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tv   Anderson Cooper 360  CNN  April 5, 2011 10:00pm-12:00am EDT

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apprehensive? >> no, because what could be less to be said about me? they know i'm this young kid and the way i carried on with women and the ridiculous things i've said and done. there's no more skeletons in my closet. >> tomorrow on "piers morgan tonight." >> that's all for tonight. thank goodness. now to anderson cooper with "ac 360." >> piers, thank you very much. tonight, with libyan opposition forces retreating and blaming nato for not bombing enough, we begin with the plight of a woman in tripoli. her name is eman al obeidy. more than a week ago, she burst into a hotel telling journalists she had been raped by gadhafi fighters. she is dragged off, held in detention and is now a virtual prisoner in tripoli. unable to leave, she can't talk to her family on the phone, unable to walk on the streets of tripoli.
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she says she's been rearrested multiple times. libyan television and radio called her an enemy of the country. tonight, we've been able to connect her to her mother. it was very difficult to arrange, but tonight you'll hear that reunion. what you will hear is a mother and her child, the bond that transcends language. eman al obeidy says the threats against her continue today. she says a man pulled a gun on her in the last 24 hours, threatened to kill her. and the regime continues to attack her character. they've shown no facts to support their attacks. the gadhafi regime called her a prostitute. this anchor says she's worse than a whore because even a whore feels patriotic about libya. "the new york times" david kirkpatrick reporting they've been circulating what they claim is a pornographic video of her. we'll take a report of what
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libya state media gave as proof. it's a woman belly dancing, it's not porn, and the dancer bears little resemblance. eman al obeidy is a law student. you might be wondering why are we focusing on this one woman? some people tweeted that question to me. well, the truth is, we're going to report on the fighting tonight, we'll talk to our correspondents and cover the japan nuclear crisis, as well. but we're focusing on eman al obeidy because unlike so many others who have died or been hurt in libya, we know her name. she's risked her life to tell her story. terrible things happen in war, terrible things happen and people disappear. their names are never known. they die on the side of a road or in a prison cell. their struggles, their stories never told, their families don't know what happened to them. but we know what eman al obeidy said happened to her. we can't prove it, but there's no doubt her life is now in danger. we know eman al obeidy's name. if reporters had not listened to
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her, had not continued to ask questions to gadhafi's henchman about her, she might still be under arrest, locked away. she might even be dead. we know her name and cannot turn away from her flight. you're going to hear her talk to her mother for the first time. we decided to let you hear eman's voice tonight without a translator. you'll see on the screen, the translation of what she's saying. we want you to hear her voice. she wants you to hear her voice. everything else has been taken away from this woman. the least we can do is give her her voice. >> what happened to you today?
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>> you feel your life is in danger? >> you had tried to leave to tunisia. what happened when you tried to get to the border? >> do you still want to try to get out of tripoli?
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>> are you still -- are you still hoping to be able to leave tripoli somehow? to be able to leave and go back to your home? >> have you heard anything more in the last 24 hours from the government? have you heard at all from them?
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>> eman, we continue to ask questions to the gadhafi regime to moussa and we will continue to do that to get answers for you about whether or not you can leave. moussa ibrahim yesterday said he was unaware that you had tried to leave. as you know, what he says is often not the truth, so we're continuing to try to find some answers. but so far we have not gotten any answers.
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>> it must feel good to know that your family is standing behind you, that your mother and father, that they all love you and support you as do many people around the world. >> eman, i know you've not been able to speak to your mother. we think we have her on the phone. feel free to talk to her now. >> in a moment, we'll have that reunion with her mom. let us know what you think on facebook or twitter. i'll be tweeting tonight, as well. also tonight, the fighting. [ gunfire ] >> nato has been blaming bad weather for the lack of air strikes on opposition fighters say they are paying the price.
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what's going on, on the ground? details are coming up. let's check in with isha sesay with breaking news. experts are being sent to japan's nuclear power plant plant. new threats and some could go on indefinitely. details ahead. leaving you... breathless the all-new ford focus with active grille shutters [ male announcer ] visine-a is clinically proven to relieve all your worst eye allergy symptoms. it goes right where you need it, relieving allergy eyes in minutes. get visine-a. the most complete allergy eye drop. (announcer) everything you need to stretch out on long trips.
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a little more than a week ago, this woman, eman al obeidy, snuck into a tripoli hotel and stepped into the global spotlight. ever since, the regime has tried and failed to get her to recant her story. they've tried coercion, confinement, bribes to her family, threats against her, a televised smear campaign. in all that time, she's been able to speak to her parents. she cannot even connect by phone because the regime had cut off communication between east and west. tonight, thanks to satellite phones, she connected with her mom. here's a portion of that conversation. >> eman, i know you've not been able to speak to your mother. we think we now have her on the phone. feel free to talk to her now.
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>> isha, what do you want your daughter to know?
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>> efrgsman, we continue to ask questions to the gadhafi regime to moussa ibrahim, we've continued to press on your behalf and we will continue to try to do that to get answers for you about whether or not you can leave. moussa ibrahim yesterday said he was unaware that you tried to leave and you were not allowed to leave. as you know, what he says is not often the truth, though. so we are continuing to try to find some answers. but so far we have not gotten any answers. >> please, please be careful,
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please stay safe. we'll continue to be in touch with you. we want you to be able to say goodbye to your mother and say whatever you want.
