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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 6, 2020 3:00am-4:00am PST

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massive mourning in iraq and new threats. the remains of the country's top general return home as iran plots its revenge and tensions with the u.s. soar. >> we made the right decision to take out this terrorist. also tonight, deadly crashes. a bus, three big rigs and other vehicles pile up in pennsylvania. multiple people are killed and hurt. >> it was a kind of chain reaction type crash. impeachment showdown with the house holding back charges. a new demand for the president's senate trial. >> we need to take matters in our own hands and change the rules. >> democrats divided. can the party unite behind a candidate in time to beat president trump? the flu spreads in alarming numbers. what you need to know about this year's deadly virus.
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and second act. prison inmates change their lives by taking on new roles. >> what does it mean? >> hope. >> hope for me. >> hope for others, yeah. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. iran continues to be a country in mourning. huge crowds turned out sunday as the remains of general qasem soleimani returned home after being killed in a u.s. drone strike. his casket draped by the iranian flag. amid the grief, chants of "death to america." in baghdad where soleimani was killed by a u.s. drone strike, the country's parliament approved a plan which would remove all american troops from its soil. all this as the u.s. and now israel prepare for iran's retaliation. ian lee in baghdad begins our coverage. ♪ >> reporter: a hero's welcome for the body of qasem soleimani.
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tens of thousands packed iran's largest mosque as part of a grand funeral procession, while in parliament, members chanted "death to america." in neighboring iraq, lawmakers and parliament voted to kick out all foreign troops, a move that could spell the end of america's military presence in iraq. today's decision was rushed through after the u.s. air strike outside baghdad's airport. but for iraqis, the source of anger isn't the killings of soleimani but rather shiite militia commander muhandis, says an iraqi politician. do you think if qasem soleimani was the only person killed, that iraq wouldn't have been as angry? de oh, definitely.aq te qasemfi nisoleimani. some believe he is a hero. some believe he is a thug. >> reporter: the unitestatesam r
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killing an american contractor that sparked off a series of retaliatory attacks. >> why isn't there outrage when the americans are being attacked? >> yes, there was anger. but the reply was in proportion to the attack. to be honest, many people were very embarrassed by the attack on the american bases. >> reporter: in lebanon, hezbollah leader hassan nasrula promised america will pay the price for killing him. many fear a war is coming. are you afraid that iraq will become the battleground between the united states and iran? >> the major threat that we all feel here in iraq as a politicians, as officials, and as a population of iraq, that the americans are using iraq to
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turn it into a battlefield. >> reporter: both the u.s. and iran say they don't want a war, but a war is what they may get. tonight we just heard multiple explosions. we understand five to six rockets fell around the green zone, one injuring an iraqi family while two fell near the u.s. embassy. elaine? >> all right, ian lee, thank you. president trump returns to the white house tonight, wrapping up his winter vacation in florida. today the president renewed his threat against iran seeking revenge for soleimani's killing, tweeting the u.s. will quickly and fully strike back. but the president is facing sharp criticism at home for escalating a crisis between washington and tehran that's now put the middle east on a new razor's edge. here is paula reid. >> reporter: after a two-week stay at his florida resort, president trump returned to washington this afternoon where he faces the political fallout from an unprecedented strike
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against iran. >> we made the right decision to take out this terrorist. >> reporter: secretary of state mike pompeo hit the sunday show circuit today defending the administration's action. >> there was sound and just and legal reason for the actions the president took. >> reporter: last night, the president tweeted a warning that if iran strikes any american interests, the u.s. has targeted 52 iranian sites that will be hit very fast and very hard. pompeo also left open the possibility of targeting other iranian leaders. does this mean other iranian leaders are now potential u.s. targets? >> we're going do everything required to keep the american people safe. >> that sounds like a yes. >> reporter: democratic senator chris murphy is among the lawmakers calling for the administration to prove that take out iran's top military leader will prevent attacks rather than inspire them. >> we do not generally execute sovereign nations, in part because we know that opens a
