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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 4, 2022 9:00am-10:01am BST

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in scotland, in the 21; has been in scotland, in the 2a others up to six o'clock this morning there were 73 millimetres of rainfall, getting close to three inches. 42 millimetres in tyndrum. if i show you the greater picture you will easily see how that happened, it has been pouring across scotland and northern ireland this morning. ahead of the bands of rain we are looking at showers and western areas and starting with a fair bit of cloud where it is dry. the weather fronts are producing this rain continue to sink southwards through the day, the second weatherford seems to stall in southern scotland and northern ireland and we see a brighten up to the north of that —— the second weather front. the north of that —— the second weatherfront. it the north of that —— the second weather front. it will be a windy day wherever you are, especially across england and wales, temperatures 13 to 20. this evening
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and overnight if anything the weather fronts wave northwards. heavy and persistent rain being taken northwards and you can see the trailing fronts associated with that area of low pressure. winter picking up area of low pressure. winter picking up across england and wales especially and a mild night once again. tomorrow we start with persistent rain in the north, this low pressure pulls away into the north sea, we have to fronts, the second one week, we take the rain south eastwards and see blustery showers behind. some will be happy and thundery, sunshine in between but the wind will feature. even in land we are looking at gusty winds with gales around the coasts, feeling fresher in the north, 11 to 13, but hanging on to about 18 degrees in the south. a man has been arrested in five american bulldogs destroyed after a
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woman died following a dog attack in liverpool. the 63—year—old woman died yesterday at the scene of the attack at her home in the kirkdale area. merseyside police have told us area. merseyside police have told us a 31—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of owning a dog dangerously. he's expected to publish details later this month on how it will be paid for. the plan is being brought forward after widespread criticism that the original date, novermber 23rd, was too long to wait. the pm is also under pressure over whether or not there will be real—terms cuts to benefits to help pay for her economic plans. in an interview with nick robinson on bbc radio 4's today programme — recorded yesterday — liz truss said her economic plans were still intact. i think it was right to listen to what people had to say. it wasn't a core part of our growth package and
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frankly it was becoming a distraction. what i'm focused on is making sure we help people get through this winter and next winter, thatis through this winter and next winter, that is why we put in place the energy price guarantee, but also we are getting our economy growing through a combination of reduced taxes but also really important reforms to our economy to make sure we gary rhodes built faster, we get broadband done, people get a better mobile phone signal and affordable childcare —— to make sure we get roads built faster. it was a distraction, that is why we made the change. distraction, that is why we made the chan . e. ., distraction, that is why we made the chance. ., _ distraction, that is why we made the chance. ., ,., distraction, that is why we made the chance. ., , ., change. you say it is a distraction from your — change. you say it is a distraction from your plan. — change. you say it is a distraction from your plan, but _ change. you say it is a distraction from your plan, but haven't - change. you say it is a distraction from your plan, but haven't you l change. you say it is a distraction i from your plan, but haven't you only got half a plan? you have a promise to spend tens of billions of pounds in uncosted tax cuts, what we do not have a plan for and i do not think you have a plan for yet is how you will raise the money to pay for it. the biggest part of the mini budget
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was the energy price support, and if you recall what we were facing going into the winter was people were facing bills of up to £6,000, we were facing high inflation but also slowing economic growth and that energy commitment deals with all three of those problems and means the average household will not be paying more than around £2500 on their bills, it means inflation will be curbed by up to 5% and it helps boost economic growth. the rest of the package is all about economic growth. the package is all about economic urowth. the package is all about economic urowth, the package is all about economic urowth. , , growth. the package is very “pensive. _ growth. the package is very expensive, isn't _ growth. the package is very expensive, isn't it? - growth. the package is very expensive, isn't it? £45 - growth. the package is very - expensive, isn't it? £45 billion, expensive, isn't it? £115 billion, more than a third of the money you are borrowing in the budget we are not logical budget is borrowed money, £115 billion, that is more than the defence budget, and we do not know how you will pay for it so i would put to you that you only have half a plan.— have half a plan. looking at uk debt, we have _ have half a plan. looking at uk
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debt, we have the _ have half a plan. looking at uk debt, we have the second - have half a plan. looking at uk i debt, we have the second lowest have half a plan. looking at uk - debt, we have the second lowest debt to gdp ratio in the g7, so we borrow less than canada, france, the united states, japan. but less than canada, france, the united states. japan-— states, japan. but we are in a huge market crisis _ states, japan. but we are in a huge market crisis of _ states, japan. but we are in a huge market crisis of confidence - states, japan. but we are in a huge market crisis of confidence last - market crisis of confidence last week. , , ., ., ,, week. this is the right time to take on some extra _ week. this is the right time to take on some extra borrowing _ week. this is the right time to take on some extra borrowing because i week. this is the right time to take | on some extra borrowing because of week. this is the right time to take i on some extra borrowing because of a very, very severe international situation that we face, and that situation that we face, and that situation is becoming apparent through rising interest rates, they are rising around the world, it is becoming apparent through huge energy costs, it is the right decision to make but of course, and we have committed to this, we will bring down debt as a proportion of gdp. the prime minister speaking this morning. speaking this morning, thejustice secretary brandon lewis said he still believed the government was doing the right thing on the economy. we've always been in a position where in the medium—term we want to make sure we have that debt to gdp ratio moving in the right way, get on top of that.
