start tomorrow and the rain moves away from scotland and moves to the south—east. as it clears, blustery showers, some thundery. and a windy day with gales thundery. and a windy day with gates in exposure and a high temperature
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of about 19. here on breakfast we brought you the story of tony hickmott — a man with autism and a learning disability who's been held in a secure hospital for almost 22 years. he was just 23 when he was first detained following a mental health crisis and has been largely held in solitary confinement ever since. now, at last, there's good news, as tony has been found what they hope will be a new home for life. breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin reports. you're coming home. a new house is taking shape in brighton. dream come true. a dream come true. a new home for pam and roy's son, tony. it's happening now. tony's going to come home. yeah. you've waited so long. yeah. decades. this is tony hickmott. last year, we had to go to court
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to be able to report how he had been detained in a secure hospitalfor 21 years — not because he's a criminal, but because he's autistic. who do you love? mum. that's it — who's boy are you? mum's. put yourthumb up. last november, his parents' long fight to bring their son home ended in the court of protection, where a judge said authorities must act. and now, finally, pam and roy are about to welcome tony back to brighton. it's his home for life, right? this is his home for life. a real home. a real home, his home. that he hasn't got to share with anybody. without the noise, the screaming and the hanging of doors, the alarms. just get him home and every day's going to be a bonus. i know he's going to do well. is this tony's old room? tony was born and raised here. he's going to have his big tv.
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but he was sectioned in a mental health crisis when he was 23. tony's clothes all in here. they were told it would likely be for nine months. it's now been more than two decades. last year, two whistle—blowers spoke to the bbc, revealing the trauma of many of those years. i don't even know how they do it — the patients, i mean. _ i don't know how they cope. it was almost like a solitary confinement prisoner. a very basic daily life. just 24/7 in that room. i do believe tony was probably the loneliest person living in that hospital — definitely. since they spoke out, tony has celebrated yet another birthday inside. his cards on top of a tv behind a perspex screen. he isn't allowed the remote control. a life with no autonomy in a room which became his world. he's just stuck in a time warp. he's got so much to learn and catch up on. he's going to have choices back.
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when people ask about my son, they ask where he is, i tell them. and they say, "why is he there for 20 years? what was he done?" and i say he's done nothing. they say, "he must have committed a crime. he must have done something." i say he's done nothing. they say, "why is he there?" i say, "because he's autistic." it's not bad behaviour, it needs not met. a team is being recruited to support tony here in brighton. they'll be trained in autism and carefully manage his environment. among them, chris. i listen to pam and roy a lot and can't even- comprehend it, really. from day one, when i met him, ijust knew that he wasn't i the person that maybe some people had made him out to be. _ so i felt completely- relaxed and kind of ready to build that relationship. you're going to give him his whole new life? yeah. i think his world is quite small at the moment, you know. . i think there's so much
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opportunity for him. i i think there's a whole world out there that can really help him i become the person that he can be. he was always meant to be? yeah. the nhs admits £11 million has been spent keeping tony detained, and he's just one of around 2000 people held in such institutions. a select committee report last year called for them all to be closed and replaced with more appropriate support in the community. but that has to be paid for by local authorities. it has taken far too long. it's complicated to try and get all the different elements in place. yet we have a responsibility. absolutely, as a society, we have a responsibility to look after these people to the optimal level we can. and the funding is really challenging to find to achieve that. so, at last, tony's for ever home is taking shape. so deserves it, pam. yeah _ it's just a short drive from his mum and dad. you can't wait for tony to be able
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to make his own cup of tea. yeah. freedom. get up when he wants to. yeah _ it is a world away from a life in solitary confinement 100 miles from home. it should never be this| hard, jayne, should it? you know, i don't think tony should have ever really gone away. - he's been forgotten. not forgotten now, pam. no, he's not. no. you never gave up hope? no. never. no. i think if we had given up hope, i don't think tony would be alive. i think he would have done himself in. he wants to go with me down to the beer garden. i'll have a pint and he'll have a half and a cheese roll. that's what he talks about? that's what he wants, yeah, and a cheese roll. you've got so much to look forward to now. it'll be like heaven. it will be. jayne joins us now.
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how does someone get stuck in the system like this? how how does someone get stuck in the system like this?— how does someone get stuck in the system like this? how did it happen? ton was system like this? how did it happen? tony was brought _ system like this? how did it happen? tony was brought up _ system like this? how did it happen? tony was brought up happily - system like this? how did it happen? tony was brought up happily at - system like this? how did it happen? tony was brought up happily at home with lots of support, mum and dad, special school. with lots of support, mum and dad, specialschool. he with lots of support, mum and dad, special school. he became a teenager and like a lot of people with learning disabilities struggled to the transition in adulthood. at that point his mum and dad needed help. there was a challenging behaviour they needed support with. he was detained under the mental health act but there are fundamental problems with that model of care, acknowledged by government. the first is that once you take someone with autism and learning disabilities away from everybody they know and everything they understand, they will not get better, they will be used to detain them longer. the second problem is when that person is deemed fit for release, they will probably need a lot of support in the community and if it is not there, what then? tony
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was deemed fit for release in 2013, years ago. but the community support package was not there until now. that is why they went to court to fight for. the care team met for the first time yesterday. huge news for the family but a long way to go because it will be difficult. tony is not alone, with 2000 people stuck in units. there have been eight reports and reviews by government and the nhs since 2011, since the winterbourne view scandal, promising a reduction in numbers and those promises have not been met. what do the government say? a statement last night said they are committed to bringing numbers inside down but are not committed to closing the units which has been called for. they said changes to the mental health act and how it applies to people with
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learning disabilities, making its way through parliament, should bring numbers down by half by 2024 and instead focus on building community support which is what needed. we will talk to you again in a moment. with the numbers there, there are people in this situation including formerly alexis quinn who has autism and was detained in mental health facilities. that was three years you are held? , . .,, facilities. that was three years you are held? , . ., , . , are held? yes, almost four years i was detained _ are held? yes, almost four years i was detained in _ are held? yes, almost four years i was detained in units, _ are held? yes, almost four years i was detained in units, same - are held? yes, almost four years i was detained in units, same story| are held? yes, almost four years i i was detained in units, same story as tony and _ was detained in units, same story as tony and the — was detained in units, same story as tony and the same story as thousands of us who— tony and the same story as thousands of us who remain detained and are living _ of us who remain detained and are living in_ of us who remain detained and are living in fear the detention could happen— living in fear the detention could happen again because of the power structures— happen again because of the power structures that enable that to happen— structures that enable that to happen are still there. how structures that enable that to happen are still there. how did you manaue to happen are still there. how did you manage to get _ happen are still there. how did you manage to get out? _ happen are still there. how did you manage to get out? i _ happen are still there. how did you manage to get out? i was - happen are still there. how did you manage to get out? i was not - manage to get out? i was not released like tony. i had been kept in for years and was sectioned for
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another year. in for years and was sectioned for anotheryear. in in for years and was sectioned for another year. in the end i could not tolerate it and had to escape the country. you literally escape the country? i escaped the unit, took a ferry to france, flew into dubai and landed in lagos a couple of days later. you are speaking _ in lagos a couple of days later. you are speaking from rotterdam. how come you are there and how are you doing? i come you are there and how are you doin: ? . , come you are there and how are you doin t ? ., , ,., . come you are there and how are you doinu? ., , ,y come you are there and how are you doing? i am still impacted by what has happened- _ doing? i am still impacted by what has happened. and _ doing? i am still impacted by what has happened. and tony _ doing? i am still impacted by what has happened. and tony will - doing? i am still impacted by what has happened. and tony will need | doing? i am still impacted by what. has happened. and tony will need a lot of support, we all world. unfortunately the support does not remain in the community. still impacted by the experience but i currently work for the rick —— the restraint reduction programme. i am here working at looking at ways we can impact the system in any way we can. ~ . ., can impact the system in any way we can. ~ ., ., , ., can impact the system in any way we can. ~ ., ., y., “ can impact the system in any way we can. ~ . ., ~ . can. what do you think about the units can. what do you think about the unns ou can. what do you think about the units you were _ can. what do you think about the
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units you were in _ can. what do you think about the units you were in and _ can. what do you think about the units you were in and tony - can. what do you think about the units you were in and tony was i can. what do you think about the i units you were in and tony was in? is there a place for them?- is there a place for them? there is no lace is there a place for them? there is no place for _ is there a place for them? there is no place for them. _ is there a place for them? there is no place for them. we _ is there a place for them? there is no place for them. we saw- is there a place for them? there is no place for them. we saw on - is there a place for them? there is no place for them. we saw on the | no place for them. we saw on the recent panorama. the structures inside these places, they are oppressive. they tell you you are sick, ill, faulty. that enable staff to other you. staff are under pressure with not much time and in a system that says these people are sick, there is a pressure which enables restraint and seclusion which enables long—term segregation. for me, there were times when i was restrained all day long or kept in a room with a mattress and fed on the floor. this is enabled because we are othered, not seen as ordinary people. untilwe are othered, not seen as ordinary people. until we are supported in the community, this will continue, i am afraid. i
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the community, this will continue, i am afraid. ., ., . the community, this will continue, i amafraid. ., ., . ., the community, this will continue, i am afraid. ., ., . ., . ~ am afraid. i do not want you to talk about things _ am afraid. i do not want you to talk about things you — am afraid. i do not want you to talk about things you are _ am afraid. i do not want you to talk about things you are not _ am afraid. i do not want you to talk i about things you are not comfortable talking about but when you look back at that time, what are the moments, times that will forever stay with you? times that will forever stay with ou? , ., ., you? they are for ever with me. i cannot get _ you? they are for ever with me. i cannot get rid _ you? they are for ever with me. i cannot get rid of— you? they are for ever with me. i cannot get rid of them, _ you? they are for ever with me. i cannot get rid of them, cannot i cannot get rid of them, cannot escape them. the banging, screaming i was doing. you cannot even imagine. your pants being ripped down. the injections, ten people holding you down. the sweat, the smell of them are new. minutes that feel like hours, days feel like years, locked alone. the worse thing is knowing you are not worth anything. it is that ijust cannot get rid of. anything. it is that i 'ust cannot get rid at anything. it is that i 'ust cannot get tie at get rid of. alexis, your story is incredible _ get rid of. alexis, your story is incredible to _ get rid of. alexis, your story is incredible to listen _ get rid of. alexis, your story is incredible to listen to. - get rid of. alexis, your story is incredible to listen to. i - get rid of. alexis, your story is incredible to listen to. i am . incredible to listen to. i am curious to know what is next for you? i curious to know what is next for ou? ., . curious to know what is next for ou? ~' ., ., curious to know what is next for ou? ~ . ., . you? i think at the moment, we are t int to
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you? i think at the moment, we are trying to push _ you? i think at the moment, we are trying to push forward _ you? i think at the moment, we are trying to push forward changes - you? i think at the moment, we are trying to push forward changes to i trying to push forward changes to the mental health act. we are worried government will use this. the underpinnings of it are good in the sense that you will not be able to be detained for treatment for autism and learning disability, but without community support where will those people go? will it be prison, people given a mental health diagnosis to enable detention of the mental health capacity act will be used to enable detention? i am used to enable detention? i am focused on _ used to enable detention? i am focused on that _ used to enable detention? i am focused on that at _ used to enable detention? i am focused on that at the - used to enable detention? i am focused on that at the moment. thank you. alexis is talking about her future so powerfully. what about tony's future? you spent time with his family. this transition. what does it look like?— his family. this transition. what does it look like? there will be a hute does it look like? there will be a huge amount _ does it look like? there will be a huge amount of— does it look like? there will be a j huge amount of round-the-clock huge amount of round—the—clock support— huge amount of round—the—clock support in— huge amount of round—the—clock support in tony's new forever home. pam and _ support in tony's new forever home. pam and roy— support in tony's new forever home. pam and roy have faith in the team assembled. but there is a long way
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to go _ assembled. but there is a long way to go they— assembled. but there is a long way to go. they say he has been traumatised, he is broken, he has a lot to _ traumatised, he is broken, he has a lot to get _ traumatised, he is broken, he has a lot to get used to in the real world — lot to get used to in the real world. but they are glad it is happening now and they have faith in the team _ happening now and they have faith in the team that is there. we happening now and they have faith in the team that is there.— happening now and they have faith in the team that is there. we wish them the team that is there. we wish them the best of luck. _ the team that is there. we wish them the best of luck. absolutely. - the team that is there. we wish them the best of luck. absolutely. i- the best of luck. absolutely. i guess they are delighted but also quite scared. i guess they are delighted but also quite scared-— guess they are delighted but also quite scared. i would not say they were celebrating _ quite scared. i would not say they were celebrating but _ quite scared. i would not say they were celebrating but they - quite scared. i would not say they were celebrating but they have i quite scared. i would not say they i were celebrating but they have said these _ were celebrating but they have said these weeks they are in feel like these weeks they are in feel like the scariest time —— they are celebrating but this feels like the scariest — celebrating but this feels like the scariest time because they are focused — scariest time because they are focused on getting this done right. thank_ focused on getting this done right. thank you — focused on getting this done right. thank you to you and to alexis. a lot more still to come. time to get the news where you are. hello, good morning, this is bbc london,
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i'm frankie mccamley. many applicants to the windrush compensation scheme are still waiting for payments four years after the government wrongly classified them as illegal immigrants. one of those is auckland elwaldo romeo who's lived in the uk since he was four years old. he says trying to get the compensation he's owed has been devastating. hearing the home office turn round and say, you've got no right of abode. it was rather puzzling and it was devastating for me. living in this country, being educated in this country. it needs to be resolved so at least you can breathe, and carry on a life without this big distraction. the home office says it's continuing to work with those affected to pay as much as possible as soon as it can. the inquest into the death of chris kaba, who was shot by the police last month, is due to be opened and adjourned later.
