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tv   American Morning  CNN  November 7, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EST

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tv, then my wife bought one. we have snuggies and even our dog has snug giz. cou could this be the next snuggie? it's a onesie for adults. right in the back there. and you know, you and i laugh right now, and this picture looks really funny, but i can think of about five people who would like a product like this right now. >> ali velshi wants one. >> i'll take one! >> yeah, and it's marketed by the same company behind the success of the snuggie. so, who knows? >> my personal favorite is pajama jeans. >> pajama jeans. are those like mom jeans? >> no! they're just kind of unattractive jeans that fit like leggings that you're supposed to wear and look fashionable. >> well, maybe you can get me a pair for christmas. >> oh, that would be so attractive! carter evans, thanks so much. "american morning" starts right now.
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scandal hits happy valley. a former penn state football coach facing child sex abuse charges. now two school officials are forced to step down, accused of lying to a grand jury to cover up the alleged crimes. a transfer of power under way at this moment in greece. the embattled prime minister agrees to step down in order to salvage that country's bailout and prevent its debt crisis from infecting other nations, but are the markets ready to breathe a sigh of relief yet? when does human life begin? mississippi voters will decide today. they're voting on a controversial amendment that could have sweeping effects on reproductive rights for women all across the country. mr. cain, an attorney for one of the women who filed a sexual harassment complaint against you -- >> don't even go there. >> can i ask my question? >> no. >> don't even go there! herman cain clamming up, refusing to discuss the sexual harassment charge that continues to hound his campaign on this "american morning."
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♪ good morning to you. it's monday, november 7th, and welcome to "american morning" to start a brand new week, everyone. >> absolutely. >> happy monday! >> good to see you guys. i was in france all last week and it was rainy, cold and windy. it was miserable! good to be back. >> it was a metaphor for what was happening. >> exactly. back here at home, though, first the ugly scandal rocking penn state university's legendary football program. jerry sandusky, a former coach with the nittany lions for more than two decades facing multiple counts of child sex abuse this morning. and late last night, penn state's athletic director, tim curly, and the university senior vice president for finance and business, gary schultz, resigned. they are both facing perjury charges. a lot of questions about the way
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the program's iconic head football coach, 84-year-old joe paterno responded. jason carroll joins us live this morning from state college, pennsylvania, with the latest. good morning, jason. >> reporter: good morning to you. an incredibly sad story, ali. you know, late last night, penn state's board of trustees held an emergency meeting, and shortly following that meeting, that's when those two school officials decided they would resign. those two officials facing perjury charges. they are expected to turn themselves in later today. of course, this is all the fallout of the investigation focused on jerry sandusky. he's a legend in the world of college football. for 23 years, jerry sandusky served as defensive coordinator for the penn state nittany lions. now he's out on bail and defending himself against charges he sexually abused young boys, one as young as 8 years old. two other penn state officials accused of covering up one of the alleged incidents resigned in the wake of the scandal.
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sandusky's lawyer says his client is innocent. >> jerry's very, very depressed, he's very upset, he's very distraught about the charges, the allegations, and the knowledge that, regardless of whether he is eventually proves his guilt or innocence, people are going to think that he did this stuff. >> reporter: pennsylvania's attorney general calls sandusky a "sexual predator." a 23-page grand jury report lays out in graphic detail how he allegedly targeted eight boys ranging in ages from 8 to 14. prosecutors say the boys were victimized between 1994 and 2009. in one case, a graduate student testified he discovered sandusky sexually abusing a boy estimated to be 10 years old in the shower of the penn state football building. the student reported it to penn state's head football coach, joe paterno, who in turn told his immediate supervisor, athletic director timothy curly. it was also brought to the attention of gary schultz, a
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university senior vice president. prosecutors questioned why none of the men reported the incident to police, which is required under pennsylvania law. both schultz and curly are charged with perjury for allegedly lying to the grand jury. the two men testified they were under the impression sandusky was "horsing around" with the boy in the shower. both men resigned late sunday. the board of trustees releasing a statement saying "under no circumstances does the university tolerate behavior that would put children at risk." >> let me just say something about it. you know, there is a big thing about the behavior of penn state here, about their failure to act. but the legal issue is whether they lied. >> reporter: according to the grand jury report, all of the alleged victims came into contact with sandusky through his charity, the second mile. >> second mile is a non-profit organization that reaches out to
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certain young people throughout the state of pennsylvania. >> reporter: sandusky and his wife formed the second mile in 1977 to help troubled boys. he retired from coaching in 1999 but still had access to penn state's facilities. so popular, he wrote an autobiography in 2001 entitled "touched: the jerry sandusky story." and, ali, sandusky continues to maintain his innocence. he is out on $100,000 bail. his next court appearance is scheduled for wednesday. if he is convicted on all counts, he could be looking at life in prison. ali? >> what a remarkable story and developments. we'll stay on top of it with you. jason carroll, thank you so much, in pennsylvania. it is day two of jury deliberations in the michael jackson death trial. katherine and joe jackson anxious to learn the fate of dr. conrad murray. they even got a hotel room near the courthouse. the jury must decide, did murray give jackson that lethal dose of
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propofol? casey wian joins us live from los angeles. good morning, casey. >> reporter: good morning, carol. of course, that is the key question the jury is trying to figure out and will be figuring out later this morning for the second day. and the prosecution says, of course, dr. conrad murray did, in fact, give michael jackson that fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol. the defense says michael jackson was a drug addict and injected himself. countering that, the prosecution says even if that's true, dr. conrad murray remains liable, basically because he's a doctor and he has that responsibility. now, this weekend, "in session's" jean casarez conducted an exclusive interview with another of michael jackson's doctors, a dermatologist named dr. arnold klein. she asked him about defense allegations that he allowed michael jackson to become addicted to another drug, demerol. >> there are some records that three days in a row he would get upwards of 900 milligrams in three days. >> no, that's not true.
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it was not over 900 milligrams in three days, not that i gave him. >> right. >> if i -- no -- >> no, i'm not saying you, i'm saying the records -- >> one day in may i gave him medicine. the rest of the times in may, he got medicine from different doctors. >> reporter: now, klein, who was not called as a witness in this case, also claims that he tried to stop three different doctors from giving jackson propofol. you can see that entire interview later this morning, 9:00 a.m. on trutv. carol? >> casey wian live in los angeles. and there's more of that exclusive interview with jackson's dermatologist, dr. arnold klein. tune in to "in session" on trutv network today at 9:00 a.m. eastern. all right, major developments in the political and financial crisis consuming greece and threatening europe. transfer of power is now under way after that country's prime minister agreed to step down. the hope is that a new unity government will help greece secure more european bailout funds and avoid defaulting on
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its massive debt and then spare the world an economic free fall in the process. jim bolden is live in athens. jim, good morning. what's the latest here? >> reporter: good morning. yes, the prime minister will be most likely stepping down in the coming days. today we should be hearing who will be caretaker for this unity government. the bottom line for the unity government is that this government, whoever runs it, will need to pass through these tough austerity measures, cutting the deficit, meaning cutting people's pensions, people's salaries, cutting state jobs. there's still a lot of people here who work for the state in areas that we wouldn't have in places like the u.s., or they've been privatized many, many decades ago, still working for the state here. so, to push all that through, the idea now is you need to have political strikes, you need people from the left and the right working together to do that. that's what the president is trying to hash out. if he can sort that out in the coming days, the markets will be relieved, for sure, christine. >> and jim, this is all an effort to try to secure the
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bailout funds that are being passed out to the country right now and to secure that overall eu bailout deal? all right, sounds like jim boldin, we lost our connection with jim boulden, but we'll check back with him. this is a country in turmoil politically, trying desperately to show europe and the rest of the world that it is doing what it needs to do to, gosh, both appease its own people, but also the people in europe who will be, you know, behind this bailout. so there you go. all right, new this morning, the search for a 2-year-old boy who's gone missing in washington state. the 2-year-old disappeared yesterday at about 10:00 a.m. in bellevue, washington. police say his mother left him in the car alone when she ran out of gas. when she returned an hour later, skye was gone. bellevue police have rescue teams searching the area where he was last seen.
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singer andy williams is battling bladder cancer. he broke the news to fans during a christmas concert in branson, missouri, saturday night. williams says he's receiving treatment and plans to return to the stage in 2012. and former heavyweight boxing champ joe frazier is fighting liver cancer at a philadelphia hospice. his manager says he is seriously ill. smokin joe went toe to toe with muhammad ali three times in the '70s and was the first fighter ever to beat him. history of the new york city marathon. the winner, one of my countrymen, jeffrey mutai of kenya came in at 2 hours, 5 minutes and seconds, a new record. the first-place woman was a 27-year-old from ethiopia. as you know, i take every opportunity to claim marathon victories. i was born in kenya. >> but this is amazing. >> it's unbelievable. >> 2 hours, 5 minutes, 5 seconds? that's like a freak of nature. >> i'd be asking course officials for details on the run at that point. >> you'd be asking for oxygen.
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>> how many miles? >> you hear 26.2 and say, "can i have oxygen?" >> can i sign up for the next one. coming up on "american morning," connecticut residents running out of time and patience. tens of thousands are still in the dark and the state utility is making promises it just can't keep. we're going to explain. oklahoma, earthquake alley this weekend. the record quake and dozens of aftershocks. a tv news anchor on air live as the ground shook? we'll show you the pictures. plus, thousands of tourists stranded on mt. everest. how the whole ordeal began and how it came to an end straight ahead. it is 12 minutes after the hour. you are watching "american morning."