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actually, we've still got the second lowest in the g7. but the chancellor... look, the chancellor and the prime minister listen to what people say. and we often get criticised as politicians for not listening to people, they have listened, they want to focus on that wider package that he outlined, a package that's going to help the most vulnerable in society, a tax cut for 30 million people, and drive economic growth, which ultimately means more money to spend on public services. so i think what they've done, i think, is a good thing in the sense that they've shown they are prepared to listen to people. we can speak now to our chief political correspondent, nick eardley, who's at the tory conference. another day at the conservative confidence, do you think the prime minister and the chancellor in particular can reassess more control of the situation after what has been admittedly by anyone's standards pretty chaotic? —— another day at the conservative conference. i pretty chaotic? -- another day at the conservative conference. i think the conservative conference. i think the will the conservative conference. i think they will certainly _ the conservative conference. i think they will certainly try. _ the conservative conference. i think they will certainly try. the _ the conservative conference. i think they will certainly try. the hope - the conservative conference. i think they will certainly try. the hope is i they will certainly try. the hope is that by announcing the u—turn on 45p and bringing forward the
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announcement of the medium—term plan the government says it has, that that will quell some of the anger and frustration seen here over the past 48 hours, but i must say it feels a bit like cape town has broken here and those conservative aunties who maybe in the past would have spoken privately about their concerns or may become quieter increasingly coming out and saying, frankly, what they think —— it feels a bit like a damp has broken. there are other pinch points coming where government could be in real trouble. the key one to watch as benefits, the government has not committed to keeping the last government's promised to increase benefits by the rate of inflation next year. in fact, downing street is mulling over the idea of scrapping that and will put benefits up by the average salary increase instead, which would be a real terms benefits cuts. if
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that happens, there are lots of conservative mps, some right up to cabinet level, who would not be on board. penny mordaunt, the cabinet minister, had said to times radio this morning that she thinks benefits should increase by the rate of inflation, lots of tory mps have said the same over the airwaves in the last day also. former deputy prime minister damian green told the bbc this morning that he thinks if there was a vote, if the government try to introduce below inflation benefits increase, there would be a vote in parliament which mist is would lose. i think that one issue is symbolic of something wider, liz truss's authority has been deeply, deeply damaged by what has happened over the last few days and there is a group of tory mps, weather it be on tax, benefits, maybe potentially
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on tax, benefits, maybe potentially on other things like spending cuts too, who are waiting in the winds, and if they don't agree, they will tell us. it and if they don't agree, they will tell us. , ., ., ., ., , tell us. it is an extraordinary situation _ tell us. it is an extraordinary situation when _ tell us. it is an extraordinary situation when a _ tell us. it is an extraordinary situation when a member. tell us. it is an extraordinary situation when a member of| tell us. it is an extraordinary . situation when a member of the cabinet is openly saying that the idea that you would try to link benefits to earnings rather than inflation is wrong, so are we heading for a showdown, is liz truss heading for a showdown, is liz truss heading for a showdown, is liz truss heading for a showdown with her party over benefits or will be seen not a u—turn, she has not come down on either side and said she definitely won't remove that link between benefits and inflation, but will she issue a statement? otherwise she is under enormous pressure from the party. i otherwise she is under enormous pressure from the party.- otherwise she is under enormous pressure from the party. i think she will be asked _ pressure from the party. i think she will be asked about _ pressure from the party. i think she will be asked about it _ pressure from the party. i think she will be asked about it a _ pressure from the party. i think she will be asked about it a lot, - pressure from the party. i think she will be asked about it a lot, she - will be asked about it a lot, she was asked about it by the today programme on radio 4 this morning and basically said no decision had been made, she wanted to look at this in the round, which i think
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it's a bit of wiggle room to say we are still trying to figure it out —— which i think gives a bit of wiggle room. having spoken to lots of people government i'm trying to figure out whether ministers will go into battle over this. if they try to introduce a below inflation benefits increase i think there will benefits increase i think there will be a battle, the question is whether ministers have the stomach for that over what has happened over the last couple of days. i'd point out that benefits is slightly different on this front, tory mps who want benefits to increase significantly will say it is a cost of living crisis, you can't squeeze incomes any lower. some people government would say, hold on, people who are working on seeing below inflation salary increases, why should it be different for people on universal credit? i wonder if some ministers
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will feel a lot more likely to stick to their guns on this and feel like it is more of a battle worth having? it will be really interesting to see because if that battle happens at japan's out in the commons, there are tory mps who seem pretty sure that the government would lose —— if that the government would lose —— if that battle happens and it pans out in the commons. like that battle happens and it pans out in the commons.— that battle happens and it pans out in the commons. like nick eardley. -- thank you. _ in the commons. like nick eardley. -- thank you, nick— in the commons. like nick eardley. -- thank you, nick eardley. - joining me now is colin talbot, who's emeritus professor of government and public administration at the university of manchester. how would you characterise the last few days of the conservative party conference and the first few weeks of liz truss being prime minister? i have been engaged in politics without 55 years and i don't think i've seen a new prime minister coming in and losing authority quite so quickly, and i think there are three different crises of authority. what is amongst the parliamentary conservative party where liz truss
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only ever got the votes from about a third of the party, i think a lot of them are quite sceptical about her. the second which is affecting everybody as the crisis in the markets, £115 billion of unfunded tax cuts really shook the markets and have caused economic problems we now have, and the third is amongst the public, i think i have been 11 opinion polls since the mini budget was announced and it is giving labour an average of about a 25 point lead. i have never seen a collapse in confidence like that in a government.— collapse in confidence like that in a government. what is at the heart ofthat a government. what is at the heart of that loss — a government. what is at the heart of that loss of _ a government. what is at the heart of that loss of authority, _ a government. what is at the heart of that loss of authority, as - a government. what is at the heart of that loss of authority, as you - of that loss of authority, as you characterise it? policy, presentation of the policy or a mixture of the two? the biggest factor is the _ mixture of the two? the biggest factor is the change _ mixture of the two? the biggest factor is the change of _ mixture of the two? the biggest - factor is the change of government. it is perfectly legitimate to change prime ministers between elections without a general election but it is
