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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  December 9, 2020 11:59am-3:59pm EST

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get absorbed by the joe biden brand and that become the democratic brand. i think it could be if we play our cards right. to be very focused on that. tove got to be intentional become the joe bryden -- joe biden rent because that will be successful in michigan and ohio. host: harry has been waiting a little bit. belleville, new jersey, republican. $1200. i need the i am on food stamps. if i wasn't on food stamps, i >> and we're going to have to leave this recorded segment of "washington journal" as the u.s. about to come in. it's part of c-span's over 40-year commitment to bringing gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house. coming up, members will debate a
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the ing bill to fund government through december 18. and now live to the floor of the u.s. house here on c-span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. lord of us all, we give you thanks for giving us another day. send your spirit of wisdom upon the members of the people's house as they move toward the completion of their work in the
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116th congress. after a long year of stress in our nation, due to a plague which continues to swell, give them the resolve to address the needs of all our citizens and communities. bless those many heroic men and women who continue to labor at great danger to themselves to care for those who suffer from covid. bring healing to those who do suffer and comfort those who mourn the loss of so much this past year. lord, have mercy. may all that is done this day in the people's house be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: amen. pursuant to section 4-a of house resolution 967, the journal of the last day's
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proceedings is approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from north carolina, mr. murphy. mr. murphy: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the entertain up to 15 requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. the hat purpose does gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, please. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. rise today to honor the legacy of daniel miller, the eldest of galesburg, from illinois. mrs. bustos: his principal as, quote, always
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smiling and caring about quote.e, end in 2004, he joined the air force nd continued to lead as the senior airman. with great courage, he diffused worked e devices and with chemical and biological weapons. senior ry 7, 2007, irman miller, senior airman onkey and technical sergeant winer attempted to diffuse a car bomb in iraq. our nation will never be able to repay them but it's our duty to remember their service and it's commemorate y to airman ice of senior miller and name the post office illinois, as the airman miller post office building. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina
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seek recognition? mr. murphy: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. murphy: thank you, mr. speaker. like to address the crippling cost of student debt. although my democratic olleagues and i agree substantially on the issue, we disagree substantially on the solution. to cure the disease, not just put a band-aid on it. debt -- ing student absolving student debt or making college free altogether does not problem.he it passes the debt onto people who have responsibly paid off their student loans while reckless g the spending on administrative bloat in higher education. 1988 to 2018, the average tuition and fees at public tripled.ons and more than doubled at private four-year institutions. ex-explosion of vice presidents, counsellors, diversity coaches, and all types administrative staff that have nothing to do with giving their students a means of finding employment. why?
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because they can. he money flows freely from the federal government and they know that, all at the expense of the student. rather than climbing walls, so called faces, they should focus on educating students. we need to address the calamity of student debt. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. tempore: the o gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from michigan seek recognition? is mr. speaker, i ask for unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is one minute.or >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today because the and the people of michigan need our help. they need congress to pass a relief package and failing to reach a deal will be a of duty dereliction here in the congress. state tkin: yesterday my
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confirmed the 10,000th death. i have hospitals that are at 98% capacity and local businesses face oblivion. of americans lining up in cars to pick up a thanksgiving meal should be memories.o our make no mistake, these food lines are modern day bread lines somethingur job to do about it. platitudes won't feed a family. get folks won't together for the holidays. frankly, it's a slap in the face i.c.u. nurses, frontline workers doing whatever they can weather the crisis. it's a slap to the nurse in east letter who wrote a pleading for economic relief. to leave his d job. they're getting behind on their rent, and they're taking out loans against their retirement. ask parties of both parties, both chambers to witness these stories, do their jobs and reach a deal even if it's not perfect. you, mr. speaker.
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i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. does the urpose gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? ask ilson: mr. speaker, i unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: thank you, mr. speaker. i am grateful for major jeremy tillman who has been serving in the washington office of the second congressional district of army forolina from the the past year as a defense fellow. ajor tillman has been deployed twice to the republic of korea and to iraq. he is the recipient of the heart, bronze service medal, the global war on the combat dal, action badge, army commendation edal and many other deserved awards. major tillman has been essential to the office for the past year. solidify d to important legislation in the authorization e act, ndaa, including modification of body armor for female troops. commitment for his to america.
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future.im well in the conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war terrorism. i appreciate president donald trump as a champion for our military, for peace through strength. back.d the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from georgia seek recognition? thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you. i am so excited to be on the loor today to congratulate sernovitz. in just a few short months that rabbi, he has e been instrumental in helping to spread our shared message of for all people a. mrs. mcbath: it translates to repair of the world and i know community in georgia will
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help build bridges for a better tomorrow. congratulations, rabbi. ur community has been blessed to have been gifted by a leadership like yourself. congregation needs assistance from my office, please don't hesitate to call us. i truly look forward to working with you and the jewish to come. for years i wish you a happy and blessed season. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? one address the house for minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is minute.ed for one mr. mccarthy: mr. speaker, having served as both the majority and minority floor i've understood the pressure of the job. floor, handling procedural fights, getting truly a on passed is 24-hour, seven day a week work. side of the aisle,
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o one knows that better than shuwanza gov. it's -- goff. get toen my privilege to know her. during her 12 years on the hill nd seven of which as a floor hoyer, for leader without a doubt she's done this better than r anyone i have ever known. effortut in her time and to build strong working relationships with members on aisle.des of the mr. speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. earned our : she's respect because of her skills, expertisethic and her
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on the floor. there were times i lost the expertise.use of her i certainly like to thank that her abilities over the past two years with recommit.r motions to i have e times that heard and have been conveyed to opinion fferences of with me in the strongest of terms. she do it in a personal way. better because of her service. but even if we haven't made her easy, we always knew we had we saw epared because the impact that her expertise can have. of us times for any people across this country ask -- do we have friends on both sides of the aisle? shuwanza as my
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friend. she will be my adversary, but friend.y she has my respect because she earned it. because y friendship she has earned it. she has the respect from both the of the aisle because way she carries her life. is.character of who she she has left an impression on aisle, and i he can tell you she has certainly this n impression on institution. we come here, we get elected, what she aracter of has of being a servant -- heart. nation.g for this there are things that divide us we do notlosophy, but divide because we are americans. do not divide ourselves because we care to serve, and i in a morenza believes perfect union, for the devotion had, and the
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frustration this body can give, but she does it because of what believes in. finally, shuwanza, speaking as a know you have brought immense joy and pride to your parents and to your sister along the way. know they have rooted for you and watched every step of your career. that has seen you walk in the well of the house of representatives on a daily basis and serve as a trusted advisor to our nation's leaders. well.ve done it my hope for you is that you do that up, that you continue to serve, and serve the greatly.at you love so on behalf of myself, my team, conference, iican want to say thank you. there are times i wouldn't say beat me on at you the floor, but i respected how it. you worked at i'm a better member because you made me prepare more knowing you side.n the other
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thank you for your counsel, your friendship. missed on this floor, but we will still be back.s, and i yield the speaker pro tempore: the -- thean from california from california is correct. this za will be missed in chamber momentarily. and he yields back. does the urpose gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? ms. kelly: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. kelly: thank you, mr. speaker. to implore my colleagues to come together and pass a covid relief bill that are help communities that still struggling to recover from this pandemic. december,beginning of over 150 people have died a day in illinois. across the midwest, heat maps glowing red with the
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transmissions of and death. cannot wait any longer. small businesses are looking for act.ess to time and time again we've seen the house act and seen the g.o.p. not act. increase in empty chairs around kitchen tables and vacant only continue l if we do not take decisive action. study found that one in three african-americans know omeone close to them who died of covid-19. i fall into this category as i knowmy uncle in may, and i many of my constituents do as well. done.ing has to be people need money now to meet their expenses. to nesses need support now continue operating. and state and local governments provide stance now to services. inaction is not an option. to say happy ke hanukkah to all our jewish friends. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from illinois yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. diaz-balart: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to bring attention to the brave action of the pro-democracy leaders in cuba. and the brutal repression that they face as a result of their demands for freedom. for example, in the last few weeks, the movement has stepped up its calls for freedom and the release of all political prisoners. their protests include such dangerous activities as poetry readings and sit-ins and for that these young rappers, artists and writers have faced arbitrary arrests, harassments and abuse. some remain in prison, which is why many activists have begun a hunger strike in protest. but despite the brutal repression in cuba, the pro-democracy movement is growing. mothers, scientists and so many others have joined its calls for freedom and the release of political prisoners, mr. speaker. i commend president trump and his administration for their
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solidarity with the cuban people in imposing serious sanctions against the cuban dictatorship. we must all stand with the brave pro-democracy activists in cuba who are risking their lives at this very moment. and join them in their pleas for freedom and the immediate unconditional release of all political prisoners. i yield back, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, on human rights day, we mark the adoption of the universal declaration of human rights. 72 years ago, china was among the countries committing itself to the principle that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. in this spirit, i call on the hinese government to release the 11th llama.
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in 1995, only days after he was chosen to serve as the 11th llama, the chinese government kidnapped him and his family. the outside world has neither seen for this heard from them since. chinese authorities tell the world that the lama and his family are safe and they say they are well. but they refuse to allow anyone to visit and verify his well-being. mr. speaker, the universal declaration enshrines the rights to liberty and religious freedom and precludes arbitrary detention. china should honor its international obligations by freeing the true lama. thank you, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the life of a very special human being, mr. charles elsey, who our community lost earlier this
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year. mr. speaker, charles was a proud graduate of ben selm high school and temple university and in 1963 charles met the love of his life, rosiea. mr. fitzpatrick: they would go on to have two children, samantha and vincent. charles dedicated his entire life to bettering our community. he spent over 25 years working for the department of defense in philadelphia. and charles was also the president of the limb park civic association and under his leadership the lpca established a community baseball league, organizing fundraising events and collaborated with laboratories to create the lynn park vets scholarship. charles also served for years s a deacon at the linconia tabernacle christian center. his connection and love for god fueled his complete and total dedication to others. and in august, the township council unanimously passed a resolution renaming warren avenue to charles elsey way in his honor. this past weekend i had the
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honor of joining charles' family and congregates of the center for the unveiling of such a fitting tribute to an amazing man. mr. speaker, we are extremely grateful for charles' contributions, for his 80 years of life, and may the spirit of his generosity and service continue to inspire our community. charles is now reaping the reward of a life he spent serving others. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i rise today to ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to offer my heartfelt gratitude to our colorado firefighters and first responders. mr. neguse: this year in colorado, in my district, we've experienced a devastating and relentless wildfire season. the cameron peak fire, the east troublesome fire, the calwood fire and the which willings
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forks fire. with over a half a million acres burned, colorado has experienced great loss, damage and destruction. for months our firefighters and first responders have worked around the clock to save lives, save homes and to protect our communities. we know this work is not easy. especially in the midst of a pandemic. and we are so grateful for the service, the sacrifice and the commitment of our firefighters, our first responders, our local emergency and management officials in law enforcement across the state of colorado. together we will rebuild and we will continue to work together. thank you for your work. we are so incredibly grateful. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. carter: mr. speaker, i rise today to congratulate savannah
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native robert e. james ii of carver state bank on his election as chair of the national bankers association. the national bankers association is based in washington, d.c., and has represent -- has represented minority owned banks in the u.s. he serves as carver -- carver state bank and as a member of his board of directors, is a partner at the law firm, and is president of coastal legacy group l.l.c. which is a real estate development and consulting firm he founded in 2004. when he was earning his law degree at harvard, he received a legal training scholarship and was elected president of harvard black law students association as well. by stepping up to the plate to lead the national bankers association, he's demonstrated his dedication to serving his community and contributing to the success of the american banking industry as a whole. congratulations again on this great accomplishment. i wish you the very best, mr.
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james. thank you, mr. speaker. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? ms. jackson lee: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to speak to the house and i thank you for your courtesy. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. jackson lee: i thank the speaker. i know that we'll be discussing covid-19 but i cannot stand on this floor without ever mentioning that we must help the american people. but today i stand on this floor to acknowledge the existence of the electoral college. many americans are unfamiliar with this very interesting fixture in law. article 1 and section 1 of the constitution gives us the electoral college. but let me be very clear. in the next couple of days, the many states will certify those who have voted. the electoral college will meet
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by the constitution on december 14. most state legislatures have indicated that the electors are to vote the popular vote. all of the battleground states have certified that the next president and vice president of the united states are joe biden and kamala harris. what is my plea today? my plea today is for us to harmoniously join together in recognizing the value of this constitution, the sanctity of democracy, and to proceed as a house and senate, to embrace this election and the victors. why? because the nation needs us and the constitution says so and i look forward to us working together. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: mr. speaker, request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to thank, celebrate and
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congratulate my friend and colleague, mike conway, who will be leaving us to enjoy his much-deserved retirement. it has been a tremendous privilege and honor to serve under mike's leadership throughout my time on the agriculture committee, and i am grateful to have worked with such a tireless advocate for rural america. mike's leadership on the 2018 farm bill was particularly impressive. which marked the first time in nearly 30 years that a farm bill was enacted in the same year that it was introduced. i continue to be inspired by mike's principles and leadership outside of the committee work as well. i've been lucky enough to share many wednesday mornings with him as a brother of faith during bible study. i want to send my very best wishes to mike and his wife, suzanne, who has been kind enough to share him with us for over the last 16 years. mike, thank you for your friendship and guidance over the years. you will be sincerely missed. thank you, mr. speaker. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time.
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for what purpose does the gentlewoman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you. it's been 257 days since the first major covid relief package was signed into law. 257 days. in that time period, covid cases in the u.s. have skyrocketed. and we've lost almost 290,000 americans. the devastation this virus has wrought on our families, our communities and our economy is enormous. but it would have been so much worse if we had not provided that early relief to our families, our small businesses and workers impacted by the spring surge. ms. scanlon: and economists are clear that we need to provide more direct relief in order to buoy the economy. much less to keep people safe. the relief that we are seeking, that the american people are seeking, is not a handout.
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it's a lifeline. it's critical to get relief in the hands of family, small businesses, front line workers and local governments so we can get the virus under control. but also so we can get the country back to work once we do so. time is of the essence. unemployment is running out. small businesses and especially restaurants are closing. families are facing eviction and foreclosure. fighting this pandemic has been hard enough on the american people. getting them the relief they need to stay safe and healthy shouldn't be. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the house will resume proceedings on postponed questions at a later time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut
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seek recognition? ms. delauro: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 8900, making further continuing appropriations for the fiscal year 2021, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 8900, a bill making further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2021 and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. delauro, and the gentlewoman from texas, ms. granger, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from connecticut. ms. delauro: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 900, currently under consideration -- 8900, currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. delauro: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may
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consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. delauro: as we speak, the appropriations committees are hard at work negotiating fiscal year 2021 appropriations bills. there are many serious issues facing our nation and federal funding plays a critical role in supporting families and communities as they go about their day to day lives. as they try to survive during this health and economic crisis. americans deserve the certainty of a full-year funding and the congress has a responsibility to the nation to do its job and pass all 12 funding bills before we adjourn. the continuing resolution we consider today will keep the government up and running to bring spending talks to a successful conclusion. these are serious issues that touch every aspect of people's lives. like their education, transportation systems, national security, public health infrastructure and our environment. in addition to an omnibus
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appropriations bill, it is my hope that this additional week will allow negotiators the time to assemble an emergency coronavirus relief package. to take advantage of this window of opportunity, that leader mcconnell finally sit down with democrats to find a bipartisan solution. coupled with a full year of government funding and interim emergency coronavirus relief package is critical, it is a lifeline for working families. if we do not act, 12 million americans could lose unemployment aid just after christmas. . millions access to paid sick leave and evictions. this would put americans to the financial cliff. urge my colleagues to join me in adopting this concurrent resolution. ongoing pport the negotiations. americans are desperate. they're counting on us.
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to provide relief to to ing families, children, schools and small businesses region.he reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized. ms. granger: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise today in h.r. 8900, a continuing resolution that will through government december 18. members of the appropriations committee have been negotiating for weeks to reach greement on a full-year appropriation bill. at the same time house and to te leaders continue discuss a coronavirus relief package with the administration. hope we can complete both of these important pieces as egislation as soon possible. there's so much at stake. our national security, the welfare of millions f americans, and our economic
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recovery. passling this -- passing this c.r. is a stopgap measure. be on the floor next week. i ask members to vote on this the nuing resolution so senate can pass it and send it to the president for signature. hen, we must immediately get back to the important work the american people expect us to finish. thank you. reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the reserves.an from texas the gentlewoman from connecticut is recognized. ms. delauro: mr. speaker, i minute to the distinguished gentleman from maryland, mr. hoyer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is for one minute. mr. hoyer: first, i thank the entlelady for yielding, mr. speaker. nd i want to congratulate the gentlelady. she and i have served on appropriations committee and in the congress for a very long time. able, ne of our most
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energetic, knowledgeable members. someone who's very proud of my relationship to the appropriations committee, i know will do an excellent job with the minority, the also g member with whom i served to make sure that the inropriation committee works a way that benefits the american eople and does so in a timely fashion. normally i would not speak. although i do speak most of the because the .r., .r. is a recognition of failure. it's not any one individual's failure. it's not a bad thing. gettinghave had trouble together and coming to an agreement. it nt to observe and maybe has already been observed, we assed 10 of our 12 26.opriations bills on july
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that was two months before the end of the fiscal year. senate, unfortunately, didn't pass any of its appropriation bills. any of hasn't passed its appropriation bills. it has a document that they did and ass through committee has not passed the senate that s the basis for our negotiations. that has delayed us substantially, not because the house didn't do its work on because for whatever reasons the senate did not address the appropriations a timely fashion. served on , i have the appropriations committee for a long time. 1983. on in january of ms. on the committee that delauro -- the subcommittee that well.lauro now chairs as and when we passed a bill and he senate would pass a bill, we'd go to conferences. so many of our members don't conference is.
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embers of the house committee, the members of the senate committee came together in a and talked about how we were going to resolve the differences between the two bills. ever happens now. and we are losing something of process because it doesn't happen. with all due respect to the floor people who are now called four corners, whether it's the chairs of the committees or minority leader in the senate and in the house. not the speaker. minority leader and majority leader in the senate. but those four people have a lot to do. the majority leader over here, i now i have a lot of things to watch out for, and i cannot focus the way the members of the focus, the subcommittees, on the substance of the issues. lose somethingwe membersaving all of the
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included. now, because that hasn't happened and they haven't come product, we're here with what we call a continuing resolution. that really an admission of failure. we passed one before september so the government didn't shut down now. it was the right thing to do. we're going to pass one now. the right thing to do. this is something we have to do working.he government but we ought not to believe or pretend or represent this is the ought to do business. it is not. t is a function of procrastination, a function of failing to come together and compromises. that's what this body is about, all these chairs here. to agreement.e the constitution says if we don't come to agreement, the enate doesn't come to agreement, the president doesn't come to agreement with exactly happens.thing, nothing
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and so i'd make this observation this, but i do will tell you this, mr. speaker. chair, alked to the new and i know the ranking member and i have worked with her and i have great respect for her, as she knows. why? because she wants to get her job done. she was a mayor. of a great city in the state of texas. she knows that you got to get done. ms. delauro is a person who gets things done. i'm going to work with both of them, mr. speaker, in this congress. we're going to pass every one of the appropriation bills. everyone. we haven't dealt with homeland security because of the wall. not because of the other items. the wall. disagreement. we couldn't forge agreement on that.nd compromised on but i'm going to work with both the chair, the ranking member, the members on both sides of the aisle to get our work done by june 30 of this
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coming year. and that will give us 90 days to reach agreement with the senate, pass the bills and do it by september 30. we've rarely done that. i think in my 40 years of this house, i think we've done it twice. i'd have to check. once.it was only maybe you can tell me that. we can find out. ut i'm hopeful that we will do it. there aren't many members on this floor. pass..r. has to all we did was change the date. because of practically we have not gotten time.rk done on and whoever's listening, whether it's the public or other members listening, mr. speaker, i hope they will take to heart our responsibility to the american to this institution work on time. told the majority leader in
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the united states senate just about two days ago, three days ago. said, mitch, there's no agreement we can make on the we can't make on the 11th. in these next seven ays -- or now i guess nine days. there's no magic in it. it's just psychologically we have until the 18th so we won't today.e agreement as -- why i set the 11th because i was hopeful that we could do the 11th and i urged members to do the 11th. very frankly, two reasons. number one, it's the right thing to do. members are at risk when they travel. they're at risk here. their homes be in quarantined with people who do propose to them any risk. to shirk hat we want our duty, but we can do our duty but we don't need to be here for
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more weeks or one more week to do it. the thought to have in mind that we are going to get it done today. his will give us eight more days. nine more days to do it. and i know the staff is going to e working round the clock over the weekend to get us a bill done. two -- three s bills. night.ed the ndaa last that bill should be passed in june as well. may.te i told mr. smith and the new ranking member that i'm going to do everything i can to have that ill on the floor this coming may. we traditionally did that. that's not -- i'm not inventing something. that.lauro knows, we did the ranking member knows we did that. and we all say it's a very bill.ant if it's a very important bill, let's deal with it in a timely this n and not have last-minute veto, we're going to do this.
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it.eed to pass 335 of us yesterday said we're going to pass this bill. this tirade by congratulations to ms. delauro, to the ranking a good friend and a very responsible member of this house. work closely with them and with all of our members, mr. peaker, to make sure that the american people can be proud of the fact that the house of epresentatives knows its responsibilities, meets its responsibilities, and passes a timely fashion and does not say to the federal employees and the people who are operating government, maybe you'll be funded tomorrow and maybe you won't. billions of dollars over the years i've been here with a government trying to they're going to prepare for a shutdown. that operated that way in america would go bankrupt pretty soon.
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the c.e.o. would be fired. and the board of directors, might be fired as well. learn the lesson that we learned too often and let's do time and do it well, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman from maryland yields back. the gentlewoman from texas is recognized. time.anger: i reserve my the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentlewoman from connecticut is recognized. speaker, i mr. yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from texas, ms. sheila jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas, ms. recognized for two minutes. i thank the ee: speaker, and i certainly
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the concerns of the leader, majority leader, mr. hoyer. associate myself with his concerns and my appreciation for the appropriations committee. me thank ms. delauro and my granger, and ms. certainly make mention of her as rankingo continue member in the next congress. rise to support this underlying legislation for the extension of the c.r. to december 18. to, as well, re-efrp the -- emphasize the conditions americans are in. dead. 300,000 predicted to have americans would lly that have -- have possibly lost their life in 2021 of upwards of 500,000 americans. this is a funding bill. say keep the government open, what we really mean is to serve the american people. have health they
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care, they have education dollars, that they are able to und their local police and fire, that they have childcare dollars, that they have research dollars. if i went on me, any local street in america today, they would be asking me a lifeline so their restaurants can stay open, the small businesses. be asking about their unemployment extension and the cash payments. into what we need to get the negotiation, and we are hoping to do the funding bill well.vid-19 as i want to rise on the floor today to make a particular point. in mber of points, particular. the necessity of the nemployment extension and increase. we had $600 in the past. the necessity of the cash as well. but i also want to make mention of the fact that our local and dictions, our cities counties and tribal jurisdictions, they need the funding to go c directly to them. no strings attached by the state. losing out.
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their firefighters are losing out. heir health clinics are losing out. their municipalities are losing getting se they're entangled with the state. environmental assessments projects like the i-45 -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time -- 30 delauro: i yield another seconds to the gentlewoman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for an additional 30 seconds. s. jackson lee: i thank the speaker and i thank the soon-to-be chair of the appropriations committee. but there are so many projects that recklessly tears into minority neighborhoods without any response to those voters, those constituents. wiping out their houses and churches and schools. so the department of transportation funding will be in here that we'll have the opportunity to assess environmental impact statements. finally, let me offer my greatest appreciation for chairwoman nita lowey. yes, an angel on this floor for so many years, guiding us,
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leading us in a way that brought back the kind of success that america needs. and i thank ms. delauro for -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentlewoman from texas is recognized. ms. granger: mr. speaker, before i close, i want to take a minute to congratulate congresswoman delauro for being named chairwoman of the full committee. next congress. i look forward to working with you in the coming years. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the bill before us today. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentlewoman from connecticut is recognized. ms. delauro: if i may for a moment, i know the majority leader has left the floor, but i thank him for his congratulations and his warm words. and look forward to working in conjunction with him as we move to pass 12 bills by june and i want to particularly say how
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pleased i am to be able to work with the ranking member, my colleague from texas. we have worked on issues in the past, never at this level, but i'm looking forward to a really close and wonderful relationship as we try to do the nation's business. thank you so, so very much. thank you. mr. speaker, with an additional week to negotiate, i'm optimistic that we can fund the government for this year. and we can deliver coronavirus relief for the american people who are desperate and looking to us for hope. i urge my colleagues to join me , passing this extension of funding so we can complete our work. but it is not about us. we have the responsibility, but it is about the people outside of this chamber who are relying on us. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 8900.
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those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative -- ms. delauro: mr. speaker, on that i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 3 of house resolution 965, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass hrment r. -- h.r. 549, reaffirming the commitment to media diversity and pledging to work with media entities and diverse stakeholders to develop common ground solutions to eliminate barriers to media diversity. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 100. house resolution 549. resolution reaffirming the commitment to media diversity and pledging to work with media
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entities and diverse stakeholders to develop common ground solutions to eliminate barriers to media diversity. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.res. 549. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of h.res. 549, reaffirming the commitment to media diversity and pledging to work with media entities and diverse stakeholders to develop common ground solutions to eliminate barriers to media diversity. this resolution promotes much-needed diversity in the communications marketplace, and
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i commend representative demings and her staff for all their efforts toward this resolution. i also want to thank ranking member walden, communications and tech knowledge subcommittee chairman doil, and subcommittee ranking member -- doyle, and subcommittee ranking member latta for their resolution to -- for their work to bring this resolution to the floor. this past year has highlighted racial inequities that have long existed in our society. and we saw with the protests over the murder of george floyd and the disparate impact that covid-19 pandemic is having on communities of color. these inequities also exist in our communications marketplace. for example, the owners of broadcast and cable media outlets do not reflect our diverse population. these media outlet owners make critical decisions about the educational, political, entertainment and news programming americans watch, and those decisions can influence people's opinions and perceptions. diversity and viewpoints and diverse ownership of media outlets promotes programs that offers different perspectives and enables viewers to access
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programming that is relevant to them. a diverse media marketplace is also central to an informed and engaged electorate which is critical to a vibe rant democracy -- vibrant democracy. committing to a diverse media marketplace, one that reflects our country, is a worthy goal and this resolution reaffirms that goal. today's resolution is a good step forward, but there's much more that we need to do. the numbers and statistics are clear that our media marketplace does not resemble the people we serve. so hope we can come together to do the additional work that's needed and i urge all of my colleagues to support this resolution and with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: well, thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today and would yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise today in support of h.res. 549. this is a resolution, introduced by my colleague, mrs. demings, that reaffirms the commitment by congress to work with media entities and diverse stake holders to find
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common ground solutions to eliminate barriers to diversity in our media. as a former radio broadcaster myself, i understand the efforts that the broadcast industry and the media industry as a whole take to ensure diversity of ownership, viewpoint and employment. my wife and i had to make those hiring decisions for our five radio stations. i know firsthand the business imperative to serve your community, with local news and local programming, that reflects the makeup of your community. while today's resolution focuses specifically on broadcast stations, this problem is not unique to one segment of the media industry. it is also an issue for their cable and digital streaming competitors in the marketplace. i appreciate the many steps that the industry has taken not to only recognize and take responsibility for this, but also to put in place the many programs and initiatives to promote opportunities for women and minorities and veterans. but as the data shows, we still have room for improvement. while today the house is considering this resolution, it is my hope that we can work together in a bipartisan manner
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to address the inequality identified in this resolution. republicans on the energy and commerce committee have put forward solutions to help uplift minority voices and promote media diversity, solutions that can actually become law. unlike this resolution before us today. in september, mr. speaker, the house passed h.res. 5567. the media diversity act sponsored by mr. long. which would help us better understand the market and regulatory barriers for socially disadvantaged individuals to enter and compete in the marketplace. this bill would help us make informed policy decisions. i've also worked with advocates and industry alike to try and find consensus on legislation to establish the long-sought broadcaster incubator program. this would help increase the number of minority-owned broadcast stations. broadcast diversity leadership act, h.r. 8154, would encourage large established broadcasters to work with aspiring
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broadcasters to break down barriers to capital and provide mentorship and experience to new minority entrants. that's how we can ensure their long-term success in serving their local communities. we must better understand the problem before us and how best to incentivize all media entities to create opportunities for and lift up the voices of those who are under-represented today. today we can affirm our commitment to working toward common ground solutions as this resolution states. the republicans stand ready, mr. speaker, to work across the aisle, to turn these common ground solutions into law. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield now to the gentlewoman from florida, mrs. demings, such time as she may consume. shells, of course, the sponsor of this -- she is, of course, the sponsor of this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida is recognized. mrs. demings: mr. speaker, first of all i'd like it thank the chairman and the ranking
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member for their support on this resolution. mr. speaker, there is no doubt media plays a critical role in how we see the world and how we see each other. when a child sees someone on the screen who looks like them, it can change their life. mr. speaker, as you know, we continue to struggle with ongoing disparities in housing, education, social justice and even this ongoing pandemic. whether in news, movies, tv or music, who tells the story matters because diverse perspectives are critical to us understanding the entire story. i am grateful for our co-sponsors and for my colleagues who will vote for this resolution today and for the media representatives who partnered with us to move this legislation forward. as we continue to work together to unite our country, break down barriers, and strengthen our future, let's continue to
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utilize the powerful diverse voices who truly are our strength. again, thank you so much for your support on this resolution and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. it is my privilege to recognize the gentleman from ohio, top republican on the telecommunications subcommittee, mr. latta, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized for two minutes. mr. latta: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.res. 549. this resolution reaffirms the importance of having diverse representation across the media to better reflect their audience and serve the public interest. i urge my colleagues to support this pledge to eliminate barriers to media diversity and reinforce our commitment to encourage diversity in media policy. mr. speaker, i'd like to spend the remainder of my time to
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commend the leadership of my good friend, the ranking member, mr. walden. unfortunately leader walden has decided to make this his last term in congress. but his work at the energy and commerce committee around his service to the people of oregon will continue to positively impact our nation for decades to come. let me say, it's going to be hard to imagine going into the committee without you at the helm on our side. you've been a steady force, just as your family has been a steady force when they took the wagon trains to oregon on that trail back in 1845. and you never forgot your roots and you show that every day. and i appreciate it because i know that under your leadership, you've helped many of us in committee and i know as your vice chair, you had a lot of confidence in me, when you let me take over the helm on many a day. and run the committee. but as one of your subcommittee chairs on digital commerce and consumer protection, and this
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congress being the rancor on telecom, i appreciate that. and i know, that again, when i think about all the things that you've worked on, especially in the last congress, and with the opioid epidemic, which claims over 73,000 lives in this country, and you were at the helm of h.r. 6 and brought together all those bills, over 60 pieces of legislation to help people in this country. and that's going to be a lasting legacy that we're going to have. so again, we're going to appreciate you, but also hate to see you leave. . with your telecom work, to have someone with that experience, as you mentioned in your opening remarks you and your bride of 38 years owning the radio stations and being able to get out there and get the work done. if i could have one minute. mr. walden: i'll yield him as much time as i have he keeps going for like that. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman is recognized for an additional one minute. mr. latta: i appreciate it. again, it's been a tremendous run. all the work that you have done, you have been a gentleman. a good friend. and something i learned from my ad from his 36 years in public experience, i'll say it again, there is a difference between people who are politicians and public servants. he said a politician is a person who sees so much they can take from the people they represent for their ben own benefit, while public servants see how much they can give of themselves back to the people they represent. what you have done for not only your constituents of your great state and also here in this body , we are going to miss you. greg, it's the first time i ever used the first name on this ploor, we are going to miss you. i'm going to miss you. but we wish you-all the best in the years to come. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized.
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mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers. see what my colleague, the ranking member -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman continues to yield. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. i'm sorry, the gentleman from oregon. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i believe we had two other speakers planning to come down and speak, but it does not appear they have been able to free themselves from their own business. with that, mr. speaker, i would just encourage us all to support this really strong resolution that our colleague has offered up. and i would yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i'll do the same, mr. speaker. i ask for support on this legislation. yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey yields back. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and agree to house resolution 549.
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so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the resolution is agreed to, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid pon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3361, the river act. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3361, a bill to amend the energy policy act of 2005 to re-authorize hydroelectric production incentives and hydroelectric efficiency improvement incentives, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from
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oregon, mr. walden, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and includeheir remarks and extraneous material on h.r. 3361. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman virginia tech. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of h.r. 3361, the reliable investment and vital energy re-authorization act, or the river act. this bipartisan bill was introduced by representatives mckinley, tonko, and loebsack. hydropower is a vital part of our clean energy portfolio and the river act re-authorizes important hydroelectric production incentives establishing an energy policy act of 2005. the river act extends incentives that provide payments to owners or operators of hydroelectric facilities that are added to
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existing dams or condue its. additionally, it re-authorizes efficiency improvement payments for improving facility efishency. i support this legislation, mr. speaker. thank my colleagues for their hard work on the bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 3361, this is the reliable investment in vital energy re-authorization act. this slaferingse was introduced by my colleague on the energy and commerce committee, mr. mckinley and will tonko, to re-authorize the hydroelectric production incentive and hydropower efeshency improvement programs at the department of energy. this legislation went through regular order and it passed the full committee, energy and commerce, by a voice vote. h.r. 3361 would authorize payments to support the development of hydropower production at existing dams and condue its.
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literally, mr. speaker, there are thousands of existing dams in the united states that can support hydropower production while avoiding the costs and environmental effects associated with building new dams. in addition to affordable and renewable energy, hydropower also provides ancillary services to stabilize the electric grid, provide storage, to maintain emergency black start capability. proud to support h.r. 3361 which would re-authorize these really important department of energy programs and will ensure access to renewable carbon free, affordable hydropower for years to come. urge my colleagues to join me in voting yes on h.r. 3361. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i have no speakers on this side, but i yield-dirble' reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from oregon is
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recognized. mr. walden: thank you, very much, mr. speaker. it's my honor and privilege to recognize the gentleman from west virginia, engineer by trade, terrific legislator, important member of our committee, and sponsor of this legislation, mr. mckinley, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from west virginia is recognized for three minutes. mr. mckinley: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman. i do want to reserve my comments to the end that i have the personal privilege to address the chairman. mr. speaker, for now i rise in support of h.r. 3361, the river act. and thank chairman tonko and congressman loebsack for working with us 8 -- in a bipartisan way on this important legislation. the river act re-authorizes key hydropower production and efish grency -- efficiency incentives through 2036. boosting hydropower production will ensure americans have access to affordable, clean
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energy. as comewoman kathy madam speaker -- madam speaker -- mcmorris rodgers, only 3% of america's 91,000 dams generate electricity. because in part it takes 10 years to get a permit to develop new hydropower projects. this bill will help streamline and develop utilizing existing infrastructure and overcome barriers to future projects. i urge my colleagues to support the river act. i ask a point of privilege to again address my esteemed chairman. mr. walden: you go ahead. mr. mckin ln-ily: -- mr. mckinley: let me say to my ranking member, former chairman, colleague i can't imagine -- since i came here 10 years ago, coming from the business sector,
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that almost nearly 50 years in private practice and business and engineering, i have been so impressed with the leadership we have had in the energy and commerce. it wasn't what i was expecting. you and fred, and even to some extent my friend, franc, some ex-- frank, some extent, don't get carried away here, i have seen you taking on some difficult issues and using the humor, your approach, you have been able to work through some difficult coming up with solutions. you're going to be missed. you and your wife have earned a break. i think of all -- you have been in my house. you have come to west virginia. west-by god, virginia. i just do appreciate what you have done for us, what you have done on the opioid epidemic.
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it's still ravaging west virginia and across this country. people have to understand that in west virginia more people are going to die from opioids than from covid this year. thanks to you, we are moving in the right direction. i can't express enough how much you have meant to me and my the r and my confidence in people's house has been in good hands under you and i appreciate very much your service and god bless all of you as you continue in your retirement. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers but i'll reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman continues to reserve. the gentleman from oregon. mr. walden: to my friend from west virginia, it has been a great honor. i yield myself such time as i may consume. it has been an honor and great
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privilege to serve with you and i have always appreciated your leadership, your great insights, your keen intellect as we have addressed these issues. especially on the issue of opioids i don't think there was a more passionate player on the committee, more engaged and informed member of the committee on this matter than you. and the citizens of west virginia and indeed the citizens of all america, mr. speaker, have a lot to say thank you to mr. mckinley for -- and others in this body, certainly, but for the legislation we passed into law. we know there is more work to do. while i may be leaving, i know he's only going to double down on that effort going forward. mr. speaker, this is good legislation that mr. mckinley and mr. tonko has brought before us. i urge passage. with that i believe i have no other speakers on this matter and would yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i would also urge support for this bill and yield back the balance
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of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3361. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid pon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5541, the tribal power act, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5541, a bill to amend the energy policy act of 1992 to re-authorize programs to assist consenting indian tribes in meeting energy education, planning, and management needs, and for other purposes.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and includeheir remarks and extraneous material on h.r. 55541. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered of -- 5541. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of h.r. 5541, the tribal power act. this is a bipartisan bill that was introduced by representative o'halleran from arizona and representative mullin from oklahoma. both members of the energy and commerce committee. this important legislation addresses. so urgent energy needs of tribal communities by improving access to energy sources that are affordable and reliable. h.r. 5541 re-authorizes the department of energy's office of
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indian energy and re-authorizes programs to assist indian tribes in meeting energy education, planning, and management needs. mr. speaker, we must work with tribal governments to ensure that members of tribal nations have access to affordable, reliable energy. we have made some strong bipartisan strides on these matters during this congress, including this bill before us today. as we prepared for the upcoming congress, i'm committed to working with the energy subcommittee chairman rush and my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to do even more to help native american communities on these matters in the 117th congress. i'd like to thank the sponsor of this bill for their continued work and leadership on tribal issues. i also want to thank house resources committee chairman grijalva, a champion of native american priorities, for his support which was crucial to bringing this bill to the floor today. this is an important bipartisan bill that deserves to become law. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting passage.
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i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 5541, this is the tribal power act. this legislation was introduced by my colleagues on the energy and commerce committee, representatives o'halleran and mullen. and it does strengthen department of energy's tribal energy program which is really important to do. this bill went through regular order in the committee and passed out of the full committee by a voice vote. h.r. 5541 updates and re-authorizes programs at the department of energy to provide funding and technical assistance to tribal governments and organizations so that they can carry out projects that would expand access to energy and provide jobs and economic development on indian lands. american indian and alaska native communities continue to struggle with energy affordability and access in many cases. households on some tribal lands also have higher rates of unemployment and lower incomes. meaning it may not be feasible
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to increase electricity rates to energize homes not currently connected to the electric grid. as a result, communities often rely on relatively expensive diesel microgrids and generators to power homes and businesses. . this would improve energy security and affordability on indian lands by re-authorizing important government programs and remove barriers to providing access to electric service and recommends ways to improve energy education planning and management. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting h.r. 5541 and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers on this side but i'll reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. it's now a great honor and privilege to recognize the gentleman from oklahoma, a tribal member and an incredibly important member of our committee who has given great voice to people who need help
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and that would be mark wayne mullin, a co-sponsor of this ledge -- markwayne mullin, a co-sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. mullin: thank you, mr. speaker. today i rise in support of h.r. 5541, the tribal power act. as the only native american that serves on energy and commerce and one who has lived in indian country my entire life, this bill is extremely important to tribes that strategically -- tribes. it can help strategically -- it can strategically help us receive capital we need to become energy efficient and enhance our energy infrastructure. i have long been a supporter of the economic benefits american energy brings to our communities. as sovereign nations, tribes should have the ability to choose and deploy this kind of energy and the best kind of energy that works for them. i am proud to be a co-lead in this very important issue. now, with the remainder of my time, i'd like to take a second
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leader gnize our good and friend that we're going to lose here in chairman walden. our committee is better because of your leadership. and anybody that can put up with my attitude and my great personality and still stay calm and effectively lead our committee, i just want to tell you that shows a good leader. it shows somebody that i would love to follow and someone i have enjoyed being able to follow. since my time in congress, you have been a friend and a mentor, one that i can always advice. give the right not necessarily something i always want to hear, but the right vills. as i said before, -- advice. as i said before, that's a character of a leader. it has been a great honor and you'll be missed.
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mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oklahoma yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i have no additional speakers but i want to say that i never thought that mr. mullin had a bad attitude. i will reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: well, thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my friend from oklahoma for his very generous, over the top words. we've had a great working relationship. he's a fierce fighter for the causes he believes in and has been a terrific legislator and will continue to blossom and grow on the energy and commerce committee, i have no doubt. the country will be better served and indian country has few stronger voices than his. and none stronger on the energy and commerce committee, i would say. so with that, mr. speaker, i'd now yield such time as he may consume to the distinguished republican whip of the house, and an incredibly important member of the energy and
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commerce committee, who always came prepared, always did great work, and always presented us with his brick phone. with that, i'd recognize the gentleman from louisiana, my good friend, mr. scalise, for such time as he may consume. mr. scalise: -- the speaker pro tempore: the distinguished whip from louisiana is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. scalise: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to first thank my friend, the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. mullin, for bringing this legislation, the tribal power act, it's an important piece of legislation to help those tribal communities, and he does, as the gentleman from oregon said, provide great leadership for tribal issues. and this is surely one. amend i'm sure we'll work with the chairman of the energy and commerce committee, mr. pallone, for bringing this as well. now with the rest of my time and you may want to cut it short, if this turns into a roast. my friend from oregon is, as
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mr. mullin said, departing at the end of this congress. i'm not sure why you would want to leave after 22 years in congress. but you surely earned the right. i got to know mr. walden when i was a freshman coming on to the energy and commerce committee, back in 2009, in my first year in congress. when you look at the dais now, it's surely changed a lot. but back in those days, you know, i would offer on my own goodwill to make coffee for mr. walden -- he was one of those senior members of the committee. probably more of a junior member, but i was the most junior member, but we actually developed a really good friendship. as we do around here, we all battle it out on issues, we come up here to fight for the things that are important to our districts, important to the country from our perspective. and then you find people alopping the way that you be-- along the way that you befriend that have that same perspective. mr. walden has been one of those. i've learned a lot from him.
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we've really, i think, achieved so many things on the energy and commerce committee, and especially during his time as chairman. i just want to mention a few of those areas where he's made this a better country. because we can all talk about the things that we want to do when we come up here. and you'd like to work with others. but then to be able to look back and see real tangible achievements that make this a better country, it really does pay tribute that your time here was well spent. and for mr. wad with a -- for mr. walden, it surely walz. maybe none more obvious -- was. maybe none more obvious than what we saw yesterday. president trump had a summit to talk about the rollout for a vaccine for covid-19. work we did to give money to the administration so that they could focus on finding a vaccine, but then it takes the ability, the tools and the f.d.a. is the gold standard in the world. and the f.d.a.'s had problems over the years in this committee, the energy and commerce committee -- and this committee, the energy and commerce committee, has had to
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come together to address those problems so the f.d.a. continues to be the gold standard that not only ensures that the trials go through the proproper process, you don't want a drug to come to the market that has adverse consequences, but you also don't want the government to get in the way and slow down a drug. that had been going on. when we were able to pass the bill to modernize f.d.a. approval of drugs a few years ago, when mr. walden, as -- was chairman, some of those reforms are what got us to the brink of an f.d.a.-approved vaccine for covid-19. that will not only save millions of lives, in america, around the world, you've seen people, a 90-year-old woman in great britain is the first woman to get the vaccine. that's from the work of what we did here at the f.d.a. the f.d.a.'s on the verge of approvinging that vaccine in america -- of approving that vaccine in america. it will also, in addition to saving lives, allow us to reopen our economy fully. i think that's another objective we all have. that doesn't happen by accident. it happened because of
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leadership and, again, without your leadership and reforming the f.d.a., we may be waiting years, not months, to get that vaccine to market. i know with the support act, to address the opioid crisis in this country, every community in america had been touched by the opioid crisis and congress had to take action. again, working republicans and democrats together under your leadership as chairman, we did just that. and there are millions of lives that are saved because of that work. the f.c.c. modernization and re-authorization, which typically happens but when it was done in 2018 it was named after ray baum, who was the staffer that ran the energy and commerce committee, i believe you all served together in the legislature. unfortunately we lost him. and to name that important piece of legislation after ray baum i know was not only important to keep the f.c.c. going, but also to pay tribute to someone who came up here to do good public service for the
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country. and did. and finally, to free up spectrum. this has been a challenge for years as we worked to get more spectrum, which has improved everybody's lives. to get to a 5-g network. that work was done and the leadership of chairman walden to get that work done, when even the score keepers here said it wouldn't produce anything for the country, and billions and billions of dollars later, that this country has to pay down our debt, came out of that legislation, as well as spectrum to allow us to get to a 5-g network, spectrum to allow us to build out more rural broadband. all of the things that improve people's quality of life happened because of the leadership of chairman walden during your time as chairman of the committee. you've earned the opportunity to go in and enjoy the next phase of your life. but while you will be missed here, you leave a great legacy where you can point to the things you've done to make america a greater country and for that, i thank you and i know all of us join in in applauding your time here in
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this great institution. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman continues to reserve. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i just want to thank -- i yield myself such time as i may consume, to thank my dear friend and colleague, from the energy and commerce committee, and the whip, the republican whip of the house, for his overly generous comments. but his fine leadership and the fun we've had on the energy and commerce -- we do have a lot of fun there on both sides of the aisle. and then we do ruffle -- ruffle and tumble and we work things out too. but mr. scalise has always been a real warrior on the committee. incredible fighter for what he believes in, an effective legislator, a terrific spokesperson. he's fallen down a little bit, though, i must stipulate, in that he's failed to get me coffee in recent years. he's been otherwise consumed with other duties.
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you know, that will be noted in the historical record, i'm sure. but, going forward, i don't believe we have any other speakers on this -- we do? on this legislation. i would yield -- mr. speaker, how much time do i have left? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 9 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. walden: i would recognize such time as he may consume to the gentleman from indiana, dr. bucshon, who we're glad to have back on the floor and looking well and i would yield him such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. bucshon: thank you, greg. mr. speaker, it's an honor and a privilege to call greg walden a colleague and a friend. his time as chairman of the house energy and commerce committee is another chapter of accomplishment and success in the committee's storied history. as chairman, greg approached every issue before the committee with his eye on achieving results for the american people. that's why we're here. he strove to reach across the
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political divide because he understood, and still does, our work on behalf of the american people is far too important to always be derailed by needless partisanship. of course we'll have our scabbles -- squabbles back and forth, but at the end of the day, it's about the american people and greg understands that. from the support for patients and communities act, to ray baum's act, as well as too many, too numerous a number of bills signed into law to even list here, greg's leadership of the energy and commerce committee produced important legislation that is today making a difference in the lives of the american people. i want to personally thank greg for taking the time to bring me in and ask for my professional medical diagnosis of many major health care-related issues or other pieces of legislation before the committee. i know at times us doctors can tell you things you don't want to hear. and quit laughing.
