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tv   New Day Sunday  CNN  September 15, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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i don't know that i'm any smarter about that now than when i first came to k-town in the middle of the night to discover a strange and fabulous and delicious slice of america i had never known was there, but i'm trying to figure it out. this framework can provide greater security to the world. >> a deal has been reached, but will the syrians comply? the clock is ticking on the hand over. the great 24 hours, the greatest number of americans rescued by helicopter since hurricane katrina. >> hundreds rescued from the colorado rainfall, but hundreds
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missing and a threat of new storms. prince william sits down for a primetime special tonight. wake up, we're waiting for you here on a sunday morning. so glad to have you company, i am christi paul. >> i am victor blackwell. it's "new day sunday." and then syria faces its first deadline to turn over the inventory of the chemical weapons at the end of this week now. >> the plan announced by the united states and russia 24 hours ago will take months, probably years to complete, but for now the agreement takes the immediate threat of u.s. air strikes off the table, at least for now. >> at least for now, yeah, good point. we are covering the deal, and reaction to it, our phil black is in moscow, and nic robertson is in beirut.
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>> and then start with tel aviv, where kerry is. >> what is his focus in israel now? >> well, he is building confidence in the deal now. he will be meeting with netanyahu in jerusalem as we speak, and the only way jerusalem is confident, and then he will go on to saudi, and this is about building confidence in the deal and letting our allies know this is something they can count on and letting them know how the u.s. and how russia are going to make sure that syria follows through on its promises on that very ambitious timeline you described. >> paris is up next on the
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secretary's itinerary. what are the authorities in france saying about this deal? they have been the most supportive of a military strike. >> reporter: no question, and good question, and they were the first, of course, and the british were initially going to be onboard and they could not get the support in their parliament, and the initial reactions was it's a good deal and positive step forward, and that's how the french prime minister described it, and you have a plan, by november a complete cataloguing and inspecting of syria's chemical weapon sites, and the destruction of the tprau sifaci and the timeline has multiple goal posts and it gives the syrians multiple opportunities to be late, and next friday will
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be the first step of how well they are going to keep with their word. thank you. we are going to jump to moscow and bill black. any word under this syria chemical weapons deal from russian president, vladimir putin? >> reporter: a great deal of responsibility falls on his shoulders, because he has committed so publicly to the deal, and russia believes its prestige and authority is to a considerable degree at stake. and so it falls on russia and president putin to insure that syria complies with the agreement. >> all right, cnn's phil black in moscow.
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thank you. >> let's go to beirut where we have nic robertson. what is the response in the deal from the assssad regime and the opposition? >> reporter: well said the talks were a good starting point. they have not made any further comment on meeting the deadline on friday and handing over the inventory of what chemical weapons they have and the indications are they would do it, so nothing negative now and the opposition saying they don't trust assad, and this is like taking the tolls away with a criminal without punishing the criminal, assad in this case, and they want him held
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accountable for the 100,000 deaths. and they say the united states has been informed by the syrians over the proceeding months here about the locations of at least some of the weapons. >> i am wondering if you can speak to something else we are hearing. a u.n. report today is alleging that syrian regime is attacking hospitals and using those hospitals to torture people. do you know anything about that, nic? >> there are certainly a lot of cases over the past couple years where the regime has targeted hospitals and clinics, and i have seen where clinics had to move, and the clinic was in the basement of a tall building and yet the regime was able to drop a bomb specifically on that one building and collapse it, and that was the medical clinic for
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the rebels in that area, and this has been completed across the country. what the regime had to do by arresting doctors working with the rebels by trying to cut off medical supplies is really undermining the rebels' ability to fight in the battlefield if they cannot get good, quick and safe medical care, and it makes it hard to treat injuries and fight from the battle front. >> nic robertson there in beirut there, and thank you. we will continue to follow the situation there in syria. colorado, we think it cannot be worse and it can. this is from denver to boulder to ft. collins, and now the same
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areas getting four more inches of rain this afternoon. >> officials also say another person, a 60-year-old woman is presumed dead and more than 500 people unaccounted for. authorities say they think a lot of them just don't have phone service, they are okay they hope but can't get in contact with anybody. but the sheriff in boulder county is bracing for the worst. >> we are assuming that there may be further loss of life or injuries. we have to assume that. i hope and pray that's not the case, but given the devastation of some of those closed canyons, it's certainly a phigh probability. >> you know the raging water is wracking up a huge price tag.
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and president obama did sign a major disaster area, so they could get federal aid for recovery, and in boulder alone they will need $150 million to repair scores of washed out roads and bridges. >> nick, we are seeing the newer pictures from the last 24 hours of all the destruction and damage there. what is the scene there this morning? has it gotten worst where you are? >> reporter: a couple days ago, if can you imagine, this was a nice residential street. the water -- this is the road right here. this is an extreme example yes, but nonetheless what people are dealing with in the hardest hit areas. days of intense rain left swollen creeks and flooded roads and damaged bridges in a state of colorado, and dealing with the weather in the aftermath is proving to be difficult and dangerous. in aurora, water and hail
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stopped raoeufrz. >> most people were able to walk out, but for many others in the area, the only way out by helicopters. hundreds have been picked up. >> i think what we have going on here in the last 24 hours, is the greatest number of americans rescued by helicopter since hurricane katrina. >> many of those are tkrrapped towns. >> the colorado governor saw the damage from the air. their tour turned into another rescue mission. >> who designed this skit. but i think most importantly they were just glad to be out of there. >> this morning, it is still a desperate area to get people out
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of the inaccessible areas. search and rescue resumes, but it will be difficult. >> the problem with this event is that it's affected every drainage and road in the county that goes west, and so you know, it's a sinking feeling when you realize that if somebody above or if somebody in the peak to peak area calls 911, we are not going to be able to help them. >> reporter: this trench it goes deeper and wider the further you get back in the neighborhood and this is a terrible situation for the residents here, the top priority is to reach those stranded in the hard-to-reach areas. >> hope they get to all of them. thank you so much. we appreciate it. with all the trouble there in colorado, the storms are pounding new mexico. new this morning, a flash flood warning in effect in
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albuquerque. the central and eastern parts of the state got six months worth of rain in one week, and it has caused severe flooding. the man whose car had california plates has not yet been identified. the last photo had the water up to the window on that car. >> oh, my good this is. in the tropics, we have not talked about hurricane ingrid yet. >> let's bring in alexandra stee steele. >> yeah, a big expectation that was supposed to be a robust year, but not over yet. the peak of hurricane season was tuesday. second hurricane of the season in the atlantic, and it's ingrid. and this is the gulf of mexico here and this is mexico and texas to the north.
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85-mile-per-hour sustained winds and gusts at 105. it's really an aggressive system that has its act together. it's expected to make landfall in the mexican coast as a category 2, and then moving west. it will impact the u.s. one thing we will see from brownsville south of tampico, but north of that, down to south padre island and brownsville, a lot of people off and the rain and flooding because it has been so dry there, an inch of rain an hour runoff in flash flooding, so a flash flooding story here as well as out west, guys. >> thank you. still ahead on "new day,"
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she's back, paula deen. former vice presidential candidate, she's back, sarah palin, but she is being sued, and we'll give you the details. you really love, what would you do?" ♪ [ woman ] i'd be a writer. [ man ] i'd be a baker. [ woman ] i wanna be a pie maker. [ man ] i wanna be a pilot. [ woman ] i'd be an architect. what if i told you someone could pay you and what if that person were you? ♪ when you think about it, isn't that what retirement should be, paying ourselves to do what we love? ♪ ugh! actually progresso's soup has pretty bold flavor. i love bold flavors! i'd love it if you'd open the chute!
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16 minutes past the hour. is paula deen making a comeback. she made her first appearance yesterday, and standing ovation from 1500 foodies brought her to tears. she lost her popular show on the food network, and the scandal that erupted over her past use of the "n" word. according to the north jersey media group, sarah palin used this photo without permission. she is accused of posting it on her facebook page and the website for her political action
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committee. cnn reached out for a comment and are waiting to hear back. well, a wild night for new york police. investigators say they fired off their weapon when an erratic man made a move with his hands, and instead of shooting him, they shot two bystanders. the man they were after is now in custody. sleeping in her bed until trial. >> jordan graham pushed her husband to his death. >> friends and family want to know how young love turned tragic. and we visited the park where the couple spent their last moments together. >> reporter: i am walking along
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the loop trail here, and many wondering how could such an immense tragedy take place in the cathedral to mother nature's wonder, and it was here along the trail that jordon graham said she was hiking with her husband, and they stopped near a stump and rocks, and at one point she said in a court affidavit she pushed him in the back with both hands and she backed away from that with her lawyer in court. they will say she was a church goer and a nanny, and his friends and family, saying how in the world could she not call the authorities when he fell around here? how could she not call paramedics or the park rangers? one quote, in an affidavit she told a park ranger this is a
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place that he would want to go before he died. back to you. >> obviously we'll keep you informed as that trial draws closer, and thank you, paul, for the story. the big question to come, did he do it? >> mayweather undefeated last night. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it.