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always fraught with dangers because the public have not had a say in who the public have not had a say in who the new prime minister is, and in this case the government is emphasising how radical and different cities from the previous orthodoxy, which i think really undermines its authority, then it is trying to do very magical things without the backing of the majority of the parliamentary conservative party and without the backing the population. i5 party and without the backing the --oulation. , , party and without the backing the --oulation. , ., . party and without the backing the --oulation. , ., party and without the backing the “oulation. , ., ., population. is this symptomatic of a dee-er population. is this symptomatic of a deeper problem _ population. is this symptomatic of a deeper problem within _ population. is this symptomatic of a deeper problem within the - deeper problem within the conservative party over the last few years, the party has gone through quite a number of prime ministers in the last five or six years and has been a disagreement with itself on a number of issues. i been a disagreement with itself on a number of issues.— number of issues. i think there is obviously a _ number of issues. i think there is obviously a very _ number of issues. i think there is obviously a very fractious - obviously a very fractious atmosphere inside the conservative party, as nick eardleyjust mentioned the fact you have a cabinet minister openly disagreeing with the prime minister in the middle of the conservative party
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conference over the uprating of benefits is quite astonishing, i can't recall anything like that happening. and lots of people had said righteous i getting rid of the leader, seems to becoming a habit in the conservative party —— a lot of people have said regicide. can the conservative party -- a lot of people have said regicide. can she turn this around _ people have said regicide. can she turn this around or _ people have said regicide. can she turn this around or has _ people have said regicide. can she turn this around or has the - people have said regicide. can she turn this around or has the horse l turn this around or has the horse already bolted? to turn this around or has the horse already bolted?— turn this around or has the horse already bolted? to some extent it has already _ already bolted? to some extent it has already bolted. _ already bolted? to some extent it has already bolted. she _ already bolted? to some extent it has already bolted. she could - already bolted? to some extent it i has already bolted. she could create a cabinet which tries to unify the parliamentary conservative party but instead she got rid of anybody who opposed her or supported rishi sunak or had not clearly supported her, replacing them with her supporters. it is a very politically monolithic cabinet and i think that makes it extremely difficult for her to win over the rest of the parliamentary conservative party.—
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conservative party. colin talbot, america's professor _ conservative party. colin talbot, america's professor of _ conservative party. colin talbot, i america's professor of government and public administration at the university of manchester, thank you very much. i am joined by the conservative and people south devon and one of the supporters of the 45p tax u—turn, mel stride. when we last spoke you said you thought the chancellor should bring forward the details of how he plans to cut the uk's death, he has done that but i am trying to understand why it was not done at the same time as the tax u—turn, because it looks messy —— to cut the uk's debt. brute u-turn, because it looks messy -- to cut the uk's debt.— cut the uk's debt. we should have had an obr _ cut the uk's debt. we should have had an obr forecast _ cut the uk's debt. we should have had an obr forecast at _ cut the uk's debt. we should have had an obr forecast at the - cut the uk's debt. we should have had an obr forecast at the time . cut the uk's debt. we should have| had an obr forecast at the time of the statement the chancellor made on friday a week ago, that would have settled the markets and saved a lot of problems that have subsequently occurred. it is very positive that this forecast has been brought
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forward, and the plan the government will produce at the same time, because providing it is credible and the market see as such, it will start to further settle the markets, take pressure off increasing interest rates, lower the expectations a little as to why inflation might otherwise go and provided it is before november the 3rd when the monetary policy committee meets in order to set interest rate rises, the base rate, that could perhaps have an impact on that could perhaps have an impact on that committee of making them feel they do not have to be quite as aggressive in those interest rate increases as would otherwise be the case, which could help millions of people with mortgages.— people with mortgages. these misste -s people with mortgages. these missteps have _ people with mortgages. these missteps have been _ people with mortgages. these - missteps have been self-inflicted, missteps have been self—inflicted, though, which must be a cause of huge frustration to yourself and many colleagues?— huge frustration to yourself and many colleagues? there have clearly been misjudgments _ many colleagues? there have clearly been misjudgments amid _ many colleagues? there have clearly been misjudgments amid steps, - many colleagues? there have clearly been misjudgments amid steps, for. been misjudgments amid steps, for example i have been urging the obr forecast to be brought forward for a
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number of weeks now and pushing very hard on that. to some degree i am happy about the 45p tax change, decided not to go ahead with that, and the putting forward of the obr forecast, it shows me some pragmatism is beginning to seep into the centre of government but we need more of it because this plan that the government comes forward without the government comes forward without the obr forecast, it needs to have everything properly thought through some fao relying on spending cuts they need to be politically deliverable and they have to work out those issues in pretty short order. it might mean if they can't find it of savings in government that they will have to revisit other of these tax pledges because they may not be affordable. $5 of these tax pledges because they may not be affordable.— of these tax pledges because they may not be affordable. as the prime minister's decision _ may not be affordable. as the prime minister's decision as _ may not be affordable. as the prime minister's decision as yet _ may not be affordable. as the prime minister's decision as yet not - may not be affordable. as the prime minister's decision as yet not to - minister's decision as yet not to say whether she would link benefits to the rate of inflation another
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misstep? it is quite extraordinary we have another cabinet member, penny mordaunt, openly saying it is her expectation that benefit should be linked to inflation, i think her earlier quota as we are not tried to help people with one hand and take away with another —— i think her earlier quotes was. do you agree with penny mordaunt? i earlier quotes was. do you agree with penny mordaunt?— earlier quotes was. do you agree with penny mordaunt? i think there is a splitting _ with penny mordaunt? i think there is a splitting cabinet, _ with penny mordaunt? i think there is a splitting cabinet, i _ with penny mordaunt? i think there is a splitting cabinet, i would - is a splitting cabinet, i would personally want to see the whole package because when we talk about supporting those on lowest incomes it is not all about welfare, but i have to say that given the last welfare operating was below inflation because of how the mechanism works, it sets the rate in april against the previous september, already those benefits are behind why inflation should have them —— given the last welfare uprating. i think another real terms
