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tv   BOS Youth Young Adult and Families Committee  SFGTV  December 18, 2021 2:00am-6:01am PST

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>> good morning, the meeting will come to order. welcome to the december 10th regularly scheduled meeting of the youth, young adult and families committee. i'm supervisor ronen and we're joined by our vice chair safai and supervisor melgar and our
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clerk is erica major. we recently learned that students have organized and are meeting in action to protest sexual harassment and assault that is expected to march to and rally at city hall today during our meeting. this is the youth, young adult and families committee, the members of this committee would like to welcome the youth to city hall and recognize and express support for their action. we will be calling a brief recess in this meeting when the activists arrive. we expect it to be around 10:15. we expect it to last about 15 minutes. i just wanted to give both our presenters and the public a head's up that we're going to have a brief recess in the middle of the meeting today. do you have any announcements?
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>> thank you madam chair. participants through remote conference to the same extent as if they are physically present. we invite public participation. public comment will be available on each item on the agenda and each speaker will be allowed two minutes to speak. comments are opportunities to speak during the public comment period are available by calling the number on your screen, 415-655-0001. again, that number is 415-655-0001. the meeting id today is 2492 063 6219. then press pound and pound
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again. you will hear the meeting discussions but you'll be muted and in listening mode only. dial star 3 to be added to the speaker line. best practices are call for from a quiet location and turn down your television and radio. you may also submit public comment to myself. at erica.major@sfgov.org. it will be forwarded to the supervisors and be made part of the official file. and written comments may be sent as well. items today are expected to appear on the january 4th, 2022, board of supervisors agenda unless otherwise stated.
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>> supervisor ronen: thank you, can you call the first item please? >> clerk: yes, a review to actively address childhood obesity under the age of 18 and what type of funding and programming is aimed at the issue. those who wish to provide public comment on item 1, please call 415-655-0001. the meeting id today is 2492-063-6214, press pound and pound again. >> supervisor ronen: vice chair safai, this is your item. >> supervisor safai: thank you and i appreciate all the work that all of the presenters put in today. just wanted to start by saying covid-19 recently had its second birthday as the first case in
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the world was detected and our city's anniversary of the first mandatory sheltering in place in the next 120 days. with many experts predicting covid-19 to stick around, i think we as legislators need to make a full analysis how it has impacted the most vulnerable residents. today's hearing does just that. it is centered on the city and county of san francisco childhood obesity rates. obesity and health related diseases caused from obesity was one of the biggest factors in covid tests. soda taxing and taking away toys from happy meals in the past and barring guarantees and city contractors from sugary foods, these efforts have been
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monumental, however there's not enough that has been done and we need to do more for sure. there's still a lot of work ahead of us. one in three san francisco children are classified as overweight or obese. with this high concentration living in district 11 and president walton's district 10 where the majority of the children are in the city and supervisor ronen's district 9. those are the three major areas of concentration of children under 18. i have assembled a group of experts of the impacts that it has had on san francisco children. we will understand the need of youth and young adult fitness initiative for 2022 in the southeast part of the city. today i have professors from san francisco state university and university of california to provide a full picture on how
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bad childhood obesity is affecting the lives of students. and i have speakers from the department of public health, department of children, youth and family and san francisco unified school district. my first speaker today is from san francisco state university health department, whose research is on childhood obesity in san francisco. are you there? >> yes, i'm here. >> supervisor safai: thank you.
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>> supervisor ronen: our legislative aides are saying we may go into recess. is that okay? >> it's a good time actually. >> supervisor ronen: i appreciate all of your understanding. we're just really excited about this important youth activism on another health issue that young people face. so we're going to go down and cheer on and greet and welcome the students to city hall. we're going to recess for 15 minutes and then come back and start with your presentation right away if that's okay. i can't appreciate enough everyone's understanding. we'll go into recess and see you in 15 minutes. >> supervisor ronen: we are back and we're just about to hear from our first presenter. >> thank you. i'm going to share my screen in
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a minute. can everybody hear me and see the presentation? great. thank you. thank you for inviting me, i'm excited to be here today. before i start, i want to acknowledge my research team, funder and state department of education. it is because of a team effort that i'm able to share our work with you today. my research presentation will start with take home messages followed by a description of the data, definitions used and present childhood obesity estimates and share some of the research from the state. my presentation basically has
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four take-home messages. the first is the data shows one in three children are overweight or obese. however, ethnic students are more classified to be overweight or obese. schools are ideal settings for the primary prevention of childhood obesity because they serve large numbers of students so they are a captive audience and spend six or more hours of their time a day in schools. as well as consume up to 50% of daily calories in this setting. the food available near schools also mattered. there's a lot that can be done inside schools and in their
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surrounding neighborhoods. i'm now turning to the data definitions and estimates. for this presentation, i used the data, a battery of tests to measure fitness and body composition among other things. public school children in 5th 7th and 9th grades. i used data from 2015 to 2018 because the data after that is either not available or incomplete. i linked this data to school characteristics data to obtain a socioeconomic level indicator. we classified children as overweight or obese if they had bmi at or above the 85th for age
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and sex and this is derived from measuring height and weight, and those available for free or reduced meals and grouped them into low, middle and high. with each category representing a higher number of low income students. the data i will present today calculated the percent of children overweight or obese by race, ethnicity, race and grade and socioeconomic indicator. the data showed there was a total of 34,535 student records across all years combined as well as grades. and this is a distribution of students by race ethnicity.
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this graph shows the percentage of childhood obesity by year and grade. nearly one in three children -- i'm sorry. nearly one in three children are classified as either overweight or obese across years. however, filipino, hispanic, african american and pacific islander students have much higher proportions as shown in the last four bars on the graph from left to right. and the data is present across years and irrespective of grade level. what we have in front of us, data for fifth graders but the pattern doesn't change if we look at seventh graders for example in this plot as well as
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for students in ninth grade as can be seen in this plot. the green bars are students eligible for free or reduced meals. by contrast, the schools with the smallest number of children eligible have the lowest prevalence. and these patterns are the same no matter the year we look at. when we examine by grade, the patterns persist in general. so for example, this plot shows fifth grade data. i will show you the seventh grade data, as you can see, the pattern is the same. and in general, the pattern stays for ninth grade as well.
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so in summary, the data showed that nearly one in three students in fifth, seventh and ninth grade are classified as overweight or obese overall, however, filipino, hispanic, african american and pacific islander children have higher prevalences, between 30 and 68% depending on the grade and race ethnicity. these estimates are conservative given that we have seen more recent research studies finding many children have gained weight during the pandemic. since schools reached large numbers of children, they are excellent settings to prevent childhood obesity. we have existing state policies for school nutrition and physical education and our own research has shown that these
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policies can reduce or slow the epidemic among many population subgroups. however, many challenges remain. we have learned from other research that staffing resources and technical assistance to schools and school districts are needed to ensure that the policies are implemented as intended. and this is particularly crucial during the pandemic because we need to make sure that children continue to have a healthy diet. resources are needed to monitor the existing policies. and there's a need to improve all food environments where children live. the food environment near schools is particularly important because we know children spend a lot of time in schools and around those school
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neighborhoods and they purchase in general, they can purchase unhealthy food and drinks in convenience stores, liquor stores, pharmacies. from our own research, we have shown that there are far too many fast food outlets near schools, especially those in poor neighborhoods and those that serve high proportions of students of color. so there are many opportunities for policy interventions that target child populations near and inside schools and i have provided several references with full text articles in the next couple of slides. i hope they are useful resources for the committee. thank you for your attention and for inviting me. >> supervisor safai: thank you dr. sanchez. i really appreciate this well laid out and concise -- i know we have a lot of presenters
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today. i want to take the time between each presentation to ask one or two questions to keep moving but my first question would be, i understand you have some -- is there anything particular you found in terms of any interventions that can happen prior to fifth grade or during fifth grade. i understand in general it is physical education and nutrition. and i'm sure there's not one specific thing. but is there something important we could be thinking about as policy makers in terms of an intervention that could be really helpful in stopping this behavior? obviously fast food near schools, the types of convenience stores near schools and the foods they have, we have smaller initiatives to try to get healthier foods in these neighborhood stores but is there something you have seen we should be thinking about as an intervention before the early
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grades? >> well, my sense -- there are policies that regulate the quality of nutrition that children consume in schools, i think that could be something to take advantage of. there's already work going on in the schools and school districts. so if you're looking for low-hanging fruit, that could be potentially a place to begin so they can make sure the food the children eat at school is meeting the standards that we want. and i understand that the standards have been sort of relaxed during the pandemic because of the complications of delivering the food to children. so i think if we go on lockdown it remains critically important that the food provided to
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children meets those health standards. >> supervisor safai: i know personally that myself just from sitting in front of a computer and having to be in constant meetings and not doing my normal walking, i simply gained at least 10-15 pounds over the last 18 months. i can't imagine for the children who don't have access to good nutrition and physical education or exercise, how bad this has been. colleagues, did you want to ask a question or two before moving on or make a comment? >> you may remember i worked in the public schools before i came to work here. and the school nutrition is something that we dealt with and i was interested in dr. sanchez's -- talking more
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nuances, by race and geography. one of the things -- so the meals that are served through nutrition program in the schools are balanced by -- all sorts of things. even though standards have been relaxed, they are pretty good. i think the issue, the kids don't eat them. i know that when i worked in the schools, my staff would carry around bottles because the kids thought that the food was bland. it wasn't culturally responsive. they didn't eat it. for the bayview, it was the same. the taste of the food and the fact that it was packaged and sitting in a hot place for five hours before being served to them -- at the end, we had a huge amount of food waste and in
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fact, during the summer, providers were penalized for the food not eaten by the nutrition services office. which is kind of a bummer, right? i'm wondering if we could talk about that, if you had any data about when food was provided that is cultural -- it's not all kids, it's certain groups of kids. it makes me wonder -- the policy solution we should be going after is addressing sort of the focus issue, not just obesity as a problem all in all. i know there have been several efforts to do curriculum development and more culturally appropriate food preparation support through the sugar tax funding that the department of public health has put out. do you have any data about that. and lastly, a lot of these --
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if you have data by geography. we do live in a city where there's segregation by race. i know the school of the picture you had at the beginning of the presentation is one of the most segregated schools in our district and supervisor ronen's and is in a neighborhood with little access to open space. i'm wondering if that was -- if you have thought about that in the relationship between access to open space and recreation and geography and obesity. >> i will try to address several of your comments. i totally agree that it's not my area of research in terms of the content of the food and consumption of the food. you are totally correct that one
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thing is the policies and standards and then the other piece that is critically important as much as the policy itself, how the policy is implemented. i think that the food that actually gets to the kids is something that could be more paid attention to and whoever is making that food, you could do some of those -- that is part of the compliance and implementation piece i think would be critical. especially -- the policies are there. we know from our research, these policies are associated with improvements in overweight obesity, especially among children who go to higher income school neighborhoods. i think it would be a good opportunity to begin to target some of these low income schools and those who serve high
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proportion of students of color and low income students. the other pieces of physical education, that is part of the research. we have done -- we have found that schools that comply with policies tend to have more fit students. and it's not our research but there is research that suggests that schools that have more access to green areas and open spaces are also able to provide more physical activity and physical education. i think the research points to that for sure and that's something that needs to be done also here in san francisco. there are some studies that show that improving parks is a critical area. of course safety around those
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parks is important especially in low income neighborhoods because even if the parks are there, if safety is an issue, the children won't be using them. >> i didn't realize one in three children in san francisco are obese. that's an unacceptable shocking statistic. thank you supervisor safai for calling this hearing. i didn't know it was that high. i remember watching a documentary by michael moore called where to invade next. i don't know if you have seen it. i highly recommend it. there's a scene where he went to a school in france, in a low income area in france and they
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recorded lunch time which included a chef in the school who offered a three course meal on real plates with real silverware and the kids took the time to eat lunch and converse with one another over a three course meal, a salad, protein and then like ended with a cheese plate. it was so amazing. it is so beyond what we can begin to imagine. and then he brought the food from the united states that students are served at lunch and asked the students the look at it and asked them what is this. they're like i don't know what that is. they couldn't even identify it let alone the food we're serving to children in the united states. when he asked them to try it, many refused because it looked so disgusting. when some of them tried it, they
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couldn't believe it. i used to send my daughter to school with lunch and she would come home with most of it uneaten and we would say why didn't you eat? she said we had no time. the time period of lunch is so short, so by the time they got there, settled down, opened lunch, kids are talking and chatting, she didn't have time to eat. i think there's a massive cultural problem we have in the united states that just undervalues meals as a time to relax and converse and get to know each other and take time and space to enjoy the food and maybe we have to do it so quick, they don't even taste the food, let alone -- because it's not up to par. i wanted to ask you if you have
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done studies about that. how much time are we giving kids to eat in our schools. if we gave them more time and spent time to see meal time as an important event where we have time to spend with each other and get to know each other properly, eat and digest our food, if that makes a difference in obesity. has there been any studies like that in the united states? >> i actually -- i don't have details in my mind but i know there are -- there is discussion in the research field about not only the time amount that is dedicated for meals but also when the meals are provided. so is it before recess or after recess, for example.
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there's many who prefer for the meals to happen before recess so that kids can actually eat and then go and spend the calories. and then others who think it is better for the kids to have physical activity, recess first and then eat because then they don't rush through the meal. so, i think -- that is an important area i think. i don't have all of the details because it's not part of my research. it is definitely an important piece of the puzzle. >> i know we have more presentations but i just want to say, i'm dealing with on a daily basis now, the financial crisis in our san francisco unified school district. so i'm working very closely with supervisor melgar on this.
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we can't even -- we don't even have the basics, we don't have enough teachers in our classrooms to teach. i'm sure we're really far from having a chef in every school because we don't properly fund public education in this country. i just really think we should talk about how we can over time get to a place, baby steps, where we look more like france in our meals and our meals on our campuses than we do in the united states. once we're not third from last in terms of funding for public schools in the state, we can start to look at that. until then, i think we need to focus on some bread and butter, no pun intended, issues in our
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school district where money needs to go. i appreciate the attention to this. i see your name supervisor melgar and then we can turn it back to supervisor safai. >> supervisor melgar: it's not just france. latin america, it's like the moms who cook the lunch and are hired to do that for the schools. i wonder -- i don't know if we'll have this in the presenters, maybe that is something we do as a committee, if we quantify the health cost at the san francisco health system of the chronic diseases that come after childhood obesity over the long run, a chef at every school might be a freaking bargain. if we think about it in those terms. as a city, as a society, what we spend to prop up this
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inequitable system, we might just be better off addressing it when they're young and still setting their tastes and maybe provide some opportunities for workforce in our schools. thank you. >> supervisor safai: thank you both. i think this has been eye-opening in just the first presentation to all of us. some of our presenters have to go. i want to make sure we move this along. some of the questions may get answered. we have the unified school district and head of pediatrics and so let's move on. thank you dr. sanchez. you are welcome to stay and hear the rest of the presentation. if you have to go, we thank you for your presentation and all your hard work. next up, we have ucsf associate
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professor of pediatrics dr. amy beck. >> thank you. can everyone see the slides? great. thank you for that introduction and thank you supervisor safai for the invitation to present today. i'm going to talk briefly about disparities in childhood obesity in san francisco prior to the pandemic. we heard a lot about that from the previous presenter. i'll move quickly there. and then i'll talk about what happened with the pandemic and how it impacted childhood
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obesity and finally, i'll provide recommendations for moving forward to hopefully reduce disparities in childhood obesity for children in san francisco. so, i just want to start by mentioning the impact of childhood obesity on health. unfortunately there are a lot of negative health consequences associated with childhood obesity. one is that it is strongly linked to adult obesity. most children who have obesity in childhood won't grow out of it. we see a lot of health complications in childhood. these include pre-diabetes and diabetes, fatty liver disease, hyper tension and mental health concerns. childhood obesity is a cause and consequence of mental health conditions. i know this audience is well aware of this, it is a disease
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of social inequity. when we look at national data, children in lower and middle income families have double the risk of childhood obesity. children whose parents have not graduated from college have double the risk of obesity compared to those with a college degree. this is some data that will look familiar to you from the previous professor's presentation. this is data on overweight and obesity combined amongst seventh graders in san francisco public schools, prior to the pandemic, from 2019. so i wanted to draw your attention to two things. one is that the absolute rates are quite high, more than 50% for latino and black seventh graders and the disparities. more than twice in the latino and black seventh graders
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compared to white and asian seventh graders. what are the factors that contribute to the inequities? we have talked about some of them in the previous conversation. structural factors, access to green space and physical activity. access to healthy school. access to employment, housing and educational opportunities and we know the targeted marketing to communities of color plays a role. i wanted to share some of my own research that really highlights the power of deceptive marketing. this was a study we conducted with low income latino parents of infants and toddlers. we asked about their beliefs of different beverages and part of a study, we showed them different beverage bottles and asked about the specific beverages and what they thought about the health properties and one was the snaple drink, peach,
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this is a beverage high in added sugar. it was 40 grams of added sugar in one bottle. because of that all natural labelling and the beautiful pictures on the front, most of the parents perceive this as a healthy beverage. these were some of the quotations represented by the comments they made. just to highlight what we are up against in terms of the power of the food and beverage industry to market products that are fundamentally unhealthy, but they are good at convincing people they are healthy. so now turning to the pandemic and how it contributed to childhood obesity, certainly a very big factor with school closures. (please stand by...)
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. >> these were all children who started off with overweight or obesity. i wanted to highlight some findings. there was a significant increase in screen time during the pandemic. decrease in activity. children were going to bed much later. there was an increase in food insecurity. more families were accessing food banks. with respect to weight status. baseline in this study 58% of the children had obesity. follow-up was an average 10 to 11 months in the pandemic was 85%. the average weight gain over 12 months was 19 pounds. for reference healthy weight gain this range of children is four to seven pounds per year.
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the children were nearly three times what we would have wanted them to gain in this time periods. i think in terms of lessons learned. a lot of factors including stress red to staggering increases in childhood obesity in communities of color in san francisco. at this point we can all agree playgrounds are essential. this is a picture of my kids on the west portal newly renovated playgrounds in october of 2020 when the playgrounds first opened. i think it is important to offer structured physical activity as well as skill development. this is a place where we have a lot of structural inequities in
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san francisco. one example, sf rec and park offers high-quality activity programs for children. they have a scholarship program. the application process is complicated. we have to pay a case manager to assist patients with process and rely on volunteers as well. when children get the scholarship. you need a laptop. parents need to navigate and you need to be available at the times and dates it opens to get a spot for your child. there are barriers for low income parents and those who do not speak english. with the recommendations for improving access to activity for low income is critical. one idea would be to set aside
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park and recprograms and set about ways to facilitate entrance to the program to decrease barriers. we want to increase physical activities in school, after school and so forth. i also think it is important to support nutrition education in multiple settings. ideally programs culturally tailored. when we think about the impact of the food and beverage industry in all of the deceptive marketing. we need to give people tools to cut through that and really make the best choices for their families and not be just at the mercy what they are hearing from the food and beverage industry. i think it is important to intensify efforts to address food insecurity. san francisco does a lot in this
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phase. there could be more. one program to highlight is vouchers for vegetables. it is wonderful. it is important to support families eligible for calfresh but not enrolled. last piece to increase resources for evidence-based and tested childhood obesity treatment. multi-disciplinary approach can be resource intensive. we want to prevent childhood obesity. we have people with obesity and complications. we want to offer them the best tools as well. u.c.s.f. is eager to partner on best practices to reduce childhood obesity. i am happy to take your questions. >> thank you, dr. beck.
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that was very informative. i appreciate you taking the time today. we all do. i have one question. how often do you believe as a city we should be pulling data on childhood obesity? how often should we look at that to inform our decisions? every year, every couple years? >> that is a great question. i love data. as a physician who does research, i think data is very important. i would say probably yearly if possible. it can take longer than that for the impact of any policy change to bear fruit. i would say yearly but necessarily to be disappointed
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just because you are not seeing year-over-year improvements. >> okay. >> i will add to that. i would say i would recommend for the data to be collected in more grades than just 6, 7, 9 because that is a real gap. we know that it is important to intervene at earlier ages. >> we have, i believe, dph might mention this. we have child care data in san francisco. we have clinical data for the children who receive care in our dph clinics as well.
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>> do you have any questions for dr. beck? >> i do. i am not quick enough with the chat. supervisor ronen and i have been working on the community model at s.f.u.s.d. we have built out in those schools. the best way i would back you the schools where the beacons are right now have higher rates of obesity in the population overall because it is mostly children in the population that you listed and high poverty rates. there is a direct correlation there. also, it is one of the things that the community models have
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included in the services they provide families. all of the schools have deals with the san francisco food bank for distribution and free food to families. there have been efforts funded by the soda tax to shore up nutrition services and education. i am wondering if we have data specific to those efforts through dcyf or the health department about what happens when there is an intervention, what works, what doesn't work, what families respond to? what can we do in support? >> no, that is a wonderful question. i don't know of anything that granular, but certainly it would
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be possible to follow at least with the business data. these are elementary schools with the younger kids. that is a place where we are getting adjusted to data on children, which is extremely helpful. >> also, do we have data from the family resource center? that is like the same idea. community schools. zero to five that are supporting those families within this population at high risk. do we have any early childhood data on either the rates of obesity or focused intervention? >> well, i know it is coming on. certainly prior to the pandemic
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they did collect data on children in child care centers and did a lot of work and inter- venges in that area. i don't be know if that -- intervention in that area. i don't know if that reflects specific interventions. they will be able to speak to that. >> any additional questions for dr. beck, colleagues? >> thank you, dr. beck for being here today. if we have any additional questions we can follow up. you are welcome to stay. i know you are busy. we appreciate the work and effort you put into this important issue. >> thank you so much. >> next we have christina gott
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and judy. >> good morning. judy with the department of public health. thank you for joining us today. >> thank you so much for inviting us for this presentation and this hearing. i am christina. i manage the chronic disease prevention program which includes the sugar drink distributor tax work and i am joined by the dr. who will present the data. this is a combined slide deck. the dr. with tap the presentation after she finishes. i want to start with a brief overview of how we have gotten to where we are. thank you.
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nationally and locally. we have gotten incredible data already. i want to take a step back and start with nationally and locally. we have seen an increase in overweight children over many decades. the prevalence of childhood obesity tripled 5% in 1978 to 18.5 in 2016. this is not by race or ethnic strat fiction. beginning in 20003 you will see the arrow. we saw a leveling off to 1% per decade. it is not enough progress. i do want to note that there is a lot of stigma around overweight and obesity. we are presenting data on this. our end goal is healthy children. i think it is important to
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explain how we got here. the great malnutrition that was a significant driver for school lunch program which started in 1946. in the early 1970s, you can see the arrow. the new technology and subsidies for corn resulted in this new cheap source of sweetener in the form of high fructose corn syrup that led to sugar syrups. they drew attention away from sugar by focusing to after. the u.s. went on low fat craze. they continued to gain weight as portion sizes of high carb and
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low protein prevailed. in 1938 prop 13 was a decrease in spending for schools which led to elimination of pe programs and vending machines in the hallways. they became an important source of funding for the schools. in the late 1980s, aggressive marketing campaigns targeting children especially in the communities began and continue. also, in the 1980s supermarkets fled urban areas. i think it is important to frame some of how did we get here with big drivers. they are important and the other presenters have alluded to them. there are other determinants like systematic racism and poverty, trauma, safety, and
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open space or lack thereof. then covid hit. that is why we are actually here. the doctor will present that data shortly. i want to just briefly move on to talk about some of the work we are doing. this is a complex problem. the work that we are doing as presented in the form of spectrum to highlight that with an issue as complex as childhood obesity these solutions at multiple level especially those solutions with greatest reach and impact. this table is by no means all inclusive of the work. i don't have time to review everything on there. it is presented in this continuum. we need all elements of the work. at the bottom are one-on-one interventions like education
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that happens at the clinics. next level is community education with campaigns. trying to do work in the media. i don't know how to possibly begin to combat or beat what the big sugar, big food industry does. we do also use providers, the third level, to help us spread the message and create good safe healthy environments like child care environments to educate providers to create healthy environments. coalitions annette works are important for the education to constituents and when we get to next two level you will have a larger reach and usually lower cost in the long-term.
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changing organizational practices like the healthy retail work that is happening, important work in clinics, during covid a number of -- almost all of the sugary drinks turned and started providing healthy food to families that needed food desperately. at the policy level which is certainly our expertise there are willing things that one can do. the food empowerment market which is a new initiative, thank you supervisor safai. complete streets, policies for pe in schools and wellness, soda tax and a new initiativemedacal waivers with food through healthcare system. it is new work that has potential there. i think that my message here is
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that we cannot tackle this epidemic at individual level. we need big system level changes to address the issue. i am going to leave it at that for now and ask the doctor to share the data that was requested. >> hello. thank you, christina. thank you for this opportunity. i saw the national trends going back over decades. this slide here is local data focused on the most recent decade. it is the data that several speakers have mentioned. basically the school district collects the data on 6, 7, ninth graders each year. the red line sixth.
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the proportion outside the healthy zone was decreasing. then plateaued. during 2018-2019 it was 35% of sixth graders outside healthy zone. this weight had normalized. we would expect to see orange and yellow below the red line. you don't see much drop there in the proportion of ninth graders outside the healthy zone is only 2%. in san francisco obesity are developing before fifth grade and tracking out of it. this slide is taking the fifth grade data by income level. it shows that consistently over time the economically
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disadvantaged have the outside the zone. they had that body composition outside the healthy zone. these two slides i showed you were before the pandemic. because the screenings were canceled with shelter-in-place we don't have the data. one members said that is one of the casualties of the pandemic. it shut down monitoring. we do have data from san francisco health network that suggests increase in obesity in 2019-2020. these bars describe most recent status of primary care patients that we are seeing in 2020. if you focus on the middle bar for the children 6-11, the fifth
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graders in that group. prevalence over 60% overweight or obese. two slides back what we estimated was 35%. it is doubling of the prevalence and 20% points higher than what we estimate for economically disadvantaged. monitoring data signal obesity by race and ethnicity. this is preschoolers. orange represent overweight and obesity for proportion of children 3 and 4 overweight or obese during the school year between fall and spring screening. two times as many black african-american and latino children are overweight or obese
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compared to asian. we see that disparity in the data from the school district for the fifth graders. this has persisted for years. other monitoring data come from hospital admissions. this data source is showing race ethnicity and hospital. hospitalization data obesity is 10 fold. 10 times more publicly insured children hospitalized with diagnosis of obesity. hospitalization data in addition to showing disparities by race, ethnicity and insurance we see zip code.
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obesity hospitalizations are unevenly distributed with the majority hospitalizations happening with children who live in southeast san francisco. from what we can say from the data about one-third of children in san francisco are overweight or obese. we think that is underestimate based on what might have happened during the pandemic. data indicate the problem is beginning before fifth grade. based on the persistent disparities we see over time it determines the health. thank you. i will be passing the presentation to our colleague from u.c.s.f. >> thank you, doctor. good morning supervisors. i am the deputy director at u.c.s.f. i will present on behalf of our department.
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before i go to the next slide, i want to say there is so much that u.c.s.f. has done over years it is hard to capture on three slides. i wanted to highlight a couple things. over the various funding cycles we have a lot to address health and physical well-being. we moved from offering healthy snacks to subpoena per and snack -- supper and snacks. food for children in our out of school programs and summer programs we have gone to increasing the number of programs that we find for physical and recreation activities such as dance, soccer, food ball, cheer, arts, surfing, to name a few. specifically during shelter-in-place when we knew reduction of physical activity was pay huge issue and concern during our community health
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initiative and partnering with rec and park we made sure that when applicable and able that youth had access to parks and playgrounds to continue to engage in physical activity in the limited capacity they could on site, making sure that was still happening. we also partnered with 18 reasons. a nonprofit whose mission is to help with confidence to provide a four week cooking series for 3-6 graders. they were able to take the grocery home and families were able to cook with what the youth learned. we created policies for our funded programs around health and newtrician. it is a long standing practice and requirement within our out
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of school program for physical integration activities as one of the main components of programming. in our current funding cycle for 2018-2024 we have overall nutrition standard that all of our funded cbos are held accountable to. we also have two funded strategies that specifically include focus on physical activity. two program requirements within those strategies that focus on addressing health, nutrition and physical activity. we called that out during this funding cycle. we knew that over the years that has been increasing issue and concern around children being able to move, healthy and fit.
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>> nutrition standard we hold accountable to. we want to make sure programs are providing healthy food and beverages available to all participants. limit unhealthy foods. we have a grant with usda that i will talk about later that breaks down exactly how things need to look. what sizes, what type of healthy snack food, food groups that folks need to be part of. we encourage programs to make sure the youth are drinking water and not sugar drinks for all funded programs. i think for the most part people have grasped on to that and abide by that policy.
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that has been a huge turning point turning programs where youth want water over something sweets and sugary. >> our health and newtrician program supports healthy snacks that we have been implementing over a decade. i have been here for 14 years. this is an initiative since i joined the department. our nutrition services are that young people's nutrition needs are met to establish healthy relationship with food. we leveraged two funds. two usda funds, summer food service and child and add adult care food program at risk. these grants provide healthy meals during the summer and after school when school is not
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in session. last fiscal year during shelter-in-place we served 2 92,000 meals. over 151 snacks across the 80 sites our community health sites. those included meals served during summer of 2020 during the height of pandemic when bulk meals to children in public housing sites. our funding strategies, there are two that we have that directly address physical activity for our young people. first is out of school time strategy. that is one of the long-standing strategies to where not only does the comprehensive program but it also provides opportunities for youth to be physically active and enjoy healthy food.
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on a daily basis. then we have els, sports and physical activity strategy to provide youth to engage in competitive and non competitive sports and physical activities. the component is extended programming for els needs to happen. both on weekends and outside normal school day. you will see that is one of our actual requirements. for out of school time we require all agencies and programs to have students participate at least 30 minutes per day in physical activity. as you can see included but not limited to games, sports, dance and martial arts and all programs serving youth more than two hours need to provide a healthy snack which we fund.
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extended programs is a program. it is evening and weekend programming to increase participant access to physical activity during nonschool hours. this is a breakdown onever the years. we were asked to show the data 2015 to currently of what we provided. on this slide you will see that we have the fiscal years, different service areas, enrichment, sports, out of school time. the funds over the years increased in our sports. we started off funding $1.1 million. in two programs that provide specifically for the activities. now we are in 2021-22 that has increased to $8 million. you will see across it is brock
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--broke do you know how many programs we fund. out of school time we also increased spending from $21 million to $38 million which means more youth were able to be served. more youth were able to have access to physical activity. one thing to note. when we came out within our current funding cycle the sport strategy specifically. we only got a few agencies to apply and get funded. therefore we re-opened that strategy and did another round to gather more programs to be able to support youth to have access to outdoor sports. in various ways from sailing to surfing to just the impact sports which i think is amazing.
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we have a continued effort and focus to making sure that many people are able to engage in physical recreational activities that they are moving. even if, you know, it is playing a game in the classroom to being outdoors. access to out door space is hugely important. our school and community-based programs with brick and mortar because they have the space and ability to serve youth outside is amazing. definitely more access to outside space would be great for those programs with limited ability to do that. i think that is it. thank you. >> thank you so much.
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we combined the depth of public health and dcyf presentation. one question for public health. you showed the number of families and hospitalizations that are extreme cases of obesity. is there a way to zero in on these families and do some aggressive interventions or ideas that you have? i understand the number of things put on the table in terms of newtrician and physical education and the programming and ideas we had in terms of access to calfresh and the veggie program and food empowerment market and the work that is highlighted here in d.c. yf in after-school programming to nonprofits. i want to know if there is something we could do to zero in on families where obesity is to
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the point of option. >> thank you for that question. when i was making the data, i was surprised to see the rates and the 10 fold disparity much worse that i was expecting to see. i see the data long after it has been collected. i don't have the connections with the people who are seeing these cases in the hospitals. i would require to go back and talk with the group. it seems strategic planning might help pull people together to make connections to address the questions you are raising. >> colleagues, any questions? supervisor melgar? >> yes, i have some questions
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for ms. dorsey. i am grateful the department responded with more funding for physical activity and some of the things we know kids need. i wonder if in the reporting to the department you see trends about some of the funding or others in getting participation so that it is cheerleading, you know, popular activity. we think that people like it but do you have the data for that? are there some things more successful than others? >> i think our sports programs have been more successful. our soccer, football. when i mentioned cheers that came out of some of our football grants where the girls, sisters,
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cousins of the students participating go to the game and want to participate. in those programs that is how that program got built out. i think we have been seeing increase in all of the after-school programs hearing what are youth interested in. more dance classes, more martial arts, boxing was popular across a lot of programs. it depending on the interest of the kids an the the time. sports is continuous. baseball is an interest. we haven't funded a program directly for baseball partly because no one has applied for that particular sport. we saw that was a huge interest during the summer together 2021. working with some of the private
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camps there is a huge interest in baseball and soccer, football. tennis is another area where there is an increased interest. the trend is that sports. >> i know that in my. [indiscernable] there were no baseball fields in the mission. to get the kids to the closest baseball field at balboa it requires a bus. i wonder if part of the solution for those communities that lack access to open space or just like adequate space. sometimes, too, if the kids are dancing, bothering the neighbors, they have to go farther out. it is transportation now that we
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have it. is it a thing or alternative to be funded by the department so kids can get to the places where they can do recreation more easily? >> that is definitely something we are looking into. transportation is a huge concern. depending where you are you have access to some things and not to have to travel across. what does that look like? we are in conversations what can we do to help alleviate that? offering more vans, vehicles, you can definitely access free muni. it is a long trip across the city. how do you shorten that? it is a lot. you have to be creative. how do we build more spaces
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closer. what is the closest? how can we builds that out? our partner ship with park and recis great. what does that look like? how do we partner together to create spaces for young people? >> questions from dph. are you still on the call? >> yes. >> my question is this. does the nutrition still in existence with your department?
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>> feeling good is. in the bay area they haven't had a meeting in a long time. we were all activated for two years. i don't know about that. feeling good is still around. >> can you say a little bit about that project. >> they offer nutrition education resources. for low income families. >> great. for dcyf. based on some of the data we have seen today which is pretty shocking to all of us. is there initiatives or ideas that can be done for the upcoming budget? is there a greater push to deal with this?
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like we talked about the mental health impacts from covid. i think we talked a lot less about the obesity impact. is there something that you are planning on prioritizing for the upcoming budget? >> there are a lot of things. the conversations with our community. the work that we are doing around recovery and with sf live. yes, it is a topic we are trying to figure out the best approach that we can take to be able to address that. of course, from the funding to go into programs. like supervisor melgar stated. the access to space. were those things to happen we need to figure out the best course of action. who do we need to partner with? i remember conversations with
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sfusd. open schoolyards on the weekends. opportunities to plug into. what is the best way to make that happen and get folks to get the youth to the spot. it is something we are discussing and looking into. there is a lot that we can do and are more than willing to. >> there was a big push on the left play initiative opening up schoolyards. is that still happening? that seems like a simple solution when you think about the different schoolyards in the mission or others that might not have walking distance to a park. it is more coordination effort. a little oversight. when you go down the peninsula a lot of high schools open the track and field. people from the community go down there and run and exercise.
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i know in our neighborhood the track and football field is never open. that was never made available just an ex ample. not to say we don't have access to playing fields and open fields. that is a simple solution that could be utilized as a way for dcyf and the school district to coordinate instead of that being an afterthought. based on this research today that i find shocking. supervisor melgar probably had a bit more experience with it being overseeing a major youth after school initiative, family initiative program mobile more experience with it than i did. i think it is something. there is such beautiful
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coordination between dcyf and the school district during covid. we are so impressed with so much what you have been able to do. the newtrician wellness could be coordinated with the left playgrounds and access to space. do you have any questions before we go to the unified school district. >> speed this up. we have another hearing and we are running late. let's get to the last presenter. >> we are trying to be on time. thank you so much. that was wonderful. >> our last presenter today is
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saida. wellness policy project manager for unified school district. thank you both for joining us today. >> thank you for having us. we are excited to be here. it is still morning. good morning. again, i am the wellness policy project manager for the district. we will answer any questions that you may have after our presentation. thanks for having me here. >> thank you. >> today our focus will be looking at current programs and policies for obesity at
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s.f.u.s.d. student health is addressed in the following ways. we have the wellness policy, nutrition education, healthy school food, pe, physical activity and sports. health education and wellness policy implementation activities such as access to clean healthy drinking water and peer to pier influence. our vision with the wellness policy to make the healthy choice the easy most desirable choice. it is a holistic approach creating healthy children and healthy schools. our mission is to implement an equity framework to actively promote environment to encourage and support our students, staff, family and communities to make healthy choices. we use the cdc model. whole school, whole community,
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whole child. i will talk about the integrated approach from social learning to family engagement to health education. one of the components within the whole school whole community whole child is basic nutrition. at the beginning of the year students were eligible for free meals. it had students eating and experiencing similar meals. we saw increase of 8% in school meal participation. school year 2022-23. the pass to support free breakfast and lunch for all students. here is a list of all of the things that we are doing in relationship to the nutrition
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policy. however, we are meeting all of the u.s. da guidelines taking an whole child approach and looking at the balance how food is in relationship to social emotional learning, academic, physical fitness and how we are implements services for the whole child. one of the things i want to point out is that it is all in relationship to creating equity. again, using the whole child model with our physical education. that is in our policy, nationally, and state policy, it is to create a life-long physical activity habit to support the child's fitness literacy. this is so that the child can feel a sense of belonging in
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each and every place in the physically activity communities after they graduate. we stated the requirements we have here. they are welcome to go through those at any point. physical activity, physical education is being offered. it is the same with our health education mandate. nutrition and physical activity are promoted through our pre-k through 12. for instance at elementary level educators are required to teach 20 lessons at middle school level. we are following the health curriculum guidelines. with the high school and middle
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school. a lot of magic is in the health promotion. this is where we are looking at having students more and more engaged in the presentations earlier. it was talked about lunch may be overred. we may not have opportunity or time to eat it or it doesn't feel appetizing. here we are using some of the strategy to get more students participating and engaging with the food. also having the peer connection to each other. one of the peer education programs we have is access to water. the soda tax has been able to help fund some of these adaptations for bottle filling stations and beautification. you may see this because every
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time something is put in or reset, we make sure that the lead level are low and it is tested to make sure it is healthy and fresh and clean. this is done in promotion with education around decreasing sugar beverages and making water the beverage of choice. what we have done is we believe youth are leading the way. we try to use that particular energy that the youth have and create wellness teams within the site. we have things such as water that we use. the bigger picture poet which talks about poetry to reduce
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type 2 diabetes. it is connected with obesity. we are putting in these programming so that students can lead the way. we have nutrition out reach workers and a few graphics there. one of the things we added for you is that our youth in action. this links to the website that we have with s.f.u.s.d. around student engagement. abc news featured youth in action at the farmers market. i draw your attention to the podcast in relationship to learning how to do project. we have a youth talking about diagnosed with early diabetes
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and what she needed to do to reverse diabetes. you can listen to the podcast. there is an aspect where during the pandemic and the night before where students created projects around mindfulness, healthy eating, physical activities. the soda tax money was able to help us pay over 1200 students to do peer to peer influencing and they are teaching each other. the work is on the website. we use that as a model of you can earn a type bend and learn about your health and be a leader in your community and your family. at the time of the pandemic
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christine mentioned that agencies receive money from the soda tax. able to turn on a dime. what we did in our programming. we had garden kits sept be to students homes in the programming. they grew bok choy. they learned to cook it. then they recorded themselves or made videos to talk about how they used the food and to influence their families. we sent our version of the hello trash box withingredients. that is what they were able to do. we want to do more and more of that programming to encourage students to earn take care of themselves and families and communities. next slide talks about access to water.
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one of the things we learned. i think the supervisor asked about the data. we have done things here where we are looking at human design theory. a lot of the water at the time are connected directly to the bathrooms. students say we don't want to drink water. it is too close to the bathroom. they set up water stations to encourage peers to come to the pitcherred water stations to get a water bottle. the students were interesting. it was so colorful and exciting. they were asking the other students if they had to pay for it. we are like, no, this is free. this is for you.
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where students are influencing each other. we took pre-surveys to find out how often students were drinking soda compared to water. we also have the post-surveys. this is done with very little staff h staff within the wellness policy programming. they did this for five weeks for a human intervention to see if there would be a change from beginning when students were coming to have this compared to the end. again, these are the things that i know that the passes of the data. i was talking about intervention. this is for on the ground and getting excited about drinking water. as well as making healthy foods.
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before questions i would like to have each of us if you have water near you take a sip. this is what ask happening on the ground. roll back your shoulders, take a small stretch. this also physiologically helps you remember and intefreight what you must heard and not so tight within your body. you can feel it. it resonates on cellular level. that happens from mentality healthy feel. we talk about how water and doing the education around water with educators to say you can re-regulate by having a sip of water every hour. doing that in front of your
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class. it is within our wellness policy we have our teacher role modeling the behavior you want to see. we are doing it again 10 minutes at a time within a hour as part of professional development. that is it. thank you. you are welcome to "go!" on shaw the website to see the work that is being done. it is a small amount compared to where we need to be. the last thing i will say. one of the best parts of the work i have done here is have the parent come up and ask me how did you get my kid to eat broccoli? i said we cook together. we cook in the classroom. then it is in the school lunch as harvest of the month. it is for the whole child. thank you all. we are here for questions.
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i know you have other meetings. >> we appreciate that. we have time for a couple questions. i think it is good. thank you for your presentation today. to have gotten the outside agencies working into the school districts for the data was presented. >> my question. you have a school lunch program. there was a lot of thought put into that. has there been discussions in the past about central kitchen and doing anything to cook meals fresh? would you talk about that? >> yes, we have high school at the beginning of the central kitchen. the meals there are delicious. if you have a chance to go and experience the beginning concept
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what it means for scratch cooking and how we want it to continue to permeate through the district in relationship to central kitchen, there is avocado toast and really nice things. that is not completely my lane. i don't know if you want to chime in about central kitchen development. i know it is in the works. >> yes. i know supervisor ronen you mentioned about friends. we don't have individual stuff. we have our standalone campus focused on 12 of our pt programs and the campus which is the academy. it is our pilot. to see what works.
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i do think if there is an opportunity to bring jennifer, our head of newtrician and don to talk more about the ideas around central kitchen i think i would let them share their vision. two are phenomenal advocates. jennifer is incredible for advocating state federal and local level and help with the free meals. dawn knows allow to share capital planning. one infrastructure component they are updates is removing packages from the food. it is packaged but it is more about having the experience for students. even if it is healthy not to think about something packaged.
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it is there. they can smell and see it. this is our next spend. a larger question it would be great. >> mar. one of the things we will say one thing in common with places like france and other parts of the world. we are one of the culinary capitols of the world. people come from all over to learn the craft and find the craft, some of the best strauchts and precious food. farm to table. supervisor melgar made a good points. it will be interesting. we put a lot of money into the department of public health. there are millions and millions of dollars to spend. i wonder if we could quantify
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what be spend for health. how there could be a partnership between department of public health and unified school district to do that up front investment. what i will ask for when we end the hearing today is to continue to the call of the chair. we will take you up on that opportunity to bring capital community back. we will ask department of public health refine more. look at the families at the highest propensity. we get those numbers and see what the cost is to our health system. if there is a way to do upfront investments for healthy food. i appreciate highlighting that and supervisor row mean talking about fresh food. many where the data today and one out of three children
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experiencing obesity. high school is too late in terms of intervention because the obesity patterns and hospitalizations have happened by that time. it is a wonderful way to show that as a model pan expand to the middle schools. anyway that is the focus of follow up how to show the linkage and quantify the costs of obesity and look at maybe asking the department of public health to shift some of their dollars. of course, it is never too late. it is an important think based on what we heards today maybe we can expand to the middle schools and try to start some of those early eating habits.
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i will give you an opportunity to respond if there is anything to add. >> i will say in terms of earlier intervention and the quote about the broccoli. that is when i was in the k-5 classes. the nutrition education project was in about 20 schools at that time. we were wheeling a mobile kitchen to the classroom and doing the language arts and math lessons with the representation of cooking and food. that has happened before. that federal funding was reduced after 10 years and things began to shift. now we get a small portion
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around that. definitely starting folks earlier. kindergarten cutting with metal knives. they are more careful than the fifth graders. where we were bringing in the joy of cooking. just a taste. then they could connect to the lunch program and the other school programs. more we can collaborate and work together would be great. >> thank you. supervisor melgar. >> thank you. i am looking forward to the continuing the hearing and hearing from folks in the central kitchen. the school district outsourced food production to a private company. no reason we outsource to the
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vocational school, the city college or any of the many community resources that we have that are producing fresh and culturally responsive food. just an idea. we could do things in a different way and leverage the assets of the community. my question was about what supervisor safai has touched on earlier which is opening up high school campuses. i know that that option is there. it is very expensive because partners using school district real estate on weekends have to pay and it costs quite a bit. that is a policy issue the school district has made and i am wondering if there is any way to revisit that policy for a community organization or teams or folks who are providing
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community resources for moving and getting the kids out and engaging in activities that are good. >> i would say that, supervisor melgar, the most important thing. it is extremely costly on our end. we want to make sure that it is open, close, clean, safe even on weekends. we are limited on capacity. we are trying to make it spread out. our team the trying to move towards better culturally and more in the community. more larger national recognized programs and we are trying to put in more community relevant programming into the schools. of course, it is a huge cost around this. our team is fully becoming more
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equipped with the day-to-day school component. we would be happy to talk through what expansion would look like. we do have shared school yards. the sites open are open. we can open more. that is a limitation in our operation at this time. >> if i may have one last comment to let you think through. one little bit about the advocacy. it happens on a federal and state level. as you mentioned and heard in the presentation. a lot are usda compliant. one example is that jennifer mentioned to me was we serve whole-grain pot stickers. that meets usda approval. we have ought eaten pot -- all eaten pot stickers.
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we advocate to make it more culturally relevant. not unhealthy. not to the extreme something that is very healthy that doesn't taste good. we do try our best to make it flavor full and meets the us da approval. when we think through culturally competent foods. i would encourage expanding our thinking. this may become more of federal advocacy component. i wanted to just plug that in to think through. these are things that are very much in our team. >> thank you. chair, anything to say? we went be over today. we had no recess. there is a lot of presenters. thank you to all presenters today. we will follow up on some of these things. the central kitchen, public
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health and s.f.u.s.d. i will ask the chair to kin. we haven't done public comment. i want to thank you for this extensive presentation for all presenters today. thank you to my staff for all-time to working with everyone to prepare for this. this is just shocking to see this information and what it says about how it has gotten worse under covid. not just mental health but children overall in obesity. chair, you want to say something? >> this was an excellent hearing. i appreciate your staff and all of the presenters. i learned so much. i love the ideas. i wanted to suggest, supervisor
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safai and i will partner with you on that. we do a look at following supervisor melgar's idea and look at the cost to the city of medicly dealing with the city. first look of how can we shift these resources into prevention and treatment instead of hospital bills? that is such a great idea. really i am interested in following that up. that is something we could do. >> i am happy. that is the angle we were going on, ask the bla to look at quantifying the costs in two departments instructing them on tuesday. i will work with both of you. happy to do that. i wanted to highlight for the
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unified school district and public health on the record today. i appreciate input and ideas. this is a collaborative effort. a lot of people putting energy into this. like other things that have happened this needs to be elevated. we have to work together. there is a lot of really detrimental impact that we are not quantifying right now on the simple data. thank you, chair. that is why we asked for data on hospitalizations. we wanted to underscore that. we didn't know what it would say. it was dramatic to see the number african-american children hospitalized for obesity.
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>> public comment. [indiscernable] would you like to speak. press star 3. [indiscernable] >> your voice sounds like a robot. i don't know what happened. >> it sounds like we went to a "star wars" movie. >> we can hear you and understand you. pop-up the comments. we are good. >> five listeners. three in queue. first caller, please. >> good afternoon, supervisors. i am a member of the greater area of board of directors.
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[indiscernable] the key areas to support good health reduce the cardiovascular disease. this helps address child obesity along with snap and food stamps. snap is vital for addressing nutrition in united states by supporting the vulnerable populations and reducing food insecurity. i suggest additional funds to snap could remove cost barriers and accessing foods. opportunities amount to fruits and vegetables and programs to
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increase fruit and vegetable consumption. they are starting to look at early childhood intervention as well and childhood education to prevent carddio vascular disease. i ask you to consider this to make sure the children have what they need to live longer lives. let the heart assistance know if we can be in assistance. thank you. >> next speaker. >> good afternoon. american heart association. couple pieces to add. data you shared was shocking. i am thankful you are elevating this topic at this time with the impactses of covid. we know that covid hit low income communities the hardest.
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high blood pressure, diabetes are leading for severe illness. while we worry about variants and vaccine bees we need to address these risk factors. the earlier the better as the doctors mentioned. we have mentioned some of the proposed changes. a couple others. making sure we have physical activity 60 minutes each day in all standards that we set. dcyf said 30 minutes. i would love to increase that to make sure we are ensuring high-quality and kids are getting moving. school food. vital to increase reimbursement rates. increase participation. supervisor ronen the time of the meals. that is explored at the state level. we can't pick recess. times to eat are vital. funding for physical education
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instructors in lower grades is needed. i wanted to highlight in terms of data. many of the research data was put on hold by the state in february of 2020. due to concerns about body shaming. we need to advocate for changes on data collection if we are going to target and taylor to those most needed. that needs collected and funded by local researchers and from supervisors themselves. consideration of the interceptions and working strategically across agencies to move the needle. american heart association is happy to collaborate with you in the future. thank you so much. >> last caller in the queue. >> good morning. i am laura urban, associate director of health and
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newtrician at children council of san francisco. it is nonprofit again be see for young children 0-5 to supporting obesity prevention strategies to support children. more than 20 years children's council held quality improvement effort goes to help san francisco child care educators implement curriculum, develop policies and create environment supporting healthy weight in children. we provide child care educators with financial support to increase access to healthy food for children in their care. there is a lot of work to be done and funding extremely limited. we are excited to see you actively address childhood obesity and what programs is there. we hope that increases investments in stopping
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childhood obesity among our youngest children ages 0-5. unfortunately children overweight or obese preschool five times as likely as normal weight children to be over wait or obese as adults. asthma and mental health problems. show the pandemic exasperated the existing crisis. to address this it is critical to prioritize investments obesity initiative and integrate health policies into early care efforts invest in long-term funding for initiatives and diversity of the community. we look forward to working with your offices more about this. thank you so much for your time and commitment to solving the childhood obesity crisis in san francisco.
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>> madam chair that completes the queue for today. >> thank you so much. public comment is closed. i would like to make a motion to continue to the call of the chair. roll call. >> motion to continue to the call of the chair. vice chair safai. >> aye. >> chair melgar. >> aye. >> chair ronen. >> aye. >> you have three ayes. >> thank you again everyone. enjoy did rest of your day and your weekend. please read item 2. >> thank you, chair. i have to excuse myself. if you would make a motion i would appreciate it. thank you for your time today. i appreciate the leeway. this was a really important hearing. >> thank you. can you please read item 2.
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resolution urging department of youth and families to require all organizations and funding from dcyf for youth 14 years old by 2023. >> i don't think that is item 2. >> that is an old script. >> hearing to discuss plans for senate bill 823 which closes california's division of juvenile justice and realigns to the county's responsibility to house young people who commit the most serious offenses and requesting information on plans and strategies for youth ordered to probation supervision in the community. >> on the motion to excuse supervisor safai.
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>> aye. >> chair reason nan. >> aye. >> you have two ayes. >> thank you. i am sorry for the wait. thank you for your patience. i know this has been quite a change for us. complicated our efforts to transform the way that we handle juvenile justice in san francisco, efforts to close juvenile hall. i am grateful for an update on your efforts. integrating this new responsibility on the part of your department into our overall juvenile justice in san francisco. thanks so much. over to you.
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>> i may have added a few talking points during the last agenda item. you are welcome. i am going to share my screen. we will be going off these slides together. we promise to be efficient. i know you are up against the lunch hour. please let me know this is working. can you see the slides? >> thank you for having us here today. i am happy to have alice with me. exective director for the county director of education with other wonderful folks that you will see their names today, too. as you indicated we are talking
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about closure of juvenile justicetis california youth authority. different names over time. more importantly the shift of the function to the county and to us, san francisco. exactly what you said we need to acknowledge what this means for san francisco. it is an added complexity that is layered onto our current efforts to close existing juvenile hall and transform the way we do youth justice. our work and complexity. we could spend an entire presentation talking about this law. i am going to give it to you in one slide. last fall 2020 governor newsom signed senate bill 823. the intent to close down to have young people closer to community
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and family and using age appropriate intervention as safe practices and minimizing the use of confinement. under this law juvenile courts can no longer send young people to the state. we have nobody from san francisco in our. [indiscernable] the djj facilities will close in 2023. it shifts responsibility to the counties. it sends the age of jurisdiction how long we work with the young person including juvenile custody up to 25. it also shifts responsibility to the counties to come up with a plan to what we are to do. operationalize it. it creates state office to offer see this new work. office of community be restoration. the governor housed that in health and human services rather
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than corrections. to operationalize the shift. eight secure responsibilities is shifted to the counties as well. courts will be able to commit young people to security treatment facilities at the county level. long-term commitments that would have mirrored the cjj commitment. secure track commitments in our conversations. counties have to figure out what that is going to be. security treatment facilities at the county level will have to follow the same rules we use for the ranch. you can house these in a hall or in a ranch or separate space. counties can contract with each other to help with cross county placement of young people or develop regional models. this is all coming as a result
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of this new law. with the responsibility comes realignment of funding. each county is going to receive an annual allocation juvenile justice block grant. rbg. you have to follow the process outlined in the legislation to receive the funds. legislation lays out who decides what the plan has to address, mission deadline also. our 21-22 allocation. you can see at the bottom of the screen. that is san francisco received 800,000 towards this work. the following years are estimates. they are based on the formula that may change. for now that is projection of what will be coming to the county each year. it is worth acknowledging the priority for the funds to address new realigned responsibilities.
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who is doing this work? i have gratitude for the people on the list and the work they have been doing over the last six and longer months. this is our juvenile justice coordinating council. realignments subcommittee. we did not make that up. first 10 people enrolled on the list are legislatively mandated. you can see the different city and public agencies at the table. school district. then three community members. the law requires minimum of three community members on the sub committee. the box on the right is the definition of what community member means in this context. we took the steps and i am proud of this in san francisco adding five more members to our body. four of those are community members who meet that state
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recommendations. they have a loved one, victim of community violence or expertise in providing community services. there were 31 individuals that applied for these four seats. extensive public application process. amazing people came forward. people joining this effort. last is from the san francisco bar association. the attorneys have 40% of the juvenile cases. they want to make sure they were at the table, too. also this means nine of the 15 members are from the community and/or are youth justice advocates. that is really important for
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this conversation. two have lived experience in juvenile hall and one in cya that is critical to our mission. transparency and accessibility are the watch words through the process. all meetings are compliance. public meeting also. all meeting materials and library of other materials are available on the juvenile probation website. i just listed the meeting dates. i am so grateful with the amount of work people put in. that on the preceding page 16 subcommittee meetings since may. these are two hour meeting. for learning sessions you can see the time and energy that has been put into this process. what is the process?
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we are building this train while it hurdled down the track. it came to us on top of all of the things. four components. initial meetings about critical information and foundation for the group. we wanted to make sure everyone on the committee understood the mandate, legislation, relative law and the data here in san francisco with young people. we wanted to make sure from the beginning we adopted a common set of values. supervisor ronen you will be happy to know we value borrowed our values. there were powerful learning sessions and conducted with young people in san francisco about what we want our justice system to look like for young people. that led to the values that we
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adopted into this movement. you can see them on the screen. with that kind of initial together then members of our groups of the people you saw on the preceding screens were leadings. people volunteered to take a particular subject. education, work force, girls, cultural responsibility, family engagement. all important things we want to think about in our support of young people. people became leads in those topics. that meant outside of the meeting they did research, information gathering. really research analysis of what we have, don't have, what are the things that we may want to beg, borrow and steal? a lot of sitting down with community members with experience to get their recommendation and advice. our leads then brought those
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back to the meetings. each meeting we heard about two subjects and debated and flushed those out further. finally we had four learning sessions. these were hours that were dedicated to subjects who wanted to dig into and learn about more. they were live but you can also watch them on demand like netflix on the website. anybody the closed juvenile hall process watch them. parents for young people? they may have children. what are the state and federal programs in california for young people? what is trauma informed design? by an amazing expert who has done be this work all over the country. what message or model would it look like from the coalition
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that does the work across the straight. i recommend people watch those. i held five info stations at jpd to bring the thoughts and ideas back to the process. that is what our work mostly looked like. >> you are at 10 minute mark for your presentation. >> thank you. in terms of the plan requirements that we have to submit to the state. it looks more like a grant application. not user friendly. our group will be voting on the final version next tuesday. we will create a more user friendly version for local youth. law requires updating every three years. in our situation we will do it sooner. it does not require board of supervisors approval but we want to share it today. it is important. in terms who we are talking
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about in san francisco. we have a lot of amazing analysis done by our staff that we shared with our group. i think the two big take aways. one, in san francisco we are ready to use it for few cases. most young people with sustained 707 petition which is like a conviction. we don't use that word in juvenile system violents offense. most young people end up in that place. still lined up in community with us by design on probation. sometimes in out of home placement in community. very few young people have gone through the states over the years. last five years 11 young people committed to the state. they stayed just under two years on average. they are mostly young adults. they have been committed to the juvenile system are young
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adults. the commitment. all have been male. violence and 100% prior law enforcements action for crimes of violence. primarily black. higher percentage than we see generally in the system. also note this has had another impact on us in our work which is that it is increasing the number of adults in our help for other reasons. today half the young people in the hall are there because of the law. what we have come up within the last two weeks important decisions for our plan going to the state. we have really look at all of the young people with those kinds of serious findings. in community, out of home placement and highest secure
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level. young people in the community we are going to do what we do. the amazing array of resources. we also have identified gaps to put funding behind. young people who the court says out of home placement relative, foster care, group home. we want to have a broader array of those resources we are working on. that can be sharing. that will continue to happen for those young people. the secure treatment facility for small number of kids. now there is nobody with this commitment. i anticipate one happening soon. these are small number of kids. a function we have never had here. it is a lot of our attention. we have voted to use the current juvenile hall for the present moment for any young person with that kind of long-term stay by
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the court, revise the plan once city leadership makes the decision about the next place of detention in san francisco. we are recommending to you the board that you consider collocating the next place of detention and the young people who may have long-term commitments. alisha will speak why we landed on that as the recommendation to you. obviously we want to make sure anything we create follows. we voted that we are going to consider the use of some out-of-county secure placements as places come on line. specifically for those that want to be in a different county for a different reason. we will keep that on the table, not something that is ready now. finally, how do we spend the money in alignment with decisions? we decided as a group some funding we allocate across all
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settings. community, placement out of homes, secure settings. four kinds of programs to get online. messenger coaches, whole family support. the need for this came up over 50 times in our conversations. flexible funding to follow kids and families. collective training for all of us to work together. for the young people who may be in the secure long-term setting instead of creating the programs and services now we want to use the funding for individual flex funding. if we have one or two young people in the situation we can builds out their plans and dynamic period in san francisco in the way they need. that is our idea how to fund this from the states. we intend to leverage the community partners for this. in some cases expanding the
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existing contracts and grants and competitive bidding to create new and amazing programs. i will turn to alice to share perspective from our group why we did land on recommending we keep our kids together in a secure setting going forward and what that can look like. >> thank you so much. for those who don't know me. i work with alternative schools. i really think of myself as being in the quality of life business. in many ways the harm reduction business. aba bolitionist. i am committed to life changing experiences for young people where ever they happen to be right now. to be honest, keeping me up
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right now is the fact that we have young people today who are in a system that was in no way designed for the circumstance that it has to meet right now. when we think what we want for our young people it is rich life changing integrated learning experiences that don't just stop between 8-3. if they are with us 24 hours each day they learn and earn 24 hours per day. we want them to identifies fithemselves, skills, identity and voice along an academic college career. if you are leaving at 18, 21, 22, you need community that you are exiting to and job experience. you can't come out at age 22 with no income and no resume and go immediately into the world.
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we find ourself in this place where we need to provide all day programming life experiences that builds all of these things at once and the deeply personalized because we have some people coming to us, 16 year-olds who need to finish high school diploma plop maand the 18 year-old finished with high school and wants the four year college program and the 17.5 year-old with one more class to finish in high school not interested in college. they want a job readiness program. so we are in this tension how to personalize deeply for the young people but how to do that in community. i think we all learned over the
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last year and a half how incredibly isolating it can be to do school, after school, everything through a computer screen where you see no one or you see no one but two or three members of your family. for the last six months orthopedic so we are hold -- or longer we have been holding 14 young people a day across the entire facility. what it takes to make a meaningful learning experience, life experience. it can't just be one human staring at the screen. you have to intern act with other people. we know a lot of things this program could look like, but for example one thing we talked about doing is really integrating academic learning, life experience, and career
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experience through farm to table culinary program. we have a beautiful garden, gets young people outside, looking at building an outdoor kitchen which is equipment that could be moved to any location that we pick. that creates opportunities for individual young people to go through food science, organic chemistry, business, marketing, obesity, health, to make meals together to come out with resume experience as a chef, waiter. also the real family experience of breaking bread together and preparing their own meals. it is experiences like that where the young people can have these experiences that are deeply personal and flexible but
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also existing community. i can't figure out a way to do that if we are in a group of one person here and a group of two people here. we don't want young people stuck with nobody but paid professionals in their lives. >> your five minutes is up and you have five minutes left. >> i will pause there. >> wonderful. >> i get how the question related to that for both of you. i know that there have been kids incarcerated as young as 10, right? >> not under the law now. >> in the past. 12 would be the youngest now? >> yes. >> you have a 12 year-old and
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25-year-old being held in the same place. how do you deal with that? the substance abuse gap? >> you can look at it in different ways. there has been a 12-year-old in the last two weeks here. most young people today over half are 18 and up. in the current state we have different living units. i think to me what this speaks to is the need to be creative in design what that residential space looks like for young people going forward. because to alice's point if we separate them the 12 year-old alone with only grownups is terrible. even between our older teens and young adults there are ways for
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young people to be in community, to be doing different be things. that general sense of we put them in different spaces around the city. what we wind up with is very small numbers of kids with each other. >> i would note financially there needs to be education where we have kids, staff, all of the things. to me and to our group having everybody together while still needing to do separations for age, the potential for rich and creative services and support. >> how is it working now in juvenile hall? the 12-year-old is in a different pod than the 18-25-year-olds? >> sure. right now we have on average
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four pods open in juvenile pod. because of the pandemic we still have an intake to any new admission or young person the first 14 days if they are there that long. we do guide young people generally by age into different pods. >> in the juvenile hall working group, and i know this is about if we have a hearing on shortly, have you been able to describe what those design elements would look like so that you would be able to house such a radical age gap?
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>> yes, those are good questions. as you know that legislation came out before this state law happened. this is actually not a part of that processor discussion. it is really space focused on the kind of more historical population we had. the report you are receiving to close juvenilehaum doesn't account for the new state law, doesn't account for the law we could have up to 25-year-olds. it does account, i believe and should account for any young person detained in the regular course of detention. it is important to note that even today when i said half of the young people are over 18. they are detained in regular course of detention now. that is because of this change in state law. i guess all of that to say the
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report doesn't address this issue. that is why we want to bring this to you. as we talk about these things we are doing it together and accounting for the factors that we need to to have a coherent plan in san francisco. >> we have a 12-year-old. in all of 2020 we never had a 12-year-old. it is very rare. >> that breaks my heart. >> absolutely. really what we most young people won't be spending time. they are generally 18 and up or 17 and 18. >> supervisor melgar any questions? i do. thank you so much. thank you for the presentation.
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juvenile hall is in my district. there is a lot of interest in the community about what is going on and what we are going to do in the future. in listening your presentation, you know, keeping up with the changes in the state law. you know, it is our opportunity be to dream big. to work for a better world where we can support young people and be successful. in a facility that was not designed with that dream in mind. i am wondering if i have not read your report. i also am wondering because it takes so long to do anything in san francisco. part of the land where you are
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sitting is under utilized. why is it that we can plan towards in terms of this dream gardening and culinary and skills-enriched learning experiences for these young people. how can we plan ahead for that for investing in that to create not just a system but support the dream and redirecting the resources and also the space where that happens? >> let me get some facts. you know, obviously when they close juvenile hall. is it here or somewhere else? do you use the land here in a different way or look somewhere
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else. which is another host of questions and challenges. right now there are things in the moment we are talking about doing differently. whatever happens next is going to take a while. we want to do what is right. we care what the plan is. alice mentioned putting in outdoor kitchen equipment. we have amazing garden space and the school district provides amazing instructors for gardening. they desire more of that farm to table work. it can move. if we decide to do something different in the city and space we can make investments in transferable things that can improve the experiences of the kids. the other thing that we are
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talking about is as alice mentioned. we have young people here. they may be with us for the bulk of their time. what do we do that is different in education space for that age group? we will talk about it for a moment. it is such a cool conversation. >> sure. one of the things we find now in this shift from high school institution to being a place that provides college and career experiences is that the easy shift to make. we are making right now is changing one of our former classrooms to be our college lounge. much like you would see if you went to the university in the
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student union. your study place to go, your library and tables and house a college experience alone but in measurement with other college -- in community with other college students. right now in the space we have opportunities exist for us. there is a lot of opportunities that exist in possible phases, making great use of the property that i agree is under utilized. there are so many resources beyond the housing units that are there right now. we want to make the most of them. >> i would add on top of the space there is the zoo. if we have more young people interested in college, amazing partner to make sure we have adults to really work through
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with our young adults living here at the moment. what does that look like? what does that college connection look like? how do we pull that in? i think of the general theme. place of isolation to place of connection. how are we fundamentally shifting orientation of anyplace that holding young people in the city for a period of time? >> is there anything else you wanted to share before we open this up for public comment. >> the only thing is that 37 day plan which is separate from juvenile hall. this is a lot of pages. that will go by january 1st. reminder our subcommittee will
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vote next tuesday on the final version. thank you to the jpd staff working on it. including emily who wrote the 37 pages. i want to acknowledge that. you know, i think for us we want to make sure this is part of the conversation. we are always happy to come back and keep you informed. >> i appreciate you both for brenting this to us. -- for presenting this to us. i understand what we are doing while juvenile hall is open and that is okay but we want to close that as soon as we can. given that, we have this additional component.
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you certainly have my brain for this difficult but crucial undertaking. i remain convinced that where there is a will there is a way. we also in my humble opinion have the best chief juvenile hall officer. i don't know your title. >> chief juvenile probation. >> chief juvenile probation officer in the country. i really believe we can do this. it will take all of our cooperation and understanding to get this done as quickly as
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possible as supervisor melgar says. nothing small happens quickly in san francisco. something as huge as juvenile hall, i know that president walton and i have a lot of urgency around it. i appreciate you bringing this up. we have to deal with it. we can't pretend it is not happening. it is happening. there are good things about the fact it happened. we need to double the efforts and i hope you join us all. you seem like the creative thinking of the group. this is a complicated undertaking. this is just the beginning of this conversation. i think we can now start to weave it into one conversation.
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i think that is what it is. thank you again. we will open this item up for public comment. >> thank you. we are checking for callers in the queue. if you would like to speak star 3 to be added. we have matthew assisting us today. no callers in the queue and no listeners. >> thank you so much for public comment is closed. i am going to go ahead if it is okay. i know they planned to introduce a hearing. [indiscernable] if it doesn't happen i will lead this conversation to that one. with that i would like to make a
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motion to file this item and again thank you so much, chief miller for all of your hard work. we are lucky to have you in charge. we really are. thank you. >> motion to file item 2 by supervisor ronan. supervisor melgar. >> aye. >> supervisor ronen. >> aye. >> you have two ayes. >> thank you so much. have a good weekend. do we have any more items? >> that completes the business for today. >> the meeting is adjourned. good-bye. better.
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san francisco department of environment is a place where climate hits the street. we know that we don't have all the answers. we need to support our local champions, our local community to find creative solutions and innovations that help us get to zero waste. >> zero waste is sending nothing to landfill or incineration, using reuse and recovery and prevention as ways to achieve zero waste. the grant program is a grant program specifically for nonprofits in san francisco to divert material from landfill. it's important to find the san francisco produce market because there's a lot of edible food
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that can be diverted and they need positions to capture that food and focus on food recovery. >> san francisco produce market is a resource that connects farmers and their produce with businesses in the bay area. i think it's a basic human right to have access to healthy foods, and all of this food here is available. it's a matter of creating the infrastructure, creating jobs, and the system whereby none of this goes to waste. since the beginning of our program in july 2016 to date, we've donated over 1 million pounds of produce to our community partners, and that's resulted in over 900,000 meals to people in our community, which we're very proud of.
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>> carolyn at the san francisco produce market texts with old produce that's available. the produce is always excellent. we get things like broccoli, brussels sprouts, bell peppers. everything that we use is nice and fresh, so when our clients get it, they really enjoy it, and it's important to me to feel good about what i do, and working in programs such as this really provides that for me. it's helping people. that's what it's really about, and i really enjoy that. >> the work at the produce market for me representing the intersection between environment and community, and when we are working at that intersection, when we are using our resources and our passion and our energy to heal the planet and feed the people, nothing gets better than
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a city like no other, san francisco has been a beacon of hope, and an ally towards lgbtq equal rights. [♪♪] >> known as the gay capital of america, san francisco has been at the forefront fighting gay civil rights for decades becoming a bedrock for the historical firsts. the first city with the first openly gay bar. the first pride parade.
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the first city to legalize gay marriage. the first place of the iconic gay pride flag. established to help cancel policy, programses, and initiatives to support trans and lgbtq communities in san francisco. >> we've created an opportunity to have a seat at the table. where trans can be part of city government and create more civic engagement through our trans advisory committee which advises our office and the mayor's office. we've also worked to really address where there's gaps across services to see where we can address things like housing and homelessness, low income, access to small businesses and employment and education.
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so we really worked across the board as well as meeting overall policies. >> among the priorities, the office of transgender initiatives also works locally to track lgbtq across the country. >> especially our young trans kids and students. so we do a lot of work to make sure we're addressing and naming those anti-trans policies and doing what we can to combat them. >> trans communities often have not been included at the policy levels at really any level whether that's local government, state government. we've always had to fend for ourselves and figure out how to care for our own communities. so an office like this can really show and become a model for the country on how to really help make sure that our entire community is served by the city and that we all get opportunities to participate
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because, in the end, our entire community is stronger. >> the pandemic underscored many of the inequities they experienced on a daily basis. nonetheless, this health crisis also highlighted the strength in the lgbtq and trans community. >> several of our team members were deployed as part of the work at the covid command center and they did incredit able work there both in terms of navigation and shelter-in-place hotels to other team members who led equity and lgbtq inclusion work to make sure we had pop-up testing and information sites across the city as well as making sure that data collection was happening. we had statewide legislation that required that we collected information on sexual orientation and our team worked so closely with d.p.h. to make
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sure those questions were included at testing site but also throughout the whole network of care. part of the work i've had a privilege to be apart of was to work with o.t.i. and a community organization to work together to create a coalition that met monthly to make sure we worked together and coordinated as much as we could to lgbtq communities in the city. >> partnering with community organizations is key to the success of this office ensuring lgbtq and gender nonconforming people have access to a wide range of services and places to go where they will be respected. o.t.i.'s trans advisory committee is committed to being that voice. >> the transgender advisory counsel is a group of amazing community leaders here in san francisco. i think we all come from all walks of life, very diverse, different backgrounds, different expertises, and i think it's just an amazing
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group of people that have a vision to make san francisco a true liberated city for transgender folks. >> being apart of the grou allows us to provide more information on the ground. we're allowed to get. and prior to the pandemic, there's always been an issue around language barriers and education access and workforce development. now, of course, the city has been more invested in to make sure our community is thriving and making sure we are mobilizing. >> all of the supervisors along with mayor london breed know that there's still a lot to be done and like i said before, i'm just so happy to live in a
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city where they see trans folks and recognize us of human beings and know that we deserve to live with dignity and respect just like everybody else. >> being part of the trans initiative has been just a great privilege for me and i feel so lucky to have been able to serve for it for so far over three years. it's the only office of its kind and i think it's a big opportunity for us to show the country or the world about things we can do when we really put a focus on transgender issues and transgender communities. and when you put transgender people in leadership positions. >> thank you, claire. and i just want to say to claire farly who is the leader of the office of transgender initiatives, she has really taken that role to a whole other level and is currently a grand marshal for this year's s.f. prize. so congratulations, claire.
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>> my dream is to really look at where we want san francisco to be in the future. how can we have a place where we have transliberation, quality, and inclusion, and equity across san francisco? and so when i look five years from now, ten years from now, i want us to make sure that we're continuing to lead the country in being the best that we can be. not only are we working to make sure we have jobs and equal opportunity and pathways to education, employment, and advancement, but we're making sure we're taking care of our most impacted communities, our trans communities of color, trans women of color, and black trans women. and we're making sure we're addressing the barriers of the access to health care and mental health services and we're supporting our seniors who've done the work and really be able to age in place and have access to the services and resources they deserve. so there's so much more work to
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do, but we're really proud of the work that we've done so far. [♪♪] >> the hon. london breed: all right. so quiet in here today. is it quiet? kind of quiet. well, first of all, thank you, everyone, for being here today. thank you for the boys and girls club for hosting us here
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in san francisco, and i really appreciate the continued to stand before you as the mayor of san francisco to introduce something that i'm very proud of and something that is long overdue. so today, we're here with a number of elected officials, nonprofits, and professionals, because the city clearly needs a change when it comes to our young people. during covid, we all know that kids suffered, and schools that were closed led to learning loss and mental health challenges that sadly continue to this day, but we can't pretend that these opportunities didn't exist in the past, but today, we can
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create a new path forward. currently, there are ten agencies that make decisions for our kids. it is so frustrating and confusing for kids when parents can't speak english and they have to translate for their parents. the thing about these programs, they don't necessarily have a coordinated vision, and the programs are confusing for families to access. we are here because we desperately desperately need to
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put our children first. there are a lot of people standing here today that really care about kids. supervisor melgar couldn't make it, but she supports our kids. supervisor raphael mandelman is here. former president of the board of supervisors norman yee is here, who led the fight in the city. we also have board members like jennie lam and former board members like hydro mendoza, who i can't tell if they're here because i can't see under the mask as well as the service providers to -- who provide services to our kids. and of course, we have our
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parents, some of whom you'll hear from today. getting this charter amendment onto the ballot is going to take a lot of partners, and i'm really proud of all the people who are supportive of this and with us today, including our young people, who probably -- [applause] >> the hon. london breed: i know we can put our kids in focus. in the summer of 2020, with our schools closed, we needed to support our kids, especially those living in public housing and congregate settings who had nowhere to go, nowhere to learn. that's when the city, under the leadership of maria su, with the department of children,
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youth, and families -- [applause] >> the hon. london breed: that's when we created the learning hub. the program that we created happened in a matter of weeks, so these hubs, they served thousands of young people with a safe place to learn, to be around other kids, to get access to other food and to feel normal during one of the most difficult times of our experiences. and what made the community learning hub successful was the communication and partnership with the city and communication and partnership with the nonprofit agencies. we would often ask why we aren't using the schools, and i had no good answer for that, and that's exactly why this ballot measure is needed. it has two main focuses. first, we will centralize the work we've done for kids.
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it seems like it should, but it's not. one of the most frustrating things as mayor is dealing with bureaucracy, and the agency that is responsible for what, and the expectation that nonprofits who are already working hard to serve our children have to fill out several different applications and meet several different requirements, and specifically, the measure will combine existing youth service departments into a single children's agency for the city and county of san francisco, which will be significant. it will create a unified vision, bring services and funding together in one place, improve efficiency by aligning all the spending that we make towards specific goals, and reduce bureaucracy so parents
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have one specific location to access services and programs. how do we allow children access to things that they may be interested in doing? this holistic approach will better serve families and kids. the next part of this charter amendment will be school board accountability. the other thing that is so critical to, i know, what everyone is most excited about, is, you know, the fact that we need to change what happens at the school board. i'm standing here with school
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board members past and present who have done difficult work. they know what it takes to make hard decisions and to focus on the core mission of that really important body, but unfortunately, the schooling board we have has too often focused on the wrong things at the expense of the big picture. people -- school renamings instead of getting schools opens, massive school budget deficits, parents who feel like they're not being heard, and kids who have not felt like they're being prioritized, i get where they're coming from. as mayor, i don't have control over the school district, but every year, the city provides millions and millions to the
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school district. i'm not just talking about the $25 million we gave them for covid along with the various district partners who provided support for the challenges that they were experiencing. my responsibility is to ensure that those city dollars and resources are being spent well. we need to set some basic, basic accountability standards if we're going to keep spending that money, so children first will do just that. it will require the board of education to self-certify every year that they've met some of these basic guidelines, including undergoing regular training to improve their effectiveness, conduct extensive parental engagement to ensure all parent voices are heard, and allow the
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superintendent to manage other staff, which unfortunately is not happening. approve the annual budget and ensure that it aligns with the overall goal of the district and conduct annual self-evaluations to ensure that they are working together as a collective body to achieve these long-term goals. now this is about good government and accountability. it's about ensuring that the city dollars are being spent wisely. it's about a reset of the board of education, and most of all, it's about our kids. no longer will this city give a blank check to the school board until it demonstrates some level of improvement and accountability to serve our children. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: so we have a lot of work to do, not just to get this charter on the ballot, but to pass it and take
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action. we have to show that this city cares about our kids and their families. let me just say, as a kid that grew up in san francisco, you know, my grandmother was the person that was completing all the paperwork and doing all the things that needed to be done to make sure that i could participate in all of these programs. i was completing all the forms. i was completing all the forms, working with my grandmother, and at the time, a lot of people with the nonprofits, they were on the forefront with me, hearing me through this process. we thought technology made it better. in fact, things have gotten way more complicated, and it should
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not be difficult for kids to participate in programs, for them to receive a good education and the support that they need and deserve so they can thrive, so their lives are made better. we owe it to them to think about their future, and part of that is making sure we're grading them. not just on math, science, reading, and writing. and right now, we're failing. we're failing our kids, we're failing our families, and so this charter amendment is about doing something different, doing something better, because i know we can do something better because they serve it, and i want to take a moment to recognize the leaders of the department of children, youth, and families. thank you, maria su, for helping to lead this charter amendment. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: thank you to all the families who
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have provided their input. we are truly grateful, and as i mentioned to a number of folks before from various nonprofits and agencies and parents, this has really been a collective effort, and long overdue, and we're going to have to work hard to get this passed, but when we get it passed, and when we implement it, we all are going to see and feel a change for our children and for our future. so thank you so much for being here today, and at this time, i want to introduce the supervisor of this district that we're in, and who represents district 8. ladies and gentlemen, supervisor rafael mandelman. >> supervisor mandelman: thank you, madam mayor. welcome to district 8,
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everyone. you know, if norman yee, london breed, maria su and phil halperin agree on something related to kids, you know it's got to go good. as another san francisco former kid myself, i know this is a really good ballot measure. i think this measure is a measured and reasonable response to some of the frankly chaos that we have seen coming out of the school district, and we have, as a city, a tremendous stake in what happens at the district. we don't run the district, but we fund it in significant measure, and this ballot recognizes that, as a condition of that funding, we should have some expectations around the quality of governance, and so i
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really appreciate that that is an important piece of this charter amendment. but i also really appreciate the thoughtful approach to the delivery to children and their families and the process that has gone on over many months. i have not been part of that process. i have checked in with folks along the way who have been part of it, and i have been really impressed to see folks digging in and helping kids in san francisco like they should. and plus, i called norman and asked him what he was doing. particularly, i want to thank maria for stepping up so phenomenally over the last two years. during this pandemic, some
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folks stepped up, but not everybody. but maria did. [applause] >> supervisor mandelman: many of the parent leaders out in the audience stepped up during the pandemic, and thank you. [applause] >> supervisor mandelman: and the boys and girls club stepped up during the pandemic. [applause] >> supervisor mandelman: and so with that, i'm going to introduce rob connolly with the boys and girls club. [applause] >> well, i'll be brief. i really just want to welcome you to our columbia clubhouse in mission park. this clubhouse has been here 114 years, and the boys and girls club has been in the city for 130 years, so we've been helping boys and girls and
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families in the city for a long, long time. i want to welcome the mayor to columbia park. we got this just in time, and i think the mayor was able to get it for a little bit. you know, i guess i just want to say, mayor, thank you for prioritizing kids, families, and community. with that, i want to thank maria yu. when the mayor called for the shelter in place in mar 2020, we called up and say hey, we
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don't think we're going to be able to close. i says, we really want to figure this out, and within a few hours, working with the mayor and dr. colfax, and whoever else that i don't know, figured out how to keep the boys and girls club open during the pandemic. our sites that we had controlled completely like this clubhouse and several other places, we were able to keep open. across the city, we have five facilities, and you heard about alignment. we receive funding from a number of different places in the city, and it is very challenging for us at every
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level, administratively as well as programatically, and responding to the different needs assessments that come out, and all the administrative processes of who's getting funded by this contract and that contract. one of the thing that's we jokingly said, we ask the kids, what are your thoughts on this program? and they said, what program is that? it's the program funded by mohcd -- no, we don't ask them that, but they say they like this program because. really appreciate having everybody here, and appreciate the leadership, and the willingness to dig in and find greater alignment for families
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like ours, and we look forward to working as a nonprofit with the city in a successful effort, which we hope it is. with that, i'm going to introduce mario paz, who runs the location here in the mission. mario's been in his role leading the organization for 15 years, so mario, welcome. [applause] >> thank you, ron. i'd first like to thank the mayor and maria su for your continued leadership on behalf of children, youth, and families. we do this work because we love our children. it's our children, and san francisco has proven to be one of the most generous cities in
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the world when it comes to our children. i think about this assault from covid that we continue to have, and one of the things that we've found out is our most vulnerable are truly, truly the most vulnerable. the other important issue we learned is that it really, really, really does take a village, right? and we are that village. and we talk about that, but it really does take a village. but guess what? in order for that village to succeed, you need to be prepared, you need to be coordinated, and you need to be accountable to each other. this creates a village that's well prepared, well coordinated, and most importantly, we're going to be accountable. we're going to be accountable to each other, and most importantly, we're going to be accountable to the children. i grew up in the city. i benefited from many of the
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programs here. i grew up in san francisco. i'm a son of san francisco, and i'm proud of it, but i'm here to tell you, we can no longer afford to fail our children. we've shown the world what we can do in so many different, but why are we failing on this? we're going to work hard, we're going to hold each other accountable, and thank you all for being here, and thank you all for your leadership. thank you. [applause]
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[speaking cantonese language]
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>> okay. i will be translating. i have two children. my son is 13 years old, and my daughter is six years old. during the pandemic, sprisk provided a community learning hub to support my children through distance learning and
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children workshops. i have received covid information and community resources such as where to got vaccination and where to get the covid test, and my family has attended events like halloween festival and thanksgiving. i'm thankful for the san francisco unified school district to provide wellness checks and meetings for parents conducted by the teachers. after my first wellness meeting, we received hand sanitizer from the teachers, and during the holidays, the
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teachers personally discovered study materials to my children. we hope the city and school district can continue to serve even after the pandemic. this will provide the services that parents have been calling for since before the pandemic for education. thank you. [applause] >> hi. my name is chanel, and i am a
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parent of two children in san francisco unified school district. thank you, mayor breed, for allowing me to speak my voice today. this children first initiative is very important for the children because during the first 18 months of distance learning for my son, he was in middle school at the time and didn't experience his graduation, and the experience of distance learning for 18 months impacted him a lot of he gave up after his younger brother went back to two days hybrid in april, he dove more into the internet. it was devastating for him, and he needed an outlet to survive, so he picked social media, and now, i'm seeing the consequences of that. he's so stuck now being a freshman now still in tenth grade. i'm a working mom, and my husband works, we didn't have
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24 hours to watch him. i assumed he was doing his classes, but he wasn't. i think he was only on the internet, and now he's having a really hard time adjusting in person in high school. it all just broke my heart because our kids were not in school. i feel like it was damaging to our kids' physical health and mental health. i understand that the district want today rename -- wanted to rename schools, but it wasn't a time for it. getting our kids back in school was our first priority. i hope this initiative will help our city kids and my kids. i'm optimistic that it will help the city kids. we're all overwhelmed, and we're all in the same boat, i get it, and we need to have all hands on deck starting
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yesterday. my hope is that we'll do this together, listen to our teachers, principals, and do this as a san francisco community. our kids need our help and resources. i'm afraid about those budget cuts. do we have enough mental health resources that they need after promo distance learning. i am a mama bear protecting her cubs, and i hope we can do this right now. i'm a fan of prevention. if we don't do this, take action, we're going to affect our children's career potential. they can be artists, doctors, lawyers, scientists, and many more opportunities in this
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city. the school board has a big responsibility. if the school board was operating as they should be, we wouldn't be here today. early on, the school district didn't listen. they didn't take the help from experts. i hope the san francisco unified school district starts to put politics aside. take advice from experts and consultants and govern better for our kids. i believe this children first initiative will help. it will move us forward helping our san francisco students be all right. to be clear, it's all about the children. thanks again for being a service for our kids. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: thank you to our parents for their compelling stories, and the reasons why we're here today,
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and at this time, i just really want someone who has been many, many years and who put kids first. although she's no longer on the school board, she cares about the children and is always actively engaged and providing feedback or historical information or institutional knowledge to help us move things forward in a positive direction, and someone who i'm sure if she was still on the school board, some of this would not be happening. please welcome former school board members rachel norton. >> good afternoon, everyone. it's really a mixed bag that i'm here today. it's sad that here's where we
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are, but this is where we are, and i have to say that san francisco is the envy of many other districts in california because of the incredible support that the city of san francisco gives our district. in 2010, when the last economic downturn happened, i had been on the board about two years, and i went to a california school board association conference, and people said oh, we're cutting p.e., we're cutting art, and we didn't have to cut those because of the support that the city gives the school district. what happened during the pandemic, maria, mayor breed, the services that were provided
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to school children made a lot of difference for families. i think normally, of course, a school board member would bridle when the mayor who's not in charge of schools should tell the school board what to do, but those are the times that we're not in, and somebody should step up and say that that's not important.
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every year, the board adopts governance rules as part of its policies and procedures, and yet, we have not always seen those governance rules or procedures to be followed by the board, so i'm very grateful to you, mayor breed, for putting this forward. i gather, since supervisor mandelman is here, that he is cosponsoring. thank you. i'm also happy to see my former colleague, norman yee here, who, like me, spent many years in the trenches on the school board, and i think that this is an idea whose time has come, and i think it's time to start moving the district forward, so thank you. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: and i just want to add one more
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speaker just to stay a few word because our former president of the board of supervisors, norman yee, also served on the school board, and so i want him to say a few words before we open it up for questions. . >> you know, i wanted to send the school district a message that if you don't step up in your leadership, then you're just going to, you know, lose it. the state's going to take it over, and they need to understand that. just because the state takes it over doesn't mean it's going to be better. it just means cutting without knowing our community, and thank you, mayor breed, for
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really introducing this charter amendment. it's been needed, and i've been pushing for these for decades. when i was president, i put in a new council for children and families, but it just lacked a, needed a little bit more teeth. i think we started seeing the coordination of children's services between departments, and to work together, no more silos. it's really similar to what we
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did [indiscernible] i'm glad to be very supportive of this charter amendment because i think this would move the city into the right direction. thank you very much. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: thank you, and i want to thank c.y.c. and sarah wong for all of her advocacy. thank you to the s.f. parent coalition for rising up and doing what's necessary to not only support your children but to support all children in san francisco, and thank you to katie albright for being with
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us today from safe and sound. we have a sector of people who truly love and support kids in san francisco, and i'm very positionate about supporting kids because i was probably one of the most problematic kids growing up. again, had it not been for the support of those places that i had to go as a kid, and teachers and all those things that i was exposed to, i just don't know where i would be. the people that i grew up with ended up, unfortunately, in many instances, in the criminal justice system, they ended up dead, and they ended up on drugs, and i still see some of those people today in various
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places, and somewhere along the way, we failed them. if we don't do this and more to support our children, to protect them, to uplift them, to make sure that we get rid of the barriers to their success, that's how we make the difference for them so they don't end up in the same situation that so many people that i grew up with ended up in. so that's why we're here today. we're here today because we need to change that structure, and we need to think differently about how we make things better for them. so i also want to just take an opportunity to really thank phil halperin for his extraordinary leadership over the years of supporting children, period. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: thank you, phil. he is one of the most committed san franciscans ensuring we are doing right through our
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policies, through our funding, and other resources, so we really appreciate you, and thank you for your work. so with that, i think i'll open it up to questions, maggie. all right. questions? yes. [indiscernible] . >> the hon. london breed: so i'll say two things. there's the superintendent that's trying to govern and propose, from my understanding, a reasonable financial plan to address some of the deficit that the school district has, and then, there's a proposal by two of the school board members, and this is part of the problem and why we are introducing this charter amendment because the fact is the one that's introduced by
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the board members, if that passes, and that is the direction the school board goes into, then sadly, the district goes into phase two of a possible takeover. the last phase is phase three, and then, there's a done deal. the state takes over the schools. so it's clear if it goes to that point, then, we're headed down that road, and to me, the fact that the school board members are moving toward that direction -- this will disqualify them from allowing them to play the $25 million that they owe to the city and county of san francisco.
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they're headed down the wrong path, and they need to let the superintendent govern the school board so we don't have school board members micromanage what the superintendent should be doing, and i think that's part of the problem. any other questions? [indiscernible] . >> the hon. london breed: well, the city doesn't have control over the school board because if we did, we would probably
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not be in the situation we're in.
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there is a financial requirement that we provide resources to support the school district. and we're attaching accountability to that. so it has nothing, from my perspective, to do with a take over. we also feel strongly that, with those public dollars, there has to be an opportunity
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for the public, including parents, to have at least some say in what's happening with the school district. and the concern that we have the most is how the board members are micromanaging the schools, micromanaging whether a principal should work at a school because of political reasons, when in fact, the only thing they should be responsible is hiring and firing the superintendent and legal assistant. but getting involved because someone supported someone in a campaign, that's crazy. that's the problem, and this is not about anything other than fixing a broken governing structure. [applause] >> just one more question.
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[indiscernible] . >> the hon. london breed: i must say, a lot of this is something that i wanted to do for sometime, especially when the pandemic hit. it's looking at a disorganized chart where funding comes from. early childhood education, dcyf, tay-u, and all of these things were all over the place and not coordinated. and then, the beacons and what's happening with the beacons. and i know these structures like the back of my hand, and there was a real disconnect between all of these agencies and all of this money and how
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our kids were not only doing in life but how they were doing in school, and so there's no direction. so we -- what we did had everything to do with being treated like we're an a.t.m. machine with unlimited money, and then, when we would ask for it to be used for a specific purpose or what have you, there was no way to have any accountability attached to that. there was money that i provided to the school district for specific purposes that i still don't necessarily have accounting for who it was used for that purposes, including
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establishing wellness centers in every school in san francisco, and this was before the pandemic, and so i want some accountability for where those dollars are, and why haven't those wellness centers even opened in the first place? so that's been the focus of wanting to make sure that there's accountability, and we get more, and we get more for our families and our children. [applause] >> the hon. london breed: all right? thank you, everyone. thank you for being here. let's get this on the ballot and get it passed, because that's what this is about. thank you. [♪♪♪]
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>> in 201,755.7 million passengers traveled through san francisco international airport. we have on average 150,000 people traveling through the airport every day. flying can be stressful so we have introduced therapy dogs to make flying more enjoyable. the wag brigade is a partnership between the airport and the san francisco therapy animal assistant program to bring therapy animals into the airport, into the terminals to make passenger travel more enjoyable. i amgen fer casarian and i work here at san francisco
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international airport. the idea for therapy dogs got started the day after 9/11. an employee brought his therapy dog to work after 9/11 and he was able to see how his dog was able to relieve passenger's jitter. when we first launched the program back in 2013, our main goal was to destress our passengers however what we quickly found is that our animals were helping us find a way to connect with our pang. passengers. we find there are a lot of people traveling through the airport who are missing their pets and who are on their road a lot and can't have pets and we have come in contact with a lot of people recently who have lost pet. >> i love the wag brigade.
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>> one of my favorite parts is walking into the terminals and seeing everybody look up from their device, today everybody is interacting on their cell phone or laptop and we can walk into the terminal with a dog or a pig and people start to interact with each other again and it's on a different level. more of an emotional level. >> i just got off an 11.5 hour flight and nice to have this distraction in the middle of it. >> we look for wag brigade handlers who are comfortable in stressful situations. >> i like coming to airport it's a lot of fun and the people you talk to are generally people who are missing their dogs. >> they are required to compete a certification process.
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and they are also required to complete a k9 good citizen test and we look for animals who have experienced working with other organizations such as hospitals and pediatric units and we want to be sure that the animals we are bringing into the airport are good with children and also good with some of our senior travelers. i think toby really likes meeting kids. that is his favorite thing. he likes to have them pet him and come up to him and he really loves the kids. >> our wag brigade animals can be spotted wearing custom vets and they have custom patches. >> there is never a day that repeats itself and there is never and encounter that repeats itself. we get to do maximum good in a
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small stretch of time and i have met amazing people who have been thrilled to have the interaction. >> the dogs are here seven days a week, we have 20 dogs and they each come for a two hour shift. >> there is a lot of stress when people have traveling so to from these animals around to ease the stress and help people relax a little bit. i think it's great. >> one of our dogs has special need and that is tristine. he wears a wheel around. >> he has special shoes and a harness and we get it together in the parking lot and then we get on the air train. he loves it. little kids love him because he is a little lower to the ground so easy to reach and he has this
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big furry head they get to pet and he loves that. >> he doesn't seem to mind at all. probably one of the happiest dogs in the world. >> many people are nervous when they travel but seeing the dogs is just a wonderful relief. >> what i absolutely love most about it is the look on people's faces, so whenever they are stressed and flying is stressful these days you get these wonderful smile. >> i am the mom of lilo the pig and she is san francisco's first therapy pig. >> lilo joined the wag brigade as our first pig. >> wag brigade invited us to
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join the program here and we have done it about a year-and-a-half ago. our visits last 1.5 to 2 hours and it does take a little bit longer to get out of the terminal because we still get a lot of attention and a lot of people that want to interact with lilo. >> i feel honored to be part of the wag brigade. it's very special to meet so many people and make so many feel happy and people that work here. it's been a great experience for me and a great experience for to toby. >> it's been an extremely successful program, so the next time you are here, stop by and say hi.
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>> shop and dine in the 49 promotes local businesses, and challenges residents to do their shopping within the 49 square miles of san francisco. by supporting local services in our neighborhood, we help san francisco remain unique, successful, and vibrant. so where will you shop and dine in the 49? >> i am the owner of this restaurant. we have been here in north beach over 100 years. [speaking foreign language] [♪♪♪] [speaking foreign language]
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[♪♪♪] [speaking foreign language] [speaking foreign language]
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[♪♪♪] [♪♪♪]
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>> live transcription can be found here.attendeeswhowishtoprd >> the attendee will need to of functioning camera to communicate with the interpreter and the board. any member of the public may e-mail their comments with the agenda item identified in the comment -- identified in the comment to board office

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