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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 2, 2019 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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it's happened again. seven people are dead here in texas. and it all came to an end right behind me. >> get down. get down. >> 24 others are wounded in another mass shooting. >> i didn't get to tell her how much i loved her. also tonight, hurricane dorian roars into the bahamas as a monster category 5 hurricane. will it be catastrophic for the u.s.? >> we're not in the worst of it. general james mattis speaks out on his resignation and president trump. >> i was honest and forthright with him about where it was parting ways. an ancient forest in california is getting a modern upgrade for the masses.
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as the temperatures goes up, the guards are going down. ♪ this is "the cbs overnight news." >> good evening. i'm david begnaud, reporting from odessa, texas. this is the site of the 38th mass killing this year in the united states. and it ended right behind us, as the gunman was headed for a movie theater. when we talk about a mass shooting, we talk about an incident where more than three people have been shot and killed. cbs news has learned the identity of the suspected gunman. he is 36-year-old seth ator, a white male. he is accused of killing sev ii people and wounding 24 others, including 3 officers. ten new gun laws easing restrictions took affect today in texas. >> there's a shooting going on in odessa. >> reporter: the violent rampage
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that began on the interstate saturday, started with a traffic stop. state troopers pulled over a man who opened fire on them, with an ar-15-type assault rifle. and then, he took off. >> initially, it was thought that there may have been multiple shooters. and that is because, at some point, this subject changed vehicles. we're now confident that there was just the one actor. >> reporter: the shooter ditched his vehicle and hijacked a postal service van, driving around and shooting at people. >> we have an active shooter on the interstate. >> reporter: the deadly chase ended outside of a movie theater. an eyewitness recorded a gunman, barreling towards a police vehicle that was blocking the road. officers opened fire, killing the gunman. the seven victims who died range in age from 15 to 57. among those killed was 59-year-old postal carrier mary
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granados. >> i basically heard her scream. >> reporter: we spoke to her identical twin sister, rosie, who was on the phone with mary when she was shot. people in the public are horrified to hear what happened. it's another mass shooting event, about a month after what happened in el paso. what are your thoughts? >> i think he could have taken her car without having to kill her, you know? he could have taken her car. that's all he needed. he didn't have to take my sister. >> reporter: texas governor greg abbott. >> too many texans are mourning. too many texans have lost their lives. the status quo in texas is unacceptable. and action is needed. >> reporter: you know, when the shooting was happening, news of a gunman on the loose spread through social media on saturday. and that caused a lot of chaos
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and fear. maria villareal is joining us now. the social media was spreading faster than the police put out a warning. >> the fear that the videos created and the shoot-out created yesterday, spread so quickly. and it really had terrifying results. >> get down. get down. >> reporter: this video was posted on social media with a message in spanish that says, god, please, protect us. you can hear a father consoling his son, as gunshots are going off in the background. >> it's okay. >> reporter: innocent bystanders are laying in an open field. one woman shielding a small child with her body. a question no father wants to hear, as this young boy's hands can't stop shaking. he's on the verge of tears, as everyone clings to the dirt. >> yeah, yeah.
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>> reporter: tan continuing to check on his family. confirm it's finally over. >> okay. okay. okay. >> reporter: you know, david, it really makes you think, what would you do if you had 40 seconds to run, just 40. where would you go? where would you hide? in a field that looks just like this, empty with really nothing around you. >> i keep thinking about people just driving their vehicles, being shot as they drove, randomly. >> yep. >> thank you. president trump called the shootings a wicked attack. the president did not say he would support any new gun support laws. ben tracy is at the white house. >> we're going to see, this really hasn't changed anything. >> reporter: president trump says he's committed to working with congress on ways to prevent mass shootings, but would not say what, if any, gun reform he would actually back. on gun control, are there any specific gun control measures,
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you will support? >> we are looking at the same things. we're in the process of dealing with democrats and republicans. they have been working very hard on it. >> reporter: after tell pas the and dayton shootings last month, president trump said he wanted tougher gun laws. after several discussions with the nra, the president now says this. >> for the mostpa,s strong as you make the background checks, they would not have stopped any of it. so, it's a big problem. it's a mental probable. it's a big problem. >> reporter: democratic presidential candidate beto o'rourke, who is from texas, says the explicit language he is using about mass shoots is purposefully defiant. we're averaging about 300 mass shoots a year. no other count comes close. yes, this is [ bleep ] up. >> it's possibly the biggest. >> reporter: the president is also focused on hurricane dorian. he visited fema today for a briefing.