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cut of 5%, it will be difficult to get through our backbenchers. serra; get through our backbenchers. sorry to interrupt. — get through our backbenchers. sorry to interrupt, but _ get through our backbenchers. sorry to interrupt, but if _ get through our backbenchers. sorry to interrupt, but if you _ get through our backbenchers. sorry to interrupt, but if you were asked to interrupt, but if you were asked to vote to uprate benefits in line with earnings, not inflation, would you? i with earnings, not inflation, would ou? ., ., , ., you? i would always look at the circumstances _ you? i would always look at the circumstances of _ you? i would always look at the circumstances of the _ you? i would always look at the circumstances of the time - you? i would always look at the circumstances of the time and i circumstances of the time and precisely what was being offered, but i think it would be something of a stretch to see myself doing that. and your thoughts today, it has been a very turbulent few days and spoke, which was just a very turbulent few days and spoke, which wasjust on a very turbulent few days and spoke, which was just on friday, what has been the impact over this short period on the authority of liz truss? —— it has been a very turbulent few days since we spoke. she has to regain authority, the key is coming forward with a fiscally credible plan but markets feel stacks up. as soon as she can reach that base, we can perhaps start to see the market reacted much more
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positively, just as it can go negative very quickly it can go more positive very quickly. she and the chancellor had to take difficult decisions around where to lean it savings and spending cuts and where to potentially rollback or defer some tax cuts they had come forward with, because you have to make the whole thing up to satisfy the markets, so these are very hard choices which need to be made quickly and got right. mei choices which need to be made quickly and got right. mel stride mp, chair quickly and got right. mel stride mp. chair of— quickly and got right. mel stride mp, chair of the _ quickly and got right. mel stride mp, chair of the treasury - quickly and got right. mel stride mp, chair of the treasury select i mp, chair of the treasury select committee, thank you very much. we wa nt we want to hear your thoughts on the conservative conference, whether the prime minister should be clear of benefit should be linked to wages or the rate of inflation, and what you think about migration, a subject the conference will hear about later today with home secretary suella braverman due to address later on
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the subject of immigration, what do you want the government to do about that? you can get in touch with me on twitter. the first preliminary hearing of the uk covid public inquiry will begin later today. it'll examine the uk's response to coronavirus and the impact of the pandemic. the hearing had originally been scheduled for last month, but was delayed after the death of the queen. our health correspondent jim reed reports. on a long wall in westminster, relatives of those who lost their lives to covid have left their marks and memories. sylvia jackson died in the first wave of the pandemic. like so many others, her daughter wants to know if the right decisions were taken at the time. so, all kinds of questions and the fact that none of them have been answered yet is precisely the reason why we need this inquiry. i don't know who is responsible for my mum's death. and i want to know. and if they behaved wrongly,
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i want them held to account. that's only right, that's only right. today, in this room in west london, the process of finding those answers gets under way. the uk covid inquiry is so wide—ranging, it will have to be split into separate sections. the first tackling preparations for a pandemic starts this morning. next month sees the start of the second section on political decision—making, including the timing of lockdowns. preliminary hearings this autumn will be followed by full public hearings next year, where ministers and other decision—makers will be called to give evidence. this all matters to people like abi williams. the care home she runs lost residents in the first wave of covid. it is important for us, too — for lessons learned, really. we want to know what went wrong,
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how can it be better handled, and we want to learn from it and to be more prepared in future. covid is still with us, of course. though the fast roll—out of vaccines across the world has cut the risk of hospitalisation and death. doctors say learning lessons now is vital to better understand what happened and to better protect ourselves against any future pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. a woman has died after being attacked by dogs at a house in liverpool. merseyside police say the victim — who was in her 60s — was pronounced dead yesterday afternoon at an address in kirkdale. tougher rules for migrants will be set out later by the new home secretary suella braverman when she addresses the tory party conference. more than 32,000 people have crossed the english channel in small boats so far this year. our paris correspondent lucy williamson has been speaking to people in northern france about the growing popularity
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of this route into the uk. it's 3am and this french patrol are tracking their target. two people smugglers spotted by a uk—funded drone. they're half a mile away, swiftly preparing a boat to take migrants across the channel. a uk—funded buggy gets the patrol there in minutes. the smugglers have already fled. but they've lost their boat, their fuel and their motor to the patrol. this journey tonight is over. french patrols are now stopping around half these crossings, but they are still attracting more migrants and new, more efficient smuggling networks run by albanians. translation: i don't know if it's the albanian mafia - in the uk, but there are a lot of albanian smugglers organising crossings. with prices of 3,000
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to 4,000 euros per person and a0 people in a boat, do the maths. it is even more lucrative than drug trafficking and with lighter criminal charges. albanian customers have been filling cafes and hotels around the station in dunkirk. this summer i see a lot of albanian people come here. more and more. maybe double or triple compared to last year. and year after year, there are people and people coming and coming who say there is no people in albania any more. smugglers have extended their operations along this coastline to avoid daily patrols from land, sea and air. this coastline has pulled in resources year after year — vehicles, technology, foot patrols. politicians change, strategies shift and, still, the number of people crossing this channel rises. and here in the camps, the uk government's latest deterrent, deportation to rwanda, isn't working.
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this crossing is sold as the solution to insurmountable problems, and that trumps any kind of risk. lucy williamson, bbc news, calais. north korea has launched a missile overjapan, sparking anger in tokyo. it defies a un security council resolution ban on missile launches. the rocket came down in the pacific ocean — and there are no reports of damage. stephanie prentice reports. it's a familiar sight — north korea testing its missiles — but monday's launch was different. for the first time since 2017 a missile flew all the way overjapan. the latest launch, the fifth in a week, has been strongly condemned by south korean and japanese officials. translation: north korea's actions, including the repeated _ ballistic missile launches, are a threat to the peace and security of our country, region and international community, and it is a serious challenge
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for our country and the entire international community. people injapan awoke to messages warning them to take shelter as rocket fragments landed in the pacific ocean. it's a serious escalation of military action, as north korea tests its rockets as well as the patients of its neighbours. there are three things you can do and one is the kind of diplomatic statements you are hearing, you condemn it, maybe there's another resolution at the united nations security council. that goes so far. north korea's heard them before, it won't have much effect. the second is sanctions, but north korea's one of the most heavily sanctioned countries on earth, so that unlikely. and the third is talk. whatever kim jong—un's intentions, the outcome is already clear as the international community unites to condemn the action, and japan says it is consulting its allies on next steps.
