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EO CIO 969 

THE BULLETIN BOARD AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCE. 
ALASKA state DEPT. Of EDUCATION, JUNEAU 
REPORT NUMBER SERV-BULL-3 pyg 

EDRS price MF-10.09 HC-$0.68 17P. 



RC 000 859 



62 



DESCRIPTORS- ^BULLETIN BOARDS, ^^INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS, 
♦motivation, ♦LESSON PLANS, JUNEAU 



THIS DOCUMENT DISCUSSES BULLETIN BOARDS AS INSTRUCTIONAL 
RESOURCES TO STIMULATE THE CURIOSITY AND INTEREST OF 
CHILDREN. IT PRESENTS THE OBJECTIVES, ARRANGEMENT, PLANNING, 
AND LETTERING THAT COULD BE USED WITH BULLETIN BOARDS. A 
SHORT LESSON PLAN IS INCLUDED. (JH) 








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U.S. DIPARTMENT OF HEALTH, El^UCATiON & WELFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATiGN 









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THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE 
PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATHiG IT. POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS 
STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OFFiCiAL OFFICE OF EDUCATION 
POSITION OR POLICY. 



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STATE OP ALASKA 
DEPARTMENT EDUCATION 

SERVICE BULI£TIN III 

The Bulletin Board as an Instructional Aid 

I 

Material in this bulletin has been prepared for teachers 
in the State- operated schools of Alaska to promote the use of 
classroom bulletin boards as instructional resources in teach- 
ing. Many of the suggestions and ideas for effective use of 
the bulletin board have been collected from the following 
current perirxiicals found in the professional library of the 
Department of Education; The Grade Teacher , The Instructor , 
and The Elementary School Journal . 

Vie recommend the use of this material as a basis for 
teacher-planning of classroom displays. Two blank pages at 
the end of the bulletin are for additional notes by the teacher. 

A classroom atmosphere in which children fee] a sense of 
warmth and security contributes greatly to effective learning. 
Every classroom can be arranged to stimulate the curiosity and 
interest of the children who will live in it five or six hours 
each school day. The bulletin board is a valuable resource 
in these respects, and one that offers teachers and pupils the 
opportunity to work together to create an attractive environment. 



••I** 



1 



OBJECTIVES 



The budletin board is more than a medium of display; it 
is something that belongs to the individuals who work on it. 
Children can take pride in a colorful and attractive display 
of their work, or accept the responsibility for one that is 
not well- planned and arranged. 

The goals of the tackboard display are to show pupil s* 
work to advantage and to convey a clear message. Sor*ie 
examples of the instructional purposes of displays follow: 



Clarification of Concepts; 

Hew We Get Water 

How Cloth is Made 

Which Came First? (time concept) 

IVhere Go the Tides; 

Development of Skills: 

tinders tending and Reading Maps 
Reading Pictures 

How-TO-Do Projects (step-by-step) 
Word-Building 

Development of Appreciation; 
Pioneers 

Beauty - Art - Literature 
Citizenship 

Display of Class Projects: 

Murals - Relief Maps 
Community Studies 



o 

ERIC 



- 2 - 




II 



PLANNING 

The effectiveness of the bulletin board as a teaching 
device depends largely upon planning » both by teacher and 
pupils. Two functions should be kept in mind: (1) the 

display may be an introduction of new facts and ideas, or 
(2) it may be a project in which children work as a group 
to share and coordinate their learning experiences. In the 
multi-graded classrooms of our rural schools older children 
may form a committee to do the initial planning of an all- 
school bulletin board. For example, if the several grades 
in a room are studying plant life in science classes, a 
display could be arranged under the caption Plants of Alaska. 
One function of the planning committee might be to determine 
the contribution each grade could make to the display. The 
success of such a project will depend upon the leadership 
of the teacher and her skill in helping the children to think 
and work together. 

Every classroom display should be organized around a 
central theme, and should be captioned to state that theme 
clearly. 



Ill 



AKRANGEMQIT 

The first requirement of the tackboard display is that 
it ve visually effective* No two arrangements of children’s 
work need be the same, but all work should be neatly and 
artistically arranged, with pleasing use of color* Captions 
should be well-placed and phrased to convey the theme of the 
display in a few words* Simple block letters for captions 
can be cut by the pupils, (see page 7) or one of the commer- 
cial alphabets may be used* Older pupils can design and cut 
from tag board or heavy paper sets of letter patterns as an 
art project* 

If a pupil coninittee is to arrange material for display, 
the work should begin by the drawing of a rough sketch on 
paper of the possible arrangement* When placing material on 
a display, use staples or pins to fasten it securely in place 
at all four corners, and a ruler or long strip of paper as a 
guide to straight line placement of letters and pictures* 

Many tackboard spaces are "awkward” — toe long, too 
narrov/, too small, too high* Some classrooms have little or 
no space for display purposes* It is here that the ingenuity 
of the teacher comes into full play* One teacher we know 
placed the classroom piano at a right angle to one wall, 
thereby creating adequate library space in one corner of 
the room* The back of the piano was covered with heavy 
paper, and tacked to it was a colorful picture map made by 




the fifth grade and captioned Weal^li of Alaska , Another 
teacher made a portable bulletin board consisting of a 
tripod and a large piece of cardboard from a packl*^g case. 

