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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  July 15, 2019 6:30pm-8:45pm EDT

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put into the economy returns $1.50? is that true? second, the gentleman said it would be detrimental to the southern states if they raise everinimum wage, has he studied which states draw the most federal subsidies? it is the southern states because of the low wages. mcdonald's for [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2019] >> live back to the house floor for a series of votes. votes will be taken in the following order. motion to suspend the rules and ass h.r. 2744, agree to h.res. 432 and pass h.r. 2037. the first electronic vote will be conducted as a 15-minute vote. pursuant to clause 9 of rule 20,
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remaining electronic votes will be conducted as five-minute votes. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the the gentleman from new york, mr. engel to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2744 on which yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 2744, a bill to authorize the administrator of the united states agency for international development to prescribe the manner in which programs of the agency are identified overseas and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 414. the nays are 1. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without
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objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, to suspend the rules and agree to house resolution 432 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: house resolution 432, resolution condemning attacks on supporting an immediate move to a democratically elected government in sudan. the speaker pro tempore: the members willthe --
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record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 414. the nays are 1. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the resolution is agreed to, and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on motion of the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2037 as amended. on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 2037, a bill to encourage accountability for the murder of "washington post" columnist jamaal khashoggi. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the
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bill as amended. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 405 the nays are seven. 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the house will come to order. a little order in the house, please. will the members take their conversations off the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask for unanimous consent that the committee on judiciary be discharged from further consideration of h.r. 962, the
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born-alive abortion survivors protection act, and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: under guidelines consistently issued by successive speakers, as recorded in section 956 of the house rules and manual, the chair is constrained not to entertain the request unless it's been cleared by the bipartisan floor and committee leaderships. the gentleman is not recognized or debate. will the house please come to order? take your conversations off the floor.
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the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one inute. mr. payne: madam speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 582, the raise the wage act. h.r. 582 is truly long overdue. truly hardworking folks across this country, most of them are first in the door and last to leave, will benefit from this strong legislation. low-wage earners, manufacturing workers, health care workers, construction workers and educators will come closer to being able to make ends meet. middle-aged and working class
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real wages, working class real wages have remained stagnant over the past several decades. even as the corporations and shareholders they labor for have seen soaring profits. in short, the federal minimum ge has not increased since 2009, 2009. hardworking families have been given -- not been given a fair deal and thus have an extremely tough time trying to keep with the rising cost of living. i will vote yes on h.r. 582, the raise the wage act, and i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to join me in standing up for hardworking american people. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. carter: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. carter: madam speaker, i rise today to recognize reverend caroline cubbage on her retirement from the ministry and from wesley monumental united methodist church. the reverend has made a tremendous impact throughout the first congressional district of georgia, as wesley's senior adult pastor. one of her most notable projects includings -- includes her work with morningstar family services which provides therapy to children who have multiple diagnoses of intellectual disabilities. but this project is only the tip of the iceberg. through her work helping the most vulnerable, organizing church events, her dedication to the ministry and her breadth and knowledge of god's word, she has helped wesley to increase its congregation and engage those members to make our community a better place to live. reverend cubbage retired on june 30 and i am both thankful and proud that we were able to have a woman like her doing
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god's work in the first congressional district of georgia. enjoy your retirement, reverend cubbage. thank you, mr. speaker -- madam speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> 18 years ago isabel moskau's son was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. mr. van drew: at the time she was struck by how little information and support was available for families affected by a.s.d., so isabel began a support group for a few parents to meet over coffee and to talk. eventually isabel's meeting grew into a nonprofit organization called faces for autism.
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and it helps over 750 families with five active and expanding support groups throughout south jersey. in addition to these support groups, isabel created a program called massie's mission, which focused on water safety and survival for those with a.s.d. now that her son is close to 21 years old, isabel is exploring employment opportunities for him and all of the faces -- face's participants. they're aging out and they're aging out of their schools. she never stops thinking, planning and creating opportunities to make our community, to make south jersey to be the best that it can be. isabel, your community thanks you every day. for everything you do. south jersey thanks you every day for all that you do. you are the best. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one
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minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i would take note that there is a couple more seats down front if some of those in the back would like to mill down forward. mr. speaker, i rise today to honor clayton edward narvison, a world war ii hero. he joined the united states marine corps following the attack on pearl harbor. he fought in the battle of tarawa in november of 1943 and during february and march, 1945, he served as a gunnar on an 81 millimeter mortar during the battle of iwo jima. after the war, mr. narvison attended a law school and had a successful year as an attorney. mr. burchett: he's made presentations to students telling some of the stories of his times in service and his struggles he and his family faced during the depression. through these presentations, he reminds young folks of the importance of serving your
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country and how blessed we are to live in the united states of america. there are real heroes in this world and they aren't music stars, famous athletes or hollywood actors. our country's heroes are the men and women of our armed forces, like mr. narvison who served and sacrificed for our freedom. it's my honor to recognize clayton narvison as the 2019 veteran of the month and to thank him for his service to our country, his dedication to his work and family and for his continued support of our community and our great country. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the memory of dorothy jones, a long-time resident of detroit's 48217 community.
