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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 14, 2019 3:00am-3:59am PDT

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the invasion. turkey at this hour stepping up its assault on u.s.-backed kurdish fighters. president trump is now ordering all u.s. troops out of northern syria. >> deliberate withdrawal. >> the new concern about fighters who have pledged their allegiance to isis. by the numbers. elizabeth warren is gaining support on the campaign trail. joe biden tonight is losing ground. what's causing the dramatic shift in the polls? deadly encounter. in texas, a worried neighbor calls police, but when officers arrive -- >> put your hands up. show me your hands. >> a white police officer kills a black woman inside her own home. the growing outrage from the community. >> a record-breaking performance on the ma how sone biles became the greatest gymnast of all time.
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and showing the world how to be comfortable in your own skin. ♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. just days after president trump greenlighted the turkish invasion of northern syria by moving u.s. troops out of the region, the conflict is threatening to spiral out of control. turkish artillery has been targeting kurdish neighborhoods sending tens of thousands fleeing for their lives and sparking charges of ethnic cleansing. the kurds have turned to an old enemy for protection. inviting syrian government troontef theie ey contro islamic state prisoners of war ing th rainder of u.s from warzi
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announcing plans to push its onslaught against kurdish forces even farther into syria, mark esper told margaret brennan, the u.s. will withdraw its roughly 1,000 troops remaining in the area. >> how long and over what time period will you? >> it will be a deliberate withdrawal. we want to conduct it as quickly and as safely at possible. >> reporter: kurdish forces were no match for turkey. charlie d'agata on the ground in syria spoke to a syrian commander of the syrian democratic forces, america's allies in the fight against isis. >> what is your message to president trump? >> reporter: he fought beside his soldiers many years, he said. he promised he would protect the ku serds, but he has don nothin themselves from turki forces. stounds a lot like they were being left to be slaughtered.
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what choice were they left other than to find someone else to n very goodm. partners in the de-isis campaign. they were very good fighters on the battlefield. we enabled that as well. at the same time, we didn't sign up to fight the turks on their behalf. >> reporter: today turkish-backed syrian groups claimed a big victory in their campaign against the kurds taking control of two key border towns. some of those fighters are being accused of executing kurdish civilians as allegedly seen in this video. as the violence intensifies, the u.n. says 130,000 people have already fled, sparking fears of a new humanitarian crisis. roxana saberi, cbs news, london. tonight, president trump is facing a new round of biparss backlash over his decision to withdraw all u.s. troops from northern syria. lawmakers are expected to introduce legislation this week to address the crisis. also this week, new revelations in the impeachment inquiry could
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put the president on the defensive. nikole killion is at the white house. >> i'm an island of one again. >> reporter: as president trump defended his initial decision to pull out ous forces from northern syria, democrats and republicans sounded the alarm. >> pulling back those 50 troops or whatever it was has given license to turkey. and then now, i think, puling out the remaining 1,000 in syria is an excuse to get out. >> i can think of nothing more disgusting in all the years i've been in congress than what this president is allowing to happen with the kurds. >> reporter: members of the president's national security team said they are meeting to monitor the situation with president warning treasury is ready to go with more sanctions against turkey. >> these sanctions could be starting small. they could be maximum pressure. >> reporter: congress is working s ra bipartisan package of cess thiweek, but t ongoing remains front and center. the top democrat leading the investigation now says he
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doesn't need to interview the whistle-blower who triggered the probe after filing a complaint about the president's phone call with the leader of ukraine. >> given that we already have the call record, we don't need the whistle-blower who wasn't on the call to tell us what took place on the call. >> reporter: some lawmakers want to hear from the president's personal attorney rudy giuliani. >> i'd like to see rudy testify, yes. >> reporter: federal authorities are looking into any business dealings giuliani may have had with two of his associates who were arrested last week on unrelated campaign finance violations. the president is still backing giuliani and met with him for lunch saturday at his golf club in virginia, according to a source. >> i know he's an honorable man. >> reporter: this week, lawmakers will hear from more witnesses in the impeachment probe, including the president's former russia adviser fiona hill and u.s. ambassador gordon sondland who was blocked from testifying last week. elaine? >> nicole, joe biden's son hunter has come under fire for serving on the board of a
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ukrainian gas company while his father was vice president. now we're learning he stepped down from another position. what can you tell us? >> hunter biden released a statement through his attorney announcing that he is resigning his position on the board of a chinese-backed private equity firm later this month. he also agreed not to serve on any boards of foreign companies if his father is elected. elaine? >> nikole killion, thank you. this week, democratic presidential contonders will face off in their fourth de.dai share the stage on tuesday night in ohio. according to our cbs news battleground tracker, senator elizabeth warren is leading the race with 31% among democratic voters. that's six points ahead of former vice president joe biden who comes in second. senator bernie sanders rounds out the top three. joining us now is anthony salvanto, the elections director. thanks for being with us.
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tell us what's behind senator warren's continued rise. >> she's doing better than joe biden on democrats seeing her as fighting a lot for people like you, and she's ahead among those who say they want someone inspiring. when we asked how well the candidates would be able to handle attacks from the trump campaign, it's elizabeth warren more so than joe biden that they felt could handle those attacks very well. another sign democrats trying to find a candidate best prepared for what's probably going to be a tough race. >> are the president's accusations against joe biden hurting the former vice president? >> democrats say they don't make much of the charges, but they aren't completely satisfied with the way joe biden responded to the president. couple that with the lower marks on handling critiques from the president, and we find those considering biden, while they do still think he can beat donald trump in 2020, the poll finds they aren't quite as sure about that as they used to be. >> all right, anthony, thank you very much. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ♪
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this is the "cbs overnight news." >> rescue crews in new orleans spent the day searching for a missing worker after a hotel under construction collapsed. two people were killed when the hard rock hotel came crashing to the ground saturday. dozens of people were hurt. here's meg oliver. >> this is a very, very serious situation as this structure is not stable. >> reporter: people on the ground ran for their lives saturday after the hard rock hotel under construction collapsed.
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the catastrophe shot a massive cloud of dust and debris across several city blocks. >> get to the back. >> reporter: dozens were injured and two people were killed. anthony is still missing. the father and grandfather was supposed to be off, but his wife says he was called in at the last minute. mayor cantrell visited the only person still hospitalized last night. >> people matter. and he was an employee on the job. you know, on the eighth floor. happened very fast, as he was talking to me, tears were, of course, you know, in his eyes. >> reporter: the disaster happened in a busy part of downtown new orleans on the edge of the french quarter. more than 100 workers were on site saturday. as rescue efforts continue, officials face the delicate job of stabilizing the building from further damage. >> safety is number one thing. the last thing you want to do as you're trying to rescue someone, lose someone else. >> reporter: in a statement, the contractor, citadel builders, said our hearts are broken over
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the loss of life and for those injured. and our prayers are with them as well as their families. the company told me over the phone, they are working as fast as possible to stabilize the building and the two cranes that are attached to it. once that is done, they will be able to retrieve the victims and determine the cause. elaine? >> meg oliver, thank you. a deadly blast is caught on surveillance cameras in china. investigators believe a gas explosion at a restaurant may be to blame. nine people were killed and ten others were hurt. the restaurant was destroyed and several nearby shops were damaged. tonight, public outcry in texas after another deadly police shooting. according to recent data compiled by "the washington post," there have been 75 deadly police shootings in texas this year. the latest just this weekend when a white police officer shot and killed a black woman inside. it comes less than two weeks after former dallas police officer amber guyger was
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sentenced to ten years in prison for killing her unarmed black neighbor. jonathan vigliotti now on the events that led to this latest shooting. >> reporter: body cam footage released by ft. worth police show the officer arriving at the house early saturday morning and looking inside an open front door. he then canvass the property, aiming both his flashlight and gun at the windows. when he sees someone standing inside, the officer shouts, then fires his weapon. >> put your hands up. show me your hands. >> reporter: a single gunshot. atatiana jefferson who was taking care of her sick mother's home, was pronounced dead at the scene. police were conducting a welfare check, initially called to the home by a neighbor who was worried before seeing the door left open. >> informed them my neighbor was elderly, sickly lady. and i was concerned for her health. >> reporter: when police arrived, james smith says they didn't identify themselves and did not use lights or sirens.