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>> eman, i'm sorry. we're going to have to go. >> okay, okay. thank you. thank you very much. >> thank you very much. stay strong. >> goodbye. >> the actual conversation went on a lot longer and we let them discuss as they wanted. nic robertson has spent several days trying to get the gadhafi regime to account for its treatment of eman or provide an
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explanation of it. he joins us with david kirkpatrick. nic, it seems like twl is this official campaign against this woman that continues on state television and the radio. do officials have any idea what to do here? >> reporter: they don't appear to. they just seem to be relentless in this smear campaign to degrade her, to negate her message. they have their own set narrative for something here and they won't deviate from it. it seems to be a default position they can't get out of, yet they know this is an issue causing anger around the rest of the world. but it's an open sore for them. >> david, do you think media attention here and reporters like yourself and nic and others who have been asking questions about her and asking the regime,
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has that kept her -- has that helped her? has that in fact saved her? because as you write in "the times" a lot of women just kind of disappear into libyan institutions. >> reporter: well, she said that she believes that the media attention has saved her. i know for myself, i felt pretty powerless when she was here at the hotel struggling to stay and find help. i don't think any of us could do anything for us. it sounds after she left, she endured 72 hours of grueling questioning. she certainly said, with some justification i think, if there hadn't been this kind of attention, she might have been sent to one of these homes that the libyans refer to as "rehabilitation facility" where women are detained without consent, sometimes for years, until someone comes along to
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marry them. >> explain that. there are these rehabilitation facilities, so-called, where women who have made allegations against rape, they're sent and what happens there, they're held there? >> reporter: they're confined there. yeah, they're held there against their will. they're not allowed to leave. and i think their lives are pretty bleak. the only way they can get out is if a male member of their family comes and takes them away or some stranger shows up looking for a wife and marries one of them off. that's the most common way to leave one of these institutions, i'm told. because women usually end up there because their families shun them after they've raised allegations of a sexual crime. >> nic, she's saying that she continues to be harassed when she goes out on the streets. she said she was at the courts today trying to press her case and an employee pulled a gun on her. would the government like to arrest her again? because it seems like they've
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arrested her several times without any real result. >> reporter: and she was describing as well yesterday to us that whenever she goes out, she gets either harassed or pulled into a police car. when they get her to the police station, they have no idea what to do with her, because there are no charges outstanding against her. she's just in this sort of eternal limbo that she can't break free from. it just seems like the government is on this crash course to harass, intimidate, degrade her, but they have no other sort of position, because when they take her to the police station, they have to release her because there's no charges, there's nothing to charge her with. >> nic, what do you think is going to happen to her? >> reporter: i think it's not
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impossible to imagine that at some point the pen is going to drop here with the government and they're going to realize the best thing is let her go, let her leave the country and get back to her family, let her do what she's been trying to do. she got to the border with tunisia last week, got to the position of customs and officials grabbed her and drove her all the way back, several hours. it must have been incredibly painful, demoralizing. just, again, for her almost the end again to be so close to freedom, to be taken back to tripoli where she can't even leave the city. perhaps the pen is going to drop for the regime and it's going to be less painful if they just let her go. we don't know if that's the case, but maybe they're going to realize that, anderson. >> david, you just encountered fresh evidence of what happens to those who defy the regime.
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>> reporter: what do you have in mind? >> i don't know. somebody told me that you had -- that in tomorrow's paper, you're in zawiya? >> reporter: that's right. yes, there's so much different evidence of that. >> i should have been more specific. >> reporter: we went on an official tour of zawiya about 30 miles from here and our photographer ventured into a burned out police building. on the second floor, an office, strewn around the floor, he found what appeared to be evidence of torture, bodies with torture marks, a man bound under a sheet. most chilling of all, a picture of a saw. and there were some burned out records being cleared up and carted away. one of the workers cleaning the place up, led him to a darkened
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room in the basement and made a gesture with his hands saying "gadhafi" suggesting this was an execution chamber. >> stay safe, thank you. coming up, the opposition is complaining about a lack of support with nato. nato is blaming the weather, but cnn's ben wedeman is saying the weather is final. we'll get the latest, next. japan's nuclear prices, the tokyo electric power company offering money to people who live near the nuclear plant, 12dz each. a new report just breaking tonight talks about lingering threats and new threats that may go on for a long, long time. details ahead. but there's one that's so clever, it makes your skin look better even after you take it off. neutrogena healthy skin liquid makeup.
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an amateur video of an explosion in libya. we can't confirm where or when it was. there are conflicts reports whether it was a nato strike or gadhafi attack. one thing is clear, the opposition says the coalition needs to step it up. opposition fighters say when they put their faith in god, they were winning. now they put their faith in nato, they're losing.