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i first met ms. dorothy jones in 2008. ms. tlaib: she was very active in her local block club. she was passionate about the right to breathe clean air and stood up against corporate polluters like marathon petroleum refinery. mrs. jones was never a person to shy away from a challenge and she always accepted nothing less than the best for her family, friends and her neighborhood. i am honored to have known ms. jones for more than 10 years. she would take me to task on important issues which i always welcomed and for which i was better for it. i am grateful for her engagement on these issues that affect the quality of life for so many residents in the 13th congress -- 13th congressional district. it's an honor to have known her and served ms. jones. we honor her memory and her surviving family members. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does my friend, the gentleman from california, seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: ithout objection. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the latest proposal by my democratic colleagues to raise the minimum wage from $7.50 to $15 nationally is going to be devastating to small businesses and jobs. mr. lamalfa: a 107% increase will not create more jobs. it might sound nice on the surface but it's not good. only .3% earn minimum wage, and half of those are below the age of 25 who need entry level jobs, to learn a skill, to learn to show up every day and grow from there. increasing it to $15 an hour nationally would cause smaller companies to pass on higher prices to consumers and eventually forcing them to close
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their doors, as i visited a estaurant in my district, they had two locations, closed one, and they're worried how long they can keep their restaurant open because of the percentage of labor in their business. let's do things that support job growth, the success we've had after the tax cuts and jobs act and not go down this path. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rom michigan seek recognition? without objection. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to congratulate a great leader of workers throughout north america and indeed the world. leo gerard who retired this afternoon as the president of the united steelworkers.
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leo rose through the ranks and was president of the steelworkers for -- and was a member of the steelworkers for 30 years, president for the last four years. he was a fierce negotiator for his members. but he was also a leader for all workers. for example, he brought the environmental movement and the labor movement together to tackle tough issues about keeping our water and air clean for everyone and for future generations. while protecting our jobs. but one thing i think stands out. i want to floge leo gerard on his retirement that we are not going to pass a replacement for nafta unless it honors the workers of mexico, canada, and the united states. what a great champion for workers in north america. leo, we're going to carry on your work. god bless you. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman
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from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> thank you, mr. speaker. earlier this month i had the prive lem of returning to blaresville, pennsylvania, and the national center for defense manufacturing machining site in my district. mr. thompson: founded in 2003, ncdmm is committed to driving innovation throughout the defense manufacturing industry. they're helping to revitalize our nation's manufacturing industry by implementing solutions, cutting defense and commercial customer costs, improving quality, decreasing lead times and reducing waste. ncdmm works to leverage the expertise of their team to deliver innovative manufacturing solutions that produce real results. my recent visit highlighted their efforts to create a two-year curriculum partnering with local institutions to train veterans for additive manufacturing placement
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following their service. this project addresses two critical issues, opportunities for veterans and strategic work force shortages. mr. speaker, i appreciate the leadership and work of the dedicated staff at ncdmm site. i wish them all the best as they continue to bring innovation and efficiency to our nation's manufacturing industries. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from oklahoma seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection.
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ms. horn: i rise today to honor an oklahoma pioneer in space. he made history in 2002 as the first native american to fly in space. a citizen of the chickasaw nation, dr. harrington earned a bachelor's of science degree in applied mathematics from the university of colorado, colorado springs, a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the u.s. naval post-graduate school, and a ph.d. from the university of idaho. as a mission specialist on s.t.s. 113 endeavor -- endeavour mission, he was the 11th american assembly mission to the international space station. dr. harrington spent more than 330 hours in space and conducted three space walks totaling nearly 20 hours. dr. harrington then served as a capsule communicator supporting shuttle and space station training and operations and was later chosen to become the chief
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engineer for safety and mission assurance at the johnson space center. i am proud of dr. harrington's achievements and barriers broken for tribal citizens in space exploration. thank you,ing mr., and i yelled back. -- thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> thank you, mr. speaker, i rise today to honor mr. randall edwards, a vet reason of world war ii who this month turns 1 2 years old. -- turns 102 years old. he enlisted in the u.s. knave in 1935 at 1 years old, served as a first class radioman in the philippines he then joined allied ground forces where he and his unit for captured and seventh to a doip these prison camp. mr. spano: he spent three years
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as a prisoner of war and despite being forced to work in appalling conditions and becoming nearly deaf because of abusing he never allowed his spirit to be broken. in fact, after the war he re-enlisted in knave and was sent to japan to serb. he became a service officer for the veterans of war organization. warrant officer edwards, you survived some of the worst of world war ii, persevere through the captivity and returned to bring democracy to your cap tar. you represent the great education of our greatest generation and on behalf of a grateful nation i say thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek reck snigs -- seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection.