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the game of the year in college football lived up to its hype all over twitter, and i was getting every second of the game from all my friends. >> weren't you sitting in front of the tv watching it? >> no.
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>> and texas a&m shows no quit. joe carter has this report. >> a game of streaks and surges, and alabama settled in and took back the lead by scoring 35 unanswered points, and johnny manziel, 98 yards rushing and texas a&m cut the lead to seven here and then alabama chewed up the clock late in the fourth quarter with a long touchdown drive that ended with this pass, and alabama would go on to win 49-42 the final. bragging rights in the manning household. two biggest names that happened to be brothers. payton had a series of neck surgeries a couple years ago and there were doubts if he would
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ever play again, and then fight night in vegas, and for the 45th time in a row, floyd "moneymaker" mayweather, and one of the judges actually scored this fight as a draw. mayweather made more than $73 million in his last two fights, and finally, a great story tonight on, and the former rutge rutger's football player, he had his jersey retired and he was given a sword with the number 52 on it, and the word "believe," and he wants to walk again and stand up on the field where he was paralyzed.
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>> he deserves the honor. joe carter, thank you. summer might be almost over, almost, but it's expected to heat up on capitol hill. will lawmakers find some common ground and avoid a government shutdown? plus a long long treasure gone for decades. how one man's discovery took him on an unforgettable journey. outdoors, or in. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it is meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. experience life well lit, ask for transitions adaptive lenses. about yoplait's fall favorites. so we brought pumpkin pie and apple crisp
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half past the hour right now. so glad to see you on a sunday morning. i am christi paul. >> i am victor blackwell. first up, check out this time lapse video, just how quickly the floodwaters rose yesterday in ft. morgan, colorado. you see the traffic and then the water starts moving. rescue efforts still underway right now across the northern part of the state, and as much as four more inches of rain are predicted today. this was the scene yesterday in aurora, colorado. that's hail floating on top of the standing water. number two, destructive
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storms on both sides of mexico, too, left five people dead. tropical storm manuel in the pacific, and ingrid here in the gulf. it's expected to make landfall tomorrow. and vice president joe biden will be slapping hands at a steak fry. i could go for that. >> right now at 6:30 in the morning? >> yeah. anytime. >> he is drawing potential candidates. the powerball jackpot in the neighborhood of 400 million bucks come wednesday. nobody got the winning numbers obviously, and so i will not bother to look at my ticketed.
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it was five weeks ago that seven new jersey workers split the jackpot, so get with your co-workers. and then the miss america pageant tonight, and all eyes on mrs. kansas that serves in the army national guard, and she is to be the first contestant to show off her ink. >> it's the serenity prayer, by the way, is why it's so big. a lot to say. let's get you back to the crisis in syria right now. the clock is ticking for bashar al assad. the regime has one week to hand over a list of the chemical weapons. >> and that came after the u.s. and russia reached a ground-breaking deal on a
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framework to destroy syria's chemical arsenal. >> secretary of state john kerry says inspectors have to be on the ground no later than november, and all chemical weapons have to be destroyed by the middle of 2014. >> president obama issued a statement saying if diplomacy fails the u.s. stands ready to act in syria. >> and congress was hard at work debating pretty big-ticket issues. >> yeah, to the threat of a possible government shutdown, it has been a juggling act for lawmakers on capitol hill. >> and yeah, the debates are expected to heat up. joe johns tells us what we can expect. good morning, joe. >> we have seen this movie before is how one senator put it, and not too long ago. congress is tied up in knots over federal spending, and obama care and the day of reckoning is
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near 37. in "groundhog day," weather man bill murray lives the same day over and over, and capitol hill is starting to look like that as congress heads to what could be another train wreck over the debt ceiling and spending and obama care. check out the calendar. september 30th, the end of the fiscal year, congress has to pass a money bill to keep the government operating or it will shut down. >> this is nasty. it has ten tau kuls that will affect many. >> republicans who despise obama care sees that as a way to cut it off. >> we will do everything we can
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to defund obama care. >> and jack lou says the government will run out of money to pay its bills unless congress races the debt ceiling, and the president says he won't negotiate. >> it's remarkable the events we are seeing here is almost unimaginable. >> we asked the senior political analyst about the political witching hour. how bad is this? >> we are facing an extraordinary few weeks in term ale and crisis at the worst, where nobody has a way to navigate through the shutdown and debt. we are facing the same issues that divided president obama and the republican house since january of 2011, coming back again in this circular loop. >> what makes this a little unusual is the fact that democrats control the senate and the white house making it extremely unlikely they would
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give much ground on the president's signature accomplishment. and they showed supporters back home they are not giving up on a rallying, to defund spending and de-fund obama care. early this morning president obama signed a major disaster declaration for colorado. >> help is on the way as rescue efforts continue in the flooded areas, and people there are bracing for more rain today. officials are starting to think about the long road to recovery, and katie murray has the latest. >> i thought there was a tornado. lightning was going crazy. >> reporter: it's a frightening sight in northern colorado. scary evacuations. the governor toured the flood-damaged zones and was involved in two rescues and he discussed colorado rebuilding after severe damage to the
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state's infrastructure. >> we're going to come back and we're going to rebuild better than it was before. >> emergency responders are continuing to rescue people trapped in boulder county, and other remote towns. >> i think what we have going on here in the last 24 hours is the greatest number of americans rescued by helicopter since hurricane katrina. and that's going to continue. >> reporter: this video shot by the fire department shows what first responders are up against on the ground and national guard troops are on scene to help local officials move people out of harm's way. one woman was trapped with their 1-month-old in their home with no food, water and little formula for her baby. the flooding nightmare is far from over. the state awaits more rainfall. as for residents who had to believe behind a home and
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belongings, she is thankful to be alive. >> i am glad we are here. >> rainfall is expected on sunday which will make rescue conditions more challenging. >> keeping all those folks in our thoughts today and keeping you informed of what is going on, too. lots still to come. >> 20 months after it crashed, crews trying to lift the costa concord concordia off of its side. and the world's most famous new father. coming up, prince william sits down with cnn to talk about f fatherhood. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004.
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good to have you with us. 50 years ago this morning, during the middle of a church service, a ku klux klan bomb ripped through the baptist church in birmingham, alabama, and four girls were killed. and they are remembering them with a sculpture this afternoon, and between 1977 and 2002, jurors convicted three klansmen. let's take a trip around the world right now.
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starting in switzerland, where the u.s. and russia reached a deal on syria's chemical weapons. matthew chance is there now. matthew? >> reporter: finally an agreement on syria's chemical weapons. in just a week the country must hand over the list of stockpiles and the weapons are to be removed from syria or destroyed by the middle of next year. the agreement between the u.s. and russia is a break through. >> matthew, thank you so much. we want to head to cnn's nic robertson, in beirut. hi, nic. >> reporter: the rebel commanders say they will work with the u.n., the united states and the chemical weapons teams going into syria but won't work with bashar al assad, and they
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don't trust him to hand over the chemical weapons stock pile, and there should be an enforcement of a no-fly zone, and taking the weapons away, but the crimes will still continue. >> we appreciate it. let's go to italy now, where crews are going to try and lift a wreaked cruise ship off of its side. >> reporter: after months of preparation, the costa concordia is finally ready to be lifted off of its side. 36 cables will help to hoist the ship up right, and then what makes this maneuver so risky, engineers say they have one shot to get it right or risk
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environmental disaster. and anthony bourdain is back with an all-new season tonight. you can watch tonight, 9:00 eastern pacific right here. a man dying of cancer reunited with the long lost symbol that connected him to his ma mother. of getting something "new."
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good morning. i know it's sunday, so you are looking at your calendar wondering what is ahead. we want to help you out with that. let's look at monday. all eyes on the u.n. this crucial chemicals report expected. the u.n. secretary general, ban ki-moon says syria has committed crimes against phaou man tea. the official release of the video game, grand theft auto v. and then will the interest rates stay the same or will they raise them? we will have it for you. could be a big day for the markets, of course. friday, new gadget fans
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waiting for this. apple's new iphones go on sale, so have at it on friday. next sunday, emmy night. three netflix original series are among the nominees, and that's a first for the industry, victor. >> i tried to do that there, and i am really bad at it. >> no. >> and you seem to reach back and tap it and it flips. >> the producer just got in my ear and said he really is. i will give you a tutorial. can't do much, but i can do this touch. a miracle? luck? it's about a dying man's long lost treasure. it was found against really all odds. >> reporter: this dark river in south carolina holds ancient secrets.
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a man comes here to uncover long lost treasures but he had no idea it would send him on journey. three weeks ago he found the most priceless treasure of all hidden 40 feet under water in a gravel bed. a 1974 college of charleston class ring with the initials rlp engraved on the inside. >> we figured, let's do investigating and follow the path and see where it leads us. >> and he called the school and he was told only two people in the graduating class had those initials, rlp, and one was a woman, and the other in this man in his college photo. through social networks, he found phillip's son and learned how the ring was. >> he talked about it because it came from his mother, and it's one of the stories that kind of
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was the season of his life. >> it was 1974, and the two are out on the boat and he reaches for a beer, and when he pops over the tap it gets stuck on the finger and when he tries to fling it off it goes to the bottom. he never got over losing the ring. it was the last gift his mother ever gave him and she died of cancer years later, which makes this moment all the more profound. >> you have been waiting for something for a while, huh? >> i have been. >> 39 years later, it's robert phillips who is dying of cancer now, and he doesn't have long live. >> i know it will look like i am proposing to you, so please don't tell my wife, okay. >> i promise i won't. >> here it is.
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>> oh, wow. >> that is awesome. >> tears trickle down his cheek. >> you have spent a lot of time thinking about why 39 years later this ring is back in your life? >> yeah, i have thought about that. i just -- i just thank you, lord, i got it back. >> robert phillips feels his mother had a hand in bringing back this long-long treasure, reuniting with a symbol of love when he needs it most. >> mama still is looking after you. >> i think mama is. >> that has got to make you feel something. ed, thank you for the story. >> bless his heart. victor, thank you. hollywood and hitler? sound like an unlikely pairing?
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(man vo) i may not know where the road will lead, but... i'm sure my subaru will get me there. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. vo:remember to changew that oil is the it on schedule toy car. keep your car healthy. show your car a little love with an oil change starting at $19.95. humanitarian. new father. future king. he is prince william of england. >> and max foster sat down with an exclusive interview. i asked max what surprised him most about what william had to say. >> the thing i liked about it, it was the real prince william, and he was really relaxed, and he was in his garden and dressed casually. this was william just really
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comfortable. and i was surprised he was like that all the way through, really, because he does tense up with the cameras, and he was relaxed, and you know, the interesting thing for me was when he talked about that scene outside the hospital, and me asking him was that intentional, were you trying to project a modern monarchy, and he said no, just me doing it my own way, and nothing to be read into it, and william trying as he gets older, to be himself as much as possible. >> he drove off in the car himself and put the baby seat in the car himself and that kind of thing? >> yeah, exactly. he did that because he wanted to do it himself. he doesn't like any fuss around all of those things. but the main sort of focus on the documentary, the rest of it really is about africa and what
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is surprising about africa is the role it plays in the british monarchy, because he struggles a bit with the idea of monarchy, because he is just there because he is born into it, and why does he qualify, and he doesn't really, he was just born into it, and the way he rationalizes that, he says he escapes to africa, and that's what he says in the documentary, and he can be himself and have his own sense of humor, and everybody treats him as a normal guy and lots of people don't know who he is, and if he gets a dose of that so often he can come back to the uk and be the prince. >> can't wait to watch more of it tonight. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. >> thank you, kristi. a reminder to you, you can see prince william's passion, new father, new home, 10:00 pacific, right here on cnn. >> looking forward to that. >> yeah, going to be a good one. we have more for you.
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>> live coverage of the big stories stateside and around the world in the next hour of your "new day" starts right now. >> if you are just joining us we want to wish you a happy sunday morning and thank you for sharing a little bit of your morning with us. i am christi paul. >> i am victor blackwell. we have got to start with the still fresh deal to get rid of syria and getting rid of the chemical weapons. john kerry is trying to soothe concerns there. >> and damascus is closer to jerusalem than boston to new york. so they have a tremendous stake in the destruction of the arsenal there, understandably. >> yeah, jim, what specifically is kerry telling the israelis
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today? >> reporter: addressing those concerns that you mentioned, israel borders syria and they are possibly other than assad's own people, they are the number one target for the chemical weapons, and they just had lunch, prime minister netanyahu and secretary kerry. they will talk about the timeline for the inspection and the destruction for the chemical weapons, and american officials have their own questions about it, as we have been traveling with them, and they have been saying we are going into this with a healthy dose of skepticism, and we believe we have the measures to keep the syrians honest, but it will only be certain when we see them deliver. >> kerry heads off to paris after the talks in israel. what are the french saying about this? they have been the most supportive of the military strike, possibly taking some role if it were to happen.
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>> reporter: the public comments from the french have been this has been a positive step forward, but like here in israel, secretary kerry will meet with the french foreign minister in paris, and the saudis and turks. the syrians have one week to give a full accounting of the chemical weapons, and we are six days away from that and that will be the first test to see if the syrians are keeping to the word and the russians as well, because the russians are the key enforcers, so there will be a lot of test and goal posts in the coming months to see how well the deal will work. >> less than a week to the first goal post. jim in tel aviv for us this morning, thanks. this all comes as the united nations is expected to release findings from its report on the chemical weapons in syria. they are expected to do that
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tomorrow. >> yes, nick, what do we expect to learn? >> it seems inawe know what cou be in the report, is the confirmation chemical weapons were used. many are asking is it going to dissect enough of the information about what happened, how it happened, and where the weapons were fired from around damascus, and people are able to work out from that who may have been responsible. let's hear from what was said a couple days ago. >> what happened is that he has committed many crimes against humanity, and therefore i think there will be surely the process of accountability when
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everything is over. >> what he was not saying there was assad responsible for the chemical weapons, but he was saying what would be in the report. we are also seeing the syrians now finally joining the chemical weapons convention, and that's a timeline is that more relaxed than the one between the u.s. and syria, but that is syria saying it wants to give up its chemical weapons, and in history nobody has gone back on that step, and they were totally on unprecedented turf there. >> and then heading off the military action in syria, and russia was going to be the veto vote in the security council, and the other potential veto vote was china. >> the chinese are quite
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optimistic about this, and it satisfies everybody. china's main problem with all of the military interventions is her against outsiders in the affairs of countries. they are going along with this at this point and always the less vocal. and it's more of a complex road ahead, and what a deal doesn't do is say what will happen if syria doesn't go along with the timetable fast enough and it has to be referred back to the security council, and then you face the problem that russia could veto the attempt for use of force against syria. >> thank you so much for keeping us up-to-date. moving to the disaster in colorado. because believe it or not, it could get even worst today, and i know that sounds ridiculous based on some of the things we are already seeing. take a look at some of the newest pictures we are getting in. already devastated, as can you see. as much as four more inches of
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rain could fall just by this afternoon. and an official says it could hamper on going rescue efforts which already have been exhausted. >> and another person, a 60-year-old woman is presumed dead. that would bring the death toll to five, and it's standing at four. she is presumed dead. more than 500 people still unaccounted for. rescuers already saved more than 1,700 people. >> i think what we have going on here in the last 24 hours is the greatest number of americans rescued by helicopter since hurricane katrina. >> early this morning, president obama did sign a major disaster declaration so colorado can get federal aid for recovery, and it looks like they are going to need it. our nick valencia is in north boulder. we have seen pictures and destruction, and what are you hearing from the people there in boulder?
