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ED 256 886 
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CE 041 388 

Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum. 
Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and 
Career Development. 

Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta* Office of 

Vocational Education. 

84 

163p.; For other guides in this series, see CE 041 
385-387. 

Guides - Classroom Use - Guides (For Teachers) (052) 
MF01/PC07 Plus Postage. 

Classroom Techniques; Computer Oriented Programs; 
Course Content; Course Descriptions; Curriculum 
Development; Design; Electromechanical Technology; 
♦Engineering Technicians; Job Skills; Manufacturing; 
Mathematics Instruction; ^Mechanical Design 
Technicians; *Mechanics (Physics); Models; Physics; 
*Pretechnology Programs; Problem Solving; Program 
Descriptions; Program Implementation; Science 
Instruction; Secondary Education; Social Studies; 
State Curriculum-Guides; Statewide Planning; 
♦Technical Education; Technological Advancement 
♦Computer Assisted Design; *Computer Assisted 
Manufacturing; Georgia; Related Subjects 
Instruction 



ABSTRACT 

This guide offers information and procedures 
necessary to train mechanical engineering technicians. Discussed 
first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The 
occupational field of mechanical engineering technology is described. 
Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on 
the standard mechanical engineering technology curriculum, electives, 
and related courses. Each course description contains some or all of 
the following: a discussion of the content of the course, a list of 
course prerequisites, credit hours to be awarded for completion of 
the course, a course outline, a list of student competencies 
addressed in the course, and a list of recommended texts. Course 
descriptions are provided for 5 courses in the social and related 
sciences, 6 courses in mathematics and science, and 18 technical 
courses. Concluding the guide is a section dealing with equipment 
needed to implement the curriculum. Appendixes to the guide contain 
guidelines for implementing a problems course-, a list of technical 
organizations and societies, and a list of technical publications and 
periodicals. (MN) 



******************************************************* 

* Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made * 

* from the original document. * 
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ERIC 




MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

CURRICULUM 



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U S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION 
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"PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE! THIS 
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INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC) " 



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Developed and Produced 
Under Contractual Agreement with 

Program Improvement and Evaluation 
Office of Vocational Education 
Georgia Department of Education 
Atlanta, Georgia 30334 
Charles McDaniel, State Superintendent of Schools 

1984 



ERIC 



2 



high technology advisory council 



July 3, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: The People of Georgia 

FRCM: R. E. Morrison, Jr., Ph.D. 

Hign Technology Coordinat 

RE: Preface to the Engineering Technology Curriculum 




In the past two years , Georgia has taken the lead in 
human resource development of engineering technicians for 
the statf s industry. This lead ensures that the industries 
locating in Georgia, or existing industries planning expansion 
or retooling will have a readily available supply of higily 
skilled, educated, and technically adaptable technicians. 
Over two million Georgians have been trained in the past 
twenty years in the state's network of thirty technical 
schools, junior and connunity colleges. 

V 

A quantum step was taken in 1982 when the General 
Assembly appropriated over $13 million to upgrade the technical school 
programs to "state-of-the-art" in the electronics, electromechanical and 
mechanical technologies. In that allocation were directives to develop $ 
two year engineering technology programs_in the same three fields, fliene 
two year programs for a degree of Associate of Applied Technology were 
begun in September, 1982. The new curriculum, highly qualified technical 
staff, the latest in instructional equipment and a highly motivated 
student body are now in place. Our first graduating classes enter the 
'Ubrld of Work" in June 1984. The rhetoric of what should be done is 
(behind us; high technology training for engineering technicians is a fact 
in Georgia. 

New and expanding industries will find a new atmosphere of cooperation 
where the human resources required to ensure a skilled technician workforce 
is available. Productive and credentialed employees are available with a 
positive attitude toward change, adaptability, flexibility and upward 
mobility. 



m 3 



HEMKANDUM 

The People of Georgia 
July 3, 1984 
Page 2 

Each of the three high technology programs is based upon a solid 
foundation of mathematics, physics and an understanding of the fundamentals 
basic to the technologies. An understanding of systems, close ties to local 
business and industry, computer literacy, and characteristics of the hi#i 
technology programs. 

The Georgia "Higji Technology Advisory Council" was appointed by the 
Governor as a blue ribbon conmittee to advise the executive branch of 
government, the General Assenbly, the Board of Education, the Board of 
Regents and the new Board on Post Secondary Vocational Education 
regarding high technology and engineering technology education issues. 
The council is composed of 12 high technology Industry representatives 
in the state and is coordinated by the High Technology Coordinator. 

Georgia's cccmitment to industry, "hi-tech" and quality training is 
now In place. Contained herein are the coordinated pieces that make up 
a ccnprehetisive and viable program in the engineering technologies. It is 
In the basics - this is and will be the difference in Georgia's hunan 
resource development product the engineering technician. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

DEVELOPED BY 
THE HIGH TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM PROJECT 
VOCATIONAL AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 
GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 
HARMON R. FOWLER, DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN 
J. D. FOWLER AND KENNETH R. ALLEN 
PROJECT DIRECTORS 




Acknowledgements 

The project staff would like to express Its sincere 
appreciation to the business and Industlal leaders In 
Georgia and to the Governor's High Technology Advisory 
Council whose Input and guidance made the development of 
this curriculum possible. Specifically we would like to 
recognize the following: 

Augusta Newsor 1 nt 
Bob Ryckman 

Delta Air 1 Ines 
Jim Dlffley 

Digital Equipment Corporation 
Elaine Jensen 

Hewj ett-Packard 
Don Lutz 

Miller Brewing Company 
Burt Friedman 
Jerry Grange 
B1 1 1 Lynch 
Steve Carpenter 

Pratt ft Whitney 
Jul la Payne 
John Lyman 

Robot Systems. Incoroated 
Les Ottlnger 
Rick Thomas 
Ray Hlnson 

Rockwe 11. 1 nternat 1 ona 1 
Wanda Saed 
Dick Egbert 

Scientific Atlanta 
Sandy Re 1 man 
Cecl 1 la Lewi s 
Geoff Hammett 
Jim Farmer 
Bob Warren 
Brit W1 1 1 lams 

Shaln Associates 
Ken Shaln 




Southeast Paper 



uary Peters 



I 



Tektronix. Inc. 
Al Relnke 

TRW. Incorporated 
All en Shore 

U.S. Armv Signal C enter. Fort Gordon 

Clarence Jeter / 

Roger A 1 1 en 
Jerry Arnstt 
Hal Knlppenberg 
Dewey Plunkett 

Warner Robins Air Force Base 
Ben Vann 

Western Electric 
W.B. Smith 
J.F. Strohecker 
F.B. Kelly 
J.B. Ann Is 



The fo flowing personnel from Education & Government 
provided direct technical support and expertise to the 
project. These Individuals are responsible for the 
success of this-* effort t N 

Athens Tech 
Robert She 1 nut t 
Ken Easom 
Ken Jarrett 
Judy Hulsey 
1 Sherrle Hilton 
Fred Stout 
Tom Joiner 
Gary Hlatt 
Jim Ha lone 

Auousta Tech 
Jack Patrick 
Corlnne Daniel 
Bill Beck 
Fred Young 

Ray Center * 

Bonnie Ml 1 1s 

George Baggs 

Tony Klckl Ighter 

Lucy Ruslca 

Lois Harmstead 

Columbua Tech 
Gr 1 f f Hart 1 1 ne 
Wa 1 1 y Car 1 son 
Ralph Spence 
Jimmy Halck 
Bob Huff 
A. T. Wilson 

Frank Woo 4 
Lynn Streleckl 

Dekalb Tech 

Paul Starnes * 

Dan Gray 

Kenneth Kent 

Wayne Brown 

Lynette Matthews 

Don Bloodworth 

Jim Bugg 

Jim Lalkam 

Glenn Pfautz 



Mar ietta-Cobb' 
L . L . Leverette 
Harlon Crimm 
Marion Freeman 
Bill Carver 
Brady James 
Norman Baker 

Savannah Tech 
Bi 11 Hair 

Richard Shlnhoster 
Bruce Eichenlaub, Jr. 
James Goss 

< 

Lanier Tech 
Robert Whelchel 

Houston V ocational Center 
Joe Vargas 

State Dep artment of Education 
W i 1 1 i am P . Johnson 
John L 1 oyd 
Robert K. Mabry 
Ray Morrison 

S tate Government 
Honorable Joe Frank Harris 
Honorable George Busbee 
Ms. Nell ie Hoenes 

and many others.... 



9 



yii 



TABiE OF CONTENTS 

i 

Introduction 

Program Description . * 

Curriculum Model 

Course Outlines 

Soda! & Related Studies 
Computer Fundamentals 
Economics 

English & Composition 
Industrial Relations 
Technical Communications 

Mathematics & Science 
Algebn 
Trigonometry 
Analytical Geometry 
Physics I 
Physics II 
Physics III 

Technical Courses 
AC Circuits 
CAD I 
CAD II 

Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) 

DC Circuits 

Dynamics 

Electromechanical Devices 
Engineering Graphics I 
Engineering Graphics II 
Engineering Materials 
Fluid Power 
Machine Design 
Manufacturing Processes I 
Manufacturing Processes II 
Mechanical Devices & Systems 
MET Problems 
Statics 

Strength of Materials 

Equipment Information 

Appendix A - Implementing a 
Problems Course 

Appendix B - Technical Organizations 
& Societies 

Technical Publications 
& Periodicals 



x111 

10 



, Education for The Technicians An Introduction 
RATIONALE 

... ^ 

Relevant education and training to prepare engineering 
technic lens Is a critical concern for the productivity needs 

v * 

of this nation." As net/ and changing technologies and 
processes for. manufactur Ing. construction, communication* 
energy, and research and development occur with great 
rapidity, the need for engineering assistants who can perform 
the "nuts-and-bolts" problem-solving tasks associated with 
current technology has Increased significantly. Modern 
Industtal and engineering devices that are multisystem In 
nature require the sort of developmental, maintenance, 
support v and operational personnel who can change, adjust, and • 
adapt to new situation and utilize Increasingly sophisticated 
hardware with a minimum of retraining. In all, this trend 
toward innovation as the status-quo has heightened the need 
for a trained technician who combines theoretical and 
conceptual knowledge with the manipulative, "hands-on" skill 
of an artisan or craftsman. It Is. toward this end that modern 
technical education must be focused. The remainder of -this 
document offers information and procedures necessary to train 
engineering technicians who can make a contribution In the 
emerging technologies. / 



H 

1 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 
PURPOSE 

The purpose of the Engineering Technology Program tn 
Georgia Is to produce specialists who possess the broad base 
of knowledqe, skill, and attitude necessary to be productive 
In modern technical occupations" that are characterized by 
rapid change and highly sophisticated content. 
OBJECTIVES , 

1. To provide basic knowledge, skill, and attitude 
development based on a systematic analysis of the 
occupational domain to be served. 

2. To produce a technician who Is able to deal with the 
comple^ -\ systems Interactions that characterize modern 
technological environments. 

3*. To provide program options that allow In-depth study In 
specialized areas of the occupational domain beyond the 
basic ski 1 1 level . 

4. To provide for awarding of credit leading to an associate 
degree credential, as well as options toward other degree 
credent 1a4s. 

5. To provide Instruction that maximizes the application of 
knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real work situations. 

6. To provide Instruction that prepares the student for the 
complex problem-solving nature of highly technical 
occupat 1 ons . 

7. To fully coordinate the high-technology program with needs 
of business and Industry through a process of 
school -community-business Inter-cooperation. 

8. Jo provide a system of Instruction that Is fully 
responsive to, and perceptive of, the Intrinsic nature of 
change and Innovation In highly technical occupations and 
disciplines. 

TECHNICIANS DEFINED 

In general the work role of the engineering technician 

falls between that of the vocational -industrial tradesman and. 

that of the professional engineer. This Is a broad range and 

Is Ill-defined In practice, having gray areas of work 



requirements at el.ther end of the continuum and at many points 
in between. Perhaps the best way 1to define a technician is by 
a summary cf tasks performed and the accompanying skills 
required. This must of necessity be done in a broad ar.d 
generalized fashion wl th- provl slons for more specificity left 
to individial -Job descriptions. (The basis for this 
description may be found in a U.S. Office, of Education 
research report ent i t 1 ed f Ofccupat i gna 1 Criteria and Preparatory 
Curriculum Patterns in Technical Education Programs . ) 

It is generally agreed that the engtneering technician 
must have the following, kinds of special ski Ms, and 
and abi 1 ities: 

1. Proficiency in the use of the disciplined and objective 

' scientific method in practical application of the basic 
principles, concepts v and laws of physics as they 
. comprise the scientific base for the individuals field 
of technology. 4^ * 

2. Facility with mathematics; ability to use algebra and 
trignome£ry ae^ probl em-sol vi~ j tools in the development 
a .d definition of, or to q rtify, scientific phenomena 
or principles; and, when r.. Jed, an understanding of - 
though not necessarily facility in - higher mathematics 
th.-ough analytical geometry and some calculus according 
to requirements of technology. 

3. A thorough understanding and facility in the use of 
materials, processes, apparatus, procedures, equipment, 
methods, and techniques commonly used in the technology. 

4. . An extensive knowledge of a field of specialization with 

an understanding of applications of the underlying 
physical sciences as they relate to the engineering or 
Industrial processes, or research activities that 
distinguish the technology of the field. The degree of 
competency and depth of understanding should be 
sufficient to enable technicians to establish effective 
rapport with scientists, managers, and engineers with 
whom they work and to enable them to perform a variety of 
detailed scientific or technical work as outllnecT^y 
general procedures or Instructions, but requiring 
individual Initiative, and resourcefulness in the use of 
techniques, handbook information, and recorded scientific 
data. 



5. Commun 1 cat I on skills that Include the .ability to record, 
analyze. Interpret, and transmit facts ajrfd Ideas with 
complete objectivity orally, graphically, and In writing. 

Activities Performed ♦ 

Technicians are expected to perform work tasks and/or 

support to engineers related to any of a comblnafe-teo^f 

the following kinds of activities: 



1. Applies knowledge of science and mathematics extensively 

I n render I ng dl r ect techn I ca 1 ass I stance to phys I ca 1 

scientists or engineers engaged In scientific research and 

exper I mentat I on . 
Z. Designs, develops, or plans modifications of new product^, 

procedures, techniques, processes, or appl I cations under 

supervision of scientific • or engineering personnel In 

applied research, design, and development. 
3. Plans, supervises, or assists In Installation and 

Inspection of complex scientific apparatus, equipment, 

and control systems. 
4.. Advises regarding operation, maintenance, and repair of 

complex .apparatus and equipment with extensive control 

systems • 

5. Plans production c~ operations as a member of the 
management unit responsible for efficient use of manpower, 
materials, money, and equipment or apparatus In mass 
production or routine technical service. 

6. Advises, plans, and estimates costs as a field 
representative of a manufacturer or distributor of 
technical appartus, equipment, services, and/or products • 

7. Assumes responsibility for performance of tests of 
mechan I ca 1 , hydrau lie, pneumat I c , el ectr I ca 1 , or 
electronic components or systems In the physical sciences 
and/or for determ 1 nat I ons , tests and/or ana 1 yses of 
substances In the physical and other engineering-related 
sciences; and/or for determinations, tests and/or analyses 
of substances In the physical and other 
engineering-related sciences; and prepares appropriate 
technical reports covering the tests. 

9. Prepares or Interprets engineering drawings and sketches, 
or writes detailed scientific specifications or procedures 
for work related to physical sciences. 

9. Selects, compiles, «nd uses technical Information from 
references such as eng 1 neer 1 ng standards , procedure 1 
outlines, and technical digests cf research findings. 
10. Analyzes and Interprets Information obtained from 
prec \ s ion measur 1 ng and record I ng \ nstruments and/or 



4 ^ 



special procedures and techniques and makes evaluations 
upon which technical decisions are based. 

11. Analyzes and diagnoses technical prob ems that Involve 
Independent decisions and and Judgement that require, In 
addition to technical know-how* substantive experience In 
the occupational fields. 

12. Deals with a variety of technical problems involving many 
factors and variables that require an understanding of 
applied scientific and technical understanding * the 
antithesis of narrow specialization. 

It Is recognized that no two-year technical training 

program will be sufficient to prepare engineering technicians 

for all the problems they will encounter In the workplace. 

The training should however be sufficient to* 

1. Provide occupational ski 1 is that are compatible with 
at least entry- level employment In the chosen field. 

2. Provide e broad base of knowledge In science, 
mathematics, and technical subjects that will allow 
the technician to progress to higher levels of Job 
competence In an environment characterized by rapid 
change and Innovation. 



A DESCRIPTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 
* AND THE RELATED OCCUPATIONAL FIELD 



Mechanical engineering technology Is concerned with 
mechanical devices and systems. Mechanics Is the study of 
physical systems under the action of forces such as gravity 
and friction. Mechanical systems* like all engineering 
systems, are designed to accomplish work with the most 
efficient energy use possible. The physical forces of nature 
have to be taken Into account In the design of mechanical 
systems. Sometimes these forces can be employed to a}6^work ( 
as In soda machines that use gravity to dispense the can or 
bottle), and sometimes they must be minimized (as In the 
lubrication of automobile wheel bearings to reduce friction). 
You are probably familiar with many of the elements of 
mechanical systems: belt drives, gear drives, cams, helical 
screws, pistons, linkages, bearings, fans and blowers, and 
valves. These and other elements are combined In various ways 
to create complex Integrated mechanical systems. 

Mechanical engineering technicians may be Involved In the 
design, construction, maintenance, repair, quality 
assurance/quality control, research and development, or sales 
of mechanical systems. 

Mechanical engineering technicians assist engineers In 
design and development work by making freehand sketches and 
rough layouts of proposed machinery and other equipment parts. 
Thts work requires knowledge of mechanical principles 



Involving tolerance, stress, str^ { .vtlon, and vibration 

factors. They analyze the and practical value of 

designs. 

In planning and testing experimental machines and 
equipment for performance, durability, and efficiency, 
techl clans record data, calculate the results ( sometimes with 
the aid of computers) plot graphs, analyze results, make 
models, and write reports. They sometimes recommend design 
changes to Improve performance. Their Job often requires 
skill In the use of complex Instruments, test equipment, and 
gauges, as we 1 1 as In the preparation and Interpretation of 
drawings. , ^ 

L/ 

When a product Is ready for production, mechanical 
engineering technicians help to prepare layouts and drawings 
of the assembly process and of parts to be manufactured. They 
may prepare specifications for mater lols, devise tests to 
ensure product quality, or study ways to Improve efficiency. 
They frequently help to estimate labor costs, equipment life, 
and plant life. They often supervise production workers to 
make sure that they follow prescribed plans and procedures. 
Some mechanical engineering technicians test and. inspect 
machines and equipment In manufacturing departments or work 
with engineers to eliminate production problems. Automated 
manufacturing and Industrial processes require a thorough 
knowledge of computer applications. This type of work often 
requires considerable Imagination and Ingenuity. 



17 

8 



MACHINE AND TOOL DESIGN 

Machine and tool designers are among th* better-known 
specialists In mechanical engineering technology. Machine 
tools .are stationary, power-driven devices used to shape or 
form metal by cutting. Impact, pressure, electrical 
techniques, or a combination of these processes. Most machine 
tools are named for the way In which they shape metal. For 
example, commonly-used machine tools Include boring machines, 
milling machines, lathes, drilling machines, and grinders. 
The most outstanding characteristic of machine tools Is their 
precision of operation. In this century, the accuracy of 
machine tools has Improved from a thousandth of an Inch to 
about a millionth of an Inch. This precision manes possible 
the production of thousands of Identical parts that may be 
Interchanged easily In the assembly or repa\r of final 
products. The Inter changeabl 1 1 ty of parts, made possible by 
machine tools. Is the most Important requirement for the mass 
production of goods. 

Common processes that mechanical engineering technicians 
perform, according to their specialty area. Include the 
f o 1 1 ow 1 ng : 

Analyze requirements and establish design criteria. 

t 

Prepare sketches. 

Make or supervise the making of detailed drawings. 

Test equipment. 

Redesign existing equipment. 

Prepare reports 



9 

18 



machine -«fitf tool design may 

. Dies 
. Presses 
. Gauges 
. Blueprints 
. Hand tools 
. Cutt Ing oils 
. Cal Ipers 
. Jigs 
. Fixtures 
. Lubricating oils 

QUALITY ASSURANCE/QUALITY CONTROL AND NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING 

Mechanical engineering technicians In the area of quality 
control Inspect and test Incoming materials, production 
processes, and final products to ensure that they meet the 
manufacturer's specifications and quality standards. Because 
accuracy Is Important In testing, often the technician uses a 
wide variety of precision measuring devices to check 
performance parameters for a given product. Sample size, 
frequency, and other statistical procedures are used to ensure 
that products receive adequate testing. 

Mechanical engineering technicians often carry out 
nondestructive tests on materials and products to determine 

10 

10 



Technicians In the area of 
work with the following equipment 
. Boring machines 
.**Mt 1 1 Ing machines 
. Drilling machines 
. Grinding machines 
. Lathes 
. Micrometers 
. Verniers 
. Optical measurers 
. Drafting equipment 



whether they meet required specifications and ^candards. 
Nondestructive testing refers to any test method that does not 
Involve damaging or destroying the test sample. With the 
advent of X-rays t ultrasonics, and other Innovations, 
nondestructive testing has become widely applicable In many 
manufacturing processes. 

Some of the basic mechanical test processes Include the 
fol lowl ng: 

. Tensile te*ts to determine proportional limit, yield points, 

modulus of elasticity, elongation, and reduction In area. 
. Hardness tests to determine resistance to penetration. 
. Bend tests to determine elasticity of a part under load. 
. Notch bar. Impact, or fat 1gue v tests to determine endurance 

limits or the fatigue strength of a part. 
. Torsion tests to determine yield strength and utllmate sheer 

stress of a part. 
. Creep tests to determine the amount of permanent set In a 

given time for a given temperature. 
Some of the basic types of nondestructive test processes are : 
. Visual tests Including optical devices. 
. Penetrant tests using magnaglo and black 

1 Ights. 

. Penetrant tests using liquid dyes. 

. Magnetic particle tests using dry or wet 

magnetized materials. 
. Ultrasonic tests using the pulse-echo system. 
. Radiographic tests using X-rays or gamma rays. 

BO 



Those technicians who specialize In quality 
assurance/quality control t performance testing, and 
nondestructive testing must have a knowledge of the following 
equ 1 pment : 



Lenses 


. Fluor scent materials 


HI rrors 


. Dyes 


Microscopes 


. Lights 


Projectors 


. Television cameras 


Comparators 


. Still and motion-picture 


Search colls cameras 


cameras 


Magnets 


. F 1 uoroscopes 


Transducers 


. Penetrameters 


(quartz* barium 


. Scleroscopes 


tltanate, and 


. Computers 


1 1th 1 urn sulfate 


. Holographs 


crystal s) 


. Hardness testers 


Sc 1 nt 1 1 1 at 1 on 


. Tensl le testers 


crystal s 


. Toughness testers 


Xe ror ad 1 ogr aph 1 c 


. Gelger counters 


equ 1 pment 


. Extensometers 


Fatigue testers 





21 

12 



COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL 



Some mechanical engineering techn leans work In close 
coordination with the machine too) operator* the part 
programmer, the production planner* and drarter In the 
production of machined parts In a numerically controlled tool 
operation. Computer numerical control (CNC) Involves the use 
of the electronically programmed Instructions through a 
digital computer. Simply stated* the computer directs the 
actions of the machine. A thorough knowledge of drafting* 
tooling, programming* tape programming, and Inspecting Is 
essential for the mechanical englnerrlng technician who Is 
specializing In the numerical control process. 

Convent la 1 machine tools are generally capable of one 
operation, such as drilling or milling. The metal, ceramic, 
or plastic piece being worked on Is transferred by hand from 
one machine tool to the next. CNC makes possible the design of 
machines that can perform multiple operations. Some CNC 
machines can perform tasks that cannot be carried out at al 1 
on conventional machines. 