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congress created this problem, and congress can fix it. i tell you what i can spend. i do my best to make it work. i'm back on the road safely. and i saved you money on brakes. that's personal pricing. it is 15 minutes past the hour. welcome back to "american morning." it was another dark and cold weekend for tens of thousands of people in connecticut after the
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power company made a promise it could not keep. connecticut light and power missing its self-imposed deadline of midnight to have everyone back online. well, this morning, 80,000 customers are still without power in the state more than a week after that freak snowstorm. the drop of temperatures forced 2,100 residents to stay in shelters this weekend. the state is now investigating why it's taking the utility so long in restoring power. >> yeah, i saw a number of people, i was in westchester over the weekend and a number of people from connecticut were there saying it's cold and they keep getting these phone calls about when the power might come on. >> and it's not like these utility companies didn't know about the freak snowstorm -- it wasn't really freak because everyone knew it was going to happen, right? >> but in new jersey, i think they are restored, but some people are still looking for power. some cases, one block has it and one block doesn't. so frustrating. >> hopefully that's resolved soon. after a weekend of aftershocks after a rare and powerful earthquake rocks oklahoma. the 5.6 quake struck near sparks
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in lincoln county late saturday night. that is the strongest earthquake oklahoma's ever felt. this only hours after another large quake hit the same area. tremors reportedly were felt in texas and in arkansas. central oklahoma is experiencing more than 30 aftershocks. several homes were severely damaged. you can see some pictures there. local news anchor ed murray from kwtv was on the air when it happened. take a look. >> reporter: another earthquake has just hit. i still hear a few lights rattling here in our studio, and we will -- we still have our -- if you can see our duratran back here, i don't know if you can see it behind us, still shaking here in oklahoma city. >> cool as a cucumber. >> it was very, yeah, because sometimes you'd be thinking maybe i should get out of here. >> maybe the duratran's going to come crashing down on top of me. >> and there's lights in a studio. at least one person suffered minor injuries. rob marciano is in the extreme weather center for us. >> i definitely would not want
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to be in this place if an earthquake were to come down. he was cool as a cucumber. good morning, guys. you know, oklahoma had quite a year. back in the wintertime, they had a record for the 24-hour amount of snowfall, they had minus 31 degrees which was the coldest temperature ever, then they had a string of 100-degree days, and now this. and now this, the potential for seeing severe weather today across much of oklahoma and texas. this is a decent chance of it. now we're getting into severe weather season. on the fall side, it's not as intense or along-lived as spring, but we can get some outbreaks, and potentially, we have one shaping up today. so the threat for tornadoes southern kansas down into central texas later on this afternoon especially. it's all along a little front that's kind of laid across the midsection of the country, just some lighter rain showers across parts of missouri and in through oklahoma right now. but as some energy comes out of the rockies, it will instigate the atmosphere and energize that front just a little bit. as a matter of fact, the back side of that front will have some snow mostly across the high plains and high prairies of
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eastern colorado. maybe three to five inches, but winter storm warnings posted. windy there as well. this storm will slowly move east, and as it does so, picks up moisture from the south. so, today will not be the only day we see a threat for seeing severe weather across this part of the country. as it gets into arkansas, louisiana and other parts of the midsouth during the day on tuesday and then to a lesser extent during the day on wednesday, we'll look for the severe weather threat here. definitely some colder air behind this system. if you are traveling today, because of the storms expected in dallas, potentially over an hour delay through dfw or love field. st. louis and kansas city, general rain there. and snow in denver and low clouds expected in san francisco. everybody east of the mississippi looks real nice again today, although a chilly morning. but other than that, a five-star fall day. and parts of southern california drying out after what they endured yesterday morning. video out of southern california. thunderstorms, you know, they happen a handful of days a year and they got a pretty good one yesterday across parts of southern california, including
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los angeles. picked up over a fifth or so an inch of rain to slow down traffic on a sunday morning. nevertheless, a drier day expected for california. 62 degrees in los angeles. temperatures yesterday were held in the 50s in some spots, so kind of chilly for so cal, 62 degrees. new york and l.a., forecast highs should be exactly the same. >> weird. >> about the only thing you guys have in common. >> good point. >> true. >> rob, we'll see you later on in the morning, rob marciano. ahead on "american morning," when does human life begin? it's a question voters in one state will decide, and its answer could have a major effect on women across the nation. plus, the holiday forecast calls for, once again, plunging tv prices. find out how low they'll go and when you can pick up a nice deal. it's 21 minutes after the hour. i don't want healthy skin for a day. i want healthy skin for life. [ female announcer ] don't just moisturize, improve the health of your skin with aveeno daily moisturizing lotion. the natural oatmeal formula goes beyond 24-hour moisture. it's clinically proven to improve your skin's health
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welcome back. "minding your business" this morning. the cue today again comes from europe. right now, u.s. stock futures are trading slightly lower. overseas, markets in europe and asia are also down, the sell-off coming as the greek prime minister announced he'll step down if it means getting europe's international bailout approved. investors' focus also shifts to italy and whether it will be a domino to fall in europe's crisis, where the political future of silvio berlusconi hangs in the balance this morning ahead of a key parliamentary vote. italian interest rates over 6.5% as investors there worry about the country's financial stability. checking out. it's estimated thousands of americans pulled their money from the nation's biggest banks over the weekend as part of bank transfer day. customers were urged to shift their accounts to credit unions. the grassroots movement really
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caught fire after bank of america announced its new debit card fee, a fee they eventually scrapped under pressure from customers, but that doesn't mean people aren't moving anyway. there is no need to wait until black friday if you're in the market for a new tv. retailers have already started slashing the prices for big-screen tvs by as much as 40%. experts say stores are trying to stir up excitement and get you in the door early this holiday season, and some say the biggest deals are yet to come. the wealth gap between young and old wider than ever, according to new census data. households headed by a person 65 years or older have a net worth 47 times greater than a household headed by someone who's 35 years or younger. that's because younger americans are taking on more debt in order to go back to school. many also purchased homes at bubble prices and now have less equity in their homes. "american morning" will be right back after this break. [ horn honks ]
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can i ask my question? >> no, because -- where's my chief of staff? >> right here. >> please send him the journalistic code of ethics. >> a defiant herman cain refusing to discuss the sexual harassment allegations that are hounding his campaign on this "american morning." and good morning to you and welcome back. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time for this morning's top stories. penn state's athletic director and a senior vice
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president with the university have now resigned, both facing perjury charges. they're accused of lying to a grand jury to cover up child sex abuse allegations against former nittany lions defensive coach jerry sandusky. prosecutors say sandusky abused eight boys at his youth services charity over a 15-year period. political leaders in greece are scrambling to build a new coalition government. this morning, prime minister george papandreou will meet with the country's main opposition party to discuss who will become the nation's next prime minister. papandreou announced he would step down yesterday if it means getting a $130 billion international bailout approved. jury deliberations set to resume in the michael jackson death trial this morning. no verdict after the first full day of deliberations on friday. jurors must decide if dr. conrad murray gave jackson a lethal dose of propofol. meantime, katherine and joe jackson are staying at a hotel near the courthouse. that way, they can get there quickly when jurors reach a
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decision. herman cain trying his best to keep moving his campaign forward. the republican front-runner insisting he's no longer willing to talk about sexual harassment allegations that have been dogging him, but that is not stopping his gop rivals from sounding off. cnn deputy political director paul stein hauser joins us live from washington. good morning, paul. >> good morning, carol. herman cain and his campaign would like this to be over, no doubt about it, as we enter the ninth day since the controversy struck. over the weekend, he had a pretty friendly debate between he and newt gingrich in texas sponsored by a tea party group. afterward, they tried to keep the questions just to the economy and entitlements, but it didn't play out that way. take a listen. >> if y'all just listen for 30 seconds, i will explain this one time. what i'm saying is this, we are getting back on message -- >> thank you, mr. cain. >> end of story. back on message. read all of the other accounts,
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read all of the other accounts where everything has been answered in a story. we're getting back on message, okay? >> that's what the cain campaign would like and the candidate would like. some of the other candidates also feel that same way, but also maybe they would like herman cain to be a little more forthcoming. listen to one of his rivals for the gop nomination, former utah governor jon huntsman, yesterday. take a listen. >> i'm concerned that we're wasting a whole lot of time on this supposed issue, this scandal, which is taking away from our ability to really address the major issues of the day, how we get this economy rebuilt, how we get to the point where we can address the issue of joblessness and secure our place in the world. and this is taking away from that ability, and therefore, it becomes a major distraction. >> now, for the cain campaign, unless all the questions are answered, i think the media's going to continue to ask these questions. carol, we're talking about it today. two debates this week, though, may move the spotlight away from that, an economy debate on
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wednesday and a foreign policy debate next weekend, carol. >> maybe so. herman cain appears on "the jimmy kimmel show" later tonight. we'll see what subjects come up there. we're also getting sort of an idea what voters might think of this whole scandal. there is a new poll out. tell us about it. >> right there tied at the top for the gop nomination, pretty much where they were before the scandal. go to the next poll as well, but this is interesting, carol. almost seven out of ten republican voters say that this right now, these allegations are not affecting their view of herman cain. but the trouble is, about one out of four say, yes, it could make them less likely to vote for herman cain. that could be troublesome for him in a very close contest, carol. >> okay, i know we didn't conduct this poll, but i just wonder about the gender split. i mean, did they poll more women than men, an equal number? i mean, would that make a difference? >> we have seen this in polls
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before this allegation struck, and currently, herman cain performs better with men than with women when it comes to polling. it was that way before these allegations struck last week. it continues to be that way, carol. >> because i do wonder if there's a split there. that would be curious. maybe i'll look into that later today. mitt romney, he's still a front-runner. what's on his agenda this week? >> mitt romney is in iowa today, and that has us all wondering, again, he's one of the co-leaders in iowa, but he hasn't spent a lot of time there on the caucus calendar. the question is, will he go big in iowa like four years ago? you'll remember it backfired. he lost there and in new hampshire and didn't win the nomination. the question this time is does mitt romney put a lot of money and effort into iowa and try to win it and then go to new hampshire and hopefully for him, win big, or does he play it safe? time will tell. we're eight weeks away from the start of the caucuses in iowa, carol. >> paul steinhauser live in washington, thank you. >> in reporting the storey last night, our good friend don lemon looked into the society for professional journalists code of
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ethics, and under the act independently section -- because herman cain said please get the book of ethics -- people use different books in this business, but it says "journalists should be freed of obligation of any interests other than the public's right to know." that's all it says. >> interpret that as you will. >> right. >> actually, there was a show all about politico and how he did his reporting and why he didn't reveal his sources. it's all online. >> it's worth looking into. also this morning, a deadly inferno at a home for developmentally disabled adults. the fire breaking out as they slept over the weekend. five residents at this facility were killed. police say the building was already up in flames by the time authorities made it there, and it happened too quickly to get everyone out. they're still trying to figure out how it started. more than 1,500 workers rescued from mt. everest. bad weather left them stranded for six days with little food or supplies. many of the hikers chose to try to make their way back down the mountain on a four-day trek. once conditions cleared, helicopters and small planes
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were able to airlift the climbers to safety. the tourists are being transported to kathmandu, the capital of nepal. okay, this just in to cnn. lindsay lohan is back behind bars. this just in to cnn, lindsay lohan has been released from jail. lohan checked into and out of a detention facility in lynwood, california, overnight, serving just four hours of a 30-day sentence for the violating of her terms of probation. officials say she could now be released within hours due to jail overcrowding. i got a tweet here. it says "so, between going to bed and getting up this morning, lindsay lohan has gone to jail and been released?" that's correct. still ahead, mississippi residents voting on an amendment that's causing heated national debate and could change reproductive rights for women there. congratulations.