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mr. johnson: remark this is weekend reminded me of lyrics by neil diamond. far, we've been traveling far, without a home, but without a star. free, only want to be free, we huddle close, hang on to a dream. on the boats and on the plane they they coming to america. never looking back again, ♪ they're coming to america ♪ and it ends with, they're coming to america, they're coming to america, they're coming to america, they're coming to america, today, today, today, today, today. my country tis of thee. today. sweet land of liberty. today. of thee i sing. today. of thee i sing. today. that is the america we know and
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we are all here contributing to what makes america, america. and i thank the body for listening and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from texas seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. jackson lee: on this past saturday, houstonons gathered together at the living water church with pastor stern and about 10 other churches. i convened the press conference in the warehouse of this church, filled with goods and necessities to respond to the most objectionable national order that i have ever heard from any president of the united
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states, manipulate law enforcement in calling for a national predawn raid across america. now no one in america wants open borders and democrats do not. but we do believe in due process, the constitution, and the justice of the phraseology on the statue of liberty to bring our forlorn and warn to this country. we are the greatest experiment and people in my constituency were fright and i came home to say, we must do something about it. and how powerful it was for the churches in our community to say, we'll open our doors to those who are frightened about the fact that they would be separated from their church or their children separated from them. what a horrible image internationally, how the united nations has condemned it. so on that day, we opened the churches of houston for those immigrants that were frightened by these predawn raids. one even occurred today. i finished my remarks by saying the 16th president of the united
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states really said what america is all about. we're not enemies, but friend. we must not be enemies, though passion may have strained it, it must not break our bonds of affection. the mystic cords of memory will swell and again touch, the better angels of our soul. that is abraham lincoln, that is who we are, thank you, houston, for opening your doors to those in fear. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. bishop of georgia for today and mr. effries of new york for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the requests are granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2019, the gentleman from nevada, mr. horsford is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the
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majority leader. mr. horsford: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today with my colleague and co-anchor for the congressional black caucus, congresswoman stacey plaskett, on behalf of the congressional black caucus for this special hour where we can reflect on the priorities facing the american public. and this week, this body will be voting on the topic of raising the minimum wage and giving americans a well-deserved raise and the impacts that that would have not only on the work force at large, but specifically for black workers and families across the united states. why is this so important as we touch on the issues of the day? according to the national low income housing coalition, there's no place in america where a full-time worker making
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the current minimum wage of $7.25 an hour can afford a modest two-bedroom apartment. additionally, many working people, particularly working women, and black workers, are still facing persistent and even in some cases worsening wage gaps since 2000. the wage gap between black and white workers has grown significantly. so for this hour, mr. speaker, we will discuss the issue affecting american workers and why it is imperative that this house take up the wage act that we will be considering later this week. so i'm honored to have with us here this evening, several of the members of the congressional black caucus who will share their thoughts, concerns, and priorities for this legislation and at this time, i would yield
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to my colleague from michigan, representative brenda lawrence, so much time as she may consume t this time. mrs. lawrence: mr. speaker, i rise today to address the issue of the stagnant wages for african-americans and as a as a result the lack of economic opportunity. the federal current minimum wage s $7.25, not enough to sustain an individual's necessary expenses, let alone for those who are -- support an entire american family. in fact the purchasing power the current minimum wage has grad gradually eroded over the past decade. since the minimum wage was raised to $7.25, its purchasing power has declined by 17% due to inflation.
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now, this, mr. speaker, is a staggering thought. a person working 40 hours a week at the current federal minimum ge earns a gross income of $15,000 per year before taxes. even families working full-time, earning the federal minimum wage, are below the federal poverty level. this is why we need to pass the raise the wage act. under h.r. 582, 1.3 million americans will be lifted out of poverty. this includes 600,000 children who will finally have a shot at a better life simply because of this raising the minimum wage. the raise the wage act helps women and workers of color the most. since women are nearly 2/3 of
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the american work force and earn the federal minimum wage or just above that. in the michigan 14th district, up to 61,000 women and over 76,000 black and hispanic workers in my district alone who receive a wage -- will receive a wage increase. this bill is way overdue. i want to enter into the record i want to enter into the record a statement from my colleague, the honorable eddie bernice johnson of texas. we have seen a recent epidemic of the working poor, hardworking americans who each day are forced to choose between food, shelter, clothing or health care for themselves and their families. in the past 40 years, minimum wage increases have not kept pace, causing many families to struggle. the current minimum wage in my
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home state of texas, eddie bernice states in this letter, is only $7.25 an hour. even lower for workers in the service industry who instead rely heavily on consumer tips for take-home pay. the african-american community, which makes up a significant portion of the minimum wage work force, is disproportionately affected by lower wages. according to the economic policy institute, 38% of all black workers would receive higher pay as a result of increased wages. therefore, opening up new economic opportunities. we must act quickly to assure that any american willing to work 40 hours a week can afford basic necessities. that's why eddie bernice johnson says she's proud to be a co-sponsor of h.r. 582, the
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raise raise act. the bill -- the raise the wage act. the bill will lift millions out of poverty by gradualy increasing the minimum wage of ver a period of $5 to $15. mr. speaker, i want to be on the record and join my colleague, eddie bernice, to say that the growing wealth gap in our country can no longer go unnoticed. we now have an opportunity to take some concrete steps to help close that gap. and this bill is way overdue. i yield back. mr. horsford: i thank the gentlewoman from michigan for bringing forward her commitment and leadership on these important issues and sharing her support for the raise the wage act which this body will e considering later this week. just before we started this special order hour, one of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle came up and talked about the negative impact of
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raising the federal minimum wage. well, what is so interesting out that position is, c.e.o. pay for the 350 largest u.s. companies, these c.e.o.'s on verage were paid $18.9 million in 2017. which is a 17% increase from the previous year. meanwhile, wages for the .2% ge u.s. worker grew by during that time. so how is it ok that c.e.o. pay can go up 17% and the average c.e.o. for the 350 largest u.s. companies can on average be $19 million and we can't afford to give america a raise? on average, controlling for age, gender and education, black workers are paid 16.2%
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less than white workers. and according to the census bureau, which is why it's so important for people to participate in the census so, that we have this vital data, -- census, so that we have this vital data, the average household income for a white family was $80,720. for a black family, that number at at $38,555. less than half of what an average white family took home. and that affects every aspect of that family's life. from their ability to afford housing, to health care, to being able to put food on the table, put gas in the car so, that they can make it to the -- car, so that they can make it to the work. we believe one job should be enough and people should have a livable wage to take care of themselves and their family. so i would urge my colleagues throughout this body,
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particularly those on the other side, that if you're going to come to this floor this week and oppose giving americans a raise, then you have to be able to explain why you support c.e.o. pay increasing more than 17% in one given year while u.s. worker wages grew at less han .2% during that same time. workers deserve a wage increase. their wages have been stagnant for far too long and that's why we're encouraging this body to bring up the raise the wage act. i am now delighted to extend some additional time to my good friend, a gentleman that i have the honor of serving on the ways and means committee with, the representative from pennsylvania, he likes to talk about the history of his great city, and i know he is here to also talk about why the constituents of that great city
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deserve a wage increase. i yield time now to the gentleman from pennsylvania, in evans. mr. evans: thank you, mr. speaker. and i applaud you and the co-leader for leading this event for the congressional black caucus, under the leadership of chairwoman karen bass, and the congressional black caucus being the conscience of this congress. you know, i don't know if you know, and i'm always constantly reminding people, mr. speaker, that the president in august of 2016 came to philadelphia and he said, quote, what the hell do you have to lose? that's what he said. well, mr. speaker, i rise to join my colleagues from the congressional black caucus in calling for an increase in the federal minimum wage. i'm pleased that the democratic leadership planned to put the raise the wage act up for a vote in the house.