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pandora's box that may expose american officials to assassination, but also because we know ultimately that might get more americans killed. >> reporter: concerns echoed by senate minority leader chuck schumer. >> we do not need this president either bumbling or impulsively getting us into a major war. >> cbs news has learned that senator lindsey graham, one of the president's closest allies, will urge the president to lay out a path to de-escalation with iran. elaine, graham was here in florida where the president earlier this week insists he wants the president to be seen as strong but ultimately reasonable. >> paula reid, thank you. and iran threatens to retaliate for soleimani's killing, a former commander of the revolutionary guard says israel will be targeted. seth doane is in tel aviv. seth, what is israel doing to prepare? >> israel knows it's a target and they have boosted troop
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reinforcements on the northern border with syria and lebanon. just across that border are a number of militant groups backed by iran, including hezbollah. and today we heard hezbollah's leader claim that it was israel that pushed the u.s. to kill qasem soleimani. soleimani had been on military intelligence radar here in israel for some time. he was a formidable foe. and today prime minister benjamin netanyahu commended president trump for taking out soleimani. we spoke with amos yadlin who was a former military intelligence chief here in israel. he told us he believes that the most likely targets would be u.s. base, embassies, an ambassadorer a general. but elaine, he said he believes iran does not want all-out war. >> seth doane, thank you. now to a new terror attack. it happened today in kenya and claimed the lives of three americans, one service member and two military contractors. al shabaab militants struck manda airfield near nairobi, a base shared by u.s. and kenyan forces. smoke rose from an airstrip, and
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the fighting continued for hours. officials say u.s. and kenyan troops repelled the assault and killed fiv attackers.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> now to pennsylvania and a deadly pileup on the state's turnpike. five people were killed. at least 60 others were hurt. state police called it a chain reaction crash. it happened near mt. pleasant about 40 miles southeast of pittsburgh. nearly 100 miles of the highway were closed in both directions. hours later, there was a second deadly crash less than 15 miles away. as hilary lane reports, it all began early this morning on icy roads. >> reporter: a tour bus carrying passengers from new jersey to ohio collided with three tractor-trailers and a passenger
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car. officials say the victims range in age between 7 and 60 years old. >> we have several people that were transported to area hospitals. we believe it's around 60 total. >> reporter: state police say the accident happened at around 3:40 in the morning. a z & d tour bus leaving from rockaway, new jersey and headed to cincinnati lost control on the pennsylvania turnpike near pittsburgh. it set off a chain reaction. >> it was headed on a downhill grade and the bus was unable to negotiate a corner. that bus went up an embankment, rolled over and was subsequently struck by two tractor-trailers, another tractor-trailer came and collided with those two tractor-trailers, and there was another passenger car that was also involved in this crash. >> reporter: the tour bus flipped on to its side. a fed ex truck separated from its cab. one passenger car was seen pinned between two other delivery trucks. police say many of the passengers on the tour bus do
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not speak english. >> we are working with the red cross. they are actually at the scene of the hospital, working with the different problems that come into play when it comes to finding housing, reconnecting loved ones. >> reporter: also this morning, less than 15 miles away another crash on i-70. that accident left a paramedic dead. officials say he was struck and killed while responding to an accident on the highway. police want to know if weather was a factor in both deadly accidents. the impact of that first crash was so severe, police are having trouble identifying the victims. we have reached out to z & d tours but haven't heard back. elaine? >> hilary, thank you. congress returns to work tomorrow still locked in a standoff over how to proceed with president trump's impeachment trial. today a top defender of the president detailed a new way to move forward. nicole killian is in washington. >> my goal is to start this
