Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 29, 2022 10:00am-10:31am BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a new wave of violence in iran — with security forces firing on anti—government protestors. the head of britain's royal navy orders an investigation into allegations that female recruits have been sexually abused and harassed on submarines. president biden condemns an attack on the husband of senior democrat, nancy pelosi, saying there's too much vitriol in us politics the un secretary general has urged all parties to renew the deal on ukrainian grain exports, which is due to expire next month. northern ireland is facing the prospect of another election, after parties failed to reach agreement on a return to power sharing.
10:01 am
hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. at least one person has been shot dead in the iranian city of zahedan, as anti—government protests continue in much of the country. activitsts say security forces fired on dozens of people as they left friday prayers in the southern city. robin brant reports. six weeks in and these protests show no sign of abating. the opposite in fact. this is zahedan, the scene of violent confrontation again. independent observers claiming the cracked on by security forces across iran and killed at least 160 people and the tactics continue to be unbearably indiscriminate. i saw footage of a teenager,
10:02 am
shot in the head and apparently has been killed and we haven't gotten exact figures for how many people have died and now many people have been injured today but the footage that we saw, we can say that certainly, they open fire again with live ammunition. what started as a protest over the death of a young woman in custody because of how she wore her hijab is not increasingly deadly confrontation. between iran's people and its religious leaders. any tactic that they had been using in any rounds of previous protests to crack down and get people to go back home, those tactics are not working this time around. there is a wave of anger in these protests that are unlike anything i've personally have ever seen and i have been reporting for years and years and this is unique.
10:03 am
iran's military has claimed the us was conspiring with others to spark the riots. meanwhile, the united nations has raised a list of issues with iran that it's deeply worried about. our particular concern is that authorities have been moving injured protesters from hospitals to detention facilities. refused to release the bodies of those killed to their families and delivered the deceased and the condition that the families do not hold a funeral and that their families do not speak the media. in one video, verified by news agencies, people are seen shouting death to the dictator and the supreme leader. as the protest continued international human rights campaign say there is a serious risk of mass
10:04 am
killings. with me is parham ghobadi from bbc persian. you have been speaking to sources, what are they saying? the 16-year-old _ what are they saying? the 16-year-old he _ what are they saying? the 16-year-old he was - what are they saying? tue: 16—year—old he was killed what are they saying? tte: 16—year—old he was killed in their early days of the protest who has become a household name. they are telling me that yesterday they held an event at her graveside and security forces started shooting at the protesters. now we have been hearing that 60 people have actually been arrested from that memorial. they have been taken to unknown locations. some of those detainees at the very close relatives of the deceased and the family is worried about the whereabouts of them. yesterday i confirmed the death of another 19—year—old, a bright young man. he was a chef are just 19. two days before his birthday at nine o'clock he leaves his restaurant and then he is getting killed by severe blows to himself with a baton. you
10:05 am
have been covering the since the beginning, is there a sense that more than a month of the processor escalating across the country and so is the response from the regime? escalating from what we have seen. this is unprecedented we have never seen protest for this long. and there is widespread across the country. it has been going on for one month and there is no sign of it belittling out —— fizzling out. they managed to attain videos that security forces raided dormitories and they are dragging students from inside the dorm and calling out for help. some really horrifying images and across the universities and schools in iran and also streets we have seen protest still going on. we have seen protest still going on. we have seen protest still going on. we have seen worldwide protest people coming out in solidarity for what is happening, iranians all over the world. they have also had the they want to make this an issue with the un next week. is that making any
10:06 am
difference?— difference? that is correct. it has already started _ difference? that is correct. it has already started in _ difference? that is correct. it has already started in new— difference? that is correct. it has already started in new zealand, i j already started in new zealand, i have been there before as well it is usually the crowd that you see that it is unprecedented for iranians to be this united from all walks of life. you see iranians knighted from —— united from different ethnicities. people in cities are chanting. let's keep in mind last week and one city we had a protest over 100,000 people showed up and i think that was one of the biggest protest. that shows the solidarity of iranian people. iranians outside the country with the iranians inside the country with the iranians inside the country. the country with the iranians inside the country-— tropical storm nalgee has killed 45 people in the philippines, and left many more homeless. it made landfall in the central part of the country and is now heading towards the capital manila. most of the casualties were caused by floods and landslides, with some areas recording their highest ever daily rainfall.
10:07 am
flash floods and landslides are always one of the greatest dangers in the philippines, with its unstable geography and deforested mountains. the head of britain's royal navy has ordered an investigation into allegations that female recruits have been sexually abused and harassed on submarines. admiral sir ben key — the first sea lord — said anyone found culpable would be held accountable, regardless of rank. he has directed a senior team to investigate the claims. the uk ministry of defence says it's improving reporting mechanisms for sexual offences. our news correspondent louisa pilbeam has been following the story. we know that the royal navy have acted swiftly. sir behnke is the most seniorfigure —— max sir ben key. he launched an investigation into sexual assault and harassment of female colour inks working on submarines. he said that anyone
10:08 am
found responsible to that this will be held to account regardless of their rank. these allegations are detailed in the daily mail newspaper. 0ne detailed in the daily mail newspaper. one woman said she was assaulted while she slept by a male colleague who was superior in rank. 0ther colleague who was superior in rank. other women have said that they have experienced repeated demands for sex acts and they also had their underwear stolen and a raped list was drawn up that detailed the order of which women would be attacked if there was an emergency at sea. now, there was an emergency at sea. now, the ministry of defence have responded by saying that they are taking these claims seriously and that they know there is more to be done. they say that while most people in the royal navy have a rewarding career there are, predominantly women they say who are subject to inappropriate sexualised
10:09 am
behaviour. emma norton is a lawyer and founder of the centre for militaryjustice, a charity which provides independent legal advice to women and men in the armed forces. she said these cases are sadly too common. it's incredibly shocking. it never ceases to be shocking. it is not unfamiliar to us unfortunately, we assisted very recently a case in the accounts that were being given by the women speaking to the daily mail are strikingly similar to the accounts given by our clients. i also think they reflect very markedly the findings of a sexual harassment survey that was published very quietly earlier this year by the royal navy. what we're finding is that independent review after independent review is recommending that the investigation of cases like this be taken away from the services themselves. while it is very good to hear that response today, it doesn't go far enough. ultimately it will still be the royal navy
10:10 am
investigating the royal navy. so a lot of campaigners and servicewomen have been calling for many many years for those who have responsibility for investigating the most serious complaints like this to be taken away from the services themselves and handed to independent body. president biden has condemned an attack on paul pelosi. the intruder reportedly shouted "where's nancy?" 0ur north america editor, sarah smith, reports. police say the intruder used a hammer to smash glass doors and break into the polosi home, shouting "where's nancy?" this appears to be a targeted attack. he tried to tie up paul pelosi to wait for his wife to come home. she was in washington at the time. police arrived as the attack was happening. 0ur officers observed mr pelosi and the suspect both holding a hammer. the suspect pulled the hammer away from mr pelosi and violently assaulted him with it. 82—year—old paul pelosi is in
10:11 am
hospital undergoing brain surgery. the suspect will be charged with attempted homicide. nancy! 0h, nancy! during the attack on the us capitol onjanuary 6 last year, rioters were specifically searching for nancy pelosi. she had been evacuated from the building by police. later she blamed donald trump for inciting the riot and putting politicians in danger. it shouldn't be that not only is the president of the united states inciting an insurrection, but keeps fanning the flames, endangering the security of members of congress. violent political threats and attacks have increased present biden say he is praying for his recovery. pull republican leaders have also condemned the attack. violent political threats and attacks have increased alarmingly in america in the last few years.
10:12 am
some senior politicians are now worried it will not be long before one of them is killed. sarah smith, bbc news, washington. present biden condemned the attack at a rally ahead of next month's mid—term elections. it's reported the same chant was used by this guy they have in custody that was used on january 6 in the attack on the us capitol. i'm not making this up. this is reported, i can't guarantee it, but i can tell you what's been reported. the chant was, "where's nancy, where's nancy, where's nancy?" this is despicable. there is no place in america, there is too much violence, political violence, too much hatred. the headlines on bbc news... a new wave of violence in iran — with security forces firing on anti—government protestors. the head of britain's royal navy orders an investigation into reports of inappropriate behaviour towards female submarine staff —
10:13 am
calling the allegations �*abhorrent�*. president biden condemns an attack on the husband an attack on the husband of senior democrat, nancy pelosi, saying there's too much vitriol in us politics. the un secretary general has urged all parties to renew the deal on ukrainian grain exports, which is due to expire next month. a spokesman for antonio guterres also called for the removal of any blocks on exports of russian grain and fertiliser. millions of tonnes of ukrainian grain has been exported since the deal was signed in turkey injuly, easing a global food crisis. i'm joined now by hugo bachega in kyiv. welcome. hugo bachega in kyiv. what is the situation with regards welcome. what is the situation with regards to grain? how much is actually getting out? returning and sa in: that actually getting out? returning and saying that russia _ actually getting out? returning and saying that russia deliberately - saying that russia deliberately delayed the inspection of ships and president zelensky said earlier this week that there is a queue of 175
10:14 am
ships. again he accused moscow of delaying the inspection of those ships. remember, injuly when this deal was negotiated it was very complicated to reach this deal. it took a lot of time, at lots of work. it is a complicated deal, the ships need to be inspected before coming in, after being loaded narrow inspected again in turkey by officials from the un. turkey which helped negotiate the deal and from russia and ukraine. the russians have been saying that they have had difficulties in carrying out some exports that are part of this deal, so some russian officials have suggested that they may not renew the deal which expires next month. we are hearing now from mr gutteres, he came to ukraine weeks after this deal was reached. he went to 0desa
10:15 am
and inspected the ports. to help ease global food crisis. and inspected the ports. to help ease globalfood crisis. we and inspected the ports. to help ease global food crisis. we are hearing now from un officials but also officials here in ukraine about the need for this deal to be extended month. ~ ., the need for this deal to be extended month. ~ . , ., extended month. meanwhile, where you are there in kyiv. — extended month. meanwhile, where you are there in kyiv, there _ extended month. meanwhile, where you are there in kyiv, there has _ extended month. meanwhile, where you are there in kyiv, there has been - extended month. meanwhile, where you are there in kyiv, there has been a - are there in kyiv, there has been a warning that they could be more power cuts because of the russian attacks in recent weeks.— attacks in recent weeks. exactly. more restrictions _ attacks in recent weeks. exactly. more restrictions have _ attacks in recent weeks. exactly. more restrictions have been - attacks in recent weeks. exactly. - more restrictions have been imposed, not only in kyiv but also in the country, electricity restrictions because of the damage that was caused in those attacks. we have heard from president zelensky saying that one third of the country's electricity infrastructure has been destroyed in attacks by russia in the last few weeks. 0fficials there have been saying that they need more air defence systems to protect cities across the country from those air strikes. cities across the country from those airstrikes. so, we are cities across the country from those air strikes. so, we are hearing officials her saying that it is going to take time to repair the damage and i think that the concern
10:16 am
here is that the system may not be able to cope ahead of winter. this is a country where temperatures drop to -10, -15, -20 is a country where temperatures drop to —10, —15, —20 celsius. there is a lot of concern that with the rising demand the system may not be able to cope. the world's richest man elon musk, who now owns the social media platform, twitter, says a new group of moderators will decide whether banned accounts, such as that of the former us president donald trump, can be reinstated. after completing his ali—billion takeover, mr musk has moved quickly to make changes at the company, with a number of top executives leaving. here's our technology editor zoe kleinman. elon musk. to his many fans, one of the most innovative and influential people in the world. he's certainly the richest. he made his money with paypal and is now the boss of the electric car firm tesla. he also owns rocket maker spacex, and his starlink satellite network provides internet access
10:17 am
around the world. and now he adds to his portfolio twitter — the small but mighty social network. "let that sink in", he said, walking into twitter hq carrying, yes, a sink. laughter. elon musk is a prolific tweeter, with more than 110 million followers. he's now calling himself "chief twit." "the bird is freed," he tweeted, followed later by "let the good times roll." he has just promised a form a moderation council to oversee decisions about banned accounts and controversial content. nothing will be decided before it meets, he said. it's not known when that will be. musk has strong views about free speech. if he starts to see that a certain type of free speech environment, eg one where anything goes, might become a "hellscape," as he said, and that might see people leave, at which case advertisers who're paying to be on the site might get concerned because there'd be fewer eyeballs looking at their ads. all this matters because twitter has become a place where world leaders, politicians and opinion formers go
10:18 am
to share their views. it's kind of a direct line between the decision—makers and us, those they represent. elon musk thinks we need a digital town square, a community space for discussion — and twitter, he argues, is it. several top execs have already been sacked, and for those who remain, they need to know that musk means business. i expect they will want to get some degree of certainty that elon musk is not going to be running this like he runs his twitter account. his twitter account is full of memes and jokes. people want a degree of seriousness. they consider this a really important product to the world. there's lots of speculation about whether musk�*s takeover will mean the return of the most high—profile person on twitter�*s banned list, former us president donald trump. one for the moderation council, but some investors are known to be keen. to really be a truly free platform — i know everybody hates donald trump, including me, but free speech
10:19 am
is about many things we don't like, and many of the things trump might say might actually be really harmful to trump, so i think this sort of fear of letting people on the platform is exactly why we need to protect speech. 0h, great shot! speaking to fox news, donald trump of course had his own view. he wished elon musk lots of luck, but said twitter couldn't succeed without him. zoe kleinman, bbc news. israelis head to the polls on tuesday for their fifth election in four years. the current coalition is fighting to stay in power, as former prime minister benjamin netanyahu attempts a comeback. to do so, he's relying on the growing strength of an ultranationalist, far right alliance, including one of its leading figures — itamar ben—gvir. who's being seeing a surge of support. 0ur middle east correspondent tom bateman reports. meet the new army of young voters
10:20 am
in israel, putting theirfaith in ultra nationalism. they're waiting for their hero. and enter from the far right, itamar ben—gvir. he's the follower of a racist movement and wants to expel what he calls disloyal arabs. ben—gvir rouses his supporters over security. translation: they should not see the light of day, _ a death sentence for the terrorists. ben—gvir electrifies his fans. they are excited because they feel they're on the verge of getting a lot stronger. a man who many felt could be kept to the fringes of israeli politics could be about to enter its government. polls suggest his party could get more seats than ever for the extreme right in the coming election.
10:21 am
listen, i love israel and... thejihad. they want kill me and kill you, thejihadis. why do you want to expel palestinians you say are disloyal, mr ben—gvir? where tensions flare, ben—gvir will be there to pour on fuel, say his critics in occupied east jerusalem. he pulled out his gun, calling for palestinians who throw stones to be shot. he taunted them, saying they'd be mown down. former prime minister benjamin netanyahu or bibi, rallies his own base. he's nurtured the extreme right, hoping to boost coalition numbers for a return to power. this veteran observer of israeli politics thinks it's a fateful moment. it's a question of what type of democracy and what type of country does it want to have. 0n the one hand, you have forces like itamar ben—gvir and his partner, bezalel smotrich, led by benjamin netanyahu, who want to change the type of democracy that we have in the state of israel, want to take
10:22 am
us potentially into a dark moment. the current coalition�*s election ads warn that netanyahu needs the far right�*s backing as he tries to swerve corruption charges, which he denies. the incumbents say they're tough on security amid spiralling violence this year. the policies affect the many in the occupied west bank. the policies affect the many. in the occupied west bank, the army is still blocking roads from nablus over palestinian gun attacks and after a soldier was shot dead a fortnight ago. it is a slow road and palestinians call this collective punishment. back at the rally, ben—gvir�*s fans think only his party can keep them safe. there are people that have target have go and they go forward. they don't care what is on their way. what do you mean by that? they have a target. they go forward.