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>> reporter: they are very anxious right now, and it gives you perspective why this picture here. just a couple days ago this was a nice and residential street, and this is the asphalt here, and the power and the force of the water that came from behind our camera straight through here, took a short pivot through this area. yesterday i shot some video that sort of gives you an extent of the damage, and it created a mote around the residential community, and some of the residents i am told were stranded and couldn't get their cars out of here, and part of the problem is the light rain comes down in boulder county, and it's visibility for the aircraft that is trying to reach the harder hit areas for those stranded today, and i talked to imagine management in boulder and they said it's a chance the aircraft won't be able to reach the stranded areas because of a lack of visibility. and yesterday during the governor of colorado's tour, he
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took a plane over the harder hit areas and his tour turn into the a rescue mission, and afterwards he spoke to the media, and he said as terrible as the communities look, the main priority is reaching the stranded people. >> once we make sure we have everybody accounted for, and everybody is safe, and clearly just as we saw, there are a lot of people that have been stranded and marooned for many days, and once we get them all accounted for we will put a full-court press on making sure we get the resources here to rebuild. >> reporter: so many dramatic scenes and images from the flood disaster, the natural disaster in the state. i want to show you a time lapse from ft. morgan. over the last 24 hours, you get a look at how fast the waters were rising in ft. morgan. this is going to be the problem without the day over the course
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of the next 12 hours, we will see one to two inches of rain here in boulder county, and as much as four inches of rain in some of the areas. the slightest bit of rain, that might not seem like that much, but the slightest bit of rain to the already saturated areas could cause a really big problem going forward. >> nick valencia, standing in the rain, as i understand it, and we appreciate it so much, nick. thanks. storms pounding new mexico, too. and check out this map. in one week the central and eastern part of the state got nearly six months worth of rain. it's caused severe flooding. you can see the pictures here. now the body of a driver swept away by raging water has been recovered and the man's who car had california plates, has not been identified. and hurricane ingrid has
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killed two people in nmexico. >> we are around peak time, right? >> yeah, it was yesterday. but what we are seeing, it was a less than robust hurricane season. second hurricane in the atlantic thus far. and so a less than robust start is fine. and here is the deal, hurricane ingrid, category one, and here it is, mexico, the gulf of mexico, and you can see pretty tightly wound and organized. it's moving northwest at 7, and the expectation to shift northwesterly, and then a 100-mile-per-hour center, a cat 2. very significant, but what we are going to see, yes, we will see strong winds, no question about it, but the biggest scenario is the scenario similar to what we are seeing in
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colorado. eastern areas where the mountains are and there's the extra lift, 25 inches is expected, and flash floods and mudslides from brownsville south but from brownsville to corpus in texas, and this area has been in drought, and an inch of hour will cause runoff and flash flooding so that's a big concern. also, guys, padre island will be impacted with strong rip currents. it's the weekend, monday, and it's a mexican holiday, independence weekend, so a lot of people and be mindful of that. >> thank you. still to come on "new day," the queen of southern cooking steps back into the spotlight. and it's a pretty emotional reunion with her fans. apple's new iphone could use one of the best passwords ever. your fingerprint. not another one like it. but is it safe from hackers and
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the government? we'll talk about that. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is jim, a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation -- an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move. jim's doctor recommended xarelto®. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce afib-related stroke risk. but xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib
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before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions such as kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is not for patients with artificial heart valves. jim changed his routine. ask your doctor about xarelto®. once a day xarelto® means no regular blood monitoring -- no known dietary restrictions. for more information and savings options, call 1-888-xarelto or visit goxarelto.com. you really love, what would you do?" ♪ [ woman ] i'd be a writer. [ man ] i'd be a baker. [ woman ] i wanna be a pie maker. [ man ] i wanna be a pilot. [ woman ] i'd be an architect. what if i told you someone could pay you and what if that person were you? ♪ when you think about it, isn't that what retirement should be, paying ourselves to do what we love? ♪
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paula deen is stepping back into the spotlight. she made her first appearance since june. after a standing ovation, deen thanked the texas foodies, and there were tears of joy. she admitted to using the "n" word in the past. when apple announced a fingerprint scanner as a security teacher, people had a lot of questions. of course you could understand that. and people wondered if it's safe from hackers. >> yeah, and if your fingerprints will be scored in a government database. >> the id censor automatically unlocks your phone, and you can use it to authorize purchases
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from our stores. >> but is it safe from identity theft? hollywood movies like national treasure make lifting prints look easy. security researchers warns it depends on how they implement the technology. >> they have thought about it. it's not going to be scored in the cloud, so there is not a giant database of lots of sensitive information, and it would be a prized target of hackers or enemy state hackers. >> he says it will be a boost to the mobile industry. >> it could open up a really huge universe of opportunities. >> the mapping opportunities are already in the making. vascular technology uses infrared light to reflect patterns of blood vessels, and iris recognition. >> the goggles go ahead and look at the iriss. >> eye mapping is said to be
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faster and more accurate. >> it's 1 in 64 billion for the fingerprint, and iris accuracy is 1 in 1 trillion. >> a lot of folks will try it. up next, shocking new claims about hollywood and hitler. i will talk with the author of a new book about how american movie moguls may have k collaborated with the nazi regime. >> what? >> yeah. affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect my family. your coughing woke me up again. i wish you'd take me to the park. i don't use my rescue inhaler a lot... depends on what you mean by a lot. coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com,
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good to have you this new day. the 1930s, it was hollywood's golden age. ♪
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the decade of clark gable, and joan, but a new book is exposing the dark side. "the collaboration" has scripts never made it to the big screen, how they edited their films including "all quiet on the western front" to maintain their hold on the german movie market. ben irwin is the author of "the collaboration." this is a fascinating book, and i have not finished it, but you are right, it gained traction during the protest in germany in 1930. how did you find the story? >> well, i had started out exploring hitler's opinions of american movies. i heard that hitler watched
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movies every night and i wanted to find out if it was true. i went to the german state archive and i looked through hitler's personal collection, and i found out he loved laurel and hardy and thought the movies contained nice ideas and jokes, and he hated tarzan, and things like this. i find a letter from 20th century fox, the german brand of 20th century fox, and the letter says would he be so kind to give his opinion of the american movies in germany, and this letter which was on the 20th century fox letter head was signed hitler. i thought this is not the story that we're aware of, and this is something that needs to be
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brought to light. >> what was the deal between the nazi regime and the studios? >> all through the 1930s, hollywood studio executives would invite the nazi german console in los angeles to the studio lot, and they would screen movies that might be offensive to germany audiences, movies about hitler's persecution of the jews, and they would ask him what he thought of certain movies, and sometimes he would tell them you cannot make the film. and the studio heads in order to keep the market for films over in germany would agree to make the cuts or cancel entire productions. >> many of the heads in the studios were jewish and had deals with the nazis to get it made. was there any evidence in all the documents you found, any evidence of inner turmoil of making the deals?
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>> the studio heads were pretty clear in their opinion on this. i will explain one story. back in 1933, one screen writer that would write "citizen cane," and he wrote it six months after hitler came to power and it predicted that hitler would kill jews. he tried to have the movie made in hollywood and he was a famous jewish screen writer, and he tried to have the movie made and the nazi german console went and said if any studio makes this movie, all of the hollywood studios would be banned in germany, and the head of mgm, the biggest movie studio at the time, he declared, as far as i am concerned this picture will never be made.
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>> what ended this pact? the par? the war? >> in 1939, warner brothers made the first anti--nazi fill thats, confessions of a nazi spy, and the business dealings between them and the nazis continued for years, and then a year after the war started, century fox reassessed their position because they lost the market for their films, not just in germany but in england and france as well, and they decided it was worth making a couple anti-nazi films and they were kicked out of the german market and that ended the collaboration. >> the book is "the collaboration." i am reading it every free moment i get. i am on a plane after this and it will be with me in that seat, an amazing read. thank you. >> thank you for having me.
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>> a quick break, and "new day" will continue after this. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] some things are designed to draw crowds. ♪ ♪ others are designed to leave them behind. ♪ the all-new 2014 lexus is. it's your move.
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stphaoefplt you know the music. it's time for the good stuff. we feature stories about the good news out there. >> we need that, don't we? a utah man owes his life here. the park worker, bart griffith stumbled upon a man when he went searching for a home run ball, and he saw the man and pulled his head out of the water and called 911. good for him. imagine if your layaway was paid off by a mystery donor? she wanted no credit and had to
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leave quickly. the donor needed to leave because she is terminally ill, and she refused to give her name, and she said she wanted to do something good before she died. >> bless her heart. back here at the top of the hour, 8:00 eastern for you. first, sanjay guptamd. >> i will introduce you to a family today whose lives may not have been that different than your own. more on that in a bit. sherry shepherd, she is going to stop by to talk about something serious for her, how to lose weight and beat diabetes, even if you don't have it. first, just a few weeks, uninsured americans are going to have a chance to sign up for coverage through the new health
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care markets but apoepb us of the law are stepping up efforts to sabotage obama care. >> let me tell you what we are doing. everything in our power to be obstructions. that's the republican, and he is georgia's insurance commissioner. he is bragging about the states' efforts to undermined obama care. >> states are wise to choose not to cooperate in any way. >> that's the president of the citizens council of health carefree dumb. she has radio ads like these. >> we have a legal right to refuse to enroll the coverage. >> they have billboards and flyers passed out on college campuses. all of it part of a campaign to convince americans, especially young atkdulaadults.
