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JC 690 129 



ED 028 775 

Instructor Rating Scale Study* Orange Coast College* Fall Semester, 196$. 

Orange Coast Junior Coll. District, Costa Mesa* Calif. Research Office. 

Pub Date Mar 69 
Note*6p. 

EDRS Price MF-S0.25 HC S0.40 

Descriptors** Junior Colleges, *Rating Scales, *Teacher Evaluation 
Identifiers* *Califomia 

This report summarizes the results of an instructor-rating scale, which was 
distributed to students at a California junior college. Reported are individual 
instructor’s average scores on seventeen items, the individual instructor’s average 
score on all of the items rated, the overall instructor’s average score on each item, 
and the overall instructor’s average score on all of the items. A copy of the scale is 
induded. (JC) 



^TC. MO ia<* ED028775, 



U.S. DEPARTMENT Of HEALTH, EDUCATION & WELFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 



THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVE!! FROM THE 
PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATING IT. POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS 
STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OFFICIAL OFFICE OF EDUCATION 
POSITION OR POLICY. 



INSTRUCTOR RATING SCALE STUDY 



ORANGE COAST COLLEGE 



FALL SEMESTER 1968 




ORANGE COAST JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT 
Research Office 

March 1969 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIF. 
LOS ANGELES 



APR 141969 

CLEARINGHOUSE FOR 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 
INFCRT 1ATIOIM 






At the conclusion of the Fall Somestor 1968-69 approximately 
55 Orange Coast Col logo Faculty members circulated an "instructor 
rating scale” amongst tboir students. 

The data presented herein were drawn from the rating scales 
returned to the Research Office by 26 instructors. 

No attempt was made to idontify the instructors involved* 
However, as each group of rating scales were sent to the Research 
Office, they were kept segregated and identified by a number. 

The results of the study show the individual instructor's 
average score on each of the items rated; the individual instructor's 
average score on all of the items rated; the overall instructor's 
average score on each item; and the overall instructor's average 
score on all of the items. 

A copy of the rating scale is attached. Please note 
"directions to students”. Hopefully, these have been observed, 
and the results of the ratings are valid from this point of view. 



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(Continued) 

g 

03 

* 

w 


FAIRNESS 

IN 

GRADING 


WILLINGNESS 

TO 

HELP 


PERSONAL AT- 
TENTION TO 
STUDENT PRODUCT 


RECOGNITION OF 
i OWN 

| LIMITATIONS 


SPEECH 

AND 

ENUNCIATION 


SENSE 

OF 

HUMOR 


GENERAL 
ESTIMATE 
OF TEACHER 


GENERAL 
ESTIMATE 
OF COURSE 


INSTRUCTOR 

AVERAGE 

SCORE 

ALL SCALES 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




1 


8.3 


7.8 


7.5 


7.9 


9.0 


9.3 


7.8 


6.7 


7.8 


2 


8.9 


8.4 


8.1 


8.7 


8.9 


9.0 


8.2 I 


7.7 


8.3 


3 


9.3 


9.6 


9.1 


9.2 


9.2 


8.7 


8.7 


7.5 


8.5 


4 ' 