Inte i" esting three-dimens io ^1 effects can be achieved 
by using paper sculpture, miniature cars, dolls, and animals 
which can bo pinned to the board, and by placing caption 
letters on pins and pulling them out to the heads of the pins. 

A limited amount of material should be used at one time. 
The bulletin board is intended to be an interesting and 
dramatic presentation; it must put its message across clearly 
and be easy to study. Material in long-range displays should 
be changed frequently or replaced with rew work so that it 
does not become an unnoticed fixture on th.e classroom wall. 



- 5 - 



IV 



MEDIA 

A 

V 

Group planning of classroom bulletin boards is good 
experience for young artists, not only in learning to dis- 
play materials attractively, with a critical eye for good 
design, spacing, variety, color and form, but also in the 
choice of materials to be used. Here again ingenuity and 
creative imagination come into focus. 



The ordinary classroom supplies ; construction paper, 
tempera, crayon, and chalk will most surely be used, but in 
addition to these old stand-bys, collect and encourage children 



to collect 
used in classroom projects: 
Corks 

Linoleum scraps 
Small wood blocks 
Corrugated paper 
Scraps of sand paper 
Wallpaper sample books 
Scraps of colorful fabric 
Small shells 
Boxes 

Plastic tubes 



materials which can be 



Foil 

Bits of cotton 

Colored cord and wool yarn 

Seed pods 

Small pine cones 

Dried grasses 

Small bits of driftwood 

Gift -wrapping paper 

Bits of ribbon 

Odd buttons 



any or all of the following 



Storage of such materials may present a problem, but an 
older child can take charge of them. Usually a single drawer 
or b^x will do nicely for orderly storage. 



The immediate environment often is an excellent source 



of materials. Small twigs make realistic bulletin-board 



fences. Leaves and evergreen branches in creative hands make 
a fine forest background. We saw a beautiful illustration of 



a sea story in which were used crushed blue tissue paper, dried 
sea weed, and a collection of tiny shells from the beach 



- 6 - 



V 






CAPTIONS AND LETTERING 

All classroom displays should carry an attractive head- 
line or caption. In many such displays step-by-step captions 
also may be essential. If the bulletin board is to be used 
as a regxilar teaching^ device, its captions must be legible, 
at ractive, and have something to say rhat provokes thought 
and interest. Whatever the theme, it should be so legible 
that the onlooker gets the message at a glance. 

On the following page are simple instructions for plain 
block letters which may be cut by middle and upper grade 
pupils in any size that is required. With practice, many 
children are able to cut free-hand, letters in variations of 
this basic style. Felt marking pens in many colors are 
available; crayon and charcoal pencil may also be used for 
lettering captions. 

Many primary teachers use the flannel board for teaching 
number concepts and combinations. This idea can be used as 
well for portable and permanent tackboards. Firm cardboard 
neatly covered with monkscloth, flannel, or burlap makes a 
good-looking and practical background. Letters with small 
pieces of sandpaper glued to their backs will adhere to fabric - 
covered board. 



- 7 - 



Hew to Cut Block Letters 



Decide the size of letter required. 

Measure and cut papet rectangles the exact 
width and height of the letters you wish to use. 

Begin by cutting the letter ”L”. Establish 
the width of cut and point out that this width 
must be used consistently. 

Continue by folding a rectangle in half 
lengthwise and cutting the letter ”T”. 

Show that the following letters can be 
cut by folding the blocks of paper lenath- 
wise: "D”, ”H”, ”U”, ”V”, ”W”. 

Fold paper rectangle across the width and 
cut the letter ”H”. Then proceed to the 
letters «H", ”C’», ”E”, ”F”, "G”, ”K”, 

"N”, »»P”. 

The following diagram shotvs the correct form 
of standard block letters; 




VI 



SUGGESTED SUBJECTS 



The following list of possible topics for instructional 
displays is intended as a quick supplemental reference for 
teachers. Included are holidays, weeks, or days set aside 
for national observance, and birthdays of famous people, 

plus suggestions for class projects which may be used at 
any time of the year. 

September 

Labor Day, Citizenship Day 

Summer Trav 1 (see cover) 

Summer Hobbies (stamp & coin collections, 
camping, etc.) 

The World Fair, The School Carnival 

Safety Week (home and school safety practices) 

Getting Ready For School 
Book of the Week 
We Need for School 
People in the News 
Birthdays: 

September 13, Walter Reed (1851-1902) 

September 15, James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) 

National Better Breakfast Month 

The Signs of Fall 

How To Cut Block Letters 






October 



Fire Prevention Week 
Smokey the Bear 
Columbus Day, October 12 
United Nations Day, October 24 
Alaska Day, October 18 
Halloween, October 31 
How Seeds Travel 
Birthdays : 

ttotober 22, Franz Liszt (1811-1886) 

October 7, James Whitcomb Riley (1849-1910) 

November 

American Education Week 
National Book Week 
Veterans* Day, November 11 
Thanksgiving Day, November 22 
Animals in Winter 
VJeather in Our Town 
Birthdays ; 

November 2, Daniel Boone (1734-1820) 

November 7, Marie Curie (1867-1934) 

November 13, Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) 

December 

Holiday Plants - holly, ivy, evergreen, 

Noche-Bueno (Mexico), mistletoe, poinsettia 

Merry Christmas in Many Languages: 

Zalig Kerstfeest - Belgium 
Gledelia Jul - Norway 
S Rozhdestvom Xhristovyn - Russia 
Prettige Kerstdagen - The Netherlands 
Boas Pestes - Portugal 
Proehliche Weihnacten - Germany 
Joyeux Noel - France 
Kungttei Shing Taan - China 
Glaedelig Jule - Denmark 
Buon Natale - Italy 



- 10 - 



o 



How to Wrap A Gift (step-by»step directions) 

Wright Brothers at Kittyhawsc, December 17, 1903 
Birthdays ; 

December 8, Eli Whitney (1765-1825) 

December 27, Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) 

Human Rights Day 

How to Read to an Audience 

January 

Hov; January Got Its Name (Roman god of 
beginnings - Janus) 

March of Dimes 

Birthdays t 

January 6, Carl Sandburg (1878) 

January 16, Robert Service (1874-1958) 

January 27, Lewis Carroll (1832-1898) 

January 30, Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882-1945) 
- January 31, Franz Schubert (1797-1828) 

It Happened last Year (important events of the 
previous year) 

What Are Snowflakes? 

Snow Scenes 

Glaciers of Alaska 

Our Number System 

Roman Numeral System 

February 

Ground Hog Day, February 2 

Building Words (root - prefix and suffix) 

Valentines Day, February 14 
How Hailstones Form 
American Heart Month 




-11 



Birthdays : 

February 4, Charles Lindbergh (1902) 

February 8, Boy Scouts of America (1910) 
February 11, Thomas A* Edison (1847-1931) 
February 12, Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) 
February 22, George Washington (1732-1799) 
February 27, Henry W. Longfellow (1807-1882) 

Babe Ruth, Baseball Hero 

All About Fractions . 

March 



Books for Spring 
Space Travel in 1963 
Robert Frost, Poems 
The Lion and the Lamb 

Winds and their Names (Chinook, Williwaw, Taku, 
Cyclone, etc.) 

Hunt for Meaning 

Our Natural Resources 

American Red Cross Month 

Seward’s Day, March 30 

St. Patrick’s Day, March 17 

Birthdays; 

March 3, Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922) 
March 14, Albert Einstein (1879-1955) 

March 26, Robert Frost (1875) 



April 



Birds’ Migration 
Pan-American Week 
National Library Week 
Birthdays j 

April 2, Hans Christian Anderson (1805-1875) 

April 26, John J. Audubon (1785-1851) 

Postmarks of Alaska (collect postmarked envelopes fwm 
many areas of the States place small map of Alaska in 
center. Arrange postmai^cs. Connect by a colored cord 
to the town or city from which they were mailed) 

- 12 - 



Pioneer Aviators of Alaska 
Five Basic Poods 



Majr 

Wild Flowers of Our State 

Time Zones of the World 

Myth, Fable, and Legend 

The Good Business Letter (step-by-step) 

Newspapers of Alaska (titles - cities where published) 
Plans for Vacations 
Birthdays : 

EEy"T7 Robert E. Peary (1856-1920) 

May 8, Harry S. Truman (1884) (one of three living 
ex-Presidents ) 

May 29, John F. Kennedy (1917) 

Best Books of the Year 




- 18 * 



A Quick Guldt To Paper Sculpture 
Paper sculpture, the method of handling dry paper so that 
it looks three-dimensional, is an activity to which most children 
take like ducks to water. One basic lesson in techniques is 
enough to start them off on their own into a world of creative 
expression with paper and scissors. The following lesson plan 
may be used as a starter: 

Introduction 

One difference in the appearance of a rea' animal and its 
photograph is that we can see all sides of the animal. In 
paper scxilpture, paper is manipulated to create objects which 
can be seen from all sides; pictures which will have a thii*d 
dimension. 



Materials 

Various textures and weights 
of paper (manila, construc- 
tion, wrapping and wall, news- 
print, magazine pages, tissue 
and foil) 

Paste, glue or stapler 

Pencil 

Dull knife 

Scissors 



Techniques 

Scoring and folding (use ruler 
and dull knife to crease paper 
for accurate folds) 

Curling (pull paper strip over 
scissor blade) 

Mitering - slashing 
Fringing - Tearing 
pleating - braiding - weaving 
Crumpling - twisting 



Procedure 

Demonstrate some of the basic tecliniques listed above. 
Introduce subject matter which calls for different reactions 
from each child, such as: 

Marine life 

Imaginary flowers, birds, animals 
Masks 

Have each child complete one sculptuj.'e and display these 
on a bulletin boai^ under the caption: Three Dimensions in Paper . 



14 -