The computer numerical control programming specialty area 
requires the use of the same equipment as the machine and tool 
design specialty. The major difference Is that the machines 
are controlled by numerical controlled devices. The emphasis 
Is then on the following equipment! 



13 22 



. Microprocessors . Teletypewriters 

. Punched Tape . Punched Cards 

. Light pens . Digitizers 

COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN 

The mechanical engineering technician who specializes In 
computer-aided design (CAD) might work with designers, 
engineers, drafters, or detallers In producing the engineering 
drawings used In manufacturing processes* particularly those 
that use numerical control. In computer-aided design, a 
computer Is programmed with a set of equations that describe 
the structure and proper 1 ties of *» machine component and Is 
able to produce perspective drawings of the component as seen 
"from any angle. A thorough understanding of spatial 
relationships, the ability to visualize objects, and an 
understanding of physical and irathemat 1 ca 1 concepts are 
required to use computers In this way. Familiarity with 
computer capabilities, machine tools, and design parameters 
enables the mechanical engineering technician to define a 
part, shape It, and analyze stresses nad deflections. AH of 
this can be done from .the same graphics terminal of the 
computet — aided design system. 



r 



14 23 



The mechanical engineering technician who specializes In 
computer-aided design uses the following equipment: 



. Standaro d -aw 1 ng equ 1 pment 



Plotters 



Digitizers 



Drums 



Drafting Tables 



Punched Tapes 



Rubber platens 



Punched Cards 



Light Pens 



Magnetic tape 



M t croprocessors 



Printers 



r-PICAL JOB TITLES AND WORK SETTINGS 



The mechanical engineering tech Inl clan occupational ^rea 
Includes occupations concerned with the application of 
principles of physics and engineering for the generation* 
transmission* and Lhe use of heat and mechanical power. 
Included are the design* production* Installation* and 
maintenance of fabricated metal products* tools* machines* 
*n«ich1nery and associated or auxiliary systems. Accessory 
techniques needed may be those used In electrical* 
metallurgical* nuclear* and civil engineering. 

Job titles are determined by the function or the 
engineering field In which the technician works. Typical 
general titles are - engineering technician* 
laboratory-development technician * or mechanical technician. 
Specialized Job titles relating to tMs course are - machine 
tool technician* die technician, quality-control technician. 



15 



24 



numerical control J^ 00 " programmer, and computer-assisted 
drafter /des 1 gner . 

Mechanical engineering technicians work under a wide 
variety of conditions. Most work regular hours In 
laboratories and Industrial plants. Others work part of their 
time outdoors. m , 

The following Is a description of Mechanical Engineering 
technician taken from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles 
published by the Department of Laoors 



007.161-026 MECHANICAL-ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN (PROFESSIONAL 
AND K I NDRED) ENG I NEER I NG TECHNICIAN; EXPERIMENTAL TECHNICIAN; 
LABORATORY-DEVELOPMENT TECHNICIAN; MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN 



Develops 
knowledge of 
direction of 
1 nstructlons 
procedures , 



and tests machinery and equipment, applying 
mechanical and engineering technology, under the 
engineering and scientific staff: Review project 
and blueprints to ascertain test specifications, 
objectives, test equipment, nature of teen leal 
problem, and problem solutions, such as part redesign, 
substitution of material or parts, or rearrangement of parts 
of* subassemblies. Drafts detail drawing or sketch for 
drafting room completion or to request parts fabrication by 
machine, sheet metal or wood shops. Devices, fabricates, and 
assembles new or modified mechanical components or assemblies 
for products, such as Industrial equipment and machinery, 
power equipment, servosystems , machine tools, and measuring 
Instruments. Sets up and conducts tests of complete units and 
components under operational conditions to Investigate design 
proposals for Improving equipment performance or other 
factors, or to obtain data for development, standardization, 
and quality control. Analyzes indicated and calculated test 
results In relation to design or rated specifications and test 
objectives, and modifies or adjusts equipment to meet 
specifications. Records test procedures and results, numerical 
and graphical data, and recommendations for changes In product 
or test method. 



16 



25 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

In 1980 about 885*000 persons worked as engineering and 
science technicians. Employment opportunities are expected to 
be favorable through the 1980' s* with employment of 
technicians growing faster than the average for all 
occupations. Graduates of a postsecondary school technician 
training program* partlculary programs in which students gain 
practical work experience* are excellent candidates for 
employment as mechanical engineering technicians. 

Industrial expansion and the Increasing complexity of 
modern technology underline the anticipated Increase In demand 
for technicians. Many will be In needed for work with the 
growing number of engineers and scientists In developing* and 
producing* and distributing new and technically advanced 
products. Automation of Industrial processes and the growing 

4 

Importance of environmental protection, energy development* 
and other areas <ff scientific research wf 1 1 add' to the demand 
for technicians. 



as 



TABLE 



I. PROJECTED JOB OPENINGS IN 
HIGH-TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY 



GEORGIA 



FOR 



YEARS 



RANK 



TECHNOLOGY 



"Host 1 Ike ly" Average Annual 

* 

Job Openings 



1 


•Ok 

Computer /Computer Services 


4,872 


2 


Communications 


1,664 


3 


Avionics 


800 


4 


Robot 1 cs /Automat 1 on 


643 

170 


5 


Fiber/Laser Optics 


6 


Biology 


80 


7 


Solar Energy 


9 


1 


Computer /Computer Services 


5,472 


2 


Commun 1 cat 1 ons 


3,475 


3 


Avionics 


1,074 


4 


Robot 1 cs/Automat 1 on 


848 


5 


Fiber /Laser Optics 


315 


o 


a » o I ogy 




7 


Solar Energy 


20 


1 


Communications 


7,220 


2 


Computer/Computer Services 


6,222 


3 


Avionics 


1,713 


4 


Robot 1 cs/Automat 1 on 


1,244 


5* 


Fiber/Laser Optics 


800 


6 


B 1 o 1 ogy 


450 


7 


Solar Energy 


93 



ERIC 



18 



27 



fable 1 . (Source - "An Advanced 
for Georgia Vocational Technical 
Technology. 1981.) 



Technology Development Study 
Schools" Georgia Institute of 



INNOVATIONS ANO TRENDS 

The rapid advances made *1n ' the computer Industry have 
created a need for Individuals who are familiar with the 
capabilities and limitations of computers. Many of the 
traditional processes of manufacturing are undergoing changes 
as a resuV%— of technological advances made, particularly In 
the area of electronics. The use of computers to assist In 

t. 

the analysis of designs, the production of visual Instructions 
for the manufacturer, the driving of production machines, and 
the rapid accumulation of data used by the Inspectors has 
resulted In the accumulation and elimination of hundreds of 
thousands of Jobs. Significant gains In productivity 
resulting from automated production. Improved machinery, and 
availability of synthetic materials and metal alloys, and 
other technological breakthroughs have permitted large 
Increases In output without additional workers. This 
realignment of the traditional manufacturing process to 
automation requires production workers to who have an 
understanding of the entire system as opposed to an 
understanding of Just one machine. Computer-assisted design, 
computer assisted drafting, and computer numerical control 



19 28 



machines are Innovations that are changing the Industry at a 
rapid rate. 

This trend toward Increasing automation will continue at a 
rapid rate as more research and development efforts discover 
new and Innovative ways of Increasing production. There will 
be an Increasing need to update those presently employed as 
well as an Increslng need for technicians who are skilled In 
these new technologies. 

COURSES FUNDAMENTAL TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

TECHNOLOGY 

Although persons can qualify for technician jobs through 
many combinations of work experience and education, most 
employers prefer those who have had some specialized training. 
Specialized training Is available at technical Institutes* 
Junior and community colleges* area vocational -technical 
schools, extension divisions of colleges and universities, and 
vocational -technical high schools. 

People who like to know how things work, who like to 
"tinker", with machinery, and who enjoy making and using 
diagrams are likely to succeed as mechanical engineering 
technicians. The ability to use field and office engineering 
dimensions, coupled with the ability to do detailed work with 
a high degree of accuracy, are Important In this field. For 
design work, creative talent Is also desirable. Oral and 



a 

ERIC 



30 29 



written communications skills enhance the technician's ability 
to work with people and communicate Ideas. 

Mathematics (basic computet 1 on » algebra, and Introductory 
trigonometry) and physics are cornerstones of knowledge for 
the mechanical and engineering technician. An Interest In 
and motivation for these subjects Is a "plus" for anyone 
entering mechanical engineering technology. Fortunately . man % ' 
students who have entered technical school with a "math 
phobia" and an aversion to physics have found these subjects 
much easier when they are meaningfully applied to specific 
technological problems. 

The courses offered In the pursuit of an associate degree 
In mechanical engineering technology are designed to develop 
the skills and aptitudes that employers desire. The following 
courses are fundamental to all areas for the Mechanical 
Engineering Technology degrees: 

Mathematics 

Physics 

English and Composition 
Techn 1 ca 1 Commun 1 cat 1 on 
Graphics 

Computer Fundamentals 
Strength of Materials 
Engineering Materials 
DC/AC Circuits 

Mechanical Devices And Systems 



21 

30 



Statics and Dynamics 
Electromechanical Devices 
Fluid Power 
Economics 

Industrial Relations 
Manufacturing Process 

Additional courses are offered that have emphasis In 
specialty areas. 



31 



22 



♦ d 
ERJC 






9 

ERIC 



CURRICULUM MODEL 



32 
23 




MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 
STANDARD CURRICULUM - QUARTER SYSTEM 
(SUGGESTED SEQUENCE ) 



Contact 



First Quarter 


Class 


Lab 


Hour 


Cr 


D.C. Circuits 


4 


3 


7 


5 


Computer Fundamentals 


3 


6 


9 


5 


A 1 gebra 


5 


0 


5 


5 


Engineering Graphics 1 


_1 




7 


_1 




13 


15 


28 


18 



Second Quarter 
Physics I 
Tr 1 gonmetry 
A.C. Circuits 
Eng 1 1 sh and Compos 1 1 1 on 



4 3 7 5 

5 0 5 5 
4 3 7 5 

18 6 24 20 



Third Quarter 



Physics II 


4 


3 


7 


5 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 


5 


0 


5 


5 


Mechanical Devices & Systems 


i 


6 


7 


3 


Elective (Group 1) 


1 


-Jl 


7 


_a 




11 


15 


26 


16 



Fourth Quarter 



• 



Stat 1 cs 


4 


3 


7 


5 


Physics III 


4 


3 


7 


5 


Technical Communications 


5 


0 


5 


5 


Elective (Group 2) 


1 


6 


7 


_i 




14 


12 


26 


18 



Fifth Quarter 

Electromechanical Devices 
Elective (Group 3) 
Economics 
Dynamics 



4 

3 
5 
_4 
16 



3 
4 

0 
_3 
10 



7 
7 
5 
_7 
26 



5 
5 
5 
_5 
20 



Sixth Quarter 



Elective (Group 4) 


1 


6 


7 


3 


Strength of Materials 


4 


3 


7 


5 


Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) 


1 


6 


7 


3 


Machine Design 


4 


3 


7 


5 




10 


18 


28 


16 



Seventh Quarter 

Industrial Relations 
Fluid Power 
Elective (Any Group) 
MET Problems (Elective) 




5 0 5 5 

3 4 7 5 

3 4 7 5 

_0 _9 _9 _3 

11 17 28 18 



9 

ERIC 



25 

33 



El act I vti - Mechanical Engineering Techno Ipgy Program 
Third Quarter (Group i) 
* Engineering Graphics II 

Computer Aided Drafting & Design (CAD) I 



Fourth Quarter (Group 2) 

Computer Aided Drafting & Design (CAD) I 
Manufacturing Process I 



Fifth Quarter (Group 3) 
( Engineering Materials 

Manufacturing Process 1 
* Computer A 1 ded Draft 1 ng & Des 1 gn ( CAD ) 1 1 



Sixth Quarter (Group 4) 

* Manufacturing Process II 

• Computer Aided Drafting & Design (CAD) II 



Seventh Quarter (Group 5) 
• Any of the above 



Require completion of I series 



34 



a 

ERIC 



26 



IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT A STUDEHT INTERESTED IN DESIGN AS A 
CAREER OPTION HAVE AT LEAST THE FOLLOWING COURSES. 



Communications and Social Studies 20 hrs 

Math and Science 30 hrs 

Computers and Graphics 12 tllA 

67 hrs 

Technical Core 

A.C. Circuits 5 hrs 

Computer Aided Mfg. (CAM) 5 hrs 

D.C. Circuits 5 hrs 

Dynamics 5 hrs 

Electromechanical Devices L» hrs 

Engineering Materials 5 hrs 

Fluid Power 5 hrs 

Machine Design ,5 hrs 

Mechanical Devices and Systems 5 hrs 

Statics 5 hrs 

Strength of Materials 5 hrs 

55 hrs 

Elect Ives 6 hrs 

TOTAL 128 hrs 




J - 

t 

IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT A STUDENT INTERESTED IN MANUFACTURING 
AS A CAREER OPTION HAVE AT LEAST THE FOLLOWING COURSES. 



Cpnjpiun* cations and Social Stud tea 20 hrs 

Math and Science 30 hrs 

Computers and Graphics ii. tULSL 

61 hrs 

Technical Core 

A.C. Circuits 5 hrs 

Computer Aided Mfg. (CAM) 5 hra 

D.C. Circuits 5 hrs 

Dynamics 5 hrs 

Electromechanical Devices 5 hrs 

Engineering Materials 5 hr?i 

Fluid Power 5 hrs 

Machine Design 5 hrs 

Manufacturing Processes I 3 hrs 

Manufacturing Processes II 3 hrs 

Mechanical Devices and Systems 5 hrs 

Statics 5 hrs 

Strength of Materials 5 hrs 

59 hrs 

Elective? 9 hr? 

TOTAL 128 hrs. 



36 

?8 



* - 




SOCIAL AND RELATED STUDIES 




r 




COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



This course will provide students with knowledge, skills* 
and attitudes to use the microcomputer as a tool to solve 
engineering technology problems typically encountered 
throughout their programs* Topics taught will Include 
microcomputer architecture* programming concepts* branching* 
looping* arrays* functions* subroutines* data files* graphics 
and appl 1 cat Ions. 

PREREQUISITE: Admission to the Program 

CREDIT HOURS: 3-6-5 



COURSE OUTLINE 



Student Contact Hours*K I 
Class , Laboratory 

3 * . 6 



Introduction to the 
M 1 cr oproces sor 

A. Hardware 

B. Termlnolgy 

C. Execution modes 

D . Programs 



II. Introduction to Concepts of 
Programming 

A . F 1 owchar t 1 ng 

B. Variable types 

C. Operations and formulas 

D. Simple BASIC programming 

E. Program comments 

F. Storage and retrieval 
of programs 



6 



III. Branching and Looping 3 6 

A. Relational operations 

B. Logical operations 

C. Conditional branching 

D. Multiple branching 

E. The stop statement 

F . Loops 

G. Nested loops 



IV. Arrays 3 6 

A. Lists and tables 

B. Subscripted variables 

C. Defining arrays 

V. Functions and Subroutines 3 6 

A. Library functions 

B. User functions 

C. Defining 



31 

38 



Student Contact Hours 
♦ Class Laboratory 



D. Random numbers 

E. Defining subroutines 

F. Referencing subroutines 



VI. Data Files 

A. Creating sequential data 
files 

B. Using sequential data files 



VII. Engineering Appl 1 cat Ions 3 12 

A. Electronic technology 
problems , A 

B. Electromechanical technology 
problems 

, C. Mechanical technology 
problems 

VIII. Graphics 3 6 

A. Drawing bar charts 

B. Graphing functions A 

C. Computer-generated Imagery '\ 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Execute' Instructor-supplied simple programs. 
. Develop, debug, and execute a simple BASIC program. 
. Save, retrieve, and execute a previously developed 
BASIC program. 

. Create a data file, develop a program that will 
manipulate the file, and produce an acceptable output. 

. Given a typical engineering program Including all 
necessary equations and data JT develop programs that will 
solve the problems and produce acceptable output. 
' . Develop, debug, and execute a program which will 
produce the % answers In tabular form. 

. Develop, debug, and execute an Interactive program. 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 



Upon completion of this course the student will be able tot 
. Identify microcomputer hardware and define the 

associated terms. 
. Execute pr e-wrltten programs. 

. Write, save, retrieve, and ^execute simple programs 
In BASIC. 

. Wrfatb BASIC programs ' using branching and looping 
statements . 

. Write BASIC programs manipulating data using arrays. 
. Write BASIC programs using library function^. 
. Develop functions and subroutines and Incorporate them 
Into BASIC programs. 

\ 

, 32 39 / 



Write programs that use and manipulate data files. 
Solve selected technology problems using the 
microcomputer. 

Define and Identfy microcomputer hardware 
(microcomputer v ' keyboard, CRT, disk drive, cassette, 
printer, floppy disk). 

List execution modes (execution, command or Immediate, 
systems, edit). 

(These may differ according to manufacturer.) 
Execute a BASIC program which has been stored on a disk. 
Enter via keyboard and execute a program which has been 
supplied by the Instructor. 

Discriminate between keywords and control words. 
Construct a flowchart which will display the logic of a 
given program or problem. 

Determine whether or not a line number Is necessary In a 
given expression. 

Construct BASIC statements to compute given formulas. 
Write a simple BASIC program. 

List and give examples of variable types (numeric, 
str 1 ng , constant ) . 

Identify symbols used for arithmetic operations 
(Ajpitlon, subtraction, multiplication, division, and 
exponentat 1 on ) . 

Outl Ine correct* structure for BASIC programs 

( 1 dent 1 f 1 cat 1 on , purpose , process ) . 

SAVE a BASIC program on tape or floppy disk. 

Retrieve a program which has been stored. 

Write BASIC statements using relational operators (less 

than, greater than, less than or equal to, greater than 

or equal to, less than or greater than, equal to). 

Write BASIC statements using logical operator (AND, OR 

NOT) . ^ 

Write BASIC programs using IF-THEN-ELSE statements. 

Demonstrate use of STOP statement to halt program and 

check progress. 

Identify and code algorithms Involving nested loops. 
Generate lists and tables using subscripted variables. 
List examples of subscripted string and numeric 
variables. 

Define an array using the DIM ststement. 

List keywords used as library functions (trig functions 

ABS, INT, RND, AQR). 

Code a DEF FN statement. 

Code algorithms using GOSUB. 

Code statements using the TAB(N) function. 

Code algorithms which wl 1 1. accumulate. 

Build a data file which contains at least five' records. 

Access data files which have been previously created. 

Write, debug, and execute at least one program which 

solves a problem In the student's major area of 

Interest. ' 

Plot a given point on the CRT. 



J3 

40 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Bent, Robert J. and Sethares, George C. Bas 1 c r An 
Introduction to Co mputer Programming. 2nd ed. Monterey, 
CAs Brooks/ Cole Publishing Co., 1982. 

Shelly, Gary and Cashmen, Thomaa. Introduction to BAfrfC^ 

Programming. Anaheim, CA: Anaheim Publishing Co., 1982; 



34 41 



\ 



ECONOMICS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



Basic principles of the American economic system of free 
enterprise will be covered. An emphasis will be placed not 
only upon the classic economic principles, but upon 
understanding these principles as they apply to current 
economic trends. The role of 

techn lea I /techno 1 og 1 ca 1 ly-orlented Industries In the 
economics of today to be emphasized. 



PREREQUISITE: None 
CREDIT HOURS t 5-0-5 



COURSE OUTLINE Student Contact Hours 

Class Laboratory 
I. Introduction (Basic Economic 1 
Concepts ) 



II. Economic Forces and Indicators 2 

A. Economics defined 

B. Modern specialization 

C. Increasing production and 
consumption 

D. Measures of economic activity 

1. gross national product 

2. national Income 

3. disposable personal Income 

4. Industrial production 

5. employment and unemployment 



III. Cap 1 ta 1 and Labor 3 
A. Tools (Capital) 

1. the Importance of saving 
and 1 nvestment 

2. the necessity for markets 



B. Large-scale enterprise 

C. Labor 

1. population characteristics 

2. vocational choice 

3. general education 

4 . spec 1 a 1 tra 1 n 1 .ng 

5. management's role In 
maintaining labor supply 

IV. Business Enterprise 7 

A. Forms of business enterprise 

1. Individual proprietorship 

2. partnership 

3 . corporat 1 on 

B. Types of corporate securities 



35 



\ 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

1 . common stocks 

2. preferred stocks 

3 . bonds 

C. Mechanics of financing 
business 

D. Plant organization and 
management 4 

V. Factors of Industrial 10 
Production Cost 

A . Bu 1 1 d 1 ngs and equ 1 pment 

1 . Initial cost and 
financing 

2. repair and maintenance 
costs 

3. depreciation and 
obsolescence costs 

B. Materials 

1 . * Initial cost and 

Inventory value 

2 . hand 1 1 ng and storage 
costs 

C. Processing and production 

1. methods of cost analysis 

2. cost of labor 

3. cost of supervision 
and process control 

4. effect of losses In 
percentage of original 
product compared to 
finished product (yield) 

0. Packaging and shipping 

E. Overhead costs 

1. Profitability and business 
survival 



VI. Price, Competition and Monopoly J 

A. Function of prices 

B. Price determination 

1 . compet 1 t 1 ve cost of product 

3. supply 

4. Interactions between supply 
and demand 

C. Competition, benefits and 
consequences 

1. monopoly and oligopoly 

2. forces that modify and 
reduce competition 

3. history of government 
regulation of competition 

0. How competitive 5s our 
economy? 



a 

ERIC 



36 



43 




Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 





VII. D I str 1 but 1 on of I ncome 

A. Increasing real Income 

B. Marginal productivity 

C. Supply In relation to demand 

D. Incomes resulting from 
production . 

1 . wages 

2 . 1 nterest 

3 . rents 

4. profits 

E. Income distribution today 

VIII. Personal Income Management 

A. Consumption - the core of 
economics 

B. Economizing defined 

C. Personal and family budgeting 

D. Analytical buying 

1. applying quality standards 

2. consumer's research and 
slml lar aids 

E. The use of credit 

F. Housing - own or rent? 

IX. Insurance, Personal Investments 
and Social Security 

A. Insurance defined 

B. Life Insurance 

1. group. Industrial, 
ordinary 

2. type of policies - 
advantages and 
disadvantages 

C. Casualty Insurance 
0. Investments 

1. savings accounts and 
government bonds 

2. corporation bonds 

3. corporation stocks 

4. annuities 

5. pension plans 
E. Social Security 

1. old-age survivor's 
Insurance 

2. unemployment compensation 

3 . med 1 care 
X. Money and Banking 

A. Function of money 

B. The natlon^s money supply 



37 



o 44 

ERIC * 



I 



St'Jti*"* Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

C. Organization and operation 
of a bank 

1. sources of deposits 

2. the reserve ratio 

3. expansion of bank 
deposits 

4. sources of reserves 

D. The Federal Reserve System 

1 . serv 1 ce funct 1 ons 

2. control of money supply 

E. F.D.l.C. 



XI. Government Expenditures* Federal 3 
and Local 

A. Economic effect 

B. Functions of government 

C. Analysis of government 
spend 1 ng 

D. Future outlook 

E. Financing government spending 

1. criteria of sound taxation 

2. tax revenues In the U.S. 

3. the fedfe, al and state 
personal Income taxes 

4. the coporate Income tax 

5. the property tax 

6. commodity taxes 

XII. Fluctuations In Production, 5 
Employment and Income 

A. Changes In aggregate spending 

B. Output and employment 

C. Other factors affecting 
economic fluctuations 

1. cost-price relationships 

2. demand for durable goods 

3. supply of commodities 

4. effects of war 

5. Inflation and deflation 

6. technology and automation 

D. Government Debt 

1 . purposes of government 

2. how burdensome Is the 
debt 

3. problems of debt 
management 

XIII. The United States Economy In 4 
Perspective 

A. Recent economic changes 

1. Inflation and recession 

2. effects of trade Imbalance 



38 



45 



a 

ERIC 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

3. new products and 
1 ndustr 1 es 

4. Increase In governmental 
contro 1 s 

B. Present economic problems of 
U.S. economy 

1 . the wor 1 d market 

2 . 1 nternat 1 ona 1 cooperat 1 on 

3. maintenance of prosperity 
and progress 

4. economic freedom and 
security 

C. Ccmmunlsmt nature and 
control by Soviet State 

D . Prob 1 ems common to a 1 1 systems 

E. Special economic problems 
of the U.S. 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES: 

At the conclusion of this course* the student will be 
able tot 

. Define what Is meant by economics In the traditional 

sense and state the Importance of economics to today's 

business enterprises. 
. Explain the relationship of productivity* balance of 

trade* and gross national product. 
. Explain the roles of capital and labor In the American 

economic system. 
. Contrast Individual proprietorships* partnerships* and 

corporations as methods of business orgran 1 zat 1 ons . 
. Explain how businesses are financed. 