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the hurricane is now a monster category 5 storm, forecast to run up the u.s. east coast. >> the category 5 is something that i don't know if i've ever heard the term, other than i know it's there. that's the ultimate. that's what we have, unfortunately. >> reporter: this is the fourth category 5 hurricane, while president trump has been in office, including hurricane maria, which devastated puerto rico and michael, which hit florida less than a year ago. david? >> thank you, ben.
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this is "the cbs overnight news." >> we're going to go to elaine quijano. she's in the broadcast center in new york city. she has more on dorian and some of the rest of the day's news. >> david, thank you. dorian is now an extremely dangerous category 5 hurricane. right now, it is thrashing the bahamas with maximum sustained winds of 185 miles per hour. it is expected to be catastrophic and deadly. images captured by satellite showed the massive storm system in the atlantic, churning slowly and moving west. dorian's unpredictable path
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could threaten millions of americans, from florida to the carolinas. we have more on dorian and the threat ahead. jeff? >> this is a monster system. it is tied for the second-strongest system in the atlantic basin history, with winds of 185 miles per hour. in terms of the wind, it is an extremely strong storm. it's beginning to slow down. it is moving west at 5. it is going to crawl ever so slowly through the northern bahamas in the next 24 or 48 hours or so. warnings cape canaveral, down to palm beach. three to five feet of storm surge. that's the official track. it slow downs and speeds up on tuesday and wednesday, moving up the eastern seaboard of florida. notice it's just offshore. any track further west puts it onshore. it remains to be seen how close it comes to the north carolina coast. what's steering it is a solid
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area of high pressure. that will break in two. the whole time it is over water temperatures, 85 to 90 degrees. high-octane fuel. that's why it's a strong storm. we hope the jet stream can catch it and move it out to sea. some of our spaghetti models show it moving out to sea. some of it have it in northeast florida and that's still a possibility. four southeast states have declared states of emergency, as hurricane dorian's path remains unpredictable and life-threatening. mark straussman reports from st. augustine. >> reporter: there's been a mood shift today, a greater intensity. a realization that dorian is a significant threat. just a slight shift in its path and this coastline could be in for major mystery. despitesunday's blue skies, st. augustine was a ghost town on labor day weekend. throngs of tour riists stayed
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inland. we found sprout kitchen empty. its forest and greg goldstein's new juice bar. >> what is it? >> supposed to be huge. >> it's something we're looking forward to is a good weekend. we kind of postponed a lot of our production, had to cut our staff this weekend. we're manning the fort ourselves. >> reporter: much of florida's east coast is under a hurricane warning. health first hospital began evacuating dozens of patients. florida governor ron de santos. >> this storm at this magnitude could really cause massive destruction. and do not put your life in jeopardy by staying behind when you have a chance to get out. >> reporter: that message is often lost on coastal residents here. many are amateur storm trackers who trust their own forecasts. >> we're concerned about it. >> reporter: rob hardwick is the
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police chief in st. augustine beach. he worries about holdout residents. >> this is their castle. this is their home. they're reduluctant to leave everything in their lives. one shift in a few degrees and it's on top of us. >> reporter: there's now an evacuation. it includes everyone who lives near this beach and the city of st. augustine. that order begins monday morning and it's mandatory. >> mark, thank you. in a important story, james mattis is breaking his silence for the first time since resigning from the trump administration last december. he spoke with david martin for sunday morning. >> reporter: james mattis met with donald trump only once before signing on as his defense secretary, a job he expected to hold for at least four years. he lasted just under two years, resigning last december. you resigned the day after the president announced that the u.s. was pulli ining all of its
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troops out of syria. >> yes. >> reporter: did that decision have anything to do with your -- >> absolutely it did. >> reporter: what about the decision to withdraw from syria? >> i disagree with it. >> reporter: because? >> because we need to maintain enough influence there that we don't see the same thing that haed when we withdrew from iraq. >> reporter: mattis believed a sudden pullout would betray allies fighting alongside americans. in his resignation letter, he wrote, my views on treating allies with respect are strongly held. >> this is how i saw the strength of america, that we keep our alliances together and keep them tight. and if i wasn't the right person to do this, the president needed someone more aligned with his views. >> reporter: this is a bold letter. >> reporte >> i was honest with him on why we were parting ways.
