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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  June 20, 2019 11:59am-2:00pm EDT

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en bloc were made in order by the rule, and they have been agreed to by both sides. they improve the bill, and i support the amendment and i urge its adoption. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: thank you, madam chair. i rise in support of the en bloc amendment as well. i want to thank the agriculture subcommittee chairman, mr. bishop, for working with our side to include many amendments that are important to our members. the chairman has been a great partner and has been very fair throughout this process. i urge my colleagues to support the amendment as it reflects the will of many members and also makes appropriate changes to the bill. the chair: the gentleman from georgia. mr. bishop: madam chair, i'd like at this time to yield one minute to the gentlelady from alabama, ms. sewell. ms. sewell: thank you, mr. chair. i'd like to thank so much the subcommittee chairperson, mr.
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bishop, for allowing me this time. part of my amendment is in the en bloc and it deals with wastewater treatment. no person in america living in this country should be allowed to -- not have adequate plumbing. this is why i've introduced an amendment asking the usda to pry or oties our ongoing efforts to address failing septic systems in rural communities. approximately 20% of americans are responsible for the installation and maintenance of their own sewage disposal systems, which isn't provided by their municipalities or their county government. at least 200,000 families live in homes that have a lack of sewage system altogether. we offer little assistance to people who live in unincorporated areas to have basic water and sewer. rural communities across this country struggle with this issue. just this week, i read lots and lots of articles that dealt with failure of those folks in rural communities to have adequate sewage systems. this amendment is a part of a multiyear effort to address this once and for all for all
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americans. the rural septic tank access act was included in the farm bill and i'd like to thank chairman bishop and his staff and the underlying -- for allowing me to speak on this underlying en bloc bill today. in f.y. 2018 we secured $-- the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. sewell: again, i ask my colleagues, urge them to vote yes for this en bloc balanced budget amendment. thank you and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman reserves. for what purpose does -- the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. . mr. smith: i ask unanimous consent to reclaim my time then yield one minute to the gentleman from illinois. the chair: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, madam chair. thank you to my colleague and ranking member, mr. foreen berry, thank to you chairman bishop for including this in the en bloc amendment, my amendment. agriculture research plays a critical role in the future of
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our food supply. in our last spending bill we helped secure 5% increase in funding for the usda's national institute of food and agriculture. seen increased funding because of bipartisan support on the house ag committee for many of the members, including my good friend and fellow co-chair of the ag research caucus, jimmy panetta of california, who finally likes to remind us all that he represents the salad bowl of america. mr. davis: this year i led a bipartisan letter signed by 111 of my colleagues advocating for robust funding for usda's agriculture food and research initiative in the 2020 appropriations. i'm extremely excited that the house appropriators increased funding by $45 million over f.y. 2019 levels to $460 million. i'm proud to see such bipartisan support for ag research because ensuring
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research necessary is vital. i thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: i reserve, madam chair. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. i thank the chairwoman. at this time i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from maryland, mr. trone. the chair: the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. trone: thank you, madam chair. i'm pleased that the four amendments i proposed to this bill have been made in order. these amendments reflect some of the most important priorities in my district. first i offered an amendment to increase funding for mental health courts which lowerer the recidivism rate for justice impacted individuals with mental illness. my second amendment underlines the importance of modernizing the national institute of standards and technology
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infrastructure. this funding will help misremain a leader and driving economic growth in maryland's sixth district and across the country. the last two amendments put additional funding toward expanding rural product band, and combating opioid crisis in rural communities, two critical priorities in western maryland. i thank representative riggleman of virginia and neguse of colorado for working with me on these amendments. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. -- the gentleman reserves. mr. bishop: i reserve. the chair: gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. for then berry: i'd like to thank the gentleman from wisconsin a. member of the financial services committee, for one minute. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you. i thank my colleague from nebraska and mr. bishop for including this amendment in the en bloc. i rise to support my amendment
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to support ourer dairy industry. i visited farms across southeast wisconsin and time and time again farmers have explained to me the challenges they have with consistently low milk prices. that's why we need this amendment so we can continue to invest in business development within the dairy industry and encourage new markets for our farmers. mr. steil: this amendment provides $1.5 million to support our nation's dairy industry in a budget neutral way. i urge my colleagues to support our dairy industry, to support our farmers, and to support this amendment. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: -- mr. fortenberry: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. r. bishop: i reserve also. the chair: the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from virginia, mr. riggleman. the chair: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. riggleman: thank you to my dear friend from maryland, representative trone, with whom i have developed a bipartisan partnership as a result in these two amendments. the first increases funding to expand broadband deployment into rural communities underserved by private sector investment. our rural communities, including some in my district, need access to broadband to keep up with the demands of the modern economy. this amendment will help communities close the digital divide which is critical to enhancing our economic opportunity, job creation, access to health care, and education in rural america. the next amendment dear to my heart increases funding for rural health and safety education program to combat the opioid epidemic in rural communities. representative trone and myself and too many others in this body and our country at large have seen friends and family members suffer and even pass away from the opioid crisis that has ravaged our country. just last week i lost my cousin to a heroin overdose. this funding is an essential
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step to turn the crisis around. i urge my colleagues to support these two amendments and i yield my time. the chair: the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. r. fortenberry: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from puerto rico, miss gonzalez-colon. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized. miss gonzalez-colon: thank you, madam chair, and ranking member, and chairman bishop for including in this en bloc group amendment my bipartisan amendment, number 103. to provide funding for the reimbursement of transportation cost payment program for geotraffical disadvantaged farmers and ranchers. this program in usda will reimburse farmers and ranchers in puerto rico as well as in other u.s. territories, hawaii, and alaska a portion of the cost they may incur when
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transporting their agricultural products or equipment. our farmers and ranchers outside of the continental u.s. operate at a competitive disadvantage relative to producers in the 48 contiguous states. partly due to geographical barriers and high transportation costs. this program will help us out address these realities by providing payment to help ranchers and farmers in the noncontiguous states and territories offset some of this cost. this program a has been funded at $1.9 million over the last fiscal years and my amendment will seek to provide the same amount of funding for fiscal year 2020 with the corresponding offset. i want to thank representative gabbard from hawaii, and radewagen from american samoa for co-sponsoring my amendment. i urge my colleagues to endorse it. the chair: the gentleman from
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nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. bishop: i reserve. the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: madam chair, there is no further speakers, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. madam hop: at this time, chairwoman, i ask my colleagues to join me in support of this amendment. we have no more speakers. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment en bloc offered by the gentleman from georgia. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the en bloc amendments are agreed to.
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it is now in order to consider amendment number 97 printed in art b of house report 116-119. it is now in order to consider amendment number 99 printed in art b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? mr. banks: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 99, printed in part b of house
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report number 116-119, offered by mr. banks of indiana. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentleman from indiana, mr. banks, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from indiana. mr. banks: thank you, madam chair. my amendment is simple. it would reduce spending in this division by 14%. e amount that is needed to avoid the budgets budgetsing caps and avoid sequestration and compromise our national security. this division would spend $1.3 billion more than the 2019 enacted level. in their quest to spend every taxpayer dollar from this generation and our future generations, my friends on the other side of the aisle have proposed spending packages that in total will bust the budget caps by nearly $90 billion.
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while my colleagues may be willing to put national security at risk to fulfill budget busting policy promises, i will not. i urge my colleagues to support my commonsense amendment. with that, thank you. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia rise? mr. bishop: thank you, madam chair. i rise in strong opposition to this amendment. i understand the gentleman's intention, but i could not disagree more. the agriculture bill funds a variety of national priorities from food safety to agriculture research, to drug approval, to rural development torques nutrition programs for our children. reducing spending by 14% would hurt our farmers who are already suffering terribly from retaliatory tariffs and hurt small communities still in need of adequate broadband. it would hurt those waiting for cures to rare cancer. it would jeopardize america's
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status as a leader of global agriculture science. it would slow our response to food borne illness outbreaks, and harm children and families who rely on these programs to put food on their tables. the bill already rejected the administration's draconian cuts to programs that will assist our rural communities and vulnerable populations. i urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment. i reserve. the chair: the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. banks: thank you, madam chair. think about the awe castity of these claims. i'm not talking my amendment about cutting any specific program. i'm proposing an amendment to cut 14% across the board to prevent the excessive spending that we are seeing come interesting -- proposed from across the aisle that would spend substantially more than what the federal government spent in the year before. madam chair, we simply cannot
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afford this reckless proposal from my friends on the other side of the aisle. my amendment offers members a clear choice. if you vote no, you support busting the budget caps and putting our national security at risk due to interering into sequestration, which is inevitable if we pass the spending measures being proposed from across the aisle. however, by supporting my amendment you can show that you support fiscal sanity by honoring the budget caps and protecting our national security. madam chair, i will continue to come back to this microphone over and over and over again and propose this same amendment to each nondefense spending division because i promised my constituents in northeast indiana that that's exactly what i would do if they elected me to congress. that would fight to reduce spending, to rebuild our
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military, and to support fiscal sanity in our nation once again by fighting for balanced budgets and fiscally conservative spending measures. this amendment fulfills all of those promises to my constituents and families in northeast indiana. and i urge my colleagues to support it. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. bishop: i urge that this amendment be rejected. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from indiana. so many as are in favor say aye. . those opposed say no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. banks: madam chair, i request a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from indiana will be postponed.
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it's now in order to consider amendment number 101 printed in art b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? mr. biggs: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 101 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by mr. biggs of arizona. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentleman from arizona, mr. biggs, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona. mr. biggs: i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. biggs: thank you. i rise in support of my amendment that prevents funds from being used to finalize, implement or enforce the draft
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guidance issued by the food and drug administration in december of 2017 titled drug products labeled as home yo pathic, guide -- pomeopathic, guidance. it upends settled enforcement practice without a compelling reason or with no directive from congress. my amendment would prevent that overreach and maintain the safe and effective guidance that has been in place since 1987. omeopathy has thrived as an alternative to pharmaceuticals. more than three million americans use it. the products can be a natural alternative to addictive opioids in the manage. pain and other conditions -- management of pain and other conditions. the guidance provides a definition of a product and clear manufacturing standards. violations of these standards are already subject to f.d.a. enforcement. the proposed change in guidance goes too far by restricting access to safe homeopathic
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medicines while being less effective at regulating the safety and quality of homeopathic products. the new
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with past practice and existing law. the guidance purports to address improperly manufactured products and i support that. but it drops the explicit manufacturing guidelines already contained in the existing guidance, under the draft guidance, americans would have less -- fewer assurances that their medicines are pure and properly manufactured. the problems that f.d.a. states as reasons for introducing the draft guidance falsely labeled products and improperly manufactured products are actually better addressed under the current guidance. and the f.d.a. has been effectively addressing these issues for the last 30 years. an draft guidance is unnecessary regulatory overreach and i urge all members to support this amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. does any member claim time in pposition? >> i rise to claim time in opposition to have a discussion with the gentleman from arizona. first, let me say, madam chair, i do understand the concerns of the gentleman from arizona. here is the issue. the food and drug administration is charged with the
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responsibility to ensure that persons seeking to be healed -- healed have both, both the right to try innovative products, as well as the right to be protected from harm or any false claims. mr. fortenberry: so let me say to my friend, mr. biggs, we would like to offer this. chairman bishop and i would seek the opportunity to have the f.d.a., the food and drug administration, meet with us to dialogue on the very issues that -- important issues that you are raising. and to relay your concerns. and i will commit to you that your objections will be conveyed to their leadership before they move forward on this guidance. so in light of that consideration, i kindly request, respectfully request that you consider withdrawing the amendment. and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. biggs: thank you. i thank the gentleman for his commentcomments and ranking member fortenberry's assurances that we can get together with
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the f.d.a. and see what we can do to resolve this very difficult issue. i look forward two,ing with him on this issue going forward and with that, madam chair, i will withdraw my amendment and i yield back. the chair: the amendment is withdrawn. it is now in order to consider amendment number 105 printed in art b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? mr. pence: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 105 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by mr. pence of indiana. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentleman from indiana, mr. pence, and a member opposed each will control
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five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from indiana. mr. pence: thank you, madam chair. i rise in support of my amendment to increase funding for the distant learning and telemedicine broadband grant program. currently, over 14 million americans living in rural communities still lack access to basic broadband service. specifically the rural broadband grant programs at usda help americans tap into telehealth technology, distant learning education and internet-based agri-business that our farmers desperately rely on to remain competitive. in my district, the d.l.t. grant program has been successful at linking features in one -- teachers in one area to students in another. last year almost half of the funds from the d.l.t. program were used to combat opioid and substance abuse. the ongoing opioid crisis is
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still wreaking havoc on communities across america and this is not the time to cut corners on programs that address this problem. we must support efforts to help people seeking treatment for and prevention of opioid use. my amendment, which is fully offset, will increase funding for the d.l.t. program by $25 million so that more communities have access to health care, education, government services and business opportunities. without broad bapped access, entire -- broadband access, entire communities are being left behind. madam chair, i am thankful this issue has remained a bipartisan priority and i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. does any member claim time in opposition? mr. bishop: madam chair --
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the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. bishop: i ask unanimous consent to claim the time in opposition, although i do not oppose the amendment. the chair: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. bishop: i rise in support of this amendment. the distance learning and telemedicine program office grants to rural areas to provide access to education, to training and to health care. these resources are critical in providing funding to acquire audio, video and other advanced technology equipment to extend educational and medical services, including those seeking opioid treatment. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment and at this point i'd like to yield a minute and a half, such time as he may consume, to mr. fortenberry. the chair: the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: thank you for the time and for your eloquent remarks. mr. pence, i just wanted to rise, even though we're under the guise of opposition, to actually thank you for offering
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this amendment. we have had substantive, thoughtful, lengthy discussions about broadband and its importance to rural revitalization, as you well put. and it is more than just wires laid. it is about creating an ecosystem of liveability and, in your words, you touched those very points. i think you'd be proud to see the underlying work here in that regard, but you've made it better. with that, i thank you, and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from georgia. mr. bishop: thank you. the amendment would bring the total funding for the program to $75 million in our bill. this program provides grants to encourage and improve telemedicine and distance learning services in rural areas through telecommunications and other technologies, and i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. and i thank the gentleman for offering it. ten chances the bill. -- it enhances the bill. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time.
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the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. pence: madam chair, i thank the gentleman. i yield two minutes of my time to my esteemed colleague from indiana, mr. baird. the chair: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for two minutes. mr. baird: thank you, madam chair. i rise today in support of my esteemed colleague's amendment to the increase the funding for distance learning and telemedicine grant program at the usda. in indiana, many of our rural areas do not have access to adequate broadband coverage, putting them at a disadvantage in our global economy. in indiana, many of our rural areas do not have the access that is necessary to be current. broadband is important to education and health care, as well as economic development and agriculture. by responsibly increasing the funding for this program, we are providing educational opportunities and improved
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health care without any additional cost to the taxpayer. we must equip our students and our 21st century -- with our 21st century tools to further their education and ensure all of our citizens have access to quality health care, regardless of their zip scode. i -- zip code. i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support this amendment, on behalf of rural communities across the nation. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. pence: thank you, madam chair. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment, to close a digital -- the digital divide in rural america. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from indiana. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. mr. pence: madam chair, i request a recorded vote.
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the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from indiana will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 114 printed in . rt b of house report 116-119 for what purpose does the gentlewoman from virginia seek recognition? ms. spanberger: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 114 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by mr. spanberger of virginia -- ms. spanberger of virginia. the chair: pursuant thousand resolution 445, the gentlewoman from virginia, ms. spanberger, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from virginia. ms. spanberger: thank you, madam chair.
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i rise in support of my amendment to h.r. 3055. across the country insufficient rural broadband access is creating a divide between those who are connected and those who are not. that's why nye amendment increases funding for the -- my amendment increases funding for the recorrect program by $55 million, representing a 10% increase over last year's funding. according to the f.c.c.'s 2019 broadband deployment report, one in four rural virginians lack access to high speed internet. this digital divide can lead to consequences that impact educational and economic opportunities across our rural communities. this figure is even more stark when you hear from those affected. earlier this year i sent out a survey to learn more about how the lack of reliable broadband internet is directly impacting the people i serve here in the house of representatives. i received more than 100 responses in a short amount of time from families, students and business owners across our
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district. take, for example, regina from virginia. she says the lack of consistent, reliable internet services hinders everything her family does from receiving reliable emergency notifications to paying their bills in a timely fashion. or jasmine. she takes online classes at home, but the lack of access to broadband internet has barred her from accessing assignments that she needs to complete in order to obtain her degree. . or robin, from amelia county, who works on her family's beef and cattle farm and she says when the internet is down, i can't do simple things like process payments, send liability payments, or check the radars for the guys on the field. for every one of those there are hundreds of thousands of americans with similar stories. to level the playing field for our rural residents, we need to make sure broadband internet is a component of our national conversation about infrastructure. that's why i believe we need to
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expand existing frams such as usda's reconnect program. this program allows communities to apply for federal funding to strengthen and expand their regional broadband infrastructure. but the current scope of these programs is insufficient to meet the scale of the challenge and demand. in the first round of reconnect program grant application this is year, usda saw a near three to one ratio in application requested versus the funding available. my amendment would increase the funding for the usda reconnect -- ram from 550 to to 605 $605 million. i'm proud to lead this bipartisan effort. this extra $55 million is not the magic solution but demonstrates one of our priorities here in congress is to keep our rural communities strong. when rural america is strong, it makes our country as a whole stronger. by hoping our rural neighbors close the broadband gap, we are allowing the rural communities to attract new businesses, spur
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economic growth, and give their kids an equal cuenttunte to succeed in a global hyper connected economy. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman reserves. is there any member claiming time in opposition? ms. spanberger: i yield one minute of my time to mr. bishop. the chair: the gentleman from georgia -- mr. bishop: i rise in strong support of this amendment. there is wide support and recognition as for the need for investing in broadband infrastructure. as a necessity of modern life, we must continue our efforts to bridge the broadband divide and ensure as many rural americans as possible receive fast and reliable broadband service and a multitude of benefits associated with it. the gentlelady's amendment if adopted would bring broadband to the highest level since 2009 with the recovery act. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. it will certainly enhance this bill.