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stephanie prentice, bbc news. just to give you an idea of the effect the north korean missile launch had injapan, this video was filmed on board a train — which was brought to a halt, with alarms ringing, from what is known as the j—alert system. the announcement said that the service would only resume moving once its safety had been confirmed. our correspondentjean mackenzie is in seoul. we are getting very used to reporting these north korean missile launchers, they have almost become normalised, this has been a record year for north korean missile tests, and just last week we had four instances of these. but today's really does stand apart because it is the first time for five years that they have flown a missile overjapan. so, most of their launches this year have been short—range missile launches, and even when they have been testing something longer range, they fly it in such a way so that it lands in the sea between korea and japan. for it actually to fly over another country's territory is seen as incredibly provocative, and it appears that japan was not
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given any prior warning that this was going to take place. so, you have, as wejust heard, people in the northern parts of japan waking up to the sounds of warning sirens and being told to take cover, being told to look up into the sky to check forfalling debris. so, it is a major escalation on the part of north korea. jean mckenzie reporting. carol has the latest weather.— the latest weather. good morning. this morning _ the latest weather. good morning. this morning we _ the latest weather. good morning. this morning we have _ the latest weather. good morning. this morning we have a _ the latest weather. good morning. this morning we have a wet - the latest weather. good morning. this morning we have a wet and i the latest weather. good morning. i this morning we have a wet and windy picture, that is the forecast for the next few days. we have had heavy rain moving across scotland and northern ireland through the early hours of today, it is two weather fronts, one continuing south and east and not making it into the southeast court, the second holds over southern scotland and northern ireland and then it brightens up in the far north—east of scotland, where we will see scattered showers
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—— not making it into the south—east quarter. fairly mild, temperatures between 13 and 20 north to south. this evening and overnight, our bands of rain started move northwards, a developing area of low pressure brings heavy, persistent rain across the north of the country and trailing fronts bring rain into the west. another mild night, the wind and strengthening. tomorrow we see heavy and persistent rain clear scotland, two week weather front pushed to the south—east, a mixture of sunshine and showers between, some showers could be heavy and thundery. we will have gales around the coast, a bit cooler in the north but very mild for the time of year in the south. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... as the conservative party conference continues, the prime minister refuses
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to rule out real—terms benefit cuts to help pay for her government's growth plan. she tells the bbc that she's in listening mode. chancellor kwasi kwarteng will set out his plan to get uk debt falling earlier than planned. he's expected to publish details later this month on how it will be paid for. tougher rules for migrants will be set out later by the new home secretary suella braverman when she addresses the tory party. the tightened rules come as it is revealed more than 32,000 people have crossed the english channel in small boats so far this year. time for the sport. good morning. we will start with football, leicester city have moved off the foot of the premier league table after a four nil victory over their east midlands
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rivals nottingham forest. it means it is now nottingham forest to prop up it is now nottingham forest to prop up the table despite those 22 new summer signings, with manager steve cooper under pressure, asjoe lynskey reports. they are the team who won this league six years ago, now, lest a face that local rivals at the bottom of it. such was the form of both of these teams, some called this match... sometimes a coach's job comes down to an on the ball. leicester's lift—off came through a deflection, but then they made their own luck. harvey barnes took the ball and found the corner. 2-0. took the ball and found the corner. 2—0. while for leicester it was ecstasy, for nottingham forest, it was bleak, and getting worse. james maddison's freekick made it three by half—time, he wants an england world cup spot. now leicester's internationals were stepping forward. there is ambience striker
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patson daka flicked in a fourth. leicester's first win of the season moves them up one place and pushes nottingham forest to the bottom of the table. with this defeat, their seasonis the table. with this defeat, their season is going south. for all their history and achievements, this will be the first time that liverpool and rangers have faced each other despite 61 years of rivalry between scottish and english clubs in europe. they meet in the champions league tonight and as we know, rangers and celtic, the two big teams in scottish football. rangers have faced manchester united in europe previously, celtic face manchester city five years ago, but this will be the first time that liverpool and rangers have faced each other and one for the history books. i5 each other and one for the history books. , ., ,., ., , each other and one for the history books. , ., ., , ., books. is a huge podium for us to erform, books. is a huge podium for us to perform. not _ books. is a huge podium for us to perform, not only _ books. is a huge podium for us to perform, not only for— books. is a huge podium for us to perform, not only for the - books. is a huge podium for us to perform, not only for the club i books. is a huge podium for us to perform, not only for the club but also for the players, as i said before, against a quality side, and since many years, there was a scottish team playing against
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english team, i think the first time in both histories of the club that we are facing each other, so we are excited to be here, and try to get a good result. excited to be here, and try to get a good result-— good result. really good football team, and that _ good result. really good football team, and that is _ good result. really good football team, and that is what _ good result. really good football team, and that is what we i good result. really good football team, and that is what we have i good result. really good football. team, and that is what we have to prepare _ team, and that is what we have to prepare for. — team, and that is what we have to prepare for, and they have not had the results — prepare for, and they have not had the results they want, so that is what _ the results they want, so that is what they— the results they want, so that is what they want to change cover definitely, so we expect a proper fight _ definitely, so we expect a proper fight a — definitely, so we expect a proper fight. a real fight, and that is what — fight. a real fight, and that is what we _ fight. a real fight, and that is what we prepare for.- fight. a real fight, and that is what we prepare for. after a freak in'u , what we prepare for. after a freak injury. england — what we prepare for. after a freak injury, england batsman - what we prepare for. after a freak injury, england batsman jonny i injury, england batsman jonny bairstow injury, england batsmanjonny bairstow has confirmed that he won't play again this year after having surgery on a broken leg and dislocated ankle. he was in the form of his life this summer but slipped on 80 box playing golf. he has already been ruled out of this months t20 world cup and he missed the final test match against south africa as well. the first players have left worcester after the rugby union side entered administration. the club's season has been suspended after they couldn't provide proof of
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funds by the deadline last week. with their next two friendlies cancelled, holly lawrence ted hill and others are alljoining bath initially on loan. it has been an incredible year of football, with standout performances in the women's domestic leagues and major international tournaments around the world. voting is now open for the bbc women's footballer of the year 2020 to, with five players up for the public vote. it was another standout season for sam kerr, who helped chelsea win the fa cup and an historic third consecutive women's super league title. it was also an incredible year for beth mead, her six goals and five assists saw her get the golden boot and player of the tournament in the euros. also on the tournament in the euros. also on the shortlist is the wolfsburg and germany striker alexandra popp, alexey petraeus and wendy reynard.
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voting closes on that one on the 12th of october, i think, so, plenty of time to get your votes and for that. and just a reminder that there is plenty more on our website including all of those details on how you vote for the winner of that award. for now, that is all from me. donald trump has launched a libel action against cnn, accusing the us broadcaster of comparing him to hitler. the former president is seeking $475 million dollars in damages. mr trump accuses cnn of carrying out a slanderous campaign against him because it fears he will stand again for the presidency. the network has not responded. our north america correspondent david willis says it's not the first time the former us president has threatened to sue the broadcaster.