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>> if you do not sign up for them, it does not fund the cost of operating them and therefore they are more likely to fail. >> another group, freedomworks is telling people to burn mock obama draft cards. they say younger americans will pay for coverage they don't need. >> they typically don't go to the doctor as much, but they will pay for the system that will cover all americans. >> texas, florida, georgia, public officials declined to set upstate-run exchanges, opting instead to let the federal government run the exchange. and then get covered america campaign are urging the same young people to sign up. >> that's a conversation not about politics, but about the new opportunities for health insurance that meets their needs and budget, and we are seeing incredible interest in the conversations we are having across the country. >> we are going to have a
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conversation about this right now. joining me from washington is my good friend, chief national correspondent, john king. thank you for joining us, john. i want to make clear, and you have been following this, we are not vilifying people against obama care. when you hear their arguments, do they have a point? >> they say they have a point in the sense thrp is a lot of politics involved, and some of the criticism is that a lot of the critics are republicans and the president is democrat. but a lot are credible, and some think it's too much of an overreach by the federal government, and they think state by state or community by community, and they have a point and some of them are standing on what they believe a proud principle. the issue is at what point do you have to acknowledge in politics that you have lost? >> you know, john, if you look at the history of some of this, the individual mandate, for example, and i worked at the
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clinton white house in the late '90s, but before that even, the individual mandate was something that came about from right-winged organizations, they were the ones that wanted it and these are the same people rallying against it, isn't that right? >> exactly right. that's a reflection of politics change with the times and it was the heritage foundation and another conservative groups back in the day, and we see this sometimes when the nra thinks there will be major changes in gun control, and they were for background checks and now it isn't, and they say you empower the individual, and the individual was making decisions as part of the bigger process, and when politics change and they think they can beat a washington dictated health care plan, they said we are not for that anymore, and welcome to politics. >> you know this better than anybody. let's talk about the practical part of this. some members of congress said
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they will be obstructionists, as you just heard. >> it's dangerous. each member of congress has to make their own decision and they are judged by the 500,000 or so people that live in their district. if you are a safe republican, a lot of these republicans don't face much opposition or if they did what they would worry about is a primary challenge from the right, and they can talk like that, but here is the challenge. you represent your entire district. there will be people calling maybe against the health care law, and it's against the law of the land, but they have a question, i don't understand this, and that's a congressman's job. to say, you know, no, we are not going to answer that question because we don't like that law, that's risky. >> we heard in that piece a lot of people against obama care, and john, i am sure the political pundits are listening to you, and if you were guiding
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them, what would you tell them in order to turn the message around? >> well, i tended try not to give advice to the politicians, but from your travels and our poll numbers people are confused about this, and i am sure you get questions, how is it going to affect me and when is it going to affect me, and there are a lot of people you have to do comprehensive or you can't pass a bill, and if you do it one piece at a time, it would be easier for people to understand. you have seen the president focus on the things that are popular, and young people get to stay on their parents' health care longer, and the president has to find implementation and communication strategy, a north star that says when we get here i think this will be better for you, but there may be bumps along the road, and the government is going to have to do a good job in helping people deal with the bumps. i am not endorsing the health care law, but as you make the big changes and people have questions and what they are
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hearing is the polarized political environment, there needs to be a place for them to go where they can get advice they trust and that's a huge talent for the president and the entire administration. >> thank you for joining us. >> thank you. i am excited to announce we are gassing up the scene in health care express and hitting the road the first week of october we will travel around the country to see what the states are doing about obama, and we want to make sure you understand what is going on with your health care. hope you will join us for that. and for right now, stay tuned for this. the always good for a laugh, sherri shepherd, we will get serious about diabetes. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day
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can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long periods. nsaids, like celebrex, increase the chance of serious skin or allergic reactions, or stomach and intestine problems, such as bleeding and ulcers, which can occur without warning and may cause death. patients also taking aspirin and the elderly are at increased risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers. don't take celebrex if you have bleeding in the stomach or intestine, or had an asthma attack, hives, other allergies to aspirin, nsaids or sulfonamides. get help right away if you have swelling of the face or throat, or trouble breathing.
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tell your doctor your medical history. and find an arthritis treatment for you. visit celebrex.com and ask your doctor about celebrex. for a body in motion. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please. "buk, buk, bukka!"
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loweri lowering glucose. cinnamon seems to reduce the total cholesterol, the ldl, and their try fifties ride levels. now, there is somebody that knows a thing or two about diabetes, and she is also very funny. award-winning co-host of "the view," sherri shepherd. it's called "plan d." >> what about this makes you chuckle? >> the thought of just eating
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right, for me, and i say in the book, when your heart is broken nobody says give me a plate of steamed asparagus. oh, my gosh, if i don't get broccoli quick -- you just don't. i was one that never ate right, i loved everything fried. i found out you could fry a twinkie. i mean, fried things in oil. you know, if it did not have srel sraeta cheese on it, i didn't want it. now the thought that i have been drinking water straight for two years, and that's all i drink is funny to me, because i would have laughed you out of the room. >> when you talk about the fried foods and velveeta, do you get hungry? >> well, it's like being a drug addict. you go, i can't go into that par. i can't go there. >> there are a lot of analogies there.
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you want to avoid that food. there is no question, it tastes good and that's why it sells so much. you also wrote that diabetes, which is the disease as you know by the year 2020, half the country will have diabetes, or be prediabetic. you say it saved your life? >> yeah, because it forces me to look at labels and read how many carbs it has, a lot of sodium or sugar content and it forces me to go to boot camp three times a week, because i want to be here. it forces me to make conscious decisions about what i put in my mouth. so when i look at something, i look at that cheesecake, and i go, oh, do i want my foot or that cheesecake? this is from diabetes. people say we will pray that god take diabetes away from you, and i don't say that, it's saving my
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life and forcing me to be healthy. >> people can feel empowered talking about this, and what did you expect kwrupbs at the time, knowing you had diabetes? >> i had so many symptoms and ignored them for a long time. i remember going to the doctor, and they would say, you are p prediabetic, and i thought that means i could still eat. i would ignore the signs and sim actuals, and i had a numberness in my hands and feet and it would tingle, and then vision was blurry, and i was thirsty all the time and no matter how many times i had to go to the bathroom, i would go again. i didn't lose weight, that was not one of the signs. i couldn't ignore it anymore. i went to the doctor, and i remember they said, you know, eat and then four hours later they would do the testing, so i went to the pancake house and ate all you can eat pancakes,
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and i was sitting there in my plastic gowns, and why do you make these gowns and they open at the butt, and i hear the doctor say, yeah, she has got it. >> really? >> yes. and it was like a sledge hammer, you know, to my heart, because it was like you can't run away from it anymore. >> you knew about diabetes, because you wrote about it in the book about your mom. >> my mom passed away from the complications of diabetes at 41 years old, and she never explained to us that she had diabetes. we saw her eat candy all the time, and she would drink red punch. we were seeing her go to the hospital because she had some type of insulin attack is what she called it, and people in my family called it sugar, and so we never thought it was a big deal. even when she passed away from the complications, she went into a coma, and her organs started to shut down and that didn't
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make we change the way i ate, and i went towards food more. >> you talk about your mom, laverne, and you have an 8-year-old son, jeffrey, and i have an 8-year-old daughter as well, and are you modeling or trying to model -- he is young, still, but how much are you thinking about him when you think about your own diabetes and his eating and all that? >> i think about him every single day, and that was my motivation forgettiivation foet together, and my mother, her dying from complications didn't change anything, even when i got the diagnosis, i went back to the pancake house and ate the food but it was a vision of my son laying in the bed crying, and trying to figure out where heaven was because everybody is saying mommy is there. i do not like exercising, but i go to the gym. when i am at boot camp, i picture my son there saying mom,
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can you do it. >> you get me choked up and make me laugh within a few minutes. really appreciate it. >> thank you. a young girl wants to play basketball. but her parents tell her that she is too fat. it's heartbreaking stuff, but now as a woman she becomes years of frustration and anger, and wait to see what she has accomplished. ♪ constipated? yeah. mm. some laxatives like dulcolax can cause cramps. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation.
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thanks. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'.
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♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good around ♪ ♪ turn around barry ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ ♪
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her busy saturday begins with back pain, when... hey pam, you should take advil. why?
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i want to spend main talking about syria. i decide the best way to do that might be to introduce you to a woman in her early 20s, she has three sons, she met her husband after his mother came over to her and insisted they meet. even one day marry. turned out to be pretty good advice for her and a few years later, they have three sons. abdel, usef and ala. they were living in the middle of this middle class neighborhood and their kids went to school and they were very much enjoying their lives. i introduce you to them today because they probably live a
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life, a similar one to many of yours. parents just trying to do the right thing for their kids, improving their life, being a part of a large community and life in a city but when the missiles came raining down, they tolerated it for a while. but then usef was burned on his left arm and like any mom would have done, she decided they had enough. their livers, you see, they're not at all what they imagined. and they are now among the two million refugees that left syria. i tell you this because it's so important not to typecast when you look at these tough images. after all, as you now realize, there may be more that ties us all together than tears us apart. i go to these places because i think you need to hear the real stories from on the ground. i don't know how it will make you feel. i don't know how it will be different for everyone that hears this, but i think it will make you more connected with some of the most important stories happening anywhere in the world. thanks for watching.