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trial in the next coming days. >> reporter: senate judiciary chairman lindsey graham says the senate should move forward with the trial even without articles of impeachment from the house. >> but if we don't get the articles this week, then we need to take matters in our own hands and change the rules, deem them be delivered to the senate so we can start the trial. >> article i is adopted. >> reporter: last month the house voted to impeach the president on abuse of power and obstruction of congress, but house speaker nancy pelosi has not sent the articles to the senate and has called on the gop-led chamber to ensure a trial. >> if the president is acquitted through a sham trial through, a mock trial where there are no witnesses, where everything is covered up, that will not be -- that will not stand him well with the american people. >> reporter: democratic leaders say new evidence has come to light, and they want to hear from witnesses, including the president's acting chief of staff mick mulvaney and former national security adviser john
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bolton, and they insist a trial can be conducted while also addressing the developing crisis with iran. >> i think our system is strong enough that we can do both. >> as for senator graham's proposal, a senior democratic aide tells cbs it would be unfair and undemocratic. keep in mind any change to the impeachment rules require 67 votes in the senate or a two-thirds majority. elaine? >> nicole killian, thank you. the democratic candidates were out in force today with the iowa caucuses just 29 days away. our new cbs news poll shows that while 14 remain in the race, iowa voters seem most interested in just five of them. there is a three-way tie for first in iowa with bernie sanders, joe biden, and pete buttigieg on top. elizabeth warren fading and amy klobuchar bumping up. ed o'keefe is on the ground in davenport, iowa. >> reporter: the 2020 race remains unsettled. in addition to a tie in iowa,
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bernie sanders and joe biden are on top in new hampshire followed by elizabeth warren and pete buttigieg. warren had been in a stronger position in the fall. >> i'm elizabeth warren. i'm running for president. >> reporter: fi of theandidates have yet t convince a majority of iowa or new hampshire primary voters that he or she could defeat president trump. that's important because in the last year democrats have consistently told us they're most concerned about finding the candidate they believe can defeat the president. >> president trump has no authority toe take us to a military conflict with iran, period. >> reporter: throughout the weekend, foreign policy has dominated the conversation gwynn the recent killing of iranian general qasem soleimani. democrats agree he was a ruthless terrorist, but also shared concerns about whether the president has a strategy to deal with the potential fallout across the middle east. >> what it's done has moved this country closer to war. we are not safer today than we were before donald trump acted. >> just because he deserved it
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doesn't mean it was the right strategic move. >> reporter: less than a month remains until the iowa caucus, a critical contest for democrats, because whoever wins here usually wins the nomination. in the coming days, candidates like joe biden and pete buttigieg will continue campaigning here in iowa and fundraising across the country. but the five senators running for president, like elizabeth warren here tonight have to stay closer to washington to see when and if that impeachment trial ever begins. elaine? >> ed o'keefe, ed, thank you. venezuelan opposition leader juan guaido was denied entry to the national assembly ahead of elections for parliament. guaido, in the blue suit tried but failed to climb an iron fence, struggling with national guard troops blocking his way and his widely expected election to lead parliament. the move is seen as a blatant power grab by venezuela's strongman nicolas maduro. to australia, where extreme heat is fueling more than 200
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bush fires raging across half the country. the death toll rose to at least 24 people this weekend. hundreds more homes and businesses were destroyed. officials fear thousands of animals have also packabeen kil over the past few months, and now the fires are even impacting new zealand, 1200 miles away, turning the daytime sky an eerie orange. still ahead, why this year's flu season could be the worst in years. thousands crossed the brooklyn bridge, united against hate. and second my gums are irritated.