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>> reporter: on other differences with the president? >> i will not speak ill of a sitting president. >> reporter: but he will say this -- >> he's an unusual president, our president is. i think that, especially with the -- just the rabid nature of politics today, we have to be careful. we could tear this country apart. >> reporter: mattis lives where he grew up in richmond, washington, a continent away from the politics of washington, d.c. as the 2020 election approaches, he will be under increasing pressure to tell the world what he really thinks of ♪
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and keeps it there longer with lock-in moisture technology. skin is petal smooth. because your best skin starts with olay. if you've seen a giant sequoia, you know they are a sight to behold. a national park in california is full of them. but this ancient forest is about to get a modern upgrade. >> reporter: it's morning here in sequoia national park, a forest high in the mountains of colorakro california. this is unbelievable. the park's main attraction reveals itself. i'm surprised there's not more accidents on this road from people just looking up. rows of some of the largest
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living things on earth, giant sequoia trees, stretching hundreds of feet into the sky. >> living relics of an ancient forest. >> reporter: daniel blankenship is sequoia national park's ranger. general sherman, the planet's largest tree. >> it's not the world's tallest. it's not the world's widest tree, either. it's the world's largest by volume. 103 feet in circumference at the base. it stands over 275 feet tall. >> one, two, three. >> reporter: general sherman is estimated to be 2,200 years old, alive during the height of the roman empire. when settlers first arrived here in the 1800s and found these giants, they tried to tell others about their discovery but the world didn't believe them. it's what's known as the california hoax. all of these years later, you can understand why, these towering trees defy gravity.
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>> reporter: the last few years have been sequoia national park's busiest, with thousands flooding through the gates to get an opportunity for a glimpse at these prehistoric giants. cellular service is nearly nonexistent. that's about to change. >> a new cell phone tower has been approved for the park. an ancient forest gets a small, modern upgrade. >> reporter: an upgrade, hundreds of millions of years in the making. jonathan vigliotti, abc news, sequoia national park, california. coming up,
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antonio? i'll get it. get to know geico and see how much you could save on renters insurance. britain just suffered through its second brutal heat wave of the summer. as elizabeth palmer explains, it has some people really down. ♪ >> reporter: on the hottest day of the year in london, the queen's guards are quick marching in hundred-degree heat. and every one of them is hoping not to do this -- all soldiers are prone to fainting. even the u.s. marines. in fact, it's such a problem, that the british army is doing research on how to prevent it. major ian parsons is an army cardiologist. >> standing for long periods of time still puts you at increase risk.
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add heat and that's further risk. >> reporter: talk about heat, look at this uniform. woollen trousers. a heavy, snug jacket all the way up. and to top it off -- when are you going to put that on? all right. that's bear fur. frankly, it's a wonder this doesn't happen more often. so, how do these soldiers prepare? >> we hydrate. >> reporter: translation, drink lots of water, eat your breakfast and, yes, that's right, wiggle your toes. it keeps the blood flowing and it doesn't show. the army's research suggests that eating four-times more salt than normal also helps. and so does exercising in the heat, which could be good advice for all kinds of people. >> policemen, people exposed to lots of heat, like firefighters. or people just on packed commuter trains, packed buses, that don't have seats.
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>> reporter: if the army does work out how to keep the queen's guards upright, we all stand to benefit. elizabeth palmer, cbs news, london. next, 'll return
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we end tonight, returning to david begnaud in the month of texas, where the month of august ended as it began, with a shooting rampage and a death toll. >> we're in odessa, texas,
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tonight because this is the latest scene of a mass shooting. 22 days later, we were in el paso. 22 people were killed there while they shopped at walmart. here, 7 people are dead and 20 injured. among the dead is a high school student. among the injured is a 17-month-old baby girl. her name is anderson davis. a family friend says anderson has shrapnel in her chest. she has a hole in the bottom of her lip and her tongue. her bottom teeth were knocked out. she's 17 months old and she's the victim of a mass shooting. today in texas, new laws went into effect that ease gun restrictions. you can bring a gun on a school campus and keep it in a locked car. guns are allowed in churches and synagogues but the church can decide not to allow it. those are the facts. if you remember nothing else, remember the victims. they matter. i'm david begnaud, reporting tonight from odessa.
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for all of us at cbs news, good night. this is "the cbs overnight news." >> good evening. i'm david begnaud, reporting, tonight, from odessa, texas. we are here because this is the site of the 38th mass killing this year in the united states. and it ended right behind us, as the gunman was headed to a movie theater. when we talk about a mass shooting, we talk about an incident where more than three people have been shot and killed. cbs news has learned the identity of the suspected gunman. he is 36-year-old seth ator, a white male. he is accused of killing 7 people and wounding 24 others,
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including 3 law enforcement officers. as this nation struggles with what to do, ten new gun laws easing restrictions took effect today, in texas. >> there's a shooting going on in odessa. >> reporter: the violent rampage that began on a texas interstate saturday, started with a traffic stop. state troopers pulled over a man who opened fire on them with an ar-15-type assault rifle. and then, he took off. >> initially, it was thought there may have been multiple shooters. and that is because at some point, this subject changed vehicles. we are now confident that there was just the one actor. >> reporter: the shooter ditched his vehicle and hijacked a postal service van, driving around and shooting at people. >> we have an active shooter on the interstate. >> reporter: the deadly chase ended outside of a movie theater. >> get down. get down. >> reporter: an eyewitness
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recorded a gunman, barreling towards a police vehicle that was blocking the road. officers opened fire, killing the gunman. the seven victims who died range in age from 15 to 57. among those killed was 29-year-old postal carrier mary granados. >> i basically heard her scream. >> reporter: we spoke to her identical twin sister, rosie, who was on the phone with mary when she was shot. people in the public are horrified to hear what happened. it's another mass shooting event, about a month after what happened in el paso. what are your thoughts? >> i think he could have taken her car without having to kill her, you know? he could have taken her car. that's all he needed. he didn't have to take my sister. >> reporter: the shootings come almost a month after 22 people were gunned down at a walmart in el paso. texas governor greg abbott. >> too many texans are mourning.
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too many texans have lost their lives. the status quo in texas is unacceptable. and action is needed. you know, when the shooting was happening, news of a gunman on the loose spread through social media on saturday. and that caused a lot of chaos and fear. maria villareal is joining us now. the social media was spreading faster than the police put out a warning. >> the fear that the videos created and the shoot-out created yesterday, spread so quickly. and it really had terrifying results. >> get down. get down. >> reporter: this video was posted on social media with a message in spanish that says, god, please, protect us. you can hear a father consoling his son, as gunshots are going off in the background. >> it's okay.
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>> reporter: innocent bystanders are laying in an open field. one woman shielding a small child with her body. you know, david, it makes you think. if you had 40 seconds to run, where would you go? where would you hide, in a field like this, empty with nothing around you. >> i keep thinking of the people driving their vehicles being shot as they drove. >> yep. >> maria, thank you. president trump called the shootings a wicked attack. the president did not say he would support new gun control laws. ben tracy is at the white house. >> we're going to see, this really hasn't changed anything. >> reporter: president trump says he's committed to working with congress on ways to prevent mass shootings, but would not say what, if any, gun reform he would actually back. on gun control, are there any specific gun control measures, you will support? >> we are looking at the same
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things. we're in the process of dealing with democrats and republicans. they have been working very hard on it. >> reporter: after the el paso and dayton shootings last month, president trump said he wanted tougher gun laws. >> we have to have meaningful background checks. >> reporter: after several discussions with the nra, the president now says this -- >> for the most part, as strong as you make the background checks, they would not have stopped any of it. so, it's a big problem. it's a mental probable. it's a big problem. >> reporter: democratic presidential candidate beto o'rourke, who is from texas, says the explicit language he is using about mass shoots is purposefully defiant. >> we're averaging about 300 mass shoots a year. no other country comes close. yes, this is [ bleep ] up. >> it's possibly the biggest. >> reporter: the president is also focused on hurricane dorian. he visited fema today for a briefing. the hurricane is now a monster category 5 storm, forecast to
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run up the u.s. east coast. >> the category 5 is something that i don't know if i've ever heard the term, other than i know it's there. that's the ultimate. that's what we have, unfortunately. >> reporter: this is the fourth category 5 hurricane, while president trump has been in office, including hurricane maria, which devastated puerto rico and michael, which hit florida less than a year ago. david? >> thank you, ben. we're going to go, now, to elaine quijano, in the broadcast center in new york city. she has more on dorian and some of the day's news. elaine, good evening. >> david, thank you. dorian is now an extremely dangerous category 5 hurricane. right now, it is thrashing the bahamas with maximum sustained winds of 185 miles per hour. it is expected to be catastrophic and deadly. images captured by satellite in space showed the massive storm system in the atlantic, churning slowly and moving west. dorian's unpredictable path could threaten millions of americans, from florida to the carolinas.