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more new video today from brega where gadhafi forces have gained the upper hand. opposition forces high tailed it out of town during an artillery bombardment. nato says it flew 58 strike missions yesterday, but efforts have been tripped up because the regime is using human shields and the weather is bad. cnn's ben wedeman says the weather is fine where he is. here's some of what he saw today near brega. >> reporter: when not withdrawing, the rebels do fire back. it's just not clear at what. while an artillery barrage is enough to send them packing, their return fire doesn't seem to be making a sent on their enemy. missing in the equation are the nato airplanes they thought would provide cover and their
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absence, despite the clear weather, has sparked talk of defeat. the french, british and american forces were seriously striking before, said this commander. now it seems as if nato has entered into a secret deal with the regime and the revolutionaries are the victims. >> ben wedeman now joins us live from ajdabiya. the state department correspondent jill dougherty and on the phone retired general george kimmet. ben, you say it's painfully obvious that you haven't seen nato air strikes in your area. why is nato not firing in that area, do you know? have you heard anything? >> reporter: well, what we've heard from nato itself is that they destroyed 30% of moammar gadhafi's military capabilities, that maybe one of the reasons is
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the weather. as we pointed out, the weather has been so good, there have been days of days being out there on the front. one possibility is that they are using civilians as human shields. we know that inside brega, they had a group of civilians being held at the university there by gadhafi's forces. so they aren't clearly using people as some sort sof cover. but you have to look beyond a town like brega. there are supply lines that go back hundreds of kilometers. and distances in this country are quite big. so it's hard to understand why those supply lines are not being hit. but certainly the excuses we've heard from nato are confusing. >> if they fled from brega, are you safe in ajdabiya? are they still firmly in control
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of ajdabiya? >> reporter: they are firmly in control of ajdabiya. but in a sense, much of the press corps and many of the residents have voted with their feet, in a sense, a vote of no confidence for nato. we've seen that essentially basically the opposition controlled all the way up to brega yesterday. at this point, they control only half of the territory between brega and ajdabiya. we did hear airplanes overhead. that was reassuring. but by and large, this possibility of an air strike i think the gadhafi forces are beginning to understand that just because you hear an airplane in the sky doesn't mean there's going to be an air strike. that might explain why they've become increasingly bold, moving on this open road between ajdabiya and brega. because even though they may fly
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overhead, the chances of an air strike don't seem to be very high. so i think we're safe. but we shall see. anderson? >> general kimmet, you heard ben's assessment. today nato said we've eliminated 30% of gadhafi's forces. but the opposition forces around brega say they're not working there. >> well, i think ben is exactly right on a couple of points. it may be partially due to the weather. it may be part of the fact that nato is getting its feet on the ground, so to speak, and is just starting to get familiar with the area of operations. we sort of have to ask nato the specific question, have there been any changes to the targeting guidance that has been given to the aircraft so that they're restricted from attacking those supply lines or restricted from attacking targets that the americans were asked to fire at first?
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if in fact there has been change to the targeting guidance, there's a substantial change. i haven't heard of that. i don't think that's been announced. but it would be a significant difference if nato's targeting guidance was different from what americans were firing on last week. >> opposition forces say nato is being much more or it takes much more time than it did the u.s. and we heard that the u.s. are the only ones that have a-10s and a-130s, which are used to fly low and take out tanks and ground forces. so does nato have the equipment and the know-how? >> it's true that the united states have those that are able to go and do gun runs against the targets on the ground. most of the other aircraft are going to have to use missiles.
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they don't have the guns that the a-10s and ac130s. again, i think we've got to take a hard look at the targeting guidance that's being given in the operations. quite frankly, they're using the same combined air operations that the americans were using when they were running these at unilateral operations. unless there's been a change in the guidance and rules of engagement, there should be no reason other than external factors such as weather that would cause the nato aircraft to be less effective than the american aircraft of a week ago. >> and yet ben is saying the weather has been fine the last couple of days. jill, do we know anything about targeting? has any targeting changed by nato? >> i can't speak specifically about the targeting, anderson.
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there really is the perception, and it seems to be correct, that the united states really is the leader in nato, and that the other countries, the uk and france now taking over a lot of the operations are really struggling to do what the united states is doing. and so that's a real dilemma for president obama. i mean, he doesn't want to lead. he doesn't want the united states running every mission. but he doesn't want it to fail. so he's caught between two things right now. the inability for nato, without the united states, to do what they're supposed to be doing. it's not that it's without the united states, of course, becauses we've been saying, those a-10s and ac-130s can be brought in. but the whole idea was to shift responsibility to nato. >> ben, one quick question. if most of the press corps has already left ajdabiya, you're in ajdabiya tonight, you say it's still in opposition controlled
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hands, how do you know when it's no longer safe? how do you know when the gadhafi forces are moving toward you, can you say? >> reporter: well, we can't really know, because for one thing, cell phones don't work in this area anymore. they've been shut down. what we did is just a few hours ago, having a quick nap before the show, i went with another of my colleagues to the main checkpoint outside of ajdabiya to speak to a senior army commander, a rebel army commander, to find out the situation. what he told us was fairly reassuring, that they do have firm control, this halfway point between ajdabiya and brega. but i have to tell you, you listen to what's going on outside, and fortunately this evening, all i've heard is stray dogs barking.
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but if we heard anything else, gunfire, a lot of gunfire as opposed to the occasional g gunfi gunfire, we probably would not be participating in your show tonight. >> please stay safe. jill, as well. and general, appreciate. "the new york times" reporting that a u.s. government engineers who have been helping japan deal with the nuclear crisis are sending a warning that the plant could be facing new threats. the measures to stabilize the plant may be causing other problems, as well. this is a breaking report. we'll bring the details to you momentarily. the death toll in yemen topped 100. today, more violence as security forces opened fire on protesters. at least two people died, dozens injured. more details just ahead. y, hybr, and plug-in vehicles. and we've got cars like that, even trucks.
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breaking news about japan 789 "the new york times" reporting tonight that u.s. government engineering sent to help with japan's nuclear crisis are now warning that the trouble at the fukushima daiichi plant is facing long-term threats as a result of the measures being taken to keep the plant stable. the "times" got ahold of the report and in a moment we'll run them by michael freelander. but first, some other developments today with this plant. tepco, the owner of the plant, says it has stopped a serious lake at the number two reactor. tepco released this photo earlier saying the latest
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attempt to repair a crack had refused the flow of radioactive water into the ocean, you can see the difference here. this picture was taken saturday, shows much more water gushing from that crack. tepco released this photo showing the leak has stopped, which is very good news. just today, the water pouring from the number two reactor contained radiation 5 million times the legal limit. apart from that leak, the plant is still dumping tons of radioactive water into the ocean. now high levels of radiation have been found in fish. today for the first time authorities issued safety standards for fish. tepco facing a growing backlash has offered payments to residents. it's calling the money a token offer and says more will come. but one city has flat out rejected the money saying it amounts to about $12 a person.
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cnn's kyung lah joinings me from tokyo and in hong kong, michael freelander. michael, u.s. government engineers are warning that the plant faces new threats, one that could persist indefinitely, mounting stresses on the containment structures, the possibility of explosions due to the release of hydrogen and oxygen. what do you make of these new reports the "new york times" is reporting? >> let's put it into a little bit of context. we are so far outside the original design basis of this power plant. it's important to know that they created a laundry list of different things that need to be considered. at the end of the day, we cannot put our severals in the situation where we stop injecting water. that is the only means of cooling the cores. it illustrated better than i could have articulated the sense
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of urgency that tepco needs to take in terms of getting on the long-term method of core cooling. it's something we need to consider and people need to ask the what if questions. but honestly, other than that, there's really nothing more than can be done. >> you talked about the heat removal system. what do you mean? >> nuclear power plants are designed so when they shut down, we have systems -- it's a two-loop system. it's like the radiator in your car where we circulate water through the reactor, it picks up the heat and flows through a heat exchanger and that exchanges the heat with another loop that sends hot water into the ocean, not radioactivity but hot water that. is the long-term method we have to get on. that equipment is normally powered by emergency diesel generators, which we know were knocked out during the tsunami. and in fact, they found when they were trying to restore
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these systems, that that is getting on that long-term stable core cooling method. >> when i heard tepco is offering what amounts to a token payment, i didn't realize how much of a token this was, $12 per person. that's kind of stunning, isn't it? >> reporter: it's very stunning to one of the towns that was evacuated that's in the shadow of the nuclear plant. the town said, tepco, take your token money and keep it. the city manager says, put yourself in his shoes. his people have been evacuated. they haven't been given a timeline that they can go home. they've lost their jobs, bodies of loved ones still lying around, they haven't been able to bury them. how are they supposed to say, here's $12, hope you feel better. they're just not going to do
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that. >> michael, in terms of the international help that japan has asked for and received, have they asked for enough? you would like to see more international involvement, right? >> absolutely, anderson. it's difficult for me to understand if it's simply a matter of logistics or an issue of communications or if this is simply a cultural issue of trying to save face and demonstrating that they can do it themselves. there is capacity and certainly capability external to japan that can be brought to bear on this. i sit here astonished looking at just how the government and how tepco is flailing around dealing with this issue. we are now three weeks into a major international crisis, and i've seen almost no external help brought in. >> in terms of the water -- the radiated water going into the
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ocean, they're still dumping tons of water, radioactive water into the pacific, right? >> you know, you are absolutely correct. on one hand, we can declare a bit of victory for the extremely highly radioactive water that was being dumped in some form. but we're still in the process of dumping more than 3 million gallons of water that has more than 100 times the allotted limit of radiation into the ocean. further more, they have not provided any analysis of exactly what's in that water. further more, because of where that water is coming from, we have reason to believe that there are long lived radio isotopes in that water. again, the issue being for several weeks now, we need to keep our eye on the food chain, because this is where this is going to come home to roost. >> michael freelander and kyung
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so you can better talk to your rheumatologist about protecting your joints. let's check in with isha sesay with a "360" news and business bulletin. anderson, a partial government shutdown could happen friday after white house meeting with congressional leaders came
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and went with no 2011 budget agreement. president obama says he'll keep scheduling meetings until there's a deal. >> when we are this close simply because of politics, and we are prepared to put whatever resources are required in terms of time and energy to get this done, but that's what the american people expect. they don't like these games. and we don't have time for them. there are some things that we can't control. we can't control earthquakes or tsunamis. we can't control uprisings on the other side of the world. but we can control our capacity to have a reasoned, fair conversation between the parties and get the business of the american people done. >> more deaths in yemen. at least six people were killed and hundreds injured in the latest clashes, which have been going on for weeks now. eyewitnesss in the capital say security forces opened fire on anti-government protesters today
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and attacked them with batons. a turning point in the disputed election in the ivory coast. they are negotiating surrender and the fighting has stopped. this after violence killed hundreds in a struggle with forces loyal to the internationally recognized president. anderson, a "360" follow. transocean's senior executives are donating their safety bonuses to the deep water horizon memorial fund. last night we told you that the company, which onlied the rig that exploded last year killing 11 workers, called 2010 its best year in safety. today, the ceo announced executives are donating their bonuses because "sit the right thing to do." yeah, it is. >> remarkable. isha, appreciate it. more ahead at the top of the hour, starting with eman al obeidy, connecting with her mom. we were able to connect them on the phone.
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tonight, with libyan opposition forces retreating and blaming nato for not bombing enough, we begin with the plight of a woman in tripoli. her life right now is in danger. her name is eman al obeidy. more than a week ago, she burst into a hotel telling journalists
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she had been raped by more than a dozen of gadhafi fighters. she is dragged off, held in detention and is now a virtual prisoner in tripoli. unable to leave, she can't return to her mother and father in eastern libya, she can't talk to them on the phone, she's unable to walk on the streets of tripoli without being harassed. she says she's been rearrested multiple times. libyan television and radio called her an enemy of the country. tonight, we've been able to connect her to her mother. it was very difficult to arrange, but tonight you'll hear that reunion. though the language is arabic, what you will hear is a mother and her child, the bond that transcends language. eman al obeidy says the threats against her continue today. she says a man pulled a gun on her in the last 24 hours, threatened to kill her. and the regime continues to attack her character. they've shown no facts to support their attacks. and we're keeping them honest. the gadhafi regime called her a drunk, mentally unstable, a prostitute. this anchor says she's worse
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than a whore because even a whore feels patriotic about libya. we've learned that supporters of the regime have been trashing her in a new way. "the new york times" david kirkpatrick reporting they've been circulating what they claim is a pornographic video of her. kirkpatrick asked for evidence. well, take a report what he was given as proof. it's a woman belly dancing, it's not porn, and the dancer bears little resemblance to eman. eman al obeidy is a law student. you might be wondering why are we focusing on this one woman? some people tweeted that question to me. and i understand the question. well, the truth is, we're going to report on the fighting tonight, we'll talk to our correspondents and cover the japan nuclear crisis, as well. but we're focusing on eman al obeidy because unlike so many others who have died or been hurt in libya, we know her name. she's risked her life to tell her story. terrible things happen in war, terrible things happen and people disappear. their names are never known.
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they die on the side of a road or in a prison cell. their struggles, their stories never told, their families don't know what happened to them. but we know what eman al obeidy said happened to her. we can't prove it, but there's no doubt her life is now in danger. we know eman al obeidy's name. if reporters had not listened to her, had not continued to ask questions to gadhafi's henchman about her, she might still be under arrest, locked away. she might even be dead. we know her name and cannot turn away from her plight. you're going to hear her talk to her mother for the first time. we decided to let you hear eman's voice tonight without a translator. you'll see on the screen, the translation of what she's saying. we want you to hear her voice. she wants you to hear her voice. everything else has been taken away from this woman. the least we can do is give her her voice. >> what happened to you today?
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>> you feel your life is in danger? >> you had tried to leave to tunisia. what happened when you tried to get to the border?
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>> do you still want to try to get out of tripoli? >> are you still -- are you still hoping to be able to leave tripoli somehow? to be able to leave and go back to your home?
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>> have you heard anything more in the last 24 hours from the government? have you heard at all from them? >> eman, we continue to ask questions to the gadhafi regime to moussa ibrahim and we will continue to press on your behalf, and we will continue to do that to try to get answers for you about whether or not you can leave. moussa ibrahim yesterday said he was unaware that you had tried to leave and that you were not allowed to leave. as you know, what he says is
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often not the truth, so we're continuing to try to find some answers. but so far we have not gotten any answers. >> it must feel good to know that your family is standing behind you, that your mother and father, that they all love you and support you as do many people around the world. >> eman, i know you've not been able to speak to your mother. we think we have her on the phone. feel free to talk to her now. >> in a moment, we'll have that reunion with her mom. let us know what you think on
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facebook or twitter. i'll be tweeting tonight, as well. also tonight, the fighting. [ gunfire ] >> nato has been blaming bad weather for the lack of air strikes and opposition fighters say they are paying the price. what's going on, on the ground? details are coming up. [ male announcer ] surprisingly priced at $15,995, the 2011 jetta has arrived. discover german engineering and premium style on the jetta s with best-in-class rear legroom, as well as no-charge scheduled carefree maintenance, all standard. that's great for the price of good. right now, lease the all-new jetta s for just $179 a month. ♪ visit vwdealer.com today.
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a little more than a week ago, this woman, eman al obeidy, snuck into a tripoli hotel and stepped into the global spotlight with allegations of rape at the hands of gadhafi troops. ever since, the regime has tried and failed to get her to recant her story. they've tried coercion, confinement, bribes to her family, threats against her, a televised smear campaign. which she continues to resist all of that. in all that time, she's been unable to speak to her parents. she cannot even connect by phone because the regime had cut off communication between east and west. tonight, thanks to satellite phones and a lot of hard work by a lot of people, she connected with her mom. here's a portion of that conversation. >> eman, i know you've not been able to speak to your mother. we think we now have her on the phone. feel free to talk to her now.
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>> aisha, what do you want your daughter to know?