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but greg always listened intently and worked with me to find -- help find a cure, so to speak, or a remedy. and for that, i'll always be appreciative. greg, your wisdom, charisma and unflappable leadership will be greatly missed in the 117th congress. i wish you and milene the best as you both begin this new chapter of your lives and i look forward to continuing to call you friend. thank you, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey continues to reserve. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. to thank my friend and colleague, the good doctor from indiana. we are so blessed in this institution to have people with such incredible backgrounds and intellect and capability and just the overall human experience that they can bring to help us be better legislators and develop better policy. i think when we listen to each other, when we're challenged in
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our views and our ideas by each other, we end up with a better product for the american people, mr. speaker. certainly dr. bucshon has been a forceful figure in trying to get to better health care policy outcomes, and i have greatly valued his counsel and his leadership and i know incredible things await him in the next congress and in the years thereafter where i hope he will serve and continue to serve with great distinction and honor and ability. i encourage passage of the legislation, tribal power act. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized to close. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to include in the record an exchange of letters between the chairman of the committee on energy and commerce and the chairman of the committee on natural resources on this bill, h.r. 5541. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered.
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mr. pallone: i would urge support for the legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5541, as amended. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid pon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1426, the timely review of infrastructure act. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 1426, a bill to amend the department of energy organization act to address insufficient compensation of employees and other personnel of
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the federal energy regulatory commission, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, each will control 20 minutes. -- -- 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 1426. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 1426, the timely review of infrastructure act. this bipartisan bill was introduced by representatives ole oson and doyle. i'd like to thank both of them for their hard work on this bill. h.r. 1426 ensures that the federal energy regulatory commission, or ferc, has the resources and personnel it needs to review and analyze energy infrastructure projects. h.r. 1426 addresses insufficient
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compensation of employees and other personnel by amending the department of energy organization act to grant ferc, the ferc chairman additional authority to adjust compensation for a category of employees and other personnel without regard to certain civil service laws. the commission must be able to hire and retain sufficiently experienced employees so that complex and highly technical environmental reviews are conducted in a rigorous a manner as possible. better staffing by the best and brightest people means better environmental outcomes, better energy outcomes, and better outcomes for the consumers. i appreciate my colleagues' hard work on this legislation and i want to offer my best wishes to the sponsor of this bill, representative olson, who is retiring at the end of this congress. always worked with him on a bipartisan basis and enjoyed spending time with him because he has a real sense of humor. while we often disagree on policy, he has always been
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fair-minded and a man of his convictions. when he is with us, it's hard to imagine a better partner, that's particularly true regarding the work we have been doing with chairman tonko and many others from both parties on legislation to phase out the use of hydrofluorocarbons. he and his staff have been two leaders in pushing forward that legislation, which if we can get it done, will be a major win for our manufacturers, our economy, and environment. i thank you for your service to our committee and our country. wish you-all the best in the next chapter of your life. with that i thank my colleagues fon their efforts and urge passage of this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. rise in support of h.r. 1426, the timely review of infrastructure act. this legislation was introduced by my colleague on the energy and commerce committee, representatives pete olson and representative mike doyle. to help the federal energy regulatory commission recruit
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and retain highly specialized personnel in the stem fields. this legislation went through regular order and it passed by voice vote in the committee. federal energy regulatory commission, otherwise known as ferc, is an independent agency. mr. speaker, it regulates the interstate transmission of electricity, natural gas, and oil. ferc's responsibilities also include reviewing and approving the siting of large-scale infrastructure projects such as l.n.g. export terminals, interstate pipelines, and all the associated environmental and safety requirements. while perk receives annual appropriations from congress, ferc recovers 100% of its appropriations through the collection of annual charges and filing fees. this unique structure where the industry essentially covers ferc's costs has resulted in a lean and efficient agency t helps keeps costs down for consumers. in testimony before the energy and commerce committee, ferc explained that it face as growing challenge to recruit and retain highly skilled work force to keep up with the demands of
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our rapidly growing energy infrastructure. ferc has especially had difficulty hiring engineers throughout the agency with many candidates citing compensation rates as frankly the main issue. h.r. 1426 would require ferc's work force would improve, forecast's work force by granting the chairman authority to adjust compensation for a certain category of stem workers this. fix would help ferc carry out its mission in a timely, efficient, and effective manner without any additional cost to our taxpayers. i want to thank mr. olson and mr. doyle for working together in a bipartisan way. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting the legislation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers on this side. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you very much, mr. speaker. before i yield to the author of the bill, the gentleman from texas, i can tell you texas has
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few stronger advocates, if any, than mr. olson. and texas 22, his congressional district, has had an incredibly effective voice in the united states congress. he, like i, will be leaving they end -- at the end of this session, but he has left his mark on all kinds of positive policy improvements in the federal government. i don't know about you, mr. speaker, but there probably aren't many of us that could cite our friend's district by number. but somehow mr. olson, when you look at him, you know it's texas 22, and you know about the houston astros. why, i don't know. that's another subject for another day. do i know that he has been an able and effective legislator on the energy and commerce committee in this house. he has served his country in capacities, including the military. he will be missed in this assembly, but his work will go on. and his work today is noticed
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once again in a bipartisan way. with that i yield such time as he may consume although do i have another speaker, to the gentleman from texas 22 -- although i do have another speaker, to the gentleman from texas 22. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from district 22 is recognized. mr. olson: i thank the speaker. i thank the chairman for those kind words. my ranking member, my inspiration, chairman greg walden, for his kind words. and for the time to speak about timely review ly of infrastructure act. 'tis the season of giving. this bipartisan bill gives three gifts to america and to the world. the first gift, we ensure the american taxpayers get the maximum value spent for the taxpayer dollars. the second gift, this grows america's economy with high-paying, high technology
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jobs. number three, it addresses climate change by encouraging transportation to the safest, medium possible pipelines above ships, trains, and trucks. bill.426 is a commonsense this is not new. it's modeled after wall street. when the market was booming in the 2000s, the private sector poached staff employees from the .e.c.. frankly dollar after dollar after dollar and got them to leave the public sector for the private sector. that will meant that oversight was not the highest quality it had been before, and those reviews were longer and longer and longer. the same thing is happening
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right now in the current xplosion of american energy. many the federal energy regulatory commission, the private sector big guys, big oil guys, have told me point-blank they poach on perk to get the best employees they possibly can get. they wave money at them that ferc does not have to compete. the s.e.c. in the 2000s, we allowed them to temporarily raise the federal employment cap to keep these s.e.c. experts on the job in the s.e.c. h.r. 1426 does that same thing, a proven remedy, for ferc. one year higher salaries, then review. every member in this house, democrat or republican, should
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vote for this bill. because it's not just bipartisan, it's bipartisan on steroids. the leading democrat, my good friend, mike doyle, is from ittsburgh, pennsylvania. in the nfl that's steeler country. i am in the suburbs of houston. hat was houston oiler country. oil fans have had a strong clash with steeler fans for over 40 years. and pittsburgh fans have never apologized for horrific blown call that may have cost my oilers a chance to go to their irst super bowl. that still hurts today.
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my point is, if mike and i can put that difference aside and pass this bill, everyone in this entire body should come together and pass this bill. we all should vote for it, h.r. 1426. i've got to close by speaking about our leader, my idol, greg walden. like me greg is retiring after this year. like me, greg is not dying, he's just retiring. a few examples of greg's guidance of this committee when he was chairman. he empowered every member, democrat, republican from any state to have an amendment, heard their voice heard on the committee. the best example at this called a bill that sun sets, sun rise, sun set. our bill to repeal and replace
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the affordable care act. that markup went on for 27 hours. because greg walden made sure every member could have their amendment with a vote in that committee before it became to the house floor. another great example of greg walden's building a team that always wins, that's always united. i'm from texas. a republican. i first got here we had 25 members. but sometimes we split. greg walden has led the entire oregon delegation, g.o.p., the whole time i have been here and they have never, ever, ever had one defection with greg walden's leadership.
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i'll close with another houston oiler coach for a great coach, bum phillips. if bum came down from heaven right now, was talking about greg walden's record career here in the house, he would say, greg walden, may not be a class by himself, but whatever class you're in, my friend, it don't take long to call the roll. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. -- walden: mr. speaker, i the speaker pro tempore: the the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey continues to reserve. mr. walden: i yield myself such time as i may consume. to thank my dear friend and colleague, mr. olson, who we now know turns out is from texas. texas 22. and his wife, nancy, and wish them the very best in their lives ahead. mr. speaker, since he's talking about a little history i want to talk about a little history to
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before i turn to my friend from georgia to speak on this bill and that is something really, really, really important happened not too far from my home state of oregon, fort lewis, washington, on this date 58 years ago, this gentleman from texas 22 arrived on this planet. today is his birthday, i hope the house will join me in acknowledging mr. olson's birthday, born in the great state of washington, as it turns out, but he is texas through and through. . happy birthday, mr. olson. with that, mr. speaker, unless mr. olson wanted to make a comment, i would yield. mr. olson: thank you for the birthday wishes. i appreciate that. thank you, thank you, thank you. mr. walden: with that, mr. speaker, i would turn now to the only pharmacist in the united states congress, which has really been important in our legislative efforts on the energy and commerce committee,
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he knows so much about how to take care of people when they're at the counter, how to make sure they get what they need and what they face when they come there in terms of costs of medicines and everything else. buddy carter, a terrific member of the committee and i yield him such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized. from georgia, i'm sorry. mr. carter: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 1426, the timely review of infrastructure act. simply put, this is a commonsense bill to address how employees are compensated for their work at the federal energy regulatory commission or ferk. it is well known that there is -- ferc. it is well known that there is a backlog of work at ferc due to a short and of qualified personnel to hand the requirements -- handle the requirements. when energy developers need to submit applications for approval at ferc, they are often delayed due to a lack of available personnel to review the project. the united states has finally reached a level of energy
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independence that we could have never dreamed of during the opec oil embargo. however, that development is often subject to the timeliness and availability of approvals at ferc. this bill will ensure that the retention and recruiting of people at ferc will remain highly competitive, bringing in the people they need to do the job. one area of serious concern was the number of pending l.n.g. applications waiting at ferc. thankfully, we have bipartisan -- we have a bipartisan bill that can turn things around. i want to thank my good friend, pete olson, from texas 22, who is unfortunately leaving this body after years of distinguished service. but this is a good way to reflect on all of his great work. we will miss my friend from texas and i do wish him well. i also want to thank my colleagues on the energy and commerce committee for their work on this important legislation. i urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation and i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized -- the gentleman from new jersey continues to reserve. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: mr. speaker, i don't believe we have any other speakers on our side of the aisle on this measure. with that, i'd urge its pass and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i would urge support for this legislation and i yield back the balance of my time as well. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 1426. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition?
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mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5878, the ceiling fan improvement act of 2020. the speaker pro tempore: the -- i'm sorry. rt does the gentleman mean to call up h.r. 5758? mr. pallone: yes. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 511. h.r. 5758. a bill to amend the energy policy and conservation act to make technical corrections to the energy conservation standard for ceiling fans and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have fitheleb -- five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on
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h.r. 5758. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 5758, the ceiling fan improvement act of 2020. this bipartisan bill was introduced by representatives guthrie of kentucky and -- representative guthrie of kentucky and representative schakowsky of illinois, both senior members of the energy and commerce committee. h.r. 5758 amends the energy policy and conservation act to provide a technical fix for large diameter ceiling fan efficiency standards. the legislation adjusts compliance requirements related to total airflow and power consumptions for these fans. this technical fix provides the highest airflow fans a path to compliance, while still requiring improvements to products that underperform. this is a commonsense change that limb prove efficiency of large diameter ceiling fans and ensure that all products will become efficient over time. energy efficiency, mr. speaker,
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is a critical tool in our efforts to address climate change, while also saving consumers money on their electric bills. residential and commercial buildings contribute nearly 40% to our nation's carbon pollution and energy efficiency measures can reduce u.s. energy use and greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2050. it's crucial that we support energy efficiency efforts across different sectors. i commend my colleagues for the bipartisan work on this important bill, and ms. schakowsky in particular who chairs our subcommittee that deals with consumer protection is always looking to not only improve efficiency but also consumer protections. and i urge my colleagues to support the bill and with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 5758, the ceiling fan improvement act. this legislation was introduced by my colleagues on the energy and commerce committee,
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representatives guthrie and schakowsky, to make technical corrections to the department of energy's energy conservation standards for large diameter ceiling fans. this legislation did go through regular order and it did pass the full committee on a voice vote. h.r. 5758 would amend the energy policy and conservation act to adjust compliance requirements that will resolve a department country -- discrepancy in the regulations that may have the unintended consequence of allowing some large diameter fans with low airflows to meet the minimum standards. the department of energy confirmed the need for a statutory revision and submitted technical assistance stayed in the drafting of this legislation, which we're appreciative of. this is a good bipartisan bill, like the others before it today, and i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting it. thank you, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield such time as she may consume to the gentlewoman from illinois, ms. schakowsky, who
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chairs our subcommittee on commerce and consumer protections. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized. ms. schakowsky: i thank you, mr. speaker, and i also want to thank representative guthrie who co-sponsored this legislation with me, and also chairman pallone and chairman bobby rush for their help in moving this bill forward. this is a bipartisan bill that provides an important fix to an energy conservation rule for ceiling fans and -- that the department of energy finalized in january. however, minor technical changes to the rule were needed in order to prevent a major unintended consequence. without the bill, some of the most energy-efficient large die metric ceiling fans would have to be taken off the market in the united states. so we fixed that. the bill will also provide
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consistent labeling requirements for residential ceiling fans, and simplify the energy star program. both of these changes will make it easier for americans to choose the right product for their homes. representative guthrie and i work together on this ceiling fan -- along with the ceiling fan manufacturers, the energy efficiency community, and other stakeholders to clarify the standard. the department of energy was consulted throughout the drafting process. what pleases me really the most about this legislation is that it highlights how we need legislation big and small to tackle the climate crisis. and this bill also highlights
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how we can work together across the aisle to enact commonsense policies that directly impact ergy usage in homes and save american families money on their energy bills at the same time. i look forward to continuing to work together with my republican colleagues in the next congress and with that i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. it's a great privilege now to recognize the gentleman from kentucky, mr. guthrie, who is the top republican on the oversight investigation subcommittee and has really done incredible work as we put together our package on operation warp speed and the second wave issues involving covid, which i commend to my colleagues to take a look at. but also he's a great legislator and working out bipartisan issues like this and i would yield to him such time as he may consume.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. guthrie: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of today of my bill, h.r. 5758, the ceiling fan improvement act. in january, 2020, the department of energy finalized energy conservation standards for ceiling fans that unfortunately did not account for the different airflow dynamics of large ceiling fans. under the current regular lag -- regulation, -- regulations, some of the most efficient large diameter fans would have to be taken off the market in the u.s. the ceiling fan improvement act is a bipartisan, commonsense bill that will ensure large diameter fans are properly regulated. technical innovation this new products will be key to protecting our environment for generations to come. and the ceiling fan improvement act seeks to ensure that high performing large diameter ceiling fans can remain on the market and help achieve real energy savings. i want to thank congresswoman jan schakowsky for working with me on this bill. i appreciate all the efforts that she's made to work with me and work together and i encourage my colleagues to support this bill and while i
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have the floor, i just want to make a couple of comments about some of our colleagues who are leaving. first, mr. speaker, we're hallway roommates in the rayburn office building, and i'll miss seeing you. congratulations on where you're going, hopefully you have -- you're not retiring -- you're retiring, you're not leaving, it has been a pleasure, your staff is fantastic and every time i walk by and pop my head in and say hello to them, they're always very gracious. we're going to miss you guys. elected with me in 2018, pete olson was just recognized -- recognized on the floor. farewell to him. we got elected to congress, we were together at new member orientation, we were chatting with each other. he said he was born in f.t.c. lewis, washington. we know he's texas through and through but he also had a sojourn in alabama. we were talking and i said, i was born in alabama. he goes, i used to live in alabama. i was born in florence, alabama. he goes, i lved -- i lived in
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florence for a year. i said, i lived in forest hills enabled. he said, i lived in forest hills neighborhood. did you ever know mr. mccue? i said, he was my little league coach. he goes, he was my little league coach. i said, you're little petey olson? so pete olson and i come together to congress in 2018, found out we knew each other when we were kids and his dad worked for a big paper mill and went on to houston. the houston oilers now play one hour from my home in nashville. so we're proud to have the hopies still cheer for them -- i hope he still cheers for them in nashville. he's a year older than me, his birthday is today. we had the same second grade teacher. he goes, did you have ms. lekates? i had her. the story about her is this, from the time summer was out that pete olson left and before school commenced that i went into second grade with ms. lekates. something momentous happened in her life. her son was killed in vietnam.
