Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 3, 2021 3:12am-4:00am PST

3:12 am
anti anti-vaxxing. okay? so if you think that's how we're going to keep government open, forget that. forget that. >> reporter: ultimately this is little more than a political stunt because there have always been enough votes to pass this measure, keeping the government funded. the question was how quickly could the senate do it and ultimately a path forward became available tonight. margaret? >> kris van cleave, thank you very much. police in los angeles made an arrest today in a killing that shocked the city. here's cbs's carter evans. >> reporter: this is one of the most protected and patrolled cities in the world. you will be caught and brought to justice. >> reporter: police say 29-year-old ariel maynor is responsible for shooting and killing jacqueline avant, the 8-year-old wife of clarence avant. it happened in the truesdale neighborhood of beverly hills at 2:30 wednesday morning. just one hour later police responded to another shooting at
3:13 am
a home in nearby hollywood. >> he was in the house and collecting property and then after that somehow discharged a weapon and apparently shot himself in the foot. >> reporter: this video appears to show maynor with an injured foot being wheeled away from the hollywood home. >> somewhere in the night we had an astute watch commander at hollywood that was starting to put two and two together and reached out to beverly hills and there were some similarities. >> reporter: like surveillance video of the getaway vehicle seen heading toward hollywood and an ar-15 style rifle found at the second scene. the detectives believe was used to kill jacqueline avant. today the family of the philanthropist and former runway model expressed gratitude to law enforcement and said "now let justice be served." police say maynor had an extensive criminal record and he is out on parole. detectives haven't had a chance to speak with him since he is in the hospital. tonight investigators have a gun, a car, and a suspect in
3:14 am
custody. but what they don't have is a motive. margaret? >> carter evans in beverly hills. tonight we're looking into one of the causes of america's housing crunch. the nationwide shortage of available homes is being driven in part by a labor shortage. industry experts say more than 2 million new workers will be needed over the next three years to meet the demand. here's cbs's mark strassmann. >> and so right now they're running the wire through the house. >> reporter: developer joe otala builds houses. like this three-bedroom, 2 1/2 bath near boise. >> and the good news is these guys have shown up. >> yeah. these guys are on the job. exactly. >> reporter: because that's not true for everybody. >> it's not. >> reporter: america's builders face twin supply chain crises. a shortage of materials and labor. all trades. >> all the way through, you know, tile and sheet rock, roofing, all of those things --
3:15 am
>> reporter: electrical. >> electrical. >> reporter: plumbing. >> exactly. >> reporter: the industry says it now has up to 430,000 open construction jobs and will need another 61,000 new hires every month for the foreseeable future. >> we need to replace, or place 740,000 people into the industry a year for the next three years. that's at crisis levels. >> reporter: this labor shortage began in 2008 during the great recession. older tradespeople kept roirg. fewer young people want to work with their hands. then the pandemic nailed the door shut on training programs. >> it's not so much us telling the contractor when they need to show up. it's them saying this is when i can show up. >> reporter: is it going to get better anytime soon? >> the narrative's changing. skilled trade jobs provide a great living. and college isn't really for everybody. >> reporter: that's the industry's hope. but for now labor costs more, so houses cost more. the framer of this house?
3:16 am
he charged atala $6,000 more than six months ago. mark strassmann, cbs news, boise. there's a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news."
3:17 am
3:18 am
new vicks convenience pack. dayquil severe for you... and daily vicks super c for me. vicks super c is a daily supplement with vitamin c and b vitamins to help energize and replenish. dayquil severe is a max strength daytime, coughing,
3:19 am
power through your day, medicine. new from vicks. did you know some deodorants may not last all day? secret works immediately! and is designed to last for up to 48 hours. with secret, keep it fresh. available in over 10 amazing scents and aluminum free. secret we turn now to a civil war that has killed tens of thousands of people in the african nation of the devastation has escalated into what the u.n. calls the world's worst hunger crisis in a decade. with millions facing starvation. here's cbs's debora patta. >> reporter: it started as an internal rebellion, morphed into an ethnic conflict, and now a famine. forced starvation has become a weapon of war, with hundreds of thousands of children in dire need of food. these images were filmed in
3:20 am
october. aid workers say it's even worse now. the world food program's clair neville in addis ababa told us they've been struggling to get food to the nearly 8 million people behind battle lines. >> we really need all authorities to allow us the access to reach the vulnerable populations wherever and whenever needed. >> reporter: some areas haven't had supplies for four months. trucks finally started going back into tigray last week. but with only enough to feed under half a million people. >> we must get the food and nutrition assistance to people peace prize winner le,nger. abi ahmed has swapped his business suit for battle fatigues. here you see him on a satellite phone leading his troops.
3:21 am
and behind the front lines, while the men wage war, the children battle starvation. it's difficult to gauge the real extent of the food crisis. for the most part international media has not been allowed into the conflict zones. and in some areas communication has been cut off altogether. margaret? >> debora patta, thank you. still ahead, our interview with a man who is starting a new life after serving decades behind bars for a crime he did not facing expensive vitamin c creams with dull results? olay brightens it up with new olay vitamin c. gives you two times brighter skin. hydrates better than the 100, 200, even $400 cream. see, my skin looks more even, and way brighter. dullness? so don turntsneway vin c my skin can face anything. shop the full vitamin c collection at olay.com
3:22 am
clerk: hello, how can i? sore throat pain? ♪honey lemon♪ try vicks vapocool drops. in honey lemon chill. for fast-acting sore throat relief. wooo vaporize sore throat pain with vicks vapocool drops. when i get a migraine, i shut out the world. but with nurtec odt that's all behind me now. nurtec can now treat and prevent migraines. don't take if allergic to nurtec. the most common side effects were nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. ask your doctor about nurtec today. when you really need to sleep you reach for the really good stuff. nausea, stomach pain, and indigestion. new zzzquil ultra helps you sleep better and longer when you need it most. it's non habit forming and powered by the makers of nyquil. new zzzquil ultra. when you really really need to sleep.
3:23 am
brene brown is the author of five number one "new york times" best-sellers. her ted talk "the power of vulnerability" is one of the most watched in the world, with 60 million views. norah o'donnell recently spoke with brown about her new book, "atlas of the heart," which maps out the language we use to describe how we feel. >> you interviewed more than 7,000 people, and what did you find about how people express themselves? >> we asked everyone to write down all the emotions that they could identify in themselves as they were experiencing them. and the average was three. i can identify happy, sad, and mad. and i thought oh, my god, what happens to us and what happens to the connection that we have e expes and emotions just thrig?
3:24 am
like what happens when it's actually not anger or sadness, it's actually disappointment or it's even more profound than sadness, it's despair or hopelessness or, you know, anguish? >> you write about growing up in a very tough, suck it up and get it done and don't talk about my feelings family. i think many people can relate to that. >> i think the only emotion that was allowed was anger. because there was some toughness around it. so today i have to be really careful about defaulting to anger when i'm feeling different things. >> mm-hmm. >> and you say that resonates for a lot of us. i think we live in a world where it's easier to be angry than it is to be hurt. >> how closely is understanding and naming your emotions tied to learning and to growth? >> the more accurately you can name what you're feeling the
3:25 am
better you can regulate it, the better you can move through it. >> you can watch more of norah's interview with
3:26 am
3:27 am
after serving 43 years behind bars for a crime he did not commit, kevin strickland is starting a new life as a free man. strickland, now 62, was released from a prison in missouri last week. he's received more than a million dollars in donations to a trust fund set up by the midwest innocence project. he's now planning to visit his daughter, who was only seven weeks old when he was arrested. in his first network interview since his release strickland tells cbs's erin moriarty he's racing to make up for lost time. >> i need to get going. i've got things to do. it's time to go. >> do you feel like you've
3:28 am
gotten a sec chond chance, you' got to fill it up to make up for everything you've lost? >> yes. they tell me to take it one step at a time, to slow down. but they didn't miss 43. i did. so i've got to go. >> strickland also shaved of off the beard he'd promised to remove as a free man. tonight major league baseball is in a deep winter freeze. for the first time in 26 years team owners today imposed a lockout on players. the league's collective bargaining agreement with players expired overnigt. until the new deal's hammered out, teams won't be able to sign or trade players. the labor dispute also put spring training and the upcoming season in jeopardy. a late season wildfire tore through a montana farming community, burning several homes and grain elevators that had stood for more than a century. the fire was sparked by fallen power lines. high winds fueled the flames, which quickly burned across drought-stricken fields. no injuries were reported. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. reporting from the nation's
3:29 am
capital, i'm margaret brennan. this is "cbs news flash." i'm tom hanson in new york. we begin with major news on capitol hill. congress has passed a stopgap spending bill averting a government shutdown. the agreement funds government operations until february 18th. it now heads to the white house. google says it will delay its mandatory return to office plans amid concerns over the omicron variant. the tech giant says it will now wait until the new year to decide when it will require its thousands of u.s. employees to go in. and it was a star-studded night in washington for the national christmas tree lighting ceremony. president biden helped light the tree. you can watch the99th national christmas tree lighting ceremony, hosted by l.l. cool j,
3:30 am
this sunday right here on cbs. for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening. thank you for joining us. i'm margaret brennan in for norah. tonight, the new covid variant omicron is spreading to a growing number of states. moments ago the governor of new york announced five new confirmed cases. it has also been detected in california, minnesota and colorado. since omicron was first discovered by scientists in south africa, it has spread to at least two dozen countries. it is now the dominant strain in south africa where infections are spiking. the biden administration today launched a new campaign to get
3:31 am
more americans a booster shot, part of a strategy to manage a surge of delta infections that's already under way. cbs's weijia jiang leads off our coverage from the white house. good evening, weijia. >> good evening, margaret. tonight we are learning that four of those new omicron cases are in new york city. still, president biden is stressing that he does not believe shutdowns or lockdowns are necessary right now. he was frank, though, about the potentially dark winter ahead, which health officials warn will include a surge in cases and deaths. >> my plan i'm announcing today pulls no punches in the fight against covid-19. >> reporter: president biden revealed his latest strategy to combat covid-19 as the u.s. confirmed at least eight more cases of the omicron variant, including a minnesota man who attended an anime convention in manhattan just before thanksgiving, an event that drew about 50,000 people, and a woman
3:32 am
from colorado who recently returned from africa. both patients were fully vaccinated. >> she is experiencing mild symptoms and is isolating at home. >> reporter: tonight preliminary data shows omicron is almost 2 1/2 times more likely to reinfect people who previously had covid. >> experts say that of covid-19 cases will continue to rise in the weeks ahead and this winter. so we need to be ready. >> reporter: as a new strain spreads, the president announced that all international travelers including americans and those who are fully vaccinated will be required to get tested one day before coming to the u.s. and in a new effort to track cases private insurance companies will have to reimburse people for at-home covid tests. so far they've been expensive and in short supply. mask mandates will also be extended on planes, trains and public transportation through mid march. but vaccines are at the center
3:33 am
of the president's plan. hundreds of new family vaccination sites will open up, focusing on giving shots to children. and there's a big push to get people boosted. >> go get it now. >> reporter: 71% of adults in the u.s. are fully vaccinated but of those only 21% have gotten a booster shot. health experts say vaccinations and boosters are critical, especially now that omicron is here. >> it's probably already more widely spread than our early determinations have indicated. and it will spread further because it is highly contagious. >> reporter: as scientists scramble to learn more about the omicron variant, tonight the white house says that nothing is off the table as they think about potential new travel restrictions. that includes vaccine and testing mandates for domestic flights. margaret? >> weijia jiang at the white
3:34 am
house. the parents of the 15-year-old boy accused of shooting and killing four fellow students in oxford at a high school in michigan this week could soon be facing criminal charges. cbs's nancy chen has new details tonight. >> we hear something that sounds like someone being punched against a locker. and he with heard at least six more gunshots followed by screaming. >> drop your backpack! >> reporter: as the attack unfolded oxford high school senior talene itkovitz credits her math teacher for springing into action. >> the shooter was right outside our classroom. he was able to shut the door immediately and get us all in a lockdown mode. he saved all of us. >> reporter: after police evacuated her class what she saw stunned her. >> there were silver bullet shells all over the floor in the hall. >> reporter: prosecutors say 15-year-old ethan crumbley used a semi-automatic handgun purchased by his father just days earlier in tuesday's rampage. four students were killed and seven other people were injured.
3:35 am
>> sir, do you understand all the charges against you? >> yes, i do. >> reporter: crumbley is now in a county jail charged with 24 felony counts including terrorism and first-degree murder. >> it's a clear intent to execute a school shooting and kill students. >> reporter: oakland county prosecutor karen mcdonald told us she wants to hold anyone who could have prevented the shooting accountable. >> you had also mentioned the possibility of charging crumbley's parents. where does that stand right now? >> we are actively considering and investigating. >> reporter: and what could those potential charges look like? >> it went far beyond just negligent parents. >> reporter: investigators say the day before the shooting crumbley made videos about killing students and just hourds beforehand he and his parents met with school officials about behavioral problems. and as students process what happened chaplains have been here at the school, where there's a growing memorial. students are also gathering tonight at a nearby park for i
3:36 am
acandlelight vigil, margaret. >> nancy, thank you. we're looking into one of the causes of america's housing crunch. the nationwide shortage of available homes is being driven in part by a labor shortage. industry experts say more than 2 million new workers will be needed over the next three years to meet the demand. here's cbs's mark strassmann. >> and so right now they're running the wire through the house. >> reporter: developer joe atala builds houses like this three-bedroom 2 1/2-bath near boise. >> and the good news is these guys are showing up. >> yeah. >> these guys are on the job. >> exactly. >> reporter: because that's not true for everybody. >> it's not. >> reporter: america's builders face twin supply chain crises. a shortage of materials and labor. all trades. >> all the way through, you know, tile and sheetrock, rofg, all of those things - eporter: electrical. >> electrical. >> reporter: plumbing. >> exactly.
3:37 am
>> reporter: the industry says it now has up to 430,000 open construction jobs and will need another 61,000 new hires every month for the foreseeable future. >> we need to replace -- or place 740,000 people into the industry a year for the next three years. that's at crisis levels. >> reporter: this labor shortage began in 2008 during the great recession. older tradespeople kept retiring. fewer young people want to work with their hands. then the pandemic nailed the door shut on training programs. >> it's not so much us telling the contractor when they need to show up. it's them saying this is when i can show up. >> reporter: is it going to get better anytime soon? >> the narrative's changing. skilled trade jobs provide a great living and college really isn't for everybody. >> reporter: that's the industry's hope. but for now labor costs more, so houses cost more. te framer of this house, he charged atala $6,000 more than
3:38 am
six months ago. mark strassmann, cbs news, boise. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. nyquil severe gives you powerful relief for your worst cold and flu symptoms, on sunday night and every night. nyquil severe. the nighttime, sniffling, sneezing, coughing, aching, stuffy head, best sleep with a cold, medicine.
3:39 am
most bladder leak pads were similar. until always discreet invented a pad that protects differently. with two rapiddry layers. for strong protection, that's always discreet. question your protection. try always discreet.