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the unarmed 24—year—old was driving a carflagged as involved in a firearms incident. the officer involved has been suspended and the police watchdog is investigating as a potential homicide. london air ambulance is launching an urgent fundraising appeal to raise £15 million to replace two helicopters. the charity says without public donations, some of the most urgent patients wouldn't be reached in time. prince william is to deliver his first speech since king charles gave him the new title prince of wales. he'll address the united for wildlife global summit at the science museum, where he's expected to talk about illegal wildlife crime. a quick look at the travel situation now. and there's a good service all round so far. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a very mild start this morning. there is quite a bit of cloud
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around but that should start to thin and break. a couple of cold fronts sinking south but they fall short of bringing us rain through today. and you can see those isobars quite close together, it is going to be very windy. we will see the cloud lifting and breaking, some sunny spells mixed in there. there is the chance of an isolated shower, largely dry, and the wind gusting 30 to 35 mph. temperatures very warm, 20 celsius the maximum which is above average for the time of year. overnight, it stays very windy. we are still going to see the cloud but again one or two clearer spells in there. should be largely dry, the minimum temperature exceptionally mild, 15 celsius in central london. tomorrow, the cold front finally sinks south but it is going to stay very windy. it will be a dry start but then the rain will move through. through the middle part of the day, wind gusting 40 to 45 mph potentially but that clears, we will get sunshine to end the day and the temperature reaching again 19, potentially 20 celsius. it is going to be a cooler night as we head into thursday, but plenty of dry weather in the forecast. few showers around and the temperature stays mild. that's it from me.
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plenty more on our website and don't forget to follow us on social media. i'm back just after 9am. enjoy your morning. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. we don't need to say our names, we have got badges. we are going to describe why this is an important part of accessibility on a recent production for the bbc and we will explain that in a moment. if you were a fan of the popular bbc drama the a word, you may remember two of the characters ralph and katie had just got married at the end of the third series. their story doesn't end there because a new spin off series
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starting this week follows the highs and lows of married life for the pair. take a look. how did you do that? i don't know. i believe in you, katie. i always will. come here. you are my knight in shining armour. that is myjob. now, get in there and smash it. get in there and smash it, brilliant! they have been smashing it to us now. joining us now is actor leon harrop who plays ralph.
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good morning. also here are the show�*s writer genevieve barr, and director, jordan hogg. do you have any flowers, leon? no, i don't! . ~ do you have any flowers, leon? no, i don't! . ,, . ., , don't! that looks like a lovely scene to film, _ don't! that looks like a lovely scene to film, you _ don't! that looks like a lovely scene to film, you have - don't! that looks like a lovely scene to film, you have been| scene to film, you have been enjoying this?— enjoying this? yeah, it was brilliant. — enjoying this? yeah, it was brilliant. what _ enjoying this? yeah, it was brilliant. what you - enjoying this? yeah, it was brilliant. what you love - enjoying this? yeah, it was i brilliant. what you love about enjoying this? yeah, it was - brilliant. what you love about it? workin t brilliant. what you love about it? working with _ brilliant. what you love about it? working with different _ brilliant. what you love about it? working with different people, i brilliant. what you love about it? | working with different people, it's just brilliant.— just brilliant. what was it like when you _ just brilliant. what was it like when you heard _ just brilliant. what was it like when you heard you - just brilliant. what was it like when you heard you were - just brilliant. what was it like i when you heard you were going just brilliant. what was it like - when you heard you were going to get to this new show, so notjust the original, but get this whole spin off series to focus on that story which is such a fabulous story? i which is such a fabulous story? i just couldn't wait to get out there and start working, it was a brilliant show to work on. genevieve, you are the writer. i am one of the — genevieve, you are the writer. i am one of the writers! _ genevieve, you are the writer. i am one of the writers! just _ genevieve, you are the writer. i am one of the writers! just tell - genevieve, you are the writer. i am one of the writers! just tell us - genevieve, you are the writer. i am one of the writers! just tell us how| one of the writers! just tell us how
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the story moves — one of the writers! just tell us how the story moves on _ one of the writers! just tell us how the story moves on from _ one of the writers! just tell us how the story moves on from the - one of the writers! just tell us how the story moves on from the last i the story moves on from the last there is, what are we expecting? —— there is, what are we expecting? —— the last series. that there is, what are we expecting? -- the last series.— the last series. at the end of the last series _ the last series. at the end of the last series of _ the last series. at the end of the last series of the _ the last series. at the end of the last series of the a _ the last series. at the end of the last series of the a word, - the last series. at the end of the last series of the a word, ralph | the last series. at the end of the - last series of the a word, ralph and katie _ last series of the a word, ralph and katie get _ last series of the a word, ralph and katie get married, and a spin if it is about— katie get married, and a spin if it is about their first year of marriage. there are a lot of things we take _ marriage. there are a lot of things we take for— marriage. there are a lot of things we take for granted about marriage, so it's— we take for granted about marriage, so it's really— we take for granted about marriage, so it's really interesting to see what _ so it's really interesting to see what it — so it's really interesting to see what it is— so it's really interesting to see what it is like for ralph and katie, getting _ what it is like for ralph and katie, getting married. and there are lots of surprises in there, and a lot of those _ of surprises in there, and a lot of those surprises come from all of the other— those surprises come from all of the other people around then responding to their— other people around then responding to their marriage. ralph and katie are just _ to their marriage. ralph and katie are just trying to get on with their lives _ are just trying to get on with their lives with— are just trying to get on with their lives with the constantly interrupted by other people. what kind of surprises? _ interrupted by other people. what kind of surprises? i _ interrupted by other people. what kind of surprises? i don't - interrupted by other people. what kind of surprises? i don't know- interrupted by other people. what i kind of surprises? i don't know what i'm kind of surprises? i don't know what l'm allowed — kind of surprises? i don't know what l'm allowed to _ kind of surprises? i don't know what i'm allowed to talk _ kind of surprises? i don't know what i'm allowed to talk about? - kind of surprises? i don't know what i'm allowed to talk about? the - i'm allowed to talk about? the flowers — i'm allowed to talk about? the flowers was a good giveaway, wasn't it? ., ., ~ ., _, flowers was a good giveaway, wasn't in ., ., ~ ., ., flowers was a good giveaway, wasn't it? jordan, i know you are and have been passionate _ it? jordan, i know you are and have been passionate about _ it? jordan, i know you are and have been passionate about the - it? jordan, i know you are and have been passionate about the way - it? jordan, i know you are and have i been passionate about the way people are represented on television. why was it so important to carry on this work in the way you are doing? with
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work in the way you are doing? with ral-h and work in the way you are doing? with ralph and katie, _ work in the way you are doing? with ralph and katie, we pioneered something. _ ralph and katie, we pioneered something. we _ ralph and katie, we pioneered something, we did _ ralph and katie, we pioneered something, we did somethingi ralph and katie, we pioneered i something, we did something which has never— something, we did something which has never been _ something, we did something which has never been attempted - something, we did something which has never been attempted before, i something, we did something which. has never been attempted before, and the levels _ has never been attempted before, and the levels of _ has never been attempted before, and the levels of accessibility _ has never been attempted before, and the levels of accessibility we _ has never been attempted before, and the levels of accessibility we went i the levels of accessibility we went to, we _ the levels of accessibility we went to, we welcomed _ the levels of accessibility we went to, we welcomed everyone. - the levels of accessibility we went to, we welcomed everyone. we . the levels of accessibility we went i to, we welcomed everyone. we dealt with everyone's — to, we welcomed everyone. we dealt with everyone's needs _ to, we welcomed everyone. we dealt with everyone's needs and _ to, we welcomed everyone. we dealt with everyone's needs and we - to, we welcomed everyone. we dealt| with everyone's needs and we treated everyone _ with everyone's needs and we treated everyone as _ with everyone's needs and we treated everyone as individuals. _ with everyone's needs and we treated everyone as individuals. that's- with everyone's needs and we treated everyone as individuals. that's the i everyone as individuals. that's the way to— everyone as individuals. that's the way to do— everyone as individuals. that's the way to do it — everyone as individuals. that's the way to do it. television _ everyone as individuals. that's the way to do it. television is- everyone as individuals. that's the way to do it. television is very i everyone as individuals. that's the way to do it. television is very set| way to do it. television is very set in its _ way to do it. television is very set in its ways, — way to do it. television is very set in its ways, how— way to do it. television is very set in its ways, how things _ way to do it. television is very set in its ways, how things are - way to do it. television is very set in its ways, how things are done. i way to do it. television is very set i in its ways, how things are done. so we bucked _ in its ways, how things are done. so we bucked the — in its ways, how things are done. so we bucked the trend _ in its ways, how things are done. so we bucked the trend on— in its ways, how things are done. so we bucked the trend on that. - in its ways, how things are done. so we bucked the trend on that. we i in its ways, how things are done. sol we bucked the trend on that. we had things— we bucked the trend on that. we had things like _ we bucked the trend on that. we had things like name _ we bucked the trend on that. we had things like name badges _ we bucked the trend on that. we had things like name badges with- we bucked the trend on that. we had things like name badges withjobs. things like name badges withjobs on, things like name badges withjobs on. so _ things like name badges withjobs on. so if— things like name badges withjobs on. so if you — things like name badges withjobs on, so if you could _ things like name badges withjobs on, so if you could go _ things like name badges withjobs on, so if you could go and - things like name badges withjobs on, so if you could go and chat. things like name badges withjobsi on, so if you could go and chat with someone _ on, so if you could go and chat with someone and — on, so if you could go and chat with someone and ask— on, so if you could go and chat with someone and ask them _ on, so if you could go and chat with someone and ask them about - on, so if you could go and chat with someone and ask them about the i on, so if you could go and chat with i someone and ask them about the job. an easy— someone and ask them about the job. an easy read — someone and ask them about the job. an easy read call— someone and ask them about the job. an easy read call sheet _ someone and ask them about the job. an easy read call sheet and _ someone and ask them about the job. an easy read call sheet and things i an easy read call sheet and things like that — an easy read call sheet and things like that so — an easy read call sheet and things like that. . . , . like that. so what was the impact that, how did _ like that. so what was the impact that, how did those _ like that. so what was the impact that, how did those little - like that. so what was the impact | that, how did those little changes create an atmosphere on set which normally would not exist on a tv show? i normally would not exist on a tv show? . ., , normally would not exist on a tv show? .. ._ ., normally would not exist on a tv show? ., ., ., show? i can say, hand on heart, ral-h show? i can say, hand on heart, ralph and _ show? i can say, hand on heart, ralph and katie _ show? i can say, hand on heart, ralph and katie is _ show? i can say, hand on heart, ralph and katie is probably i show? i can say, hand on heart, ralph and katie is probably the l ralph and katie is probably the happiest — ralph and katie is probably the happiest environment - ralph and katie is probably the happiest environment i - ralph and katie is probably the happiest environment i have i ralph and katie is probably the i happiest environment i have ever been _ happiest environment i have ever been in. — happiest environment i have ever been in. everyone _ happiest environment i have ever been in, everyone was— happiest environment i have ever been in, everyone was so- happiest environment i have ever| been in, everyone was so pleased happiest environment i have ever. been in, everyone was so pleased to been in, everyone was so pleased to be there _ been in, everyone was so pleased to be there i_ been in, everyone was so pleased to be there i spoke _ been in, everyone was so pleased to be there. i spoke a _ been in, everyone was so pleased to be there. i spoke a lot— been in, everyone was so pleased to be there. i spoke a lot about - be there. i spoke a lot about responsibility, _ be there. i spoke a lot about responsibility, we _ be there. i spoke a lot about responsibility, we were i be there. i spoke a lot about - responsibility, we were responsible for doing _ responsibility, we were responsible for doing this — responsibility, we were responsible for doing this and _ responsibility, we were responsible for doing this and leading _ responsibility, we were responsible for doing this and leading the - responsibility, we were responsible for doing this and leading the way. for doing this and leading the way on how— for doing this and leading the way on how this — for doing this and leading the way on how this was _ for doing this and leading the way on how this was done. _ for doing this and leading the way on how this was done. i— for doing this and leading the way on how this was done. i use - for doing this and leading the way on how this was done. i use the i for doing this and leading the way. on how this was done. i use the term a lot because — on how this was done. i use the term a lot because it— on how this was done. i use the term a lot because it is— on how this was done. i use the term a lot because it is split _ on how this was done. i use the term a lot because it is split into— on how this was done. i use the term a lot because it is split into two, i a lot because it is split into two, ability— a lot because it is split into two, ability is — a lot because it is split into two, ability is one _ a lot because it is split into two, ability is one of— a lot because it is split into two, ability is one of word, _ a lot because it is split into two, ability is one of word, and - a lot because it is split into two, ability is one of word, and the l a lot because it is split into two, . ability is one of word, and the cast and crew_ ability is one of word, and the cast and crew we —
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ability is one of word, and the cast and crew we chose, _ ability is one of word, and the cast and crew we chose, we _ ability is one of word, and the cast and crew we chose, we chose - ability is one of word, and the cast| and crew we chose, we chose them ability is one of word, and the cast- and crew we chose, we chose them not for their— and crew we chose, we chose them not for their ability— and crew we chose, we chose them not for their ability but _ and crew we chose, we chose them not for their ability but how _ and crew we chose, we chose them not for their ability but how they— and crew we chose, we chose them not for their ability but how they were - for their ability but how they were willing _ for their ability but how they were willing to — for their ability but how they were willing to adapt _ for their ability but how they were willing to adapt and _ for their ability but how they were willing to adapt and respond - for their ability but how they were willing to adapt and respond to i for their ability but how they were l willing to adapt and respond to the environment — willing to adapt and respond to the environment they— willing to adapt and respond to the environment they were _ willing to adapt and respond to the environment they were in, - willing to adapt and respond to the environment they were in, to - willing to adapt and respond to the| environment they were in, to adapt and create — environment they were in, to adapt and create a — environment they were in, to adapt and create a positive _ environment they were in, to adapt and create a positive environment. and create a positive environment for everybody _ and create a positive environment for everybody-— and create a positive environment for everybody. genevieve, disability is an issue which _ for everybody. genevieve, disability is an issue which is _ for everybody. genevieve, disability is an issue which is dealt _ for everybody. genevieve, disability is an issue which is dealt with - for everybody. genevieve, disability is an issue which is dealt with in - is an issue which is dealt with in the show, but the show is actually about life, really, isn't it? it has been called ground—breaking, did it feel like that for you to be involved? or did itjust feel like a lovely show? i involved? or did it 'ust feel like a lovely show?_ involved? or did it 'ust feel like a lovel show? ~ ., , lovely show? i think anything, given so much television _ lovely show? i think anything, given so much television being _ lovely show? i think anything, given so much television being made - lovely show? i think anything, given | so much television being made now, to be _ so much television being made now, to be called — so much television being made now, to be called ground—breaking is amazing — to be called ground—breaking is amazing. the way that the show was put together and produce was incredibly ground—breaking and i hope _ incredibly ground—breaking and i hope that— incredibly ground—breaking and i hope that when the audience sees it, they see _ hope that when the audience sees it, they see the kind of show we need i’ilht they see the kind of show we need right now. — they see the kind of show we need right now, a joyous show about marriage _ right now, a joyous show about marriage. and i think also when we think— marriage. and i think also when we think about — marriage. and i think also when we think about disability, sometimes it's quite — think about disability, sometimes it's quite hard to see beyond that. and for— it's quite hard to see beyond that. and for a — it's quite hard to see beyond that. and for a lot of people who live
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with disability and have lived experience of it, 99% of their lives is about— experience of it, 99% of their lives is about everything other than the disability — is about everything other than the disability. this is the show that realty— disability. this is the show that really champions what marriage is like for— really champions what marriage is like for two people who happen to have disabilities.— have disabilities. leon, as the romantic hero, _ have disabilities. leon, as the romantic hero, of _ have disabilities. leon, as the romantic hero, of this - have disabilities. leon, as the romantic hero, of this piece, i have disabilities. leon, as the - romantic hero, of this piece, what do you hope people will enjoy about it when they watch it? do you hope people will en'oy about it when they watch it?_ it when they watch it? you've got to en'o it, it when they watch it? you've got to enjoy it. we — it when they watch it? you've got to enjoy it. we have — it when they watch it? you've got to enjoy it, we have got _ it when they watch it? you've got to enjoy it, we have got these - it when they watch it? you've got to enjoy it, we have got these two - it when they watch it? you've got to | enjoy it, we have got these two main characters who got married, people will enjoy it, and what we can do to show we cope with married life. people will see what we can do, and we want to see their faces light up and say, well, it is an amazing show. �* and say, well, it is an amazing show— it - and say, well, it is an amazing show— it is- i and say, well, it is an amazing show. �* it is. �* show. and it looks fun. it is. and how much _ show. and it looks fun. it is. and how much do _ show. and it looks fun. it is. and how much do you _ show. and it looks fun. it is. and how much do you hope _ show. and it looks fun. it is. and how much do you hope to - show. and it looks fun. it is. and how much do you hope to be - show. and it looks fun. it is. and | how much do you hope to be able show. and it looks fun. it is. and i how much do you hope to be able to inspire other people who might want to act or perform, who perhaps have
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been told that that is not an option for them? , .., ., , .., for them? they can do it, they can. the can for them? they can do it, they can. they can figure _ for them? they can do it, they can. they can figure out _ for them? they can do it, they can. they can figure out where - for them? they can do it, they can. they can figure out where they - for them? they can do it, they can. they can figure out where they can | they can figure out where they can do stuff. and they can do it. they cant reach and get what they want. and different people can do that. but all of us can. i want people to get that goal of what they want. and be on tv like us. i want to show them how we can do it, bring more people like us on tv.— them how we can do it, bring more people like us on tv. what are your friends and — people like us on tv. what are your friends and family _ people like us on tv. what are your friends and family think _ people like us on tv. what are your friends and family think of - people like us on tv. what are your friends and family think of the - people like us on tv. what are your friends and family think of the fact. friends and family think of the fact that you are now the hero, the lead character in this picture? i bet they are really proud?- character in this picture? i bet they are really proud? yeah, they are so proud _ they are really proud? yeah, they are so proud of— they are really proud? yeah, they are so proud of me. _ they are really proud? yeah, they are so proud of me. all _ they are really proud? yeah, they are so proud of me. all of - they are really proud? yeah, they are so proud of me. all of my - are so proud of me. all of my friends and my family. they
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absolutely are excited to watch it. jordan, i imagine what leon is saying there is music to your ears. i think of leon doesn't realise how tatented _ i think of leon doesn't realise how tatented he — i think of leon doesn't realise how tatented he is _ i think of leon doesn't realise how talented he is. i— i think of leon doesn't realise how talented he is. i have _ i think of leon doesn't realise how talented he is. i have worked - i think of leon doesn't realise how talented he is. i have worked with| talented he is. i have worked with so many— talented he is. i have worked with so many actors _ talented he is. i have worked with so many actors who _ talented he is. i have worked with so many actors who are _ talented he is. i have worked with| so many actors who are household names _ so many actors who are household names and — so many actors who are household names and leon— so many actors who are household names and leon has _ so many actors who are household names and leon has got— so many actors who are household names and leon has got to - so many actors who are household names and leon has got to be - so many actors who are household names and leon has got to be up. so many actors who are household . names and leon has got to be up with the tlest— names and leon has got to be up with the best of— names and leon has got to be up with the best of them. _ names and leon has got to be up with the best of them. his _ names and leon has got to be up with the best of them. his timing - names and leon has got to be up with the best of them. his timing and - the best of them. his timing and instinct— the best of them. his timing and instinct and _ the best of them. his timing and instinct and his _ the best of them. his timing and instinct and his enthusiasm, - the best of them. his timing and instinct and his enthusiasm, he i instinct and his enthusiasm, he loves _ instinct and his enthusiasm, he loves what _ instinct and his enthusiasm, he loves what he _ instinct and his enthusiasm, he loves what he does, _ instinct and his enthusiasm, he loves what he does, he - instinct and his enthusiasm, he loves what he does, he is - loves what he does, he is tremendous, _ loves what he does, he is tremendous, i— loves what he does, he is tremendous, i love - loves what he does, he is tremendous, i love the l loves what he does, he is . tremendous, i love the lad. loves what he does, he is tremendous, i love the lad. thank ou, tremendous, i love the lad. thank you. jordan! _ tremendous, i love the lad. thank you. jordan! but— tremendous, i love the lad. thank you, jordan! but -- _ tremendous, i love the lad. thank you, jordan! but -- what's - tremendous, i love the lad. thank you, jordan! but -- what's it - tremendous, i love the lad. thank you, jordan! but -- what's it like l you, jordan! but —— what's it like to hear that? you, jordan! but -- what's it like to hear that?— you, jordan! but -- what's it like to hear that? that's so nice, thank ou, to hear that? that's so nice, thank you. jordan- _ to hear that? that's so nice, thank you. jordan- is _ to hear that? that's so nice, thank you, jordan. is this _ to hear that? that's so nice, thank you, jordan. is this a _ to hear that? that's so nice, thank you, jordan. is this a series - to hear that? that's so nice, thank you, jordan. is this a series that i you, jordan. is this a series that is lloin you, jordan. is this a series that is going to _ you, jordan. is this a series that is going to lead _ you, jordan. is this a series that is going to lead to _ you, jordan. is this a series that is going to lead to more - you, jordan. is this a series that is going to lead to more? - you, jordan. is this a series that is going to lead to more? i - you, jordan. is this a series thatj is going to lead to more? i hope you, jordan. is this a series that - is going to lead to more? i hope so. the bbc have _ is going to lead to more? i hope so. the bbc have had _ is going to lead to more? i hope so. the bbc have had an _ is going to lead to more? i hope so. the bbc have had an amazing - is going to lead to more? i hope so. the bbc have had an amazing year. the bbc have had an amazing year when _ the bbc have had an amazing year when it _ the bbc have had an amazing year when it comes to flagship disability programmes, with ralph and katie and others, _ programmes, with ralph and katie and others, and _ programmes, with ralph and katie and others, and so it feels like the enthusiasm for showcasing that kind of content, — enthusiasm for showcasing that kind of content, we have a lot of work to
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do it _ of content, we have a lot of work to do it behind — of content, we have a lot of work to do it behind the scenes in terms of how we _ do it behind the scenes in terms of how we improve access and how we work _ how we improve access and how we work differently and think about all those _ work differently and think about all those different approaches. in august— those different approaches. in august at the edinburgh tv festival, they announced the tv access project. — they announced the tv access project, nine extremist and brokers that have _ project, nine extremist and brokers that have signed up under the idea is that— that have signed up under the idea is that we — that have signed up under the idea is that we look —— nine streamers and brokes — is that we look —— nine streamers and brokes casters have signed up for it. _ and brokes casters have signed up for it. we — and brokes casters have signed up for it, we look at everything like using _ for it, we look at everything like using access coordinators and putting — using access coordinators and putting lines in the budget to support— putting lines in the budget to support those requirements that people _ support those requirements that people have so people can go in on the first— people have so people can go in on the first day and do theirjob, whether— the first day and do theirjob, whether it is acting, directing, writing~ — whether it is acting, directing, writing. and disability does not need _ writing. and disability does not need to— writing. and disability does not need to be an impediment to doing thatjob _ need to be an impediment to doing thatjob to— need to be an impediment to doing thatjob to their full need to be an impediment to doing that job to their full potential. do that 'ob to their full potential. do ou that job to their full potential. you feel that job to their full potential. idir’r you feel like things that job to their full potential. dr? you feel like things are changing? i you feel like things are changing? i think so, i think people are saying they are _ think so, i think people are saying they are interested in that change, and i_ they are interested in that change, and i think— they are interested in that change, and i think we just need to see whether— and i think we just need to see whether that is backed up by all of the commissions that hopefully
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happen— the commissions that hopefully happen in the next year. certainly tv is— happen in the next year. certainly tv is a _ happen in the next year. certainly tv is a really exciting space, and ralph— tv is a really exciting space, and ralph and — tv is a really exciting space, and ralph and katie is a good example of how you _ ralph and katie is a good example of how you can work differently and creatively — how you can work differently and creatively utilise those differences to make _ creatively utilise those differences to make a — creatively utilise those differences to make a show that is different to anything _ to make a show that is different to anything you have seen before. britiiant, — anything you have seen before. brilliant, well, congratulations all of you. lovely to meet you, well done, looking forward to seeing it in full. ralph and katie is on bbc one tomorrow at 9pm and on the iplayer. don't miss it, looks fantastic. thank you, thank you. quarter to nine. a rover designed and built by british engineers at airbus in stevenage was all set to go to mars until its role in a mission to collect martian rocks was cancelled. now it's a robot on the hunt for a newjob, to prevent all of the expertise and work that's taken more than a decade from going to waste. our science editor rebecca morelle reports. one state—of—the—art rover. its skills, it can drive autonomously, negotiate the most difficult terrain and cope in extreme environments. but now it's looking for work.
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built in the uk, it's being tested in a quarry in bedfordshire. it was heading for mars, until its mission was cancelled. its task on the red planet was to pick up samples, but it's been scrapped. mini mars helicopters will do thejob instead. the uk doesn't want to see the technology mothballed, they think this rover has still got a bright future. we have spent a lot of time and a lot of effort on developing this expertise. we don't want to let that go to waste, we want to exploit it to make sure that investment comes to fruition. also, it puts us in a good place to be involved in future space missions which is brilliant for the reputation of the uk. so, where could the rover go instead of mars? one option could be to swap the red martian terrain for the grey lunar landscape. this rover was designed for mars.