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>> eman, we continue to ask questions to the gadhafi regime to moussa ibrahim, we've continued to press on your behalf and we will continue to try to do that to get answers for you about whether or not you can leave. moussa ibrahim yesterday said he was unaware that you tried to leave and you were not allowed to leave. as you know, what he says is not often the truth, though. so we are continuing to try to find some answers. but so far we have not gotten any answers. >> please, please be careful, please stay safe. we'll continue to be in touch with you. we want you to be able to say
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goodbye to your mother and say whatever you want.
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>> eman, i'm sorry. we're going to have to go. >> okay, okay. thank you. thank you very much. >> thank you very much. stay strong. >> goodbye. >> the actual conversation went on a lot longer and we let them discuss as they wanted. nic robertson has spent several days trying to get the gadhafi regime to account for its treatment of eman or provide an consistent explanation of it.
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he joins us with david kirkpatrick. nic, it seems like there is this official campaign against this woman that continues on state television and the radio. do officials have any idea what to do here? >> reporter: they don't appear to. they just seem to be relentless in this smear campaign to degrade her, to debase her, to negate her message. it's all part of the government -- in everything they do here, they have their own set narrative and they won't deviate from it. it seems to be a default position they can't get out of, yet they know this is an issue causing anger around the rest of the world. but it's an open sore for them. >> david, do you think media attention here and reporters like yourself and nic and others who have been asking questions about her and asking the regime, has that kept her -- has that helped her?
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has that in fact saved her? because as you write in "the times" a lot of women just kind of disappear into libyan institutions. >> reporter: well, she said that she believes that the media attention has saved her. i know for myself, i felt pretty powerless when she was here at the hotel struggling to stay and find help. i don't think any of us could do anything for us. it sounds after she left, she endured 72 hours of grueling questioning. so i wouldn't necessarily say this is a victory for the media. she certainly said, with some justification i think, if there hadn't been this kind of attention around her case, she might have been sent to one of these homes that the libyans refer to as "rehabilitation facilities" where women are detained without consent, sometimes for years, until someone comes along to marry them.
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>> so wait a minute, explain that. there are these rehabilitation facilities, so-called, where women who have made allegations against rape, they're sent and what happens there, they're held there? >> reporter: they're confined there. yeah, they're held there against their will. they're not allowed to leave. and i think their lives are pretty bleak. the only way they can get out is if a male member of their family comes and takes them away or some stranger shows up looking for a wife and marries one of them off. that's the most common way to leave one of these institutions, i'm told. because women usually end up there because their families shun them after they've raised allegations of a sexual crime. >> nic, she's saying that she continues to be harassed when she goes out on the streets. that at check points she's stopped. she said she was at the courts today trying to press her case and an employee pulled a gun on her. would the government like to arrest her again? because it seems like they've arrested her several times
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without any real result. >> reporter: and she was describing as well yesterday to us that whenever she goes out, she gets either harassed or eventually pulled into a police car. when they get her to the police station, they have no idea what to do with her, because there are no charges outstanding against her. she's just in this sort of eternal limbo, this utterly painful, demoralizing situation that she can't break free from. it just seems like the government is on this crash course to harass, intimidate, degrade her, but they have no other sort of position, because when they take her to the police station, they have to release her because there's no charges, there's nothing to charge her with. >> stay safe, thank you. coming up, as gadhafi forces regain control of brega, the opposition is complaining about lack of support from nato.
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nato is partly blaming the weather, but cnn's ben wedeman says the weather is fine. we'll get the latest from the front lines, next. japan's nuclear crisis. the tokyo electric power company offering money to people who live near the crippled power plant, about $12 each. some are saying, no thanks. and a new report breaking tonight talks about lingering threats and new threats that may go on for a long, long time. details ahead. [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china,
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near brega. >> reporter: when not withdrawing, the rebels do fire back. it's just not clear at what. while an artillery barrage is enough to send them packing, their return fire doesn't seem to be making a dent on their enemy. missing in the equation are the nato airplanes they thought would provide cover and their absence, despite the clear weather, has sparked talk of defeat. the french, british and american forces were seriously striking before, said this commander.