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donald trump has used the phrase fake news and regards to all sorts of different media organisations here in the us, of course, but perhaps none more so than cnn, which, together with the new york times, have become his betes noires, if you like, as far as media organisations are concerned. he's filed this 29 page lawsuit in his home state of florida, which basically accuses cnn of attempting to undermine his political ambitions, and also increasing its attacks in recent months, as speculation has grown, that he, donald trump, might run for office once again. but in particular, this lawsuit draws attention to parallels which it says cnn presenters and reporters have drawn between the former president and adolf hitler, in particular, its use of the phrase "the big lie", which is the phrase that cnn presenters have taken to using in order to describe donald trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election, at the big lie election, the big lie was also a phrase used by adolf
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hitler to invoke violence against the jews. so, in this lawsuit, donald trump is seeking $75,000 in compensatory damages, and $475 million in punitive damages. and he's saying in a statement that he is going to file similar lawsuits against other media organisations in the weeks and months ahead. he has had mixed results in the past in this regard. he has sued the new york times and the washington post a couple of years ago, after those newspapers suggested that he had some involvement in russian attempts to undermine the result of the 2020 election. one of those lawsuits was thrown out, another is still pending, and of course, he lost a lawsuit against twitter after it threw him off its social media platform. he threatened to sue cnn three years ago but never followed through, and at the time, cnn described it as a pr stunt.
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well, it has yet to comment on this latest lawsuit. the conservative conference continues today with more pressure on liz truss over some of her key policies. yesterday, chancellor kwasi kwarteng abandoned his plan to cut the tax rate for the highest earners to stave off a revolt among tory mps. today, he's expected to reveal when he will publish his plan to cut the uk's debts to help regain the confidence of the markets after last month's mini—budget. the plan is being brought forward after widespread criticism that the original date, novermber 23rd, was too long to wait. the pm is also under pressure over whether or not there will be real—terms cuts to benefits to help pay for her economic plans. ican bring i can bring you a couple of your reactions on twitter... this one says you should bring them up to the same level as average wages, rather than the barest minimum enable to survive. this one says, insufficient to survive, there can be no moral argument for to survive, there can be no moral argument for not to survive, there can be no moral argument for not increasing
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to survive, there can be no moral argument for not increasing them to survive, there can be no moral argument for not increasing them in line with the cost of. if you want to get in touch about that particular policy, or indeed the immigration policy, we are expected to hear more on that today, at the conservative conference, you can do that on twitter. let's get more on this now with kate bell, the head of economics at the tuc, which represents the majority of trade unions in england and wales. before i get onto public services, on the issue of benefit cuts, do you think the prime minister needs to make it absolutely clear as soon as possible what she is going to do on that and whether she is going to upgrade benefits in line with wages or in line with inflation? i upgrade benefits in line with wages or in line with inflation?— or in line with inflation? i think she needs _ or in line with inflation? i think she needs to _ or in line with inflation? i think she needs to make _ or in line with inflation? i think she needs to make it _ or in line with inflation? i think| she needs to make it absolutely clear that as a minimum she will be operating benefits in line with inflation. as i think one of your listeners just inflation. as i think one of your listenersjust said, it inflation. as i think one of your listeners just said, it would be immoral not to go ahead with that and to deliver a real terms cut for people who desperately need that support. and i think we have to get away from this idea that it is
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somehow a division between working and nonworking people, 40% of the people who get universal credit are in work. the chancellor rishi sunak promised they would get that operating in line with inflation and that should be the absolute minimum the government delivers now. she has talked about — the government delivers now. she has talked about supporting _ the government delivers now. she has talked about supporting the _ the government delivers now. she has talked about supporting the most i talked about supporting the most vulnerable, but what is your definition of the most vulnerable, at a time when you know people are clearly suffering because of the cost of living crisis? brute clearly suffering because of the cost of living crisis?— cost of living crisis? we have a benefit system _ cost of living crisis? we have a benefit system which - cost of living crisis? we have a benefit system which says i cost of living crisis? we have a benefit system which says you | cost of living crisis? we have a i benefit system which says you can only claim those benefits to pursue if you absolutely need them, we think the systems should be absolutely more generous, but there are very strict rules, and to say that you might be thinking of cutting off support for those people who desperately need it, we have already got record numbers of people going to food banks, and those are people in work, nurses, jobcentres staffed themselves using food banks,
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to say that they are the people who are going to bear the price of the chancellor's unfunded tax cuts is just not acceptable. the government is sa in: it just not acceptable. the government is saying it has _ just not acceptable. the government is saying it has got _ just not acceptable. the government is saying it has got to _ just not acceptable. the government is saying it has got to pay _ just not acceptable. the government is saying it has got to pay for - just not acceptable. the government is saying it has got to pay for its i is saying it has got to pay for its growth plans, so, where will efficiencies come from, where will some of that money come from? should it come from public services? i am not sure why _ it come from public services? i am not sure why the _ it come from public services? i �*iii not sure why the government thinks it has to pay for tax cuts for big corporations, £18 billion they are handing out to the big corporations in no form of corporation tax cuts, and i don't think even business is asking for that, nobody thinks that is going to deliver growth. we have seen over the last decade massive tax cuts for businesses, no impact on growth, and the idea that that is what is going to deliver growth now, and at the expense of our public services, is notjust bad economically, it isjust services, is notjust bad economically, it is just bad morally, and i think people across the country are looking at the state of our public services, they are looking at those waiting lists in hospitals, they are looking at the huge pressure on teachers and their workloads, they are looking at those
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denigrated services across level go local government and they know there is no for cuts and what those services need is investment. you wrote about _ services need is investment. you wrote about this _ services need is investment. you wrote about this to _ services need is investment. you wrote about this to liz truss when she became prime minister, what was the response? i she became prime minister, what was the response?— the response? i don't think we have had a response _ the response? i don't think we have had a response to _ the response? i don't think we have had a response to that _ the response? i don't think we have had a response to that yet, - the response? i don't think we have had a response to that yet, of- had a response to that yet, of course we always want to talk to government about their plans, we want them to hear the voice of working people and i think today they have been saying, we are listening. there is a lot of 5 million workers represented by trade unions who would very much like to have their say about these issues and they can explain to the government that strong public services are also vital to economic growth. services are also vital to economic urowth. . , services are also vital to economic urowth. ., , ., ~ services are also vital to economic irowth. ., , ., 4' , growth. kate belle, thank you very much for your— growth. kate belle, thank you very much for your time _ growth. kate belle, thank you very much for your time today, - growth. kate belle, thank you very much for your time today, so, i growth. kate belle, thank you very much for your time today, so, no i much for your time today, so, no response yet from the prime minister to the tuc�*s letter which they sent to the tuc�*s letter which they sent to her when she became prime minister on the issue of public services. joining me now from the conference is mo hussein, a former chief press officer for david cameron's time in no 10. thank you forjoining us today. i