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and it's really the only name i personally know on the wall when i go. you've heyward of people, but the only person i had a personal connection to. every time i go to the wall, i told him that, every time i go to the wall, i look at robert lekates and i look at his name and it reminds me to this day that there are people who sacrifice their lives doctor lives for us to be here, for us to do what we're doing and we need to conduct ourselves worthy of people who gave the ultimate sacrifice for that. that was our story. i just want to close with talking about our former chairman and ranking member, greg walden. wish him well in his retirement. outstanding to work with. just outstanding to work with. no matter what subcommittee, he knew the policy that was going on, he had handle on it but he also let us go out and do our work and bring issues to him and move forward with him as well. particularly on the support act, i think that's one that i, as the opioid epidemic, trying to address that, it's been a
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plague on my state like it has so many others and he really gave people freedom to bring the best ideas and put all the best ideas together. and with both sides. he could always compromise without compromising his values and his principles. he said if there's a way for both sides to win, let's find a way for both sides to win. and i know you yielded me as much time as i consume. if i consumed everything, to say what's good about you and what the value you are to this -- i'd be here all afternoon. because you've really made an impact on this institution, you made an impact on our conference. i think people on both sides of the aisle said your service here has made a difference. not for congress, but through your service in congress for the country. and i thank you for that, we're going to miss you, and i wish you god speed as you move forward. thank you, and i yield back. .
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mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers on this side. i'll reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. now i'd like to recognize the gentleman from georgia again, mr. carter, as he comes up i just yield myself a minute or so here to thank my friend from kentucky, mr. guthrie, who, as you-all know, is a terrific legislator, bright mind. he, too, has served his country with distinction in uniform and here in the congress. and he will have a great future going forward in this institution. with that i recognize the gentleman from georgia, mr. carter, for such time he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. carter: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 5758, the sealing fan improvement act. this legislation will update the energy efficiency standards for sealing fans manufactured after january 21 of this year. we are here today because the
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existing energy efficiency standards for sealing fans was insufficient to meet the characteristics of sealing fans being manufactured. specifically, the energy conservation standards finalized in january, 2017, didn't propertyly account for the different types of airflow of large sealing fans. twhrfer the result of not changing this law could be the removal of large sealing fans from the market because they won't be in compliance. this issue is a great example of how now nuanced and challenging some of these issues and topics can be here in congress. thanks to the leader of my good friend, congressman guthrie, and that of chairwoman schakowsky, we are now one step closer to getting this fixed across the finish line. i want to thank my colleagues on the energy and commerce committee for their work on this legislation and for the bipartisan efforts to get it here. i urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: many the gentleman from georgia yields back.
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the gentleman from new jersey continues to reserve. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: i have no other speakers on my side of the aisle. it's good legislation. bipartisan. should become law. urge its passage. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i have no additional speakers. i would urge support for this legislation. yield back the balance of my time. i'll mention that i am at the appropriate time ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5758. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded rules -- irmative the mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i now ask for the yeas and nays.
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on this bill. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 3 of house resolution 965 the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 t. further proceedings on this uestion are postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3797, the medical marijuana research act, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report o the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3797, a bill to amend the controlled substances act to make marijuana accessible for use by qualified marijuana researchers for medical purposes, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask
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unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and includeheir remarks and extraneous material on h.r. 3797. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman may proceed. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 3797, the medical marijuana research act. in recent years, including in this most recent election cycle, many states have taken action to allow cannabis use. while states are moving ahead with this action, there is a significant need for more research about the use of cannabis products in these states and the safety of products on the shelves. according to the national conference of state legislatures, 36 states as well as puerto rico, guam, the u.s. virgin islands, and the district of columbia have approved medical cannabis programs while 15 states, the district of columbia, guam, and the northern mariana islands, have approved adult use cannabis.
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this is a major shift in cannabis pol and the united states is not the only one making these changes. just last week in a vote by the united nations commission on car notic -- narcotic drugs, they acknowledged the municipal and therapeutic possession of cannabis and removed it from the most strictest classification of categories. while voicing need for control the united states voted in favor of this move stating the legitimate medical use of cannabis has been established through scientific research. unfortunately, american researchers seeking to study the products byly avoid -- widely available and use in these states and territories face restrictions and numerous hurdles created by u.s. federal policy. it's time we break through this catch-22. this bipartisan bill begins to address this issue by reducing barriers to cannabis research. in january the energy and commerce committee heard from federal officials about the difficulty researchers face when it comes to conducting research
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with cannabis. as an example, for years there has been only one source of marijuana made available by the us -- university of mississippi that can be used in the u.s. for research purposes. another difficulty is the current federal registration requirements can be time consuming and add a unique and additional responsibilities than what is required for other types of medical research. the council on government relations, an association of research universities and other entities, says that this more cumbersome process often requires six to 12 months to complete. in testimony before our committee on this bill, dr. nora volkov, the director of the national institute on drug abuse underscored this point. she testified that barriers in the current process, i quote, present challenges to advancing cannabis research. as a result, she said, we have a gap in our understanding of cannabis products on health. this bill, h.r. 3797, addresses some of these barriers by streamlining the registration
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process of those who want to advance cannabis research. the bill does this while still maintaining appropriate oversight from both the department of health and human services and the drug enforcement administration. this bill also requires h.h.s. and d.e.a. to act within specified time periods to ensure timely registration for researchers. and it encourages additional manufacturers and distributors to supply cannabis for purposes of research. this will diversify the range of products and make it easier for legitimate researchers to obtain products that better reflect the changing cannabis landscape. finally, mr. speaker, the bill would also promote research on cana business products available through state authorized programs. this additional research is critical if we are to better understand the benefits and risk of cannabis products available in state markets today and most frequently used by consumers. i thank the lead sponsor of this bipartisan legislation, representatives blumenauer, harris, lofgren, griffith,
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bishop, and dingell and their staffs for their tireless work. i want to thank the committee staff for their hard work, as well as the staff of both h.h.s. and d.e.a. for their technical assistance. mr. speaker, again i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i open the senate will act on it swiftly. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise today to express my support of h.r. 3797, the medical marijuana research act, introduced by my colleague and friend from oregon, representative blumenauer. my friend from maryland, representative andy harris, among others. i'm surprised when taking this up at 4:20 in the afternoon rather than 2:10 we'll let history dweel that. federally sanged -- sanctioned research on marijuana sin credibly challenging. it is a schedule 1 controlled substance under the controlled substances act. meaning that researchers seeking
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to investigate a drug have to work with the department of health and human services and the drug enforcement administration to meet certain federal requirements in order to conduct that research, mr. speaker. in addition, international obligations outlined in the united nations drug control treaties impozz requirements that impact the supply of research grade cannabis. currently, those conducting federally sanctioned research can only study marijuana that is sourced through the national institute on drug abuse's single d.e.a. license at the university of mississippi. unfortunately, that marijuana is chemically distinct from what is commercially available from state legal dispenseries such as in my home state of oregon. what does that mean? it means we have little to no data on the actual health impacts of products in states that have legalized cannabis for medical or recreational use. states that have pursued marijuana legalization have largely done so in an
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information vacuum. with less understanding of what it does than virtually any nutritional supplement currently on the market. with far less information than they have on legal substances that are easily abused such as alcohol or tobacco. we don't even know at what point it is unsafe for marijuana users to drive. the t.h.c. levels that states set for driving legal limits or purposes of food consumption are arbitrary. in oregon, for example, cookies infused with t.h.c. are limited to five milligrams per serving or 50 per package. you go across the river to washington and their limit is 10 milligrams or 100 milligrams. there is little to no scientific evidence to support either of these levels. we simply don't know. here's what we do know. is that there have been increases in cannabis related poison center calls, emergency room visits, and impaired driving incidents.
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nationwide exposure in youth is increasing with record numbers of eighth through 12th graders regularly videotaping marijuana products. we need research that reflects the reality of what's on the market. products contained c.b.d. from the hemp plant have become commonplace from health food stores and fast food chains since hemp was removed from the 2018 farm bill. these these products often contain claims they can effectively treat everything from depression and inflammation to cancer or alzheimer's. however none of these claims have been evaluated or approved by the f.d.a. meaning patients may be relying on the unsubstaniated claims of c.b.d. products and foregoing other proven medical treatments. like cannabis, while there is potential for c.b.d. to provide patient benefits, the is far behind the market. last week the majority forced this chamber to vote on the more act which completely removed mare juan why from the list of
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scheduled substances under the controlled substances act, among many other things, they didn't have the data to justify this decision. not only was this legislation incredibly premature, it could put the u.s. in violation of international treaty obligations. any discussion of descheduling must be preceded by a fuller understanding associated with cannabis use which we do not have. the current research restrictions on fully studying cannabis have create add catch-22 in rescheduling debate. evaluations by the f.d.a. and the national academies have both conclude the lack of research is a significant factor in denying previous administrative rescheduling petitions. more research, better data remain the critical first steps to any future policy discussions. making it ease your to research cannabis' common ground, we can all agree on and pursue together. i'd like to thank my colleagues and especially representatives
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harris and blumenauer for working tirelessly to bring us this bipartisan, commonsense legislation. this will improve marijuana research landscape, give consumers the information they need. i urge a yvette on this measure. i reserve the balance of my time. -- i urge a yes vote on this measure. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i'd like to yield three minutes to the prime sponsor of the bill, the gentleman from oregon, but i also want to thank him. he has really been out o front in educating me and in particular so many of us on the cannabis issue. without him we would not see many states like my own moving towards legalization. thafpk you, earl -- thank you, earl. i yield three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. blumenauer: thank you. i appreciate your kind comments and cooperation and working with the ranking member, working with dr. harris. we made real progress here. the cannabis laws in this
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country are broken, especially those that deal with research. it's illegal everywhere in america to drive under the influence of alcohol. cannabis or any other substance. but we do not have a good test for impairment because we can't study it. many dr. harris and i don't necessarily agree on the efficacy of cannabis, but we agree that this is insane. and we need to change it. at a time when there are four million registered medical cannabis patients, and many more who self-medicate, when there are 91% of americans supporting medical cannabis, it's time to change the system. . we have a broad coalition of members and organizations who support the bill, including those who do have concerns about cannabis. specifically, the bill will issues.wo main
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research licensing and manufacturing. for manufacturers, it requires d.e.a. to license outside of nida monopoly so we can study the products that americans are using. it shortens the timelines, reduces unnecessary ecurity measures, and streamlines approval. this bill will not only reduce to medical research but all cannabis research. bill that picks broken ixes one of many cannabis laws. needso longer negates the of legalization, like we did with the more act, but this is question.foundational no matter where you are, there's no reason the federal government critical ede this research. one of the most moving moments in the last two years working on this issue was in the of a constituent in
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southeast portland who brought families half dozen with children with extreme seizure disorder. the only thing that stopped torturedies from being cannabis.l and they had to research it themselves. hey had to formulate it themselves. at oregon state medical niversity, they told me, you know, this works. we know it works. e can go on the street corner and buy something, but we legally can't do it. listening to those heartbreaking stories of the to do.s of what they had they crossed their fingers. for them, but ed no family should have to do that. e ought to get the federal overnment out of the obstacles
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to simple, commonsense research. it will make a huge difference across the country, move forward so there's less nnecessary dispute about cannabis, and get the job done. back.you and i yield the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. it's lden: mr. speaker, to a great privilege recognize the gentleman from maryland, dr. harris, for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. harris: i thank you very much. want to thank you for your concern about addiction nd all the problems and the ancillary problems. thank you for your concern for that. chairman of nk the the committee and the ranking member. this has been years in the making. bringing this across the finish line. i'll tell you, americans with -- nd i want to thank my co-sponsor from across the aisle and the gentleman from oregon is absolutely right. he and i will disagree probably most -- two people can
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disagree with recreational marijuana. 100% agree we need to do this research and need to do this bill. because of the discussion with what -- ey realize vaccines and therapeutics for that. they realize how medical has to be done and how and tant it has to be done they expect efficacy for anything that has a claim to be product. now, unfortunately, because of in public policy we've had place with marijuana and the scheduling, this simply couldn't be done. he unfortunate consequence is that legislatures in general across the state and unfortunately this legislature week took a ready, fire, aim approach. et's go ahead and legalize it even for recreational use basis. a medical
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but i'm only going to talk about medical marijuana. we need good studies. nderstandably because of current scheduling, we can't do it. i get it. i did research it as a physician on drugs. can't do it under the current scheduling. research. do the dr. volkow appeared before our and said many times there are -- that the claims of medical usefulness are simply exaggerated because we don't have the science. many claims are made. proven. are we don't tolerate that for other medications. it ertainly don't tolerate for covid vaccines and therapeutics. for ouldn't tolerate it medical marijuana. hasn't been done for a variety of reasons, most f which gets cured by this bill. now, could medical marijuana be used for ptsd for my fellow veterans? absolutely, it might be useful. we have no idea. instead e have done is
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the public press has said, it's for ptsd. that's not the way we treat medicine in this country. research.y do the our veterans deserve for us to do the research. couldn't be done because of the scheduling. rules. of the the rules, by the way, that congress made. us.know, this is on we shouldn't have taken so long to get to this point. ould it be useful for nonnerogenic chronic pain? i don't know. the last thing we need to do for as chronic pain patients, you know treating chronic pain, about the false claims. if this works, great. this is a solution for part of problem.tion if this doesn't work, those people deserve to know. look, it's useful. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. walden: i yield another minute to the gentleman from maryland. much.rris: thank you very look, is it useful for that those people or
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with seizures? sure. people with for glaucoma and m.s.? yeah. or 50 claims we don't know about. claims aren't founded on science. look, let's do the science. let's see what medical marijuana for.eful as a physician, anything is want to provide for patients. let's do the science. h.r. 3797. back.d the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i yield three minutes now to one of our olleagues on the committee, mrs. dingell from michigan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from michigan is recognized. mrs. dingell: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. chairman. rise in strong support of the medical marijuana research act, hich would streamline outdated
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bureaucratic barriers and federal roadblocks preventing intoimate medical research the impacts of medical marijuana. colleague, ike my thank you for your leadership. lost a healthy -- i sister to drug overdose. here's too much information we do not have. we have seen dramatic changes in at legal status of marijuana the state level. almost one year ago today, sales recreational marijuana began in my home state of michigan. successful ltiple state ballot initiatives last onth, medical marijuana is now legal in 36 states. framework e federal for conducting marijuana esearch is-decades-old and has not -- is decades old and has ot kept pace with these changes. scientists in the united states, looking to conduct research on must contend with a
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heavy-handed, duplicative and licensure process that doesn't work. they're limited to using grown at a single ocation, overseen by the national institutes on drug buse at the university of mississippi. collectively, this regulatory red tape greatly limits our understanding of the health of marijuana and prevents qualified researchers in further study. we're drivingknow cars -- nhtsa can't do the to do while need people are driving. we should know that. medical marijuana research should would streamline this process.e it will direct the f.d.a. to guidelines on the production of marijuana and ensure that adequate amounts are
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for research. the legislation also mandates a of the nsive review available body of research on arijuana by the secretary of h.h.s. five years after enactment. want to thank my colleagues, congressman blumenauer, griffith, lofgren, harris, and bishop for all their work on this. this does matter. we need answers. nd i want to thank my chairman who's been great about this, and i still -- i refuse to accept our ranking member walden is leaving. he's a dear friend, and he's difference. of a he's had very thoughtful input, as he does on everything on this. mr. speaker, it's high time we modernize our nation's federal to facilitate legitimate medical research into and i acts of marijuana, urge my colleagues to support this legislation. back.yield the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. well, thank you, mr.