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meteorologist jeff berardelli has more on dorian and the threat ahead. jeff? >> this is a monster system. it is tied for the second-strongest system in the atlantic basin history, with winds of 185 miles per hour. in terms of the wind, it is an extremely strong storm. it's beginning to slow down. it is moving west at 5. it is going to crawl ever so slowly through the northern bahamas in the next 24 or 48 hours or so. warnings out from cape canaveral, down to palm beach. a storm surge warning of three to five feet of storm surge. that's the official track. it slow downs and speeds up on tuesday and wednesday, moving up the eastern seaboard of florida. notice it's just offshore. any track further west puts it onshore. that's why it needs to be watched very closely. and it takes a turn to the northeast. it remains to be seen how close it comes to the north carolina coast. what's steering it is a solid area of high pressure. that will break in two. the whole time it is over water
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temperatures, 85 to 90 degrees. high-octane fuel. that's why it's a strong storm. we hope the jet stream can catch it and move it out to sea. some of our spaghetti models show it moving out to sea. there's brushing and there's oral-b power brushing. oral-b just cleans better. it's the one inspired by dentists... with the round brush head. oral-b's gentle rounded brush head removes more plaque along the gumline... for cleaner teeth and healthier gums. oral-b. brush like a pro.
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this is "the cbs overnight news." >> welcome back to "the overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. president trump's continued trade war with china has sent financial markets on a rollercoaster ride. and it doesn't seem likely to end anytime soon. the president is urging manufacturers to find other places to make their goods. and the preference would be to see the products made in the usa. there's one entrepreneur who has achieved that goal, 100% made in america. john blackstone has his story.
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>> we're in middlesex, north carolina. >> reporter: six years ago, this manufacturer in rural north carolina, was ready to close. until byron winthrop helped buy the company. >> we spent years moving manufacturing overseas to cheaper standards and lower regulations. >> reporter: in 1980, almost 80% of the clothing bought here was made in america. today, it's around 3%. winthrop says while globalization and trade deals made things cheaper, they brought decades of layoffs and plant closures. >> manufacturing plants are moving to where the workers are cheap. >> we can't compete with those prices. >> i'm a free trade person but 'm also a believer in saying you cannot gut a bunch of communities in the u.s. and move to bangladesh and import the goods again and sell them at the
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local dollar store to all these people that don't have jobs. >> reporter: sound familiar? >> we're living through the latest jobs theft in history of the world. >> reporter: president trump is not the first to campaign on bringing back manufacturing jobs. >> there will be a job sucking sound going south. >> there will be no more nafta sellouts of american workers. >> 1.2 million new manufacturing jobs right here in america. >> i think if they don't make a deal, it will be very bad for china. >> reporter: president trump's answer has been tariffs and trade wars. back in 2012, in san francisco, bayard winthrop set up to bring back manufacturing jobs the old-fashioned way, by creating them. winthrop's previous experience was on wall street and silicon fally. but he started with a clothing company, with a big name,
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american giant, and a bigger goal -- making everything, from start to finish, in the united states. like a few other clothing companies, trying to manufacture in the u.s., there's a big challenge. all those closed factories have left a thread-bare infrastructure for making appar apparel. this dyed in america? >> it did. we have to bring back one of the dyers to create this program. >> reporter: this involved multiple steps. we followed the chain for american giant's hoodie and learned the jobs are not what they used to be. the seeds of winthrop's big idea are found on farms like this one, in north carolina, where cotton is planted in the spring. >> i need some asphate this morning, please. >> reporter: grower jerry hamil
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is looking for help but says few are up to the job. >> the labor force here, the ones that will work are working. and some are not going to work, it makes no difference what they are offered, money, benefits. they are not going to work. >> reporter: so, each season, hamil hires men from mexico on temporary worker visas. come fall, they will pick the cotton and transfer it to the local gin, which removes the seeds. the next stop is parkdale mills in gaffney, south carolina, where raw cotton is cleaned and spun into yarn. parkdale mills has more in common with silicon valley, than it does with the mills seen in the 1979 movie "norma ray." >> i'm going as fast as i can. >> yeah. they're watching me. >> reporter: i come into your mill, i expect to see sally