. Define and/or explain the Importance of the fol lowing 
terms to production cost: capital outlay* materials* 
direct labor* Indirect labor* scrappage and efficiency* 
materials shipping and handling* overhead* taxation and 
government regulation. 

. Explain how free enterprise Is different from 
monopolistic or socialistic economies. 

• Define real Income. 

. Compute real Income given gross Income and relevant 

var labl es . 
. Plan a personal budget. 

.Plan a projected program of personal Investment* 

savings* and Insurance. 
. Explain the meaning of money In economic terms. 
. Discuss orally or In writing the effects of government 

regulation on business and economics. 
. List and briefly describe three major problems which 

affect the American economy today. 



39 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Amacher. Principles of Economics . (Second Edition). 

Southwestern Pub 1 1 shl no » 1983. 
Hellbraner and Thuran. The Economic Problem. Prentice-Hall, 

1981. 

01 sen and Kennedy. Economics! Princi ples and Applications 
(Nlneth Edition). Southwestern Publishing, 1978. 

Theussen, et al . Engineering Economy . (5th Edition). 
Prentice-Hall, 1977. 



47 



40 

9 

ERJ.C 

i 



ENGLISH AND COMPOSITION 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course Is designed to enhance the student's skill 
In writing, grammar usage and composition. Topics for student 
exercises may be chosen from material discussed or 
experienced In technical courses. Course material will serve 
to Integrate basic communication skills with studies In 
technical subject areas. Topics to be covered Include 
grammar, writing skills and composition. 

PREREQUISITE! Admission to Program 

CREDIT HOURS* 5-0-5 

COURSE OUTLINE 

Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

I. Communications and the 5 
Technician > 

A. Why the technician must be 
proficient 

B. Importance of written 
communications as an 
essential ski 1 1 

C. Study ski 1 1 s 

1. notetaklng skills 

2. following written and 
oral Instructions 

3. test-taking skills 

II. Composition (Emphasis on 47 
Student Writing) 

A . D 1 ct 1 on 

B. Sentence Review 

1. review of basic parts 
of speech 

2. complete sentences 

3. use and placement of 
modifiers, phrases, 
cl auses 

4. sentence conciseness 

5. exercises In sentence 
structure 

C. Grammar usage 

1 . capital Izat Ion 

2 . punctuat 1 on 

3. subject-verb agreement 

D. Paragraph construction 

1. topic sentence 

2. development 



41 



48 



3. unity and coherence 

4. translstlonal devices 

E. Narration, description, and 
expos 1 1 1 on 

F. Theme construct Ion 

1. thesis statement 

2. transitions 

3. conclusions 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES ' * 

At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able to: 

. Explain the need for effective written communication and an 

appreciation for the writing process. 
. Use effective techniques for taking notes, following 

Instructions, and taking tests. 
. Analyze the f^eas In essays related to technology and 
« society. 

. Recognize and articulate multiple points of view. 

. Use commonly misused words correctly In basic sentences. 

. Punctuate, capitalize, and spell correctly. 

. Recognize and write simple, complex, compound, and 

complex-compound sentence structures. 
. Rewrite ambiguous, wordy statements Into clear, terse 

sentences. 

. Recognize and write paragraphs using varied organizational 
techniques (cause and effect, description, definition, and 
so on) . 

. Wrlve paragraphs containing well-defined topic sentences 

and develop each paragraph Into a unified whole. 
. Use transitional words and paragraphs to achieve coherence 

and unity In writing. 
. Organize thoughts during the pre-wrltlng stage using a 

written out 1 1ne. 
. Effectively write a unified, we 1 1 -deve 1 oped five paragraph 

theme following standard English grammer usage. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Hodges, John C. , Whiten, Mary E., Harbrace College Handbook. 
9th ed.. New York, Har court. Brace, Jovanovlch, 1982. 

Lynch, Robert E. and Thomas, B. Swanzey, eds. The Example of 

Science: An Anthology for College Ccxroos 1 1 1 on . 

Englewood Cliffs, NJi Prentice-Hall, 1981. 

Watklns, Floyd C. and Martin, Edwin T., Practical English 
Handbook , Boston, Houghton Mifflin. 



42 40 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course Includes the study of the basis of human 
rea It Ions and the organization of Individual and group 
behavior. Leadership, organizational and social environments \ 
(Including labor unions)* career development, communications 
and grbup processes as well as selected operating activities 
are covered. Appropriate case problems are reviewed and 
discussed. Special emphasis Is placed on typical Industrial 
and business relationships In everyday situations. 

PREREQUISITE * None 

CO-REQUISITE i None 

CREDIT HOURS i 5-0-5 

COURSE OUTLINE 

Student Contact Hours 
Ocas Laboratory 
I. Fundamentals of Organizational 4 
Behav i or 

A. Working with people 

B. Mainsprings of motivation 

C. Social systems 

D. Morale Information and Its use 

E. Developing a sound behavioral 
cl Imate 

II. Leadership and Its Development 6 

A. The leadership role 

B. Effective supervision 

C. Development of participation 

D. Human relations training 

111. Organ 1 zat 1 ona 1 Env 1 ronment 6 

A . Or gan 1 zat 1 ona 1 structures 

B . Organ 1 zat 1 ona 1 dynam 1 cs 

C. The Individual In the 
organization 

D . 1 nf orma 1 organ 1 zat 1 on 

IV. . Career Development In 6 
" Organizations 

A. Understanding career 
mot 1 vat 1 on 

B. Making career choices 

C. Attitudes and advancement 

D. Career development and 
management practices 



43 



50 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
V. Social Environment 4 

A. Labor unions 

B. Working with unions 

C. Employment discrimination 

D. Managing scientific and 
professional employees 

E. Managing employees In 
International operations 

VI. Communications and Group 10 
Processes 

A. Communication with employees 

B. Communication groups 

C. Counseling and Interviewing 

D. Group dynamics 

E. Managing change 

VII. Operating Activities 4 

A. Appraising and rewarding 
performance 

B. Using economic Incentive 
systems 

C. Integrating work systems with 
people 

D. Understanding automation 

E. Organizational behavior In 
perspective 

VIII. Case Problems In Technical 10 
Organizations 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of the course, the student will be able tot 

. List and describe 5 fundamental componenets of a sound 

organ 1 zat 1 ona 1 env 1 ronment . 
. Explain the critical role of leadership In developing an 

organizational cl Imate. 
. Describe the characteristics of an effective leader. 
. List 4 basic types of organizational Structures. 
. Diagram an organizational structure and label components, 
. Develop a personal career objective and explain the 

rationale for the choice. / 
. Discuss and evaluate the Impact of unionization on the 

U.S. economy . 

. Explain the Importance of Interpersonal communication In 

an organization. 
. Lis*- ^nd describe the various types of communication 

ths .we Important at work. 



44 



51 



ERIC 



. Explain the possible Impact of automation on the people 

In an organization* 
. Effectively formulate solutions to organizational 

problems presented by the instructor* 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Yodar and Standohar, Personnel Management and Industrial 
Relations . Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 1982. 

Armlne et al.. Manufacturing Organization and Management. 
Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 1982. 

Everand and Shi It, Business Principles and Management. 
Southwestern Publishing, 1979. 



52 

45 



TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS 

y 

Techn 1 ca 1 Commun 1 cat 1 ons will prov 1 de the student with 
working knowledge of the use of communication techniques, 
procedures, and formats used In Industry and business. The 
student will learn accepted methods of describing devices and 
processes, and of making oral and written technical 
presentations. Also, proper use of written manuals, guides, 
specifications, and vendor Instructions will be reviewed. 

PREREQUISITE* English and Composition 

CREDIT HOURS i 5-0-5 

COURSE OUTLINE 

I. Introducing Technical 
Communications 

A. Purpose of course 

B. Definition of technical 
wr 1 t 1 ng 

C. Basic principles of 
technical writing 

0 . Sty 1 e 

1. audience 

2 . purpose 

3. scientific attitude 
E. Introduction to oral 

commun 1 cat 1 on 

1 1 . Conduct 1 ng" Research 6 

A. Completing preliminary steps 

B. Assembling sources 

1. searching subject 
heading Indexes 

2. using the card 
cata 1 og 

3. consulting specialized 
gu 1 des 

4. locatlhg bibliographies 

5. using Indexes and 
abstract services 

6. using reference materials 

C. Using research results 

1 . taking notes 

2. assembling an annotated 
blbl lography 

III. Planning the report 5 

A. Outlines 

1. outlining effectively 

2. rules for formal outlines 

B. Abstracts and Introductory 
summaries 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
3 



s 



/ 



A * • 

Student Contact Hours ^ 
Class , Laboratory . 

1 . types of abstracts - 

2. ' suggestions for writing 

abstracts 

IV/ Writing Definitions 

A. What should be defined 

1. familiar words for 
r unfaml 1 lar things 

2. unfamiliar words for 
faml 1 lar things 

B. How definitions are constructed 
1 . 1 nf orma I 7 

2 •. forma 1 

a. class 

b. distinguishing 
characteristics 

v c. summary of formal usage 
d. additional suggestions 
for formal usage 

3. ampl If led definitions 

C. Where definitions should be placed 

V. Describe Mechanisms 

A. Describing mechanisms 

5. Components of the description 
of a mechanism 

1. some potential problems 

2. specifications 

C. Describing malfunctions of 
a mechanism 

■4 

VI. Describing Processes 

A. Describing a process 

6. Problems encountered In 
describing a process 

C. . Instructions In a process 

D. Describing malfunctions of 
a ,-rocess 

VII. Putting Ski 1 1s 1 ntc^Pract 1 ce : 
Writing a Formal "technical 
Report 

A. Writing the rough draft 

1 . prefactory pages 

2. body of the report 

3 . append 1 x 

B. Editing the rough draft 

C. Producing the final copy 

VII I. Presenting an Oral Technical 
Report 



48 54 



A. Oral and visual aspects 

of technical communl cat Ions 

B. Oral presentations and 
activities 

1. oral reports and 
presentations 

2. leading conferences and 
group discussions 

C. Visual Illustrations 

1. what Illustrations can do 

2. types of Illustrations 

D. Presenting the oral report 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

. Explain the Importance of technical communications to the 

engineering technician. 
. Use appropriate reference materials in preparing a 

technical report. 
. Write a formal and an Informal outline for a technical 

report. 

. Write an abstract for a technical report. 
. Write appropriate definitions of technical terminology. 
. Precisely describe the characteristics and components of 
mechanisms. 

. Precisely describe the characteristics and componenets of 
processes. 

. Prepare a formal technical report using accepted formats 
and style. 

. Deliver orally an Informative persuasive technical 
presentations using supportive visual aids. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Brenner, Ingrld, Mathes, J. C. and Stevenson, Dwlght. JhS. 
Technician As Writer. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merrill, 1980. 

Messer, Ronald. Stvle In Technical Writing. Glenvlew, 11 J 
Scot t-Foresman, 1982. 

Sherman, Theodore and Johnson, Simon. Modern Technical 
Writing. 4th edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJ; Prentice 
Ha 1 1 , 1 983 . 



49 




MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE COURSES 




9 

ERIC 



ALGEBRA 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course Is designed to develop and update algebraic 
skills required for engineering technicians as applied to the 
solution of practical problems encountered In electrical, 
mechan 1 ca 1 , therma 1 , hydrau 11c, pneumat 1 c , and opt 1 ca 1 
technologies. Topics to be covered Include functions and 
graphs, linear equations, determinants, factoring, 
quadratics, and the solution of right triangles. 

PREREQUISITES: Admission to Program 

CREDIT HOURS: 5-0-5 

course outline student Contact Hours 

Class Laboratory 

I. Fundamental Concepts and 13 
Operations 

A . Numbers and 1 1 tera 1 
symbols 

B. Fundamental laws of 
a 1 gebra 

C. The laws of exponents 

D. Scientific notation 

E. Exponents and radicals 

F. Addition and subtraction 
of algebraic expressions 

G. Multiplication and division 
of algebraic expressions 

H. Equations and formulas 

II. Functions and Graphs 6 
A. Functions 
P. Cartesian coordinates 

C. Graphing functions 

D . So 1 v* 1 ng equat 1 ons 
graphical 1y 

III. Linear Equations and H 
Determinants 

A. Linear equations 

B. Graphical solution of 
systems of two 1 1 near 
equations In two unknowns 

C. Algebraic solution of 
systems 

D. Solution by determinants 
of systems of two 1 1 near 
equations In two unknowns 

E. Algebraic solutions of three 
linear equations In three 
unknowns 



53 

57 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

F. Solution by determinants of 
systems of three linear 
equations In three unknowns 

IV. Factoring and Fractions 10 

A. Special products 

B. Factoring 

C. Simplifying fractions 

D. Multiplication and division 
of fractions 

F. Addition and subtraction 
of fractions 

V. Quadratic Equations 5 

A. Quadratic equations. 
Solution by factoring 

B. Completing the square 

C. The quadratic formula 

VI. Variation (optional) 

A. Direct 

B. Inverse 

C. Joint 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course , the student will be able 
to: 

. Write concepts mathematically using numbers and symbols. 
. Perform mathematical operations using the fundamental laws 

of algebra and the laws of exponents and radicals. 
. Make mathematical computations using scientific notation. 
. Perform algebraic operations of addition* subtraction, 

multiplication, and division on algebraic expressions. 
. Perform basic mathematical operations on equations and 

formulas to solve for any given variable. 
. Graph relations and functions with two variables. 
. Graphically solve two linear equations with two unknowns. 
. Algebraically solve two linear equations with two unknowns. 
. Use determinants to solve three linear equations in three 

unknowns . 

. Identify the general form of first, second, and third 

degree equation products in three unkr.owns. 
. Factor into prime factors algebraic expressions containing 

common monomial factors. 
. Factor the difference of two squares. 
. Factor trinomial expressions. 
. Factor perfect square trinomials. 

. Change a given algebraic fraction into a specified 
equivalent fraction. 



9 

ERIC 



54 5 3 



. Perform operations of addition* subtract I on * 
multiplication and division on algebraic fractions. 

. Solve equations containing algebraic fractions. 

. Solve quadratic equations by factoring. 

. Solve quadratic equations by completing the square. 

. Solve quadratic equations by use of the quadratic formula. 

. Define trigonometric functions using the standard 
trlangre. 

. Solve right triangles. 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Clar and Hart. Mathematics for the Technologies. Englewood 
Cliff, N.J.t Pretlce-Hal 1 , Inc. 

Paul and Shaevel . Essentials of Technical Mathematics with 
Calculus. Englewood Cliffs, NJ.t Prentice-Hall, Inc. 

Washington, Allyn J. Basic Technical Mathematics with 
Calculus. 3rd Edition. Benjamin Cummlngs. 



55 5 9 



-\ *R I GONOMETRY 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 



This course Is designed to develop tr Igonometrlc. skills 
required for engineering technicians as applied to the 
solution of practical problems encountered In electrical, 
mechan 1 ca 1 . therma 1 , hydrau lie. pneumat ! c and opt 1 ca 1 
technologies. Topics to be covered Include- trigonometric 
functions of angles, vectors, solutions to ob. 'que triangles, 
graphs of trigonometric functions. J -Operator . Identities. 
Inverse functions and logarithms, exponents and radicals and 
additional solutions to systems and equations. 

PREREQU ISITE: A 1 gebra 

CO-REQUISITE: NONE 

CREDIT HOURS t 5-0-5 

COURSE OUTLINE 

I. Tr 1 vKJnometr 1 c functions 
of any- angle 

A. Signs of the 
trigonometric function 

B . Rad 1 an 

C. Applications of the use 
of radian measure 

II. Vectors and triangles 

A. Vectors 

B. Application of vectors 

C. Oblique triangles 

D. The law of sines 

E. The law of cosines 



III. Graphs of the Trigonometric 
Functions 

A. Graphs of Y«A sin x 
and Y«A cos x 

B. Graphs of Y«A sin bx 
and Y*A cos bx 

C. Graphs of Y»A sin (bx+c) and 
Y*csc x 

D. Graphs of Y*tan x, Y» cot x, 
Y»sec x, Y»csc x 

E. Application of the 
trigonometric graphs 

F. Composite trigonometric curves 

IV. Exponents and Radicals 7 
A. Positive Integers as exponents 



Student Contact: Hours 
Class Laboratory 



57 60 



\ 



Student C ontact Hours 
Class Laboratory 



ERIC 



B. Zero and negative Integers 
as exponents 

C. Fractional exponents 

D. Simplest radical form 

E. Addition and subtraction 
of radical s 

F. Multiplication and division 
of rad i ca 1 s 

V. The J -Operator 

A. Imaginary and complex numbers 

B. Operations with complex 
numbers 

C. Graphical representation of > 
complex numbers 

D. Polar form of a complex number 

E. Exponential form of a 
complex number * * 

F* Products, quotients, powers 
and roots of complex numbers 

IV. Properties of Trigonometric 
Functions 

A. Fundamental trigonometric 
identities 

B. Sine and cosine of the sum and 
difference of two angles 

C. Double-angle formulas 

D. Ha If -angle formulas 

E. Trigonometric equations 

VII. The Inverse of Trigonometric 
Functions 

A. Inverse trigonometric 
* f unct i ons 

B. Principal values 

VIII. Logar 1 thms 

A. Exponential and logarithmic 
functions 

B. Graphs of Y - b K and 
Y = log bx 

C. Properties of logarithms 

D. Logarithms to the base 10 

E. Logarithms to the base e 

F. Solutions of the exponential 
and logarithmic equations 

IX. Additional Solutions to 

Equations and Systems of 
Equations 

A . Graph 1 ca 1 so 1 ut I on of 
systems of equations 



tV> 6 1 



E. Algebraic solution of 

systems of equations 
C. Equations In the 

quadratic form 
0. Equations with radicals 

STUDENT COMPENTENCIES 

At the conclusion If this course* the student will be able 
to* 

. Define <.he six trigonometric functions. 
. Determt e the sign of the function of an angle. 
. Find the value of a given function of an angle. 
. Find the value of the angle of the Inverse trigonometric 
function. 

. Convert between systems of angular measurement. 
. Hake trigonometric computations with angles measured In 
radians. 

. Define vector quanltles and give examples. 
. Graphically represent a vector. 

. Graphically add and subtract vectors. 
. Use vectors to solve problems by resolving vectors Into 

rectangular components. 
. Solve oblique triangles using the laws of sines. 
. Solve oblique triangles using the law of cosines. 
. Graph the trigonometric functions Y ■ A sin x and Y * A 

cos x. 

. Graph the trigonometric functions Y *s1n (bx + c) and Y 

■ A cos (bx +C) . 
. Graph the tr 1 gonmetr 1 c f unct 1 ons Y * A sin bx ^pri^Y ■ A 

cos bx. 

. Determine amplitude* perlodt and phase of periodic 

(sinusoidal) motion. 
. Graph the trigonometric functions Y » tan x» Y /e cot x, 

Y = sec x, Y = esc x. 
• Describe various types of motion In terms of the sine 

curve. 

. Graphically combine two or more trigonometric curves. 
. Perform operations Involving algebraic expressions 

containing fractional components. 
. Reduce radicals to simplest form. 

. Perform operations wtlh algebraic expressions containing 

fractional components. 
. Define and describe the complex number system. 
. Perform complex numbers graphically. 
. Represent complex numbers graphically. 
. Write complex numbers In polar form. 
. Write complex numbers In exponential form. 
. Calculate the product* quotient* powers* and roots of 

complex numbers. 
. Recognize and verify the basic trigonometric Identities. 
. Prove the vallldlty of trigonometric equations by means 

of the trigonometric Identities. 



59 



62 



. Compute the sine and cosine of the sum and difference of 
two angles. 

. Compute the value of the sine and cosine of the double 
angl e. 

. Compute the value of the sine and cosine of the half 
angle. 

. Recognize and define Inverse trigonometric functions. 
. Compute the principal value of a given trigonometric 
f unct 1 on . 

. Recognize and define an equation In exponential form. 
. Recognize and define an equation In logarithmic form. 
. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions. 
. Perform algebraic operations with logarithmic 

expressions using the properties of a logarithm. 
. Write a number as a logarithm to the Base 10. 
. Write a number as a logarithm to the Base e. 
. Solve exponenetlal and logarithmic equations. 
. Graphically solve systems of first and second degree 

equations with two variables. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Clar and Hart, Mathemati cs for the Technologies. Englewood 
C 1 1 f f s ♦ NJ : Prent 1 ce-Ha 1 1 . 

Paul and Shaevel , Essentials of Technical M athematics with 
Calculus. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. 



C>3 

bO 



ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This court* 1s a survsy courss designed to develop 
analytic geometry and calculus skills required for 
engineering technicians as applied to the solution of 
practical problems encountered In electrical t mechanical • 
thermal, hydraulic, pneumatic, end optical technologies. 
Topics to be covered Include analytic geometry, derivatives. 
Integrals, different let Ion and integration of polynomial 
functions end transcendental functions and Integretlon 
techniques. 

PREREQUISITES: Algebra, Trigonometry 
CREDIT HOURS: 5-0-5 
COURSE OUTLINE 

I. Elements of Analytic Geometry 

A. The straight line 

B. The circle 

C. The parabola 
.D. The el 1 ipse 
E. The hyperbola 

II. Sequences and Series (optional) 2 

A. Finite sequences and series 

B. Infinite sequences and series 

C. Limit of a sequence or series 

III. Derivatives and Applications 15 

A. Limits 

B. The slope of a tangent to 
a curve 

C. The derivative 

D. Derivatives of polynomials 

E. Derivatives of products 
and quotients of functions 

F. The derivative of a 
power of a function 

G. The derivative as 
a rate of change 

H. Maximum and minimum problems 

I . I mp 1 1 c 1 1 d 1 f f erent 1 at 1 on 

IV. Integration and App] . cations 15 

A. Differentials and Inverse 
d I ff erent 1 at 1 on 

B. The Indefinite Integral 

C. The area under a curve 
The definite Integral 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
8 




Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

E. Finding area by Integration 

F. Volume by Integration 

G. Applications for the Integral > 

H. Trapezlodal rule or rectangula 
method for approximating areas 
(optional ) 

V. Differentiation of transcendental 8 
f unct 1 ons 

A. Derivatives of the sine and 
cosine functions 

B. Derivatives of the other 
trigonometric functions 

C. Derivatives of the Inverse 
trigonometric functions 

D. Derivatives of the exponential 
and logarithmic functions 

VI. Integration Techniques (Optional) 4 
A. The genral power formula 
8. The logarithmic and 
exponential form 

C. Basic trigonometric forms 

D. Integration by parts 

E. Integration by substitution 

F. Use of the tables. 

STUDENT COMPENTENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
to: 

. Find the stralght-1 Ine distance between two points on a 
graph . 

. Define and find the slope of a line. 

. Write the equation of a stralght-1 Ine "Iven various 

properties of the line such as points on the line, slope 

and/or Intercepts. 
. Define a circle and write the equation of a circle with 

the center at (0,0) and with the center at any 

coordinate (x,y). 
. Define and derive the equation of a parabola given 

appropriate data. 
. Define and derive the equation of an ellipse given the 

appropriate data. 
. Define and derive the equation of a hyperbola given 

the appropriate data. 
. Find the sum of a finite arithmetic or geometric 

series and of other finite series. 
. Find the nth term of a sequence. 

.Find the sum of an infinite geometric series 1f one 
exists. 