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welcome back. it's 40 minutes after the hour. mississippi is voting on a controversial amendment tomorrow, one that could have a big impact on the entire nation. voters will decide whether to give legal status to fertilized human eggs, basically answering the question does human life begin at conception. opponents say it's an effort to make abortion illegal and that it could outlaw certain methods of birth control and invitro fertility treatments. for more on the legal implications of this measure, we turn to jonathan will, an assistant professor for the mississippi college school of law. jonathan, thank you for being with us. let me just read so our viewers can see this, what the question is. there are a few measures on the ballot and this one is
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initiative measure 26. should the term person be defined to include every human being from the moment of fertilization, cloning or the equivalent thereof. first of all, to get on the record, jonathan, you are against this amendment. you'd not like it to pass. >> well, i mean, personally, it's not really an issue for me other than to make sure that enough information gets out that other people can vote intelligently on the matter. i hope i have enough information to make a decision myself. >> right. >> but i'm hoping that other people have enough information to make an intelligent decision for themselves. >> okay, so jonathan, for people who have dealt with this type of issue through roe versus wade and who understand it and understand the challenges like this that have been out over the years, what, if anything, is different about this particular ballot question and what would be the implications of it becoming law in mississippi? >> well, i think what's different is that this amendment would, for the first time really
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in a constitutional amendment, define personhood to begin at the very earliest moments of human development. so, when you look at the supreme court's jurisprudence in the abortion cases, they struggle a little bit with what exactly the state's interest is. so, they'll identify a legitimate interest in protecting prenatal life or the potential for life or the life of the unborn child, but something other than a person after birth. and so, what could happen is that these amendments, like one that may pass in mississippi, could change the nature of the inquiry, because now the state's interests is in protecting a life, just like you. and so, the court -- >> can this exist in contravention of roe versus wade? >> well, i think the court -- the hope would be, on the proponents' side, that the court would overturn roe v. wade. so, i don't think it could exist
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consistent with roe v. wade, but the hope would be that this new appreciation of personhood would require the court to overturn roe v. wade. >> i'm not a lawyer, but it seems to me to be even broader than roe v. wade, because it's not only about abortion, it's about the establishment of personhood in any fashion. >> well, that's correct. i mean, if it was merely about abortion, commonly understood as the termination of a pregnancy, it might be drafted to say life begins or personhood begins at, say, implantation. but since it goes back even farther than that to fertilization, whatever we mean by that, it implicates more than just abortion. it implicates certain forms of birth control, it implicates fertility treatments, anyplace where we're putting these pre-embryonic persons' life at risk. >> colorado's tried this, as far as i've read, a couple times, maybe? and the group there involved in this, personhood usa, is looking carefully to see whether they can put these on ballots in different states. it hasn't passed anywhere before, but if it does pass, and
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there seems to be some polling to indicate that it may, what are those implications that you're talking about that are not necessarily abortion-related but birth control-related? >> well, i think a lot of it would hinge upon what isthe immediate impact of the amendment, were it to pass? so, if the amendment were deemed to be effectively self-executing, meaning that the entire mississippi code with its thousands of references to person, would be interpreted with this new understanding of pre-embryonic personhood, then the concern would be that local prosecutors could immediately after it takes effect put abortion clinics on notice, maybe put ivf clinics on notice, saying with our new understanding of personhood, we view your actions to be against the existing criminal code. if it's not effectively self-executing, then we would see a period where we need enabling legislation to set it in motion, and then we'd get lobbying efforts on all sides about what any antiabortion legislation might look like,
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what any restrictions on ivf might look like and so forth. >> all right, so, it's something we should all be watching very carefully because it could have implications far beyond mississippi, let alone the very serious implications it could have in mississippi. thanks for joining us, jonathan. good to talk to you. jonathan will is the director of bioethics and health law at mississippi college school of law in jackson. all right, just in this morning, reuters and bloomberg are reporting italian prime minister silvio berlusconi is on the verge of stepping down as concerns mount that that country may fall victim to the european debt crisis that has plagued greece. this morning, that country's borrowing costs soared to their highest level since the euro was created more than 6.5% for the country to borrow money for ten years. that's showing real concern about the financial stability of this country. it is the eurozone's third largest economy. we're working to confirm all of this, of course. we'll go live to matthew chance in rome in about 15 minutes. usually, when you're hearing
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rumors of silvio berlusconi wanting to step down, it's because of a bribery scandal. he's faced bribery scandals in the past -- >> sex scandals. >> sex scandals and the like, but this is a big deal. this is -- >> not that they aren't big deals. >> you're right. this is about the financial stability of europe here and a worry that italy is somehow the next domino to fall there. >> so, does that mean that italy's going to get a bailout plan, or a bailout, too? >> too big for -- this is a big economy. you look at france and germany as these massive, massive economies. italy's a really big economy. so, this is exactly what was scaring all those folks at the g-20 and the eurozone last week. greece is a problem that could be solved. italy, spain is another big economy in trouble. so, people are asking -- -- >> i want to know underneath it all, he's going to step down. so, what will be put into place that berlusconi is not putting into place in italy? >> that's what we'd like to know as well, what they're going to do to contain this crisis, because the markets are telling us there's a problem right now with borrowing money in italy.
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6.5% -- 2% in the u.s. for us to borrow money. >> while we talk about this crisis, the u.s. government can borrow money for less money than any of us can. italy at that point -- and people say, why is that a bad thing? why are high interest rates a bad thing? because every dollar italy has to spend servicing this debt is a dollar they don't spend -- >> on their country. >> and that's a real problem. there is a big bailout fund that the european leaders are trying to do. so, all the countries get together along with the imf and they fund this big pool of money, but what's that going to look like? how are you going to draw on it? how will they backstop the losses and restore confidence so you don't see the dominos starting to fall? that's what the crisis is all about and italy is showing strains this morning. >> we'll find out more in a bit. we're also excited to tell you about this, not so much the italy thing. there is an exciting, new program about to begin here at cnn, called "the next list," and it focuses on america's innovators, the people creating cutting-edge technology that will one day change our lives when it comes to technology,
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education and entertainment. so, check it out. >> i'm a cyber illusionist, which means i combine magic and science to create illusions. it's deception, it's science, technology, gadgets. calling myself a magician evokes a certain image. like, if you're a magician, you immediately know what that is. it's a guy who does a magic trick. a cyber illusionist, it requires a little bit of explanation. >> certainly does. "the next list" debuts this coming sunday, november 13th, at 2:00 p.m. eastern. >> looks cool. >> really fun. there's just these neat things, and the concept is these are not people you've heard of as innovators, they're the next list of innovators. still to come on "american morning," money is the most important language and this morning we'll show you how to speak and understand this language so you can make your money work for you.
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it's 48 minutes after the hour. . .
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ten minutes to the top of the hour. here's what you need to know to start your day. penn state's athletic director and vice president are stepping down facing perjury charges. prosecutors say they lied to cover up sex abuse charges
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against former nittany lions assistant coach sandusky. and greece will decide who will become the country's next prime minister. papandreou agreed to step down as part of the deal to get the $178 billion international bailout approved. it's day two of jury deliberations in the michael jackson death trial. jurors must decide if dr. conrad murray gave jackson a lethal dose of propofol. if convicted, he faces four years in prison. we could be looking at a lost season now. locked-out nba players have a wednesday deadline to accept the league's latest contract offer. it's reportedly worth 49% to 51% of the league's revenues, but the head of the players association already says he won't even bring it to a vote. it's the ultimate beauty pageant title. the winner of the 2011 miss world crown goes to miss venezuela, elian sarcos. the runner-up, miss philippines. third place goes to miss puerto rico. and that's the news you need to
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start your day. "american morning" back after a break.
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all right, welcome back. this week we're going to teach all of you a new language so you know how to speak money. we all know that learning how to speak and understand the language of money is important, because every decision is a financial decision, whether you know it and whether you like it or not. >> a lot of people see christine and i on tv, but we come from very different places. as i was talking about the marathon this morning, i was born in kenya, i was raised in toronto, and i guess i'm a risk-taker when it comes to money. >> i was born in iowa, the granddaughter of farmers who were extremely risk diverse
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people and it's a risky business, but my grandparents are very different. they planted with the profits from the year before, and that was something that really has, i mean, infiltrated my world financial view. i'm very cautious. >> there's no right or wrong, but you need to know what type of investor you are. we've broken it down into three categories. while your particular financial personality may overlap with another category, that's okay. use this just as a guide to form a foundation for your financial house. first, meet the risk-taker. the younger you are, by the way, the more likely you are to be a risk-taker, because time is the most powerful factor on your side. you're building wealth and earnings, and you can withstand bigger risks and stock market shocks. >> then things start to get more moderate, once you hit maybe 40 or 45. it's time to make sure you're balancing your money, that your money is all in the right place. you have less time now, 20 to 25 years before you need to start drawing down and living on this retirement savings, so time is not your best friend anymore. in this more moderate period of your life, you are still earning, but you also have an eye to preserving wealth.
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>> right. now third, and a lot of you fall into this category, we know, because you e-mail and you tweet us -- cautious. the closer you are to retirement, the more cautious you need to be because you will soon need to live on your money. once you figure out what kind of investor you are, you can then move forward with your financial planning. you can't do it until then. >> that guy was so cautious, he wouldn't even go to the barber. did you see the beard? >> yeah, the beard going. >> how do you do that? we want to preview making your plan. in our new book "how to speak money," we lay out bruce stellar's five-step plan, which we completely agree with and this is so important for you. first, lay the foundation. answer the question what's my money for? vacation, college, rainy days? once you decide what it's for, you're likely to make more responsible decisions with it. sometimes you're just trying to get to the point of what to do with your money longer term. >> then you decide what you want, do you want to retire, live out your days in a villa in tuscany? saying you want to retire is vague. another is highly specific.
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and if you can picture your retirement, visualizing it makes it easier to work towards actually achieving it. >> all right. people plan for everything, but do you plan for your money, right? you plan for weight loss, how to divide and conquer house chores, launching a new product at work, how you're going to try to get the next promotion. but many with finance, they're just wandering around. so, have goals. figure out a road to them and map it. >> and fourth, take action on your plan. this is where it becomes tricky, right? you actually have to do something about it. we all make excuses and say i'll do it tomorrow. make tomorrow today. ask yourself what will it take to get me to take action on this plan? you might need creativity, patience, discipline, you might need to get others around you to support you, but move forward. that's the most important part. >> then, stay engaged. once you start, don't stop. you don't start a diet and then don't do the diet -- well, although some of us do. diets and money, there's so many parallels between them, aren't there? but you have to stay with it. it's the same thing with money. you don't take control of your financial life, it's just going
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to turn out the way it does, and you can't afford to have that happen to you in your retirement. >> here's the thing, if you have a plan, then the market gyrations don't matter as much to you because the market is one part of your financial plan. your other part should be working better. so, we've got a lot more on this in our new book "how to speak money." it's available, called "how to speak money: the language and knowledge you need now." it's out now, amazon and bookstores, wherever you like. tell us what you think. ♪
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♪ if i should fall from grace with god ♪
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♪ where no doctor can relieve me ♪ ♪ if i'm buried 'neath the sod ♪ but the angels won't receive me ♪ ♪ let me go, boys, let me go, boys ♪ ♪ let me go down in the mud where the rivers... ♪ [ female announcer ] when you're responsible for this much of the team, you need a car you can count on. ♪ congratulations. congratulations. today, the city of charlotte can use verizon technology to inspire businesses to conserve energy and monitor costs. making communities greener... congratulations. ... and buildings as valuable to the bottom line... whoa ! ... as the people inside them. congratulations. because when you add verizon to your company, you don't just add, you multiply. ♪ discover something new... verizon.