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the chair: the gentlewoman from virginia is recognized. ms. spanberger: i reserve the remainder of my time. the chair: does any member seek time in opposition? seeing none, the gentlelady from virginia is recognized. ms. spanberger: i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: does the gentlelady yield back? ms. spanberger: i yield back. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from virginia. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. ms. spanberger: i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlelady from virginia will e postponed.
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it is now in order to consider amendment number 115 printed in art b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? miss underwood: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designater -- designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 115 printsed in part b of house report number 116-119, offered by miss underwood of illinois. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentlewoman from illinois, ms. underwood, and a member owe -- opposed will each control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from illinois. miss underwood: i rise today in support of my amendment which prevents federal agencies like the u.s. department of agriculture to remove existing publication about long term variation in our climate. this information gives farmers the tools they need to succeed and important we don't subject it to politics. i'm proud to represent a
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community rich in agriculture and the illinois 14th district. we have the best farmers in the world. right now they are facing real challenges to their businesses and their way of life caused by long-term baterns and whether variation, leading to worse seasonal extremes. the science is clear, extreme weather has links to human induced climate change. climate change has broad impacts on virtually all aspects of the agriculture industry. ignoring the link between climate change and extreme weather is a direct threat to our national security, food security, and to the livelihoods of farmers in northern illinois and throughout america. this year catastrophic flooding and rain in illinois have prevented many farmers from planting their crops. as of this week, only 88% of farms in illinois were able to plant their corn prepared with a four year average of 100% between 2014 and 2018. meanwhile, only 70% of soybeans
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are planted compared to a four year average of 95%. nationwide, farmers are expected to harvest the smallen corn crop in four years, according to the u.s. department of agriculture. i have spoken to farmers who are concerned that an early frost could threaten entire farm operations this year because of late planting and more unpredictable weather patterns. this is an immediate threat. we are already suffering the consequences. and it will only get worse with time. the very existence of multigenerational farms and entire way of life for some families and community are at risk. once these farms are gone, they aren't coming back. make no mistake, due to drought, severe storms, and early spring and flooding, our farmers are on the frontline when it comes to climate change. unfortunately, over the past two years references to climate change, long-term weather variation, and the effects of human activity on oiler climate have been scrubbed from many federal websites and publications.
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farmers are veterinarians, entrepreneurs, accountants, meteorologistists, scientists in one day. by deleting information and references to climate change in official communication, we hamstring their ability to rely on accurate and precise information to make important business decisions and adapt their farming practices to face future challenges. information on climate change and impact on agriculture is also valuable to researchers and innovators working on technology to support farming communities throughout the country and policymakers as we work to make informed choices to address these issues. we have the capacity and responsibility to address the challenges of climate change head-on as a country. american farmers are some of the most hardworking, resilient, and optimistic people in the country. their hard work nourishes our families and literally feeds the world. we can can and must make sure that they are equipped to be successful because their success not only affects our community's economy but a secure food supply depends on it. this amendment will ensure that
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usda and other federal agencies will continue to make important information available to farmers at a time they need it most. madam chair, i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support my amendment. thank you. i reserve my time. the chair: the gentlewoman reserves. does any member claim time in opposition? the gentleman from nebraska is recognized. mr. fortenberry: i rise to claim time in opposition to the gentlelady's amendment. trying to control what words usda officials use to describe changing weather conditions should not really be our focus. forer one, this amendment is a solution in search of a problem. usda has plenty of materials on their website or elsewhere with the term climate change embedded in them. if the usda was going to completely wipe away this terminology for political purposes, which was implied, they would have done so over the past 2 1/2 years. secondly, the amendment attempts to politicize an issue
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that does not need further politicization. for example, chairman bishop and i were able to have a civil discussion on changing climate in a subcommittee hearing this year without dragging controversy into it. in addition to outside witnesses, usda actually set up a subject matter expert on the very topic. we had a hearing where we talked about how to deal with changing weather and how our farmers and ranchers could adjust to such changes. instead of spending time on this type of messaging, let's spend our time on actually helping our farmers and ranchers, and building a more secure and sustainable energy future that benefits all of america. i urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from virginia is recognized. ms. underwood: i'm honored to
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yield one minute to mr. bishop. mr. bishop: i thank the gentlelady for yielding. madam chair, i rise in support of this amendment. as i have said before congress' oversight role is one of the most important functions. that functions extends to preserving the integrity of science. the academics, economists, and researchers at usda produce topnotch scientific reports characterizing the state of the farm economy, the agriculture industry at large, and analyzing future impacts. it is clear that one of the most important stressers on agriculture today and in the coming years will be the effects of climate change. we cannot prevent the effects of climate change by simply removing any reference to it in the department scientific publications. we must allow the science community to to its work. free from political influence. i have no objection to the proposed amendment and i urge
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its adoption. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady from illinois is recognized. s. underwood: i reserve. the chair: the gentlewoman has only time remaining. ms. underwood: i would be happy to close, thank you. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. underwood: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from illinois. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. he amendment is agreed to.
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the share understands that amendment number 121 will not e offered. for what purpose does the -- the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. bishop: madam chair, i rise as the designee of chairwoman lowey to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. bishop: madam chair, i yield to my colleague from ohio, ms. kaptur. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. kaptur: i thank the gentleman for yielding. congressman bishop, just a superb chair of the agriculture subcommittee of appropriations. and rise to discuss an issue very important to america's livestock and poultry farmers, the packers and stockyards act.
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for decades the green inspection packers and stockyards administration familiarly known as gipsa was a stand alone agency within the u.s. department of agriculture until recently, gypsa was a parallel agency to the agricultural marketing service itself, but under second sonny purdue's reorganization of the department of agriculture and consolidation plan, it was moved deep within the agricultural marketing service, some fear buried. now the packers and stockyards division of the fair trade practices branch within the agricultural marketing service administers the packers and stockyards act. do you see the layers? this consolidation will increase difficulty for farmers who seek relief from unfair and abusive practices common, unfortunately, in the livestock and poultry sectors.
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the administration recently announced a rule making process to define criteria the secretary will consider to determine violations of the packers and stockyards act on whether an undue or unreasonable preference or advantage occurred. i welcome this action. these terms were never adequately defined or explained. however, i'm very concerned this administration is utelizing delays and stalling tactics through this rule making process. for several years the previous administration's rule making process was blocked through appropriation riders. year after year. i fought those riders. finally congress reached -- reacted to the public backlash over the riders and backed off efforts to block the rule. this enabled the last administration to move forward and to comply, are you ready, with the 2008 farm bill
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requirements. however, the rule making was not complete but the turnover in administrations and secretary perdue quickly stopped all work on these rules and deroethlisberger motted the agency in charge of the effort. it seems a positive step that the secretary decided to advance new rules to clarify criteria use aed to enforce the undue and unreasonable preference or advantage authority, however, given the administration's previous actions, i'm quite concerned that this rule making will fall far short of addressing the worst abuses america's livestock and poultry farmers experience. . there are gross examples of abusive contracting practices, particularly in the poultry sector. companies greatly disadvantage certain growers at expense of others. the thumb of justice surely seems obsolete. protection against retaliation, pay transparency and a right to
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a fair and just legal system are essential to protect our hardworking farmers from abuse. each of these concerns must be addressed in the rulemaking process. the alarming realities of the poultry industry and similar ones in the hog and beef industries highlight the imbalance within today's corporate meat production hierarchy. this must be addressed through usda's planned packers and stockyards act rulemaking process. i hope the administration will better protect small farmers who work very hard every day and elp feed our nation. the chair: the gentleman from georgia. mr. bishop: madam chair, i appreciate my colleague's long-time support for fair trade practices, for our livestock and for our poultry farmers. i've worked on this issue over the years with the gentlelady and i too share her concerns
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regarding the administration's past history in such rulemakings. i look forward to working with my colleague from ohio as the administration takes steps toward complying with the farm bill requirements from 2008. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields ack the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. bishop: i rise as the designee of chairwoman lowey to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. bishop: this time -- at this time i'd like to yield to the gentlelady from wisconsin, ms. moore. the chair: the gentlewoman from wisconsin is recognized. ms. moore: thank you, madam
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chair, and thank you, mr. chairman. i want to continue to work with you and the subcommittee on agriculture appropriations subcommittee to fight the administration's reprehensible attempts to increase hunger in our country. including through usda's proposed and harmful able-bodied adults without dependents rule. now, as you well know, mr. bishop, snap is a critical anti-hunger program that helps many families struggling with food insecurity. and what i find so counterintuitive about this rule is that the most common reason for seeking snap is because someone is losing a job. which is even more critical for those who have barriers to employment or who are already at the margins of the work force. as many experts have testified
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to congress, the labor market experience of snap participants, as it is for so many low-paid workers, is highly unstable and participants tend to cycle in and out of full-time employment. this rule would cut food aid for 821,000 55,000 and individuals from red states, from blue states, from purple states, from rural, urban and suburban communities. without any regard to the barriers they may face or the fact that they may live in areas or zip codes or census tracks that lack jobs or companies are moving, or other unanticipated egresses from the work force. and no matter what people say, mr. chairman, there are still pobblingts of high, high --
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pockets of high, high unemployment rates, well above the national average. this body must make crystal clear that we support the vulnerable population of able-bodied adults who are being targeted here and that increasing hunger does not increase employability. it does not create new jobs in rural or other areas with high unemployment, and it doesn't remove barriers to unemployment -- to employment. it just simply increases hunger. now, while there are so many good things in this package that will help to attack hunger and food insecurity, i am deeply disappointed that we are missing the opportunity to use congress' title 1 power to block this rule . let's not go down the did-nothing congress when it comes to something so common sense as providing food for the most vulnerable. i am so concerned about this rule's impact on truly
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vulnerable individuals. let's not be fooled. because we are calling them, quote-unquote, able-bodied. these folks are challenge -- have challenges that make finding work difficult. mr. bishop, des, veterans, homeless people, children who have aged out of foster care and college students. the vast majority of snap participants affected by this proposal live in deep poverty with 88% of households at or below 50% of the poverty level. one in 10 are working, although less than an average of 20 hours per week. one study found 75% do participate in the work force and of those who do work, they sometimes do not, the majority don't work due to their having lost a job or they couldn't get enough hours.
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this rule would do nothing to address those issues. and of those who are not in the labor force, 80%, 80% of them said that it was due to a health and disability. this rule would do nothing to address those issues. i'm also concerned about the impact on states. despite all the wonderful claims of a strong economy, we continue to hear about -- that all boats are not lifted. which is why the existing flexibility to protect people from hunger when jobs are simply not available in some areas is so critical. almost every state has used this flexibility under the existing waiver at some point, including some of the most conservative states. and if you claim to support states' rights, that governors and local elected officials know best, about what's going none their states, especially where we know economic conditions can vary from county to county, city
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to city, even zip code to zip code, then this rule, you should be opposed to it. punishing poor people will not elp them get jobs. i unwillingly yield back. the chair: the gentleman from georgia. mr. bishop: madam chair, -- the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. bishop: i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields ack the balance of his time.
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the chair: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from minnesota rise? >> i rise as the designee of chairwoman lowey to strike the last word. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. i rise to speak about fiscal year 2020 interior, environment and related agencies appropriations bill. ms. mccollum: i want to thank the chairwoman and the ranking member of the full committee and also my ranking member, mr. joyce, for all his collaboration. i want people to know that this bill is the proud work, hard work and collaboration of our subcommittee, which held 16 hearings. which received over 6,000 requests from members of congress and we worked hard to make a bill that reflects the priorities of the entire house. i also want to note that this bill makes critical investments for the american people and for our planet. and it does that because the subcommittee had a recommending total of $37.3 billion of
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discretionary funding and that's an increase of $1.7 billion over last year. we also were able to include this year because of hard work by the subcommittee, led by mr. simpson last year, we have an additional $2.25 billion in fire caps adjusted funds for suppression operations. and that's really important for the forest service, in order to fight wildland fires without borrowing from nonfire programs. some of the biggest increases in this bill, however, honor our federal and treaty trust responsibilities, to provide house and education for our native american brothers an sisters. mr. joyce and i worked on in a very nonpartisan fashion with our entire subcommittee. we can be proud that this bill continues to move us in the right direction in honoring their treaty and trust obligations. in fact, this bill invests over $10 billion to support and strengthen tribal self-determination, including $1 billion, the highest ever recommended for the operation of
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native american programs. as i said, mr. chair, we did that together in the subcommittee in a nonpartisan way. for many other agencies in this bill, however, the trump administration had devastating cuts. the president's request was a 31% cut to the environmental protection agency and that cut would have prevented the e.p.a. from completing its mission to keep our communities safe and healthy. in fact, under president trump's watch yesterday, the administration rolled out what many of us call their dirty power plan. we have evidence from the scientific community to say that it could contribute up to 1,400 premature deaths annually. so democrats are fighting back on this bill with important investments to protect the air we breathe and the water we drink. and we boost support for the e.p.a.'s clean air program by $2.-- excuse me, $25.6 million. and we increase congressional oversight to make sure that there aren't any rollbacks attempted to put the public
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health at risk. we also fund safe drinking water, state revolving fund at the authorized level, and we target resources needed to address drinking and waste water needs. so this bill also takes a huge step forward in building on what started in the defense bill that we voted on earlier this week to address the crisis of contaminating our water. i'm very proud, after the president signed a bipartisan bill, to permanently re-authorize the land, water conservation fund, even though the president zeer odom it out in his budget, we chose to in-- zeroed it out in his budget, we chose to invest in lwcf. so i'd like to conclusion with just talking about climate change for a second. as we know, the administration has cut everywhere it can to decimate the federal funding to do research, combat and adapt climate change. our bill does the opposite. it boosts funding for climate
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change research, tracking, the reporting of greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water efficiency programs in the e.p.a. and the u.s. geological survey has its role to play and we support that in climate change and it also restores very important programs that were eliminated in the fish and wildlife service on this. so this bill recognizes the importance of science, to understand the impacts of climate change and our natural cultural resources and our ecosystems and human health. it's a good bill and i think as get through it, mr. chair, and listen to the amendments, we can make a good bill even better. and with that, i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from minnesota seek recognition? ms. mccollum: pursuant to rule 3 of the house, resolution 45 had 4 as the designee -- 454 as the designee of the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. lowey, i offer
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amendments he en bloc. the chair: the clerk will designate amendments en bloc. the clerk: en bloc number 4 consisting amendments numbered 153, 38, 141, 142, 152, 170, 59, 160, 164, 169, 71, 172, 175, 177, 178, 180, 181, 182, 192 and 193 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by ms. mccollum of minnesota. . the chair: the gentlewoman from minnesota, ms. mccollum, and the gentleman from ohio, mr. joyce, each will control 10 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from minnesota. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, the amendments included in the en bloc made in order by the rule and i support the amendment and i urge its adoption. mr. chair, if it's appropriate at this time, i'd yield one minute -- 1 1/2 minutes to the
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gentlewoman from pennsylvania, ms. scanlon. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. scanlon: thank you. i thank the gentlewoman, ms. mccollum, and rise in support of my amendment in the en bloc. mr. speaker, my district is home to chesteron, a majority black city that has struggled for generations. major polluting industries have set up there next to schools and hospitals and homes and businesses. one of these polluters, a waste incinerator, was featured on a cnn report which was released this week. all day every day my constituents are breathing in carcinogens released like mercury, particulate matter that prevent them from working, leading healthy lives. at the same time, the trump administration has failed to enforce clean air act standards that could protect these citizens. our interior appropriations bill makes sure that clean air act is appropriate.
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but this amendment will make sure that they can't these underserved communities for granted. we will fight for our constituents and we will take address the eps to environmental -- i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman from minnesota. ms. mccollum: i reserve the balance of the time. the chair: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. joyce: i rise to oppose the democratic en bloc amendments. this amendment includes language which would take a major step back in unleashing our domestic potential to procure critical minerals and reduce our alliance on china and russia. the amendment includes language which would limit access to the healthiest beverage option in our national parks, water. should we limit drinking water options available to park visitors, especially in parks where the temperatures can
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easily reach triple digits? the answer is no. finally, i offer a few observations that i believe we should keep in mind as we discussth lien oxide. th lien -- discuss ethelen oxide. for many materials, that is certain plastics, it is the only safe option for
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radiation, steam, heat will call 'cause them to lose their integrity. i oppose this en bloc amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: thank you. the gentlewoman from minnesota. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, i yield a minute and a half to the gentlewoman from oregon, ms. bonamici. the chair: the gentlewoman from oregon is recognized. ms. bonamici: i rise in support of the en bloc amendment which includes funding for the environmental protection agency's science advisory board to review the strengthening transparency and regulatory science, or so-called secret science proposed rule, and decrease funding for the e.p.a. administrator's executive management account. i thank chair mccollum for her leadership in increasing funding for the e.p.a.'s science advisory board in the underlying bill. the e.p.a. relies on peer-reviewed science. unfortunately, the proposed strengthening transparency and regulatory science rule would preclude the use of the best available science. it endangers the e.p.a.'s ability to fulfill its mission. it would impede, if not eradicate, the agency's work to protect americans from significant risks to human ealth and the environment. a limited science advisory board in the scope of the board's review. the proposed rule would have chilling consequence for the e.p.a. and for every person who benefits from clean air and clean water. this amendment will direct the science advisory board to provide a comprehensive review of the entire proposed rule before it is finalized. we must defend science. i thank chair mccollom as well as tonko, fletcher for their support. i ask my colleagues to support the en bloc amendment and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. joyce: i reserve the balance of my time.
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the chair: the gentlewoman from minnesota. ms. mccollum: i yield a minute and a half to the gentlewoman from michigan, mrs. dingell. the chair: the gentlewoman from michigan is recognized. mrs. dingell: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to support the en bloc amendment which contains an amendment i have offered. in order tone sure the environmental protection agency is effectively able to protect human health and the environment for future generations, we need to ensure emergency responders and investigators are there when we need them. closing e.p.a. facilities or relocating employees with the task for the responsibility to answer the call during an environmental emergency and investigate the cost and who we hold accountable in the aftermath is the wrong approach. future generations will be less safe and the health of our environment will be at increased risk. this amendment would simply
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prevent the e.p.a. from closing or relocating any office or facility that houses either emergency responders or criminal investigation unit responsible for carrying out the agency's mission. e.p.a. emergency response personnel serve in offices, some large, some small, all across this nation. these brave and dedicated public servants respond to oil spills, chemical, biological, raological releases and large -- radiological releases and large-scale national emergencies. they have response assistance when state and local first responder capabilities have been exhausted or need additional support. located in my district is the large lakes research station, an island in the detroit river. this facility serves the great lakes region -- the chair: the gentlewoman's time has expired. mrs. dingell: please, i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. the chair: the gentlewoman from
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minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. joyce: i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, i yield a minute and a half to the gentlewoman from colorado, ms. degette. ms. degette: i rise in support of the en bloc amendment and offer my environmental justice amendment to h.r. 3055. this amendment would require that the e.p.a. identify 100 communities across the country that are suffering from especially egregious violations of environmental law and clean them up. it would require the e.p.a. to study what happens when communities experience multiple sources of pollution and then come up with better ways to protect them going forward. the amendment has one simple goal, to ensure that every american has clean air to breathe, safe water to drink, and access to food that's free
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of toxins. while the goal may sound simple, the harsh reality is that we as a nation have been failing to provide these staples of life to too many communities for far too long. when we fail to protect our environment, it is often the poorest among us who suffer the most. when we allow pipes to become contaminated or when we allow companies to spew more toxins into the air, it's usually lower income communities and communities of color that get hurt the most. this amendment is for them. these communities include mmunities like globeville, a neighborhood in the northern part of my district. the people experience a wide range of health problems on a daily basis, like throat irritation and watery eyes which are likely linked to their constant exposure to a long list of toxins in the air. whether it's hydrogen cyanide, whether it's other kinds of
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waste or smog-causing pollutants, these people suffer every day. i urge the members to support my amendment and let these communities be remedied. the chair: the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman yields. the gentleman from ohio. mr. joyce: i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman has the only time remaining. mr. joyce: apparently, there was an individual in route that would like to speak on this. so at this point in time i do not have a witness right here. i yield back. the chair: does the gentleman yield? mr. joyce: i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields. the question is on the amendments en bloc offered by the gentlewoman from minnesota. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
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in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the en bloc amendments are agreed to. it's now in order to consider amendment number 127 printed in art b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio rise? mr. joyce: sorry. can you repeat the number? the chair: it's number 127. r. burgess' amendment.
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it it is now in order to consider amendment number 128 printed in house report 116-119. the hat purpose does gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? ms. was: mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. -- ms. wasserman schultz mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 128 printed in house report 116-119 offered by ms. wasserman schultz of florida. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. wasserman schultz, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from florida. ms. was: thank you, mr. chairman. i -- ms. wasserman schultz: thank you, mr. chairman. i offer an amendment, as we will see this morning from my
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colleagues' comments, has strong bipartisan support from our colleagues in the florida delegation. when it comes to the idea of turning our beaches into a fossil fuel industrial zone, there is no divergens between democrats and republicans in florida. we -- divergeans between democrats and republicans in florida. we stand united to not drill off our coast. we have a $65 billion tourism facility. our hotels, fishermen and recreational facilities depend on clean coastal waters and the still recovering florida bay cannot afford an oil spill. every time i talk about this i talk about the deepwater horizon spill. at worst the spill leaked more than 60,000 barrels of oil a day. 87 days went by while crews rushed into the oceangoing unchecked. millions of barrels were released in the gulf of mexico. this devastated the entire ecosystem. they were harmed by oil slicks and dead zones.
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coral reefs between alabama and florida were decimated. hydrocarbons were found on hundreds of miles of beaches around the gulf. this environmental impact also left a human toll. the accident caused the deaths of 11 rig workers. it left 12,000 people unemployed and decimated local economies which rely on fishing and marine recreation. now is not the time to expand fossil fuel extraction. we must do everything we can to transition to a clean energy economy. mr. chairman, i'd like to yield one minute you to my friend from florida, the former governor of our great state, mr. chryst. -- mr. crist. the chair: the gentleman from florida is recognized for one minute. mr. crist: i want to thank my colleague from florida, representative debbie wasserman schultz, for her leadership on this important issue and for working with me and the florida delegation to include banning drilling in the eastern gulf of mexico in this amendment. as you can imagine, those of us
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in florida -- and i represent pinellas county, florida, on the gulf coast, my district is surrounded by you water on three sides. it is virtually a peninsula. as you can imagine, this issue is deeply important to me and my constituents and all floridians. i was governor of florida when the deepwater horizon exploded in 2010. i saw the tar balls wash up on florida beaches. i saw the harm done to florida's economy and our way of life. i have seen firsthand the consequences of off-shore oil drilling. i hope to never see it again. . we must protect the eastern gulf of mexico and the environmental, economic and national security benefits it provides to the region and to the united states of america. i could not be more proud that the florida delegation stands united to do just that. i urge passage of this amendment and the underlying legislation. i yield back. thank you. the chair: the gentlewoman from florida. was was thank you, mr. chairman.
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if i -- ms. wasserman schultz: thank you, mr. chairman. if i might inquire how much time i have remaining. the chair: the gentlewoman has two minutes remaining. ms. wasserman schultz: thank you. at this time i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from southwest florida who represents the great counties of collier and lee, mr. rooney. the chair: the gentleman from florida is recognized for one minute. mr. rooney: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to thank my colleague from the east coast of florida, congresswoman waserman schultz, for her courageous leadership on this issue and to join and echo what the governor said as we continue to work together to fight the scourge of offshore drilling. offshore drilling anywhere near florida represents an existential threat to our tourist economy that cannot risk taking. we also have the important military bases all along the gulf coast that the governor referred to that are equally important to use the gulf as offshore testing grounds. that's the only place in the world where our united states navy and air force can conduct these tests. so i want to thank congresswoman
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wasserman schultz for her leadership and to urge adoption of this amendment and protect florida. 21 million people are being protected by congresswoman wasserman schultz. thank you. ms. wasserman schultz: thank you so much. the chair: the gentlewoman from florida. ms. wasserman schultz: thank you. mr. chairman, before i yield the remaining time to mr. rutherford from jacksonville, i want to ask unanimous consent that this letter from the florida delegation opposing offshore oil drilling that was sent to the secretary be included in the record. the chair: the gentlewoman's request will be covered under general leave. ms. wasserman schultz: thank you. i'd like to yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from jacksonville, florida, mr. rutherford. the chair: the gentleman from florida is recognized for one minute. mr. rutherford: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank my colleague from south florida for, as was mentioned earlier, having the courage to stand up for our state and protect it from the scourge of drilling. and i have to tell you, just last november, mr. speaker, 69%
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of florida voters supported banning drilling in the state waters off of florida's coast. it's no secret that our florida beaches, our oceans drive our economy. drilling could effect not only our beautiful beaches and thriving tourism, but also our national security. i met with the department of defense officials multiple times and they've continued to share serious concerns about how offshore drilling activities could impact their operations. the eastern gulf is a vital training ground for our military and on florida's atlantic coast, that i share with my colleague, we're home to mayport and king's bay, just to name a few. mr. speaker, this important amendment will protect our coast, our economies and our national defense and for all these reasons, i urge my colleagues to support this amendment and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time.