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if it's heading to the moon, it will need some modifications. the lunar surface can get as hot as 120 degrees celsius, and as cold as —230. so this will have to cope with extremes. there's also problem with light. the moon gets two weeks of daylight followed by two weeks of darkness, and this will be a challenge for solar power. and then there's the fine lunar dust. it's particularly clingy and abrasive, which could be an issue for the rover�*s moving parts. lunar exploration is having a resurgence right now. nasa's new artemis rocket will soon be heading there and eventually taking astronauts to the moon's surface. the idea is to have a permanent lunar base, and rovers could play a crucial role. they could be used anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, so it could be autonomously moving around rovers for building habitats, or it could be used for going to places
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that are uninhabitable by humans or an extreme temperature or particularly dangerous. so anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, this rover could still use that technology to do that. for now, the rover is out of work, stuck on earth, driving around a quarry. but this isn't just about salvaging a £23 million piece of kit, it's about the people and expertise that goes with it. the hope is the rover gets some new employment soon. rebecca morelle, bbc news. so, that's what you do with the rover you cannot send to mars! i always wondered! rover you cannot send to mars! i always wondered! leave - rover you cannot send to mars! i always wondered! leave it - rover you cannot send to mars! i always wondered! leave it in - rover you cannot send to mars! i always wondered! leave it in a l rover you cannot send to mars! i - always wondered! leave it in a chair and wait for — always wondered! leave it in a chair and wait for a _ always wondered! leave it in a chair and wait for a better— always wondered! leave it in a chair and wait for a better offer. - always wondered! leave it in a chair and wait for a better offer. nearly . and wait for a better offer. nearly ten to nine. —— leave it in bedfordshire. huge response to the items we have been talking about, tony and his situation where he has been held and he is about to come out and join his family. and also accessibility in the tv industry.
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thank you very much for your comments, they are appreciated. craig david is one of the biggest british artists of all time, and it's no wonder, with hits like 7 days, walking away and rewind. over the last 22 years he's had 25 top llo singles, more than five billion streams worldwide and been nominated for ill brit awards. let's take a look. # took her for a drink on tuesday # we were making love by wednesday # and on thursday, friday, saturday, we chilled on sunday. # why can't you keep your promises no more? # say you'll be home by 12, comes strolling in at four # out with the girls but leaving with the boy next door # can you fill me in? # never be, never be the same # there's something in your dna, na # because heaven did it right baby when you were made # you hit it different, i feel some type of way
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# i'll never be, never be the same # there's something in your dna. and craig joins us now. morning. how you both? really good, how are you? — morning. how you both? really good, how are you? really, _ morning. how you both? really good, how are you? really, really _ morning. how you both? really good, how are you? really, really good. - how are you? really, really good. that last song _ how are you? really, really good. that last song is _ how are you? really, really good. that last song is the _ how are you? really, really good. that last song is the new- how are you? really, really good. that last song is the new one? i how are you? really, really good. l that last song is the new one? tell us about it. that last song is the new one? tell us about it— us about it. just trying to break it down how connected _ us about it. just trying to break it down how connected we - us about it. just trying to break it down how connected we are - us about it. just trying to break it i down how connected we are through our dna. i have been seeing that doing my live shows, the light at the end of the totook —— tunnel we were hoping for, you are seeing everyone together and connected finally. so it touches on that and i also wanted a banger to go out and do in ibiza, so it was really well received and it was great. the numbers there, _ received and it was great. the numbers there, billions of streams and hits, it is bonkers. it’s and hits, it is bonkers. it's unbelievable, _
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and hits, it is bonkers. it's unbelievable, and - and hits, it is bonkers. it�*s unbelievable, and i it kind of mummy reinforces how important those songs have been in peoples lives. —— it kind of reinforces that. the people who have got married with those songs, or they have met when it was plain, that's the biggest recognition you can have as an artist. it corresponds to people, those numbers, so it's great. you are so busy. _ those numbers, so it's great. you are so busy, what _ those numbers, so it's great. you are so busy, what it _ those numbers, so it's great. you are so busy, what it is it like to still be working at that picture and have that energy all these years later? how do you find the inspiration and try to keep going? do you know what, it is through knowing that i get to live my dream through my music and i get to give that experience to people with live shows. with 22 years of music, i'm blessed and grateful to have that impact. and have the responsibility to know that, what do you really
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saying? 22 years with that platform, now you have got to really do the work, use it to help people through music and the way they talk. you have hardly _ music and the way they talk. you have hardly aged _ music and the way they talk. you have hardly aged since this, you don't look any different. i so? have hardly aged since this, you don't look any different.- don't look any different. i say it to everyone _ don't look any different. i say it to everyone else _ don't look any different. i say it to everyone else about - don't look any different. i say it. to everyone else about benjamin button. i think it is a lot to do with, i'mjust button. i think it is a lot to do with, i'm just enjoying the moment. people reinforcing that, doing signings recently, people saying, i have waited 22 years to see you. what you have done for me, you have helped me through a difficult time with songs like walking away, that is a rejuvenating in it self so it has been a wonderfuljourney. you has been a wonderful 'ourney. you have learned h has been a wonderful 'ourney. you have learned so h has been a wonderfuljourney. you have learned so much over the years that you have written it all down to help other people. why did you do that, and what were the points in your life that took you to places that perhaps you learn from? do you know what. — that perhaps you learn from? do you know what. i — that perhaps you learn from? do you know what, i mean, _ that perhaps you learn from? do you know what, i mean, i— that perhaps you learn from? do you know what, i mean, i talk— that perhaps you learn from? do you know what, i mean, i talk about - that perhaps you learn from? do you know what, i mean, i talk about this| know what, i mean, i talk about this much more expensively than i can do today in the book, but it was all
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about early days behind the scenes of some of those songs, and howl may have been feeling behind the scenes. there are human beings, and then there was the portraying that life was great as a musician. i needed to unravel that and say that i have experienced depression, being bullied at school, being bullied and ridiculed nationally on cd. and the reasons why i may have moved away to miami and come back. but the healing i had to go through, and telling it in story form so people can hopefully resonate with it, people don't have to be in the public eye, everyone deals with depression at different levels but you have to have felt it. you can only speak on bullying when you have really experienced it and you can only speak on depression when you've experienced it. it took me to a duck race which i never thought is such a positive person i would be speaking about —— it took me to a dark place.