. Identify convergent and divergent sequences and series. 



62 65 



. Find the limit of an Infinite sequence or series If It 
ex 1 sts . 

. find the limit of an Infinite sequence or series If It 
exists. 

. Determine If a function Is continuous. 
. Determine the limits of a function If they exist. 
. Find the slope of the tangent to a curve. 
. Define and find the derivative of a function. 
. Derive the derivatives of products and quotients of 
f unct 1 ons . 

. Derive the derivative of a power of a function. 

. Use differential calculus to solve problems Involving 

rate of change. * 
. Use differential calculus to solve maximum and minimum 

problems. 

. Use implicit differentiation to solve applied problems. 

. Find the differential of a function. 

. Find the ant 1 der 1 vat 1 ve of a function. 

. Define and find the Indefinite Integral of a function. 

. Find the area under a curve. 

. Define the definite Integral of f (n). 

. Find volume by Integration. 

. Apply Integral calculus to solve problems Involving 
moments of Inertia* work* average values* etc. 

. Compute derivatives of the sine and cosine functions. 

. Compute derivatives of the other trigonometric 
f unct 1 ons . 

. Compute derivatives of the Inverse trigonometric 

functions. J 
. Compute derivatives of the exponential .'logarithmic 

f unct 1 ons . 

. Integrate functions by use of the general power 
f ormu 1 a . 

. Integrate functions In logarithmic and exponential 
form. 

. Integrate the trigonometric functions. 
. Perform Integration by parts. 
. Perform Integration by substitution. 
. Perform Integration by use of tpbles. 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Clar and Hart, Mathematics for the Technologies. Englewood 
Cliffs, NJj Prentice-Hal 1 . 

Paul and Shaevel , Essential of Technical Mathematics with 
Calculus. Eng 1 ewood C 1 1 f f s , N J * Prent 1 ce-Ha 1 1 . 

Washington, Allyn J., Basic Technical Mathematics with 
Calculus. 3rd ed. , Benjamin Cummlngs. 



63 



PHYSICS J 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



A practical approach toward the concepts of force* work, 
rate* and power Is presented' fn Physics I. Students are 
shown v by classroom -demonstration * how these four concepts 
are applied to the four energy systems - mechanical , fluldal* 
el ectr leal • and thermal - and then will perform laboratory 
experiments that relate each concept to the four energy 
systems . 



PREREQUISITE! 
CO-REQUISITE » 
CREDIT HOURS i 
COURSE OUTLINE 
I . 



Admission of Program 
A 1 gebra 

4-3-5 



I ntroduct 1 on . 

A. Identification of energy 
systems 

B. Review of simple 
mathemat 1 cs 

C. Review of basic concepts 
of physics 



Student Contact Hours 
C 1 ass Laboratory 



II 



10 



Force 

A. Mechanical systems 

1 . 1 Inear force 

2. units of mass and force 

3. forcelike quantities 

4 . torque 
V 1 u 1 da 1 systems 

1 . pressure 

2. density/pressure relationships 
Electrical systems 

1. electromotive force (EMF) 

2. methods of producing an EMF 
Thermal systems 

1. temperature difference 

2. temperature scales 



10 



B. 



C. 



D. 



III. 



Work 

A. Mechanical systems 

1 . mechan 1 ca 1 work , 
trans 1 at lonal 

2 . mechan 1 ca 1 work v 
rotat-forta 1 

B. Fluida) systems 

1. pressure/ volume 
relationships 



10 



65 



Student Contact Hour« 
Class Laboratory 

2. energy considerations 
C Electrical systems 

1 . charge movement and EMF 

2. conversion factors for 
electrical systems 

3. current 

D. Thermal systems 

1 . heat flow rate 

2. heat measure 

3. change of state 

IV. Rate 10 , 5 

A. Mechanical system 

1. speed and velocity* 
linear motion 

2. acceleration* linear 

3. 9 rotational' motion, 

angular ^velocity 

4. angular acceleration 

B. Fluldal .systems 

1. volume flow rate 

2. mass flow rate 

C. Electrical systems 

1 . current, 

2. AC /DC 

0. Thermal systems 

1. heat energy transfer 

2. heat flow rate 

V. Power 5 5 

A. Power equations 

1 . power def 1 ned 

2. basic equation form 

B. Efficiency 

C. Mechanical systems 

1 . trans 1 at 1 ona 1 

2 . rotat 1 ona 1 

D . F 1 u 1 da 1 systems 

E. Electrical systems 

F. Thermal systems 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

. Define the following physical quantities and, where 
applicable, state their units In both SI (International 
System of Units) and English System of Units: 

Force 

Torque 

Pressure 

Vo 1 tage 

Temperature Difference 
. Given two or more mechanical forces acting along the 
same line, determine the resultant force. 



Given two of the following quantities In a mechanical 
rotational system determine the thirds 

Force 

Lever Arm 

Torque 

Given two of the following quantities In a fluid system, 
determine the thirds 

Force 

Area 

Pressure 

Given two of the following quantities In a fluid system, 
determine the thirds 

Pressure 

Height of fluid 

Weight density 
Given two or more voltage sources connected In series* 
determine the resultant voltage. 

Given a temperature In either degrees Celsius or degrees 
Fahrenheit • determine the equivalent temperature on the 
other scale. 

Describe how pressure In fluldal systems* voltage In 
electrical systems, and temperature difference In 
thermal systems are similar to force and torque In 
mechanical systems. 

Describe the conditions that must be met for equilibrium 
In each of the following energy systems s 

Mechanical 

Fluldal 

Electrical 

Thermal 
Define work and energy 
any energy system, and 
the fol lowing systems s 

Mechanical translations! 

Mechan l-ca 1 rotat 1 ona 1 

Fluldal 

Electrical 

Thermal 

Define the following units of work and energy 
Foot -Pound 
Ca 1 or 1 e 

British thermal unit 
Joul e 

Define the following terms and explain their usefulness 
In determining work denes 

Radian (mechanical system) 
Current (electrical system) , 
Specific heat (tht -*isl system) 
Heat capacity (thermal system) 
Given two of the following quantities in a mechar leal 
trans 1 at 1 ona 1 system* determine the third: 
Force 

Dlsplacemnt 
Work 



In general 
distinguish 



terms that 
work from 



apply to 
energy 1 n 



67 



6 a 



Given two of the following quantities In a mechanical 
rotational system, determine the third: 
Torque 

Angular displacement 
Work 

Given two of the following quantities In a fluldal 
system, determine the third: 

Pressure dlffernece 

Volume displace 

Work 

Given two of the following quantities In an electrical 
system, determine the third: 
Vo 1 tage 

Charge transferred 
Work 

Given the temperature difference across a uniform 
thickness of a substance, the dimensions of the 
substance, and Its thermal conductivity, calculate the 
heat flow rate through the substance. 

Given two of the following quantities In a thermal 
system, determine the third: 

Temperature chahge of object 

Heat capacity of object 

Work (hea, energy transferred) * 
Define and give examples of: 

Latent heat 

Sensible heat 

State the general equation for work, and explain how It 
applies to each of the following energy systems: 

Mechanical trans 1 at lonal 

Mechanclal rota 1 tonal 

Kluldal 

Electrical 

Thermal 

Define the following rates and, where applicable, 
express their baste units both In SI and English systems 
of units: 

Speed and velocity 
v t Acceleration 
•** Angular velocity 

Angular acceleration 

Volume flow rate 

Mass flow rate."' 

Electric current 

Heat flow rate 

In a linear mechanical system, given all the quantities 
except one In each of the following groups, determine 
the unknown quantity: 

Displacement, elasped time, velocity 

Initial velocity, final velocity, 

elapsed time, acceleration 

Mass, force, acceleration 



68 70 



ERIC 



In a rotational mechanical system* given all the 
quantities except one In each of the following groups* 
determine the unknown quantity! 

Angular displacement* elapsed time* 

angular velocity / Initial angular 

velocity* final angular velocity* 

elapsed time* angular acceleration 
In a fluldal system* given all the quantities except one 
In each of the following groups* determine the unknown 
quant 1 ty : 

Volume of fluid moved* elapsed time 

volume flow rate / Mass of fluid moved » elapsed 

time* mass flow rate 
Given two of the following quantities In an electrical 
system* determine the third: 

Charge transferred 

Elapsed time 

Current 

Given two of the following quantities In a thermal system* 
Determine the t 

Heat energy transferred 

Elapsed time 

Heat flow rate 

State the general equation for rate* and explain how It - 
applies to each of the following energy systems: 

Mechanclal trans 1 at tonal 

Mechan 1 ca 1 rotat 1 ona 1 

Fluldal 

E 1 ectr 1 ca 1 

Thermal 

Define "power" as It applies* In general* to all energy 
systems; and equations that relate work* elapsed time* 
force* and rate to power In these energy systems: 
Mechanical system 

Fluldal system , 

Electrical system ^ 
List for each energy system the SI and English units 
used to define power* 

Given any two of the following quantities In any energy 
system, determine the third: 

Work (or force- like quantity x 

displacement - like quantity) 

Elapsed time 

Power 

Given any two of the following quantities In any energy 
system, determine the third: 

Force- 1 1 ke quant 1 ty , 7 

Rate 

Power 

Define the following terms: 
Input power 
Output power 
Efficiency 

71 



69 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Cord, Unified Technical Concepts. Waco, Tx: Center for 
Occupational Reasearch and Development, 1980. 

Dlerauf, Edward J., Jr., and Court, James E. Unified Concepts 
in Applied Phvaics. Eng 1 ewood C 1 I f f s • N J : 

Prent1ce-Ha11 , Inc., 1979. 



72 

70 



PHYSICS II 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

The second quarter of Physics builds on the foundation 
developed In the first quarter by presenting concepts 
of magnetism* resistance, energy* momentum* force 
transformers, and energy converters. The course balances 
theory related to these six concepts with practical hands-on 
expert atoce in working with associated devices In the four 
energy systems (mechanical* fluldal* electrical* and 
therms 1 » , 

PREREQUISITE! Physics I 
COREQUISITEt Trigonometry 
CREDIT HOURS i 4-3-5 
COURSE OUTLINE 

I . Magnet 1 sm 

A. Magnetic theory 

B. Magnetic fields and 
flux 

C. Comparison of magnetic 
and electric circuits 

Res 1 stance 1 0 5 

A. Mechanical systems 

1 . dry friction 

2. static and kinetic 
friction 

B. Fluldal systems 

1 . fluid res 1 stance 1 n 
pipe' 

2 . v 1 scos 1 ty 

C. Electr ?»J systems 

1 . Ohm j Law 

2. res J a*. I \ ity of conductors 

D. Thermal systems 

1 . therma I res • stance 

2. Insulation 

III. Potential and Kinetic Energy 10 5 

A. Mechanical systems 

1. trans 1 at 1 one 1 

2 . rotat 1 ona 1 

B . F 1 u 1 da 1 systems 

1. volume /mass conversion 

2 . Bernou Ill's equat 1 on 

C. Electrical systems 
1. charge relationships 



Student Contact Hour s 
Class Laboratory 
5 5 



II. 



71 

73 



i 



Student 
Class 



Contact Hours 
Laboratory 



2. capacitors 
D. Thermal systems 



IV. Momentum 

A. Linear momentum 

B. Impulse and momentum 
change 

C. Angular momentum 

D. Momentum In fluldal systems 

E. Conservation of momentum 

V. Force Transformers 

A. Principles of force 
transformers 

B. Mechanical systems 

1 . the pul 1 ey 

2. the lever 

3. the Inclined place 

4. the screw 

v 5. the wheel and the axle 

C. Fluldal systems 

1 . the hydrau 11c 1 1 ft 

2. mechanical advantage of 
a hydrau 11c 1 1 ft 

D. Electrical systems - 
electrical transformers 



VI . 



Energy Converters 

A. General considerations and 
background 

B. Converters of mechanical 
Input energy 

C. Converters of fluldal Input 
energy 

1. mechanical output energy 

2. electrical output energy 

D. Converters of electrical 
Input energy 

1. mechanical output energy 

2. thermal output energy 

3. optical output energy 

E. Converters of thermal 
Input energy 

1. mechanical output energy 

2. thermal output energy 

3. optical output energy 

F. Converters of optical Input 
energy 

. 1. electrical output energy 
2. thermal output energy 



9 

ERIC 



7? 



74 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

. Determine the direction and strength of a magnetic 
field. 

. Examine how the concepts of force, parameter, rate, and 

resistance apply to magnetic circuits. 
. List and describe different types of magnetic material. 
. Calculate magnetic field strength, or magnetic flux of 

an area. 

. Explain the effects magnetism has In each of the energy 
systems. * 

• Describe the effect of magnetic forces exerted on 
moving charged particles In a magnetic field. 

. Compare simple magnetic and electric circuits using the 
unified concepts. 

• Given two of the following quantities In a fluid system 
determine the thirds 

Pressure 

Height of fluid 

Weight density 
Given two or more voltage sources connected In series, 
determine the resultant voltage. 

• Given a temperature In either degrees Celsius or degrees 
Fahrenheit, determine the equivalent temperature on the 
other scale. 

Describe how pressure In fluldal systems, voltage In 
electrical systems, and temperature difference In 
thermal systems are similar to force and torque In 
mechan 1 ca 1 systems • 
. Describe the conditions that must be met for equilibrium 
In each of the following energy systems i 

Mechanical 

Fluldal 

El ectr leal 

Therma 1 

. Define work and energy In general terms that apply to 
any energy system, and distinguish work from energy In 
the following systemst 

Mechanical trans 1 at lonal 

Mechanical rotational 

Fluldal 

£1 ectr leal 

Thermal 

. Define the following units of work and energy 
Foot-Pound 
Ca 1 or 1 e 

British thermal unit ' 
Newton-Meter Joule 
. Define the following terms and explain their usefulness 
1n determining work done* 

Radian (mechanical system) 
Current (electrical syste»a) 



73 75 



Specific heat (thermal system) 

Heat capacity (thermal system) 
Given two of the following quantities In a mechanical 
translations! system, determine the third: 

Force 

Displacement 
Work 

Given two of the following quantities In a mechanical 
rotational system, determine the third: 
Torque 

Angular displacement 
Work 

Given two of the following quantities 1ha*f1u1dal 
system, determine the third: 
Torque 

Angular dlsplacemnt 
Work 

Given two of the following quantities In ah electrical 
system, determine the third: 
Vo 1 tage 

Charge transferred 
Work 

Given the temperature difference across a uniform 
thickness of a substance, the dimensions of the 
substance, and Its thermal conductvlty, calculate the 
heat flow rate through the substance. 
Given two of the following quantities In a thermal 
system, determine the third: 

Temperature change of object 

Hecit capacity of object 

Work (heat energy transferred) 
Define and given examples of: 

Latent heat 

Sensible heat 

State the general equation for work, and explain how It 
applies to each of the following energy systems: 

Mechanical translation^ 

Mechan 1 ca 1 rotat 1 ona I 

Fluldal 

Electrical 

Therma 1 , . . , 

Define the following rates and , where applicable, 
express thler basic units both In 31 and English 
systems of units: 

Speed and velocity 

Accel erat Ion 

Angular velocity 

Angular acceleration 

Volume flow rate 

Mass flow rate 

Electric current 

Heat flow rate 



76 



O J 

ERIC 



74 



In a linear mechanical system, given all the quantities 
except one In each of the following groups, determine 
the unknown quant ttyt 

Displacement, elapsed time, velocity 
Initial velocity, final velocity, 
elapsed time, acceleration 
Mass, force, acceleration 
In a rotational mechanical system, given all the 
quantities except one In each of the following groups, 
determine the unknown quantity: 

Angluar displacement, elapsed time, angular 
velocity/ Initial angular velocity, final 
angular velocity, elapsed time, angular 
acceleration 

In a fluldal system, given all the quantities except one 
In each of the following groups, determine the unknown 
quantity: 

Volume of fluid moved, elapsed time volume 
flow rate, mass fluid moved, elapsed flow rate 
Given two of the following quantities In an electrical 
system, determine the third: 
Charge transferred 
Elapsed time 
Current 

Given two of the following quantities In a thermal 
system, determine the third: 

Heat energy transferred 

Elasped time 

Heat flow rate 
Define resistance In a general way, and state the final 
form of the energy expended when a force 1 1 ke quant 1 ty 
does work to overcome resistance In an energy system. 
Calculate the magnitudes of starting and sliding 
frlctlonal forces, given the mass or weight of the 
object, the coefficients of friction, and the angle of 
Incl ine. 

Given the two of the following quantities In fluldal, 
electrical, and thermal systems, determine the third: 

Force 1 Ike quantity 

Rate 

Resistance 

Describe the difference between laminar and turbulent 
flow. 

State the factors contributing to fluid resistance In 
pi pes . 

State the factors contributing to thermal resistance of 
objects. 

Describe with the use of graphs the definition of 
resistance as the ration of force like quantity to rate 
(n fluldal, electrical, and thermal systems. Include 
the units of forcelike quantity, rate, and resistance 
for each system. 

State the fundamental difference between sliding 



75 

77 



frldtlon and resistance as It applies to fluldaN 
electrical t and thermal systems. 

Define potential energy, kinetic energy, and 
conservation of enrgy by using examples from mechanical 
systems . 

Given any two of the quantities In the following groups, 

determine the third: 

Mass, velocity, kinetic energy 
Mass, height, potential energy 
Spring constant, spring displacement, 
potential energy / Moment of Ineitla, angular 
velocity, kinetic energy / Capacitance, voltage, 
potential energy 

Given BernoullPs equation and the height of liquid In a 

tank, determine the exit velocity at the bottom of the 

tank If ther Is no fluid friction. 

List and describe the three processes that transfer 
thermal energy. 

Discuss the conservation of energy as It applies to 
fluldal, electrical, and thermal systems. 
D.ef1ne the fcTI lowing terms? state the appropriate units 
In the mk/s system (SI) and t cg/s system; and give the 
equation for each* 

Linear momentum 

Angular momentum 

Impul se 

Angular Impulse 

Moment of Inertia 
Given two of the following quantities, determine the 
third: 

Mass of an object ( 

Velocity of the object 

Momentum of the object 
Given all the following quanltles, determine the third: 

Moment of Inertia of an object 

Angular velocity of the object 

Angular momentum of the object 
Given two of the following quantities except one 
describing a linear col 11 son, determine the unknown 
quantity* 

Mass of first object 

Initial velocity of first object 

Final velocity of first object 

Mass of second object 

Initial velocity of second object 

Final velocity of second object 
Explain the following concepts In a short paragraph 
each: 

Consevatlon of linear momentum 

Conservation of angular momentum 
Use a given equation to calcuate the force produced on 
one blade of a reaction turbine, given the velocity of 
,-luld and the mass of fluid per unit time striking the 
blade. 



76 78 



Describe specific force transformers In the mechanical 
trans 1 at 1 ona 1 f mechanical rotational* fluldalt and 
electrical systems; and discuss their fundamental 
similarity as transformers of forcelike quantities. 
Define the following terms i 

Ideal mechanical advantage 

Actual mechanical advantage 

Efficiency 

. Calculate the Ideal mechanical advantage of a specific 
I pulley, lever* screw* wheel and axle* hydraulic press or 
1 1 f t « and e 1 ectr 1 ca 1 transformer . 
. Calculate the change In current In an Ideal electrical 
transformer. 

Discuss how the role of resistance In a transformer 
dissipates energy Input and reduces efflclence. 
Describe the power Input- and power output 
character 1st tcs of a transformer that operates 
continuously. 

. ' Describe energy converters In general terms that apply 
to all energy-conversion devices. 

Describe the operation of the following energy converters 
Vane pump 
Turbine 

Electric generator 
Electric motor 
Electric heater 
Internal combust on engine 
Bo Her 

So 1 ar co 11 actor 
Given two of the following quant ties, determine the 
third* 

input energy 
Output energy 
Efficiency 

Given the efficiency of all the energy converters used 
In an energy conversion system* determine the overall 
system efficiency. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Cord, Unified Technical Concepts. Waco « TX: Center for 
Occupational Research and Development, 1980. 

? 

D-ferauf, Edward J.* Jr., and Court, James E. Un 1 f 1 ed 
Concepts 1 n App 1 1 ed Phvs 1 cs . Englewood Cliffs, NJi 
Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1979. 



PHYSICS III 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



This third quarter of Physics will provide the student 
with practical knowledge of sound scientific principles 
behind devlcss and components addressed In four concepts? 
transducers i energy transfer and storage, vibration and 
waves* and radiation. Practical hands-on experience with 
devices common to many technologies Is offered In the 
laboratory. 

PREREQUISITE? Trigonometry, Physics II 
CREDIT HOURS ? 4-3-5 



COURSE OUTLINE 



I . 



1 1 . 



Transducers 

A. Basic concepts 

B. Self excited transducers 

C. Externally excited transducers 

Energy Transfer and Storage 10 
A. Basic considerations 

1 . thermal cool 1ng , 

2 . rotat 1 ona 1 
Mechanical systems 
4. trans 1 at 1 ona 1 
2 . rotat 1 ona 1 
Fluldal systems 
Electrical systems 
Thermal systems 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
5 5 



B. 



C. 
D. 
E. 



Ill 



Vibrations and Waves 

A. Oscillating systems 

1. simple harmonic motion 

2. oscillating systems with 
res 1 stance 

3. forced oscillations 

4. resonance 

B. Types of waves 

1 . transverse 

2. longitudinal 

C. Wave characteristics 

1 . wave velocity 

2. the wave equation 

3. superposition 

4. standing waves 

5. Interference 
D. Wave motion as a 

unifying concept 

1. mechanical systems 



15 



79 



SO 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

2. fluldal systems 

3. electrical waves 

IV. Radiation 10 10 

A. Electromagnetic radiation « 

B. Light 

C. Optical Instruments 
0. Waves and particles 
E. particle radiation 

t 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES / 

. / 

In a short paragraph, define a transducer. Include a 
distinction - between those transducers that require 
external energy sources and those that do not. 
. Describe the operation of the following transducers* 
Strain gage 

Accel erometer x 
M 1 crophone 
Turbine flowmeter 
Barometer 
Meter movement 
Thermocouple 
, Thermistor 

Bimetal 1 ic strip 
Photoconduct 1 ve ce 1 1 
Photovo 1 ta 1 c cell 
. Define the following terms: 
Steady state 
Transient 
Damping 
Time constant 
Half-life 
Decay constant 

. Draw and label a graph showing an exponentially-decaying 
function. Include on the graph the time constants Tl/2 
and Tl/e = *X • also write an equation for the function 
shown on the graph. 

Given the Initial temperature of a hot body, the ambient 
temperature of' Its surroundings, and the thermal time 
constant of the syscem, determine the temperature of the 
body after a specif 1 ed time Interval. 

Given the number of radioactive atoms In a*. sample and 
y» the decay constant, determine the number of atoms 

remaining after a specified time Interval. 
Given the values of resistance, capacitance, and applied 
voltage in an RC electrical circuit, determine the time 
constant for the circuit, the^tlme required for the 
capacitor voltage to reach 99% of the Applied voltage, 
and the circuit current and capacitor 'voltage after a 



<• 



9 

ERIC 



80 81 



specified time Interval. 

Explain how the concept of time constants can be applied 
to the following energy systems; give a specific example 
1 n each case : 

Mechanical trans 1 at 1 ona 1 

Mechan 1 ca 1 rotat 1 ona 1 

Fluldal 

Electrical 

Thermal 

Optical 

Nuc 1 ear 

Solve problems Involving simple harmonic motion. 
Describe damping phenomena In oscl Hating systems with 
resistance. 

Describe systems oscillating under the Influence of 
an energy source. 

Distinguish between longitudinal and transverse waves by 
giving at least two examples of each types and by 
drawing and labeling a sketch of each. 

Define the following terms associated with waves and 
wave motion: 

Propagating medium 

Wavelength 

Frequency 

Period 

Displacement 
Ampl Itude 
Phase 

Standing wave 
Constructive Interference 
Destructive Interference 
Beats 

Calculate the wavelength of a wave, given Its velocity 
and frequency. 

