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IVIASA 


NASA SP-7037 (114) 
October 1979 


Aeronautical 
Engineering 
A Continuing 
Bibliography 
with Indexes 


National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration 


I Aeronautical Engiri^^ng Aei 
ering Aeronautical Engineerin 
igineering Aeronautical Engin 
cal Engineering Aeronautical E 
nautical Er^ineering AeronaiJ 
Aeronautical Engineering Aer 
ering Aeronautical Engineerinc 
gineering Aeronautical Engine 
^1 E^neering Aeronautical E 
lautical Engineering Aeronaut 
i\eronautical Engineering Aerc 
ling Aeronautical Engineering 


ACCtSSlON NUMBER RANGES 


Accession numbers cited in this Supplement fall within the 


following ranges. 


STAR (N- 10000 Series) 

N79-26009 - N79-28117 

lAA (A-IOOOO Series) 

A79-39975 - A79-43832 


This bibliography was prepared by the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Facility 
operated for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration by Informatics Information 
Systems Company. 


NASA SP-7037(114) 


AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 


A Continuing Bibliography 
Supplement 114 


A selection of annotated references to unclas- 
sified reports and journal articles that were 
introduced into the NASA scientific and tech- 
nical information system and announced in 
September 1 979 in 

• Scientific and Technical Aerospace 
Reports (STAR) 

• International Aerospace Abstracts (lAA). 


Scientific and Technical Information Branch 1979 

I \l/ \ National Aeronautics and Space Administration 

Washington, DC 



INTRODUCTION 


Under the terms of an interagency agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration 
this publication has been prepared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
for the joint use of both agencies and the scientific and technical community concerned with 
the field of aeronautical engineering. The first issue of this bibliography was published in 
September 1970 and the first supplement in January 1971. Since that time, monthly 
supplements have been issued. 

This supplement to A eronautical Engineering — A Continuing Bibliography (NASA 
SP-7037) lists 394 reports, journal articles, and other documents originally announced in 
September 1979 in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) or in International 
A erospace A hstracts (JAAj, 

The coverage includes documents on the engineering and theoretical aspects of design, 
construction, evaluation, testing, operation, and performance of aircraft (including aircraft 
engines) and associated components, equipment, and systems. It also includes research and 
development in aerodynamics, aeronautics, and ground support equipment for aeronautical 
vehicles. 

Each entry in the bibliography consists of a standard bibliographic citation accompanied 
in most cases by an abstract. The listing of the entries is arranged in two major sections, lAA 
Entries and STAR Entries, in that order. The citations, and abstracts when available, are 
reproduced exactly as they appeared originally in lAA and STAR, including the original 
accession numbers from the respective announcement journals. This procedure, which saves 
time and money, accounts for the slight variation in citation appearances. 

Three indexes - subject, personal author, and contract number - are included. 

An annual cumulative index will be published. 


iii 



AVAILABILITY OF CITED PUBLICATIONS 

lAA ENTRIES (A79-10000 Series) 

All publications abstracted in this Section are available from the Technical Information Service. 
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Inc. (AIAA). as follows: Paper copies of 

accessions are available at $6.00 per document up to a maximum of 20 pages. The charge for 
each additional page is $0.25. Microfiche*’’ of documents announced in !AA are available at the 
rate of $2.50 per microfiche on demand, and at the rate of $1.10 per microfiche for standing 
orders for all lAA microfiche. The price for the lAA microfiche by category is available at the rate 
of $1.25 per microfiche plus a $1.00 service charge per category per issue. Microfiche of all the 
current AIAA Meeting Papers are available on a standing order basis at the rate of $1.35 per 
microfiche. 

Minimum air-mail postage to foreign countries is $1.00 and all foreign orders are shipped on 
payment of pro-forma invoices. 

All inquiries and requests should be addressed to AIAA Technical Information Service. Please refer 
to the accession number when requesting publications. 

STAR ENTRIES (N79 10000 Series) 

One or more sources from which a document announced in STAR is available to the public is 

ordinarily given on the last line of the citation. The most commonly indicated sources and their 

acronyms or abbreviations are listed below. If the publication is available from a source other than 
those listed, the publisher and his address will be displayed on the availability line or in combination 
with the corporate source line. 

Avail; NTIS. Sold by the National Technical Information Service. Prices for hard copy (HC) 
and microfiche (MF) are indicated by a price code followed by the letters HC or MF in 

the STAR citation. Current values for the price codes are given in the tables on page 

viii. 

Documents on microfiche are designated by a pound sign {§) following the accession 
number. The pound sign is used without regard to the source or quality of the 
microfiche. 

Initially distributed microfiche under the NTIS SRIM (Selected Research in Microfiche) is 
available at greatly reduced unit prices. For this service and for information concerning 
subscription to NASA printed reports, consult the NTIS Subscription Section. Springfield. 
Va. 22161. 

NOTE ON ORDERING DOCUMENTS: When ordering NASA publications (those followed 
by the * symbol), use the N accession number. NASA patent applications (only the 
specifications are offered) should be ordered by the U S-Patent-Appl-SN number. 
Non-NASA publications (no asterisk) should be ordered by the AD, PB, or other report 
number shown on the last line of the citation, not by the N accession number. It is 
also advisable to cite the title and other bibliographic identification. 

Avail: SOD (or GPO). Sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U S. Government Printing 
Office, in hard copy. The current price and order number are given following the 
availability line. (NTIS will fill microfiche requests, at the standard $3.00 price, for 
those documents identified by a jj/ symbol.) 


(1) A microfiche is a transparent sheet of film, 105 by 148 mm in size, containing as many as 60 to 98 pages of 
information reduced to micro images (not to exceed 26. 1 reduction). 


IV 



Avail: NASA /^ublic Document Rooms. Documents so indicated may be examined at or 
purchased from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Public Documents 
Room (Room 126). 600 Independence Ave.. S.W., Washington. D C. 20546. or public 
document rooms located at each of the NASA research centers, the NASA Space 
Technology Laboratories, and the NASA Pasadena Office at the Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory. 

Avail: DOE Depository Libraries. Organizations in U S. cities and abroad that maintain collections 
of Department of Energy reports, usually in microfiche form, are listed in Energy Research 
Abstracts, Services available from the DOE and its depositories are described in a 
booklet. DOE Technical Information Center - Its Functions and Services (TID-4660), 
which may be obtained without charge from the DOE Technical Information Center. 

Avail: Univ. Microfilms. Documents so indicated are dissertations selected from Dissertation 
Abstracts and are sold by University Microfilms as xerographic copy (HC) and microfilm. 
All requests should cite the author and the Order Number as they appear in the 
citation. 

Avail: USGS. Originals of many reports from the U S. Geological Survey, which may contain 
color illustrations, or otherwise may not have the quality of illustrations preserved in the 
microfiche or facsimile reproduction, may be examined by the public at the libraries of 
the USGS field offices whose addresses are listed in this introduction. The libraries 
may be queried concerning the availability of specific documents and the possible 
utilization of local copying services, such as color reproduction. 

Avail: HMSO. Publications of Her Majesty's Stationery Office are sold in the U S. by Pendragon 
House, Inc. (PHI), Redwood City, California. The U.S. price (including a service and 
mailing charge) is given, or a conversion table may be obtained from PHI. 

Avail: BLL (formerly NLL): British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, Yorkshire, 

England. Photocopies available from this organization at the price shown. (If none is 
given, inquiry should be addressed to the BLL.) 

Avail: Fachinformationszentrum, Karlsruhe. Sold by the Fachinformationszentrum Energie. Physik, 
Mathematik GMBH, Eggenstein Leopoldshafen, Federal Republic of Germany, at the price 
shown in deutschmarks (DM). 

Avail: Issuing Activity, or Corporate Author, or no indication of availability. Inquiries as to the 
availability of these documents should be addressed to the organization shown in the 
citation as the corporate author of the document. 

Avail: U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Sold by Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks. 
U.S, Patent and Trademark Office, at the standard price of 50 cents each, postage free. 

Other availabilities: If the publication is available from a source other than the above, the 

publisher and his address will be displayed entirely on the availability line or in combination 
with the corporate author line. 


V 



GENERAL AVAILABILITY 


All publications abstracted in this bibliography are available to the public through the sources 
as indicated in the STAR Entries and iAA Entries sections. It is suggested that the bibliography 
user contact his own library or other local libraries prior to ordering any publication inasmuch as 
many of the documents have been widely distributed by the issuing agencies, especially NASA. 
A listing of public collections of NASA documents is included on the inside back cover. 


SUBSCRIPTION AVAILABILITY 

This publication is available on subscription from the National Technical Information Service 
(NTIS). The annual subscription rate for the monthly supplements is $45.00 domestic: $75.00 
foreign. All questions relating to the subscriptions should be referred to NTIS. Attn; Subscrip- 
tions. 5285 Port Royal Road. Springfield Virginia 22161. 


VI 



ADDRESSES OF ORGANIZATIONS 


American Institute of Aeronautics 
and Astronautics 
Technical Information Service 
555 West 57th Street. 1 2th Floor 
New York. New York 10019 

British Library Lending Division. 

Boston Spa. Wetherby. Yorkshire. 

England 

Commissioner of Patents and 
Trademarks 

U S. Patent and Trademark Office 
Washington. D C. 20231 

Department of Energy 
Technical Information Center 
P.O. Box 62 

Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 

ESA-Information Retrieval Service 
ESRIN 

Via Galileo Galilei 
00044 Frascati (Rome) Italy 

Her Majesty's Stationery Office 
P.O. Box 569. S.E. 1 
London, England 

NASA Scientific and Technical Information 
Facility 

P.O. Box 8757 

B. W. I. Airport. Maryland 21240 

National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration 

Scientific and Technical Information 
Branch (NST-41) 

Washington, D C. 20546 

National Technical Information Service 
5285 Port Royal Road 
Springfield. Virginia 22161 


Pendragon House, Inc. 

899 Broadway Avenue 
Redwood City. California 94063 

Superintendent of Documents 
U S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D C. 20402 

University Microfilms 
A Xerox Company 
300 North Zeeb Road 
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106 

University Microfilms. Ltd. 

Tylers Green 
London, England 

U S. Geological Survey 
1033 General Services Administration 
Building 

Washington. D C. 20242 

U S. Geological Survey 
601 E. Cedar Avenue 
Flagstaff. Arizona 86002 

U S. Geological Survey 
345 MIddlefleld Road 
Menlo Park, California 94025 

U S. Geological Survey 

Bldg. 25. Denver Federal Center 

Denver. Colorado 80225 


Fachinformationszentrum Energie, Physik. 

Mathematik GMBH 
7514 Eggenstein Leopoldshafen 
Federal Republic of Germany 



NTIS PRICE SCHEDULES 


Schedule A 

STANDARD PAPER COPY PRICE SCHEDULE 

(Effwrtive October 1, 1977) 


Prie* 



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051-075 



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10.50 

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076-100 



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101 125 



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126-150 



7.25 

14.50 

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151-175 



8.00 

16.00 

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176-200 



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276-300 



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301-325 



11.75 

2350 

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326-350 



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376 400 



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401-425 



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426 450 



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451-475 



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476-500 



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625 

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900 

18 00 

E06 

10 50 

21.00 

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12 50 

2500 

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15 00 

3000 

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17.50 

35.00 

E10 

2000 

4000 

Ell 

22 50 

4500 

E12 

2500 

50 00 

E13 

2800 

56 00 

E14 

31.00 

6200 

E15 

34.00 

68 00 

E16 

37.00 

74.00 

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40 00 

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4500 

90 00 

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50 00 

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NOl 

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4000 


viii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 


lAA Entries 507 

STAR Entries 537 

Subject Index A-1 

Personal Author Index B-1 

Contract Number Index C-1 


TYPICAL CITATION AND ABSTRACT FROM STAR 


NASA SPONSORED 
DOCUMENT 




NASA ACCESSION 
NUMBER 


r 


TITLE ' ~ 

AUTHOR 

CONTRACT 
OR GRANT — * 

REPORT 
NUMBERS 


N79- 10024*1 Northrop Corp.. Hawthorne. Calif. Aircraft 


Group. 

STUDY OF AERODYNAMIC TECHNOLOGY FOR VSTOL 
FIGHTER/ATTACK AIRCRAFT: HORIZONTAL ATTITUDE 

CONCEPT Final Raport 

S. H. Brown May 1978 242 p refs Sponsored in part by 

the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center. 
Bethesda. Md. 

(Contract NAS2-9771) 

(NASA-CR 152130; NOR78-54} Avail: NTIS 

HCA11/MFA01 CSCL OlA — 


A horizontal attitude VSTOL (HAVSTOL) supersonic fighter 
attack aircraft powered by RALS turbofan propulsion system is 
analyzed. Reaction control for subaerodynamic flight is obtained 
in pitch and yaw from the RALS and roil from wingtip jets 
powered. by bleed air from the RALS duct. Emphasis is placed 
on the development of aerodynamic characteristics and the 
identification of aerodynamic uncertainties. A wind tunnel program 
is shown to resolve some of the uncertainties. Aerodynamic 
data developed are static characteristics about all axes, control 
effectiveness, drag, propulsion induced effects and reaction control 
characteristics. G.Y. 


-AVAILABLE ON 
MICROFICHE 

^ CORPORATE 

SOURCE 

— PUBLICATION 
DATE 

L AVAILABILITY 
SOURCE 


COSATI 

CODE 


TYPICAL CITATION AND ABSTRACT FROM /;i;i 


NASA SPONSORED. 


AIAA ACCESSION fX 
NUMBER ' 


title 1 

TITLE OF 

PERIODICAL 


♦ ! 

A79-10266*^ ^ An experimental study of three-dimensional 

turbulent boundary layer and turbulence characteristics inside a 
turbo machinery rotor passage. A. K. Anand and B. Lakshminarayana 
(Pennsylvania State University, University Park, ?a.) ^{ American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, Gas Turbine Conference and 
Products Show, London, England, Apr. 9-13, 1978, Paper 

78 GT-114.) A SME, Tr ansae tions,^ o urnaf of Engineering for Power, 
vol. 100, Oct. 1978, p. 676-687; Discussion, p. 688-690. 19 refs. 

Grant No. NGL^9-009 007. 1 

Three-dimensional boundary layer and turbulence measurements 
of flow inside a rotating helical channel of a turbomachinery rotor 
are described. The rotor is a four-bladed axial flow inducer operated 
at large axial pressure gradient. The mean velocity profiles, turbu- 
lence intensities and shear stresses, and limiting stream-line angles are 
measured at various radial and chordwise locations, using rotating 
triaxial hot-wire and conventional probes. The radial flows in the 
rotor channel are found to be higher compared to those at zero or 
small axial pressure gradient. The radial compxjnent of turbulence 
intensity is found to be higher than the streamwise component due 
to the effect of rotation. Flow near the annulus wall is found to be 
highly complex due to the interaction of the blade boundary layers 
and the annulus wall resulting in an appreciable radial inward flow, 
and a large defect in the mainstream velocity. Increased level of 
turbulence intensity and shear stresses near the midpassage are also 
observed near this radial location. (Author) 


AVAILABLE ON 
MICROFICHE 


— AUTHORS 

AUTHOR'S 

AFFILIATION 

PUBLICATION 

DATE 


tx 



AERONAUTICAL 

ENGINEERING 


A Continuing Bibliography (Suppl. 114) 


OCTOBER 1979 


lAA ENTRIES 


A79-40139 Airport engineering. N. Ashford (Lough- 

borough University of Technology, Loughborough, Leics., England) 
and P. H. Wright (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. Ga.). 
New York, Wiley- Interscience, 1979. 458 p. 203 refs. $24.95. 

Fundamental aspects of airport engineering are presented. The 
various international, national and local organizations associated with 
air transportation are discussed, together with the means by which 
airports are financed. Principles of airport master planning and 
systems planning are examined, including airport capacity and 
configuration and aspects of airport layout and design such as 
geometric design, airport drainage, pavement design, and passenger 
terminal lay-outs. Chapters on forecasting air traffic demand, air 
cargo facilities, airport access, requirements of V/STOL aircraft, and 
environmental effects of airports are provided. C.K.D. 

A79-40155 Flight control. II - Control system design 

(Flugregelung. II - Entwurf von Regelsystemen). R. Brockhaus 
(Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, Braunschweig, West Ger- 
many). Munich, R. Oldenbourg Verlag GmbH. 1979. 332 p. 101 refs. 
In German. $25. 12. 

General principles of flight control are reviewed and attention is 
given to the development of flight measurement methods and 
instrumentation. Particular consideration is given to the design of 
fully or partly automatic flight control systems; the structure and 
design of integrated flight control systems are examined. B.J. 

A79-40172 New air service and deregulation - A study in 

transition. M. S. Cofi^ (Civil Aeronautics Board, Washington, D.C.). 
(Annual Air Law Symposium, 13th, Dallas, Tex., Mar. 22, 1979.) 
Journal of Air Law and Commerce, vol. 44, no. 4, 1979, p. 695-703. 

An overview of the changes in service patterns since the airline 
deregulation and the implications of these changes for small and 
medium sized communities are discussed. Types of air carriers and 
their control by CAB is described, noting that the Airline Deregula- 
tion Act of 1978 enabled all airlines to place equipment in the 
markets that have the greatest demand consistent with the most 
efficient operation of their system, produced profitable expansion, 
and reduced fares. Although some cutbacks in service occurred, 
currently 98% of the traveling public have the same or more service 
available than one year ago. Determining the essential level of air 
service for 500 communities by October 1979. protecting the public 
from carriers exercizing monopoly power, and abolishing anti- 
competitive agreements are some of the current CAB problems. A.T. 

A79-40200 fi Simplified calculation method for subsonic 

airloads on wing-body combinations. S. Chu and P.-J. Lu (National 
Taiwan University, Taipei, Nationalist China). National Science 
Council, Proceedings, vol. 3, Apr. 1, 1979, p. 212-221. 19 refs. 
National Science Council of Nationalist China Contract No. 66E- 
0401-02(01). 

A simplified method for the calculation of airloads on combina- 
tions of planar and/or non-planar wings and a slender body in steady 
or unsteady subsonic flow is presented. In this method, the linearized 


boundary-value problem is transformed to an integral equation and it 
is then solved numerically through the finite-element approach. With 
wings represented by oscillatory doublets, major emphasis of the 
method is placed on the formulation of an improved body scherne 
with internal source/sink/doublet distributions and wing image 
systems. By taking full advantage of symmetric/antisymmetric 
characteristics of the vehicle configuration and loading conditions, 
the calculation scheme is significantly simplified. The solution 
enables the evaluation of net airload distributions on the body and 
wings; and of static and dynamic aerodynamic coefficients. Applica- 
tion of the method is demonstrated through examples of wing-body 
combinations with the planar wing and wrap-around wings. Calcu- 
lated results have been compared with experimental measurements. 
The agreement is excellent. (Author) 

A79-40313 fj Canadair Challenger. R. D. Neal and E. Aubrey 

(Canadair, Ltd., St. Laurent, Quebec, Camddi). Aircraft Engineering, 
vol. 51, June 1979, p. 7-13. 

A new Canadian, high speed, wide body business jet, the 
Challenger, is discussed. Powered by two high by-pass ratio (5:1) 
turbofan engines of 7500 lb take-off thrust, the aircraft features 
advanced aerodynamics allowing for low fuel consumption and high 
performance. The powerplant system, designed with overall aircraft 
serviceability in mind, features a quick release 1-piece engine nacelle. 
Attention is given to the APU, the air driven emergency generator, 
fuel system, electrical system, and hydraulic system. Flight controls 
comply with FAR 25.671 and have features such as appropriate 
redundancy in the control signal mechanical and electrical circuits, 
disposition of control surface actuators among the various multiple 
power sources (hydraulic and electric), and location of the various 
system components outside of the rotor burst zone. Also discussed 
are the oxygen system, landing gear, structural design including 
empennage bird impact testing. In addition, Canadian DOT Type 
Approval includes compliance with parts of FAR 25, FAR 36, and 
FAA Special Conditions. M.E.P. 

A79-40314 if New techniques In jet engine balancing. W.-D. 

Reutlinger and H. Boxberger (Dr. Reutlinger und Sohne, Darmstadt, 
West Germany). Aircraft Engineering, vol. 51, June 1979, p. 14-17. 

A method, which uses specially adapted force measuring 
balancing machines for jet engine balancing is discussed. Considera- 
tion is given to special demands that jet engine parts make on 
balancing machines, such as the need for minimum spinning time to 
reduce the risk of scoring the journal surface. The system uses a 
motionless force measuring support system, which eliminates the 
need for nulling or calibration runs and a formula utilized by the 
computer-based system to reduce the measured forces to a function 
of two parameters is given. With these preliminary runs eliminated, 
total spinning time - including starting and stopping the piece - is 
20-30 sec, whereas a displacement measuring machine needs about 
ten times as long for the same operation. Since motion free 
measuring does not require frames to connect vibration bridges, an 
additional source of balancing error is eliminated. M.E.P. 

A79-40315 if Display monitoring problems. R. A. Chorley 

(Smith's Industries, Ltd., Aviation Div., London, England). Aircraft 
Engineering, vol. 51, June 1979, p. 20-23. 

Consideration is given to methods of making the aircraft pilot's 
monitoring tasks easier. The problem of lowering system malfunction 


507 


A79-40326 


probability which results in greater system complexity is discussed. 
Eventually complexity reaches a point where the pilot can no longer 
cope with the monitoring tasks, which again increases the malfunc- 
tion probability. Simple monitoring aids such as warning flags to 
draw attention to a fact that may not have been observed by direct 
monitoring are covered. Also covered are more advanced monitoring 
aids including electronic checks on altimeters and Mach/airspeed 
indicators, which measure the servo motor voltage signaling when 
this does not remain zero, indicating an error. Attention is also given 
to CRT displays which will allow monitoring of more data with less 
complexity. Since this allows the pilot to suppress information not 
of current interest, a capability to monitor this data and signal 
potential hazards must be incorporated. M.E.P. 

A79-40326 # Preparing for the TKF 90. G. Kannamuller. 

Dornier-Post (English Edition), no. 3, 1979, p. 8-10. 

The German Air Force plans to adopt a new tactical combat 
aircraft (TKF 90) in the early nineties is discussed, noting prelimi- 
nary concept related studies and basic layout. Design philosophy 
developed from military mission resulting from threat, technical 
feasibilities and available resources, is presented. Technological 
features of the basic design include CCV to improve L/D ratio also 
during maneuvers, carbon fiber composite materials to reduce 
structural weight, and multipurpose displays. Attention is also given 
to trade off studies including thrust/mass ratio, options such as night 
visibility through FLIR, and alternatives such as different engines, 
wing configurations, etc. Carbon fiber structures being tested on an 
Alpha Jet flying test bed are airbrake, rudder, horizontal tail surface 
and wing. It is concluded that German work in this field will improve 
their negotiating position in their efforts to arrive at a European 
cooperative program. M.E.P. 

A79-40327 {j First flight imminent for new technology 

wing. W. Haberland. Dornier-Post (English Edition), no. 3, 1979, p. 
20-25. 

The new technology wing program is intended to develop a wing 
for twin-engine general aviation aircraft that will result in; a 
substantial reduction in drag, particularly in the design-critical 
situation of an engine failure during a climb; a substantial increase in 
the maximum lift coefficient for an acceptably complex flap system; 
a reduction in manufacturing costs and in wing weight due to a new 
integral construction. A Dornier Skyservant has been modified for 
use as a flying test bed for the new wing which also utilizes 
single-slotted Fowler flaps. The program phases and details of the 
design studies embraced, are detailed. Attention is given to the test 
aircraft wing construction which is of a cantilever design with a 
rectangular trapezoidal planform. Also surveyed are fuselage, tail 
unit, landing gear, power plant fuel system, etc. Results of the testing 
will be available by mid 1980. M.E.P. 


A79-40476 jf Analytical modeling of ramjet combustor heat 

transfer modes. P. F. Melia (United Technologies Corp., Chemical 
Systems Div., Sunnyvale, Calif.). AIAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint 
Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, 
AIAA Paper 79-1124. 7 p. 8 refs. Contract No. F33615-74-C-2059. 

An analytical model of charring heat transfer in an ablativety 
lined ramjet combustor correlated well with firings using either virgin 
linings or fully charred linings. Pyrolysis gas reactions were shown to 
be a significant heat transfer mechanism in certain regions. The 
model showed the existence of two qualitatively different heat 
transfer zones with similar total heat fluxes. An aft. zone existed, 
characterized by a heat flux that was reactive and convective for 
actively charring linings. Linings in this zone, when fully charred, 
experienced only the convective flux. A forward recirculation zone 
also existed, in which the heat transfer was convective and radiative 
in nature. In this zone, total flux was comparable to the total flux 
experienced in the aft zone for actively charring linings. However, 
this forward flux remained essentially the same for either charring of 
fully charred linings. (Author) 


A79^40480 * # Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft. R. 0. Bailey, M. Harper (NASA, 
Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.), and T. Jannetta 
(NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif; McDonnell 
Aircraft Co., St. Louis, Mo.). AIAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint 
Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, 
A lAA Paper 79- 1 149. 1 7 p. 1 3 refs. 

Ames Research Center has under way a program to develop the 
technology for using turbine-powered jet engine simulators as a test 
technique for simulating installed jet engine characteristics in 
small-scale wind-tunnel models of complete VSTOL fighter config- 
urations. The program consists of three key elements: (1) static 
testing SN003 prototype turbine engine simulator (MAPS), (2) the 
development of the Propulsion Simulator Calibration Laboratory at 
Ames, ^d (3) the design, fabrication, and testing of a twin-engine 
'closely coupled' V/STOL fighter wind-tunnel model. The model will 
use the Compact Multi-mission Propulsion Simulator (CMAPS) and 
will also be tested in flow-through and jet-effects modes to assess the 
effect of simultaneous inlet and nozzle flow simulation. This paper 
includes a description of the planned effort and anticipated future 
tasks. (Author) 


A79-40481 fi Effects of Reynolds number and other param- 

eters on the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of an 0.11 
scale single-engine aircraft model. R. J. Glidewell (USAF, Aero 
Propulsion Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio), H. L. Stevens 
(United Technologies Corp., Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Group, West 
Palm Beach, Fla.), and W. M. Presz (United Technologies Corp., Pratt 
and Whitney Aircraft Group, East Hartford, Conn.). AMA, SAE, and 
ASME, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 
18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1167. 1 1 p. 12 refs. 

A series of wind tunnel, nozzle/afterbody tests was carried out 
on a 0.11 scale F-16 model. Results are presented for three basic 
support systems (the small sting support, large sting support and 
wing tip support) tested at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2. 
Sufficient data were obtained to define the effects of the support 
system, Reynolds number, angle-of-attack and horizontal tail inci- 
dence on variations in the throttle-dependent drag characteristics of 
the nozzle/afterbody. The drag and pressure measure ments were 
compared with results obtained with state-of-the-art flow prediction 
procedures, including three-dimensional paneling procedures applied 
to the exact F-16 wind tunnel model with and without support 
systems, and two axisymmetric flow calculations (a potential flow 
calculation and a finite difference transonic procedure) applied to 
the F-16 equivalent bodies of revolution. Predicted drag trends were 
found to provide the minimum support system interference. C.K.D. 

A79-40483 * jj Causes of high pressure compressor deteriora- 
tion in service. J. H. Richardson, G. P. Sallee, and F. K. Smakula 
(United Technologies Corp.. Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Group, East 
Hartford, Conn.). AIAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint Propulsion Confer- 
ence, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1234. 
8 p. Contract No. NAS3-20632. 

The high mechanical reliability and low deterioration rate of the 
JT9D high-pressure compressor results in long utilization without 
exceeding engine operational limits. The increasing cost and decreas- 
ing supply of fuel have focused attention on the fuel burned 
implications of such high time use without refurbishment. The paper 
presents the results of JT9D high pressure compressor studies. The 
mechanical deterioration of the JT9D high-pressure compressor 
gaspath parts versus increasing service usage, documented from 
inspection of service parts, is presented and discussed including 
changes in airfoil roughness, blade length, airfoil contour and outer 
air sea) trench characteristics. An estimate of the performance loss 
versus usage is related to each type of damage. The combined 
estimated high-pressure compressor performance loss for all mechan- 
isms determined from part inspection is compared to historical 
engine test data to establish the validity of the predicted loss levels. 
The effect of cold section refurbishment on engine fuel consumption 
recovery and the results of an optimization study to determine the 


508 



A79-40680 


appropriate interval for high pressure compressor refurbishment are 
also reported. (Author) 

A79-40486 H Parts tracking and engine history recording for 

on-condition maintenance. G. I. Walker and R. M. Donovan (General 
Electric Co., Aircraft Engine Business Group, Lynn, Mass.). AIAA, 
SAE, and ASMS, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, 
Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1280. 12 p. USAF- 
supported research. 

The Parts Life Tracking System (PLTS) used to manage 
on-condition maintenance of the TF34-100 engine in USAF/AIO 
aircraft is described. The PLTS includes a parts-tracking system 
(PTS) and an engine time-temperature recorder (ETTR) system. The 
central data base includes a parts master file encompassing all 
designated parts entered into the system either as spares or as part of 
an engine, and an engine master file section containing a record of 
the engine data and data for all designated parts in that engine. The 
PLTS requires data from the mechanic responsible for changing parts 
(engine serial number, part serial number, location of part and date) 
and periodic reading and recording of information taken from the 
signal to the aircraft cockpit Inter-Turbine Temperature and stored 
in the ETTR system. The ETTR parameters used in logistic analysis 
include events at 550 C, events at 790 C, events at 810 C, time at or 
above 790 C, time at or above 810 C, and engine operating hours. 
The PLTS provides repair facilities with an accurate listing of the 
estimated life remaining on all designated parts in the engine and also 
of the spare parts available for installation. C.K.D. 

A79-40487 ff V/STOL performance comparisons with vari- 
able pitch and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data. H. Mealy (United Technologies Corp., Hamilton 
Standard Div., Windsor Locks, Conn.). AIAA, SAE, and ASM E, Joint 
Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, 
AIAA Paper 79- 1286. 13 p. 

Two twenty inch fan models tested in a compressor test rig were 
designed with the pressure ratio and flow rate for the V/STOL Type 
A aircraft. Fan maps showing pressure ratios, stall lines, and 
efficiencies as functions of speed, flow rate, and variable geometry 
angles are drawn, and when related to a V/STOL operation including 
take-off and approach to landing with control showed that variable 
pitch fan did a better job of covering the required thrust range than 
the variable inlet guide vane fan. Blade element data including 
loading, loss, Mach number, and incidence were compared, and the 
fans were tested with a clean inlet, and radial and circumferential 
inlet distortion screens. The variable pitch fan efficiency was up to 
3.5% higher than that for the variable Inlet guide vane fan, and the 
only area where the latter was better than the variable pitch fan was 
In stall margin at high thrust. A.T. 

A79-40488 * ff A summary of NASA/Air Force Full Scale 
Engine Research programs using the FIDO engine. W. J. Deskin 
(United Technologies Corp., Government Products Div., West Palm 
Beach, Fla.) and H. G. Murrell (NASA, Lewis Research Center, 
Cleveland, Ohio). AIAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint Propulsion Confer- 
ence, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1308. 
14 p. 20 refs. 

This paper summarizes a joint NASA/Air Force Full Scale 
Engine Research (FSER) program conducted with the FI 00 engine 
during the period 1974 through 1979. The program mechanism is 
described and the FI 00 test vehicles utilized are illustrated. 
Technology items which have been addressed in the areas of swirl 
augmentation, flutter phenomenon, advanced electronic control logic 
theory, strain gage technology, and distortion sensitivity are identi- 
fied and the associated test programs conducted at the NASA-Lewis 
Research Center are described. Results presented show that the 
FSER approach, which utilizes existing state-of-the-art engine hard- 
ware to evaluate advanced technology concepts and problem areas, 
can contribute a significant data base for future system applications. 
Aerodynamic phenomenon previously not considered by current 
design systems have been identified and incorporated into current 
industry design tools. (Author) 


A79-40647 jf The distribution pattern of Omega observa- 

tions. E. R. Swanson (U.S. Naval Ocean Systems Onter, San Diego, 
Calif.), Journal of Navigation, vol. 32, May 1979, p. 276-278. 6 refs! 

The distribution pattern of errors in observations of the Omega 
navigation system is discussed. Large deviations of Omega observa- 
tions from nominal are almost entirely due to the perturbation of the 
ionosphere by sudden ionospheric disturbances and polar cap 
absorptions, which are associated with solar activity cycles. It is 
pointed out that the data used by Hiraiwa (1978) to compile the 
basic distribution of Omega errors were obtained near a solar 
minimum, possibly making safety estimates based on his findings 
overly optimistic. The distribution of Omega measurements over a 
propagation path is also known to exhibit both positive kurtosis and 
negative skewness, however the skewness can be eliminated by 
pairing propagation paths to obtain lines of position. A.L.W. 

A79-40664 * Simulation of distributed microprocessor- 

based flight control systems. P. S. Lee and H. F. VanLandingham 
(Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, 
Va.). In: International Symposium on Simulation Software and 
Numerical Methods for Differential Equations, Blacksburg, Va., 
March 9-11, 1977. Amsterdam, North-Holland 

Publishing Co., 1978, p. 131-134. Grant No. NsG-1239. 

The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate, within the 
framework of a digital flight control system, the method of 
simulating the information exchange between a microcomputer and a 
supervisory computer, and between microcomputers working on 
separate control tasks. A gradient technique is described that 
considers the trade-off between the objectives of the control system 
and the information exchange requirements. V.P. 


A79-40676 Materials problems in gas turbine engine tech- 

nology; Colloquium, Munich, West Germany, October 27, 28, 1977, 
Report (Werkstofftechnixhe Probleme bei Gasturbinentriebwerken; 
Kolloquium, Munich, West Germany, October 27, 28, 1977, Be- 
richt). Colloquium sponsored by the Motoren- und Turbinen- Union 
Munchen GmbH. Edited by W. Hansen and P. Esslinger (Motoren- 
und Turbinen-Union Munchen GmbH, Munich, West Germany). 
Karlsruhe, Werkstofftechnische Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, 1978. 262 
p. In German. 

In this examination of gas turbine materials, attention is given to 
materials technology research and development, service life determi- 
nation (using turbine blades as an example), and considerations of 
failure analysis and quality assurance (using turbine disks as an 
example). Papers are presented on such topics as service life 
prediction for heat-resistant materials, high- integrity casting of 
turbine blades of high thermal stability and long service life, 
determination of safety factors, and materials quality assurance for 
turbine disks. B.J. 

A79-40677 Advances in materials technology through the 

BMVg - Goals, problems and main points of interest (Forderung der 
Werkstrofftechnik durch das BMVg - Ziele, Probleme, Schwer- 
punkte). W. Simmler (Bundesministerium der Verteidigung, Bonn, 
West Germany). In: Materials problems in gas turbine engine 
technology; Colloquium, Munich, West Germany, October 27, 28, 
1977, Report. Karlsruhe, Werkstofftechnische 

Verlagsgesellschaft mbH, 1978, p. 9-19. In German. 

Certain aspects of military-related materials technology in 
Germany are discussed with special reference to aviation materials. 
Particular consideration is given to research and development on 
processing techniques for engine materials. B.J. 


A79-40680 Development of materials and processes for 

engine components - Current and future points of interest 
(Werkstoff- und Verfahrensentwicklung fiir Triebwerk-Bauteile 
Schwerpunkte heute und morgen). P. Esslinger (Motoren- und 
Turbinen-Union Munchen GmbH, Munich, West Germany). In: 


509 



A79 40684 


Materials problems in gas turbine engine technology; Colloquium, 
Munich, West Germany, October 27, 28, 1977, Report. 

Karlsruhe, Werkstofftechnische Verlagsgesellschaft 
mbH, 1978, p. 59-74. In German. 

The goals of materials technology for gas turbine engines are 
outlined. These include elevated gas temperature, weight reduction, 
increased reliability, and cost reduction. The current status of gas 
turbine development is reviewed and attention is given to possible 
directions of realizing the future goals of gas-turbine R&D, namely 
higher temperature and lower weight. B.J. 

A79-40684 Service life parameters of turbine blades 

(Lebensdauerbestimmende Parameter bei Turbinenschaufein). W. 
Betz (Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Munchen GmbH, Munich, West 
Germany). In: Materials problems in gas turbine engine technology; 
Colloquium, Munich, West Germany, October 27, 28, 1977, Report. 

Karlsruhe, Werkstofftechnische Verlagsgesell- 
schaft mbH, 1978, p. 127-134. In German. 

Parameters characterizing the service life of turbine blades are 
defined in terms of blade load and strength characteristics. Several 
examples are considered including the effects of hot-gas corrosion on 
blade service life. B.J. 

A79-40687 Methodological considerations on the service 

life design of turbine disks (Methodische Betrachtungen zur Lebens- 
dauerdimensionierung von Triebwerksscheiben). K. H. Nasitta 
(Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Munchen GmbH, Munich, West 
Germany). In; Materials problems in gas turbine engine technology; 
(Colloquium, Munich, West Germany, October 27, 28, 1977, Report. 

Karlsruhe, Werkstofftechnische Verlagsgesell- 
schaft mbH, 1978, p. 183-201. 20 refs. In German. 

The paper considers the development of methods of low cycle 
fatigue testing of turbine blade specimens; emphasis is placed on the 
choice of crack conditions. The use of test specimens to simulate the 
actual turbine components is discussed in some detail and attention 
is given to analytical concepts of low cycle fatigue. B.J. 

A79-40752 ff Further test results with the airjet distortion 

generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine engine testing. M. W. 
Mcliveen (ARO, Inc., Arnold Air Force Station, Tenn.). AIAA, SAE, 
and ASMS, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 
18 20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1185. 10 p. 6 refs. 

An airjet distortion generator system has been developed to 
produce steady-state total pressure distortion at the inlet of turbine 
engines. The system employs a method of injecting controlled 
amounts of high-velocity secondary air counter to the primary 
airstream to produce a local total pressure decay. Digital computer 
control provides an on-demand distortion pattern capability. Results 
of the latest development effort of the ADG are discussed and 
compared to previous test results in terms of steady-state distortion 
pattern fidelity, time-variant flow-field characteristics, and engine 
stability assessment. (Author) 


A79-40755 # Type A V/STOL propulsion system develop- 

ment. E. R. Glasgow and R. E. Skarshaug (Lockheed-California Co., 
Burbank, Calif.). A /A A, SAE, and ASM E, Joint Propulsion Confer- 
ence, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1287. 
11 p. 6 refs. 

Design and performance considerations associated with the 
development of a unique Type A V/STOL four-turbofan propulsion 
system concept are described. This propulsion system uses fixed 
horizontal nacelles with thrust vectoring nozzles installed for 
achieving lift, a coaxial fan flow reaction control system for pitch 
control and trim, and an engine compressor bleed reaction control 
system for roll and yaw control and engine-out roll trim. Critical 
propulsion system sizing conditions are identified, and the sensitivity 
of aircraft takeoff gross weight to changes in control criteria 
requirements, engine cycle parameters, and engine rating schemes are 


discussed. The use of wing tip ejectors, a cruise cross shaft, and water 
injection are also evaluated. In addition to having competitive 
performance characteristics, the propulsion system concept described 
herein has zero single point failures, low development cost and risk, 
and good reliability/maintainability. (Author) 

A7940758 fj General Electric Company variable cycle 

engine technology demonstrator programs. R. D. Allan (General 
Electric Co., Aircraft Engine Group, Evendale, Ohio). AIAA, SAE, 
and ASM E, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 
18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-131 1. 1 p. 

The variable cycle engine (VCE) technology demonstration 
program aimed to improve mixed mission (supersonic/subsonic) 
propulsion systems installed performance is reviewed. The VCE is 
expected to reduce or eliminate the propulsion drag associated with 
the mixed mission aircraft and to contribute to reduction of the 
noise pollution problem. The single bypass and double bypass VCE 
concepts are discussed, and features which contribute to the 
performance and acoustic advantages of the double bypass VCE, aft 
variable area bypass injector, variable area low pressure turbine 
stator, split fan, forward variable area bypass injector, and co-annular 
acoustic plug exhaust nozzle are described. All of the VCE testing 
used YJ101 dual rotor, low bypass ratio turbojet hardware and it is 
providing demonstration of the feasibility of VCE features in a sea 
level static test program. A final step in the current test series 
scheduled for 1980 is the NASA Test Bed VCE which will duplicate 
• the Supersonic Cruise Research study VCE configuration in YJlOl 
size except for the temperature levels in the engine hot section. A.T. 

A79-40759 * ff Progress on Variable Cycle Engines. J. S. 
Westmoreland, R. A. Howlett, and R. P. Lohmann (United Technolo- 
gies Corp., Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Group, East Hartford, Conn.). 
AIAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las 
Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1312. 1 1 p. 9 refs. 
Contracts No. NAS3-20061 ; No. NAS3- 20602; No. NAS3-20048. 

Progress in the development and future requirements of the 
Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) are presented. The two most 
critical components of this advanced system for future supersonic 
transports, the high performance duct burner for thrust augmenta- 
tion, and the low jet coannutar nozzle were studied. Nozzle model 
tests substantiated the jet noise benefit associated with the unique 
velocity profile possible with a coannular nozzle system on a VSCE. 
Additional nozzle model performance tests have established high 
thrust efficiency levels only at takeoff and supersonic cruise for this 
nozzle system. An experimental program involving both isolated 
component and complete engine tests has been conducted for the 
high performance, low emissions duct burner with good results and 
large scale testing of these two components is being conducted using 
a FlOO engine as the testbed for simulating the VSCE, Future work 
includes application of computer programs for supersonic flow fields 
to coannular nozzle geometries, further experimental testing with the 
duct burner segment rig, and the use of the Variable Cycle Engine 
(VCE) Testbed Program for evaluating the VSCE duct burner and 
coannular nozzle technologies. A.T. 

A79-40760 * fj Design and performance of the propulsion 
system for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/. M. D. 
Shovlin (NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.), H. 
Skavdahl, and D. L. Harkonen (Boeing Commercial Airplane Co., 
Seattle, Wash.). AIAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint Propulsion Confer- 
ence, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1313. 
10 p. 6 refs. 

This paper describes the design and performance of the Quiet 
Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) propulsion system. A discus- 
sion of the mixed-flow boundary layer control (BLC) system, which 
uses high and low pressure engine bleed air, is included. This system 
seriously affected propulsion system performance, particularly en- 
gine acceleration characteristics, requiring an integration of BLC 
system and powerplant controls. Funding limitations for the QSRA 
Project prevented extensive full-scale testing and systems mockups, 
resulting in a high reliance on small-scale tests and analytical 


510 



A79-41174 


/ 


techniques. Ground tests of the actual aircraft systems showed that 
the extrapolation of small-scale tests and analytical techniques were 
in good agreement with measured full-scale results. (Author) 

A79-40761 ff Some recent developments in solid propellant 

gas generator technology. G. B. Pogue and E. J. Pacanowsky (Talley 
Industries of Arizona, Inc., M esa, Ariz. ). AlAA, SAS, and ASMS, 
Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 
1979, AlAA Paper 79- 1327. 6 p. 

A gas generator propellant incorporating a proprietary 'phase- 
stabilized' modified ammonium nitrate (AN) which can be 
temperature-cycled indefinitely without the detrimental effects of 
grain growth has been demonstrated and released for use. A new 
low-cost moldable rubber/AN propellant with an exhaust gas 
cleanliness approaching N-28 has been developed for use in hot gas 
missile servo applications. A new castable AN propellant has been 
demonstrated with a burn rate approaching 0,025 inch/second at 
1000 psi for use in long burn time gas generators within reasonable 
envelop constraints. A series of sodium azide based propellants which 
yield nontoxic nitrogen have been developed and utilized in 
applications such as the automobile air bag and aircraft emergency 
inflation systems. (Author) 

A79-40764 1/ Contribution of the engine R & D community 

to reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters. D. B. Gale (U.S. 
Army, Applied Technology Laboratory, Fort Eustis, Va.). AlAA, 
SAS, and ASMS, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, 
Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AlAA Paper 79-1360. 7 p. 8 refs. 

The three basic categories of helicopter ownership cost and the 
contributions of the engine R&D community to cost reductions are 
examined. Development cost covers the aircraft engineering develop- 
ment through the fabrication and testing of prototypes and the 
government pays the cost directly. Acquisition cost includes produc- 
tion budgets, and operational costs are for fuel, lubricants, repair and 
maintenance parts, and personnel. The Army engine R&D programs 
aimed at improvements in component performance, reliability, and 
maintenance, new specification requirements, new manufacturing 
methods and technology, and design-to-unit production cost 
(DTUPC) efforts are discussed, with their impact on the T700 engine 
development. The experience acquired during the T700 program was 
applied to the Army 800 hp Advanced Technology Demonstrator 
Engine (ATDE) program to reduce its ownership cost, and it 
provided inputs in areas of technology level, instrumentation, 
hardware, testing, specifications, and reliability and maintainability. 
During the course of the ATDE evaluation, the Material Index Factor 
(MIF) method was used as a tool for estimating the production cost 
and it is concluded that the MIF method can be used to track the 
DTUPC effort during the development phase, A.T. 


A79-40770 § Indirect measurement of turbulent skin fric- 

tion. G. M. Elfstrom (National Aeronautical Establishment, High 
Speed Aerodynamics Laboratory, Ottawa, Canada). (Hydrodynamics 
Colloquium, Bethesda, Md., Feb. 2, 1979.) Canada, National 
Research Council, Division of Mechanical Engineering and National 
Aeronautical Establishment, Quarterly Bulletin, no. 1, 1979, p. 
21-51. 17 refs. 

The indirect techniques reviewed in the present paper are based, 
respectively, on the use of the logarithmic portion of the velocity 
profile to estimate skin friction in turbulent boundary layers; the use 
of the analogy between local skin friction coefficient and heat 
transfer from heated strips imbedded in a surface; and surface flow 
visualization. Particular attention is given to devices which exploit 
the wall-similarity of the flow in a turbulent boundary layer. These 
devices include the razor blade technique, the sublayer fence device 
(which, like the razor blade senses the flow very close to the wall), 
the Preston tube - a device which senses part of the logarithmic 
portion of the velocity profile; and the obstacle block. The principles 
of obstacle block operation are outlined. V.P. 


A79-41113 Multivariable control design principles applied 

to a variable cycle turbofan engine. R. L. De Hoff and S. M. Rock 
(Systems Control, Inc., Palo Alto, Calif.). In: Annual Asilomar 
Conference on Circuits, Systems, and Computers, 12th, Pacific 
Grove, Calif., November 6-8, 1978, Conference Record. 

New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers, Inc., 1979. p. 122-131. 11 refs. Contract No 
F33615-77-C-2096. 

Described is a preliminary design of a controller for an advanced 
turbine engine concept, the variable cycle engine. This controller 
provides transient and steady-state regulation, fault detection and 
accommodation, and supervisory engine protection logic. It is 
designed for engine-mounted microprocessor implementation. 
Emphasis is on regulator design and trajectory generation. New 
techniques are described which have been developed to satisfy the 
requirements imposed by the variable cycle engine technology. The 
regulator Is based on output feedback. It Incorporates dc gain 
considerations and fixed structure gain matrices in its design. The 
trajectory generator mimics optimal trajectories for both large and 
small transients without the need for solving a two-point boundary 
value problem. (Author) 


A79-41167 f) Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems I (Theoretische Grundlagen von Langstrecken- 
Navigationsanlagen. I). P. Korrell (Gesellschaft fur Internationalen 
Flugverkehr mbH, Berlin, East Germany). Technisch-dkonomische 
Information der zivUen Luftfahrt, vol. 14, no. 6, 1978, p. 306-322. 
In German. 

The fundamentals of aircraft navigation systems are reviewed. 
Attention is given to inertia navigation systems. Including compound 
navigation, noting its Inaccuracies in the higher latitudes. Formulas 
relating to gyroxopic theory, such as those for moment of inertia 
and angular momentum, are studied and basics of inertial navigation, 
including forces exerted by acceleration, are analyzed. Platform 
aabilization, covering position, vertical, and turning gyroxopes, and 
including methods of orientation such as geographic, free, and 
azimuth, Is surveyed. Attention is also given to the force vectors 
acting on gyroxopes, the effect of platform attitude on speed and 
position error, and the coriolis effect. Further consideration is given 
to acceleration signals and position finding, with the Soviet 1-11 
system highlighted. M.E.P. 

A79-41168 fi Problems of increasing the efficiency of Malev. 

II (Aufgaben zur Erhohung der Effektivitat der Malev. II). E. Vilmos 
(Magyar Legikozlekedesi Vallalat, Budapest, Hungary). Technisch- 
dkonomische Information der zivUen Luftfahrt, vol. 14, no. 6, 1978, 
p. 323-336. In German. 

Further problems associated with increasing the productivity of 
Malev Air Tours are surveyed. Topics covered are: (1) making full use 
of aircraft capacity including seat load factors and useful load 
factors, (2) market considerations, (3) the degree of compliance 
between supply and demand (4) organization of the commercial 
service, and (5) airline image. Also studied are the economic effects 
of increased capacity utilization. Consideration is given to factors in 
the reduction of operating -costs such as flight speed, which affects 
fuel consumption, crew salaries, and depreciation. Other possibilities 
for fuel savings are purchasing fuel where it is cheapest and selection 
of the proper flight profile, an area which will see more research 
during the present five-year plan. M.E.P. 


A79-41174 * f{ Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 
installed on an F-18 propulsion wind tunnel model. J. E. Petit 
(Boeing Aerospace Co., Seattle, Wash.) and F. J. Capone (NASA, 
Langley Research Center, High-Speed Aerodynamics Div., Hampton, 
Va.). AlAA, SAE, and ASME, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, 
Las Vegas, Nev., June 18-20, 1979, AlAA Paper 79-1164. 19 p. 11 
refs. 

The results of two-dimensional wedge non-axisymmetric nozzle 
(2D-AIN) tests to determine its performance relative to the baseline 


51 1 



A79 41175 


ax i symmetric nozzle using an F-18 jet effects wind tunnel model are 
presented. Configurations and test conditions simulated forward 
thrust-minus drag, thrust vectoring/induced lift, and thrust reversing 
flight conditions from Mach .6 to 1.20 and attack angles up to 10 
degrees. Results of the model test program indicate that non- 
axisymmetric nozzles can be installed on a twin engine fighter 
aircraft model with equivalent thrust minus drag performance as the 
baseline axisymmetric nozzles. Thrust vectoring capability of the 
non-axisymmetric nozzles provided significant jet-induced lift on the 
nozzle/aftbody and horizontal tail surfaces. Thrust reversing panels 
deployed from the 2D-AIN centerbody wedge were very effective for 
static and inflight operation. A.T. 

A79-41175 ff CF6 jet engine performance deterioration. R. 

H. Wulf (General Electric Co., Cincinnati, Ohio). AIAA, SAE, and 
ASME, Joint Propulsion Conference, 15th, Las Vegas, Nev., June 
18-20, 1979, AIAA Paper 79-1233. 1 p. 

The results of performance deterioration studies of CF6 engines 
are presented. The program was aimed at identifying and quantifying 
engine hardware degradation, and it included in-depth reviews of 
hardware conditions to analyze detrimental sources, documented 
observed deterioration trends, and assigned performance degradation 
to specific part conditions. The Engine Diagnostics program was 
utilized to accumulate engine life cycle trends and fuel burn 
degradation data to construct performance and hardware deteriora- 
tion models for each step in the engine life cycle. The program 
verified that performance deterioration is due to damaged clearances, 
airfoil quality and leakages. The effects of hardware conditions on 
performance data analyses and of shop practices on hardware 
conditions are discussed. The program was applied during the routine 
overhaul of three CF6-50 engines and demonstrated that fuel burn 
could be reduced by at least one percent. A.T. 

A79-41176 Manoeuvre handling in a multiradar, a.t.c. 

system. H. W. Thomas (Manchester, Victoria University, Manchester, 
England). Institution of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings, vol. 126, 
June 1979, p. 469-475. 

Results are presented for a study of maneuver detection in 
multiradar environments. A tracking scheme, essentially based on the 
Kalman filter but using a probability approach to detecting maneu- 
vers, is proposed and described. An interesting result is the definition 
of an effective plant-noise term for the filter in terms of maneuver 
probabilities. Some comparisons ate maae between the proposed 
tracker and a more conventional approach to maneuver detection, 
and improvements are observed, particularly in difficult track 
situations. A further advantage is that the approach described is 
suitable for incorporating additional information (e.g. flight-plan 
data) into the tracking process. S.D. 


A79-41207 CFM56 - Franco-Amer lean ten-tonne turbofan 

production launch. J. M. Ramsden. Flight International, vol. 115, 
June 9, 19/9, p. 2025-2028. 2045. 

A method for extending the longevity of the DC-8 aircraft, by 
using ten-ton turbofan engines, is presented. The redesigning of the 
DC-8 engines is expected to increase total flying hours by at least 
50,000 or 13 years. United is the first airline to begin converting its 
present 31 DC-8-61 aircraft to the ten-ton turbofan CFM56 engine. 
The expected cost of $3 billion, to refit the entire world fleet of 243 
DC-8's, which would require 1,250 new engines, is weighed against 
noise levels and fuel consumption. FAA guidelines are discussed, and 
emphasis is given to their implementation over the next 6 years. A 
point is made that the upgraded DC-8 will be the quietest 
four-engined transport in service, not only meeting FAA regulations, 
but offering protection against more stringent future regulations. 
Data are presented about various cyclic endurance tests, which 
consist of takeoff, engine heating and cooling as well as bird impact 
tests. Special detail is given to the study of extensive engine abuse 
and its results. C.F.W. 


A79-41209 Can Europe choose a common fighter. Flight 

International, vol. 1 15, June 9. 1979, p. 2075-2077. 

A proposal by Great Britain, France and West Germany to 
collaborate on a new tactical combat aircraft for the 1990's, is 
discussed noting the difficult problem of the appointment of a design 
leader. Design necessities such as digital flight control, direct lift 
control, gust alleviations and radar systems are analyzed. In addition, 
various missile technologies and their capabilities are described. It is 
concluded, that if a common design cannot be developed, the RAF 
will import the U.S. F-18L and employ it as a future combat aircraft. 

C.F.W. 

A79-41233 Military-technology-related flight testing in the 

framework of DFVLR/BWB cooperation - Status and perspectives 
(Wehrtechnische Flugerprobung im Rahmen des Kooperationsver- 
trags DFVLR/BWB • Bilanz und Perspektiven). P. Hamel, H. 
Galleithner, and R. Koehler (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsan- 
stalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fur Flugmechanik, Braun- 
schweig, West Germany), DFVLR-Nachrichten, June 1979, p. 32-35. 
In German. 

DFVLR/BWB flight test cooperation encompasses such tasks as 
(1) improvement and further development of test methodology, (2) 
development of standardized evaluation procedures, (3) development 
of appropriate software, (4) organization of flight-mechanics research 
flights, and (5) radar and telemetry developments. Planning and 
organization of the cooperative program are described and considera- 
tion is given to some particular examples of flight testing, including 
the testing of MRCA Tornado aircraft. B.J. 

A79-41234 The DFVLR-F4 transonic wing as European 

test model (Transsonischer Tragfliigel DFVLR-F4 als europaisches 
Testmodell). G. Redeker and N. Schmidt (Deutsche Forschungs- und 
Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fur Entwurfs- 
Aerodynamik, Braunschweig, West Germany). DFVLR-Nachrichten, 
June 1979, p, 36-39. In German. 

The 'Supercritical Wings' group of the Group for Aeronautical 
Research and Technology in Europe has selected the DFVLR-F4 
transonic wing as a model to be tested in European wind tunnels. 
This paper outlines the technology of transonic wings and gives 
results on the aerodynamic design and analysis of the DFVLR-F4 
wing; experimentally determined pressure distributions on the wing 
are compared with calculated ones. B.J. 


A79-41237 Experimental studies of axial and radial com- 

pressors by means of new measurement techniques (Experimentelle 
Untersuchungen an Axial- und Radialverdichtern mit neuen Mess- 
techniken). H. B. Weyer (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt 
fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fiir Antriebstechnik, Cologne, West 
Germany). DFVLR-Nachrichten, June 1979, p. 50-53. In German. 

A two-focus laser procedure has been developed for measuring 
flow velocity in axial and radial compressors. Some sample results are 
presented on flow profiles in transonic axial compressors. The 
measurement of fluctuating pressures in turbo compressors is also 
considered. B.J. 


A79-41238 Sound absorption through flow separation - A 

new possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines (Schallabsorption 
durch Stromungsablosung - Eine neue MoglichkeitOur Schalldamp- 
fung von Triebwerken). D. Bechert, U. Michel, and E. Pfizenmaier 
(Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, 
Institut fiir experimentelle Stromungsmechanik, Gottingen, West 
Germany). DFVLR-Nachrichten, June 1979, p. 54-56. In German. 

Experimental studies of internal engine noise have shown that a 
separated-flow effect in the exhaust jet can lead to attenuation of 
low-frequency noise. This attenuation principle appears to hold 
generally for free jets separating from rigid walls. Experimental data 
on this type of attenuation are presented and compared with current 
theory. B.J. 


512 



A79-41751 


A79-41304 ,f Application of a laminar lighting device to the 

smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind tunnels (Applica* 
tion d'un dispositif d'^lairage laminaire a la visualisation des 
ecoulements aerodynamiques en soufflerte par emission de fumee). 
M. Philbert, R. Beaupoil, and J.*P. Faleni (ONERA, Chatillon-sous- 
Bagneux, Hauts-de-Seine, France). La Recherche Aerospatiale, May- 
June 1979, p. 173-179. 22 refs. In French. 

The paper deals with the application of a 1-W argon ion laser to 
the three-dimensional smoke visualization of wind tunnel flows. 
Photographs of turbulent flows past delta- and swept-wing models 
are presented and discussed. V.P. 

A79-41407 The transonic integral equation method with 

curved shock waves. D. Nixon. Acta Mechanica, vol, 32, no. 1-3, 
1979, p. 141-151. 

Nixon (1975) calculated the pressure distribution about a 
parabolic arc airfoil using the extended integral equation method and 
compared the results to computations by the accurate 'conservative' 
finite difference method of Murman (1974). In this comparison the 
basic potential equation and the boundary conditions were identical 
in both methods, but in the integral equation method the simplifying 
assumption of a normal (to the freestream) shock wave was made; a 
further simplification was that the velocity ahead of and behind the 
airfoil could be neglected in the computation. The present study 
investigates the possibility of removing the two simplifying assump- 
tions made by Nixon (1975), particularly the assumption of a normal 
shock wave. B.J. 

A79-41414 Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets. P. 

Plaschko (Berlin, Technische Universitat, Berlin. West Germany). 
Journal of Fluid Mechanics, volT 92, May 28, 1979, p. 209-215. 8 
refs. 

The inviscid spatial growth of spiral modes of circular, slowly 
diverging jets is analyzed. A multiple-scales expansion is used to 
develop a linear stability study for nonaxisymmetric disturbances of 
arbitrary helicity. The numerical evaluation is restricted to 
axisymmetric modes and to the first two helical modes. It is shown 
that in the case of comparatively high values of the Strouhal number 
the modes exhibit a very rapid growth and reach their maximal 
amplification after a short distance, the axisymmetric instabilities 
being excited more strongly than their spiral counterparts. Contrary 
to this, the modes grow comparatively slowly in the case of smaller 
values of the Strouhal number and exhibit their maximal amplifica- 
tion further downstream. In the latter case the first spiral mode is 
more unstable than the axisymmetric one. A comparison vyith 
experiments seems to support these results. (Author) 

A79-41418 Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of 

the moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number. J. D. Iversen 
(Iowa State (Jniversity of Science and Technology, Ames, Iowa). 
Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol. 92, May 28, 1979, p. 327-348. 35 
refs. 

Free-flight and wind-tunnel measurements by previous investiga- 
tors of the flat-plate autorotation phenomenon have been analyzed. 
The variation of the autorotation characteristics with changes in the 
Reynolds number and the aspect ratio, thickness ratio and moment 
of inertia of the flat plate have been correlated. The interpretation of 
the role of the Reynolds number made in a previous investigation is 
shown to be incorrect. The tip-speed ratio, for the ranges of the 
dimensionless parameters investigated, is shown to be a function of 
only the plate aspect ratio, thickness ratio, and also the moment of 
inertia if the latter is sufficiently small. The lift and drag coefficients, 
and therefore the free-flight glide angle, are shown to be functions of 
the tip-speed ratio, the aspect ratio and the Reynolds numbers based 
on the chord and plate thickness. (Author) 

A79-41494 ff Unsteady aerodynamic pressure measurements 

on rotating lifting systems. K. Kienappel (Deutsche Forschungs- und 
Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fur Aeroelastik, 
Gottingen, West Germany). (Biennia! Fluid Dynamics Symposium, 
13th, Poland, Sept. 5-10, 1977.) Archiwum Mechaniki Stosowanej, 
vol. 31, no. 1, 1979, p. 107-114. 


An experiment designed to measure the local pressure distribu- 
tion of a ship propeller Is described in which a pressure pipe and a 
pressure transducer near the propeller hub were used. The method of 
measurement involves an analog Fourier analysis system to measure 
the real and imaginary parts of the first six harmonic components of 
a periodic signal. Experimental results are reported which indicate 
that a periodic signal can be measured by measuring its harmonics. 

F.G.M. 

A79-41567 Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 

finite-span wing. V. I. Bogatko, A. A. Grib, and G. A. Kolton 
(Leningradskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Leningrad, USSR). 
(Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Doklady, vol. 240, June 11, 1978, p. 1040, 
1041.) Soviet Physics - Doklady, vol. 23, June 1978, p. 355. 
Translation. 

The problem of the unsteady uniform hypersonic flow of an 
ideal gas past the windward side of a finite-span thin wing at constant 
angle of attack Is examined. It is assumed that the shape of the wing 
surface depends on time. The thin-shock-layer method is used to find 
a solution. B.J. 

A79-41568 On a property of the linearized boundary layer 

equations with self-induced pressure. V. I. Zhuk and 0. S. Ryzhov 
(Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Vychislitel'nyi Tsentr, Moscow, USSR). 
(Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Doklady, vol. 240, June 11, 1978, p. 
1042-1045.) Soviet Physics - Doklady, vol. 23, June 1978, p. 
356-358. 15 refs. Translation. 

Consideration is given to the theory of perturbations of a 
boundary layer with self- induced pressure on a heat-insulated flat 
plate for the case when the free-stream Mach number of the 
incoming flow is greater than unity. A system of asymptotic 
equations is presented for the viscous sublayer. It is found that the 
theory gives a good description of the slow propagation of small-scale 
perturbations. These disturbances are concentrated not Inside the 
boundary layer, but at its base near the plate surface. B.J. * 

A79-41573 Nonlinear mathematical simulation of un- 

steady flow past a helicopter rotor. S. M. Belotserkovskii, V. A. 
Vasin, and B. E. Loktev, (Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Doklady, vol. 240, 
June 21, 1978, p. 1320-1323.) Soviet Physics - Doklady, vol. 23, 
June 1978, p. 393, 394. 6 refs. Translation. 

The problem of modeling unsteady flow past a helicopter 
propeller is solved in a nonlinear framework. Each blade is simulated 
by an infinitely thin midsurface; it is assumed that attached and free 
vortices are located on each blade; and free vortices are shed from 
the blade as it moves. Only the aerodynamic part of the problem is 
considered; the problem of determining deformations and Mach 
motions of blades is neglected. Some digital simulation results are 
presented. B.J. 

A79-41727 What makes a plane crash. L. Torrey. New 

Scientist, vol. 82, June 28, 1979, p. 1074-1077. 

The procedures used in investigating the causes of the May 25, 
1979 crash of an American Airlines DC- 10 are discussed. The 
approach included analysis of the injuries received by the victims, 
reassembly of the engine pylon, analysis of data logs for the flight, 
electron scanning microscope studies of failed components, and 
simulation studies. Numerous examples of techniques used to 
determine the causes of other crashes are given. C.K.D, 

A79-41751 a Rotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II. Y. 

Fujimori, Y. K. Lin (Illinois, University, Urbana, III.), and S. T. 
Arisratnam. AIAA Journal, vol. 17, July 1979, p. 673-678. 8 refs. 
Grant No. DAAG29-78-G-0039. 

This paper is directed towards the effects of turbulence in the 
atmosphere on rotor blade stability during a forward flight. Two 
types of motion are considered; uncoupled flapping, and coupled 
flapping and torsion. Assuming that the turbulence velocities which 
appear as parametric excitations can be approximated by white noise 
processes, the method of Markov processes is applied in the 
formulation of the problem. The results are presented as stability 
boundaries for the first- and second-order stochastic moments 


513 



A79-41752 


corresponding to different spectral levels of the excitations. The 
stability boundaries for the nonturbulence case, previously obtained 
from deterministic analyses, are also included for comparison. It is 
shown that the uncoupled flapping motion remains quite stable 
under the turbulence intensities and operating conditions which may 
be reasonably expected in the service life of a helicopter, but the 
stability region for the coupled flapping and torsional motion is 
significantly reduced due to normal turbulence. . (Author) 

A79-41752 # Finite>element approach to compressor blade- 

to-blade cascade analysis. W. G. Habashi (Concordia University, 
Montreal, Canada), E. G. Dueck, and D. P. Kenny (Pratt and Whitney 
Aircraft of Canada, Ltd., Longueuil, Quebec, Canada). AIAA 
Journal, vol. 17, July 1979, p. 693-698. 17 refs. Natural Sciences and 
Engineering Research Council of Canada Grants No. A-3662- No 
P-7901. 

A study of the application of the finite-element method to 
compressible potential flows in the context of axial turbomachinery 
is undertaken. Some novel finite-element approaches relating to the 
analysis as well as to the mesh generation are presented. The 
solutions use a pseudovariational integral, applicable to shockless 
transonic flows and possessing a physical basis for the iteration. 
Appropriate grids are generated automatically for all cascades at any 
solidity. The scheme is based upon an approximate mapping of a 
blade into a near circle around which a suitable grid, with layers 
reproducing the airfoil shape, is constructed. Such mapping homoge- 
nizes the gradients by geometrically condensing regions of low 
gradients on the main part of the blade while magnifying regions of 
steep gradients near the leading and trailing edges. The analysis, 
however, is carried out in the original physical plane. Successful 
comparisons are made with other results for incompressible flows. 

(Author) 

A79-41763 ff On the transonic-dip mechanism of flutter of a 
sweptback wing. K. Isogai (National Aerospace Laboratory, Tokyo, 
Japan). 4 /A A Journal, vol. 17, July 1979, p. 793-795. 1 1 refs. 

The mechanism for the sharp drop of the flutter boundary 
observed for sweptback wings in transonic flight (transonic dip) is 
investigated. The calculated deepening of the drop with increasing 
mass ratio, the decrease of the flutter frequency with increasing 
Mach number, and the rapid decrease of the phase difference 
between vertical and pitching displacements with increasing Mach 
number and mass ratio indicates that the flutter mode is basically a 
pitching oscillation with the pivotal point very close to the first 
natural mode. It is concluded that the mechanism of single-degree- 
of-freedom flutter dominates the flutter at the bottom of the 
transonic dip and that the large time lag between aerodynamic 
pressures and airfoil motion in the transonic region, due to ‘ 
compressibility effects, is the main cause of transonic dip. A.L.W. 

A79-41766 Slender wings for civil and military aircraft 

/Eighth Theodore von Karman Memorial Lecture/. P. Poisson- 
Quinton (ONERA, Chatiilon-sous-Bagneux, Hauts-de-Seine, France). 
Israel Journal of Technology, vol. 16, no. 3, 1978, p. 97-131. 73 refs. 

The effect of wing shape and the various ways to control or 
enhance the vortex flow are reviewed along with stability and control 
problems. The slender wing at incidence is discussed relative to 
vortex lift and its control. Vortex lift enhancement is examined on 
the basis of the wing-plus-strake concept, spanwise blowing, and 
canard configurations. The transonic and supersonic performances of 
delta shapes are analyzed, with particular reference to transonic 
highly maneuverable fighters and to optimized configurations for 
supersonic transportation. Finally, highly swept configurations suit- 
able for hypervelocities are illustrated by hypersonic-cruise projects 
and by the Space Shuttle Orbiter. S.D. 

A79-41767 A new analytic method for the study of classic 

helicopter ground resonance. H. L. Price (Leeds University, Leeds, 
England). Israel Journal of Technology, vol. 16, no. 3, 1978 p 
142-153. 9 refs. 


A simple analytical method of determining neutral stability 
boundaries is developed for a single main rotor helicopter when the 
rotor has three or four articulated blades and the helicopter stands 
on an undercarriage that is either isotropic or possesses only lateral 
freedom.' The discussion concerns the stability determinant and its 
treatment, neutral stability-boundaries, and extension of the theory 
to exponential oscillations. Curves of constant modal damping are 
studied, and their -geometry is discussed In some detail. The classical 
Coleman criterion for stability is shown to be false, and the growth 
rate of the unstable oscillations is found for cases where the criterion 
is satisfied. The Coleman criterion can be nearly true over a range of 
values for the undercarriage viscous damping parameter, but in other 
cases is drastically wrong. S.D. 

A79-41768 A dynamic analysis of larKling impact. A. Brot 

(Israel Aircraft Industries, Ltd., Lod, Israel). Israel Journal of 
Technology, vol. 16, no. 3, 1978, p. 154-158. 

The paper summarizes the methods used at the Israel Aircraft 
Industries to compute the dynamic loads during landing impact. A 
schematic representation of the landing impact model as applied to a 
cantilever-type landing gear is presented. Equations defining the 
dynamics of landing impact are given. Solution of the equations of 
motion by numerical integration is discussed, along with the results 
of a landing-impact simulation (typical time-history of landing 
impact). Very good agreement is observed between the analytical and 
test results on both the vertical load and the shock-absorber closure. 

S.D. 

A79-41771 * Numerical solution for supersonic flow near 

the trailing edge of a flat plate. D. Degani (Technion - Israel Institute 
of Technology, Haifa, Israel), M. Y. Hussaini, and B. S. Baldwin 
(NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.; Technion - 
Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel). (Israel Conference on 
Mechanical Engineering, 12th, Technion - Israel Institute of Technol- 
ogy, Haifa, Israel, July 11, 12, 1978.) Israel Journal of Technology, 
vol. 16, no. 5-6, 1978, p. 208-215. 9 refs. 

In the present study, problems of laminar and turbulent 
two-dimensional flow of a viscous compressible fluid near the trailing 
edge of a thin flat plate are considered. The complete set of 
Navier-Stokes equations is solved by the finite-difference method of 
MacCormack (MacCormack and Baldwin, 1975). It is an explicit, 
predictor-corrector, time-splitting method of second order acuracy. 
.The computational mesh employed has sufficient resolution for all 
the characteristic lengths suggested by theory. In the laminar case, 
the present results are compared with the triple deck solution of 
Daniels (1974). This comparison indicates that the asymptotic triple 
deck theory for supersonic trailing edge flow is accurate within five 
percent for Reynolds numbers greater than 1000. In the turbulent 
case, the PrandtI-Van Driest-Clauser algebraic eddy viscosity model is 
used. The numerical results show that the region of upstream 
influence is approximately of the order of the boundary layer 
thickness. The solutions for skin-'triction, pressure and wake center- 
line velocity are presented. (Author) 

A79-41777 Advanced instrumentation and data evaluation 

techniques for flight tests. B. Stieler and H. Winter (Deutsche 
Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Braun- 
xhweig. West Germany). Ortung und Navigation, no. 1, 1979 p 
55-100. 12 refs. 

The use of advanced hardware and software techniques for flight 
testing at the DFVLR is reviewed. The flight test sensors include 
both ground-based (i.e., tracking radar and/or cinetheodolites) and 
onboard (i.e., INS, Doppler radar, and barometric altimeter) sensors. 
All data recorded during flight are evaluated off-line using optimal 
filtering and smoothing algorithm! Testing experience is demon- 
strated with three examples: testing of the German MLS, a Doppler 
radar, and an INS. B.J. 

A79-41778 Increasing the accuracy of integrated Doppler/ 

TACAN navigation through frequent change of TACAN stations 
(Steigerung der Genauigkeit der integrierten Doppler /TACAN 


514 



A79 42029 


Navigation durch haufigen Wechsel der TACAN-Stationen). M. Reich 
and W. Scholler (Stuttgart, Universitat. Stuttgart, West Germany). 
Ortung und Navigation, no. 1, 1979, p. 117-132. 6 refs. In German. 

The range and direction errors of individual stations (so-called 
station-specific errors) in an integrated Doppler/TACAN system have 
a great influence on total system error. This paper shows that the 
overall system error can be reduced by frequent changes of TACAN 
stations utilized in a narrow time interval. Simulated TACAN data 
demonstrate that total navigation accuracy can be increased substan- 
tially by computer-controlled alternation of network stations. B.J. 

A79-41827 jf Error localization in turbojet engines through 

determination of the characteristics of structural members (Fehler- 
lokalisierung an Turbinen-Luftstrahl-Triebwerken durch Bestimmung 
der Bauteilkenngrossen). G. Dahl. Braunschweig, Technische Univer- 
sitat, Fakultat fiir Mashinenbau und Elektrotechnik, Dr.-Ing. Disser- 
tation, 1977. 172 p. 57 refs. In German. 

In the present thesis, a conventional continuous-process calcula- 
tion, where the flow parameters are determined from the given 
component characteristics is inverted in such a way that component 
characteristics can be determined from the given flow parameters. 
The ambient pressure and temperature and the pressures and 
temperatures at the input and output of the compressor and at the 
turbine output plane, as well as the fuel flow rate, were taken as the 
flow parameters. The adaptation of this approach to the localization 
of engine malfunctions is described. V.P. 


A79-41849 CKS - Taiwan's 21st century airport. J. Wang. 

Journal of Air Traffic Control, vol. 21, Apr.- June 1979, p. 8-11. 

Taiwan's 532,000 sq. ft. Chiang Kai-Shek International airport 
outside Taipei, is described in this paper in full detail. The automated 
Airport Management System, which consists of computer connected 
sensors, displays, monitors, closed circuit TV and discreetly located 
cameras and communications equipment, directs all airport opera- 
tions. All systems ranging from flight information to watering 
systems are encompassed; preventive maintenance is one of AMS' 
major roles resulting in a safer and more economical monitoring 
system. The terminal radar system is equipped with underground 
cables which relay information to the control tower. Along with 
basic radar signals, the computer complex adds aircraft identifica- 
tion, speed and altitude data to the control display. An independent 
category II ILS provides horizontal, vertical and distance information 
on either of the two runways, helping pilots in landing. The radio 
and interphone systems in the control tower as well as high-powered 
long-range air ground communications instruments, and a highly 
sensitive security system are discussed. The possibility of using the 
airport also as an air-defense airbase in time of war is stressed. C.F.W. 

A79-41850 Geneva, Zurich get fine-grain 3-D color 

weather radar. T. K. Vickers. Journal. of Air Traffic Control, vol. 21, 
Apr.-June 1979, p. 12-16. 

The .Airways Environmental Radar Information System 
(AERIS) installed in Geneva, Switzerland, to cope with the problem 
of storms in the Swiss Alps is analyzed. It includes C-band weather 
radar connected to a minicomputer which extracts . and 'processes 
radar data creating a 3-D color display of the location and 'intensity 
of the precipitation in the area. A set of 19 scans, known as a volume 
scan, constructs a complete picture that is updated every 10 minutes 
with the volume scan made at incremented elevation angles from 1/2 
to 40 degrees. The average precipitation intensity in a 2 by 2 by 1 
km block is displayed on a color TV by using six different colors 
which correspond to six different levels of precipitation. The display 
concept is discussed in detail with emphasis on the dimensional 
capabilities. Unnecessary aircraft detours are eliminated by the 
'consistent altitude mode' which enables the controller to view 
individual 'slices' of the plan to measure the precipitation intensity 
of any selected altitude band. Specific emphasis is given to the 
feature that distinguishes between ground clutter and heavy precipi- 
tation. C.F.W. 


A79-41913 f} Nuclear aircraft innovations and applications. 

J. C. Muehibauer (Lock heed -Georgia Co., Marietta, Ga.) and R. E. 
Thompson (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Advanced Energy Systems 
Div., Pittsburgh, Pa.). American Institute of Aeronautics and 
Astronautics, Very Large Vehicle Conference, Arlington, Va., Apr. 
26, 27, 1979, Paper 79 0846. 15 p. 18 refs. 

Determination of the minimum weight nuclear propulsion cycle 
and aircraft configuration, identification of technologies and innova- 
tions for enhancing mission accomplishment, and evaluation of 
alternate mission applications in the framework of the Innovative 
Aircraft Design Study (IADS) program are discussed. Parametric 
studies of four aircraft configurations showed the minimum weight 
configuration to be one which carries the payload and reactor in the 
fuselage and uses a canard surface for horizontal control. A 
Bi-Brayton propulsion cycle with a gas cooled reactor and dual mode 
engines offers the potential for the lightest weight nuclear aircraft. 
While sea control, cruise missile carrier, tanker, and airborne 
command post are prospective alternate mission applications, the 
nuclear powered cruise missile carrier aircraft (NuCMCA) concept 
provides unique strategic capabilities. V.T. 

A79-41945 Lift and drag of sail aerofoil. J. Robert and B. 

G. Newman (McGill University, Montreal, Canada). Wind Engineer- 
ing, vol. 3, no. 1, 1979, p. 1-22. 12 refs. 

A two-dimensional sail aerofoil formed by wrapping fabric 
round a circular leading edge and bringing the two sides together to 
form a sharp trailing edge was tested. Lift, drag, and trailing force 
were measured for the full range of angles of attack, using a nylon 
fabric, and more limited tests were made on a less porous but stiffer 
dacron fabric. The aerofoils were stable’ and showed no tendency to 
flap. It was found that due to the increase of camber with angle of 
attack they have a life-curve slope and a higher lift than comparable 
conventional aerofoils; nevertheless their drag is usually higher. The 
maximum lift coefficient and drag coefficient both increase with 
looseness of the sail. The trailing edge force coefficients are 5 or less 
in the chordwise direction and 1 or less in the normal direction. This 
information is useful for designing a sail wing, since it determines the 
force on the wire or rope which is required to tension the trailing 
edge. V.T. 

A79-42007 Mathematical model of the oscillatory cycle 

associated with nonsteady interaction of a supersonic jet with a 
barrier. V. G. Dulov. (PMTF - Zhurna! Prikladnoi Mekhaniki i 
Tekhnicheskoi Fiziki, Nov.- Dec. 1978, 48-%^.) Journal of Applied 

Mechanics and Technical Physics, vol. 19, no. 6, May 1979, p. 
747-754^5 refs. Translation. 

A supersonic jet impinging on a wall can give rise to intense 
self-sustaining vibrational processes at the wall. In the present paper, 
an attempt is made to substantiate a physical hypothesis, according 
to which a dominant part in the mechanism of this phenomenon is 
played by an internal, periodically arising and vanishing wake behind 
the bifurcation line of shock fronts. The system as a whole acts to 
amplify the relatively weak disturbances associated with the periodic 
behavior of the wake. It is shown that this hypothesis is capable of 
interpreting some experimentally observed phenomena. V.P. 


A79-42029 * Split-film anemometer measurements on an 

airfoil with turbulent separated flow. W. H. Wentz, Jr. (Wichita State 
University, Wichita, Kan.) and H. C. Seetharam (Boeing Co., Renton, 
Wash.). In: Biennial Symposium on Turbulence, 5th, Rolla, Mo., 
October 3-5, 1977, Proceedings. Princeton, N.J., 

Science Press, 1979, p. 31-38; Discussion, p. 39. *5 refs. Grants No. 
NGR-1 7-003-021; No. NsG-2134. 

Experimental studies of turbulent separation on airfoils have 
been conducted to aid in improving theoretical models of post-stall 
airfoil behavior. The studies utilize a variety of pressure and hot-film 
probes. The split-film anemometer has proved particularly valuable 
for measurement of highly turbulent reversing flows. Suggested 


515 



A79-42053 


techniques for on-line digital computer processing of the data are 
discussed. (Author) 


A79-42053 Dilatational model of noise from a moving jet 

in terms of arbitrary jet structure and observer motion. R. J. Adrian 
and B. G. Jones (Illinois, University, Urbana, HI.). In: Biennial 
Symposium on Turbulence, 5th, Rolla, Mo., October 3-5, 1977, 
Proceedings. Princeton, N.J., Science Press, 

1979, p. 303-311. 17 refs. 

The dilatational model of noise generated by turbulent motions 
is extended to include subsonic motion of the reference frame with 
respect to a uniform acoustic medium and arbitrary motion of the 
observer. The application of particular interest is the fly-by of a noise 
producing jet over a stationary observer. The model neglects 
refraction by mean shear, but it allows the space-time covariance of 
the hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations in the jet to have arbitrary 
structure, thus permitting the use of realistic fits to experimental 
space-time covariances. A non-singular result is also derived for the 
case of noise emitted along the eddy convection Mach cone of 
supersonic jets. The application of these results to the prediction of 
the far field noise generated by stationary and non-stationary jets is 
discussed. (Author) 

A79-42061 Laser velocimetry measurements on high 

temperature round and rectangular twin-jet flows. J. C. F. Wang 
(General Electric Co., Schenectady, N.Y.). In: Biennial Symposium 
on Turbulence, 5th, Rolla, Mo., October 3-5, 1977, Proceedings. 

Princeton, N.J., Science Press, 1979, p. 435-443. 
Department of Transportation Contract No. OS-30034. 

Mean and turbulent velocity measurements of high temperature 
twin-round and twin-rectangular jet flows were obtained at the 
Corporate Research and Development Center of the General Electric 
Company. These experimental results were obtained in connection 
with basic jet engine noise and suppressor studies. Evidence of a 
turbulence intensity reduction at the interface between the two jets 
was found. The experimental setup, laser velocimeter system and 
results will be discussed in this paper. (Author) 


A79-42062 The European Airbus has definitively pene- 

trated the world market (L'Airbus European a definitivement perce 
sur le marche mondial). J. Morisset. L'Aeronautique et ('Astro- 
nautique, no. 76, 1979, p. 5-9, 11-13. In French. 

In the first five months of 1979, the number of European 
Airbus A300 aircraft firmly sold or under option to 28 companies 
increased from 176 to 239, and orders for the A310 Airbus increased 
from 60 to 107, representing a total of over 100 aircraft sold. 
Factors precipitating and means of meeting the rapid increase of 
Airbus orders are discussed. The necessary quadrupling of the rate of 
aircraft production to about eight aircraft per month could be 
supported by the aeronautical industries of the present Airbus 
Industries consortium, consisting of Belgium, France, Germany, 
Great Britain, the Netherlands and Spain. Factors considered 
responsible for the dramatic increase in orders include the high 
performance and reliability of Airbuses already in service, the second 
wave of fuel price Increases, the freight capacity of the Airbus, 
postponements of orders by other companies and the initiation of 
the A310 program. Airbus Industries has thus become one of the 
four largest producers of transport aircraft in the world. A.L.W. 


A79-42063 Alpha Jet - The Franco-German training and 

tactical support aircraft (L'avion Franco-Allemand d'entrainement et 
d'appui tactique Alpha Jet). G. Bruner (Centre de Documentation de 
I'Armement, Paris, France). L'Aeronautique et I 'Astronautique, no. 
76, 1979, p. 15-33. In French. 

The history, design, performance and production of the Alpha 
Jet Franco-German training and tactical support aircraft are dis- 
cussed. Specifications for a twin jet subsonic training aircraft were 
drawn up jointly by France and the Federal Republic of Germany in 


1969 and a tactical air support variant was later designed for German 
use exclusively. The first prototype was tested in October, 1973, and 
the first flight versions were flown in November 1977 and April, 
1978. The design of the aircraft is detailed, including the airfoil, 
fuselage, empennage, landing gear, propulsion system, flight control 
and hydraulic, electric, compressed air and weapons systems, and 
performance criteria of the two versions are illustrated for high and 
low altitude flight regimes. Delivery of the 200 aircraft contracted by 
each country is expected to continue through 1980, and 246 more 
aircraft have been ordered by other nations. Fabrication of the 
airframe and the Larzac 04 engines and the final assembly are 
outlined. A.L.W. 

A79-42064 The European helicopter industry and 

cooperation (L'industrie Europeenne de Thelicoptere et la coopera- 
tion). F. Legrand (Societe Nationale Industrielle Aerospatiale, 
Division Helicopteres, Marignane, Bouches-Du-Rhone, France). 
L'Aeronautique et f' Astronautique, no. 76, 1979, p. 35-45. In 
French. 

The condition of the helicopter industry in Europe is examined, 
with special attention given to cooperation between European 
manufacturers. The development of helicopter technology since the 
end of the second world war is outlined and the current status of 
European manufactures as a group is shown to be comparable to that 
of American manufacturers, with European products attaining a 
significant fraction of the world market. Factors influencing the 
success of European helicopters include both novel designs, market- 
ing procedures, the development of appropriate products and 
cooperation in the development of such products as the Franco- 
British Puma, Gazelle and Lynx helicopters. Problems to be resolved 
in the future are discussed, and it is argued that continued attention 
to the development of advanced technology, the requirements of the 
world market and cooperation between governments and industries 
will ensure the future competitiveness of the European helicopter 
industry. A.L.W. 

A79-42065 CFM56 - An act of cooperation, a new class of 

engine, a path towards the aeronautics of tomorrow (Le CFM56 - 
Une cooperation, une nouveile famille de moteurs, une voie vers 
I'aeronautique de demain). J.-C. Malroux (CFM International, S.A., 
Paris, France). L'Aeronautique et ('Astronautique, no. 76, 1979, p. 
51-61. In French. 

The CFM 56 aircraft engine is discussed from the viewpoints of 
its design and development and the cooperation between SNECMA 
and General Electric which led to the introduction of this new class 
of engine of from nine to 12 tons of thrust for 100- to 150-seat civil 
or 50- to 180-ton military transport aircraft. The CFM56 is a twin 
spool dual flow turbojet engine with high aspect ratio and a variable 
high pressure compressor stator, designed for subsonic flight and 
derived from the FI 01 engine. Engine components are detailed and 
the division of fabrication, development and testing responsibilites 
between the two manufacturers is outlined. The engine development 
program is discussed, noting that the testing program has so far 
progressed very satisfactorily. Principles guiding the collaboration, 
the success of which is demonstrated by the ordering of 150 CFM56 
engines by a major airline, consist of considerations of mutual 
long-term interest, a carefu l alloc ation of tasks and reve nues , 
program management by Tbody distinct from both participants, and 
efforts towards clarity and simplicity. A.L.W. 


A79-42066 The new European subsonic aerodynamic test- 

ing facilities (Les nouveaux moyens d'essais aerodynamiques Euro- 
peans en subsonique). P. Poisson-Quinton (ONERA, Chatillon-sous- 
Bagneux, Hauts-de-Seine, France). L'Aeronautique et ('Astro- 
nautique, no. 76, 1979, p. 62-69. 8 refs. In French. 

Four high performance subsonic wind tunnels developed by the 
laboratories of the principle European investigating nations are 
discussed. The facilities considered are the German-Dutch atmo- 
spheric tunnel in the Dutch northeast polders, the RAE pressurized 


516 



A79 42352 


tunnel at Farnborough, the ONER A F-1 pressurized tunnel at Fauga 
and the ONERA S-1 subsonic and transonic atmospheric tunnel at 
Modane, which are intended to serve as complementary facilities. 
The design and performance characteristics of the four wind tunnels 
are presented, noting the use of interchangeable airflow chambers 
and the Reynolds numbers attainable. Specific characteristics of each 
of the facilities are noted, with particular attention given to model 
support systems. A.L.W. 

A79-42067 Euromissile - An example of cooperation with 

respect to missiles (Euromissile - Example de cooperation en matiere 
de missiles). J. P. Meyer. L'Aeronautique et TAstronautique, no. 76, 
1979, p. 71-78. In French. 

The origin and functions of the Euromissile group are described 
as an example of industrial and government cooperation in the field 
of tactical missiles. The creation of the Euromissile group by the 
Office of Franco-German Programs as a governmental directing 
agency for the already existing collaboration between Nord-Aviation 
and Bolkow for the development of missiles is detailed. The 
organization of the group is outlined, and the major products of the 
collaboration, the Milan light antitank missile for infantry use, the 
Hot long-range antitank missile and the Roland ground-to-air missile 
systems, are described. It is concluded that the organization of 
Euromissile offers a solution to the problem of bilateral cooperation. 

A.L.W. 

A79-42207 jf Theoretical approach to spray combustion in 

gas turbine combustor. M. Katsuki, Y. Mizutani, and M. Ohta {Osaka 
University, Osaka, Japan). Osaka University, Technology Reports, 
vol. 29, Mar. 1979. p. 205-213. 8 refs. 

An analytical model was developed for the process of spray 
combustion in a gas turbine combustor of can-type. Droplets of 
liquid fuel were introduced into the combustor premixed with the 
primary air (premixed spray). The droplets were classified into 
several size-groups, and the law of mass conservation was applied to 
each size-group considering the evaporation and diffusion of drop- 
lets. The emission of nitric oxide was estimated assuming the 
Zeldovich mechanism and the finite-rate, one-step combustion 
reaction of fuel vapor. Significant effects of the mean droplet 
diameter on the combustion efficiency and nitric oxide emission 
were predicted. (Author) 

A79-42245 Practical considerations for manufacturing 

high-strength Ti-10V-2Fe-3AI alloy forgings. C. C. Chen (Wyman- 
Gordon Co., Worcester, Mass.) and R. R. Boyer (Boeing Commercial 
Airplane Co.. Seattle, Wash.). Journal of Metals, vol. 31, July 1979, 
p. 33-39. 13 refs. 

The manufacturing method for producing high-strength Ti-1 OV- 
2Fe-3AI alloy forgings with suitable ductility/toughness combina- 
tions has been established. The achievable property combinations at 
high strengths depend critically on the billet chemistry-homogeneity, 
the forge heat-treat variables, and the section thickness of the 
forgings. The manufacturing capability developed In this program has 
made this alloy an attractive potential for high-strength forging 
applications on Boeing's future aircraft. (Author) 


A79-42275 fj The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

(Khimicheskaia stabil'nost' kerosinovykh fraktsii). A. Ivanov, K. 
Kovacheva, Z. Kutsarova. and S. Vylkova. Khimiia i Tekhnologiia 
Topliv i Masel, no. 6, 1979, p. 6-9. In Russian. 

The compositions of the adsorbed resin components of the 
kerosene fractions of jet fuels which are desorbed by methanol or 
acetic acid are investigated and the effects of the resins on fuel 
stability are assessed. Infrared spectroscopy in the region 650 to 
4000 kaysers indicates that the major components of the methanol 
fraction are alcohols, while predominantly organic acids and other 
carbonyl compounds are observed in the acetic acid fraction. Resins 
desorbed by methanol are found to inhibit fuel oxidation to a greater 
degree than resins desorbed by acetic acid, when added in various 


concentrations to kerosene from which resins and sulfur have been 
removed. A.L.W. 

A79-42348 H Possibilities and limits of the application of 

estimation methods for development costs and equipment unit prices 
of flight systems in preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 
(Moglichkeiten und Grenzen der Anwendung von Schatzverfahren fur 
Entwicklungskosten und Geratestiickpreise fllegender Systeme bei 
Vorentwurfs-, Planungs- und Bewertungsaufgaben). H. Hansen, P. 
Ebeling, and W. Lohkamp (Industrleanlagen-Betriebsgesellschaft 
mbH, Ottobrunn, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- 
und Raumfahrt, Symposium uber Kostenprog nosen bei fUegenden 
Systemen, Cologne, West Germany, May 17, 1979, Paper 79-052. 51 
p. In German. 

General principles of cost estimation in early design stages of 
military aircraft are discussed. The features of the RCA system 
PRICE are discussed and illustrated. P.T.H. 

A79-42349 § Survey of the cost estimation process used 

during the transporter design stage (Abriss der bei der Transporter* 
konzeptfindung angewendeten Kostenverfahren). H. Lankenau 
(Vereinigte Flugtechnische Werke-Fokker GmbH, Bremen, West 
Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, Sympo- 
sium iiber Kostenprognosen bei fUegenden Systemen, Cologne, West 
Germany, May 17, 1979, Paper 79-054. 43 p. In German. 

During the development phases it is necessary to make cost 
estimates in order to determine the project's chances for realization, 
and in order to optimize, compare, and evaluate several projects. A 
VFW-Fokker developed cost prognosis procedure is detailed, and 
various aspects such as cost prognosis models, their structure, 
method of operation and possible applications, are examined. In 
addition, an operating costs procedure is being reworked and 
expanded. M.E.P. 

A79-42351 § Possibilities and limitations of air traffic con- 

trol (Moglichkeiten und Grenzen der Flugsicherung). H. Voss 
(Bundesanstalt fur Flugsicherung, Frankfurt am Main, West Ger- 
many). Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche 
Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber Fliegen im 
Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, 
DGLR Paper 79-023. 29 p. In German, 

Consideration is given to various aspects of air traffic control. 
Freedom of mobility is discussed, noting the reluctance of amateur 
pilots to follow a strict flight plan. Economics and environmental 
concerns are studied, as is safety. In addition, the fluidity of air 
traffic is investigated noting the dependence on adequate system 
capacity. Finally, air traffic regularity, resulting from reduced 
sensitivity to poor weather due to all weather instrumentation, is 
covered. M.E.P. 

A79-42352 # The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 
airline operations (Der Einfluss des Flughafen-Nahbereichs auf den 
Betrieb einer Luftverkehrsgesellschaft). J. Voigt (Deutsche Lufthansa 
AG, Hamburg, West Germany), Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- und 
Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, 
Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-024. 19p. In German. 

The problems of airport operations, including all aspects of air 
travel ranging from pre-taxiing conditions and navigational check 
systems to the landing approach, are examined. Methods to alleviate 
time-lags between announced and actual departure times, including 
shorter holding times, as well as air traffic, and landing difficulties 
induced by wind shear are discussed, and the use of an air-traffic- 
flow-management system to ease airflow at peak travel times, for all 
European countries, is suggested. The possibility of a corrtmunication 
network between individual countries, through a centralized system, 
enabling instant rerouting and alternate flight paths, are considered. 

It is suggested that solutions to problems of air traffic are to be 
found not only in air traffic control, but also in the availability of 
basic knowledge and research directed developments as well as 
combined efforts by all parties involved. C.F.W. 


517 



A79-42353 


A79-42353 jj Air traffic control requirements from the 

viewpoint of the airport (Die Anforderungen an die Flugsicherung 
aus der Sicht des Flughafens). B. Rietdorf. Deutsche Gesefischaft fur 
Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und 
Navigation, Synnposium uber F/iegen im F lughafenNahbereich, 
Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 24 26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-025. 13 
p. In German. 

The main air traffic control requirements as seen from the 
viewpoint of the airport are discussed. Attention is given to airport 
noise, choice of approach procedure, and maintenance of the 
approach path. P.T.H. 

A79-42354 if Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems 
and perspectives (Flugfiihrung im Flughafennahbereich - Aufgaben 
und Perspektivenl. M. Fricke (Berlin, Technische Universitat, Berlin, 
West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber 
FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-026. 41 p. 25 refs. In German. 

Increasing demands on aircraft guidance with respect to safety, 
economics, and environmental concerns, are discussed. Attention is 
given to current developments in the following areas: (1) aircraft 
noise, all-weather flight, windshear, and wake vortices; (2) flight 
control, including structure and technology of aircraft guidance 
systems, digital guidance systems, and the interaction of the pilot 
and the flight control system; and (3) navigation and flight safety, 
noting future navigation systems such as TRSB. new approach 
techniques involving MLS, automation of flight and traffic safety. 
The current status of West German aviation development is detailed, 
and areas of future research are proposed. M.E.P. 

A79-42355 Missed approach of commercial aircraft regard- 

ing wind shear in the ground boundary layer (Fehlanflug von 
Verkehrsflugzeugen unter Beriicksichtigung von Windscherung in der 
Bodengrenzschicht). R. Konig (Braunschweig, Technische Univer- 
sitat, Braunschweig, West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- 
und Raumfahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Naviga- 
tion, Symposium uber FUegen im Ffughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, 
West Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-028. 21 p. In 
German. 

Factors affecting aircraft climbing ability after missed approach 
are examined. Head and tail winds and wind shear occurring in the 
clearway can cause hazardous conditions for low performance 
aircraft in spite of their complying with FAR part 25. Other factors 
studied are engine power reduction due to high temperatures and the 
use of air conditioning. Attention is given to results from simulations 
at Stuttgart airport, where It was found that unfavorable wind and 
temperature conditions could lead to penetration of the clearway at 
the end of the flight path. Uneven terrain can cause hitherto 
unencountered forms of wind shear due to wind/ajrface interaction 
in the ground boundary layer. It is concluded that such factors 
should be addressed in clearway regulations and the FAR. M.E.P. 

A79-42356 ff Influence of delay time and dead time on wind 

shear landings (Verzogerungs- und Totzeiteinflusse bei Scherwind- 
landungen). P. Krauspe (Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, 
Braunschweig, West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und 
Raumfahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, 
Symposium uber FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-029. 31 p. 10 refs. In 
German. 

The reaction time of jet engines and pilots during wind shear 
conditions is studied. Topics examined include causes and effects of 
jet engine lag time, a mathematical jet engine model, and the thrust 
corrections required while under wind shear influence. In addition 
consideration is given to the causes of pilot delay time, and related 
simulator results are analyzed. It is found that engine lag time is of 
minimal influence but that pilot delay time (5-10 seconds) can lead 
to a hazardous situation. Since delay time occurs with the use of 
conventional instruments, some precautionary techniques to be 
observed until on board wind shear detectors become available, are 
given. M.E.P. 


A79-42357 }f Factors influencing runway capacity as 

typified by the Munich-Riem airport (Die Startbahnkapazitat und 
ihre Einflussfaktoren, dargestellt am Beispiel des Flughafens 
Miinchen-Riem), G. Och (Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH, Otto- 
brunn. West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fiir Luft- und Raum- 
fahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fiir Ortung und Navigation, Sympo- 
sium liber FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-030. 27 p. 18 refs. In 
German. 

Runway capacity determination based on measurements of the 
time required for arrivals, runway clearance, and departures, is 
described. Depending on traffic conditions, the Munich airport has a 
capacity of 20 to 40 movements per hour. The quantitative influence 
of the following factors is studied: (1) visibility conditions (VFR to 
category II); (2) wind with wet runway; (3) staggering, and other air 
traffic control regulations (including wake vortex problems); and (4) 
traffic composition consisting of (a) arrivals and departures and (b) 
widebody jets and medium size aircraft. Finally, technical possibili- 
ties for increasing capacity, such as high speed taxi lanes and MLS, 
are analyzed. M.E.P. 

A79-42358 fj Introduction of Category IMA at Deutsche 

Lufthansa AG (Einfiihrung der Betriebsstufe IMA bei der Deutschen 
Lufthansa AG). K. Menninger (Deutsche Lufthansa AG, Hamburg, 
West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber 
FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-031. 9 p. In German. 

Cat IMA deals, by definition, with operation down to the 
runway surface with visibility during last phase of landing of around 
200 m. The paper discusses some of the questions posed by this 
category for a commercial airline. The main questions are (1) who 
will need the new flight rule, and (2) what are the costs of 
implementation. In the case of Lufthansa, it was decided to 
introduce Cat IMA with the A300 as first model. Estimated cost over 
six years is 415,000 DM, with seven airports under consideration. 

P.T.H. 

A79-42359 # Air traffic control strategies for handling air 

traffic in the terminal area (Strategien der Flugsicherung zur 
Abwicklung des Luftverkehrs im Flughafennahbereich). W. P. 
Schwarzott (Bundesanstalt fiir Flugsicherung, Frankfurt am Main, 
West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber 
FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-032. 1 1 p. In German. 

The paper reviews the present-day capabilities of terminal area 
air traffic control, with emphasis on the exchange of control between 
the terminal area authority and the route segment authority. It is 
pointed out that in the area from about 40 nautical miles from the 
airport to the glide path there exists at present no automatic course 
guidance. All instructions must be given by radio among the crew, 
and there are no automatic aids to support the pilot in the 'balancing 
act' of hIgh-capacity/maintenance of stagger. P.T.H. 

A79-42360 jf Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 

region (Aspekte zur Verkehrsflussteuerung im Anflugbereich). M. 
Schubert, U. Voickers (Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, Braun- 
xhweig. West Germany), and A. Seyfried (Deutxhe Forschungs- und 
Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Braunxhweig, West 
Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fiir Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber 
FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR-Paper 79-033. 20 p. In German. 

The general problem of traffic control in the approach area is 
dixussed. The basic techniques employed in this traffic control are 
reviewed, and their effects on the arrival distribution and on the 
traffic flow are evaluated. Possibilities for a coordinated computer- 
supported operation are considered. P.T.H. 

A79-42361 ff Development of specifications for taxiing guid- 

ance and control systems (Rollfeldnavigation und Rollfuhrung - 


518 



A7942368 


Teilaspekte einer Verkehrsfluss-Steuerung des Flugplatzverkehrs). C. 
Woltge (Hannover, Technische Universitat, Hanover, West Germany). 
Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche 
Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber Ftiegen im 
Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, l/l/est Germany, Apr 24-26, 1979, 
DGLR Paper 79-034. 13 p. 8 refs. In German and English. 

The taxiing and control guidance requirements of a pilot, 
including steering and distance information as well as warnings of 
directional changes and system failures are discussed, while other 
guidelines for control unit personnel, ground vehicle operators and 
those of a general nature are presented in outline form. Require- 
ments for a system to provide safe and expeditious movement under 
extremely low visibility conditions are described and three sets of 
conditions for taxiing purposes are developed, where visibility is 
sufficient for both the pilot and the ground crew, sufficient for the 
pilot and not for the ground crew, and where visibility is insufficient 
for both. C.F.W. 

A79-42362 jf Technical calculation methods for automatic 
collision recognition and avoidance in air traffic (Rechentechnische 
Verfahren zur automatischen Konflikterkennung und -losung im 
Nahverkehrsbereich). D. Brunner (Braunschweig. Technische Univer- 
sitat. Braunschweig, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- 
und Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Naviga- 
tion, Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, 
West Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-035. 21 p. 5 refs. 
In German, 

A FAA problem of deciding among the constant flow of cheaper 
and more efficient systems to equip the over 130,000 aircraft In the 
U.S., is one of the reasons for not implementing a collision avoidance 
system (CAS). Methods for determining the distance between aircraft 
are discussed and particular attention is given to the formula 
developed by Morrel (1956), that calculates the time it takes two 
aircraft to come within sounding distance of each other. Guidelines 
for a CAS are presented, including instantaneous speed, distance and 
azimuth measurements, thus enabling quick and accurate rerouting. 
A Eurocontrol filtering system that can determine the exact 
coordinates of 150 planes in only 80 ms and also calculate the 
advanced positions for the next 9 to 128 seconds is examined. 
Emphasis is also given to three CAS, (airborne, beacon-based and 
ground-based), suggesting that the ground-based system may be the 
best way of preventing collisions. C.F.W. 

A79-42363 # Experience in the analysis of real and simu- 

lated collisions and dangerous encounters in German airspace 
(Erfahrungen bei der Analyse echter und simulierter Zusammenstosse 
und gefahrlicher Begegnungen im deutschen Luftraum). 0. Weber 
(Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, 
Institut fur Flugmechanik, Braunschweig, West Germany). Deutsche 
Gesellschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fiir 
Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen- 
Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr 24-26, 1979, DGLR 
Paper 79-036. 31 p. 36 refs. In German. 

The paper discusses general principles of collision avoidance in 
the airport region under visual flight conditions, and examines those 
parameters which are of interest for design of automatic conflict 
detection and resolution systems for two- and three-dimensional 
curved flights. Real and simulated conflict situations are studied, in 
order to determine which factors are present in possible collisions. 
Simulations were carried out to determine if certain types of 
equipment for conflict detection and resolution could have been 
useful in real situations. P.T.H. 

A79-42364 fj The DME-based Azimuth System /DAS/ as a' 
commercial navigation aid (Das DME-gestiitzte Azimut-System DAS 
als wirtschaftliche Navigationshilfe). G. Blaschke (Standard Elektrik 
Lorenz AG, Stuttgart, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft fiir 
Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung und 
Navigation, Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, 
Hamburg, West Germany, Apr 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-038. 46 
p. 6 refs. In German. 


DAS, a high accuracy polar coordinate navigation system with 
an azimuth error of less than 0.05 deg and a distance error of less 
than 20 m is described. DAS is based on and fully compatible with 
the ICAO-standardized 'Distance Measuring Equipment', (DME). 
Functioning principles of the precision-DME-transponder are detailed 
as are the angle measurement principles and the DAS data format for 
angle and broadcast data transmissions. Attention is given to possible 
DAS applications especially in conjunction with TRSB landing 
systems and as a navigation aid in the terminal control area. Possible 
economic advantages through the use of DAS are noted. M.E.P. 

A79-42365 if Investigation of different system configura- 

tions for a TMA navigation system taking special account of traffic 
load and channel requirements (Untersuchung verschiedener System- 
konfigurationen fiir ein TMA-Navigationssystem unter besonderer 
Beriicksichtigung von Verkehrsbelastung und Kanalbedarf). A. 
Becker (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und 
Raumfahrt, Institut fiir Flugfiihrung Braunschweig, West Germany) 
and W. Skupin (Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, Braunschweig, 
West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber 
Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-039. 27 p. In German. 

The paper reports on a comparison of three alternative terminal 
maneuvering area (TMA) navigation system configurations with the 
current system. The new systems make use of VOR/DME, TRSB 
(approach azimuth, approach elevation, and missed approach 
azimuth), and PDME. The procedures used in these systems are 
discussed in terms of four flight phases. One variant uses a 
TRSB-360-deg element in place of VOR/DME, and another one 
substitutes DAS for VOR/DME, The systems are briefly discussed in 
terms of operational considerations. Implementation, Integrity, per- 
formance, cost, and growth potential. P.T.H. 


A79-42366 ff Possibilities for increasing distance measure- 

ment accuracy of DME (DME, Mdglichkeiten zur Erhohung der 
Entfernungsmessgenauigkeit). H. Vogel (Standard Elektrik Lorenz 
AG, Stuttgart, West Germany). Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Luft- und 
Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, 
Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-040. 28 p. 5 refs. In 
German. 

The paper presents some results of a study of the errors in DME 
systems with the purpose of finding means of increasing the distance 
measuring accuracy of DME while retaining the standard DME signal 
format. The errors are divided into instrumental errors and radio 
field errors. Special attention is given to reflection errors, arising 
from multipath propagation by the superposition of the direct signal 
onto later arriving reflected signals. A number of current methods 
being Investigated for reducing these errors are reviewed. P.T.H. 

A79-42367 if A simple integrated navigation system based 

on multiple DME (Ein einfaches integriertes Navigationssystem 
basierend auf Mehrfach-DME). U. Brokof and K. Hurrass (Deutsche 
Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut 
fiir Flugfiihrung, Braunschweig, West Germany). Deutsche Gesell- 
schaft fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung 
und Navigation, Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, 
Hamburg, West Germany, Apr 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-041 . 19 
p, 5 refs. In German. 

A simple integrated navigation system is described, consisting of 
a dead reckoning system using the intrinsic velocity and the compass 
heading. The system is supported by range measurements to various 
DME ground stations by means of a Kalman filter. The state vector 
contains, besides the elements for dead reckoning, the systematic 
errors of the ground stations. The operation of the system is 
discussed in the light of test flight results with an HFB 320. P.T.H. 

A79-42368 if Application oriented simulation as a tool for 

the planning of radio beacon systems (Praxisorientierte Simulation 
als Instrument der Planung von Funksystemen). H. Ecklundt 
(Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, Braunschweig, West 


519 



A79-42369 


Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium tiber 
Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-042. 16 p. In German. 

Attention is given to the various factors to be considered when 
planning a radio beacon system. Such factors are: development of 
new systems, choice of versions, system installation, and planning of 
the surrounding area. An MLS is used as an example for organization 
of the simulation, noting the necessity for three models: (1) an 
aircraft motion model, (2) an electromagnetic wave propagation 
model with the formation of an interference field, and (3) the system 
model which, when using DLS, must consider signal generation, 
ground measurement, and on-board signal processing. Finally, prob- 
lems with duplicating complex phenomena such as diffraction and 
wave propagation are surveyed. M.E.P. 

A79-42369 § Increasing guidance accuracy through use of 

an integrated digital piloting system (Erhohung der Fiihrungsgenau- 
igkeit durch den Einsatz eines integrierten digitalen Ftugfiihrungs- 
systems). V. Adam (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fur 
Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fur Flugfiihrung, Braunschweig, West 
Germany). Deutxhe GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium iiber 
Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-043. 28 p. In German. 

The paper presents the control system, sensor system, and 
software structure of an integrated digital piloting system. The 
system has a hierarchical structure corresponding to different degrees 
of automatization running through the groups denoted as advance 
control, automatic operating modes, and functions. The control 
system is a coupled multiparameter system. The computational 
functions are clearly separated from one another in the modular 
software structure. Some flight test results are presented. P.T.H. 


A79-42370 # The influence of the amount of automation in 

a flight path guidance system on flight path deviation and pilot work 
load (Der Einfluss des Automatisierungsgrades eines Bahnfiihrungs- 
systems auf Bahnablagen und Pilotenbelastung). P. Sundermeyer and 
W. Alles (Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, Braunschweig, West 
Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and 
Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber 
Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 
24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-044. 39 p. 17 refs. In German. 

Attention is given to simulations carried out to investigate the 
delegation of duties between the pilot and autopilot by determining 
the effect of the amount of automation on flight path accuracy and 
pilot work load. Three steps of automation are studied: (1) flight 
path guidance with autopilot control, (2) flight path guidance with 
information relay to the control elements, and (3) fully automatic 
flight path guidance. It was found that flight path accuracy improved 
through a vertical speed error reduction of 20% for step 2, and 25% 
for step 3. In addition, course error was reduced 10 and 25%, 
respectively. M.E.P. 

A79-42371 ff Decelerated approach - Comparison of dif- 

ferent procedures (Decelerated approach - Vergleich verschiedener 
Verfahren). W. Wellern and P. Wiist (Bodenseewerk Geratetechnik 
GmbH, Uberlingen, West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- 
und Raumfahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Naviga- 
tion, Symposium uber FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, 
West Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-045. 17 p. 5 refs. 
In German. 

The paper compares the operational and computational aspects 
of several different procedures for decelerated approach, by which a 
reduction in engine power is achieved during approach. Emphasis is 
on those methods in which the flaps are extended later than usual. 

P.T.H. 

A79-42372 # Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 

modern methods of digital signal processing (Effektivitatssteigerung 


von Flugfiihrungssystemen durch moderne Methoden digitaler Signal- 
verarbeitung). V. Krebs (Bodenseewerk Geratetechnik GmbH, Uber- 
lingen, West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raum- 
fahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Sympo- 
sium uber FUegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Ger- 
many, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-046. 14 p. 5 refs. In 
German. 

Some signal processing techniques are discussed that offer 
possibilities for improved piloting systems. After a brief discussion of 
possible structures of parallel-redundant systems, the concept of 
analytic redundance is introduced, through which it is possible to 
replace one of the three radar altitude measurements needed for an 
automatic landing system by the drop velocity calculated by the air 
data computer. Two practical applications implemented in the GCU 
70 D digital piloting system for the microwave landing system are 
presented: implementation of a mathematical model for the MLS 
signals received on board and comparison of model outputs and 
measurement signals, enabling design of an adaptive Kalman filter for 
signal filtering with error control, and a sensor concept for relating 
barometric altitude measurement to the MLS-derived altitude by 
Kalman filtering. P.T.H. 

A79-42373 Onboard methods for increasing landing ap- 

proach capacity upon introduction of MLS (Bordseitige Massnahmen 
zur Erhohung der Anflugkapazitat mit Einfiihrung des MLS). R. 
Seifert (Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH, Ottobrunn, West Ger- 
many). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche 
GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, Symposium uber FUegen im 
Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, 
DGLR Paper 79-047. 28 p. 8 refs. In German. 

Attention is given to onboard equipment necessary to take full 
advantage of MLS. It includes: (1) precise flight autopilot and data 
display, and (2) inclusion of time handicap for landing and a data 
display that allows an exact adherence to the prescribed landing time 
4- or - 10 s. Present development trends in the USA are surveyed, 
noting the NASA Langley modified B-737 used for testing. The 
results of this testing, which has demonstrated the development 
degree of Time Referenced Scanning Beam (TRSB), are studied. 

M.E.P. 

A79-42374 § Problems of onboard determination of wind 

relationships with optimal filters (Probleme bei der bordseitigen 
Bestimmung der Windverhaltnisse mit Optimalfiltern). H. J. Hotop, 
W. Lechner, and B. Stieler (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsan- 
stalt fur Luft* und Raumfahrt, Institut fur Flugfiihrung, Braun- 
schweig, West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und 
Raumfahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, 
Symposium iiber FUegen im F lughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-048. 50 p. 8 refs. In 
German. 

The paper reports on studies aimed at determining the errors in 
the inertial navigation system (INS) and air data sensors used in the 
air traffic control operations in the airport region. The experiments 
were conducted on an HFB 320 equipped with a Litton LN-3A INS, 
various flight data sensors, and flight log. The paper describes the 
procedure for onboard wind-measurement and the regression tech- 
nique for separating the wind part from the sensor error. The 
regression technique is valid even for small wind velocity, but cannot 
be used in flight where the azimuth angle does not change. The 
results of the experiments are suitable for developing a method to 
prepare optimal measurement signals for obtaining wind relationships 
in flight. P.T.H. 

A79-42375 § New onboard structure of display and control 

system for piloting and air traffic control (Neue bordseitige Struktur 
des Anzeige- und Bediensystems fur Flugfiihrung und Flugsicherung). 
R. Beyer (Deutxhe Forxhungs- und Versuchianstalt fur Luft- und 
Raumfahrt, Institut fiir Flugfiihrung, Braunschweig, West Germany) 
and F. V. Schick (Braunxhweig, Technische Universitat, Braun- 
xhweig. West Germany). Deutsche GeseUschaft fiir Luft- ^ und 
Raumfahrt and Deutsche GeseUschaft fiir Ortung und Navigation, 


520 



A79 42382 


Symposium uber Fliegen im Ftugbafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-049. 19 p. In German. 

Electronic image tube displays and control devicescan form the 
basic element of future aircraft display and control systems in which 
the same devices are used for different functions by the use of 
different control programs. Advantages of such electronic display 
and control systems are discussed, and some development trends in 
this area are noted. P.T.H. 

A79-42376 ^ Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal 

/AT/ for pilot/controller communication over a ground/board/ 
ground data link (Untersuchungen zu einem Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
fiir die Kommunikation Pilot/Lotse uber eine Datenverbindung 
Boden/Bord/Boden). H.-D. Schenk and J. Thomas (Deutsche 
Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut 
fiir Flugfuhrung, Braunschweig, West Germany). Deutsche GeseU- 
schaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesefischaft fur Ortung 
und Navigation, Symposium uber Fiiegen im Ffughafen-Nahbereich, 
Hamburg, West Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper 79-050. 21 
p. 5 refs. In German. 

As opposed to the usual tactical executive air traffic control 
procedures, strategic air traffic planning over a two-way radio link 
between pilot and controller is proposed, whose purpose is to ensure 
conflict-free flight for all aircraft operating in a given airspace for the 
whole flight of an individual aircraft, including movements on the 
ground. Three components of the system are the electronic display 
of flight control data along with function keys for communication 
with ATC points, hardcopy printer for output of long-term valid 
data, and interface of display and printer with the data link. Some of 
the desired features of the display are discussed. P.T.H. 

A79-42377 Fundamentals of navigation in the terminal 

maneuvering area (Etemente der Navigation im Flughafen- 
nahbereich). P. Form (Braunschweig, Technische Universitat, Braun- 
schweig, West Germany). Deutsche Geselfschaft fiir Luft- und 
Raumfahrt and Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Ortung und Navigation, 
Symposium uber Fliegen im Flughafen-Nahbereich, Hamburg, West 
Germany, Apr. 24-26, 1979, DGLR Paper. 21 p. In German. 

The paper discusses some of the principles of traffic manage- 
ment in the terminal maneuvering areas. The discussion covers 
standardized approach paths, procedures followed as an aircraft flies 
over these paths, the need sometimes to deviate from standard paths, 
and special problems in an area near mountains, such as Salzburg. 
Illustration are provided for the discussion of the standard terminal 
arrival routes of Frankfurt, Bremen, London, and Salzburg. P.T.H. 


A79-42378 Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Confer- 

ence, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 
Conference sponsored by the American Institute of Aeronautics and 
Astronautics. New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and 
/Astronautics, Inc,, 1979. 221 p. Members, $27.50; nonmembers, 
$35. 

Papers are presented on the productivity of airships in long- 
range transportation, analysis of Coast Guard missions for maritime 
patrol airships, thruster control for airships and the structural loads 
due to gusts on semibuoyant airships. British civil airworthiness 
requirements for airships, Japanese lighter-than-air mission studies 
and Canadian interest in modern LTA mission studies are also among 
the papers discussed. Attention is given to airship dynamic stability, 
unmanned miniblimp systems, and tethered communications and 
monitoring systems. C.F.W. 

A79-42379 ff Analysis of Coast Guard missions for a mari- 

time patrol airship. H. K. Rappoport (Summit Research Corp., 
Gaithersburg, Md.). In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology 

Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics 
and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 1-5. (AIAA 79-1571) 

A review of the U.S. Coast Guard's operation, has led to the 
selection of eight airship participation programs that, compared to 
the current operating platforms of ships and aircraft, were found to 


be cost effective. 30 potential airship missions, for the eight 
programs, were described and 263 mission profiles were compiled, 
including ice patrol, surveillance and inshore undersea warfare. 
Special attention was given to the point design analysis of these 
programs and the annual requirements for capable airships, as a 
function of flight duration. Emphasis was placed on statistical data 
and calculations of crew size and mission duration. 120,000 hours of 
operations of less than 40 hours were analyzed and it was concluded 
that 50 maritime patrol ships, at a cost of $10 million, could be 
utilized. The hourly cost of operating an airship was found to lie 
between $700 and $1200, depending on the mission requirements 
and flight duration. C.F.W. 

A79-42380 § Tri-rotor Coast Guard airship. N. D. Brown 

(Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron, Ohio). In: Lighter-Than-Air 
Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, 
Technical Papers. New York, American Institute 

of Aemnautics and /Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 6-14. 7 refs. (AIAA 
79-1573) 

Development of the tri-rotor Coast Guard airship (ZP-3G) Is 
discussed and the vehicle characteristics for the eight missions 
(including search and rescue operations, port safety, and ice 
operations), examined by Rappoport (1979), are tabulated. 
Emphasis is given to speed control and acceleration, propeller 
performance, fuel consumption, power setting, envelope sizing and 
the inboard profile. The design of the three-engine, 800 hp airship, 
with an envelope volume of 875,000 cu ft and a top speed of 97 
knots. Is examined. A vertical takeoff and landing system is 
incorporated as well as conventional operations. The maximum ferry 
range is noted at 3407 n mi, with a 4420 lb fixed-on-board payload, 
a crew of 6, provisions for 5 days, 10% fuel reserve and a minimum 
flight speed of 40 knots. Further detail is given to various major 
characteristics, including beta factors, gross weights, dynamic lift 
capabilities, varying speed ranges and other performance statistics. It 
is concluded that the technical risk associated with the ZP-3G Is low 
and an operational prototype could be flying within three years after 
the finalized design. C.F.W. 

A79-42381 # The potential role of airships for oceanogra- 

phy. R. E, Stevenson (U.S. Navy, Office of Naval Research; 
California, University, La Jolla, Calif.). In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems 
Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Tech- 
nical Papers. New York, American Institute of 

Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 15-24. (AIAA 79-1574) 

The use of an oceanographic airship to collect data of 
temperature discontinuities at sea surfaces, extending through the 
upper ocean, is proposed. A scenario of an oceanographic experiment 
is outlined, implementing an airship equipped with a complete 
satellite receiving system, expendable bathythermographs, salinity 
probes, sound velocimeters, plus a collection of remote sensors. 
Several photographs, mostly taken from orbiting satellites, are 
attached depicting ocean swells, large internal waves, eddies, whip 
wakes and sea surface slicks. C.F.W. 

A79-42382 # Modern rigid airships as sea control escort 

platforms. D. G. Kinney (U.S. Nava! Weapons Center, China Lake, 
Calif.). In: Lighter- Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo 
Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979, p. 25-33. (AIAA 79-1575) 

A preliminary analysis of the potential of modern airships to 
meet the U.S. Navy's sea control escort needs, is presented. The use 
of airborne stations (rigid airships), operating at high altitudes with 
reduced empty weight, is suggested and the modern rigid airship, an 
updated version of the I930's design, with improved materials and 
components and equipped with modern surveillance systems, is 
described. Airship size, performance and endurance are studied 
together with payload capabilities (up to 60,000 lb) and gas volumes 
of up to 6 million cu ft. Special emphasis is given to the airship's 
radar detection performance, and antiair and antisubmarine warfare 


521 



A79-42383 


capabilities of the airship are investigated, showing cost- comparisons 
to present airborne defense systems. It is concluded that the cost of a 
15-year life cyde for 5 airships would be $600 to $900 million, only 
8 to 12% of present defense systems. Finally, results show that the 
limitations of modern rigid airships, including low operating ability 
in severe storm conditions, and high detectability and survivability, 
do not outweigh its potentially valuable contribution. C.F.W. 

A79-42383 * jj Weight and cost estimating relationships for 
heavy lift airships. D. W. Gray (Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron, 
Ohio}. In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo 
Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979, p. 34-42. NASA-supported research. (AIAA 79-1577) 

Weight and cost estimating relationships, including additional 
parameters that influence the cost and performance of heavy-lift 
airships (HLA), are discussed. Inputs to a closed loop computer 
program, consisting of useful load, forward speed, lift module 
positive or negative thrust, and rotors and propellers, are examined. 
Detail is given to the HLA cost and weight program (HLACW), which 
computes component weights, vehicle size, buoyancy lift, rotor and 
propel la r thrust, and engine horse power. This program solves the 
problem of interrelating the different aerostat, rotors, engines and 
propeller sizes. Six sets of 'default parameters' are left for the 
operator to change during each computer run enabling slight data 
manipulation without altering the program. C.F.W. 

A79-42384 fi Structural loads due to gusts on semibuoyant 

airships. A. D. Topping (Bell Aerospace Textron, New Orleans, La.). 
In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, 
Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New 

York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979, p. 43-46. 7 refs. (AIAA 79-1581) 

The semiempirical preliminary design equations often used for 
the estimation of the structural weight of airship envelopes implicitly 
assume neutral buoyancy. Many proposed new airships are semi- 
buoyant, and the heavy-lift airship (HLA) is a case in point. In this 
paper, translational accelerations in the vertical plane are calculated 
for a gust loading based on existing experimental data. Virtual mass 
effects are included. Results indicate envelope weights for heavy 
airships may be much higher than for neutrally buoyant airships, 
while car and related structure may be lighter than would be 
expected in a conventional airship with the same gross weight. 

(Author) 

A79-42385 # British lighter-than-air activity - A review. A. 
W. L. Nayler (Royal Aeronautical Society, London, England). In: 
Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., 
July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
47-56. 18 refs. (AIAA 79-1583) 

The progress of British lighter-than-air activity and its state-of- 
the-art is discussed and a brief historical background is presented. 
The possible uses of airships to provide convenient lift devices for 
freight and heavy indivisible loads are examined. A current project, 
has made use of advanced materials and technologies to develop the 
AD-500 nonrigid airship, using helium, and an envelope of thin 
single-ply polyester, coated with polyurethane and loaded with 
titanium dioxide. The design of a nonrigid helium airship, carrying an 
array of solar cells that generate electrical power and feeds it to dc 
motors, that drive Its propellers, is suggested. It is concluded that the 
airship could be a fuel-economic load carrier and the comparatively 
small versions being built today could be the forerunners of 
tomorrow's freight airship fleets. C.F.W. 


A79-42386 # Canadian interest in modern LTA transport. 

R. G. E. Browning (Alberta Transportation, Edmonton, Canada). In: 
Llghter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., 
July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
57-66. (AIAA 79-1585) 


A market study to assess the applicability of LTA in the 
Canadian North-West to satisfy particular transporation demands has 
been completed. The study identifies possible vehicle configurations 
and assigns them to specific tasks that were identified by potential 
users. An economic analysis of some of the missions is provided. 
Results indicate that the market has sufficient economic significance 
to warrant LTA operations in this region. (Author) 

A79-42387 § Japanese lighter-than-air mission studies. K. 

linuma (Japan Buoyant Flight Association, Tokyo, Japan). In: 
Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., 
July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
67-72. (AIAA 79-1587) 

The transportation of people and heavy cargo, using express 
trains, aircraft and possibly lighter-than-air (LTA) ships, among the 
islands of Japan is examined. The conceptual design of a 120 seat 
LTA craft, with a cruising speed of 150 km/h and a range of 700 km 
is discussed. A two phase plane, one for heavy cargo (up to 100 tons) 
transportation and the other for the transportation of people, is 
presented. It is concluded that insufficient evidence is available to 
decide what type of LTA craft is most suitable for these purposes. 

C.F.W. 


A79-42388 ff Flight dynamics analyses and simulation of 

Heavy Lift Airship. B. L. Nagabhushan and N. P. Tomlinson 
(Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron, Ohio). In: Lighter-Than-Air 
Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, 
Technical Papers. New York, American Institute 

of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 73-81. 8 refs. (AIAA 
79-1593) 

Performance, stability, and control characteristics of a quad- 
rotor Heavy Lift Airship concept with a simply suspended payload 
are determined by using an analytical model of such a configuration. 
Nonlinear equations of motion are derived and used to construct a 
hybrid computer simulation of the system as well as to derive a linear 
system model of the configuration dynamics. Results are presented 
that show (1) the performance of the vehicle in typical missions, 
such as off-loading container ships and logging; (2) possible instabili- 
ties of the configuration dynamics; and (3) controllability of the 
vehicle-payload system in the flight envelope of operational. interest. 

(Author) 


A79-42389 ff 'Thruster control for airships'. V. H. Pavlecka 

(Airships International, Inc., Tustin, Calif.). In: Lighter-Than-Air 
Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, 
Technical Papers. New York, American Institute 

of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 82-87. 18 refs. 
(AIAA 79-1595) 

The use of thruster control to alleviate the task of controlling 
airships at low speeds and standstill, is presented. Historical 
background, including the Forlani solution (1920) of using momen- 
tum of cold air jets valved off in the bow and stern to move an 
airship horizontally or vertically is given. Four possible systems of 
thruster control are examined: (1) the use of control blowers with 
pressurized air ducting to valve manifolds, (2) the use of local 
blowers In the bow and stern plenum chambers activating valves for 
cold air jets, (3) tapping internal pressure of the hull with blowers 
supercharging it, and (4) the deployment of individual electrically 
driven thrusters, using external air driven intermittently from the 
central airship electrical power plant. A NASA directed study found 
the last system to be much lighter than the fins and movable control 
surfaces that it will replace, and is the most desirable solution. 
Evaluation of results confirmed that airships will become indepen- 
dent of ground crews and fully controllable at zero and low flight 
speeds as well as lower in cost due to the lower fuel weight of control 
thruster installation, C.F.W. 


522 



A79 42396 


A79-42390 H The productivrty of airships in long-range 

transportation. W. N. Brewer (Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron, 
Ohio). In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo 
Alto. Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979. p. 88-98. (AIAA 79-1596) 

Closed-form solutions are developed for the transportation 
productivity (payload ton/nautical miles per hour) for airships in 
long-range transportation. Both fully air-buoyant (FAB) and semi- 
air-buoyant (SAB) concepts are treated. It is shown that FAB 
vehicles develop maximum productivity when the useful load is split 
into two-thirds payload and one-third fuel at all ranges. A cruise 
speed is selected so that this amount of fuel will last the full range of 
a particular mission. The SAB airships are treated for flying at 
constant speed or at constant L/D with or without buoyancy 
control. The fundamental relationships between productivity and 
airship parameters are shown for each case. (Author) 

A79-42391 § Lighter-than-air craft for strategic mobility. G. 

A. Pasquet (USAF, Military Airlift Command, Scott AFB. III.). In: 
Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., 
July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
99-104. 9 refs. (AIAA 79-1597) 

The possibility of using lighter-than-air craft (LTAC), as a viable 
means of improving U.S. strategic mobility, is suggested. Four tasks 
and their relationships to intertheater or strategic airlift are presented 
with the most critical airlift task found to be the deployment of 
personnel and equipment to overseas theaters in order to balance 
force ratios. Another important 'retrograde' task is the shipping 
home of noncombatants, wounded and damaged equipment. Other 
tasks consist of providing material, which allow the sustaining of 
combat capabilities, as well as 'employment', involving direct 
delivery of combat forces to the area of operations. Special attention 
Is given to mission flexibility, defined as a combination of ranges, 
payloads, self-sufficiency, off runway and adverse weather capabili- 
ties. It is estimated that a LTAC should have an unrefueled range of 
7,100 nautical miles and payloads between 600 and 1,500 tons. 
Results show that survivability, in terms of its large size and slow 
speed, eliminate the LTAC from consideration as a combat vehicle, 
but advantages of complementing present air and sea lift capabilities 
provide enough data to give serious thought to using LTAC for 
strategic mobility. C.F.W. 


A79-42392 ff Airship potential in strategic airlift operations. 
J. E. Glod (Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron, Ohio). In: Lighter- 
Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 
11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
105-112. 11 refs. (AIAA 79-1598) 

The use of fully-air buoyant (FAB) and semi-air-buoyant (SAB) 
airships, as potential strategic transport airships (STA), is described. 
The scope of the airlift requirement is found to be in an approximate 
range of 4,600 n mi with a varying payload from 300,000 to 780,000 
tons. In order to develop a suitable airship, four technological areas 
are studied: structure, propulsion, aerodynamics, and operational 
requirements. It was determined that missions of non-stop flights 
from the continental U.S. to Europe and the Mid- East, would require 
a rigid type of structure, with VTOL thrusts loads and the classical 
wire braced frame and upper limits of 50 million cu ft and speeds of 
75 to 100 knots. The most suitable all-round STA was determined to 
be a SAB, cruising at 1 15 knots with a 363 ton payload. Finally, the 
most critical limitation associated with a SAB vehicle is that it is a 
totally new and unique vehicle compared with any prior LTA or 
HTA craft. C.F.W. 

A79-42393 ff Further advancements in the concept of delta- 

winged hybrid-airships. P.-A. Mackrodt (Deutsche Forschungs- und 
Versuchsanstalt fiir Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fiir Experimentelle 
Stromungsmechanik, Gottingen, West Germany). In: Lighter-Than- 
Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 


1979, Technical Papers. New York, American 

Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 113-122. 35 
refs. (AIAA 79-1599) 

During the last years several concepts arose for hybrid-airships. 
One of these concepts combines a slender delta-wing with a rigid 
airship, called hybrid- Zeppelin. In the present paper, the aerodynam- 
ic performance of such a vehicle has been calculated starting from 
the technical state of the art of the prewar L2 129 and based on the 
slender body theory. The results show that the optimum hybrid- 
Zeppelin at the given conditions lifts roughly one half of its take-off 
weight by aerodynamic lift at a cruise speed in the closed interval 
125-225 km/hr. If fueled with liquid hydrogen or Blaugas and driven 
by gas-turbines its payload and fuel consumption figures are much 
superior to those of existing aircraft. (Author) 

A79-42394 ff British civil airworthiness requirements for 

airships. E. J. Niedermayer (Civil Aviation Authority, Airworthiness 
Div., Redhill, Surrey, England). In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Tech- 
nology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical 
Papers. New York, American Institute of Aero- 

nautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 123-130. (AIAA 79-1600) 

The historic background of airship airworthiness requirements in 
the UK are reviewed and the philosophy which has led to the 
development of the British Civil Airworthiness Requirements for 
nonrigid airships is discussed. Restrictions apply to nonrigid airships 
with an envelope volume of not more than 0.5 million cu ft and 
equipped with two, or more, piston engines. The philosophy which 
has led to the formulation of specific airship requirements includes 
flight handling and performance, structural, design, and construction 
aspects, engine and equipment installations, and levels of safety. The 
framework of these requirements can be expanded to cover rigid 
airship structures, turbine engines and control systems. V.T. 

A79-42395 ^ High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft. 

M. H. Horn and J. J. Pigliacampi (Du Pont de Nemours and Co., 
Textile Fibers Dept., Wilmington, Del.). In: Lighter-Than-Air Sys- 
tems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, 
Technical Papers. New York, American Institute 

of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 131-139. 19 refs. 
(AIAA 79-1601) 

High performance fibers that combine mechanical properties 
comparable to metals with the light weight and handleability of 
conventional textiles are needed in any new lighter-than-air craft. 
Kevlar aramid, graphite, and glass fibers are prime candidates to meet 
the demanding performance criteria of this evolving concept. 
Specifically, the performance of these materials are compared in the 
configurations envisioned for lighter-than-air craft, i.e., composites, 
coated fabrics, ropes, and industrial hose. (Author) 


A79-42396 * # Potential applications of a high altitude 
powered platform in the ocean/coastal zone community. D. Escoe, P. 
Rigterink (Computer Sciences Corp., Silver Spring, Md.), and J. D. 
Oberholtzer (NASA, Wallops Flight Center, Wallops Island, Va.). In: 
Lighter- Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., 
July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
140-145. (AIAA 79-1602) 

The results of a survey of the ocean/coastal zone community 
conducted for the NASA Wallops Flight Center to identify potential 
applications of a high altitude powered platform (HAPP) are 
presented. Such a platform would stationkeep at 70,000 feet for up 
to a year over a given location and make frequent high resolution 
observations, or serve as a regional communications link. The survey 
results indicate user interest among scientific researchers, operational 
agencies and private industry. It-li felt that such a platform would 
combine the desirable characteristics of both geostationary satellites 
(wide area, frequent observation) and aircraft (high resolution). As a 
result a concept for an operational HAPP system in the form of a 
'mesoscale geostationary satellite' system evolved. Such a system 
could employ many of the same technologies used in current NASA 


523 



A79-42397 


and NOAA geostationary satellite programs. A set of generalized 
instrument requirements for HAPP borne sensors is also presented. 

(Author) 

A79-42397 * }} Applications of a high>altitude powered plat- 
form /HAPP/. M. 8. Kuhner (Battelle Columbus Laboratories, 
Columbus, Ohio). In; Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Confer- 
ence, Palo Alto. Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and 
Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 146-154. 9 refs. Contract No. NASw- 
2800. NASA Task 19. (AIAA 79-1603) 

The high-altitude powered platform (HAPP) is a conceptual 
unmanned vehicle which could be either an airship or airplane. It 
would keep station at an altitude of 70.000 ft above a fixed point on 
the ground. A microwave power transmission system would beam 
energy from the ground up to the HAPP to power an electric 
motor-driven propeller and the payload. A study of the HAPP has 
shown that it could potentially be a cost-competitive platform for 
such remote sensing applications as forest fire detection, Great Lakes 
ice monitoring and Coast Guard law enforcement. It also has 
significant potential as a communications relay platform for (among 
other things) direct broadcast to home TVs over a large region, 

(Author) 


A79-42398 * }f Wind study for high altitude platform design. 
T. W. Strganac (NASA, Wallops Flight Center, Wallops Island, Va.). 
In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, 
Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New 

York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979. p. 15S161. 6 refs. (AIAA 79-1607) 

.An analysis of upper air winds was performed to define the wind 
environment at potential operating altitudes for high-altitude 
powered platform concepts. Expected wind conditions of the 
contiguous United States, Pacific area (Alaska to Sea of Japan), and 
European area (Norwegian and Mediterranean Seas) were obtained 
using a representative network of sites selected based upon adequate 
high-altitude sampling, geographic dispersion, and observed upper 
wind patterns. A data base of twenty plus years of rawinsonde 
gathered wind information was used in the analysis. Annual 
variations from surface to 10 mb (approximately 31 km) pressure 
altitude were investigated to encompass the practical operating range 
for the platform concepts. Parametric analysis for the United States 
and foreign areas was performed to provide a basis for vehicle system 
design tradeoffs. This analysis of wind magnitudes indicates the 
feasibility of annual operation at a majority of sites and more 
selective seasonal operation for the extreme conditions between the 
pressure altitudes of 100 to 25 mb based upon the assumed design 
speeds. (Author) 


A79-42399 H The ATMOSAT Program 1975-78. T. F. Hein- 
sheimer (Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, Calif.). In: Lighter-Than-Air 
Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 1 1-13, 1979, 
Technical Papers. New York, American Institute 

of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 162-172. (AIAA 
79-1608) 

The first manned superpressure balloon has been developed to 
provide means for accurately following a parcel of air, making 
physical and chemical measurement en route, and collecting atmo- 
spheric data: ozone, NOx, S02, temperature gradients and turbu- 
lence. The aim of the first prototype ATMOSAT flight was to 
measure the superpressure induced by supertemperature at the 100 
mb level, while the performance of materials (Kelvar composite 
fabrics), balloon, launch and flight techniques were evaluated during 
the 10-meter ATMOSAT flights. The history and results of the 
pollution monitoring flights 4-9 conducted in 1976-1978 are 
presented. It is proposed to use ATMOSAT-type balloons rolling 
about on the surface of Mars for exploring the planet in the late 
1980s. V.T. 


A79-42400 § Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems. J. P. Hirl (TCOM Corp., Columbia, Md.). In: 
Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., 
July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New York, 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 
173-180. (AIAA 79-1609) 

This paper reviews the TCOM aerostat technology of a station- 
ary platform 3 km high whose operation and, specifically, onstation 
time is not encumbered by energy-supporting considerations. Operat- 
ing from this platform, modern electronic equipment gains a 
substantial advantage in cost-effective area coverage. As applied to 
telecommunications, a system configured to the telephone require- 
ments of a specific area can be fulfilled on a short term, wide 
application basis with the flexibility of expansion as the real growth 
of the area demands. A full range of direct broadcast-to-user services 
(TV, AM/FM, mobile radio, etc.) can be provided from the platform, 
blanketing an area in excess of 1 25,000 sq km. Further, the aerostat 
system can accommodate active or passive monitoring devices that 
have unique application to such difficult problems as control and 
protection of coastal areas. This paper concludes that the tethered 
aerostat is a unique system whose platform capability significantly 
enhances the use of modern electronic equipment to provide a broad 
range of cost-effective services with a very short time from 
conception to achievement of full system utilization. (Author) 

A79-42401 Unmanned mini-blimp system. G. R. Seemann, 

G. J. Brown, and G. L. Harris (Development Sciences, Inc., City of 
Industry, Calif.). In; Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Confer- 
ence, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and 
Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 181-186. (AIAA 79-1610) 

Technology development of an unmanned (remotely piloted) 
mini-blimp (RPMB) during the past four years are discussed including 
aerodynamics, propulsion, flight' control, envelope and car construc- 
tion. Flight test results of two prototype systems are presented. 
Applications are numerous for both civil and military. This paper 
deals primarily with civil applications such as law enforcement, 
customs and immigration, pollution monitoring, and surveillance and 
patrol. A law-enforcement RPMB system is presented in detail 
including technical and operational data. Funding is required for a 
full scale demonstration in a civilian application before implementa- 
tion in an urban area. (Author) 

A79-42402 # Determination of the natural frequency of an 

airship model. S. G. Sampath (Batelle Columbus Laboratories, 
Columbus, Ohio), G. H. Workman (Applied Mechanics, Inc., Colum- 
bus, Ohio), and W. N. Brewer (Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron, 
Ohio). In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo 
Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers, 

New York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979, p. 187-191. 6 refs. (AIAA 79-1 582) 

In this effort the determination of the natural frequency of a 
lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle design with an internal catenary system 
Is described. The Rayleigh method, coupled with the finite-element 
method to obtain the assumed model shape about the large 
displacement static 'rigged' condition, was utilized for the frequency 
determination. To obtain the response of a LTA vehicle to both the 
initial static loadings and the analyzed displacement pattern due to 
the assumed dynamic loads, a finite element digital computer 
program was utilized. The natural frequency as calculated by the 
above methodology agreed well with that based on limited experi- 
mental data on LTA vehicles of this type. (Author) 


A79-42403 fj Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air 

vehicles. K. E. Williams and J. T. Milton (U.S. Coast Guard, 
Conservation and Advanced Technology Branch, Washington, D.C.). 
In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, 
Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. __ New 

York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979, p. 192-197. 7 refs. (AIAA 79-1570) 


524 



A79-42550 


The Coast Guard Office of Research and Development is 
examining the potential of modern lighter-than*air vehicles for 
coastal patrol and other missions. This paper describes Coast Guard 
missions and responsibilities. LTA vehicles appear to fill a gap 
between ships and aircraft regarding speed, payload and endurance 
capabilities. Energy savings for certain missions may be significant. 
Heavy weather operations and the economic viability for LTA 
vehicles which would satisfy performance and environmental needs 
are the major areas of uncertainty. (Author) 


A79-42404 H Airship dynamic stability. J. DeLaurier and D. 

Schenck (Toronto, University, Toronto, Canada). In: Llghter-Than- 
Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 
1979, Technical Papers. New York, American 

Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 1979, p. 198-211. 22 
refs. Research supported by the Transport Canada and National 
Research Council of Canada. (AIAA 79-1591) 

An analysis has been developed for predicting the lateral and 
longitudinal dynamic stability of airships in which non-neutral net 
buoyancy and non-coincident mass and volumetric centers are 
accounted for. Also, control forces and moments act on the vehicle 
through static gains of its pitch and heading angles. This analysis has 
been applied to three example airships, including two historic designs 
(U.S. Navy Airships ZR-1 and ZR-4) for which comprehensive values 
of their geometric, inertial, and aerodynamic properties have been 
obtained and derived. The results from this work show that: (1) 
specific types of airship dynamic modes are readily identifiable for a 
general range of configurations; (2) the two historic airships were 
controls-fixed unstable in certain operational conditions. (Author) 


A79-42405 # High altitude powered platform - A microwave 

powered airship. J. W. Sinko (SRI International, Menlo Park, Calif.). 
In: Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, Palo Alto, 
Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical Papers. New 

York, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 
1979, p. 212-218. (AIAA 79-1606) 

A concept for providing a platform for communications and 
earth observations at an altitude of about 20 km over a station 
transmitting a microwave beam to power the platform's electric 
motors, is described. Since fuel does not have to be physically 
supplied to the airship, the flight duration is limited only by the need 
to perform maintenance on the airship and its payload. Cost 
estimates and environmental effects are evaluated and it is noted that 
in the design presented costs were minimized by balancing the costs 
of larger antenna sizes with the increased power costs associated with 
operating at a lower efficiency. Samarium-cobalt electric motors 
would be used for the airship while the baseline design uses ballonets 
(airbags in the hull). The advantages are listed particularly noting the 
possibility of building a direct television broadcast network. V.T. 


A79-42410 Optimization of the weight of a wing with 

constraints on the static aeroelasticity. A. P. Seiranian. (Akademiia 
Nauk SSSR, Izvestiia, Mekhanika Tverdogo Tela, vol. 13, July-Aug. 
1978, p. 34-42.) Mechanics of Sol ids, vol. 13, no. 4, 1978, p. 29-36. 
16 refs. Translation. 

The paper examines the problem of minimizing the weight of an 
unswept wing of a flight vehicle with constraints imposed on the 
critical divergence and reversal velocities c>f the aileron. An unswept 
wing with a large span-chord ratio and an aileron in a gas flow is 
considered. The way in which the optimal solution and minimum 
weight depend on the parameters of the problem is analyzed. Some 
numerical results are reported. S.D. 


A79-42423 Ilyushin 'Candid'. Air International vol. 17, 

July 1979, p. 42-44. 

The Ilyushin 11-76 Candid is the key element in the current 
Soviet military air mobility enhancement program and a more 


effective logistic support aircraft than the An 12 Cub, affording 
twice the payload and twice the range. Essentially of similar concept 
to the Lockheed C-141B StarLifter, with which it compares closely 
in size and weight, the 11-76 is 20% more powerful and capable of 
utilizing relatively primitive airstrips. With nominal task of transport- 
ing 40 tons of freight ove r 310 0 miles in less than six hours, the 11-76 
combines full-span slats, double-slotted trailing-edge flaps and hlgh- 
flotation 20-wheel undercarriage with ample power to permit 
operation from short, unprepared strips. The four Soloviev D-30KP 
two-shaft turbofans are each rated at 26,455 lb for take-off and are 
fitted with clamshell-type thrust reversers. The aircraft is expected to 
enter service with both the long-range Aviation and the Naval Air 
Force as a flight refuelling tanker compatible with the Backfire, and 
It is serving as the basis of the new AWACS aircraft. V.T. 


A79-42546 ji Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type 'slow' compression wind tunnel (Raschet rabochego 
protsessa v aerodinamicheskoi porshnevoi trube 'medlennogo' 
szhatiia). A. B. Berezovskii and V. B. Panfilovich. Aviatsionnaia 
Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 3-10. In Russian. 

The thermodynamic processes during the compression phase of 
the cycle of a piston-type slow compression wind tunnel are analyzed 
on the following assumptions: (1) the process is quasi-steady-state; 
(2) the gas is ideal; (3) the piston is massless; (4) heat exchange 
between the gas and the external medium is neglected; and (5) 
friction between the piston and wall is absent. The fundamental 
equations are the work equation of Leuchter (1965) and a given 
relation between the pressure of the working gas and the instantane- 
ous volume. The resulting equations were numerically integrated to 
obtain plots of temperature and barotropic index as a function of 
time during compression and of the temperature of the compressed 
gas as a function of the pressure rise during passage of the gas 
through the nozzle. P.T.H. 

A79-42547 ff Gas curtain in gas turbine engines (Gazovaia 

zavesa v gazoturbinnykh dvigateliakh). I. S. Varganov. A wafs/o/7/?a/a 
Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 1 1-16. 13 refs. In Russian. 

The use of a gas curtain in the bypass circuit of a turbofan 
engine permitting variation of the flow rate ratio according to flight 
conditions Is analyzed. To achieve a ratio of pressure behind turbine 
to pressure behind the fan of at least 2 during thrust reversal at 
constant rotational speed of the high pressure rotor, it is proposed to 
change the operating condition of the fan by reducing the slot area 
relative to the area of the exit nozzle of the main circuit. A method 
for establishing the energetic foundation for such a process is 
developed. P.T.H. 

A79-42549 ff Study of the nonuniformity of the tempera- 
ture field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the parameters 
of the primary zone vary (Issledovanie neravnomernosti polia 
temperatur gomogennoi kamery sgoraniia pri izmeneni parametrov 
pervichnoi zony). 0. A. Evin, V. M. lankovskii, and I. N. Diatlov. 
Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, mo\. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 24-29. In Russian. 


A79-42550 jf Measuring the moment imparted by a liquid 

pump in startup regime (Izmerenie momenta peredavaemogo 
nasosom zhidkosti, na rezhime zapuska). N. S. Ershov, V. V. 
Ramodina, and V. V. Chervakov. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, 
no. 1, 1979, p. 30-35. In Russian. 

An experimental method was developed for determining the 
moment required by a high-speed bladed pump during transient 
regimes that makes use of coaxial input and output multipliers. A 
method for calculating the moments acting in the multipliers during 
startup with allowance for the friction in the supports and the inertia 
of the rotating masses is given. Experiments on empty and flooded 
pumps were performed to determine coefficients in the relationships. 

P.T.H. 


525 



A79 42551 


A79-42551 ff Computer calculations of steady-state tem- 
perature fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades (Raschet na ETsVM 
statsionarnykh temperaturnykh polei v rabochikh lopatkakh turbin s 
vozdushnym okhlazhdeniem). V. I. Lokai, lu. N. Ivan'shin, and Sh. 
Sh. Abdrakhmanov. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 
36-40. 6 refs. In Russian. 

A simple engineering method using a digital computer is 
proposed for calculating the steady-state temperature fields in the 
blades of turbines with longitudinal cooling channels under variable 
boundary conditions pertaining to the gas and coolant with 
allowance for the change in cross-sectional area of the blade and the 
dependence of the heat conduction coefficient on temperature. The 
blade is divided into sections, to each of which is applied the solution 
of the one-dimensional heat conduction problem with matched 
solutions at the section divisions. P.T.H. 


A79-42552 fj Choice of optimal parameters for a heat 

exchanger with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine (Vybor 
optimal'nykh parametrov teploobmennika s teplovymi trubami, 
prednaznachennogo dlia GTD). IM. V. Lokai and I. I. Mosin. 
Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 41-46. 5 refs. In 
Russian. 

Some means of achieving maximum degree of regeneration in a 
heat exchanger with heat pipes are investigated by extending some 
previous analysis methods for heat exchangers with intermediate heat 
carrier. Two conditions are found which must be satisfied in order to 
achieve maximum degree of regeneration: (1) the heat transmitting 
power of the heat pipes must exceed the heat release intensity from 
both the gas and air directions; and (2) two dimensionless parameters 
for the gas and air sides must be equal. P.T.H. 


A79-42553 # Computer calculation of steady-state tempera- 
ture fields in cooled turbine disks (Raschet na ETsVM statsionarnykh 
temperaturnykh polei v okhlazhdaemykh diskakh turbin). V. I. 
Lokai, V. V. Zhuikov, and R. D. Fakhrutdinov. Aviatsionnaia 
Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 47-50. In Russian. 

The calculation of the steady-state temperature field in a cooled 
turbine disk of arbitrary shape is based on the solution of the Bessel 
equation for a disk of constant thickness. The variable-thickness disk 
is divided into a series of concentric rings such that at the edges of 
each ring the relevant parameters can be regarded as constant, and 
the Bessel equation solution Is worked out for each ring. An 
algorithm for the method is given, and some computer calculation 
results are presented and compared with temperature field measure- 
ments in a real disk. P.T.H. 

A79-42555 // Systematization of simple structural elements 

of a regulated gas turbine engine nozzle (Sistematizatsiia prostykh 
ob'ektov konstruktsii reguliruemogo sopla GTD). I. E. Sapozhkov 
and E. D. Sten'kin. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 
57-63. In Russian. 

A systematic approach to the classification of gas turbine engine 
nozzle parts is based on function of the part in its module, its 
connection modes, surface types, type of initial forming, type of 
finishing, type of strength calculation, and basic shape. Such a 
subsystem approach reveals that in a regulated nozzle 30-70% of the 
parts are not subjected to strength analysis and that their shape and 
dimensions are determined from structural considerations, and also 
enables establishing the most common type of connection and the 
most massive shape. P.T.H. 


A79-42558 // Study of mass transfer between the primary 

zone and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine combustion 
chambers (Issledovanie massoobmena mezhdy pervichnoi zonoi i 
struiami vtorichnogo vozdukha v kamerakh sgoraniia GTD). V. G. 
Chumachenko, V. M. lankovskii, and A. V. Talantov. Aviatsionnaia 
Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 81-85. In Russian. 


The oxygen excess coefficient in the primary zone of a 
combustion chamber depends on the amount of air reaching the 
primary zone from jets of secondary air. This paper is concerned 
with determining this amount by a combined experimental- 
theoretical technique for combustion chambers in which the flow 
pattern in the primary zone is formed by secondary flow jets of the 
first belt of openings. P.T.H. 

A79-42559 ff An approximate method for calculating a 
laminar boundary layer in micronozzles (Ob odnom priblizhennom 
metode rascheta laminarnogo pogranichnogo sloia v mikrosoplakh). 
F. A. Akhmed'ianova, A. A. Vaindiner, P. G. Danilaev, and N. F. 
Salikhov. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979. p. 86-88. In 
Russian. 

The results of a calculation of a liminary boundary layer arising 
during the motion of an ideal gas in microchannels by the simple 
method of Natalevich (1973) are compared with a finite difference 
solution of the transformed laminary boundary layer equations for 
flow in a flat Laval microchannel with thermally insulated wall and 
Prandtl number of unity. The Natalevich method gave good 
agreement with the finite difference results with regard to integral 
characteristics, especially the boundary layer displacement thickness, 
but the deviation for the velocity profile could attain 20%. P.T.H. 

A79-42560 H Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of 
a gas turbine (Aerodinamicheskoe sovershenstvovanie vkhodnogo 
patrubka gazovoi turbiny). I. G, Gogolev, P. V. Korolev, lu. D. 
Kudashev, V. A. Magala, and B. A. Shifrin. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, 
vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 88-91. In Russian. 

The velocity field, mass flow rate distribution, and stream line 
shapes were measured in several variants of a turbine engine with 
tangentially situated combustion chambers and spiral inlet. Different 
ways of controlling the flow were evaluated, and simple methods of 
obtaining flow uniformity were found. P.T.H. 


A79-42562 ^ An analysis of air intakes in the boundary 

layer (Raschet vozdukhozabornykh ustroistv v pogranichnom sloe). 
V. T. Kalugin, T. V. Klebanova, lu. I. Kozlov, and V. N. Koshevoi. 
Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 93-96. 6 refs. In 
Russian. 

A method for analyzing the parameters of air intakes operating 
at an altitude corresponding to the thickness of the boundary layer is 
presented. The distribution of the pressure at the inlet and outlet of 
the air intake device is analyzed as a function of the degree of 
throttling. The analysis shows that in the absence of air intake, a 
separated stagnation zone develops in front of the inlet. The size of 
the separated flow zone decreases with an increase in the outlet 
cross-section. The theoretical results have been confirmed by 
experimental measurements. C.K.D. 

A79-42564 § Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 

operating at high pressures (K voprosu o razgruzke privoda klapanov 
gazoraspredelitelei, rabotaiushchikh pri vysokikh davlentiakh). I. A. 
Krivosheev, A. M. Rusak, I. M. Urakaev, and Z. G. Shaikhutdinov. 
Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 100-102. In Russian. 

By using simple gasdynamic relations it is shown possible to use 
the reaction of an issuing gas to unload valves whose working forces 
are rather large at high inlet pressure. Three valve designs are studied 
with respect to their static force characteristics. One valve with a 
spring element is shown to be best in terms of reduction of drive 
power. P.T.H. 


A79-42565 jj The amplification factor in the two- 

dimensional interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow (Koeffitsient usileniia pri dvumernom vzaimodeistvii 
poperechnoi zvukovoi strui so sverkhzvukovym potokom). V. I. 
Krishtal'. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 102-105. 9 
refs. In Russian. 


526 



A79 42891 


A79-42569 f} Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 

during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades (O zakrutke 
rabochikh lopatok osevoi turbinnoi stupeni pri tangentsiarnom 
naklone soplovykh lopatok). lu. 1. Mitiushkin, A. V. Perevoznikov, 
and V. P. Iakovlev. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p. 
112-115. 5 refs. In Russian. 

Tangential inclination of nozzle blades in an axial turbine is an 
effective way to reduce the reactivity gradient along the turbine 
blades. This paper presents experimental results on the influence of 
turbine blade twist on the efficiency of axial turbines in the case of 
tangential inclination of nozzle blades; investigations were conducted 
at nozzle outlet velocities of M = 0.48-0.5 and nozzle outlet 
Reynolds numbers of 500,000 to 570,000. B.J. 

A79-42570 # Through-heating of chambers with regenera- 

tive cooling (0 progreve kamer s regenerativnym okhlazhdeniem). V. 
V. Orlov. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p, 115-117. 
In Russian. 

A one-dimensional heat propagation model was used to investi- 
gate the through-heating of engine combustion chambers with 
regenerative cooling during the process of engine startup. Chambers 
of different design were analyzed and the results identified some 
characteristics of thermal loading which affect the stress-strain state 
of chamber structural elements. It is shown that pressure changes in 
the chamber have a substantial effect on the intensity of through- 
heating of the most thermally stressed structural elements, B.J. 

A79-42571 ff Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which 

form in the oil-system mains of ga s-turbine engines (Issledovanie 
di^el-snosti kapel' masla, obrazuiushchikhsia v magistraliakh maslia- 
nykh sistem GTD). P. G. Petrov and 0. A. Povarov. Aviatsionnaia 
Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979. p. 117-119. In Russian. 

A79-42572 ff Nonstationarity of heat transfer In the blade 

cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine start-up {O nestatsio- 
narnosti teploobmena v turbinnoi osevoi lopatochnoi reshetke pri 
zapuske dvigatelia). A. M. Poliakov, V. S. Petrovskii, and V. I. 
Krichakin. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 1979, p, 119-123. 
In Russian. 

In the thermal design of gas-turbine elements, it is conventional- 
ly assumed that the heat transfer coefficients are independent of the 
nonstationarity of the heat transfer process. In the present paper, the 
time dependence of the coefficient of local heat transfer at the 
surface of the rotor blades of an axial-flow gas-turbine is determined 
on the basis of temperature measurement during start-up of the 
engine. V.P, 

A79-42574 ff A pneumatic distributor for the control sys- 

tem of a turbojet engine (Pnevmoraspredeliter sistemy upravleniia 
TRD). M. G. Khabibullin. Aviatsionnaia Tekhnika, vol. 22, no. 1, 
1979. p. 126, 127. In Russian. 

A pneumatic distributor developed for the thrust reverser 
control system of the NK-8-2U turbojet engine used in the TU-154 is 
described. The load bearing rings are made of metallographite which 
acts as a lubricant for the contact surfaces. The distributor partition 
Is significantly thinner than the load bearing rings, a design feature 
which reduces the driving stroke of the sleeve valve and the overall 
dimensions of the distributor. C.K.D. 


A79-42624 Estimation of fatigue life of Al-alloy used for 

compressor disc of jet engine. H. Minata and H. Nakamura (Kawasaki 
Heavy Industries, Ltd., Technical Research Laboratory, Akashi, 
Japan). Japan Society of Materials Science, Journal, vol. 28, Apr. 
1979, p. 272-277. 21 refs. In Japanese, with abstract in English. 

The life of gas turbine engine compressor and turbine disks 
made of Al alloy 2014-T6 at 120 C and combined stress of 21-22 
kg/sq mm was estimated on the basis of creep rupture data at 212, 
400, and 600 F. The creep rupture curves were obtained from the 
Larson-Miller curves. Time-strength diagrams were plotted including 
static creep, intermittent creep, and push-pull wave with hold time. 


A79-42799 ff Calculation of rotor impedance for 
articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight. K. Kato (Tokyo, 
University, Tokyo, Japan) and T. Yamane. Journal of Aircraft, vol. 
16, July 1979, p. 470-476. 5 refs. 

A procedure is presented to calculate the loads transferred from 
an articulated flexible rotor to the fuselage when the hub is forced to 
oscillate sinusoidally. Blade motions are determined from a set of 
linear algebraic equations derived from equations of motion with 
periodic coefficients. The aerodynamic loads are based on two- 
dimensional quasisteady strip theory and the effect of preceding and 
returning wakes as well as the reversed frequency flow are neglected. 
Sample calculations indicate that: 1) the major components of 
impedances with hub-forcing frequency predominate over those with 
interharmonic coupling frequencies; 2) the former impedances do 
not depend on the blade azimuth angle relative to the hub excitation 
phase; and 3) the former impedances are similar to those obtained in 
hovering flight. (Author) 

A79-42800 * ff Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches. L. Tobias, E. A. Palmer (NASA, Ames 
Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.), and P. J. O'Brien (FAA, 
National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center, Atlantic City, 
HJ.). Journal of Aircraft, vol. 16, July 1979, p. 498-505. 5 refs. 

Fuel-conservative procedures have been investigated using real- 
time air traffic control simulations linked to two piloted simulators. 
The fuel-conservative procedures studied were profile descents and 
two types of landing approaches, delayed flap and lATA. The 
investigation determined the effect of these procedures on the ATC 
system operation. It examined the mixing of aircraft executing 
fuel-conservative approaches with those executing conventional 
approaches. The most difficult approach type mix of traffic was 
found to be 50% conventional and 50% delayed flap. However, for 
the test scenario chosen, arrival rates of at least 30 aircraft per hour 
were feasible and resulted in a net average fuel saving, even for the 
most difficult mix. Also, there is a fuel savings and reduced 
controller workload for the profile descent procedures. (Author) 


A79-42806 Modeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids. S. 

M. Belotserkovskii and M. I. Nisht. Fluid Mechanics - Soviet 
Research, vol. 7, Jan. -Feb. 1978, p. 102-115. 15 refs. Translation. 

A model of turbulent wakes, produced in separated flow of an 
ideal fluid over buff bodies (airfoils), is described. The final pattern 
of the flow with separation is defined from an analysis of the entire 
process leading to its formation. It is assumed that tangential 
discontinuity surfaces that move together with the perturbed flow 
are shed from the sharp edges and inflections of the airfoil surface. It 
is also assumed that the Chaplygin-Zhukovskii finite-velocity hy- 
pothesis is satisfied on these edges and inflections, while the 
impermeability condition is satisfied over the entire airfoil surface. 
The problem is solved by the method of discrete vortices. Fields of 
average and fluctuating velocities and pressures, as well as the 
principal statistical properties of the turbulent flow are calculated 
from the computed intensity and location of vortices in the wake. 
The structure and principal characteristics of flat, axisymmetric and 
three-dimensional wakes are described. The effectiveness of the 
approach herein described is proved by comparison with experi- 
mental data. Certain examples of computed statistical properties of 
the flow are also given. (Author) 


A79-42891 Measurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 

blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient cascade. T. V. Jones, D. 
L. Schultz, M. L. G, Oldfield, and L. C. Daniels (Oxford University, 
Oxford, England). In: International Heat Transfer Conference, 6th, 
Toronto, Canada, August 7-11, 1978, General Papers. Volume 2. 

Washington, D.C., Hemisphere Publishing Corp., 
1978, p. 73-78. 7 refs. Research supported by the Science Research 
Council, Ministry of Defence (Procurement Executive), and Rolls- 
Royce Ltd. 


527 



A79-42892 


A heat transfer measurement technique is described which 
enables complete heat transfer distributions to be determined on 
turbine blades at representative full-scale engine conditions. A new 
form of short-duration wind tunnel is used for these tests, and the 
instrumentation for this transient experiment Is described. Typical 
heat transfer distributions are presented and discussed. The transient 
method shows advantages over other techniques in terms of tunnel 
power requirements, model construction and accuracy of measure- 
ment of heat transfer rates. S.D. 


A79-42892 The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 

and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in turbine blades. L. 
M. Zysina-Mclozhen, M. A. Medvedeva, and E. G. Rohst. In: 
International Heat Transfer Conference, 6th, Toronto, Canada, 

August 7-11, 1978, General Papers. Volume 2. 

Washington, D.C., Hemisphere Publishing Corp., 1979, p. 79-84. 10 
refs. 

Results are presented for an experimental study on the local 
values of heat transfer coefficients outside an airfoil profile in the 
presence of a transonic flow with different degrees of turbulence in 
an airfoil cascade inlet. The discussion covers heat transfer at the 
leading edge of a blade, heat transfer of convex profile surfaces, heat 
transfer of concave profile surfaces, and relaminarization of the 
turbulent boundary layer. Empirical equations for heat transfer 
calculations are presented. S.D. 

A79-42971 Numerical methods for solution of radiative- 

convective heat transfer problems - Radiative boundary layer. M. V. 
Brykin (Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Institut Vysokikh Temperatur, 
Moscow, USSR). In: International Heat Transfer Conference, 6th, 
Toronto, Canada, August 7-11, 1978, General Papers. Volume 3. 

Washington, D.C., Hemisphere Publishing Corp., 

1978, p. 397-401. 

New rapid iterative methods are proposed for solving the 
problem of radiative-convective heat transfer in the vicinity of the 
stagnation point of a blunt body traveling at hypersonic speed 
through dense atmosphere. The proposed methods allow problem 
solving for any optical thickness of a radiating volume. It is shown 
that the radiant thermal conductivity approximation enables one to 
describe correctly the flow structure and to determine the radiation 
flux with an error no more than 10%. Simple relations for radiation 
flux on the surface are established. Flow regimes are shown to exist 
when the radiation mean free path exceeds the boundary-layer 
thickness, in which case the thermal conductivity approximation is 
no more valid. S.D. 

A79-42981 Regenerator matrices for automotive gas tur- 

bines. C. W. Rapley (Sunderland Polytechnic, Sunderland, England). 
In: International Heat Transfer Conference, 6th, Toronto, Canada, 
August 7-11, 1978, General Papers. Volume 4. 

Washington, D.C., Hemisphere Publishing Corp., 1978, p. 201-206. 
21 refs. 

A recently developed compact passage-type regenerator matrix 
is described and the heat transfer and pressure-drop performance 
reported. The heat transfer performance was obtained with the single 
blow technique using a new test rig, the features of which are 
discussed. A brief review is made of the evolution of the single blow 
technique and the various evaluation procedures that can be used. An 
attempt is made to compare the performance of different types of 
regenerator matrix using the available published data in a way that is 
particularly applicable to automotive gas turbine regenerators. This 
comparison indicates the range of overall matrix parameters that 
should lead to effective automotive gas turbine regenerator matrix 
design. (Author) 


A79-42989 Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a 

flat plate at a large free-stream Mach number. S. P. Venkateshan and 
K. Krishna Prasad (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, lr)dia). In: 
International Heat Transfer Conference, 6th, Toronto, Canada, 


August 7-11, 1978, General Papers. Volume 5. 

Washington, D.C., Hemisphere Publishing Corp., 1978. p. 203-208. 
16 refs. 

The basic theory of flow over a flat plate in the presence of both 
radiation and large freestream Mach numbers is formulated. It is 
shown that radiation Knudsen numbers, Boltzmann numbers, and 
Mach numbers are the three parameters that characterize the 
radiating flow and that the Boltzmann number is important for 
determining the effects and regimes of radiation interaction. Con- 
sideration Is given to the case of equal wall and freestream 
temperatures and the dominant radiation interaction in a weak shock 
limit. No radiation heat flux is observed at the wall. It is noted that 
the larger the Eckert number the larger is the effect of interaction 
and that the interaction results in a general reduction of the 
temperature throughout the boundary layer which itself is optically 
thin. V.T. 

A79-43135 ff Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equa- 

tion (K nakhozhdeniiu resheniia uravneniia nesushchei poverkh- 
nosti). V. V, Dykhta. Prikladnaia Matematika i Mekhanika, vol. 43, 
May-June 1979, p. 475-479. In Russian. 

In the present paper, the basic two-dimensional singular integral 
equation of the linear theory of thin airfoils of arbitrary aspect ratio 
and planform is reduced, by means of a number of artificial devices, 
to certain homogeneous Riemann boundary value problems that are 
amenable to solution in terms of Cauchy integrals. The results are 
analyzed for a lifting surface moving at a constant velocity along a 
straight line in an unbounded medium. V.P. 

A79-43136 }f Region of a plane pointed profile In supersonic 

flow (Okrestnost' ploskogo zaostreniia pri sverkhzvukovom 
obtekanli). lu. B. Radvogin. Prikladnaia Matematika i Mekhanika, 
vol. 43, May-June 1979, p. 480-488. 6 refs. In Russian. 

The present analysis deals with the local structure of the 
supersonic flow of an inviscid nonheat-conducting gas past a pointed 
profile. It is assumed that the shock wave is attached to the leading 
edge. The problem is linearized with respect to the flow past an 
infinite wedge. This leads to a boundary value problem 'In a corner', 
A solution is obtained in explicit form, and its properties are studied. 

V.P. 

A79-43153 f! Fast-acting valves for use in shock tubes. II - 

Formation of shock waves. T. Ikui, K. Matsuo, and Y. Yamamoto 
(Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan). JSME, Bulletin, vol. 22, May 
1979, p. 693-699. 10 refs. 

In the previous paper (1977), two types of quick-response valves 
(type-V and type-H) were developed and their characteristics 
discussed. In the present paper, the type-H valve is used in a shock 
tube and investigated experimentally in order to assess the intensity 
of shock waves generated by the opening of the valve, along with the 
correlation between shock formation distance and the opening time 
of the valve. Also, experiments with a cellophane diaphragm are 
carried out, with all operating conditions remaining unchanged. It is 
shown that when the initial pressure ratio is relatively small, the valve 
produces as strong a plane shock wave as the conventional diaphragm 
shock tubes, although the shock Mach numbers are less than those 
produced by the breaking of diaphragm at a larger initial pressure 
ratio. The shock formation distance is nearly proportional to the 
product of the maximum shock Mach number along the tube axis 
and the opening time of the valve or the diaphragm. S.D. 


A79-43166 H Theoretical and experimental investigation of 
the aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional bodies (Teoreti- 
cheskoe i eksperimentaTnoe issledovanie aerodinamicheskikh kharak- 
teristik prostranstvennykh tel). A. A. Gusarov, V. M. Dvoretskii, M. 
la. Ivanov, V. A. Levin, and G. G. Chernyi. Akademiia Nauk SSSR, 
Izvestiia, Mekhanika Zhidkosti i Gaza, May-June 1979, p. 97-102. 11 
refs. In Russian. 

The present analysis deals with the problem of designing the 
aerodynamic configuration of flight vehicles in accordance with their 


528 



A79 43245 




intended operational conditions. The analysis is centered on the 
aerodynamic configuration of nose cones smoothly fitted to midsec- 
tions of arbitrary shape, and on the determination of the type of 
surfaces capable of meeting this requirement. The drag characteristics 
of ruled surfaces of special shape are studied. V.P. 

A79-43172 ff Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic 

drag of simple bodies in two-phase flow (Eksperimentarnoe issledo- 
vanie aerodinamicheskogo soprotivleniia prostykh tel v dvukhfaznom 
potoke). B. A. Balanin and V. V. Zlobin. Akademiia Nauk SSSR, 
Izvestiia, Mekhanika Zhidkosti i Gaza, May-June 1979, p. 159-162. 
In Russian. 

In the present study, the drag of steel models in the form of 
plates, spheres, cylinders, cones, and wedges was studied in a wind 
tunnel at flow velocities of up to 200 m/sec. All measurements were 
made at zero incidence. The medium employed was air with 
suspended particles of abrasive powder. Plots of the drag coefficient 
versus powder concentration are given and discussed. V.P. 


A79 43174 // Deformation of a shell under the influence of 

a supersonic gas flow (Deformatsiia obolochki pod vozdeistviem 
sverkhzvukovogo potoka gaza). N. M. Beliaev and V. K. Khrushch. 
Akademiia Nauk SSSR, Izvestiia, Mekhanika Zhidkosti i Gaza, 
May-June 1979, p. 165-168. 6 refs. In Russian. 

The effect of static deformation of a conical or wedge-shaped 
shell on its aerodynamic resistance in a supersonic gas flow is 
analyzed. The shape of the deformed surface is initially unknown but 
is obtained simultaneously with the numerical solution of the gas 
dynamics equations. The influence of the thickness of the shell and 
of the dimensions of its midship cross-section on the increase in wave 
resistance caused by the deformed surface is examined. It is shown 
that deformation of a shell can significantly increase its wave 
resistance. For an aircraft flying at Mach 4 at an altitude of 10 km 
incorporating a conical shell 1 m long and 5.3 mm thick with a 
mid-ship cross section of 0.488 m, made of a material with a Young's 
modulus of 20 x 10 to the 10th N/sq m, the wave pressure is 
increased by 30%. C.K.D. 


A79-43223 Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 

incidence in longitudinal oscillations. C. Maresca, D. Favier, and J. 
Rebont (Aix-Marseille I, Universite, Marseille, France). Journal of 
Fluid Mechanics, vol. 92, June 27, 1979, p. 671-690. 12 refs. 
Direction Technique des Constructions Aeronautiques Contract No. 
76/98214-00481-7586. 

An investigation into unsteady flow phenomena associated with 
a wing in motion parallel to a uniform subsonic airstream at fixed 
incidences involved torsion dynamometric measurements, smoke- 
filament visualization, pressure and skin friction measurements, and 
hot-wire anemometer measurements. For large incidences, the 
mechanism of dynamic reattachment of the boundary layer over part 
of the period, followed by a vortex shedding process, is observed and 
analyzed. Unsteady effect on the time histories of pressure and skin 
friction distributions, aerodynamic forces, and pitching moment are 
also studied. An empirical formula concerning the averaged lift over a 
period is obtained as a function of the reduced amplitude and 
frequency for a wide range of angles of incidence below and above 
the angle~of static stall. Optimization of the favorable unsteadiness 
effect on the mean lift coefficient is also discussed. P .T.H. 

A7 9-43241 YC-14 thermoplastic /graphite elevator. E. E. 

House (Boeing Aerospace Co., Seattle, Wash.). In: The enigma of the 
eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 

Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 201-216. 

Interest in thermoplastic matrix composites is on the upswing 
because of their cost-reduction potential over more commonly used 


high-performance composites, such as the graphite/epoxies. To 
demonstrate the advantages and manufacturing capabilities of the 
thermoplastic matrix composites, full-size elevator boxes for the 
YC-14 AMST aircraft were fabricated. These parts have a span of 19 
feet and a maximum chord of 18 inches. Two resin systems were 
used: P-1700 polysulfone and PKXA. The latter is an end-capped 
polysulfone. Graphite fabric was selected as the reinforcement 
because of its superior handling characteristics compared with 
unidirectional graphite. The molding processes evaluated included 
autoclave consolidation of prepreg into sheet stock, forming and 
fusing of prepreg plies to preconsolidated sheet stock, autoclave 
forming and consolidation, and matched die molding. (Author) 


A79-43243 * Fabrication research for supersonic cruise air- 

craft. E. L. Hoffman, T. T. Bales (NASA, Langley Research Center, 
Materials Div., Hampton, Va.), and L. Payne (Lockheed-California 
Co., Sunland, Calif.). In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, 
economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National 
Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. 
Book 1. Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advance- 

ment of Material and Process Engineering, 1979, p. 232-241. 

Advanced fabrication and joining processes for titanium and 
composite materials are being investigated by NASA to develop 
technology for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) Program. 
Full-scale structural panels are being designed and fabricated to meet 
the criteria of an existing integrally stiffened shear panel on the 
upper wing surface of the NASA YF-12 aircraft. The program 
consists of laboratory testing and Mach 3 flight service of full-scale 
structural panels and laboratory testing of representative structural 
element specimens. Borsic/aluminum honeycomb-core, titanium clad 
Borsic/aluminum skin-stringer, graphite/PMR-1 5 polyimide 
honeycomb-core, and titanium superplastically formed /diffusion 
bonded panels have been designed, fabricated, and tested. Graphite/ 
LARC-160 polyimide skin-stringer panels have been designed, and 
fabrication m'ethods are being developed. (Author) 

A79-43244 C-141 hybrid composite leading edge. C. W. 

Schneider (Lockheed-Georgia Co., Marietta, Ga.). In: The enigma of 
the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 
Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 242-251. USAF-sponsored research. 

A program to demonstrate the production readiness of a hybrid 
composite for the C-141 leading edge and provide flightworthy 
structure for service evaluation is described. Cost comparisons with 
aluminum honeycomb structures showed that significant life cycle 
cost reductions are possible. The composite leading edge was 
designed to meet the same criteria as the honeycomb component, 
and is fabricated from unidirectional tape graphite/epoxy and 
fiberglass/epoxy fabric. Design and manufacturing details are de- 
scribed, noting that the rib mandrels were made of the Dapco No. 1 
'Blue' castable rubber to overcome the shrinkage effects on the rib 
longitudinal direction when using black tool rubber mandrels. The 
composite leading edge weight is 10 lbs higher than that of the 
honeycomb due to the conservative design restricting edge deflec- 
tion, but the relaxation of this criteria can yield significant weight 
reduction since each fiberglass skin ply accounts for 9 lbs. A.T. 

A79-43245 Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing sur- 

face structure. L. E. Meade (Lockheed-Georgia Co., Marietta, Ga.). 
In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; 
Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibi- 
tion, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. 

Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advancement of Material and 
Process Engineering, 1979, p. 252-259. 8 refs. 

The fabrication of thick structural laminates from Narmco 
5208/T300 graph ite/epoxy prepreg has presented problems of 
dimensional and void content control. This paper describes the 
fabrication process development conducted on Laminar Flow Con- 


529 



A79 43253 


trol wing surfaces for passenger transport applications to achieve 
thick laminates of high quality- The steps addressed include 
prebleeding, layup, tooling aids, and curing to achieve the required 
laminate quality. (Author) 

A79>43253 Overage indicators for prepreg products. Z. N. 

Sanjana (Westinghouse Research Laboratories, Pittsburgh, Pa.). In: 
The enigma of the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; 
Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibi- 
tion, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. 

Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advancement of Material and 
Process Engineering, 1979, p. 330-341. Contract No. 
N00019-77-C-0247. 

Prepreg products consist of a partially reacted mixture of 
monomers which have been impregnated into the reinforcement. 
During shipping and storage, prior to use, the reactions will continue. 
The amount of reaction or 'age' of the prepreg will depend on the 
conditions (principally, temperature and time) that it has been 
exposed to. These conditions are often unknown. At a point in the 
age of the prepreg, some critical property or properties will 
deteriorate. This would then represent the end of the useful life of 
the prepreg. The critical property will often depend upon the 
material and the end use intended for the prepreg. The overage 
indicator is a measurement which monitors the age of the prepreg 
and correlates well with the loss of the critical property. This paper 
presents data and results of aging studies performed on Hercules 
3501-6/AS graphite epoxy prepreg. During the aging, the following 
methods were used successfully to track the age of the prepreg: (1) 
dielectric analysis, (2) dynamic mechanical analysis, and (3) a 
time- temperature integrating device which is carried with the prepreg 
and provides a visual observation of the time and temperature 
exposure of the prepreg. (Author) 

A79-43257 Non destructive evaluation /NDE/ of impact 

damage in thick graphite composite aircraft structures. W. H. 
Sheldon (Northrop Corp., Aircraft Div., Hawthorne, Calif.). In: The 
enigma of the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings 
of the Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San 
Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. 

Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advancement of Material and Process 
Engineering, 1979, p. 372-376. 

Graphite composites are vulnerable to damage resulting from 
impact by hard objects with low velocity. The effect of this impact 
causes severe internal damage to the structure with little or no visual 
surface indications. Various impact damaged panels were nondestruc- 
tively tested to assess damage. A field test was developed using a 
portable ultrasonic thickness tester. (Author) 

A79-43261 The structural effects and detection of varia- 

tions in Hercules 3501-5A and Avco 5505 resin systems. H. Borstell 
(Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, N.Y.). In: The enigma of the 
eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 

Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 422-445. USAF-supported research. 

The effects of resin variations on the structural properties of 
Hercules 3501 -5A graphite-epoxy and Avco 5505-4 boron/epoxy 
resin systems were analyzed. Prepreg tapes containing resin with 
known variations were prepared with production processes, tension 
and compression tested after saturation at 150 F and 82% relative 
humidity, and constant amplitude fatigue tested with the laminate 
oriented to emphasize matrix dominated properties. The resin and 
prepreg samples were analyzed with infrared spectroscopy, liquid 
chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic 
dielectric analysis. The laminate and analytical data were correlated, 
showing that the structurally unacceptable variations can be detected 
by chemical analysis, and that the majority of the variations are 
prevented by resin suppliers quality controls. Thus, it is feasible to 
prepare matrix specifications with chemical analytical requirements 
to screen out structurally undesirable resin variations. A.T. 


A79-43264 Chemical analysis of advanced composite 

prepregs and resins. A. A. Wickham, D. D. Rice, and R. J. DuBois 
(Hercules, Inc., Aerospace Div., Magna, Utah). In: The enigma of the 
eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 
Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 506-521. 

A rapid and precise chemical analysis system is described for 
amine-cured, epoxy-based advanced composite prepregs and resins. 
Infrared, liquid chromatographic and other analytical methods are 
proposed for determination of the 'as built' and 'free' components of 
the resin as well as for the degree of resin advancement in Hercules 
composite systems. Typical recovery data and the relative precision 
of the analytical methods is presented. (Author) 


A79-43269 Recent advancei in fire resistant materials in 

aircraft construction. H. M. Deutsch (Aircraft Products Co., 
Anaheim, Calif.). In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, 
economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National 
Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. 
Book 1. Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advance- 

ment of Material and Process Engineering, 1979, p. 575-589. 5 refs. 

Silicone polymers, their fire resistance, low by-product toxicity, 
and usefulness for aircraft construction materials are reviewed. 
Silicone structure and behavior during heating, decomposition, and 
ignition are discussed, noting that they produce nonflammable 
silicone dioxide, high thermal insulation carbonaceous chars, and 
condensed silica which drastically reduce flame spread. Silicone 
polymer applications include seals, acoustic curtains, firewall 
sealants, and wire insulation, and their mechanical properties as a 
function of temperature are compared with organic elastomers. The 
test methods related to aircraft materials are classified, noting that 
the Steiner tunnel method performs burning tests reliably and 
simply, and also measures smoke emission, dripping, and after 
burning characteristics. A.T. 


A79-43270 Special sandwich constructions for the interior 

of commercial aircraft. J. Kummer and H. Schellstede (VFW-Fokker 
GmbH, Bremen, West Germany). In: The enigma of the eighties: 
Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth 
National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 
8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., Society for 

the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 1979, p. 
590-598. 

Fiberglass reinforced phenolic resin skin and a polymethacryli- 
mide rigid-foam core sandwich was tested for suitability for the 
interior of commercial aircraft. Tests showed that fire safety 
requirements, flammability, smoke density and toxicity are met by 
the composite, which also provides good heat insulation with sound 
insulation equal to that of a comparable honeycomb sandwich. The 
strength is adequate for several components, and the core filling 
material can be eliminated to produce weight and labor savings. The 
technique. Is of rigid foam sandwich construction was demonstrated 
by the manufacture of a window panel. A.T. 


A79-43271 Aircraft passenger seat material development 

for airline fire safety. E. L. Trabold (Douglas Aircraft Co., Long 
Beach, Calif.). In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, 
economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National 
Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. 
Book 1. Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advance- 

ment of Material and Process Engineeri ng, 1979, p. 599-610. 

A program to establish a basic data base for selection of 
improved fire-resistant aircraft passenger seat materials is described. 
The individual material screening program is briefly outlined. The 
functional layers of future seat designs are identified and related key 


530 



A79 43317 


requirements suggested. The main focus is on heat-release-rate 
determinations for multilayer specimens. Selected materials for 
multilayer tests are described and test results reported herein. 

(Author) 

A79-43272 * Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy- 

composites on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire. S. S. 
Tompkins and W. D. Brewer (NASA. Langley Research Center. 
Hampton, Va.). In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, 
economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National 
Symposium and Exhibition. San Francisco. Calif., May 8-10, 1979. 
Book I. Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advance- 

ment of Material and Process Engineering, 1979. p. 620-630. 

Recent studies have shown that the benefits gained by using 
graphite-epoxy composite structures may not be realized without 
some risk. The graphite fibers are very good electrical conductors and 
fibers released into the environment during a fire create a possible 
hazard to electrical equipment. Several graphite-epoxy hybrids were 
exposed to a fire and simulated explosion and their graphite fiber 
retention characteristics were examined. Several low melting- 
temperature glasses which wet and clump graphite-fibers and a 
glass/graphite fabric which reduced impact damage were identified as 
promising hybridizing components to minimize graphite fiber release. 

(Author) 

A79-43273 Elimination of friction induced thermal cracks 

in landing gear components. H. E. Fewtrell ( Lockheed-California Co., 
Structures Div., Burbank, Calif.). In: The enigma of the eighties: 
Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth 
National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 
8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., Society for 

the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 1979, p. 
631-637. 

Tests indicating that the thermal properties of bearing materials 
are more significant In controlling transient temperature spikes than 
mechanical properties in Inducing thermal cracks in landing gear 
components are reported. High and low strength aluminum bronzes 
and a beryllium copper alloy were subjected to bearing pressures and 
velocities of the landing gear of a wide bodied commercial transport 
in a test rig. Test considerations are discussed with respect to size 
effects, thermal time constants, and metallurgical features required 
to simulate operational conditions which Initiate thermally induced 
cracks in chrome-plated high strength steel landing gear components. 
It was concluded that the interfacial temperature was substantially 
lower with beryllium copper, and it prevented hot-spotting and 
thermal cracking of the bearing surface. It was also shown that an 
epoxy-phenolic bonded solid lubricant coating on the chromium 
plated surface prevented the triggering of cumulative damage and 
high interfacial temperature spikes. A.T. 

A79-43276 Demonstration of an improved method for 

repair of bonded aircraft structure. R. E. Horton (Boeing Co., 
Seattle, Wash.). In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, 
economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National 
Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. 
Book 1. Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advance- 

ment of Material and Process Engineering, 1979, p.659-668. 13 refs. 

This paper describes work that was done to demonstrate the 
practical application of bonded repair procedures that provided 
significantly improved environmental durability. Results of the work 
led to the recommendation of the phosphoric acid nontank anodize 
process for surface preparation of aluminum for bonded repairs. The 
repairs were accomplished under both on-the-aircraft and off-the- 
aircraft conditions. The repairs were nondestructively and destruc- 
tively evaluated, including examination of the bond surfaces with a 
scanning electron microscope. (Author) 

A79-43277 Material developments for airline safety - 

Impact on the safety of ground maintenance employees. W. C. 
Applegate, J. J. Brenneman, and D. Rush (United Airlines Mainte- 
nance Operations Center, San Francisco. Calif.). In: The enigma of 
the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 


Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 1. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 669-674. 

Health, safety, and fire protection of personnel and equipment 
from chemicals used in aircraft maintenance are discussed. Control of 
potential hazards including education on the adverse effects of 
chemicals on the body, protective devices such as respirators and 
safety glasses, ventilation, and substitution of less hazardous 
materials are considered. Industrial hygiene aspects covering expo- 
sure to hazardous solder fumes, carcinogens, talc and asbestos packed 
Inflatable rafts, and poisonous organic solvents are described. Finally, 
fire protection and control documentation are outlined, and it is 
concluded that material suppliers and specification writers should 
provide for the safety aspects of raw materials as they affect the user. 

A.T. 


A79-43314 Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft 

flight control surfaces. M. H. Kuperman (United Airlines Mainte- 
nance Operations Center, San Francisco, Calif.). In: The enigma of 
the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 
Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 2. Azusa, Calif,, 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 1126-1139. 5 refs. 

The repair techniques for aircraft metal-honeycomb adhesive 
bonded structures are reported. Adhesives and surface preparation 
are discussed, noting that most honeycomb bonded flight control 
surfaces consist of 2024T3 or 7075T6 alclad aluminum skins joined 
with 250-350 F adhesives. Failure modes are described, with almost 
all of the deteriorated structures delaminated and corroded, 
necessitating the adoption of phosphoric acid anodizing of the 
aluminum surfaces. Repair techniques are classified into six cate- 
gories, from the partial repairs with a heating blanket and a vacuum 
bag, an autoclave when time constraints do not allow anodizing and 
corrosion inhibiting priming, to full reconditioning with acid etching, 
anodizing, and priming. The rebuilding of a structure is illustrated by 
a description of all steps in the repair of a delaminated and corroded 
spoiler, noting that the same steps are used for other parts such as 
flaps and aileron tabs. (Author) 

A79-43315 The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft struc- 

tures using vacuum pressure. K. B. Armstrong (British Airways, 
Heathrow Airport, Middx., England). In: The enigma of the eighties: 
Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth 
National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 
8-10, 1979. Book 2. Azusa, Calif., Society for 

the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 1979, p. 
1140-1187. 16 refs. 

The use of vacuum pressure for repair of adhesively bonded 
metal/metal and metal/honeycomb structures is reported. The test 
program covered the effects of vacuum pressures on lap shear tests to 
determine the minimum acceptable pressure, the effects of cure 
cycles on adhesives, and the properties of the fabric interlayer 
between the adhesive and the honeycomb which allows extraction of 
air from the honeycomb to ensure a positive bonding pressure. 
Metal/metal bonding of doublers to skins was done with a 120 C 
curing film adhesive at vacuum pressures from zero to 11 psi, 
showing that it could be cured 4 times. Metal/honeycomb bonding 
with a 120 C film under the 10 psi vacuum pressure showed that 
with a fabric interlayer this method can be used to bond thin, flat, or 
single curvature aluminum, steel, or titanium skin/honeycombs. 
Finally, the effects of nylon, acrylic, and Terylene, woven and 
non-woven, mono and multifilament fabrics, and their percentage 
open space and yarn surface areas are discussed. A.T. 

A79-43317 Aircraft service experience of bonded assem- 

blies prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond surface 
treatment. D. B. Arnold and J. C. McMillan (Boeing Co., Seattle, 
Wash.). In: The enigma of the eighties: Environment, economics. 


531 



A79-43320 


energy; Proceedings of the Twenty-fourth National Symposium and 
Exhibition, San Francisco, Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 2. 

Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advancement of Material 
and Process Engineering, 1979, p, 1200-1210. 7 refs. 

Tests of prebond phosphoric acid anodized (PAA) aluminum 
aircraft structures are reported. PAA and its advantages which led to 
the three test programs undertaken prior to its production use are 
discussed. Various PAA treated panels, including fin closure, body 
skin, trailing edge, and stringer were Installed on the 727 and 737 
models and served over 4 years without degradation. The empennage 
primary structure of the prototype YC-14 aircraft used PAA treated 
alummum sandwich panels for 2 years without bond failures, and 
PAA treated aluminum spars and fittings bonded to graphite 
reinforced composites to produce model 737 spoilers were tested 
without premature bond failures. A.T. 


A79-43320 Applications of metal-matrix composites, the 

emerging structural materials. L. Rubin (Aerospace Corp., Materials 
Sciences Laboratory, El Segundo, Calif.). In: The enigma of the 
eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 

Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition. San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 2. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 1236-1249. 11 refs. 

Applications, development, benefits, and costs of metal-matrix 
composites (MMC) are reviewed. The properties of the MMCs, 
including high temperature strength, structural rigidity, dimensional 
stability, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion in the 
fiber direction, and the high specific stiffness are discussed. Charac- 
teristics of reinforcing fibers including boron, borsic, graphite, 
alumina, and silicon carbide are described, noting that materials with 
the tensile modulus greater than 50 million psi prove most useful. 
Boron-aluminum composites are used in the Space Shuttle airframe, 
the aft pylon skin in the DC-10, and the wing rib of the B-1 bomber. 
Graphite fibers are the most widely used reinforcement materials in 
MMCs, and graphite-aluminum composites are studied for the Army 
helicopters, tanks, and assault bridges and Navy foils, skins, ducts, 
and fuel tanks for tactical missiles. Finally, the mechanical properties 
and costs of the MMC materials fabricated as representative 
structures are summarized. A.T. 

A79-43331 Hybrid Wing Box structure. G. L. Bailey and 

G. E. Kuhn (Vought Corp., Dallas, Tex.). In: The enigma of the 
eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings of the 

Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San Francisco, 
Calif., May 8-10, 1979. Book 2. Azusa, Calif., 

Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering, 
1979, p. 1372-1381. 

This paper presents the results of the recently completed 
Laminated Hybrid Wing Box program. The study, sponsored by the 
Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory, involved the development of 
preliminary designs, and fabrication and test of structural segments 
of a hybrid (composite/metallic) wingbox for the F-16 Air Combat 
Fighter. It resulted in a structurally acceptable design with projected 
weight and cost savings of 7% and 12% as compared to the baseline 
F-16 configuration. The hybrid design utilized a graphite/epoxy 
lower skin with integral spar caps and bonded laminated aluminum 
spars and upper skin. (Author) 


A79-43332 High tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum 

fan blades. R. T. Debski (United Technologies Corp., Pratt and 
Whitney Aircraft Group, West Palm Beach, Fla.) and D. R. Beeler 
(USAF, Materials Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio). In: The 
enigma of the eighties: Environment, economics, energy; Proceedings 
of the Twenty-fourth National Symposium and Exhibition, San 
Francisco, Calif,, May 8-10, 1979. Book 2. 

Azusa, Calif., Society for the Advancement of Material and Process 
Engineering, 1979, p. 1382-1404. 


Results are presented on the development of a composite blade 
for the FI 00 engine first stage fan. The design of the all composite, 
shroudless blade features an all radial boron fiber construction in an 
aluminum matrix with a titanium outer sheath and a curved root 
attachment. Six blades each were fabricated by two different 
methods representative of an all composite blade along with six 
blades to the APSI spar-shell concept. Screening tests will subject the 
three blade types to single blade structural and foreign object damage 
tests. (Author) 


A79-43436 Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft. R. 

Yamartino, J. Lee, S. Bremer (Argonne National Laboratory, 
Argonne, III.), D. Smith, and J. Caiman (Environmental Research and 
Technology, Inc., Lexington, Mass.). In: Symposium on Turbulence, 
Diffusion, and Air Pollution, 4th, Reno, Nev,, January 15-18, 1979, 
Preprints. Boston, Mass., American Meteorologi- 

cal Society, 1978, p. 630-635. 11 refs. FAA-USAF-supported 
research. 

The ensemble-fit method was used to analyze measurements of 
the CO exhaust plume from taxiing B707 and B727 aircraft obtained 
in the monitoring program at Dulles International Airport. Results 
suggest that the rise of these horizontally injected, buoyant plumes is 
not consistent with the 2/3 power relation obtained by Slawson and 
Csanady (1967) over the distance range of 65 to 165 m; however, 
large event by event deviations from this average behavior give rather 
poor correlations between predicted and observed pollutant concen- 
trations. The average ensemble value of h determined in the present 
study is about one-half the value found from the relation 1.6 F to 
the 1/3, where the total buoyancy flux (F) of the taxiing aircraft is 
approximately 150 m to the 4th/ sec to the 3rd. (Goldberg, 1978). 
The plume rise delay time is found to be significant. C.K.D. 


A79-43456 The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval 

craft. K. H. Harbaugh. Hovering Craft and Hydrofoil, vol. 18, May 
1979, p. 8-10. 5 refs. 

A vehicle, (basically a seaplane) that is not dependent on 
continued operation at or in close proximity to the air water 
interface of the sea which incorporates a single hydrofoil for 
performing landing and takeoffs in high sea states is described. The 
performance of seaplanes in waves is found to be drastically 
improved through the employment of a heavily loaded element such 
as a hydrofoil or a hydroski, achieving localization of large 
hydrodynamic forces while providing an energy absorbing stroke 
over the length of its strut. Design considerations and performance in 
overload conditions are discussed, and it is found that the use of a 
hydrofoil produces a reduction in landing load 'g' factors of up to 
70%. The possible use of the combined system of a hydrofoil and a 
seaplane as a high speed naval vehicle is considered concluding that 
such a system offers the best solution for a vehicle suitable for ASW 
and search and rescue missions. C.F.W. 


A79-43457 Winglets are no drag. Aviation Engineering and 

Maintenance, vol. 3, June 1979, p. 6. 8. 9. 

The first application of winglets in the production of commer- 
cial aircraft is analyzed, noting reduced drag and a correspondingly 
reduced fuel flow as the most significant gains. It is determined that 
a winglet equipped aircraft can climb to 50,000 ft in approximately 
12 minutes and due to a long wingspan, exhibit superior takeoff 
performance and a reduced takeoff distance of 26%. The key effect 
of winglets is that an increase in aspect ratio and reduced drag is 
produced. Stability and control as well as drag polar comparisons are 
analyzed in detail and one of the most beneficial effects of winglets 
is its sideslip maneuverability. At sideslips beyond 8 degrees though 
the forward wing stalls and causes a large stabilization moment, 
which slows the forward wing, swinging the aircraft back in line with 
the direction indicated by its nose. C.F.W. 


532 



A79 43507 




A79-43458 Fly>by-light. R. Cotta. Aviation Engineering 

and Maintenance, vol. 3, June 1979, p. 30-32. 

The Hydra-Optic Servo System, (developed by Bertea Corp.,) 
and also known as fly-by-light. Is an aircraft control system that 
transmits signals over optical fiber guides using light impulses. The 
uniqueness of the system consists in the fact that the electrical power 
to receive and process the signals is generated hydraulically at the 
control surface actuators, allowing servo loop closure and control 
electronics to be housed completely within the actuator. The 
conductively sealed actuator eliminates problems caused by electro- 
magnetic interference, radio frequency interference and lightning 
strikes. Attention is given to the flowcharts of the hydra-optic 
system and the remote control system and hydraulics. The latter is 
examined in detail, dealing mainly with its application on a 
conventional aircraft. C.F.W. 

A79-43469 Garrett ATF 3. M. Hirst. Flight International, 

vol. 115, July 14, 1979, p. 108-112. 

The Garrett ATF 3, a turbofan for business jets, is examined. 
The engine layout is described, which places engine accessories at the 
rear, and uses eight diffuser boxes to spill core gases into the fan 
flow. In addition, the engine is a three shaft design in which the fan 
is driven by the intermediate-pressure turbine. Thus, the engine is 
believed to be highly efficient in spite of an internal gas path of twice 
the engine length. Overall losses are considered negligible because the 
180 deg bends in the core exhaust only affect 25% of the total mass 
flow. While the diffuser boxes probably cause backpressure it is 
noted that they are effective silencers. In the HU-25A Guardian the 
engine will be rated at 5,050 lb thrust at takeoff. Finally, simplified 
maintenance is claimed as a result of the unusual layout. M.E.P. 

A79-43499 Hovering Impulsive noise - Some measured and 

calculated results. D. A. Boxwell, Y. H. Yu, and F. H, Schmitz (U.S. 
Army, Aeromechanics Laboratory, Moffett Field, Calif.). Vertica, 
vol. 3, no. 1, 1979, p. 35-45. 12 refs. 

In-plane impulsive noise, radiating from a hovering model rotor 
has been measured in an anechoic environment. The hover acoustic 
signature was compared with existing theoretical prediction models 
and with previous forward flight experiments using the same model 
rotor. These hover tests showed good experimental consistency with 
forward flight measurements, both in pressure level and waveform 
character over the range of Mach numbers tested (0.8- 1.0). Generally 
poor correlation, however, was confirmed with current linear theory 
prediction efforts. Failure to predict both the peak pressure levels 
and shape was reported, especially with increasing tip Mach number. 

(Author) 

A79-43500 An experimental study of high frequency 

noise from model rotors - Prediction and reduction. K. S. Aravamu- 
dan, A. Lee, and W. L. Harris (MIT, Cambridge, Mass.). Vertica, vol. 
3, no. 1, 1979, p. 47-63. 1 5 refs. 

Experimental results pertaining to prediction and reduction of 
high frequency noise radiation from a 1.27 m model rotor operating 
in a 1.52 x 2.29m open jet anechoic facility are discussed. The 
effects of rotor mean thrust, advance ratio and number of blades on 
the intensity and spectrum of high frequency broadband noise 
(HFBN) have been investigated. The effects of each parameter were 
determined by maintaining the other two constant. Based on the 
experimental evidence, a scaling law is proposed to predict the 
frequency and amplitude of HFBN. The effects of free stream 
turbulence on the high frequency noise is discussed. Influence of 
leading edge, pressure side and suction side serrations in reducing the 
radiation of HFBN and their consequent effects on the performance 
of the rotor are described. (Author) 


A79-43501 ff New paths for the development of aircraft 

equipment opened up by the use of modern computer technology 
(Nektere nove smery vyvoje vybaveni letadel umoznene vyuzitim 
modern i pocitacove techniky). M. Lnenicka. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 1, 
1979, p. 1 1-15. 6 refs. In Czech. 


Possibilities for employing modern digital computer technology 
for transport aircraft equipment are discussed. A system for spatial 
navigation is briefly presented, and a review of new methods of flight 
indication in the cockpit is given. The prospects for further 
penetration of digital computer technology in airborne systems are 
evaluated. P.T.H. 


A79-43502 ff Prospects for airborne computer systems (Per- 

spektivy palubnich pocitacovych soustav). M. Knezovic. Zpravodaj 
VZLU, no. 1, 1979, p. 17-20. 5 refs. In Czech. 

The paper discusses the structure of a prospective onboard 
computer system and its operating system. The system includes a 
sequential multiprocessor, full processor, matrix processor containing 
a fast Fourier processor, permanent memory, operational memory, 
main control block, and power supply. P.T.H. 

A79-43503 ff Sources and magnitude of radio compass 

instrumental errors (Zdroje a velikost pristrojove chyby radio- 
kompasu). V. Hoffner. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 1, 1979, p. 21-23. In 
Czech. 

Sources of instrumental errors in radio compasses are identified 
and the magnitudes of certain kinds of errors are estimated. Special 
attention is given to errors arising during encoding and decoding of 
directional information. P.T.H. 


A79-43504 ff Omega navigation system (Navigacni system 

Omega). F. Vejrazka, J. Fiker, and B. Stavovcik. Zpravodaj VZLU, 
no. 1, 1979, p. 25-30. 18 refs. In Czech. 

The paper describes briefly some of the more important signal 
processing methods used in the Omega navigational system. Three 
basic synchronization techniques are mentioned, arid their errors are 
briefly analyzed. Cost, weight, and size questions of the Omega 
system are discussed. P.T.H. 


A79-43505 ff Quasi-autonomous navigation system 

(Kvaziautonomni navigacni system). P. Bakos. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 
1, 1979, p. 31-36. In Czech. 

A quasi-autonomous navigation system that calculates the 
instantaneous position of an aircraft is described. The input data are 
the data from the azimuth-range measuring system; the relative 
bearings of a transmitter on two radio beacons and the aircraft 
heading; and the true airspeed, heading, and probable wind vector 
attitude of the aircraft. The calculation supplies the geographical 
coordinates of the instantaneous aircraft position. The calculation 
formulas are presented and the accuracy of position determination is 
analyzed. P.T.H. 

A79-43506 ff Solution of navigation problems in aircraft 

onboard systems equipped with digital computer (Realizace navi- 
gacni ulohy V leteckych palubnich systemech vybavenych cislicovym 
pocitacem). J. Kotas. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 1, 1979, p. 37-40. 5 refs. 
In Czech. 

A general concept of an onboard computer system as a 
multiprocessor system based on rriicroprocessors is proposed. A 
variant of the operating system of an onboard computer system for a 
light aircraft is considered, and the navigation tasks performed by the 
system are examined. The nature of the particular navigation tasks is 
reflected in the structure of the operating system control programs 
and in the overall structure of the system. P.T.H. 

A79-43507 ff The basic geodetic shapes and position lines 

(Zakladni geodeticke utvary a polohove cary). Z. Pech. Zpravodaj 
VZLU, no. 1, 1979, p. 41-45. 5 refs. In Czech. 

The paper reviews some of the main concepts and reference 
surfaces of higher geodesy. The discussion covers the geoid, the 
reference ellipsoid, the reference sphere, and other concepts. 


533 



A79 43508 


Formulas of the fundamental problem of geodesy are given. A 
method of calculating the characteristics of the great circle and 
rhumb line is set forth. P.T.H. 

A79-43508 H Some possibilities for the navigation of small 
passenger aircraft (Nektere z moznosti navigace maleho dopravniho 
letadia). S. Vosecky, Zprsvodaj VZLU, no. 2, 1979, p. 59-62. In 
Czech. 

The use of angle measuring or angle-and-range measuring 
navigation systems for small passenger aircraft is considered. Some 
applications of such systems are discussed including landing 
approach. B.J. 


A79-43509 ff Navigation instruments for small passenger 

aircraft of the 1980s (Navigacni pristroje pro mala dopravni letadia v 
osmdesatych letech). V. Vek. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 2, 1979, p. 
63-66. In Czech. 

A brief description is given of an airborne system for horizontal 
navigation designed for small passenger aircraft of the 1980s. The 
system includes RSBN, VOR, and Omega and a computer for 
automation of navigation and displays. B.J. 

A79-43510 ff Compass system for small aircraft (Kursova 

soustava pro mala letadia). V. Jirsa. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 2, 1979, p. 
67-69. In Czech. 

A brief description is given of a gyrocompass system for small 
aircraft. The technical requirements of this system are discussed 
along with effects of systematic and random disturbances ex- 
perienced by the system in flight. The feasibility of using this system 
for navigation in controlled air traffic is discussed. B.J. 

A79-43511 fi Use of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 

suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors (Pouziti setrvacniku s 
ladenym torznim zavesem v presnych gyroskopickych snimacich). V. 
Silhanek. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 2, 1979, p. 71-74. 5 refs. In Czech. 

The characteristics of a new gyroscopic sensor with adjustable 
torsion suspension for use in inertial navigation systems is described. 
Consideration is given to the design, principles of operation, and 
applications of the sensor. B.J. 

A79-43513 jf Technical means for automation of air naviga- 

tion (Technicke prostredky pro automatizaci letecke navigace). A. 
Vanek. Zpravodaj VZLU, no. 2, 1979, p. 79-83. 17 refs. In Czech. 

The use of microprocessors to automate aircraft control and 
navigation functions is discussed. The characteristics of different 
classes of microprocessor component sets are examined and com- 
pared from the point of view of requirements on navigation 
computers. The impact of microprocessor technology on air naviga- 
tion is reviewed in light of recent developments in digital flight 
control technology. B.J. 

A79-43514 § Navigation at high latitudes (Navigace v ex- 

tremnich zemepisnych sirkach). J. Cernohorsky. Zpravodaj VZLU, 
no. 2, 1979, p. 85-88. In Czech. 

Some aspects of air navigation at high latitudes are considered 
with special reference to medium-haul passenger aircraft. Particular 
consideration is given to problems associated with the utilization of 
VOR and strapdown inertial systems. B.J. 

A79-43515 fj Allowable notch effectivity criterion for air- 

craft structures. J. Drexler and V. Nejedly. Zprava VZLU, no, Z-32, 
1978, p. 1-11. 5 refs. 

A procedure for evaluation of fatigue quality of a new aircraft 
design by an allowable notch effect criterion is presented. The 
criterion is constructed by comparing the fatigue behavior of a new 
structure with model specimens of area critical from fatigue 
standpoint. The allowable notch effect criterion of a new aircraft 


design, criteria for model specimens with unknown fatigue notch 
factor, and derivation of input data for allowable notch effect 
criterion are discussed. The deduced criteria are based on previous 
service and fatigue testing, comparing the fatigue notch effect of new 
structures with test specimens considered to be a good model of the 
critical part or with the fatigue tests of an analogous structure proven 
successful by experiment and service experience. Statistical analysis 
of allowable notch effectivity criterion for a light aircraft transport 
wing structure is given as an example. A.T. 

A79-43597 Wave propagation associated with wings (Wel- 

lenausbreitung an Fliigeln). K. Oswatitsch (Wien, Technische Univer- 
sitat, Vienna, Austria). Zeitschrift fur Ffugwissenschaften and Welt- 
raumforschung, vol. 3, May-June 1979, p. 149-156. In German. 

This lecture reviews wave phenomena associated with wings, 
including wave processes associated with local supersonic regions, 
sonic booms generated by supersonic aircraft, and three-dimensional 
steady and unsteady flows. The wave propagation problem is 
discussed in relation to Mach lines and Mach angles, shock-free 
supercritical flows, principal types of transonic flows, and shock 
wave propagation in unsteady flow. B.J. 

A79-43600 LCF life prediction for a flight-by-flight load 

sequence of a turbine disc (Lebensdauei*vorhersage im LCF-Bereich 
am Beispiel eines Einzelflugablaufs fur Triebwerksscheiben). H. 
Zenner (Industrieanlagen-Bctriebsgesellschaft mbH, Ottobrunn, West 
Germany). (Deutsche GeseUschaft fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, Sympo- 
sium uber Ermudungsfestigkeit von Flugzeugen und Modernen 
Bauweisen, Darmstadt, West Germany, Sept 22, 1978.) Zeitschrift 
fiir Ffugwissenschaften und Weftraumforschung, vol. 3, May-June 
1979, p. 182-187. 10 refs. In German. 

Two concepts of LCF life prediction are presented: the nominal 
stress concept and the notch stress-strain concept. The methods are 
described for one flight-by-flight load sequence of a turbine disc. A 
comparison between calculated and experimentally tested lifetime 
(the tests were carried out with notched specimens taken from an 
Inconel 718 turbine disc) results in a similar unconservative 
prediction for the two concepts. The scatter of the damage sum for 
different stress levels and temperatures is relatively small. At present, 
too few experimental results for realistic load sequences at high 
temperatures are available. So these results should not be generalized. 