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now it seems as if nato has entered into a secret deal with the regime and the revolutionaries are the victims. >> ben wedeman now joins us live from ajdabiya. the state department foreign affairs correspondent jill doubty and joining us on the phone retired general george kimmitt. ben, you say it's painfully obvious that you haven't seen nato air strikes in your area. why is nato not firing in that area, do you know? have you heard anything? >> reporter: well, what we've heard from nato itself is that they destroyed 30% of moammar gadhafi's military capabilities, that maybe one of the reasons is the weather. as we pointed out, the weather has been so good, there have been days of days being out there on the front. one possibility is that they are using civilians as human
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shields. we know that inside brega, they had a group of civilians being held at the university there by gadhafi's forces. so they aren't clearly using people as some sort of cover. but by and large, you have to look beyond a up to like brega. there are supply lines that go back hundreds of kilometers. and of course, distances in this very large country are quite big. so it's hard to understand why those supply lines are not being hit. but certainly the excuses we've heard from nato are confusing. >> if they fled from brega, are you safe in ajdabiya? are they still firmly in control of ajdabiya? >> reporter: they are firmly in control of ajdabiya. but in a sense, much of the press corps and many of the residents have voted with their feet, in a sense, a vote of no
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confidence for nato. we've seen that essentially basically the opposition controlled all the way up to brega yesterday. at this point, they control only half of the territory between brega and ajdabiya. we did hear airplanes overhead. that was reassuring. but by and large, this possibility of an air strike i think the gadhafi forces are beginning to understand that just because you hear an airplane in the sky doesn't mean there's going to be an air strike. that might explain why they've become increasingly bold, moving on this open road between ajdabiya and brega. because even though they may fly overhead, the chances of an air strike don't seem to be very high. so i think we're safe. but we shall see. anderson? >> general kimmitt, you heard bep's description of the
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situation on the ground. is nato delivering on its mission or falling short? today nato said we've eliminated 30% of gadhafi's forces. but the opposition forces around brega say they're not working there. >> well, i think ben is exactly right on a couple of points. it may be partially due to the weather. it may be part of the fact that nato is getting its feet on the ground, so to speak, and is just starting to get familiar with the area of operations. we sort of have to ask nato the specific question, have there been any changes to the targeting guidance that has been given to the aircraft so that they're restricted from attacking those supply lines or restricted from attacking targets that the americans were asked to fire at first? if in fact there has been change to the targeting guidance, that's a substantial change on part of the nato guidance versus what the americans were flying after. i haven't heard of that. i don't think that's been
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announced. but it would be a significant difference if nato's targeting guidance was different from what americans were firing on last week. >> opposition forces say nato is a lot more cautious than the u.s. was, or it takes much more time for nato to make a decision and respond to events on the ground than it did the u.s. and we heard that the u.s. are the only ones that have a-10s and a-130s, which are used to fly low and take out tanks and ground forces. so does nato have the equipment and the know-how? >> it's true that the united states are the only ones that have the a-10s and the ac-130s that are able to go and do gun runs against the targets on the ground. most of the other aircraft are going to have to use missiles. they don't have the guns that the a-10s and ac-130s. however, i don't believe that the americans have stopped participated in those raids.
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again, i think we've got to take a hard look at the targeting guidance that's being given in the operations. quite frankly, they're using the same combined air operations that the americans were using when they were running these at unilateral operations. unless there's been a change in the guidance and rules of engagement, there should be no reason other than external factors such as weather that would cause the nato aircraft to be less effective than the american aircraft of a week ago. >> and yet ben is saying the weather in the area certainly around brega has been fine the last couple of days. jill, do we know anything about targeting? has any targeting changed by nato? what are you hearing about nato? >> i can't speak specifically about the targeting, anderson. there really is the perception, and it seems to be correct, that the united states really is the leader in nato, and that the other countries, the uk and france now taking over a lot of
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the operations are really struggling to do what the united states is doing. and so that's a real dilemma for president obama. i mean, he doesn't want to lead. he doesn't want the united states to be out there and running every mission. but on the other hand, he doesn't want it to fail. so he's caught between two things right now. the inability of nato, without the united states, to do what they're supposed to be doing. it's not that it's without the united states, of course, because as we've been saying, those a-10s and ac-130s can be brought in. but the whole idea was to shift responsibility to nato. >> thank you for being with us. please stay safe. jill, as well. and general mark kimmitt, thank you. breaking news tonight. "new york times" reporting that a u.s. government engineers who have been helping japan deal with the nuclear crisis are now sounding a major alarm. a warning that the plant could be facing serious new threats
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and measures to stabilize the plant may be causing other problems, as well. this is a breaking report. we're getting all the details and will bring them to you momentarily. [ sneezes ] allergies? you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. both: really? fyi.
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breaking news about japan. "the new york times" reporting tonight that u.s. government engineers sent to help with japan's nuclear crisis are now warning that the trouble at the fukushima daiichi plant is facing long-term threats as a result of the measures being taken to keep the plant stable. the "times" got ahold of the report outlining the potential problems and we're going to run them by nuclear engineer michael freelander. but first, some other developments today with this plant. tepco, the owner of the plant, says it has stopped a serious lake at the number two reactor.
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tepco released this photo earlier saying the latest attempt to repair a crack had reduced the flow of radioactive water into the ocean, you can see the difference here. the picture on the left was taken saturday, showing much more water gushing from that crack. a short time ago, tepco released this photo showing the leak had stopped. which is very good news. just today, the water pouring from the number two reactor contained radiation 5 million times the legal limit. apart from that leak, the plant is still dumping tons of radioactive water into the ocean to free up its storage tanks for water that's even more radioactive. now high levels of radiation have been found in fish. today for the first time authorities issued safety standards for fish. tepco facing a growing backlash has offered payments to residents in ten communities near the plant. it's calling the money a token offer and says more will come. but one city has flatout
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rejected the money saying it amounts to about $12 a person. cnn's kyung lah joins me from tokyo and in hong kong, michael freelander. michael, u.s. government engineers are warning that the plant faces new threats, one that could persist indefinitely, mounting stresses on the containment structures, the possibility of explosions due to the release of hydrogen and oxygen. what do you make of these new reports the "new york times" is reporting? >> well, you know, anderson, let's put it into a bit of context. we are so far outside the original design basis of this power plant. i think it's prudent. it's important to know that they created a laundry list of different things that need to be looked at and considered. at the end of the day, we cannot put ourselves in the situation where we stop injecting water. that is the only means of cooling the cores. but more importantly, what it
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does is it illustrates better than i could have articulated the sense of urgency that tepco needs to take in terms of getting on the long-term method of core cooling, which is the residual heat removing system. it's something we need to consider and people need to ask the what if questions. but honestly, other than that, there's really nothing more than can be done. >> you talked about the heat removal system. what do you mean? >> nuclear power plants are designed so when they shut down, we have systems -- it's a two-loop system. it's like the radiator in your car where we circulate water through the reactor, it picks up the heat and flows through a heat exchanger and that exchanges the heat with another loop that sends hot water into the ocean, not radioactivity but hot water. that is the long-term method of core cooling we have to get on. that equipment is normally powered by emergency diesel generators, which we know were knocked out during the tsunami. and in fact, they found when
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they were trying to restore these systems, that that is the end game here, getting on that long-term stable core cooling method. >> kyung, when i heard tepco is offering what amounts to a token payment, i didn't realize how much of a token this was, $12 per person. that's kind of stunning, isn't it? >> reporter: it's very stunning to one of the towns that was evacuated that's in the shadow of the nuclear plant. the town said, tepco, take your token money and keep it. the city manager says, put yourself in his shoes. his people have been evacuated. they haven't been given a timeline that they can go home. they've lost their jobs, bodies of loved ones still lying around after the tsunami. they haven't been able to bury them. how is he, as a city manager, supposed to say, here's $12, hope you feel better.