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horror in happy valley. penn state university rocked by a child sex abuse scandal. the accused, a former longtime coach. the fallout this morning, two school officials forced to step down for allegedly lying to a grand jury to cover it up. a continent in crisis. greece on the brink and now two prime ministers reportedly on their way out. why italy's prime minister this morning may be the next to go. mr. cain, the attorney for one of the women who filed sexual harassment complaints against you -- >> don't even go there. >> herman cain clamming up,
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refusing to discuss the sexual harassment allegations that continue to hound his campaign. plus, is it time to refinance your mortgage? interest rates are at historic lows and that could save you hundreds of dollars every single month, but there's also the fine print. find out if it's worth the time and money and who's benefiting most from all this refinancing on this "american morning." ♪ good morning. it's monday, november 7th. welcome to "american morning." >> up first this morning, the horrible scandal that's rocking happy valley. jerry sandusky, a former penn state football coach for more than two decades, facing multiple counts of child sex abuse this morning, and there's a new development. late last night, penn state's athletic director and the university's senior vice president for finance and business resigned. they're both facing perjury charges, and now some people are
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questioning how legendary coach joe paterno handled this highly charged case. jason carroll joining us live this morning from state college, pennsylvania. and jason, joe paterno, he's a legend, but some people say he knew about these allegations a long time ago and told the wrong person. >> reporter: well, you know, carol, there are so many questions surrounding this investigation. joe paterno, such a respected figure here in this part of the state. his statue, in fact, right behind me. but let's just sort of set the scene in terms of what's happened in terms of the latest developments. late last night, penn state board of trustees held an emergency meeting. following that meeting, you had the resignation of those two school officials facing perjury charges. those school officials, carol, expected to turn themselves in later today, but make no mistake, carol, the focus of this investigation is on jerry sandusky. he's a legend in the world of college football. for 23 years, jerry sandusky served as defensive coordinator for the penn state nittany
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lions. now he's out on bail and defending himself against charges he sexually abused young boys, one as young as 8 years old. two other penn state officials accused of covering up one of the alleged incidents resigned in the wake of the scandal. sandusky's lawyer says his client is innocent. >> jerry's very, very depressed. he's very upset. he's very distraught about the charges, the allegations, and the knowledge that regardless of whether he is eventually proves his guilt or innocence, people are going to think that he did this stuff. >> reporter: pennsylvania's attorney general calls sandusky a "sexual predator." the 23-page grand jury report lays out in graphic detail how he allegedly targeted eight boys ranging in ages from 8 to 14. prosecutors say the boys were victimized between 1994 and 2009. in one case, a graduate student testified he discovered sandusky sexually abusing a boy estimated
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to be 10 years old in the shower of the penn state football building. the student reported it to penn state's head football coach, joe paterno, who, in turn, told his immediate supervisor, the athletic director, timothy curley it was also brought to the attention of gary schultz, a university senior vice president. prosecutors questioned why none of the men reported the incident to police, which is required under pennsylvania law. both schultz and curley are charged with perjury for allegedly lying to the grand jury. the two men testified they were under the impression sandusky was "horsing around" with the boy in the shower. both men resigned late sunday. the board of trustees releasing a statement saying "under no circumstances does the university risk." >> let me just say something about it. you know, there is a big moral issue about the behavior of penn state here, about their failure
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to act. but the legal issue is whether they lied. >> reporter: according to the grand jury report, all of the alleged victims came into contact with sandusky through his charity, the second mile. >> the second mile is a non-profit organization that reaches out to serve young people throughout the state of pennsylvania. >> reporter: sandusky and his wife formed the second mile in 1977 to help troubled boys. he retired from coaching in 1999 but still had access to penn state's facilities. so popular, he wrote an autobiography in 2001 entitled "touched: the jerry sandusky story." and carol, sandusky is currently out on $100,000 bail. he's expected to make another court appearance on wednesday. and later today, we're expected to hear from the attorney general at that point. we are waiting to hear more details and we'll have some more of our questions answered about this particular case. carol? >> all right, jason carroll reporting live for us this morning. thank you.
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major developments this morning in the political and financial crisis that is consuming greece. a transfer of power is under way after that country's prime minister agreed to step down, even though he survived a confidence vote on friday night. the hope is that a new unity government will help greece secure more european bailout funds and avoid defaulting on its massive debt. and there is also growing concern right now about the financial stability and the future of italy. reuters and "bloomberg" are reporting that two journalists close to italian prime minister silvio berlusconi say the leader is on the verge of stepping down. joining me live from rome, italy, is matthew chance. good morning, matthew. what's the situation on the ground there? >> reporter: well, if he is stepping down, he's keeping it very close to his chest, at least publicly, because we've just spoken to the press office of the prime minister, silvio berlusconi, and they're denying that he's intending to do that. instead, what we will see over the course of the next few days is a lot of pressure to be brought down on silvio berlusconi, as he faces a crucial parliamentary vote
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tomorrow on plans for the 2010 budget. so, for last year's budget, which still has to be passed. if he fails to get the majority in that parliamentary vote tomorrow, then we could see some kind of movement in terms of him staying on in power, ali. >> matthew, obviously, the implications of italy defaulting are substantially more serious than greece. is there some sense that -- you know, carol asked this a question a few minutes ago, what gets achieved in solving italy's massive financial problems by berlusconi stepping aside, if that rumor turns out to be true? >> reporter: because italy's problems, italy's economic problems are essentially about the lack of credibility that silvio berlusconi has in the eyes of the people of italy, in the eyes of the market. that he's the right person, that he has the political strength to push through the tough austerity measures the country needs to get its economy back on track. he just doesn't have the parliamentary support to do that. so, what the markets want to see is somebody else, a more credible figure, to move into place and to impose those
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austerity measures, try and bring the italian debt, which is something like $2.6 trillion, more than greece and spain and portugal and ireland combined, from being under control, ali. >> thank you very much, matthew chance in rome for us. it's day two of jury deliberations in the michael jackson death trial. no verdict after the first full day of deliberations on friday. katherine and joe jackson anxious to learn the fate of dr. conrad murray. they even got a hotel room to be near the courthouse. the jury must decide, did murray give jackson that lethal dose of propofol? casey wian is joining us live from los angeles very early this morning in los angeles. good morning, casey. >> reporter: good morning, christine. yeah, the jury deliberated for 7 hours and 40 minutes on friday. they'll get back at it in about four hours from right now, again, this morning. of course, the key question they are trying to decide, did dr. conrad murray deliver that fatal dose of propofol to michael jackson? the defense claims that michael
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jackson was a drug addict, and possibly injected himself with the propofol. the prosecution says even if that is the case, that conrad murray is still liable for michael jackson's death, basically because he has added responsibilities as a doctor. now, outside the courtroom, we saw some verbal scuffles among supporters of dr. conrad murray and michael jackson's fans on friday. frankly, a lot of those scuffles were probably ramped up a little bit by the presence of television news cameras. i counted 45 cameras outside the courthouse at one point on friday. michael jackson's fans saying on some blogs and on the internet this morning that they're going to plan a more somber attitude, more rev reshl tone. michael jackson's family expected to gather at a hotel near here so they can be close to the courtroom and be in the courtroom when that verdict is finally reached.
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christine? >> all right, casey wian in los angeles. thanks, casey. herman cain is having a very hard time keeping everyone focused on his campaign. he's refusing to discuss sexual harassment allegations that continue to dog him at every step. and even though he's ordered the media not to bring it up, the questions persist. >> mr. cain, the attorney for one of the women who filed sexual harassment complaints against you -- >> don't even go there. >> can i ask the question? >> no, because -- where's my chief of staff? >> right here. >> please send him the journalistic code of ethics. >> cain may not want to discuss the sexual harassment accusations, but his republican rivals do. jon huntsman says it's causing a distraction for all the candidates and he's calling on cain to come totally clean. still to come this morning, more on the child sex abuse scandal at penn state. why legendary football coach joe paterno could get caught up in
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this controversy. and no longer just tornado country. oklahoma gets rocked by a record earthquake and then dozens of aftershocks. a tv news anchor on air, live as the ground shook. we'll have that video for you. and 20 years ago today, magic johnson shocked the nation, announcing his retirement from the nba because of hiv. what we all thought at the time was a death sentence. we'll find out how he's doing and what his life is like now. it's 11 minutes past the hour. this is $100,000.
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14 minutes past the hour. welcome back to "american morning." more now on that ugly scandal that's rocking penn state's legendary football program. jerry sandusky, a former defensive coordinator for the nittany lions for more than two decades, charged with sexually abusing eight boys, and now the university's athletic director and a senior vice president have stepped down after being accused of lying to a grand jury to cover it up. mark vieira joins us live from state college, pennsylvania, this morning. he's a contributor to "the new york times." he's been covering this case quite closely. welcome.
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>> thank you for having me. >> the charges are horrifying enough, but what's also disturbing is that the staff, the athletic director and the senior vice president, they allegedly heard from witnesses who saw this abuse, yet they failed to report it to police as is required by pennsylvania law. were they trying to cover it up, were they ignoring the problem, what was happening with them? >> i really can't speak to what their motives were, but it seems that when they were presented with this evidence, they got together, they huddled, they met with some higher-up officials, including president graham spaniard, who was notified in some form or fashion about what they had heard from a graduate assistant who allegedly had seen this 2002 incident. perhaps in not saying it, they were simply hoping it would just go away. and clearly, it didn't, and clearly, the problems persisted.
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and obviously, it all sort of came to light on saturday morning when the charges came down. >> but the witness saw this suspect in the shower with a 10-year-old boy. it couldn't be more explicit than that. i want to talk about the head coach, joe paterno, because this witness told joe paterno -- joe paterno told the athletic director, but he didn't go to the police. is he required to go to the police? >> under pennsylvania law, he technically is in the clear in this because he presented it to his supervisor. how penn state has laid it out, including scott paterno, the son of joe paterno, who i spoke with last night -- what they're saying is that the graduate assistant who saw this 2002 incident you're referring to didn't describe in exact detail what he had seen. perhaps it was just horseplay was what was conveyed to paterno, which is why he felt comfortable passing it to his superiors, as opposed to
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reaching out to the authorities, for example. however, a lot of people look at that and say that's sort of flimsy. anything that's involving a 76-year-old man and a 10-year-old boy in a shower, whether it was horseplay or something more severe, as it's alleged to be, probably needed to be brought to the authorities first and foremost, in addition to his superiors. >> i think most parents would agree with you. the other, just bizarre thing about this, is university officials didn't bother to find out who this boy was. >> there are a lot of unanswered questions in this, and i think that's what's been the most startling and stark thing for a lot of people to come to grips with and sort of put their head arou around, as they've read the grand jury report. there's so many questions unanswered, for example like the one you posed to me. okay, why didn't you go to the police about this first? why didn't you even mention it further? why didn't the president feel that it was worthy of following
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up? who knew what when, and to the extent of what happened, what were they aware of happened -- what were they aware of what happened at certain times? i think there's a lot of unanswered questions, and it's all still very much unclear. >> a lot of people are wondering, you know, this is just another sign that college football is just too powerful. i mean, there's nothing you can do to hurt it because it brings universities so much money, and maybe it's best to cover up something like this because you don't want to hurt a college football program, especially one like penn state's, who's been untouched by scandal. >> i think that's the thing that's in all this that makes it the most startling, is in joe paterno's 46 years as head coach, dating back to 1966, the program has established a stellar reputation. it is one of four major universities that's never had
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major sanctions by the ncaa in terms of recruiting violations and these things, and penn state, frankly, has been very proud to sort of hold itself to that higher standard and sort of likes to think of itself as carrying itself above the fray. this, obviously, has sort of pierced that notion, and that's what's been the most difficult thing for a lot of people to come to grips with, is maybe this institution that they've held in such high regard wasn't as perfect as everyone had believed it to be from the outside. >> and quickly, with that in mind, i know these two university officials have stepped down, but should we expect more university officials to step down in the days to come? >> again, i think that goes back to some of the unanswered questions about who knew exactly what and when. i think as some of those questions, hopefully, get cleared up, as the legal process continues, we'll have a lot better indications. but i will say this. at the highest levels of the university, the president and coach joe paterno, i certainly
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think that there are going to be fierce questions opened up to them and their futures. like i had mentioned earlier, tim curley and gary schultz, or some combination of that group, had alerted them in some form or fashion, whether that was some sort of formal memo or letter or whether that was an informal conversation about what they knew about the 2002 incident. spanier seemed to sort of wipe his hands of culpability in that whole scenario. >> right. >> so, i think going forward, that's going to be a big issue, and i think also, with joe paterno, he's 84 years old, he's coached here for 46 seasons. i think a lot of people before any of this stuff happened were wondering very loudly whether this could be his last year. and now with all this as sort of the backdrop, we certainly have to wonder how much longer he has for the job. >> mark viera, sports contributor to "the new york times," thanks so much for joining us this morning. we appreciate it.