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and healthy nails. nature's bounty, because you're better off healthy. new numbers from the cdc suggest this year's flu season could be especially severe. flu activity is now high in 34 states. it hasn't been this widespread this early in more than a decade. an estimated 2900 people have died. dr. jon lapook reports on what's being done to contain the outbreak. >> reporter: at riley hospital for children in indianapolis, fighting flu begins at the front door. >> we're just trying to take extra precautions. >> reporter: the hospital has created influenza checkpoints where security keeps a list of approved visitors, mostly parents. dr. elaine cox is an infectious disease specialist. >> even when they're visit and they're on the list, they're screened for illness, so fever,
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cough, temperature, body aches. >> reporter: around vulnerable kids, that's especially important to de'anthony knighton and his son. >> his immune system is a lot weaker with his condition. so making sure we are all vaccinated is very important to make sure he stays at 100% with his health. >> reporter: today the cdc reported there have been more than 55,000 hospitalizations this flu season. usually the predominant strain is influenza a, but this year it's been influenza b so far. what comes next is anyone's guess. lynette brammer is with the cdc. >> we'll have to wait and see what happens in the coming weeks. each if we are at peak, we still have half of the flu season to go, and there may be other viruses circulating after the influenza bs that are here right now. >> reporter: it's still too early to say how effective this year's influenza vaccine will end up being, but with the onng earlier than usual and accelerating, the cdc
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is reminding people it's not too late to get immunized. dr. jon lapook, cbs news. a former media mogul faces the first criminal trial triggered by the me too movement. new tide power pods one up the cleaning power of liquid. can it one up spaghetti night? it sure can. really? can it one up breakfast in bed? yeah, for sure. thanks, boys. what about that? uhh, yep! it can? yeah, even that! i would very much like to see that. me too. introducing new tide power pods. one up the toughest stains with 50% more cleaning power than liquid detergent. any further questions? uh uh! nope! one up the power of liquid with new tide power pods. he's a systems quarterback.
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harvey weinstein is headed for trial in new york tomorrow. the disgraced movie suasa two women.stn's arrest i 17 released a flood of accusations against other men, many from women who had remained silent for decades, sparking the me too movement. if convicted, weinstein faces up to life in prison. thousands of people marched across the brooklyn bridge today under the banner "no hate, no fear." the unity march was organized by new york's jewish community to stand up to the recent wave of anti-semitic attacks in the region. the nypd reports anti-semitic incidents in the city rose by 50% in the last year. the new england patriots ended their one-game play-off drive last night, losing to the tennessee titans 20-13. but the sorrow in new england is dwarfed by a bigger question. will future hall of fame quarterback and now free agent tom brady hang up his cleats or,
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hold your breath, would he dare play for another team? so far brady isn't saying. next, convicted
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we end tonight with men who have spent years behind bars. as dean reynolds reports, they're trying to rewrite the script, focusing on the next stage of their lives. >> i mean, think about it. >> reporter: in this south bend, indiana theater, an unlikely transition is taking place. >> we're talking about a child born with no heart. >> reporter: from the jail cell -- >> i managed to keep mine. >> reporter: to center stage, and possibly to a second chance.
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>> see, most of the friends i grew up with sold they souls to the devil. >> reporter: it's here a group of current and former convicts tell the stories in the play "heartless" which features jamarcus fields. how long were you in? >> 26 years. >> reporter: and it was for what? >> it was for murder. >> i understand i committed a crime. i had to do the time. all i'm saying is we still human. that fact don't change once you get incarcerated. >> reporter: fields finished his sentence in october at what's called a reentry center, which tries to reintroduce convicts to society. his fellow actors will end their decades behind bars in the coming months. explain to me how a guy in the joint gets involved in this sort of thing. >> as i begin to get closer and begin to see the finish line, okay, how am i going to reintroduce myself to the society, to the community? because for the last 26 years, this is what they've known me a.
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>> having no heart -- >> reporter: fellow convict turned actor john applegate. >> it makes doing time real easy. >> the pain that i've caused, that's going to haunt me till the day i died. >> this is a heartless human being. >> reporter: antrone crockett wrote the play in prison. is it amazing to you to see it come to life? >> it really is. it's a surreal feeling. this is the type of work i've been wanting to do. >> reporter: what does it mean? >> hope. >> hope for me. hope for others, yeah. >> reporter: 18-year-old harrison hayden was in the audience and got the message. >> i think it's two times more powerful because they went through what they went through and they're able to do something like this and share their story. >> reporter: because their story is bigger than play, bigger than a stage. it's about life and death and choices. dean reynolds, cbs news, south bend, indiana. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you, the news continues. for others check back with us a
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little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. iran continues to be a country in mourning. huge crowds turned out sunday as the remains of general qasem soleimani returned home after being killed in a u.s. drone strike. his casket draped by the iranian flag. amid the grief, chants of "death to america." in baghdad, where soleimani was killed by a u.s. drone strike, the country's parliament approved a plan which would remove all american troops from its soil. all this as the u.s. and now israel prepare for iran's retaliation. ian lee in baghdad begin ours coverage.