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this framework can provide greater protection and security to the world. >> a deal has been reached but will the syrians comply? the clock starts ticking on syria's chemical weapons handover. in the last 24 hours, it's the greatest number of americans rescued by helicopter since hurricane katrina. >> hundreds have been rescued from the colorado floodwaters, but hundreds more are still missing and now the threat of more storms. this do open up a really huge universe of opportunities. >> a biomet rick technology goes mainstream thanks to the new iphone. but is it really secure? that's today's "science behind." good to see you on a sunday morning. thanks for keeping us company
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here. >> 8:00 on the east coast. this is "new day sunday"me." we have a lot going on. we have two big stories this morning, a deal struck between the u.s. and russia to destroy syria's vast arsenal of chemical weapons. we're covering the deal and reaction around the world. >> also, major floods drenching large parts of colorado. more than 500 people still unaccounted for, lots of flood damage and more rain in the forecast. so first let's get to syria's chemical weapons, the regem's willingness to comply with the deal to get rid of them will be the test almost immediately. syria must turn over an inventory of its chemical arsenal by friday. >> yeah, we have reaction to the agreement from chief national security correspondent jim sciutto who is in tel aviv right now, senior international
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correspondent nick robertson and nick peyton walsh in new york covering from the u.n. jim, i want to start with secretary of state john kerry who is in israel today. >> reporter: secretary kerry arrived in israel. he is meeting benjamin netanyahu to talk about two things, one, their efforts at mideast peace talks and also to give him an update on this syria deal and to give him reason to be confident in this syria deal. it's something that secretary kerry is going to continue as he travels from here to paris later in the day where he'll meet the french and british foreign ministers as well as the turkish and saudi foreign ministers. they'll go over all the details about the time line for syria to give up the chemical weapons. he's going to give them more specifics. what did you hear from the russian foreign minister in their private conversations? how is the u.s., how are russia, the international community going to keep syria to its promises here on what is a very aggressive and very ambitious time line? as a reminder, here's how it's
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expected to play out. by november they'll complete inspections of all of syria's chemical weapons sites and also by november, complete the destruction of the mixing and production facilities for these chemical weapons and by the middle of 2014 have the complete elimination, so says the deal, of all of syria's chemical weapons. that, of course, all those goal posts along the way provide multiple opportunities for syria to delay. the first test is going to be next week. by next week, they have to deliver a full accounting of all those chemical weapons sites and, of course, an open question as to what the consequences will be if syria fails. the russians don't want military action. the americans want to keep military action on the table. we go now to cnn's nick robertson who is in beirut. >> in damascus what we're hearing from the government there on the state media, they're playing the talks in geneva between kerry and their
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leader about being about future peace talks, no mention of the chemical issue. the moderate rebels in syria say they will support and help the ch chemical weapons inspectors. they don't expect the leader to turn over the 1,000 ton pile of chemical weapons. the u.n. should holdal assad to account and he should stand in front of the international criminal court on charges of killing 100,000 people. they also want the u.n. to ban his use of aircraft, to ban his use of ballistic missiles, essentially calling for a no fly zone over syria and, of course, the real wild card in syria right now is islamist rebels not clear what they're going to do whether they see the chemical weapons inspectors turn up there. over to phil black in moscow now. >> nick, thank you. russia's foreign minister is sharing the credit, really,
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saying this is the result of a joint u.s.-russian initiative and that the process here really began more than a year ago when presidents obama and putin first discussed their concerns about the security of the chemical weapons stockpile. now russia's significant responsibility for insuring that shira lives here is syria lives. as syria's biggest protector and ally, russia is seen as having the most influence over the syrian regime and russia made some concessions in insuring this agreement is acceptable to the united states. such as allowing for consequences yet to be defined for syria if it does not comply with the terms of this agreement. so russian prestige and authority is heavily invested and insuring this works and russian officials now hope that this will create some diplomatic momentum that could ultimately lead to a negotiated political
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agreement for the overall civil war. now to my colleague peyton walsh in new york. thanks, phil. we're looking at two busy days. there has to be some kind of u.n. security council resolution. it is pretty unlikely it will refer to chapter seven which may allow force if syria doesn't comply. we also have on monday at 11:00 the key unveiling of the u.n. inspector's report inside syria. 291 21st of august where the chemical weapons were used. there was a slip on friday saying that report will overwhelmingly confirm chemical weapons were used. and in the same sentence, accusing at sad regime crime against humanity. but also moving quickly now here, the syrian regime has made
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it clear they want to join the convention yesterday. they accepted that request. that does also have a slower timetable than that which moscow and washington have agreed between themselves. but really the legal process under way here and we have to see how fast the u.s. and russia can push through a resolution and whether or not it will indicate what kind of consequences there could be for the assad regime if they don't comply. >> thank you, nick and our team of correspondents covering reaction to the syrian chemical weapons deal. thank you to you all. you know the other thing we've got our eye on this morning, this other big story is what is happening in colorado. it is awful and it could get even worse today. in areas already devastated, i want to show you the latest pictures we're getting in here, as much as four more inches of rain could fall by this afternoon. officials say obviously that could hamper rescue efforts
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which were already in jeopardy in a lot of places. >> they have been. lots of people are still trapped. what is worse, authorities say another person, a 60-year-old woman, is presumed dead. now the death toll stands at four. it could go to five. she's right now presumed dead. and more than 500 people, you can't find them, unaccounted for. 1700 people, good news here, they have been saved. >> now in case you haven't heard, early this morning president obama did sign a major disaster declaration. colorado can get federal aid for recovery. our nick valencia is in north boulder right now. it was raining already there earlier this morning. nick, what's it look like now? >> reporter: well, it's still quite dangerous for the residents. i'm standing in a trench right now that was once a beautiful street in this residential neighborhood. a little while ago, in fact, before this live shot i was on the edge of the asphalt and it collapsed from under me. this land is so saturated with water. that's going to be a really big problem throughout the day. they're expecting about 12 hours
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of steady rain. one to two inches in boulder county. however slight that may seem, it could cause a very big problem for aircraft trying to reach the stranded people in the hard hit areas. days of intense rain left swollen creeks, flooded roads and damaged bridges in a state of colorado. dealing with the weather and its aftermath is proving to be difficult and dangerous. in aurora, water and hail trapped drivers in a parking lot. >> my car just stopped. so i told my son and my daughter, i was like, yael, we got to get out. we opened the car door and water started rushing in. i threw my son on my shoulders. >> reporter: most people were able to walk out, but for many others, the only way out by helicopter. hundreds have been picked up. >> i think what we have going on here in the last 24 hours is the greatest number of americans rescued by helicopter since hurricane katrina. >> reporter: many of those are trapped in towns where severe flooding shut down roads, leaving them stranded.
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colorado governor john hickenlooper and other officials saw the damage from the air. their tour turned into another rescue mission. >> senator, where are we? who designed this skit. i think they were just glad to be out of there. >> reporter: this morning it's still a desperate effort to get people out of the inaccessible areas. the boulder county sheriff says search and rescue resumes, but it will be difficult. >> the problem with this event is that it's affected every drainage and every road in the town. and so, you know, this is sinking feeling when you realize that if someone above or someone calls 911, we are not going to be able to help them. >> reporter: the power of this water has created this big trench in this neighborhood.
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the house behind me has a mote front of me. it's difficult for the residents to get around. the anxiety is still very, very strong here among the residents as they predict more rain throughout the weekend which could cause more major problems. victor? >> nick valencia, you and your team stay safe there. thank you so much. the storms really are showing us the power of nature. it can be deadly in some cases. unfortunately, there is more rain on the way. >> i know. i can't believe it. in fact, i was reading that colorado in some places got 1.73 inches of rain in less than 30 minutes yesterday. so i'm wondering is there anyplace in the state that mother nature is going to give them a break today? >> you know, not really. i don't think we're going to see the voracious amount of rain. here is the current radar. here is denver. you can see showers and thunderstorms popping up in colorado and new mexico. today we will see more showers,
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more thunderstorms. let me show you some of the video. in addition to all of the flooding, there is hail on top of this. showing you how powerful the uplift was with some of the strong storms. so there's the hail. you know, about a dozen cities have significant flooding. some cities seeing even almost a year's worth of rain in just a few short days. so here's a look. the forecast for today, again, more scattered showers. more thunderstorms. you can see there. tomorrow, less moisture associated with it. so predominantly morning showers. and then from tuesday to friday, skies finally will dry out there. so that is the good news. also, believe it or not, last tuesday was the peak of hurricane season. our second hurricane of the season in the atlantic. it is hurricane ingrid. category one now. winds at 85. expected to come ashore tomorrow morning right here just north of mexico with incredible amounts of rain.
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could see locally 5 inches. here again, more flash flooding potentially this monday, tuesday, wednesday. >> good heavens. thanks for letting us know. we appreciate it. >> yep. >> so a "new york times" columnist upset a lot of readers with his views on syria. you'll hear the explanation he gave me. that is next. and floyd "money" mayweather and alverez battle it out for big money, bragging rights, we have highlights from last night's big fight. >> and just so you know, anthony boredane is back with a new season. we explore jerusalem, gaza, and the west bank. so watch it tonight at 9:00 eastern and pacific right here on cnn. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004.
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or you can choose to blend out. ♪ oh, yeah-eah! ♪ the all-new 2014 lexus is. it's your move. sonchts b . so the big story this weekend is on how the syrian government needs to proceed in handing over the chemical weapons. a columnist for "the new york times" is making the case that if diplomacy does not work, a u.s. missile strike must go forward. listen, he knows he upset a lot of readers. earlier i asked him why he feels so strongly about using u.s.
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military force in syria. >> this is something i believe in very deeply. and i think i'm shaped by what i've seen in humanitarian disasters around the world. i've seen war up close and the horrors that it can inflict. but i've also seen situations of genocide where we stood by and did nothing. and i think that where we can modestly intervene with any kind of tool, diplomatic or military and make a difference, then that is something we should not walk away from. that is not an option we should take from the table. >> do you think that the president should launch this attack before we get through this process with congress, with their vote? should he just say i believe this is something we should do and order the attack? >> i -- no. i think once he has said he is going to consult congress, i don't see that there is any realistic option for him to go ahead with a strike without congress' approval. and now that we also have a
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diplomatic process under way, i think he needs to give that time to breathe. although i must say i'm fairly skeptical that this will end up with syria actually giving up its chemical weapons. >> let's talk about today's column. you said you offended a lot of readers with your support of a strike. you decided to answer some of the questions and concerns. i want to tick through a few of them. how can we justify spending money on military strikes when our own educational system is failing? you see a lot of american schools, a lot of them are falling apart. >> that is a legitimate question. and, you know, in afghanistan, it always bothered me that for the cost of station and one u.s. soldier in afghanistan for a year we could have started 20 schools in afghanistan. and, you know, as well as right here at home. but in this case, the numbers just don't add up. for starters, there is -- there would be no supplemental budget for a strike in -- in syria. there would be no additional, they all come to military pride
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beyond that. right now we're already spending at a rate of a billion dollars a year in syria, humanitarian aid to those refugees because we have allowed this to grow. and if we can strike and ground ass assad's air force, for example, so there are fewer of these atrocities around the country, then that will slow the flow of refugees and might even has reduce our spending. that would come from the existing military. >> the assad regime kills about 100,000 and the u.s. does nothing. but they used sarin gas and the u.s. gets involved. first 100,000, that wasn't enough and then because of the use of the chemical, the u.s. says now we have to stop the killing. >> you know, i think again, that is a legitimate criticism.
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so just go ahead and slaughter people with conventional weapons and we won't touch you. so there is an inconsistency here. but if we can inconsistently stand up to some kinds of atrocities, some kind of slaughter, then that is better than consistently standing up to none. >> all right, nick kristoff, thank you. >> my pleasure. >> you can read the column on syria on newyorktimes.com. that was recorded on friday. >> how did you safe in three minutes? >> yeah. it's gone. it actually happened friday night. and we didn't discuss the new deal that came out on saturday morning. that's why it wasn't part of the conversation because we had the conversation friday night. >> just before it happening. >> yes. >> still to come on "new day,"
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alabama settled into the game and took back the lead by scoring 35 unanswered points. johnny manziel had a couple turnovers. he put up monster stats otherwise. 98 yards rushing, 464 yards passing. texas a&m did cut the tleed seven with this touchdown right here. but then alabama chewed up the clock late in the fourth quarter. a long drive ending with a touchdown pass from a.j. mccarron. alabama goes on to win 49-42. now bragging rights in the manning household are at stake this afternoon when the denver broncos play the new york giants. we're talking about two super bowl winning quarterbacks who also just happen to be brothers going head-to-head later on today. peyton, of course, had a couple neck surgeries a couple years ago. there were doubts if he would ever even play again. and look at him now. this morning on the front page of the papers, fight night in vegas and for the 45th time in a row, floyd "money" mayweather walks out as the winner. the consensus pound for pound
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champ beatal al vvarez in a may decision. of course, it wouldn't be boxing if there wasn't controversy on one of the judge's scorecard, they scored the fight a draw. now mayweather has made more than $73 million in his last two fights. guys, some of the late pay per view estimates say he could push over the $100 million mark if the big numbers come in obviously from the pay-per-view draw. >> good for him. >> yeah. >> joe carter, thank you. >> more rain today could ground helicopters in colorado. we'll tell you more. first responders trying to get those left stranded. we'll talk with an official in boeder abo boulder. thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia...
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four more inches of rain are predicted today. and more than 500 people are still unaccounted for. rescue efforts are under way right now. president obama has declared major disaster. the move could release federal money to help rebuild roads like that one that used to be a road. >> she's been away for a few months, the queen of southern cooking is stepping back into the spotlight. >> hi. i'm back. [ applause ] >> yes, she is. she made her first public appearance in three months during a houston cooking competition. this was saturday. her empire came under fire. it happened this summer add she admitted to using the n word. she lost a few endorsements and her cooking show. 1500 foodies welcomed her. number four, outrage after an unarmed north carolina man was shot and killed by police yesterday morning. now police say jonathan farrell was running or charging toward them when they fired a wrecked
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car with them nearby. so they believe now he may have just been looking for help. one officer has been charged with voluntary manslaughter. and, five, now from birmingham, alabama. citizens show off a sculpture honoring four little girls. those were the girls killed 50 years ago this morning, september 15th, 1963, when the ku klux klan bombed the 16th street baptist church. eric holder and former secretary of state condoleeza rice are set to speak at ceremonies today. the situation in colorado is bad enough. it could get even worse today, sefkly because four more inches of rain could fall by this afternoon. >> and that could make the already swollen waterways even more deadly. it could also hamper the rescue efforts that are still under
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way. joining us now is kim cobel with the boulder, colorado office. we understand that two hours ago the weather there could ground helicopters. they can't pull people up. what is happening now? can they fly? >> right now the air support is going to be dependent on the weather conditions for this morning. that decision hasn't been made. the briefing hasn't happened yet with the internet management team. again, we'll be counting on the weather as far as sending up any air support. the national weather service is telling us that visibility will be very poor today. poor visibility means the pilots will not be able to fly. it is important that the helicopter evacuations could be grounded. the national weather service is telling us that the rain forecast is actually going to be smaller than what had originally
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been forecast, four inches. we might get another one inch or so in the next 12 hours. that will help us a little bit. again, the grounds are saturated. there is nowhere for the standing watter that is already here to go. we're still digging out and cleaning up debris, et cetera. we have some good news as far as we have been able to punch a road through to jamestown. jamestown, as you know, is where many people were stranded and many of the air evacuations took place. so we are almost there as far as a road and that will be a one lane road that will be for emergency vehicles only. although later on in the day if people are still up there and able to drive their car out, we'll let them out. all roads out of boulder into the western county are closed at the sheriff's request. >> all right. we're hearing reports right now of possibly as many as five more deaths. can you elaborate on what you know at this point, please? >> i think that the total number we're hearing is five, not five more. we have three confirmed deaths
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in boulder county. i believe that there is another confirmed death in colorado springs. and there is a presumed death in larimier county. >> so presumed deaths, are you waiting to possibly find -- i understand this may be the 60-year-old woman who people believe is dead. you are waiting to find her? >> well, that is in larimer county. we're in boulder county. i know that person is presumed dead. i don't know what their status is today as far as determining if that person is physically unaccounted for if they have indeed died. >> and one more thing. yesterday about this time we talked with a colleague of yours about a group of campers. 1 au 150 people were stranded there. what is the update on the campers and the people that were there with them? >> all of the campers have been evacuated. they were evacuated about 7:30.