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a raise for these workers is long overdue. congress has not raised the national minimum wage in 10 years. my home state has not raised its minimum wage for 13 years. inflation has increased the cost of living nearly 19% from 10 years ago. food, health care, utilities, all went up. let me repeat that. a raise for these workers is long overdue. congress has not raised the national minimum wage for 10 years. my home state of pennsylvania has not raised its minimum wage for 13 years. inflation has raised the cost of living nearly 19% from 10
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years. food, health care, utilities all went up. members from both parties should be able to agree that no one who works full-time should live in poverty. i'm very focused on poverty because my city of philadelphia has 26% of the poverty rate. raising the minimum wage is one of the best tools in the tool box for lifting americans out of poverty. that includes 600,000 children who would be lifted out of poverty by raising the wage gap. and it's important, mr. speaker, to understand that one of our colleagues, congresswoman barbara lesion who leads the effort about the reduction around poverty,
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particularly child poverty, when you talk about the issue of 600,000 children who will be lifted out of poverty by raise the wage act, how can you say -- raising the wage act, how can you say no to that? we need to find some way to move forward. and we have an opportunity. and that opportunity is raise the wage act. the americans who are working the hardest to grow out of the grow -- to grow our economy needs to share the rewards of that group. because just think. that raise in their pocket allows them to spend money in the economy. that's not something to take lightly. when you talk about small businesses, and i'm the vice chair of the small business committee, and you talk about small businesses being the backbones of our communities, obviously they need customers. and they need customers who have money in their pockets. so it's not just enough for
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that individual, but it's enough for entrepreneurs. it's enough for building businesses. it's enough for building the communities. it's enough for all of us to recognize the importance and the significance of raising the wage. we need not to take that lightly. we need to understand that in some of our communities there's a growing, growing income inequality gap. and we need to address that. and the way to address it is by fundamentally raising the wage. raising the wage gives people more of an opportunity to participate in this economy. this economy we know -- and this economy, we know, tend to be rigged for those at the top and bottom who are trying to struggle and find a way. when you talk about us not raising the minimum wage in 10 years and in pennsylvania, 13
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years. i want anyone who is listening or watching what is taking place here this evening, the congressional black caucus, clearly as the chairperson always likes to say, she always talks about the hidden figures. the hidden figures is that we haven't raised the wage in 10 yorse and in pennsylvania they haven't -- years and in pennsylvania they haven't waged -- raised it in 13 years. americans who are working, they're working harder. they're working more than one job. they're working two, three jobs. there is something wrong with that. the c.e.o.'s have definitely been getting their raises. but where is the raise for the people who cook the food, make the beds, and clean their offices? where is the raise for the people who cook the food, make the beds and clean their offices? well, today, led by my two colleagues from the great state of nevada and the great islands
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of the dominican republic, who are leaders in this effort, i'm glad to join with them, to join with them to add my voice to raising this wage. this is not an accident that the congressional black caucus would be in the forefront because this is an issue that means a greet deal to an awful lot of americans. and particularly african-americans. when you have a president of the united states who comes and says that what do we have to lose, the fact of the matter is when we look at his administration, it's clearly the policies are not connecting to moving the people. at least not moving the people that we're talking to and the situations that we're seeing. so the bottom line on the minimum wage is simple. the bottom line is simple. pay these people now. pay these people now.
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and raise the wage. we can no longer joke about this, we can no longer have it as political rhetoric. we must show action. and we must show people that we are determined to raise the wage. so i'd like to thank my colleagues for giving me the opportunity to just add my voice to both of you for what we are attempting to do. and we need to keep doing this every single day and not leave here until this wage is raised. so the bottom line on the minimum wage is simple pay these people now, raise the wage. i yield back the balance of my time, thank you. mr. horsford: i thank the gentleman from pennsylvania and, again, thank you for your dedication and commitment on behalf of your constituents in philadelphia and bringing their voice to this process. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the subject of tonight's special
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order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. horsford: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i am honored and delighted, you know, we are led by a dynamic chair of the congressional black caucus, the representative from california, congresswoman karen bass, who i had the honor of tending one of her -- attending one of her congressional field hearings this week, but the cbdg has dedicated on a number -- c.b.c. is dedicated on a number of platforms, and this is one of them, and we are co-anchored this evening with my colleague, the gentlelady from the u.s. virgin islands, representative stacey plaskett, who i will yield to at this time. ms. plaskett: thank you for the work you are doing on this issue and so many issues that affect american families. sometimes in congress we can be dust tracted that can come up,
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but you have kept your focus on the things that every day americans are skirpped with. that is proper wages, livable homes, good education, affordable housing and i'm appreciative we have kept our eyes on the prize and the policy and the things that move the needle in this. i was happy to hear from the congressman from philadelphia, dwight evans, there is one area that he talks quite a bit and that is sustaining black home ownership. and this minimum wage bill, raising the wage act of 2019 supports those initiatives. t raises the minimum wage from next six 15 other the
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years to lift workers out of poverty and those who are working, and stimulate local economies and restore the minimum wage. as we heard from my colleague and good friend brend after lawrence of michigan, it helps women and workers of color. 40% of black workers would get a raise. women make up nearly 2/3 of all minimum-wage workers. islands ike virgin where they are run by single-person households and those being predominantly black women that women have 2/3 of the minimum wage workers.
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one thing that i think this touches on and hasn't been expressed is wealth disparity. the wealth of a financial net worth provides all opportunities. wealth makes it easier for people to transition between jobs, move to new neighborhoods, respond to emergency are situations. wealth in this country is unequally distributed by race between race. african-american families have a fraction of white families leaving them more economically insecure. even after considering positive factors such as inkoreaed education levels, african-americans have less than whites.
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nd it is compounded by lower chances to build wealth. this also is very symptomatic and well documented history of mortgage market discrimination and plaques are less likely to be homeowners than whites and have less access to loans. segregation forced blacks into fewer opportunities than the white counterparts. even when they have home ownership, they have less access and our ability to have that ownership rment. in the virgin islands, almost 60% of families of plaque people in the virgin islands own their homes. they can't leverage it for
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education, to start businesses. when we are talking about wages, in the virgin islands, we make 75% of what is the national average. the average for virgin island amily is $37,000, 254, whereas the estimated national average 221. ,000 d 13.5% of u.s. virgin islanders have income levels below 10,000 per year. that is horrendous. this bill and passage will mean lots of wealth and lots of opportunity for plaque families. frican-americans, white poor families, hispanic families and
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hispanics own 1/10. the median wealth for nonretired black households was less than /10 of similarly situated of white house holds and having the same assets as black families are making 1/10 of similarly situated white house holds. gap has not te recovered. in 2007 after the great reseeing, the median wealth was 14% of whites. blacks still owned less than 10% median.s' wealth at the they have greater need than other greater white
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counterparts. lacks are more likely to experience negative income shots and less access to emergency savings. blacks are more likely to fall behind on their bills and go into debt. the system attic charges in narrowing the wealth grap for african americans with whites persists. it persists regardless of education, marital status. this is something we are fighting for. we are grateful for this legislation that will make a difference. i yield back to my colleague and thank him for bringing this important matter to the floor for us to discuss here this evening. and it is my plea to pass this legislation for us to go to the
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senate and make a tremendous difference in so many americans' lives. raising the income level of less fortunate assists all americans in raising the tide of americans' ability to excel and i yield back. mr. horsford: i appreciate your work as the co-anchor tonight in bringing not only the issues of increasing wages for american workers but tying and connecting the point around housing and the ability to afford to live. as we have heard time and time from our constituents, people have fallen behind and they have seen stagnant wages while they have given corporate tax cuts, $1.7 the benefit of trillion benefited the top one percent and did nothing to help
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the working poor. and for the past 40 years, congress has failed to keep up with inflation and the longest period of time in history without an increase. years, the ast 40 minimum wage was stuck at $7.25 since 2009 have lost 0% of its value. it means the minimum wage has worked less than a day than 1960. the same wage can't buy you due to inflation and wages not being corrected to match for inflation. and the person who has been leading the charge as the chairman of the education and labor committee, the person who has brought so much perspective
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from criminal justice reform and voting rights and making sure this body considers the raise the wage act this week is none owner the the gentleman from virginia, congressman bobby scott. mr. scott: thank you very much, mr. speaker. we are now considering the raise the wage act and that proposal 15 and crease up to $15 adjusts for inflation. i thank the gentleman from nevada for convening this special order to discuss this because this gives us the tuvent to explore the continuing intersection between race and the federal minimum wage. the federal minimum wage was
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established under the fair labor standards act in 198, it excluded many african-american workers, agriculture and service workers were exempted from labor law protections. in 190 to 1940, the share of blacks holing worked in agriculture was over 40%. at the same time, the practice of tipping which had enabled american employers to avoid paying wages to newly-freed black workers was in effect and t treated disabled workers and permitly cod opioid fide some workers. those exclusions lowered labor standards in the south, excluding a large share of its work force and denied african-american workers to
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protections. tore 6, congress expanded agriculture, nursing homes and other service workers. this was particularly strong for black workers. one-third imagining protection compared to only 18% of whites. the size of the minimum wage increase and protecting a larger share of african-americans showed the gap. estimates on the differential impact on the 1966 legislation was a clear indication of how important the minimum wage protection was because it established a federal minimum wage. we know that -- we know how effective it was because black workers who were not protected
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were paid significantly lower than the minimum wage. after the increases in the minimum wage increased earnings and it increased earnings by an average of %, studies found modest to positive job janes as a direct result of the increase in the minimum wage and industries it object taped. the poverty rate for african-american children -- the poverty rate fell from a in ering 65% in 1965 to % 1969 after the minimum wage expansion and coverage acknowledge increase to its value in real terms. that caused a rapid decline. 50 years later raise the wage act would have a strong impact on african-american workers. this past june marked the
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longest time where there was no increase in the minimum wage. just about half of african-american workers live in the 21 states where the minimum wage has not been increased over $7.25 an hour. most of the states have not waited for the federal government but increased it but half of the african-american population are stuck at $7.25. these minimum-wage workers suffered a cut over the last decade. millions of american workers who are working full-time still find themselves in poverty. in fact, one recent study showed that there is no city or county in america where a minimum-wage worker working 40 hours a week
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can afford a two bedroom apartment. for nearly a third are, they would get a raise if congress passes the raise the wage act. we have the responsibility and opportunity to restore the minimum wage and boost the wages for african-american families across the country. there is nothing more we can to reduce the wealth gaps that we have in america today. nothing more we can do to raise the minimum wage. wage t pass the raise the act for a fair day's pay for a day's work. .