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>> how long this has taken. that 10-year-old boy today would be 19 years old. >> yeah. >> so, all of this time, while this child grew up with this scandal sort of simmering, or at least completely out of public view. 40 counts. 40 counts. he faces a maximum of life in prison if he's found guilty of all these counts. >> yeah. >> it's just -- and you just wonder about the children, like what effect -- i mean, if these charges are true, what effect that this stuff has had on these children. >> yeah. >> who are now, you're right, adults. >> they're college age, yeah. all right, a weekend of aftershocks after a rare and powerful earthquake rocks oklahoma. the 5.6 quake struck near sparks in lincoln county late saturday night. it's the strongest ever in that state. this only hours after another large quake hit the same area. tremors reportedly felt in texas, arkansas, central oklahoma experiencing more than 30 aftershocks. several homes were damaged pretty severely. local news anchor ed murray from kwtv, he was on the air when the ground shook. take a look.
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>> another earthquake has just hit. i still hear a few lights rattling here in our studio, and we will -- we still have our -- if you can see our duratran here, i don't know if you can see it behind us, still shaking here in oklahoma city. >> at least one person suffered minor injuries. still to come this morning, anger and frustration over those bank fees are prompting thousands and thousands of people to check out of their banks. where are they putting their money this morning? we'll tell you. and new york city's first casino finally open for business, but will gamblers show up in a down economy? you're watching "american morning."
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at 26 minutes after the hour, welcome back. we're "minding your business." the cue today again comes from europe. right now u.s. stock futures are trading slightly lower. the greek prime minister announced he will step down if it means getting the bailout approved. and investors shifting to italy and wondering whether it will be a domino effect. silvio berlusconi hangs in the balance ahead of a parliamentary vote. italian rates are about 6.5% and investors are worried about the country's financial stability. checking out now. an estimated thousands of americans pulled their money from the nation's biggest banks over the weekend as part of bank transfer day. customers were urged to shift their accounts to credit unions. the grassroots movement caught fire after bank of america announced its new debit card fee, a fee they eventually scrapped under pressure from customers. today, barnes&noble is expected to unveil an updated
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version of the color ereader, the nook. they say it will be more powerful and slightly thinner and cost as much as the amazon kindle, $199. and according to reports, robert de niro will play bernie madoff in the hbo version of "the wizard of lies: bernie madoff and the death of trust." "american morning" right back. ♪ it's true.
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you never forget your first subaru.
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i just love it here and i'm so glad he came to new york. >> the big apple opens its first casino, but can it deliver the big payoff? city officials are hoping for it, banking on it on this "american morning." and good morning to you and welcome back. it's 30 minutes past the hour. your top stories now. today, greek prime minister george papandreou is meeting with that country's opposition leader to discuss who will be the next prime minister. papandreou has agreed to step down as long as lawmakers approve a $130 billion euro bailout deal. and italy's growing debt crisis may send that country's
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prime minister, silvio berlusconi, packing. reuters and bloomberg are reporting that two respected journalists close to the leader believe he's about to step down. berlusco berlusconi's office tells our matthew chance in rome the prime minister's not going anywhere. penn state's storied football program rocked by scandal. former defensive coach sandusky accused of sexually abusing eight boys. the university's athletic director and a senior vice president both stepping down last night. they're facing perjury charges, accused of lying to a grand jury to cover up this case. a big change at occupy wall street. a women's only tent has been set up for protesters in zuccotti park, the home for the movement. a sign calls it a safe sleeping space. it can hold nearly 15 protesters. the new tent comes after police charged a brooklyn man with sexually assaulting a woman at the park last week. and for years, new yorkers have been forced to drive three hours to gamble in connecticut or new jersey, but all that has
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changed last week when the big apple opened its first casino. as richard roth reports, city officials are betting on resorts world to bring in some much-needed revenue. >> we're open! >> reporter: start spreading the news, new york city's first ever casino is now open for gambling business. >> whoo! >> reporter: the city that never sleeps has also been the city that you never could spin a slot machine. >> i love the slots. i just love it here and i'm so glad it came to new york. >> reporter: the ginting group brought resorts world casino to new york. >> this is a landmark decision for us to come into the united states. >> reporter: thousands lined up in the cold on opening day. >> but it's worth it. first one in new york, hey, if we have to wait two hours, we'll be here. >> reporter: it took much longer for this casino to start rolling. political squabbles and scandal caused lengthy delays. the crowds feel the casino opened not a moment too soon. >> we're happy.
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>> reporter: there is the random new york city reference, but once inside, gamblers could be anywhere. the casino is a long subway ride from manhattan but easy driving distance for millions of residents. >> i hit it again! i'm so excited! >> reporter: the goal, though, is to bring another $500 million in taxes to the state by keeping customers and cash from going to atlantic city, vegas and other casino cities. >> we intend to keep some of the new york gaming dollars that are leaking out of state right here in new york. >> reporter: at the same time, casino backers hope out-of-towners landing at the nearby airport will be tempted, too. >> so, when people do come from out of state or even out of the country, right next door at jfk, they land, they're looking for a place to have a good time. >> reporter: it's called a racino, because it's next to aqueduct racetrack where bets have been taken for years. gambling success isn't guaranteed in new york. otb, the now shuttered off track
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horse betting operation was a giant failure. more effective agreements between the company and state may mean success. >> they decided to put these racinos near racetracks because it's more acceptable to have gambling where gambling already was. >> reporter: one problem -- unlike las vegas, this place has only video machines for slots and other games. this woman is nice, but she's a cyber roulette dealer. state law, for now, prohibits human black jack and crabs dealers. >> he's an addict and i'm just a watcher. ♪ happy trails to you >> reporter: in a rough economy, gamblers will have to make sure that they don't lose money in a casino they so desperately waited for. richard roth, cnn, new york. >> do you gamble? >> i like casinos. i'm not a gambler. i never do well on it, but i like the vibe. >> he likes the vibe. i don't -- i just don't want to throw my money away because i always lose. >> same with me. >> yeah. i love poker. i won $186 at poker one night
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and never played again. the gambling gods will not get me. i'm up $8,600. that's it. >> up for life. this just in to cnn, lindsay lohan is back behind bars. >> what? >> and this just in to cnn, lindsay lohan has been released from jail. >> what? >> lohan checked in and out of a detention facility overnight, serving just four hours of a 30-day sentence for violating the terms of her probation. officials said she could be released within hours due to jail overcrowding. facebook founder mark zuckerberg is going back to harvard! the ceo famously dropped out of the ivy league school. he's returning today to speak with students at a recruiting event for internships at facebook. this is zuckerberg's first time back to harvard since leaving in 2004 to found facebook. >> i would have thought he would have been back for speeches or things like that. interesting. 22-year-old college grad molly catchpole led the effort to get bank of america to ditch its $5 debit card fee. now that the job's done, molly's searching for an actual job that can help her pay off her college
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debt. she currently makes $400 a week at a part-time job and she's got some $40,000 in student loans, says she's been looking for work with some left-leaning non-profit organizations. if i were a left-leaning non-profit organization, i'll get molly in there fast. that was one of the most effective campaigns a regular person with no connections to anything has ever conducted. >> and she's so enthusiastic and motivated. >> yeah. >> eloquent, too. still to come this morning, the european debt crisis grows as a new superpower emerges in the east. so, how bad is western europe and the u.s.? how bad is the old guard west losing? we'll ask neil ferguson, an award-winning author on the subject. and 20 years ago today, a shocking announcement. basketball legend magic johnson contracted hiv, and he announced he was retiring from the nba. still ahead, what's life like for magic today? it's 36 minutes past the hour. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion.
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good morning, new york city. it is sunny and 44. and later today, it's going to be sunny and 62 and rob marciano told us it will be the same weather in new york as in california. rare for november. welcome back.
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just as greece takes steps to, at least temporarily get a better handle on its debt crisis, italy is now teetering, and we're hearing reports that prime minister silvio berlusconi may be on the verge of resigning, although his facebook page this morning says he will not be resigning. a very singular kind of political figure who announces such things on a facebook page. but joining me now is neil ferguson, author of "civilization: the west and the rest." he's also a columnist at "newsweek" and "the daily beast." the book is a fascinating read, as all of your works are. >> thank you. >> let me talk first about greece and italy. let's start with italy here. all this pressure on silvio berlusconi. there's pressure on him to resign periodically for any number of scandals that he's involved in, but this is a bond market, these are investors in the world looking at this potentially as the next.c domin. what's happening there? >> you couldn't have asked for more if you had just written a book on the subject to have governmental collapses in greece and italy, the cradles of western civilization. the italian case, it's clear,
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it's the end of the line for berlusconi, because he seems to be standing between italy and the kind of reforms they have to make, if international investors are to be reassured. italy's borrowing costs are up where portugal's and greece's and spain's were before they got into dire straits. so it was high time he left. he should have gone long ago to make way for somebody more credib credible. >> at this hour, he is still holding on. >> in classic fashion. >> i'll tell you, this is the third largest economy in europe. this isn't a greece. >> no. >> italy is something that -- when you look in all of the dominos, this is a serious issue. >> well, greece is to europe what washington state is to the united states, but italy is more like texas or california. this is a really big economy and it's thought of as one of the cores of the european union. so, this is really a sign that europe is in dire straits, and i think we have to look ahead to further crises because it's very hard for the europeans to solve this problem. if you create a monetary union
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with such incompatible economies -- germany at the core, the police officerry not very competitive -- something's got to give and it's not clear to me what it will be. it's hard for countries to leave the eurozone and hard for the germans to bail them out. >> we knew at the invention of this experiment in europe that there would be moments like this where at some point, these countries were going to have to merge together closer with some of their other, you know, other governmental arms. you can't just have different bond markets but the same rate-setting poll -- different rate-setting policies, the same currency. is this the crisis that moves them together or does it break them apart? >> i don't think it's at all clear that they can go to the next level of being a federal state like the united states. >> right. >> 10 or 11 years ago, larry and i predicted the degeneration of the monetary union after about ten years because of this fundamental mismatch. so, it's going to be very interesting to see what happens next, but i wouldn't be at all surprised to see this get worse before it gets better. >> all right, so what a perfect time to be writing a book about civilization, because -- and the declines of civilizations, what
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makes them great. talk about the west and the rest, how we got to this point and how the rest of the world is now, i guess beating us at our own game, if not better. >> there was a time when europe was the most dynamic place in the world, and it was, indeed, the expansion of europe after around 1500 to the new world, to north america that was probably the biggest story of the last half millennium in terms of economic history and political history, because these european countries not only emigrated, but they created huge empires and transformed almost every field of human activity, including, for example, science and the way we do business. so, it's fascinating to watch europe unraveling in this way because it seems to me to signal the end of an era after, what, 500 years? it's no longer a western-dominated world. pretty soon, the u.s. won't be the biggest economy. >> right. >> pretty soon, we'll be looking not only at the disintegration of europe, which i think is the big story now, but the ascent of asia and the rise of china into position of real dominance. i thought it was highly significant that just the other day the europeans went cap in hand to beijing, saying, please,
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bail us out! i mean, europe asking for aid from china? that's amazing. >> remember the middle of the heated financial crisis here it was china bailing out some american banks, too, with big investments, although they lost a lot of money on those investments, the chinese did. >> which is why they're not about to write europe a big check. >> what about the u.s. and china? so many people have long said that capitalism will bring to china democracy and more human rights and more opportunity for people, but we've seen china spending $500 billion a year to invest in the areas of its economy to out-compete us. in the united states, we argue about whether we'll spend $30 billion a month for unemployment benefits. it's playing offense and defense, these two countries. >> it's true. i mean, in civilization, i argue that there were really six killer apps that set the west apart from the rest, ranging from competition in the economy through to scientific innovation. and in almost all those measures, china is now pulling ahead. for example, we assume that we do the innovation and they just sit on an assembly line, but
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it's not true anymore. increasingly, china is an innovative economy, pouring huge resources into research and development. the only real difference, and this is really the key to your question, is that they have no desire to go down our political route towards democracy. they don't even want the kind of rule of law system that we developed even before we became full democracies, and that's going to be the big difference. can china run this kind of a capitalist economic model with a one-party state? that's really the big question of the 21st century. >> you don't think it's a slam dunk that they are the world's leader? >> oh, no, because there are all kinds of problems, demographic and environmental problems and ultimately political problems. if you create the biggest middle class in the world that says you don't have choices, it's still a communist state, you get pushback. >> you give all these people a job to keep them from rioting in the streets and overthrowing the government, but at some time with the job, they will want rights and a voice, too. niall ferguson, thank you very much. >> thank you. ahead, romans' numeral $5,200. check your piggy bank.
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it's 45 minutes after the top of the hour. ♪ [ cellphone rings ] cut! [ monica ] i have a small part in a big movie. i thought we'd be on location for 3 days, it's been 3 weeks. so, i used my citi simplicity card to pick up a few things. and i don't have to worry about a late fee. which is good... no! bigger! bigger! [ monica ] ...because i don't think we're going anywhere for a while. [ male announcer ] write your story with the new citi simplicity card. no late fees. no penalty rate. no worries. get started at citisimplicity.com.
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prime minister silvio berlusconi's office is denying reports the leader is on the verge of stepping down. penn state's athletic director and a senior vice president have stepped down. they're facing perjury charges. prosecutors say they lied to a grand jury to cover up child sex abuse charges against former nittany lions defensive coach jerry sandusky. verdict watch in the michael jackson death trial. it is day two of deliberations. jurors must decide if dr. conrad murray gave jackson a lethal dose of propofol. if convicted, the doctor faces four years in prison. 80,000 residents still without power in connecticut, more than one week after a snowstorm slammed into the area. connecticut light and power missing its self-declared deadline to restore electricity by midnight. former heavyweight boxing champ joe frazier is fighting liver cancer at a philadelphia hospi hospice. his manager says he's seriously ill. the 67-year-old smokin joe went toe to toe with muhammad ali
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three times in the '70s and he was the first fighter ever to defeat him. that's the news you need to start your day. "american morning" back after a break. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future.
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good morning, atlanta. you must be waking up thinking this is atlanta? it's 27 degrees. who moved me to massachusetts? the sun is coming up and it will be 71 degrees. >> this morning in the news, the number is $5,200. >> five ounces of gold. >> this is how much the average checking account contains. many can't afford the monthly charges so this is a number behind the outrage about big banks nickelling and diming you to death. we will know how much people are keeping in their pocket. >> the only impediment is moving your account. that's difficult. >> someone was talking about the big banks don't care that people with smaller -- go ahead and move it because it costs us more to maintain your checking
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account with your measly $5 in it. >> they are setting up storefronts with more than $5,000 to invest. now is a great time to refinance your mortgage, but it's not easy. i want to be clear about that. if you are under water, you owe more than it's worth, you don't qualify. if you don't have a good credit score, ditto. if you can tough it out and get it town, you have to shop around. don't just ask to refinance. it's easy, but it costs you more in the end. i spoke with americana mortgage who said shopping local is key to getting the best terms on a refinance. >> we are going to shop around, stay with a lend they're is local or be referred to you. the rest source is work with someone in the business and understands the local market and knows how to get the deal done. the rate is important, but
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equalifying is more important. >> the banks are so over-well wellmed with foreclosures, you have to clean up your credit. check your credit reports for free and fix mistakes. a lot of people have mistakes they don't know are there. you need 700 plus for the lowest rates. you need cash on hand. you have three to six months of mortgage payments stashed away. pick the loan that is right for you. adjust rates? they are so low, you can't believe it. >> if you are in your 50s, don't get another 30-year loan when you paid down 10 years. refinance to a 10 or 20-year loan. maybe not a smart strategy if you haven't controlled your spending problem.
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you going to move for your job? how long are you going to stay in the home and what monthly payment can you afford? you need to be ready for thousands of fees and closing costs. you are going to do it all over again. do the math and make sure it's right for you. >> it could still be worth it. rates have dropped so significantly. >> what's happening now, we applied to refinance, but it's taking the banks so long to get back to us, the rate is going up. by the time the bank contacts us, we have sent in all of our information. >> by the time the bank has the mortgage, it's a different bank. >> it's one of the things they doesn't move as quickly as you like. >> one of the producers was another full time job would leave and go and it was every day, hours and hours.
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>> remember the old days when you proved your mortgage that day within a week? >> i didn't ask if it was you or how much money you made. that's what caused this whole problem. it's agony, but worth it in the end. 20 years ago today, magic johnson made a shocking announcement that stunned the country. >> because of the hiv virus that i have obtained, i will have to retire from the lakers today. i just want to say that i do not have the aids disease that a lot of you want to know that, but the hiv virus. >> he is still hiv positive, but managed to keep the condition into developing into full-blown aids. how is magic johnson's health 20
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years later? >> by all accounts doing well. he said i'm not cured, but hiv is asleep deep in my and the t cell count should is an indicator is doing well and he continued activism to have people get test and take care of themselves and take the stigma f a way from the disease. >> how much of this has to do with the fact that he had the resources. can other people who get hiv stay healthy for 20 years. >> that's a great question. he announced in 1991 that he was hiv positive and he got the anti-viral drugs that saved so many lives. about a year and a half before the general public. he had access to the drugs before other people did.
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now, if you are asking about now is he surviving because he has money, insurance pays for the drugs so even ordinary people with hiv do have access if they have insurance. >> along with drugs in treating this, we learned so much about this virus and the disease than when he announced. >> hiv in many ways was a death sentence and the drug when is they came out in 1996 saved countless lives and they learned more about how to combine them. he takes three pills a day buan he won't say which because the mix is different for everyone. you can do it in many places. peerm living with aids and in five don't know it.
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that's dangerous for that person because it means they can't start taking drugs and it's dangerous for their sexual partners spreading the virus and not know it. >> top stories are next including herman cain refusing to answer questions about allegations against him, but can he keep his campaign on message? it's 58 minutes after the hour. black and white when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's new glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have 6 grams of sugars. with 15 grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] new glucerna hunger smart.
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i'm christine romans. penn state rocked as a former coach faces life behind bars if convicted. there serious questions about how the legendary leader of the lions handled the case when it crossed his desk nine years ago.
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oklahoma earthquake alley this weekend. dozens of aftershocks following the biggest quake in the state's history. >> concern about the financial stability of europe. greece's program agrees to step down. italy's prime minister may be the next to fall. what berlusconi is saying now on this american morning. good morning. it is monday, november 7th. a lot going on here and around the world, but a lot of good news this weekend. >> first up, the scandal is rocking the legendary football program. a coach with the lions faces multiple counts of child sex abuse. the athletic director and the university senior vice president
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for finance and business stepped down and resigned. they are facing perjury and they are facing questions about the way the head football coach, 84-year-old joe paturno handled the matter nine years ago. joining us live from state college, pennsylvania. jason, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. as you know the school official who is resigned did so after an emergency meeting with the board of trustees late last night. they are expected to turn themselves in later today the investigation is clearly still focused on jerry. he's a legend in the word of college football. he served as defensive coordinator for the penn state lions and he is out on bail and defending himself against charges he sexually abused young boys, one as young as 8 years
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old. two other state officials accused of covering up resigned in the wake of the scandal. sandusky's lawyer said he is innocent. >> jerry is very, very depressed and the knowledge of whether or not he proves his guilt or innocence, people are going to think he did this. >> pennsylvania's attorney general calls him a sexual predator. the 23-page report lays out in graphic detail how he targeted eight boys from 8 to 14. the boys were victimized between 1994 and 2009. a grad student testified he discovered sandusky sexually abusing a boy estimated to be 10 years old in the shower of the football building.