8.9 


8.3 


8.1 


8.6 


8.9 


6.5 


8.2 


6.9 


7.9 


5 


8.1 


8.4 


7.6 


7.9 


8.9 


8.3 


7.7 


6.5 


7.6 


5 


9.1 


7.7 


7.4 


8.5 


8.9 


9.0 


8.5 


7.6 


8*3 


7 


9.3 


9.1 


9.1 


3.5 


8.9 


8.6 


8.7 


9.3 


8.6 


8 


9.2 


7.7 


7.7 


8.6 


8.9 


'9.0 1 


8.5 


7.3 


. 8 #3 


9 


8.7 


9.3 


8.9 


9.1 


8.3 


9.3 


7.9 


7.7 


8.2 


10 


9.6 


9.4 


9.2 


9.4 


9.1 


9,5 


9.4 


, 8.8 , 


9.3 


11 


9.2 


9.8 


8.2 


9.7 


9.3 


9.8 


9.1 


8.2 


8.9 


12 


9.7 


9.4 


8.1 


9.2 


9.1 


9.4 


8.9 


8.3 


8 «8 


13 

14 


9.6 


9.2 


8*8 


[9.3 


J * 9.1 


9«5 


8.9 


7.7 


8.7 


8.9 


9;0 


8.8 


9.0 


9.4 


9.5 1 


8.8 


8.3 -771 


8.7 


15 


7.6 


r 8.1 


7.5 


8.4 


8.2 


7.9 


8.2 


7.2 


7.7 


16 


9.1 


9.1 


8.5 


8.7 


9.0 


9.3 


8.1 


7.2 


8 .4 


17 


8.3 


8.7 


6.9 


8.4 


8.8 


8.4 


7.9 


6.2 


7.6 


18 


9.3 


9.3 


9.2 


9.6 


9.2 


9.6 


9.3 


8«9 


’ 9.2 


19 


8.8 


8.7 


8.0 


8.5 


9.0 


8.3 


7.6 


7.6 


7.9 


20 


8.5 


9.0 


7.8 


8.9 


9.5 


8.9 


8.9 


8 *2 


8.4 


21 


8.4 


8.9 


7.9 


8.5 


8.9 


8.5 


8.6 


7.5 


8 • 2 


22 


8.8 


8.8 


8.3 


9.0 


9.5 


9.6 


9.3 


7.9 


8 .8 


23 


9.3 


9.0 


9.0 


8.9 


9.3 


r 9.i 


9.4 


8.7 


9.1 


24 


9.0 


9.3 


8.6 


9.3 


9.7 


9.8 


9.6 


8.6 


9*2 


25 


8.4 


8.9 


7.9 


8.5 


8.9 


8.5 


8.6 


7.5 


8.2 


26 


8.5 


9.0 


7.8 


8.9 


9.5 


8.9 


8.9 


8.2 


8.4 


Instruct 

tor’s 

Average 

Score 

Each 

Scalp 


8.9 


8.8 


8.2 


8J8 


9.1 

V~ .r » >ti - W^*»' 


8.9 


8.6_ 


7.7 


8.4 



INSTRUCTOR RATING SCALE 



DO HOT SIGN YOUR NAME, BUT PLEASE RATE EACH ITEM HONESTLY 



DIRECTIONS TO STUDENTS: In order to secure information which may lead to the improvement of 
of instruction in this college, you are asked to rate your instructor on EACH of the items listed. On 
each line make an (X) at the place which seems to you most appropriate for the instructor you are 
rating. The highest possible rating for an item is 10, the lowest is 1^ with nine gradations between. 
To aid you in making your marking, note the three descriptions for each item, one at the left for the 
best rating, one at the right for the poorest rating, and one in the middle for the average rating. 



1. OBJECTIVES CLARIFIED BY INSTRUCTOR 
10 9 8 7 6 



3. 






o 

ERIC 






l 



Objectives clearly defined. 



Objectives somewhat vague 
or indefinite. 



2. ORGANIZATION OF COURSE 
10 9 8 7 



Objectives very vague or 
given no attention. 



1 



Course exceptionally well Course satisfactorily organized; 

organized; subject matter in subject matter fairly well suited 

agreement with course objectives, to objectives. 

KNOWLEDGE OF SUBJECT 

10 98 7 654 3 



Organization very poor; 
subject matter frequently 
unrelated to objectives. 



1 



Knowledge of subject broad, 
accurate, up-to-date. 



Knowledge of subject somewhat 
limited and at times not up-to-date. 



Knowledge of subject serious 
ly deficient and frequently 
inaccurate and out-of-date. 



