Skip to main content

tv   New Day  CNN  August 21, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
today. >> mr. mark zucker beg, founder of facebook, what made him come out of his shell, that's the question. the answer is something big to be sure. what could be bigger than what he's already done? he's already got 1 billion people. guess what? it's five times as big. it's a little bit of a surprise something he gives us at the end of the show. >> not any of his stock. just warning. >> yes, lots of stock. new details on the shocking story out of oklahoma, two teenagers charged as adults accused of killing an australian exchange student simply because they were bored. this is front page news in australia, many in the country angry at the u.s. and we'll talk to one politician there calling for a boycott on the u.s. take a look at this, this is dr. oz helping to save a complete stranger's life in the middle of new york city. it's not a stage shoot for a tv or tv show. it happened, he jumped right
3:01 am
into action and seemed to be caught on tape and a woman likely he came to her rescue. >> not a big surprise he was there when people needed him, for those of us who know him. brand new video from syria that's hard to believe and hard to see but incredibly important nonetheless. rebel forces, they say hundreds are dead or injured and they're accusing the assad regime of using chemical weapons in a new attack. the syrian government denying the allegations. if these reports are true, it has serious implications for the united states. the obama administration has said the use of chemical weapons would cross a red line. what happens now? we have live team coverage overseas and washington. let's start first with arwa damon live from beirut. what's the latest you're hearing, arwa?
3:02 am
>> reporter: those images are so hard to watch and it's absolutely horrible scenes of lifeless children, doctors trying to desperately resuscitate others. i just spoke via skype with a doctor who says he is in syria, we cannot independently verify that. he said they're struggling in primitive conditions, unable to attend to all of those who are suffering the side effects of what he is also saying was a chemical attack. they look atroprine and oxygen. another volunteer medics throughout all of this, if you'll remember, he was describing the symptoms he personally felt. he said he initially lost vision and then he lost all feeling in his body, and at one point, he collapsed. now this is not the first time that we've heard claims of chemical weapons being used in syria. it is, however, the first time that the death toll from any of these alleged attacks has been this high, hundreds reportedly
3:03 am
were killed. >> arwa, thank you for the reporting. to be sure we're not showing the most graphic of the images, trying to be sensitive. the other sensitivity what does it mean for the united states, what's going on, on the ground. there had been the position stated by the u.s. government use of chemical weapons by the syrian government would prompt military reaction so what do these reports about people dying from what appear to be chemical agents mean? john king joining us from washington this morning. the obvious question, john, is what more will it take before the u.s. has to face its own ultimatum? >> chris we've seen the administration's caution of this. let me start by trying to track down reaction for you this morning. i reached out to state department, pentagon and the white house. one official said the administration was aware of the media reports and other traffic. that normally means incoming from the pentagon or incoming from the intelligence, things they've seen overnight in the intelligence community. this official told me no
3:04 am
official united states confirmation that chemical weapons were used but the official went on to say if it is true it would be "furtherered of unconscionable brutality by a desperate man and desperate regime. it was back in june the administration did reach the conclusion it was reasonably certain that chemical weapons had been used in the past by the regime. it decided to give some more direct aid to the anti-assad rebels. the question now, if you have an escalation by the regime on this scale as arwa described and you see the images, and these are not the worst, would the administration do something more. there were calls for john mccain and others for a no fly zone. the administration says that's a nonstarter. they're trying to get the russians to bring about a diplomatic conference that has gotten nowhere because russia won't budge. the president spoke to this months ago saying this would be the red line. when it was crossed once they did something relatively modest, most people would say, to help
3:05 am
the anti-assad opposition f there's proof of this, if this turns out to have documented evidence of this, a lot of pressure on the president. >> the pressure to do what will be the big question. john king thank you very much, we'll stay with you on this. an unimaginable day of horror for 800 schoolchildren. this morning we're learning more about the 20-year-old convicted felon who walked into an elementary school near atlanta armed with an ak-47. he barricaded himself inside and soon bullets began flying. david mattingly is live from decatur, georgia, with the latest. good morning, david. >> reporter: good morning, kate. the kids at this elementary school will be returning to class today, but not in the building that they were accustomed to. they'll be meeting at a nearby high school, not coming back here today because of a case that was made so frightening by what could have happened. hundreds of kids, ages 4 to 10, running for safety, as gunfire erupts in their school. inside 20-year-old michael
3:06 am
brandon hill, armed with what police say was an ak-47 and another of other weapons takes the workers hostage and tells them to call a tv station with a chilling message. >> i've never experienced anything like this. he wanted us to start filming as people die. >> reporter: the gunman started firing and officers returned fire. one convinced him to surrender. >> i told him my life story and he put his weapons down and i told the police he was giving himself up. >> reporter: children had to be escorted from buses away from the school before being reunited with their anxious parents. now in police custody hill faces charges including aggravated assault on a police officer, terroristic threats and possession of a firearm by a
3:07 am
convicted felon. parents complain of a lack of communication. most say they heard it on the local news. >> after they put the kids on lockdown and secured the kids the parents should have been called immediately. >> reporter: there are new fears about security from parents deeply shaken by what could have happened. >> we have a button to push to go in and you're supposed to show i.d. taken aggravates me. >> reporter: are you going to let your daughters go back to school? >> i don't want to. i want to home school them. >> reporter: we're learning that the alleged shooter, michael brandon hill, was actually arrested once before in a nearby county, again on making terroristic threats and terroristic acts. we don't have any more details about that case, only that he was released on $1,500 bond at the time. sheriffs deputies there were not able to tell us exactly what the courts were able to decide about him after that, but authorities here in de kalb county are
3:08 am
telling us that he was a convicted felon. so something like this possibly happening in his past before. chris in. >> david there's a lot of attention to detail as the fallout conditions, parents understandably terrified. one of the interesting things while this man seemed to have a different plan than other school shooters same basic formula, someone fallen off the grid, had a lot of access to weapons raises a lot of questions. later in the show we'll debate what does this mean we keep having the gun violence in schools? are there ways to keep our kids safer? we'll take that on. right now we want to talk to you about what we'll call a bizarre development in the abduction of hannah anderson. the sister of suspect james dimaggio is asking the anderson family for dna tests. dimaggio's family believes he may have fathered hannah and her 8-year-old brother ethan. no one saw this coming. >> so many twists and turns in this story.
3:09 am
after james dimaggio died it was revealed he left behind $112,000 in life insurance money to the family of his alleged victims. it will go to bernice anderson, hannah and ethan's paternal grandmother. the dimaggios are not contesting the policy but they are asking to have dna testing to find out if hannah and ethan may be the its children of dimaggio. the reason, according to a family spokesman, she wants to know if dimaggio was actually the children's biological father. >> there's been a lot of rumors about whether or not jim might be the father of either of both children. we find it strange he's left all this money without any explanation. >> reporter: that money is from a life insurance policy that
3:10 am
named hannah's paternal grandmother. it reportedly is worth around $110,000. jim's sister was reportedly the beneficiary up until 2011. >> expected the grandmother to use the money to take care of the two children. we stated specifically he didn't want to give it to either parent because he didn't trust them. >> reporter: dimaggio was described by brett as a platonic family friend to the anderson family, referred to as uncle jim, in an interview with "new day" while hannah was still missing. hannah's father was asked about the relationship. >> he basically became like part of our family but we were just very good friends. there was nothing ever to show any indication of this. >> insurance agents say if dimaggio's policy was in order his alleged crimes should not impact the payout so bernice anderson could receive a check within 30 to 45 days. the san diego county sheriff's
3:11 am
department now says dimaggio used a timer to set the fire to his house where hannah anderson's mother, christina, and brother ethan were found dead. it should be noted cnn also reached out to the anderson family for comment about the latest twists in the case but we have not heard back. >> all the while it makes the recovery for their family probably that much more difficult. >> no doubt. >> zoraida, thank you so much. there is a lot of news developing at this hour, straight to michaela for the latest. >> good morning to you at home, in the news, firefighters are making good headway against the massive beaver creek fire in idaho. they say they're cautiously optimistic about their fire fight and hoping to get evac ways back in their home. in california a fast growing rim fire closed the main road in and out of the yosemite national park. that fire is threatening some 2,500 structures. army major nadal hasan begins his defense today. the big question, who if anyone will he call to the stand and
3:12 am
will he himself testify? he's being tried on 13 counts of murder and 32 accounts of attempted murder at ft. hood, texas, base. prosecutors recommended a 60-year sentence for bradley manning found guilty of the biggest leak of leaking classified documents. the military judge will announce her decision later this morning. dr. sanjay gupta changed his mind about medical marijuana but will the president? this question of whether that reversal has made the president rethink his own position on legalizing weed came up in a question at tuesday's white house briefing. >> i don't think i've ever predicted this was the question you were going to ask me. [ laughter ] so i really wasn't in the potpourri category of questions for this one. i have to confess i did not see the sanjay gupta column that
3:13 am
you're referring to so it's hard for me to comment on it at this point. >> in this column, dr. gupta, who was the president's one-time choice for surgeon general apologized for misleading the public on the effects of marijuana and also explored the subject in his cnn entitled "weed." dr. oz putting his great skills to work after a taxi hit several people. dr. mehmet and his staff were working a block away and ran over to help, he fixed a tourniquet a bystander applied to one of the victims. he credits the man who turns out as a plumber with saving that woman's life. we'll have more on this story coming up later on our show. >> you see where the taxi wound up? there's so many people there. >> such a congested area. >> lucky it wasn't a lot worse. >> absolutely. we have news for you, also weather news for you. indra petersons is keeping track on the latest on the forecast. >> we've been waiting for a big
3:14 am
change in the southeast and slowly getting there. i want to show you the water vapor loop showing you the moisture we've been seeing, by now you're probably used to this but the moisture fueling into the southeast. the stationary front causing all this rain is in place creating about one to two inches of rain but it will start to dissipate. rain not out of the forecast as we go through the weekend but instead of more of the heavy rain you get the typical afternoon thunderstorms. the new story is going to be another cold front making its way through the great lakes so today a chance for some severe weather, going to be looking up through portions of upper michigan, wisconsin, through iowa and eventually the cold front will make its way through the great lakes by tomorrow and pushing all the way to the mid-atlantic. with that some showers along the way. that's the bad side of it. the upside of it pretty big. we're talking about heat advisories in minnesota yesterday but as this guy makes through we're going to be talking about 70s so showers is
3:15 am
a kick but pretty much brief showers. some could be heavy at times but check this out, this is friday going into the weekend, say good-bye to the 80s. zor rye zoraida was complaining but i'll take it. we'll take a break and when we come back our interview with facebook founder mark zuckerberg. what do you do when you've already connected 1 billion people around the world, what could you do to top that? wait until you hear what mr. zuckerberg plans to do next in our broadcast exclusive. plus google reportedly meeting with the nfl. is the internet giant ready to shell out $1 billion or more to start broadcasting football games? [ phil ] when you have joint pain and stiffness... accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis,
3:16 am
my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. since enbrel helped relieve my joint pain, it's the little things that mean the most. ask your rheumatologist if enbrel is right for you. [ doctor ] enbrel, the number one biologic medicine prescribed by rheumatologists.
3:17 am
with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme.