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♪ >> reporter: a hero's welcome for the body of qasem soleimani. tens of thousands packed iran's largest mosque as part of a grand funeral procession, while in parliament, members chanted "death to america." in neighboring iraq, lawmakers and parliament voted to kick out all foreign troops, a move that could spell the end of america's military presence in iraq. today's decision was rushed through after the u.s. air strike outside baghdad's airport. but for iraqis, the source of anger isn't the killings of soleimani but rather shiite militia commander abu mahdi al muhandis, says an iraqi politician. do you think if qasem soleimani was the only person killed, that iraq wouldn't have been as angry? >> oh, definitely. definitely. qasem soleimani has mixed some bieve h aates aq on q meel.
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es al handis' militias for killing an american contractor that sparked off a series of retaliatory attacks. >> why isn't there outrage when the americans are being attacked? >> yes, there was anger. there was. but the reply was in proportion to the attack. to be honest, many people were very embarrassed by the attack on the american bases. >> reporter: in lebanon, hezbollah leader hassan nasrallah promised supporters american soldiers will pay the price for killing him. this comes as additional u.s. troops leave for the region. many fear a war is coming. are you afraid that iraq will become the battleground between the united states and iran? >> the major threat that we all feel here in iraq as a politicians, as officials, and as a population of iraq, that the americans are using iraq to
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iran say they don't want a war, but a war is what they may get. tonight we just heard multiple explosions. we understand five to six rockets fell around the green zone, one injuring an iraqi family while two fell near the u.s. embassy. elaine? >> all right, ian lee, thank you. president trump returns to the white house tonight, wrapping up his winter vacation in florida. today the president renewed his threat against iran seeking revenge for soleimani's killing, tweeting the u.s. will quickly and fully strike back. but the president is facing sharp criticism at home for escalating a crisis between washington and tehran that's now put the middle east on a new razor's edge. here is paula reid. >> reporter: after a two-week stay at his florida resort, president trump returned to afr he faces the political fallout
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from an unprecedented strike against iran. >> we made the right decision to take out this terrorist. >> reporter: secretary of state mike pompeo hit the sunday show circuit today defending the administration's action. >> there was sound and just and legal reason for the actions the president took. >> reporter: last night, the president tweeted a warning that if iran strikes any american interests, the u.s. has targeted 52 iranian sites that will be hit very fast and very hard. pompeo also left open the possibility of targeting other iranian leaders. does this mean other iranian leaders are now potential u.s. targets? >> we're going do everything required to keep the american people safe. >> that sounds like a yes. >> reporter: democratic senator chris murphy is among the lawmakers calling for the administration to prove that taking out iran's top military leader will prevent attacks rather than inspire them. >> we do not generally execute high level political figures of sovereign nations, in part
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because we know that opens a pandora's box that may expose american officials to assassination, but also because we know ultimately that might get more americans killed. >> reporter: concerns echoed by senate inority leader chuck schumer. >> we do not need this president either bumbling or impulsively getting us into a major war. >> cbs news has learned that senator lindsey graham, one of the president's closest allies, will urge the president to lay out a path to de-escalation with iran. elaine, graham was here in florida where the president earlier this week insists he wants the president to be seen as strong but ultimately reasonable. >> paula reid, thank you. as iran threatens to retaliate for soleimani's killing a former commander of the revolutionary guard says israel will be targeted. seth doane is in tel aviv. seth, what is israel doing to prepare? >> elaine, israel knows it's a
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target and they have boosted troop reinforcements on the northern border with syria and lebanon. just across that border are a number of militant groups backed by iran, including hezbollah. and today we heard hezbollah's leader claim that it was israel that pushed the u.s. to kill qasem soleimani. soleimani had been on military intelligence radar here in israel for some time. he was a formidable foe.and prir beetyahu commended presidt leimani. we spokeam was a former military intelligence chief here in israel. he told us he believes that the most likely targets would be u.s. bases, embassies, an ambassador, a general. but elaine, he said he believes iran does not want all-out war. >> seth doane, thank you. now to a new terror attack. it happened today in kenya and claimed the lives of three americans, one service member and two military contractors. al shabaab militants struck manda airfield near nairobi, a base shared by u.s. and kenyan forces.
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smoke rose from an airstrip, and the fighting continued for hours. officials say u.s. and kenyan troops repelled the assault and killed five attackers. now to pennsylvania and a deadly pileup on the state's turnpike. five people were killed. at least 60 others were hurt. state police called it a chain reaction crash. it happened near mt. pleasant about 40 miles southeast of pittsburgh. nearly 100 miles of the highway were closed in both directions. hours later, there was a second deadly crash less than 15 miles away. as hilary lane reports, it all began early this morning on icy roads. >> reporter: a tour bus carrying passengers from new jersey to ohio collided with three tractor-trailers and a passenger car. less than 15 miles away, another crash on i-70. that accident left a paramedic dead.
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officials say he was struck and killed while responding to an accident on the highway. we have reached out to z & d tours but haven't heard back. elaine? co mpetition and we broke through. you've tried retinol, but you have never tried one like this. olay's retinol24 complex hydrates better than the #1 retinol. visibly smoother brighter skin in just 24 hours. a skin upgrade? new olay retinol24. face anything. olay. now available with retinol serum and retinol eye cream.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome back to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. tensions remain high in the middle east and around the world after the assassination of iran's top general. qasem soleimani was killed in a drone strike at baghdad airport on orders of president trump. the iraqi parliament voiced its outrage, voting to expel all 5200 u.s. troops from the country, and iran said it will no longer abide by terms of the 2015 international nuclear deal. president trump pulled the u.s. out of the treaty, but iran continued to operate within its terms. so who is qasem soleimani and why would his death spark such
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anger? here is seth doane. >> reporter: major general qasem soleimani was an architect of iran's influence across the middle east, creating a shiite ies, including hezbollah com warned 35 u.s. targets in tel aviv are within iran's reach. chants of "death to the u.s." have been a common refrain among protesters in iran since the 1979 hostage crisis, and soleimani has been seen as a fierce nationalist fighting for iran, reaching cult-like status. >> he is a hero in iran. he is adored. there are posters of him everywhere. everybody knows who he is. >> reporter: dexter filkins, a staff writer at "the new yorker" penned a profile on soleimani and likend his force which soleimani led to a sort of cia meets special forces. >> he is one of the most powerful men in the country. he is very close to the supreme
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leader. it would be like killing, you know, the vice president or supreme court justice. i mean, it's huge. >> reporter: soleimani is credited with employing so-called asymmetrical warfare tactics, using proxy forces to fight for iran, including against israel. how close of an eye did you keep on soleimani? >> very close. >> reporter: amos yadlin is a former chief of israeli military intelligence. >> you could see him in any place that iran tried to change the regime or to have a terror attack. you could see him in lebanon with hezbollah, in syria fighting for assad, in iraq killing american soldiers, and in yemen firing rockets to saudi arabia. >> reporter: yadlin told us he thinks iran is considering three options for retaliation, a strike on the united states, which is risky, on an american ally like saudi arabia or united arab emirates, or israel, but ultimately he thinks iran does
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tucker has been writing songs and performing on stage for more thisk in big way. her new album "while i'm liviel" has her nominated for grammy awards. the singer sat down with bob schieffer to discuss her life and music. >> reporter: on a cold and rainy december sunday outside northern virginia's music hall, the sellout crowd was lining up five hours before show time. >> how about you guys? >> reporter: some earlier. >> we've been here since 7:00 this morning and we were first. ♪ >> reporter: and they're inside tanya tucker was doing what she has been doing since she was nine years old, getting ready to put on a show. ♪ >> reporter: after more than 50 years on stage, she is up this month for not just one, but four grammy nominations.
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more than any other country singer. has it sunk in yet? >> i don't really think so. it's great to be nominated, but it would be nice to win one too. ♪ ♪ in her younger days they called her delta dawn slow ♪ >> reporter: you likely know her hit. since the ripe old age of 13, she's had nearly two dozen top 40 albums. >> thank for all the number one songs, you know, that you've given me. hell, i like the number tens. ♪ >> reporter: she became country music's wild child with a personal life that has often grabbed more attention than her music. ♪ i bring my flowers now while i'm living ♪ >> reporter: but her latest album has made her the critics' darling, and it's her music that is making headlines again. well, i got to tell you. i got my marching orders here. i'm told do not ask her how she
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likes this comeback, because you say it's not a comeback. so what is it? >> gosh, lik word "relaunch". >> reporter: relaunch? >> yeah, relaunch. it wasn't something that i had really planned out. it really just kind of happened. >> reporter: isn't that always the best way when something just sort of happens? >> well, of course. you make plans and god chuckles when you start making plans. >> reporter: god only knows how oil field rough neck jesse bo tucker recognized the potential in his youngest daughter, tanya born 1958 in seminole, texas. but by age 9, she knew what she wanted, and her father was with her all the way. >> i was ready then, but they just weren't ready for me. my dad always said you're a 9-year-old girl. so that means you're going to have to put twice as much feeling in that song you're singing because he said they're not going to believe a 9-year-old kid sing.
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♪ you ain't woman enough to take my man ♪ >> reporter: in 1970, she landed an audience with legendary nashville producer billy sherrill, still hot after his success with tammy wynette's "stand by your man." sherrill wanted tanya to record an age appropriate song called "the happiest girl in the whole usa." she was set on another. >> it started out "she's 41 and her daddy still called her baby ♪ . i said that is my song. ♪ she's 41 and her daddy still calls her baby ♪ ♪ all the folks around brownsville say she's crazy ♪ >> reporter: delta dawn is sung from the point of view of a middle age faded beauty. billy sherrill heard bette midler sing it on "the tonight show," yet somehow he saw fit to offer it to tucker. ♪ delta dawn, what's that flower
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you have on, could it be a faded rose from days gone by ♪ ♪ and did i hear you say he was a meeting you here today, to take you to his mansion in the sky ♪ >> reporter: it is just one of the all-time greats. ♪ in her younger days >> reporter: the lyrics seemed so improbable coming from a 13-year-old, that the record label tried to keep tanya's age a secret. ♪ that didn't last long, and as the hits rolled in, so did the money. ♪ the little girl with the big girl's voice took on some grown-up habit, drinking, drugs, and romance. do you think in any way any of that hurt your career? >> you know, it could have. it probably did in some ways. but in a way i don't think you
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can be successful unless you've had a lot of failures. and i've had some. ♪ >> reporter: the same can be said for her love life. though she was never married, she has raised her three children as a single mother and made no apologies for it. throughout the 1980s, she carried on a public affair with glen campbell, who was more than two decades her senior. >> it was the kind of love that i think i probably found it too soon in life and was not mature enough at that time. i think if we'd met later on, we would have made it. because it was love there. ♪ like two sparrows in a hurricane ♪ >> reporter: that's just the sort of feeling you hear in our songs, the emotion that has always cut through the tabloid headlines. maybe that's why tucker's fans use one particular word to describe her. >> she's real. she's the real deal. >> she is real, very real. >> what you see is what you get.
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>> you get a lot with her. >> yeah you do. >> reporter: yes, they do, and the more real she gets. >> open for business. >> reporter: the more they love her.eeopen the whole time. thank you very much. thank you. ♪ the rodeo is an old man's dreams ♪ >> reporter: as it turns out, two of tucker's biggest fans would help compose this latest chapter in her life story. >> wants to be an introwith shooter on the piano. >> reporter: in 2018, producer shooter jennings, the son of waylon jennings regarded singer/songwriter brandi carlile to write new material for tucker. but it's a song that carlisle has been trying to put on paper for decades that would with carlisle's help. ♪ though it's been time, tears
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and money in my old breathless body ♪ ♪ if you're heart is in them flowers, bring 'em on ♪ . >> it kind of chokes me up just hearing you sing it. because it makes you think of the times that that you'd wished you told somebody. >> absolutely. it's caused me to make a real effort to try to tell those that i love that i do love them. and even some of those that i don't, you know? ♪ and even though one day they'll bury me and jesse ray ♪ >> reporter: "bring my flowers now" is the sound of a more reflective tanya tucker. at age 61 here in franklin, tennessee, she surrounds herself with the people and the animals she loves. >> how's my baby boy. jenin is going to go in the box with me, and of course his daddy
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who is in a small box. i want an extra big box. i'll have five dogs and two horses. we're going to be together forever. ♪ when i die, i may not go to heaven. >> reporter: tanya tucker has packed a lot of living in her time on earth. >> tanya tucker! >> reporter: since she was a little girl, her voice has been her ticket. ♪ delta dawn, what's that flower you have on ♪ >> reporter: and her voice has never had more to offer than it does today. ♪ ♪ lord knows i'm a hard luck girl ♪ >> my dad always told me you know how to change the world? he said you build your platform, you know? you build it, build it, build it until you can't build it any higher, you can't get no higher. and that's when you can change the world, because then people will listen to you. that's the thing. >> want to not just be another female on this planet. i want to change a lot of things. >> reporter: well, i think you're going toe change people when you remind them to bring
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the flowers now. >> and that's just another way of saying show me you love me now. don't hesitate.
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the halls of many colleges and universities are adorned with paintings of school presidents, big money donors and famous alumni. but a princeton university, a gallery of portraits presents campus workers as the heroes they are. adriana diaz has the story from her alma mater. >> okay, the first two orders are up. >> reporter: at princeton university, the most popular man on campus. >> here you go, sir. >> reporter: may be howard sutphin, who has worked in dining 22 years. >> can i have a two-egg omelette with everything? >> everybody knows howard. >> that's true. >> reporter: that's because he is a staple at princeton games. >> every game or every sport i go to, it's like bumblebees. they come right to me, and i love it. i love it. >> reporter: how many times have you come here to look at this?
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>> ah, i don't want to say. >> reporter: but now he is off the sidelines and center stage in portraits by visiting art fellow mario moore. >> these people are some of the most important people on campuses that deserve to be seen and seen on the walls in the same way as these figures historically have been seen at institutions. >> reporter: so now graduate james madison and princeton presidents are joined by guy packwood, a princeton security guard, garfield brown, a groundskeeper, and sutphin, kaneisha long and valerie sykes from dining. >> the majority of the people you see in dining and facilities are african americans. for me as a student, these are the people they connected with. >> when they need some advice or a motherly figure, a nice hug, you know, they'll come and look for either me or howard to talk to them. >> i figure they're away from home and they need love. and i tell them, you know, when you're in the dining area, just relax, eat your food.
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assume the minute you leave here, jump back into that book. >> reporter: you're creating a legacy for people who are so often in the background. >> for sure. and i think it was a really important for it to be at princeton because of the history of princeton. >> reporter: that history includes slaves who worked at the president's house for decades, and woodrow wilson, who blocked black student enrollment as princeton's president and oversaw segregationist policies as u.s. president. these portraits are working to create a new legacy. >> i was wondering how i can be here after i retire, but that's going to be here after i retire, because the school has purchased it. uh-huh. >> repor what does that mean to you? >> love. that's love. all the years i g love, i got it back in that. >> reporter: love that will now live on. adriana diaz, cbs news, princeton, new jersey. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning
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news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. . this monday, juary this monday, january 5th, 2020, this is the "cbs morning news." trading threats, trending, president trump issues a warning about targeting iranian cultural sites, around threatens iran. iraq tells u.s. troops to get out. the continuing fallout this morning. deadly turnpike crash. at least five people are dead and bout 60 injured in pennsylvania. a tour bus set off a fatal chain reaction. and the golden globe goes to -- >> plus the big winners and big tributes at the golden globe awards.

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