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speaker. i thank the gentlelady. i yield myself such time as i may consume. from k the gentlelady michigan for her kind comments and her leadership on this legislation. before i w yield -- do, can i inquire as to how much time remains on each side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon has 11 1/2 minutes. r. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd now yield as much time as he may consume to an extraordinary leader on the energy and committee, the gentleman from virginia, the gentleman i refer to as our counsel on the committee. an extraordinary lawyer and incredible public policy mr. ator, and that is morgan griffith for such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. griffith: thank you very much, mr. speaker. thank you, ranking member, exile walden. thank you, chairman pallone. appreciate that this bill has made it to this level. you know, congress doesn't lways work well, but sometimes were s, andy harris and i
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back having a discussion one day. a lot of times things get solved to a head because we're trying to solve problems for the american people. believe that there are many uses for medicinal marijuana. i don't support recreational. support medicinal. andy thinks it goes way too far, say.u heard him just but the bottom line is we were discussing it. cite r one of us could scientific research to support positions.ans -- our so we agreed we would work on our side of the aisle and obviously the gentleman from this fors been leading many, many years. he was going to lead on the other side. we agreed, we tried to find worked. that we have tried some back door outes to get it through some energy and commerce bills before. schedule 1-r to do research. important. extremely and you can either for medicinal against medicinal marijuana, but you can't make an the ent either way without
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proper research. this fine piece of legislation over a hammered out couple of years, maybe more, maybe as many as five years, is good piece of legislation and it deserves the unanimous of this united states house. and i recommend it to each and you. one of i'd like to take another minute to speak about my relationship ranking member walden who is leaving us. it is with regret on my part that he's leaving. a life to lead. that's what people forget about members of congress. life after congress. he's going to do some interesting things. i'm anxious to learn what they are. says he's anxious to learn what they are, too, but he and he's ledalent, our committee and our side of he aisle on the committee so well and has allowed those of us who are a little different ometimes to have some
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interesting ideas, to have those ideas bubble up, to take some in resting votes sometimes committee, be to allow members -- to allow members down dais to have significant input. i'm appreciative of that. of his eciative friendship and loyalty. i remember when we discovered balm ng time friend ray had a fatal disease and how he tuck with him and how ray kept coming to work and was doing things all the way through and how he passed an important piece f legislation which commemorated all of ray's work. ray's w, the bill has name on it, as it should, but it was a tribute from his friend i respect that type of friendship and i appreciate it very much and i will always hold in high regard. if i can do anything to be of assistance in the future, i will gladly do so. with that i yield back. mr. walden: mr. speaker, i just want to thank my friend and colleague from virginia for both very kind comments but also
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his incredible work ethic. know anybody -- i'll tell one quick story about griffith. i had a little bill, suspension bill that mr. blumenauer and i do a land exchange up in mount hood and it came through through here one night first night of votes and dissending -- dissenting vote. i said i am going to win this. it's only two noes. why did you vote no? he said, well, i read the bill and it referenced this understanding between the forest service and mount hood meadows about this land exchange and i tried to get a copy of that m.o.u. and i couldn't get it before i voted no.he bill so i voted the bill didn't get through that congress. it got through the house but, of other body.the the next congress we did it again and i made sure mr. riffith had that memorandum of understanding related to this little land transfer bill in a district that -- an area that and i shared and
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he voted with us on that measure. good , he's a pretty darn thorough legislator if he's reading through every land transfer bill and diving into weeds. americans need to know what a great man he is. with that i'd recognize the georgia, again, mr. carter, for such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. . mr. carter: mr. chairman, i rise in support, in support of the medical marijuana research act. cannabis has been known by humans for thousands of years yet we still don't truly nancy pelosi know if it's beneficial. some preliminary findings have given cause to believe that there may be some medicinal benefits. in fact the f.d.a. has authorized use of medical grade c.b.d. products for rare forms of epilepsy. but large-scale research has not occurred. despite this even more than half of the states have legalized cannabis for medical purposes. even georgia, my home state, has acted to extend cannabis laws.
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as the real status of cannabis evolves, we must prioritize making the plant available for medicinal research. in 2017, the national academy of medicine found that there are several challenges and barriers in conducting cannabis research including the classification of cannabis as a schedule 12 substance. and the -- schedule 1 substance, and the difficulty for researchers to gain access to the quality and quantity of product necessary for research. i do not believe that the federal government should be standing by in the way of medical research for cannabis products. cannabis could be a lifesaving product. it may also not be but we owe it to the patients to do the due diligence, research, and testing so they may make the best medical decisions for themselves. while we may all have differing opinions on the decriminalization of recreational marijuana, and my stance on that is well-known and
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well documented that i am adamantly opposed to the recreational use of marijuana, i think we can all agree that we should facilitate better research on the plant's medicinal benefits. i'm glad to see this legislation come to the floor of the house for a vote. i thank my colleague, mr. blumenauer, for working on this legislation with me. i urge passage of this legislation. mr. chairman, before i leave, i want to pay homage, if you will, to mr. walden who will be leaving, as you have heard other speakers indicate before. i came on this committee four years ago. onlyted to be -- being the pharmacist in congress i wanted to be in the health subcommittee and work in that arena. that's where energy and demers was -- commerce was. i have to be honest with you i didn't understand just what a great committee, the best committee in congress, energy
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and commerce is. i understand that now. i want to thank greg walden. when i came in four years ago he was the chairman of this committee. he was very encouraging to me. in fact, he was my mentor on this committee. and he led me and gave me opportunities. i appreciate that very, very much. his diversity, his intelligence, his fairness has been outstanding. his leadership has been outstanding it's only surpassed by his impeccable character. as he leaves, i want him to know how much i personally am appreciative of all of your help and of all of your leadership. our committee, our congress, our country is better off because of your work. thank you. godspeed. i yield back. mr. chairman. the speaker pro tempore: -- mr. walden: mr. chairman, i yield myself such time as i may consume. i want to manage my dear friend and colleague from georgia, mr. carter, for his leadership on so many issues before the committee and for his very kind and begun russ words.
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i will miss serving with you, mr. carter. you have been a terrific member of the committee. you, too, have a great future ahead. mr. speaker, i don't believe my friend from new jersey has any other speakers so i'll go ahead and yield such time as he may consume to the -- i should call you deputy mayor of washington, d.c., because that's what you are when you are the ranking member of the house administration committee. he has been a passionate advocate on the next bill, but because of a meeting he has coming up i'm going to yield to him now so he can make that scheduled appointment to talk about this bill and that one, mr. davis of illinois, for such time he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you my colleague, ranking member of the energy and commerce committee. do i support the bill we are talking about. been a long time supporter of medical marijuana use. i certainly believe that the bipartisan legislation that's being put forward today is a great idea. it's also great to follow my favorite legalized drug dealer here at the dais, buddy carter.
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the only pharmacist in congress. this is a guy who says a lot of things about greg walden, all of them are true. i'll get to that. i am here to thank my good friend, donald payne jr. for allowing me to co-sponsor a bill that's very personal to me and that's the removing barriers to colorectal cancer screening act of 2019. as some of you may know, my wife was diagnosed with early onset colon cancer in 1999. she was 26 years old and she's a 21-year cancer survivor today. it's a genetic form of cancer, lynch syndrome, that i hope and pray families like mine and many others don't have to continue to fight. but it's imperative we catch cancer in early stages. i can speak with experience with my wife constantly being misdiagnosed just a few short years ago. that's what this legislation does for our medicare population. put simply, this legislation ensures that if a medicare beneficiary receives a colonoscopy, covered by
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medicare, he or she won't be build for any subsequent tests on polyps that may be discovered during the screening. the current policy of providing colonoscopies at no cost to beneficiaries but billing them or potential findings, greatly disincentivizes vulnerable individuals from actually seeking the screening process. that could lead to worse cancer. possibly death. this is a commonsense fix that will save lives. i'm proud to co-lead it again with my good friend, mr. payne, and this is bipartisan. before i close, i want to take a moment to thank the countless advocates who have visited my office to fight for increased screening, including those with fight colorectal cancer mearn cancer society. today's vote stands as a testament to your advocacy and hard work. i thank again chairman pallone, ranking member walden, everyone often the energy and commerce committee, ways and means committee, for working with us to move this legislation forward.
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i urge my colleagues to vote yes. and now i do want to take some time, it's actually ironic to watch all of the well wishes to greg walden. after first meeting him on an airplane that happened to land at the wrong airport, didn't have a lot of high hopes for you, mr. ranking member. who lands at the wrong airport except an airplane that greg walden's on? unlike a lot of folks here touting what you have done, i say good riddance, it's about time. in all seriousness, my friend, this place is going to miss you. this place will miss your humor. this place will miss your leadership and your tenacity. i can't tell you how proud i am to not just call you my colleague but friend. thank you for everything you have done for me and this great institution. it is a better place because you served here and it will not be as good a place without you here. i yield back. mr. walden: mr. speaker, i don't believe we have any other speakers. i want to thank my friend from
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illinois for his generous comments and his great leadership. wish him well in the future. with that i urge passage of the underlying bill. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that -- consent to include in the record an exchange of letters between the chairman of the committee on nerg an commerce and the chairman of the committee on judiciary on this bill h.r. 3797. with that i ask support to pass this legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3797, as amended. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. thirds third, the rules are suspended, the -- 2/3 of those
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voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is thravenlt -- is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1570, the removing barriers to coalo representative-elect tal screening act -- colorectal cancer screening act of 2020. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the bill. the clerk: a bill to amend title 18 of the social security act to waive co-insurance under medicare for colorectal screening tests, regardless of whether therapeutic intervention is required during the screening. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from organize oon, mr. walden, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and include remarks extraneous material on h.r. 1570. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may
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consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 1570, the removing barriers to colorectal cancer screening act of 2020. this bill eliminates out-of-pocket costs for colorectal cancer screening tests under medicare even in situations when a polyp is detected and removed. colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men and women combined in the united states. the american cancer society predicts that more than 53,000 americans will die from the disease this year. this is clearly a tragedy. especially because these deaths are so preventable. approximately 90% of all individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer at an early stage are still alive five years later. research shows that out-of-pocket costs discourage individuals from seeking out preventive screenings that could save their lives. under current law, medicare waives co-insurance and
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deductibles for colonoscopies, when a polyp is discovered and removed during the procedure, it is then reclassified as therapeutic for medicare billing purposes pane patients are required to pay the co-insurance. this simply is not right. patients should not be saddled with hundreds of dollars in medical bills that they justifiably thought would be covered by medicare as part of a preventive service. h.r. 1570 provides a commonsense fix to this oversight. the bill would ensure that colonoscopies, whether they are diagnostic or therapeutic, are treated equally at the billing stage so all cost sharing is waived under medicare. by removing the financial burden associated with this procedure, medicare beneficiaries may seek care for colorectal cancer without the added deterrence of surprise bills. in addition, h.r. 1570 incorporates a policy that requires all part b drug manufacturers to report average sale price data to the medicare frame and provides the secretary
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with new authority to verify this data. under current law only manufacturers with medicaid drug rebate agreements are required to report average sales price data. in the absence of such data, the medicare program ends up paying more. this legislation ensures that the government is paying the right price for part b drugs, saving taxpayers billions and allowing great traps around drug pricing. i want to thank representative donald payne from my state. he's been working on this bill for so many years. of course it came out of the passing of his dad from colorectal cancer. i remember his dad so fondly. i also want to thank representatives davis, mceachin, and mckinley for their hard work on this important piece of legislation. i want to thank representative doget on his work for the drug pricing policy included today and urge my colleagues to support h.r. 1570. i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 1570, the removing barriers to colorectal screening act of 2019. this is really important legislation as you have heard. it's received strong bipartisan support from literally hundreds of our o colleagues, including myself. it was a key provision of a bill i actually introduced last year, h.r. 19 the lower cost more cures act of 2019, which had a lot of bipartisan solutions to lower drug prices without hindering the development of new therapeutics or cures. so i'm happy to see the house take this action on this critical component of that other legislation. this bill would address an oversight in medicare that requires beneficiaries to cover the cost of an unexpected polyp removal when provided a free screening colonoscopy. these surprise medical bills as i call them create financial barriers for patients, access to
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these lifesaving screenings which can save thousands, thousands of lives a year. the united states colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths, mr. speaker. screenings are the most effective way to detect and treat this devastating disease early on, and efforts must be made to ensure individuals have access to these important services. by removing these financial barriers for patients, this bill would enhance screening efforts and ultimately save lives. the bill is offset with another policy from h.r. 19 that would require pharmaceutical companies report their caverager average sales price, a.s.p. of the right now certain companies are exploiting a loophole in the current law where they are not reporting their a.s.p. and drawing down higher reimbursement rates from medicare as a result. well, this creates an unfair advantage with competitors who are doing the right thing as the statute intended and reporting their data. aim glad this package includes these two provisions of h.r. 19. further adding to the number of provisions from this bill that i
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hope are enacted into law during this remainder of this congress. . i am disappointed congress has that it wouldbill end surprise billing for all americans. worked closely i on this legislation. we have a bipartisan bill. it is ready to go. we could pass it into law before the end of the year and put an end to surprise billing for all those with ot just unexpected polyp removal. o i urge congress to take further swift action to do what the american people want us to do. let's end surprise billing once everyone.l for i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i thank you, mr. speaker. time as he may consume to my colleague from new jersey, the sponsor of this bill hard on this, o mr. payne. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. payne: thank you, mr.