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was talking to the minister, the mp, mel stride, earlier, and asking him to try and help my understanding of what has been going on, and our viewers' understanding of what has been going on over the last few days, and i put it to him, well, when this u—turn on tax was announced, would it not then have been sensible to also say that the government's plan to explain how it is going to cut uk debt was being brought forward at the same time, because otherwise it looks quite messy, doesn't it, what you think is going on in terms of strategy? yes. going on in terms of strategy? yes, it does look — going on in terms of strategy? yes, it does look quite _ going on in terms of strategy? yes, it does look quite messy _ going on in terms of strategy? 1'313 it does look quite messy and going on in terms of strategy? ia: it does look quite messy and this drip drip of continuing the story and making it look even more chaotic and making it look even more chaotic and last—minute decisions are being made, is not really helpful because if you are going to u—turn, and i do think the government was right to listen and learn and to change the policy, but then you do it quickly and then you try and change the
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narrative and you try and move on and talk about all of the other things the government does want to talk about, about how it will generate growth, but if you continue with, actually we are now going to change this, that actually there will be more details to come, and the dates change, it becomes quite confusing for people, both the people who are here and the people who are watching, and itjust feels a bit like testing the water, and just seeing, the last u—turn was done after a lot of pressure and a lot of opposition inside the party, and of course, the public is welcome and of course, the public is welcome and now that has happened once, i think mps will certainly feel a bit more emboldened in terms of what are the other parts of the government agenda, not least the question around operating benefits with inflation, and can they force a change on that as well? and inflation, and can they force a change on that as well? and how difficult is it — change on that as well? and how difficult is it for _ change on that as well? and how difficult is it for liz _ change on that as well? and how difficult is it for liz truss - change on that as well? and how difficult is it for liz truss that i difficult is it for liz truss that this is all happening at the time of the conservative conference, her first conference as prime minister, withinjust a few first conference as prime minister, within just a few weeks of getting the job?
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within just a few weeks of getting thejob? it within just a few weeks of getting the “ob? , ., , ., within just a few weeks of getting the'ob? , ., the job? it should be a really positive. _ the job? it should be a really positive. a — the job? it should be a really positive, a really _ the job? it should be a really positive, a really boosting i positive, a really boosting occasion, where you spend a lot of time working on what the announcements will be, in all numero, behind the scenes, the good, positive things which are conservative friendly, consumer friendly, clearly we haven't had that, it has been overshadowed. and i think any u—turn is challenging but particularly four vts ck into a new government when you are trying to assert your authority and perhaps differentiate yourself from your predecessor. —— four weeks in. and this is the thing which everyone is talking about, and people can sense the weakness in that, and as i say, other people are thinking ahead to, there was talk of wanting to be radical in decision—making, if you fall flat in that process, and if you do give into the pressure, what else are you potentially going to u—turn on? it is challenging from both sides, for the people who are now involved and by this and do what her to change course, but also her
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supporters. let's remember that she did win the majority of members, maybe not mps, which is part of the problem, but certainly members, who do quite like her broader agenda about how the she will do things differently and generate growth and if back and that she is not going to do what she said she would, where does that leave her with her supporters as well? so, difficulty on all sides. supporters as well? so, difficulty on all sides-— on all sides. which is part of the roblem, on all sides. which is part of the problem. was — on all sides. which is part of the problem, was the _ on all sides. which is part of the problem, was the phrase i on all sides. which is part of the problem, was the phrase you i on all sides. which is part of the i problem, was the phrase you used, about the selection process, she did not win the support of the majority of the parliamentary party, but conservative party members more broadly around the uk, voted for her, do you think the conservatives will be looking at this and thinking, do they need to revisit the selection process, how it works? i think quite possibly, yes, because, to have this situation where you try to turn a new page and you try to move on from the many challenges over the last months of the johnson challenges over the last months of thejohnson administration, and the johnson administration, and still thejohnson administration, and still be in a situation, but in a worse situation in terms of the impact on the markets, i think a lot
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of people will be looking again at how that process works in terms of who gets to choose and also the length of the selection, it was a very long and drawnout battle, as we all know, which was not good for conservative party unity as well. so, there are many reasons why i think the process will probably be one to look at again certainly. fine one to look at again certainly. one newspaper— one to look at again certainly. one newspaper headline this morning declares, get a grip. if you are advising liz truss, how would you suggest she does that?— advising liz truss, how would you suggest she does that? well, i think ou have suggest she does that? well, i think you have to — suggest she does that? well, i think you have to admit _ suggest she does that? well, i think you have to admit that _ suggest she does that? well, i think you have to admit that this - suggest she does that? well, i think you have to admit that this has i suggest she does that? well, i think you have to admit that this has gone wrong, and it isn'tjust a communications issue, there is a lot of talk about the communications could have been better, but actually it is also about the policy under substance. the politics where your own backbenchers, which are very senior, and some of them have sat around the cabinet table with you, do not like this policy at all. i am thinking about the challenge that some of the newer conservative mps have, particularly in the red wall, labour facing seats, have, particularly in the red wall, labourfacing seats, how have, particularly in the red wall, labour facing seats, how do they a tax cut at the top and yet less help
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to people who are every day families are struggling? so i think if you are struggling? so i think if you are going to u—turn, you do it quickly and you acknowledge that you got it wrong and then you talk about everything else you want to do in concrete terms. so, what are the other plans for the economy? it is notjust other plans for the economy? it is not just tax cuts, other plans for the economy? it is notjust tax cuts, it is all the other supply—side reforms we keep on hearing about, but what are the details of that? but then i think you also move forward the medium—term fiscal plan, two months to the end of november is still quite a long time for people to be talking about this, and also fur talbot turmoil, they did that, but they didn't in a very drip feed, late—night announcement, and crucially you bring forward the data as well so what are the obr facts, the assessments the obr is making, things like that i think could help give people certainty and reassurance, and if that would have been done together and quicker. thank you very much, mo hussein, former chief press officer at no 10.