Interpret the following equation* explaining the 
significance of each symbol: 

y - A sin 2tT( 7 ft ). 
Explain the meaning of the expression* "The current 
leads the voltage by a given phase aogle " by using 
sine-wave sketches of both current and voltage. 
Describe the superposition principle. 

Describe wave phenomena In each of the following energy 
sytems : 

Mechan 1 ca 1 

Fluldal 

Electrical 

Describe In one or two sentences the basic properties of 
each of the following types of radlatlont 

Sound 

Light 

Alpha and beta particles 
Define electromagnetic radiation (radiant energy), and 
describe a simple experiment that Illustrates how 
electromagnetic radiation can be created. 



81 

82 



. List the frequencies In the electromagnetic spectrum 
from wavelength Em waves of AC power (60 hertz) to gamma 
rays (10 hertz). Including each major part - radio, FM, 
television, radar, microwave. Infrared, visible, 
ultraviolet. X-ray, and gamma ray. 

. Given the equation v +Af - relating wave speed, 
wavelength and frequency J - determine the radiation 
frequency for any part of ihe el ectromagentl c spectrum. 
Given the equation E * hf or E » h c/e, determine the 
energy of different waves In Em spectrum. 

. Describe qualitatively the nature of an electromagnetic 
wave In terms of electric and magnetic fields; state 
what Is always required to generate an EM wave; and 
explain how EM wave* - ^ propagated through empty space 
without benefit of *n elastic medium. 

. Describe a photon, and explain why both wave and 
particle-like (photon) phenomena are required to 
describe 1~< traction of Em radiation with matter. Give 
examples 1r which the wave character Is most useful In 
describing Em radiation and In which the photon 
character is most useful. 

. Explain what Is meant by the Inverse square law and how 
thl* law Is used to describe the fall -off of EM 
radiation propagating from a smeil 1 source. 

. Define polarization, and explain what Is meant by 
po.er1z«d Em radiation - In particular polarized light. 

. Define visible radiation, and determine It's limits 
numerically In terms of wavelength, frequency, and 
energy. 

. Describe tho reflection and refraction of EM radiation - 
especially light - and set up an experiment to verify 
the two laws. 

. Differentiate between elpha and beta radiation and gamma 
i ad 1 at 1 on . 

. Briefly explain each of the three parts In the symbol 
. Given the appropriate equipment. Illustrate and verffy 

the Inverse square law EM radiation In the visible 

region. 

Given the appropriate equipment, produce and aetect 
polarized light In the microwave region. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

CORD, Unified Technical Co n cepts. Waco TX: Center for 
Occupational Research and Development, .1980. 

Dlerauf, Edward J. * Jr. and Court, James E. Unified Concepts 
In AppI led Physics. Englewood Cliffs, NJt Prentice-Hall, 
Inc., 1979. 



238 



82 83 




TECHNICAL COURSES 




«3 



84 



9 

ERIC 



r 



A-C CIRCUITS ' 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course provides the student with the knowledge end 
skills to analyze basic A-C circuits. The course Includes 
the fol lowing main topless Magnetism, Inductance* 
Alternating current , Reactance v Impedance, and Admittance. 

PREREQUSI ITE: DC Circuits, Algeb-a 

CO-REQU I S I TE x Trigonometry, Phuslcs I 

CREDIT HOURS i 4-3-5 

COURSE OUTLINE 

Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
1 . Magnet 1 sm 5 3 

A. Magnetization curves 

B. Permablllty from the BH curve 

C. Hysteresis 

D. Eddy current 

E. Magnetic shielding 

F. Magnetic ctrcults 

II. Inductance 

* A. Faraday's law 

B. Lenz's law , 

C. Counter emf 

D. Time constant 

111. A 1 ternat 1 ng Current 

A. The sine wave 

B. Peak values 

C. Instantaneous' values of 
voltage emd current 

D. The radian 

E. Rms Values 

F. Average values 

IV. Reactance 6 6 

A. Inductive reactance 
'B.« Capacltlve reactance 
C. Vector algebra 

V. lmpedar.ee 10 6 

A. RLC series circuits 

B. RLC parallel circuits 

C. Admittance 

D. Conductance and susceptance 

E. Power factor 



85 



y 



VI . Impedance networks 
A. Loop equations 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Analyze magnetic circuits. 

Operation of an oscilloscope. 
. Determine the peak value , RMS value, and peak-to-peak 

value of a slnewave using an oscilloscope. 
. Plot the response curve of a series RL and RC network. 
. Plot the response curve of a parallel RC and RL network. 
. Analyze A-C circuits using the Thevlnln theorem. 
. Determine the total current In a series RC, RL and RLC 

circuit. 

Determine real and apparent power Iri, a series RLC circuit. 
Use loop equations to solve Impedance networks. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
tot 

. Operate an oscilloscope. 

. Determine peak value. Instantaneous value, average value, 

and RMS value of a sine wave. 
. Measure voltage and current In a series RLC circuit and 

parallel RLC circuit. 
. Determine the total Impedance and admittance of a series 

and parallel RLC circuit. 

Use loop equation to solve Impedance networks. 
RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Boylestad, Robert D. Introductory Circ uit Analysis. Fourth 
Edition, Indianapolis, Int Bobbs Merr 1 1 1 , 1981. 

Jackson, herbert W. , Introductory to Ele ctric Circuits. Fifth 
Edition, Englewood Cliffs, NJt Prentice-Hall, Inc., 
1981 . 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
3 3 



86 



86 



7*W 



COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN (CAD) 1 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



The purpose of this course Is to Introduce and 
familiarize the student with the usage of CAD/CAM equipment, 
software, and terminology. The student will perform a simple 
two-D drafting exercise on a CAD system. 

PREREQUISITES: Computer Fundamentals, Engineering Graphics I 

CO-REQUISITES* None 



CREDIT HOURS: ! -3 
COURSE OUTLINE 

Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
I. Introduction to CAD 1 ~" 

A. Need for computer graphics 
1 n 1 ndustry 

B. Present engineering methods 

C. Need for productivity 

D. Vocabulary - terms and 
acronyms 

E. Who uses CAD/CAH 

II. Computer Applications In 1 
c Engineering 

'a, Computer aided drafting 
CAD 

B. Computer aided design 
CAD 

Computer aided engineering 
CAE 

D. Computer aided manufacturing 
CAM 

III. Computer Aided Drafting & Design 1 

A. Mechanical 

B. Electrical - electronic 

C. Architectural 

D. Mapping 

E. Miscellaneous 



IV. The CAD System 2 4 

A. Hardware 

1. central processing unit 

2. disk memory 

3. magnetic tape 

4. Interactive terminals 

5. pi otter s/^*" 1 



«7 87 



Student Contact Hours 

Class Laboratory 

B. Software 

1. operating systems ^ 

2. application packages 

3. language support 

C. Other standard 
peripheral devices 

V. Why CAD/CAM - Justification 1 

IV. CAD/CAK Usage 

A. Printed circuit board design 2 12 

1. system description 

2. board geometry and 
component placement 

3 . si gna 1 rout 1 ng 

4. editing and checking 

B. Integrated circuit design 

1 . I.C. f abr 1 cat 1 on 

2. the role of CAD/CArt 

C. Generating a wiring diagram 
database 

1. wiring diagrams/wire charts 

2. cabling diagrams 

D. Cartographic processes 

1 . background 

2. using the Information system 
In planning 

Ek Mechanical de&lgn using 2D/3D CAD 

1. the ro!e of Interactive graphics 

2. drafting mechanical parts 

3. generating numerical control data 

4. tool design 

F. CAD/CAM In manufacturing processes 

1. process design applications 

2. forging, extrusion, rolling and 
forming 

3. machine shop application 

VII. 2D Drafting on CAD 2 42 

A. Part description 

B. Orthographic projection 

C. Dimensioning the part 



STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Tour (as available) firms using CAD/CAM systems. 

Observe part being machined on CNC machine. 
. Operate CAD system to reproduce a prr stored drawing. 
. Design/Draw a printed circuit board Ing CAO system. 
. Design/Draw a cable diagram using CAD system. 



Design/describe a basic part. 

Design/draw a machine part In three views. 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 

to: 

. Oescrlbe need for CAD In Industry. 

Describe CAD engineering methods. 
. Explain CAD's role In productivity. 
. Demonstrate CAD vocabulary. 

Enumerate personnel using CAD/CAM. 
. Explain Computer Aided Applications In Draft Ing-CAD. 
. Explain Computer Aided Applications In Deslgn-CAD. 
. Explain Computer Aided Applications In Engineering-CAE. 
. Explain Computer Aided Applications in Manuf actur 1 ng-CAM . 
. Describe capability In mechanical drafting & design. 
. Describe capability In electrical /electronic drafting & 

design. 

• Describe capability In architectural drafting and design. 
Describe capability In cartographic drafting and design. 
Describe miscellaneous capabilities. 

• Describe the function of various hardware In a typical 
CAD system. 

Central processing unit - CPU 
Disc memory 
Magnetic tape 
Plotters 

Operating systems 
Application packages 
Language support 
. Describe the function of other peripheral devices. 
Digitizers 
Pens 

Describe the operations and functions possible In: 

Printer clruit design 

Integrated circuit design 

Generation of a wiring diagram database 

Cartographic processes 

Mechanical design, using 2D/3D CAU 

Manufacturing process 
„ Demonstrate knowledge of all hardware/ software In the 
system to be used. 

Demonstrate proper address and setup techniques. 
Design/descr *be a basic part. 

Demonstate completion of a part by generating a usable 
drawing (hardcopy) . 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Geotsch, David. CAD/CAM Workbook. Southwestern Polishing 
Company. 



a; 89 



Computervlslon Corporation, CAD/CAM Handbook t Computer 

Vision Corporation, 210 Burlington Road, Bedford, Ma. , 1980. 

Ryan. Computerciraph 1 cs Prob 1 ems . Brooks-Cole Engineering, 
Deimart CA., 1983. 

Volflnet. Introductio n to CAD. McGrawHIII, 1983. 

Angell, Ian 0., A Practical Introduction £fi — Computer . 

Graphics. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Available 
from the Numerical Control Society. 

Foley, James D. & Van Dam, Andrles, Fundamentals at 

Interactive Computer Graphics. Reading, Massachusetts* 
Add 1 son-Wesley Publishing Co., 1982. 

GlloK Wolfgang K., Interacti ve Computer Graphics. Englewood 
Cliffs, New Jerseys Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1978. 

Machover, Carl, Understand ing Computer Graphics. New York* 
Van Nostrand Relnhold Co., 

Newman, William & Sproull, Robert, Principles of — Interactive 
Computer Graphics. (2nd Edition.) New York: 
McGraw-HI 1 1,1979. 

Nlevergelt, Jurg 7 Fallman, Michael, Eert 1 nent — Concepts In 
Cony ut er Graph 1 cs . University of Illinois Press, 1969. 

Parslow, R.D. . Computer Graphics : Techniques _§nc| 

AppI 1 cations. New York: Plenum Press, 1969. 

PoMack, Virginia, Becomm 1 no Cotnf ortab 1 e with — Computer 

Graphics. San Diego: Hewlett Packard Corp., 1980. 



Scott , Joan E . , Introduction to Interactive Computer 

Graphics. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Available 
from the Numerical Control Society. 



Thompson, Harmon, Implementing Computer gra phics. Available 
from the Numerical Control Society- 



9 'J 



yu 



COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN (CAD) ,11 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course Is an advanced computer design course that 
assumes the student has a working Knowledge of the use of a 
CAD machine. The student Is expected ^to demonstrate his/her 
working Knowledge of engineering, drawing, technical report 
writing, and prepare a complete engineering design and 
proposal . 

PREREQUISITE* Computer Aided Drafting ft Design (CAD) I 
CREDIT HOURS* 1-6-3 



COURSE OUTLINE 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 



I. CAD/CAM Capability (relevant 
to equipment available) 

A. Scope of available graphics 

B. Analysis capability 

C. CAM capability 

D. Other CAD/CAM capabl 1 1 ties 

II. Engineering Design Specifications 

A. Scope of project 

B. Required sketches for 
preliminary design 

C. I nstructor /Student discussion 
of project 

III. Student Proposal for Design^ 

A. 3-vlew sketch 

B. Preliminary calculations 

C. Project Justification 

IV. CAD Drawings 

A. 3-vlew overall design 

B. 3 views, each part of 
design 

C. Sectional views 

D. Material 1 Ists 

t. loierancing/ notes r .o 
manufacturer 



V . Techn 1 en 1 Report 

A. 8 1/2" X 11" 3-vlew with 
part numbers 

B. Parts listing 

C. Description of how parts 
are to be manufactured 



61 



91 91 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

D. Description of how design 
will work 

E. Cost estimate 

F. Load analysis 

IV. Project Check 1 6 

A. Student review of another 
student's project 

B. Instructor review of project 
and grade 

C. Student corrections of 
draw 1 ngs 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Produce* on CAD, all sketches needed for a preliminary 
design review. 

Produce, on CAD, a 3-vlew sketch and calculations 

sufficient for an engineering proposal. 
. Produce, on CAD, all 3-vlew and 3-d 1 mens lonal drawings 

needed for a "top" drawing. 
. Produce, on CAD, all 3-vlew, 3 dimensional and sectional 

views needed for all detail drawings in a product. 

Generate, on CAD, material lists, tolerance notes and 

manufacturing notes for a Droduct. 
• Prepare fault analysis reports (as required) of other 

student's projects. 

Students correct own errors and finalize all drawings and 
reports. 

Machine assemble and test product generated In the project 
(time permitting.) 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
tot 

,. Explain the >tffcope of graphics available In the CAD/CAM 
system (as relevant to each respective Institution). 

. List the analysis functions which are available In the 
CAU/CAM system ( as relevant to each respective 
Institution). 

. Enumerate the different types of CAM operations that 
could be performed with the CAD/CAM system (as relevant to 
each respective Institution). 

Produce, on CAD, the necessary preliminary sketches for 
design definition of a student project. 

Prepare, on CAD, all sketches, calcuatlons and project 
Justifications needed to produce a design proposal. 
. Generate all overall drawings, detal 1 drawl ngs, material 
lists, toleranclng and manufacturing notes needed to 
produce the proposed project. 

» 92 

92 



I 



Produce a comprehensive technical report on the proposed 
project. 

Correct all design and/or production discrepancies found 
In peer cross-rev* and Instructor checks. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Chasen, Sylvan H. t Geometric Principles and Procedures for 
Computer Graphic Add Ileal tons. Englewood Cliffs, New 
Jersey i Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1978. 

7 

Computer-vision Corporation, CAD /CAM Handbook. C omputer 
V 1 s 1 on Cor por at Ion, 201 Bur 1 1 ngton Road , Bedford , MA , 1 980 

i 

Goetsch, Dav^d. ^AD/CAM Workbook . Southwestern Pub 1 Ashing 
Company. V 



Moore, Patricia A., Harvard Library of Computer Graphics. 
Cambridge i Harvard University Laboratory for Computer 
Graphics and Spatial Analysis, 1980.x 



Parslow, R.D., Advanced Computer Graph lest Economic 

Techniques and A pplications. New York: Plenum^ Press, 
1971. 

Ryan. Computer graph les Problems. Brooks-Cole Engineering, 
Delmart, CA. 1983. 



Sherr , 



S., 



Electronic 



Displays. . 



New ' York: 



W1 ley-Inter science, 1979. 
volflnet. Introduclton to CAD. McGraw-Hill, 1983. 



£3 



COMPUTER AIDED MANUFACTURING (CAM) 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

i 

Computer numerical controlled machining Introduces the 
student to the concept of automated machining, necessary 
coordinate systems. manual programming, conversational 
programming and the actual production of parts on CNC 
machines. ' 

PREREQUISITE! Manufacturing Processes II 

CREDIT HOURS i 1-6-3 

COURSE OUTLINE 



I, 

/ 

II, 
III. 
IV. 



VI 



Student Contact Hours 



Class 

Introduction to Numerical Control 1 

A. History 

B. Introduction terminology , 

C. Economics 



Laboratory 



Drafting for Numerical Control 
A. Base line dimensioning 
&T Cumulative dimensioning 

Review of Mathematics for. NC 

A. Plane geometry 

B. Trigonometry 



1 



Introduction to Coordinate Systems 1 
A. ' Base 1 1 ne 
Cartes Ian 
Two axis planar 
Wor kp 1 ece 1 ocat 1 on 
Point to point and 
continuous path 
Absolute and Incremental 



B. 
C. 
D. 
E. 

F. 



Program Preparation 

A. Planning the Job for NC 

tf\ Flxturihg 

C. Cutting tools 

D. Set-up sheet 

E. Plotting command point and 
cutter path 

F. Writing the part program 
manuscript 

,» 

CNC Ml 1 1 Ing Machine 

A. Machine specifications 

B. Programming format 

C. Tools and methods consideration 



I 



18 



94 



D. Program entries descriptions 

VII. CNC Lathe 1 18 

A. Machine specifications 

B. Programming format 

C. Tools and methods considerations 
0. Program entries descriptions 

'E. Operation procedure 

F. Optional equipment 

VIII. Optional Support Equipment 2 

A. Paper tape 

B. Cassette recorder 

C. Floppy disk x 

D. CAO systems 



STUDENT LABORATORIES 8 

"l Students will plot absolute and Incremental machine 
cutter paths and demonstrate those paths on (the CNC 
/„ machines. 

Students will demonstrate correct location of zero 
"pdlnts relative to planned cutter paths. 
. Students will demonstrate correct operating procedures 

for the respective CNC equipment. 
. Students will demonstrate correctly-written part 
programs on the respective CNC machines. 
, . Students will prepare programs off-line and on-line. 

Students win edit programs ana demonstrate successful 
outcomes on the CNC machines. 

i 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES N 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
tot 

Manually write acceptable part programs. 
. Prepare acceptable tapes and other formats of programs 

and demonstrate correct loading 1nt*» CNC machines. 
. Write acceptable part programs utilizing conversational 

programming techniques. 
. Select prdpe*- tools relative to part programs.^ 
.« Produce acceptable parts on ihe respective CNC machines 

In the laboratories. 

Recommended texts 

Ch 1 1 ds , James J . , Principles of Numerica l Control .Third 
Edition, Industrial Press Inc. 200 Madison Ave., N.Y., 
1982. 



95 

96 



- / 

Harrington* Joseph Jr., Computer In tegrated Manuf ac^ur 1 no . 
New York * Kr I eger . Aval table from the Numer I ca 1 /Cont ro t 
Society. / 

/ 

Nicks, J. BASIC Programming Solutions for Manu/ flCtur 1 nfl t 

Dearbornt Society of Manufacturing Engineers. 

Orr, Joes, The Complete CAD/CAM Anthology. Chestnut HI 1 1 , 
Massachusetts: Management Roundtable Inc., 1989. 

Taraman , K . , CAD /CAM i Meeting Today's Productivity 

Cha) lenoe. Dearborn* Society of Manufacturing Engineers, 
1990. 

\ i ' 



9 £ 



D-C CIRCUITS 




COURSE DESCRIPTION 



This course provides the student with the knowledge and 
skills to analyze basic D-C circuits. The course Includes 
the following main topics: Scientific notation and unit 
converslonst Insulators, Conductors* Sources, Resistance, 
Work and power. Series and parallel circuits* Series-parallel 
circuits, and Equivalent circuits. 

PREREQUISITE: Admission to program. 

CO-REQUISITE: Algebra 

CREDIT HOURS: 4-3-5 




COURSE OUTLINE 



I. Introduction to Engineering 
Technology 

A. SI units 

B. Scientific Notation 

C. Unit Conversions 

II. Introduction to Electricity 

A. Insulators 

B. Conductors 

C. Sources 

D. Resistance 

E. Work and power 



Student 
Class 
4 



Contact Hours 
Laboratory 
6 



III. Series and parallel circuits 

A. Series circuits 

B. Parallel circuits 

C. Series-parallel circuits 



8 



IV. D-C Circuit Theorems 

A. Thevenln's theorem 

B. Norton's theorem 

C. Superposition theorem 

D. Millman's theorem 

E. Delta-wye transformations 

F. Nodal analysis 

G. Mesh analysis 

V. Capacitance 

A. Capacitance reactance 

B. Charging and discharging 

C. Time constants 



15 




4 



ERIC 



99 



97 



STUDENT* LABORATORIES 

Introduce the student to Engineering Technology. 
Introduction' to Instruments, measurement procedures, and 
saftey precautions. 

Measure D-C voltage, current and resistance 
In merles circuits. 
. Measure D-C voltage, current, and resistance In 

paral lei cl rcults. 
. Measure D-C voltage, current, and resistance In 
serles-paral le'i circuits. 

Design a basic voltmeter and current meter. 
. Analyze series-parallel circuits using circuit theorems. 
Determine capacitance values by use of discharge times. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 

. to » 

Convert from one unit of measurement to another. 

Express decimal numbers In scientific notation. 
[ . Use SI units 

. Determine resistor values from their color code. 
. Convert mechanical power to electrical power. 
. Use a digital and analog VOM. 
. . Measure the current and voltage In a D-C series and 

parallel circuit. 
. Use D-C circuit theorems to determine the total resistance, 

current and voltage In resrl stance networks. 
. Plot the charging curve of a capacitor. 

RECOMMENDED TEXT 

Boylestad, Robert D. Introduc tory Circuit Analysis. Fourth 
Edition, Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs Merrill, 1981. 

Jackson, Herbert W., Introduction to E lectric Circuits, Fifth 
Editions, Englewood Cl Iffs, N J : Prentice-Hall, Inc, 1981. 



9 b 



100 

"ERJC 



DYNAMICS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Dynamics Is the study of forces on particles and bodies 
1 n mot 1 on . It Is a f undamente 1 Mechan 1 ca 1 Eng 1 neer 1 ng 
Technology course which supplements the knowledge acquired In 
Statics and allows students to apply this knowledge to 
dynamic systems. 

PREREQUISITES: Statics, Physics II, Analytical Geometry and 

Cal cuius 

CREDIT HOURS: 4-3-7 

COURSE OUTLINE Student Contact Hours 

Class Laboratory 
I. Kinematics of Particles 6 6 

A. Introduction to dynamics 

B. Description of motion 

C. Rectilinear and angular motion 

D. Plane curvilinear motion 

II. Kinetics of Particles 8 6 

A. Equations ' ' motion 

B. Work and Energy 

C. Impulse and momentum 

III. Kinematics of Rigid Bodies 8 6 

A. Translation 

B. Rotation about an axis 

C. General plane motion 

D. Motion about a fixed point 

IV. Kinetics of Rigid Bodies 6 6 

A. Force, mass, and acceleration 

B. Impulse and momentum 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

Student will Investigate change and momentum. 
Using equations and principles of rotational motion, 
students will determine angular velocity and angular 
acceleration of a phonograph turntable. 
. Students will calculate the angular momentum of a flywheel 
drive. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

By the conclusion of this course students will be able to: 

Determine the position, velocity, and acceleration of a 
particle given set conditions. 



101 



Determine the 
Determine the 
Determine the 
Determine the 
Determine the 



motion of a particle. 

acceleration of a particle. 

force acting on a particle. 

angular momentum of a particle. 

angular velocity and angular acceleration. 



of 



a point on a rotating body. 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 



Breneman, Mechanics. McGrfew-HI 11 . 

Jensen and Chenoweth, Applied Engine ering Mechanics. 
McGraw-HI 1 1 . 



102 



9 

ERIC 



ELECTROMECHANICAL DEVICES 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Electromechanical Devices Is designed to provide the 
student with a working knowledge of control elements in 
electrical circuits, transformers, generators, motors, and 
synchromechanl sms. Topics presented Include pcv;er losses In 
transformers, large alternators, DC motor controls and 
efficiency, three-phase AC motors, synchronous motors, single 
and three-phase Induction motors, stepper motors, and 
classifications and applications of synchromechanl sms. 

PREREQUSI ITE: Circuit Analysis 

CO-REQUISITE: None 

CREDIT HOURS: 4-3-5 

COURSE OUTLINE Student C ontact Hours 

Class Laboratory 
I. Electromechanical Devices 2 
An Introduction 

A. Magnetic forces and fields 

B. The origin of magnetism 

C. Magnetic fields of electric currents 

D. * Forces of charged particles 

moving through magnetic fields 

E. Generator action 

F. Motor action 

G. Transformers 

II. Control Elements In Electrical 4 3 

CI rcults 

A. Switches 

B. Testing and maintenance of 
switches 

C. Relays 

D. Testing and maintenance of 
re 1 ays 

E. Relay circuits 

F. Fuses 

G. Checking and replacing fuses 

H. Checking circuit breakers 

III. Transformers 4 3 

A. The basic transformer 

B. Power losses In transformers 

C. Power transformers 

D. Auto transformers 

E. Other transformers 

F. Troubleshooting transformers 



103 



I 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
IV. Generators and Alternators 4 3 

A. The simple DC generator 

B. Construction of DC generators 

C. Field coll connections In 
DC generators 

D. Operation of DC generators 

E. The alternator 

F. Automobl 1e alternators 
Gv Large alternators 

H. Operation of alternators 

I. Maintenance 

V. DC Motors and Controls 8 6 

A. The simple DC motor 

B. Construction of DC motors 

C. QsC motor controls 

D. Motor efficiency 

E. Motor maintenance and 
troub 1 eshoot 1 ng 

VI. AC Motors and Controls 10 9 

A. Three-phase AC motors 

1. rotating magnetic fields 

2 . synchronous motors 

3. Induction motors 

4. power factor In AC motors 

B. Synchronous motors 

1. rotor construction 

2. field pxcltatlon and power 
factor 

3. starting synchronous motors 

4. applications of synchronous 
motors 

C. Three-phase Induction motors 

1. rotor construction 

2. starting three-phase Induction 
motors 

3. applications of three-phase 
1 nduct 1 on motors . 

4. wound rotor motors 

D. Single-phase Induction motors 

1. capacitor - start motors 

2. permanent-capacitor motors 

3. repulsion-Induction motors 

4. shaded-pole motors 

5. speed control of is Ingle- 
phase Induction motors 

E. Universal motors 

VI 1. Stepper Motors 4 3 

A. Operation of the stepper motor 

B. Stepper motor control 



9 

ERIC 



104 



102 



V 1 1 1 . Synchromechan 1 sms 

A. The synchro transmitter 

B. The synchro receiver 

C. Differential synchro 
transmitter and receivers 

0. The synchro control 
transformer 

E. Classification of 
synchromechan i sms 

F. Applications of 
synchromechan i sms 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Examine the characteristics and diagram the magnetic 
fields of permanent magnets and electromagnets. 
Construct common control circuits using switches and 
relays. 

. Construct circuits and measure efficiency of a power 
transformer. 

Set-up a generator and an alternator and measure the 
output character i s t i c s . 

Construct a motor circuit and measure the output 
characteristics of a shunt motor. 

Set up, operate, and determine the functioning 
characteristics of synchronous, induction, anjJ universal 
motors . 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

. At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
to: 

. Diagram and explain the components and relationships of 
basic magnetic and electromagnetic systems. 
Use the right hand rule to determine direction of force on 
a conductor or a current carrying a conductor in a 
magnetic field. 

Identify, diagram, and explain the functioning 
characteristics of basic types of relays used in 
electrical circuits. 

Identify, diagram and explain the function of basic fuses. 
Construct a relay control circuit. 
. Diagram, label, and explain the functioning 
characteristics and the components of basic types of 
transformers . 

Determine primary voltage and current, secondary voltage 
and current, input power and efficiency of a transformer. 
Test transformers for continuity of windings, and shunted 
windings. 

. Diagram, label, and explain the functioing characteristics 
of basic generators. 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
4 3 



105 

103 



. Operate a DC generator and alternator and determine their 

operating characteristics. 
. Diagram, label, and explain the components and funct' «ng . 

.characteristics of common types of '.C Motors. 

Specify appropriate types of motors for a given me r jal 

load. 

Diagram, label, and explain the components and functioning 

characteristics of common AC motors. 
. Construct, test, and plot^the curve of a DC motor circuit. 

Diagram, label, and explain the components and functioning 

characteristics of common types of AC motors. 

Given necessary data . determine the number of magnetic 

poles, synchronous speed, operating speed, slip speed of 

common AC Motors. 
. Operate properly universal motor, shaded pole motor, 

capacitor start motor. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Center for Occupational Research and Development. 
Electromechanical Devices. Waco , TX : CORD , 1 98 1 . 

Alevich, Walker N. Electric Motor Control. New York* Van 
• Nostrand Publishing Co., 1975. 

Anderson, Edwin P. Electric Motors. Indianapolis.. INj 
Theodore Aide and Co., 1969. 

Fitzgerald, A.E. and Kirply, Charles, Jr. Electric Machinery, 
New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc. 1952. 




ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 1 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

An introductory course to provide the technician with 
basic skills and techniques used to communicate Information 
and Ideas graphically. Topics to Includes an Introduction 
to freehand sketching; graphic drafting techniques and 
procedures, schematic drawing; descriptive geometry; and 
computer graphics. . 

PREREQISITE: Algebra 

CO-REQUISITE: Trigonometry 

CREDIT HOURS: 1-6-3 



COURSE OUTLINE 



Technical Sketching 

A. Sketching lines, circles* 
and arcs 

B. Using the 
technique 

C. Sketching 

D. Sketching 



box construction 

In Isometric 
1 n obi Ique 



Student 
Class 
1 



Contact Hours 
Laboratory 
9 



II. Drafting Fundamentals ,2 15 



A. 


Use of Instruments 


B. 


Lettering 


C. 


Alphabet of 1 Ines 


D. 


Drawing reproduction 


E. 


Sea 1 e 


F. 


Dimensioning and toleranclng 


G. 


Geometric construction 




techniques 



III. Orthographic Projection 2 15 

A. Third-angle projection in 
drawing 

B. Section drawing 

IV. Pictorial Drawing 2 12 

A. Drawing objects In Isometric 

V. Schematic Drawing 1 6 

VI. Descriptive Geometry 2 12 

A. True length, slope, 
# and bearing 

B. Auxl 1 lary views 

C. Developments 



107 1 '° 



VII. 'Computer Graphics ' 

A. Drawing on CRT 

B. CAD 'Introduction 

VIII. Overview of Engineering Graphics 
Drawing In Industry 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
1' * 



STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Make freehand sketches In .Isometric and oblique. 

. Use .drafting Instruments to make simple drawings Involving 

geometric construe ton techniques. 
.' Make drawings of objects In orthographic. 

Make Isometric drawings of simple objects. 

Make schematic drawings. 

Find true length, slope,. and bearing of lines. 
Make developments of objects. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES - 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
to: 

. Make simple freehand sketches that will describe an object 
or a process In three dimensions. 

Use drafting Instruments to make simple engineering 
drawl ngs . 

. Draw and Interpret objects ~ln orthographic projection. 

Draw and Interpret simple objects In isometric. 

Prepare and Interpret schematic drawings. 
. Graphically find the true length, slope, and bearing of a 

1 1 ne . 

. Determine true shapes and sizes of surfaces from 
alternative vies utilizing the line and plan methods of 
descriptive geometry. 

Discuss the use of computer as a graphics tool. 
RECOMMENDED TEXT 

Luadder, Warren J., F undamentals of Enginee ring Drawing. 
Englewood Cliff, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1981. 



ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II 

COURSE DESCRIPTION r. 

This course Is designed to further the student's 
knowledge and skills necessary to communicate Information and 
Ideas graphically. Topics to Includes advanced sketching* 
advanced orthographic projection techniques, advanced 
pictorial techniques. Industrial graphics applications and* 
an Introduction to computer graphics. 

PREREQUISITE: Engineering Graphics I. 

CREDIT HOURS: 1-6-3 

COURSE OUTLINE ,~ 

Student Contact Hours 
■* Class Laboratory 

1. Technical Sketching 1 6 

A. Sketching In Isometric 

B. Sketching In oblique 

C. Sketching In orthographic 

II. Lettering 4 

III. Advanced Orthographic Projection • 3 18 
and Dimensioning 

A. Auxiliary views 

B. Points, lines and planes 
C Skew 1 Ines 

D. Piercing points and plane 
* nter sect Ions 

E. Dihedral angles 

F; Intersection and development 

IV. Advanced Pictorial Techniques 3 18 

A. Isometric techniques 

B. Oblique techniques 

V. Industrial Graphics Applications 3 14 
and An Introduction to Computer 
Graphics 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

Make freehand. sketches In Isometric and oblique. 
Letter exerciser us,1ng single-stroke Gothic letters. 
Make- advanced drawings In orthographic. 
Make advanced drawings In Isometric and oblique. 
Make drawings relating to Industrial applications. 
Make basic drawings using 2-D comptuer graphics. 



iol07 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student wl 1 1 be able 

to: . 

. Make detailed freehand sketches In Isometric and oblique. 
. Letter notes and dimensions on drawings using 

single-stroke Gothic letters. 
. Make detailed drawings In orthographic projection 

utilizing standard dimensioning procedures. 
. Make detailed drawings In Isometric and oblique utilizing 

standard dimensioning procedures . " 
. Make . work 1 ng draw 1 hgs ut 1 11 z 1 ng 1 ndustr 1 a 1 app 1 1 catl ons . 
. Make basic computer drawings utilizing 2-D graphics. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Luzadder, Warren J. Fundamentals of Engineering D. awl no. 
Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, .1981. 

Luadder, Warren J. Problems 1n Engineering Drawing, Volumes 
I and II. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall (workbook) 




ma 

HQ 



ENGINEERING MATERIALS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION p 

The purpose of the course Is to provide the student with 
the knowledge of the more Important physical properties, 
limitations, and processing of metals, plastics, and ceramics 
so that he will be able to select materials to use In 

engineering designs. 

PREREQUISITE* Statics, Dynamics 
CREDIT HOURS: 3-^4-5 



COURSE OUTLINE 



Student Contact Hours 
J Class Laboratory 



I. Materials of Engineering 1 

A. Materials In Industry 

B. Types of materials 

II. Properties 4 12 

A. Mechanical properties 
! . stress 

2. strain 

3. hardness 

4. toughness 

B. Thermal properties 

1. thermal conductivity 

2. expansion 

III. Steel Products 2 2 

A^ Making of steel 
B. Steel terminology 

IV. Heat Treatment of Steels 3 4 

A. EquI 1 Ibrl urn diagrams 

B. Mlcrostructure of steel 

C. Reasons for heat treating 

D. Heat treat cycles 

V. Surface and Local Hardening 3 4 

A. Mechanisms 

B. Processes 

VI. Carbon and Alloy Steels 2 4 

A. Alloy designations 

B. Carbon steels 

C. A1 loy steels 

VII. Tool Steel 1 



ml 03 



I 



I 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

VIII. Cast Iron 2 

IX. Corrosion 3 4 

A. Nature of corrosion 

B. Factors affecting corrosion 

C. Types of corrosion 

X. Aluminus and Its Alloys 2 4 

A. General characteristics 

B. Alloy designations 

XI. Copper and Its Alloys 2 

A. Properties 

B. Al loys 

XII. Polymer Materials 3 4 

A. Types 

B. Strengthening mechanisms 

C. Polymer systems 

D. Uses of plastics 

1. structural components 

2. friction & wear 

XIII. Ceramics 2 

A. Types 

B. Appl 1 cations 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Determine and compare the tensile properties of various 
mater 1 al s . 

Measure the compress We stress and strain of metal or 
ceramic samples. 
. Polish a metal specimen furnished by the Instructor and 
observe the specimen In a microscope and sketch the 
observed surface, each the surface and sketch the etched 
surface. 

. Measure the hardness of metal samples with either the 
Brlnell, Rockwell, or Vlckers hardness test. 

. Perform a Charpy Impact test on metal specimens and 
measure the energy absorbed and determine whether the 
fracture was ductile or brittle. 

. Determine the effect of cold working and annealing on the 
structure and properties of metal samples. 

. Determine the Increase of hardness of the metal as a 
function of cold work and the determination of the 
annealing rate as a function of time and temperature. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
to: 



112 

ERIC X1U 



Discuss the production of Iron and steel. 

Explain atomic and molecular structure of metals* 

polymers and ceramics. 
. Discuss plastic deformation* annealing and hot working. 

Work binary phase diagram problems. 

Prepare metal logr pah 1c specimens. 

Discuss various heat treatments on carbon steel* 

Discuss surfact hardening treatments. 
. Explain the nature and use of alloy steels, cast Itons, 

nonferrous metals, plastics and ceramics. 
. Discuss the effect of wear and corrosion. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Budlnskl, Kenneth. Engineering Mater ial Properties flDd 

Selection (Second ed.,). Reston, VA; Reston Publishing 
Co, 1983. 

Van Vlack, L.H. A Textbook of Mater ial Technology. Reading, 
MA t Add 1 son-Wesley Publishing Co. 



llil 



FLUID POWER 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Fluid Power Is designed to give the student an overview 
of fluid power technology and a working knowledge of each of 
the componenets used In fluid circuits. Hydraulic and 
pneumatic systems are covered. Topics Include fundamentals 
of fluid dynamics, coventlonal fluid circuits, and fluid 
power components. 

PREREQUISITE* Physics 111 

CREDIT HOURS i 4-3-5 

COURSE OUTLINE: 

Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
I. Introduction and Fundamentals of 5 6 
Fluid Power 

A. Introduction of fluid power 

1. background and applications 
of fluid power. 

2. advantages and disadvantages 
of fluid power 

3. capabilities 

4. how fluid power works 

B. Basic fluid power systems 

1. hydrauHc systems 

2. pneumatic systems 

C. Review of physics fundamentals 

1 . forms of energy 

2. force and pressure 

3. work done by a fluid 

4. power In fluid power systems 

D. Basic principles of fluid 
behavior 

1. the continuity equation 

2. Bernoulli's theorem 

3. Torrlcelll's theorem 

4. Gas Laws 

5. Pascal 's Law 

6. Charleses Law 

E. Basic fluid symbols 

F . Summary 

II. Fluid Power Properties 
and Characteristics 
A. Properties of hydraulic fluids 

1 . vl scosl ty 

2 . v 1 scos 1 ty 1 ndex 

3 . 1 ubr 1 cat 1 ng ab 1 1 1 ty 



115 

112 



I 



Student gnntact Hours 
Class Labortory 

4. rust and corrosion 
prevention 

5. oxidation stab 1 11 ty 

6. resistance to foaming 

7. flash and fire points 

B. Types of hydraulic fluids 

1 . water 

2. petroleum o1 1 s 

3. watei — o1 1 emulsions 

4. water-glycol fluids 

5. synthetic fluids 

C. Replacing hydraulic o1 1 

III. Fluid Storage, Conditioning 6 3 

Maintenance 

A. Reservlors and tanks 

1. hydraulic reservoirs 

2. pneumatic tanks 

B. Temperature Control 

1. cooling 1n hydraulic L./'" 
systems 

2. cooling 1n pneumatic 
systems . 

C. Filters and strainers 

1. types of hydraulic filters 

2. location of hydraulic 
f liters 

3. pneumatic filters 

4. air pressure regulators 

5. a1r-11ne lubricators 

6. FRL units 

D. Seal 1ng devices 

1. compression packings 

2 . 0-r 1 ngs 

3. V-r1ngs 

4. piston cup packings 

5. piston rings 

6. water rings 

7. seal materials 

E. Summary 

IV. Pumps and Compressors 

A. Theory of pumps 6 3 

1. pos1t1ve-d1sp1acememt 
pumps 

2. characteristics of 
positive displacement 
1 Iquld pumps 

3. nonposl t1 ve-d1 splacement 
pumps 



116 



113 



9 

-ERIC 



St udent Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

B. Hydraul 1c Pumps 

1 . vane pumps 

2. piston pumps 

3. selection of hydraulic 
pumps 

4. pump maintenance 

C. Pressure boosters 
0. Air compressors 

1. reciprocating compressors 

2. rotary compressors 

3. compressor maintenance 

E. Vacuum pumps 

F . Summary 

Actuators and Fluid Motors 6 3 

A. Fluid power actuators 

1. constructon of hydraulic 
cyl Inders 

2 . cy 11 nder operat 1 ng 
character 1 st 1 cs 

3. construction of air 
cyl Inders 

4. mounting and application 
of cyl Inders 

5. special cylinder types 

6. rotary actuators 

7. causes of cylinder failure 

8. cyl Inder maintenance 

B. Fluid motors 

1 . hydrau 1 1 c motor tyopes 

2. hydraulic motor performance 

C. Summary 



Fluid Distribution and 6 3 

Control Devices 

A . Accumu 1 ators 

1. accumulator types 

2. accumulator applications 

B. Pressure Intenslflers 

C. Fluid conductors and 
connectors 

1 . rigid pipes 

2. semirigid tubing 

3. flexible hoses 

4. plastic tubing 

D. Fluid control devices 

1. directional control valves 

2. servo valves 

3. pressure control valves 

4. flow control valves 



117 114 



StyjdSnt Contart Hours 
Class Laboratory 

5. other control valves 
E . Summary 

VIU Fluid Circuits 6 6 

A. Fluid power symbols 

B. Basic hydraulic circuits 

1 . cylinder circuits 

2. motor circuits 

3. speed control 

C. Basic pneumatic circuits 

1. cylinder circuits 

2. motor circuits 

3. speed control 

4. multi-pressure circuits 

D. Synchronous motion 

1. hydraulic cylinders In 
ser 1 es 

2. fluid motors as 
synchronizers 

3 . al r cyl Inders 

4. hydraul 1c motors 

E. Acutator speed 

1. pneumatic circuits 

2. hydraulic circuits 

STUDENT LABORTORIES 

. Construct and operate fluid circuits for single-acting 
hydraulic, and double-acting cylinders. 
Compare characteristics and operation of the cylinders. 

. Measure volumetric efficiency of a hydraulic pump, overall 
efficiency of a hydraulic power system, and delivery rate 
of an air compressor. 

. Construct and operate fluid power circuits for operation 
of single-acting, hydraulic and double-acting cylinders, 
and for operation of hydraulic and pneumatic motors. 
Construct and operate a circuit .using an accumulator to 
power a pressure Intenslfler and a circuit to sequence the 
operation of hydraulic cylinders. 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 

Identify components and describe the function of basic 
hydraulic and pneumatic power systems; show all 
connections for operating a single-acting cylinder. 

. Calcuate quantities for a fluid power system. 

. Construct and operate fluid circuits for single-acting 
cyl 1 nder . 

. Describe principles of fluid behavior and explain how they 



118 1 1 5 



relate to fluid power systems. 
. Explain hydraulic system problems (rust, corrosion, oil 

viscosity too high or low, oil oxidation). 

Describe and list characteristics of hydraulic fluids. 

Construct fluid power circuits, comparing characteristics 

and operation of each. 
. List characteristics and function of each major part of a 

hudrau 1 1 c reser v 1 or . 
. Explain the role of a compressed-air taryk In fluid 

conditioning In a pneumatic system. 

Explain Importance and "methods of controlling temperature 

of fluid In hydraulic and pneumatic systems. 

Explain operation, advantages, and disadvantages of 

various hydraulic filters, and filter locations. 

Explain operation of each element In a pneumatic 

f 1 1 ter-r egu 1 ator- 1 ubr 1 cator unit. 

Draw diagrams of and list applications, and approximate 
operating temperature ranges of various seal materials. 
. List characteristics, applications, and approximate 
operating temperature ranges of various types of pumps. 
Calculate delivery rate of a compressor. 

Explain Importance of cooling and how cooling Is 
accomplished with air and water In a multistage piston 
compressor. 

Explain operation of reciprocating compressors and of 
positive -displacement and nonpoa 1 t 1 ve-d 1 sp I acement rotary 
air comporessors. 

Explain types of damage and maintenance to prevent these 
damages to pump and hydraulic compressors. 
Measure volumetric efficiency of hydraulic pump, overall 
efficiency of a hydraulic power system, and a delivery 
rate of an air compressor. 

Contrast differences In the construction components and 
functioning capabilities of hydraulic versus pneumatic 
cy 1 Inders. 

Sketch dlsgrams and explain operation of common types of 
actuators. . Describe common causes for actuator failure 
and malfunction. 

List procedures for troubleshooting damaged cylinders. 
. Compare operating characteristics of basic hydraulic 
motors(gear, vane, axial piston, radial piston). 
Construct fluid circuits for operation of hydraulic and 
pneumatic motors and compare operating characteristics. 
List and describe the functioning of basic types of 
accumulators. 

Explain the Importance of common types of conductors and 
the 1 r app 1 1 cat 1 ons . 

List common types of control valves, their Importance, and 
their operating characteristics. 

Construct and operate a circuit using an accumulator to 
power a pressure Intenslfler and a circuit for sequencing 
the operating of hydraulic cylinders. 



19 116 



i 



. Explain design demands and control characteristics 
Important In construction of fluid circuits. Including 
actuator speed limits, slow control characteristics, 
synchronous motion, cylinder t>peed. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Fluid Power Systems . Waco.TX: Center for Occupational 
Research a. id Development, 1980. 

Sullivan, James A. Fluid Powe r Th~2Q and Application. 
Reston Publishing Company, Inc. 1982. 

Vlckers. Mobil Hydraulic Manual. 

Henke . Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. Add 1 son-Wes 1 ey . 



A 



1 



9 

ERIC 



1 1 7 

120 




MACHINE DESIGN 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



The purpose of the course Is to provide the baste 
theories and techniques In analysis of machine parts such as 
gears, belts, shafting, clutches, and other machine elements. 
Solutions to the design process Includes the sue of applied 
engineering mechanics and strength of materials. Some of the 
designs will be based on the methods of failures due to 
static loads, fatigue loads, and rigidity. Soma problems are 
based on actua 1 1 nsta 11 at 1 ons w 1 th emphas 1 s on both des 1 gn 
and analysis. The designer gets experience In making 
assumptions and decisions, which give an opportunity to 
exercise his Ingenuity and creative ability. 



PREREQUISITES} Strength of Materials. 

Systems • 



Mechanical Devices and 



CREDIT HOUTS: 
COURSE OUTLINE 
I. 



4-3-7 




Introduction 

A. Computation and precision 

B. .Stress * 

C . Def ormaton 



Student C ontact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
2 



1 1 . Shaft 1 ng 

A. Stress concentration 

B. Keyways 

III. Gears 

A. Types 

B. Strength 

C. Use of catalogues 



6 



IV. Mechanical Fabrication 
A. Rivets 
B Welds 

C. Bolts and screws 

D. Knuckle and cotter Joints 



6 



V. Belts and Chains 

A. Flat belts 

B. V belts 

C. Rol ler chains 




VI. Clutches and Brakes 

A. Plate type 

B. Cone type 

C. Block type 



8 



a 

ERIC 



121 



118 



t 



VII. Springs 

A. Helical 

B. Torsion 

C. Disk 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

Determine size of a shaft based on strength. 
Determine size of a shaft based on deflection. 
Calculate strength of gear teeth. 
. List types of gear failures. 

. Determine tha stresses In a knuckle and cotter Joint. 
Size a knuckle and cotter Joint. 

Determine loads on the rivets of an eccentrically loaded 
connect 1 on . 

Calculate the length and contact angle of a belt or chain. 
Find the allowable horsepower for a flat belt. 
. Computer the number of V belts required In a drive. 
Design a plate or block type brake. 
Find the torque transmitted by a cone clutch. 
Compute the spring rate of a coll spring. 
Analyze a spring for torsional stresses. 
Compute the deflection of a spring. 
Design a simple mechanical device. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

Design a shaft* taking Into consideration stress 
concentrat 1 on . 

Calculate the required dimension of a shaft key. 

Describe the terminology used In gear design. 
. Classify the types of gears. 

Use catalogues to select gears. 

Design a rivet or bolt connection. 

Determine the strength of a weld Joint. 
. Describe the different types of chains. 

Classify the categories of clutches and brakes. 

Analyze torque or force requirements for a clutch or 

brake. 

. Know the purpose of different types of springs. 

Select a coll spring for a given deflection and load. 
Calculate wire size of a coll spring. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Machine Design: Black; McGraw-Hill 

Machine Designs Myatt; McGraw-Hill 

Machine Design; Levlslon; Reston 

Design of Machine Elements; Spotts; Prentice-Hall 



113 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
8 6 



MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 1 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course Is designed to provide a background of 
knowledge covering various manufacturing materials and 
fundamental types of manufacturing methods as employed In 
cold workfng processes. Through lecture* demonstration* 
familiar with the various types of machine tools,, tooling, 
measuring, and Inspection procedures. Automation Is 
Introduced and Information Is presented to aqualnt the 
student with the practices of numerical control for machine 
tools and the uses of special machines* 

PREREQUISITE* Engineering Graphics 

CREDIT HOURS: 1-6-7 



COURSE OUTLINE 

I. Introduction to Production 
Processes 

A. Course objectives 

B. Production design and 
process selection 

1. product specifications 

2. production design 

3. production process 

4. Inspection 

5. marketing 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
2 



II. Principles of Metal Cutting 

A. Mechanics of metal cutting 

B. Metal cutting tools 



III. Metal Cutting Tools 

A. Turning lathes 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3 . operat 1 on 

B. Turret and automatic tathes 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3. operations 

4. multiple toolings 

C. Screw machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3. operations 

D. Drilling machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3. operations 

E. Boring machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3 . operat 1 on 



30 



123 



120 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

F. Planers and shapers 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3 . ope rat 1 on 

G. Ml 1 1 Ing Machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3. operation 

H. Broaching machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3. operation 

I. Sawing machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3 . operat 1 on 

J. Grinding machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3. operation 

K. Gear cutter machines 

1 . types 

2. construction and design 

3 . operat 1 on 

IV. Special Cutting Tools I 18 

A. Chemical ml 1 1 1ng machines 

1 . processes 

2. appl 1 cat Ions 

3. operation 

B. Electrical discharge machines 

1 . processes 

2. appl 1 cat Ions 

3. operation 

C. Electrochemical machines 

1 . processes 

2 . appl 1 cat Ions 

3 . operat 1 on 

D. Laser bean machines 

1 . processes 

2. applications 

3. operation 

E. Ultrasonic machines 

1 . processes 

2. appl 1 cat ions 

3. operation 

F. Electron beam machines 

1 . processes 

2. appl 1 cat Ions 

3. operation 



121 

124 

ERIC 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

G. Automatic machines 

1. definition 

2. application 

H. Numerical control machines 

1. definition 

2. computers 

3. control concepts 

4. application 

5 . operat 1 on 

V. Metal Forming Machines 2 

A. Processes 

B. Operations 

1 . stamp 1 ng 

2. piercing 

3 . bend 1 ng 

4. drawing 
.-5. rolling 

6. squeezing 

VI. Measuring, Gaging, and 1 6 

Inspection Techniques 
A. Visual Inspection 
JJ. Direct measurement 

C. Comparative measurement 

D. Precision measurement 

E. Measuring standards 

F . To 1 erances 

G. Optical measuring 

VII . Finishing ,2 6 

A. Surface finishing 

1 . types ' 

2. processes 

B. Cleaning and coating 

1 . mechan 1 ca 1 c 1 ean 1 ng 

2. chemical cleaning 

3. organic coating 

4. Inorganic coating 

5. metallic coating 

6. conversion coating 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

Conduct a tour of the school facilities to Include machine 
shop, tool and die shop and welding shop. 

Conduct tour of local manufacturing Industry which would 
Include machine ships, foundries, fabrication shops, etc. 
Observe machine operations In local Industries. 
Show film of different forms of metal cutting procedures. 



125 



122 



1* • 
♦ < 



Give a hypothetical piece part, have the student design 
and describe a manufacturing process to produce It, to 
Include the overall system, the necessary equipment, and 
processses performed. 

Have student assist 1n per form 1hg proper metal cutting 
procedures on selected piece parts on the following metal 
cutting tools: 
- Lathe 

M1 1 1 1ng machine 

Dr 1 1 1 press ^ 

Saw 

Gr 1 nder 

Show a film on as many processes as possible. 
Instructor Hll demonstrate common' measuring devices to 
class. Student will then practice measurements with each 
of the devices, and will report results. 

selected machine parts, student will select the 
measuring device., perform and report measurements 



Given 
proper 



for each . 
STUDENT COMPETENCIES 



At the 
to : 



conclusion of this course, the student will be able 



Discuss elements used 1n selection and design of the 
processes used 1n 'manufacturing. 
Describe what takes place when metal 1s cut. 
Name and describe principal cutting tools. 
Explain the purpose of cutting fluids. 

Define the terms "speed" and "fe*ed" and explain how they 
are related to lathe work. 
Define the following lathe terms: 

Plane or straight turning 

Facing 

Parting 

Chamfer 1 ng 

Knur 1 1 ng 

Swing 

Headstock 

Ta1 1 stock 

Co 1 nage 

Bed 

Explain operation of an engine lathe. 

Describe the most common lathe accessories and 
attachments . 

List ways to cut tapers on a lathe. 

Constrast major differences among a bench lathe, a tool 
lathe, and a speed lathe. 

Discuss Important features of a horizontal turret lathe 
and describe the nature of work performed. 
Define the following terms: 

Dr1 1 1 1ng 

Core dr 11 1 1 ng 



9 

ERIC 



126 



123 



Counterdr fill ng 
St«p drilling 
Bor I ng 

Counterbor 1 ng 
Spot-f ac 1 ng 
Countersinking 
Reaming 

Name the two types of boring machines. 

Contrast Important similarities and differences between 
shaping and planing. * 

Describe the difference between peripheral milling and 
face ml 1 1 1ng. ~) 

Describe a hole broach and name Its principal operations. 
List Important advantages. 

Give a practical tolerance for production grinding 
ope rat 1 ons . 

Name th« three classes of gear cutting methods. 

Prepare a brief outline showing the sequence of operations 

Involved 1n» 

Chemical blanking 

Contour machining 
Explain why EDM Is not classified as a high-volume 
production proces. 

Compare similarities and differences of £CM and EDM. 
Discuss reasons that a C02 laser Is particularly effective 
for machining non*eta1s. 

List Important factors that control the quality of 
surface finish obtained by ultrasonic machines. 
Define an electron beam. 

Given,' certain production criteria* make an analysis to 
determine whether^ to auotmate an operation. 
Prepare a sketch lllusratlng how five axes of machine 
mot 1 on ml ght be app 1 1 ed to manuf actur 1 ng operat 1 ons on 
machine part. 

Define the following forming operat 1 ons t 
Stamp 1 ng 
Piercing 
Bend 1 ng 
Drawing 
Rol 1 Ing 
Squeezing 

Give an example of the machines and tools used for those 
operations listed above. 

Explain differences between Inspection, quality control, 
and stat 1 st 1 ca 1 qua 1 1 ty contr o 1 . 
Define the following measurement terms i 

Tolerance 

A 1 1 owance 

CI earance 

Basic size 

Standard size 

Nominal size 



127 



124 



r 



Given a number of direct measurement , comparative 
measurement* and precision measurement Instruments* 
perform and record results of an Inspection of various 
parts to determine If the parts conform to appropriate 
measuring standards. 

Using a table of typical surface finish values* compare 
the ranges of surface-roughness-height values of 
drilling* grinding* and pol 1 shlng. 

Explain why honing cannot be used as a method to Improve 
errors of hole location or alignment on a workplece. 
List some limitations of abrasive blasting. 
Discuss the major advantages of ultrasonic cleaning. 
Explain why alkaline cleaning of aluminum, zinc, brass, 
or tin workpleces Is not recommended. 

Explain the function of organic coating and Inorganic 
coat 1 ng . 

Compare metallic coating with conversion coating. 
List advantages of vibratory finishing. 

RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Doyle, L.E., Manufacturing Processes and Materials for 

Engineers. 2nd Edition. Englewood Cliffs, NJi 
Pr ent 1 ce-Ha 11 Inc. , 1 969 . 

Yankee, H.W., Manufacturing Processes. Englewood Cliffs, NJ» 
Prent 1 ce-Ha 11 I nc . , 1 979 . 



95 



1?8 



a 

ERIC 



MANUFACTURING PROCESSES II 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This course Is designed to provide a background of 
knowledge primarily covering the various hot working 
processes. ' Through lecture , (demonstration, and discussion 
the student becomes familiar with the various methods of 
welding and their applications, casting machinery and 
methods, and special machining operations such as ultrasonic, 
electrolytic grinding and chemical milling. 

PREREQUISITE* Manufacturing Processes I 

CREDIT HOURS t 1-6-3 

COURSE OUTLINE 

Student Contact Hours 
C 1 ass Laboratory 
I. Introduction to Hot Working 1 
Processes 



A. 


Course objectives 


B. 


Class procedures 


C. 


History of welding processes 


D. 


Welding processes 4 nomenclature 




1. 


arc 




2. 


gas 




3. 


Inert gas 




4. 


braz 1 ng 




5. 


forge 




6. 


carbon arc 




7. 


submerged arc 




8. 


laser beam 




9. 


various automated processes 



II. Welding Procedures- Arc 12 

A . Safety 

B. Machines & accessor 1 us 

1 . el ectrodes 

2. base materials 

C. Types of welds 

D. Applications 

III. Welding Procr.du es- Oxyacetylene 12 

A . Saf tey 

B. Equipment & materials 

1 . rods 

2. base materials 

C. Types of welds 4 brazing 

D. Appl 1 cat Ions 



129 128 



9 

ERIC 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 
IV. Welding Procedures - Inert G*-s 12 

A . Saf tey 

B. Equipment & materials 

1 . gases 

2 . rods 

3. base materials 

C. Types of welds 

D. Applications 

V. Welding Design Considerations 1 

A. Appropriate types of Joints 

B . Symbo 1 s 

C. Casting vs. weld fabrication 

D. Weld testing 

E. Economy considerations 

F . Other 

VI. Introduction to Metal Casting 1 

A. Ferrous metals 

1. historical development 

2. modern processing 
(production of metals) 

B. Nonferrous metals 

1. historical development 

2. modern processing 
(production of metals) 

VII. Foundry Practice^ 2 

A. Patterns - construction 

B. Molding considerations 

1 . sand cast 1 ng 

2. sandless casting 

C. Coring considerations 

D. Gating and rlserlng 

VIII. Foundry Equipment & materials 4 

A. Melting equipment 

B. Molding equipment 

C. Casting equipment 

D. Foundry accessories 

E. Foundry materials 

IX. Types of molds 1 2 

A. Classification 

B. Application and use 

X. Types of cores 1 2 

A. Classification 

B. Mixtures and binders 

C. Core finishing 



130 

127 



Student Contact Hours 
Class laboratory 
XI. Foundry Sands 1 2 

A. Natural types and uses 

B. Synthetic sands and uses 

C. Foundry sand preparation 

XII. Sand Testing 6 

A . Types 

B. Purposes of sand 
control tests 

C. Sand preparation 

D. Equipment used 

XIII. Molding Machines 1 

A . Types 

B. Applications 

XIV. Permanent Molding 1 

A. Design 

B . Types 

C. Uses 

XV. Die Casting and Investment 6 
Cast 1 ng 

A. Types of equipment 

B . App 1 1 cat 1 ons 

C. Advantages and limitations 

XV I . Cast 1 ng Des 1 gn and Economy 1 

A . Shapes 

B. Types of metals used 

C. Economy of foundry 
pract 1 ces 

XVII. Special Processes 1 

A . El ectrof orm 1 ng 

B. Electrolytic grinding 

C. Chemical milling 

D. Ultrasonic machining 

E. Electric-discharge 
machining 

F. Electron beam welding 

G. Electron beam machining 



STUDENT LABORATORIES 

Set up range compatible with rod & material to be welded. 
Select correct rod for material and weld position. 
Correctly prepare material for welding. 
Perform satisfactory down-hand butt weld. 
Perform In other positions as time permits. 



131 



128 



Safely set up torch to cut. 
. Cut or level specimens. 

. Safely and properly set up torch for brazing. 

Perform satisfactory brazing on light metal. 
. Safely and properly set up torch for welding. 
. Satisfactorily weld light metal. 

. Safely and correctly set up equipment for light metal. 
. Choose correct heat and rod for material to be welded and 
satisfactorily weld light metal. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

At the conclusion to this course. the student will be 
able tot 

Briefly trace the history of welding. 
. Describe all major welding processes. 
. Demonstrate basic welding vocabulary. 

. Demonstrate correct set up of machine vs. material & rod 
to be used. 

. Produce acceptable butt weld In down-hand position. 
. Perform safe, proper set up and cut light plate. 
. Perform safe, proper set up and produce acceptable brazed 
Joint. 

. Perform safe, proper set up and produce an acceptable butt 

we 1 d on 11 ght meta 1 . 
. Demonstrate safe, proper set up vs. metal and rod to be 

used. 

. Describe some considerations favorable to welded assemblies 
vs. cast assemblies. 

Briefly trace the history of ferrous metals. 
. Briefly trace the history of non-ferrous metals. 
. Describe basic casting from pattern to par£. 

Describe current equipment and materials. 

Describe types of molds and applications. 

Define a core and describe types and applications. 

Deer 1 be types and preparation of foundry sands. 
. Explain reasons for testing & types of tests on sand. 
. Describe the major types of molding machines. 
. Define the concept, types, and uses of permanent molding. 
. Define the concept of die casting. 

Describe types of equipment used In casting. 
. Explain advantages and disadvantages of casting. 

Explain what shapes are feasible to cast. 

Explain what shapes are economical to cast. 

Explain some factors affecting the casting economy. 

Describe the following processes: 

a . Elect r of orm 1 ng 

b. Electrolytic grinding 

c. Chemical ml 1 1 Ing 

d. Ultrasonic machining 

e. Electric-discharge machl nl ng(EDM) 

f. Electron beam welding 

g. Electron beam machining 

132 ±/ ^ J 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Doyle, L.E., Manufacturing Processes and Materials for 

Engtneerst 2nd ed. , Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, 
Inc., 1969. 

Yankee, H.W., Manufacturing Processes. Englewood Cliffs, 
N J, Prent Ice-Hal 1 , Inc., 1979. 



133 130 



MECHANICAL DEVICES AND SYSTEMS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



Mechan 1 ca 1 Dev I ces I s an I ntroductory treatment of modern 
mechanical dr1ves f combining the elements of mechanical 
theory with those of practicality. The topics treated 
Includes i various gear drive con/ fgurat Ions employing spurt 
bevel and helical gears, friction dr1ves v and some selected 
special topics such as cams and universal Joints. An attempt 
has been made to expose the student to a practical skill of 
mechanical assembly. 



PREREQU ISITESs Dynam 1 cs 
CREDIT HOURS t 4-3-7 

COURSE OUTLINE Student Contact Hour s 

Class Laboratory 
I . Spur Gear 7 2 1 

A. Velocity ratio 

B. Torque ratio 

C. Simple trains 

D. Compound trains 

E. Reverted gears 

F. Internal gears 



1 1 . Spec 1 a 1 Gears 4 1 2 

A . He 1 1 ca 1 gears 

B. Bevel gears 

C. Worm gears 

D. Cross-helical 



III. Specie 1 Applications 3 9 

A. Rack and pinion 

B. Counter rotaters 

C . Comb 1 ned mechan 1 sms 

D. Differentials 



IV. Linkages 2 6 

A. Terms and definitions 

B. Types of linkages 

C. Linkage analysis 

V. Miscellaneous Drives 4 12 

A. Disk drive 

B. Cams 

C. Universal Joints 



STUDENT LABORATORIES 



Assemble a gear and pinion. 

Compute the velocity and torque ratio. 



135 

131 



. Construct a simple and compound gear train. 

Measure the velocity ratio of bevel and worm gear. 

Solve for the displacement In a rack and pinion set up. 
. Make a counter rotater drive. 

Set up a mechanical differential and measure Its speed 

ratio. 

. Measure and calculate the mechanical properties of dluk 

drives and rotary cams. 
. Upon examination of two or more of various list of 

machines* Identify type of linkages used. Sketch and 

describe each mechanism movement using arrows to show 

force Input and output. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

Computer gear speed ratios. 

Calculate torque and displacement. 

Identify types of gears. 

Explain the advantages of a worm gear. 
. Discuss the purpose of bevel and helical gears. 
. Sketch a simple and compund gear train. 

Analyze the angular displacement of a differential. 

Describe the operation of disk drives. 

Interpret the effects of the angle of a unf vernal Joint on 
Its velocity output. 

Name and explain the operational characteristics and major 
components of common mechancal linkages. 
. List and describe the used and operational characteristics 
of common cams and cam sytems. 

RECOMMENDED TEXT 

Drives: Center for Occupational Research and Development! 
Waco* Texas 

Mechanical Devices and Systems « Center for Occupational 
Research and Development! Waco* Texas. 

Millwright and Hechanlcs Guldet Audel 

Machinery Handbook 



132 

13b 



MET PROBLEMS 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

The problems course In mechanical engineering techno logy, 
as outlined here, puts the design and production students 
together In a simulated engineering/manufacturing situation. 
Additionally, It Is recommended that the electromechanical 
technology students Join with the mechanical technology 
classes to combine all the resources needed to address a 
complex project such as designing and building equipment 
needed In a robotic cell. 

The production student can gain from Involvement In the 
design, the design student can gain from the manufacturing 
aspect and the electromechanical student can benefit from 
both, which adding the expertise needed to connect and 
checkout the system. 

It Is recommended that the project (s) present as complete 
a CAD/CAM path as possible; I.e., design, drawing, tooling 
and machining. Additionally, It would be desirable to 
Incorporate an adequate electric/electronic component to 
assure a challenge to the electromechanical student. 



PREREQUISITE* Consent of Instructor 
CO-REQUISITE i None 
CREDIT HOURS: 0-9-3 

COURSE OUTLINE Student Contact Hours 

Class Laboratory 
I. Assignment and Clarification of 2 
Projects 

A. Instructor suggests one or 
mors of the following ( or 
slml lar) : 

1 . end effector ( s ) for 
robot ( s ) 

2. pick and place statlon(s) 
for robot (s) 

3. Interface devices for robot 
eel 1(s) In conjunction with 
electromechanical students 

a. conveyor(s) 

b. holding devices for 
dr 1 11 1 ng 

c. turning & "flipping" 
devices 

d. feed devices (move roll 
of sheet metal • advance 



"7 133 



Student Contact Hours 
Class Laboratory 

for stock t etc . ) 
e. brackets for robot arms 
(to hold sight devices, 
etc. ) 

4. duplicate, machine and 
assemble structural parts 
of robots In conjunction 
with electromechanical 
tech 

5. design, machine and 
assemble simple robots 
(pick & place) In 
conjunction with 
electromechanical tech 

6. design tools for the 
CNC ml 1 1 

7. design tools for the 
CNC lathe 

8. others 



II. Produce Preliminary Sketches 

III. Generate Total Design 
and Make Database 

A. 
B. 

c. 
D. 
E. 
F. 



7 
47 



Overall drawing and detail database 
All to 1 eranc 1 ng and product 1 on notes 
All tooling data needed for fixtures 
Generate part programs & machine 
Measure on 3-axls validator 
Assemble projects 



-IV. Test and Evaluate Product 

A. Run as cwnplete engineering test bs 
practical • 

B. Write test report and/or failure 
ana 1 ys 1 s 

C. Prepare and publish corrections (may 
be used for the next problem class) 



STUDENT LABORATORIES 

. Students will develop preliminary design sketches on CAD. 
. Students will create a total CAD/CAM project, from design 
to machining. 

. Students will develop and conduct engineering test(s) on 
product. 

STUDENT COMPETENCIES 

. Demonstrate ability to convert engineering parameters to 
mechanical design. 

134 

138 



Create a total CAD/CAM design/manufacture program and 

produce a product. 

Design and conduct an engineering test for the product 

created. ' 

Prepare and 'publish results of the engineering test. 



r 



135 

139 



STATICS 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 



Statics, a branch of mechanics. Is the study of force and 
their effects on bodies at rest. . This study provides a 
fundamental background for the mephanlcal engineering 
technician to be able to analyze problems In a logical 
manner. Students will apply these principles In 
understanding structural systems. 

PREREQUISITES* Physics II, Analytical Geometry, anc Calculus 
CRLDIT HOURS t 4-3-7 



COURSE OUTLINE 



1 1 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



Introoductlon to Statics 

A. Definitions 

B. . fundamentals concepts 

and principles 

C. Urilts 

Bes1c*^r1nc1p1es 

A. Scalers and vectors 

B. Newtons's laws 

C. Description of statics 
problems 

D. Free body diagram 

Forces and Equilibrium 

A. Introduction 

B. Forces 

C. Moments and couples 

D. Resultant of force systems 

E. Equilibrium 

Center of Gravity and Moment 
of Inertia 

A. Center of Gravity 

1. parallel force systems 

2. Irregular areas 

3. composite areas 

B. Moment of Inertia 

1. parallel axis theorems 

2. composite areas 

3. radius of gyration 

Truss Analyts 

A. Concurrent force systems 

B. Non-concurrent force systems 



Student Contact Hours 
C 1 ass Laboratory 
4 3 



8 



12 



9 



8 



8 



141 



136 



Student Laboratories 

Students will solve a series of force problems with 
multiple forces. 

Students will measure the forces at different points 
within a truss. 

Students will extend their experience with force problems 
through an Investigation of moments. 



Student Competencies 

By the conclusion of this course, the student will be able 
to i 



. Define scalar and vector, and position vector. 

Add and subtract vectors. 
. Multiply vectors by scalers. 

. Find the dot product and cross product of 2 vectors. 

. Draw a free body diagram for a problem showing all of the 

forces acting on the body. 
. Determine the resultant of 2 forces graphically and by 

tr Igonmetry. 

. Find the resultant of 2 forces <by adding x and y components. 

Resolve a force Into tW& components. 

Find the moment of a force about a point. 
. Find the addition of 2 couples. 

Reduce a system of forces to one force and a couple. 

Define center of gravity, and moment of inertia. 
. Calculate the center of gravity of discrete weights. 

Irregular areas and composite areas. 
. Explain the parallel axis theorem. 
. Calculate the moment of Inertia of composite area. 

Calculate the radius of gyration. 
. Find the addition of 2 couples. 



Recommended Texts 

Brannernan, Mechanics. McGraw-Hill Book Company 

Jensen & Chenoweth, Applied Engineering M echanics. 
McGraw-Hill Book Company. 




Define statics. 



1 3 7 



142 



STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 



Strength of materials Is designed to give the student an 
overview of how materials behave when subjected to different 
loadings and restraints and for the student to predict this 
behavior In a given situation. Topics presented will Include 
concepts of stress » strain* torsion* center of gravity and 
moments of Inertia. The course Is Intended for students who 
have successfully completed courses In Statics and Dynamics. 

PREREQUS I TES » Statics and Dynamics* Calculus 

CREDIT HOURS » 4-3-7 



COURSE OUTLINE: Student Contact Hours 

Class Laboratory 
I. Simple Stress and Strain 8 6 

A. Normal stresses 

B. Shearing stresses 

C. Ultimate stresses 

D. Allowable stress 

E. Factor of safety 

F. The direct-stress formula 

G. Axial deformation (strain) 

H. Elasticity-elastic limit 

I . Hook ' s Law 

J. Shearing deformation and 

Polsson's Ratio 
K. The stress-strain diagram 
L. Stress concentration 
M. Axial stresses In members 

of two mater 1 a 1 l* 
11^; Torsion 

A. The torsion formula 4 3 

B. Analysis and design of 
circular shafts 

C. Shaft couplings 

D. Angle of twist 

E. Power transmission of shafts 



III. Beams 1 2 

A. Beam loading conditions 

B. Shear and shear diagrams 

C. Bending moments and moment 
diagrams 

D. Bending stress* the flexure 
formula and section modulus 

E. Shearing stresses In standard 
sections 

F. Designing beams of standard 
sect ions 



i*l3S 



i 



Student Conta ct Hours 
Class Laboratory 

G. Calculating the Deflection 
of Beams 

H . Stat 1 ca 11 y I ndeterm 1 nate Beams 

IV. Bending Combined With Tension 4 3 

or Compression 

A. Combined axial and bending 
stresses 

B. Combined stresses caused by 
eccentric axial loading 

V. Compression Members 4 3 

A. Types of compression members 

and 1 oad 1 ng 
B* Radius of gyration and 

sjenderness ratio 

C. Euler's formula for column 
des 1 gn 

D. Gordon-Rankin formula for 
column design 

VI. Bolted, Riveted and Welded 8 
Connections 

A. Types of failures In riveted 
and bolted connections 

B. Calculating shearing stresses 
In rivets and bolts 

C. Calculating bearing stresses In 
rlvetsand bolts 

D. Designing simple riveted and 
bolted Joints 

E. Designing simple welded 
connections 

STUDENT LABORATORIES 

Research the availability of steel structural shapes 
according to ASTM standards from the A ISC handbook. . 
. Identify structural shapes (W, M, S, HP, C, L, BAK,) 
(A ISC handbook) 

Research dimensions for detailing from the A ISC handbook. 
Research data of allowable stress for structural cross 
sections. 

Explore applications of composite materials In Industry 

(graphite, fiberglass, etc.) 

Identify beam types and loading conditions. 

Identify failures In riveted, bolted and welded 

connections. 

Prepare a stress-strain diagram. 
Construct free body diagrams. 
Construct shear and moment diagrams. 
Perform a tensile test. 
Perform a hardness test. 

Explore applications of aluminum, copper, titanium, 
cobalt, brass, tin, lead, nickel 1n Industry. 

144 

o 139 

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6 



4 



STUDENT COMPETENCIES 



. Define terms as; normal shearing, ultimate and allowable 
stress, factor of safety, axial deformation, elasticity, 
Polsson's Ratio, modulus of elasticity. 
Solve problems In stress and strain. 

• Identify points on the stress-strain diagram. 
Solve axtal stresses In members of two materials. 

• Solve problems Involving Polsson's Ratio. 

• Solve problems In temperature stresses. 
Solve problems In shearing deformation. 

• Solve problems In torsion. 

Solve problems In power transmission on shafts. 
Calculate shear In beams and draw shear diagrams. 
Calculate bending moments and draw moment diagrams. 
Design beams If standard section. 
Calculate deflections In b'»ams. 

Design simple statically Indeterminate beams (beams over 3 
or 4 spans ) • 

Define radius of gyration and s tenderness ratio. 
Identify types of compression members and loading 
conditions. • Design compression members using Euler's 
Formula and the Gordon-Rankin Formula. 

Calculate problems Involved with bending combined with 
tension. 

• Design simple riveted, bolted and welded connections. 



RECOMMENDED TEXTS 

Granet, Irving, Strength of Materials fox Engineering 

Technology. Reston, VA Prentice-Hall Co., 1980. 

Material a. Waco, TX Center for Occupational Research and 
Deve 1 opment • 1 980 . 



140 

145 



PILOT LEVEL TEACHING EQUIPMENT INFORMATION 
FOR MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 





Note: This (s a suggested equipment list which Is 
considered to be a minimum requirement for carrying 
out pilot level programs. 



147 141 

ERIC 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS - SUGGESTED EQUIPMENT INFORMATION 



Basic Courses 



Equipment/ 
Instrumentation 


Training Devices/ 
Systems 


Qty. Per 
School 


Approximate 
Unit Cost 


.tx tension 




Draftina Tables 


20 


500 


10,000 




iraCK uraTiera 


20 


350 


7,000 




niarn Printer 


1 


1,500 


1,500 




naruemny rur nave 


I 

* 


10,000 


10,000 


These items may be 


Tempering Furnace 


1 


9,000 


9,000 


used jointly with 


Polishing Table 


2 


2,000 


4,000 


mechanical and 


Grinding Table 


2 


2,000 


4,000 


electromechanical 


Cut-off Machine 


1 


6,000 


6,000 


technology 


Mold Press 


3 


1,500 


4,500 




Belt Surfacer 


2 


3,000 


6,000 




Metallurgical Microscope 


4 


3,000 


12,000 




Metal lograph 


1 


30,000 


30,000 



143 



142 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS - SUGGESTED EQUIPMENT INFORMATION 



Basic Courses 


Equipment/ 
Instrumentation 


I raining Devices/ 
Systems 


C\M\» Dam 

yty. Per 
School 


Approximate 
Unit Cost 


Extension 


CNC Milling Machine 






1 






Drill Press 


Sharing 




3 


10,000 


30,000 


Surface Grinder 


Possible 
with 




3 


20,000 


60,000 


Lathes, 145" 
Vertical Mill 


Electro- 
Mechanical 
Program 




3 
3 


8,000 
30,000 


24,000 
90,000 


Horizontal Mill 




12 


500 


6,000 


Tool Sets and Gauges 


* 

Shared 
with 
Other 
Programs 


Mechanical Drives Trainers 
Belt Drives 
Chain Drives 

Mechanical Linkages Trainers 
Levers Followers 
Rocker Arms Geneva Mechanism 
Cranks Sliding Links 
Drag links Ratchets 
Cams Toggles 







145 



144 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS - SUGGESTED EQUIPMENT INFORMATION 



Basic Courses 



Equipment/ 
Instrumentation 


Training Devices/ 
Systems 


Qty. Per 
bcnooi 


Approximate 
unit 105 1 


LA LCI la 1 UN 


CNC Coordinate Measuring Machine 




1 


7c nflfl 
/o >uuu 


75 000 


CNC Machine Tuning Center 






i no nnn 


100 000 


CNC Wire Feed EDM 






75,000 x 


75,000 


CNC Floppy Disk Programming 
Center 






20.000 


20,000 


Atmospheric Controlled Heat 
Treatment Center 






25,000 


25,000 


Hardness Tester 






10,000 


10,000 


Tensile Testing Machine 






15,000 


15,000 


Digital Optical Comparator 






30,000 


30,000 


Electronic Microscope 






20,000 


20,000 


Computer Assisted Drafting 
System 




1 


97,000 


97,000 



$467.000 



147 



146 



APPENDIX A 
SUGGESTIONS FOR 
IMPLEMENTING A 
PROBLEMS COURSE 



V 



148 



* r 



SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPLEMENTING A PROBLEMS COURSE 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The problems course Is intended to be the capstone of the 
two years a student spends tn the technical school. It 
should be problem/project centered and attempt to 
synthesize everything that has occurred throughout the 
curriculum. It Is also possible to broaden the student's 
areas of understanding during this time and to cover 
topics not covered because of time or other constraints. 
An excellent strategy is to .pair students from different 
disciplines,. ,EMT/EET, Robotlcs/CAD et... Just as might 
happen In Industry. A great deal of/ learning and sharing 
can take place through this arrangement end the 
experiences should as closely as possible approximate the 
conditions of the "real" high tech world. 

II. POSSIBLE PROBLEMS TO BE ENCOUNTERED * 

Too often, curriculum designers suggest problems courses 
which sound Ideal on paper, but are Impossible to 
Implement. This Is due. In the final analysis, to 
widely uppredlctable factors discovered at the time the 
problems course Is to come togeher. such as: 

V 

A. Student numbers and distribution - 

The M.E./E.M.T. combination, for example, could 
arrive at the proper quarter for "problems" \ without 
a design student or a production student. What 
then? 

Obviously, adjustments would need to be made., If 
a mechanical design student were 1ack1ng.-^then a 
on-deslgn project should be picked - - such as 
replication an electromechanical device ( which 
would Increase the number of devices available for 
future learning labs.). 

Invaluable experience would be gained In measuring 
the pasts to be replicated, then describing them 
accurately on CAD. If a production student were 
then available, he/she could translate the CAD data 
Into CAM operations to make the parts. In the 
absence of a production student, a machine student 
could complete the CAM cycle. * 

• » 

Finally, the electromechanical technology students ' 
could assemble and check out the product. If no 
electromechanical technology students were 
available. It Is conceivable that the mechanical 



156 149 



technology students could complete the project In 
cooperation with the electronic/electric technology 
students. 

Chances are good that* In combining classes* numbers 
will seem too large and unmanageable for a single* 
coordinated project. In this case there are 
reasonable options* 

1. Assign small Individual projects 
concurrently with a coordinated* or group 
project. 

2. Assign a group project large enough so that 
all students can work on a sub-assembly or 
detail part of the whole. (Beware of a "log 
Jam" at test and checkout ! ) * 

3. Assign two or more group projects. 

The above examples of "what-lfs" are Intented to 
serve as a model to stimulate thinking of ways to 
solve number and distribution problems. 

B. Student pr ogress and distribution 

Occasionally students arrive at the "problems" area 
somewhat weak In an area of knowledge. Seldom Is 
distribution of this weakness such that all students 
have the subject deficiency. In the case of a . 
reasonable number having a well-rounded grasp of the 
technology, "pairing" of the lesser skilled students 
with the stronger students can be beneficial. 

In a case where the distribution runs to a majority 
weakness In an area of knowledge, the curriculum 
should be examined. However, to proceed with the 
subject group, the staff should steer the projects 
In such a way that they tend to remediate the lack. 

C. Student creativity 

It Is desirable to draw first from the Ideas of the 
student body In putting together "problems'* 
projects. Often It Is possible /to assign small 
projects that were originated Individually by the 
students themselves. Or, students may suggest a 
coordinated, or group, project that Is very worthy. 
It Is an excellent Idea to work closely with local 
firms having tool design needs. Simple tools and 
equipment can be designed and built for these 
companies (to -the great benefit of both parties). 
Occasionally, however, solicitation of proposals for 
projects produces a low number of useable Ideas. It 
Is wise to have on hand a number of both Individual 
and group projects from which the students may 
choose to their liking. 



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156 159 



PLANNING A PROBLEMS COURSE 



A "problems" cou.se can linger In a student's mind ss 
the high-water mark of technical education, or be 
remembered as waste of time. The difference usually 
Is In the planning done by the school staff. 

A. Interdlsctpl Ine staff coordination 

If "probU-ns" are to be attempted which simulate 
an engineering / manufacturing environment! an 
interdlsclpl Ine approach should be taken (such as 
a problem Involving H.E. and E.M.T.). The first 
step Is for the staff In these disciplines to meet 
and address the following minimum Issues. 

1. What roles each staff member would assume. 

2. What laboratories will be needed. 

3. What scope of project (s) Is reasonable. 

4. Maximum material costs affordable. 

5. General learning objectives desired. 

6. Estimated number of students per group 
project. 

B. Formulating student entry 

Many approaches are possible to enlist and assign 
students to projects, but the staff should have 
planned In detail how the student be assigned to a 
"problems" project. 

A suggested method fol lows: 

1. Staff and students need to discuss thoroughly 
the rules regarding time. cost, scope, and 
grading. 

Give handouts. 

2. Students receive a form for proposal and 
deadl Ine. 

3. Students submit proposals. 

4. Instructors evaluate proposals, suggest 
changes and deadline. 

5. Instructors assign Individual projects and 
group projects. 

C. Formulate engineering coordination methods 

Students sharing a group design/make project 
across 2 or 3 disciplines will need an organized 
way to coordinate their design and build 
efforts . 

They need to learn the methods employed by 
Industry 

I. Suggest that the groups elect a "project" 
engineer who will be responsible for total 
coordination of the project. Elect 
assistant for backup. 



I 



A 



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2. Suggest that each discipline elect a "group" 
engineer; 1 .e. v a single point of contact for 
that group. 

3. Suggest that each "group" engineer assign 
tasks within his/her group. 

4. Establish regular coordination meetings 
(usually with basically a fixed format to 
prevent digression). 

5. Empower "project" engineer to call special 
meetings as required. 

6. Suggest weekly progress reports by "group" 
engineer to the "project" and a composite 
weekly report from the "project" engineer. 

7. Suggest that "project". In conjunction with 
"group"* prepare a master schedule and keep 
It current. Off-schedule reports must be 
accompanied by "make-up" plans and newly 
scheduled target dates. 

8. Suggest that "group" prepare al 1 the Input 
data as they go to a 1 1 ow rev 1 s 1 on and prompt 
compilation of the final engineering and 
cost report. 

9. Suggest that "project" demand as we go data 
to a 1 1 ow comp 1 1 at 1 on of the f 1 na 1 
engineering and cost reports In a timely 
manner ( project status* man hours* span 
time and cost* etc.) 

10. Suggest that a file be set up for drawings 
and that It be handled professionally. 
Changes should be documented and routed to 
"group" and "project" leaders. 

D. Plan the physical details 

Often all the people and procedural plans are In 
order* but the physical and logistical plans are 
sketchy. They staff should give considerable 
thought to the followlngx 

1. Materials. Are there adequate materials for 
student projects? 

Have plans been laid for timely puchases of 
special needs? 

2. Special processes. Some special needs* such 
as heat-treating, may be generated In the 
projects. Have plans been laid to handle 
these needs? 

3. Equipment availabllty. If the project Is 
large, or If there are multiple projects, 
access to machines and equipment can become a 
problem. Considerable thought must be given 
to availability and scheduling of CAD and CAM 




I 



equipment, as well as utilizing non-CAM 
machines. 

4. Space. It Is desirable to set up a simulated 
eng 1 neer 1 ng/produc 1 ton setting. Is space 
available? Can "group" and "project" leaders 
set up a slmulateed office (or work stations 
with pigeonholes and baskets for report 
and change notices)? 

E. Formulate progress reviews 

Obviously the coordinated, or group, project 
described In c above, will be supplying weekly 
reports at both group and project levels. They 
will also maintain a master schedule as well, so 
progress wl 1 1 be we 11 documented. 

It Is possible, however, to have a group project 
going concurrently with small Individual 
projects. The Individual should learn the same 
discipline of reporting that Is legislated for 
the group. 

Following Is a suggested method: 

1. Prepare a "contract" with the student 
relative to completion of design, build, 
test and final engineering reports. 

2. Discuss the progress reports and format to 
preclude any misunderstanding. Explain 
weight of progress reviews In final grade. 

3. Fo 1 1 ow up 1 The Instructor must call for 
progress reviews, look at them and return 
them as quickly as possible. 

F. Formulate a grade system 

Since student projects have dlslnct phases It Is 
suggested that some method be designed to grade 
accorldngly. Additionally, It Is sometimes case 
that a project cannot be completed In the allotted 
time. If grading Is done by phases <n these cases, 
a base exists for formulating a final score. 

Phases of a project and grading could be as follows: 

1. Organization of the eng 1 neer 1 ng/produc Ion groups. 

2. Design of engineering checkolnts and controls. Including 
forms and paperwork. 

3 . Hov effect 1 ve group coord 1 naton actua 11 y Is. 

4. Aptness of the design vs. the oparameters. 

5. Producab 1 1 1 ty of the product. 



159 

153 



6. How well the design fulfills the original parameters. 

7. How well schedules are met 

8. The test procedures 



i 



154 

160 



APPENDIX B 
TECHNICAL SOCIETIES 

TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS OF 

INTEREST 



i6i 155 



TECHNICAL SOCIETIES AND ORGAN I AT IONS 



American Automatic Control Council (AACC) 

P.O. Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 
919/549-0600 

Numerical Control Society (Automatic Control) (NCS) 
519 Zenith Drive, Glanvlew, IL 60025 
312/297-5010 Responsibility for the application of 
numerical control techniques. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 
345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY 10017 
212/644-7910 

International Society for Hybrid Microelectronics (ISHM) 
P.O. Box 3255, Montgomery, AL 36109 205/272-3191 
Ceramics, thick/thin films, semiconductor packaging, 
discrete semiconductor devices, and monolithic circuits. 
Bimonthly newsletter. 

National Engineering Consortium (NEC0 (Not an association) 
1211 West 22nd fcvreet. Oak Brook, IL 60521 312/325-5700 
Provides fellowships, scholarships, grants, and endowments 
to engineering students for furthering electronic training. 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 

345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY 10017 312/644-7685 
Accredits college engineering curricula and engineering 
technology programs. 

American Association of Engineering Societies (AAES) 

345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY 10017 
212/686-5676 

Advance the science and practice of engineering In the 
public Interest. 

American Institute of Industrial Engineers (AIIE) 

25 Technology Park, Norcross, GA 30092 404/449-0460 
Design, Improvement, and Installation of Integrated systems 
of people, materials, equipment, and energy. 

American Instltue of Plant Engineers (AIPE) 
3975 Erie Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45208 
Newsletter 8 times/year; Journal quarterly. 

American Society for Certified Engineering Technicians (ASCET) 
4450 West 109th Street, Overland Park, KS 66211 913/341-5669 
Skilled technicians whose training and experience qualify 
them to provide technical support and assistance to 
registered professional engineers. Cert 1 f 1 ed_EngJ neer 1 no. 
Technl clan , bimonthly. 



Automated Procedures and Engineering Consultants (APEC) 

Miami Valley Tower, Suite 2100, Dayton, OH 45402 
513/228-2602 

Application of up-to-date computer technology to building 
design. Journal, bimonthly. 

Engineering Technologist Certification Institute (ETC I) 
2029 K Street, NW< Washington, DC 20006 202/659-5773 
Not a membership organization. Issues certificates for 
Associate Technologists and Engineers. 

American Institute for Design and Drafting (AIDD) 

3119 Prince Road, Bartlesvi 1 1e, OK 74003 918/333-1053 
Design and Drafting News , monthly. 

Design and Drafting Management Council (DDMC) 

P.O. Box 11811, Santa Ana, Ca 92711 714/838-5800 
Computer-assisted drafting. Library. Commentary, monthly. 

+> 

Engineering Reprographic Society (ERS) 

P.O. Box 5805, St. Louis, MO 63134 314/232-7386 

American Federation of Information Processing Societies 
(AFIPS) 

1825 North Lynn Street, Suite 800, Arl Ington.VA 22209 
703/558-3600 

Serves as national voice for the computing field, advanced 
knowledge of the Information processing sciences. 

Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) 

1133 Avenue of Americas, New York City, NY 10036 
212/265-6300 

Computer and Automated Systems Association of the Society of 
Manufacturing Engineers (CASA/SME) 

Box 930, One SME Drive, Dearborn, MI 48128 313/271-1500 

Instrument Society of America (ESA) 

P.O. Box 1227, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 
919/549-841 1 

Instruments and controls In science and industry. 
Instrumentation Technology , monthly. 

Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) 

P.O. Box 930, Dearbor, MI 48128 313/271-1500 
Library. Manuf actur I no Eno I neer I ng . monthly. 

American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 

345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY 10017 212/644-7722 
Sponsor for ANSI. Library. Applied Mechani cs Review, 
monthly. Mechanical Engineering , monthly. 

American Institute of Physics (AIP) 

335 East 45th Street, New York City, NY 10017 
212/661-9404 



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164 



157 



\ 



American Physical Society 

335 East 45th Street, New York City, NY 10017 
212/682-7341 

American Society for Quality Control (ASQC) 

161 West Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53227 
414/272-8575 

Qua] Itv Progress , mpnthly. 

International Institute for Robotics (IIR) 
.Box 21078, Dallas, TX 75211 
Smell library. Robotics Newsletter , monthly. 

Robot Institute of America (RIA) 

P.O. Box 930, Dearborn, MI 48128 313/271-1500 
Robotics Today , quarterly. 

Robotics International (RI/SME) 

P.O. Box 930, Dearborn, MI 48128 313/271-1500 
Library. Robotics Today, bimonthly. 

American National Standards Institute 

1430 Broadway, New York City, NY 10018 212/354-3300 



m 158 



JOURNALS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS 
OF INTEREST TO THE ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN 

American Journal of Physics , monthly $25 

335 East 45th Street, New York City, NY 10017 

American Machinist, biweekly, $25 

1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York City, NY 10020 

Canadian Controls and Instr umentation, monthly, $10/12 
481 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada H52 1A7 

Canadian Datasvstems. monthly $10/12 

481 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M52 1A7 

Canadian Electronics Engineering , monthly, $10/12 

481 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M52 1A7 

♦ 

Computer . monthly, $30 

5855 Naples h>/1ne Plaza, Suite 301, Long Beach, CA 90803 

Computer Decisions , monthly, $15 

50 Essex Street, Rochelle Park, NJ 07662 

Computers and Automation . 13 times/year, $18.50 
815 Washington Street, Newtonvllle, MA 12160 

Computer wor Id . weekly, $12 

797 Washington Street, Newtonvllle, MA 02160 

Data Management , monthly, $8 

505 Busse Highway, Park Ridge, IL 60068 

Datamation , monthly, $18 

35 Mason Street, Greenwich, CT 06830 

Design Engineering , monthly, $12/15 

481 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M52 1A7 

Design News , biweekly, $20 

221 Columbus Avenue., Boston, MA 02116 

EE - Electrical Equipment , monthly, no price listed 
172 South Broadway, White Plains, NY 10605 
(Instrument Society of America) 

Electromechanical Design , monthly, $20 
167 Corey Road, Brook 1 Ine, MA 02146 

Electronic Design , biweekly, $25 

50 Essex Street, Rockelle Park, NJ 07662 

Electronic Engineering Times . 26 times/year, $8 
280 Community Drive, Great Neck, NY 11030 



\ 



Electronic Newsl weekly, $9.50 

7 East 12th Street, New York City, NY 10003 

Electronic Technic Ian /Dealer , monthly, $6 
757 Third Avenue, New York City, NY 10017 

Electronics , biweekly, $12 

1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York City, NY 10020 

Engineering Education . 8 times/year, $20 

One duPont Circle, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20036 
(American Society for Engineering Education) 

I^EE Spectrum , monthly, $3 

345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY 10017 
(Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 

Instrumentation Technology , monthly, $7 
400 Stanwlx Street, Plttsburge, PA 15222 

I nstruments and Control Systems , monthly, $25 
P.O. Box 2025, Radnor, PA 19089 

Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery , quarterly, 
$30 ,1133- Avenue of the Americas, New York City, NY 10036 

Machine and Tool Blue Book , monthly, no price listed 
Hitchcock Bui idlng, Wheaton, IL 60187 

Machine Design . 31 times/year, $20 

Penton Plaza, 1111 Chester Avenue, Cleveland, Oh 44114 

Manufacturing Engineering and Management , monthly, $8.50 
20501 Ford Road, Dearborn, Ml 48128 

Mechanical Engineering , monthly, $10 

345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY 10017 

Phvslcs Today , monthly, $12 

335 East 45th Street, New York City, NY 10017 

Process Design , monthly, no price listed 
221 Columbus Avenue, Boston, MA 02116 

Production , monthly, no price listed 

P.O. Box 101, Bloomf leld H11 1 s. Ml 48013 

Tooling and Production , monthly, $10 
5821 Harper Road, Solon, OH 44139 

Hewlett-Packard Journal 

3000 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94303 



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168 I S() 




Technology , bimonthly, $24 

Technology Information Corporation, 2200 Central Avenue, 
Suite F, Boulder, CO 80301 

Tekscope - Tektronix. Inc. (customer Information) 
P.O. Box 500, Beaverton, OR 97077 





161 



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Federal law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin (Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964); sex (Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and Title II of the 
Vocational Education Amendments of 1976); or handicap (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 
1973) in educational programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance. 

Employees, students and the general public are hereby notified that the Georgia Department of 
Education does not discriminate in any educational programs or activities or in employment policies. 

The following individuals have been designated as the employees responsible for coordinating the 
department's effort to implement this nondiscriminatory policy. 

Title II - Ann Lary, Vocational Equity Coordinator 
Title VI - Peyton Williams Jr., Associate Superintendent 

of State Schools and Special Services 
Title IX - Myra Tolbert, Coordinator 
Section 504 - Jane Lee, Coordinator of Special Education 

Inquiries concerning the application of Title II, Title VI, Title IX or Section 504 to the policies and 
practices of the department may be addressed to the persons listed above at the Georgia Department of 
Education, Twin Towers East, Atlanta 30334; to the Regional Office for Civil Rights, Atlanta 30323; 
or to the Director, Office for Civil Rights, Education Department, Washington, D.C. 20201. 



ERIC 



162 



Program Improvement and Evaluation 
Office of Vocational Education 
Georgia Department of Education 
Atlanta. Georgia 30334 
Charles McDaniel, State Superintendent of Schools 




1984