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the operations were focusing on getting the rescue workers out of the evacuation area. it is basically bringing them back to the boulder airport to let them camp overnight before they got started again this morning. i want to emphasize that even if air support is not available today because of the weather, we will still be doing evacuations where we can using the high water vehicles that the national guard has. and i spoke to a sheriff's deputy who was in another area very isolated. he is telling a very interesting and hair owing story about some of the rescues that they've had to do. there is basically one bridge that is passable. and from what he tells me, it's barely passable. and so one vehicle can go over the bridge at a time. and that might be a boulder county sheriff's suv, or that could be one of the high wear the vehicles. every time they go over that bridge, pieces of that bridge crumble away. there's going to be a point where they'll not be able to use
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that bridge anymore. but for right now, they're going to use it as long as they k but that bridge is going as well. what they're doing out there is really very dangerous. but they're doing as much as they can to get as many people out as they k. as soon as they can. >> kim, one more quick question. when we were sitting here talking to your colleagues yesterday, there were about 200 people unaccounted for. since that time, we jumped to a number of 500. do you know what is happening? >> so in boulder county, the number we have is 234. now other counties are impacted by flooding. for example, greeley was flooded as well. places in evans, larimer county. i think the 500 number that you're hearing is from the entire flood system which is several counties in colorado. in boulder we have 234. i'm not sure the exact count for the other counties. i think that 500 is a total for everything at this point. >> all right. kim cobel in boulder, colorado,
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you're working hard. your team is working hard. our best to you and we'll be praying for you. >> thank you very much. take good care. you know we've been showing you the latest pictures, aerial pictures that we've been getting in. nick valencia is on the ground there. we're going to go live to colorado to see what he is finding as he's there. >> we also have a programming reminder, anthony bourdain back with a new season. it is jerusalem, gaza and the west bank. starts tonight at 9:00 eastern and pacific right here on cnn. my name is mike and i quit smoking. chantix... it's a non-nicotine pill. i didn't want nicotine to give up nicotine. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. [ mike ] when i was taking the chantix, it reduced the urge to smoke. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions
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just before the break, we got good news from colorado dealing wlt floods. they certainly need it there. we learned that minutes ago rescue workers managed to punch through by a road to jamestown. now floodwaters cut off ground access to that town. rescue workers and residents there are bracing, unfortunately, for more rain today. it could end up being less than worst predictions. >> right. our nick valencia is on the ground there in north boulder. nick, i understand that you're talking to some folks. you found some folks where you are to talk to and how is the weather there? i know it was raining earlier. >> well, yeah. it was raining for a couple hours. it was a slight drizzle. they predicted steady rain over the next 12 hours. this is one of the harder hit areas as we've been showing you all morning. i'm with one of the residents. your house is right across the
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street here. tell us what it was like when the floodwaters came through. >> when they actually came through, we were asleep. it was wednesday night. my husband woke us up about 3:30 in the morning because of this loud noise. and it was the water rushing around our house, a torrential river. we were in a lake of moving, i don't know, foot deep water in some places and we just started -- we just got into action, damming where it might come into our living room, damming with our neighbor's help the street behind us, diverting water around our house. >> all the residents chipped in though? >> that was 4:00 or 5:00 in the morning. so the next morning when everybody woke up, people were -- we didn't feel safe crossing the street. >> you have this right next to you. >> we didn't know. >> and you're telling me you didn't know it all because it was so flooded with water.
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>> right. we had rivers rushing down this street and the street behind us that also went across the property. >> i was talking about how will is more rain expected through the weekend. you were telling me you had some sort of anxiety about that. >> i did. >> tell us about that. >> there was rain predicted every day. we didn't get it. we actually had sun which was amazing. and last night it started raining pretty heavy about 11:30 or 12:00. and i noticed i was very anxious. a little post trauma there. >> absolutely. still very dangerous here. you're standing on the asphalt and it collapsed under me. do you think the residents share the anxiety? >> i don't know. because, like i said, it's been predicted every day. it hasn't shown up. >> you're hoping that worst is past. >> we certainly are. with operating on that assumption. >> so what about normality in what are they talking about when
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this place will get back to normal? >> we haven't heard from the local officials. we're very low priority. we're just a little circle that we don't get any through traffic. but we would love that to happen. we would love to know. we can get out. and we even got our neighbors' cars out yesterday. so today i get to run errands. it's the first day. >> some sense of normalcy. >> yeah. >> residents have been going through a lot here. it's been a lot for them to deal with. they're hoping the worst has passed, victor and christie. but, of course meteorologies are predicting another round of rain. none of these areas have been hard hit by it. none of them need it at all at this point. victor? christie? >> all right. best of luck to her and all of those folks there. we're certainly thinking about them. bless your heart. >> oh, thank you. >> it's amazing the things you look forward. she's looking forward to running errands. >> going to the grocery store.
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it's true. it's so true. yeah. we're going to be thinking about them. thank you so much. >> next on "new day," time for your political check. candy crowley joins us to talk about threats of, yes, another government shutdown. don't go anywhere. mom, dad told me that cheerios is good for your heart, is that true? says here that cheerios has whole grain oats that can help remove some cholesterol, and that's heart healthy. ♪ [ dad ] jan?
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all right. >> we have state of the union starting at the top of the hour. candy, good morning. what do you have for us? >> top of the hour, we're going to give you a little update on those colorado floods. i read they may get four inches of rain in certain places again today. just phenomenal pictures. so we're going to talk to the governor and get a quick update from him. the bulk of the show is about this new u.s.-russian agreement and whether syria is serious. we're going to talk to the chairman of the intelligence committee mike rogers along with
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his colleague jason chavez along with elijah comings and we want to talk about domestic policy. speaking of deadlines for syria, there are also deadlines for congress end of this month. they have to figure out a way to continue to fund the government. and probably sometime next month they're going to have to figure out how to increase the credit for the u.s. so big things happening domestically as well. >> yeah, the domestic deadlines don't stop because of international deadlines. >> that's right. candy crowley, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> stay here for "state of the union with candy crowley" at the top of the hour, 9:00 a.m. eastern right here on cnn. sarah palin, have you heard about this? her political action committee, with her committee are being sued according to the north jersey media group. she used this iconic 9/11 photo, remember this one? she did it without permission. she's accused of poeting it on a facebook page and website for her political action committee.
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cnn reached out to palin for a comment, by the way, have not heard. we'll wait. >> we're going to hear something. still to come, apple's new iphone could be using one of the best pass words ever, your fingerprint. >> i don't know about that. >> is it safe from hackers? that's an important question. also, is it safe from the government?
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so when apple announced a fingerprint scanner as a execute feature on the new iphone, people had a lot of questions. some people wondered is this safe from hackers? >> not only that, there were questions about your fingerprints and would they be stored in a government data base, too? our reporter is joining us live. i know you went looking for some answers, margaret. what did you find out? >> apple said this new iphone 5 uses one of the best pass words in the world, your fingerprint. but with this new technology, there are growing concerns about security. >> i tried these. it quickly reads your fingerprint and automatically unlocks your phone. you can even use it to authorize purchases through the stores. >> is fingerprinting safe from hackers and the growing risk of identity theft? hollywood movies like national treasure made lifting prints look easy.
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security researchers warns that it depends on how the software giant implements the technology. >> apple clearly has this because the data is not stored in the account. there isn't going to be a giant data base. it will be a prized target of hackers and enemy state actors. >> he says fingerprinting is convenient for users and will be a boost to the mobile industry. >> it could open up a really huge universe of opportunities. >> new biotech mapping opportunities are already in the making. vascular technology uses infrared light to reflect patterns of blood ves he wills and iris recognition developed by companies. >> the goggles go ahead and automatically like at the irises. >> eye mapping is said to be faster and more accurate. >> you have finger that's are one in 64 billion. and irises accuracy is you have one in about 1 trillion.
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>> now that iris technology is expensive. they told us it was about $25,000 for the technology. they're saying it is becoming more popular but especially with law enforcement. >> okay, but what are we hearing about -- i'm hearing rumbles of vascular technology. >> yeah. we saw some of that in the video just now. that was shot in new york. new york branch of one of japan's largest banks. and they say that the technology is just too expensive for them. it's tough for them to maintain it. so they're going to switch back to card readers. >> all right. >> going back to something we all know. thank you, margaret. margaret conley in new york for us. >> okay. try not to look away, people. >> it's a must-see moment. that's why we can't look away. >> set your eyes on the world's ugliest animal. that is not according to me. that is according to the ugly animal preservation society. i did not know there was one.
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>> there is one. i'm looking at it on the phone. they have other animals. >> i feel sorry for this little guy which is ridiculous. it's not like he has any clue what we're talking about. >> i think it is cute. the nose and eyes, if that's what they are. the group announced that the blob fish is the society's new mascot after voters made their selection. the fish lives on the ocean floor off the coast of australia. >> it is oblivious to what we think. >> i like the thing. he could have his own cartoon. >> he looks like a character, but i can't place my finger on it. if anybody -- >> ziggy. >> it is ziggy! look at victor pulling it out. >> just like ziggy. >> i'm going to tell people to tweet me. he answered it. >> okay. we found the name for your new masc mascot. >> that's right. >> ziggy. if that happens, kudos to you. >> i try. >> we're so grateful to have you with us tonight.
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just to let you know, we're still watching the floods in colorado as we though that more, you know, rain is expected to hit today. >> candy crowley sits down with the colorado governor to get the latest on the rescue efforts. we'll have that for you in just a moment as "state of union" starts right now. >> have a good day. a u.s.-russian game plan to destroy syria's chemical weapons by mid 2014. today, will it play in damascus. >> we have committed here to a standard that says verify and verify. >> can syrian president be trusted to comply? and even if the deal collapses, has russia succeeded in making a u.s. military strike more difficult? questions for the chairman of the house intelligence committee mike rogers along with committee member adam shift. then, what's old is new again. >> it's time for the president and his party tho

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