10:23 am
what do they believe? where we should be. and they go there. their opponents call them pyromaniac as they portray themselves as patriots. israel's race to break its election deadlock sees a battle over how far the far right will reach. tom bateman, bbc news, jerusalem. the coronation of the zulu king, is about to take place in south africa. he will be officially recognised as monarch by president cyril ramaphosa. representatives from royal families across africa are in attendance. this is a government backed ceremony followed by a ceremony when the king hunted a lion. 0ur correspondent nomsa maseko is in durban. take us through what is happening. thousands of people started gathering here at the stadium in
10:24 am
south africa's coastal city of durban to witness the official coronation. we understand that the king's motorcade has arrived and zulu warriors are now standing by to usher him inside the stadium for the official start of the ceremony. now, president will be here to give the new king and accreditation certificate, which basically certifies them as the ninth king. and the thousands of zulu gathered her say they have been waiting for this for a very long time. this is the first time in 50 years that are zulu king has been correlated. the last time that happened was in 1971 on a rainy day when the late king was correlated by the apartheid government. this is the first time
10:25 am
that a black president is going to be handing over this accreditation certificate. . ~ , ., certificate. take us through the role of a zulu _ certificate. take us through the role of a zulu king. _ certificate. take us through the role of a zulu king. the - certificate. take us through the role of a zulu king. the zulu . certificate. take us through the l role of a zulu king. the zulu king does not have _ role of a zulu king. the zulu king does not have political— role of a zulu king. the zulu king does not have political power- does not have political power however he does have influence when it comes to the people who particularly believe in the monarchy. we were to report that the zulu nation is south africa's biggest nation with just over 12 million people. and because of south africa's tumultuous past when it wasn'tjust africa's tumultuous past when it wasn't just a africa's tumultuous past when it wasn'tjust a pate and black south africans fighting against apartheid, there was defences infighting between different ethnic groups. social confusion cohesion has been held as important. that is why these events are welcomed and funded by the government. this events are welcomed and funded by the government.—
10:26 am
events are welcomed and funded by the government. this is a scene live there in the — the government. this is a scene live there in the stadium _ the government. this is a scene live there in the stadium as _ the government. this is a scene live there in the stadium as the - there in the stadium as the coronation begins of the new zulu king. now time for a look at the weather.. hello. we had a fair amount of cloud and some outbreaks of rain around so far today. that rain gradually moving northwards and eastwards across the uk. as we head through the rest of the weekend, we stick through the mild seem particularly today and more rain around at times. we have got low pressure setting out to the west of the atlantic. that is driving these weather fronts across the uk. it is also bringing us to win from a southerly or south—westerly direction. you can see the orange colours on the map. we are going to see that rain pushing across
10:27 am
northern ireland into southern scotland as we had through the afternoon. the northern part of scotland keeping dry without sunshine. in the south, particular the western of england and wales. down towards the south—east 22 celsius in that sunshine. it will feel quite warm out there today. most places in the mid—to high teens. that band of rain could be quite heavy at times for scotland, thatis quite heavy at times for scotland, that is going to gradually push its way northwards overnight. clearing skies, still a scattering of showers overnight. it is going to be frosty, temperatures not falling below 1a degrees. don't forget the clocks are set to go back by an hour in the early hours of sunday morning. it is going to be good by british summer time and will feel less summary is going to the week ahead. 0n time and will feel less summary is going to the week ahead. on sunday, a scattering of blustery heavy showers and an area of clown bringing some patchy rain to the far south—east and east anglia as well. that is psychically as a way for
10:28 am
more sunshine later on. gusty winds we could see a0 or even 50 mph gusts towards the west. temperatures tomorrow still above average, down towards the south is that is about 5 degrees cooler compared to today. most of you through into monday, high pressure setting across the near continent, but weather fronts trying to move on from the atlantic. that sets us up for an unsettled week ahead. 0ften that sets us up for an unsettled week ahead. often when the rain around at times. we still need plenty of rain a course. on the outlook charts what you were really notice is that there's temperatures are starting to dip throughout the week ahead. that's it for now. goodbye.
10:29 am
hello this is bbc news. the headlines... a new wave of violence in iran, with security forces firing on anti—government protestors. the head of britain's royal navy
10:30 am
orders an investigation into allegations that female recruits have been sexually abused and harrassed on submarines. president biden condemns an attack on the husband of senior democrat nancy pelosi, saying there's too much vitriol in us politics. the un secretary general urges all sides to renew the deal on ukrainian grain exports, which is due to expire next month. and northern ireland is facing the prospect of another election, after parties failed to reach agreement on a return to power—sharing. now on bbc news, the travel show. mind blowing, look at this. incredible. i have been to japan several times, incredible. i have been to japan severaltimes, but incredible. i have been to japan several times, but never to explore the remote rural and volcanic south where you can expect the unexpected. the extrovert... risk—takers... and
10:31 am
the unpredictable.

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on