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the gentlewoman's time has expired. does any member seek recognition in opposition to the amendment? >> yes, i rise in opposition to the amendment. the chair: the gentleman from arizona is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you so very, very much. i want to rise in opposition to this. because i want to remind everybody, this is continental offshore. this is not state-owned property. this is the property of the american public. so if we're going to extend that aspect, i want the same type of application to lands out in western arizona. mr. gosar: and the western united states. so we have to start looking at this. you know, we've seen opposition basically state that they can't co-exist. fundamental energy development, exploration, and tourism. but we see that very vibrantly in the gulf state of louisiana. we see one of the most vibrant fishing areas, you know, that doesn't hold muster in that regard. so in regards to that, we need
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to explore and find out exactly what kind of resources are actually there. it makes a big difference in regards to energy independence, because those that spend money for tourism have to have a job and plentiful energy at affordable prices help the american business and the american worker. so the same aspects that we are trying to extend here now for florida should be extended all the way across the board. but once again, this is the public's property. it needs to be well invested and the government has a due diligence in which to do that. we can take into consideration concerns of the military. we do in southwestern arizona. we have the goldwater range, the grounds and we still co-exist with the natural resources and environmental protections. so i think within that aspect i rise in opposition and i would ask everybody to defeat this amendment. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question now is on the
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amendment offered by the gentlewoman from florida. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the amendment is agreed to. >> i ask for a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from florida will be postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 129 printed in . rt b of house report 116-119 for what purpose does the gentleman from alaska seek recognition? mr. young: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend, without objection. mr. chairman, i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the gentleman has an amendment at the desk. the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment numbered -- amendment number 129 offered by mr. young of alaska. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentleman from alaska, mr. young, and a
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member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from alaska. mr. young: mr. chairman, in 2013 the e.p.a. issued new standards of air pollutant emissions for commercial and industrial solid waste insin ration which included -- in-- included in alaska. my amendment would prohibit the e.p.a. from enforcing these rules. my amendment would not effect anyone but alaskans. i know this chamber has shown a great interest in my state recently but i hope you'd agree that enforcing these rules in remote locations that don't even connect with highway systems is unjustified. while i appreciate the focus on clean air, these standards are unattainable for rural alaska. if the 2013 is enforced in my state, residents and industries alike will be forced to be noncompliant or will not be uble to use waste -- be able to use waste disposal at all. the ground is frozen and the water table is too high.
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the locations would be impacted by this rule are hundreds of miles away from waste facilities. while garbage trucks are critical flass the lower 48, transferring waste from these sites would create more emissions than burning near the sites. when e.p.a. used this rule they used bad science and statistical methods to collect new standards. hey didn't use enough samples. data did not have quality as a small remote area that are both located within 20 miles of the regional land fill. insin ration is the most clean way to deal with this waste in small village. 1,000 pounds of waste can be reduced to 50 pounds of ash that can be safely transported. we have a lot of small villages cinerators.ly have in they cannot have landfills. this is not a good idea, it's the wrong thing to do. i will say again, alaska's a little unique. we're just about half as big as the united states with 750,000
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people. making these people break the law is wrong and this amendment would keep them from applying that to the standards -- standards and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. does the gentlewoman from minnesota seek recognition? ms. mccollum: i rise in opposition to this amendment. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized for five minutes. ms. mccollum: as this amendment would exempt certain small incinerators from alaska being regulated under the clean air act. my good friend notes that this amendment is fundamentally different from what was done in the 2019 bill. that language barred incinerator rules adopted in 2011 from being enforced but left in place the pre-2011 rules governing those acilities. this would barren actment of any clean air act rule and for me that's unacceptable. these incinerators, as the gentleman points out, are currently burning, but what
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they're releasing is some of the knocksic air emissions -- noxic air emissions in the country, some of the most grievous. it's critical that we ensure we're complying with clean air regulations. there has to be some rules to this. we have an obligation to protect the health and safety of all americans an exempting incinerators in the way that this language is currently written, even small and remote ones, from the clean air act regulations is just something i can't accept at this time. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from alaska is recognized. mr. young: i appreciate the gentlelady's comments but again, what do you do with a town that has 500 people and the only way to dispose of waste is by burning or letting it go in the turf? let it below around? threat pollute the other parts of the earth? this is the only sensible way to do it. i'm not talking about great big cities. i'm talking about small communities that cannot have
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landfills. and that does occur. we don't have that many in alaska but where they do have these incinerators, there ought to be some compliance in the sense, ok, guys, you're not really polluting the air, it's a better way, more environmental damage by not being able to bury it, letting it run around on the top of the surface of the earth, than there is burning it. i know i just came out of denmark. they have one of the largest incinerators in the world, it handles two million people. they burn 35 tons an hour. now, i'm saying, ok, let's have those kind of incinerators, but you can't afford it for a small village. i know where the gentlelady is coming from you but can't apply all rules turnover place at one time when it doesn't work. you have to look at the total environmental damage. i think if you don't burn it, you have a lot harder problem than you do if you do burn it. so i urge my colleagues to support this small innocuous amendment to try to make people live a better way than have them enforced by a government agency at a standard that can't be met
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unless they run it around on the top of the ground. with that, i yield. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. does the gentlewoman seek recognition? ms. mccollum: i reserve the right to close. at this time i reserve. the chair: the gentlewoman is the only one with time remaining. ms. mccollum: thank you. as i said, i understand the gentleman's concerns. but the fact that this is fundamentally different from what we did in the f.y. 2020 bill and working with the lead senator from alaska who is the counterpart on the interior appropriations this just goes too far. i oppose this as it's currently written. i can't support this because it completely, completely eliminates the clean air act wish and i wish that -- i the gentleman an opportunity to go in front of the authorizing
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committee and at that point if he wants to talk some more and we can figure out a way to create a win-win, i'd be happy to help him in the authorizing committee. but i cannot support this rule, this amendment as it stands, eliminating the rules for clean air at this time. with, that i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the question son the amendment offered by the gentleman from -- the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from alaska. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the noes have it. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it, the amendment is not agreed to.