3:18 am
3:19 am
welcome back, everybody. turning now to our "new day" broadcast exclusive, mark zuckerberg doesn't do a lot of interviews and when you're worth $17 billion and running the world's largest social media network, face it, you don't have to do much of anything you don't want to do. he invited us to his headquarters in menlo park, california. he has something big, nothing short of world-changing. when you visit the facebook campus you get the sense that anything is possible. >> we want the camp to us feel like a little city or village. >> reporter: and now zuckerberg wants to make the entire world like the facebook campus in a
3:20 am
way, by providing internet access to the entire world. the idea is called internet.org, its target? the 5 billion people around the globe without access to the net. >> here we use things like facebook to share news and catch up with our friends but there, they're going to use it to decide what kind of government they want, get access to health care for the first time ever, connect with family hundreds of miles away that they haven't seen in decades. getting access to the internet is a really big deal. i think we're going to be able to do it. >> reporter: the word "we" is the key word. this isn't just about facebook. zuckerberg has done something extraordinary to achieve the extraordinary, reached out to the biggest players in social media and mobile data, aka his competitors in part, to work together. how did those calls go? >> it probably varies. but in general, these are companies that we have deep relationships with and have worked with on a lot of things for a long time so this kind of came out of a lot of the
3:21 am
discussions that we had. >> reporter: so a team of the best in the business is coming together but for a task this size, you nighting five times the global presence facebook has already, it's going to take a lot more. what about the how? like how do you do this? how developed is the plan? >> you know, we have a plan, a rough plan for what we think we're going to need to do to pull it off, and of course the plan will evolve over time and we'll get better ideas, but if you look at the trends, data is becoming more available to people. apps are getting more efficient to run. there are new business models to help more people get online. it's also good for facebook and the other companies, right, because mobile access to the internet is where your business lies, right? >> if we were just focused on making money, the first billion people we've connected have way more money than the rest of the next 6 billion combined. it's not fair but it's the way that it is. and we just believe that everyone deserves to be connected and on the internet so
3:22 am
we are putting a lot of energy towards this. >> people see you as somewhat of a comeback kid right now. forget about the kid now but it's a phrase. you took some lumps and found a way to come back. are awe ware of that? do you feel that in yourself that, like some people thought it wasn't going to happen, that you had had your run but look at me now? do you get a sense of that? >> we've always just focused on building something great over the long-term. right, so everyone at facebook i just tell them come in and try to make the biggest impact that you can have and if we keep building a service that people love and that more and more people use every day which we seem to be doing pretty well at, then we're going to be fine over time and that's our focus and in terms of building the company. >> reporter: hard to do when you hit the bumps in the road though, right? it's a great message when everything is okay. >> especially important when you hit the bumps. >> we're not trying to connect the world to the internet. you have to run one of the
3:23 am
biggest companies and when you want a distraction from that you've decided to take on the easy task of immigration policy and the united states. why are you wading into those waters? >> when we were first talking about doing this a lot of people actually were worried that it was going to be a problem for facebook, and i just decided i think that this is too important of an issue for the country. there are 11 million undocumented people who came here to work hard and contribute to the country and i don't think it's quite as polarized as people always say. >> reporter: what would be your advice to people in d.c. who are trying to balance these two almost dieiametrically opposed positions, one is immigration policy, let's bring in our human potential and the other one is let's find a way to get them out. how if you had to enter that, this is your new team, you have to make these democrats and republicans come together, what advice do you think you'd have that's not going on down there now? >> well i can't really tell anyone how to legislate.
3:24 am
i mean that's -- everyone understands this stuff way better than i do, so my goal in this is just to try to help support folks who care deeply about getting this done, on both sides, and hopefully we can make a difference. >> in terms of the politics, you think it's important enough where you're going to do it anyway. >> i think there are some things in life that if you believe that it's such a big problem, you just stick your neck out and try to do it, right, and i mean, a lot of people think that it's going to be really challenging to connect 5 billion people, too. it is, but i think it's one of the biggest problems of my generation to get everyone in the world to have internet access and when similarly 11 million undocumented people, that's a lot of people whose lives we can improve and make the country stronger. >> good luck with everything. not even 30 yet, you're doing great. good luck with everything. also an interesting source of new engineers for companies like facebook. there's a lot of human potential there that gets lost in the country now, it was a big point
3:25 am
of his. also you have to look the at the savvy. we see it with his idea of internet.org, reaching out to his competitors. on immigration his ideas sound lefty about paths to immigration and citizenship but the first thing he's asking for is tighter border security. the politicians he's embracing, chris cuomo, later today, he's meeting with senator mark rubio, rubio is going to visit the campus, so he's a very savvy guy, hoody and all. >> i wanted to ask you, did he give a time frame of when he thinks this is possible because it sounds -- i'm talking obviously about the internet access -- but it sounds like a great idea and sounds like a good business plan for a guy running an internet company but it seems really far out there. >> he sees that. we were playing with the idea of what's the time line, is it months? is it years? how many? his idea is it has to be done and. >> so it doesn't matter the time. >> you don't set the time parameter. you put everything in place to make it happen and there's no reason to upset a goal just
3:26 am
because it's going to be hard to attain. and certainly, look, very often what do we say, altruism is about motivated self-interest and people around the world need internet access. of course they do. we saw what happened with the arab spring, the power of the internet and social media but this is also about expanding the marketplace. they go hand in hand. and after the interview look what i got. >> is that a zuckerberg hoodie? >> this is a mark zuckerberg hoodie. >> is it actually one of his in. >> i ripped it off his body. it was an ugly fight. on the inside "making the world more open and connected" the facebook logo. the question is do i wear it, directly put it on ebay to pay for the cuomo college fund. i'll have to ask christine romans. >> i don't think it will fit you. >> when he handed it to me i thought he was going to offer me
3:27 am
a job but he said you have no skills. on that note let's get to "money time." christine romans is here with a surprising next move for another tech giant, is google looking to get into business with the nfl? >> imagine google and the nfl sunday package, a meeting between the two, according to the tech website allthingsdigital, larry page met with roger goodell. the topic could have going the buying the sunday all you can eat subscription deal. the directv deal ends in 2014 and this discussion came up according to all things d. >> what would that cost in. >> 1 billion bucks, maybe more. it makes sense the nfl is trying to drum up support because it's got a contract that's going to be expiring but an interesting combination. it would mean interesting foray for google.
3:28 am
>> what a game changer. >> do you have that nfl sunday package you can watch every minute of every game, eight games at a time, the widow maker on sundays? >> i can't handle it. i just watch my jets, they lose. >> he goes home. hello football season. >> maybe a chat, a beginning of the conversation but certainly interesting to see the nfl reaching out to silicon valley companies like that, especially google, america's most popular sport and the world's most powerful internet company. could be an interesting conversation. >> absolutely. thanks so much, christine. >> it's got to happen, it's the future. eventually everything will wind up having some digital things. we'll be watching two screens at once. we know t it's a question of how. christine romans we know what she's doing today, little investment decisions. when we come back, climate change, another massive issue, they say we're causing it, is it real? according to an international panel of scientists, grave consequences could be coming.
3:29 am
also coming up is senator ted cruz eyeing the white house in 2016? a lot of people are questioning whether he can legally run and a lot of people are putting that to rest. also why the texas lawmaker tells cnn we are in the middle of silly season in politics a head. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. ♪ (woman) this place has got really good chocolate shakes.
3:30 am
(growls) (man) that's a good look for you. (woman) that was fun. (man) yeah. (man) let me help you out with the.. (woman)...oh no, i got it. (man) you sure? (woman) just pop the trunk. (man vo) i may not know where the road will lead, but... i'm sure my subaru will get me there. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec® love the air. ...and a great deal. . take it. grrrr ahhh let's leave the deals to hotels.com. oh my gosh this is so cool... awesome! perfect! save up to 30% plus an extra 12% off with coupon... now until labor day. only at hotels.com american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back,
3:31 am
which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no limits on rewards. and with the fidelity cash management account debit card, you get reimbursed for all atm fees. is that it? oh, this guy, too. turn more of the money you spend into money you invest. it's everyday reinvesting for your personal economy. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey babe, i got to go.
3:32 am
bye daddy! have a good day at school, ok? ...but what about when my parents visit? ok. i just love this one... and it's next to a park. i love it. i love it too. here's our new house... daddy! you're not just looking for a house. you're looking for a place for your life to happen. ♪ welcome back to "new day," it's wednesday, august 21st. i'm chris cuomo. >> i'm kate bolduan here with anchor michaela pereira. a student is senselessly
3:33 am
murdered in oklahoma. the teen suspects who allegedly shot the man did it out of sheer bore dm leaving two governments demanding answer this is morning. plus silly season on capitol hill, some call that status quo but snd ted cruz is calling it the explanation for all this kerfuffle about his citizenship. your "new day" political gut check straight ahead. first to michaela with the top stories right now. more blood shed and disturbing video in syria's civil war. syrian activists accusig the assad regime of killing and wounding hundreds of rebels outside of damascus by using chemical agents. witnesses and opposition sources reported several explosions and serious casualties in rebel strongholds overnight. syria's state-run media denies the government is using chemical weapons. the obama administration saying using chemical weapons on its own people would cross a red
3:34 am
line. a gunman who opened fire at a georgia elementary school was armed with an ak-47 and a number of other weapons. witness says he told her he was not afraid to die. 20-year-old michael brandon hill barricaded himself in the front office with some school workers tuesday, before exchanging gunfire with police. he eventually surrendered. no one thankfully was hurt. hill faced aggravated assault on an officer and terroristic threat charges. the family of the late james dimaggio wants dna testing and want to know if he fathered 16-year-old hannah anderson and her brother, ethan. he left the family a $112,000 life insurance policy. ethan and his mom were found dead in dimablg yo's california home earlier this month. a court hearing in florida for george zimmerman's wife, shell shelley, facing a purgecy charge for allegedly lying about the
3:35 am
couple's finances during their initial bond hearing. she failed to disclose thousands of dollars in donations in a special account set up for george zimmerman's defense fund. shelley zimmerman is not expected to attend this morning's hearing. if you have a pooch, you know they don't really love taking a bath. this dog was definitely not having it. he tried a trick that usually works, he played dead, for a while. but unfortunately his owner wasn't fooled and was tenacious. i give this lady key points for tenacity, dragging him around for a while. soon though it was cleanup time for this ever so reluctant pooch. >> i can't -- i feel like the dog. >> it's time to get up out of bed, just drag me out. >> i wonder if he was watching how to deter the bear attack. >> exactly, play dead. >> going with the brown bear technique. >> she's the bear and he's the doggy. let's move on to our political gut check all the
3:36 am
stories you need to know coming out of washington. we want to return to the big story we're following, syrian opposition forces claiming chemical weapons have been used again, the syrian government denies it but what's the next move for the u.s. in this? cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to break it down for us. john at the top of the hour when we talked about it, there's no official confirmation from u.s. officials of the latest attacks, but if true, what does this mean for the administration? this would be the second time in syria the red line has been crossed. >> the boldness of this, if true, is the united nations team in syria right now trying to determine the extent of the use of any chemical agents by either the regime or the anti-assad forces but back to this, kate, you're showing the pictures, these are not the gruesome pictures. they get worse in what came overnight. the administration will study this and the administration will be cautious, they are aware of the images and i'm told of
3:37 am
traffic, some reports from embassies or in from the pentagon. no official comment. one senior official said if true it would be further evidence of unconscionable brutality by a desperate man and desperate regime. what next? in june when the administration reached the benchmark the regime had used sarin gas in the past, at that point the administration publicly announced it would do more to help the anti-assad fighters. some said that wasn't enough, they wanted a no-fly zone. that's a nonstarter at the white house. the president stepped before the microphones months and months ago said use of chemical weapons would be his personal red line. look for the administration to condemn this conditionally, look to prove it and then there's pressure on the white house no doubt. >> the problem here is, and this is part of the political calculation, is getting accurate information in a timely fashion from the ground in syria. no administration is going to want to more quickly. we've known what that has done in the past when you move
3:38 am
quickly without confirmation that chemical weapons have been used and the u.n. experts are on the ground and some five, six months when the last event happened. >> the u.n. inspectors are in there, the proximity to israel, now that the united states is openly helping the anti-assad, you can be sure there are sensors that can detect nerve agents in the atmosphere if they're being used. part of the caution is you want to prove it before you go to the u.n. and try to put additional pressure on the russians but part of the caution also is, kate, and unfortunately this is not a slap at the administration, just the cold, hard reality of the middle east you go to syria, you go to egypt, around that region and keep saying the same sentence, there are no good options. >> and that is unfortunately very true. i want to ask you before i let you go some presidential politics. candy crowley had a great sit-down with senator ted cruz and one topic that came up his dual citizenship, his birth certificate. here's a little bit of that interview. >> i think it's the silly season
3:39 am
in politics. this past week the "dallas morning news" asked me for a copy of my birth certificate so i sent it to him and they ran a story a whole lot of media outlets, i guess it was a slow news day but they ran with the story which is fine >> it may very well be a slow news day. it's a slow news period in the summer quite often but this resulted in a lot of speculation, is this one step to him saying he's running in 2016? better to deal with it now or is this drawing unnecessary attention to a serious issue? >> better to do it now if you're going to run. republican activists say senator cruz and rand paul are doing their part to travel into key states so if this might be an issue, either the left attacking you raising questions about your eligibility or the right saying you're canadian? deal with it now. smart move. >> thank you, john, great reporting. we'll talk to you soon, thanks. coming up on "new day," dr. oz to the rescue, a woman plowed
3:40 am
down in the streets of new york and the tv doc and some brave new yorkers were there. also coming up a pandemonium in the uk, thousands of one direction fans waiting hours, even days to meet the boy band at their big film premiere. we'll take you there. i'd be there, too, but i've got to work. [ male announcer ] these heads belong to those who can't put life on hold because of a migraine. so they trust excedrin migraine to relieve pain fast. plus sensitivity to light, sound, even nausea. and it's #1 neurologist recommended. migraines are where excedrin excels. it's back to school time. and excedrin wants to make sure your child's school is equipped to help your child excel. purchase excedrin for a chance to win one of 5 $10,000 donations
3:41 am
to your child's school. go to excedrin's facebook page to enter. as your life changes, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust along the way, refocus as careers change and kids head off to college, and revisit your investments as retirement gets closer. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you fine-tune your personal economy. start today with a free one-on-one review of your retirement plan.