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mr. horsford: i thank the gentleman it. makes a big difference when he has the gavel and the priorities he has set as the chairman of that committee and the fact that as we have done from the beginning of this congress, the for-the-people agenda has been focused on making a difference in the lives of the american people that we represent. the gentleman just pointed out that 2/3 of the minimum wage workers in this country are women. and that 2/5, in fact, 38% of african-americans and 1/3, 30%, 33%, of a latinos would get a raise when we pass the federal minimum wage and its increase to $15 an hour. it would also boost the economy, a 10% increase in the minimum wage would increase sales by around $2 billion each year. i want to just take on a couple of the myths that have been out
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there with this administration and my republican colleagues who have opposed the efforts of the house democrats to bring forward this raise. one of the myths that are out there is around the black unemployment rate in this country. we hear often the president say that among certain racial groups, particularly african-americans, that the unemployment rate is at an all-time low. and while it is in fact true that unemployment rate is down and it has been down, it has been down and has been steadily falling since 2011, well before trump was sworn into office, and that rate of decline has not gained momentum since. in fact, even at an annual rate of 6.6%, the black unemployment rate is still more than double the white unemployment rate
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which is at 3.2%. what this says is that the black unemployment rate has been about double the white unemployment rate for more than four decades. making this relationship more historically significant than any single unemployment rate. so, mr. president, if you want to take credit for the low unemployment rate among african-americans, then you need to be held accountable for keeping the rate down and to propose a plan to close the persistent two to one disparity that has existed for more than 40 years. another issue that i want to take on is the fact that the amount of jobs that have been created since this administration has taken over. we knee many of the jobs that have been created are in fact low-wage, low-paying jobs. many of the jobs are in the gig economy and those individuals are not getting paid the same
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amount as traditional workers. we know that many employers are paying workers for less than full-time work, which means that they still cannot provide for their families, they are not being afforded health care, and in fact the government is subsidizing many of these corporations. the same corporations that give their c.e.o.'s 17% pay increases, but then want to tell the workers, you can't have a raise. and these are the myths that the other side wants to, again, put out there to distract from the house democrats and our agenda in giving americans a raise. i want to just touch on one specific point from my home state in nevada. recently our governor, governor -- the first democratic governor to be elected in nevada in 20 years, he recently signed into law a $12 minimum wage increase, following 10
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years of wage stagnation from working -- for working class families in nevada. in fact, the last time we raised the wage in nevada was when i was serving in the state senate. so elections do have consequences. but with the help of our legislative leaders, speaker and senate majority leader, the nevada legislature increased the minimum wage to $12. that raise won't go into effect until 2020, and for now one in five workers in nevada are making under $12 an hour. less than $24,000 a year. $24,000 a year. what is a family supposed to do, how are they supposed to per ends meet on $24,000 year? $12 for nevadans is a step in the right direction. but we need to be working to
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provide equitable wages for all nevadans. the raise the wage act would work towards a $15 minimum wage by 2024 as the chairman from the education and labor committee indicated. a pay increase will benefit 127,000 workers in my district alone. specifically it will raise wages for 18,800 black workers, more than any other congressional district in nevada. so the raise the wage act is an important measure. it would give up to 27 million workers a raise, lifting $1 -- 1.3 million americans out of poverty, and boosting economic growth by putting money in the pockets of workers who will spend that money in growing the economy. not like the corporate tax cut that was given to big corporations where they simply just bought up more shares of their own stock. they didn't do anything to hire
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more workers or to help stimulate the economy. they just made themselves more, which all americans who work hard deserve to afford a middle class life, and opportunities to get ahead. i believe that one job should be enough and that it's time that we set our children up for success by making sure that working families have the wages that they need to provide for themselves and their family. i'd like to yield time again to my colleague, representative plaskett. ms. plaskett: i want to thank you for that discussion about what is happening in nevada and raising the minimum wake, what that's going to do in your state. kudos to your governor to take that bold leap. you know, there is concern about what happens with small businesses, and i know that the chairman of labor and -- has been thinking about that as well. that this bill does take this into account. that there are small businesses
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that this may be difficult for. but we have to understand what it is the entire objective of this bill -- what is the entire objective of this bill. i know there are other amendments by other good democrats to look at the government accountability office, to determine and make employment impacts. that's much more helpful than what was done with the tax bill that the republicans passed. they weren't trying to see what has been the impact of their legislation. they didn't ask for a look back to see if this is stimulating the economy, because the objective was not to stimulate the economy. the objective was to give the 1%, those corporate c.e.o.'s and others, additional money. it was not to put money into the economy. because if it was, then we would be looking at it right now. what is the impact on america? that was not put into that tax bill. but the democrats are willing to do that. the democrats want to make sure that this legislation is doing
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what it's meant to do. that's for the people. for the larger american people by supporting that. when i was talking earlier about wealth gap and income, income unemployment are obstacles to wealth gap. the income gap has worsened over time. according to a 2016 economic policy institute report, the income gap between blacks and whites has grown since the 1970's. not lessened. in 1979, for example, black men earned 22% less than white men. in 2015 black men earn 31% less . the report's authors note that 1979, black women's wages reached near a parity with white women's wages. but that by 2015, the gap had rose to 19%. we are not getting better.
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the equality gap is not narrowing. we need to face the statistics and democrats are willing to do something about that. the report also found that the gap persists across women's educational levels and worsened for those with higher levels of educational attainment. the gap at a higher level of education for white women and black women with similar educations is worse than it is for those lower. in 1980 college educated black women with more work experience actually earned slightly higher wages than college educated white women with the same experience. by 2014, however, the gap had widened to 10% in white women's favor. that is a reversal. similarly, while the gap between college educated black and white men in 1980 was slightly less than 10%, it rose to 20% by 2014. in 2017 researchers from the
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federal reserve bank of san francisco similarly concluded that the black-white earning gap is growing and that growth can largely be attributable to so-called immeasurable factors. what are some of those factors? those factors that play a role in the black-white income employment gap include employment discrimination, weak enforcement of anti-discrimination laws, racial differences in unobserved skill levels, as opposed to measurable factors such as educational attainment or work experience. i'm grateful that we have this time this evening to talk about this, to let the american people see the truth. not a tweet, not what's happening on the news on a regular basis, but the things that everyday americans care about. wages, minimum wages, having quality of life. as my colleague from nevada
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said, the ability to have one job to sustain your family. not have to juggle two and three jobs, leaving your children at home, not being able to be an important and positive force in your children's lives because you have to work. we are so concerned as well about what's happening to our young children who don't have that supervision in the evening. we look -- those are some of e issues that we have, concern in black communities. not because parents aren't working and they're not there for their children, because they're lazy, etc., the things you hear, it's because parents have two jobs. they're trying to hold it together. single households, even those households that have both parents working, they have to have two jobs to make ends meet. this is a means to get people to be able not only to get out of poverty, but to support their families, to support their communities, to create wealth, to have home ownership,
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which allows access to so many other things. education and so many things that is in fact the american dream. mr. horsford: will the gentlelady yield? ms. plaskett: yes. mr. horsford: thank you. you were talking about the impact beyond just family incomes. which is important and we want to give all americans a raise. and while the priorities on the other side were about giving corporations and billionaires more wealth creation, we're laser-focused on putting more money in the pockets of hardworking americans. but the question i have is around the recent research which states that following an increase in wages, we can actually see the rates of suicide fall. consumer spending rise. and a more productive work force. there is no place in america where a full-time worker making
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$7.25 an hour can support their entire family, let alone afford basic needs. there is no place in america where a full-time worker making the current $7.25 an hour can support their entire family. and as i said, the productivity piece, which again, my colleagues are always talking about the need to make america more competitive and more productive. well in one study, researchers tracked 10,000 workers at about 200 department stores and found a dollar increase in the minimum wage led a typical employee to sell about 4.5% more per hour. so if we give workers the wage that they are deserving of, they will put that extra money to work for the american economy. unlike giving more tax breaks to the wealthy. for a worker earning the minimum wage, the increase
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could be almost 20%. now, again, i've underscored repeatedly the impacts to the economy. and we'll take on that debate later this week, when this bill comes to the floor. but the point i just wanted to ask my colleague about is that human impact. this is more than just numbers. this is the 2/3 of american workers who are women, who are increasingly the head of their household. so can you relate to that impact and the constituents that you serve and the stories that you've heard about the anxiety that they go through every day in not being able to make ends meet? ms. plaskett: every day, every week, and definitely every month as they're trying to juggle which bill they're going to pay and which bill they're not going to pay. are they going to be able to pay
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the rent-n virgin islands, public school students wear uniforms. get hey scrung up money to money for children to go to school. those are the things. working minimum wage jobs and working them hard and maybe at night, having a night-time job and making sure the older ildren are working younger ones, not and they care enough to be put food on the tail. those are the stories you hear in your district and you know i hear in the virgin island they are willing to listen to the people on the grouped, the people who have put them here in congress. mr. horsford: the affected
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workers, they want this raise, this raise would provide on the order of about $,000 a year. that's enough money to make a tremendous difference in the life of a bank teller. we have fast-food workers who day struggle to get around $20,000. a dars 15 minimum wage would generate $144 billion for higher wages for workers and would benefit the communities which they live. while corporate profit are at an all-time high, wages are at a 65-year low. so if we are not going to give workers a wage now, when are we going to give it to them? i want to commend the leadership of our speaker, the chairwoman
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of the congressional black caucus and the chairman of the education and labor committee, and it's because of their leadership, that keem jeffries, that this is part of the for-people ageppeda. and we are laser focused and want to give workers a wage and address housing affordability d the out of pocket expenses that so many americans are dealing with, we know more entrepreneurs want to start a business and give temperature the tools and resources to do so. we want to repeal some of the unnecessary tax burdens on americans like the cadillac tax on health care which this body is going to be considering. these are among the priorities of the house democratic caucus