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speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to iscuss my bill, the removing barriers to colorectal cancer screening act. long time coming. want to thank my friend and colleague, congressman frank pallone, the hairman of the energy and commerce committee. as chairman of the house committee, his leadership was getting my bill to the floor today. i have been working on this bill my arrival to the united representatives. unfortunately, colorectal cancer that i'm a member of this body. in addition, i want to thank my co-leads on the bill, as you earlier, congressman
quote
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rodney davis, and my colleague virginia, who has been instrumental in moving this bill forward, donald mceachin of virginia. he incredible job to promote the bill and increase he awareness of colorectal cancer. i'd like to thank my other congressman david mckinley from west virginia for well.forts as these great representatives importance of this bill, to the health and security of millions of that ans, and know olorectal cancer is a bipartisan -- bipartisan in nature of its negative impact on in this country. olorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in america. cancer and ls lung
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effects -- and it affects both men and women. so it's the second leading cause of death in the united states in cancers. cancers, it is truable, and patients can it's caught early enough. depends on whether americans get screened. and one of the reasons why we today.e my bill would seek to remove one of the barriers to screenings. allow medicare to cover screenings and surgical cancerous to remove screenings.g the today, medicare covers only screenings for eligible patients. if doctors find and remove a ancerous polyp during the screening, patients could wake p to a surprised bill that
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could cost thousands of dollars. succumbing to this dreadful disease, i had my colonoscopy, and at that time, they found 13 polyps. so can you imagine the bill that have potentially awakened to, tens of thousands bills that i did not even know that i had. men refuse to get screened because of the fear of surprise bill. men of the old reasons on't find this procedure very palatable. then, they wait until there's a screened, and potentially that's a decision fatal.uld be so i encourage my colleagues ouse colleagues to vote for
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this bill so we can save thousands of americans' lives annually. been almost nine years father, ost my congressman donald payne jr., to colorectal cancer, and i do not other families go and gh the same horror pain. this i ask that we pass bill. i urge my colleagues to vote yes of the american people. and with that, mr. speaker, i ield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. from oregon. without objection, the gentleman rom texas will now control time. r. burgess: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i served with the gentleman's for nine years and certainly understand the pain was reflected in his voice
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on those remarks. bill.s a commonsense when a practitioner encounters a time tible lesion at the f a screening colonoscopy, the curative procedure should be able to undertake without the -- to be undertaken without the patient waking up with an unintended charge. know, the other thing that rosses my mind as we sit here now hopefully on the downside of he pandemic is how many people have not proceeded with the screening procedure because of a cern about going to facility during the time of the coronavirus. upon ally, it's incumbent us as policymakers to ensure that people do understand the undertaking these screenings and removing any prevent that would someone from having a life -- potentially lifesaving screening
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procedure done. and then just further, mr. could, many people today have reflected on the time who isice of mr. walden, retiring at the end of this congress. great all miss him a deal. and as i've listened to several speakers give testimony to mr. walden's leadership on committee, i just am both ed of so many times, good times and rough times we served together in the majority nd minority for a number of years on the committee on energy and commerce. but the country can look to the last 10-year re-authorization of the state children's health insurance thank mr. walden for those -- for the vision of enacted.hat certainly the support act in the ast congress, starting with a member day in the committee and culminating with the signing ceremony in the white house later.ly 12 months these were some of the
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significant accomplishments of walden, now ranking member walden. e's left a rich legacy in this congress, and we're very much in his debt and will miss him congresses to come. i thank the gentleman for his will yield and i back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the back.man yields the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i'll reserve at this time. i don't have additional reserve. but i'll the speaker pro tempore: the entleman has the only time remaining. mr. burgess: i urge passage and yield back my time. the peaker pro tempore: gentleman from texas has yielded back. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to include in the record an exchange of chairman of en the the committee on energy and commerce and the chairman of the committee on ways and means on bill, h.r. 1570.
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i would ask for -- withoutker pro tempore: objection. mr. pallone: thank you. and i would ask that we support it, legislation and pass and with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the the house will suspend the rules and pass the 1570, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. chair, 2/3ion of the having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. without objection, the title is amended. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move pass pend the rules and h.r. 1966, the henrietta lacks cancer research act of 2019, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the
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clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 1966, a bill to general e comptroller of the united states to complete a study on barriers to participation in federally clinical trials by populations that have been traditionally underrepresented such trials. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, and the gentleman from mr. walden, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and include remarks extraneous material on h.r. 1966. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i of d congressman mfume maryland the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized. very much, hank you mr. speaker. i want to thank the chair of the energy and commerce committee, pallone of new jersey. i appreciate his oversight of his and the way his committee has moved to move us to where we today. mr. pallone and i go way back,
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body some left this time ago i didn't know i would come back and he would be chair of the committee, but i couldn't of a better person. want to, also, say to mr. walden, the ranking member from oregon, that the body obviously you.miss as you heard on both sides of the aisle with the comments that people have e, respected your leadership, the leadership that you have brought committee. both as ranking member and as chair. it's -- and by the way, let me tell you, there is life after congress. found 24 years of it before coming back. you, t of everything to sir. body, let me just, if i might, talk a bit bout a distinguished, in my opinion, woman whose picture is here beside me. name was henrietta lacks.
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he was born 100 years ago in roanoke, virginia. rs. lacks and her husband and her family later moved to in 1941, county seeking, as a lot of people did that wereht were jobs available the further north you moved. they moved in an area known as the old bethlehem steel plant. her family lived not far from me and my family in a enclave known k station. ill.cally, mrs. lacks got in 1951 as a young mother, she complaininghospital of vaginal bleeding. she went to johns hopkins at the of the few was one hospitals that african-americans treated at.and be
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upon examination, gynecologists a large malignant in herrer cervix. during her treatment there, two taken from ms.re lacks and from her cervix permission and without her knowledge. healthy tissue. he other sample was cancerous tissue. these samples were given to a hysician and a cancer researcher to study. what he would soon discover was mrs. lacks' cells were nlike any others he had ever seen. where other cells would die, cells doubled every 20 to 24 hours. continued after her death. cancerous rom the
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sample became known eventually heliah immortal cell line. it is the oldest and the most cell line in human scientific research anywhere in the world. t was it was found to be durable and prolific. it allows for use in extended scientific study and this was the first cell line to be successful in in vote roe studies, scientific achievement with profound implications for the future and profound benefits to medical research. he-la cells can divide an unlimited number of times in the laboratory cell culture plate as long as fundamental cell survival conditions are met and sustained.
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there are, as we have come to know over time, many strains of he-la cells as they continue to mutate in other cell cultures. ut all he-la cells are descended from the same tumor cells once removed from mrs. lacks. the total number of cells propagated far exceeds the number of cells that were in her body. today these incredible cells are used to study the effects of toxins, drugs, hormone, and viruses on the growth of cancer cells without having to experiment on humans while that's being done. they have been used to test the effects of a number of different things, radiation, poisons and to study the human gee noem and to learn more about how all viruses ultimately work. they have played a crucial role in the development of the polio
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vaccine. jonas salk was so close to getting what he thought was an effective vaccine, dr. salk tested the vaccine against the cells and the cells directed him to make the vaccine even more potent. the n.i.h. analyzed and evaluated scientific literature over the course of time involving he-la cells and found at over 110,000 publications cited the use of those cells from 1953 to 2018. so this analysis, i think, further highlights the persistent impact of hela cell -science and medicine, proving that they have been a consistent and essential tool that has allowed researchers to expand their knowledge base in fields such as cancer biology, infectious disease and many, many other areas. there's so much to be said about
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ms. lacks, who died in that same black, poor enclave many, many years ago. but to her credit and to the credit of all science, her living clearly was not in vain and her death has proven something that nobody ever anticipated at the time, that there could even be such a cell that would continue to develop and mutate long beyond the donor's ability to live. i want to reserve, if i might, the balance of my time, i don't know if the gentleman from oregon at this time wants to be recognized. i reserve whatever time we have left on this side. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from maryland will reserve, will control the remained or the time for the majority. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i want to thank the gentleman from maryland for bringing us this legislation and for his very kind comments about my
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service and the future that lies ahead of me, perhaps. i appreciate his leadership and his kind words. i too rise today to speak on r. 1966, the henrietta lacks enhancing cancer research act of 2019, which was sponsored by the late, great representative elijah cummings, originally. this bill is named after henrietta lacks, who donated her cells without her knowledge or consent, beginning what was the first human cell line able to reproduce indefinitely. her cells have been used for biomedical research around the world. this bill requires g.a.o. to study how there have been barriers to participation in clinical trials to individual underrepresented in clinical
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trials. the fwell of the bill is laudable, i know it's been an issue 9/11 covid trials, that is real issue they face trying to get the right mix to reflect the community and make sure that everyone who takes the various drugs and vaccines are represented in these trials. it's a concern because people of different ages, different races, different ethnicities, simply may react differently to medical treatments. so we have to get this right. i appreciate my friend from maryland for bringing this legislation to the floor and of course paying homage to representative cummings for his initial leadership on this as well. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from maryland is recognize. mr. mfume: thank you, mr. speakerism yield for five minutes, to the gentleman from maryland, mr. ruppersberger of the appropriations committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. ruppersberger: i rise in support of h.r. 1966 and thank you for yielding. i co-led this bill when it was first introduced by our late friend elijah cummings in honor of the life and legacy of a baltimore native, henrietta lacks. though congressman cummings has passed on and is missed, i'm glad that congressman mfume has picked up this legislation. without her knowledge or permission, doctors used cells from henrietta lacks for research that led to throughs like the vaccine for polio and treatments for aids and parkinsons. i can think of only a handful of americans who contributed more to modern medicine than
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henrietta lacks. her cells will continue to enhance cures for debilitating diseases for years to come. yet many communs still face glaring health disparities. while cancer incidence rates are highest among non-hispanic white females, non-hispanic black females have the highest rate of deaths. clinical trials are a key component to advancing cancer research and treatment. 20% of cancer clinical trials fail because of a lack of patient enrollment, with racial and ethnic minorities and older, rural, an lower income americans generally unrepresented in such trials. this bill examines access to government-funded cancer clinical trials for traditionally unrepresented groups. but it's also about much more. it's about giving credit where credit has been long overdue. it's about ensuring all
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americans get the medical treatments they deserve. and it's about ensuring clinical trials succeed because they are inclusive. i urge all my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. mr. walden: it is my great privilege to recognize the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. hern, for such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. hern: i rise in support of h.r. 1966. this legislation was brought to my attention by a constituentment -- constituent, carla, who is fighting cancer. we talked about the way clinical trials work with cancer. the trials rarely represent the population of cancer patients. when women and minorities are underrepresented it impacts results.
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about one in five trials fail because of lack of participation. this bill studies barriers to participation for underrepresented groups. we need to find ways to reduce those barriers and enroll more patients from diverse backgrounds. my niece, jennifer, is 3 years ld and is fighting stage 4 neuroblastoma. juniper is a fighter and she has so many people who love and are praying for her. bills like this help jennifer and carla and millions of cancer patients around the world. every step forward in cancer research is important. every pit of -- every bit of progress gets us closer to a better world. i urge my colleagues to vote in support of h.r. 1966 today. thank you and i yield back my ime. mr. walden: we have no further speakers on our side.
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i encourage members to support this important legislation an yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon reserves. the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. mfume: might i inquire how much time remains on this side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 10 1/2 minutes. mr. mfume: thank you, mr. speaker. my thanks again to the gentleman from oregon and others who have spoken on behalf of this including congressman ruppersberger who has been, as he indicated, a part of this effort for a while. and that while goes all the way back to the other reason that i'm here today. and that is my friend of 42 years and a member of this body for 23 years, the late elijah cummings, who originally introduced this bill before his death and a commitment that i made to him and to others long ago that working outside of the congress i would be supportive of him but now that i am inside i wanted to make sure that i got
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unanimous consent from this body, as i did a month or so back, to be able to assume the leadership of this bill, its sponsorship, and to move it forward. we have been doing all that we could to get to this point. again, i would be remiss if i didn't thank mr. pallone and mr. walden for their efforts. let me, if i might, just say a couple of things, mr. speaker. it's been long recognized that the burden of cancer is not equal and not equivalent among different racial and ethnic groups in our society. in fact, there is a four-fold increase or disparity in the number of black people diagnosed ith cancer -- and people participating in clinical trials. the gentleman from oregon mentioned how sensitive this is right now as we are trying to work with drug companies to come
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up with a number of vaccines and whether it was the pfizer or moderna trial, one thing is career, there never seems to be enough persons of ethnic backgrounds, particularly african-americans and latinos, who are participating in these trials. to underscore this more, let me remind you that 20% of all -- 20% of alzheimer's patients in this country are african-american but only 3% to 10% are trial participant -clinical trials. and i said covid is a disease with a roughly two-fold higher rate of diagnosis an mortality between african-americans and other populations, so all of that in the aggregate really stresses the need for a more diverse research participatory effort in order to fully understand, comprehensively deal with, and cure these diseases. clinical trials are an essential
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step in advancing potential new cancer treatments. we know that patient participation in those trials is absolutely crucial to their success. now, many patients will express a willingness to participate in clinical research yet only a small fraction of those persons do actually do that. in terms of the larger african-american community, some of the barriers that have existed continue to exist. so people can't take time off from their job to participate and be studied at a clinical trial or more importantly, there is this level of distrust and the distrust, particularly among african-americans, goes back to 1932, when our government, through the united states public health service, oversaw and gave authorization for what was come to be known as the infamous tuskegee study where 600 black
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men without their knowledge, without their approval or consent, were injected with syphilis. and told that they were being treated for something altogether different. those 600 men lived and watched their bodies change, many of them may have reinfected others, they suffered a great deal of pain and nowhere during that time did the government step in and say, stop it. that tuskegee study, which many of us who grew up hearing about, is something that lurks in the minds of a lot of african-americans about why you can't trust the government on research when it comes to your body and the shame that went with that ought to be a collective shame that all of us in this country feel. we're beyond 1932. people are still getting ill. there are all sorts of infectious diseases. we need vaccines. we've got to find a way now to participate in that process and to find a way to get beyond the
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things that hold us back. but in this instance, i just though it was important to mention why that reluctance tends to exist. so racial and ethnic groups and older americans an rural americans an poor americans are all the groups that still remain underrepresented in cancer clinical trials and without action, these groups will continue to face barriers in terms of enrollment in cancer and other clinical trials which then deprive many americans from access to effective treatments and effective interventions. . with the story, the life and the lesson of henrietta lacks who at an early age, a mother seeking ho came north employment, who developed an treated and got
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who, without her knowledge or onsent, had cells taken out of her body that were not cancerous, in addition to the to erous cells, only miraculously find there was omething very, very special about ms. lacks and her biological makeup. mutate hat continued to and to mutate and to double long fter it was taken from her body, long after her death, and 110,000 has created studies about this miraculous has been ll hela, and he basis of research, nobel-winning award research in the years that followed. for thanks to all of you participating and for understanding the passion that that elijah on this, drives me on this. i want to thank the lacks henrietta lacks foundation. i want to thank the american cancer society.