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the chair understands that amendments number 130 and 131 will not be offered. it is now in order to consider amendment number 132 printed in part b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 132 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by mr. pallone of new jersey. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and a member opposed each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise today to offer an amendment to block oil and gas drilling in the atlantic ocean. my amendment is steeped in bipartisan tradition. for 27 years starting in 1982,
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congress continuously supported an atlantic oil and gas drilling moratorium. and we can't take the greatest resource of our coastal communities and economies for granted, which is why today we must act to restore the bipartisan language that would protect the atlantic coast from drilling. the trump administration's misguided effort to drill in the atlantic is reckless, in my opinion. simply put, the vitality of our coastal economies is tied to healthy ocean ecosystems. healthy oceans along the east coast support billions in gross domestic product and more than maljobs through fishing, recreational -- more than a million jobs through fishing, recreation and tourism alone. tourism supports over half a million jobs in new jersey alone. this will no longer be the case if the beautiful beaches of the jersey shore are slicked with oil. the bipartisan co-sponsors of this amendment and the communities we represent are unwilling to accept the tremendous risks that come with oil and gas drilling in the atlantic. hundreds of local governments have passed formal resolutions
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opposing oil and gas exploration and drilling in the atlantic, as have numerous local chambers of commerce, tourism and restaurant associations, and commercial and recreational fishing associations. more than 43,000 businesses and 500,000 commercial fishing families have joined together to strongly oppose offshore oil and gas exploration and drilling. rising sea temperatures and acidification due to climate change, our oceans and economies can't afford the risk of dangerous oil and gas development. more than four million gallons of oil have been spilled or leaked in the pacific ocean since 1969. again, the unimaginable risk to our shores is not worth making wealthy oil and gas companies richer. he deepwater horizeon caused a projected loss of $7 billion in fisheries from texas to florida. including 22,000 lost jobs. and there is no hiding behind
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oil spips. we need a full atlantic moratorium and return to historic bipartisan precedent. i thank you and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. does a member seek to -- >> i speak in opposition. the chair: the gentleman from outh carolina is recognized. the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> this amendment i am speaking in opposition of is actually shortsighted. we have been producing oil and gas off-shore all over the country on the outer continental shelf for a long time. we can do it safely. but i believe the ones that don't want to see the areas mentioned in this amendment opened up for off-shore leasing really just don't want fossil fuel development, but we are in an energy renaissance in this country where we are finding more oil and gas to the point
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we are now a net exporter of oil, we're a net exporter of gas. mr. duncan: that means we're producing more in this country than we use in this sununu country so we have a surplus and we're able to help our allies in europe to lessen their dependence on russian gas. but by shutting down the opportunity to explore on the outer continental shelf in these areas is really not wanting to find out what's out there. what harm does it do to look, to begin the seismic work, to find out what may be off the coast of the great state of south carolina? because recently they just found off the coast of ghana 32 trillion cubic feet of natural gas using 21st century 3-d seismic technology. now, if we allow the seismic work to happen in these areas that y'all are wanting to exclude from energy
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exploration, we might find 32 trillion, 50 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. then, the southeast is playing in the energy renaissance in this country. i think this is shortsighted. what harm does to do to look, to allow these areas to be opened up for exploration and then ultimately production to help meet the energy needs of this nation and others around the world going forward? with that i'll reserve. the chair: the gentleman from south carolina reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. chairman, might i inquire how much time i have left? the chair: the gentleman has 2 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. pallone: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i appreciate the comments that the gentleman from south carolina made, and i don't mean to speak for his state, but i have to tell you, i was in savannah and then went a couple days over to st. helena island and hilton head and some of the
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areas and then on another occasion in may i was in charleston and i went to james island and a few other places. i find it very hard to believe that the people that live in those coastal areas don't share the same concerns we have in new jersey about the impact of an oil spill on our tourism and recreational fishing industries. again, i am not going to speak for your state because that wouldn't be proper. but let me say this. when you say -- when my colleague on the other side says you can drill safely, i have to disagree. when we had the b.p. spill nine years ago, there was a commission, bipartisan, that was set up and they made certain recommendations about drilling. and those recommendations were not followed by the republican leadership in congress. the fact of the matter is that the b.p. spill was in relatively shallow water compared to the type of drilling that's proposed off the coast of the atlantic. and what's happening, as you go further and further off out of
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the outer continental shelf, the possibility of spill and inability to take proper safety precautions becomes even more of a problem. and that was what the b.p. commission recommended. they pointed out as you go deeper out, it is -- really, the technology doesn't exist to protect the coastal areas from a spill. i have to take issue with the gentleman. i might -- i would point out that the recommendations of the b.p. commission were never met. i just ask my colleagues to stand united by voting in favor, protecting the health and economic vitality of the coastal communities in all 14 states along the atlantic coast and the district of columbia and with that, mr. chairman, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new jersey yields back the balance of his time. does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. duncan: i have seen in the natural resources committee when i was there years ago where fear tactics were used,
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aying wells and other -- seals and other mammals would be killed because of seismic work. one said not a single marine mammal has ever been harmed. off of the coast of the mediterranean, africa, these fear tactics of oil spills are just shortsighted on meeting our energy needs. the gentleman from arizona -- i'd like to yield to mr. gosar two minutes. the chair: the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. gosar: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i mean, the irony of this aspect, to explore something that's of the public nature of the people of the united states, the ironic aspect is unfathomable. to look at seismic, we don't want to do seismic. you need seismic to look at morguings, with regard to big wind. this area wants to have big wind. so the other part to this
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aspect, how does it work when you need to have a russian taker outside of your bay? which is one of the most easily aspects of oil. that you have for heating oil and natural gas in terms of heating your energy platforms in the areas. that's just unfathomable to me. we do this better and the technology is actually coming back around. we just had -- as western caucus chairman, we went down to houston to see the technology that exists. it's profound, absolutely profound what's there. no one's asking to go pass go, collect $00. what they want to do is follow the aspects. there is evidence, like i cited in the gulf states, definitely when you look at louisiana, it's a plethora. it's the most diverse ecosystems, aquatic ecosystems around. so there is a way to have it
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and look at it and it benefiting everyone. the dichotomy trying to separate one aspect of holdings for the american people and then apply it to out west where there is more defined aspects of jurisdiction, to land aspects of public lands and public minerals and gas leases is just ironic. so i thank the gentleman for yielding. i'd like to remain in opposition. mr. duncan: i ask my colleagues to defeat this amendment because it is shortsighted. there are states that want to play in the renaissance. they want to hopefully experience a 37.5% revenue sharing back to the states. hopefully experience jobs that are created in the oil and gas industry that's an economic boom, not only for the state coffers through tax revenue but also the jobs created in those communities. so i would urge my colleagues to defeat this amendment. with that i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields
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back. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new jersey. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. pallone: mr. chairman, i'd ask for a recorded vote. the chair: the amendment is agreed to. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18 further proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from new jersey will e postponed. it is now in order to consider amendment number 133 printed in part b of house report 116-119. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? mr. buchanan: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will
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designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 133 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by mr. buchanan of florida. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentleman from florida, mr. buchanan, and a member opposed, each will control five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida. mr. buchanan: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise today in support of my amendment with my constituents in my area, it's very important to them. the amendment would prohibit permits for hunting and killing indengered lions and elephants for trove -- endangered lions and elephants for controversyies from zimbabwe, zambia, and tanzania. they are on verge of extinction. we have seen lions populations decline by 50%. in tanzania, the elephant population dropped to 60% from 2009 to 2014. this amendment is critical to
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ensure these animals do not become extinct. president trump called the elephant hunting a horror show. there is no scientific evidence to claim trophy hunting controls populations of these animals. if so we would see an increase in the species, not a dramatic ecline in elephants and lion populations. with that i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. who seeks time in opposition? for what purpose does the entleman from ohio rise? the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. >> i rise to claim time in opposition. president teddy roosevelt, a champion of the conservation movement, went on hunting expeditions around the world. mr. joyce: this amendment would negatively impact of the people zambia, tanzania.
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one of the countries listed in the amendment is zimbabwe. the management plan for indigenous program in zimbabwe attempted to create economic incentives for communities and landowners to conduct habitat and ecosystem restoration. at one point, campfire generated more than $20 million, which almost 90% came from trophy hunting, allowing communities to establish management over habitat and resources within the range area. another country mentioned in the amendment is zambia. zambia's administrative design for game management program has served as a model for locally accruing trophy hunting area as the program receives 67% of the trophy hunting revenue and game management areas and 53% of the program revenue is directed toward wildlife management that goes to community development. there is a lack of sufficient data on the effect of hunting species that would lead us to
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support efforts like this amendment. according to the nonpartisan congressional research service, many scientific studies on trophy hunting effects on wildlife populations claim insufficient data to measure the effect of hunting on a species. certainly, improvements can be made in other countries to further conserve species and benefit local communities. however, this amendment would take us in the wrong direction. instead, we should focus our efforts on habitat loss, illegal poaching and conflict with humans. i urge my colleagues to vote no on this amendment, and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. buchanan: i yield two minutes to my co-chair of the congressional animal protection caucus, mr. blumenauer of oregon. the chair: the gentleman from oregon is recognized for two minutes. mr. blumenauer: i appreciate the gentleman's courtesy and i appreciate his leadership on this. sadly, invoking the memory of teddy roosevelt is not exactly the best symbol of
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conservation. he was one of the people that slaughtered thousands of buffalo and had trophy hunting around the world. what's different today is that the scale is much greater. the populations we want to protect are dwindling. at one point we thought there was an exhaustible supply of wild animals to kill. even teddy roosevelt ended up supporting legislation to be able to protect endangered species, which he did in terms of the slaughter of wild birds. we've seen these populations drop dramatically, and what trophy hunters do, they kill the strongest, the most magnificent animals, if they were left in the population would promote stronger herds of elephants and lions. we're working against ourselves. for a while here, the federal
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government issued -- took steps to limit the issuance of these permits which, as my friend, mr. buchanan, points out, even donald trump says is a horror show. if you talk to those people there, their future is not slaughtering wildlife, it's protecting it. the photo expeditions where they take the pictures and they don't kill them, that they reuse over and over and over again is far more valuable and doesn't hurt the species. i would respectfully request that we approve the gentleman's amendment, that we stop this barbaric practice, that we undermine the protection of these species and do everything we can to reverse the horrific condition they have faced over the course of the last 20 years. and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from florida is recognized.
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mr. buchanan: i yield 30 seconds to ms. mccollum of minnesota. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized for 30 seconds. ms. mccollum: thank you. we should not be facilitating the hunting of species in countries that do not have good domestic conservation programs. and have not demonstrated established, sound science-based management programs. the interior bill recognizes the importance of these iconic species and the role they play in the ecosystem and it's imperative to conserve these species, especially in light of the recent u.n. report on biodiversity that warns one million species face extinction. this amendment supports the committee's effort to ensure the survival of elephants and lions for future and present generations and with that i support the amendment and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. buchanan: i urge adoption of my amendment and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio is
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recognized. >> thank you. i yield two minutes to my distinguished colleague from alaska, mr. young. mr. young: i thank the gentleman for yielding and the misinformation you've just heard on the floor. you're not going to save any animals. you're going to help kill be a mals -- animals. i've been to africa eight times. i've tried to conserve and i've done so. areas that have not been hunted, the loss of animals because of poaching, not for the ivory but because of the food. because there's no value to the animals, so they'll kill it and eat it. the local people. you're not going to help it out because there's no value to that animal other than food. if you don't have trophy hunting, when it's worth more. if i was to kill a buffalo over there, all i get is the head and the hide. they get the meat. all you're going to do is prohibit it being imported into the united states, make you feel good. but it's not going to save the animal. in fact, the animal's going to diminish. that's been proven, regardless of what you may read.
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we're the real conservationists. people hunting in those areas, probably without any investment. this may sound good and help somebody out in their district, but it's not going to save the animals. i suggest respectfully you ought to go and witness what is occurring over there by those that live there and destroying the animals if we do not hunt because there's no value. i believe i'm a great conservationist. i probably saved moran mals than any of you in the room -- more animals than any of you in the room because i do contribute. you don't. you talk. i think it's a shameful thing to say we're going to tell another country what they can and cannot do. that's what you're doing to make yourself feel good. but you're not saving the animals. a conservationist is a true man that conserves, not tries to preserve in a natural state, because the natural state is very cruel. it takes the weak, it takes the strong, it takes them all.
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and the man is the strongest of all and they will take them all if it has no to value other than food -- has no value other than food. so i urge defeat of this amendment. i wish more people would go and look and see because you don't know what you're talking about. with, that i yield back. the chair: -- with that, i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. members are reminded to address their remarks to the chair. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. >> i yield one minute to the gentleman from south carolina, mr. duncan. the chair: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for one minute. mr. duncan: thank you, thank you, mr. chairman. i rise as the immediate past chairman of the congressional sportsman's caucus. the largest bipartisan caucus in the united states congress. both republicans and democrats. and i agree with what the gentleman from alaska just said. hunters have conserved more acres and protected moran mals -- more animals all across the globe than many in this chamber. i realize we're an urban nation,
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that we're having more representation from urban areas and we've gotten away from our days of planting -- hunting and fishing and understanding the role the hunter plays in conservation. but as the gentleman from alaska says, we're going to tell other countries that they can't allow hunting because you're going to shut off the ability of the american hunter to bring certain trophies back. these folks live with five-ton animals that are damaging crops. a whole season's worth of crops in one single night. elephants are dangerous. but ultimately, if you take the hunter out of that situation, the hunter that's paying with his hard-earned dollars, not -- tax dollars, his money, i urge my colleagues to defeat this amendment. the chair: the question is now on the amendment offered by the gentleman from florida. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the
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oes have it. ms. mccollum: i request a recorded vote. the chair: pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, further proceedings offered by the gentleman from florida will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from minnesota seek recognition? ms. mccollum: mr. chair, pursuant to section 3 of house rule 445, as the designee of the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. lowey, i offer the amendments en bloc which are at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendments en bloc. the clerk: en bloc number 5 consisting of amendments 146, d 134, 137, 145, 162, 166,15 4rks157, 185, 74, 179, 183, 184,
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186, 188, 189 and 191 printed in part b of house report 116-119 offered by ms. machine gun comumof minnesota -- ms. mccollum of minnesota. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 445, the gentlewoman from minnesota and the gentleman from ohio will each control 10 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from minnesota. ms. mccollum: mr. chairman, the amendments included in the en bloc have been made in order by the rule and have been agreed to by both sides. i sport amendments and urge -- i support the amendments and urge adoption and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. joyce: mr. chair, i rise to support the en bloc amendments. i'd like to thank chairman lowey and chair mccollum for working with us to include provisions important to members on both sides of the aisle. included in this en bloc amendment are several water provisions that i support, including grants to states and to reduce pollution in our
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waterways. the amendment also supports the maintenance of the great lakes advisory board, which helps to ensure the transparent, incredible views great lakes restoration investments. finally, the en bloc amendment includes language prioritizing funding for grants to fight domestic violence in american indian and alaska native communities. again, i support the bipartisan en bloc amendment and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, i yield a minute and a half to the gentleman from illinois, mr. casten. the chair: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. casten: thank you, mr. speaker. the great lakes advisory board plays an essential role in providing the e.p.a. with the technical, environmental and local expertise needed to carry out the great lakes restoration initiative. this board is one of over 1,000 advisory boards that operate across the federal government. is this past friday, the trump administration put all of those boards at risk by signing an
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executive order eliminating 1/3 of federal advisory boards. these boards provide technical expertise on topics as diverse as animal health, safe pesticide use, trade, and offer useful third party review of scientific research conducted at federal agencies. the trump administration order is, in a word, arbitrary. it presents a clear threat to the ability of agencies to have the best information when making fundamental and far-reaching decisions. while my amendment is specific to the great lakes advisory board, i've offered this amendment to underscore the importance of preserving funding for all of these boards. the executive order is a mistake. it's another stunning escalation in this ace administration's war on science and the american people deserve better. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. joyce: thank you, mr. chair. i yield two minutes to my distinguished colleague, friend, from north carolina, mr. hudson.
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the chair: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for two minutes. mr. hudson: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i also want to thank chairwoman mccollum, ranking member joyce for working with me on this very important amendment. north carolina's eighth congressional district, we're fortunate to have a national forest. throughout my time in congress, i've heard horror stories from my constituents of the danger of the public roads within the national forest. i've seen these roads firsthand and can testify to the critical need of paving these roads. my amendment works toward improving and maintaining these roads and ebb -- and ensuring public access to the state treasure. one of my constituents had a heard a-- had a heart attack and the ambulance couldn't get down the road because of the ruts and the washouts. thankfully the desperate, resourceful paramedics got out of the ambulance and sprinted down the road with a stretcher. another one of my constituents' house burned to the ground because the road was so impassable a firetruck couldn't get down to put out the blaze. these are just a few of the
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examples of the severe public safety concerns that my constituents are facing due to the inability of the park service to maintain these roads. that's unacceptable. and it's one reason why i've worked so hard to advocate on behalf of the national forest and advocate for more resources for the park service in general. i want to thank the chee he was -- the chief of the forest service for her attention to this issue and for working with me to address interest this public safety crisis. in addition, i want to again thank chairwoman mccollum for her work to increase funding for road construction in this legislation. i'll continue to work and stress the urgency of this issue until my constituents are safe. it is my duty as their congressman to get this done. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment, as well as the en bloc, and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. joyce: i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, i yield a minute and a half to the gentleman from michigan, another great lakes state, mr. levin. the chair: the gentleman from michigan is recognized.
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mr. levin: thank you very much, mr. chair. i want to thank chairwoman mccollum for her leadership in bringing forward a proposal that protects and preserves public lands, ensures access to clean air and drinking water, and combats climate change. i'm especially pleased to see this bill's $90 million investment for the first time in sewer overflow control grants. to control and treat sewer overflows and to help address the water infrastructure crisis our country faces. my amendment prioritizes grant funding for mccomb county's retention basin and other such sewer overflow systems that help protect the water sources our communities rely on every day. this funding will help make urgent water quality improvements to lake st. clair, to the great lakes, and to freshwater bodies all across our country. i would also like to thank the former distinguished member of
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this body and the current mccomb county public works commissioner, candice miller, for her partnership to make sure we protect lake st. clair. thank you so much and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from minnesota is recognized. ms. mccollum: mr. chair, at this time i'd like to yield a minute to the gentlewoman from texas. the chair: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized for one minute. ms. jackson lee: i want to thank the gentlelady for her leadership and i want to thank the appropriations committee, and this one in particular, for the great work that it's doing. i've had the privilege of doing amendments under the c.j.s. agricultural interior and let me express my appreciation for the added $2 million for research in historically black colleges and particularly the opportunity for my amendment is to enable an infant to increase funding by $2 million to the 1980 institutions which are land grato

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