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Full text of "ERIC ED034520: Criteria for Granting Tenure at College of the Mainland."

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Criteria for Granting Tenure at College of the 
Mainland. 

College of the Mainland, Texas City, Tex. 

13 Oct 69 

9d. 



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ESCPIP^OPS 

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ED PS Price MF-S0.25 HC-$0.55 

♦Contracts, *Job Tenure, ^Junior Colleges, ^Teacher 

Employment, ^Tenure 

Texas 



ABSTRACT 

Tollowinq a brief description of the purposes of 
tenure, the Dolicy adopted by the College of the Mainland (Texas) in 
July 1967 was presented. The policy outlines: who is eligible to 
receive tenure, the rights o^ those who have received tenure, and the 
criteria and procedure used by the president for recommendina tenure. 
(MB) 



ED 0 3 452.0 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION l WELFARE 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 



COLLEGE OF THE MAINLAND 
TEXAS CITY, TEXAS 



THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE 
PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATING IT. POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS 
STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OFFICIAL OFFICE OF EDUCATION 
POSITION OR POLIC/. 



October 13, 1969 



CRITERIA FOR GRANTING TENURE 
AT COLLEGE OF THE MAINLAND 



I. INTRODUCTION 

A review of the history of tenure in colleges in the United 
States reveals that tenure means that the person who has achieved 
tenure has the option of continuing employment in the institution 
granting the tenure; i. e. , he who has tenure can be discharged 

only for cause and through due process. 

History also reveals a purpose of tenure is to enable the 
teacher to lead students into inquiry into controversial areas of study 
without fear that his job will be taken from him for having done so. 

In the universities the freedom to do scholarly research in any and 
all areas of phenomena, both social and non- social, without fear of 
having his job taken from him because of such scholarly inquiry, is 
a purpose of tenure. 

History further also reveals that a purpose of tenure is to protect 
the teacher when an influential person or persons, either inside or 
s3 outside of the institution, desire/s to terminate or cause the termination 



of the employment of the teacher for arbitrary rea g^ RS |fy distinguished 



from cause. 




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CLEARINGHOUt. . A 
JUNIOR COLLEGE 
M' ,r ! 



ERIC 



College of the Mainland Tenure Policy was adopted by the 
Trustees on July 13, 1967, and is as follows: 

A. Tenure 

1. A member of the instructional staff of the College who has 
been granted tenure by the Board of Trustees shall have the 
status of permanent member of the instructional staff and 
be in continuing employment of the College until: 

a. He voluntarily leaves the employ of the College 

b. He retires 

c. He is dismissed by the Board of Trustees for cause 

d. He dies 

2. Tenure may be granted by the Board of Trustees only on 
the recommendation of the President. Nomination of a 
faculty member for tenure shall signify the President is 
satisfied that an acceptable degree of competence has been 
demonstrated and that continuing employment of the person 
concerned will serve the best interest of the College. 

3 Tenure shall apply only to instructional positions. 

Administrators who have teaching responsibilities may 
qualify for tenure in the teaching position concerned only. 



No person shall be granted tenure in a non-teaching or 
purely administrative position. 

A person may become eligible for consideration for tenure 
when he has completed three full academic years of uninter- 
rupted service in teaching in the College. A person who has 
not been granted tenure by the end of five full academic years 
of uninterrupted service shall automatically be granted tenure 
if he is to be retained in employment beyond five years 
except as provided in paragraph three (3) of the section on 
N epotism .- (Note: Three full academic years shall be con- 
strued to mean 10f months in teaching multiplied by 3, excep 
for Chairmen, in which case three years of uninterrupted 
service shall be considered three full academic years). 

The Board of Trustees may grant tenure at an earlier time 
if it is recommended with sufficient justification by the President. 
Time spent away from the institution, except when the employe 
is on a special assignment and paid by the institution, shall 
not be counted toward the fulfillment of eligibility for tenure. 
Regular retirement of the President and all other full-time 
employees of the College shall take place at age sixty-five 
(65). After sixty-five (65), the employee may be re-elected 



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year to year at the discretion of the Board of Trustees 
until he reaches age seventy (70), at which time retirement 
is compulsory. ( Policies , July 13, 1967). 

Paragraph 2. above assigns to the President the serious respon- 
sibility of recommending to the Trustees those who shall be granted 
tenure in instructional positions. Where a person is both a super- 
visor and an instructor, tenure is limited to and applies only to the 
instructional role. For instance, a person in Salary Schedule B-I 
who is in that salary schedule solely because he is a Chairman cen 
be granted tenure only in the instructional role and should he cease to 
be Chairman after being granted tenure he would move to Salary 
Schedule B-II. 

CRITERIA THAT THE PRESIDENT WILL USE TO RECOMMEND TENURE 

A. Introduction: All of the following criteria are derived directly 

or indirectly from current Board or Administrative policies. 

B. Criteria: The following criteria should be studied carefully 

by all persons who may be subject to the tenure policy and 
especially by persons in supervisory positions. Persons in 
supervisory positions have the direct responsibility for preparing 
persons for tenure or for, when the evidence is sufficient th?t 
the individual has not the ability and/or the will to fulfill 



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to an acceptable degree the terms of his contract, counseling 

the individual to find employment elsewhere. 

a. The individual must have demonstrated that he has designed, 
and continues to design, teaching and learning work in each 
course on the basis of behaviorally specified objectives. 

(See Section III. B. for basis of judgement. ) 

b. The individual must have demonstrated that he has written, 
and continues to write, behaviorally specified objectives 
which meet the minimal specifications for sound behaviorally 
specified objectives. (See the Manual for Course Planning 
for criteria. ) 

c. The individual must have demonstrated that he has functioned 
cooperatively both laterally and with his supervisor. (See 

III. B. for basis for judgement. ) 

d. The individual must have demonstrated that he has designed 
and reconstructed teaching and learning work experimentally; 
i. e. , with awareness, exercise of imagination, and with 
continuous observation of the ends-means process with a 
view to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of student 
learning work. (Evidence of reconstruction is key basis for 
judgement. ) 

e. The individual must have demonstrated that he has gone 
beyond the conventional and traditional shape of teaching 

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and learning by innovating on the following parameters, 
among others, but not limited to: 

1) Time 

2) Place 

3) Available tools of teaching and learning work 

4) Organization of teaching and learning work 

5) Adaptation of diagnostic information to the needs of 

individual students 

6) Independence ( supported independence) in student 

work. 

f. The individual must have demonstrated the capacity to 
have a sustained colleague relationship with students; 
that is to say, the individual must have demonstrated 
that he has chosen his own behaviors so that they 
have been humane and supportive of individual students 
in accordance with human growth and development 
considerations. (Evidence of assessment by Chairman 
is principal basis for judgement. ) 

g. The individual must have demonstrated that he has 
arranged teaching and learning activity in such a manner 
that his students have been structured into purposeful 
learning behavior "beyond the box, " "beyond the box" 
meaning principally "outside of the college campus, " 




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and secondarily outside the classroom but inside the 
campus. 

The individual must have demonstrated by his 
actions that he has structured situations calculated 
to help students to have three-dimensional contact with 
and in the characteristic public social institutions 
(economic, governmental, health, labor, etc. ) of 
the society, and with individual representatives of 
same in order to reduce the alienation caused by 
ignorance of such social functions and institutions 
and by non-participation or lack of three-dimensional 
contact with them. (Note: Paragraph g. shall be 
measured on the basis of evidence provided by the 
Instructional Supervisor concerned. ) 
h. The individual must have demonstrated by his acts 
that he understands the model of the open society 
and the model of the free and responsible individual, 
and that he has designed teaching and learning toward 
the following ends: 

a) That the student be helped to have or develop 



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self-esteem 



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b) That the student have appropriate practice in 
the method of inquiry in social and non-social 
phenomena, 

c) That the student has practice in the values of 
the open societal model, the model of the free 
and responsible individual, and has practice 

in "prepared-for" civilized debate and discussion 
of controversial issues (as distinguished from 
mere exchange of unreflected opinion) 

d) That the student learn that open-ended mutually - 
supportive behavior is the chief social end of 

a democratic culture. 

PROCEDURE FOE RECOMMENDING TENURE 

A. The President will recommend tenure for a member of the faculty 
only if he is satisfied, by persuasive evidence, that the person 
has performed acceptably the minimum requirements set forth 
herein and'* in other 'expectations communicated in other official 
documents, and expectations that flow from the general theory 

of the College. 

It shall be the responsibility of the Dean of Instruction to 
provide the necessary information to place the President in the 
position to make the judgement in each individual case as to 
whether the individual shall be recommended for tenure. 




The objective evidence which the 
the President in each case shall 

1. The individuals own tenure file; the individual's personnel 
folder, such folder to include, among other things, all 
Instructor Evaluation forms executed after October 1969, 
that have such evaluation form to be geared directly iO 

the position description for Instructor and/or to this present 
document. 

2. Instructor and/or student documents prepared by the individual 
alone or in significant cooperation with others. 

3 > Objective evidence that the individual has met the criteria 
outlined above, where there can be objective evidence. 

4. The recommendation of the Dean of Instruction that the 
individual be recommended for tenure. 

5. The above materials and recommendation shall be in the 
hands of the President at least 90 days prior to the date 
that the individual shall become eligible for tenure. 



Dean of Instruction snail pr^v-d * 
include: