Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 2, 2012 6:00am-9:00am EDT

6:00 am
other reports and other papers and from other observers, it doesn't body well for a congenial united states senate in the future. we'll find out about that in the future with a big win in the primary runoff for u.s. senate in texas, the tea party is proving it's still a major player in this year's elections. ted cruz's double digit win is the second coup for the u.s. senate in the primary season. 17 contested senate races, more than half dozen candidates are embraced by the tea party. ted cruz says it's a reflection of the party getting back to its bedrock principles. >> a lot of republicans would say they think things have gotten worse with the tea party members there, that that's put a stop or halt to a lot of things. >> i think there are a lot of things to needed to stop, that needed to halt. our $16 trillion debt was a bipartisan problem.
6:01 am
a whole lot of republicans went arm in arm with the democrats in agreeing to that spending. >> do you feel like a lot of people out there are out to get the tea party? >> oh, sure. look, everyone who has a vested interest in the status quo, in business as usual, in spending and spending and spending wants to stop anyone who wants to stop that gravy train. >> donny deutsch, since mika is not with us, this morning you will play the liberal from new york who gets hives every time the tea party advances like this. what concerns do you have, donny? >> it's not concerns as it is observations. i think what the tea party is finally getting right, their candidates in terms of tone and matter. i call it the velvet around an iron fist. if you notice the demeanor of ted cruz, not belligerent. what the tea party wants for
6:02 am
their movement is human beings that seem pattalable as aopposed to the screaming, raging right. the principles are the same but the delivery system and tone and manner is different with these candidates. that's them getting it right. >> gale collins, you wrote a book about this. >> i told you it was all texas. >> you did. you said it all goes back to texas. they change everything. talk about texas and talk about this win for ted cruz. he's going to be a rising star in the republican party very quickly and about your column that you wrote. >> well, it's interesting, ted cruz, i think you're seeing the same pattern here over and over again. you've got your basic party guy that everybody respects. he's been in office for 2000 years one way or another. and he's going to go and be in the senate and everybody likes him. and then suddenly this person comes out of nowhere saying, no,
6:03 am
no, no. and he's more interesting. he's more exciting. he's sort of more active. he's more energetic. and he wins. it's about right wing principles but it's also, i think, just about how the base of the republican party, the old establishment doesn't have any juice anymore. it just doesn't seem to have any candidates that get -- >> they really don't. they really don't. the gop establishment is dead. they are -- if they're not dead, they are exhausted and they're moving that way, from texas to wisconsin, from coast to coast. they get pummeled. it's almost like you know if somebody puts themselves up as the gop establishment figure, they're going to lose. >> joe, your initial instinct is correct. they're dead. they're dead and gone. that's a memory. the gop establishment as we used to know it, even a few years ago, five, ten years ago, that's
6:04 am
gone. the aforementioned "new york times" column that she wrote is titled today "for god, texas and golf." in it she takes up comments about protecting america's golf courses from the united nations. everyone is concerned about that. while i can personally look with equanimity upon the idea of a world without golf courses, the thing cruz was talking about is actually a vague, noninboarding resolution that's more than 20 years old. cruz's vick we was the latest in a number of tea party triumphants in the republican primaries and certainly does suggest that next year the republican senate contingent will be composed almost entirely of right wing purists and people month are afraid they will be primaried by a right wing purist. it's so ironic, people, the national electorate is totally
6:05 am
turned off by partisan standoffs you can't almost hear the public imploring will you, please, make some back room deals. at that same moment, the republican candidates are being pushed into being more and more intractable. there you have it. >> i mean, it seems like literally, it was another century, you had a few, a sprinkling of moderate republicans in the united states senate who understood a way of life that adheres to more than just politics. it's called bargaining, whether you're buying a house, used car, whatever, you bargain. there's no bargaining with these people. >> you have a number of republicans who just don't want to go over a cliff, any cliff. they don't like the cliffs. cliffs are bad. i'm not sure these new guys are not nearly as cliff averse as the ones that we've been used to. >> can we please re-establish exactly what the tea party is? because when i listen to ted
6:06 am
cruz, i see, you know, a very appealing candidate. i see an ivy educated guy. i'm going to go back to what i said, i don't see the characteristics on paper that feel like the tea party. can we once reset button and say what they are once and for all. >> i know ted cruz a little bit. i think he's being caricatured somewhat in the national press. he'll be in the senate, more like pat toomey, the snore from pennsylvania than jim demint or rand paul. he did a good job of running not exactly what he actually is, because he sienes what the tea party moment is about. look, in january, whoever gets elected president, whoever's in the new congress will have to deal with the issue of the tea party. which is spending. and after that deal, whatever it is, the deal with the fiscal cliff, then we'll know what's the future of the republican party, what's the future of somebody like ted cruz on issues beyond spending. until we see the terms of that
6:07 am
deal, i don't think we can say too much about what kind of senate or house we'll have or what kind of senate ted cruz will be. i think he'll be part of a solution rather than obstruction on that deal. >> well, you know, i'm glad you red that excerpt from gale's piece. great, this is great for the tea party, they're back on map, they're resurgent and all of that. when ted cruz gets to washington, what does it mean for governing? we have all these things coming up. mark mentioned the fiscal cliff. what will it mean when you have this new influx, assuming he wins. what does it mean in terms of solving the problems this country has? the american people are really tired, they're angry of all the partisanship and having more ted cruzs come in isn't going to help that. sam, what do you think? >> well, you know, i think mark's right in some respects.
6:08 am
the campaign ted cruz ran when you looked at the actual policy differences, there weren't any really. it was difficult to find actual areas of disagreement. the main problem was he worked constructively as a legislator. he brought people together to pass conservative legislation. the mere fact that he worked behind scenes to pass legislation was a problem for his candidacy. the people that propelled ted cruz to victory don't want someone who will work constructively in congress. this was next lien in people's hostile takeover of washington. there's going to be a lot of pressure on him not to compromise when he gets there. i don't want to understate that. i think these people understand what it took to get them into office. they don't want to owe fentd people who helped them get ther i'm not sure what the long-term implications are for the republican party. let's keep in mind, the tea party is great at reluctant candidates but it's not the most poppy\. the nbc poll had them at negative 14% or 15%,
6:09 am
positive/negative favorability rating. that was 1 percentage worse than occupy wall street, the worst in the poll. i think mitch mcconnell has a tough job on his hands when all this is said and done. >> mark halperin, let's talk about what is still fueling the tea party. it's still a reaction to what happened in 2009, 2010. and when we have this discussion about whether an election of tea party senators is going to help move the ball forward and bring about compromise, well, the republican response, the conservative response is, yes, it's probably not going to be any more constructive as it comes to compromise between parties as the president was in 2009 and 2010. i mean, this is a reaction to the overreach in conservativesize of what happened in 2009 and 2010. and the president and the
6:10 am
democrat didn't reach across the aisle to compromise then. raynes and conservatives don't want that happening over the next four years. >> the last data we have to go on, 2010, it is about spending. there will be energy on the right side in this election from the tea party. there's no doubt. they're not going to lose a seat in texas over it. i'm not sure they'd lose a seat in wisconsin over it, no matter who whens the nomination in that senate race. for the election itself, the tea party, as long as they focus on spending is probably -- is certainly a net plus for raynes in the election. in terms of after the election, again, the first that the country will have to deal with after the election, partly in a lame duck session is spending. that is their yigs. the election results will be a mandate for the new washington
6:11 am
lineup to deal with spending. the tea party's unpopular, sam's right, in terms of polling. cutting spending, dealing with the deficit, it's going to be essential. it will be the first big agenda item. >> donny, what's so fascinating about this race that we're watching and this discussion is, it's almost like there are two elections simultaneously going on in two different countries. you have the race for president. whereas we've said around the table before, even in the republican primary crazy never wins. you always get sort of the moderate midwest guy or usually you get that. in these legislative races, in the house races, in the senate races, it becomes much, much more conservative and what you are setting up is, again, tea party members. well, actually extremes on both sides, on the democratic side, on the house side, the jerryman
6:12 am
d jerrymandering. >> i'm going to give the republicans good free advice. i'm being completely serious. i look at ted cruz and i go, wow, that's an appealing candidate. i put next to him, i put the tea party pin on his lapel. they should call it to be the progressive fiscal conservatives. >> you're not going to get the word progressive in there. >> the new age conservatism. i don't know why they're badging themselves with tea party. when we hear tea party, to sam's point. >> because they win. >> no. >> because they win. they're not trying to get the votes in manhattan, they're trying to get the votes in south
6:13 am
texas. >> that's my point. you can get both. we all know this country in reality is just right of center. instead of positioning yourself you have all those principles. be that same guy, be that aelle paing guy but instead of saying tea party, re-invent the party. it is the right wing part of the party. take away the fanatic, extreme energy that permeates around tea party and once again, call it new age conservatism. then you bring both worlds together. >> stunned silence. >> donny's idea new age conservatism, i don't think that will work and also progressive conservatism. >> i think they like it the way it is. i like the whole tea party we're going back to the founders, to the constitution stuff. can i say, they don't just want to cut spending so we can
6:14 am
balance the budget. they want to astically, radically shrink the entire size of government and reduce the role of the federal government in the country in ways that most people do not want to do. most people like social security. most people don't think it's a ponzi scheme. most people, wouldn't say, like the irs but you get nervous if you say, as ted cruz does, let's abolish the internal revenue service. it's not just a thrifty way of living. it's bigger than that for them. >> let me ask you about your book. >> thank you. >> we talked about ted cruz, we talked about this election. you talk about in your book texas is outsized influence on american politics. >> yes, the tea party, if you look at texas, you look at the country.
6:15 am
this is not just a little state sitting out there like arkansas or north dakota. this is a monster state, creating 10% of the work force of the future, even as we speak. and it was the -- if there's a founding place for the tea party it was texas. that sense of government is bad, the federal -- you can just run for office running against the federal government. you don't have to be for stuff. you have to be against the federal government. that's very tea party and they all came out of texas. you looked at texas and you can see the future in many ways. >> all right. mark halperin, jump in. >> i'm going to dissent from the upper west side perspective just this one. donny, it's easy to cherry pick some things that some people in the tea party say. but don't you support for your churn and for your grandchildren reigning in federal spending? don you think that's -- >> that's my point. that is my point. they're not selling themselves. call it power conservatism.
6:16 am
my point is, yes. >> if you don't cherry pick extreme positions on social security or other issues with be most of what the tea party stands for is what everyone involved -- >> yes, they are selling themselves wrong by calling them tea party. call it turbo conservatisconser. they are -- >> that name won them one election. >> to point, start to appeal to the upper west side guy, who in reality a lot of the principles are re-assigned. they're not selling themselves on a narrow basis. you want to take it to the big show as they say. that's the rebranding. >> the problem with the perception of the tea party is, my view, is the coverage of sarah palin skewed the coverage of the tea party. >> yes. >> during scott brown's election campaign when he was running for the united states senate against
6:17 am
the attorney general in massachusetts, if you went to his rals or where he speak or where he appeared, there are many members of the tea party there. guess who they were? your next door neighbors, they were normal people. the other problem with the tea party is, if these are their beliefs why haven't they caught hold in an enormously way in the country? some of their beliefs, the most vivid and visceral of them are like crazy ideas. that's where i'm coming from, joe. >> yes, yes. speaking of crazy, donny deutsch, let's get your advertising and your marketing, let's put it on display this morning. so let's talk about chicken sandwiches. >> i like chicken sandwiches. right? >> yes. >> i love chick-fil-a. i have known my entire life growing up in the south that
6:18 am
these guys are practicing conservative christians. they close chick-fil-aon sunday. every sunday i drive past chick-fil-a. i look at the sign, it's closed, i swear and then i go back home. they are who they are. they get a strong christian belief system and have always been very front and center. suddenly, protesters come out because shock of all shocks, they have a traditional christian view of marriage. and suddenly a chicken restaurant has become ground zero in culture wars over gay marriage? how stupid is this? >> stupid. first of all as a current member of the new formally tea party now power conservative movement, we've successfully rebranded them. i interviewed dan cathi.
6:19 am
i disagree with most of his principles but applaud his right to say what he sees biblically. if you like the sandwiches, go there, if you don't, don't go there. >> you're not going to find me at chick-fil-a anytime soon. >> which is all right. >> i agree he has a right to say what he wants to say. but i also think that the people who are protesting chick-fil-a have free speech rights and have a right to protest what he's saying. it's not just what dan cathi is saying. he's putting his money where his mouth is. he is putting money through the wind shape foundation, the philanthropic arm of chick-fil-a. >> don't go there. that's the answer. don't go there and say loud and clear i'm not going there.
6:20 am
>> but i don't think it's fair to say that the people who are protesting chick-fil-a are wrong. >> they're not. they're not. >> the larger issue is, do the mayors of chicago and boston and perhaps other cities, where are they coming from when they say no chick-fil-as? our city. >> give me a break. >> exactly. >> not just because of what a guy says but also what a guy believes. this is not like it is a fringe belief. these guys are traditional christian believers. and for a mayor of chicago or a mayor of boston, i heard him say, there will never be a chick-fil-a in -- really? keep it to yourself. if you don't want to go to the restaurants, don't go to the restaurants. but please, let's not start
6:21 am
putting fences up around gay restaurants and having one cultural battle there and fences around other restaurants having another cultural battle there, because of something that somebody believes or somebody says. i mean, that's ridiculous. >> you don't want to argue it on basis of this is a traditional belief and, therefore, it's okay for him to believe this. this is his belief. it could be an untraditional belief. it cowl be fire worshipping, whatever he wants to do. i think we all agree here, it's his right to do it and his right to talk about it and it's other people's rights to protest it and to try to bring publicity to look at the question of what he thinks. i think we're all agreed the problem here is mayor is trying to use the zoning board of appeals to enforce these beliefs. that's not where you want to go. >> sam stein. >> i mean, the culture wars are so bizarre and weird and borg. we are getting excited over
6:22 am
something we basically all agree on. the store owner has the right to espouse the beliefs he want to espouse. chick-fil-a -- mitt romney should pick a chick-fil-a sandwich as a running mate. we sit around here and argue over the differences when in fact i think we're basically all in agreement. each side has a right to argue their own side and protest the way they want to protest, right? >> i have to tell you, sam, chick-fil-a looks better to me at this hour of the day than rob portman does. >> it comes in spicier versions. there's a real chance here. >> chicken, butter and pickles on a soft bun. just works somehow. >> this is electoral votes behind that. we'll talk to lawrence o'donnell and dr. zeke emanuel and emily senay join us with
6:23 am
health news and boris johnson, proving once again he's world's most entertaining mayor. but first, bill karins, we have to check on his forecast. >> i have important information to pass on. we're into the heart of the hurricane season, august, september, october, we're tracking a new storm. this is tropical depression number 5. if it gets a name eventually, it would be ernesto. the hurricane center over the next five days is taking this as a tropical storm towards jamaica and possibly near the yucatan and the gulf of mexico, the mid toll end of next week. that's why we pay attention. the water is very warm. if this storm survives the next couple of days it could be a big problem for someone as we go throughout the end of the next week. we're watching showers and thunderstorms from topeka to kansas city, the heart of drought area. this is where we desperately need it. today we continue to get the heat and drought wave conditions from oklahoma city to dallas.
6:24 am
easily near 110 degrees today. yesterday, oklahoma city was 112. that was the second hottest day you've ever recorded going back about 120 years. forecast for the northeast today, we're looking just fine. the thunderstorms may clip new england area, near boston. the rest of the region is staying very hot and the southeast also remains very, very warm. just missed that one, barnicle. we had watching again tropical depression number 5. that ill with be the big story as we go throughout the week. you're watching "morning joe," we're brewed by starbucks. why should our wallets tell us what our favorite color is? every room deserves to look great. and every footstep should tell us we made the right decision. so when we can feel our way through the newest, softest, and most colorful options... ...across every possible price range...
6:25 am
...our budgets won't be picking the style. we will. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. make room for savings with $37 basic installation on martha stewart living and platinum plus carpet. that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade.
6:26 am
6:27 am
the global ready one ? yeah, but you won't need... ♪ hajimemashite. hajimemashite. hajimemashite. you guys like football ? thank you so much. i'm stoked. you stoked ? totally. ... and he says, "under the mattress." souse le matelas. ( laughter ) why's the new guy sending me emails from paris ? paris, france ? verizon's 4g lte devices are global-ready. plus, global data for just $25. only from verizon. athletes are just kids, folks. a perspective that was not lost on cnn's zain verjee.
6:28 am
>> her performance was so good, so solid, they won by such a big margin, it was there that the u.s. team left the russians and chinese on the sidelines in tears. well done, team usa. >> yes. well done team usa. this is what the olympic games are all about. making little foreign girls cry. >> welcome back to "morning joe." take a live look at london. let's go to the morning papers enstart with the "washington post." wow, what a story. three u.s. airways commuter jets missed a midair collision by just seconds tuesday at reagan national airport in washington, d.c. according to "the post," air traffic controllers launched two outbound flights directly at another plane that was coming in to land around 2:00 p.m. last year you'll remember an air traffic control supervisor, the only one on duty fell asleep on
6:29 am
the job and failed to respond when planes were trying to make their final approaches into reagan national. >> i don't like that story, joe. let's go to the "chicago sun times" lollapalooza begins tomorrow. it now has an estimated $100 million impact on the city of chicago. laa-lollapalooza hasn't been wit controversy. bad weather last year turned it into a mud pit. they are accused of using charity status to avoid city taxes. i'm shock by that. four badminton teams have been kicked out for trying to lose on purpose, they are from china, south korea and indonesia were accused of trying to throw matches in an early play to draw easier competitors in later rounds. south korea and indonesia appealed the rulings but those appeals tossed out.
6:30 am
>> i better not take a look at my fantasy baseball team, then if that's the rules. boris johnson got stuck on a zip line while trying to make a grand entrance at victoria park. he got caught 65 feet from the end and hung there for about five minutes. someone asked how he was feeling and he replied very, very well, before asking for a rope and ladder. >> my god. in the "usa today," you've love this one, mike, an umpiring first in professional baseball. after making a bad call during yesterday's daytona cup's minor league game, the home plate umpire ejected the p.a. announcer, after the announcer played the song "three blind mice." a fan from the stands had to step in and do player introductions for the rest of the game. >> that's great. i love that story. that's great. up next, buckle up.
6:31 am
jonathan capehart brings us olympic highlights, which is an olympic thing himself, including a photo finish. "morning joe" will be right back. with the spark cash card from capital one,
6:32 am
olaf's pizza palace gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! pizza!!!!! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! put it on my spark card! [ high-pitched ] nice doin' business with you!
6:33 am
[ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve the most rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash bac or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? with lean cuisine steam bags. get our crispiest carrots and our snappiest peas all freshly steamed in just minutes. steam bags from lean cuisine. be culinary chic.
6:34 am
and you're looking at a live picture of the olympic cauldron
6:35 am
in london. to sports now. it was a busy night for the americans in the pool. no one had a more thrilling fishen than nathan adrian. he outtouched australia to earn the gold for the u.s. the victory was particularly sweet for adrian after magneson warned the other swimmers, "brace yourself" before the race. it was his first time swimming in an olympic final. he gives the u.s. its first olympic gold in the men's 100 meter freestyle since 1988. the relay team featuring missy franklin, allison schmitt and vollmer. it took a strong finish by schmitt to overtake the french who led by half a second before schmitt got into the pool.
6:36 am
she was en route to i adecisive win for the u.s. team. schmitt has four medals, including two golds in these olympic games. in the men's gymnastics all-around competition, team usa's leyva came back from a critical mistake to earn a bronze medal. he found himself in 17th place after having difficulty with his pommel horse routine but parallel bars and a clutch finish moved him to the podium. after a big day in the pool yesterday, the u.s. is up to 29 medals but china still leads the pack with 30, including 17 gold medals. at the end of five days of full competition. great britain notched its first gold medal of these games yesterday with a win in the women's pairs rowing event.
6:37 am
one of those women, first time in the boat. >> really? >> yes. >> nbc's primetime coverage includes gabby douglas and aly reisman. equestrian dressage will be this afternoon on msnbc. >> how did you know that was the woman's first time in the boat? >> i was watching bob costas last night. >> show prep? >> of course. >> no baseball? >> it was all olympics. it was an inspiring story. i don't remember which one it was but it's an inspiring story. >> can you give us baseball scores later. >> if you want me to. angels and rangers played
6:38 am
yesterday. i can't remember what the score was. still ahead, "forbes" magazine ranks colleges with which schools are turning out tomorrow's business leaders. up next, the must-read opinion pages. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. are so ama,
6:39 am
you'll get lost in an all-beef hot dog world. what was i supposed to wish for? why am i wearing a bow-tie? where did i leave my bicycle? after all, when you're enjoying the beefiest, juciest bite of pure kosher beef, nothing else matters. goodness gracious, that's kosher. with no fillers, by-products, artificial flavors or colors. hebrew national. the better-than-a-hot dog- hot dog. for a "back to school" clothing party. what they don't know is they're on hidden camera, and all the clothes are actually from walmart. let's see what happens. they feel really soft. i like it. i feel like i could wear this with almost anything. we love the material. so far all the material is phenomenal. these clothes are all from walmart. what? wow! i've never bought kids' clothes at walmart. [ earl ] would you now? yes! walmart has great brands that make great looks. you'll love them, or your money back, guaranteed. see for yourself. ♪
6:40 am
6:41 am
see for yourself. this is new york state. we built the first railway, the first trade route to the west, the greatest empires. then, some said, we lost our edge. well today, there's a new new york state. one that's working to attract businesses and create jobs. a place where innovation meets determination... and businesses lead the world. the new new york works for business. find out how it can work for yours at thenewny.com. the president's leading and continues to lead. this is held pretty steady, 47% for the president and mitt romney at 43%. >> one recent poll showed any generic republican candidate would beat president obama by eight points. >> clearly mitt romney's best
6:42 am
option is to run as generic republican. to run as a generic republican doesn't mean you can't express preference for things. >> i love the declaration of independence. i love our constitution. i like all the amendments. i love american cars. i love humor. i love our people. i love jobs. i love our land. i love the lakes. i don't love vampires. >> really thought long and hard about that last one. just didn't want to give people the impression that i was favoring humans over the undead. the undead are people with, my friends. anyway. the problem, of course, for a generic republican is what kind of vice president do you get to round out the ticket. >> i'm not going to characterize anybody's qualifications for vice president. >> of course you won't. although i think we can rule out one ticket. he doesn't like vampires. >> welcome back to "morning joe." look at the sunrise over reagan national airport, of course, in
6:43 am
the news this morning. for all the wrong reasons. it's time for mika's must-read opinion pages which have been sent to us directly from an undisclosed locale somewhere in monte carlo. i didn't know she was a "wall street journal" fan. daniel writes inside one presidential term barack obama's old world of hope and change has been disrupted. yes, there was a time when one could pretend economic reality arrived in some macked future. not unlike the social security or medicare illusion. someone will pay for it. someone will hire me when i zeed to work after i've made the transition from liberal to whatever comes after that. that's the way the youth vote thought through the '60s, hope and change was this generation's woodstock. but the youth vote this time comes down to one thing. is this candidate going to plug me in to the new american world
6:44 am
or not? donny? what do you think? >> i think at the end of the day, the youth vote has nowhere else to go. obviously hope didn't happen and change didn't happen. you have not only a rich candidate, a wall street rich candidate who maybe doesn't pay the same kind of taxes you and i do, who has offshore accounts and who's not a likable guy. the youth begrudgingly have nowhere else to go. it's that simple. >> that's assuming they go and vote. the youth don't -- traditionally vote. >> don't vote that much. >> yes. >> i haven't read the whole piece. but the premise of the paragraph that joe just said, hope and change was this generation's woodstock, which candidate will plug me into the new american world or not. what is going to be the definition of this new american world? is it going to be reality-based? when you stop and think about it, we are now a nation more than a decade into war, a war
6:45 am
that began with tax cuts, a war that began with no plan to pay for the war. so now we're saddled with enormous national deficits. 11 i don'ts worth of war. yesterday "new york times" in the on page 9, there were the names of eight americans killed in action in afghanistan. nobody pays attention to it. is that going to be part of this new american world that people write about? >> as a person who was actually at woodstock, i would say i miss the nonreality-based politics we had back then. the poor youth right now, they're so desperate out there. there's really a generation you feel is getting completely cut out of the job market, the future market. they are seeing new kids come into the market every year and they still haven't gotten their job from three years ago when they graduated.
6:46 am
i think you're right, i don't know they're going to go to the polls and vote for anybody. they're sitting at home eating ice cream on bed. >> in their parent's home. >> you're right. >> youth is obviously a broad word. what i'm seeing with a lot of young people is learned helplessness. i'm going to get a job. they've been taught it's okay to maybe not have a job. that's kind of like, oh -- >> do you think so? >> no, no, no, i've seen it with a lot of people. people just graduated college. there are no jobs out there, there are no jobs out there, there are no jobs out there. we have a new generation, what we really need is shared sacrifice that our generation does not have is going in the opposite direction. it's what i'll call almost entitlement to not move forward. mark, any thoughts on that? >> it's possible we're all suffering from grumpy old person syndrome. almost everybody i know who works in a competitive field
6:47 am
like what we all work in, has experienced in a lot of younger people don't have the same ethic of you have to work hard and prove yourself in a chosen profession. maybe, again, just pining for good old days that didn't exist. that is in my experience the universal sense that people we all know have. in terms of the politics of this, you know, "the wall street journal" writes about young people. conservative press is looking at hispanic voters, maybe african-american voters. there's a school of thought among some strategists that say we're not going to win those groups or we might do worse with those groups than john mccain did against barack obama. they think they can win without it. they think there are other groups they can overperform with and gain a victory. >> you're going to hold the other axis, please defend the young against these grumpy old men and women. >> defend me, sam. >> you guys are totally nuts and
6:48 am
have it completely wrong. the idea that the youth are sort of entitled to their laziness is silly. talk to anyone who has been forced to live in their parents' basement. they don't want to be there. it's really annoying. they would like anything to get out of it. the problem is the economy sucks. my brother -- >> that's the -- >> whoa, whoa, whoa. >> sam, that's that thing. we keep saying -- >> let him finish. >> i'm sorry. i'm a power conservative. >> let him finish because he's right. he is right. go ahead, sam. >> let little sam finish, grandpa. >> my brother just graduated college. he has a bunch of friends who are dying for jobs. they've pounded the pavement, looked and done interviews. it's not just a good market for them to get any jobs. i'm not just talking about white collar jobs, even blue collar jobs are difficult to come by. it's not for a lack of want. when you want to relate this to politics, the candidate they will go for is one not who's going to promise them a tax cut.
6:49 am
they don't need a tax cut. they don't have any money. they want a candidate who will promise them different avenues to get employment. that's where they end up siding with obama. he's talking about specific thing he's wants to do, whether it's helping with student debt, helping with the retention of teachers. >> sam, very quickly, i think we have too many young people going the economy's bad, the economy's bad. you put a gun to somebody's head -- >> no, no, no, no, no. >> economy is bad. >> the economy is bad but that doesn't give somebody the -- >> you have 22, 23-year-olds saying the economy is bad, i don't want to work anyway. they're not doing that. >> they pursue you everywhere you go. i cannot walk five feet without some kid giving me a resume and how hard they want to work. they've had 10,000 unpaid internsh internships.
6:50 am
>> the problem with the 23-year-olds that you know, is you're dating them. >> ooh. >> you're just mad about the old comment. >> i am not dating 23-year-olds. >> age-appropriate women. >> coming up, we'll reveal the latest edition of "time" magazine. "morning joe" will be back in a moment. one is for a clean, wedomestic energy future that puts us in control. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in america and supporting wind and solar. though all energy development comes with some risk, we're committed to safely and responsibly producing natural gas. it's not a dream. america's natural gas...
6:51 am
putting us in control of our energy future, now. for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. building pass, corporate card, verizon 4g lte phone.
6:52 am
the global ready one ? yeah, but you won't need... ♪ hajimemashite. hajimemashite. hajimemashite. you guys like football ? thank you so much. i'm stoked. you stoked ? totally. ... and he says, "under the mattress." souse le matelas. ( laughter ) why's the new guy sending me emails from paris ? paris, france ? verizon's 4g lte devices are global-ready.
6:53 am
plus, global data for just $25. only from verizon.
6:54 am
up next, senator tom coburn but incredibly, lawrence o'donnell is here. he'll join us right here in the studio, right here. keep it on "morning joe." [ male announcer ] every day, the world gets more complex. and this is what inspires us to create new technology. ♪ technology that connects us to everything the world has to offer and vice versa. ♪ technology that makes lightweight stronger, safer, and faster than ever before. ♪ technology that makes electric electrifying
6:55 am
and efficiency exhilarating. ♪ technology that doesn't just drive us, but drives progress. ♪ and driving progress is what we do every day. ♪ ♪
6:56 am
[ female announcer ] weak, damaged hair needs new aveeno nourish+ strengthen. active naturals wheat formulas restore strength for up to 90% less breakage in three washes. for strong, healthy hair with life, new aveeno nourish+ strengthen. yeah, you -- you know, everything can cost upwards of...[ whistles ] i did not want to think about that. relax, relax, relax. look at me, look at me. three words, dad -- e-trade financial consultants. so i can just go talk to 'em? just walk right in and talk to 'em. dude, those guys are pros.
6:57 am
they'll hook you up with a solid plan. they'll -- wa-- wa-- wait a minute. bobby? bobby! what are you doing, man? i'm speed dating! [ male announcer ] get investing advice for your family at e-trade. with lean cuisine steam bags. get our crispiest carrots and our snappiest peas all freshly steamed in just minutes. steam bags from lean cuisine. be culinary chic.
6:58 am
washington monument, ladies and gentlemen, the white house. jefferson memorial in the background. beautiful shot. national airport, way off in the distance where they'd better be going to work today. this front page story in the "washington post" national airport averted collision of three jets tuesday afternoon. we didn't like that. welcome back to "morning joe." donny deutsch is still here, jonathan capehart, gail collins still with us. sam stein, absolutely right about younger people wanting to work. he's still with us in washington. this is incredible, absolutely incredible who we have here. >> good used to it, my friend. introduction, camera, keep going. i'm sure you have a longer introduction than that. there must be a string of compliments, resume items. >> from dorchester, massachusetts -- >> you going to mention miami? >> it's fine. >> yes, that's right. >> for what?
6:59 am
>> west wing tv show, sir. >> wow. >> it's the cheapest emmy you can get. not all emmys are created equal. if the show wins best show, everybody with the word producer in their title gets an emmy. not all of us have earned that emmy with the same amount of effort but, yes, it's the cheapest -- >> what do you think of mr. sorkin's new show, newsroom? >> it's great. >> that was not convincing. >> i could go on and on. >> that you could. >> no, i -- i love it. have not missed a second of the show. >> you want to do some news, get you out of this? >> whatever you got. >> okay. >> is that what you do here? >> we do everything here. >> okay. >> we do everything. i'll cook for you, whatever you want. you came in, you were nice enough to come in, whatever you need. >> they pay me. the nice enough thing -- the
7:00 am
nice explains nothing with me. >> do you have direct deposit. >> you get paid for this? i didn't get that memo. >> you have direct deposit? wow, what a country. a u.s. senate in texas, the tea party is still moving it's a major player in this year's election. >> have you been practicing reading teleprompters? you haven't missed a word. >> parochial school. >> they teach teleprompters in parochial school in 1922. >> they teach reading and the polymer method writing. you never forget those things. i wish americanedication would go back to that. it's the second major coup for the u.s. senate for the movement in the primary season. acoring to "the new york times," among 17 contested senate races more than half a dozen of the candidates are embraced by the tea party. ted cruz says it's a reflection of the party getting back to its bedrock principles. >> a lot of republicans would
7:01 am
say they think things have gotten worse with the tea party members there. that that's put a stop or a halt to a lot of things. >> i think there are a lot of things that needed to stop, needed to halt. our $16 trillion debt was a bipartisan problem. a whole lot of republicans went arm in arm with the democrats in agreeing to that spending. >> do you feel like a lot of people out there are out to get the tea party? >> oh, sure. look. everyone who has a vested interest in the status quo, in business as usual, in spending and spending and spending wants to stop anyone who wants to stop that gravy train. >> lawrence, i want to ask you a question. i know you probably weren't watching first hour. >> i was. >> you were in touch with your worldwide sources. >> i just didn't walk in here. >> i had a theory that was not mocked but challenged in that a very big core -- >> that's a success for you. >> yes, it is not mocked but challenge.
7:02 am
that's progress. >> when you start to produce candidates like a cruz who is ivy educated, soft spoken and some of the other new tea party candidates, the tea party is doing themselves a disservice being branded tea party because with tea party you conjure up guys with williamsburg caps or whatnot. a new name, power conservatives or something would actually widen the ten and bring the upper west siders in because i hear tea party, i shut down. i hear a new definition of conservatism that's more thoughtful and going back to basics. ten the is widened. >> remember the old first bush formula of compassionate conservative. i think if they were going to prebrand it it would have to be freedom conservative. it has to be two words and freedom has to be one of them. >> whatever the words. >> you're on to something. as far as i can tell so far in republican world, tea party is only a negative phrase in, say,
7:03 am
you know, manhattan, in places where -- >> yes, correct. >> but in texas it's a positive. >> you're right but they have -- >> who's running in texas? >> my point is this. >> i think you're right long term. >> all of a sudden you want new jersey to want to start to listen, pennsylvania you want to start to listen. that's the game. >> you'll notice when people try to make that wider appeal, who have tea party afilliations, they are pretty good at muting that tea party part of their resu resume, of quieting down that word. you're right. it's hard to conceive of the presidential candidate who is the tea party republican presidential candidate. in fact we saw that those people couldn't make it. we got the guy who lives at the greatest distance from the tea party, mitt romney as the president -- >> exactly. freedom conservative, yes. >> there's a good reason people don't relate to the tea party. it's not because its name is the tea party it's because it wants
7:04 am
to undo all the entitlements that people like and drastically reduce the size of the government, wants to get rid of veterans benefits, education aid, all the stuff people actually like. it's not really about the name, donny, i don't think. it's about what it. >> what they're trying to do. >> how do we explain, i really don't know how we explain this, veterans receiving veterans benefits standing there prominently at tea party rallies cheering on the tea party person. >> the world is divided between empty places and crowded places. people from empty places don't see any point to government. that used to make sure wednesday it was hamilton versus jefferson. but now -- >> you're receiving a government check. >> in their minds live in an empty place, in their minds they have -- they're independent, they don't need government and they disassociate themselves from anything that says that they are in fact dependent on government for a lot of things in their lives. >> as long as we're talking about ted cruz, let's speak to
7:05 am
someone who endorsed ted cruz in his senate campaign, senator tom coburn of oklahoma who joins us now, senator, tell us a little bit about him. >> good morning. a real person. mild-mannered, very smart. actually gets it. you know, i was amazed with your all's conversation. i don't think you all get it. the tea party -- >> i beg your pardon. >> in the tea party, the tea party is every person in america who really is fed up with washington and recognizes the way we got there was abandoning the core principles of the -- of our country but also abandoning the constitution. i don't know one tea party leader anywhere that wants to eliminate veterans benefits. i'm appalled. that's not a plank anywhere. it's about how do you deliver those benefits and keep your wore to the very people who defended this country.
7:06 am
there's a big difference of viewpoint in what a tea party means. i think they're the best things that happened in the country, because we're re-engaging hundreds of thousands of people in this country who go to work every day, obey the law, pay their taxes but they're sick and tired in terms of what they say, the waste and stupidity they see going on in washington. >> i don't have i aquestion for you. i want to use my brief time here to thank you for something that you did recently on the senate floor. it's something we would rarely see, i think, in today's senate. a while ago you said some things publicly about harry reid that you decided upon reflection was intemperate. you went to the senate floor and you actually apologized. you said you were sorry. and i just have to tell you that, for someone who used to work in the senate, to see someone score a point for civility in that apology was something that i just want to thank you for.
7:07 am
>> well, i'm not afraid to admit when i'm wrong. i get out in front of myself. i'm 64 years of age. i guess i always will a little bit every now and then make mistakes in terms of my words. i don't mind apologizing. i don't know anybody, even talk show hosts that don't make errors every now and then. >> i may be the only one, i think. >> it's interesting, lawrence. i'm glad you brought that up. any current tea party -- wouldn't that work against you in the next election? >> you'd miss something. you're seeing them totally different to what they are. you ought to come and visit with some people who are just regular joes that believe the tea party has got it right. they're union members. they're all sorts -- they're a cross-section of people, because you think that would be a
7:08 am
problem. most of them are really kind people. you know, when you look at a tea party rally and when they're gone, it's pristine. they picked it up. in other words, they're responsible citizens and they're also pretty bright. they actually get that you got to have human relations to get along in this world. and they also realize we all make mistakes. picture you paint didn't come close to anybody i know in the tea party, the hundreds of thousands of people i've spoken to and met. >> senator coburn, it's jonathan capehart. i want to bring you back to something you said when you first came on, you were talking about people in the tea party who are fed up with washington and for the abandonment of the constitution. could you please tell me how and when did we abandon the constitution? >> yes. again, go read article 1, section a. it gives the enumerated powers and what you're seeing happen --
7:09 am
this has been a pro-grassive thing, the courts have babandond the constitution, not holing congress within article 1, section a of the constitution. the american people get it. our founders got it. the balance of power that doesn't get talk about and what you're seeing expressed through the tea party is we the people wanting to hold the government accountable. that's what's going to happen happening in this country. we're $16 trillion in debt. we have totally cut the legs out from underneath our kids and grand kids and now we're saying there's something wrong with the people that want to get back to the thing that built this country rather than thing that tore it down. >> i tell you, senator, article 1, section 8, i should know this but i don't. >> it's the enumerated powers with be what the founders gave us as the authority under which we can work. the constitution is loaded with
7:10 am
nos. it's not loaded with yes, sirs. it te we've expanded the federal government outside the range, outside the range of what our founders ever thought the federal government would have a hand in. you can't go anywhere that the federal government doesn't have involvement and wrongly so, because quite frankly, even though we're well intentioned, we're not very good at doing these things. >> senator sam stein's in washington. he has a question for you. sam? >> if it's tea party sheep to reign in the size and spending of government, i guess by extension one of the things the tea party members should want to do is champion off some of the fat from the defense department budget. what we see is a bunch of republican senators going around the country arguing that the sequester, the cuts that will hill the defense department budget if no deal is reached should be actually eliminated. do you look at your colleagues
7:11 am
your john mccain, lency graham and others and say they aren't getting the tea party mojo here? >> you mixed two people. you said tea party and then you said republicans. there are not very many. >> i heard what you said. >> i didn't tell anybody. >> just because you're a republican doesn't mean you embrace the principles of the tea party. >> i actually am a republican that embraced their principles. and that's what's wrong. i've had discussions over the last month with my friend john mccain and lindsey graham. i can find the fat in the pentagon. they're just not willing to do it. they don't believe it's there. i believe it's there. i've studied it. i put you don't a trillion dollars worth of cuts in the pentagon over the next ten years. we can do that. the point is, they're worried that we will cut into the actual real thing that will keep us defending. i understand that concern. plu plus, sequestering is stupid.
7:12 am
>> gail collins, tea party champion, "new york times." >> senator, both parties try to get things going in congress, trying to create legislation and compromises that will work. but you're going away, congress is going away without having done anything about the farm bill, without having done anything about the post office, which is now the postal service, which is now in default. we have a budget that kicks it down the road for another six months without making any changes. what's the problem there, do you think? >> the problem is an election. the election is keeping us from doing what we need to do, because, you know, if you have 23 senators up, you don't want them to tate first hard vote. that's why we haven't had a budget. that's why we haven't done anything to address the real problems in this country. you named the post office. you named the fact that we'll
7:13 am
have is have sequestration. there won't be any money. there's no way to get money for it when it does run out of money. we're not addressing the real problems. that's why i overspoke on harry reid. his leadership is lacking, because he's not addressing the real problem. here's what my observation is. america's ready for us to do hard things because they know we're in trouble. and america can do hard things. but when we've done hard things in the past it's required real leadership. we don't have it from the president right now, republican leaders or the leader of the senate. we need real leadership that requires people to make sacrifice. >> i understand this afternoon you're going to have a press conference to talk about the bill that you're proposing, the audit the pentagon act. can you take us, just briefly, into the world of why we need more billion dollar aircraft
7:14 am
carriers and more billion dollar airplanes flying around? >> well, we done the have any billion dollar airplanes flying around but they're pretty expensive. we do need to have a strong defense. but the defense of this country and our ability to defend ourselves is based on our economic strength. and you cannot have a strong defense without a strong economically viable, growing nation. what we've done is spent way too much money and not had any grown-ups in the room when it comes to major weapons systems. >> what are we spending too much money on? >> well, let me -- this is a long story, if you have time for it, i'm happy to go into it. when somebody gets an idea in the pentagon and they want to say, well, here's a new idea, they put out a cost plus contract on research. well, if you're on other side of that, you say, oh, yummy.
7:15 am
you know? they want to do something, we'll do it, and they make good money. then the idea for a weapons system comes up. we start the development of a weapons system. and it's a cost plus contract. now you have 50 people saying what if we do this, what if we do this, what if we do this. there's no grown-up in the room to say the bells and whistles have to stop, guys. here's how much we can afford to spend to get to this technology. and because there's no grown-up or limit on what we -- innovation dries up and what we do is we suck the dollars out of then pentagon, appropriately so, but because there's no adult watching. and there's a real problem in contracting for major weapons systems in this country because we -- nobody can balance what the technology is against what we can afford. what happens is we build technology greater than we can afford with very little incremental increase in benefit
7:16 am
for the war fighter but tremendous increase for the prestigious of the pentagon and the profits for the companies. >> snow tom coburn, a grown-up in the united states senate. thank you very much. >> you guys have a great weekend. >> you, too. up next, congressman chris van hollen joins the conversation. first, bill karins with the forecast. today is going to be an unprecedented day and potentially historic day in oklahoma. bring your attention to the middle of this weather map. this is the actual forecast for oklahoma city today. the reason i'm highlighting this and trying to bring your eyes there, if this does occur it will be the warmest temperature ever recorded in oklahoma city. their weather records go back 120 years. if it hits 114, no one ever alive has ever seen that temperature in oklahoma city. that's the kind of drought and heat wave we're in the middle
7:17 am
of. we'd love to get more rain on the map. the only rain we have this morning is from manhattan, kansas, kansas city. we'll take whatever we can get. this area has had very little rainfall. what we need is a weak tropical system to head into the deep south and the middle of the country. that would help us from the drought. doesn't look like that will help anytime soon. tropical depression number 5 is the so-called next storm to watch. it could become tropical storm ernesto heading towards jamaica or cuba. it could be somewhere near the gulf of mexico next week. that's when we begin to watch closely, from florida, to texas. starting toasty on the east coast, too. the humidity is up. we'll see numerous thunderstorms during the late afternoon in the southeast. once again, oak of course city forecasting you have to your warmest day ever. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] it's a golden opportunity...
7:18 am
to experience the lexus performance line... including the gs and is. [ engines revving ] because control is the ultimate expression of power. [ revving continues ] ♪ during the golden opportunity sales event, get great values on some of our newest models. this is the pursuit of perfection. get great values on some of our newest models. there are projects. and there are game-changers. those ideas that start with us rolling up our sleeves... ...and end with a new favorite room in the house. and when we can save even more on those kinds of projects... ...with advice to make them even better... ...that's a game-changer in itself.
7:19 am
more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get this all in one vanity, faucet, and hardware for just $249.
7:20 am
7:21 am
the centerpiece of my opponent's entire economic plan is not only to extend the bush tax cuts but then to add a new $5 trillion tax cut on top of it. they're asking you to pay an extra $2,000 not to pay down deficit, not to invest in our kids education. mr. romney is asking you to pay more for the people like him get a tax cut. >> that was the president yesterday suggesting that under mitt romney's tax plan, more americans would see the government take a bigger bite
7:22 am
out of their paycheck. a study found that 95% of americans would pay, on average, $500 more in taxes. millionaires would receive an $87,000 tax cut. how is that for early morning prompter reading, mike barnicle. >> very good, lawrence. good job. >> joining us now from washington, democratic representative from maryland, congressman chris van hollen. congressman, mitt romney says i'm not proposing a tax increase on anyone. how is the president doing the math here? >> the math is straightforward. as you said, it was crunched by the tax policy center, an independent, nonpartisan, well respected grupp. here's the math. when you drop the top rate from the current 35% -- it would go to 39%. when you drop that all the way down to 25% and you do it in a deficit neutral way, which is what mitt romney says he wants
7:23 am
to do, that costs $4 trillion. in other words, when you do that cut, that's $4 trillion you have to make up. how do you make it up? mitt romney says you have to make it up by taking away from deducks, taking away exemptions. some of those are things like the deduction for health care, mortgage interest, things that help middle income americans. and so when you do all that math, the result is you're going to be reducing the tax burden on the very wealthy people. they benefit most from the big drop in the tax rate. and you're going to be increasing the tax burden on folks in the middle. that's just basic math. >> congressman, has it occurred to you democrats that mitt romney might actually be just a classic republican tax cutter and when he says it's beginning to be deficit neutral, he's only kidding. he has no intention of making up the revenue lost through the tax cuts? >> well, lawrence, that's right
7:24 am
but either way, he's misrepresenting his position to the american people. either he's dramatically increasing the deficit, which of course is what happened with the bush tax cuts that exploded the deficit or he's shifting the burden on the middle class taxpayers. later today in the house of representatives we're going to vote on the principles for tax reform. and what people will see is in the republican tax reform principles, they do not include something that was included in every bipartisan commission report, which is maintaining at least the progressivety of the current tax code, making sure we do not shift the burden in the tax code down on middle income taxpayers, more away from the top. they do not have that. the democratic principles will have that foreign provision. it is an indication that republicans want to do what mitt romney is proposing, which is to begin to shift that tax burden
7:25 am
on the middle income taxpayers, otherwise you would include maintaining progressivety as one of your principles and they d don't. >> how does mitt romney expect to get elected if at the end of the day he is a wall street rich guy who will not show his tax returns past the last year or two and at the same time very clearly, this is an unbiased group, policy group, that i am going to lower taxes on the 1% and raise it. how is that in any theory an electable strategy. >> don't be surprised if you've just stumped the table. i've got nothing on that. >> as a guy for a living who sells people and sells stuff, it's an unsellable strategy. and this is a guy who wants to get elected. it's implausible. >> stop looking at me. >> we have nothing on this.
7:26 am
>> just wait around and hope that the unemployment rate goes back up. >> even with that, though. >> let me ask the congressman off of donny's astute observation, congressman, which i think all of us have no answer for, why is it that given that, given the load that mitt romney seems to be carrying as donny articulated, how come -- how come it's dead even? the two candidates, it's dead even. what's going on? >> a couple things. i think the most recent poll shows the president is opening up a lead in some key battleground states, ohio, florida and some other areas. i this i that will continue to xpan as people begin it focus on what mitt romney wants to do. he's been relying on people thinking here's this guy who because of his business background will somehow help the country. when people hear what he actually is proposing, they realize it's certainly not going to help them. i think the difference in the
7:27 am
tax debate now than what it used to be is people understand that everybody else pays a price now when you provide tax breaks for folks at the very top. they're not for free. either it means that you're going to increase the burden on middle income taxpayers or it means that somebody else is going to have to pick up the bill if we're going to reduce the deficit. that means seniors on medicare take a hit. big cuts to education. but that is what's different in the debate. the president is laying out the fact that if you provide these additional tax breaks for folks at the very top, it's going to cost the rest of the country. it's going to cost middle class america, it's going to cost seniors. these are not freebies. >> can i pick up donny's challenge? >> yes, sam, go ahead. >> in part because jeoe's not here. there's a certain way the romney campaign would sell this.
7:28 am
>> romney also praised a study by the same group. >> i knew you'd point that out. they argue by cutting rates across the board with you including the corporate tax rate, you'll produce a huge economic boom, which i guess you can say is fool's gold in terms of policy. they argue that would make the deficit neutral. how do you go about arguing that a huge across the board tax cut doesn't in itself produce an economic boom that will in turn allow for an increase in tax revenues? >> well, you just have to look at history, right? we've tried this experiment and it didn't work. we tried this experiment for eight years in the bush administration. we had big tax cuts in 2001, 2003. eight years later, we actually had a net loss in private sector jobs. i mean, the idea that all these cuts to the folks at the top would trickle down and lift up
7:29 am
all the votes didn't work. it was great for the yachts but the boats ran aground. compare that to the clinton years where they imposed fiscal discipline, they had a balanced approach. at the end of that eight-year period where the tax rates were higher, you had 20 million jobs created because the small differences in the top tax rates are not the main drivers of the economy. they have to do with lots of other, more important things, including investments that we make in this country, which mitt romney now says he wants to slash. so basic history tells us that the trickle-down theory is a bust. >> sam, there's two floors to your argument. number one, according to the study, the average guy would pay -- >> it's not sam's argument. >> even if you -- even if you are a trickle down guy, to the guy going to the polls, you're not voting in theory.
7:30 am
you're voting what does your pocketbook look like in the next year, two years, four years. it is an argument that is thin. >> my point is this, the romney campaign will say listen, we're trying to slash taxes across the board. everyone's going to get a tax cut. the obama campaign has to say, listen, the earned income tax credit, health care related tax credits, those are all going to be cut and those are all going to hurt the middle class. that's a little bit more complicated counterargument to make. that's what the romney campaign is banking on, they have a simple formula, we're slashing taxes, going to grow the economy. and, look, obama's been a failure. >> congressman, quickly, before we get out of here, while you've been talking about taxes and everything, you're one of the few members of congress who drives become and forth to work. you live basically in your district. when you stop and get out of your car for gas or groceries or whatever, do people come up and
7:31 am
talk to you about the tax code as a principle issue? >> people talk to me primarily about jobs and the economy and about schools as the big issue. so the idea that mitt romney's going to somehow solve jobs and the economy by another round of trickle-down economics is something that most people think just ain't gonna get us there. you're right. i'm one of the few people who actually gets to go home and talk to constituents. >> every day. >> that's right. >> congressman chris van hollen, thank you for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. coming up, what does a $250,000 education get you? we'll ask the editor of "forbes" magazine who's here with this year's list of america's best colleges, next on "morning joe." ♪
7:32 am
[ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations.
7:33 am
so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they help cover some of the expenses medicare doesn't pay. and save you up tohousands in out-of-pocket costs. to find out more, request your free decision guide. call or go oine today. after all, when you're going the distance, it's nice to have the experience and commitment to go along with you. keep dreaming. keep doing. go long.
7:34 am
7:35 am
israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is pushing back on the u.s. government's approach on how to deal with iran's nuclear ambitions. with defense secretary leon panetta in israel for high-level meetings, netanyahu seemed to catch american officials off guard with a public challenge saying right now, the iranian regime believes the international community does not have the will to stop their nuclear program. this must change and it must change quickly.
7:36 am
panetta has repeatedly insisted that sanctions against iran are working and should be given more time before military action is considered. nbc news is confirming president obama has authorized secretive aid to syrian rebels battling bashar al assad's regime, the intelligence finding as it's called allows the cia and other agencies to give support to rebel factions. nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel reports from inside syria. >> reporter: 11:00 a.m., attack helicopters circled the sky over the city of aretha. we moved to the alley to try to find out why syrian forces are attacking this city of 70,000 south of aleppo. we see civilians fleeing, searching for cover.
7:37 am
it appears that a large military convoy was passing this town on the way to join aleppo. >> in a mikeshift media center, activists try to upload videos of the attack they've taken with small cameras. they show me syrian tanks are now firing into arihah. now, this city is paying for it. back in the alley, men on motorcycles tell us their are bodies up the street, many. we find them, along with their drought relatives. witnesses say the victims were civilians, standing outside a mosque and attacked by a helicopter. there seem to be many casualties. here eight bodies have been brought. they can't even get them to the hospital. they're putting ice on top of the bodies. they can't move them around the
7:38 am
city because there's still too much helicopter fire, still too much mortar fire coming in. menem brace the deceased. oh, uncle, oh, uncle, this man cries. the rebels in arihah seem desperately outgun and may have taken on a battle they can't win. each fighter says he only has about 60 bullets and hand-made grenades. how are you going to protect yourself against the assault. god is with us, he says. back in the media center, bad news has just arrived. one of the rebels media activists has just been killed, more than a dozen killed in arihah and the rebels never stopped the syrian army convoy headed to aleppo. >> the united nations general assembly meets today as arab countries push a resolution urging syria's president to give up power.
7:39 am
gail collins, thank you very much for joining us. we'll be reading your column in today's "new york times." i've read a couple sentences already. up next -- >> look at that look. >> he's here to reveal something. i don't know what. maybe, i don't know, the cover of "time" magazine maybe? "sports illustrated." ♪
7:40 am
♪ i want to go ♪ i want to win [ breathes deeply ] ♪ this is where the dream begins ♪ ♪ i want to grow ♪ i want to try ♪ i can almost touch the sky [ male announcer ] even the planet has an olympic dream. dow is proud to support that dream by helping provide greener, more sustainable solutions from the olympic village to the stadium. solutionism. the new optimism.™ ♪ this dream
7:41 am
7:42 am
this is new york state. we built the first railway, the first trade route to the west, the greatest empires. then, some said, we lost our edge. well today, there's a new new york state. one that's working to attract businesses and create jobs. a place where innovation meets determination... and businesses lead the world. the new new york works for business. find out how it can work for yours at thenewny.com. joining us now on the set at the world headquarters of "morning joe," "time" magazine's managing editor, rick stengel. rick, i have spent another week in desperate suspense about what -- what are you going to
7:43 am
put on the cover of the magazine? >> i always tell you beforehand. >> i have no idea this week. >> he called me tuesday night about midnight -- >> couldn't sleep. >> any hints on the idea? >> i said, no, i don't know. >> are you being ironic? is that what i'm guessing here? here is the cover, guys. a subject that "time" magazine -- >> we cover here on "morning joe" a lot as well. the white house for sale, the most expensive presidential campaign in history presidential campaigns like moore's law in technology. they double every four years. because of the 501 c4s, super a pacs, it will be the most negative campaign in history. it already is. already the amount and percentage of negative ads is faster and more than it ever has been before. the lerl i spending has been faster and bigger and more than
7:44 am
it has been before. >> i'll try and look for a silver lining in this. clearly when someone like adelson can spend $35 million to help someone get elected anonymo anonymously, do they have a mechanism where it just shuts down? there's equality of ridiculousness on both sides. that the voter gets a sense of that and it shuts down and it starts to just blur? >> i have a slightly contrarian view of this, money in politics is not inherronly good or bad. there's nothing that is necessarily bad about spending this much money. by the way, we spend $3 billion on this much campaign. procter & gamble spends $6 billion a year. >> there's a different when it is one citizen because of the supreme court ruling or a corporation. >> to me, the biggest problem is the anonymity of it. the problem of the amount of
7:45 am
commerci commercials, to me is not necessarily bad. if there's one thing that americans do understand and know how to figure out, it's television commercials. they're used to seeing -- >> i think they should shut them down. >> what we've seen, too, this fantastic charge, the lion's share amount of money is spent in 16 or 17 swing states. >> of course. >> we're not going to see that many ads in new york. you're not going to see many ads in california. if you're living in virginia, if you're living in colorado, if you're living in florida, if you're living in ohio, you will see a lot of ads. >> people will tune those out, i agree. >> i am of the school that the flood of negative ads that we see on tv news shows, even though we don't live in those states will depress turnout. do you buy that? >> i doubt it. i think the turnout is going to be churned by the dynamics, anger at unemployment. there will be a lot of anger turnout on each side, anger at
7:46 am
the campaign against the president, anger at the campaign against romney, that sort of thing. rick, what do you make of this recent piece, i think it was in "the new york times" magazine who said when you look at the money flow, the increase we're seeing is not a citizens united phenomenon. it's really just what we've seen in the general trend of increase in spending over time, when you look at it over decades. >> that is correct. our two pieces by mike crowley and miker scherer explore this idea. the suspense of not getting it until right now. >> you need a little more preparation. there's been a lot that's written about citizens united that is not true. citizens united expands some of the boundaries that didn't exist before. the 30-day period before elections you can now, those issue groups can now advertise. the anonymity has been
7:47 am
reinforced by that. we saw 527s four years ago, we saw them eight years ago. what it basically does, it tells the court, money is speech and don regulate these things too highly. >> our friends that we were talking about earlier, 23, 24, 25 years of age, they voted four years ago, they're now living in the basements of their parents' homes. they can't find jobs. do you think they'll vote again. >> who knows. i think it depends how the economy will go. >> are they going to have the time. >> a lot of this money is designed to suppress voter turnout. one of the thing that money buys is negative advertising. i think that depresses voter turnout. with citizens united, reveal donation to the romney super pac. you have to still reveal what you're doing. the programs are not
7:48 am
transparent, and what used to be sort of a bedrock principle conservatism is that you could have limitless donations so long as your name is attached to it has now been abandoned. and there was a thing called the disclosure act. it essentially said that anyone who don'ts to one of these groups and turns around and the money is used for political advertisements, their names have to be public. that seemed like a very low hanging piece of fruit. what ended up happening in the political culture is if you're a perspective candidate, if you're thinking of running for office. the easiest thing to do is find three or four millionaire friends. it's hard to build a grass roots operation where you can run, basically built on small donations. i think obama is going to be the last of his breed. >> you can have the sheldon adelsons, and you have billionaires on both sides.
7:49 am
he will get more money than last time, but it will be less because the pie has grown. >> i think it's more 3, 3.5. there's a trick now. people on both sides put extreme ads on the internet. shows like this run them because those are the ads we run, and that's the interesting trick now. so this number we have to really increase. there are ads out there that all the national mediators run. >> so the effect is greater. >> so you're going to run the correction in the online version. >> thank you, lawrence. >> how many people tune into that. >> the reading, i'm going to watch this one. the new cover of "time." is the white house for sale? >> thank you, lawrence. >> there's more here. more tv show. >> he's reading from a
7:50 am
teleprompter. >> he's not reading. he's emoting. coming up, coming up. could the new health care law cause a doctor shortage, we'll have our own resident physicians here to answer that question. dr. zeke emanuel. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. era detergent once clobbered a stain made by a meatball. that meatball now lives in hiding, in constant fear
7:51 am
that era will one day track it down too. (suspenseful ♪) era. so much fight, it's chuck norris approved. why severy room deserves ll us what outo look great.or is? and every footstep should tell us we made the right decision. so when we can feel our way through the newest, softest, and most colorful options... ...across every possible price range... ...our budgets won't be picking the style. we will. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. make room for savings with $37 basic installation on martha stewart living and platinum plus carpet. it's something you're born with. and inspires the things you choose to do.
7:52 am
you do what you do... because it matters. at hp we don't just believe in the power of technology. we believe in the power of people when technology works for you. to dream. to create. to work. if you're going to do something. make it matter. with lean cuisine steam bags. get our crispiest carrots and our snappiest peas all freshly steamed in just minutes. steam bags from lean cuisine. be culinary chic. sven's home security gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve the most rewards!
7:53 am
[ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice.
7:54 am
on tomorrow's show, the behind the scenes look at americans. here's what's funny. here's what's funny about this. i've actually read this article, but reading about it in the teleprompter is harder for me, of course. and there's more on tomorrow's show. also, retiring congressman steve latourette on why he's calling it quits in washington, plus former white house adviser van jones joins the conversation. and coming up next, what the victory tea party means in texas and can it survive? johnny continues to rebrand the
7:55 am
movement. "morning joe", back in a moment. done without rehearsal. in florida we had more suntans... in alabama we had more beautiful blooms... in mississippi we had more good times... in louisiana we had more fun on the water. last season we broke all kinds of records on the gulf. this year we are out to do even better... and now is a great time to start. our beatches are even more relaxing... the fishing's great. so pick your favorite spot on the gulf... and come on down. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home.
7:56 am
7:57 am
ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about market volatility. ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 in times like these, it can be tough to know which ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 way the wind is blowing. ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 at charles schwab, we're ready with objective insights about ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 the present market and economic conditions. ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 and can help turn those insights into ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 a plan of action that's right for you. ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 so don't let the current situation take you off course. ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 talk to chuck.
7:58 am
ttd#: 1-800-345-2550 good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. welcome back to "morning joe" as you take a live look at new york city. back with us onset. mike barnacle. donny deustch, gayle collins. and mark stein in washington.
7:59 am
mike barnacle, a lot to talk about today. "the new york times" is leading the story about the republican nominee ted cruz. now he's shaking things up. the "washington post" has a story about how the senate race in wisconsin has suddenly become bright because of the tea party's influence. looks like they're going to have an impact and may bump tommy thompson, who has been a political heavy wait for years up inaway out of the way. it looks like the tea party is reasserting itself. >> yeah, joe, it does. and from other observers, it doesn't bode well for a congenial united states senate in the future. but we're going to find out about that. and with a big win in the primary run off the u.s. senate in texas, the te party is proving it's still a major player in this year's election. ted cruise's double digit victory is the second major coup
8:00 am
for the movement in the primary season. according to "the new york times," among 17 contested races, more than half the candidates are embraced by the tea party. ted cruise say it's a reflection of the party getting back to bedrock principles. >> a lot of republicans would say they think things have gotten worse with the tea pear members there. that it's really put a stop or halt to a lot of things. >> well, there are a lot of things that needed to stop, that needed to halt. our $16 trillion debt was a bipartisan problem. a whole lot of republicans went arm in arm with the democrats in agreeing to that spending. >> do you feel like a lot of people out there are out to get the tea party? >> oh, sure. look, everyone who has invested interest in the status quo, in business as usual, in spending and spending and spending wants to stop anyone who wants to stop that gravy train.
8:01 am
>> donny, since mika is not with us this morning, you will play the liberal from new york who gets hives every time the tea party advances like this. what concerns do you have, donny? >> it's not about a concern. it's more observations. they are candidates in terms of tone and matter. if you notice the demeern around him, what the tea party wans for their movement is human beings that seem powerful, as opposed to the screaming raging right. so the principles are the same. the delivery system and the tone is different in the candidates. >> gayle collins, my gosh. you wrote a book about this. >> i told you it was all texas. >> you said it all goes back to
8:02 am
texas. talk about texas and talk about this win for ted cruise. he's going to be a rising star very quickly. tell us about the column you wrote. >> this is interesting. i think you're seeing the same pattern over and over again. you have your basic party guy that everybody respects. he's been in office for 2,000 years one way or the other. he's going to be in the senate and everybody likes him. then suddenly this person comes out of nowhere saying no, no, no, no, and he's more interesting. he's more exciting. he's more active and he wins. and it's about right wing principles. but it's also just about how the base of the republican party, the old establishment, doesn't have any juice anymore. it just doesn't seem to have any candidates -- >> they really don't. they really don't.
8:03 am
gayle is exactly right, mike. the gop establishment is dead if they're not dead, they're exhausted and moving that west. it's almost like you know if somebody puts themselves up as the gop establishment figure, they're going to lose. >> your initial instinct is correct. they're dead and gone. that's a memory. gop establishment as we used to know it. even five or ten years ago, that's gone. the aforementioned "new york times" column that gail wrote, she takes up comments about protecting american's golf courses for the united nations. everyone is concerned about that. but the idea of a world without golf courses and to cruise is talking about is a big nonbinding resolution more than
8:04 am
20 years old. the senate seat in question is held by kay bailey hutchison. a politically conservative and emotionally moderate republican, who likes working on issues like saveuation safety. cruz's victory certainly suggests that next year the republican senate will be composed almost entirely of right-wing purists and people afraid they're going to be primaried by a right wing purist. the national electorate is totally turned off by partisan standoffs. you can almost hear the public imploring, will you please make some back room deals. at the same moment the republican candidates are being pushed into being more and more intractable. i mean, it seems like literally that you had a few strebt in
8:05 am
theed moderate republicans who understand the way of live that adheres to more than just politics. it's called bargaining. a house, a used car, whatever, you bargain. >> and even to this very day, i think, you have a number of republicans who just don't want to go over a cliff. any cliff. they don't like the cliffs. cliffs are bad. but i'm not sure the new guys are nearly as cliff averse than the ones we've been used to. >> hey, mark, it's donny. i want to ask a question. can we please reestablish what the tea party is. when i listen to ted cruz i see a very appealing candidate. i see a highly educated guy. i don't see the characteristics on paper that feel like the tea party. can we say what the tea party is once and for all? >> i know him a little bit. he's been characterized somewhat in the senate press. he's going to be more like pat
8:06 am
toomey than jim demint or ran paul. he did a very good job of running, not exactly what he is, but he senses what the tea party home is about. in jan, whoever is elected president. whoever is in the new congress is going to have to deal with the issue of the tea party. then we'll know, what's the future of the republican party? until that deal, until we see the terms of the deal, i don't think we can say too much about what kind of setting it will have, what kind of senator ted cruz will be. i think he will be part of a solution rather than obstruction on that deal. >> i'm glad you read that. they're back on the map.
8:07 am
but when ted cruz gets to washington, what does it mean for gompbing. what does it mean in terms of solving the problem that this company has? right now the american people are really -- they're tired. they're angry of all the partisanship. and having more ted cruz's come in is not going to help them. >> the campaign that he read. >> there weren't any. it was difficult to find areas of disagreement. the main problem is he worked constructively as a legislature. but the fact that he worked in legislation was a big problem for the candidacy.
8:08 am
and the people that propelled ted cruz don't want someone to boric for congress. they said this was the next line in the hostile takeov in washington. and i don't want to understate that. these people understand what it did or took to get them into office. and i'm not sure what the long term locations are for the republican party. the tea party is great at electing candidates, but it's not exactly the most popular thing in the world. they were at a negative 14%, negative 15%, favorability rating. it was worse than bain. it was the worst in the poll. i think mitch mcconnell has a really tough job on his hands when this is all said and done. zbl let's talk about what is still fuelling the tea party. it's still a reaction to what happened in 2009, 2010, and when we have this discussion about
8:09 am
whether an election of tea party senators is going to help move the ball forward and bring about compromise, well, the really response, the conservative response is yeah, yeah, it's probably not going to be anymore constructive as it comes to compromise between parties as the president was in 2009 and 2010. i mean, this is a reaction to the overreach and conservative size of what happened in 2009 and 2010. republicans an conservatives don't want that happening over the next years. >> it was about the tea party and spending. people saying the presidential year, it's a different dynamic and different electorate. but there will be energy on the right side from the tea party. there's no doubt. they're not going to lose a seat in texas over it.
8:10 am
i think the tea party, as long as they focus on spending, it's probably certainly a net plus for republicans in the election. in terms of after the election, again, the first thing the country is going to have to deal with, partly in the lame duck session is spending. that's the issue. i think the election results, even if the president wins, it's going to be a mandate for the new washington lineup to deal with spending. the tea party is unpopular, sam is right, in terms of polling. but cutting spending and dealing with the deficit. it's essential. it's going to the first big agenda item. >> let's talk about chicken sandwiches. i like chicken sandwiches, right? i love chic-fil-a.
8:11 am
i have known my entire life these guys are practicing conservative christians. they close chic-fil-a on sunday. every sunday i drive by. i look at the sign, it's closed, i swear, and then i go back home. they are who they are, and they get a strong christian belief system and have always been front and center. and suddenly protesters come out because they have a very critical view of marriage. and suddenly a cricken restaurant has become ground zero in culture wars over gay marriage. how stupid is this? >> first of all, as a current member of the new formally tea party, mow power conservative movement, we've successfully branded them. i interviewed the president a number of years ago. and he's a gentleman, and he's a
8:12 am
man of principle. i applaud his right as an individual and ceo. if you like the sandwiches, go there. if you don't like the sandwiches, don't go there. to me, they make a great sandwich. >> you're not going to find me at chick-fil-a any time soon. i agree he has the right to say what he wants to say. this is america. he has frhis free speech rights. i also think the people protesting also have a right to protist. it's not just what dan kathy is saying. he's putting his money where his mouth is. hooe not saying i have a traditional view of marriage. he is putting money into anti-gay organizations, the female research council. exodus international. >> don't go there.
8:13 am
and say it loud and clear. >> but i don't think it's fair to say that the people protesting chick-fil-a are wrong or dumb. >> they're not. they're not. the larger issue is do the mayors of wisconsin and boston and other cities, where are they coming from when they say no chick-fil-a's in our city because of what a guy says. >> not just because of what a guy says but also what a goi believes. this is not like a fringe belief. these guys will traditional christian believers. and for a mayor of chicago or a mayor of boston. really? you are going to hold me hostage to your political battle. to your culture war? keep it to yourself. if you don't want to go to the restaurants, don't go to the
8:14 am
restaurants. please. let's not start putting fences up around gay restauranting and having one cultural battle there and fences around other restaurants having another cultural battle there because of something that somebody believes or somebody says. that's ridiculous. >> you don't want to argue it on the basis of this is a traditional belief, and therefore it's okay for him to believe this. this is his belief. it could be a nontraditional belief. it could be fire worshipping. whatever he wants to do, we all agree here. it's his right to do it and talk about it. it's other people's rights to protest it and to try to bring publicity to look at the question of what he thinks. we all agree the problem here is the mayor is trying to use the zoning board of appeals to impose the beliefs. that's not where you want to go. still ahead, the forbes magazine is out with a list of the top colleges. with soaring tuition in the top
8:15 am
job market, plenty of students are asking if higher learning is even worth it. we're going to talk to the magazine's editor in a few minutes. the president's health care law means millions of people will get medical insurance. that doesn't mean there are nur doctors to take care of it. two residents will weigh in. but first bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> yesterday was bad enough. it was 112 in oklahoma city yesterday. almost every location in oklahoma was well above 100. okc is the warmest spot in the country. 83 degrees. prigt behind them is dallas. it's going to be an unbelievable day. we're predicting a high of 114 degrees in oklahoma city. why is that so crazy? they've never been that high before in reported history. today is looking to be the hottest day in oklahoma city
8:16 am
every recorded. dallas is not far behind at 103 either. also, showers and thunderstorms right where we need them. we've had horrible drought in areas of arkansas. this is welcomed rainfall. it's not enough, of course. but at least it's better than baking in the sunshine. forecast throughout the next five days is all about the tropics. tropical depression number five. it could be a threat to the yucatan or the gulf of mexico the middle to end of the week. forecast is a quiet day. just thunderstorms and high humidity on the east coast. the west coast, you are dry as could be. st. louis, you've been a poster child. friends in oklahoma city are going to top you today. i've worked hard to build my family.
8:17 am
and also to build my career. so i'm not about to always let my frequent bladder urges, or the worry my pipes might leak get in the way of my busy lifestyle. that's why i take care, with vesicare. once-daily vesicare can help control your bladder muscle and is proven to treat overactive bladder with symptoms of frequent urges and leaks day and night. if you have certain stomach or glaucoma problems,
8:18 am
or trouble emptying your bladder, do not take vesicare. vesicare may cause allergic reactions that may be serious. if you experience swelling of the face, lips, throat or tongue, stop taking vesicare and get emergency help. tell your doctor right away if you have severe abdominal pain, or become constipated for three or more days. vesicare may cause blurred vision, so use caution while driving or doing unsafe tasks. common side effects are dry mouth, constipation, and indigestion. i've worked hard to get to where i am... and i've got better places to go than always going to the bathroom. so take charge of your symptoms by talking to your doctor and go to vesicare.com for a free trial offer. olaf's pizza palace gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! pizza!!!!! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! put it on my spark card! [ high-pitched ] nice doin' business with you! [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve the most rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one.
8:19 am
choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet?
8:20 am
welcome back to "morning joe". i'm lawrence o'donnell back at the table for mika. mike barnacle, donny deutsch and jonathan capehart are still with us. joining us now for some doctors orders. move the prompter down. joining us now for some doctors orders, medical correspondent for pbs "need to know." why was doctor's orders in
8:21 am
quotation marks. dr. emily senay. and in washington, former white house adviser for policy, dr. zeke emanuel who is teaching an online course. i know that because it was in the teleprompter. dr. emanuel, we don't have enough doctors as it is. anybody who takes weeks to get a doctor appointment. now the affordable care act will make the waits longer. 25 million people or more coming into the system thanks to your work, getting the affordable care act passed. so how can the system absorb the new patients? >> first of all, i disagree with almost every statement you just made. >> everything you're disagreeing with was not in the propermpter. that's the problem. as soon as i go off prompter, there's no telling what's going
8:22 am
to happen. >> first of all we do wait a long time. one of the things we learned from massachusetts is they added half a million more people to their rolls through insurance. and waiting times have not changed for primary care doctors, for obstetricians and card yalgss there. one thing we need to see a complete transformation on how doctors give care. after we finish treating breast cancer patients, we see them every three months. who said every three months was the right period of the time? they could have seen a nurse practitioner or other people. we're going to change how we deliver care that will be much more team based.
8:23 am
it will free up doctor time to focus on the most serious problem. so they're thinking about an old system,s no what's coming in terms of team based care. >> what did dr. emanuel just get wrong. i got everything wrong in my tern turn. he mugt have gotten one thing wrong. >> he speaks to the mts experience. right after their law was passed they saw a huge uptick. they had to scramble to take care of the new people that came into the system. but they did it. and they figured out smarter ways to deliver care by utilizing highly trained practitioner advisers. and they're hitting on new ways to deliver care that's very promising. but we do need to train some doctors. i know the school that i work with has taken in more medical students. we turn away hundreds and
8:24 am
hundreds if not hows of highly qualified candidates every year. >> you're in the doctor's waiting room every week, aren't you? >> at least twice a week. >> let me ask you a question, doctor, and the answer would come from you and then zeke and then to sam stein, who is the son of two daughters in washington. with all the new medical schools, with the influx hopefully of more medical students, how do you convince people? you know you want to be a cardiologist? no, we want you to be an internist. we need more interns to actually see patients. is there a way to get that done? >> there is. there's already some incentives built into the affordable care act that will make it more appealing to practice primary care. you're right. it's less appealing to practice primary care. they don't make as much money.
8:25 am
the the system sort of conspires against them in terms of the number of patients we need to say. and those things are changing, i think, primary care, i hope, will become as appealing as cardiology or dermatology even. dr. emanuel can weigh in on that. >> i do think you're seeing a shift among the medical students certainly that i talk to. and i think the market is sending signals that it's going to be a lot better to be in primary care. i also think we need to fundamentally change how we pay doctors so primary care is rewarded for all the things that it does. the talking of patients. the arranging of continuity of care. and we done reimburse the most for procedures. when that shift happens, you will' a dramatic shift in how doctors respond because they will see that, in fact, they can make just as much money being a primary care doctor as being a
8:26 am
high paid surgeon or cardiologist. the other thing i would say is this team based approach is also going to change the incentive structure so more primary care will be focused on keeping people healthy and reducing the amount of people that need to see specialists. >> you know, one thing we're forgetting is when the death panels come in, the doctor will be freed up. in all seriousness, two things that haven't been doesed. one is preventive care. it's a mixed bag with respect to costs. i know there's questions about how much it will save in the long run. also electronic medical records. i have a question for the two actual doctors on the show. electronic medical records hold a lot of promise. but from my understanding there's been a difficulty of people implementing them. because you have all the written medical records. it takes a lot of tech savvy to
8:27 am
con ver them. what's the status of the investment made in the stimulus? >> first of all, there's a huge uptake in the electronic health records as a result of the high-tech app. and we are seeing a lot more adoption. it's a teething, bumpy process. to introduce them requires changing how doctors see patients. changing how they track patients over time. by the end of the decade we're all going to have inner operable electronic records. we've also seen a huge influx of companies into the space, bringing a lot of tech savvy innovation, and they're going to completely transform the kinds of medical records we have now. they're good for tracking patients. they're good for communicating with patients. they're also good for mining, trying to figure out the best treatments across a number of
8:28 am
patients. zl and one other thing is integrating the billing and backlogging of the sfuf so all the things are seamlessly linked together. that will make for cost savings right there and make it easier for everybody to get through the system. >> what are meatless mondays? >> meatless mondays are a long standing campaign that advocates taking one day off from meat products. doesn't sound very controversial, unless you're the usda and recommend that to your own employees. not sure if you're aware, but that caused a giant up roar. >> don't worry. he's not aware. if you're ever wondering, is mike aware? if you bet no, you are going to win. >> i'm sure you're not aware. >> i'm not. the national cattle and beef association got all up in arms.
8:29 am
they quickly retracted this simple health message that they put on the website for their own employees. and they took it down off the website. the dean of the school of public health has written to the head of the usda. >> when you were kids, who used to win in the fights? >> what fights? >> i know this is always hard for everyone to understand but ron was the peacemaker. >> could you kick his butt? early on. but after a while, ari definitely took me because he joined the wrestling team, man. >> scrappy. >> excuse me, i have something to read. thank you for joining us this morning. >> there is more.
8:30 am
in other news, forbes magazine is here with the annual list of america's best colleges. the best colleges. keep it on "morning joe." do you see it ? there it is ! there it is ! where ? where ? it's getting away ! where is it ? it's gone. we'll find it. any day can be an adventure. that's why we got a subaru. love wherever the road takes you. wow, there it is. there are projects. and there are game-changers. those ideas that start with us rolling up our sleeves... ...and end with a new favorite room in the house.
8:31 am
and when we can save even more on those kinds of projects... ...with advice to make them even better... ...that's a game-changer in itself. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get this all in one vanity, faucet, and hardware for just $249.
8:32 am
8:33 am
8:34 am
hooer here now with forbes magazine shocking list t of top university, randall, lang. as you know, you watched us. we've been buzzing through the list. the top ten, i'm not very surprised. princeton number one. stanford number three. university of chicago number four. harvard number six. eight, columbia. nine. panoma college. i happen to know where panoma college is. but i'm surprised that it's the nooin best college. >> and my parents are screaming at the screen because they spent a lot of money at the university of pennsylvania for me. and it's 19. >> my alma mater as well. we did this a different way.
8:35 am
now we're in an era where you take out a -- you can be a debt a quarter million dollars when you graduated from school. >> so panoma is free? >> it is not free. we did take into effect how much dead you have. we looked at this from a consumer standpoint. how happy are the customers? and a lot of the small schools, the students come out and we're looking at surveys and how happy they were tw the educational experience. and the students who were in smaller school. less than 2,000 students. i am very happy with the product i purchased. >> let me ask you about number 28. world famous harvey mud. it ranks higher -- >> i've never heard of harvey.
8:36 am
>> it's doing better in this list than vanderbilt, georgetown. >> it's a school with an entrepreneurial focus with less than 1,000 state of the unions. so we're measuring not only how happy they were with their purchase b but what was the outcomes? we looked at salaries ten years out. we weren'ting to say let's make sure all the ivy league students are on there. sorry. i'm an avid reader of forbes, but i have to challenge that. also 25% of your studies, do the students like it? i don't know if that's a criteria. maybe they partied a lot or whatever. >> were they happy with their professors? >> you have to understand something about us geniuses. mike could tell you this. us geniuses are not happy
8:37 am
people. you can ask us. so you're asking happy people if they're happy. come on. >> i want to talk to sam who just graduated from college six weeks ago. >> what? >> well, i'm just saying, any list that puts dartmouth college at number 34 is an absolute joke. we need to disregard this. done by "forbes" magazine. it's terrible. no, seously. it was a wonderful place. small school. great quality of living and success rate for the alum. how do you do about managing the tangibles of the school? how well the professors relate to the student? >> again, we were looking at outcome. did you come out? did you feel like you got a good education? and how much debt do you have? and how well were you doing ten years out in terms of salary? in terms of how many people got
8:38 am
ph.d.s. went onto degrees they were going to cash in? we're not looking for reputation. a lot of other ranks are about reputation. about selectivity getting in. and who cares? to an employer, i think you do care. >> absolutely. then we measured what the salary was. >> that's the shocker. >> also, we looked at how well they did getting students in. williams at number two gets 91% of the students out in four years. want to get the hell out of there. >> we're going to do the tape for you right here of college graduates that you've been talking with. and some of this may surprise you. probably not. florence, went to harvard. donny, upenn ranked number 17 on the list.
8:39 am
sam went to dartmouth, it's ranked number 34. why, i don't know. that's bizarre. i attended boston university. and it barely made the list at 98. >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. and i have a vivid memory of the subway, going back and for to school. as a day hop. >> if you graduated it would have been higher on the list. but the trouble with this social science is you're measuring a bunch of things hooer that we're not acknowledging that we're measuring. one of the things we're measuring is how much do people who go to this school care about money. once you say we're going to evaluate the success of an education based on how much money it returns, you are saying we will not value people who leave this school and become public schoolteachers.
8:40 am
we just won't value them if they do that. >> or if they're great thinkers. but the issue right now, i mean, it used to be, you got into college. four years, i was a history major. you studied history. you learned how to think. you learned how to process information. unfortunately right now in the world we're living in, we all know college graduates coming out with great degrees, not necessarily useful degrees, and they're moving home full of debt. we're in a different dynamic where getting into college all the sudden is not automatic. we're saying, these are all automatic. there are a lot of schools where you have to look and it's not an automatic decision. nothing really changed for america, and it's scary. >> you were supposed to tease out of this. can i try to do it as a demonstration. >> yeah, go ahead. i want you to notice the pauses. the punches. >> and you're going to do it word for word. >> forbes listed america's best college is in the latest issue
8:41 am
of "forbes" magazine. randall, i thank you and we thank you. >> you're squinting a little. do you want to squint that much. >> i can't see. >> this is before the bell. [ male announcer ] now you can swipe... scroll... tap... pinch... and zoom... in your car.
8:42 am
introducing the all-new cadillac xts with cue. ♪ don't worry. we haven't forgotten, you still like things to push. [ engine revs ] the all-new cadillac xts has arrived, and it's bringing the future forward. it's something you're born with. and inspires the things you choose to do. you do what you do... because it matters. at hp we don't just believe in the power of technology. we believe in the power of people when technology works for you. to dream. to create. to work. if you're going to do something. make it matter.
8:43 am
tdd# 1-800-345-2550 there are atm fees. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 account service fees.
8:44 am
tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and the most dreaded fees of all, hidden fees. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 at charles schwab, you won't pay fees on top of fees. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 no monthly account service fees. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 no hidden fees. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and we rebate every atm fee. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 so talk to chuck tdd# 1-800-345-2550 because when it comes to talking, there is no fee. you know what we're going to do now? >> well, i see some words in front of us. >> we are going to get a check on business. >> oh, that's a good idea. >> is it before the bell, during the bell or after the bell. >> you're looking at a va tech guy. virginia tech, home of the greatest baseball coach in all
8:45 am
of college baseball. >> what does this rank? >> before brian went there it was ranked number seven. after he graduated it's now down to 127. brian, sorry about that. >> but that's out of 20 million colleges in america. >> you guys are skating the issue, right? i just realized listening to your previous conversation that i think i'm the only public school kid that comes on morning joe show. kindergarten to college, public school, middle class. you guys were private school elites. i don't know if i can hang out with you. i don't drive a saab. >> i can't spell saab. >> brian, you have an orange volvo station wagon parked outside the building. >> i wish i did. it's called the "a" or "c" train up town. let's talk about business. it looks like a good opening here. don't look at week to week.
8:46 am
tomorrow is the big day. that's the monthly jobs number. the biggest market moving event is we have basically officials in europe saying they need to buy bonds directly. i don't want to call it a bank, but it's kind of their tarp, if you think of it that way, where they can buy the troubled debt for the european nations. that's given the market some optimism here. this is a bigger theme about computers taking over trading was the software glitch that really sent 148 stocks soaring at the opening yesterday. night capital, one of the biggest market makers out there saying this morning that they're having a capital issue with their company because this is going to cost them hundreds of millions of dollars, it kind of goes back to the idea that computers are a good thing, maybe in littmited numbers. it's like tmz, computers gone wild. this was a flash rally.
8:47 am
night capital stock down 60% right now. >> lawrence wanted me to ask you this. the portfolio is 71% hedge funds. he's thinking next year of moving it to more traditional spiders. >> spiders? >> yeah. >> listen, the overall snptf. a lot of investors will tell you. jack vogul says buy low cost index funds and just let it ride. but put money away every month. so i'm not going to give you any financial advice but that. pay yourself first, save a little money. then put the rest in the bank. >> brian sullivan, virginia tech, class of 2010. thanks, brian. >> thank you. up next, one of the strangest baseball ejections you've ever seen. we're going to explain that next on "morning joe." this man is about to be the millionth customer.
8:48 am
would you mind if i go ahead of you? instead we had someone go ahead of him and win fifty thousand dollars. congratulations you are our one millionth customer. people don't like to miss out on money that should have been theirs. that's why at ally we have the raise your rate 2-year cd. you can get a one-time rate increase if our two-year rate goes up. if your bank makes you miss out, you need an ally. ally bank. no nonsense. just people sense. with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see what criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the strategies and narrow down to exactly those stocks you want to follow. i'm mark allen of fidelity investments. the expert strategies feature is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account.
8:49 am
[ female announcer ] great taste is always in style with lean cuisine steam bags. get our crispiest carrots and our snappiest peas all freshly steamed in just minutes. steam bags from lean cuisine. be culinary chic.
8:50 am
ornicdoes your cauliflower fhave a big carbon footprint? not at all. that's great. melons!!! oh yeah!! well that was unlled for. uhh... mr. gallagher. incoming!!! hahaha! it's wasteful. you know jimmy. folks who save hundres switching to geico sure are happy. how happy, ronny? happier than gallagher at a farmers'arket. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fteen percent or more.
8:51 am
>> best story of the day. an umpiring first in professional baseball. after making a questionable car during yesterday's daytona cubs minor league game, this happened.
8:52 am
>> oh, he just got tossed. >> turn this off the rest of the night. >> that is awesome. that's absolutely awesome. that is so cool. >> awesome is an understatement. in case you didn't hear that. the home plate umpire ejected, threw out the p.a. announcer for playing the song three blind mice. with no one to run the public address system, a fan from the stands had to step in for the remainder of the game. that's one of the greatest things that's ever happened. >> i didn't know the umpire had authority on anyone. >> you're out. what if anything could be learned today? sometimes, i feel like it's me against my hair.
8:53 am
[ female announcer ] weak, damaged hair needs new aveeno nourish+ strengthen. active naturals wheat formulas restore strength for up to 90% less breakage in three washes. for strong, healthy hair with life, new aveeno nourish+ strengthen. [ "human" by the human league playing ] humans. we mean well, but we're imperfect creatures living in a beautifully imperfect world. it's amazing we've made it this far. maybe it's because when one of us messes up, someone else comes along to help out. that's the thing about humans. when things are at their worst, we're at our best. see how at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's your policy? why should our wallets tell us what our favorite color is?
8:54 am
8:55 am
every room deserves to look great. and every footstep should tell us we made the right decision. so when we can feel our way through the newest, softest, and most colorful options... ...across every possible price range... ...our budgets won't be picking the style.
8:56 am
we will. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. make room for savings with $37 basic installation on martha stewart living and platinum plus carpet. it is time to talk about what we all learned today. sam stein in washington. what did you learn? >> i learn that had providing a four-year education in beer pong only gets dartmouth a 34th racing from "forbes" magazine. disgraceful. >> although john and i could talk fax, it's the great lawrence o'donnell rocking the
8:57 am
black check van that will be the fashion must have come this fall. >> my office is santa monica is right over the vans store. it's really all i have. >> i learned carlton ranked 31, which outranks dartmouth. i learned sam stein's parents are both physicians, which makes me ask, how disappointed in you are your parents? >> terribly. i'm still not allowed home for thanksgiving. >> i learned as usual begin because the college i attended went so low, i did the right thing. i never went. i never went. but you're in for a treat. olympics coverage is up right now.
8:58 am
good morning, everyone. welcome to our nbc olympics headquarters in new york. i'm kelly tillman. the focus is on the equestrian sport of dressage. described for the uninitiated at horse ballet. this year it has gained prominence for reasons unrelated to the competition. in fact, stephen colbert has called it the sport of the summer. david marcus of canada had a problem as his horse capital began bucking and did not finish. so canada was eliminated from the competition. interesting developments. right now we take you out live to history british park where we
8:59 am
join tim ryan and melanie smith-taylor on the call. >> welcome to greenwich park. this is the site of the equestrian event, all of them. today the first day of the dressage. equestrian events have been in the game since 1912. this venue dates back to 1943. and how the world sets its watches. the horse arena and all the other facilities including the stables have been built just for these games and they're on platforms, elevated by more than 2,000 pillars to protect the grounds of history below which date back to roman times. everything will be removed after the olympics and this will be returned to the parkland setting hoped to all who can come to this site. this is the first day of dressage. and in the ring at the moment

213 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on