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institute of minority health and health disparities, research america, and all the other organizations continue to fight to bring about some sort of balance and of ty in the whole issue research and clinical trials. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: both gentlemen have yielded. question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 1966, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the rules are , the suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i move o suspend the rules and pass h.r. 7898, to amend title 30 of he public health services act to provide for a technical correction to provide the
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inspector of the department of and human services certain authorities with respect to investigations of information blocking, and for other purposes. as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the title of report the the bill. the clerk: h.r. 7898, a bill to amend title 30 of the public services act to provide for a technical correction to provide the inspector general of and epartment of health human services certain authorities with respect to nvestigations of information blocking, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the jersey, mr. m new pallone, and the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, will each minutes.0 the chair recognizes the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and include remarks h.r. eous material on 7898. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. pallone: and mr. speaker, i ield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. speaker, in mr. 2016, the energy and commerce
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ommittee led the charge in passing the 21st century cures act in addition to investing cutting edge research and opioid abuse prevention and treatment. cures act also included several provisions related to improving the interoperability health information technology. of ifically, the act information blocking. it also provided the health and services, office of the inspector general, o.i.g., to penalties for those ngaging in information blocking. examples could include a eveloper placing unnecessary restrictions on authorized exchanges of information. another example would be when a implements their electronic health record, e.h.r. technology, in such a way it becomes incredibly difficult to exchange a patient's health information by that stem not owned developer. practices like these simply
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tand in the way of patients accessing their own data and carrying their data with them as hey move between plans and providers. so i'm pleased that the office of the national coordinator for technology, ation o.n.c., and o.i.g., have worked since the passage of the cures implement these important policies. the bill before us today, h.r. provide for a technical correction to the cures act to ensure that the the authority they fully need to enforce the blocking n prohibitions. h.r. 7898 also includes another i.t.-related policy that was part of a bipartisan, bicameral health agreement the energy and commerce committee and the enate health committee last december. this policy incentivizes health are entities to adopt strong cybersecurity practices by encouraging the secretary of entities' onsider adoption of recognized
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cybersecurity practices when audits or administering hipaa fines. a erattacks are increasingly major concern for health care providers. it's important that we acknowledge those providers that are acting in good faith and doing everything in their power data.eguard patient in this provision, it encourages providers to follow widely best practices, i should say best practices in the field, with the goal of helping providers be better prepared for potential cybersecurity attacks. hese are both commonsense policies, and i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting them, and i reserve time.lance of my the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey reserves. the gentleman from oregon is recognized. much,alden: thank you very mr. speaker. i'd yield myself such time as i may consume. rise today in support of h.r. 7898, a technical corrections bill introduced by dr. burgess. 21st century cures act had a major provision led by dr. urgess regarding information blocking. this is a process where a health care provider or electronic
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ealth record vendor will not move a patient's data between are settings or erect significant technological or significant financial barriers to do so. cures act was y significant in that it banned the practice of information blocking. key patient protection in an effort in transforming our health care system. the patient's access and control over personal health information should be at the center of their high-qualitycuring and patient-driven care. energy and commerce committee patients,this win for and today we need to make a minor but very important ensure l correction to our policy is enforced. .r. 7898 would clarify the authority the department of health and human services inspector general regarding to make on blocking crystal clear that the i.g. has the authority to enforce this go after bad actors, and to protect patient access to personal health data. speaker, i'd yield two minutes to the author dr. burgess, ion,
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our ranking member, top member n the republican side on the health subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i thank the the recognition. do rise in support of h.r. 7898. once again, to clarify the nforcement and investigative authorities of the inspector general at the department of health and human services with record to health information blocking. stated, as been congress passed the bipartisan 21st century cures act with the oal of closing the gap between the innovation in our nation's regulatory process. hroughout the drafting of cures, i made it a priority to address important health technology issues, including interoperability, and information n of blocking. i'm a physician but i'm also a acutely aware m of the frustrations surrounded the difficulty of a patient
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medical records. patients should control their own medical data. et, if a patient and their doctor have difficulty in accessing electronic health may ds, the patient's care suffer. in the cures bill, congress provided the tools necessary for and patients to better coordinate their care through data.aring of patient the office of national coordinator for health information technology promulgated a rule that outlines what is permissible. his rule, which was finalized this past may, aims to allow patients to seamlessly access heir electronic health information. this bill, h.r. 7898, is needed there isto ensure that a smooth and effective mplementation and to allow for the inspector general at the department of health and human rule.es to enforce this in the context of this coronavirus pandemic, i think we ave all seen the importance of allowing the efficient flow of a patient's medical records so
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hat patients and their doctors can have informed conversations about their care plans. of importance is ensuring patient privacy in ensuring it's is ected and information secure. h.r. 7898 builds on the sections 21st century cures act and encourages health care to adopt strong cybersecurity practices which are essential in protecting data from bad actors. the alden: i yield gentleman another minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: finally, i'd like bicameral,ut that the bipartisan support of h.r. 7898, which was included in title 5 of lower health care cost passage in the senate. chambers and oth both parties coming to an agreement. it 's a positive sign and certainly independeicates the importance of this legislation. it's for these reasons i members to vote in favor of 7898 and, again, i want
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the ranking member for his years of friendship and service to the committee. i'll yield back the balance of time. mr. walden: i thank the gentleman and i reserve the time.ce of my the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. allone: thank you, speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i was hoping i wasn't going to make this statement about greg walden retiring, really didn't want him to retire. i guess i kept hoping he wouldn't or that he'd still be fashion.ome and he will be in some fashion. but i just wanted to thank him years of extraordinary service on the energy and commerce committee, in i want to and particularly thank him for his leadership and friendship over as he served years as the top republican on the committee. those first two years he chaired the committee and the last two years he served as member. our committee has a long and
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proud tradition of and greg has , really been a great partner, particularly over the last year s we faced the unprecedented challenges of covid-19. e've worked very closely over the last 11 months on all of the legislation that was signed into the pandemic. to among those laws was the cares essential provide assistance to the american people, health care workers, businesses, all state and local government, and we've taken some significant steps, but the work continues as to complete another covid-19 relief package in the coming days before we adjourn. to the pandemic this year, we were able to come together over the last four years, thanks to greg's to pass a lot of other substantial bills that actually became law. comprehensive legislation to address the expanding emic by treatment for people fighting and those disorder affected by the opioid crisis.
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we re-authorized the safe water act. we eliminated robe owe calls -- sure eliminating them them. eliminated a lot of and we passed the federal commission for the first time in 28 years. i know the law was important for it was t only because named after ray, but because of greg's longtime love of broadcasting. of course, not everything was bipartisan. he'll probably never forget his chairman. as his first committee markup was already mentioned by some of the other colleagues, the longest markup in the energy and committee's history. 27 hours as we debated the affordable care act repeal bill. and that was really baptism by fire. day, i'm goinghe to remember greg most for the ommitment he made day in and day out to help everyday americans. he's really special. know, a lot of people have a bad opinion of congress.
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for think we come here self-agrandizement because we somehow get a better job after we leave -- not that there s one -- or we're trying to help our families or we're trying to help special interests. the one thing i will say about that is true. e has a strong dose of humility, and humility is something that i would say oftentimes is lacking, not just congress but in general. sometimes i wonder if people value it as something that they cherish. but certainly greg does. not only humble. he really cares about everyone. nd he's not just out for himself. but i also want to thank his him meline, for sharing with us for all these years. we'll miss greg and we'll miss i wish you so, but nothing but the best in your future endeavors. i've been hearing like different from other members about -- i think earl actually
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old me about some trip you took, you know, in the mountains in oregon or whatever. and everybody is sort of secret these different things that he's doing. i suspect that they're going to endeavors that will really he about themhen i hear will be fantastic. so i just want to -- i just -- i don't know. just feel bad about making this speech about his leaving. the way it is. and i'm going to miss him. thanks, again. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman is recognized. mr. walden: thank you very much, mr. speaker. to my friends in this assembly, thank you for your friendship. to the chairman of the committee, we have developed a wonderful relationship. sometimes we spar and your staff and our staff -- but we're a family. and families do disagree from time to time but generally speaking we're headed in the
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same direction that direction is making america a better place for everyone. solving problems. so i'm very thankful for your very generous, kind comments, mr. chairman. and mr. speaker. i would just say it's been a real delight an joy to work with the chairman of the energy and commerce committee. i would have to admit it was a more delight and joy to work with the ranking member when i was chairman but that's the way of the world and that's democracy. we switched roles and handed a you have the gavel in peace and we began to approach issues from a different angle but with the same mission. mr. speaker, as 2020 comes to a thankful close, i think we're all ready to get it behind us, so does my 22 years of public service in this incredible crucible of democracy, the united states house of representatives. i want to start by thanking my wife of 38 years and our son who is 30, melene and anthony have
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always supported me -- supported of n my three decades service. i know my colleagues will understand this when i say i'll never fully understand all that they've sacrificed so i could fulfill my duty in office but i do know it was a lot. i also want to thank my terrific staff over the years and especially those who helped me build and lead such successful organizations, including my two personal office chiefs of staff, over 22 years, brian mcdonald and larissa bounds, terrific leaders both my executive directors at the nrcc when i ran the republican campaign organization, liesl hickey and rob symms my staff directors at the energy and commerce committee. you've heard of the late ray bauming, my colleague dating back to the clear -- dating clear back to the 1980's in the oregon legislature until just a couple of years ago when he passed away of cancer.
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mike blomqust and ryan long also did terrific work heading up the best committee in congress. i want to thank the professional staff, many of whom have been on the floor today my personal staff in oregon and washington, d.c., we rely so much on these very smart, talented people. and the country is well-served by their work. i want to thank the thousands of volunteers and supporters of my campaigns over the years. we did it together. and i'd like to believe we did it for the right reasons. to leave our state, and to leave our country, better places than we found them. i also want to thank some important mentors in my life, and of course i'd have to start with my parents who grew up with nothing during the great depression. and they taught me the importance of giving back to the community, working hard, of always being honest and seldom being judgmental. i want to thank those along the way who gave me some interesting career opportunities. my freshman year in college was spent at the university of
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alaska-fairbanks and i want to thank the folks at ktvf and mighty nighty who put a 17-year-old kid in charge of producing and directing the 11:00 tv news. i had never been in a tv studio before and suddenly as a freshman in college i was doing that every night. i learned so much from each of you and to oregon -- former oregon speaker larry campbell, time and again you showed oregon how principled leadership produced real results. it was great sport serving alongside you as majority leader of the oregon house. toicht thank the church and school and scout leaders who influenced my life in such a way. i'd give a shout out to the late earle fowler, my late high school principal, whose counsel when i was student body president in 1973-1974 was as valuable then as it is now.
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i remember one of the thing he is told us as student leaders, he said, when there's a leadership vacuum, fill it. he expected us to step up, lead and take on challenges. i'm indeed thankful for the opportunity the people of oregon have given me to represent them in the united states house of representatives. it is a responsibility i have always taken seriously and i thankfully tried to do my best to represent them. after all this is their office, not mine. i was simply entrusted to use the powers bestowed upon it for their benefit. something i never forgot. it's part of why i've returned home nearly every weekend and will soon, whenever we wrap up 644th s here, completely round trip back home. my team and i put special emphasis on taking care of the men and women who wear or have worn our uniform in this job. our nation's uniform and defended america's tree dom. we helped thousands of oregon
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veterans and their families get the been fits they earned and deserved. veterans o wope clinics throughout the community, we helped save the veterans community in white city. america is blessed to have these brave men and women who risked their lives so we can enjoy our lives in peace. america owes them a debt we can never fully repay. having grown out -- grown up in cherry orchard in oregon, i always had great respect for those who grow food to feed us. i stood up for their wauther rights, protected their land and ranching way of life and i'm proud of the cooperative mountain protection act and the cooperative approach it envisioned. i supported efforts throughout the district. while we made much progress, my one regret is we could never find the key to unlocking a durable and fair solution to the
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water crisis in the clamuth basin that could also pass in congress. i'm disappointed congress has dragged its feet in enacting much-needed reforms to make our forests healthier and more resilient to climate change. 17 years ago lasthealthy forest into law. pefully next congress you'll eed the advice of our yale graduate, mr. westerman, before it all goes up in smoke. i'm proud of the bipartisan work we did together to open up spectrum for advanced communications, enact firstnet, our first responders knew -- new interoperable broadband network and expand access to high speed interinternet though much work still remains to fully connect all americans to high speed
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broadband. with the ray bonds act, we modernized the f.c.c. and that hadn't been done in a couple of decades. i had the great privilege and honor to chair the energy and commerce committee, we took on the deadly epidemic of drug overdose and combined more than 0 bipartisan pieces of legislation into the support act which while focus thond eopioid crisis actually was much bigger than that and provided support for our communities to help all with addiction. we modernized our mental health law, stepped up medical research and fully funded the children's health insurance program for a decade, something never done before. we modernized the f.d.a. and its approval processes for medicines and medical devices and thank good -- and thank goodness we did. some of these changes have already proved their value in this pandemic. i am proud to have done my part to enact medicare part d which brought more affordable medicines to america's seniors. while we need to update this law it is a fact that medicare part
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d has been a godsend to seniors who no longer have to board buses to foreign countries to get life-saving medicines. we unleashed a cleaner -- clean air revolution in america that produced thousands of new jobs and reduced emissions. we hold the opportunity for a strong economy and healthier environment. mr. speaker, as you can tell i'm passionate about good public policy. i have really enjoyed this opportunity in serving with all of you. i think we can use our resources we have among ourselves -congress to get good things done for the american people. it wasn't easy to decide to voluntarily leave this wonderful institution but i'd long ago decided i didn't want to get voted out. i don't think that was going to happen. or carried out. i was confident i'd win re-electioning, my health is good so i leave on my own terms. feeling good about that which i have helped to improve the lives of those who entrusted me, election after election, and i leave feeling positive about the ability to get good policy done right here in the u.s. house of
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representatives. in fact we just worked through a slate of bipartisan bills again today. i'll miss this process. and i'll miss you. my colleagues. always remember how important it is, the work you do here, and how much the fate of american way of life rest -your hands every time you put that voting card in one of these machines. i'm a big fan of theodore roosevelt whose ritings have -- writings have also had an impact on my life just as my high school advisor encouraged us to fill leadership vacuums, so did roosevelt laud those who climbed into the arena. i close with roosevelt's words, it is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs who comes up
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short again and again because there's no effort without error and shortcoming, but who does actually strive to do the deeds. who knows great enthusiasms, great devotions, who spends himself in a worthy cause who has the best nose in the end the triumph of high achievemented on who at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so that his place shall never be with those cold and tim souls who neither know victory nor defeat. god bless you my colleagues, family, and friends and may god bless the united states of america, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i would urge support for passage of the bill and also yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the
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bill h.r. 7898 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. without objection, the title amended. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on december 9, 2020, at 11:54 a.m., that the senate agreed with respect to the death of paul sarbanes, former united states senator for the state of maryland, s.res. 797. that the senate agreed to senate concurrent resolution resolution
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51, that the senate agrees to house resolution 1689, that the senate passed 3325, that the senate passed senate 3729, that the senate passed senate 4128, that the senate passed senate 4460, that the senate passed with an amendment h.r. 5663. with best wished, i am, sincerely, cheryl johnson, clerk of the house. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 068 rule 20, the fun inish -- unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. delawyer rowe, to suspend the rules and pass -- ms. delauro to suspend the rules and the 35s h.r. 8900 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 8900, a bill making further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2021 and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill.
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members will record their votes by electronic device. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington seek recognition? >> as the member designated by dr. schrier, pursuant to house resolution 965, i inform the house that dr. schrier will vote yes on h.r. 8900.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? mr. jeffries: as the member chairwoman eddie
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bernice johnson, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the house chairwoman johnson will 8900.ea on h.r. as the member designated by chairwoman zoe lofgren, pursuant i inform the house that chairwoman lofgren 8900.ote yea on h.r. as the member designated by chairman jerry nadler, pursuant i inform the house that chairman nadler will vote yea on h.r. 8900. as the member designated by congressman jose serrano, i informto h.res. 965, the house that congressman serrano will vote yea on h.r. 8900. as the member designated by congressman brendan boyle, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform congressman boyle will vote yea on h.r. 8900.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota rise? -- the gentlewoman from minnesota rise. as the g: mr. speaker, member designated by mr. prz, i inform the -- pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the house that mr. peterson will vote yes on h.r. 8900.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california rise? ms. matsui: mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. desaulnier, pursuant to h.res. i inform the house that mr. esaulnier votes yes on h.r. 8900. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? as the er: mr. speaker, member designated by mr. costa, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the house that mr. costa will 8900.es on h.r. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from kansas rise? ms. davids: mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. kim, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform
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will votethat mr. kim aye on h.r. 8900. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida rise? ms. wasserman schultz: mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. hastings of florida, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the house that mr. yea on h.r. vote 8900. mr. speaker, as the member esignated by ms. mucarsel-powell of florida, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the house that ms.
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also vote well will yea on h.r. 8900. and mr. speaker, as the member new nated by mr. payne of jersey, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the house that mr. payne will also vote yea on h.r. 8900. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. garcia: mr. speaker, as the member designated by mr. illinois, pursuant to h.res. 965, i inform the ouse that mr. schneider will vote yes on h.r. 8900.
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