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the head football coach told his supervisor who was also brought to the attention of gary schultz. they questioned why none of the men reported the incident to police. both are charged with perjury for allegedly lying to the grand jury. they testified they were under the impression that sandusky was horsing around with the boy in the shower. both resigned late sunday. the board released a statement saying under no circumstances does the university tolerate behavior that puts children at risk. >> let me say something about -- this is a big issue about the behavior of penn state and the failure to act. the legal issue is whether they buy. >> according to the report, all of the alleged victims came into
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contact through his charity the second mile. >> it's a nonprofit organization that reaches out to serve young people throughout the state of pennsylvania. >> sandusky and his wife formed the second mile to help troubled boys. he retireed from coaching in 1999 and still had access to penn state facilities. he wrote an auto biography called touched, the jerry sandusky story. >> carol sandusky is out on 1 100,000 bail. she will reveal more details about this case. carol. >> you have to wonder if it affects other people. two officials have stepped down. the university president knew this. will he step down? we don't know. >> there so many questions about
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this and when you think about the official and what they know now, for some is t may not be a legal question, but one person told me it's a moral question. when you hear about allegations of an older man being in a shower with a young boy, many questions about why that was not immediately reported to police. >> reporting live for us this morning, thanks. >> the occupy protesters are showing no signs of slowing down and there is a new addition. a women only tent has been set up at the park. it's a guard sleeping space that holds about 15 women. it comes after police charged a brooklyn man for sexually assaulting a woman last week. >> occupy atlanta protesters return to the streets and arrested 19 demonstrators after refusing to leave the park. one was charged with aggravated
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assault. >> the jury is back at it in the michael jackson death trial. deliberations resume later this morning. they could not reach a verdict on the first day. they must decide if murray gave jackson a lethal dose of propofol. >> it could be a season for the nba. they have until wednesday to accept the offer worth 49 to 51% of the rev news. they order said it's not even bringing it to a vote. >> major developments in the crisis that is consuming europe. just as greece attempts to at least temporarily get a better handle by announcing the prime minister agreed to resign. another country is teetering. the problems in italy may be too
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big for a bailout. that country's is denying reports he is on the urge of stepping down. he thinks it's only a matter of time and does not have the confidence. they do not have the confidence to get this under control. >> he doesn't have the confidence that could force him to step down. what's happen suggest having a direct impact on the stock markets. in europe, trading is under way and the market is also down. >> let's go to rome. really conflicting information about the rumors that berlusconi might step down as early as today. what are you hearing? >> reporter: berlusconi himself has gone on the facebook page and issued a denial. that's basically put the idea to the speculation.
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political circles and allies as well said the days of berlusconi as italian prime minister are numbered. he lacks the credibility of the markets that he can push through the important severe reforms the economy needs. when there was speculation, the marks viewed it favorably and the interest rates decreased. only when the deny came out did they resume upward trends. that gives you the lack of credibility amongst the markets and to large extents as well. >> matthew, we interviewed the head of the eu and said one of the thing that's different is markets work faster than the politics so the marks may be a
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bigger factor than what politicians feel they can stand. it's all about credibility. we will stay close to the camera and you have work to continue to confirm and check out sources, but we want to be on top of this story. >> the key for the u.s. is you went have europe on the verge of falling into another recession. >> they are the biggest trading partner. >> the u.s. can't have a recovery that matters. that's why it matters for everyone. >> still ahead, herman cain refusing to answer more questions about the sexual harassment allegations. can he keep his campaign on message? >> a string of aftershocks after a quick rocked the state. a tv news anchor live with the ground shakes. we will tell you what happened. >> plus, it's what everyone is talking about with the mtv european music award.
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just who or what is that? >> katy perry? lady gaga? we will tell you after the break. e rings ] cut! [ monica ] i have a small part in a big movie. i thought we'd be on location for 3 days, it's been 3 weeks. so, i used my citi simplicity card to pick up a few things. and i don't have to worry about a late fee. which is good... no! bigger! bigger! [ monica ] ...because i don't think we're going anywhere for a while. [ male announcer ] write your story with the new citi simplicity card. no late fees. no penalty rate. no worries. get started at citisimplicity.com. it's good. honey, i love you... oh my gosh, oh my gosh.. look at these big pieces of potato. ♪ what's that? big piece of potato. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
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it is 65 degrees and you have strong storms, but after the weekend, you had -- who cares? >> a weekend of aftershocks and unbelievable there. a rare and powerful earthquake. 5.6 quake striking near sparks late saturday, the strongest ever. this was hours after another large quake hit the same area. experiencing more than 30 aftershocks. several homes were damaged severely. ed murray, cool as a cucumber. he reports it, i would say. >> another earthquake has just hit. i still hear a few lights
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rattling. you can see the glass still shaking here in oklahoma city. >> i would get under the desk. >> i would get away from that. are stay on the air for the sake of the viewers. >> people just need to hear me, not see me. seeing me is not really a strong suit anyway. >> good morning. >> the golden voice. being in a tv studio in an earthquake is like being in the silo in the movie twister with all the blades and hanging around. you guys mentioned the storms are possible in parts of oklahoma. that's where we are going to see it. we are into fall now. severe weather season and not as long lasting or intense as spring, but we had the threat seeing that tornados or storms
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that produce today and as we go through tomorrow. into fall it's cooler. the back side of the systems you get snow as well. all the way back to wisconsin over the next 48 hours. storm warnings posted for the high plains. this storm will move to the east and not only see the red today, but the deep and mid-south and parts of louisiana and into arkansas. east of the mississippi today, it's perfect. it's beautiful. looking at the gorgeous weather and parts of southern california saw storms. today's high in the lower 60s. cool there in southern california. no earthquakes to report to you this morning. certainly none here in atlanta. >> same temperature in new york city as los angeles. >> love fall. >> take that, l.a.
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good to see you. herman cain said he is through answering questions about the sexual harassment allegations, but if he doesn't want to discuss it, his republican rivals are happy to do so. can he continue to resist the conversation? hillary rosen and el rollins, former manager for michele bachmann. nothing helps you get respected by not being here. i was in cannes last week for the g20 and we thought that was the biggest story going on, but every time herman cane's issue was going on. he needs a conference to clear the air. tell the truth. let's tell you what he has done. this weekend, here's what he said. >> mr. cain, the attorney for one of the women who filed sexual harassment -- >> don't even go there. >> can i ask my question? >> no. >> can i ask a question?
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>> where is my chief of staff? >> right here. >> please cent him the journalistic code of ethics. >> let's talk about this. he has been a media darling. he makes himself available and talks to the media a lot and says more than he should and now he's clamming up. >> it will destroy him. the oldest rule in politics is a made that is made and not answered sticks. if he doesn't want to respond, the media will continue to look at it and it will be a bigger and bigger story. he will never get back talking about 9-9-9. he's a likeable man and what is part of his skill is that you like him. that's not a likeable man. the media is part of the game. whether you like it or not, it's part of the game. if you predent like it's not there. >> he is making a singular mistake being fooled by his own
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special polls and fund-raising success. that has come from a die-hard group of conservatives who don't like mitt romney and want an alternative. he raised more money and still strong in the polls. he thinks that's because people don't care about what he's done. i think that's a mistake. >> you both worked in campaigns. is there anything he can do at this point? he said i want to stay on message. >> nobody is interested in anything else he has to say at this point. this is a serious challenge and if this was mitt romney or anybody else, they have to respond. it's not an unfair thing and the fact that there were payoffs, it's an abuse of power and they don't want presidents to abuse power. >> anything they can do? >> he has all the advice in the world. from haley barber to liberal democrats, he is not going to take it.
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>> who wins from this? who gets the biggest pop? >> his 25%, we had seven people who led polls over the last year. everybody from donald trump to michele bachmann to and perry. the 25%, nobody else benefits. my sense is who does benefit? it could be the others out there campaigning in iowa. less than 60 days to iowa and basically they will be the challenge. >> the only that moved up is gingrich. perry and bachman moving down. the gainer here is mitt romney. even though just in a poll only 17% of republicans said they think he is honest and truthful. more people thought herman cain was honest and truthful than romney. this is the central problem and the republicans keep looking for an alternative until the last minute. >> guy who thought he may
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benefit is john huntsman. he has not moved the needle at all. at 1% in the polls, he had endorse ams from all sorts of people who like him. what do you make of this? >> he has all the credentials, but his ideas does not fit the republican party and he went out and i thought he was a candidate for the future, but he diminished himself. the magic was he was going to use his own money and be viable and he has not moved into polls and i don't think he can beat romney in new hampshire. >> those ypt independents. romney will appeal to most independents. >> romney has a lot of problems. >> people don't seem to trust him because he is inconsistent. here you have a guy who made all
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of his money on wall street, the wrong place to have made money in this presidential election year. you have somebody who said he is going to do things like repeal health care, about you he wants to appeal to independent who is think it's a good thing if more people are insured. he doesn't have a place to go beyond the republican primary. >> i would argue this is a president with great vulnerability. either cain or romney showed in the polls as a year to go before the election, a lot is going to happen. i think romney will be a front-runner, but in 90 days we will know pretty much who the nominee will be. >> barack obama gained in popularity in the last two weeks mostly because he is out there fighting and also because the republicans are starting to implode. they are looking bad. that helps president obama. >> what happens in this economy and they will have a lot to do
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with that. good to see you both. check on the markets next and get ready for spectacular holiday deals. one product in particular that is dropping from price. 23 minutes after the hour. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] some prescription drugs may lead to constipation. fortunately... there's senokot-s® tablets. senokot-s®. for occasional constipation associated with certain medications. now you can save big on senokot-s® tablets! go to senokot-s.com. colace® capsules stool softener helps ease straining to make going easier. try colace® capsules for effective, comfortable relief from occasional constipation. now you can save big on colace® capsules! go to colacecapsules.com.
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but when they come home, they don't want a parade; they want a job. the postal service employs more veterans than any other civilian employer. but congress is debating a bill that would force the postal service to fire tens of thousands of vets, close post offices, shut mail processing plants, and disrupt mail delivery. drastic cuts won't fix the postal service and aren't needed. tell your representative to vote "no" on house resolution 2309. it's time to deliver for our veterans -- and america. to vote "no" on house resolution 2309. ♪ ♪ ♪ when your chain of supply ♪ goes from here to shanghai, that's logistics. ♪ ♪ chips from here, boards from there ♪ ♪ track it all through the air, that's logistics. ♪
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♪ clearing customs like that ♪ hurry up no time flat that's logistics. ♪ ♪ all new technology ups brings to me, ♪ ♪ that's logistics. ♪
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welcome back. 26 minutes after the hour. minding your business, italian prime minister berlusconi does not plan to resign despite growing opposition to the government and reforms. in greece, the prime minister said he agreed to step down in order to help greece secure more european bailout funds.
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weighing on investors, the dow and futures all trading lower this morning. consumers in the u.s., no need to wait until black friday. retailers have already started slashing the prices for big screen tvs. experts say they are trying to stir up excitement to get you in the door early. some experts say the sales will continue. who needs shrek, pus in boots was number one for the second week in a row with $33 million haul. robert deniro wants to add ponzi schemer. he will play bernie madoff in the version of the wizard of lies. bernie madoff and the death trust s. a fertilized egg a person. when does life begin. mississippi voters are about to find out what defines a person.
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the concept aimed at outlawing abortion. next after the break.
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> 30 minutes past the hour. when does human life begin? mississippi voters take on an amendment to change abortion laws and affect the availability of forms of birth control for all women on this american morning. crossing the half hour. the story football program is rocked by scandal. jerry sandusky charged with sexually abusing eight boys. the athletic director and the senior vice president stepping down and facing perjury charges, accused of lying to cover up the case. >> a big change on wall street. a women only tent and the home base for the movement. this new at the present time after police charged a brooklyn
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man for allegedly sexually assaulting a man last week. >> 1 that could have a big impact on the entire nag. voters will be answering a question does human life begin at conception. they are afraid it's an effort to make abortion illegal. the amendment that outlaws birth control and ban in vitro fertilization. david matingly has more. >> in vitro brought robin and emily a baby boy. they are wanting to try it again worried if they wait, they might break the law. you afraid this will pass and all your plans will be interrupted? >> afraid, yes, but it's a chance we want to take. >> i don't want or need anybody else to get involved in trying to limit how it works for us.
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>> the carpenters are among voters fearing possible ramifications of amendment 26. >> now we know an unborn baby is a person. >> it's an amendment that defines a person at the moment of fertilization. more than stopping abortions, even in the cases of rape or incest, legal protection for all fertilized eggs, account affect forms of birth control and in vitro. >> if it means i'm able to have children, we will definitely take the risk. >> if the personhood amendment passes, they may go out of state for fertility treatment. women wants abortions would have to do the same. there is only one abortion clinic in the state and this is it in the city of jackson. administrators say they perform from 22 to 2500 abortions a year. inside, the clinic owner seeks
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common ground with voters opposed to abortion. >> by the definition, a fertilized egg is a person. >> phone banks reach 30,000 voters a day in this deeply conservative state. no votes are a tough sell when republicans and democrats both support the amendment. >> can you be pro live and be against this amendment? >> this amendment is clearly simple. life begins at the beginning. >> proposition 26 advocate bush is an ob-gyn who said passing it would start an overhaul of state laws and the challenge to abortion rights nationally. >> i hope it does reignite a culture of life in mississippi. that this will spread to america. >> dear heavenly father --
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>> the carp enders describe themselves as no life and the no votes came after serious soul searching. if it passes, both sides are preparing a plunge into a legal unknown with challenges reaching the supreme court. david matingly, cnn, jackson, mississippi. >> interesting story. we will be watching closely. >> coming up, ohio voters will hit the polls and deciding the state of the bill that limits bargaining rights. some say this could seriously impact the 2012 race to the white house. it's 35 minutes past the hour. congratulations. congratulations. congratulations. today, the city of charlotte can use verizon technology to inspire businesses to conserve energy and monitor costs. making communities greener... congratulations. ... and buildings as valuable to the bottom line... whoa ! ... as the people inside them. congratulations. because when you add verizon to your company,
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there is the lot light on ohio. voters are about to hit the polls to decide whether to keep a bill to strip public unions of collective bargaining rights. the vote could hold serious political consequences for the 2012 elections. joining us live from pittsburgh from youngstown state university. >> good morning, carol. >> this bill was passed in march and signed into law by the governor. it limits collective bargaining for public employees and reduces what they can bargain for among other things. reduces what they can bargain for like firefighters and police officers and it includes teachers and some say because it includes teachers and police officers and firefighters, this is why this thing will go down to defeat today.
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>> this is a much bigger law. it affect police officers and firefighters and makes it much more controversial. this has gotten out the vote it seems in ohio among unions. public and private are interested in the issue. >> is it a case that the republican overreach and many ohioans are for limited collective bargaining rights. not to firefighters and police officers. >> exactly. >> as you look inside the law, a lot of things would be popular with the people of ohio. things like requiring public employees and to pay a certain percentage of health wear costs and a percentage of retirement. these things are popular. to me this is a little bit parallel to the national health care debate. in that case if you look inside
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the reform act, a lot of things seem to be popular, but when you take its a whole, it seems unpopular with the american people. it's the same in ohio. there things that are popular and there is a whole that seems unpopular. >> if voters vote to throw out this bill, this new law in ohio, what will it say to the presidential election in 2012? does that mean that unions have organize and are stronger? they are the reason this is on the ballot in the first place, right? >> exactly. this is forced a real bond between the unions and private unions. what's happen suggest they got organized to fight this fight. if you look at the number of signatures that were on the petitions, to get this on the bill, you needed less than 300,000 and they collected 1.3 million signatures. that makes a lot of organization to get the signatures on the
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ballot. these connections being made and the organization among the unions will probably be a factor in 2012. they are probably going to be working for barack obama. >> that's right. they will be working for barack obama. obama won the state of ohio by five pointses, but against mitt romney today, doesn't he lose? >> it's very close and within the margin of error within most polls. if nothing changes between now and a year from now, november of 2012, organization and get out the vote will win ohio and often that's the case. you have to make sure the vote is there. this organization that the unions are doing now and the connections they are making could be vital for president obama as he seeks reelection and could be poison to the republicans. mitt romney and whoever the nom sidney. >> thanks so much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >> to read more about the thoughts on the critical ohio
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vote and what it could mean for the election, head to cnn.com/opinion. it's 42 minutes past the hour.
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here are the morning headlines. stocks are struggling. 45 minutes to the opening bell. the dow, nasdaq and futures are trading lower, that indicates a lower day for stocks. investors are nervous despite a new greek government and shifting attention to another debt burd eped country, italy. berlusconi's office is denying report that is the leader is on the verge of stepping down
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there. penn state's athletic director and a senior vice president stepped down, facing perjury charges. prosecutors said they lied to cover up child sex abuse charges against the defensive coach, jerry sandusky. day two of the jury deliberations. jurors must decide if they gave jackson a lethal dose of propofol. if convicted he faces four years in prison. rescueed from an area around mount everest, bad weather left them stranded with little food or splice. 80,000 residents without power in connecticut more than a week after a snowstorm slammed the area. connecticut light and power missing the dead loin to restore electricity to 99% of customers. the search is on for a 2-year-old boy who has gone missing in bellevue, washington. his mother left him in the car
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alone when she ran out of gas. when she returned an hour later, he was gone. rescue team are searching the area. joe frazier is fighting liver cancer at a philadelphia hospice. his manager said he was seriously ill. he went to toe with mohammed ali in the 70s and the first fighter ever to beat him. back after the break.
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> 49 degrees and sunny. 62 degrees on tuesday and they stay in new york city. >> that are sounds great. time to get out and run. >> warmer than for the marathon yesterday. >> speaking of running. >> still they might prevail. >> he always takes credit somehow. >> the guy who won was a kenyan. >> you have run how many marathons? >> we don't each have to run one. i was with him in spirit. crazy. a world record.
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>> the woman who won by the way was from ethiopia. we don't know her time, but it was amazing as well. >> 27 years old and amazing. >> it's glamorous and the ultimate beauty pageant. the miss world competition. take a look at the winner. miss venezuela. krouped miss world beating out 121 other contestants. she started her own foundation to help children. the runner up is miss philippines and puerto rico took 30 place. >> they're always cry. >> i would too if i were miss world. >> after running a marathon. >> so many other complexities. >> one artist donated serious head gear. imagine that. lady gaga dominated the show picking up award for best female
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act and best song and video. justin bieber winni best male act and best pop act. that's crazy. she wears crazy stuff. >> part of her charm. looks like the tooth fairy broke the bank. one of john lennon's teeth -- this is so gross too to me -- it sold for over $1,000. >> can you imagine eating and look up and see that? >> lennon gave this tooth to a former housekeeper in the late 60s and claims lennon told her to throw it out. then he found out her daughter was a beatles fan and said keep the teeth as a souvenir. it was in the family's possession ever since until now canadian dentist claims -- >> why would you give it to your house keep sner. >> he said throw it out and said i know your daughter is a big
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fan. >> so give her my tooth. that's a weird story. i have nothing else to give your daughter, but here's my rot on tooth. >> it's worth $30,000. >> it's a good draw for a new business. changing the world using the worldwide web. a social networking start trying to make a difference directly connecting people in need. the ceo knows firsthand what a commitment to a cause can accomplish. he only needs to look to his family legacy. soledad o'brien sat down with the ceo and founder of the website. >> eight mog ago, la toya reid was struggling to get by. >> i was facing addiction and my bills were really behind. i didn't know where the money would come from. >> the single mother of three went online in search kindness and found it from a start up called give locally.net that
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meshes social networking with charity. >> technology is the way to take the dent out of poverty. >> the drive force for brad newman and the son of the famed civil rights leader, former congressman and un ambassador of the same name. >> i'm able to explore my dreams and at the same time live up to my family expectations of giving back. >> the site posts profiles of those in need that allows donors to select a recipient and amount. >> we're vouch for every family we put on our site. >> we never give cash and write checks to doctors and utilities. >> how do you make money. >> we take 18 cents and neither bo or i or any eastern management take a single penny in salary and other form. we give back. >> do people give you push back on the 18%?
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>> almost never. we don't have government money or grant money from foundations. our product is helping people. we are a start up and not a charity. >> does it feel like you are changing the world? >> no, i feel like we are doing our small part. we have the opportunity to change lives across the country by the thousands or tens of thousands, but i'm not going to be so optimistic. >> i'm here. everybody say grace. >> she is proof of the impact. >> i didn't realize there were so many giving people out there. even $5 helps. it goes a long way. >> reporting for in america, soledad o'brien, cnn, atlanta. >> 53 minutes after the hour. we'll be right back. whoa. how do you top great vacations? whoa. getting twice the points on great vacations.
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three years from now, a 2011 ford fusion is projected to be worth more than a 2011 toyota camry. any thoughts on this news? are you sure? i'm absolutely positive. fusion is projected to hold its resale value better than camry.
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a live picture from the white house now. we are just hearing that president obama will be speaking from the rose garden. that will come your way at noon eastern. the topics we hear are tax credits including the new jobs plan and helping veterans find work. you can hear the speech live here at noon eastern. >> for years new yorkers have enjoyed a three-hour car ride to find the nearest casino. the big apple opened their first casino. as only richard roth can report, officials are betting on resorts to bring in much-needed reef new. >> we are open. >> start spreading the news. new york city's first ever casino is open for gambling business. the city that never sleeps has also been the city that you never could spin a lot machine. >> i love the slots. i love it here.
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i'm glad it came to new york. >> the largest gambling operator in england and southeast asia brought resorts world casino to new york. >> this is i landmark decision to come into the united states. >> thousands lined up in the cold on opening day. >> first new york, if we have to wait two hours, we will be here. >> it took longer for the casino to roll. they caused lengthy delays. the crowds felt they opened not a moment too soon. >> we are happy. >> there is the random new york city reference, but once inside, gamblers could be anywhere. it's a long subway ride from manhattan, but easy driving for millions of residents. >> i hit it again. i'm so excited. >> the goal is to bring another $500 million in taxes to the state by keeping customers and cash from going to atlantic city, vegas and other casino cities. >>. >> we need to keep the gaming
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dollars leaking out of state right here in new york. >> at the same time, casino backers hope out of towners landing at the airport will be tempted too. >> when are people come from out of state or out of the country, at jfk they land and are looking for a place to have a good time. >> it's called a racino because it's next to the race track. gambling success is not guaranteed in new york. the now shuttered off track horse betting operation was a giant failure. more effective agreements between the company and state may mean success. >> they decided to put the racinos because it's more acceptable to have gambling where gambling already was. >> this place has only video machines for slots and other games. this woman is nice, but she's a cyber roulette dealer. state law

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