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field and i see robots, instead. >> to stay in business today, you have to automate. >> reporter: andy is the ceo. >> we couldn't survive if it wasn't automated. we have more robots than employees. but the employees are trained to operate the robots. it's the key to our survival. >> reporter: in 1960, a mill like this could have had 2,000 workers. today, about 25 work here, producing yarn every week. it's knitted into fabric and sent away to carolina cotton works, where it's dried and dyed. >> there's a series of hooks on the rolls. >> reporter: the founder, page ashby and sons, hunter, and brian, started working with winthrop in 2015, after realizing he doesn't the typical
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client. >> it contradicted the conventional thinking of taking cost out and offering something cheaper than everything else. on top of everything else, he'll make it here in north carolina. my response is, this is the guy we've been dreaming about. where he's been for the past 15 years? >> reporter: for tinal stop, the finished fabric goes to the knitwear plant, that winthrop helped buy, eagle sportswear. >> each modular line is making part of the sweatshirt. >> reporter: to improve productivity, winthrop replaced assembly lines with groups of sewers working in teams. they get extra pay for meeting quotas. >> reporter: this is a three-woman modelular sew line. they're at 90. their efficiency is at 1 23%.
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>> reporter: you make more money? >> yeah. it's more money. >> reporter: donna has worked her 25 years. >> we try every day. >> reporter: i'm holding you up from meeting your goal. >> yeah. >> reporter: you have to pay these people a good deal more than you would if they were sewing in china or vietnam. >> yeah. i would argue that's a good thing, right? >> reporter: keeping this final step here in the u.s., winthrop says, adds as much as $17 to the overall cost of the hoodie. to remove overhead, american giant sells online, with two stores. the final price tag from the catten fields, to the gin, to the mill, to the dyer, to the knitwear plant, is no bargain. $108. the sweatshirt is $108. >> what we want to do with this
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item, is make something you're going to have for decades. >> reporter: in this era of fast fashion, winthrop seems out of step. but his hoodie has been selling well, since the digital magazine, slate, calls it, the greatest hoodie ever made. >> the article came out. in 24 hours, we sold everything we ever made. >> reporter: he wants to inspire other companies to manufacture here. for him, the made in usa label creates both jobs and pride. are you selling an idea? an image, as much as clothing? >> i think we're selling a value system. stand for things that matter. stand for american manufacturing. stand for people who are making stuff. when we buy things and we do it consciously and we do it with an eye toward understanding how these little votes that we make have an impact attached to them. we'll be better off. "the cbs overnight news"
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okay, this is getting a little weird. we all go, why not enjoy the go with charmin? shhhh. i took mucinex dm for my phlegmy cough. what about rob's dry cough? works on that too. and lasts 12 hours. 12 hours?! who studies that long?! only mucinex dm relieves wet and dry coughs for 12 hours with 2 medicines in 1 pill. for longer than the united states has been a nation, there's been fog on san francisco bay. it's been the inspiration for countless songs and the backdrop
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for dozens of movies. and now, the fog has a twitter account and a book deal and a name, karl. here, again, is john blackstone. >> reporter: in san francisco, it's a typical summer day. the fog is in. high points on buildings and bridges may poke into the sun. but the city is engulfed in gray. for mike, somewhere there in the fog, that's the way it is supposed to be. coming along here, there's nothing but a wall of white out there. >> summertime in san francisco, that's what you're going to see, is a wall of white. fog is the natural air conditioning of san francisco. >> it's foggy. >> reporter: it presents a challenge for tourists searching for that perfect picture of the golden gate bridge. >> the golden gate. where? >> reporter: where is the golden gate bridge? >> i have no idea. >> reporter: while this weather