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and the for-the-people agenda that we are reminding people that we need to deal with in this congressional session. just to highlight the raise the wage act of 2019 would graudly raise the minimum wage to $15 to 2024. it would raise the federal minimum rage from $8.55 this year and increase it over the next five years until it reaches $15 an hour in 2024. after 2024, it would adjust the minimum wage each year to keep pace with growth and the typical workers' wages. it would phase out the outdated subminimum wage for tip workers $2.1 ave been frozen at
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and sunset the subminimum wages for workers with workers employed in sheltered work shops and workers under age 20. this is a commonsense measure, something that american workers and our constituents have been demanding. one in nine u.s. workers are paid wages that leave them in poverty today even working full-time and year round. that's why this bill is so important, the raise the wage act. i'm looking forward to bring this measure to the floor later this week and debate with my colleagues on the other side where they stand and join with the house democrats to pass this legislation over to the senate so they can take action. i want to touch on appoint that
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my colleague was talking about dealing with home ownership. today the wall street jourm released a report that black home ownership is an an all-time low. low in it an all-time the first quarter. homes and neighborhoods with the concentration of black home .wners are worth less than 6% in second participate, it stood at 46.1, a full half percent from the first quarter rate. the black home earp rate is 1.6%, unchanged from 50 years ago when the federal fair ousing act banned racial
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discrimination. the white home ownership is 71%. these are dire statistics that i wanted to bring to the attention of this body. i know the chairwoman, maxine waters and her committee and subcommittee on housing are working to tackle this problem as well. but it's time we address the 30% gap in home ownership between white and black americans which is at it highest point. why is this so important? so much of our wealth is accumulated in the equity of home ownership and workers getting a raise and needs that raise in order to afford the higher cost of health care and food and gas. everything is going up but their paychecks and that's what i hear from my constituents, from those
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who are earning a minimum wage under the raise the wage act, it would increase by almost 20%. i'm looking forward to debating my colleagues on this important issue when we come to the floor later this week. as we have talked about here tonight, the congressional black caucus is laser focused on making sure that americans get a raise. we know that giving americans a raise would give up to 27 million workers a benefit of increased take-home pay and lift 1.3 americans out of the poverty and boost our economic growth and put money in the pockets of workers who will spend that money in the economy, unlike what was done with the corporate
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tax cuts that were given where 3% of the benefit of the $17 trillion benefited the top 1%. we are focused on helping every day americans get the money they need in their pocket. i asked the question at the beginning of tonight's special 350 hour dealing with the c.e.o. from the largest u.s. companies who earned an average pay in 2017 of 18.9 million. that's a lot of money. i have no beef with c.e. oomplet 's getting a fair pay. but that pay increase amounted to 17% increase from the previous year. and just before we started the
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special order hour, one of my colleagues came to the floor said increasing the federal minimum wage would be devastating on our economy. but what does he say about the c.e.o.'s who are getting record pay and record bonuses and all of the corporate tax cuts went to buying more stock in those companies. the wages for the average u.s. worker grew at.2% during that same time. this is a fem question that i would like my colleagues to be able to answer. and i will seek them out during this week, because i want them to join with us to pass this bill. this shouldn't be a partisan issue, giving americans a raise should be something that we all agree on.
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my colleagues have low-paid workers in their district just myi have low-paid workers in district. this proposes raises the federal 2024 willge to $15 to result in a pay increase and 23.2% of all white workers. this effect comes not just because they are more often played in jobs that pay less as we discussed tonight but also because they are less likely to work in states or localities that have passed a state minimum wage that are higher than the federal minimum wage. we have to set the standard. regardless of where you live,
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you can earn a decent livable wage to provide for yourself and your family. we believe one job should be enough to provide for you and your family and put a roof. and enough to pay for the co-pays and the prescription drugs you need to stay well. it should be enough so we can address food insecurity in this country and enough for your children to be set up. i encourage my colleagues to study this bill, to think about the constituents back home in their district and to ask themselves what were we sent here to do, to help the well off and the well connected or to give voice to those hole deserve
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to be heard in this body. i am honored to be a representative from nevada's 4th congressional district. i know my district is not the same, but i have rural parts and ban covering 5 2,000 square miles. there are struggling people. and so when i vote this week in vote of giving workers a raise, i will be voting to give a raise to every every worker. i thank my colleague, the co-anchor, stacy plaskett and mr. scott of the house education and labor committee and each and every one of my colleagues who
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have spoken here tonight. thank you for giving us this hour to bring about the issues that are important. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12-arch of rule 1, the chair declares the house in resees measure that re-authorizes policy for 2020. also measure holding bar and ross in contempt of congress on the citizenship question on the 2020 senses. members return at

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