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>> three or four tactical officers come from around the corner it seemed like. go in front of her house, past the front doors which were open, and less than a minute, i heard a gunshot. >> reporter: ft. worth police released a statement saying the officer used his weapon after perceiving a threat. police say they later found a gun in the home. family attorney lee merit said the real threat came from police. >> that's murder. >> reporter: and community members are calling for more answers. >> this is one i cannot swallow. >> i feel guilty because had i not called the ft. worth police department, my neighbor would still be alive today. >> reporter: ft. worth police say the white male officer joined the force last year and is on administrative leave pending an bs . cooler temperatures are hd on two major wildfires. both fires are burning near los
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angeles. the saddle ridge fire has burned more than 8,000 acres and is now 41% contained. the sandalwood fire is 77% contained and has burned roughly 1,000 acres. at least 31 structures have been damaged or destroyed. at least three people have been killed. in japan tonight, a deadly typhoon has been downgraded to a tropical storm. torrential rains flooded more than 1200 homes. up to people were killed and nearly 20 are still missing. tens of thousands of troops and rescuers responded to help people stranded in ramging floodwaters. simone biles has done what no other gymnast has done before. the 22-year-old flipped and twisted her way to two more gold medals at the world championships in germany. the victory makes her the most decorated gymnast in history. >> simone biles!
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>> she makes the impossible look easy. simone biles is enkleshrined in history at the gymnast to beat. >> it's just incredible. >> reporter: she's now distinguished at the most decorated gymnast ever. her record was seal sunday at the world championships in germany. she's broken the longstanding mark of 23 medals held by a gymnast from belarus held since the 1990s. the five-time world champion from texas hasn't confirmed whether she'll continue to compete beyond next summer's 2020 tokyo games. she already has four olympic gold medals and now has two new signature moves named after her. the biles double-double dismount on beam and the biles 2, a triple twisting double somersault in her floor routine. after she won her fifth individual all-around world gold
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by a record margin on thursday, biles dropped the mic. we are cheering for her. up next -- bombshell allegations in the death investigation of tyler skaggs. the new details emerging about the new details emerging about puberty means personal space. so sports clothes sit around growing odors. that's why we graduated to tide pods sport. finally something more powerful than the funk. tide sport removes even week-old sweat odor. it's got to be tide. your cold's gonna make you a zombie tomorrow. wrong. new mucinex nightshift fights my cold symptoms so i can sleep great and wake up human. don't eat me i taste terrible. fight your worst symptoms so you can sleep great and wake up human.
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it captures dust in one swipe. duty cloths lock awaysweeper he twice as much dirt and dust. it gets stuff deep in the grooves other tools can miss. y'know what? my place... is a lot cleaner now. stop cleaning. start swiffering. the los angeles angels pitcher who died this summer was reportedly given drugs by a team
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employee. tyler skaggs was found dead in a texas hotel in july. an autopsy found opioids in his system. according to espn, an angels public relations representative told federal agents he gave skaggs oxycodone and watched skaggs snort drugs the night before he died. the team said they never heard of any employee providing illegal narcotics to players. california is cracking down on fur. the state will soon become the first in the nation to ban the sale and manufacture of new fur products. the new law goes into effect in 2023. governor gavin newsom also signed a new law barring most animals from circus performances. country superstar dolly parton is celebrating a major milestone. ♪ she's been a member of the grand
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ole opry for years. she first played there when she was just a teenager. and she's still doing what she does best. she performed at a sold-out concert in nashville. tripping toward a peace of mind. the effect psychedelic drugs could have on cancer patients. the russels travel to a different swim meet
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tonight, new research suggests an active agent in magic mushrooms could treat addiction, and anxiety. anderson cooper is looking into the fascinating early study results for "60 minutes." >> reporter: everything is done the same way it was for the lsd experiments scientists conducted in the 1950s and '60s. some of the most dramatic results have been with terminal cancer patients struggle with anxiety and paralyzing depression. >> i start seeing the colors and the geometric designs. oh, this is so cool, how lovely, and then, boom. visions began. >> reporter: carrie was diagnosed with stage 3 lung cancer in 2013. during her session, she found herself trapped in a nightmare
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her mind created. >> an ancient prehistoric, barren land, and there's these men with pick axes just slamming on the rocks. >> and this felt absolutely real to you? >> absolutely real. i was being shown the truth of reality. life is meaningless. we have no purpose. and then i look and i'm still like a witness. a beautiful, shimmering bright jewel. and then it was sound and it was booming, booming. right here, right now. >> that was being said? >> yes. you are alive right here, right now because that's all you have. and that is my mantra to this
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day. mirror image. up
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finally tonight, helping kids with skin conditions learn to appreciate the way they look. jericka duncan now on how they're overcoming. >> it's beautiful. i love the back. >> reporter: 14-year-old alex, 13-year-old emily. >> i love this. >> reporter: and 16-year-old mia johnson are at their final fitting in houston preparing for a fashion show in new york city. >> i'm a little nervous, to be honest. >> reporter: the dresses they'll be modeling in represent something more than what meets the eye. each of these girls has a serious skin condition. and each one of their dress patterns mirrors the image of what that girl's condition looks like under a microscope. >> i have alopecia, which is an
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autoimmune disease that cause myself hair to fall out. >> i have severe atopic derm tight. exema. people ask, is it contagious? is it poison ivy? that lowered my self confidence. >> i have scleroderma on my face. it's where i lose tissue and it made me like insecure going into middle school. when people are trying to find themselves, you know, like find who you are. >> reporter: mia, alex and emily found each other through a children's house for the soul in houston. dr.bury, a dermatologist by trade, left her high-paying job at a hospital and later opened the nonprofit four years ago. >> i hope that what we do brings a light to the world for the darkness of these kids. they suffer so much. and if we can just be a little small light, i think that's awesome. >> dr. brie says her goal wasn't just to treat what you can see but to treat the emotional wounds that are not visible.
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>> most people, i think when they are diagnosed with a skin condition, they think that it's, like, probably the wor that could ever happen to them. >> is that what you thought originally? >> originally, i will be honest, i was not very happy with it. i was, like, why did this happen to me? but now my perspective has definitely changed. >> what changed your perspective? >> i think it was the people around me and especially dr. brie and her team. they really helped me to view myself as a beautiful young woman that i am today. >> the moral to this story? >> love the skin you're in. ♪ this is me >> it's that attitude that br where all eyes were on them for all the right reasons. jericka duncan, cbs news, new york. >> true beauty is so much more than skin r this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us
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later for the "morning news" and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. ♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. just days after president trump green-lighted the turkish invasion of northern syria by moving u.s. troops out of the region, the conflict is threatening to spiral out of control. turkish artillery has been rgrhoo sending tens of thousands fleeing for their lives and sparking charges of ethnic cleansing. the kurds have turned to an old enemy for protection, inviting syrian government troops into some of the cities they control. islamic state prisoners of war and their families have escaped from several detention centers. and the pentagon announced it is
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pulling the remainder of u.s. forcessaberi has more. >> reporter: with turkey announcing plans to push its onslaught against kurdish forces even farther into syria, defense secretary mark esper told margaret brennan, the u.s. will withdraw its roughly 1,000 troops remaining in the area. >> how long and over what time period will you be pulling back? >> it will be a deliberate withdrawal. we want to conduct it as quickly and as safely at possible. >> reporter: even before this news, kurdish forces were no match for turkey. cbs' charlie d'agata on the ground in syria spoke to a syrian commander of the syrian democratic forces, america's allies in the fight against isis. >> what is your message to president trump? >> reporter: he fought beside his soldiers for many years, he said. they were brothers in arms. he promised he would protect the kurds, but he has done nothing. secretary esper says kurdish
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authorities are now turning to syria and russia to defend themselves from turkish forces. >> it sounds a lot like they were being left to be slaughtered. what choice were they left other than to find someone else to protect them? >> the kurds have been very good partners in the de-isis campaign. they were very good fighters on the battlefield. we obviously enabled that as well. at the same time, we didn't sign up to fight the turks on their behalf. >> reporter: today turkish-backed syrian groups claimed a big victory in their campaign against the kurds taking control of two key border towns. some of those fighters are being accused of executing kurdish civilians and soldiers, as allegedly seen in this video. as the violence intensifies, the u.n. says 130,000 people have already fled, sparking fears of a new humanitarian crisis. roxana saberi, cbs news, london. tonight, president trump is facing a new round of bipartisan backlash over his decision to withdraw all u.s. troops from northern syria. lawmakers are expected to introduce legislation this week
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to address the crisis. also this week, new revelations in the impeachment inquiry could put the president on the defensive. nikole killion is at the white house. >> i'm sort of an island of one again. >> reporter: as president trump defended his initial decision to pull out u.s. forces from northern syria, democrats and republicans sounded the alarm. >> pulling back those 50 troops or whatever it was has given license to turkey. and then now, i think, pulling out the remaining 1,000 in syria is an excuse to get out. >> i can think of nothing more disgusting in all the years i've been in congress than what this president is allowing to happen with the kurds. >> reporter: members of the president's national security team said they are meeting to monitor the situation with the president warning treasury is ready to go with more sanctions against turkey. >> these sanctions could be starting small. they could be maximum pressure. >> reporter: congress is working on a bipartisan package of sanctions when it returns from ss ongoing impeachment inquiry
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remains front and center. the top democrat leading the investigation now says he doesn't need to interview the whistle-blower who triggered the probe after filing a complaint about the president's phone call with the leader of ukraine. >> given that we already have the call record, we don't need the whistle-blower who wasn't on the call to tell us what took place on the call. >> reporter: some lawmakers want to hear from the president's personal attorney rudy giuliani. >> i'd like to see rudy testify, yes. >> reporter: cbs news has learned federal authorities are are looking into any business dealings giuliani may have had with two of his associates who were arrested last week on unrelated campaign finance violations. the president is still backing giuliani and met with him for lunch saturday at his golf club in virginia, according to a source. >> i know he's an honorable man. >> reporter: this week, lawmakers will hear from more witnesses in the impeachment probe, including the president's former russia adviser fiona hill and u.s. ambassador gordon sondland who was blocked from testifying last week. elaine?
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>> nicole, joe biden's son hunter has come under fire for serving on the board of a ukrainian gas company while his father was vice president. now we're learning he stepped down from another position. what can you tell us? >> hunter biden released a statement through his attorney announcing that he is resigning his position on the board of a chinese-backed private equity firm later this month. he also agreed not to serve on any boards of foreign companies if his father is elected. elaine? >> nikole killion, thank you. this week, democratic presidential contenders will face off in their fourth debate. a total of 12 candidates will share the stage on tuesday night in ohio. according to our cbs news battleground tracker, senator elizabeth warren is leading the race with 31% among democratic voters. that's six points ahead of former vice president joe biden who comes in second. joing us now is an
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salvanto, cbs news elections and surveys director. thanks for being with us. tell us what's behind senator warren's continued rise. >> she's doing better than joe biden on democrats seeing her as fighting a lot for people like you, and she's ahead among those who say they want someone inspiring. when we asked how well the candidates would be able to handle attacks from the trump campaign, it's elizabeth warren more so than joe biden that they felt could handle those attacks very well. another sign democrats are trying to find a candidate best prepared for what's probably going to be a tough race. >> are the president's accusations against joe biden hurting the former vice president? >> democrats say they don't make much of the charges, but they aren't completely satisfied with the way joe biden responded to the president. couple that with the lower marks he gets on handling critiques from the president, and we find those considering biden, while they do still think he can beat donald trump in 2020, the poll finds they aren't quite as sure about that as they used to be. >> all right, anthony, thank you
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very much. cooler temperatures are helping firefighters in southern california gain the upper hand on two major wildfires. both fires are burning near los angeles. the saddle ridge fire has burned more than 8,000 acres and is now 41% contained. the sandalwood fire is 77% contained and has burned roughly 1,000 acres. at least 31 structures have been damaged or destroyed. at least three people have been killed. in japan, a deadly typhoon has been downgraded to a tropical storm. tor rential rains included more than 1200 homes. up to 33 people were killed, and nearly 20 are still missing. tens of thousands of troops and rescuers responded to help people stranded in raging floodwaters. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. yeah, that's half the fun of a new house.
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♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome back. i'm elaine quijano. 11 states and the district of columbia now allow the recreational use of cannabis. but cons t story of the nation's first cannabis cafe in california. >> reporter: california's law is typical. it says it's illegal to consume, smoke, eat or vape cannabis in public or even to open a package
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containing it. but the golden state now has a brand-new venue led by a cordon bleu chef where people can partake in pot outside their homes. the nation's very first cannabis cafe is open for business in the city of west hollywood. take a look around. >> it's really hip in here. >> reporter: you might see something a little different. >> you can finally smoke in public. >> reporter: and smell it, too. >> i think this is a big step in the right direction towards destigmatizing weed. >> reporter: welcome to the lowell cafe, america's first marijuana restaurant, where they serve traditional comfort food with a side order of pot. in all its forms. >> i get my own buzz just looking at the food that we get coming in here. >> reporter: but chef andrea drummer insists the food is not infused with cannabis. >> what would you pair each of these items with? >> we have the burger, the
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nachos, the chef salad, the chicken sandwich. >> i would pair this particular sandwich with our vape pen because it does have citrus notes and it goes well with that slaw. then we also have a super o og cush that i would pair with nachos or the burger. >> reporter: a tasting menu featuring pot might seem odd considering -- >> you are an anti-drug counselor? >> i was. >> how does an anti-drug counselor become an establishment -- and a chef. >> it was really about being open-minded and allowing your views to shift. often we get stuck in our perceptions about things. >> reporter: perceptions s hopes to erase. >> we're saying that it's time. there's a normalcy about cannabis consumption that we've had to hide for some time.
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that it's no different tha going to a bar or going to a restaurant and ordering a bottle of merlot. lowell.rter: drummer they licensed besses that allow marijuana consumption. would you say that west hollywood has rolled out the welcome mat for businesses like this? >> 100%. >> reporter: john leonard works for the city. >> our council didn't want to have a lottery or first come, first served. they wanted it to be merit based. >> reporter: the lowell cafe is the first of 16 spots that will allow smoking and vaping or edibles. businesses that could draw tourists and pop up to 7 million tax dollars into the city. >> how do you make sure people aren't getting behind the wheel? >> the way we're doing it is the businesses are really kind of in control. when you first sit down, they ask what your level of experience is with smoking cannabis or injeftsing cannabis
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and kind of walk you through that process based on your tolerance and your level. and if you're intoxicated they'll help you get an uber or lyft ride home. it's similar to any bar here in the city. bartenders, there are flower hosts to help match tastes. >> i am free roll just to get things started. >> the flavor profile is distinct. you have chocolate flavor, some more pungent than others. some are very light. >> we came here for the full experience which was great. >> reporter: what heather and her girlfriends didn't expect -- >> the food was exceptionally good. and i'm really surprised. >> reporter: of course, that opinion may have come after the munchies set in. >> vegans and nonvegans alike love this dish. >> is this good? >> reporter: the true test might better come from someone inexposed. >> mm. wow. that's really good. >> it's just a beautiful like community that comes here.
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and that's what i love about it. >> reporter: design team mark and johnny houston, the brains behind a dozen l.a. nightclubs and bars had to fuse function with their vision. take the air filtration system which, by code, had to keep aromas from floating onto city streets. >> to me, when i looked at it, i thought it was a bunch of korean barbecue hoods. we're not doing that. i had to redesign this to look a little more approachable and not heavy. and then all the growth of like the landscaping and everything that's going to come over and take over it. it's not dark and dingy. it's welcoming. it's, i think, surprising many. >> you're not hiding? >> we're not hiding. we're out here and embracing everyone and letting them all know, hey, this is your home, too. >> that sense of community was another attraction for the city which, like the lowell cafe's promise to pay employees generously and give opportunities to people who may have drug offenses. recreational marijuana is legal
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in 11 states and washington, d.c., and is expected to net more than $40 billion by 2025. despite the drug's growing acceptance, nearly half of all drug possession arrests in 2015 were for marijuana. >> there's a lot of people that went to prison for having a menu like this. >> reporter: that's one point comedian justin williams and his friend brittany chapman hope won't get lost here. >> i feel like with this becoming natural in this area it will make it more common for us to discuss the issues that have come from cannabis in the past. and if we discuss those issues, we can rectify those issues. >> and it's going to be like your beer and these would be like sodas. >> you want cannabis legalized globally? and there's no concern that you have for that widespread consumption? >> people are waking up right now drinking whiskey. absolutely not. >> reporter: is this a vision of
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the future? >> i think so. i mean, the future is now. we're living the possibilities. we're living the possibilities. and we hope to see other the in-laws have moved in with us. and our adult children are here. so we save by using tide. which means we use less. three generations of clothes cleaned in one wash. #1 stain and odor fighter, #1 trusted. it's got to be tide.
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you may not have heard about the ugly produce movement, but it's gaining steam across the country. the idea is to take fruits and vegetables that supermarkets won't sell and get them to people in need.
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all of the produce is perfectly fine to eat, but it may have a blemish or odd shape. either way, the ugly produce movement has turned into big business. kenneth craig got a taste. >> up here we've got -- right over 2,000 acres. >> reporter: we met juan gonzalez in the heart of california farm country, where about 90% of america's cauliflower is harvested every year. but he says until recent years, his farms were also the site of a staggering amount of food waste. >> 10 million pounds a way. >> 10 million pounds? >> 10 million pounds. >> reporter: vegetables that never made it to store shelves, rejected simply for looking a little different. >> cauliflower, historically, everybody knows it as being white. in order to keep organic cauliflower white you have to come in and break the leaves or tie the leaves. keep the sun from hitting this head of cauliflower. >> the store will say this is too yellow up top. we can't take it? >> we can't take it.
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>> usda guidelines separate vegetables into grades based on things like size and color. and large volume retailers, including supermarkets often follow those strict beauty standards. that's led to 10 million tons of cosmessillrfec or unharvested food lost each year. so this is the perfect one right here. this is the imperfect. >> this is the imperfect. >> it's delicious. sweet. >> perfectly good cauliflower to me. >> reporter: some flaws are easier to see than others. >> carrots grow underground. if you hit a hard spot they turn and twist and grow a little uneven. so there's nothing wrong with them. they just look funky. i think they look gnarly. they're funky. >> you'll get peaches, plums, nectarines. >> reporter: one man's trash has become another man's treasure for ben chessler who saw imperfect produce as the perfect
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recipe and name for a new business model. >> when you founded imperfect produce, what was the goal? >> the goal was really to fix a part of the food system, starting with produce and eventually moving into the wider food system. we could solve the environmental impact of all the food going to waste. make food more affordable for people and take a bite out of this problem of food deserts where we can deliver healthy produce to people for more affordable than a grocery store. the funny story about peppers is to be grade a it has to stand on its own two feet. something mis-shapen like this and can't stand up on its own or has scarring is not going to make it to a supermarket. his company is an offstheeft food recovery network, a stunt-led movement he started in college. >> there was a huge amount of food going to waste in our dining halls from these giant buffets. and there was hunger in the community. so we started a student organization to take that food from the dining halls and donate it to homeless shelters and meal
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sites in the community and it was the largest student movement against hunger. >> reporter: the doorstep delivery service has expanded to more than 30 markets and over 200,000 customers, including carolina devonte's home in cambridge, massachusetts. >> lemons. >> where is the imperfection here? >> good question. you think it's this? in my sprexperience, the food h been just as good as grocery store quality. when i look for the imperfections, i'm like, is it really imperfect? it seems just fine. and it's a great price. >> reporter: the mother of two says it's not only saving her money but also trips to the store. >> it's nice to think that there's a very small kind of consumer impact that i can make just choosing these vegetables versus choosing the very beautiful vegetables at the grocery store. >> reporter: the ugly produce movement has grown into a competitive field with companies like misfits market and hungry harvest all fighting for a
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share. it's also ignited a debate. skeptics pointing out more than 80% of food waste each year comes from consumers at homes, businesses and restaurants. >> there's no silver bullet to any of these problems like food waste. 6 billion pounds of food never make it to a human mouth. that's in any form. that's after the food banks, which we love, have taken produce, after the salsas, the juices and the jams. >> reporter: and on thousands of acres at lakeside organic gardens where juan gonzalez's team grows more than 50 different vegetable varieties, the rescue efforts have been a game-changer. >> profitability has gone up. our employees' production numbers have gone up. the fields' harvest numbers have gone up. everything has gone up. >> reporter: it's not only helped the bottom line here, but we're talking about an entire industry, particularly in the state, that's benefiting from this. >> that is correct. if we can turn all that around, california could pretty much end world hunger. >> you feel that way? >> that's how much product gets left behind.
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most kids have a dream of what they'll become when they grow up. steve hartman found a man whose dream took a little more time to come to reality. >> i really want to be a doctor when i grow up. >> reporter: whenever his two little girls play doctor and dream of becoming one some day -- >> let me take your heartbeat. >> reporter: master mechanic carl allenby is flooded with the feeling of deja vu. >> you wanted to be a doctor? >> oh, yeah. >> but that wasn't realistic? >> not where i came from, no. i grew up in east cleveland, which is a very impoverished city. we were on welfare. i remembered government powdered milk and block cheese. >> reporter: and because they were so poor, young carl quickly set aside his professional aspirations and focused instead on becoming the best auto mechanic he could.
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>> this is the parts store. >> you'd work on cars in the parking lot of the parts store? >> yeah, sometimes until 1:00, 2:00 in the morning. >> reporter: eventually he got his own shop and for 15 years, he did okay. until one day he decided to ratchet things up. in 2006, carl enrolled at ursulan college. his intention was to get a business degree to help him manage his business shop. but there was one hurdle. a biology class. he couldn't understand why he had to take it and put it off as long as possible. >> i'm a business major. what do i even care about biology? but i went to class, and in the first hour of being there i knew what i wanted to do with the rest of my life. all those ideas of wanting to be a doctor just came rushing back. >> reporter: and to make a long story short, the car doctor -- >> dr. carl allenby. >> reporter: -- is now a doctor doctor. last spring he graduated from northeast ohio medical university and today he's an
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emergency medicine resident at cleveland clinic akron general. by all accounts, carl is already an exemplary doctor. partlybecause, according to his supervisors, he worked so long in a garage. >> that cannot translate. >> you'd be shocked actually. it's some of the customer service. >> reporter: this is dr. rebecca merrill. could you imagine right now going and learning auto mechanics? >> no. but carl said he'll do our oil changes, so -- >> reporter: carl now has more important repairs on his mind. but this old autso mechanic also knows that whether you're working under a hood or staring down a hatch -- >> open up your mouth. eporter: -- your success succes hinges on your drive. >> i would hear pe say, well, carl, it's going to take nine years to become a doctor. i'd say, well, nine years are going to pass anyway. i'd rather be some place i want to be than some place that i could have been. >> rep it" blues. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine
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quijano. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, october 14th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." chaos in syria. the u.s. prepares to pull all troops from the region as turkey continues its assault on the kurds. there are fears of a widening conflict as the kurds strike a deal with syria. confronting conflicts of interest. joe biden's son, hunter, steps down from the board of a chinese company amid attacks from president trump. the pledge joe biden made about his family if he were to become president. and deadly police shooting. body camera video reveals what happened before a white texas

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