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people say, i know what he is going through and i know i am going to it and hopefully some people can resonate with that and do not have to go through the pitfalls? that i went through. to go through the pitfalls? that i went through-— to go through the pitfalls? that i went through. to go through the pitfalls? that i went throu:h. ., . y., ., ., went through. how are you doing now? much better. — went through. how are you doing now? much better, and _ went through. how are you doing now? much better, and i _ went through. how are you doing now? much better, and i recognise _ went through. how are you doing now? much better, and i recognise that - much better, and i recognise that mental health is something which has to be managed and you are triggered by things usually from your childhood and as an adult you try and unravel those in the more you push them under the carpet, the more they rear their head up in other ways. so it's a constant maintaining of mime mental health. talking about it, i saw lyon talking earlier, speaking his truth and making a difference by speaking about what matters to you. for me as an artist, thatis matters to you. for me as an artist, that is my responsibility now, to unravel the mystery, about, it is glitzy, posting an instagram, let it
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underneath it and have a real deep dive conversation rather than ice—skating through life. it has been empowering for me. i ice-skating through life. it has been empowering for me. i skating to life is a great — been empowering for me. i skating to life is a great phrase. _ been empowering for me. i skating to life is a great phrase. it _ been empowering for me. i skating to life is a great phrase. it has _ been empowering for me. i skating to life is a great phrase. it has been - life is a great phrase. it has been nas at life is a great phrase. it has been nasty at times. — life is a great phrase. it has been nasty at times, you _ life is a great phrase. it has been nasty at times, you talk- life is a great phrase. it has been nasty at times, you talk about i life is a great phrase. it has been i nasty at times, you talk about being bullied _ nasty at times, you talk about being bullied as _ nasty at times, you talk about being bullied as a — nasty at times, you talk about being bullied as a child and on national television — bullied as a child and on national television. how do you come through that. television. how do you come through that not _ television. how do you come through that not as— television. how do you come through that. not as a musician but as a human— that. not as a musician but as a human being, where'd you find the resilience — human being, where'd you find the resilience to put back together again— resilience to put back together again and come and talk to us on the sofa and _ again and come and talk to us on the sofa and release new music and people — sofa and release new music and people have been mean? its sofa and release new music and people have been mean? as you said, it's about bringing _ people have been mean? as you said, it's about bringing fragmented - people have been mean? as you said, it's about bringing fragmented parts i it's about bringing fragmented parts of you back together. part of you. my of you back together. part of you. my experience of bullying at school was not as bad as many other people, and i wrote a song about that called johnny. is the defence mechanisms, laughing it off or becoming
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introverted or you want to run away and leave school. there is a kid in me speaking to every young boy and girl out there from the bullying stage, but because it was compounded about being ridiculed on tv which wasjust straight about being ridiculed on tv which was just straight bullying,, for me, it was having to work through it and i needed to go to miami. because of that show in particular, it made it feel like people to continue the bullying without knowing and normalising it. i needed to address it, i am talking on behalf of anyone being bullying right now. —— being bullied. to talk about it right now, saying, i'm interested in talking about that because we all experience different forms of it. it's something we need to address because it led me into a spiral of depression, and questioning why i had never experienced it itself? i
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had never experienced it itself? i think everyone is saying, just say it. when the bo selecta show was out... ~ �* ., it. when the bo selecta show was out... ~ ,, ..,, ., out... when the bo selecta show was out, a out... when the bo selecta show was out. a short — out... when the bo selecta show was out. a short song _ out... when the bo selecta show was out, a short song rewind _ out... when the bo selecta show was out, a short song rewind which - out... when the bo selecta show was out, a short song rewind which was i out... when the bo selecta show was out, a short song rewind which was a | out, a short song rewind which was a cultural song which broke the ice, it was being ridiculed. it was a music thing but what he was doing was slowly bullying. with mel b as well, bullying tricia. i thought there was no real accountability at that time. i was young, between a rock and a hard place. do you lean in, defence mechanism, laugh it off, do a show together? iterates in, defence mechanism, laugh it off, do a show together?— do a show together? was it suggested? _ do a show together? was it suggested? yes, _ do a show together? was it suggested? yes, there - do a show together? was it suggested? yes, there wasj do a show together? was it i suggested? yes, there was a do a show together? was it - suggested? yes, there was a point where he was _ suggested? yes, there was a point where he was doing _ suggested? yes, there was a point where he was doing his _ suggested? yes, there was a point where he was doing his whole - suggested? yes, there was a point where he was doing his whole act i suggested? yes, there was a point i where he was doing his whole act on stage, leigh francis, and it was
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leaning in, orare you going stage, leigh francis, and it was leaning in, or are you going to play the victim? it was being accountable.— the victim? it was being accountable. ., ., , accountable. he has apologised, he said he shouldn't _ accountable. he has apologised, he said he shouldn't have _ accountable. he has apologised, he said he shouldn't have done - accountable. he has apologised, he said he shouldn't have done it. - accountable. he has apologised, he said he shouldn't have done it. i i said he shouldn't have done it. i don't know how sincere, it feels like a bit of a coincidence that it happened to come at a time when george floyd had been killed in broad daylight in america, to have the black lives matter movement, a protest around the world, and it came at a time when it was a reaction, saying, i need to say my piece for something which is should really never gone there, putting a rubber mask on which was blackface, which it was. it's being accountable for that. which it was. it's being accountable forthat. i which it was. it's being accountable for that. i never really spoke about that. they coincidence about it felt very timely. i feel emotional speaking about it because i felt i was talking about so many people who had been bullied, on their behalf. this is my moment to be, not that i am doubling down on leigh francis,
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it is not. it is being accountable to things that truly matter to people because i represent that. i talk about it all in the book what's your vibe?, talk about it all in the book what's yourvibe?, it talk about it all in the book what's your vibe?, it was very empowering to heal myself by talking about it. that is good to hear. the album out at the same time as well. celebrating music and talking our truth, and you don't do much more than that. the new album, the feeling i got my first album, have done it all over again, and the new book, what's your vibe?. done it all over again, and the new book, what's your vibe? .- done it all over again, and the new book, what's your vibe?. thank you for talkinl book, what's your vibe?. thank you for talking to — book, what's your vibe?. thank you for talking to us, _ book, what's your vibe?. thank you for talking to us, lovely _ book, what's your vibe?. thank you for talking to us, lovely to _ book, what's your vibe?. thank you for talking to us, lovely to see - for talking to us, lovely to see you. craig david's new album is called "22". you're watching bbc breakfast. it is looking quite drunk in keswick
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this morning. at the heaviest rain has been in scotland, in the 2a others up to six o'clock this morning there were 73 millimetres of rainfall, getting close to three inches. 42 millimetres in tyndrum. if i show you the greater picture you will easily see how that happened, it has been pouring across scotland and northern ireland this morning. ahead of the bands of rain we are looking at showers and western areas and starting with a fair bit of cloud where it is dry. the weather fronts are producing this rain continue to sink southwards through the day, the second weatherford seems to stall in southern scotland and northern ireland and we see a brighten up to the north of that —— the second weather front. the north of that —— the second weatherfront. it the north of that —— the second weather front. it will be a windy day wherever you are, especially across england and wales, temperatures 13 to 20. this evening
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and overnight if anything the weather

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