4. RANGE OF INTERESTS AND CULTURE 
10 9 8 7 6 



1 



Instructor has very broad inter- 
ests and culture; frequently re- 
lates course to other fields and 
to present day problems. 



Instructor has fair breadth of inter- 
ests and culture; occasionally re- 
lates subject to other fields and to 
present day problems.' 



Instructor is narrow in his 
interests and culture; seldom 
relates subject to other fields 
or to present day problems. 



5. VARIETY IN CLASSROOM TECHNIQUES 
10 9 8 7 6 



1 



Effective and varied use of 
classroom methods and tech- 
niques: lecture, discussion, 
demonstration, visual aids. 



Occasionally changes method from 
straight lecture or discussion. 



Uses one method almost 
exclusively; all class hours 
seem alike. 



6. ASSIGNMENTS 
10 9 



8 



1 



Clear, reasonable, coordinated 
with class work. 



Occasionally indefinite and un- 
related to class work. 



Confused, often made late, 
with no relation to work of 



course. 



7. ABILITY TO AROUSE INTEREST 
10 9 8 7 



1 



Interest among students usually Students seem only mildly inter- 
rUns high. ested. 



Majority of students inatten< 
tive most of the time. 



8. SKILL IN GUIDING THE LEARNING PROCESS 



10 



8 



1 



Gives student opportunity to 
think and learn independently, 
critically, and creatively. 



Gives student some opportunity to 
develop his academic resources on 
his own initiative. 



Little or no attention to stu-i 
dent ideas; ignores or dis- 
courages original and in- 
dependent effort. 



9. MANNERISMS 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 

Monner pleasing; free from Mannerisms. not seriously objec- 

annoying mannerisms. tionable. 

10. FAIRNESS IN GRADING 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3_ 

Fair and impartial; grades Partial at times; grades based 

based on several evidences on a few evidences of achieve- 
of achievement. ment. 

11. WILLINGNESS TO HELP 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3_ 

Instructor exceptionally Instructor moderately friendly; 

friendly; usually willing to usually willing to help students, 
help students even if busy. 

12. PERSONAL ATTENTION TO STUDENT PRODUCT 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3^ 

Gives close personal atten- Reads his own papers but does 
tion to and recognition of not comment very generousiy or 

student's product; exami- helpfully, 

nation, term-paper, theme, 
notebook. 

13. RECOGNITION OF OWN LIMITATIONS 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3_ 

Welcomes differences of Moderately tolerant of different 

opinion; honest in admitting viewpoints; usually willing to 

when he does not know. admit when he does not know. 

14. SPEECH AND ENUNCIATION 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3^ 

Speaks clearly and distinctly. Words sometimes indistinct and 

hard to hear. 

15. SENSE OF HUMOR 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 

Enjoys a good joke (even when Unpredictable; sometimes plea- 
it is on himself); yet knows sant and happy; at other times 

when to be serious. downcast. 

16. GENERAL ESTIMATE OF TEACHER 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 

Very superior teacher. Average teacher. 

17. GENERAL ESTIMATE OF THE COURSE 

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 

One of the most interesting, About average in interest, 
informative, useful, personal- usefulness, etc. 
ly helpful courses. 



2 1 

Constantly exhibits annoying 
mannerisms. 



2 1 

Frequently shows partiality; 
grades based on very limited 
evidences of achievement. 

2 1 

Instructor aloof or sarcastic 
and pre-occupied; unwilling 
to help students. 

2 1 

Invariably pushes reading 
and judgments off onto 
reader or assistant; reads 
student's work super- 
ficially. 

2 ] 

Displeased by opposite 
viewpoints; dogmatic and 
argumentative even when 
clearly wrong. 

2 1 

Words very indistinct; often 
impossible to hear. 

2 1 

Poor sport; never sees the 
humorous side of any 
situation. 



2 1 

Very poor teacher. 

2 ] 

One of the least interest- 
ing, informative# useful, 
personally helpful courses. 



18. ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: