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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 4, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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a fresh battle within the conservative party, this time over benefit payments. after the row over tax cuts for higher earners, now the prime minister is under pressure to increase welfare payments in line with inflation, and not to consider cutting them in real terms. well, we haven't made a decision yet on that specific issue, and all of these things depend on the specific circumstances. one cabinet minister, penny mordaunt, has broken ranks, calling on the prime minister to honour the increase in benefits promised under borisjohnson�*s government. also this lunchtime... the first preliminary hearing of the public inquiry on covid looks at how prepared the uk was for a pandemic. i have a duty to the public to conduct a thorough,
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fair and independent inquiry for the whole of the united kingdom, and i intend to do so. more counter—attacks by ukrainian troops in regions annexed by russia. calls for supermarkets to give more surplus food to those in need after a drop—off in donations. and the british—built space rover looking for work after its mission to mars was cancelled. and coming up on the bbc news channel... making history — despite six decades of rivalry between english and scottish sides, tonight liverpool play rangers for the first time in the champions league.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the prime minister has refused to rule out a real terms cut in benefits despite growing pressure to do so. liz truss faces a fresh battle with some conservative mps who want her to promise that benefits will rise in line with inflation rather than earnings, a lower percentage figure that would save the government billions of pounds. there's already a cabinet split on the issue. the leader of the commons penny morduant has openly demanded that benefits do go up in line with prices. iain watson reports from the conservative party conference. it is to hurt time for liz truss. she and her chancellor are under pressure, reversed their abolition
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of the 45p tax rate, now she is facing more pressure from some of her own mps to increase benefits in line with inflation, a promise made by her predecessor but which is now in the balance. {iii by her predecessor but which is now in the balance.— in the balance. of course, how we 0 erate in the balance. of course, how we operate benefits _ in the balance. of course, how we operate benefits is _ in the balance. of course, how we operate benefits is an _ in the balance. of course, how we operate benefits is an important l operate benefits is an important issue, but that is a decision to be made later this year. my priority was dealing with the immediate issues that families face this winter, and i'm sure people can understand why we had to act on that first. , ., , , first. here is what she is weighing u -. first. here is what she is weighing un- reversing _ first. here is what she is weighing up. reversing the _ first. here is what she is weighing up. reversing the national- up. reversing the national insurance rise is costing her government £18 million, some of that, £5.5 million, could be clawed back if most benefits were raised in line with earnings which aren't going up as much as prices or inflation. but most ministers can't make a political or financial case for this, because no decision has been taken. i would you operate them? i have got cabinet collective responsibility so i am going to let the work— responsibility so i am going to let the work and pensions secretary go to work _ the work and pensions secretary go to work. ., ., . ~ the work and pensions secretary go to work. . ., . ~ ., . ., , the work and pensions secretary go to work. . ., . ., ,
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to work. that lack of certainty has civen mps to work. that lack of certainty has given mps licensed _ to work. that lack of certainty has given mps licensed to _ to work. that lack of certainty has given mps licensed to speak- to work. that lack of certainty has given mps licensed to speak out. | to work. that lack of certainty has i given mps licensed to speak out. we given mps licensed to speak out. - absolutely need to make sure that we increase benefits in line with inflation, it was promised by the previous chancellor, it was promised by the previous prime minister, borisjohnson, and it is those on lowest earnings who are being hurt most the cost—of—living challenges that we face. so, it is morally right for the government to do so. what does this say about the prime minister's authority? it is notjust backbench mps, one former leadership rival who sits around her cabinet table is also speaking out. i have alwa s table is also speaking out. i have always supported, _ table is also speaking out. i have always supported, whether- table is also speaking out. i have always supported, whether it's . always supported, whether it's pensions, _ always supported, whether it's pensions, whether it's our welfare system, _ pensions, whether it's our welfare system, keeping pace with inflation. privately. _ system, keeping pace with inflation. privately, those inside no 10 tell me there is a strong case for increasing benefits in line with earnings. but it seems that they are largely leaving it to the rank and file to make the argument. i think it has to be _ file to make the argument. i think it has to be in _ file to make the argument. i think it has to be in line _ file to make the argument. i think it has to be in line with _ file to make the argument. i think it has to be in line with earnings, | it has to be in line with earnings,
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i am it has to be in line with earnings, iam an it has to be in line with earnings, i am an employer, we unfortunately will not be able to increase our wage rates in line with inflation because it's impossible, and if we do, we willjust inflate, inflation will get higher and higher, do, we willjust inflate, inflation will get higherand higher, it do, we willjust inflate, inflation will get higher and higher, it is a spiral. will get higher and higher, it is a siral. , ~ will get higher and higher, it is a siral. , . ., spiral. ever since the u-turn on tax a little more _ spiral. ever since the u-turn on tax a little more than _ spiral. ever since the u-turn on tax a little more than 24 _ spiral. ever since the u-turn on tax a little more than 24 hours - spiral. ever since the u-turn on tax a little more than 24 hours ago, . spiral. ever since the u-turn on tax i a little more than 24 hours ago, mps and members of liz trussj—lo zone party have been trying to shift out this way and that on other issues too but in a bbc interview, she has since suggested a row over the 45p rate was only something of a tactical retreat and that she remains committed to getting taxes down, even for higher earners. i would like to see the higher rate lower, i want us to be a competitive country, but i have listened to feedback, i want to take people with me. liz feedback, i want to take people with me. , , feedback, i want to take people with me, , , , ., , feedback, i want to take people with me. , , , ., , feedback, i want to take people with me. , ., me. liz truss promised bold and decisive leadership, _ me. liz truss promised bold and decisive leadership, but - me. liz truss promised bold and decisive leadership, but at - me. liz truss promised bold and decisive leadership, but at her i decisive leadership, but at her first conference as prime minister, some of her own members seem very willing to put that to the test. iain watson, bbc news, birmingham.
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0ur chief poltiical correspondent nick eardley is in birmingham. so, nick, we have had the row over tax for higher earners, it seems that the prime minister is now facing a row over welfare payments as well? . , , ., , �* as well? that is the problem, ben, when ou as well? that is the problem, ben, when you back _ as well? that is the problem, ben, when you back down _ as well? that is the problem, ben, when you back down on _ as well? that is the problem, ben, when you back down on one - as well? that is the problem, ben, when you back down on one thing i when you back down on one thing because of a rebellion among your backbenchers, it risks the danger that the same thing willjust keep happening, and that is exactly what is happening today. there is this active debate within government, within the cabinet, and within the wider conservative party, about exactly what you should do when it comes to increasing benefits next year. now, there is an argument within government that if you're telling people that they should accept below inflation pay rises, why would you give people on benefits inflation matching benefit rises? there is also an argument that ultimately, the government needs to make the hard case to the electorate that it needs to get more
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people into work. but on the other side, there are an increasing number of tory mps and cabinet ministers who feel it is just the wrong thing to do during a cost of living crisis, to tell people on benefits that they are going to get a real terms cut in the money they get from the state. so, that issue is going to run and run and run, because the government hasn't made its mind up, and then within the last hour liz truss has opened another can of worms by saying, actually, in the long term, she still likes the idea of bringing tax down for the higher earners, just 24 hours after she had junked the policy that would have done exactly that. a month into her premiership, ben, it feels like there is a lot of debate, and some would say a lot of chaos around government positions. ilick would say a lot of chaos around government positions. nick eardley, thank ou government positions. nick eardley, thank you very _ government positions. nick eardley, thank you very much, _ government positions. nick eardley, thank you very much, at _ government positions. nick eardley, thank you very much, at the - thank you very much, at the conservative party conference. 0ur economics correspondent dharsini david is in the bbc business newsroom.
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dharshini, we saw turmoil on the financial markets after the mini budget, howeverthose financial markets after the mini budget, however those markets responding to yesterday's government u—turn on tax? responding to yesterday's government u-turn on tax?— u-turn on tax? karma, ben, but for how long. — u-turn on tax? karma, ben, but for how long. is — u-turn on tax? karma, ben, but for how long. is the _ u-turn on tax? karma, ben, but for how long, is the question _ u-turn on tax? karma, ben, but for how long, is the question we - u-turn on tax? karma, ben, but for how long, is the question we have l how long, is the question we have -ot how long, is the question we have got to— how long, is the question we have got to ask — how long, is the question we have got to ask. we know what is concerning the markets is, how big are these _ concerning the markets is, how big are these tax cut plans? also, how are these tax cut plans? also, how are they _ are these tax cut plans? also, how are they going to be funded, what does _ are they going to be funded, what does it— are they going to be funded, what does it mean for growth, what does it mean— does it mean for growth, what does it mean for— does it mean for growth, what does it mean for interest rates? they are hoping _ it mean for interest rates? they are hoping to— it mean for interest rates? they are hoping to see those official forecasts by the official watchdog brought _ forecasts by the official watchdog brought forward, some uncertainty about— brought forward, some uncertainty about that — brought forward, some uncertainty about that emerging this lunchtime. so, about that emerging this lunchtime. so. as_ about that emerging this lunchtime. so. as it _ about that emerging this lunchtime. so, as it stands at the moment, you can see _ so, as it stands at the moment, you can see here — so, as it stands at the moment, you can see here the pound against the dollar, _ can see here the pound against the dollar, above where it was ahead of that mini _ dollar, above where it was ahead of that mini budget, but it is changing, so we are going to keep an eye on— changing, so we are going to keep an eye on that _ changing, so we are going to keep an eye on that one. also, borrowing costs _ eye on that one. also, borrowing costs for— eye on that one. also, borrowing costs for mortgage borrowers as well, _ costs for mortgage borrowers as welt, as— costs for mortgage borrowers as well, as denoted by the bond markets you can _ well, as denoted by the bond markets you can see _ well, as denoted by the bond markets you can see there, lower than they have _ you can see there, lower than they have been. — you can see there, lower than they have been, perhaps, in the last few days, _ have been, perhaps, in the last few days, but— have been, perhaps, in the last few days, but on— have been, perhaps, in the last few days, but on the other hand, still about— days, but on the other hand, still about twice as high as they were 'ust about twice as high as they were
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just a _ about twice as high as they were just a few— about twice as high as they were just a few months ago, which really underlines — just a few months ago, which really underlines the anxiety that remains in the _ underlines the anxiety that remains in the markets, because whenever we do see _ in the markets, because whenever we do see these — in the markets, because whenever we do see these forecasts published, there _ do see these forecasts published, there are — do see these forecasts published, there are some big questions here to answer _ there are some big questions here to answer one — there are some big questions here to answer. one of the key questions is, how answer. 0ne of the key questions is, how does— answer. one of the key questions is, how does the government fund its tax cutting _ how does the government fund its tax cutting plans? because some economists say this alone will have added _ economists say this alone will have added £10 — economists say this alone will have added £10 billion to borrowing costs. — added £10 billion to borrowing costs, put the tax cuts on top of that, _ costs, put the tax cuts on top of that, you — costs, put the tax cuts on top of that, you may have to look for around — that, you may have to look for around £40 billion of savings limiting — around £40 billion of savings limiting the rise in benefits only goes _ limiting the rise in benefits only goes a — limiting the rise in benefits only goes a small way towards that, some are saying _ goes a small way towards that, some are saying perhaps we are going to have to _ are saying perhaps we are going to have to look at cuts on a far larger scale _ have to look at cuts on a far larger scale £40 — have to look at cuts on a far larger scale. £40 billion, almost the amount— scale. £40 billion, almost the amount of— scale. £40 billion, almost the amount of money they get in the schools— amount of money they get in the schools core budget every year, that is the _ schools core budget every year, that is the scale — schools core budget every year, that is the scale of it. so, big questions to be answered here, services — questions to be answered here, services already under pressure because — services already under pressure because of rising inflation, all of this, _ because of rising inflation, all of this, it _ because of rising inflation, all of this, it is — because of rising inflation, all of this, it is notjust numbers on charts — this, it is notjust numbers on charts and _ this, it is notjust numbers on charts and words on pages, this is going _ charts and words on pages, this is going to _ charts and words on pages, this is going to impact likelihoods up and down _ going to impact likelihoods up and down the — going to impact likelihoods up and down the country.— going to impact likelihoods up and down the country. dharshini david, our economic—
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down the country. dharshini david, our economic correspondent, - down the country. dharshini david, | our economic correspondent, thank you very much indeed. the first hearing of the public inquiry into the covid—19 pandemic has begun. chaired by lady hallett, the inquiry will begin by examining how well prepared the uk was. she was speaking at the start of a want a anemone hearing which is mostly dealing with legal matters. 0ur health correspondent jim reed has this report. on a long wall in westminster, relatives of those who lost their lives to covid have left their marks and memories. sylvia jackson died in the first wave of the pandemic. like so many others, her daughter wants to know if the right decisions were taken at the time. so, all kinds of questions and the fact that none of them have been answered yet is precisely the reason why we need this inquiry. i don't know who is responsible for my mum's death. and i want to know. and if they behaved wrongly, i want them held to account. that's only right,
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that's only right. today, in this room in west london, the process of finding those answers is now under way. the uk covid inquiry is so wide—ranging it will have to be split into separate sections. the first, tackling preparations for the pandemic, started this morning. next month sees the start of the second section on political decision—making, including the timing of lockdowns. preliminary hearings this autumn will be followed by full public hearings next year, where ministers and other decision—makers will be called to give evidence. the inquiry chair has said those who suffered the most deserve to know if more could have been done. millions of people suffered loss, including the loss of friends and family members, the loss of good health, both mental and physical, economic loss, loss of educational opportunities and the loss of social interaction.
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this all matters to people like abi williams. the care home she runs lost residents in the first wave of covid. it is important for us, too — for lessons learned, really. we want to know what went wrong, how can it be better handled, and we want to learn from it and to be more prepared in future. covid is still with us, of course, though the fast roll—out of vaccines across the world has cut the risk of hospitalisation and death. doctors say learning lessons now is vital to better understand what happened and better protect ourselves against any future pandemic. and ben, lady hallett, the chair of the inquiry, hasjust finished the inquiry, has just finished speaking the inquiry, hasjust finished speaking in this building behind me. she said if you could sum up the
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pandemic in one word, it would be using the word loss. she said the key question is, where the losses connected to covid inevitable, or could some of those 204,000 deaths have been prevented? back to you in the studio. jim reed, our health correspondent, thank you very much. a 31—year—old man has been arrested after a woman was fatally attacked by dogs in a house in liverpool. police said five american bulldogs which were inside the property in kirkdale where the attack happened had been destroyed. ukrainian forces have siezed back more territory in the south of the country near the key city of kherson having destroyed more than 30 russian tanks. ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky says fierce fighting continues in a number of areas in the south and the east, as his forces push ahead with offensives in regions annexed by russia last week. 0ur correspondent hugo bachega is in kyiv. how significant is this latest
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advance by ukrainian troops, particularly the offensive near kherson? �* . , kherson? ben, it is very significant, _ kherson? ben, it is very significant, in _ kherson? ben, it is very significant, in fact - kherson? ben, it is very significant, in fact it - kherson? ben, it is very significant, in fact it is l kherson? ben, it is very l significant, in fact it is the kherson? ben, it is very - significant, in fact it is the most significant breakthrough for the ukrainians in the south since the start of this counteroffensive. we have been watching the situation in kherson for weeks, with very little movement in terms of military positions, but that has changed, the ukrainians have reclaimed several villages along the dnipro river, which acts as a natural barrier in that part of the region, and this morning, more reports that the ukrainians have taken back more territory, or villages in that part of the country, and that the russians had had to abandon some positions in the south. so, very significant what is happening in the south. and in the east, the ukrainians seem to be reinforcing positions in the town of lyman, the town that was recaptured over the weekend, a major victory for the ukrainians because it was being used as a transport and logistics hub by
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the russian forces. and it gives the ukrainians the possibility of trying to recapture more territory in the donetsk, but also in the luhansk region. so, massive gains for the ukrainians, and also major embarrassment for president putin, because these gains are happening in two of the areas that russia said it was annexed in, a move that has been dismissed by the ukrainians as illegal. dismissed by the ukrainians as illeaal. ., �* ., , illegal. hugo bachega, in kyiv, thank you- _ there has been strong international condemnation of north korea's launch of a ballistic missile overjapan for the first time in five years. the united states said the test was dangerous, reckless and destabilising. sirens were sounded and some trains stopped injapan. it comes days after the us, south korea and japan staged large—scale military exercises. the united nations has made another appeal for aid for pakistan after the worst floods
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there in decades. the un says it needs more than £700 million, that's five times more than it was previously asking for. at least 1,700 people have died in the disaster, some 600 of them children. with flood waters not expected to recede for many months, there's an increase in life—threatening waterborne diseases and the un says it's a public health emergency. 0ur correspondent rajini vaidyanathan reports from sindh. in pakistan, as fields remain flooded, villages remain isolated. doctors are delivering medical care by boat, with the help here of unicef. we asked if we could follow them as they visited far—flung communities who have been stranded. these remote areas already had very limited access to medical help. now, what this mobile camp is providing today is testing
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for malnutrition over here, over there they are doing malaria tests, in the corner there tests for hepatitis and here, a whole load of medicines available for people, all kinds of things from oral rehydration to antimalarials and there's even soap that they are providing people. fouzia approaches the camp with herfour young children. she tells me they are all sick. translation: it's really difficult, there's water everywhere - and we can't get medicines. now, some help has arrived to treat a rise in waterborne diseases like malaria and diarrhoea, and a spike in malnutrition. as doctors measure her arm, they learn that baby sima is perilously thin. since the floods, her mother has struggled to eat. there is a shortage of clean
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water and food supplies, so mainly there are so many people like this baby, she's nine months old, and she is severely malnourished. these camps provide some relief. but with a shortage of medicines, boats and even doctors, not everyone can get this help. it could take months for the waters to recede, that's many more months of suffering. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. the time is 13:18. our top story this lunchtime... a fresh battle within the conservative party, this time over benefit payments. the prime minister is under pressure to increase them in line with inflation. and after decades in a secure hospital — much of it in solitary confinenment — tony hickmott, who has autism and a learning disability, is told he can come home.
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coming up on the bbc news channel: who's in and who's out? nikita parris and lotte wubben—moy are called up by the lionesses as they prepare for their friendly against the usa as a sold—out wembley on friday. —— at ——ata —— at a sold—out wembley. a charity which redistributes surplus food is asking the britain's biggest supermarkets and brands to step up their contributions. fareshare says it has seen a drop in donations at a time when demand for its services is surging. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has this report. fareshare is a huge unseen network behind almost 10,000 food banks and community kitchens, getting surplus food from producers and retailers into the hands of someone who can use it. but in recent months,
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they've hit a problem. supermarkets are under real pressure at the moment keep costs low for customers and keep the shelves full, which means their supply chains have been getting leaner and meaner, more of these products ending up on the supermarket shelves and fewer ending up here. it's really empty compared to what it normally is. that is a daily headache for carl. he is getting 40 fewer pallets from supermarkets into this centre in barnsley each month. there is a just not a great deal in at the moment. so you've got some meat in here... some meat, yeah, somejuices, there. a bit of hummus, and then you've got tomatoes, courgettes... and donations from supermarkets are particularly important. if you are a community group trying to make a meal out of, let's say, just beetroot, it's really hard to make a meal out of them, whereas the retail food is very mixed, so it makes it much easier for our charities and community groups to make meals for the beneficiaries that they are serving. is it also that it's expensive for supermarkets to get the food to you? like, is it cheaperfor them to just throw it away?
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yeah, quite often. so that food is being wasted. there's people over here that are hungry. trying to connect those two things together makes a lot of sense and right now it's more challenging than ever. five of the big supermarkets have told this they are continuing to work with fareshare and other charities, but sainsbury�*s and asda said that reducing food waste was an important commitment for them. so this is our freezer room... suppliers like fullers food understand the problem. they make the frozen chips inside the supermarket brand packaging and now give all their surplus food to fareshare. it costs to waste food as well, so if we send food to landfill we get charged for that, we have to distribute it, we have to have it collected. the thing is, like the supermarkets, theyjust don't have as much surplus food any more. it's not a conscious decision not to generate food, but it's a consequence of increased demand. food banks have become increasingly dependent on the generosity of supermarkets and suppliers,
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and as they tighten their own belts, the collateral damage is the millions of people who are now depending on their surplus supplies. colletta smith, bbc news, in barnsley. tougher rules for migrants are expected to be set out by the new home secretary suella braverman later today when she addresses the conservative party conference. more than 32,000 people have crossed the english channel in small boats so far this year. lucy williamson reports from northern france. it's 3am and this french patrol are tracking their target. two people smugglers spotted by a uk—funded drone. they're half a mile away, swiftly preparing a boat to take migrants across the channel. a uk—funded buggy gets the patrol there in minutes. the smugglers have already fled... ..but they've lost their boat,
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their fuel and their motor to the patrol. this journey tonight is over. french patrols are now stopping around half these crossings, but they are still attracting more migrants and new, more efficient smuggling networks run by albanians. translation: i don't know if it's the albanian mafia in the uk, - but there are a lot of albanian smugglers organising crossings. with prices of 3,000 to 4,000 euros per person and 40 people in a boat, do the maths. it is even more lucrative than drug trafficking, and with lighter criminal charges. albanian customers have been filling cafes and hotels around the station in dunkirk. this summer i see a lot of albanian people come here. more and more. maybe double or triple compared to last year. and year after year, there are people and people coming and coming who say there is no people in albania any more. smugglers have extended their operations along this coastline to avoid daily patrols
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from land, sea and air. this coastline has pulled in resources year after year — vehicles, technology, foot patrols. politicians change, strategies shift, and still the number of people crossing this channel rises. and here in the camps, the uk government's latest deterrent, deportation to rwanda, isn't working. this crossing is sold as the solution to insurmountable problems, and that trumps any kind of risk. lucy williamson, bbc news, calais. tony hickmott is a man with autism and a learning disability who's been held in a secure hospital for more than two decades. he was just 23 years old when he was first detained after a mental health crisis, and he's been largely held in solitary confinement ever since. but now a home has been found for him — one his family hopes is for life. jayne mccubbin reports.
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you're coming home. dream come true. a dream come true. it's happening now. tony's going to come home. yeah. you've waited so long. yeah. decades. the fight to bring tony hickmott home is almost over. he was sectioned 100 miles from home in a mental health crisis when he was 23 and he never came back. now, finally, a real home and a care package is taking shape, authorities forced to act by a court of protection judge. this is his home for life. a real home. a real home, his home. that he hasn't got to share with anybody. without the noise, the screaming, the banging of doors, the alarms. just get him home and every day's going to be a bonus. i know he's going to do well. last year, two whistle—blowers spoke to the bbc, revealing what they had seen of tony's world.
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i don't even know how they do it — the patients, i mean. _ i don't know how they cope. it was almost like a solitary confinement prisoner. a very basic daily life. i do believe tony was probably the loneliest person living in that hospital. tony will always struggle to cope in a world which often struggles to cope with autism, but from november a specially trained care team will support him in his own home, a short drive from his family. you know, we know it's going to be small wins for tony, and we'll celebrate those little successes. tony loves being here on the beach, going for a walk, and if he continues to do that in his home town, then he'll be happy. authorities admit £11 million has been spent by the nhs keeping tony detained, against his wishes, his parents' wishes and, since 2013, the professional opinion of psychiatrists. but community care has to be paid for by local authorities,
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and there's the rub. we have a responsibility, absolutely, as a society, we have a responsibility to look after these people to the optimal level we can. and the funding is really challenging to find to achieve that. the hickmotts have been helped byjane, a family advocate. i don't think tony should have ever really gone away. - he's been forgotten. right now, almost 2000 people with autism and learning disabilities are locked in hospitals rather than real homes. you've dreamed of this? yeah. a select committee report has called for them all to be closed by next year. a government spokesman said they are instead connected to halving the number detained by 2024, with investment in community provision. he wants to go with me down to the beer garden. i'll have a pint and he'll have a half and a cheese roll. that's what he talks about? that's what he wants, yeah, and a cheese roll. tony comes home in november. you've got so much to look forward to now.
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it'll be like heaven. it will be. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. a space rover designed and built by british engineers at airbus in stevenage was all set to go to mars — until its role in a mission to collect martian rocks was cancelled. now it's a robot on the hunt for a newjob — as our science editor rebecca morelle reports. one state—of—the—art rover. its skills — it can drive autonomously, negotiate the most difficult terrain and cope in extreme environments. but now it's looking for work. built in the uk, it's being tested in a quarry in bedfordshire. it was heading for mars, until its mission was cancelled. we have spent a lot of time and a lot of effort in developing this expertise. we don't want to let that go to waste, we want to exploit it and make sure that investment comes to fruition.
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also, it puts us in a good place to be involved in future space missions, which is brilliant for the reputation of the uk. so where could the rover go instead of mars? one option could be to swap the red martian terrain for the grey lunar landscape. this rover was designed for mars. if it's heading to the moon, it will need some modifications. the lunar surface can get as hot as 120 degrees celsius, and as cold as —230. so this will have to cope with extremes. there's also problem with light. the moon gets two weeks of daylight followed by two weeks of darkness, and this will be a challenge for solar power. and then there's the fine lunar dust. it's particularly clingy and abrasive, which could be an issue for the rover�*s moving parts. lunar exploration is having a resurgence right now. nasa's new artemis rocket will soon be heading
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there and eventually taking astronauts to the moon's surface. the idea is to have a permanent lunar base, and rovers could play a crucial role. they could be used anywhere that you want to do something autonomously, so it could be autonomously moving around rovers for building habitats, or it could be used for going to places that are uninhabitable by humans, or in an extreme temperature or particularly dangerous. for now, the rover is out of work, stuck on earth, driving around a quarry. but this isn't just about salvaging a £23 million piece of kit — it's about the people and expertise that goes with it. rebecca morelle, bbc news. time for a look at the weather — )here's stav da naos good afternoon. but closer to earth and the weather looks pretty unsettled across the uk for the rest of this week. though pressure always
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nearby so it will tend to be windy, gales are

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