3:42 am
3:43 am
all right welcome back. hope your morning is going okay. we have a blockbuster new warning for you on climate change this morning. an international panel of scientists says it is real and almost certainly caused by human activity. the report also warns that sea levels could rise by more than three feet by the end of the century, very aggressive predictions there. cnn's tom foreman is in washington with more. >> hi chris, hey kate, hey
3:44 am
michaela. this is the world's scientific community now almost in one voice saying that they believe that global warm something not only happening but that humans are predominantly responsible for it. yes, there are some other causes, but humans, they say, are the biggest cause, and if we don't do something about it, they're furthermore saying there will be real consequences. let's look at some of those. south street seaport, one of the huge attractions in new york city, millions of tourists have iz visited this over the year, every summer it's packed. this is where it's located on the island of manhattan, right there at that dot and this is the coast of the island of manhattan right now if you want to call it such, and if nothing, it's changed, this is where the coast will be in another 80 or 90 years. look at this tremendous loss of investment of land, of buildings, of everything on the south street sea port, it will be out to sea. further down the coast let's look at another option, the outer banks of north carolina, a
3:45 am
very popular place, if we look at the map right now and again draw lines on the outer banks, here is where the rest of the land is located right now, and according to these scientists, if nothing gets changed and we move forward, this is what will happen, water will take all of this away, the outer banks will be diminished significantly from where it is today. further down the coast let's go down to miami, another huge city out there with a huge economic impact on the state of florida, very important state in this country, that's where miami is. here is the coast of florida today, and they're saying if nothing changes here -- by the way, these are the keys down here, if nothing changes, these scientists are saying look what will happen. all of that gets taken over by water, every bit of it. that is a really significant reduction in the state of florida and the keys, virtually disappear. this is why these scientists are concerned n a nutshell because
3:46 am
they're saying the evidence to them is clear. if nothing is done, if we don't change anything, the results will be catastrophic for many places around the world. chris? kate? michaela? let's go around the world starting in the uk where the british government is defending the detention of david miranda. atika shubert has more from london. >> reporter: this is london's high court and this is where the lawyers for david miranda say they are going to take legal action. this is the letter they sent to britain's home office demanding to know why he was detained for nine hours at heath row airport and what exactly police were looking for and his lawyers say they will come here to get the answers. back to you, kate. >> atika, thank you so much. nuclear regulators in japan fear more tanks at the troubled fukushima reactor are leaking
3:47 am
contaminated water. cnn's christi lu stout has more. >> after the 2011 tsunami that hit the fukushima plant, the current level one is said to be raised to a level three meaning a serious incident. the tokyo electric power company which runs the plant says 300 tons has leaked from a storage tank. spokeswoman tells cnn the leaking container may be emptied into another tank as early as today. back in july ten poe admitted radiation is seeping into the sea and the warning level will be raised after a meeting between japanese officials and international nuclear regulators on wednesday. back to you, kate. >> thank you so much. boy bands and screaming fans, they seem to go hand in hand, i guess. witness the london prenear of one direction's 3-d documentary. zain verjee has more. >> reporter: this is the world prime minister with two boys and
3:48 am
the band mates one directin. the movie is supposed to be fantastic, it is all about -- oh, darling, really? and it is all about the way that they do things behind the scenes, the relationship with the families, and just really gives us insight into the lives of a mega star band. they are really awesome guys, there are 70,000 fans here all screaming and having a great time. i think i've just become one of them. back to you. >> she's reading this off of a monitor. >> i've never seen zain verjee flustered and she seemed flustered. >> he's high on the list of kids needing a smack, getting involved with the shot. bring it on, show respect for the woman, doing her job and reading off the thing, trying to kiss her face and distracting her. >> is there any female artist trying to give you a kiss? >> every time that happens,
3:49 am
kate, i say the same thing. >> respect. >> wait until the shot's over. >> thanks, zain. >> quick lit knives come out on this set. this is all kevlar. >> i'm trying to protect you from the teenage viewers. coming up the american medical association saying diets don't really work. the reason behind it you'll want to hear, the fat free foods, all that fuels controversy. we'll take you through what actually works in your life. big, new study talks about it. our must see moment of the day an awesome chain reaction dunk fest. wait for it. oh, look at that. genius! we'll show you more when we come back. >> who's the guy on the radio of? right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy.
3:50 am
and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together.
3:51 am
i'm here to get the lady of the house back on her feet. [ all gasp ] oj, veggies -- you're cool. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! 'cause i'm re-workin' the menu, keeping her healthy and you on your toes. [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. i see you, cupcake! uh-oh! [ bottle ] the number one doctor recommended brand. ensure®. nutrition in charge™.
3:52 am
3:53 am
♪ might as well jump, jump i guess that is appropriate music. welcome back to "new day." school is almost back in session. how about a pool party, how about serious flourish? our must see moment. these dunks take it to a whole new level, two guys on the roof, amazing. posted on vine. you have to watch it a couple of times through to catch all the tricks. and i had to say chris, have you ever jumps off a roof? they found this video or at least a still with these. >> that clears shows roof
3:54 am
jumping. >> that was staged. >> that pa thetic middle aged man in corset. >> a former life of his. >> for charity when i was on "gma" we did the face your face and i was going to cover something on the way out the door, well i'm not crazy about heights. next thing i know i'm at the top of the taj mahal in atlantic city and put me in a device for the stunt person and dropped me from the top of the building and trump said after we made it, "i'll give you double if do you it tomorrow" and we gave the money to a homeless organization and to the northern illinois university funds after school shooting. it was for a good cause but you know. >> absolutely look at you. >> i've seen the videos. he was very shaken. >> listen, i make absolutely no claims of any type of bravery. >> i'm not making fun of that. >> you are. >> i wouldn't jump off a building even though i did stand on a high wire out a safety net. >> you looked good doing it. i was scared. >> how high?
3:55 am
>> 55 stories. it was very story. i was very scared. lot of hairline loss that day. >> and it all grew back, it's amazing. >> yeah, sure. come up next on "new day," paging dr. oz, the popular tv doctor jumps in to help a woman hit by a cab outside rockefeller, details ahead. plus mark zuckerberg's exclusive one on one interview with the facebook chief straight ahead. wait until you see what he gave us. every ocean... but we still swim. every second, somewhere in the world, lightning strikes... but we still play in the rain. poisonous snakes can be found in 49 of the 50 states, but we still go looking for adventure. a car can crash...
3:56 am
a house can crumble... but we still drive... and love coming home. because i think deep down we know... all the bad things that can happen in life... they can't stop us from making our lives... good. ♪ ♪ but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can help make this a great block party. ♪ [ male announcer ] advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day.
3:57 am
people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. [ male announcer ] advair diskus fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder. get your first prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com.
3:58 am
with diabetes, it's tough to keep life balanced. i don't always have time to eat like i should. and the more i focus on everything else, the less time i have to take care of me. that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes. glucerna products help me keep everything balanced. [ golf clubs clanking ] [ husband ] i'm good! well, almost everything. [ male announcer ] glucerna. delicious shakes and bars. helping people with diabetes find balance. [ male announcer ] glucerna. delicious shakes and bars. we raise natureraised farms® on a 100% vegetarian diet with no antibiotics ever. look for natureraised farms® chicken at your local store. breaking news, graphic, new video just out, the syrian government accused of using
3:59 am
nerve gas on its own people. the u.s. had said chemical weapons would force their hand so what now? new details on the alleged shooter who opened fire at a grade school. parents and children terrified. why did he do it and how did school administrator get him to surrender. dr. oz to the rescue, saving a woman's life after a car accident in the middle of new york city, get this, wasn't the first stranger he's saved this week. >> your "new day" starts right now. >> announcer: what you need to know. >> accelerates, hits mie and gos through the lady and jumps the curve. >> announcer: what you just have to see. this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan, and michaela pereira. >> good morning.
4:00 am
welcoming back to "new day." it is wednesday, august 21st, 7:00 in the east. i'm chris cuomo. >> i'm kate bolduan here with news anchor michaela pereira and a major tv exclusive. >> a man known as mark zuckerberg has already connected a billion people via facebook. what could be his second act? he has a major announcement today and we'll bring it to you in a bit. a disturbing new twist in the abduction and rescue of hannah anderson. relatives of the man who kidnapped hannah, killed her mother and brother want a paternity test. why? they think james dimaggio is the biological father of hannah and her late brother. we have the unbelievable details ahead. haven't we all been slaving away on some diet trying to shed a little bit of weight? have we been completely wasting our time? a new study says diets do not work. that is upsetting a whole lot of people this morning. we're going to break it down with a top physician coming up. first we have breaking news
4:01 am
overnight, syrian opposition groups say the government is using chemical weapons. we're going to show you some video now, some of it is disturbing but it is not the worst of what's out there, much of it online. doctor at a field hospital outside damascus says these are symptoms of the use of chemical agents. the syrian government is denying the accusations at this time. cnn's arwa damon is live in beirut. thank you for joining us. >> reporter: and you know, chris, i spoke to one doctor who was saying that at his one facility, they had 300 people die and they ran out of atrophine an an hour, effectively left with nothing to treat these countless victims that kept on coming in, and you were talking about the images there, some of them so young, a lot of children died in syria according to opposition activists. this is not the first time there have been allegations of a
4:02 am
chemical attack taking place with both sides pointing the finger of blame at one another, that is exactly why there currently is a u.n. monitoring team on the ground presumably they're going to have to ask for access to the site of today's attacks, perhaps shedding more light on what took place but this most certainly is among the deadliest days in syria and most certainly the deadliest alleged chemical weapons atack. will that potentially provide a game changer we'll have to wait and see. >> we'll wait and see, arwa, thank you for that. reminder looking at the images there have been more than 100,000 people who died since this tragedy started more than two years ago. something to remember when you see the images. back home, tragedy averted at a grade school in georgia. this morning a 20-year-old suspect, michael brandon hill, is in custody. police say he entered the school building levelily armed and took hostages and opened fire on police. cnn's david mattingly is following the developments live
4:03 am
in decatur, georgia, this morning. good morning, david. >> reporter: good morning, kate. hundreds of parents here counting their blessings after a gunman entered their children's school yesterday, fired shots but ended up hurting no one. hundreds of kids, ages 4 to 10, running for safety, as gunfire erupts in their school. inside 20-year-old michael brandon hill, armed with what police say was an ak-47 and another of other weapons takes the office workers hostage and tells them to call a tv station with a chilling message. >> i've never experienced anything like this. he wanted us to start filming as police die. >> reporter: the gunman started firing at police, maybe a half dozen times, officers returned fire. one office worker convinced him to surrender. >> he wanted to go outside and start shooting again and i started telling him my life
4:04 am
story and i asked him to put the weapons down and i told the police he was giving himself up. >> reporter: police searched the suspect's car for explosives. children had to be escorted from buses away from the school for precaution before being reunited with their anxious parents. now in police custody hill faces charges including aggravated assault on a police officer, terroristic threats and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. parents complain of a lack of communication. most say they heard about it on the local news. >> after they put the school on lockdown and secured the kids the parents should have been called immediately. right then and there. >> reporter: there are new fears about security from parents deeply shaken by what could have happened. >> we have a button to push to go in and you're supposed to show i.d., and it aggravates me. >> reporter: are you going to let your daughters go back to school? >> i don't want to. i want to home school them. >> reporter: michael brandon
4:05 am
hill was arrested once before, back in a nearby county, he was charged on making terroristic threats and terrorist acts and released on other than $1,000. authorities won't tell us the status of his case what happened after that, we're expected to find out why today and why he was a free man and able to come to the school and do what he did yesterday. >> so many families hugging their kids a little tighter this morning. thank you so much. we'll debate whether or not teachers should be armed in schools to keep children safe. it's something a lot of people are talking about. we'll have debate on that. we have a bizarre twist in the hannah anderson kidnapping case. the sister of suspect james dimaggio wants dna samples taken from hannah and dna remains to find out whether dimaggio was actually their father. zoraida sambolin is tracking the latest for us. >> lots of bizarre twists. james dimaggio left more than
4:06 am
$110,000 in life insurance money to the grandmother of hannah and ethan anderson. he made it known that he wanted the cash to go to the anderson children as well and now his family is asking for paternity tests to find out for sure if he was more than just their uncle jim. overnight a painful twist to an already tragic story, laura dimaggio, cyster to jim dimaggio the man accused of kidnapping 16-year-old hannah anderson and murdering her mother and younger brother now requesting dna samples from both hannah and her brother. the reason, according to a family spokesman, she wants to know if dimaggio was actually the children's biological father. >> there's been a lot of rumors about whether or not jim might be the father of either or both children. we find it strange he's left all this money without any explanation. >> that money is from a life insurance policy that named hannah's paternal grandmother. it reportedly is worth around $110,000. jim's sister was reportedly the
4:07 am
beneficiary up until 2011. >> expected the grandmother to use the money to take care of the two children. he had stated specifically that he didn't want to give it to either parent because he didn't trust them. >> dimaggio has been described by anderson's father, brett, as a platonic family friend to the anderson family. referred to as uncle jim in an interview with "new day" while hannah was still missing. hannah's father was asked about the relationship. >> he is basically, became like part of our family but we were just very good friends. there was nothing ever to show any indication of this. >> if dimaggio's life insurance policy is in order, his alleged crimes are not expected to impact the payouts, so that means hannah's grandmother, bernice could, receive a check within 45 days. cnn reached out to the anderson family for comment about these latest twists in the case and we have not heard back yet. >> another thing for that family to deal with.