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a rover designed and built by british engineers at airbus in stevenage was all set to go to mars until its role in a mission to collect martian rocks was cancelled. now it's a robot on the hunt for a newjob to prevent all of the expertise and work that's taken more than a decade from going to waste. our science editor rebecca morelle reports. one state—of—the—art rover. its skills, it can drive autonomously, negotiate the most difficult terrain and cope in extreme environments. but now it's looking for work. built in the uk, it's being tested in a quarry in bedfordshire. it was heading for mars, until its mission was cancelled. its task on the red planet was to pick up samples, but it's been scrapped. mini mars helicopters will do thejob instead. the uk doesn't want to see the technology mothballed, they think this rover has still got a bright future. we've spent a lot of time and a lot of effort
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on developing this expertise. we don't want to let that go to waste, we want to exploit it to make sure that investment comes to fruition. also, it puts us in a good place to be involved in future space missions which is brilliant for the reputation of the uk. so, where could the rover go instead of mars? one option could be to swap the red martian terrain for the grey lunar landscape. this rover was designed for mars. if it's heading to the moon, it will need some modifications. the lunar surface can get as hot as 120 degrees celsius, and as cold as —230. so, this will have to cope with extremes. there's also problem with light. the moon gets two weeks of daylight followed by two weeks of darkness, and this will be a challenge for solar power. and then there's the fine lunar dust. it's particularly clingy and abrasive, which could be an issue for the rover�*s moving parts.
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lunar exploration is having a resurgence right now. nasa's new artemis rocket will soon be heading there and eventually taking astronauts to the moon's surface. the idea is to have a permanent lunar base, and rovers could play a crucial role. they could be used anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, so it could be autonomously moving around rovers for building habitats, or it could be used for going to places that are uninhabitable by humans or in an extreme temperature or particularly dangerous. so, anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, this rover could still use that technology to do that. for now, the rover is out of work, stuck on earth, driving around a quarry. but this isn't just about salvaging a £23 million piece of kit, it's about the people and expertise that goes with it. the hope is the rover gets some new employment soon. rebecca morelle, bbc news. in san francisco a futuristic pilot is taking place,
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fully driverless robo—taxis are being permitted at night time for paying customers. cruise, the company behind them, says the cars will revolutionise transport. but critics say putting fully autonomous taxis on urban streets is premature and dangerous. our north america technology reporterjames clayton has more. wow, i think there is actually no—one in there. it's incredible. on san francisco streets, something straight out of a sci—fi film is happening. people are able to hail cabs with no driver — fully autonomous robo—taxis. some love it. i cannot believe this is happening. but is the tech ready? there's only one way to find out. get into one of these cars ourselves. the bbc was one of the first media organisations in the world to try it. car: buckle up and get ready to ride. - it's really, really weird. it does not act like a race track or a testing facility.
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we are fully in the centre of san francisco. the car is totally driverless. it's amazing, unnerving, surreal, all mixed into one. on any of our cruise avs, we have lidar, we have radar and we have cameras. and what we do is all those together using machine learning and that gives us this amazing understanding of the world around us. but it didn't always feel like that. this is interesting. there is a bus in our lane and there are cars to our left. so what is it going to do? 0h. ok, it's pulling out left. oh, another bus is coming out. it really doesn't know what to do. 0h. there is a car behind us. like this isjust bad driving. i was ready to love this and i'm definitely... i'm definitely nervous. cruise has been involved in a number of accidents in san francisco this year, most of them minor. however, after a collision injune, its software was recalled.
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some believe it's too soon for real passengers to be driven around without a driver on urban streets. these vehicles are still somewhat in the test phase. we believe that manufacturers need to provide the public with some sort of transparent evidence that these vehicles aren't going to cause problems, deaths or injuries on the road. we are six months into deploying this product — brand—new, game—changing product — and, with that, comes some early teething problems. we are really proud of our safety record and we report continuously to our regulators, and safety is absolutely the top priority at cruise. despite safety concerns, cruise's vision is to expand, and quickly. and if they get their way, these kinds of rides will become the new normal. bye. james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. the forecast for the next few days is a wet and windy
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one for most of us. the least amount of rain is going to fall in the south—east, the most across western parts of scotland. today, we've got two weather fronts sinking southwards. you can see from the isobars it is going to be a blustery day, windier across england and wales than it has been, and with our first band of rain sinking southwards, the second one tending to stall across parts of scotland and northern ireland and to the north of that we are looking at some brighter skies and scattered showers. the rain not getting into the south—east, where we have got highs of up to 20 degrees. but wherever you are you will notice the wind, it will be blustery today. this evening and overnight, if anything, the weather fronts start to go back northwards, we have got this developing low pressure also pushing northwards, producing some heavy rain, and some more rain coming into the west. it will be windy again, especially across england and also wales and it will be another mild night. tomorrow, the low pressure pushes into the north sea but you can see two weather fronts moving
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towards the south—east, one of them fairly weak. in graphic form, there goes the rain, there go the weather fronts, and behind them, we see a return to some sunshine but some heavy and potentially thundery showers, and windy, these are the gusts, even inland it is going to be windy. it will be windy all day. we're looking at gusts to gale force with exposure. temperature—wise, tomorrow, a wee bit cooler in the north, 11—13, but coming south, we could see 18 or 19 degrees. heading into thursday, we start off on a dry but cooler note across england and wales. in scotland and northern ireland we will see the showers emerging to give longer spells of rain and a few showers in the midlands and wales. and still a blustery day. the strongest winds across the north and the west. and that continues into friday, the strongest winds will be in the north and the west, once again we're looking at some
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showers and a weather front sinking south, taking some rain with it, but in between, something drier and brighter. temperature—wise, 11 in lerwick to a high of about 19 down towards london.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. british prime minister liz truss has spoken to the bbc in an interview that was recorded before the u—turn on scrapping the 45p tax rate was announced. she says she's in listening mode. we are also a listening government that do listen to people, that do reflect on where we could have done things better. chancellor of the exchequer kwasi kwarteng will set out his plan to get uk debt falling earlier than planned. he's expected to publish details later this month on how it will be paid for. on the trail of the people smugglers — the uk government prepares to set out new rules to stop thousands of migrants crossing the english channel. the first preliminary hearing of the uk covid public inquiry will begin shortly, focussing on the
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country's pre—pandemic preparations before 2020.

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