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pattern may disappoint some -- >> we came to enjoy the view. >> reporter: many others are on a first-name basis with san francisco's fog. >> i know karl the fog is ever present here. >> reporter: who? >> karl. >> reporter: who is karl? >> the fog. >> karl the fog has gone viral here. >> reporter: when it comes to views of the golden gate bridge, the fog giveth and the fog taketh away. now, san francisco's fog is on social media. it has its own coffee table book. on twitter, karl the fog has followers. this system posts pictures on instagram, proudly showing his impact on the city. now, karl is an author, with a book of photos and his wisdom. >> i'm not karl the fog. i'm karl's editor. >> reporter: steve not only edited karl's book, he is one of the few people who knows the
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identity of the human behind karl. >> he is really funny. for a weather system, he's really funny. >> reporter: if i may, you put conditions on this interview. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: what was the condition? >> we wouldn't talk about karl's identity. i know you can ask me. go for it. i can't tell you anything. >> reporter: you work with real people in your job as a book editor. when that e-mail arrived from karl, when somebody told you, okay, you're going to be working with the fog next, what was that? >> it was really exciting. i was following his ptravails over social media. and he is a real celebrity. nothing could be more than san francisco than hearing from karl the fog. >> reporter: people love the fog and hate the fog. how do we know that karl is a russian campaign aimed at dividing us. >> he's very kind. >> reporter: kind enough to pull back that veil of weight frhite
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time-to-time, providing a picture-perfect setting, as long as you're quick. here i am. get in the picture. if the picture sn't perfect, we
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at at&t we believe in access. the opportunity for everyone to explore a digital world. connecting with the things that matter most. and because nothing keeps us more connected than the internet. we've created access from at&t california households with at least one resident who receives snap or ssi benefits. may qualify for home internet
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at a discounted rate of $10 a month. no commitment, deposit, or installation fee. visit att.com/accessnow, to learn more. we lost a member of the cbs family friday. valerie harper passed away on friday. she was 80. you probably remember her on "the mary tyler moore show." but she had a life on the stage and screen. >> reporter: it may have been mary tyler moore's show. but it was verie harper who became america's favorite upstairs neighbor. >> you're rhoda? >> i'm mary richards. >> hello. >> get out of my apartment. >> reporter: she made rhoda a
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hou household name. she had it all. a frank wit. >> i should apply it to my hips. >> reporter: and a brash style that never seemed to offend. >> allow me to introduce myself. i'm another person in the room. >> reporter: the role earned harper four emmys and a golden globe, plus, a slot in tv history. >> hey, taxi. taxi. >> reporter: when rhoda finally got married on her spin-off show, the episode became a tv event. one of the highest rated of the time. >> by the authority vested in me by the state of new york, i now pronounce you married. >> reporter: over the course of her 60-year career, harper was active on broadway and in the movies, too. >> i'm caroline, your regular waitress. >> oh. my turn. sorry. >> reporter: she was working steadily even after 2013, when
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she announced she had a rare form of brain cancer. doctors told her back then, she only had months to live. >> i know a lot of you feel like you know me, that you are part of the morgenstern family. and i feel i know you, too. i owe you the truth, at the same time, with everybody else. >> reporter: she went on the episode of "the doctors," where she explained living with the knowledge of death was a great gift. >> more than anything, i'm living in the moment. i really want americans, and all of us, to be less afraid of death. and know that it's a passage. but that don't go to the funeral before the day of the funeral.n. >> reporter: she made it to 80, the same age mary tyler moore was when she died in 2017. their friend and co-star, ed asner, who is nearly 90 himself, said of harper on twitter, her brilliance burst through and signed its light upon all of us.
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good night, beautiful, he said. i'll see you soon. that's the overn ht news for this monday. from the cbsbs broadcast centern new york city, i'm elaine quijano. caioni funded by cbs it's monday, september 2nd, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." hurricane dorian approaches the u.s. as it tears through the bahamas. we're tracking the massive storm, which is creeping toward florida. at least seven dead after a shooting rampage in texas. what we're learning about the 36-year-old gunman. plus, gun control gridlock. what president trump says would not have stopped the mass shooting from happening as democrats call for stricter laws.

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