4:08 am
zoraida, thanks so much. there is a lot of news developing at this hour. straight to mikial for the latest. >> fire crews reporting good progress battling the beaver creek fire near sun valley, idaho. the fire scorched 106,000 acres and is at 30% containment. meantime, an out of control wildfire near california's yosemite national park is threatening thousands of structures. in all nearly 50 major fires are burning in 11 western states stretching fire fighting resources to the limit. ft. hood massacre suspect nidal hasan begins his defense today. the former army psychologist faces 13 murder counts and a possible death sentence for the 2009 shooting rampage at the texas military base. a court hearing for a vanderbilt football player and
4:09 am
four other former players. none of them will have to appear in court, among them chris boyd one of the team's top receivers. investigators say he took part in a coverup following the rape of an unconscious female friend. four others were indicted for their alleged roles in that sexual assault. the nsa's domestic surveillance network much larger than officials had been willing to disclose publicly according to current and former nsa officials who spoke to "the wall street journal." they tell the newspaper the agency has the capacity to access 75% of all u.s. internet communications, and that it is keeping the content of many e-mails sent between u.s. citizens. you might recall the navy vet who woke up in a california hospital speaking only swedish with no memory of his american life? he is now in sweden, trying to piece together his past. 61-year-old michael boatwright was reunited tuesday with a woman he once dated in the 1980s. mental health officials in california bought him a one-way ticket after he made it clear he
4:10 am
wanted to live in sweden. a scary moment caught on camera, a truck flying over a guardrail, happened in michigan. the 17-year-old who shot this video said she had seen the truck driver hit a sign in the middle of the median. she took out her phone and started shooting when she captured this terrifying accident. doctors believe the driver had some redical episode before his vehicle jumped over the median. is he in the hospital with serious injuries. we're pleased to say is he expected to make a full recovery. imagine witnessing that and knowing there's nothing you can do. >> there's nothing you can do about it. he must have been going so fast to be able to -- to get air that way. >> with a trailer. that's loaded, behind him. reminder, very interesting for all of us to see, driving and taking video at the same time, not the best idea for her. >> i hope he makes a full recover pi. thanks, michaela. >> boy, oh boy. that's on the news side. what do we have in terms of weather news? let's get to indra petersons
4:11 am
with more. >> slowly getting better, starting to make friends. in the southeast conditions are improving. we still have a stationary front, you can see the moisture in the water vapor site going into the southeast. the change in the forecast is that stationary front that's been lingering day after day, almost feels like week after week. we'll start to see that dissipate so still another day, one to two inches of rain still possible in the area and then it dissipates. what does that mean for the weekend? still some afternoon thunderstorms you typically see but either way huge improvement compared to what we've been seeing. new cold front we'll be watching today that means we're going to be looking at severe weather from wisconsin, upper peninsula of michigan going down through iowa. this is a mixed bag, good news as it makes its way through, rain into the ohio valley tomorrow and eventually into the mid-atlantic but it's the temperatures that are going to be amazing. as this kicks through, notice we start with 80s today. behind it each day we'll see more and more 70s, first through the midwest and then through the ohio valley and yes into the
4:12 am
northeast so the weekend will set up literally gorgeous and perfect with a lot of 70s into the area. love it! >> indra, thanks so much for that update. we'll check back in with you in a few. let's move on to dr. oz to the rescue it seems. the celebrity surgeon rushed to the aid of a woman struck by a new york city taxi tuesday, right outside the studio, where his talk show is filmed. dr. oz is giving all the credit to another good samaritan at the scene. nischelle turner is taking a look at that. >> he's being humble but this was a group effort but it's a story we like to bring you and good newspapers at end of this. this happened in the heart of the day and dr. oz says i was there but also says it was everyday people doing extraordinary things that really helped. it was like a scene out of a movie. >> he gets impatient and accelerates, hits me, goes through me and the lady and jumps the curb. >> reporter: one staring a real
4:13 am
life tv star and surgeon. cab driver swerved on to this bus lane manhattan sidewalk late tuesday morning hitting this bicycle delivery man and then a british tourist, severing her leg. >> she screamed bloody murder. >> reporter: david gestino a union plumber trained in emergency first aid removed his belt and used it as a tourniquet. >> i was down there holding it on one thing only, just stop the blood, hold on and i felt somebody nudge me and i was a little angry and i said "i'm waiting for a doctor" and i heard "i'm dr. oz." i went, "you are dr. oz what should i do?" he said "you're doing it." >> reporter: dr. mehmet ozs aone of the first responders on the scene. his office just up the blo block. oz quickly assisted gestino. >> there was a dog leash and belt, amazingly two mundane things you wouldn't think of and they saved her life. >> reporter: this comes on the heels of an incident in salt lake city pa past weekend, dr.
4:14 am
oz came to the rescue of a 53-year-old runner who collapse during a charity 5k run after his lungs filled with fluid. >> the experience of having dr. oz watch over ome and care for me was incredible, came to my bedside, so caring. he saved my life. >> reporter: as dr. oz assisted in this week's midtown manhattan rescue he says the kudos goes to gestino. >> the real hero today is the plumber, who is an average day walking along the street and saves a life. >> a miracle on 49th street. we wish the woman recovery of the best. initially it is called an accident but police are investigating. dr. oz jumped off the stage to help a woman who fell ill in sacramen sacramento. can we give a "new day" shout out to david gestino the
4:15 am
plumber? come on! >> thank goodness we the training. >> an ordinary person in extraordinary circumstances. >> with a belt and a dog leash. >> i can't even imagine. >> that's great, thanks nischelle. coming up on "new day" australia's former prime minister calling on his countrymen to boycott the u.s. after an australian college baseball player was killed here allegedly by teens who did it because they were bored. plus still ahead our broadcast exclusive, chris's one on one interview with facebook chief mark zuckerberg, his major announcement, after this. how do you do a summer clearance event the dodge way?
4:16 am
first wait till summer. then get the cars ready. now add the dodge part. ♪ the dodge summer clearance event. right now get 0% financing for up to 72 months and no payments for 90 days on all dodge vehicles.
4:17 am
( bell rings ) they remwish i saw mine of my granmore often, but they live so far away. i've been thinking about moving in with my daughter and her family. it's been pretty tough since jack passed away. it's a good thing you had life insurance through the colonial penn program. you're right. it was affordable, and we were guaranteed acceptance. guaranteed acceptance? it means you can't be turned down because of your health. you don't have to take a physical or answer any health questions. they don't care about your aches and pains. well, how do you know? did you speak to alex trebek? because i have a policy myself. it costs just $9.95 a month per unit. it's perfect for my budget. my rate will never go up. and my coverage will never go down because of my age. affordable coverage and guaranteed acceptance? we should give them a call. do you want to help protect your loved ones from the burden of final expenses?
4:18 am
if you're between 50 and 85, you can get quality insurance that does not require any health questions or a medical exam. your rate of $9.95 a month per unit will never increase, and your coverage will never decrease -- that's guaranteed. so join the six million people who have already called about this insurance. whether you're getting new insurance or supplementing what you already have, call now and ask one of their representatives about a plan that meets your needs. so, what are you waiting for? go call now! we'll finish up here.
4:19 am
take a little sip of coffee, take a little breath and listen to this because we have a "new day" broadcast exclusive for you. what do you do when you've already made $17 billion connecting a billion people around the world? well if you're facebook founder mark zuckerberg, you double down or more accurately you quintuple down. mr. facebook on his next big idea, and if he didn't have enough to work on already, why he is also taking on immigration reform. when you visit the facebook campus you get the sense that anything is possible. >> we want the camp to us feel like a little city or village. >> reporter: and now zuckerberg wants to make the entire world like the facebook campus in a way, by providing internet access to the entire world. the idea is called internet.org, its target? the 5 billion people around the
4:20 am
globe without access to the net. >> here we use things like facebook to share news and catch up with our friends but there, they're going to use it to decide what kind of government they want, get access to health care for the first time ever, connect with family hundreds of miles away that they haven't seen in decades. getting access to the internet is a really big deal. i think we're going to be able to do it. >> reporter: the word "we" is the key word. this isn't just about facebook. zuckerberg has done something extraordinary to achieve the extraordinary, reached out to the biggest players in social media and mobile data, aka his competitors in part, to work together. how did those calls go? >> it probably varies. but in general, these are companies that we have deep relationships with and have worked with on a lot of things for a long time so this kind of came out of a lot of the discussions that we had. >> reporter: so a team of the best in the business is coming
4:21 am
together but for a task this size, uniting five times the global presence facebook has already, it's going to take a lot more. what about the how? like how do you do this? how developed is the plan? >> you know, we have a plan, a rough plan for what we think we're going to need to do to pull it off, and of course the plan will evolve over time and we'll get better ideas, but if you look at the trends, data is becoming more available to people. apps are getting more efficient to run. there are new business models to help more people get online. it's also good for facebook and the other companies, right, because mobile access to the internet is where your business lies, right? >> if we were just focused on making money, the first billion people we've connected have way more money than the rest of the next 6 billion combined. it's not fair but it's the way that it is. and we just believe that everyone deserves to be connected and on the internet so we are putting a lot of energy towards this. >> people see you as somewhat of a comeback kid right now.
4:22 am
forget about the kid now but it's a phrase. you took some lumps and found a way to come back. are awe ware of that? do you feel that in yourself that, like some people thought it wasn't going to happen, that you had had your run but look at me now? do you get a sense of that? >> we've always just focused on building something great over the long-term. right, so everyone at facebook i just tell them come in and try to make the biggest impact that you can have and if we keep building a service that people love and that more and more people use every day which we seem to be doing pretty well at, then we're going to be fine over time and that's our focus and in terms of building the company. >> reporter: hard to do when you hit the bumps in the road though, right? it's a great message when everything is okay. >> especially important when you hit the bumps. >> we're not trying to connect the world to the internet. you have to run one of the biggest companies and when you want a distraction from that you've decided to take on the
4:23 am
easy task of immigration policy and the united states. why are you wading into those waters? >> when we were first talking about doing this a lot of people actually were worried that it was going to be a problem for facebook, and i just decided i think that this is too important of an issue for the country. there are 11 million undocumented people who came here to work hard and contribute to the country and i don't think it's quite as polarized as people always say. >> reporter: what would be your advice to people in d.c. who are trying to balance these two almost diametrically opposed positions, one is immigration policy, let's bring in our human potential and the other one is let's find a way to get them out. how if you had to enter that, this is your new team, you have to make these democrats and republicans come together, what advice do you think you'd have that's not going on down there now? >> well i can't really tell anyone how to legislate. i mean that's -- everyone understands this stuff way better than i do, so my goal in this is just to try to help
4:24 am
support folks who care deeply about getting this done, on both sides, and hopefully we can make a difference. >> in terms of the politics, you think it's important enough where you're going to do it anyway. >> i think there are some things in life that if you believe that it's such a big problem, you just stick your neck out and try to do it, right, and i mean, a lot of people think that it's going to be really challenging to connect 5 billion people, too. it is, but i think it's one of the biggest problems of my generation to get everyone in the world to have internet access and when similarly 11 million undocumented people, that's a lot of people whose lives we can improve and make the country stronger. >> good luck with everything. not even 30 yet, you're doing great. good luck with everything. he's 30 next may. can you imagine that? before people write off his politics like oh i know what he's about. his high profile political alliances, governor christie in new jersey and meeting with m i
4:25 am
marco rubio. >> donated quite a bit of noun new jersey's education fund. i think that's right. mark zuckerberg does not do many interviews. what surprised you when you sat down with him? obviously there are big issues and big topics you wanted to hit on. did anything surprise you? >> yeah, that he seems to have a more defined sense of purpose about himself. i think he's always been known as a single focus i'm going to do facebook and get a lot of heat and controversy, i don't care, i'm focused on this. you see a little bit of that but there's a maturity to what he wants to do with himself that i think we're going to see more and more of if he keeps going. >> to that end you mentioned about the failed ipo. did he have any sense of -- you mentioned that he sort of has a greater sense of his vision, but did he give any inkling that was a troubled part that bothered him still? >> i think that he was very careful about that answer. he was careful about a lot of answers. >> very measured it seems.
4:26 am
>> you see that in a lot of people who are high functioning thinkers, very careful about what they say but often when you deal with failure, and that ipo when it came out the perception of it was very bad you often ignore what happened there because you've had success, his stock price has popped and the one thing that he did say that we don't have in the interview, he was like look, when bad things happen you have to remember to refocus about what you're all about and you can't listen to the noise. you got to remember what got you there in the first place and he did that. he also gave me a hoodie. i showed this earlier and keep showing it, trying to figure out what to do with it. this is one of the ones he likes to wear by his particular designer. it says "making the world more open and connected." >> we can frame it and hang it in the "new day" center. >> we could put it up in the rafters like jerseys. >> the first of many we hope, many a sweatshirt to come on. >> we'll ask everyone for a garment when they come on.
4:27 am
>> be careful about that. >> a new one. >> not what they have on at the time although that would be good for ratings. coming up next on "new day" a college baseball player from australia is murdered while jogging in oklahoma, allegedly by teens who say they were just bored. now australia's former deputy prime minister is telling his countrymen to boycott the u.s. we're going to talk to him live, ahead. and the american medical association says fad diets don't work. they want dieters to make some serious lifestyle changes instead. no fast fix? do we like that? of course not, but we'll tell you why. >> no kidding. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big.
4:28 am
hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results.
4:29 am
4:30 am
4:31 am
♪ take me down to the very last city ♪ ♪ where the grass is green and the girls are petty ♪ welcome baaing to "new dy." i'm chris cuomo. >> i'm kate bolduan here with news anchor michaela pereira. >> good morning. >> coming up in the show an australian student in the united states, came to the united states to play college baseball. he was murdered while out jogging in oklahoma. the teenaged suspects say they killed him because they were bored. we'll talk with australia's former deputy prime minister about the case. his strong opinions on it coming up. there's nothing you like more than a nice easy diet to handle, going to take your weight off, not too much work, not too much time. the american medical association says they don't work. there's a new study. the good news is they'll tell us what does work but first up this morning we're going to head right to michaela with news about what's been happening overnight in syria. >> there's breaking news overnight, new claims and new video that purports to show chemical weapons used in syria.
4:32 am
we warn you, you may find the video disturbing, the opposition accusing the assad regime of killing and injuring hundreds of people including children. syria's state run media denies the claims. a goingman who walked into a georgia elementary school with an ak-47 and began firing at police apparently wanted to harm as many officers as he could and said he was not afraid to die according to witnesses. 20-year-old convicted felon michael brandon hill surrendered after firing at least six shots at police from inside the ran alleged mcnair discovery academy near atlanta. no one was killed. james dimaggio's sister asking for paternity to be determined. he named hannah's grandmother as beneficiary in a $112,000 insurance policy. an explosion at a naval
4:33 am
weapons stations boatinjuring eight people in new jersey. we do not know what caused that explosion but the fire was contained to the boathouse. among the injured a department of defense civilian firefighter and seven sailors. here is proof there is a child in all of us, even animals. you're looking at the older tiger in captivity in the world, flavio, bengal tiger, he is loving this sprinkler, frolicking, playing like a little cub really. it's nice to see he has all that energy in his golden years and gets great joy out of something as simple as a sprinkler. >> he's just hot. >> and maybe thirsty. >> or confused. >> there is that. you never know. >> good stuff, all right. we want to tell you the latest on this horrific murder case that's sparking outrage across the globe.
4:34 am
an australian student studying in the u.s. gunned down in oklahoma by teens who allegedly did it because they were bored. this morning officials on two continents are demanding answers. in moments we'll talk live with australia's former deputy prime minister who is telling his countrymen to boycott the u.s. and he'll tell us why. first cnn's alina machado is in the cnn center. >> good morning, chris. all teens remain in custody a accused of a murder police say was random. a frantic call for help by a woman who saw chris lane moments after he was gunned down during an afternoon jog. >> is he breathing? is he cautious? is he talking to you? what's he doing? >> he's not conscious. is he still breathing? barely. >> reporter: police in oklahoma say the 23-year-old east central university student from australia was the victim of three teens on a mission to
4:35 am
kill. >> it was in the second interview of the 17-year-old. he was asked why they did it and he basically said "we were bored. we didn't have anything to do and we decided to kill somebody. he was our target." >> reporter: two are charged with adults with first-degree m fell me murder. 17-year-old michael jones accused as accessory to the crime. >> i'll do everything i can do to ensure the three thugs pay for what they did to christopher lane. >> reporter: the father of one of the accused said he's also suffered a loss. >> families in australia, they are hurting. i'm hurting the same way. i don't cry on the outside, i'm crying right here from the heart right now. >> reporter: lane's college baseball coach described him as kind-hearted with a magnetic personality. the murder has sparked outrage in australia, where former deputy prime minister tim fisher released a statement cautioning australians about going to america. he says in part, "tourists th k
4:36 am
thinking of going to the usa should think twice. i'm deeply angry about this, not just because of the callous attitude of the three teenagers but it's a sign of the proliferation of guns on the ground in the usa." court documents show authorities found a .12 gauge shotgun in the trunk of the car belonging to one of the teens but police say they continue to search for the .22 caliber gun used in lane's murder. kate? >> thank you so much. as alina said australian's former deputy prime minister tim fischer has made strong remarks and joining us to talk about the case and his warning to australian tourists to boycott visiting the united states. mr. fischer, thank you so much for joining us this morning. let's get right to it. you're warning australianeur tourists or anyone who wants to come to the united states not to come to the united states. is this an emotional response on your part to a tragedy or do you really not think it is safe to be visiting the united states?
4:37 am
>> it's a reflection of statistics which show that you are 15 times more likely to be shot dead in the usa per 1 million people than here in australia, and people should factor that in. they should think twice in the circumstances that it's joged along by the senseless killing, the shooting in the back of an outstanding young australian on a scholarship in the usa, which has, of course, quite properly deep-seated anger right across australia. >> have you heard any reaction from australians about your warning? how are they reacting to you? >> look, i've been consistent on this. six months ago or even after the massacre at sandy hollow, i said think twice. evaluate the risk. you are 15 times more likely to be shot dead because there are over 250 million guns in the usa and your congress earlier this year at the start of a new term could not even introduce background checks at gun shows,
4:38 am
and this public policy disconnect is public knowledge down here, and we have gone another way. we have firearms safety legislation. we have sensible controls on firearms, shooters can have guns, i support proper use of guns but i also support firearms sensible control. >> i think everyone agrees that this tragedy in oklahoma is absolutely just that, a senseless tragedy, but why boycott the united states over the horrible actions of what appears to be a very few disturbed teenagers? >> not true. you've had on average 400 more people shot dead since friday and the shocking murder in duncan, oklahoma. in other words, there is murder mayhem on main street usa every day of the week. but you hide from that. you don't face up to that, and
4:39 am
you let your congressmen and senators escape and dance around the bush when it's a very real circumstance supported by the nra. i've been to the philadelphia constitutional museum. i've looked at your second amendment. i don't believe your second amendment provides for semiautomatics or automatics in the suburbs. this is why australians and anybody else should think carefully about traveling to the usa, until you start to make a move on gun and firearm sensible control. >> debate about gun control has been going on for a long time as you are clearly watching it closely but there are statistics that gun related homicides have gone down dramatically in the united states down some 49% over about the last decade so it does appear the united states is making progress. that is not making any excuse. i'm not making any excuse for senseless tragedies, though. >> glad of that. >> i'll ask you, why is this
4:40 am
senseless tragedy an indictment of an entire kr i? many people enjoy visiting the u.s. >> and i enjoyed taking my family on the coastal starlight on amtrak from los angeles to seattle a few years ago. i'll think twice about it again because your massacre level -- i mean since 1996, since we took positive action under john howard's legislation, zero gun massacres in australia. since 1996, every year in the usa, more gun massacres. try the harvard study which points out that children in the usa are 11 times more likely to be shot dead through and from guns than any other oecd country in the world. you have to face up to this. >> and so mr. fischer, i appreciate the statistics. do you think that australians will heed your warning or are you taking this as an opportunity to voice your opinion and make a political statement? >> no, i'm not in politics.
4:41 am
i'm not now a congressman. i've stepped down as a regional republican equivalent. i'm a vietnam veteran. i support sensible use of guns but i do simply make this statement that people should evaluate risks when they travel, whether it's to bhutan or whether it's to baltimore, and i just am reminded of this by this senseless killing on a peaceful street in duncan, oklahoma, but don't wiggal way from the fact that since then, there's been 400 more americans shot dead elsewhere along main streets of the u.s. of a. >> mr. timothy fischer, thank you for coming on. chris? all right, kate. when we come back here on "new day" a new editorial from the american medical association sends out a message loud and clear. it is? diets don't work. they want researchers to stop studying fald diets. we'll tell you why. la's known definitely for its traffic,
4:42 am
congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment.
4:43 am
4:44 am
4:45 am
welcome back. the journal of the american medical association released what it is calling a controversial editorial, taking aim at the national diet debate, it essentially argues that no diet ever really works. the only way to lose weight is by changing overall behavior. here to walk us through is dr. raz, contribute be medical editor to "health" magazine. thank you for being here. is it shocking that the fad diets don't work? >> it's interesting, there's an opinion article published in the "journal of the american medical association" really targets not just the really crazy fad diets but things that we kind of think of as more reasonable like the mediterranean diet, and the point here is not that you should never go on a diet but you need to focus more not just on what you're eating but how
4:46 am
you're eating the behavior that goes along with our patterns of exercise and eating. >> sort of making a lifestyle change. >> making a lifestyle intervention. what does has mean? behavioral modification which is counseling with a nutritionist or a dietitian or support groups where you're checking in every week or every couple weeks. these have been shown to help with weight loss. the diets, any particular diet, high protein or low carb hasn't shown sustained benefits. that's why this article comes out saying we need to focus our resources and attention more on a wholistic change in behavior, not just what we're eating. >> what is your opinion? they show evidence of why it's not a one size fits all approach, it does not work for everyone, but do you think this is confirming common sense that if you're going to try any diet, you need to change your behavior and you need to exercise as part of it. >> yeah, i think that it does confirm that, but i think a lot of americans don't really -- that hasn't really sunk in yet and all of us, it's sort of
4:47 am
human nature to want that quick fix. >> of course. >> you hear so and so lost weight on this diet. tell me what it is, i need to write it down and you really do need to reinforce the fact it's about your behavior, it's about checking in frequently with your doctor or a counselor and one of the things came out of the article i thought was interesting, we don't have a lot of support for that. insurance companies don't really pay for a lot of nutritional counseling or frequent visits with your doctor to talk about weight loss in particular. >> and people want to go for the quick fix they find in the book. >> they go for the quick fix that's who we are. there's nothing here that's going to make people shake their heads. people know if it's quick it's probably not going to last but that's how we it in this country and the results are painfully obvious. >> they are but one glimmer of hope there, we're such a social media internet friendly society now, hopefully that will help, if you're not going to be able to pay for a nutritionist, maybe there's online counseling, there's some great apps out there like lose it or fit device
4:48 am
that help you keep track of your calories but more importantly get in touch with other people working toward the same goals. that's been shown to help with weight loss having a community striving for the same thing. >> so reinforcing the important point i want everyone to get your best advice, if they say diets don't work, what is your best advice to the viewers? >> my best advice is look at your overall behavior. i like the example of if you have a tub of ice cream in your freezer, are you someone who eats it in two days or two weeks? it's not that the ice cream is the problem. it's how you're eating it. focus on that, talk to your nutritioni nutritionist, to your doctor, get some support and take a wholistic approach. >> dr. raj, we appreciate you coming in and talking us through this. >> i appreciate being here. >> change is hard. that's what we know for sure. >> long-term especially. taking a break, coming up on "new day" a close call as a gunman enters a georgia elementary school with an ak-47. sound familiar? of course it does. some say the answer is armed guards in the school and maybe
4:49 am
armed teachers. will that help? we're going to talk it through. in a different story, are we finally going to get the first look at northwest? kim kardashian and kanye west's baby. could be soon. hi, i'm terry and i have diabetic nerve pain. i worked a patrol unit for 17 years in the city of baltimore. when i first started experiencing the pain, it's, it's hard to describe because you have a numbness... but yet you have the pain like thousands of needles sticking in your foot. it was progressively getting worse, and at that point i knew i had to do something. when i went back to my healthcare professional... that's when she suggested the lyrica. once i started taking the lyrica, the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right away if you have these, new, or worsening depression,
4:50 am
or unusual changes in mood or behavior. or swelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores from diabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swelling of hands, legs and feet. don't drink alcohol while taking lyrica. don't drive or use machinery until you know how lyrica affects you. those who have had a drug or alcohol problem may be more likely to misuse lyrica. ask your doctor about lyrica today. it's specific treatment for diabetic nerve pain. to hear more of terry's story, visit lyrica.com. starts with freshly-made pasta, and 100% real cheddar cheese. but what makes stouffer's mac n' cheese best of all. that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. made with care for you or your family.
4:51 am
4:52 am
welcome back to "new day" time for the pop four with our
4:53 am
nischelle turner. >> i'm hanging on to what chris cuomo said early today. after today, you don't have that much longer. i'm hanging on to that is everything i have today. let's get to the pop four. this is our number four story. damon told a uk radio station that he and wahlberg are confused for each other so often they got an agreement to just go with it when confronted by other fans. >> i did have that happen. >> with who? >> you. >> i am only that lucky. >> kate, kate bolduan. kate? who is yours? >> everybody's cousin. >> yeah. there are random. anyone is blonde they think i look like. >> who do you get? andrew cuomo. he is funny looking, that's insulting. >> andrew? >> e-mail coming in right now.
4:54 am
>> one day he's watching the show. >> our number three story. i am proud to be a dad. simon cowell opening up and confirming to the bbc that he will be a father and also saying things are changing in my life right now for the better. congrats, simon. could baby northwest make her tv debut this week. rumors during an interview on kris jenner's talk show kanye west showed off a picture of his baby girl. the episode airs on friday. big, big bucks. number one story. tv guide released its annual list of top paid tv stars. keeping the crown the highest paid actor in primetime. who do you think? >> ashton kutcher. >> on the screen. >> probably like not me. >> $750,000 an episode for his role in "two and a half men." we did math for you here on "new day" this morning. folks at home, $34,000 a minute. a minute. >> is he worth it ratings wise?
4:55 am
is he doing better than charlie sheen was? >> "two and a half men" was such a ratings juggernaut during charlie sheen days. not -- >> he made more than $750,000 an episode. >> nail in the coffin this morning. thanks. we're going to take a break here on "new day." when we come back, can mark zuckerberg make history, dot, dot, dot, again. first social media and then the facebook phenomenon and then we'll tell you what it is in this exclusive interview. the family of kidnap and murder suspect james dimaggio is asking the anderson family for dna samples. the reason? it will shock you. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
4:56 am
♪ hooking up the country helping business run ♪ ♪ build! we're investing big to keep our country in the lead. ♪ load! we keep moving to deliver what you need. and that means growth, lots of cargo going all around the globe. cars and parts, fuel and steel, peas and rice, hey that's nice! ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
4:57 am
♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪
4:58 am
4:59 am
breaking overnight. do these images from syria show chemical weapon use? the government accused as hundreds said to be dead. will this trigger a u.s. military response? terrifying start to the school year. a gunman opens fire at a grade school. we have new information about the brave administrator who convinced the suspect to surr d surrender. the big interview. mark zuckerberg in is a tv exclusive one-on-one as he reveals his next, world-changing project right here on "new day." >> your "new day" continues right now. what you need to know -- >> i was getting ready -- what you just have to see. >> my two girls saved my life. if it wasn't for them, i wouldn't be here today.
5:00 am
this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan and michaela pereira. >> good morning, welcome back to "new day." 8:00 in the east, i'm kate bolduan. >> i'm chris cuomo here with the one and only michaela pereira. the family of the man who kidnapped girl they want samples for a dna sample because they believe james dimaggio could be the father of ethan and hannah anderson. we'll look at this complicated new twist. we've been following an unarmed florida man shot at 15 times by police in their driveway. when they mistook him as a thief, that man is speaking out for the first time on cnn about what happened and the answers he's looking for. we'll get reaction from the county sheriff whose officers were involved. also have a little bit of fun today. if you happen to love oreos.
5:01 am
it could be earth shattering. how much stuff is in that double stuff oreos. there are concerns my producers may have eaten my props. we'll have the answer, you may not like it. news breaking from overnight from syria. a poison attack by government forces, that's what's going on. we want to warn you some of the video is disturbing, but the truth is, there's far worse that we're not showing you that seemed to show deadly effects of chemical weapons on adults and children. the syrian opposition says hundreds of people were killed and injured in an assault on rebel strongholds outside of damascus. they accuse the assad regime of using chemical weapons on its own people. syria's government denies the claims. if reports are true, it could have serious implications for the united states. the obama administration has said the use of chemical weapons would "cross a red line." cnn's arwa damon is monitoring developments for us from beirut, leban
5:02 am
lebanon. >> most images are too graphic, too disturbing to show. a lot of the victims very young, quite a few chilling videos showing doctors desperately trying to resuscitate some of the children. and one doctor who we spoke to said his location ran out of within an hour. accusing the syrian government of carrying out this alleged chemical attack. allegations the government does deny. this is not the first time that there have been allegations of a chemical attack inside syria. in fact, that is exactly why there is a u.n. monitoring team on the ground. presumably requesting permission to visit the sites. none of the previous attacks have a death toll that is even close to as high as what we're seeing come out of syria right now. kate? >> arwa damon, thank you so much. president obama is on the record if they use chemical
5:03 am
weapons on its people, they will be crossing a red line. if these reports are true? what's next? dan lothian is live at the white house, next. dan, disturbing reports to wake up to. are you hearing anything from the white house at this point? >> nothing from the white house. this does put more pressure on the administration as it tries to deal with syria. a senior administration official telling cnn's john king this morning that they're aware of these reports out there and they have no coniffirmation that chemical weapons were used. in fact, if those weapons were used it would be unconscionable brutality by desperate man and desperate regime. remember earlier this summer in june that the u.s. announced it would provide military support to those rebels in syria. this came as a result of that red line that you've been talking about. the president had laid down and there was evidence that chemcell weapons had been used and that's when the u.s. decided to provide
5:04 am
support for the rebels. some asking for much more, like a no-fly zone. so far, the administration not willing to do that. chris? >> dan, thank you for the reporting this morning. a 20-year-old man, a gunman is under arrest this morning after entering a decatur, georgia, elementary school armed with an ak-47. the witness says the suspect was not afraid to die. he exchanged gunfire with police, but in the end no one was injured. the officers were able to place the man under arrest. david mattingly is live in decatur, georgia, with the latest. >> good morning, chris. the students are back in class today, but they're not at the school that they left yesterday. they're actually gathering at nearby high school. they will be back at classes here in this building tomorrow, that is if parents let them after now thinking about the terrible things that could have happened here. hundreds of kids, ages 4 to 10
5:05 am
running for safety as gunfire erupts in their school. inside, 20-year-old michael brandon hill, armed with what police say was an ak-47 and a number of other weapons takes office workers hostage and tells them to call a tv station with a chilling message. >> i've never experienced anything like this. he wanted us to start filming as police die. >> reporter: the gunman fire at police, maybe a half dozen times. officers return fire. when one office worker convinced him to surrender. >> i had him there the whole time because he actually wanted to go outside and start shooting again. i just start telling my life story and what was going on with me. asked him to put all his weapons down and told the police he was giving himself up. >> reporter: police search the suspect's car for explosives. children had to be escorted away before being reunited with their anxious parents. now, in police custody, hill faces charges including aggravated assault on a police
5:06 am
officer, terroristic threats and a possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. parents complain about a lack of communication. most say they heard about it on local news. >> yesterday they put the school on lockdown and secured the kids. the parent should have been called immediately, right then and there. >> reporter: new fears about security from parents deeply shaken by what could have happened. >> we have a button to push to go in and you're supposed to show i.d. and it aggravated me. >> are you going to let your daughters go back to school? >> i don't want to. i want to home school them. >> michael brandon hill getting in trouble with police not too long ago, back in march. and a neighboring county. he was actually arrested and charged with making terrorist threats and terroristic acts. we don't have any more details on what that involved, but we do know he was able to get out on
5:07 am
1,050 bond. authorities have not been able to tell us the status of that case or why he was a free man. chris? >> david, thank you very much. that points to something that is often ignored in these stories. these school shootings put gun control in the spotlight but is there a way to make this safer? we'll debate this in just a few moments. kate? was james dimaggio hannah anderson's biological father? that is what the alleged kidnapper and murderer's family wants to know. now requesting dna samples from hannah and the remains of her 8-year-old brother to find out for sure whether dimaggio was something more than their uncle jim. zoraida sambolin tracking these bizarre latest developments for us. >> james dimaggio left $112,000 in life insurance money to the paternal grandmother of hannah and ethan anderson. he made it clear that he wanted the cash to go to the anderson children and now dimaggio's family is asking for paternity
5:08 am
tests to rule out the suspicion that he was the children's father. overnight, a painful twist to an already tragic story. laura dimaggio, sister to jim dimaggio, the man accused of kidnapping 16-year-old hannah anderson and murdering her mother and younger brother now requesting dna samples from both hannah and her brother. the reason, according to a family spokesman, she wants to know if dimaggio was actually the children's biological father. >> there's been a lot of rumors about whether or not jim might be the father of either or both children. find it strange he left the money without an explanation. >> that money is from a life insurance policy that named hannah's grandmother. it is worth $110,000. jim's sister was reportedly the beneficiary up until 2011. >> expected the grandmother to use the money to take care of the two children. he had stated specifically that he didn't want to give it to
5:09 am
either parent because he didn't trust them. >> dimaggio described as a family friend. hannah's father was asked about the relationship. >> he is basically, became like a part of our family. but we were just very good friends. there was never anything to show any indication of this. >> if dimaggio's life insurance policy is in order, his alleged crimes are not expected to impact the payout. that means hannah's grandmother, burr nie bernice, could receive a check within 45 days. all the latest twists in the case and we have not heard back yet. >> not something the anderson family needs to deal with at this moment. a lot of other news to get to this morning. let's get to michaela dealing with wildfires out west. >> a lot of them, too, chris. a lot burning right now.
5:10 am
headlines. firefighters gaining some ground against the massive beaver creek fire near sun valley, idaho. many evacuation orders have been lifted. right now that fire is at 30% containment. in california, the fast growing rim fire threatening some 2,500 structures and scorched more than 10,000 acres and currently burning out of control. ft. hood massacre suspect nidal hasan could take the stand in his own defense today. the former army psychiatrist is acting as his own attorney and faces a possible death sentence for the 2009 shooting rampage that left fellow american soldiers dead. nuclear concerns today in japan where officials fear more tanks nuclear reactor are now leaking contaminated water. a level three situation, that is a serious incident. officials in china say they are shocked by today's announcement, which comes two years after a tsunami and earthquake damaged the fukushima nuclear disaster.
5:11 am
an evidence tampering of a former massachusetts chemist. annie faces 27 counts including obstruction of justice, mishandling drug evidence and lying about holding a master's degree. she has been released on $10,000 bail. accused of altering drug evidence while she was a state chemist from 2003 to 2012. want to show you some really exceptional talent. check out this young fellow. he plays baseball with just one leg. this video has been going around for a while, but it is going viral, currently. he was born with a cancerous tumor on his left leg and had to be amputated after he turned 1. that has not stopped him. he is, in fact, using his experience to infire others. he has his own motivatal website where he shows people that anything can be done and he's proof. he's living proof.
5:12 am
espn did a series on him on their dotcom page and they find an old folded up wheelchair in the garage and the mom said, keep it. he said, i'm never using that. >> awesome. every step he takes. >> what a kid. >> he's fast, too. >> thanks for doing that. let's get to indra petersons and find out what's going on with the weather today. >> an inch of rain and eventually the stationary front will dissipate. the new story is rather going to be right around the great lakes. watching a new front that could produce severe weather from michigan stretching down through iowa and big portions of wisconsin today looking for heavier thunderstorms and strong winds and maybe large hail out of that. beach day, as this makes its way farther to the east and eventually into the mid-atlantic, talking about not only more storms and rain, but on everyone's mind the temperature change. beautif
5:13 am
beautiful weather. a lot of 8 os will shift to the 70s. the warm tempertures are returning. look at this right as we set up for the weekend. pittsburgh looking 71 and new york 80s but eventually seeing some 70s as we go through the weekend. so, good news there. unfortunately, still way too much heat on the west coast. in fact, we do have red flag warnings, unfortunately, where we're continuing to fight all the wildfires. one of the big concerns, we're looking at showers moving into the area. you think rain, that's a good thing. it means dry winds and lightning threats out there. remember, if you have burn areas, a lot of rain in a short period of time and too much rain could be a bad thing. >> too much of any of it. >> exactly. >> thanks so much, indra. take a break on "new day" you heard about the near tragedy in georgia turning the focus on gun violence in our schools. when are we going to learn that lesson? what is the lesson? should we have more gun control? should we focus on the issues that surround these shooters?
5:14 am
what are the best options for us? we'll debate it when we come back. deputies shot at this man 15 times hitting him twice. he survived. he's now telling us what happened. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years -
5:15 am
making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. with diabetes, it's tough to keep life balanced. i don't always have time to eat like i should. and the more i focus on everything else, the less time i have to take care of me. that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes. glucerna products help me keep everything balanced. [ golf clubs clanking ] [ husband ] i'm good! well, almost everything. [ male announcer ] glucerna. delicious shakes and bars. helping people with diabetes find balance.
5:16 am
5:17 am
welcome back to "new day." the gunman at a georgia elementary school puts the issue of gun violence in our schools in sharp focus. allow some steechers, security guards and other staff to carry firearms. is that the answer? would it make it worse? should we be doing different things? are we missing the point altogether? let's discuss. host of ben ferguson show, guess what his name is, ben ferguson.
5:18 am
and kim russell. thank you to both of you for joining us. ben, let's start with you. >> morning. >> guns in the school. is that the answer? if so, why and how would you do it? >> well, i think it is the answer and the reason why is yesterday is yet, again, another example of proof that gun-free zones as much as we wanted them to work when we passed that legislation all over the country, it doesn't work as soon as one person decides to break that rule. and yesterday gun control wouldn't have fixed the issue because you had a convicted felon who was not allowed to buy guns who had multiple guns. when you have that combination of law brakers, you have to have a line of defense to protect kids. when they dialed 911 yesterday they wanted a guy to show up with a gun. communities have to look at this and decide what is best for their community whether it is hiring armed guards or putting resource officers in the
5:19 am
schools. but yesterday's school was one of those classic schools that had a phenomenal security system. they were supposed to buzz you in. you're supposed to show an i.d. and be stuck between two sets of doors and all of that failed and that's where you've got an issue. >> you say, but it's putting the focus in the wrong place because? >> because guns are not the answer. more guns simply leads to more gun death. having armed guards in school will create a less safe environment for our children. those guns are far more likely to be used in homicide, suicide or accidental shooting than they are actually protecting students. >> so, to go to ben, ben just said how. that is the question, right? in these situations we see that if there had been someone there with a weapon who knew how to use it to defend these kids, things may have been different. why isn't that enough? >> we could speculate how things could have been different at new town and we'll never know. what we do know is having a gun for protection is far less likely to be used for protection
5:20 am
than it is at risk of being used by an accidental shooter or, you know, in homicide. and, also, there was an armed guard at columbine. those shooters still managed to skill kill 15 people and then themselves. >> generally not the case. ben, pick up the point? >> in a perfect world no guns would make everything great. we have no guns in that perfect world on every campus in this country. elementary, high school, we have a no-gun, a gun-free zone. and to imply after we see these shootings happen and these people that have free reign on all these children to imply that somehow we're going to stick with that idea, it's a failure. we continue to see it be a failure and it's like i said earlier, when they dial 911 from these gun-free zones, they're begging for somebody show up with a gun to stop the mad man. this guy was a convicted felon and a security system at the
5:21 am
school, that didn't work. he wasn't supposed to own a gun, that didn't work. the police showed up and that's what they want when there is a bad guy with a gun. to put kids' lives at risk over the policy that i feel unsafe with more guns around is unrealistic and we keep seeing kids shot and killed each time we have a gun-free zone. >> i believe there is a reason we're putting too much emphasis on guns. most of them were shot down, no pun intended. you're aware of that. more gun control. there was so much outcry after newtown, i was there, we all know the pain. it didn't amount to about anything. in states where it did, there was a voter backlash. what does that tell us about guns? maybe we're putting too much emphasis on it. the shooter was arrested before for making terroristic threats. he is still out on the streets
5:22 am
and still able to get weapons. something being wrong with the mental health of the people involved. no laws, no early intervention and no money spent there. should we focus on that first and leave the guns where they are for now. >> i don't think we can forget about the guns for a second. first, we need to have our streets safer and we need stronger gun legislation. >> you can always find a gun the way america is today. you will never get rid of all the guns. >> we'll never get rid of all the guns. if we enact stronger gun legislations and gun trafficking penalties and we can greatly reduce the amount of guns where felons who get them shouldn't get them. >> all right, let's say we can get the number down. ben, address it to this. i want to leave the guns sideways for a second, here's why. the frustration that in every one of these cases it's someone who is deranged or stabilized and they didn't take their treatment or follow up or allowed to stay in their system
5:23 am
anyway. why not more attention on that, ben? where is the answer for that? >> we should. we absolutely should. i'm a prime example of that. i had a gun put to my head and shot by someone when that had been declared that he was mentally insane, mentally incompetent and had been in and out of the legal system five times before he shot at me. luckily i survived that shooting and was able to protect myself. he should have never been out on the streets. he was a convicted felon and wasn't supposed to own a gun, he got one. the mental health side of things, even when we went to trial. they brought someone up to declare that he was mentally competent to stand trial. a huge gap there with mental health. at the same time, if we have a gap there and we know that there are mental issues that are not being dealt with, we still have a duty, i believe, to protect children in schools and that is not to think that because we
5:24 am
post a sign up that says, gun-free zone, that that is going to protect children. i would ask the guest this question. what gun law would she have passed that would have stopped the guy yesterday from getting a gun because he broke probably more than 53 gun laws yesterday based on him being a felon. so, what other law would have stopped him from getting that gun? i don't think there is a law that she can pass that will fix that problem. >> you asked the right question, let's get the answer. >> i would like to point out that yesterday's event was handled incredibly well by the dekalb county police and there were no injuries. the police were notified and they arrived. >> is there a law that if it were passed this would never happen this way again? >> we would not be able to prevent gun violence. simply too many guns in this country. we need to responsibly regulate the ones that are here. if more guns in more places were the answer, then we would not have a problem. our country has more guns per capital tuthan any other country
5:25 am
in the world and yet we have a murder gun rate 15 times higher than any other developed nation. this is not a solution. our schools are places of nurturing and learning. we do not want to arm our staff to, you know, be responsible for these guns. >> well, look, first of all -- >> teachers, the two main teaching unions in this country -- >> are against it. >> do not want guns. >> a lot of reasons for that. here's what i know, mr. ferguson, ms. russell, you did well laying out the issues. i appreciate it. kate, i send it over to you. people have to remember, guns have a lot of power in this country, so they get a lot of attention. in every one of the school shootings the people involved that had a mental health issue that was ignored. kate? >> thanks, chris. coming up next roy middleton was shot 15 times in his own driveway by deputies and he survived and he's now talking. his side of what happened.
5:26 am
also ahead, facebook founder mark zuckerberg talking about his next big venture. connecting the whole world to the web. an exclusive interview and we'll have that for you. first, cnn's legendary show "crossfire" returns september 16th. and as we lead up to the premiere, here's a look back at one of its most memorable moments. >> the new "crossfire" is going to bring a lot of new things to television and also bring some that have been on a long time. i will share with you 21 years ago a topic that we're going to be talking about for the next few years, maybe for the next decade. hillary clinton. if hillary clinton has a public life, if she is a professional woman who gave up baking cookies who has a full-time profession and goes to thei luncheon to praise anita hill and on the legal services board as a full professional, i would assume she
5:27 am
would want to be in the fray. president bush is talking about the wife as a wife. a distinction that every professional women in the united states has to make in terms of how they're dealt with. #%tia[ ♪
5:28 am
[ male announcer ] a family that vacations together, sunscreens together. find a hilton everywhere you want to go with rates as low as $109 per night. book now at hilton.com/getaway.
5:29 am
5:30 am
welcome back to "new day." i'm chris cuomo. >> i'm kate bolduan. we're here with news anchor michaela pereira. a man is speaking out to cnn
5:31 am
about that terrifying night. not easy to get mr. mark zuckerberg to sit for an interview. the facebook chief is talking about his major new project in an exclusive broadcast interview that we'll tell you about. but, first, let's get to michaela to get the five things you need for your new day. >> accusing the regime of attacking them with chemical weapons. the syrian government for its part denies those accusations. tragedy averted at a decatur, georgia, elementary school. a gunman barricaded himself inside with ak-47. police officers were able to take him in without anyone getting hurt. bradley manning learning his fate today for the largest leak of classified information in american history. a judge will announce his sentence this morning. private manning faces up to 90 years in prison. a florida hearing in the perjury case involving george zimmerman's wife, shellie.
5:32 am
she is accused of lying about their finances. at number five mike tyson back in the boxing ring. prefight press conference today for the first championship bout sponsored by iron mike productions. always updating the five things to know, be sure to go to cnnnewday.com for the very latest. now to our "new day" broadcast exclusive. getting everyone online. remember who is saying they want to achieve it. ma ma mark zuckerberg, not even 30 years old and he changed the world once. here's his plan to do it all over again. when you visit the facebook campus you get the sense that anything is possible. >> we want the campus to feel like a little, like a little city or village. >> reporter: now zuckerberg wants to make the entire world like the facebook campus, in a way. by providing internet access to the entire world.
5:33 am
the idea is called internet.org. its target, the 5 billion people around the globe without access to the net. >> here we use things like facebook to share news and catch up with our friends, but, there, they're going to use it to decide what kind of government they want. get access to health care for the first time ever. connect with family hundreds of miles away that they haven't seen in decades. getting access to the internet is a really big deal. i think we're going to be able to do it. >> the key word is we because this isn't just about facebook. zuckerberg has done something extraordinary to achieve the extraordinary. reach out to the biggest to work together. how did those calls go? >> probably varies. but, i mean, in general, these are companies that we have deep relationships with and have worked with on a lot of things for a long time. so, this kind of came out of all
5:34 am
the discussions we had. >> reporter: a team of the best in the business is coming together. for a task this size uniting five times the global presence facebook has already is going to take a lot more. what about the how? how do you do this? how developed is the plan? >> you know, we have a plan, a rough plan for what we think we're going to need to do to pull it off and, of course, the plan will evolve over time and we'll get better ideas. but, you know, if you look at the trends, i mean, data is becoming more available to people. apps are more efficient to run and more business models to help more people get online. >> also good for facebook and these other companies because mobile access to the internet is where your business lies, right? >> if we were just focused on making money, the first billion people that we connected have way more money than the rest of the next 6 billion combined. it's not fair, but it's the way that it is. we just believe that every one deserves to be connected and on
5:35 am
the internet. we're putting a lot of effort towards this. >> a lot of people see you as the comeback kid. forget about the kid part, it is just a phrase. you took some lumps and found a way to come back. are you aware of that? do you feel that in yourself that some people thought it wasn't going to happen. that you had your run but look at me now. do you get a sense of that? >> we always just focused on building something great over the long term. everyone at facebook, i tell them, come in and try to make the biggest impact that you can have and if we keep building a service that people love and that more and more people use every day, which we seem to be doing pretty well at, then we're going to be fine over time and that's our focus in terms of building the company. >> hard to do, though, when you hit the bumps in the road, though. it's a great message when everything is -- >> especially important when you hit the bumps. >> when not trying to connect the world to internet, you have to run one of the biggest companies. when you want a distraction from
5:36 am
that, you decided to take on the easy task of immigration policy in the united states. why are you wading into those waters? >> when we were first talking about doing this, a lot of people were worried that it was going to be a problem for facebook, right. and i decided that i think this is too important of an issue for the country. 11 million undocumented people who came here to work hard and to contribute to the country. and, you know, i don't think it's quite as polarized as people always say. >> what would be your advice to the people in d.c. trying to balance these two almost diametically opposed positions. immigration policy is what you're talking about. the other one is, let's find a way to get them out. if you had to enter that, this is your new team and you have to make these democrats and republicans come together, what advice do you think you'll have that's not going on down there now? >> i can't really tell anyone how to legislate.
5:37 am
everyone understands the stuff way better than i do. so, you know, my goal in this is to just try to help support folks who care deeply about getting this done on both sides and hopefully we can make a difference. >> in terms of the politics of it, you think it's just important enough where you're going to do it anyway. >> i think there are some things in life that if you believe it is such a big problem, you just stick your neck out and try to do it. a lot of people think it's going to be really challenging to connect 5 million people, too. it is. i think it's one of the biggest problems of my generation to get everyone in the world to have internet access. similarly, you know, 11 million undocumented people, that's a lot of people whose lives we can improve and make the country stronger. >> good luck with everything. you're not even 30 yet. you're doing great. good luck with everything. >> great interview. you covered a lot. >> gave us a hoodie. i'm looking for ideas. >> tweet him right now.
5:38 am
it's crumpled up like your dirty laundry. >> that's his look. but i already, you know, i can't pull it off. i don't have enough talent. >> on more serious topics other than the hoodie. did you get a sense from him on how long he thinks it will pull it off? >> this is what has to happened and the goal should not be frustrated by the difficulty in achieving it. >> asking a lot. >> we were talking before, he's so -- >> he's intense. he's focused. this matters to him. he was not there to goof around or talk about himself. he's this is what i want to do and this is why i'm doing it because i don't want to do interviews for no reason. look, he has the leverage and he uses it when it's important for him and that's the way he should. >> great interview. >> thanks for giving it to us. >> absolutely. coming up next on "new day" deputies firing 15 rounds at a man in his own driveway. he's recovering and talking to
5:39 am
cnn. his angry message to law enforcement ahead. also, when it comes to the creamy center of an oreo, how does the cookie crumble? we tested the cream i know, why did we do that? we will give you the results. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ hooking up the country helping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪ see, i knew testosterone could affect sex drive, but not energy or even my mood. that's when i talked with my doctor.
5:40 am
he gave me some blood tests... showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% testosterone gel. the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breast-feeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical conditions and medications, especially insulin, corticosteroids, or medicines to decrease blood clotting. in a clinical study, over 80% of treated men had their t levels restored to normal. talk to your doctor about all your symptoms.
5:41 am
get the blood tests. change your number. turn it up. androgel 1.62%. get the blood tests. change your number. turn it up. what areow! that hurt!k there? no, no, no, no. you can't go to school like this, c'mon. don't do it! no! (mom vo) you never know what life's gonna throw at you. if i gotta wear clothes, you gotta wear clothes. (mom vo) that's why i got a subaru. i just pulled up. he did what now? no he's never done that before! oh really? i might have some clothes in the car.
5:42 am
(announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
5:43 am
welcome back, everybody. a florida man shot by police in his own driveway last month. well, now, he's speaking out for the first time since leaving the hospital. his name is roy middleton and he says he's plagued by nightmares of the incident when police fired 15 rounds at him, in his own driveway, i repeat, shattering his left leg. cnn's nick vulenalencia is ther with the latest. >> how do you feel about what happened to you? >> how do i feel about what happened? how would anybody feel getting shot. >> reporter: still visibly in pain and haunted by the night he was shot at 15 times by sheriff deputies nearly a month ago. it all happened when a neighbor called 911 after spotting roy middleton rummaging through a
5:44 am
car in his own driveway. he was mistaken for a car thief when confronted by police. they said you made a lunging motion. >> why would i run at someone halfway down my driveway. i was getting ready to raise my hands and i got shot doing that. >> reporter: the county sheriff has, all along, defended the actions of his officers who remain on paid, administrative leave. the point to making the comment about the lunging was his jerky movements that he was making. and, again, a failure to follow the deputy instructions. >> reporter: shot in his own driveway outside his own car while holding his car keys. he says his leg is now shattered held together by metal rods. middleton said the whole thing happened in about 30 seconds. >> ran my address and license plate or something. so, you know, before somebody is
5:45 am
a suspect in your own yard. suspecting of what? >> reporter: police disagree. >> mr. middleton was a suspect for the scenario up until such time that he was identified. he was a suspect in an attempted car theft. i have an eyewitness that stated that that called into my folks and that's what they respawned to. >> reporter: he couldn't have done anything differently to change the outcome. were you sober that night? >> i had a couple beers around 2:00. >> reporter: he was handcuffed by deputies while he thought he was dying. do you ask yourself why, why did this happen to me? >> why they shot me, first. then why shoot so many times afterwards. yeah, i ask why. that's all i can ask why. >> reporter: do you get any answers? >> not yet. >> reporter: nick valencia, cnn, pensacola, florida. >> a whole lot of questions surrounding that and the state now investigating. >> that's the good news. let's move now to the human
5:46 am
factor. epipens can be life savers for allergy sufferers but very cumbersome to carry around. twins came up with a new design. >> as long as they can remember, they had allergies. the official diagnosis came up when they were 3. >> all egg products, all seafood including shell fish and fish and tree nuts and peanuts and seasonal allergies. >> reporter: for them school was a huge challenge. >> we were those guys that had to be placed at a special table at lunch to try to ensure that there was no potential for contamination. >> reporter: with the near constant threat of a severe life-threatening allergic reaction, the twins had to have epipens at all times. a pen-like device that injects a dose of epinephrine to help
5:47 am
serious breathing problems. but they both thought they were too bulky and often didn't carry them. both had three close calls. when they left high school, they decided to invent a smaller, more portable device. after college, they started their company, inteligect. an autoinjector that is about the size of a credit card and it's the first to talk you through an injection. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn reporting. >> our thanks to sanjay. >> get your hands -- next up on "new day" break out the milk. >> there's only one f in stuff. >> i won't let you eat them because we need them for the segment coming up. you all can eat a lot of oreos. i watched you. >> why are we talking about oreos? because, apparently, there is some controversy about how much
5:48 am
stuffing is in the double stuff. >> eating the oreo that dean just touched. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good around ♪ ♪ turn around barry ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ ♪
5:49 am
♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ this man is about to be the millionth customer. would you mind if i go ahead of you? instead we had someone go ahead of him and win fifty thousand dollars. congratulations you are our one millionth customer. nobody likes to miss out. that's why ally treats all their customers the same. whether you're the first or the millionth. if your bank doesn't think you're special anymore,
5:50 am
you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally.
5:51 am
i wasn't happy about it. in a few moments wool break down an oreo expose. >> i couldn't understand you with the cookies in your mouth. >> sorry. >> better company to make our commitments and we made a big commitment to america. bp supports 250,000 jobs here. through all our energy operations we invest more in the
5:52 am
u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we invested over $55 billion in the last five years. making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >> here we are. i have a question for you this morning, friends. how do you like your oreos? i, myself, am an oreo purest. original only because i don't like double stuff because i don't actually care for the icing. i can do without it, frankly, chris and kate. that debate aside, grab your milk and get ready for some cookie crumbling breaking news. >> cream cookie. >> twist them, dunk them, lick them. swallow them whole. no matter how you eat your oreos, one thing most oreo lovers can agree on. the cream is the best part. but there's a new twist. that beloved cream is in the center of scandal.
5:53 am
are double stuff oreos really all they're stuffed up to be? a high school math class in upstate new york find out how much stuff is actually in double stuf oreos. >> most of them had practice and separating the oreo in half and getting a clean side bet gutting two clean sides and just leaving the stuf was difficult. >> reporter: the original and double stuf oreos and provided to a mathematical equation. according to the cookie calculations, the double stuf was only 1.86 times the size of regular oreos. >> i think the class as a whole was surprised it wasn't double. >> reporter: not a first time a food favorite has not come under fire for not measuring up. a subway commercial went viral showing that his foot long only
5:54 am
measured 11 inches. the best-selling cookie since 1912 likely to outlast the latest controversy showing, once again, the cream rises to the top. before we get to the amount of cookies that mr. cuomo has managed to indulge in in the last ten seconds alone. an oreo spokesman said while i'm not familiar with what was done in the classroom setting, i can confirm that the recipe for the oreo double stuf has double the stuf or creme filling when compared with our base, or original oreo cookie. now, can we get to the amount of cookies that have been consumed on this set? >> i don't understand why it bothers you so much. >> i needed them for the segment, that was just one technical issue, but i'm also concerned for your gut. how many did you just eat? >> i have portion control issues. >> do you? >> did you not listen to the
5:55 am
doctor. >> no fad diet has worked effectively. can we talk about the amazing stuff. >> as parents we're supposed to be our kids' heroes. for one mom in oregon, it is the other way around. she has two little girls and also has asthma and during a recent hike she left her inhaler at home, proved to be nearly fatal mistake as she went into respiratory distress. she got one word out to her 5 and 7 year old girls. run, run they did. two miles over the rough oregon countryside. >> having to go down rocks and trying not to fall over the cliff. >> we went super quick on the rocks and i didn't fall there. >> 5 and 7. remember that. well, they made it back to civilization. once they got there, they were able to tell rescuers exactly where to go. their mom was saved.
5:56 am
>> it just blows me away that my two girls saved my life. if it wasn't for them, i wouldn't be here today. >> 5 and 7 year olds usually struggle to put a cookie directly into their mouths. these kids made it two miles, alerted rescuers, led them back, saved their mother. >> that is incredible. >> you talk about the ratio of stuff to good stuff, i mean, they are like 70 million times what is in the ordinary person. thank you so much. does that earn me some cookies? earns you girls cookies. thank you for showing us how great we can be, even when we are young. 5 and 7 years of age. you have the good stuff, young ladies. thanks for saving your mom. >> have another cookie. bly anyone else. we've had this farm for 30 years. we raise black and red angus cattle. we also produce natural gas. that's how we make our living
5:57 am
and that's how we can pass the land and water back to future generations. people should make up their own mind what's best for them. all i can say is it has worked well for us.
5:58 am
[ male announcer ] a family that vacations together, sunscreens together. find a hilton everywhere you want to go with rates as low as $109 per night. book now at hilton.com/getaway.
5:59 am
6:00 am
according when kate dips her cookie, she has her pinky out. >> i just get very excited. thank you for watching "new day." thanks for watching us eat cookies. carol costello -- >> please tell me you have my back, carol. >> i love carol costello. >> i love you right back. have a great day, guys. "newsroom" starts now. happening now in "newsroom" a shooting just because. >> one man, he has blood on him. a 23-year-old australian baseball player gunned down. >> he's not conscious. >> now, a warning from his home country, stay away from the united states. >> think twice. on map

229 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on