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they're just not going to do that. >> michael, in terms of the international help that japan has asked for and received, have they asked for enough? you would like to see more international involvement, right? >> absolutely, anderson. it's difficult for me to understand if it's simply a matter of logistics or an issue of communications or if this is simply a cultural issue of trying to save face and demonstrating that they can do it themselves. there is capacity and certainly capability external to japan that can be brought to bear on this. i sit here astonished looking at just how the government and how tepco is flailing around dealing with this issue. we are now three weeks into a major international crisis, and i've seen almost no external help brought in. >> in terms of the water -- the
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radiated water going into the ocean, they've stopped that leak and we've showed those pictures before, but they're still dumping tons of radioactive water into the pacific, right? >> you know, you are absolutely correct. on one hand, we can declare a bit of victory for the extremely highly radioactive water that was being dumped in some form. but we're still in the process of dumping more than 3 million gallons of water that has more than 100 times the allotted limit of radiation into the ocean. furthermore, they have not provided any isotopic analysis of exactly what's in that water. further more, because of where that water is coming from, we have reason to believe that there are long lived radioisotopes in that water. again, the issue being for several weeks now, we need to keep our eye on the food chain, because this is where this is going to come home to roost. >> michael freelander and kyung
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lah thank you. still ahead, tough talk from president obama but still no budget deal. new information behind the scene to avoid a government shutdown friday. plus what executives that owned the rig that exploded in the gulf of mexico say they plan to do with their huge safety bonuses. impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex global economy. it's just one reason over 80% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing.
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let's check in with isha sesay with a "360" news and business bulletin. what are you following, isha? anderson, a partial government shutdown could happen friday after white house meeting with congressional leaders came and went with no 2011 budget agreement. president obama says he'll keep scheduling meetings until
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there's a deal. >> when we are this close simply because of politics, and we are prepared to put whatever resources are required in terms of time and energy to get this done, but that's what the american people expect. they don't like these games. and we don't have time for them. there are some things that we can't control. we can't control earthquakes or tsunamis. we can't control uprisings on the other side of the world. but we can control our capacity to have a reasoned, fair conversation between the parties and get the business of the american people done. more deaths in yemen. we've now learned that at least six people were killed and hundreds injured in the latest clashes, which have been going on for weeks now. eyewitnesss in the capital say security forces opened fire on anti-government protesters today and attacked them with batons. a turning point in the disputed election in the ivory
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coast. they are negotiating surrender and forces loyal to him have stopped fighting. this after violence killed hundreds in a struggle with forces loyal to the internationally recognized president. anderson, a "360" follow. transocean's senior executives are donating their safety bonuses to the deep water horizon memorial fund. last night we told you that the company, which owned the rig that exploded last year killing 11 workers, called 2010 its best year in safety. today, the ceo announced executives are donating their bonuses because "it is the right thing to do." up next, building up america. see who's building the music industry.
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well, memphis, of course, is known as the home of blues, birthplace of rock 'n' roll, there ease the music of elvis presley's graceland, johnny cash and a lot of others who have ties to the city. for decades, the city lost its musical magic. a group of people are now working to change that. here's tom foreman with tonight's "building up america" report. ♪ >> reporter: in the clubs up and down the street everywhere, the music industry here is rising fast. this is the memphis music foundation. two years ago, businesses opened this nonprofit center to help artists with everything from copy right law to concert
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promotion, all for no charge. they pulled in pros like al bell. >> without being the record company, we are in fact the record company that provides those kind of services. >> reporter: you're still in the same services you used to be? >> yeah, we're just doing it as an institution now and we're doing it for free. >> reporter: for decades the business here languished. steady crowds came to graceland and sun studios but new talent had to leave for success. james alexander, the founding member of the memphis super group the bar caves. >> it was devastating. when it first happened, we said wow, what are we going to do. >> when you see young people come in here today, how do you feel? >> hey, it's great. >> reporter: the foundation now connects 4,000 artists, promoters, agents and others with information, resources. >> they are absolutely today making more

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