3:40 am
>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm jan crawford in washington. thanks for staying with us. after 43 years behind bars, 62-year-old kevin strickland is talking to us about his efforts to start a new life as a free strickland was sent to prison in 1979 for a triple murder he did not commit. last week a missouri judge ordered his immediate release, citing clear and convincing evidence that strickland was wrongly convicted. erin moriarty has been following his story for years, and she sat down with strickland for his first in-person television interview since his release. re
3:41 am
prison with very little. the state won't provide him any financial assistance and even took away his wheelchair. really. in the last few days family and friends and thousands of strangers have rallied around him as he striez to start a life he never got to live. >> he's here! >> what did this feel like on tuesday, november 23rd, going out for the last time? >> the day that i walked out, you mean? rolled out? i'm feeling it turned into a space age i know nothing about. >> reporter: it's been a whirlwind of a week for kevin strickland, who once feared he'd die in prison. >> three, two, one! >> reporter: the 62-year-old joined the mayor at kansas city's christmas tree lighting ceremony, received more than a
3:42 am
million dollars in donations to a trust fund set up by the midwest innocence project, and shaved off the beard he'd promised to remove as a free man. >> done deal? >> done deal. >> reporter: but after 43 years behind bars some things are harder to leave behind. >> i'm still referring to my bed as a bunk. my room as a cell. sleep in light. you know, paranoia. always on alert. suspicious of everything. yeah, i'm still there. i haven't shook that off yet. somebody shook my hand, i thought what do you want? >> reporter: so the world has changed a great deal since you went in. >> is this the same planet? i mean, yes. yeah. i'm still trying to figure out how to open my telephone. >> reporter: what do you mean? >> i don't know how to turn it on. they're trying to move me all the emojis and i'm trying to say hello. >> reporter: strickland was sent to prison in 1979 after being wrongfully convicted of a triple homicide by an all-white jury.
3:43 am
in may of 2021 the local prosecutor, jean peters baker, declared strickland factually innocent but had to fight the state attorney general in court to secure strickland's release. >> did you ever expect that it would be this long and this hard? >> no. nope. it was surprising. discouraging, disheartening. they wanted him to stay right where he was. >> reporter: but during a three-day hearing missouri judge james welsh did look at the evidence and ruled that the court's confidence in strickland's conviction is so undermined that it cannot stand. six months after peters baker's press conference, strickland was finally on his way home. >> how did you hear you were getting out of prison? >> oh. i watch soaps in the daytime, one in particular. i could hear other inmates banging on their door and beating on the wall, hollering my name. and i went up to the door and they said hey, man, you're getting out, you're getting out, you're getting out.
3:44 am
>> if you had cut a deal you would have been out 20 years ago at least. >> maybe 30. now, that would have required me to lie. admit to a crime that i didn't do. i just didn't have that kind of lie in me. >> no regrets? >> no. i'm sitting here today and i didn't do it. i've still got a few years in me and i'm just going to try to make the best of them the rest of the bap. >> reporter: strickland is now focused on starting the life he says he never got to live, including reconnecting with his daughter, who was just seven weeks old when he was arrested. >> have you talked to her since you got out? >> yes. i'm going to go with the short answer, yes. >> and does she want to see you? >> yeah. she's adamant about it. yes. she's going to give me a whole week. >> seriously? >> she's going to give me a whole week. yeah. so we might not sleep. because i'm making an itinerary now. we're doing everything i can think of. >> do you feel like you've
3:45 am
gotten a second chance, you've got to fill it up to make up for everything you've lost? >> yes. and they try to tell me one step at a time, slow down, but they didn't miss 43. i did. so i've got to go. >> the missouri attorney general's office claims it was defending the rule of law but that the court has spoken. it will not pursue further action. as for wrongful imprisonment payments, in missouri that only applies to people exonerated through dna evidence. so strickland doesn't qualify. he says he wants to help change that law and help other wrongly convicted inmates prove
3:46 am
such tree-mendous views. i'm at a moss for words. when a cough tries to steal dad's punchlines, he takes robitussin naturals powered by 100% drug-free ingredients. are you gonna leaf me hanging? soothe your cough naturally. frequent heartburn? not anymore. the prilosec otc two-week challenge is helping people love what they love again. just one pill a day. 24 hours. zero heartburn. because life starts when heartburn stops. take the challenge at prilosecotc dot com.
3:47 am
feeling sluggish or weighed down? it could be a sign that your digestive system isn't working at it's best taking metamucil everyday can help. metamucil psyllium fiber, gels to trap and remove the waste that weighs you down. ito he to promoodar cl ghter more metamucil. support your daily digestive health.
3:48 am
and try metamucil fiber thins. a great tasting and easy way to start your day. in this season of giving we have the story of a father and his young daughter, who are going miles out of their way to help those who've lost nearly everything. and when i say miles, it's hundreds of miles. here's jamie wax. >> should we get a snack or are you doing okay? >> yep. >> what are you thinking? >> i don't know. >> some healthy vegetarian gas station options? >> reporter: woody faircloth and his 9-year-old daughter luna are getting used to life on the road. >> look how beautiful this is. it really is pretty. >> reporter: for the last three years they've been taking special trips to deliver rv wildfires. it's a mission they began after watching news of the deadly 2018
3:49 am
camp fire in california. >> i turned to luna and i said, luna, you know, why don't we get an rv and we'll drive it to california and give it to a family so they have a place to call home for thanksgiving? >> reporter: luna, you said something very special right then at that thanksgiving. >> yeah. i said dad, god and santa claus are going to be very proud of us. >> reporter: and do you feel like god and santa claus are very proud of you? >> yes. >> reporter: faircloth began looking for rv donors and was amazed by how many people wanted to help with unwanted rvs or their time. >> we have volunteers all over the country that have helped us. we have people right now that are answering e-mails and processing paperwork for these donations. i mean, it's -- just raise your hand and say hey, i'd like to help. >> they can come home and make a home-cooked meal. >> reporter: dnd have personally delivered abos firefighters, first responders
3:50 am
and veterans. and he's helped arrange around 100 donations in all. but it's also been an opportunity to teach his daughter. >> oh, look at the palm trees. >> reporter: everywhere along their trips are reminders of the cost of these fires. >> look at the ground, how it's just ash. >> reporter: and they've developed a stronger bond. >> it's been really special for the two of us just to be able to spend that time together and to make a difference. just so she knows that it's not just about her and it's not just about me. it's about the people that we're helping. and you know, we're blessed. >> oh, my gosh, it's so like bumpy. >> reporter: we joined them on a trip from denver to redding, california. >> all right. now we're really in the home stretch. ♪ da, da, da, da ♪ >> reporter: they were there to deliver a new home. >> that's beautiful. >> reporter: to don george, a firefighter who lost nearly everything when his own home burned in the fawn fire this past september while he was helping to save others' homes. >> i went to the crew and i go hey, i've got to go check on my
3:51 am
house. and it was already too late. my son says i don't know how to tell you but -- he just couldn't even talk. he didn't know how to say it. it's gone. >> reporter: george has been fighting fires for nearly 50 years. he's used to being the one doing the rescuing. >> that's your co-pilot? >> reporter: his role changed when the faircloths arrived. >> i've got keys for you. >> thank you. >> i've got a title for you. >> reporter: when we visited george a few weeks later -- >> look at the crown molding. >> i mean, it's just absolutely gorgeous. >> reporter: he'd received a second donated rv so that his adult sons who lived with their parents could also have a place to live. >> all i can say is thank god for woody. you couldn't ask for a better man. he came just exactly the right time for me. renewed my faith in mankind. man, if there was more people like that, we'd have a beautiful world. >> reporter: and the experience has also helped a little girl grow wise beyond her years.
3:52 am
what makes you most proud? >> that i've made a really big change in the world. for a lot of people. >> reporter: do you want people to see this and decide children and adults that they can do the same thing? >> yes. >> reporter: what can we all do to help make that happen? >> just be nicer to each other. >> they say the wisdom of children. that's jamie wax reporting. well, if you've got an rv, you may want to take a trip to the rolling hills of montana. a native american tribe is celebrating the homecoming of the american buffalo, or bison if you prefer that. which one's roamed the northern plains by the millions. michel miller reports. >> reporter: buffalo are an elusive breed here on the eastern border of glacier national park. >> they're taking off. they're taking off. >> yeah. they won't wait for us, these ones. >> reporter: but irvin carlson and the blackfeet nation are changing that. they returned 90 buffalo to
3:53 am
blackfeet territory, reinforcing a kinship passed through the ages. >> they were our food, our clothing, our lodging, our tools. they were our whole economy. that's what we existed, on them. >> reporter: when european settlers arrived in the 1800s, the delicate balance shifted. in the 19th century there were millions of buffalo that roamed this region. until they were hunted to near extinction. >> the blackfeet captured those calves, and they took them across the mountains and they sold them to the canadian government. and that's how they got into canada. and they eventually ended up at the elk island national park. >> reporter: those descendants survived there for more than 100 years. then in 2016 parks canada gave the buffalo initiative permission to return 100 buffalo to the blackfeet reservation. >> when we got back, waiting for us in celebration of these buffalo coming home.
3:54 am
that was a real great day for us. >> reporter: they've been living here peacefully ever since. but 13 of them made a detour, continuing on to california's oakland zoo. >> we were able to secure some of these to bring them here to oakland for an incredible not only exhibit but really the educational purpose of why they're here. >> reporter: zoo ceo nick dehejia plans to return the ten babies born and bred here to the montana plains. >> there is the red dog that was just born 24 hours ago. watching this young one yesterday literally within hours of birth just trying to stand up and walk, and you can see that right now. getting her footing. >> reporter: the goal is to increase this herd's size and even its territory. >> to me it keeps -- it keeps our history and our culture alive. cris home to them, where they originated from and traveled a big full circle to, across the
3:55 am
mountains to canada to back here to home. >> reporter: it only took 100-some years. >> it only took 100 and
3:56 am
3:57 am
a brewery in australia is doing its part to help slow climate change. believe it or not, they're making and selling green beer. ian lee explains. >> reporter: looking around this brewery, something might seem out of place. green tanks of bubbling algae are probably more fitting in a mad scientist's laboratory. >> it's mind-blowing. >> reporter: but australian brewer oscar mcmahon is harnessing the algae to make green beer. not in the way you're thinking. >> the algae is just part of the production process. it never touches the beer. this is not green beer. >> reporter: during the beer's fermentation process carbon dioxide is released. >> basically, the co2 is then ingested by the microalgae.
3:58 am
>> reporter: so instead of floating off into the atmosphere the greenhouse gas is captured and fed to the algae, producing oxygen. >> we're combating climate change. algae captures co2 up to 400 times more efficiently than a tree. >> reporter: the more co2 the more algae. and all that green stuff is not just thrown away. >> this is the grain left over from the brewing process. this currently goes out as cattle feed. >> reporter: scientists say adding algae to cattle feed reduces the gas cows pass. which means less methane in the air. >> happy anniversary. >> reporter: amanda thompson likes doing her part for the planet one pint at a time. >> we're happy to have a few, have a chat, change the world. >> reporter: all the while toasting to a greener future. ian lee, cbs news. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues.
3:59 am
for others check back later for "cbs mornings" and follow us online anytime at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm jancrawford. this is "cbs news flash." i'm tom hanson in new york. we begin with major new o capitol hill. congress has passed a stopgap spending bill, averting a government shutdown. the agreement funds government operations until february 18th. it now heads to the white house. google says it will delay its mandatory return to office plans amid concerns over the omicron variant. the tech giant says it will now wait until the new year to decide when it will require its thousands of u.s. employees to go in. and it was a star-studd night in washington for the national christmas tree lighting ceremony. president biden helped light the tree. you can watch the 99th national christmas tree lighting ceremony hosted by l.l. cool j this
4:00 am
sunday right here on cbs. for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm tom hanson, cbs news, new york. it's friday, december 3rd, 2021. this is the "cbs morning news." more confirmed cases in the u.s. the omicron variant is detected in more states while president biden lays out his plan to take on covid this winter. heroic actions. how one student says a math teacher saved the entire classroom as a school shooting suspect stood right outside the door. the trigger wasn't pulled. i didn't pull the trigger. >> you never pulled the trigger? >> no, no, no, no. i would never point a gun and pull a trigger at them, never. >> alec baldwin speaks out in his first sit-down interview. the actor explains why he's not responsible for that deadly shooting on the movie set of "rust."

65 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on