(Author) 

A79-43607 fj Problems associated with flows in aerodynam- 

ic wakes of blade cascades (Problematyka przeplywu w sladach 
aerodynamicznych palisady profili). J. W. Eisner and J. Wiiczynski 
(Czestochowa, Politechnika, Czestochowa,^ Poland). Politechnika 
Czestochowska, Zeszyty Naukowe, Nauki Techniczne - Mechanika, 
no. 14, 1978, p, 5-35. 23 refs. In Polish. 

In the work described, the evolution of velocity fields in 
turbulent wakes with a longitudinal pressure gradient was studied 
theoretically and experimentally. Existing similarity hypotheses are 
examined, and the concept of a flow region where the mean and 
fluctuating motions may be described by means of two different 
velocity scales is proposed and discussed. The experiments indicate 
that the degree of notiuniformity of the mean flow and the turbulent 
stress tensor components are potential functions of the distance from 
the cascade, whose exponents depend both on the longitudinal 
pressure gradient and the initial turbulence level. V.P. 


A79-43620 jj New methods for ground-testing aeronautical 

structures (Nouvelles methodes d'essai au sol de structures aeronau- 
tiques). G. Piazzoli. (Conference sur les Probfemes d'Aeroelasticite et 
fa Conception des Avions, Rhode-Saint-Genese, Befgium, May 7-11, 
1979.) ONERA, TA no. 1979-47, 1979. 23 p. In French. 

The classical method for dynamical identification of structures, 
which entailed the 'appropriation' of excitational forces and succes- 
sive isolation of each degree of freedom, can lead to large errors 


534 



A79-43724 


when applied to complex systems such as aeronautical structures. 
Two new methods which give the modal characteristics of a system 
with greater accuracy and rapidity are presented. The identification 
procedures are based on independent and 'non-appropriate' excita- 
tions. The first method requires the resolution of the eigenvalue 
equations of a complex power matrix. The second approach is based 
on finding a set of forces which isolate one mode and cancel all 
others. C.K.D. 

A79-43621 0 Aerospace applications of oscillators (Applica- 

tion aerospatiales des oscillateurs). R. Moreau. (Seminaire sur /es 
B talons de Frequence, leur Caracterisation et teur Utilisation, 
Besancon, France, Apr. 24-27, 1979.) ONERA, TP no. 1979-48, 
1979. 43 p. 18 refs. In French. 

Aerospace applications of oscillators are discussed, with atten- 
tion to four broad areas: location and navigation (radars, radio 
telescopes, phased arrays), detection (surveillance radar, echo analy- 
sis, radio holography, selective radiometry); telecommunications 
(multiplexing, telecommunications satellites, data transmission); in- 
strumentation (time-frequency hybrid systems, very long base 
interferometers, manometers, thermometers, accelerometers). The 
state-of-the-art of oscillator technology in these areas is examined, 
and problems in the application of oscillators are considered. It is 
concluded that progress must be made in two directions: improve- 
ment of long-term stability and development of more accurate 
expressions for modeling drift. C.K.D. 

A79-43622 ff Wind tunnel simulation of the firing of missiles 

carried under aircraft (Simulation en soufflerie de tirs de missiles 
sous avion). J. Coste (ONERA, Chatiilon-sous-Bagneux, Hauts-de- 
Seine, France). (NATO, AGARD, Symposium on Missile System 
Flight Mechanics, London, England, May 21-24, 1979.) ONERA, TP 
no. 1979-65, 1979. 9 p. In French. 

Methods used in studying separation trajectories of missiles 
carried under aircraft by means of wind tunnel simulations are 
discussed on the basis of experience gained at ONERA. The ONERA 
S2 (cross section: 1.85 x 1.75 m) continuous flow wind tunnel at 
Modane-Avrieux is equipped with a computer controlled stand with 
six degrees of freedom. The missile/aircraft interaction for the entire 
flight envelope can be evaluated by either the 'grid' method, in which 
the forces exerted on the missile in the aerodynamic field of the 
aircraft are measured and used to calculate its trajectory, or the 
'captive trajectory' method, in which the trajectory is determined by 
computer as the test takes place. In addition, the trajectories of 
mockups dynamically similar to those of the missile in question can 
be investigated by cinematographic techniques. The advantages and 
limitations of these approaches are discussed, and some test results 
are presented. C.K.D. 

A79-43678 # Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 

film-cooled leading edge. M. Suo, W. P. Patrick, and B. V. Johnson 
(United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, Conn.). 
Journal of Energy, vol. 3, May-June 1979, p. 156-160. 5 refs. 

Flow visualization techniques were developed and used to study 
particle trajectories near an airfoil with a film-cooled leading edge. 
The study was conducted to determine the size of particles which 
could be deflected by the cooling air jets. This is an important 
problem relevant to the development of high-temperature gas 
turbines which burn fuels which produce ash particles (e.g., coal). 
Experiments were performed on a large-scale airfoil in a low-speed 
wind tunnel utilizing uniformly sized DOP (Di-octyl phthalate) 
droplets and chopped streak photography to visualize particle 
trajectories. The results have been related to the flow in an engine 
through the use of Stokes parameter scaling. The results indicate that 
turbine airfoil leading-edge film cooling in a gas turbine engine may 
deflect particles up to at least 5.8-microns in diameter when the 
cooling air velocity Is at least 0.67 times the approach velocity. 

(Author) 

A79-43679 H Particle trajectories in turbine cascades. R. P. 

Dring, J. R. Caspar, and M. Suo (United Technologies Research 


Center, East Hartford, Conn.). Journal of Energy, vol 3 May-June 
1979, p. 161-166. 11 refs. 

An analytical investigation into the nature of particle trajec- 
tories in cascades of airfoils has been carried out in order to predict 
the location, velocity, and angle of particle impact on the airfoils of 
turbines. As a result of this analysis it has been shown that for any 
given inviscid flow, particle trajectories are uniquely determined by 
the specification of only two dimensionless parameters, the most 
important of which is the Stokes number. In addition, computed 
results have indicated that particle trajectories are virtually invariant 
with cascade Mach number. Finally, a comparison of analytically and 
experimentally determined trajectories for the flow around the 
circular leading edge of a blunt body has shown excellent agreement 
over a wide range of Stokes number. (Author) 

A79-43710 Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing 

edges. C. S. Ventres (Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., Cambridge, 
Mass.) and R. Barakat (Harvard University; Bolt Beranek and 
Newman, Inc., Cambridge, Mass.). Aeronautical Quarterly, vol. 30, 
May 1979, p. 387-399. 7 refs. 

The aerodynamics of a thin airfoil of arbitrary camber having a 
porous trailing edge in steady, subsonic, compressible potential flow 
is investigated. In the special case of a flat plate airfoil with a porous 
trailing edge, an exact, closed form solution is obtained using 
complex variable theory. The pressure loading on the airfoil, the lift 
and pitching moments are exhibited explicitly along with typical 
numerical results. The corresponding situation in supersonic flow is 
also considered. (Author) 

A79-43711 Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic 

drag of an axisymmetric cylinder. T. Morel (GM Research Labora- 
tories, Warren, Mich.). Aeronautical Quarterly, vol. 30 May 1979 p 
400-412. 11 refs. 

Experiments were performed using three different types of base 
cavities, one solid walled and two ventilated, each with six different 
depths ranging from 0.1 to 0.9 body diameters. All three types of 
cavities reduced the body drag for small cavity depth: the reductions 
are an order of magnitude lower than those reported for two- 
dimensional bodies, but are achieved with a much shorter cavity 
depth. Hotwire investigations revealed that base cavities suppress 
wake periodicity. For cavities of small depth this correlated with a 
reduction in drag, but for large cavity depths the trends of the 
intensity of the periodic motion and of drag are not always the same. 

V.T. 

A79-43712 The fibre composite helicopter blade. E. H. 

Mansfield and A. J. Sobey (Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farn- 
borough, Hants., England). Aeronautical Quarterly vol 30 May 
1979, p. 413-449. 

Expressions are derived for the coupled torsional, extensional 
and flexural stiffnesses of a fibre composite tube, such as a helicopter 
blade, which is subject to torsion, longitudinal tension, chordwise, 
and flapping bending moments and shear. Particular attention is 
given to the coupling effects in which an asymmetric fibre lay-up 
results in a twisting of the tube under bending and/or tension. 
Consideration is also given to the influence on the stiffness 
characteristics of an initial twist in the tube. The amount of twist 
induced by bending and/or tension is determined for certain 
glass-fiber-reinforced plastic tubes with varying degrees of asymmetry 
in the fibre lay-up. An analysis, simplified by the omission of end 
effects, of the vibrational behavior of such tubes is also presented. 

V.T. 


A79-43724 Fundamentals of design. II - VTO for combat 

aircraft. B. R. A. Burns. Air International, vol. 16, Apr. 1979, p. 
177-181. 

The design models of various prototype aircraft, including the 
British Harrier and the Dassault Mirage IIIV, specializing In vertical 
take-offs (VTO) and/or vector thrust operations are examined. In 


535 



A79-43725 


determining which method is best suitable for combat, acceleration 
and maneuver, as well as jet induced lift losses, hot gas reingestion 
and reaction control bleed are analyzed. Attention is given to the 
study of directed airflows which, depending on the position of the 
engine mounting, will reduce thrust loss to a minimum. It was 
determined, that if thrust margin is insufficient for a VTO, then 
rolling to a speed of 60 kt will produce enough engine and wing lift 
for a safe lift-off. The advantages and disadvantages of separate lift 
engines and vectored thrust are analyzed noting that a logistical 
disadvantage in using two types of engines in the same aircraft exists. 
For true VTO, the use of specialized lift engines is found to offer the 
lightest solution for a single mission design, but vectored thrust uses 
optimum combinations of lift and propulsive thrust for best airfield 
performance. C.F.W. 

A79-43725 Fundamentals of design. HI - V-G for combat 

aircraft. B. R. A. Burns. Air International, vol. 17, Aug. 1979, p. 
72-75. 

The characteristics of a variable-sweep and a fixed-wing design, 
sized to meet the same requirements, are compared with respect to 
lift, drag, and gust response. It was determined that sweep-wings 
increase maximum lift at takeoff and subsonic speeds at least 30% 
and that a much higher lift/drag ratio, which is beneficial to aerial 
combat, exists. The benefits of a smaller variable-sweep aircraft, 
yielding lower drag and reduced fuel requirements, are offset by: (1) 
increased structural weight, (2) 'dead' volume in the fuselage and, (3) 
overall increased systems weight. Attention is also given to stability 
and control and it was found that the rearward shift of the center of 
lift, is reduced by one of the following options: (1) outbound 
location of the wing pivot, (2) rearward location of the pivot on the 
chord or, (3) an increased wing taper. It is concluded that 
variable-sweep offers a more versatile aircraft, efficient over a wider 
range of operating conditions, possibly not foreseen at the time the 
operational requirement is specified. C.F.W. 

A79-43732 Sharjah - An airport out of Arabian Nights. A. 

F. Meldrum and J. Ries. Airport Forum, vol. 9, June 1979, p. 29-32, 
34. 36-42. In English and German. 

The facilities of the Sharjah airport in the United Arab Emirates 
are detailed. The airport is part of the Sharjahport complex which 
seeks to capitalize on Sharjah's geographical location on the Arabian 
Gulf. Other factors cited in the emirate's favor are: Liberal 
governmental attitude towards business and individual freedom, 
potential of natural resources (oil), and the nearness of other 
developing localities, particularly Dubai and Abu Dhabi, which will 
ensure a transport market. Future prospects include transiting and 
tourist traffic. In addition the airport's single runway can accept the 
Concorde white the boarding area can accomodate four wide body 
jets at a time. M.E.P. 

A79-43733 Mombasa - Welcome to a new airport. V. 

Davies. Airport Forum, vol. 9, June 1979, p. 45, 47, 48, 51-54. In 
English and German. 

Features and specifications of the new airport in Mombassa, 
Kenya are presented. The modified airport includes a new 3350-m 
runway that permits 747's to land, thus allowing lower cost direct 
flights. The scope of works, planning, financing, and construction are 
discussed. Attention is given to the tight schedule under which work 
was completed, noting that the runway was lengthened in time for 
707/DC 8 use in December 1975 and completed in October 1976 for 
747 use. M.E.P. 

A79-43734 Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 

transport systems. II. L. Scheichl. A /rpo/t Forum, vol. 9, June 1979, 
p. 61, 62, 64-66. In English and German. 

Technical precautions for preventing fires in tanks and tank 
farms are examined. Attention is given to the proper venting of fixed 
roof tanks, and some other necessary design safety features are 
discussed including: flame arresters, anti-static grounding, use of light 
color reflecting paints on tanks, tank sprinkler systems, a fuel spillage 
catch trough around each tank, and safety zones around tank farms. 


Formulas for determining the maximum permissible rate of filling or 
draining are presented. Fuel transport by rail and by road are also 
covered. M.E.P. 

A79-43779 Near field problems in three-dimensional panel 

methods. J. A. H. Petrie (British Aerospace, Aircraft Group, 
Kingston-on-Thames, Surrey; Leeds University, Leeds, England). 
Aeronautical Journal, vol. 83, May 1979, p. 194-197. 

The paper addresses the disadvantages of using a lattice of 
vortex rings to model a surface of vorticity, namely that points close 
to the lattice surface may see large 'holes' in what from a greater 
distance appears as smooth distribution. The obvious way to 
overcome this problem is to improve the accuracy of the vorticity 
model whenever a point draws critically near to the vortex lattice. A 
method based on Maskew's two dimensional technique, and 
extended to three dimensions is presented, and results for the 
program's test on a flat plate and a thick swept wing are given. M.E.P. 


536 



N79-26018 


STAR ENTRIES 


N79-26009*^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Ames Research Center/ Moffett Field. Calif. 

FUEL-CONSERVATIVE GUIDANCE SYSTEM FOR POWER- 
ED-LIFT AIRCRAFT 

Heinz Erzberger and John D. McLean Jun. 1979 18 p refs 

To be presented at the AlAA Guidance and Control Conf.. Boulder. 
Colo., 6-7 Aug. 1979 

(NASA-TM-78595; A-7860} Avail; NTIS HC A02/MF AOl 
CSCL QIC 

A concept for automatic terminal area guidance, comprising' 
two modes of operation, was developed and evaluated in flight 
tests. In the predictive mode, fuel efficient approach trajectories 
are synthesized in fast time. In the tracking mode, the synthesized 
trajectories are reconstructed and tracked automatically. An energy 
rate performance model derived from the lift, drag, and propulsion 
system characteristics of the aircraft is used in the synthesis 
algorithm. The method optimizes the trajectory for the initial 
aircraft position and wind and temperature profiles encountered 
during each landing approach. The design theory and the results 
of simulations and flight tests using the Augmentor Wing Jet 
STOL Research Aircraft are described. S.E.S. 

N79-26010j|( Loughborough Univ. of Technology (England). 
Dept, of Transport Technology. 

A CONSIDERATION OF GENERAL AVIATION IN THE UK 

R. E. Caves May 1979 73 p refs 

(TT-7902; ISSN-01 40-975 1 ) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF AOl 
Performance and cost data for the operation of a range of 
general aviation aircraft in the U.K. were established. Two 
potentially attractive routes were examined from a conventional, 
theoretical stand point to demonstrate the marginal nature of 
Third Level operations. Some attention is given to airport access, 
to non-scheduled general aviation, and to the relevance of the 
results within present U.K. transport planning choices. J.A.M. 


N79-26013*^ Maryland Univ.. College Park. Dept, of Aerospace 
Engineering. 

A STUDY OF THE DROOPED LEADING EDGE AIRFOIL 

John D. Anderson. Jr. and Jewel B. Barlow Apr. 1979 41 p 

refs 

(Grant NsG-1570) 

(NASA-CR-158717; SR-1) Avail; NTIS HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 
01A 

Wind tunnel tests were conducted to examine various aspects 
of the drooped-leading edge airfoil which reduces the tendency 
for an airplane to enter a spin after stall occurs, Three baseline 
models were used for tests of two dimensional models; 
NACA 0015. 0014.6. and 0014.2. The 14.6% and 14.2% models 
were derived from NACA 0015 sections by increasing the chord 
and matching the profiles aft section. Force, balance data (lift, 
drag, pitching moment) were obtained for each model at a 
free-steam Reynold's number of 2.66 x 10 to the 6th power/m. 
In addition, oil flow visualization tests were performed at various 
angles of attack. An existing NACA 64 sub 1 A211 airfoil was 
used in a second series of tests. The leading edge flap was 
segmented in three parts which allowed various baseline/ drooped 
leading edge configurations to be tested. Force balance and flow 
visualization tests were completer at chord Renolds numbers of 
0.44 X 10 to the 6th power, 1.4 x 10 to the 6th power, and 
2.11 x 10 to the 6th power. Test results are included. A.R.H. 


N79-26015*/|( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

FUSELAGE SURFACE PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS OF A 
HELICOPTER WIND-TUNNEL MODEL WITH A 3.15-METER 
DIAMETER SINGLE ROTOR 

Carl E. Freeman and Raymond E. Mineck Mar. 1979 170 p 

refs 

(NASA-TM-80051) Avail: NTIS HC A08/MF AOl CSCL 
OlA 

A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to measure the 
time averaged fuselage surface pressures of a helicopter model 
with a 3.15 meter diameter, four-bladed articulated rotor. 
Measurements were made at hover and advance ratios of 0.05, 
0.15, and 0.20 for a range of thrusts. Data are presented with 
no analysis. Author 

N79-26016*/^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. Edwards, Calif. 

GROUND-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF THE WAKE 
VORTEX CHARACTERISTICS OF A B-747 AIRCRAFT IN 
VARIOUS CONFIGURATIONS Final Report. Dec. 1975 
Jul. 1978 

D. C. Burnham (Transportation Systems Center), J. N. Hallock 
(Transportation Systems Center), I. H. Tombach (AeroVironment, 
Inc.), M. R. Brashears (Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., 
Huntsville, Ala.), and M. R. Barber Dec. 1978 545 p refs 

(NASA-TM-80474: AD-A067588, FAA-RD-78-146; 
DOT-TSC-FAA-78-28) Avail: NTIS HC A23/MF AOl CSCL 
01/2 

A Boeing 747 aircraft flew 54 passes at low altitude over 
ground based sensors. Vortex velocities were measured by a 
laser Doppler velocimeter, an array of monostatic acoustic 
sounders, and an array of propeller anemometers. Flow visualiza- 
tion of the wake was achieved using smoke and balloon tracers 
and was recorded photographically. Data were obtained on vortex 
velocity fields, vortex decay, and the effects of spoilers and 
differential flap settings on the dissipation and structure of the 
vortices. Author 

N79-26017*/!/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Ames Research Center. Moffett Field, Calif. 

WIND-TUNNEL INVESTIGATION OF HIGHLY MANEUVER- 
ABLE SUPERSONIC V/STOL FIGHTER 

Michael Falarski Jun. 1979 24 p refs Presented at V/STOL 
Aerodyn. Workshop, Monterey, Calif., May 1979 
(NASA-TM-78599: A-7876) Avail; NTIS HC A02/MF AOl 
CSCL OlA 

Results from the initial wind-tunnel test of a large-scale, 
highly maneuverable supersonic V/STOL fighter model in the 
Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel are summarized. The STOL 
configuration which was tested combined upper surface blowing 
and spanwise blowing to improve the lift characteristics over a 
wide angle-of-attack range. A close-coupled canard was added 
to this configuration to create a highly maneuverable STOL aircraft. 
The 7.28 m (24 ft) span model was powered by two J-97 turbojet 
engines, each producing 9340 N (2200 lb) thrust at a pressure 
ratio of 2. With the nozzle flap and aileron set at 30 deg. the 
model produced lift coefficients greater than 4. The model was 
longitudinally unstable because of the forward canard position 
and because of the large body area of fuselage, strake, and 
nacelles forward of the center of gravity. J.A.M. 

N79-26018*/^f Kansas Univ. Center for Research. Inc.. Lawrence. 

COMPARISON OF THEORETICAL PREDICTED LONGITUDI- 
NAL AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS WITH FULL- 
SCALE WIND TUNNEL DATA ON THE ATLIT AIRPLANE 

Cornelis P. G. vanDam. Michael Griswold, and J. Roskam Jul. 
1979 365 p 
(Grant NsG-1574) 

(NASA-CR-158753; KU-FRL-399- 1 ) Avail: NTIS 

HC A16/MF AOl CSCL OlA 

An analytical method is presented for predicting the lift 
coefficient, the pitching moment coefficient, and the drag 
coefficient of light, twin-engine, propeller-driven airplanes. The 
method was applied to the Advanced Technology Light Twin- 


537 



N79 26020 


Engine airplane. The calculated characteristics were then correlated 
against full scale wind tunnel data. The analytical method was 
found to predict the drag and pitching moment fairly well. However, 
the lift prediction was extremely poor. R.E.S. 

N79-26020*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

EFFECTS OF WING LEADING EDGE DEFLECTION ON 
LOW SPEED AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A 
LOW-ASPECT-RATIO HIGHLY SWEPT ARROW-WING 
CONFIGURATION 

Paul L. Coe, Jr. and Robert P. Weston 1979 73 p refs 
(NASA-TP-1434: L-12784) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF AOl 
CSCL OlA 

Static force tests were conducted in the Langley V/STOL 
tunnel at a Reynolds number (based on the mean aerodynamic 
chord) of about 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power for an angle-of-attack 
range from about - 10 deg to 17 deg and angles of sideslip or 
0 and -f or - 5 deg. Limited flow visualization studies were 
also conducted in order to provide a qualitative assessment of 
leading-edge upwash characteristics. A.R.H. 

N79-26021*j^ Applied Physics Lab , Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, 
Md. 

BUMBLEBEE PROGRAM AERODYNAMIC DATA. PART 3: 
PRESSURE FIELDS AT MACH NUMBERS 1.5 TO 2.0 

G. A. Barnes and L. L. Cronvich Apr. 1979 169 p 
(NASA Order L-600036-A) 

(NASA-CR-3116) Avail; NTIS HC A08/MF AOl CSCL OlA 
Additional data are provided for use in defining the Mach 
number effect (M = 1.5 and 2.0) on flow field characteristics 
around a missile body at relatively high angles of attack (to 
alpha = 23 deg). The Mach number effect is described by means 
of pressure fields only, at a mid-body station where a wing 
might be located. A.R.H. 

N79-26022*j^l National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center, Hampton. Va. 

EFFECT OF SEVERAL GEOMETRIC PARAMETERS ON THE 
STATIC INTERNAL PERFORMANCE OF THREE NONAXI- 
SYMMETRIC NOZZLE CONCEPTS 

Bobby L. Berrier and Richard J. Re Jul. 1979 136 p refs 

(NASA-TP-1468: L-12810) Avail: NTIS HC A07/MF AOl 
CSCL OlA 

Effects of several geometric parameters on the internal 
performance of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent, single- 
ramp expansion, and wedge nozzles were investigated at nozzle 
pressure ratios up to approximately 10. In addition, two different 
thrust-vectoring schemes were investigated with the wedge nozzle. 
The results indicated that as with conventional round nozzles, 
peak nonaxisymmetric nozzle, internal performance occurred near 
the nozzle pressure ratio required for fully expanded exhaust 
flow. Nozzle sidewall length or area generally had little effect 
on the internal performance of the nozzles investigated. J A M. 


N79-26023*§ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

EFFECT OF NOSE BLUNTNESS AND AFTERBODY SHAPE 
ON AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A MONO- 
PLANAR MISSILE CONCEPT WITH BODIES OF CIRCULAR 
AND ELLIPTICAL CROSS SECTIONS AT A MACH NUMBER 
OF 2.50 

Ernald B. Graves and Roger H. Fournier Washington 1979 
88 p refs 

(NASA-TM-80055: L-12632) Avail: NTIS HC A05/MF AOl 
CSCL OlA 

The tests were performed at a Mach number of 2.50 and 
at angles of attack from about -4 deg to 32 deg. The results 
indicate that increasing nose bluntness increases zero lift drag 
and decreases both the maximum lift-drag ratio and the level of 
directional stability. The center of pressure generally moves forward 
with increasing nose size; however, small nose radii on the 
modified elliptical configurations move the center of pressure 
rearward. The circular bodied configurations exhibit the greatest 
longitudinal stability and the least directional stability. Concepts 


with the variable geometry afterbody contour display the most 
directional stability and the greatest zero lift drag. S.E.S. 

N79-26024*/jf Low Energy Transport Systems, Capistrano Beach. 
Calif. 

SUMMARY OF PAST EXPERIENCE IN NATURAL LAMINAR 
FLOW AND EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM FOR RESILIENT 
LEADING EDGE 

B. H. Carmichael May 1979 50 p refs 
(Contract NAS2-101 13) 

(NASA-CR-1 52276) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 
OlA 

The potential of natural laminar flow for significant drag 
reduction and improved efficiency for aircraft is assessed. Past 
experience with natural laminar flow as reported in published 
and unpublished data and personal observations of various 
researchers is summarized. Aspects discussed include surface 
contour, waviness, and smoothness requirements; noise and 
vibration effects on boundary layer transition, boundary layer 
stability criteria; flight experience with natural laminar flow and 
suction stabilized boundary layers; and propeller slipstream, rain, 
frost, ice and insect contamination effects on boundary layer 
transition. The resilient leading edge appears to be a very promising 
method to prevent leading edge insect contamination. A.R.H. 

N79-26025I Naval Ship Research and Development Center. 
Bethesda. Md. Aviation and Surface Effects Dept. 

AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLOSE- 
COUPLED CANARD AS APPLIED TO LOW-TO MODERATE 
SWEPT WINGS. VOLUME 2: SUBSONIC SPEED REGIME 
Final Report. 1970 - 1974 

David W. Lacey Jan. 1979 116 p refs 
(WF14142109) 

(AD-A067122; AERO- 1 257- Vol-2; DTNSRDC-79/002) Avail; 
NTIS HC A06/MF AOl CSCL 01/3 

An analysis of the effects of canard size, shape, position 
and deflection on the aerodynamic characteristics of two general 
research models having leading edge sweep angles of 25 and 
50 degrees is presented. The analysis summarizes the findings 
of four experimental subsonic wind-tunnel programs conducted 
at the David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development 
Center between 1970 and 1974. The analysis is based on four 
canard geometries varying in planform from a 60-degree delta 
to a 25-degree swept wing high aspect ratio canard. The canards 
were located at seven different positions and deflected from -10 
to 25 degrees. Significant findings include; the excellent correlation 
between canard exposed area ratio and changes in lift, drag, 
and pitching moment; the detrimental effect of positive canard 
deflection; and the optimum longitudinal position for each canard 
shape for maximum improvements in lift and drag. It is further 
concluded that the favorable aerodynamic changes caused by 
interference of the close-coupled canard are not significantly 
dependent on wing leading edge sweep or wing leading edge 
modifications. Author (GRA) 


N79-26027j^ Oklahoma Univ.. Norman. School of Aerospace. 
Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering. 

SUPERSONIC FLOW PAST CONICAL BODIES WITH 
NEARLY CIRCULAR CROSS SECTIONS Final Report 

Martin C. Jischke .Oct. 1978 65 p refs 
(Grant AF-AFOSR-3468-77) 

(AD-A068004; OU-AMNE-78- 10; AFOSR-79-0475TR) Avail: 
NTIS HC A04/MF AOl CSCL 20/4 

Inviscid. supersonic conical flows past bodies whose 
cross-section deviates slightly from that of a right circular cone 
are studied by means of a perturbation technique. The effects 
of small angles of attack and yaw are included. Using the 
hypersonic small disturbances theory approximations, we have 
developed explicity results for the flow field velocity components, 
pressure, entropy, and shock shape for cases n. m = 1. 2. 3. 
4. Comparisons of theory with experiment for n = 1. 2 are 
favorable. The stream surfaces of the velocity field are calculated 
and possible waverider geometries that can be developed 
therefrom are discussed. GRA 


538 



N79-26037 


N79-26029/I/ Louisiana State Univ.. Baton Rouge. Dept, of 
Mechanical Engineering. 

DEVELOPMENT OF A RESEARCH PLAN FOR THE IM- 
PROVEMENT OF AERODYNAMIC MODELS FOR ANALYSIS 
OF BALLISTIC RANGE DATA Final Report, 1 Feb. 1978 - 
31 Jan. 1979 

Robert W. Courter Mar. 1979 51 p refs 
(Grant AF-AFOSR-3489-78; AF Proj. 2307) 

(AD-A067950: AFOSR-79-0476TR) Avail: NTIS 

HC A04/MF AOl CSCL 16/2 

A study is made of the relationship between aerodynamic 
models and parameter estimation methods to determine a feasible 
plan for improving the aerodynamic models which are used for 
ballistic range data analysis at Eglin AFB. A plan is presented 
which utilizes a computer graphics terminal to process simulation 
runs and provide comparisons with experimental data and 
theoretical data fits. Included in the report are algorithms for 
performing system simulation and for accounting for mass-offset 
effects on the motion of the test item. Author (GRA) 

N79-26030/I/ Analytical Methods, Inc., Bellevue, Wash. 

A VISCOUS/POTENTIAL FLOW INTERACTION ANALYSIS 
FOR CIRCULATION-CONTROLLED AIRFOILS Final Report 

F. A. Dvorak May 1978 52 p refs 
(Contract N00600-76-C- 1494) 

(AD-A067913: Rept-7710) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF AOl 
CSCL 20/4 

A method developed for the analysis of the incompressible 
viscous flow over circulation-controlled airfoils is described. A 
surface vorticity method is used to solve the inviscid portion of 
the flow and a combination of integral and finite difference 
methods is used to calculate the development of the viscous 
layers. An iterative process is used to arrive at final solutions 
which satisfy an appropriate trailing-edge condition and incorpor- 
ate the interaction between the viscous and potential regions of 
the flow. Comparisons between calculated and experimental 
results show good agreement for surface pressure distributions 
and lift coefficients over a range of blowing momentum coefficient 
from 0 to 0.12. A discussion of the possibility of Coanda jet 
detachment when circulation-controlled airfoils are operating at 
high subsonic Mach Numbers is included in an Appendix. 

Author (GRA) 

N79-26031j^ McDonnell-Douglas Astronautics Co., Huntington 
Beach, Calif. 

OPTIMUM TAIL FAIRINGS FOR BODIES OF REVOLUTION 
Final Report 

A. M. 0. Smith, T. R. Stokes, Jr., and R. S. Lee Mar. 1979 
54 p refs 

(Contract N00014-77-C-0672) 

(AD-A067927; MDC-G7823) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF AOl 
CSCL 20/4 

This report describes a computerized method that will design 
tails for bodies of revolution that satisfy the Stratford criterion 
for zero wall shear. Stratford's original two-dimensional solution 
is extended to axisymmetric flow in order to implement the 
procedure. The method involves simultaneous solution of the 
extended Stratford equation and the necessary boundary 
conditions through the use of an inverse potential flow program. 
Tails designed with this procedure can be categorized as follows: 

(1) The entire tail is at incipient separation (no skin friction): 

(2) The pressure recovery is the most rapid possible; (3) The 

resultant tail is the shortest possible. The final result is a unique 
geometry for given freestream conditions and boundary layer 
transition point. By unique, it is meant that any deviation from 
the 'ideal' geometry will either cause extensive separation or 
the tail must become longer and, hence, contribute to skin friction 
and reduced volumetric efficiency. GRA 

N79-26034j|( National Transportation Safety Board, Washington. 
D. C. 

AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT REPORT: LAS VEGAS AIRLINES. 

PIPER PA-31-350, N44LV, LAS VEGAS, NEVADA. 
AUGUST 30. 1978 

7 Jun. 1979 38 p 

(NTSB-AAR-79-8) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 


About 0747 P.d.t., on August 30 1978. Las Vegas Airlines 
Flight 44, a Piper PA-3 1-350 (N44LV), crashed in VFR conditions 
shortly after takeoff from runway 25 at the North Las Vegas 
Airport. Las Vegas. Nevada. Flight 44 was a charter flight from 
Las Vegas, Nevada, to Santa Ana. California, with nine passen- 
gers and a pilot on board. After liftoff following a Idnger-than- 
normal ground roll, the aircraft pitched nose up. climbed steeply 
to about 400 ft above the ground, stalled, reversed course, and 
crashed 1.150 ft beyond and 650 ft to the' right of the runway. 
There was no fire. All persons on board the aircraft were killed. 
The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the 
probable cause of the accident was the backed out elevator 
down-stop bolt tha5 limited down elevator travel and made it 
impossible for the pilot to prevent a pitchup and stall after 
takeoff. Author 

N79-26035*/|( National Aeronautics and Space Administration; 
Ames Research Center. Moffett Field. Calif. 

QUIET PROPULSIVE LIFT FOR COMMUTER AIRLINES 

Darrell E. Wilcox and John A. Cochrane Jun. 1979 29 p 

refs 

(NASA-TM-78596: A-7861) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 
CSCL 01 C 

The performance of STOL or RTOL aircraft and NASA's 
research program to provide options for future design and 
certification of quiet propulsive-life transports is described. 

M.M.M. 

N79-26036j^ Naval Air Development Center. Warminster. Pa. 
Aircraft and Crew Svstems Technology Directorate, 

FEASIBILITY OF NON CATAPULT EJECTION AND HAZARD 
OF AN EJECTION SEAT ROCKET PLUME 

Thomas J. Zenobi 23 Jan. 1979 21 p refs 
(AD-A067080; NADC-78225-60) Avail: NTIS 

HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 01/3 

Efforts conducted by the Navy focused on feasibility of utilizing 
a rocket propelled ejection seat without a catapult. It was 
speculated that elimination of the catapult would result in 
significant weight reduction. However, between time of rocket 
ignition and the time the ejecting crewmember leaves the cockpit, 
there is a burn hazard to the crewmember created by the rocket 
exhaust plume from his own rocket as it scatters about the 
cockpit. The crewman may be exposed to temperatures as high 
as 5000 F during ejection. Extreme temperature and blast pressure 
also create severe erosive effects. Methods for protecting the 
crewmember from the rocket plume which were investigated 
included venting the plume, containing/shielding the plume, and 
quenching afterburn of rocket propellant with inert gas. Engineer- 
ing trade-offs such as weight penalties, complexity of maintenance, 
cost and anomalies on overall escape system performance were 
compared between utilization of the catapult and rocket plume 
protection methods. Based on these engineering trade-offs it 
was concluded that the catapult is still recommended for use in 
current aircraft cockpits. Author (GRA) 

N79-26037jj( Calspan Corp., Buffalo, N. Y. 

AN OPERATIONAL RESEARCH INVESTIGATION OF THE 
ICE-DETECTION CAPABILITY AND UTILITY OF THE 
SURFACE CONDITION ANALYZER (SCAN) SYSTEM AND 
ITS APPLICABILITY TO NAVY-WIDE USE Final Report. 
8 Feb. 1978 - 7 Apr. 1979 

E. J. Mack. R. J. Anderson. 0. H. Bock, T. A. Niziol. and H. G. 
Reif Mar. 1979 181 p refs 
(Contract N00014-78-C-0284) 

(AD-A067174: CALSPAN-6283-M-1 ) Avail: NTIS 

HC A09/MF AOl CSCL 01/2 

During 1978, Calspan Corporation conducted an independent 
research investigation of the basic principles and operational 
performance of the Surface Condition Analyzer system (SCAN)TM 
in the detection of icing conditions on runway surfaces and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use. The results and conclusions derived 
from this investigation were formulated from data and information 
garnered from the following sources: site visits and interviews 
at civil and Naval airfields where SCAN is installed: visits and 
discussions at the manufacturer’s plant; strip-chart records of 
actual SCAN-output signals, correlated with visual inspection of 


539 



N79-26038 


runway and sensor surfaces, runway traction, and display terminal 
readouts, obtained during a two-week operational performance 
study at Keflavik NAS; study of the manufacturer's drawings 
and schematics: review of the literature on snow and ice removal 
and control (SIRC) operations and economic analyses of these 
procedures as impacted by SCAN: and climatological analyses. 
The principal conclusion was that, while SCAN will not supplant 
routine personal inspection of runways. SCAN's ability to provide, 
on occasion, advance warning of hazardous icing conditions 
coupled with its surface temperature information (used for more 
effective chemical application) makes it well worth the investment 
costs. Author (GRA) 

N79-26038)^ Naval Air Development Center. Warminster. Pa. 
Aircraft and Crew Systems Technology Directorate. 
DEVELOPMENT OF AN INFLATABLE HEAD/NECK RE- 
STRAINT SYSTEM FOR EJECTION SEATS, UPDATE 

Thomas J. Zenobi 19 Dec. 1978 36 p refs 
(AD-A067124; NADC-78213-60) Avail: NTIS 

HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 06/17 

A ring-shaped inflatable head/neck restraint system for 
ejection seats is being developed at the Aircraft and Crew Systems 
Technology Directorate. NADC. The purpose of this system is to 
reduce neck injuries due to violent forward head rotation at the 
time of ejection thrust on parachute opening shock. Inflation of 
the neck ring will be conducted by a solid propellant gas generator. 
Design considerations include form-an-fit, cost effectiveness, 
packaging and integration into life support equipment. 

Author (GRA) 

N79-26039/^ Air Force Engineering Technology Office, Tyndall 
AFB, Fla. 

AN EVALUATION OF THE B I R D / A I R C R A FT STRIKE 
HAZARD DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, TEXAS 

James S. Kent and Ardrah L. Buddin. Ill Sep. 1978 53 p 

refs 

(AD-A068026: AFETO-TM-8-78) Avail; NTIS 

HC A04/MF A01 CSCL 01/2 

The Air Force Engineering Technology Office's Bird/Aircraft 
Strike Hazard (BASH) Team surveyed Dyess AFB from 20 to 
30 September 1978. During this period environmental factors 
which create potential bird strike hazards were observed. Specific 
recommendations based on observations are provided to reduce 
the bird strike hazard. Author (GRA) 

N79-26040^ Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough 
(England). Dept, of Engineering Physics. 

A STUDY OF SMOKE MOVEMENT IN AN AIRCRAFT 
FUSELAGE 

T. J. Methven and J, S. Webster 11 Jan. 1978 31 p refs 

(RAE-TM-EP-613; BR61816) Avail; NTIS HC A03/MF A01 
The migration of smoke from in-flight fires and possible 
measures to improve its removal were studied in ground tests 
on a Comet 4B. Results show that under normal conditions, 
smoke generated in various sections in the fuselage follows the 
air flow and disperses throughout the fuselage before passing 
overboard. Biasing discharge to the front or rear affects smoke 
clearance only slightly, but directing the total air supply to the 
compartment in which the smoke is generated has a beneficial 
eftect locally at the expense of adjacent cabins. Tests in the 
flight deck show that, in smoke laden conditions, flight instruments 
were best viewed with individual illumination in low ambient 
light. Further work with higher smoke densities is recom- 
mended. Author (ESA) 


N79-26041|j!l Lincoln Lab.. Mass. Inst, of Tech.. Lexington. 

UPLINK ATCRBS ENVIRONMENT MEASUREMENTS 
ALONG THE BOSTON-WASHINGTON CORRIDOR. 
VOLUME 2: INTERROGATOR CHARACTERISTICS 

Ferenc Nagy, Jr. 28 Feb. 1979 88 p refs 

(Contracts DOT-FA71WAI-242: F19628-78-C-0002: FAA Proj. 

052-241-04) 

(AD-A067944: ATC-83-Vol-2: FAA-RD-78-33) Avail. NTIS 
HC A05/MF AOl CSCL 17/7 


Airborne measurements of the Air Traffic Control Radar 
Beacon System (ATCRBS) 1030 MHz uplink environment due 
to ATC ground interrogators are described. The measurements 
were made using a special purpose airborne sensor-recorder during 
a flight from Boston to Washington (at 8500 feet) and back (at 
17.500 feet) on 16 December 1977. Data were recorded at 
24 locations between Boston and Washington. Specific character- 
istics of the sources of the interrogations observed from the air 
during this flight are presented. These characteristics include the 
identities of 46 of the interrogators, the approximate locations 
of 22 unidentified interrogators, and the radiated PI, P2, and 
P3 levels in the form of antenna patterns for six selected 
interrogators. It was found that approximately 40% of the 
interrogators employ the standard AAC or 2ACA mode interlaces 
while 20% transmit no Mode C interrogations. The distributions 
of PRI's and scan periods were found to be relatively free of 
bunching which would cause undesired synchronization effects. 
The antenna plots measured from the air show relatively large 
scan to scan variations due to aircraft motion. Some of the 
interrogator sites were found to suffer from reflections and sidelobe 
punch through effects. S.E.S. 

N79-26042|j/ Federal Aviation Administration, Washington, 
D.C. Office of Systems Engineering Management. 

REPORT OF THE FAA TASK FORCE ON AIRCRAFT 
SEPARATION ASSURANCE. VOLUME 1: EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY 

N. A. Blake et al Dec. 1978 32 p refs 

(AD-A067905: FAA-EM-78- 1 9- 1 -Vol- 1 ) Avail; NTIS 

HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 17/7 

The system errors, midairs, and near midairs to define the 
problem were examined. The system element requirements are 
defined to provide two levels of backup to the ATC system; a 
separation violation warning and a last-ditch collision advisory 
and resolution function. The current FAA ASA development 
programs are discussed, and the changes which are required to 
transition to an integrated ASA system are reported. S.E.S. 

N79-26044 Georgia Inst, of Tech.. Atlanta. 

A METHOD OF COMPUTING THE PRESSURE DISTRIBU- 
TION ON A SINGLE BLADED HOVERING HELICOPTER 
ROTOR Ph.D. Thesis 

Koodige Rajarama Shenoy 1979 167 p 
Avail: Univ. Microfilms Order No. 7913950 

An iterative method was developed to predict accurately 
the pressure and velocity distributions over the entire blade and 
particularly near the tip of the rotor. The blade is represented 
as a sheet of vorticity wrapped around the blade. This sheet is 
divided into a grid system and the vortex sheet strength is assumed 
to vary linearly within each panel. The wake vortex sheet geometry 
and a first approximation to the blade bound vorticity distribution 
are then computed suing a lifting-line/ blade-element analysis. 
A new set of vorticity values are obtained by computing the 
tangential velocity induced at the midpoints of each panel. 
Geometric coefficients are used in conjunction with the recur- 
rence relations to reduce the computations. The pressure 
distributions obtained by using the present method of pitch angles 
of 0 degrees, 6.175 degrees and 11.4 degrees are in good 
agreement with the experiments. Dissert. Abstr. 

N79-26045*/JI Textron Bell Aerospace Co.. Buffalo, N. Y. 

AIR CUSHION LANDING GEAR APPLICATIONS STUDY 
Report, Jan. - Mar 1979 

T. Desmond Earl Apr. 1979 83 p refs 
(Contract NASI -15202) 

(NASA-CR-1 59002; D7605-927002) Avail: NTIS 

HC A05/MF AOl CSCL 01C 

A series of air cushion landing gear (ACLG) applications 
was studied and potential benefits analyzed in order to identify 
the most attractive of these. The selected applications are new 
integrated designs (not retrofits) and employ a modified design 
approach with improved characteristics and performance. To aid 
the study, a survey of potential users was made. Applications 
were evaluated in the light of comments received. A technology 
scenario is developed, with discussion of problem areas, current 


540 



N79-26051 


technology level and future needs. Feasible development 
timetables are suggested. It is concluded that near-term 
development of small-size ACLG trunks, exploration of flight effects 
and braking are key items. The most attractive applications are 
amphibious with very large cargo aircraft and STiall general aviation 
having the greatest potential. Author 


N79-26046*)!/ Textron Bell Helicopter, Fort Worth, Tex. 

SYSTEM DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED 
ROTARY-WING AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT 

Harold E. Lemont May 1979 231 p refs 
(Contract NASl-15153) 

(NASA-CR- 158938) Avail: NTIS HCAIl/MFAOl CSCL 
OIC 

Helicopter aerial dispersal systems were studied to ascertain 
constraints to the system, the effects of removal of limitations 
(technical and FAA regulations), and subsystem improvements. 
Productivity indices for the aircraft and swath effects were 
examined. Typical missions were formulated through conversa- 
tions with operators, and differing gross weight aircraft were 
synthesized to perform these missions. Economic analysis of 
missions and aircraft indicated a general correlation of small 
aircraft (3000 lb gross weight) suitability for small fields 
(25 acres), and low dispersion rates (less than 32 Ib/acre). with 
larger aircraft (12,000 lb gross weight) being more favorable for 
bigger fields (200 acres) and heavier dispersal rates (100 Ib/acre). 
Operator problems, possible aircraft and system improvements, 
and selected removal of operating limitations were reviewed into 
recommendations for future NASA research items. S.E.S. 

N79-26047j||l Army Aviation Engineering Flight Activity, Edwards 
AFB, Calif. 

PRELIMINARY AIRWORTHINESS EVALUATION AH-1S 
HELICOPTER EQUIPPED WITH A GARRETT INFRARED 
RADIATION SUPPRESSOR AND AN AN/ALQ-144 JAMMER 
Final Report 

Gary L. Bender. Edward E. Bailes. Charles E. Frankenber. Jr., 
and Sherwood C. Spring May 1978 79 p 
(AD-A067757; USAEFA-77-33) Avail. NTIS 

HC A05/MF A01 CSCL 01/3 

The tests were conducted to determine the effects of 
installation of the IRS and the AN/ALQ-144 infrared jammer. 
There was no apparent effect on power required to hover and 
only a small increase in power required to maintain level flight. 
Because of a power-available degradation, however, there was 
a loss of 220 pounds payload In an out-of-ground-effect hover 
at 4000 feet, 35 C. Additionally, at 2000 feet. 25 C, and 
9300 pounds gross weight, there was a reduction in maximum 
level flight airspeed of 3.5 knots true airspeed in the clean wing 
configuration. No degradation in handling qualities was caused 
by IRS or infrared jammer installation. However, one deficiency 
and six shortcomings inherent in the basic AH- IS were noted. 
The nonadjustable ventilation system is a deficiency because it 
blows dirt and dust into the pilot's eyes during operations from 
unprepared surfaces. GRA 


N79-26048j|^ Ministry of Defence, London (England). 

HELICOPTER ICING SYMPOSIUM 

T. C. Don Nov. 1978 316 p refs Symp. held at London. 

6-7 Nov. 1978 

(AD-A067981) Avail: NTIS HC A14/MF A01 CSCL 01/3 
This document is a collection of papers presented at the 
Helicopter Icing Symposium, held in London. England. 
6-7 November 1978. The emphasis of the symposium was on 
helicopter rotor blade icing. Papers covered methods of rotor 
blade ice protection (electrothormal, ice phobic coatings, 
microwave, vibratory and mechanical-pneumatic concepts); 
design and test criteria; ice protection system capabilities and 
testing and certification methods. Also included are papers on 
meteorological data; instrumentation; icing tunnel tests and 
correlations of results to mathematical accretion model; and 
simulated and natural icing flight tests. Author (GRA) 


N79-26049j^( Naval Ship Research and Development Center, 
Bethesda. Md. Aviation and Surface Effects Dept. 

THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SPRAY GENERATED BY 
THE EFFLUX OF VARIOUS AIRCRAFT PROPULSORS 
IMPINGING NORMALLY ON WATER Technical Report. 
May - Sep. 1978 

Basil S. Papadales. Jr. Jun. 1978 52 p refs 
(WF41421091) 

(AD-A067742; DTNSRDC/ASED-78/07) Avail: NTIS 

HC A04/MF AOl CSCL 01/3 

A review of previous model tests of the efflux from aircraft 
propulsors impinging normally on water is presented. The height 
of the resulting spray cloud was found to be a function of the 
maximum dynamic pressure at the surface after impingement, 
and the propulsor diameter. A generalized relationship using 
these variables, based on Froude scaling and which favorably 
compares with the existing model data is presented. Other 
characteristics of the water surface and spray cloud are discussed, 
although there are insufficient data to formulate any general 
conclusions. Results from tests with Froude-scaled vertical takeoff 
and landing aircraft models are presented. These results are 
tentative due to the lack of substantiating full-scale data. The 
height of a spray cloud and the water depression diameter obtained 
during Froude-scaled tests of a conceptual ducted fan propulsor 
are also presented. The spray cloud heights compares favorably 
with the generalized relationship derived from previous tests. 
The water depression diameter was found to differ substantially 
from that determined from previous model tests. Spray cloud 
heights and water depression diameters are predicted for two 
conceptual full-scale aircraft propulsors. Author (GRA) 


N79-26050# Lockheed-California Co., Burbank, 

ICING TESTS OF A UH IH HELICOPTER WITH AN 
ELECTROTHERMAL ICE PROTECTION SYSTEM UNDER 
SIMULATED AND NATURAL ICING CONDITIONS Final 
Report. 31 Jan. - 31 Mar. 1978 

R. H. Cotton Apr. 1979 81 p refs 
(DA Proj. 1L2-63209-D-103) 

(AD-A067737; LR-28667; USARTL-TR-78-48) Avail: NTIS 
HC A05/MF AOl CSCL 01/3 

Natural and simulated icing tests were conducted during 
February and March 1978 with a UH-IH helicopter equipped 
with an advanced ice protection system. This was the fourth 
program of icing tests accomplished with this test aircraft and 
the second to include natural icing. The objective of this year's 
program was to expand the icing test envelope, to gather 
additional data on ice protection system design and perform- 
ance characteristics, and to obtain specific data for use in a 
product improvement program for the UH-1 Partial Ice Protection 
System (Kit A). The testing was conducted at Ottawa. Ontario, 
Canada. Seven tests in the spray rig and twelve natural icing 
flights were made totaling 25.8 hours of icing tests. Icing was 
encountered on seven of the natural icing flights. GRA 


N79-26051/^ National Physical Lab., Teddington (England). Div. 
of Numerical Analysis and Computer Science. 

THE CALCULATION OF OPTIMAL AIRCRAFT TRAJECTO- 
RIES 

P. E. M. Curtis and D. W. Martin Dec. 1978 18 p refs 
(NPL-DNACS-1 1/78) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl 

Two versions of a method for solving the minimum time-to- 
climb and minimum fuel-to-climb problems are described. This 
method uses the energy-state approximation to reduce the two 
problems to univariate minimization problems which are then 
solved numerically. The first version uses bilinear interpolation 
of the engine thrust data. This version runs faster on the computer 
by a factor of between 6 and 8 than a method in operational 
use. In order to obtain more accurate optimal trajectories a 
second version was developed which replaces the bilinear 
interpolation by natural bicubic spline interpolation. The improve- 
ment in accuracy is at the expense of a factor of about 2 in 
the computer run-time compared with the first version, but the 
gain over the operational method is still a factor of between 3 
and 4. Author (ESA) 


541 



IM79-26052 


N79-26052*j 5( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

A SIMULATION INVESTIGATION OF COCKPIT DISPLAY 
OF AIRCRAFT TRAFFIC DURING CURVED. DESCENDING. 
DECELERATING APPROACHES 

George G. Steinmetz May 1979 34 p refs 
(NASA-TM-80098) Avail; NTIS HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 
OID 

The results of a simulation experiment involving the evaluation 
of cockpit display of aircraft traffic information are presented. 
The experiment was conducted using taped time dependent, 
noninteractive traffic in an approach to landing situation and 
two levels of pilot control models: 3-D automatic and computer 
augmented control. The tests involved two cases- the simulation 
aircraft flew approach paths which (1) followed another aircraft 
in between two other aircraft, and (2) merged between two 
other aircraft. Speed control via manual throttles was used in 
all tests (path stretching was not allowed for maintaining 
separation between aircraft). The approaches were conducted 
while the simulation aircraft was conducting a curved, descending, 
decelerating approach to landing. Performance data sets were 
examined, and subjective opinions regarding workload were 
gathered. Traffic positioning was varied to further evaluate the 
test subjects' monitoring performance. S.F.S. 

N79-26053/^ Aeronautical Research Labs.. Melbourne (Australia). 

AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF THE READABILITY 
OF TWO DIGITAL ALTIMETERS 

G. R. White Dec. 1978 25 p 

(ARL/Sys-Note-60: AR-001-325) Avail; NTIS 

HC A02/MF AOl 

Twelve male volunteer subjects with flying experience were 
required to read one of two digital altimeters while performing 
a two dimensional tracking task. It was found that the Smiths 
Type 3B servo altimeter was read in a significantly shorter time 
than was the Aero Mechanism Type 8047/20A capsule altimeter. 
An ergonomic appraisal of the latter instrument and a subjective 
evaluation by the subjects indicates that the probability of 
misreading this altimeter is high. Author 

N79-26054# Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Fla. 

HIGH ALTITUDE ALTIMETER FLIGHT TEST Final Report. 
1 Aug. 1977 30 Sep. 1978 

W. G. Martin 30 Sep. 1978 157 p 
(Contract F33615-77-C-1222; AF Proj. 1995) 

(AD-A066904; AFAL-TR-78-1 43) Avail; NTIS 

HC A08/MF AOl CSCL 01/4 

The HAAFT program was conducted to obtain high altitude 
radar altimeter data that could be used in a feasibility assessment 
of High Altitude TERCOM (HATCOM). The HAAFT program 
involved collecting altimeter data over seven scenes with terrain 
altitude standard deviations ranging from 25 to 320 feet 
located in the vicinity of Edward AF6 and Point Mugu, California. 
Two pulse and one FM/CW altimeters were operated simulta- 
neously at nominal altitudes of 5, 20, 30. 45, and 65 kft, AGL 
The aircraft three-dimensional position was measured and provided 
by the AN/FPS-16 radar sets at Edwards AFB and Pt. Mugu. 
The tracking data were later merged with the data recorded in 
the aircraft and stored on computer tapes. An inertial navigator 
was included in the flight test equipment to provide aircraft 
attitude, velocity, and position data. In addition to the normal 
altitude measurement data provided by the altimeters, the pulse 
return waveform for the pulse altimeters and the prediscrimina- 
tor waveform for the FM/CW altimeter were processed to be 
recorded on television video cassette recorders. Author (GRA) 

N79-26055*# Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Group, East Hartford, 
Conn. 

ROTOR REDESIGN FOR A HIGHLY LOADED 1800 FT/SEC 
TIP SPEED FAN. 1: AERODYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL 
DESIGN REPORT 

J. M. Norton. U. Tari. and R. M. Weber Apr. 1979 104 p 

refs 

(Contract NAS3-20591) 

(NASA-CR-1 59596: PWA-5523-42) Avail. NTIS 

HC A06/MF AOl CSCL 21E 


A quasi three dimensional design system and multiple-circular- 
arc airfoil sections were used to design a fan rotor. An 
axisymmetric intrablade flow field calculation modeled the shroud 
of an isolated splitter and radial distribution. The structural analysis 
indicates that the design is satisfactory for evaluation of 
aerodynamic performance of the fan stage in a test facility. 

S.E.S. 

N79-26066*jjf McDonnell Aircraft Co.. St. Louis. Mo. 

THRUST AND MASS FLOW CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR 
36 INCH DIAMETER TIP TURBINE FAN THRUST VECTOR- 
ING SYSTEMS IN AND OUT OF GROUND EFFECT 

D. W. Esker and H. A. Roddiger Jun. 1979 105 p refs 
(Contract NAS2-9690) 

(NASA-CR-1 52239; MDC-A5704) Avail: NTIS 

HC A06/MF AOl CSCL 21 E 

The calibration tests carried out on the propulsion system 
components of a 70 percent scale, powered model of a NASA 
3-fan V/STOL aircraft configuration are described. The three 
X3/6B/T58 turbotip fan units used in the large scale powered 
model were tested on an isolated 'basis over a range of ground 
heights from H/D of 1.02 to infinity. A higher pressure ratio 
LF336/J85 fan unit was tested over a range of ground heights 
from 1.55 to infinity. The results of the test program demon- 
strated that; (1) the thrust and mass flow performance of the 
X376B/T58 nose lift unit is essentially constant for H/D variations 
down to 1.55; at H/D 1,02 back pressurization of the fan exit 
occurs and is accompanied by an increase in thrust of five percent; 
(2) a change in nose fan exit hub shape from flat plate to 
hemispherical produces no significant difference in louvered lift 
nozzle performance for height variations from H/D = 1.02 to 
infinity: (3) operation of the nose lift nozzle at the higher fan 
pressure ratio generated by the LF336/J85 fan system causes 
no significant change in ground proximity performance down to 
an H/D of 1.55, the lowest height tested with this unit: and 
(4) the performance of the left and right X376B/T58 lift/cruise 
units in the vertical lift mode remains unchanged, within plus or 
minus two percent for the range of ground heights from H/D = 
1.02 to infinity. J.M.S. 

N79-26057*jj( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. 

EVALUATION OF A SIMPLIFIED GROSS THRUST CALCU- 
LATION TECHNIQUE USING TWO PROTOTYPE FIDO 
TURBOFAN ENGINES IN AN ALTITUDE FACILITY 

Frank J. Kurtenbach Jun. 1979 30 p refs 

(NASA-TP-1482: H-1061) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 

21E 

The technique which relies on afterburner duct pressure 
measurements and empirical corrections to an ideal one 
dimensional flow analysis to determine thrust is presented. A 
comparison of the calculated and facility measured thrust values 
is reported. The simplified model with the engine manufacturer's 
gas generator model are compared. The evaluation was conducted 
over a range of Mach numbers from 0 80 to 2.00 and at altitudes 
from 4020 meters to 15.240 meters. The effects of variations 
in inlet total temperature from standard day conditions were 
explored. Engine conditions were varied from those normally 
scheduled for flight. The technique was found to be accurate to 
a twice standard deviation of 2.89 percent, with accuracy a 
strong function of afterburner duct pressure difference. S.E.S. 

N79-26058/^ Ai Research Mfg. Co., Phoenix, Ariz. 

ALTERNATE SUBSONIC LOW-COST ENGINE Final 
Technical Report, 1 Apr, 1976 - 31 Dec. 1977 

C. F. Baerst and J. W. Sandborn May 1978 169 p refs 
(Contract F33615-76-C-2063) 

(AD-A067277; AiResearch-76-212199(21); AFAPL-TR-78-31) 
Avail; NTIS HC A08/MF AOl CSCL 21/5 

This document presents the final report on the research and 
development of a turbojet derived from low-cost, high-production 
turbocharger components and an augmentor based on a low-cost, 
ramjet sudden-expansion burner. The engine, designated AiRe- 
search ETJ131 Moel 1030, is an afterburning derivative of the 
AiResearch ETJ131 engine. Changes to the basic ETJ131 included 
placing the combustor parallel to the engine center line. 


542 



N79 26076 


incorporating aerodynamic changes to accommodate the 
additional airflow required to achieve the thrust goal for the 
Model 1030. and adding an afterburner. Author (GRA) 

N79~26060j^ Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology. 
Ames. Engineering Research Inst. 

THE INFLUENCE OF COMPRESSOR INLET GUIDE VANE/ 
STATOR RELATIVE CIRCUMFERENTIAL POSITIONING ON 
BLADE WAKE TRANSPORT AND INTERACTION Interim 
Report. 30 Sep. 1977 • 31 Aug. 1978 

G. J. Holbrook and T. H. Okiishi Sep. 1978 126 p refs 
(Grant AF-AFOSR-2916-76: ERI Proj. 1204) 

{AD-A067969; ISU ERI-AMES-79037; TCRL-13: 
AFOSR-79-0509TR) Avail: NTIS HC A07/MF AOl CSCL 
13/7 

A periodically sampling hot-wire measurement system was 
used to obtain numerous periodic-average (Electronically and 
arithmetically averaged values of periodically sampled data) 
three-dimensional velocity vector data for flow through the first 
stage (inlet guide vane, rotor, and stator rows) of a low-speed, 
multistage, axial-flow research compressor. New data are 
presented for the maximum noise circumferential position of the 
first stator blade row. Comparisons are made between these 
data and similar data previously acquired and reported for the 
minimum noise configuration of the compressor. The inlet guide 
vane (IGV) wake avenue was found to interest first stator row 
blades at two span locations, one near the hub and the other 
near the tip. for maximum noise and at only one span location, 
near mid-span, for minimum noise. This difference in IGV 
wake / stator leading edge intersection patterns resulted in 
variations of the first stator exit flow deviation angle near the 
hub and tip portions of the compressor annulus. These variations 
were explained in terms of the larger fluctuations of stator inlet 
flow associated with the inlet guide vane wake avenues. GRA 

N79-26062*)^ Massachusetts Inst, of Tech.. Cambridge. 
Aeroelastic and Structures Research Lab. 

A WIND-TUNNEL INVESTIGATION OF TILT ROTOR GUST 
ALLEVIATION SYSTEMS Final Report. 1972 - 1978 

Norman D. Ham and H. Philip Whitaker Jan. 1978 140 p 

refs 

(Contract NAS2-7262) 

(NASA-CR-1 52264; ASRL-TR-1 74-7) Avail; NTIS 

HC A07/MF AOl CSCL 01C 

The alleviation of the effects of gusts on tilt rotor aircraft 
by means of active control systems was investigated. The gust 
generator, the derivation of the equations of motion of the rotor 
wing combination, the correlation of these equations with the 
results of wind tunnel model tests, the use of the equations to 
design various gust alleviating active control systems, and the 
testing and evaluation of these control systems by means of 
wind tunnel model tests were developed. S.E.S. 

N79-260€3*)5I Vought Corp., Hampton. Va. 

BOEING 747 AIRCRAFT WITH LARGE EXTERNAL POD FOR 
TRANSPORTING OUTSIZE CARGO 

Jack E. Price. C. Baptiste Quartero. Paul M. Smith, and G. Fred 
Washburn May 1979 21 p refs 
(Contract NASI -13500) 

(NASA-CR-1 59067) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 
OIC 

The effect on structural arrangement, system weight, and 
range performance of the cargo pod payload carrying capability 
was determined to include either the bridge launcher or a spacelab 
module on a Boeing 747 aircraft. Modifications to the carrier 
aircraft and the installation hme reouired to attach the external 
pod to the 747 were minimized. Results indicate that the increase 
in pod size was minimal, and that the basic 747 structure was 
adequate to safely absorb the load induced by ground or air 
operation while transporting either payload. S.E.S. 

N79-26064*/il National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Langley Research Center. Hampton, Va. 

FULL SCALE AIRCRAFT SIMULATION WITH CRYOGENIC 
TUNNELS AND STATUS OF THE NATIONAL TRANSONIC 
FACILITY 


Robert A. Kilgore. William B. Igoe. Jerry B. Adcock. Robert M. 
Hall, and Charles B. Johnson Apr. 1979 20 p refs Presented 
at 1st Internatl. Symp. on Cryog. Wind Tunnels. Southampton, 
England, 3-5 Apr. 1979 

(NASA-TM-80085) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 
14B 

The effect of thermal and caloric imperfections in cryogenic 
nitrogen on boundary layers was determined to indicate that in 
order to simulate nonadiabatic laminar or turbulent boundary 
layers in a cryogenic nitrogen wind tunnel, the flight enthalpy 
ratio, rather than the temperature ratio, should be reproduced. 
The absence of significant real gas effects on both viscous and 
inviscid flows makes it unlikely that there will be large real gas 
effects on the cryogenic tunnel simulation of shock boundary 
layer interactions or other complex flow conditions encountered 
in flight. Condensation effects were studied to determine^ the 
minimum usable temperature and indicated that under most 
circumstances free stream Mach number rather than maximum 
local Mach number determines the onset of condensation 
effects. S.E.S. 

N79-26067*# Control Data Corp., St. Paul. Minn. Research 
and Advanced Design Lab. 

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A NUMERICAL AERODYNAMIC 
SIMULATION FACILITY: SUMMARY Final Report 

N. R. Lincoln May 1979 24 p 4 Vol. 

(Contract NAS2-9896) 

(NASA-CR-1 52286) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 
14B 

The Ames Research Center of NASA is engaged in the 
development and investigation of numerical methods and computer 
technologies to be employed in conjunction with physical 
experiments, particularly utilizing wind tunnels in the furtherance 
of the field of aircraft and aerodynamic body design. Several 
studies, aimed primarily at the areas of development and 
production of extremely high-speed computing facilities, were 
conducted. The studies focused on evaluating the aspects of 
feasibility, reliability, costs, and practicability of designing, 
constructing, and bringing into effect production of a special- 
purpose system. An executive summary of the activities for this 
project is presented in this volume. G.Y. 

N79-26073/j|l Aeronautical Research Labs.. Melbourne (Australia). 

A SIMPLE METHOD OF ADAPTING A WIND TUNNEL 
SCHLIEREN SYSTEM FOR INTERFEROMETRY 

N. Pollock Jun. 1978 44 p refs 

{AD-A067233: ARL/AERO-Note-378) ' Avail: NTIS 

HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 20/4 

A simple method of adapting a wind tunnel Schlieren system 
for interferometry is described. This new interferometer arrange- 
ment employs a laser light source, a lens which splits off the 
reference beam after test beam expansion and a lens and Lloyd 
mirror to recombine the two beams. The reference beam passes 
through the test section but is contracted to a narrow waist 
and displaced well away from the model location. The proposed 
design combines a number of favourable characteristics which 
render it particularly useful for wind tunnel tests. These 
characteristics include; simplicity, optical robustness, low 
vibration sensitivity, modest coherence requirements and ease 
of interferogram analysis. The main disadvantage is that slightly 
less than half of the total field of view can be recorded on a 
single interferogram. Interferograms obtained from tests on a 
prototype instrument based on a Schlieren system of low 
mechanical rigidity are presented. Also included is a comparison 
between aerofoil pressure distributions obtained by direct 
measurement and by interferogram analysis. Author (GRA) 


N79-26076*|jf National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Marshall Space Flight Center. Huntsville. Ala. 

PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOPS TO DEFINE ENGINEER- 
ING REQUIREMENTS FOR A SPACE VACUUM RESEARCH 
FACILITY 

W. A. Oran, ed., S. T, Wu. ed. (Alabama Univ. in Huntsville), 
and R. W. Hoffman, ed. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Ohio) 



N79 26224 


Jun. 1979 152 p refs Workshops held at Huntsville, Ala.. 

12-13 Jun. 1978 and 3-4 Apr. 1978 

(NASA-CP-2091) Avail: NTIS HC A08/MF AOl CSCL 22A 
The construction of a molecular wake shield for the shuttle 
orbiter is presented as well as a collision model with a program 
depicting emitted molecular density around the spacecraft giving 
estimates of backscattered flux and other collisional processes. 

N79-26224j^ Air Force Aero Propulsion Lab.. Wright- Patterson 
AFB, Ohio. 

FUEL HYDROGEN CONTENT AS AN INDICATOR OF 
RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER IN AN AIRCRAFT GAS 
TURBINE COMBUSTOR Final Report, Jun. - Nov. 1976 

Thomas A. Jackson and W. S. Blazowski Feb. 1979 24 p 

refs Presented at the Am. Soc. of Mech. Engr. Winter Ann. 
Meeting. Atlanta. 27 Nov. - 2 Dec. 1977 

(AD-A067709: AFAPL-TR-79-2014) Avail: NTIS 

HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 21/4 

Eleven fuels representing a wide range of hydrogen content 
were studied using a T56 single can combustor rig. Test fuels 
included single and double ring aromatic types as well as paraffins 
blended with each other and with JP-4. Fuel mixtures with 
hydrogen contents ranging from 9.9 to 15.9 per cent by weight 
were examined. The combustor inlet conditions simulated the 
discharge from both low and high pressure ratio gas turbine 
compressors operating at the cruise condition. Thermocouple data 
from the T56 liner are correlated wth fuel hydrogen content 
using a new, nondimensional combustor liner temper^ure 
parameter. Least-squares mathematical treatment of the data 
resulted in an excellent second order correlation between the 
nondimensional temperature parameter and fuel hydrogen content 
and a simplified radiation analysis is presented which also explains 
the resulting empirical trends. Author (GRA) 

N79-26253*j^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Pasadena Office, Calif. 

ECHO TRACKER/RANGE FINDER FOR RADARS AND 
SONARS Patent Application 

Nick J. Constantinides, inventor {to NASA) (JPL) Filed 29 Jun. 
1979 22 p 
(Contract NAS7-100) 

(NASA-Case-NPO-14361-1; US-Patent-Appl-SN-053572) Avail: 
NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 20N 

An echo tracker/ range finder or altimeter is described in 
which the pulse repetition frequency (PFR) of a predetermined 
number of transmitted pulses is adjusted so that echo pulses 
received from a reflecting object are positioned between 
transmitted pulses and divide their interpulse time interval into 
two time intervals having a predetermined ratio with respect to 
each other. The thus-adjusted PRF is related to the range of 
the reflecting object. In addition, the invention provides a means 
whereby the arrival time of a plurality of echo pulses is defined 
as the time at which a composite echo pulse formed of a sum 
of the individual echo pulses has the highest amplitude. An 
especially useful application is in determining altitude information 
for an aircraft or an orbiting spacecraft utilizing a synthetic aperture 
imaging radar system. However, it could be used with sonar 
systems, laser ranger finders, or any other kind of rangefinding 
application in which a number of pulses are received. NASA 

N79-26288j|{ National Telecommunication Information Adminis- 
tration, Boulder, Colo. Inst, for Telecommunication Sciences. 

AIRCRAFT OBSTRUCTION OF MICROWAVE LINKS 
Final Report 

R. E. Skerjanec and R. W. Hubbard Jan. 1979 68 p refs 

Sponsored in part by Army Communciations-Electronics Engineer- 
ing Installation Agency 

{PB-292372/0: NTlA/REPORT-79/ 14) Avail. NTIS 

HC A04/MF AOl CSCL 17B 

A limited measurement program at 8 GHz at Altanta and 
Chicago Airports was undertaken to determine if a condition 
existed that could cause excessive error rates on digital 
systems. Measurements were made of the received signal level 
together with the impulse response of the transmission medium. 
Measurement results indicate that during takeoff and landing. 


aircraft can cause signal level fades to 20 db. The impulse response 
measurements at Atlanta did not reveal any delayed or distorted 
pulses that would indicate excessive multipath and frequency 
selective fading. However, slight distortion from taxiing aircraft 
at Chicago was observed. GRA 

N79-26374*)^ Lockheed Missiles and Space Co.. Huntsville, 
Ala. Research and Engineering Center. 

INVESTIGATION OF A LASER DOPPLER VELOCIMETER 
SYSTEM TO MEASURE THE FLOW FIELD AROUND A 
LARGE SCALE V/STOL AIRCRAFT IN GROUND EFFECT 

Andrew D. Zalay, Melvin R. Brashears, Archie J. Jordan. Kenneth 
R, Shrider. and Carl D. Vought May 1979 76 p refs Document 
includes a microfiche supplement 
(Contract NAS2-8959) 

(NASA-CR-152212: LM SC-H R EC-TR-0568) Avail: NTIS 
HC E04/MF AOl CSCL 14B 

The flow field measured around a hovering 70 percent scale 
vertical takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft model is described. 
The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground based 
laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote ser>sing instrumentation 
and experimental tests of the velocity surveys are discussed. 
The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain: 
the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity 
along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine 
rpms and aircraft height abouve ground Results show that it is 
feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure 
the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating 
in ground effect. S.E.S. 

N79-26810*jJI National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center, Hampton. Va. 

TRENDS IN RELIABILITY MODELING TECHNOLOGY FOR 
FAULT TOLERANT SYSTEMS 

Salvatore J. Bavuso Apr 1979 15 p refs 
(NASA-TM-80089) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 
09 B 

Reliability modeling for fault tolerant avionic computing 
systems was developed. The modeling of large systems involving 
Issues of state size and complexity, fault coverage, and practical 
computation was discussed. A novel technique which provides 
the tool for studying the reliability of systems with nonconstant 
failure rates is presented. The fault latency which may provide 
a method of obtaining vital latent fault data is measured. S.E.S. 


N79-26881*/|( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. 

AN EVALUATION OF LINEAR ACOUSTIC THEORY FOR A 
HOVERING ROTOR 

Charles E. K. Morris, Jr.. F. Farassat (Joint Inst, for Advan. of 
Flight Sci ). and Paul A. Nystrom May 1979 57 p refs 
(Grant NsG-1474) 

(NASA-TM-80059) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF AOl CSCL 
20A 

Linear acoustic calculations are compared with previously 
reported data for a small-scale hovering rotor operated at high 
tip Mach numbers. A detailed calculated description of the 
distributions of blade surface pressure and shear stress due to 
skin friction is presented. The noise due to skin friction and 
loading, in the rotor disk plane, is small compared to thickness 
noise. The basic conclusions of Boxwell et al about the importance 
of nonlinear effects are upheld. Some approximations involved 
in the current theories for the inclusion of nonlinear effects are 
discussed. Using a model nonlinear problem, it is shown that to 
use the acoustic analogy, good knowledge of the flowfield is 
required. M.M.M. 


N79-27014# Lehigh Univ.. Bethlehem. Pa. 

STRUCTURING OF DATA SYSTEMS: PSYCHOPHYSIOLOG- 
ICAL DATA FROM THE DYNAMIC FLIGHT SIMULATOR 
Final Report 

Bruce D. Fritcbman and John G. Nelson 9 Mar. 1979 39 p 

refs 


544 



N79-27080 


(Contract N62269-77-C-0347) 

(AD-A067175; NADC-79052-60) Avail: NTIS 

HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 14/2 

This investigation considered the methods and problems of 
collection, storage, processing and display of psychophysiological 
data from dynamic flight simulation in the Nava! Air Development 
Center human centrifuge, using analog, mini, and remote 
main-frame computers. An integrated data processing system is 
described. Problems associated with data collection and storage 
are evaluated, and alternate solutions discussed. Anticipated 
problems in the development of data processing software are 
examined, and the applicable basic technology identified. 
Approaches to the critical problem of orderly and systematic 
development and maintenance of software for semi-open-shop 
operations is examined. Author (GRA) 

N79-27071*/^ Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, 
Ames. 

MINIMUM ALTITUDE-LOSS SOARING IN A SPECIFIED 
VERTICAL WIND DISTRIBUTION 

Bion L Pierson and Imao Chen /n NASA. Langley Res. Center 
Sci. and Techno!, of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 
1979 p 305-318 refs 

Avail; NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

Minimum altitude-loss flight of a sailplane through a given 
vertical wind distribution is discussed. The problem is posed as 
an optimal control problem, and several numerical solutions are 
obtained for a sinusoidal wind distribution. J.M.S. 

N79-27072*jl/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. 

A STUDY OF COURSE DEVIATIONS DURING CROSS- 
COUNTRY SOARING 

Steven M. Sliwa and David J. Sliwa (III. Univ. at Urbana- 
Champaign) /n its Sci. and Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless 
Flight Jun. 1979 p 319-353 refs 

Avail; NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL01C 

Several models are developed for studying the impact of 
deviations from course during cross country soaring flights. 
Analyses are performed at the microstrategy and macrostrategy 
levels. Two types of lift sources are considered; concentrated 
thermals and thermal streets. The sensitivity of the optimum 
speed solutions to various model, piloting and performance 
parameters is evaluated. Guides are presented to provide the 
pilot with criterions for making in-flight decisions. In general, 
course deviations are warranted during weak lift conditions, but 
are less justifiable with moderate to strong lift conditions, Author 

N79-27073*|^ Liege Univ. (Belgium). 

ON GLOBAL OPTIMAL SAILPLANE FLIGHT STRATEGY 

Guy J. Sander and Francois-Xavier Litt (n NASA. Langley 
Res. Center Sci. and. Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless 
Flight Jun. 1979 p 355-375 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 1 7G 

The derivation and interpretation of the necessary conditions 
that a sailplane cross-country flight has to satisfy to achieve 
the maximum global flight speed is considered. Simple rules are 
obtained for two specific meteorological models. The first one 
uses concentrated lifts of various strengths and unequal distance. 
The second one takes into account finite, nonuniform space 
amplitudes for the lifts and allows, therefore, for dolphin style 
flight. In both models, altitude constraints consisting of upper 
and lower limits are shown to be essential to model realistic 
problems. Numerical examples illustrate the difference with 
existing techniques based on local optimality conditions. J.M.S. 


N79-2707B*§ Stuttgart Univ. (West Germany). Inst. A for 
Mechanics. 

A GENERAL METHOD FOR THE LAYOUT OF AILERONS 
AND ELEVATORS OF GLIDERS AND MOTORPLANES 


Manfred H. Hiller in NASA. Langley Res. Center Sci. and 
Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 
p 399-418 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

A method is described which allows the layout of the spatial 
driving mechanism of the aileron for a glider or a motorplane to 
be performed in a systematic manner. In particular, a prescribed 
input-output behavior of the mechanism can be realized by 
variation of individual parameters of the spatial four-bar 
mechanisms which constitute the entire driving mechanis n. By 
means of a sensitivity analysis, a systematic choice of parameters 
is possible. At the same time the forces acting in the mechanism 
can be limited by imposing maximum values of the forces as 
secondary conditions during the variation process. J.M.S. 

N79-27077*/j( Politecnico di Torino (Italy). 

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION INTO THE FEASIBILITY 
OF AN EXTRUDED WING 

Piero Morelli and Giulio Romeo in NASA. Langley Res. Center 
Sci. and Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 
1979 p 419-436 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

Fabrications of extruded aluminum alloy structures are 
reviewed. The design criteria and the fabrication of the main 
structure of a sailplane wing made of a few extruded profiles 
longitudinally connected one to the other are illustrated. Structural 
tests recently carried out are reported upon. J.M.S. 

N79-27078*;(!l National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

TREATMENT OF THE CONTROL MECHANISMS OF LIGHT 
AIRPLANES IN THE FLUTTER CLEARANCE PROCESS 

Elmar J. Breitbach in its Sci. and Technol. of Low Speed and 
Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 p 437-466 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

It has become more and more evident that many difficulties 
encountered in the course of aircraft flutter analyses can be 
traced to strong localized nonlinearities in the control mechanisms. 
To cope with these problems, more reliable mathematical models 
paying special attention to control system nonlinearities were 
established by means of modified ground vibration test procedures 
in combination with suitably adapted modal synthesis approaches. 
Three different concepts are presented. J A M. 

N79-27079*/j( Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer 
Luft- und Raumfahrt. Stuttgart (West Germany). 

ADVANCED COMPOSITES IN SAILPLANE STRUCTURES: 
APPLICATION AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 

Dieter Muser in NASA. Langley Res. Center Sci. and Technol. 
of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 p 467-483 
refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

Advanced Composites in sailplanes mean the use of carbon 
and aramid fibers in an epoxy matrix. Weight savings were in 
the range of 8 to 1 8% in comparison with glass fiber structures. 
The laminates will be produced by hand-layup techniques and 
all material tests were done with these materials. These values 
may be used for calculation of strength and stiffness, as well as 
for comparison of the materials to get a weight-optimum 
construction. Proposals for material-optimum construction are 
mentioned. J.A.M. 

N79-27080*/|( Boeing Commercial Airplane Co,. Seattle, Wash. 

THE ULTRALIGHT SAILPLANE 

John H. McMasters in NASA. Langley Res. Center Sci. and 
Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 
p 485-504 refs 

Avail; NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

As presently envisioned, the ultralight sailplane is intermediate 
in size, cost and performance between current hang gliders and 
the lower end of the traditional sailplane spectrum. In the design 
of an ultralight sailplane, safety, low cost, and operational simplicity 
were emphasized at the expense of absolute performance. An 


545 



N79-27081 


overview of the design requirements for an ultralight sailplane 
is presented. It was concluded that by a judicious combination 
of the technologies of hang gliding, human powered flight, 
conventional soaring and motor gliding, an operationally and 
economically viable class of ultralight, self-launching sailplanes 
can be developed. J.A.M. 

N79-27081*/^ Stanford Univ.. Calif. 

ANALYTICAL AND SCALE MODEL RESEARCH AIMED AT 
IMPROVED HANGGUDER DESIGN 

llan Kroo and U-Shing Chang In NASA. Langley Res. Center 
Sci. and Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 
1979 p 505-521 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01C 

Research consisted of a theoretical analysis which attempts 
to predict aerodynamic characteristics using lifting surface theory 
and finite-element structural analysis as well as an experimental 
investigation using 1/5 scale elastically similar models in the 
NASA Ames 2m x 3m (7* x 10') wind tunnel. Experimental 
data were compared with theoretical results in the development 
of a computer program which may be used in the design and 
evaluation of ultralight gliders. J.A.M. 

H79-270B2*§ Instytut Lotnictwa. Warsaw (Poland). 

IMPROVEMENT OF HANG GLIDER PERFORMANCE BY USE 
OF ULTRALIGHT ELASTIC WING 

Jerzy S. Wolf In NASA. Langley Res. Center Sci. and Technol. 
of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 p 523-536 
refs 

Avail; NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

The problem of the lateral controllability of the hang glider 
by the pilot's weight shift was considered. The influence of the 
span and the torsional elasticity of the wing was determined. It 
was stated that an ultralight elastic wing of a new kind was 
most suitable for good control. The wing also has other 
advantageous properties. J.A.M. 

N79-27083*j)l Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches 
Aerospatiales. Paris (France). Aerospace Mechanics Div. 

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE FLIGHT ENVELOPE AND 
RESEARCH OF SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR HANG- 
GLIDERS 

Claudius LaBurthe In NASA. Langley Res. Center Sci. and 
Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 
p 537-556 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01 C 

The flight mechanic computations were computed, providing 
both the flight envelopes with all sorts of limits and a fairly 
precise idea of the influence of several parameters, such as 
pilot's weight, wing settings, aeroelasticity. etc. The particular 
problem of luffing dives was thoroughly analyzed, and two kinds 
of causes were exhibited in both the rules of luffing and aeroelastic 
effects. The general analysis of longitudinal stability showed a 
strong link with fabric tension, as expected through Nielsen's 
and Twaites' theory. Fabric tension strongly depending upon 
aeroelasticity, that parameter was found to be the most effective 
design ohe for positive stability. Lateral stability was found to 
be very similar in all gliders except perhaps the cylindro-conical. 
The loss of stability happens in roll at low angle of attack, 
whereas it happens in yaw at high angle. Turning performance 
was a bit suprising, with a common maximum value of 
approximately 55 deg of bank angle for a steady turn. Author 

N79-27084*j|( Army Research and Technology Labs., Moffett 
Field. Calif. Aeromechanics Lab. 

WIND TUNNEL TESTS OF FOUR FLEXIBLE WING ULTRA- 
LIGHT GUDERS 

Robert A. Ormiston In NASA. Langley Res. Center Sci. and 
Technol. of Low Speed and Motorless Flight Jun. 1979 
p 557-589 

Avail: NTIS HC A99/MF AOl CSCL 01A 

The aerodynamic lift, drag, and pitching moment characteris- 
tics of four full scale, flexible wing, ultralight gliders were measured 
in the settling chamber of a low speed wind tunnel. The gliders 
were tested over a wide range of angle of attack and at two 


different velocities. Particular attention was devoted to the lift 
and pitching moment behavior at low and negative angles of 
attack because of the potential loss of longitudinal stability of 
flexible wing gliders in this regime. The test results were used 
to estimate the performance and longitudinal control characteris- 
tics of the gliders. J.A.M. 

N79-27086*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS AND READINESS FOR 
VERY LARGE VEHICLES 

D. William Conner Jun. 1979 11 p Presented at the AIAA 

Very Large Vehicle Conf.. Arlington. Va.. 26-27 Apr. 1979 
(NASA-TM-80127) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 
02A 

Common concerns of very large vehicles in the areas of 
economics, transportation system interfaces and operational 
problems were reviewed regarding their influence on vehicle 
configurations and technology. Fifty-four technology requirements 
were fdehtified which are judged to be unique, or particularly 
critical, to very large vehicles. The requirements were about equally 
divided among the four general areas of aero/hydrodynamics, 
propulsion and acoustics, structures, and vehicle systems and 
operations. The state of technology readiness was judged to be 
poor to fair for slightly more than one half of the requirements. 
In the classic disciplinary areas, the state of technology readiness 
appears to be more advanced than for vehicle systems and 
operations. S.E.S. 

N79-27087*/j( Milco International, Inc., Huntington Beach. Calif. 

STATE OF THE ART SURVEY OF TECHNOLOGIES APPLICA- 
BLE TO NASA'S AERONAUTICS, AVIONICS AND CON- 
TROLS PROGRAM 

Richard K. Smyth, ed. May 1979 332 p refs Prepared in 

cooperation with ORI. Inc.. Silver Spring, Md. 

(Contract NASw-2961) 

(NASA-CR- 159050) Avail: NTIS HC A15/MF AOl CSCL 
02A 

. The state of the art survey (SOAS) covers six technology 
areas Including flightpath management, aircraft control system, 
crew station technology, interface & integration technology, 
military technology, and fundamental technology. The SOAS 
Included contributions from over 70 individuals in industry, 
government, and the universities. Author 

N79-27088*j)l National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. Edwards. Calif. 

CORRELATION OF PREDICTED AND MEASURED THER- 
MAL STRESSES ON AN ADVANCED AIRCRAFT STRUC- 
TURE WITH DISSIMILAR MATERIALS 

Jerald M. Jenkins Jun. 1979 47 p refs 
(NASA-TM-72865: H-1092) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 
CSCL 02A 

Additional information was added to a growing data base 
from which estimates of finite element model complexities can 
be made with respect o thermal stress analysis. The manner in 
which temperatures were smeared to the finite element grid 
points was examined from the point of view of the impact on 
thermal stress calculations. The general comparison of calculated 
and measured thermal stresses is guite good and there is little 
doubt that the finite element approach provided by NASTRAN 
results in correct thermal stress calculations. Discrepancies did 
exist between measured and calculated values in the skin and 
the skin/ frame junctures. The problems with predicting skin 
thermal stress were attributed to inadequate temperature inputs 
to the structural model rather than modeling insufficiencies. The 
discrepancies occurring at the skin/frame juncture were most 
likely due to insufficient modeling elements rather than tempera- 
ture problems. .A.R.H. 

N79-27093*fj/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center, Cleveland. Ohio. 

PERFORMANCE OF A V/STOL TILT NACELLE INLET WITH 
BLOWING BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL 

Albert L. Johns, Robert C. Williams, and H. C. Potonides (Grumman 
Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, N. Y.) 1979 13 p refs Presented 


546 



N79-27100 


at the 15th Joint Propulsion Conf., Las Vegas. Nev., 18-20 Jun. 
1979; cosponsored by AIAA, SAE and ASME 
(NASA-TM-79176; E-043) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01 CSCL 
01A 

A scale model of a V/STOL tilt nacelle fitted to a 0.508 m 
single stage fan was tested in the NASA Lewis 9x15 ft low 
speed wind tunnel to determine the effect of diffuser blowing 
on the inlet aerodynamics and aeromechanical performance. The 
test was conducted over a range of freestream speeds (up to 
120 knots) and angles of attack (up to 120 deg). Diffuser blowing 
had a beneficial affect on all performance parameters. The angle 
of attack range for separation free flow substantially increased, 
and the fan face distortion significantly reduced with a correspond- 
ing increase in total pressure recovery. Discrete narrow band 
blade stress peaks which were common to the non blowing 
(baseline) configuration were eradicated with diffuser blowing. 

S.E.S. 

N79-27096*/|/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

INFLUENCE OP OPTIMIZED LEADING-EDGE DEFLECTION 
AND GEOMETRIC ANHEDRAL ON THE LOW-SPEED 
AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A LOW-ASPECT- 
RATIO HIGHLY SWEPT ARROW-WING CONFIGURATION 

Paul L. Coe. Jr. and Jarret K. Huffman Jun. 1979 53 p refs 
(NASA-TM-80083) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF A01 CSCL 
01A 

An investigation conducted in the Langley 7 by 10 foot 
tunnel to determine the influence of an optimized leading-edge 
deflection on the low speed aerodynamic performance of a 
configuration with a low aspect ratio, highly swept wing. The 
sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative to geometric anhedral 
was also studied, the optimized leading edge deflection was 
developed by aligning the leading edge with the incoming flow 
along the entire span. Owing to the spanwise variation of unwdsh, 
the resulting optimized leading edge was a smooth, continuously 
warped surface for which the deflection varied from 16 deg at 
the side of body to 50 deg at the wing tip. For the particular 
configuration studied, levels of leading-edge suction on the order 
of 90 percent were achieved. The results of tests conducted to 
determine the sensitivity of the lateral stability derivative to 
geometric anhedral indicate values which are in reasonable 
agreement with estimates provided by simple vortex-lattice 
theories. J.M.S. 

N79-27096*^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va. 

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF A FINITE DIFFERENCE 
METHOD FOR CALCULATING UNSTEADY TRANSONIC 
POTENTIAL FLOW 

Robert M. Bennett and Samuel R. Bland Jun. 1979 22 p 

refs Presented at AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS Struct., Structural 
Dyn.. and Mater. Conf., St. Louis. 4-6 Apr. 1979 
(NASA-TM-80105; AIAA-PAPER-79-0768) Avail: NTIS 
HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 01A 

A method for calculating transonic flow over steady and 
oscillating airfoils was developed by Isogai. The full potential 
equation is solved with a semi-implicit, time-marching, finite 
difference technique. Steady flow solutions are obtained from 
time asymptotic solutions for a steady airfoil. Corresponding 
oscillatory solutions are obtained by initiating an oscillation and 
marching in time for several cycles until a converged periodic 
solution is achieved. The method is described in general terms 
and results for the case of an airfoil with an oscillating flap are 
presented for Mach numbers 0.500 and 0.875. Although 
satisfactory results are obtained for some reduced frequencies, 
it is found that the numerical technique generates spurious 
oscillations in the indicial response functions and in the variation 
of the aerodynamic coefficients with reduced frequency. These 
oscillations are examined with a dynamic data reduction method 
to evaluate their effects and trends with reduced frequency and 
Mach number. Further development of the numerical method is 
needed to eliminate these oscillations. S.E.S. 

N79-27097*j|( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton, Va. 


A FUGHT INVESTIGATION OF BASIC PERFORMANCE 
CHARACTERISTICS OF A TEETERING-ROTOR ATTACK 
HELICOPTER 

Charles E. K. Morris, Jr. Jun. 1979 114 p refs Sponsored 

in part by the US Army Aviation Research and Development 
Command. Hampton. Va. 

(NASA-TM-801 12) Avail: NTIS HCA06/MFA01 CSCL 
01A 

Flight data were obtained with an instrumented AH- 16 
helicopter having uninstrumented, standard main-rotor blades. The 
data are presented to facilitate the analysis of data taken when 
the same vehicle was flown with instrumented main-rotor blades 
built with new airfoils. Test results include data on performance, 
flight-state parameters, pitch-link loads and blade angles for level 
flight,' descending turns and pull-ups. Flight test procedures and 
the effects of both trim variations and transient phenomena on 
the data are discussed. Author 

N79-27098*/j( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center, Hampton. Va. 

AN EXPLORATORY INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF 
A PLASTIC COATING ON THE PROFILE DRAG OF A 
PRACTICAL-METAL-CONSTRUCTION SAILPLANE AIR- 
FOIL 

Dan M. Somers and Jean M. Foster Jul. 1979 34 p refs 
(NASA-TM-80092: L-11623) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 
CSCL OlA > 

The Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine 
the effect of a plastic coating on the profile drag of a practical- 
metal-construction sailplane airfoil was investigated. The model 
was tested with three surface configurations: (1) filled, painted, 
and sanded smooth; (2) rough bare metal; and (3) plastic-coated. 
The results are compared with data for the design airfoil 
(Wortmann FX 67-K-1 70/ 1 7) from another low-turbulence wind 
tunnel. The investigation was conducted at Reynolds numbers 
based on airfoil chord of 1.1 x 10 to the 6th power. 2.2 x 10 
to the 6th power, and 3.3 x 10 to the 6th power at a Mach 
number of 0.10. A.R.H. 


N79-27099*/^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton, Va. 

PRESSURE DISTRIBUTIONS ON THREE DIFFERENT 
CRUCIFORM AFT-TAIL CONTROL SURFACES OF A 
WINGLESS MISSILE AT MACH 1.60, 2.36, AND 3.70 
VOLUME 1: TRAPEZOIDAL TAIL 

Milton Lamb, Wallace C, Sawyer, Donald L. Wassum. and C. 
Donald Babb Aug. 1979 345 p 

(NASA-TM-80097; L-12993) Avail; NTIS HC A15/MF AOl 
CSCL 01A 

The results of pressure distribution tests conducted in the 
Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel are presented. The data were 
obtained for three sets of cruciform aft-tail control surfaces on 
a wingless missile model at Mach numbers of 1.60, 2.36, and 
3.70 for angles of attack from -4 degrees to 20 degrees, model 
roll angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees, and tail deflections 
of 0 degrees and 15 degrees. The test Reynolds number used 
was 6.6 million per meter. Author 

N79-27100*/5I National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Ames Research Center. Moffett Field, Calif. 

LEADING-EDGE SLAT OPTIMIZATION FOR MAXIMUM 
AIRFOIL LIFT 

Lawrence E. Olson, Phillip R. McGowan (Computer Sci. Corp.. 
Mountain View, Calif.), and Clayton J. Guest (Computer Sci. 
Corp., Mountain View. Calif.) Jul. 1979 28 p refs 
(NASA-TM-78566; A-7753) Avail; NTIS HC A03/MF A01 
CSCL 01A 

A numerical procedure for determining the position (horizontal 
location, vertical location, and deflection) of a leading edge slat 
that maximizes the lift of multielement airfoils is presented. The 
structure of the flow field is calculated by iteratively coupling 
potential flow and boundary layer analysis. This aerodynamic 
calculation is combined with a constrained function minimization 
analysis to determine the position of a leading edge slat so that 
the suction peak on the nose of the main airfoil Is minized. The 


547 



N79 27101 


slat position is constrained by the numerical procedure to ensure 
an attached boundary layer on the upper surface of the slat 
and to ensure negligible interaction between the slat wake and 
the boundary layer on the upper surface of the main airfoil. The 
highest angle attack at which this optimized slat position can 
maintain attached flow on the main airfoil defines the optimum 
slat position for maximum lift. The design method is demonstrated 
for an airfoil equipped with a leading-edge slat and a trailing 
edge, single-slotted flap. The theoretical results are compared 
with experimental data, obtained in the Ames 40 by 80 Foot 
Wind Tunnel, to verify experimentally the predicted slat position 
for maximum lift. The exp^lmentally optimized slat position is 
in good~agreement with the theoretical prediction, indicating that 
the theoretical procedure is a feasible design method. Author 

N79-27101# Flow Research. Inc., Kent. Wash. 

NUMERICAL EVALUATION OF TRANSONIC EQUIVALENCE 
RULE 

M. M. Hafez Sep. 1978 56 p refs 
(Contract N00014-76-C-0880) 

(AD-A067902; FLOW-RR-127) Avail: NTIS 

HC A04/MF A01 CSCL 20/4 

A numerical investigation was conducted to explore the 
applicability of the transonic equivalence rule. It is shown that 
for wings of small leading edge sweep angle, departure from 
Whitcomb-Oswatitsch area rule is significant. For sufficiently large 
or moderate leading edge sweep-angle, however, the agreement 
is satisfactory. Drag-rise and outer flow field calculations are 
presented for a number of cases and their equivalent bodies. 
Nonlinear lift corrections to the classical area rule are examined. 
There seems to be a surprisingly good agreement between 
calculated flows around equivalent wing-body combinations with 
the same wing planform for cases with appreciable lift. 

Author (GRA) 

N79-27103/^ Technische Univ., Berlin {West Germany). Inst, 
fuer Luft und Raumfahrt. 

LEE SIDE FLOW FIELD OVER SLENDER DELTA WINGS 
OF FINITE THICKNESS [LEESEITEN STROEMUNG BEI 
SCHLANKEN DELTAFLUEGELN ENDLICHER DICKE] 

Joachim Czodruch 1977 150 p refs In GERMAN: ENGLISH 

summary 

(lLR-23; ISBN-3-7983-0597-8) Avail; NTIS 

HC A07/MF A01 

An experimental and theoretical investigation was carried 
out to determine the lee side flow field over delta wings at 
supersonic speeds. The experiments were performed with models 
of the same slenderness s/I = 0.3, but of different cross-section 
shape. The known types of flow, separated by the Stanbrook- 
Squire boundary into leading edge and shock induced separation 
were been verified. However, further types of flow exist and a 
detailed survey of the boundaries is necessary. The influence of 
the cross sectional shape on the lee side flow is discussed for 
the thick wing inside the region of shock induced separation. 
Parameters such as wedge angle at the center line, angle between 
upper and lower surface, and the lower side shape are considered. 
A theoretical method to describe the flow field is outlined 
where boundary conditions as a result of the experimental study 
are needed. The computed flow field with shock induced separation 
is satisfactory. Author (ESA) 


N79-27107/^ Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt (West Ger- 
many). Inst, fuer Flugtechnik. 

WIND TUNNEL MEASUREMENTS OF DYNAMIC DERIVA- 
TIVES IN THE GERMAN FEDERAL REPUBLIC [WINDKAN- 
ALMESSUNG DYNAMISCHER DERIVATIVA IN DER 
BUNDES REPUBUK DEUTSCHLAND] 

Xaver Hafer. Otto Determann. and Juergen Oser 2 May 1978 
31 p refs In GERMAN Sponsored by Deut. Forschungsgemein- 
schaft 

(IFD-5-78) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 

The oscillatory and rotary derivative balances employed are 
described. Test results obtained with identical models in different 
wind tunnels using different dynarr.ic balances are compared. 
Results obtained with a simple standard test appear to be 


sufficiently accurate and reproducible. Furthermore, agreement 
between wind tunnel and flight measurements is good. Emphasis 
is given to the significance of simple dynamic derivatives for 
the dynamic behavior of various aircraft. Author (ESA) 

N79-27109||f Aeronautical Research Inst, of Sweden. Stockholm. 
Aerodynamics Dept. 

INVESTIGATIONS OF INTERFERENCE EFFECTS IN A WIND 
TUNNEL CAUSED BY A MODEL SUPPORT STRUT ON A 
REFLECTION PLANE MOUNTED HALF MODEL 
M.S. Theais - Roy. Inst, of Technol.. Stockholm 

Olle Lindau and Bertil Braennstroem 1978 95 p re^s 
(Contract FMV-FK-82223-76-002-21 -001 ) 

(FFA-TN-AU- 1335:2) Avail: NTIS HC A05/MF AOl 

A theoretical and experimental investigation of the interfer- 
ence effects in a wind tunnel, caused by the support strut for 
complete models, on the flow around a reflection-plane mounted 
half model was made. The theoretical part consisted of a computer 
simulation of the flow around a half model in the wind tunnel 
with and without the support strut. The experimental part consisted 
of wind tunnel tests with a 1:25 scale model in the 0.5 x 
0.5 sq m transonic wind tunnel S5 at Mach numbers from 0.5 
to 0.975. Three different struts were investigated. The theoretical 
estimates of the interference loads at small incidence agree well 
with the measured values. The effects are in general small 
except at higher angles of attack where the effects increase. 
This is especially noticeable in the pitching moment, resulting in 
the earlier occurrence of the pitch-up. Author (ESA) 

N79-27110/^ Aeronautical Research Inst, of Sweden, Stockholm. 
Aerodynamics Dept. 

CALCULATION OF PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION FOR A 
WING-BODY COMBINATION AT SUBSONIC MACH 
NUMBERS Final Report 

Sven Hedman 1978 49 p refs 
(Contract FMV-FK-82223-73-009-730906) 

(FFA-TN-AU-1091) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 

Calculation of pressure distribution on a simple wing-body 
combination was performed at subsonic Mach numbers 0.1, 0.5, 
0.7 and 0.8 for 0 deg and 5,73 deg angles of attack with a 
method derived from the Woodward panel method. These results 
were compared with two other computational methods, one being 
a surface panel method and the other a method based on 
Truckenbrodt lifting surface theory. Comparisons between the 
three computational procedures show good agreement. 

Author (ESA) 

N79-27113*# Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Long Beach. Calif. 

THE 1990 SYSTEM CHARACTERISTICS AND REQUIRE- 
MENTS 

In its Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS), Vol. 3 
Oct. 1978 p 1-64 

Avail. NTIS HC A17/MF AOl CSCL 01C 

Potential future developments that may occur in the air. 
truck, rail, and sea transportation industries were identified. 
Technological and operational developments were qualitatively 
evaluated for their potential effect upon the vehicle and institutional 
characteristics of the respective modes. Also identified were the 
multiplicity of cross impacts that must be considered when 
viewing air cargo as an integrated transport system. R.E.S. 

N79-271 Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Long Beach, Calif. 

AIRFREIGHT FORECASTING METHODOLOGY AND 
RESULTS 

In its Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Vol. 3 
Oct. 1978 p 65-132 

Avail: NTIS HC A17/MF AOl CSCL 01C 

A series of econometric behavioral equations was developed 
to explain and forecast the evolution of airfreight traffic demand 
for the total U.S. domestic airfreight system, the total U.S. 
international airfreight system, and the total scheduled interna- 
tional cargo traffic carried by the top 44 foreign airlines. The 
basic explanatory variables used in these macromodels were 
the real gross national products of the countries involved and a 


548 



N79 27127 


measure of relative transportation costs. The results of the 
econometric analysis reveal that the models explain more than 
99 percent of the historical evolution of freight traffic. The long 
term traffic forecasts generated with these models are based on 
scenarios of the likely economic outlook in the United States 
and 31 major foreign countries. R.E-.S. 

N79-27115*j^ Douglas Aircraft Co.. Inc.. Long Beach. Calif. 
THE 1990 DIRECT SUPPORT INFRASTRUCTURE 
//7 its Cargo Logistics Airlift Systems Study (CLASS). Vol. 3 
Oct. 1978 p 133-351 

Avail; NTIS HC A17/MF A01 CSCL01C 

The airport and cargo terminal were individually analyzed in 
depth as the principal direct infrastructure components having 
cross impacts with aircraft carrying cargo. Containerization was 
also addressed in depth as an infrastructure component since it 
categorically is linked with and cross impacted by the aircraft, 
the cargo terminal, the surface transport system, the shipper 
and consignee, and the actual cargo being moved. R.E.S. 

N79-27116/|( Lockheed- California Co.. Burbank. 

SUMMARY OF RESULTS FOR A TWIN-ENGINE, LOW-WING 
AIRPLANE SUBSTRUCTURE CRASH IMPACT CONDITION 
ANALYZED WITH PROGRAM KRASH Final Report. Jul. 
1978 - Jan. 1979 

G. L. Wittlin Jan. 1979 122 p refs 
(Contract D0T-FA75WA-3707) 

(AO-A069171; LR-28869: FAA-R D -79- 1 3) Avail; NTIS 
HC A06/MF A01 CSCL 01/3 

The results of using digital computer program KRASH to 
model and analyze the dynamic response of a twin-engine, 
low-wing airplane substructure subjected to a 27.5 ft/sec vertical 
velocity impact are reported. The test was performed previously 
by NASA- Langley as part of a joint FAA-NASA effort concerning 
general aviation airplane crash dynamics. A mathematical model 
description, pertinent test data, a comparison of analysis versus 
test results and the results of a limited parameter sensitivity 
using program KRASH are included. Floor and occupant pelvis 
vertical acceleration responses obtained from test measurement 
are compared to corresponding analytical results. The effect of 
model representation and input data selection variations on 
dynamic behavior are evaluated. S.E.S. 

N79-27118# Mitre Corp.. McLean. Va. Metrek Div. 

DEFINITION, DESCRIPTION, AND INTERFACES OF THE 
FAA'S DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAMS. VOLUME 2: ATC 
FACILITIES AND INTERFACES Final Report 

P. 0. Dodge. T. R. Simpson, W. F. Potter, G. G. Beeker, H. P. 
Guerber. J. C. Fowlkes, and F. S. Keblawi Sep. 1978 436 p 

refs 

(Contract DOT-FA79WA-41 84) 

(AD-A068401; MTR -7904-Vol-2; FAA-EM -78- 1 6-2-Vol-2) 
Avail: NTIS HC A19/MF A01 CSCL 17/7 

The evolution of the air traffic control system facilities is 
described. Major system improvements currently being developed 
by the FAA are also described. Information flow between facilities 
is emphasized. R.E.S. 


N79-27119)j( Lincoln Lab.. Mass. Inst, of Tech., Lexington. 

DISCRETE ADDRESS BEACON SYSTEM (DABS) AIR 
TRAFFIC CONTROL RADAR BEACON SYSTEM (ATCRBS) 
INTERFERENCE ANALYSIS Final Report 

J. D. Welch and W. H. Harman 27 Nov. 1978 87 p refs 

Prepared for DOT 

(Contract DOT-FA72WAI-261 ; F19628-78-C-0002) 
(AD-A068565: FAA-RD-78-147) Avail: NTIS 

HC A05/MF A01 CSCL 17/7 

The Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) of the Air 
Traffic Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS) is provided to 
improve the surveillance and data link service to suitably equipped 
aircraft operating on the same ATCRBS frequencies. The 
assumptions, models, and system operation necessary to assess 
the potential interference effects of DABS on ATCRBS are 
presented. S.E.S. 


N79-27124^ Fondazione Ugo Bordoni, Rome (Italy). 

THEORY AND EXPERIMENTS ON PRECISION L BAND 
DME 

Franco Chiarini (FACE Standard. Pomezia. Italy). Gabriele 
Falciasecca (Bologne Univ.). and Danio Graziani (FACE Standard. 
Milan) Dec. 1977 25 p refs 
(FUB-44-1977) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01 

A preliminary report is given on studies and experiments 
conducted on the problems of increasing the accuracy of existing 
DME systems for use with microwave landing systems (MLS). 
Studies made on multipath errors suggested the use of a computer 
model which includes the area, the airport, and the receiver 
model. A mathematical expression of the receiver model is given. 
Improvement in accuracy can be obtained if the processing of 
many measurements is adapted to estimating the aircraft position. 
This procedure, however, was proved to reduce only the errors 
due to the electronic equipment. An example of a simple data 
processing procedure is given. The relationship between shape 
and frequency spectrum of a pulse was aniayzed. A pulse 
synthesizer built to facilitate the generation of special pulse shapes 
is described. Results of these investigations are given. 

Author (ESA) 

N79-27126*j^ Princeton Univ., N. J. Dept, of Mechanical 
and Aerospace Engineering. 

THE INFLUENCE OF FEEDBACK ON THE AEROELASTIC 
BEHAVIOR OF TILT PROPROTOR AIRCRAFT INCLUDING 
THE EFFECTS OF FUSELAGE MOTION Final Technical 
Report, 1 Sep. 1976 - 31 Jan. 1978 

H. C. Curtiss. Jr.. T. Komatsuzaki. and J. J. Traybar Jul. 1979 
176 p refs 
(Grant NsG-2181) 

(NASA-CR-158778; TR-1441) Avail; NTIS HC A09/MF AOl 
CSCL 01 C 

The influence of single loop feedbacks to improve the stability 
of the system are considered. Reduced order dynamic models 
are employed where appropriate to promote physical insight. 
The influence of fuselage freedom on the aeroelastic stability, 
and the influence of the airframe flexibility on the low frequency 
modes of motion relevant to the stability and control characteristics 
of the vehicle were examined. S.E.S. 


N79-27^26*§ Northrop Corp.. Hawthorne. Calif. 

YF-17/ADEN SYSTEM STUDY Final Report 

N. S. Gowadia, W. D. Bard, and W. H. Wooten (General Electric 
Co.) Jul. 1979 160 p refs 

(Contract NAS4-2499) 

(NASA-CR-144882) Avail: NTIS HC A08/MF AOl CSCL 
01C 

The YF-17 aircraft was evaluated as a candidate nonaxisym- 
metric nozzle flight demonstrator. Configuration design modifica- 
tions. control system design, flight performance assessment, and 
program plan and cost we are summarized. Two aircraft 
configurations were studied. The first was modified as required 
to install only the augmented deflector exhaust nozzle (ADEN). 
The second one added a canard installation to take advantage 
of the full (up to 20 deg) nozzle vectoring capability. Results 
indicate that: (1) the program is feasible and can be accomplished 
at reasonable cost and low risk; (2) installation of ADEN increases 
the aircraft weight by 600 kg (1325 lb); (3) the control system 
can be modified to accomplish direct lift, pointing capability, 
variable static margin and deceleration modes of operation; 
(4) unvectored thrust-minus-drag is similar to the baseline YF-17; 
and (5) vectoring does not improve maneuvering performance. 
However, some potential benefits in direct lift, aircraft pointing, 
handling at low dynamic pressure and takeoff/landing ground 
roll are available. A 27 month program with 12 months of flight 
test is envisioned, with the cost estimated to be $15.9 million 
for the canard equipped aircraft and $13.2 million for the version 
without canard. The feasiblity of adding a thrust reverser to the 
YF-17/ ADEN was investigated. S.E.S. 

N79 27127/^ Pacer Systems. Inc.. Arlington. Va. 

REVIEW OF AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS FOR CERTI- 


549 



N79-27128 


FiCATION OF HELICOPTERS FOR INSTRUMENT FLIGHT 
RULES (IFR) OPERATION Final Report. Apr. 1977 - Jun. 
1978 

J. J. Traybar. D. L Green, and A. G. DeLucien Feb. 1979 
245 p refs 

(Contract DOT-FA77WA-3966) 

(AD-A068397; PAR-007-79; FAA-RD-78-157) Avail: NTIS 
HC A11/MF A01 CSCL 01/3 

A review of current technology, existing data applicable to 
Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)helicopter operation and certifica- 
tion procedures was accomplished. Identification of specific 
airworthiness requrements for helicopters operating in IFR 
conditions was studied and special attention was given to aircrew 
manning configurations, pilot flight control workloads, helicopter 
trim, static stability, dynamic stability, handling qualities, analysis 
of time history data and documentation procedures, augmentation 
systems, autopilots and a review of certain flight test techniques. 
An analysis was made of the numerous helicopters recently 
certified for IFR flight in order to establish the various systems 
uutilized including avionics systems, display systems and autopilot 
type systems. Special emphasis was centered on the study of 
the most critical IFR flight phases depicted by high workload 
cruise conditions and marginal stability conditions. Author 


N79-27128/^ Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage. N.Y. System 
Sciences. 

THE COMPUTATION OF OPTIMAL AIRCRAFT TRAJECTO- 
RIES 

H. G. Moyer Jul. 1979 65 p refs 
(RE-577) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF A01 

An aircraft trajectory optimization computer program that 
was used successfully at Grumman for a variety of problems 
over a period of many years is described. Three airplanes are 
simulated: the F-14. F-15. and Advanced Tactical Fighter. The 
trajectories are in three dimensions over a flat earth. Optimization 
is achieved by means of the conjugate gradient variational 
technique. Inequality constraints on the path and equality 
constraints on the final point are satisfied by penalty integrals 
and penalty functions, respectively. The equality constraints can 
be satisfied to the limit of computer accuracy by a technique 
that avoids increases in the penalty function constants. M.M.M. 


H79-27M9§ McDonnell Aircraft Co., St. Louis. Mo. 

AIRCRAFT HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS DYNAMIC ANALYSIS 
Final Report. 18 Feb. 1977 - 30 Sep. 1978 

H. DeGarcia. J. B. Greene. R. J. Levek, and N. J. Pierce Jan. 
1978 356 p refs 

(Contract F3361 5-74-C-201 6: AF Proj. 3145) 

(AD-A067549; AFAPL-TR-78-77) Avail: NTIS 

HC A15/MF A01 CSCL 13/7 

This report describes the continued development and test 
verification of digital computer models used to simulate hydraulic 
systems under dynamic conditions. Frequency and transient 
models of a variable delivery vane pump and a fixed displacement 
piston-type hydraulic motor are included. Additional verification 
and development of the transient model for the piston-type 
hydraulic pump was accomplished. Verification and development 
of a computer program to describe the mechanical response of 
a hydraulic line to internal excitations from a hydraulic pump 
was begun. This effort was a continuation of the basic contract 
wherein four computer programs for hydraulic system dynamic 
analysis were developed. GRA 

N79-27130# Army Aviation Research and Development 
Command, St. Louis. Mo. 

RAM PROJECTIONS FOR AIRCRAFT ROTOR BLADES Final 
Report 

Israel Nussbaum Apr. 1979 18 p 

(AD-A068822; USAAVR ADCOM-TR-79- 1 6) Avail: NTIS 
HC A02/MF A01 CSCL 01/3 

Data was collected and a comparative analysis was performed 
on the estimated Reliability and Maintainability (RAM) characteris- 
tics of the main rotor blades belonging to two groups of four 
Army aircraft systems each. The first group is composed of 
aircraft in the current Army inventory, while the second consists 


of developmental and PIP aircraft which will be using the new 
composite rotor blades. The study was initiated internally as a 
result of wide discrepancies observed among various aircraft 
programs in the assumptions, definitions and methodologies used 
In projecting rotor blade RAM characteristics. The need became 
apparent to develop and apply a set of factors and criteria that 
could be used to help achieve uniformity, consistency and validity 
in the RAM projections. GRA 

N79-27131/|f Rockwell International Corp.. El Segundo. Calif. 
Los Angeles Div. 

AIRCRAFT TRANSPARENCY FAILURE AND LOGISTICAL 
COST ANALYSIS. VOLUME 1: PROGRAM SUMMARY 

Final Report, Jun. 1977 - Sep. 1978 

S. S. Brown Dec. 1978 67 p refs 
(Contract F3361 5-77-C-3060) 

(AD-A068719: NA-78-604-Vol-1) Avail: NTIS HCA04/MFA01 
CSCL01/3 

The concern for increasing costs in the maintenance of 
transparency systems has prompted the Air Force Flight Dynamics 
Laboratory to sponsor this study contract. The objective of this 
study is to identify the high-cost, high-maintenance transpar- 
ency components. Identify cause of failures, and recommend 
corrective programs to reduce cost of ownership to the Air Force 
Logistics Command. The study involved the review of 20 selected 
aircraft in current Air Force inventory to establish an extensive 
data base relating to transparency maintenance activity and 
associated logistical support costs. During this study, a collection 
of detailed design characteristics, methods of construction, test 
and qualification, and costing information was assembled. From 
these data, the basis for design improvements were determined. 
The approach used in the identification of candidate improve- 
ments was to focus on the high-cost contributors to maintenance 
and repair. Trade studies were subsequently generated to 
determine the design improvements that resulted in reduced 
logistical costs. The study results are presented in this report. 

GRA 


N79-27134){/ Technische Hochschule, Darmstadt (West Ger- 
many), Inst, fuer Flugtechnik. 

AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH INTO VERTICAL PROBLEMS 
IN V/STOL AIRCRAFT APPROACH LANDING Final Report 
[FLUGMECHANISCHE UNTERSUCHUNG ZUM PROBLEM 
STEILER LANDEANFLUEGE FUER V/STOL FLUGZEUGE] 

Volker Nitsche 18 Aug. 1978 157 p refs In GERMAN 

Sponsored by Deut. Forschungsgemeinschaft 
(IFD-4-78) Avail: NTIS HC A08/MF A01 

Take-off and landing behavior of two typical VTOL aircraft 
(jet and propeller driven) were investigated from the noise point 
of view. Various factors (thrust, thrust angle, flap shutter position, 
transition angles, etc.) influence noise. A digital computer 
simulation program was used to define a noise protected zone. 
Certain criteria must be satisfied, such as minimum fuel 
consumption, minimum take-off time, and minmum noise. In all 
cases, other then the landing of VTOL propeller craft (where 
fuel consumption is minimum and noise optimum), increasing 
excess take-off thrust enlarges the noise protected zone. Air 
temperature and humidity must be taken into account if reliable 
results are to be obtained. Author (ESA) 

N79-27135# National Aerospace Lab.. Amsterdam (Netherlands). 
Div. of Structure and Materials. 

THE REQUIREMENT OF DAMAGE TOLERANCE. AN 
ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TOLERANCE REQUIREMENTS 
WITH SPECIFIC REFERENCE TO MIL-A-83444 

J. B. deJonge 16 Jan. 1978 33 p refs Sponsored by the 

Dept, of Civil Aviation (RLA) 

(NLR-TR-77005-U) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF A01 

Various aspects of damage tolerance are discussed with 
specific reference to a recently issued USAF detailed damage 
tolerance specification. Main criteria stipulate that if a crack occurs 
the aircraft structure should be able to sustain a reasonably 
high load in cracked condition. It is concluded that USAF 
specifications will stimulate the development of improved 
manufacturing techniques, although it will tend to favor non- 
inspectable slow-crack propagation structures rather than easily 


550 ' 


N79 27148 


inspectable fail-safe structures. It is also felt that USAF 
requirements are not well suited to civil needs. Author (ESA) 


N79-27136*/^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Ames Research Center. Moffett Field. Calif. 

AN ADVANCED COCKPIT INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEM: 
THE COORDINATED COCKPIT DISPLAY 

D. L Baty and M. L Watkins (San Jose State Univ.) Jul. 
1979 22 p refs 

(NASA-TM-78559; A-7733) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01 
CSCL 01 D 

Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) and computer technologies are 
described In one approach to the replacement of flight instruments 
using three separate color CRT's. Each CRT display information 
pertinent to one of the three orthogonal projections of the aircraft 
flight situation. Three airline pilot's assessment of the display 
set is presented. Comments, rankings, and ratings show that 
the pilots accepted the concept of pictorial flight displays. S.E.S. 


N79-27137j^ Naval Postgraduate School. Monterey. Calif. 
APPUCATION OF COLOR-CODING IN AIRBORNE TACTI- 
CAL DISPLAYS M.S. Thesis 

Hilton L. Conner. Jr. Mar. 1979 96 p refs 
(AD-A067558) Avail: NTIS HC A05/MF AOl CSCL 15/1 
This thesis analyzes the operational environment and task 
variables of the Tactical Coordinator in the S-3A for possible 
application of color coding in the display symbology in the 
multi-purpose display. Beginning with the ASW threat to the 
carrier force under the CV concept, the missions of the S-3A 
are presented. The roles, tasks and functions of the Tactical 
coordinator are identified and form the basis for an analysis of 
the need of color in airborne displays. Current display design 
requirements and discrepancies in the S-3A are discussed as a 
basis for areas of color application. Color research recently 
conducted is reviewed with the results directed toward the 
symbology currently used in airborne displays. Author (GRA) 

N79-27 138*1^ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif. 

AERODYNAMICS OF A TILT-NACELLE V/STOL PROPUL- 
SION SYSTEM 

Mark D. Betzina and Michael D. Falarski Jun. 1979 18 p 

refs Presented at Workshop of V/STOL Aerodynamics. Monterey. 
Calif., May 1979 

(NASA-TM-78606: A-7849) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl 
CSCL 21 E 

Tests were performed in the Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind 
Tunnel on a large-scale, tilt-nacelle V/STOL propulsion system 
to determine its aerodynamic characteristics. Unpowered nacelle 
aerodynamics and power induced effects over an angle of 
attack range from 0 to 105 deg are presented. It is shown 
that: (1) the characteristics of the unpowered nacelle can be 
estimated with annular airfoil data. (2) the power-induced effects 
on the nacelle aerodynamics are significant, and (3) pitching 
moment can be correlated with lift and thrust. S.E.S. 

N79-27139j|f Rolls-Royce Ltd.. Derby (England). 

ENGINE PERFORMANCE CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE 
LARGE SUBSONIC TRANSPORT 

B. Wrigley 1969 28 p Lecture given at the Von Karrfian 

Inst.. Brussels. 23 Apr. 1969 
Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF AOl 

The importance of the design point parameters for a 
subsonic aircraft and the factors influencing off design perform- 
ance. including computer matching are presented. Noise reducing 
features, such as the single fan stage was examined. M.M.M. 


N79-27140*fj( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. 

TURBINE ENGINE ALTITUDE CHAMBER AND FLIGHT 
TESTING WITH LIQUID HYDROGEN 

E. William Conrad 1979 22 p refs Presented at the Intern. 
DGLR/DFVLR Symp. on Hydrogen in Air Transportation. Stuttgart. 


11-14 Sep. 1979 

(NASA-TM-79196: E-062) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl 
CSCL21E 

Flight engine experiments using liquid hydrogen fuel were 
reviewed. A few implications of the results to modern turbine 
engines are presented. A subsequent contract dealing with a 
positive displacement pump operating on liquid hydrogen is 
discussed, and some aspects of liquid hydrogen propellant systems, 
reflected by rocket booster experience are treated. S.E.S. 

National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center. Cleveland. Ohio 
ENERGY EFFICIENT AIRCRAFT ENGINES 
Roger Chamberlin and Brent Miller 1979 21 p refs Presented 
at Aircraft Systems Meeting. New York. 20-22 Aug. 1979; 
sponsored by AIAA 

(NASA-TM-79204; E-089) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 
21E 

The three engine programs that constitute the propulsion 
portion of NASA's Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program are 
described, their status indicated, and anticipated improvements 
in SFC discussed. The three engine programs are (1) Engine 
Component Improvement-directed at current engines, (2) Energy 
Efficiency Engine directed at new turbofan engines, and 
(3) Advanced Turboprops-directed at technology for advanced 
turboprop-powered aircraft with cruise speeds to Mach 0.8. 
Unique propulsion system interactive ties to the airframe resulting 
from engine design features to reduce fuel consumption are 
discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advanced turboprop since 
it offers the largest poetntial fuel savings of the three propulsion 
programs and also has the strongest interactive ties to the 
airframe. Author 

N79-27143*jj( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center. Cleveland. Ohio. 

PERFORMANCE OF TWO-STAGE FAN HAVING LOW- 
ASPECT-RATIO FIRST-STAGE ROTOR BLADING 

Donald C. Urasek. William T. Gorrell (Army Aviation Res. and 
Develop. Command, Cleveland), and Walter S. Cunnan Aug. 
1979 132 p Prepared m cooperation with US Army Aviation 

Research and Development Command. Cleveland 
(NASA-TP-1493; AVRADCOM-TR-78-49; E-9237) Avail: NTIS 
HC A07/MF AOl CSCL 21 E 

The NASA two stage fan was tested with a low aspect 
ratio first stage rotor having no midspan dampers. At design 
speed the fan achieved an adiabatic design efficiency of 0.846, 
and peak efficiencies for the first stage and rotor of 0.870 and 
0.906. respectively. Peak efficiency occurred very close to the 
stall line. In an attempt to improve stall margin, the fan was 
retested yyith circumferentially grooved casing treatment and with 
a series of stator blade resets. Results showed no improvement 
in stall margin with casing treatment but increased to 8 percent 
with stator blade reset. Author 

N79-27144^ Naval Postgraduate School. Monterey, Calif. 

DESIGN OF SHOCK-FREE TRANSONIC FLOW IN TURBO- 
MACHINERY Technical Report, 20 Jun. 1978 - 16 Aug. 
1978 

Helmut Sobieczky Nov. 1978 42 p refs 

(AD-A067703, NPS67-78-005) Avail: NTIS 

HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 20/4 

A now design method for transonic flow in turbomachinery 
is described. The idea is based on the author's previous experience 
with hodograph methods but* carried out in physical space. If 
combined with a flow analysis code the new method can be 
used as a design/analysis tool. Results illustrating this procedure 
are given for two dimerisional flow through cascades and past 
airfoils. Existing configurations can be made shock-free by 
computational modifications which are limited to that portion of 
the design shape which is wetted by supersonic flow. 

Author (GRA) 


N79-27l48|jf Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and 
Development. Neuilly-Sur-Selne (France). 

STRESSES, VIBRATIONS, STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION 


551 



N79-27149 


AND ENGINE INTEGRITY (INCLUDING AEROELASTICITY 
AND FLUTTER) 

Apr. 1979 494 p refs In ENGLISH and FRENCH Presented 

at the Propulsion and Energetics Panel's 52d Meeting. Cleveland, 
Ohio. 23-28 Oct. 1978 

(AGARD-CP-248; ISBN-92-835-0235-3) Avail: NTIS 

HC A21/MF AOl 

Experimental stress analysis, stress analysis techniques-life 
prediction, and engine structural integrity-vibration, containment 
are covered. Also, engine-airframe integration/compatibility and 
aeroelasticity and flutter are included. 


N79-27149j(( Avco Lycoming Div.. Stratford. Conn. 

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF A GAS TURBINE IMPELLER 
USING FINITE-ELEMENT AND HOLOGRAPHIC TECH- 
NIQUES 

Peter S. Kuo and Kenneth S. CoHinge /n AGARD Stresses, 
Vibrations. Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity {Including 
Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 15 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

A rigorous finite element structural analysis method is 
presented which, combined with the holographic technique, deals 
with the highly stressed, curved vanes and the vibration of the 
flexible circular backplate so that the magnitude and the pattern 
of static, dynamic, and thermal loadings can be improved. The 
method demonstrates a computerized procedure for the design 
of a modern centrifugal impeller. Holography used as a means 
for determining the dynamic behavior of the engine component 
offers an accurate experimental measurement of natural 
frequencies and modes. The interference fringe pattern represen- 
ting the contours of equal surface displacement provides a 
permanent record for vibration amplitude evaluation. Compar- 
ison between the theoretical and the experimental results is 
made. J.M.S. 

N79-27150}^ Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 
Villeurbanne (France). Lab. de Mechanique des Structures. 

THE ANALYSIS OF ENGINE VIBRATIONS [ANALYSE DES 
VIBRATIONS DE MOTEUR] 

Michel Lalanne, Philippe Trompette. Remy Henry, and Guy Ferraris 
In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. 
Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 13 p 

refs In FRENCH 
Avail; NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The control of the vibrations of a structure is generally achieved 
at some stage of the project by the theoretical determination of 
frequencies and modes. The principal elements of an aircraft 
engine, for practical purposes, can be classed in three categories: 
compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine. These elements 
are fixed, or in rotation and are then under the Coriolis effect, 
and at a supplementary softening i ntrod uced by centrifugal force. 
fheTalcuiation of thick and thin blades, of 'axisymmetric systems 
in rotation, and of disk-blade assemblies is reviewed. Once the 
prototype of the engine is constructed, it can withstand troubling 
frequencies, and instead of making structural modifications 
designed to displace these frequencies, damping materials can 
be selected to provide sufficient reduction in the amplitude of 
the resonance. The calculation of these types of damped structures 
is outlined: the finite element method is used. The diverse types 
of calculations performed in the study of frequencies and modes, 
and in predicting the damping introduced by the addition of 
materials, are illustrated by applications to the motor elements. 

Transl. bv A.R.H. 

N79-27161/^ General Electric Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. Aircraft 
Engine Group. 

AIRCRAFT ENGINE DESIGN USING EXPERIMENTAL 
STRESS ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES 

Bernard L. Koff /n AGARD Stresses, Vibrations, Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 12 p 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

A perspective of prominent experimental techniques used in 
current aircraft engine stress analyses is given. The verification 


of temperature, stress, steady state and dynamic deformation, 
pressure, and fatigue strength is addressed. Advancements in 
instrumentation are described, including: high-energy X-rays and 
high durability strain gages: computers and software to reduce 
vast amounts of data: increased photoelastic capabilities: and 
advancements for reproducing loading and environmental 
conditions in laboratory component tests. J.M.S. 

N79-27153# Motoren- und Turbinen-Union Muenchen G.m.b.H. 
(West Germany). 

A CONTRIBUTION ON THERMAL FATIGUE IN COOLED 
TURBINE BLADING 

W. Peschel and R. Schreieck In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations. 
Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and 
Flutter) Apr. 1979 10 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

Thermal fatigue, an important criterion for predicting the life 
of cooled turbine blading. Is caused by thermal stresses which 
arise from local inhibition of thermal expansion and which are 
not amenable to direct measurement. In the case of turbine 
blading, temperature distribution in the mean section of the blade 
can readily be dealt with as a problem of heat conduction in a 
plane. For stress calculation, it is assumed that the cross section 
remains plane. Stresses in the sectional plane and normal stresses 
in the direction of blade span re^lt, the latter being the dominant 
ones. For thermal fatigue test conditions, stress and strain profiles 
in the blade are calculated using measured and calculated 
temperature distributions. Non-elastic material behavior (creep) 
is taken into account. In the thermal fatigue tests, the pattern 
of damage vary with superimposed external stresses: this behavior 
is explained in the light of the calculated stress-strain cycles. 

J.M.S. 

N79-27164/|^ Societe Nationale d'Etude et de Construction de 
Moteurs d'Aviation, Villaroche (France). 

FORECASTING ENGINE LIFE [PREVISION DE LA DUREE 
DE VIE DES MOTEURS] 

D. Grandoulier In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 10 p In FRENCH 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The compromise between light weight and endurance for 
aircraft gas turbine engines requires the precise prediction of 
the durability of the engine parts. Those parts whose rupture 
threatens the integrity of the engine must be rated to meet two 
criteria; the initiation of a crack must be avoided during the 
predicted life of the part, and a flaw not detected during a 
general inspection must not develop to a critical point before 
the next inspection. A turbine disk is used to present a method 
for predicting low cycle fatigue life and for showing the importance 
of knowing the behavior laws of materials. Transl. by A.R.H. 

N79-27156^ AiResearch Mfg. Co., Phoenix. Ariz. 
THREE-DIMENSIONAL FINITE-ELEMENT TECHNIQUES 
FOR GAS TURBINE BLADE LIFE PREDICTION 

M. R. Peterson, R. G. Alderson, R. J. Stockton, and D. J. Tree 
In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. 
Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 14 p 

refs 

(Contract F33615-74-C-2012) 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The use of three dimensional finite element analyses in 
conjunction with test derived data to predict the vibratory fatigue 
life of turbine blades is described. Vibratory strain measurements 
are interpreted and extended using predicted strain distributions 
from the finite element analysis. The statistical nature of test 
data is considered. Also, some techniques employed in three 
dimensional finite element analyses to enhance their use for 
stress and vibration analysis are described. These techniques 
include a method for reduction of the size of the eigenvalue 
problem for vibration analysis by a transformation to generalized 
coordinates derived from static solutions. An example of the 
application of these methods to a turbine blade analysis is 
presented. Author 


552 



IM79 27166 


N79-27168# Fiat Aviazione S.p.A.. Turin (Italy). 

SOME THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGA- 
TIONS OF STRESSES AND VIBRATIONS IN A RADIAL 
FLOW ROTOR 

A. Grasso. J. J. Blech, and G. Martinelli In AGARD Stresses. 
Vibrations. Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including 
Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

The problem of an Integrally bladed radial compressor under 
the Influence of a centrifugal force is considered. Two calculation 
methods based also on finite element method are proposed. 
The first adopts a mixed three dimensional and two dimensional 
analysis, using plate elements for blades and axisymmetrical ring 
for the disk coupled by substructuring technique. The second 
implements axisymmetric anisotropic ring elements for the blades 
and the isotropic ring elements for the disk. A dynamic analysis 
of the blade with the finite element method is also presented. 
As an example the various methods are applied to the centrifugal 
compressor design of the FIAT 6803 engine and compared with 
results of experimental investigation. J.M.S. 

N79-27159/|f Pisa Univ. (Italy). Inst, di Macchine. 

PREDICTION OF AEROELASTIC INSTABILITIES IN 
ROTORCRAFT 

Dino Oini In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations, Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 29 p refs 
Avail: NTIS HC A21/MP AOl 

Design of modern rotorcraft engines requires that aeroelastic 
considerations be included for prediction of instabilities due to 
engines-rotors-airframe interference. Computational approaches 
are presented which have generality in the selection of stress 
analysis methods and are applicable to rotorcrafts involving a 
large number of operation variables. An instability criterion for 
the prediction of fatigue effects of alternating stresses on engine 
structural integrity is identified and applied to the corresponding 
airframe behavior during high speed forward flight and severe 
rotorcraft maneuvers. J.M.S. 

N79>27160/j( National Gas Turbine Establishment, Pyestock 
(England). 

APPLICATION OF ENGINE USAGE ANALYSIS TO COMPO- 
NENT UFE UTIUZATION 

M. Holmes In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 15 p refs 
Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

Engine parameters were monitored during operation in service 
aircraft to investigate the maximum life potential of aero engine 
components. Analytical methods were used for determining low 
cycle fatigue. The influence of data availability and computing 
capability on the procedures were investigated by comparing 
the software appropriate to an airborne unit monitoring engine 
revolutions per minute with that for a ground based computing 
facility analyzing recorded flight data. R.E.S. 


N79-27161|j( Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Group, East Hartford. 
Conn. Commercial Products DIv. 

BOUNDARY-INTEGRAL EOUATION ANALYSIS OF AN 
ADVANCED TURBINE DISK RIM SLOT 

R, B. Wilson. R. G. Potter, and J. K. Wong In AGARD Stresses. 
Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including 
Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 9 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The mathematical basis and numerical implementation of 
the boundary-integral equation method are presented. The method 
was shown to be capable of predicting rapidly varying stress 
and strain fields in complex geometries, using either plane 
triangular or higher order elements. Ease of geometrical modeling 
and higher order boundary data variation combined to make 
shape function based codes most efficient for design analysis 
use. R.E.S. 


N79-27162*jK Massachusetts Inst, of Tech.. Cambridge. Dept 
of Aeronautics and Astronautics. 

ENGINE ROTOR BURST CONTAINMENT/CONTROL 
STUDIES 

Emmett A. Witmer, Thomas R. Stagliano. and Jose J. A. Rodal 
In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. 
Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 30 p 
refs 

(Grant NGR-22-009-339) 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

Investigations on the impact-interaction of both complex 
engine rotor fragments and simple fragments with various types 
of single-layer and multilayer containment structures were 
reviewed. The resulting data were used (1) to develop empirical 
design rules and (2) to evaluate proposed theoretical methods 
for predicting the impact induced responses of containment 
structures. Examples of typical numerical methods for predicting 
the large deflection, elastic-plastic transient structural responses 
of simple two dimensional and three dimensional containment 
shields were illustrated. R.E.S. 

N79-27163/|( Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and 
Development, Neuilly-Sur-Seine (France). 

SMALL TURBINES: EXPERIENCES WITH DISK RUPTURES 
[PETITES TURBOMACHINES: EXPERIENCES SUR LA 

RUPTURE DES BISQUES] 

J. M. Foueillassar and A. R. VonDerMuhll In its Stresses, 
Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including 
Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 16 p In FRENCH 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

On turbines with small dimensions, the construction of casings 
capable of integrally retaining all the debris in the case of disk 
rupture can be realized with a very acceptable mass penalty. 
Practical experience and systematic tests of disk rupture under 
real operating conditions provide useful data concerning the shape 
and size of the most penetrating elements; the shape and most 
efficacious arrangement of elements serving as casings; and the 
most adaptable materials to be used for casings. For rotors whose 
security relies on the fact that the blades tear away without 
disk rupture, or for the cylinder, properly so-called, in case of 
failure from excess speed, the tests equally confirm the confidence 
that can be put in casing elements constructed according to 
the same principles of evaluation. Transl. by A.R.H. 

N79-27164/^ Sussex Univ., Brighton (England). 

AN INVESTIGATION OF VIBRATION DAMPERS IN 
GAS-TURBINE ENGINES 

R. Holmes and B. Humes (Roy. Armament Res. and Develop. 
Estab., Sevenoaks, Engl.) In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. Struct. 
Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) 
Apr. 1979 10 p refs Sponsored in cooperation with the Natl. 
Gas Turbine Estab. 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The feasibility of using the squeeze-film both as a damper 
and a load bearing member was investigated. It was found that 
when the squeeze-film provided a load carrying capability as 
well as damping, cavitation, which has a deleterious effect, is 
generated in the film. Equations are presented for predicting the 
vibration amplitude and the force transmitted to the engine frame 
when the squeeze-film is used for damping. F.O.S. 

N79-27166/^ Naval Air Propulsion Test Center. Trenton. N.J. 
Research and Technology Div. 

ROTOR BUST PROTECTION: DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR 

CONTAINMENT 

James T. Salvino, Gaetan J. Mangano, and Robert A. DeLucia 
In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations. Struct. Integration and Eng. 
Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 16 p 

refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The results are presented of tests that were conducted to 
develop guidelines for the weight optimum design of turbine 
rotor burst fragment containment rings. The ring materials used 
for each of the several ring configurations were Kevlar 29 cloth. 


553 



N79 27167 


centrifugally cast 4130 steel and coiled 304 stainless steel. A 
comparative assessment of the containment capability for each 
material is provided in terms of a specific energy variable that 
was developed for this purpose. Also included In this assessment 
Is the effect of the number of equal pie sector shaped fragments 
on the ring containment capability. Author 

N79-27167j{( Boeing Co.. Seattle, Wash. 

ENGINE/AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL INTEGRATION: AN 

OVERVIEW 

T. E. Dunning. M. N. Aarnes. and G. L Bailey tn AGARD 
Stresses. Vibrations. Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity 
(Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 35 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

The structural installation of engines in aircraft is discussed 
in terms of modeling techniques, development of a computerized 
data base, and planning the propulsion system tests. Problems 
encountered in engine installation are described. F.O.S. 

N79-27168^ Messerschmitt-Boelkow*Biohm G.m.b.H., Munich 
(West Germany). Military Airplane Div, 

DYNAMIC PRESSURE LOADS IN THE AIR INDUCTION 
SYSTEM OF THE TORNADO FIGHTER AIRCRAFT 

K. W. Lotter and N. C. Bissinger tn AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. 
Struct, integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and 
Flutter) Apr. 1979 20 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The engine fact, duct and forward intake peak pressures 
applied for structural design of the European fighter airplane. 
Tornado, and the experimental data obtained during the 
development phase from full scale intake/engine compatibility 
test are described. S.E.S. 

N79'27169)||l National Aerospace Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands). 
Performance and Evaluation Dept. 

HANDLING PROBLEMS THROUGH COMPRESSOR DETE- 
RIORATION 

J- P- K. VIeghert In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations, Struct. 
Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) 
Apr. 1979 7 p 
Avail; NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

RNLAF has experienced performance loss and an increased 
rate of in flight compressor stalls due to compressor deterioration 
of some of their 15 year old engines. The Maintenance Depot 
test bed showed that significant loss of air mass flow occurred 
near the surge line under conditions which were not covered by 
the normal post overhall acceptance tests. Impending stall was 
always preceded by increasing fluctuations, although the level 
of these pressure fluctuations varied with different engines. A 
method was developed to routine check for this phenomenon. 
The surge margin of the affected engines was recovered by 
replacing the rear compressor casing. S.E.S. 

N79-27170# Pratt and Whitney Aircraft of Canada Ltd.. Longueuil 
(Quebec). 

SMALL TURBINE ENGINE INTEGRATION IN AIRCRAFT 
INSTALLATIONS 

M. Botman and R. K. Blinco In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. 
Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and 
Flutter) Apr. 1979 12 p 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

Various design and development problems related to the 
integration of small turbine engines in aircraft installations are 
reviewed. Important considerations In turbo-prop installations are 
vibration transmissibility, propeller-whirl flutter, engine structure 
strength and stiffness, mount failure modes, and nacelle 
clearances. Requirements are adequate compartment ventilation 
and engine oil cooling with minimum aerodynamic loss. The 
installations of the PT6 series of turbo-prop engines are 
discussed. S.E.S. 

N79-27171/j( Avions Marcel Dassault-Breguet Aviation. 
Saint-Cloud (France). 


DETERMINING THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE DUE TO AN 
IMBALANCE AT THE ATTACHMENTS OF A MOTOR ON 
A POD [DETERMINATION DES EFFORTS DYNAMIQUES 
DUS A UN BALOURD AUX ATTACHES D UN MOTEUR 
MONTE EN PODE] 

B. Schneider In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr 
1979 16 p refs In FRENCH 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The loss of a rotor blade produces an imbalance which is 
transmitted to the attachments of an engine on a pod. The 
reactions of these attachments are calculated as a function of 
the angular velocity of the rotor by means of the matrix of 
flexibility of the pod. of inertial characteristics of the rigid engine 
and of the generalized mass, as well as of the frequency of the 
damping of the distortions of the flexible modes of the motor. 
A problem is seen regarding the complexity of the vibration 
tests of an engine; the flexible modes of the engine, whose 
frequency remains too low for intervening in the coupling, cannot 
be used because they have not been completely measured. 
Furthermore, it seems that the damping mode is a fundamental 
parameter, as in all phenomena of excitation; therefore, particular 
care must be taken to its determination outside of the test 
itself. At the same time, the calculation of generalized forces 
requires knowledge of the deformation of the rotor for each 
flexible mode used, which Imposes the use of specialized lock-ons 
outside of vibration tests. Transl. by A.R.H. 

N79-27172/|( British Aerospace Aircraft Group. Preston (England). 
Advanced Projects Dept. 

INTEGRATION OF AN AIRFRAME WITH A TURBOFAN AND 
AFTERBURNER SYSTEM 

Michael S. Wooding and Harry Hurdis (Rolls-Royce Ltd., Derby, 
Engl.) In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations, Struct. Integration and 
Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 

10 p 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

Alternative ways for improving the performance of installed 
military engines are described. The weight, performance, and 
cost tradeoffs that might result for a single engined fixed wing 
combat aircraft are discussed. S.E.S. 

N79-27173|j/ Arnold Engineering Development Center. Arnold 
Air Force Station. Tenn. 

A NEW FACILITY FOR STRUCTURAL ENGINE TESTING 

Robert L. B. Swain and James G. Mitchell In AGARD Stresses, 
Vibrations. Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including 
Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr, 1979 6 p 

Avail; NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

A test facility to simulate the maneuver environment an 
engine actually experiences in flight is presented. The facility 
and its potential benefits to the engine development process 
are described. S E S 

N79-27174/j( Centre d'Essais des Propulseurs. Orsay (France). 

THE INTEGRITY OF AIRCRAFT JET ENGINES UNDER THE 
IMPACT OF FOREIGN BODIES [INTEGRITE DES RE- 
ACTEURS D'AVIONS SOUS IMPACTS DE CORPS ETRANG- 
ERS] 

Dominique Hedon and Jean Barrere In AGARD Stresses, 
Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including 
Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 13 p In FRENCH 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF AOl 

The ingestion of foreign bodies, especially of birds, remains 
a major hazard to aircraft. The improvement of the resistance of 
engines to impacts has. for several years, been the object of 
important efforts on the part of aircraft manufacturers working 
with official services. The Centre D’Essais des Propulseurs 
furnished a special installation for this type of research. The 
experience acquired from tests made show that consideration of 
impact resistance must be made part of engine design and can 
influence the general architecture of the project as well as the 
definition of Internal details or of preparations. Transl. by A.R.H. 


554 



N79 27182 


N79-27176j^ Rolls-Royce Ltd.. Derby (England). Aero DIv. 

THE EFFECT OF INTAKE CONDITIONS ON SUPERSONIC 
FLUTTER IN TURBOFAN ENGINES 

D. G. Halliwell In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 8 p refs 
Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

The nature of supersonic flutter, to which high tip speed, 
front stage fans of modern aircraft turbofan engines are 
susceptible, is introduced. The effect of varying engine intake 
conditions of altitude, flight speed and ambient temperature were 
examined, and test data was compared with theory. Some 
important flight conditions for minimum flutter margins in typical 
civil and military applications are outlined. The effect of engine 
intake type is then covered with respect to the degree of pressure 
distortion presented to the fan, A tentative relationship is derived 
between this distortion and flutter onset speed. Author 

N79-27176# Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer 
Luft- und Raumfahrt, Cologne (West Germany). Inst, fuer 
Antriebstechnik. 

UNSTEADY ROTOR BLADE LOADING IN AN AXIAL 
COMPRESSOR WITH STEADY-STATE INLET DISTOR- 
TIONS 

M. Lecht and H. B. Weyer In AGARD Stress. Vibrations. 
Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and 
Flutter) Apr. 1979 13 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

A steady state measuring technique with conventional probes 
and pressure tapes combined with an adequate data analysis 
was used to investigate the unsteady rotor flow with particular 
respect to the variation of the blade loading during rotor revolution. 
Some relevant results of this investigation are submitted and 
discussed. M.M.M. 

N79-27177/^ Liege Univ. (Belgium). Inst, de Mecanique. 

DISTORTIONS, ROTATING STALL AND MECHANICAL 
SOLICITATIONS 

J. Colpin In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity ,and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 24 p refs i 
. Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

A one stage axial flow compressor is studied aerodynamically 

and mechanically when operating with moldistributed inlet flow, 
i.e. inlet flow total pressure distortions and rotating stall. A 
theoretical model is presented which calculates the distortion 
propagation through the compressor stage. That enables the 
computation of the unsteady aerodynamic loading of the rotor 
blades. The theoretical results are successful compared with the 
measured flow fields. An experimental study defines the rotating 
stall characteristics of the compressor stage and relates the blades 
vibrations and stresses with the existence of a distortion and/or 
rotating stall cell. Author 


N79-27178fjf Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches 
Aeronautiques. Paris (France). 

STUDY IN A STRAIGHT CASCADE WIND TUNNEL OF 
AEROELASTIC INSTABILITIES IN COMPRESSORS 

Edmond Szechenyi. Henri Loiseau, and Brigitte Maquennenhan 
(SNECMA) In AGARD Stresses, Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 13 p refs In FRENCH; ENGLISH summary 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

Most of the aeroelastic instabilities encountered in tur- 
bomachines, in particular in compressor first stages, occur in 
flow conditions that can not be calculated on purely 'theoretical 
bases. The very nature of these instabilities is not always known, 
and tests in a straight cascade wind tunnel should make it 
possible, first to understand the physical mechanisms of 
phenomena observed in compressors. The experimental results 
would then be used to develop mathematical models to be used 
for prediction calculations. A straight cascade wind tunnel permits 
the simulation of subsonic and transonic flows up to very close 


to Mach 1 with angles of attack reaching 12 degrees, and of 
supersonic flows at fixed Mach numbers thanks to interchangeable 
nozzles. The first tests in this facility brought to light several 
kinds of flutter. The parametric study, or which the paper gives 
the first results, shows the influence of reduced frequency, 
incidence, pitch axis position and Mach number. A few results 
obtained in supersonic regime are also given. A.R.H. 

N79-27179*/jf National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center, Cleveland. Ohio. 

REVIEW OF THE AGARD S AND M PANEL EVALUATION 
PROGRAM OF THE NASA-LEWIS SRP APPROACH TO 
HIGH-TEMPERATURE LCF UFE PREDICTION 

Marvin H. Hirschberg In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations. Struct. 
Integration and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) 
Apr. 1979 9 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 CSCL 21E 

The strain range partitioning SRP method method presented 
Is a significant step forward in high temperature low cycle fatigue 
life prediction. Several concerns and recommendations regarding 
SRP were described. These dealt ' primarily with the problems 
associated with the application of SRP to cases involving small 
inelastic strains (and therefore long lives). The difficulties 
associated with partitioning these narrow hysteresis loops and 
the present inability of SRP to handle mean stress effects were 
also noted. M.M.M. 


N79-27180# Detroit Diesel Allison, Indianapolis, Ind. Cascade 
and Flow Systems Research. 

THE UNSTEADY AERODYNAMICS OF A CASCADE IN 
TRANSLATION 

Sanford Fleeter. Ronald E. Riffel. Thomas H. Lindsey, and Mark 
D. Rothrock In AGARD Stresses. Vibrations. Struct. Integration 
and Eng. Integrity (Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 
1979 13 p refs 
(Contract N00014-72-C-0351 ) 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 

The fundamental time variant translation mode aerody- 
namics are determined for a classical airfoil cascade in a 
supersonic inlet flow field over a range of interblade phase angles 
at a realistic reduced frequency value. These experimental data 
are then correlated with predictions obtained from an appropriate 
state-of-the-art harmonically oscillating flat plate cascade 
aerodynamic analysis. M.M.M. 

N79-27181*/j( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center, Cleveland. Ohio. 

SUPERSONIC UNSTALLED FLUTTER 

J. J. Adamczyk, M. E. Goldstein, and M. J. Hartmann In AGARD 
Stresses. Vibrations, Struct. Integration and Eng. Integrity 
(Including Aeroelasticity and Flutter) Apr. 1979 14 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A21/MF A01 CSCL 21E 

A parametric study to show the effects of cascade geometry, 
inlet Mach number, and backpressure on the onset of single 
and multi degree of freedom unstalled supersonic flutter is 
presented. Several of the results are correlated against experimen- 
tal. qualitative observation to validate the models. M.M.M. 

N79-27182*/!/ National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Ames Research Center, Moffen Field. Calif. 

A COMPARISON OF THE V/STOL HANDLING QUALITIES 
OF THE VAK-191B WITH THE REQUIREMENTS OF AGARD 
REPORT 677 AND MIL-F-83300 

Seth B. Anderson Jul. 1979 38 p refs 

(NASA-TP-1494; A-7117) Avail. NTIS HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 

01C 

The handling qualities of the VAK-191B VTOL aircraft are 
compared with current V/STOL handling qualities requirements. 
The aircraft handling qualities were superior to other V/STOL 
fighter aircraft. Several deficiencies which would seriously affect 
shipboard V/STOL operation includes: (1) poor hovering precision; 
(2) inadequate mechanical control characteristics: (3) nonlinear 


555 



N79-27183 


pitch and roll response: (4) an uncommanded movement of the 
height control lever: {5} low pitch control sensitivity: {6| excessive 
dihedral effect: and (7) inadequate overall thrust response. The 
attitude command control system resulted on reduced pilot 
workload during hover and low speed flight. S.E.S. 

N79-27183/^ CalspanAdvanced Technology Center. Buffalo, N. Y. 

EFFECTS OF CONTROL SYSTEM DYNAMICS ON FIGHTER 
APPROACH AND LANDING LONGITUDINAL FLYING 
QUALITIES, VOLUME 1 Interim Report, Jun. 1977 - Mar. 
1978 

Rogers E. Smith Mar. 1978 232 p refs 
{Contract F3361 5-73-C-3051 ; AF Proj. 2403) 

{AD-A067550; CALSPAN-AK-5280-F- 1 2: 
AFFDL-TR-78-122-VOM) Avail: NTIS HC All/MF A01 CSCL 
01/3 

The effects of significant control system dynamics on fighter 
approach and landing longitudinal flying qualities were investigated 
in flight using the USAF/Calspan variable stability NT-33 aircraft. 
Two pilots evaluated 49 different combinations of control system 
and short period dynamics while performing representative 
approach and landing tasks. The landing task for the majority of 
the evaluations included an actual touchdown. Pilot rating and 
comment data, supported by task performance records, indicate 
that the landing task, in particular the last 50 ft of the task, is 
clearly the critical task for aircraft with significant control system 
lags. For these aircraft, a sharp degradation in flying qualities 
takes place during this critical phase of the landing task: for 
example, severe pilot induced oscillations occurred during the 
landing task but were not in evidence during the approach task. 
The results provide a data base for the development of suitable 
flying qualities requirements which are applicable to aircraft 
with significant control system dynamics: the results show that 
the present landing approach requirements in MIL-F-8785B (ASG) 
are not adequate; in particular, they are not applicable to aircraft 
with complex flight control systems. Author (GRA) 

N79-27184j^ Technische Univ.. Berlin (West Germany). Inst, 
fuer Luft und Raumfahrt. 

STUDY OF THE THEORETICAL TO REAL CORRE8POND- 
ANCE OF AN OPTIMAL CONTROL MODEL AND THE 
SIGNIFICANCE OF THIS MODEL FOR THE DESCRIPTION 
OF WORKING METHODOLOGY WITH PARTLY AUTOMAT- 
ED AIRCRAFT GUIDANCE AND CONTROL SYSTEMS 
[BEITRAG ZUR lOENTIFIZIERARBEIT DES BBN-MODELLS 
UND DIE BEDEUTUNG DES MODELLS ALS BE8CHREIB- 
UNGSFORM DER ARBEITWEIS8E DES MENSCHEN IM 
TEILAUTMATISCHEN FLUGFUEHRUNGSSYSTEM] 

Uwe Kirchhoff 1978 170 p refs In GERMAN 

(ILR-35; ISBN-3-7983-0640-0) Avail: NTIS 

HC A08/MF A01 

Global concepts for the interaction between man and partly 
automated aircraft guidance and control systems were studied, 
emphasis being given to working methodology. Linear systems 
are discussed. An attempt is made to show up. to what point 
the optimal control model provides a good description of the 
interactions taking place. The faults occuring in this model are 
determined, and a model in which these faults are eliminated is 
proposed being fulfilled. Author (ESA) 


N79-27186*jj^ Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Long Beach, Calif. 

AIRCRAFT AND AVIONIC RELATED RESEARCH REQUIRED 
TO DEVELOP AN EFFECTIVE HIGH-SPEED RUNWAY EXIT 
SYSTEM 

M. L. Schoen. J. E. Hosford, J. M. Graham, Jr.. 0. W. Preston, 
R. S. Frankel, and J. B. Erickson Jun. 1979 115 p refs 
(Contract NASI -15545) 

(NASA-CR-159075) Avail: NTIS HC A06/MF A01 CSCL 
01E 

Research was conducted to increase airport capacity by 
studying the feasibility of the longitudinal separation between 
aircraft sequences on final approach. The multidisciplinary factors 
which include the utility of high speed exits for efficient runway 
operations were described along with recommendations and 
highlights of these studies. M.M.M. 


N79-27188/II Air Force Human Resources Lab., Brooks AFB, 
Tex. 

F-15 FLIGHT SIMULATOR: DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS 
OF COMPUTER SCORING ALGORITHM Final Report, 
Jun. - Sep. 1977 

Michael J. McDonald. Bruce A. Smith, David W. Evans. Lester 

H. Baer, and William H. Nelson Mar. 1979 30 p refs 

(AD-A067765: AFHRL-TR-78-72) Avail: NTIS 

HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 05/9 

This study was designed to develop and evaluate the computer 
scoring algorithm of the F-15 flight simulator. Subjects were 
F-15 pilots in the grade of 1st Lt. through Lt. Col. with previous 
flying experience commensurate with grade and operational 
assignments. Evaluation involved simultaneous scoring by the 
computer and Instructor Pilots (IP) of flight departures and 
approaches. Both scores were then compared to estimate the 
validity of the computer algorithm. Departure scores were 
moderately correlated; however, approach scores exhibited 
moderate to high negative correlation. Interaction from the IPs 
indicated that scoring parameters measured by the computer 
were correct. It was determined that the negative correlations 
on the approaches were a result of the computer Initiating scoring 
whenever a certain range boundary was reached, whereas the 
IPs began scoring only when the appropriate legs of the 
approaches were being flown. Because of the correlation of the 
departure scores, it was concluded that with improvements to 
the computer scoring procedures for the approaches, the scoring 
algorithms of the F-15 flight simulator could provide a valuable 
tool for evaluation of fighter pilots. GRA 

N79-27189j|!l ARO, Inc., Arnold Air Force Station, Tenn. 
AEROPROPULSION SYSTEMS TEST FACILITY RAKE 
CALIBRATION TEST IN TUNNEL A Final Report 

W. A. Crosby AEDC Dec. 1978 35 p ref 

(AD-A068975; AEDC-TSR-78-V49) Avail: NTIS 

HC A03/MF AOl CSCL 20/4 

A pressure test was conducted in the VKF Tunnel A to 
obtain calibration data on the APTU Free-Jet Nozzle Calibration 
Rake. The test covered the supersonic Mach number range of 

I. 76, 2.0. 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0, nominally, at a 

free-stream unit Reynolds number of 5.0 million per foot. The 
angle-of-attack range was -6 to -1-6 deg with typical roll angles 
of 0 and -90 deg. Model flow-field Schlieren photographs were 
obtained at ail Mach numbers of 0 deg and positive angles-of- 
attack. GRA 

N79-27191^ Oxford Univ. (England). Dept, of Engineering 
Science 

EXTENSION OF RUNNING TIME IN THE RAE HYPERSONIC 
SHOCK TUNNEL 

D. L. Schultz 1978 14 p refs 
(OUEL-1260/78) Avail; NTIS HC A02/MF AOl 

The running time performance of the RAE 6 inch shock 
tunnel as a LICH (Ludwig tube isoentropic compression heating) 
or as a free piston compressor (FPC) is compared with its present 
capability as a function of total temperature and nozzle throat 
area. Positive results obtained in this analysis suggest the feasibility 
of proceeding with more detailed design studies. LICH mode 
and FPC mode schemes for the RAE 6 inch shock tunnel are 
shown. Author (ESA) 


N79-27205]j/ Royal Aircraft Establishment. Farnborough 
(England). Aerodynamics Dept. 

WEAPON/AIRCRAFT INTERACTIONS 

George G. Brebner In Von Karman Inst, for Fluid Dyn. Missile 
Aerodyn,, Vol. 1 Apr. 1974 41 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A14/MF AOl 

The aerodynamic aspects of weapon/aircraft interactions are 
considered. Emphasis is placed on drag of the aircraft/weapon 
combination, loads acting on the weapon during carriage, and 
disturbances experienced by the weapon after release or launch. 
Methods of determining installed drag, carriage loads, and 
trajectories are discussed. J.M.S. 


556 



N79-27522 


N79-27246*j^ Lockheed-California Co., Burbank. 

FLIGHT SERVICE EVALUATION OF KEVLAR-49 EPOXY 
COMPOSITE PANELS IN WIDE-BODIED COMMERCIAL 
TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT Annual Flight Service Report. Jan. 
1978 Dec. 1978 

R. H. Stone Mar. 1979 36 p refs 
(Contract NASI -11621) 

(NASA-CR-159071: AR-5) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 
11D 

Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components 
on three L- 101 Is. were inspected after five years' service. There 
are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft; a left-hand and 
right-hand set of a wing-body sandwich fairing; a solid laminate 
under-wing fillet panel; and a 150 C (300 F) service aft engine 
fairing. The fairings have accumulated a total of 40.534 hours, 
with one ship set having 16.091 hours service as of Feb. 11, 
1979. The Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing 
satisfactorily in service with no major problems, or any condition 
requiring corrective action. The only defects noted were minor 
impact damage, and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying 
and elongation. These are for the most part comparable to 
damage noted on fiberglass fairings. A.R.H, 


N79-27321*/^ Jet Propulsion Lab.. Calif. Inst, of Tech., Pasadena. 

COMPATIBILITY OF ELASTOMERS IN ALTERNATE JET 
FUELS 

S. H. Kalfayan, R. F. Fedors, and W. W. Reilly 1 Jun. 1979 
70 p refs 

(Contract NAS7-100) 

(NASA-CR-158773: JPL-Pub-79-28) Avail: NTIS 

HC A04/MF A01 CSCL 21 D 

The compatibility of elastomeric compositions of known 
resistance to aircraft fuels was tested for potential use in Jet A 
type fuels obtainable from alternate sources, such as coal. Since 
such fuels were not available at the time, synthetic alternate 
fuels were prepared by adding tetraiin to a petroleum based 
Jet A type fuel to simulate coal derived fuels which are expected 
to contain higher amounts of aromatic and hydroaromatic 
hydrocarbons. The elastomeric compounds tested were, based 
on butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber, a castable Thiokol polysulfide 
rubber, and a castable fluorosilicone rubber. Batches of various 
cross-link densities of these rubbers were made and their chemical 
stress relaxation behavior in fuel. air. and nitrogen, their swelling 
properties, and response to mechanical testing were deter- 
mined. Author 

N79-27336jj|l Department of Energy. Washington, D. C. Office 
of Regulations and Emergency Planning. 

FINDINGS AND VIEWS CONCERNING THE EXEMPTION 
OF AVIATION GASOLINE FROM THE MANDATORY 
PETROLEUM ALLOCATION AND PRICE REGULATIONS 

Jun. 1978 85 p 

(DOE/ERA-0024) Avail: NTIS HC A05/MF A01 

An added section to the regulation which requires that any 
amendment submitted to the Congress for the purpose of 
exempting a petroleum product or refined product category from 
regulation be supported with certain findings and views on a 
variety of matters related to the exemption was presented. Based 
on an analysis of historic and projected supply, demand, and 
price trends, the DOE concluded that allocation and price controls 
are no longer necessary for aviation gasoline and that its exemption 
in addition to satisfying the other requisite criteria of Section 12 
of the EPAA, consistent with the attainment of the objectives 
specified in Section 4 (b)(1) of the EPAA. DOE 

N79-27366# Rome Air Development Center. Griffiss AFB. N.Y. 

MICROSTRIP ANTENNA ELEMENTS FOR USE IN HEMIS- 
PHERICALLY SCANNED ARRAYS 

Nicholas P. Kernweis and John Mclivenna Feb. 1979 30 p 

refs 

(AF Proj. 4600) 

(AD-A068566: RADC-TR-79-43) Avail; NTIS 

HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 09/5 

This report is an experimental study of various modifications 
that affect the radiation pattern of a circular disc microstrip 


element. The objective is to produce an element pattern with 
enhanced performance in the angular regions well away from 
broadside. The study includes the effect of higher order modes, 
an investigation of circumferential loading, the use of shorting 
pins at the element edge, and the pattern changes produced by 
mutual coupling in a closely spaced array. GRA 

N79-27435/|f Rolls-Royce Ltd.. Derby (England). 

AXIAL COMPRESSOR STALL 

R. R. Moritz In Von Ka rman Inst, for Fluid Dyn. Unsteady 
Flows in Axial Flow Compressors 1970 56 p refs 

Avail: NTIS HC A10/MF A01 

Rotating stall is the direct cause of blade failures in resonant 
vibration as well as the indirect cause of mechanical problems 
due to the frequently associated duality in compressor behavior. 
The effects of compressor stall on aircraft engines are examined 
with emphasis on the mechanical properties of compressor blades, 
single stage stall, and multistage stall. A.R.H. 


N79-27516# Teledyne CAE. Toledo. Ohio. 

CERAMIC MAINSHAFT ROLLER BEARING PERFORMANCE 
IN A GAS TURBINE ENGINE Final Report, Aug. 1978 - 
Nov. 1978 

Glenn W. Hamburg and William F. Prusaitis Feb. 1979 40 p 
(Contracts N00014-76-C-1 104; MIPR-AMRDLt 75-5) 
(AD-A067904; TCAE-1623) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF A01 
CSCL 13/9 

The program tests conducted on a modified J402 turbine 
engine were to demonstrate the feasibility of using ceramic 
bearings for high speed gas turbine applications with reduced 
or no lubrication to the bearing. Six engine tests were conducted, 
each test complementing the next to establish baseline parame- 
ters of the test to follow. Test No. 3 was the first to demonstrate 
the ceramic bearing operation unlubricated at 39,000 rpm and 
minimum lubrication of lOcc per minute at 41.200 rpm. Engine 
Test No. 4. which was a repeat of Test No. 3, was successfully 
completed and demonstrated 33 minutes of unlubricated operation 
at 39,000 rpm. All engine tests were conducted with the bearing 
and bearing housing instrumented for temperature read-out during 
the test. Engine Tests 3, 4. 5 and 6 were also instrumented for 
lubrication flow pressure and bearing cavity pressure in order to 
monitor lubrication to the bearing as a function of pressure 
differential. Author (GRA) 

N79-27518f|/ McDonnell Aircraft Co., St. Louis. Mo. 

EFFECT OF VARIANCES AND MANUFACTURING TOLER- 
ANCES ON THE DESIGN STRENGTH AND LIFE OF 
MECHANICALLY FASTENED COMPOSITE JOINTS Interim 
Report, 15 Feb. - 30 Jun. 1978 

Samuel P. Garbo and J. M. Ogonowski Dec. 1978 97 p refs 
(Contract F3361 5-77-C-3140) 

(AD-A069170; AFFDL-TR-78-179) Avail: NTIS 

HC A05/MF A01 CSCL 13/5 

The objective of this program is development of failure criterion 
and improved fatigue life prediction methodology of mechanically 
fastened joints in advanced composite structure. This report 
summarizes activity for the period 15 February 1978 to 30 June 
1978. Program activities are divided into five tasks: Task 1 - 
Literature Survey; Task 2 - Evaluation of Joint Design Variables; 
Task 3 - Evaluation of Manufacturing and Service Anomalies; 
Task 4 - Evaluation of the Effect of Critical Joint Design Parameters 
on Fatigue Life: Task 5 - Development of Final Analyses and 
Correlation. This report documents Task 1 - Literature Survey 
activities. Summarized are the state-of-the-art in design and 
analysis of mechanically fastened composite joints, selected 
methodology, conclusions, and recommendations for the remainder 
of this program. GRA 


N79-27522j^ Laboratorio de Acustica e Sonica. Sao Paulo (Brazil). 

ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF ENGINE NACELLE STRUC- 
TURE SEARCHING FOR CRACKS 

L. X. Nepomuceno 7 Oct. 1976 23 p 
(Rept-76 10.909) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01 


557 



N79-27523 


The observed results of the ultrasonic inspection of the engine 
nacelle structure of five aircraft are reported. The 45 degree 
wedge showed better echoes in the thicker tubes and cracks 
were not detected in any of the inspected nacelles. M.M.M. 

N79-27623}|^ Laboratorio de Acustica e Sonica, Sao Paulo (Brazil). 
ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF WING SPAR ATTACHMENT 
JOINTS AND LUGS IN VISCOUNT AIRCRAFT 

L X. Nepomuceno 6 Oct. 1976 7 p 
{Rept-7610.910) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01 

The observed results of the inspection carried out according 
to PTL-97 of British Aircraft Corporation are presented. Author 

N79-27533}^ Air Force Flight Dynamics Lab.. Wright-Patterson 
AFB. Ohio. 

EFFECTS OF GEOMETRIC VARIABLES ON STRESS 
INTENSITY FACTORS FOR CRACK GAGES M.S. Thesis < 
AFIT. Final Report 

Menachem Carmon Feb. 1979 71 p refs 

IAD-A068631; AFFDL-TR-79-3002) Avail: NTIS 

HC A04/MF A01 CSCL 01/3 

A cracked metallic coupon, called crack gage, is being 
considered as a device for monitoring crack growth in aircraft 
structures. For this purpose, a stress intensity factor solution for 
the gage has to be known. This study provides stress intensity 
factor solutions for two basic geometric configurations subjected 
to prescribed displacements: 1 . Edge cracked, trapezoidal shaped 
gages of uniform thickness. 2. Center cracked gages with varying 
or stepped thickness. For the trapezoid, the influences of changing 
the length of the cracked edge, while other edge remains constant, 
and vice-versa, were investigated. The results obtained do not 
show significant beneficial changes in stress intensity factor for 
the range of parameters considered over those of rectangular 
gages. Stress intensity factors were determined for stepped gages 
of various geometries. Various thickness ratios, length ratios and 
aspect ratios were considered, including the specific geometries 
of two gages now under development. In each case, the stress 
intensity factor was determined as a function of crack length. 

GRA 


N79-27772*H National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

METEOROLOGICAL AND OPERATIONAL ASPECTS OF 46 
CLEAR AIR TURBULENT SAMPUNG MISSIONS WITH AN 
INSTRUMENTED B-67B AIRCRAFT. VOLUME 2. APPENDIX 
C: TURBULENCE MISSIONS 

David E. Waco (California Energy Resources Conserv. and Develop. 
Comm.. Sacramento) May 1979 188 p refs 
(NASA-TM-80045) Avail: NTIS HC A09/MF A01 CSCL 
04B 

The results of 46 clear air turbulence (CAT) probing missions 
conducted with an extensively instrumented B-57B aircraft are 
summarized from a meteorological viewpoint in a two-volume 
technical memorandum. The missions were part of the NASA 
Langley Research Center's MAT (Measurement of Atmospheric 
Turbulence) program, which was conducted between March 1974, 
and September 1975. at altitudes ranging up to 15 km. Turbulence 
samples were obtained under diverse conditions including 
mountain waves, jet streams, upper level fronts and troughs, 
and low altitude mechanical and thermal turbulence. CAT was 
encountered on 20 flights comprising 77 data runs. In all, 
approximately 4335 km were flown in light turbulence. 1415 km 
in moderate turbulence, and 255 km in severe turbulence during 
the program. Author 


N79-27930*/(( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Lewis Research Center. Cleveland, Ohio. 

TRAILING EDGE NOISE DATA WITH COMPARISON TO 
THEORY 

W. Olsen and D. Boldman 1979 30 p refs Presented at 

12th Fluid and Plasma Dynamics Conf.. Williamsburg. Va.. 
23-25 Jul. 1979: sponsored by AIAA 

(NASA-TM-79208: E-093; A lA A-79- 1 524) Avail: NTIS 
HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 20A 


The noise emission generated by the passage of a turbulent 
airstream over the trailing edge of a semi-infinite plate was 
measured over a large range of airstream velocity and plate 
geometry. The experiment was designed to validate trailing 
edge noise theories. The results show that the peak of the radiation 
pattern moves from an upstream to a downstream direction as 
the velocity increases. The measured radiation pattern of the 
noise was in excellent agreement with that predicted by the 
recent theory of Goldstein. As predicted, the pattern shape was 
independent of the nature of the turbulence producing the 
noise. Author 

N79-27931*/(( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SOUND RADIATION FROM 
HYPERBOI^OIDAL INLET DUCTS 

Lorenzo R. Clark and Y. C. Cho Jun. 1979 19 p ref Presented 
at the 97th meeting of the Acoustical Soc. of America. Cambridge, 
Mass.. 11-15 Jun. 1979 

(NASA-TM-80109) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01 CSCL 
20A 

Sound radiation from hyperboloidal inlet ducts which include 
a circular cylinder with plane baffle as a limiting case was 
investigated. Results include the polar angle variation of the 
pressure level and the phase of the radiated field for various 
frequencies and various modes incident which were produced 
using an electronically operated mode synthesizer. Good 
agreement with a rigorous theoretical prediction was found. 

A.R.H. 

N79-27932*jj( National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 
Langley Research Center. Hampton. Va. 

ON THE ATTENUATION OF SOUND BY THREE- 
DIMENSIONALLY SEGMENTED ACOUSTIC UNERS IN A 
RECTANGULAR DUCT 

W. Koch (Institut fuer Theoretische Stroemungsmechanik, 
DFVLR/AVA. Goettingen, Germany) Jun. 1979 29 p 
(NASA-TM-80118) Avail; NTIS HC A03/MF A01 CSCL 
20A 

Axial segmentation of acoustically absorbing liners in 
rectangular, circular or annual duct configurations is a very useful 
concept for obtaining higher noise attenuation with respect to 
the bandwidth of absorption as well as the maximum attenua- 
tion. As a consequence, advanced liner concepts are proposed 
which induce a modal energy transfer in both cross-sectional 
directions to further reduce the noise radiated from turbofan 
engines. However, these advanced liner concepts require 
three-dimensional geometries which are difficult to treat 
theoretically. A very simple three-dimensional problem is 
investigated analytically. The results show a strong dependence 
on the positioning of the liner for some incident source modes 
while the effect of three-dimensional segmentation appears to 
be negligible over the frequency range considered. A.R.H. 

N79-27933*/j( Lockheed-Georgia Co., Marietta. 

STUDIES OF THE ACOUSTIC TRANSMISSION CHARAC- 
TERISTICS OF COAXIAL NOZZLES WITH INVERTED 
VELOCITY PROFILES: COMPREHENSIVE DATA REPORT 

Final Report 

P. D. Dean. M. Salikuddin, K. K. Ahuja, H. E. Plumblee, and P. 
Mungur May 1979 182 p ref 
(Contract NAS3-20797) 

(NASA-CR-159628) Avail: NTIS HC A09/MF A01 CSCL 
20A 

The efficiency of internal noise radiation through a coannular 
exhaust nozzle with an inverted velocity profile was studied. A 
preliminary investigation was first undertaken (1) to define the 
test parameters which influence the internal noise radiation; 
(2) to develop a test methodology which could realistically be 
used to examine the effects of the test parameters: and (3) to 
validate this methodology. The result was the choice of an acoustic 
impulse as the internal noise source in the jet nozzles. Noise 
transmission characteristics of a coannular nozzle system were 
then investigated. In particular, the effects of fan convergence 
angle, core extension length to annulus height ratio and flow 
Mach numbers and temperatures were studied. Relevant spectral 


558 



N79-28058 


data only is presented in the form of normalized nozzle transfer 
function versus nondimensional frequency. A.R.H. 


N79-27978]!/ Naval Ocean Systems Center. San Diego, Calif. 

AIRCRAFT FIBER-OPTIC INTERCONNECT SYSTEMS 
PROJECT 

T. A. Meador 1 Mar. 1979 47 p refs 

(AD-A068366; NOSC/TR-390) Avail: NTIS 

HC A02/MF A01 CSCL 20/6 

The Avioptics Program is an engineering* and application 
development program whose central objective is to support the 
preparation of fiber-optic transmission technology for use in naval 
aircraft. The program has been organized and is being managed 
by the Air Surveillance Systems Project Office code 7309 of 
the Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC). The Avioptics Program 
Plan is presented in detail in NOSC Technical Document 197.1. 
The applications of principal interest in the Avioptics Program 
are the transmission interconnects of aircraft multiplex systems. 
Included within the scope of this area are digital time division 
multiplex TDM systems, video multiplex and distribution systems, 
and such equipment ensembles as armaments, flight control, 
and voice communications. GRA 


N79-28037jjf Department of Energy, Bartlesville. Okla. Energy 
Technology Center. 

ENTHALPY OF COMBUSTION OF RJ-6 

N. K. Smith Apr. 1979 10 p refs 
(Grant AF-AFOSR-0009-78) 

(AD-A067968; AFOSR-79-0508TR) Avail: NTIS 

HC A02/MF AOl CSCL 21/4 

In cooperation with the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, 
this laboratory has studied compounds that may be used to 
impart particular properties to fuels such as high enthalpy of 
combustion per unit volume or per unit mass. This report 
concerns the ramjet fuel RJ-6. Author (GRA) 


N79-28068/{/ Department of Energy. Washington. D. C. Office 
of Regulations and Emergency Planning. 

FINDINGS AND VIEWS CONCERNING THE EXEMPTION 
OF KEROJET FUELS FROM THE MANDATORY PETROLEUM 
ALLOCATION AND PRICE REGULATIONS 

Dec. 1978 105 p refs 

(DOE/ERA-0023) Avail: NTIS HC A06/MF AOl 

Based on an analysis of historic and projected supply, demand, 
and price trends, the DOE concluded that allocation and price 
controls are no longer necessary for kerojet fuel and that exemption 
of kerojet fuel will be consistent with the attainment, to the 
maximum extent practicable, of the objectives specified. DOE 


559 



SUBIECT INDEX 


AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING / A Continuing Bibliography (Suppt. 114) 

Typical Subject Index Listing 


OCTOBER 1979 


AEBODTHAfllC LOADS- 


SUBJECT 

HEADING 


TITLE 

1 

EXTENSION 

h 


-Supersonic unstalled flutter aerodynaiic I 

loading of thin airfoils induced by cascade notion; 
[HASA-TH-7900n N79-11000 



The title is used to provide a description of the subject matter. When the title is 
insufficiently descriptive of the document content, a title extension is added, 
separated from the title by three hyphens. The NASA or AIAA accession number 
is included in each entry to assist the user in locating the abstract in the abstract 
section of this supplement. If applicable, a report number is also included as an 
aid in identifying the document. 


A 


ABLATIVE HATEBIALS 

Aualytical nodeling of ramjet combustor heat 
transfer toodes 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1124] A79-40476 

ACCESSOBIES 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 

imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 
caused by rotor blade loss 


H79-27171 

ACOUSTIC ATTB8QATIOB 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 

ACOUSTIC DUCTS 


On the attenuation of sound by three-dimensionally 
segmented acoustic liners in a rectangular duct 
[HASA-TH-80118] H79-27932 

ACOUSTIC EBISSIOB 

Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[NASA-TH-79208] H79-27930 

ACOUSTIC BEASUBEBEHTS 

An experimental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[NASA-TH-80109] H79-27931 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

nozzle transfer functions 

[NASA-CR-159628] N79-27933 

ACOUSTICS 

An evaluation of linear acoustic theory for a 
hovering rotor 

[SASA-TH-80059] H79-26881 

ADHESITB BOIDIIG 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 


A79-43314 

The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 


A79- 43315 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 


A79-43317 

AEBIAL PHOTOGBAPHT 

The potential role of airships for oceanography 
[AIAA 79-1574] A79-42381 

AEBIAL BECOHBAISSAHCE 


Unmanned mini-blimp system 
[AIAA 79-1610] 


AEBOACOUSTICS 

Wave propagation associated with wings three 

dimensional unsteady flow analysis for 
supersonic aircraft 

A79-43597 

AEBODTHABIC CHABACTEBISTICS 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 


A79-42560 

Problems associated with flows in aerodynamic 
wakes of blade cascades 


A79-43607 

Wind tunnel simulation of the firing of missiles 
carried under aircraft 

[OHEBA, TP HO, 1979-65] A79-43622 

Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal 
aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind 
tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane 
C HASA-CB- 158753 ] H79-2601 8 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 

configuration wind tunnel tests 

[ HASA-TP-1 434 ] H79-26020 

Effect of nose bluntness and afterbody shape on 
aerodynamic characteristics of a monoplanar 
missile concept with bodies of circular and 
elliptical cross sections at a Bach number of 2,50 
CHASA-TB-80055] H79-26023 

Aerodynamic characteristics of the close-coupled 
canard as applied to low-to-moderate swept 
wings. Volume 2: Subsonic speed regime 

[AD-A067122] H79-26025 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[HASA-CB-1 52286] H79- 26067 

Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and 
geometric anhedral on the low— speed aerodynamic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 

swept arrow-wing configuration langley 7 by 

10 foot tunnel 

[HASA-TB-80083] H79-27095 

A flight investigation of basic performance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attack 
helicopter 

[HASA-TH-80112] H79-27097 

Wind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Bepublic 

[IPD-5-78] H79-27107 

Investigations of interference effects in a wind 
tunnel caused by a model support strut on a 
reflection plane mounted half model 
[FFA-TH-AU-1335:2] H79-27109 

Aerodynamics of a tilt-nacelle V/STOL propulsion 
system 

[ NASA-TB-78606 ] H79-27 138 

AEBODTBABIC COBFFICIEITS 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 


AEBODTHABIC C0HFI60BATI0HS 


A79-41945 


Further advancements in the concept of 
delta-winged hybrid-airships 

[AIAA 79-1599] A79-42393 

Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic drag 
of simple bodies in two-phase flow 

A79-43172 

Rotor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip 
speed fan, 1 : Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

[HASA-CB-159596] H79-26055 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[ HASA-CR-1 52286 ] H79-26067 


A79-42401 







&BBODTHAHIC DBA6 


SOBJECT IlDBZ 


Influence of optinized leading-edge deflection and 
geonetric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynanic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 

swept arrow-wing configuration langley 7 by 

10 foot tunnel 

[HASA-TH-80083] H79- 27095 

Calculation of pressure distribution for a 

wing-body conbination at subsonic Hach nunbers 
[PFA-TH-AO-1091 ] H79-27110 

AEBODTHAHIC DBA6 

Effects of Beynolds nunber and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1167] A79-h0481 

Indirect measurement of turbulent skin friction 

A79-40770 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 

A79-41945 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic drag 
of simple bodies in two-phase flow 

A79-43172 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisymmetric cylinder 

A79-43711 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical-raetal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[HASA-TH-80092] B79-27098 

AEBODTHAHIC FOBCES 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

Development of a research plan for the improvement 
of aerodynamic models for analysis of ballistic 
range data 

[ AD-A067950 ] H79-26029 

AEBODTHAHIC HEATIHG 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 
IF- 12 skin structures 

A79-43243 

AEBODTHAHIC LOADS 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

H79-27176 

Supersonic nnstalled flutter 

H79-27181 

AEBODTHAHIC BOISE 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 

c^culated results - — from helicopter rotors in 
an anechoic chamber 


A79-43499 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43500 

Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[HASA-TH-79208] H79-27930 

AEBODTHAHIC STABILITT 

Botor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an AH/ALQ-144 Jammer 
[AD-A067757] H79-26047 

Prediction of aeroelastic instabilities in 
rotorcraft 


H79-27159 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

H79-27178 

AEBO DT HAHIC STALL IHG ' 

A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil on 

wind tunnel models to reduce spin entry after 
stall 


[HASA-CB-158717] H79-26013 

AEBO DTHA Hies 

Application of a laminar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 


A79-41304 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading 
edge 

[HASA-CB- 152276] H79-26024 


Heapon/aircraft interactions 
AEBOELASTICITT 

Optimization of the weight of a wing with 
constraints on the static aeroelasticity 


B79-27205 


A79-42410 

The fibre composite helicopter blade 

A79-43712 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage motion 

[HASA-CB-1 58778] 879-27125 

Stresses, vibrations, structural integration and 
engine integrity (including aeroelasticity and 
flutter) 

[ AGABD-CP-248] B79-27148 

Prediction of aeroelastic instabilities in 
rotorcraft 


H79-27159 


Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

H7 9- 27 178 

AFTEBBDBHIH6 

Alternate subsonic low-cost engine 

[AD-A067277] H79-26058 

Integration of an airframe with a turbofan and 
afterburner system 

879-27172 

AGIH6 (HATEBIALS) 

Overage indicators for prepreg products 

materials performance for military aircraft 

A79-43253 

AGBICULTOBAL AIBCBAFT 

System design requirements for advanced 
rotary-wing agricultural aircraft 
t HASA-CB-1 58938] 879-26046 

AILEBOHS 

A general method for the layout of ailerons and 
elevators of gliders and motorplanes 

879-27076 

AIB CABGO 

Ilyushin 'Candid* — - Soviet transport for 
enhanced air nobility and logistical support 

A79-42423 

Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for 
transporting outsize cargo 

[HASA-CH-I 59067] 879-26063 

Airfreight forecasting methodology and results 

879-27114 

The 1990 direct support infrastructure 

879-27115 

AIB COOLIBG 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

Computer calculation of steady-state temperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 

A79-42553 

AIB COSHIOH LAHDIHG STSTEHS 

Air cushion landing gear applications study 

[HASA-CH-159002] 879-26045 

AIB IHTAKES 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 

Dynamic pressure loads in the air induction system 
of the tornado fighter aircraft 

879-27168 

The effect of intake conditions on supersonic 
flutter. in turbofan engines 

879-27175 

AIB JETS 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 


A79-42558 

AIB LAUHCHIHG 

Hind tunnel simulation of the firing of missiles ^ 
carried under aircraft 

(OHEHA, TP 80. 1979-65] A79-43622 

AIB HATIGATIOH 

Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems. I 

A79-41167 

Advanced instrumentation and data evaluation 

techniques for flight tests of aircraft 

navigation systems 

A79-41777 


A-2 



SUBJECT IBDEZ 


&IBCSAFT BBEKES 


Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAH navigation through fregaent change 
of TACAH stations 

A79-t»1778 

The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 
airline operations 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-024] A79-42352 

The DHE-based Azinuth System /UAS/ as a commercial 
navigation aid 

[OGLE PAPEB 79-038] A79-42364 

Investigation of different system configurations 
for a THA navigation system taking special 
account of traffic load and channel requirements 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

Possibilities for increasing distance measurement 

accuracy of DEE Distance Heasuring Equipment 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-040] A79-42366 

A simple integrated navigation system based on 
multiple DHE 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-041] A79-42367 

Increasing guidance accuracy through use of an 
integrated digital piloting system 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-043] A79-42369 

Fundamentals of navigation in the terminal 
maneuvering area 

^ A79-42377 

Quasi-autonomous navigation system for 

aircraft position indication 

A79-43505 

Solution of navigation problems in aircraft 

onboard systems equipped with digital computer 

A79-43506 

Some possibilities for the navigation of small 
passenger aircraft 

A79-43508 

navigation instruments for small passenger 
aircraft of the 1980s 

A79-43509 

Compass system for small aircraft 

A79-43510 

Technical means for automation of air navigation 

A79-43S13 

Navigation at high latitudes 

A79-43514 


AIB POLLOTIOB 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

AIB SAflPLIHG 

Heteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear 
air turbulent sampling missions with an 
instrumented B-57B aircraft. Volume 2, appendix 
C: Turbulence missions 

[HASA-TH-80045] F79-27772 

AIB TBAFFIC 

Aircraft obstruction of microwave links 

[PB-292372/0] H79-26288 

AIB TBAFFIC COBTBOL 

Hanoeuvre handling in a multiradar, a.t.c. system 

A79-41176 

Geneva^. Zurich get fine-grain 3-D color weather 
radar 

A79-41850 


Possibilities and limitations of air traffic control 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-023] A79-42351 

The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 

airline operations 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-024] A79-42352 

Air traffic control requirements from the 
viewpoint of the airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-025] A79-42353 

Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems and 
perspectives 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-026] A79-42354 

Factors influencing runway capacity as typified by 
the Hunich-Biem airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-030] A79-42357 

Air traffic control strategies for handling air 
traffic in the terminal area 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-032] A79-42359 

Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 
region 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-033] A79- 42360 

Development of specifications for taxiing guidance 
and control systems 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-034] A79-42361 

Technical calculation methods for automatic 

collision recognition and avoidance in air traffic 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-035] A79-42362 


Investigation of different system configurations 
for a THA navigation system taking special 
account of traffic load and channel requirements 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 

relationships with optimal filters in 

inertial navigation system 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-048] A79-42374 

Hew onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-049] A79-42375 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 

for pilot/controller communication over a 
ground/board/ground data link 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-050] A79-42376 

Fundamentals of navigation in the terminal 
maneuvering area 

A79-42377 

Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 

Uplink ATCBBS environment measurements along the 
Boston- Washington corridor. Volume 2: 

Interrogator characteristics 

[AD-A067944] H79-26041 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA's developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[AD-A068401] H79-27118 

Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) Air Traffic 
control Badar Beacon System (ATCBBS) 
interference analysis 

[AD-A068565] H79-27119 

AIB TBAFFIC COVTBOLLBBS (PEBSOHHEL) 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
ground/board/ground data link 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-050] A79-42376 

AIB TBAISPOBTATIOH 

Airport engineering Book 

A79-40139 

Problems of increasing the efficiency of Balev. II 
— - airline operations 

A79-41168 

Quiet propulsive lift for commuter airlines 

[HASA-TH-78596] H79-26035 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[ H AS A-CB-1 59075] H79-27185 

AIBBOBBB EQUIPHBHT 

Application of color-coding in airborne tactical 
displays 

[AD-A067558] H79-27137 

AIBBOBHB/SPACEBOBHB COBPUTBBS 

Hew paths for the development of aircraft 
equipment opened up by the use of modem 

computer technology digital systems for 

civil aviation 

A79-43501 

Prospects for airborne computer systems 

A79-43502 

Solution of navigation problems in aircraft 

onboard systems equipped with digital computer 

A79-43506 


AIBCBAFT ACCIDBHT IBTBSTIGATIOH 

What makes a plane crash DC- 10 crash 

investigation 

A79-41727 

Aircraft accident report: Las Vegas Airlines, 

Piper PA-31-350, H44LV, Las Vegas, Nevada, 

August 30, 1978 

[ HTSB-AAB-79-8] N79-26034 

AIBCBAFT ACCIDBRS 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79-42394 

AIBCBAFT ABTEIVAS 

Ricrostrip antenna elements for use in 
hemispherically scanned arrays 

[AD-A068566] H79-27366 

AIBCBAFT APPBOACB SPACING 

Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 
region 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-033] A79-42360 

AIBCBAFT BBAKES 

Elimination of friction induced thermal cracks in 
landing gear components 


A79-43273 



AIBCB&FT COBHOHIC&TIOH 


SOBJBCT IHDBX 


AIBCB&FT COBBOBICATIOB 

Application oriented sianlation as a tool for the 

planning of radio beacon systens for 

aircraft comnnnications 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-042] A79-42368 

The basic geodetic shapes and position lines 

A79-43507 

AIBCBAFT COBPABTBBBTS 

Special sandwich constructions for the interior of 
coaoercial aircraft 

A79-43270 

AIBCBAFT COBFIGOBATIOBS 

Preparing for the TKP 90 

A79-40326 

Type A T/STOL propulsion system development 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1287] A79-40755 

nuclear aircraft innovations and applications 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-0846] A79-41913 

British lighter-than-air activity - A review 

[AIAA 79-1583] A79-42385 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 

Winglets are no drag enhancement of 

aerodynamic efficiency with vertical wingtip 
extensions 

A79-43457 

Technology reguirements and readiness for very 
large vehicles 

[NASA-TH-80127] B79-27086 

Summary of results for a twin-engine« low-wing 
airplane substructure crash impact condition 
analyzed with program KBASB 

[AD-A069171] B79-27116 

AIBCBAFT COBSTBOCTIOB BATEBIAIS 

TC-14 thermoplastic/graphite elevator 

. A79-43241 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 
TF-12 skin structures 

A79-43243 

C-141 hybrid composite leading edge — - materials 
and fabrication methods 

A79-43244 

Becent advances in fire resistant materials in 
aircraft construction 

A79-43269 

Special sandwich constructions for the interior of 
commercial aircraft 

A79-43270 

Plight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels in wide-bodied commercial 
transport aircraft 

[ NASA-CR-159071 ] N79-27246 

AIBCBAFT COBTBOI 

Flight control, II - Control system design 

German book 


A79-40155 


Fly-by-light 

A79-43458 

State of the art survey of technologies applicable 
to RASA'S aeronautics, avionics and controls 
program 

[NASA-CB-159050] M79-27087 

AIBCBAFT OBSIGB 


Canadair Challenger business jet subsystems 

and structural design 

A79-40313 

Preparing for the TKP 90 


A79-40326 

First flight imminent for new technology wing 

A79-40327 


Can Europe choose a common fighter 

A79-41209 

Slender wings for civil and military aircraft 
/Eighth Theodore von Karman Hemorial Lecture/ 

A79-41766 

Nuclear aircraft innovations and applications 

[AIAA PAPER 79-0846] A79-41913 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 

[DGLR PAPER 79-052] A79-42348 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 

the transporter design stage — - military aviation 
[DGLR PAPER 79-054] A79-42349 

Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, 

Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical 
Papers 


Tri-rotor Coast Guard airship 

[AIAA 79-1573] A79-42380 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-42400 

Becent advances in fire resistant materials in 
aircraft construction 

A79-43269 

Allowable notch effectivity criterion for aircraft 
structures 

A79-43515 

Fundamentals of design. II - VTO for combat aircraft 

A79-43724 

Fundamentals of design. Ill - V-G for combat 
aircraft 


A79-43725 

Air cushion landing gear applications study 

[NASA-Ce-159002] H79-26045 

Experimental investigation into the feasibility of 
an extruded wing 

N79-27077 

The ultralight sailplane 

B79-27080 

Beapon/aircraft interactions 

R79-27205 


AIBCBAFT BBGIBES 


New techniques in jet engine balancing 

A79-40314 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1149] A79-40480 

Development of materials and processes for engine 

components - Current and future points of interest 

A79-40680 

CPH56 - An act of cooperation, a new class of 

engine, a path towards the aeronautics of tomorrow 

A79-42065 

Influence of delay time and dead time on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-029] A79-42356 

•Thruster control for airships' 

[AIAA 79-1595] A79-42389 

Seasuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

Through-heating of chambers with regenerative 
cooling for aircraft engines 

A79-42570 

Garrett ATF 3 


A79-43469 

Energy efficient aircraft engines 

[NASA-TH-79204] H79-27141 

Stresses, vibrations, structural integration and 
engine integrity (including aeroelasticity and 
flutter) 

[ AGABD-CP-248] H79-27148 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

B79-27150 

Aircraft engine design using experimental stress 
analysis techniques 

B79-27151 

Engine/aircraft structural integration: An overview 

R79-27167 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
Impact of foreign bodies 

F79-27174 

Axial compressor stall — - effects on aircraft 
engines 

N79-27435 

AIBCBAFT EQOIPBEBT 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation, detection, 

telecommunications, and instrumentation 

[OHERA, TP BO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

A simulation investigation of cockpit display of 
aircraft traffic during curved, descending, 
decelerating approaches 

[ HASA-TB-80098] B79-26052 

AIBCBAFT FUELS 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 

Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 
transport systems. II 

A79-43734 

Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels 
[HASA-CB-158773] B79-27321 


A79-42378 



SOBJECfF IHOEX 


AIBC6&FT SPECIPIC&TIOBS 


Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
aviation gasoline from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

[DOE/EHA-0024] H79- 27336 

Enthalpy of combustion of BJ-6 

[AD-A067968] H79-28037 

&IBCBAFT GUIO&BCE 

Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems and 
perspectives 

[DGLR PAPEB 79-026] A79-42354 

Increasing guidance accuracy through use of an 
integrated digital piloting system 
(DGLB PAPEB 79-043] A79-42369 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLR PAPER 79-044] A79-42370 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 
modern methods of digital signal processing 
[DGLR PAPEB 79-046] A79- 42372 

Study of the theoretical to real correspondence of 
an optimal control model and the significance of 
this model for the description of working 
methodology with partly automated aircraft 
guidance and control systems 

[ILR-35] 879-27184 

AIBCBAFT BTDBAOLIC STSTEBS 


Fly-by-light 

A79-43458 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[AD-A067549] 879-27129 

AIBCBAFT IHDUSTBT 

The European Airbus has definitively penetrated 
the world market 

A79-42062 


The European helicopter industry and cooperation 

A79-42064 

CFB56 - Ad act of cooperation, a new class of 

engine, a path towards the aeronautics of tomorrow 

A79-42065 

Enron issile - An example of cooperation with 
respect to missiles 

A79-42067 


AIBCBAFT IISTBDBEBTS 


Display monitoring problems for aircraft pilots 

A79-40315 

Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems. I 


A79-41167 


Onboard methods for increasing landing approach 
capacity upon introduction of HLS 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-047] A79-42373 

New onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-049] A79-42375 

New paths for the development of aircraft 
equipment opened up by the use of modern 

computer technology digital systems for 

civil aviation 


Prospects for airborne computer systems 

Quasi-autonomous navigation system for 

aircraft position indication 


A79-43501 

A79-43502 

A79-43505 


Some possibilities for the navigation of small 
passenger aircraft 


A79-43508 


Navigation instruments for small passenger 
aircraft of the 1980s 


A79-43509 


Compass system for small aircraft 

Ose of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 
suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors 


A79-43510 

A79-43511 


AIBCBAFT LAHDIBG 

A dynamic analysis of landing impact 

A79-41768 

Influence of delay time and dead time on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLR PAPEB 79-029] A79-42356 

Introduction of Category III A at Deutsche 

Lufthansa AG for all-weather landing 

[DGLR PAPER 79-031] A79-42358 

Effects of control system dynamics on fighter 
approach and landing longitudinal flying 
qualities, volume 1 

[AD-A067550] N79-27183 


AIBCBAFT HAIREBABCE 

Demonstration of an improved method for repair of 
bonded aircraft structure 

A79-43276 

Baterial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 


A79-43314 

The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 

A79-43315 

RAH projections for aircraft rotor blades 

[ AD-A068822] 879-27130 

Small turbine engine integration in aircraft 
installations 


AIBCBAFT BABEOFBBS 


879-27170 


Hanoeuvre handling in a mnltiradar, a.t.c. system 

A79-41176 

Investigation of different system configurations 
for a THA navigation system taking special 
account of traffic load and channel requirements 
[DGLR PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

Fundamentals of navigation in the terminal 
maneuvering area 

A79-42377 

The calculation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[ FPL-D8 ACS -11/78] 879-26051 

AIBCBAFT HOOELS 

Effects of Reynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1167] A79-40481 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the National Transonic 
Facility 

[8ASA-TH-80085] 879-26064 

AIBCBAFT BOISE 

Aeronautical research into vertical problems in 
V/STOL aircraft approach landing 

[ lFD-4-78 ] 879-27134 

AIBCBAFT PBBFOBHABCE 

Tri-rotor Coast Guard airship 

[AIAA 79-1573] A79-42380 

The calculation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[8PL-D8ACS -11/78] 879-26051 

Engine performance considerations for the large 
subsonic transport 

879-27139 

AIBCBAFT PILOTS 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-044] A79-42370 

AIBCBAFT BELIABILITT 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79-42394 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an A8/ALQ-144 jammer 
[AD-A067757] N79-26047 

Review of airworthiness standards for 

certification of helicopters for Instrument 
Flight Boles (IFB) operation 

[AD-A068397] 879-27127 

AIBCBAFT SAFETY 

Aircraft passenger seat material development for 
airline fire safety 

A7 9-43 271 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A79-43272 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAN) system and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use 

[AD-A067174] 879-26037 

AIBCBAFT SPECIFICATIOHS 


Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

[AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

The requirement of damage tolerance. An analysis 
of damage tolerance requirements with specific 
reference to HIL-A-83444 

[ 8LB-TR-77005-0 ] N79-27 135 


A-5 



AIBCBAFT SPIB 


SUBJECT IBDBX 


&IBCB&FT SPIB 

A Study of the drooped leading edge airfoil on 

wind tunnel nodels to reduce spin entry after 
stall 

t HASA-CB-158717] H79-26013 

AIBCBAFT STABH.ITI 

Plight dynaiics analyses and siaulation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-h2388 

AXBCBAFT STBOCTOBES 

First flight inainent for new technology wing 

A79-40327 

Indirect aeasureaent of turbulent skin friction 

A79- 40770 

Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 

structure for subsonic transport aircraft 

A79-43245 

Hon destructive evaluation /HDE/ of iapact damage 
in thick graphite composite aircraft structures 
- — for dropped tools on airfields 

A79-43257 

Demonstration of an improved method for repair of 
bonded aircraft structure 

A79-43276 

The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 

A79-43315 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 

A79-43317 

Allowable notch effectivity criterion for aircraft 
structures 

A79-43515 

Hew methods for ground-testing aeronautical 
structures 

[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-47] A79-43620 

Beport of the FAA task force on aircraft 

separation assurance. Volume 1; Executive summary 
[AD-A067905] H79-26042 

Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 

dissimilar materials hypersonic heating 

siaulation 

[FASA-TB-72865] H79- 27088 

AIBCBAFT HAKES 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
configurations 

[HASA-TH-80474] H79-26016 

AIBPIELD S0BFACE BOVEHBBTS 

The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 
airline operations 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-024] A79-42352 

Air traffic control requirements from the 
viewpoint of the airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-025] A79-42353 

Factors influencing runway capacity as typified by 
the Hunich-Eiem airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-030] A79-42357 

Development of specifications for taxiing guidance 
and control systems 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-034] A79-42361 

AIBFOIL PBOFIIES 

The transonic integral equation method with curved 
shock waves 

A79-41407 

Begion of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 


Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

♦ A79-43223 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 

A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil on 

wind tunnel models to reduce spin entry after 
stall 

t HASA-CB-158717 ] H79-26013 

Botor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip 
speed fan. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

( HASA-CB-159596] H79-26055 

AIBFOILS 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 

A79-41945 


Split-film anemometer measurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 

A79-42029 

Rodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

A79-42806 

High tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum fan 
blades 

A79-43332 

A viscous/potential flow interaction analysis for 
circulation-controlled airfoils 

( AD-A06791 3 ] H79-26030 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 

plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical- metal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[ HASA-TH-80092 ] H79-27098 

Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil 

lift 

[HASA-TH-78566] H79- 27100 

Supersonic unstalled flutter 

H79-27181 


AIBFBABB HATEBIALS 

Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 

dissimilar materials hypersonic heating 

simulation 

[ HAS A-TB-72865 ] H79-27088 

AIBFBABES 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 

A79-43314 

Integration of an airframe with a turbofan and 
afterburner system 

H79-27172 

Effects of geometric variables on stress intensity 
factors for crack gages 

[AD-A068631] H79-27533 

AIBLIHB OPEBATIOHS 

Hew air service and deregulation - A study in 
transition 

A79-40172 

Problems of increasing the efficiency of Balev. II 
airline operations 

A79-41168 

The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 
airline operations 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-024] A79-42352 

Introduction of Category IIIA at Deutsche 
Lufthansa AG — for all-weather landing 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-031] A79-42358 

Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 


Aircraft accident report: Las Vegas Airlines, 

Piper PA-31-350, H44LV, Las Vegas, Hevada, 

August 30, 1978 

[HTSB-AAB-79-8] H79-26034 

Airfreight forecasting methodology and results 

H79-27114 

The 1990 direct support infrastructure 

H79-27115 


AIBPLAHB PBODOCtlOB COSTS 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 

the transporter design stage military aviation 

[DGLB PAPER 79-054] A79-42349 

AIBPOBT PLA1BIB6 

Airport engineering Book 

A79-40139 


Air traffic control requirements from the 
viewpoint of the airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-025] A79-42353 

Sharjah - An airport out of Arabian Hights 

innovative airport design 

A79-43732 


Bombasa - Helcome to a new airport planning 

and construction 


A79-43733 


AIBPOBTS 

CKS - Taiwan's 21st century airport 

A79-41849 

The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 
airline operations 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-024] A79-42352 

Factors influencing runway capacity as typified by 
the Bnnich-Biem airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-030] A79-42357 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA's developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[AD-A068401] H79-27118 


A-6 



SOBJBCt IBDEZ 


ftBCHITBCTOfiB 


&IBSHIPS 

Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, 

Palo Alto, Calif., Jnly 11-13, 1979, Technical 
Papers 

A79-42378 

Analysis of Coast Gnard nissions for a naritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 

Tri-rotor Coast Gnard airship 

[AIAA 79-1573] A79-42380 

The potential role of airships for oceanography 

[AIAA 79-1574] A79-42381 

Modern rigid airships as sea control escort 
platforms 

[AIAA 79-1575] A79-42382 

Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

[AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

Strnctnral loads dne to gnsts on senibnoyant 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1581] A79-42384 

British lighter- than- air activity - A review 

[AIAA 79-1583] A79-42385 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 

[AIAA 79-1585] A79-42386 

Japanese lighter-than-air mission studies 

[AIAA 79-1587] A79-42387 

Flight dynamics analyses and sinnlation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-42388 

•Thruster control for airships* 

[AIAA 79-1595] A79-42389 

The prodnctivity of airships in long-range 
transportation 

[AIAA 79-1596] A79-42390 

Lighter-than-air craft for strategic nobility 

[AIAA 79-1597] A79-42391 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

Further advancements in the concept of 
delta-winged hybrid-airships 

[AIAA 79-1599] A79-42393 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79-42394 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79- 42395 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

Applications of a high-altitude powered platform 
/HAPP/ 

[AIAA 79-1603] A79-42397 

Wind study for high altitude platform design 

[AIAA 79-1607] A79-42398 

The ATHOSAT Program 1975-78 manned 

superpressure balloon flights for atmospheric 
monitoring 

[AIAA 79-1608] A79-42399 

Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-42400 

Unmanned mini-blimp system 

[AIAA 79-1610] A79-42401 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air vehicles 
[AIAA 79-1570] A79-42403 

Airship dynamic stability 

[AIAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 
[AIAA 79-1606] 

ALL-WBATBBB LABDIB6 STSTBHS 

Introduction of Category IIIA at Deutsche 

Lufthansa AG for all-weather landing 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-031] 

ALPHA JET AIBCBAFT 

Alpha Jet - The Franco-German training and 
tactical support aircraft 

A79-42063 

ALTIHETEBS 

An experimental comparison of the readability of 
two digital altimeters 

[ ABL/SYS-HOTE-60] H79-26053 

Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars 
[ HASA-CASB-HPO-14361-1 ] H79-26253 


A79-42405 


A79-42358 


ALTITBDB TBST5 

Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing 
with liquid hydrogen 

[HASA-TH-79196] H79-27140 

ALOHIHOH UIOTS 

Estimation of fatigue life of Al-alloy used for 
compressor disc of jet engine 

A79-42624 

ALOaiBOB BOBOB COaPOSITBS 

Applications of metal-matrix composites, the 
emerging structural materials 

A79-43320 

High tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum fan 
blades 

A79-43332 

ALUaiBOH 6BAFBITB COHPOSITBS 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 

A79-43317 

Applications of metal-matrix composites, the 
emerging structural materials 

A79-43320 

Hybrid Wing Box structure 

A79-43331 

AHHOlIOa BITBATBS 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1327] A79-40761 

AHPHIBIOUS AIBCBAFT 

Air cushion landing gear applications study 

[NASA-CB-1 59002] B79-26045 

AHBCHOIC CHABBEBS 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 

calculated results — from helicopter rotors in 
an anechoic chamber 

A79-43499 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43500 

ABODIZIB6 

Demonstration of an improved method for repair of 
bonded aircraft structure 

A79-43276 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 

A79-43317 

AHTBBBA ABBATS 

Hicrostrip antenna elements for use in 
hemispherically scanned arrays 

[AD-A068566] H79-27366 

ABTIFBICTIOB BBABIBGS 

Elimination of friction induced thermal cracks in 
landing gear components 

A79-43273 

ABTIHISSIIE DEFBBSB 

Modern rigid airships as sea control escort 
platforms 

[AIAA 79-1575] A79-42382 

AHTISQB8ABIBB B ABF ABE AIBCBAFT 

Modern rigid airships as sea control escort 
platforms 

[AIAA 79-1575] A79-42382 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 

APPBOACB 

Effects of control system dynamics on fighter 
approach and landing longitudinal flying 
qualities, volume 1 

[AD-A067550] H79-27183 

APPBOACB COBTBOL 

Air traffic control requirements from the 
viewpoint of the airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-025] A79-42353 

Missed approach of commercial aircraft regarding 
wind shear in the ground boundary layer 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-028] A79-42355 

Decelerated approach - Comparison of different 
procedures 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-045] A79-42371 

Onboard methods for increasing landing approach 
capacity upon introduction of MLS 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-047] A79-42373 

ABCHITSCTOBB 

Sharjah - An airport out of Arabian Mights — - 
innovative airport design 

A79-43732 


A-7 



USl HITI6ATI0I 


SOBJSCT IHDBX 


ABEA HAVIGATIOH 

Investigation of different systea confignrations 
for a THA navigation systea taking special 
account of traffic load and channel reguireaents 
[OGLE PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

Fundamentals of navigation in the terainal 
maneuvering area 

A79-42377 


ABGOH LASEBS 

Application of a laminar 
smoke visualization of 
tunnels 


lighting device to the 
aerodynamic flows in wind 

A79-41304 


ABBBD FOBCES (OIITED STATES) 

Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air vehicles 
[AIAA 79-1570] A79-42403 

ABBOB BIHGS 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 
configuration — - wind tunnel tests 
[ HASA-TP-1434] H79-26020 

Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and 
geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 

swept arrow-wing configuration langley 7 by 

10 foot tunnel 

[NASA-TH-80083] H79-27095 

ASCEBT PBOPOISIOB STSTEflS 

Quiet propulsive lift for commuter airlines 

[HASA-TH-78596] H79- 26035 

ASSEBBLIHG 

YC-14 thermoplastic/graphite elevator 

A79-43241 


ATLIT PfiOJECT 

Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal 
aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind 
tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane 

[HASA-CE- 158753] H79-26018 

ATBOSPHEBIC PBTSICS 

The ATHOSAT Program 1975-78 manned 

superpressure balloon flights for atmospheric 
monitoring 

[AIAA 79-1608] A79-42399 

ATBOSPHEBIC TOBBOLEBCB 

Meteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear 
air turbulent sampling missions with an 
instrumented B-57B aircraft. Volume 2, appendix 
C: Turbulence missions 

[ NASA-TH-80045 ] N79-27772 

AOTOHATIC COHTBOl 

Technical calculation methods for automatic 

collision recognition and avoidance in air traffic 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-035] A79-42362 

AOTOBATIC FLIGHT COHTBOL 

Plight control. II - Control system design 

German book 

A79-40155 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor-based 
flight control systems 

A79-40664 

Increasing guidance accuracy through use of an 
integrated digital piloting system 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-043] A79-42369 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 
modern methods of digital signal processing 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-046] A79-42372 

Technical means for automation of air navigation 

A79-43513 

Study of the theoretical to real correspondance of 
an optimal control model and the significance of 
this model for the description of working 
methodology with partly automated aircraft 
guidance and control systems 

[ILB-35] S79-27184 

AOTOHATIC PILOTS 

The Influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-044] A79-42370 

AOTOHATIC TEST EQOIPHEHT 

New techniques in jet engine balancing 

A79-40314 

AOTOHATIOH 

Technical means for automation of air navigation 

A79-43513 

AOTOflOBILE BHGIBES 

Begenerator matrices for automotive gas turbines 

A79-42981 


ATIOBICS 

Trends in reliability modeling technology for 
fault tolerant systems 

[ HASA-TH-80089] N79-26810 

State of the art survey of technologies applicable 
to NASA's aeronautics, avionics and controls 
program 

[HASA-CB-159050] H79-27087 

Aircraft fiber-optic interconnect systems project 
[ AD- A068366 ] H79-27978 

AXIAL FL01 T0B6IBBS 

Experimental studies of axial and radial 

compressors by means of new measurement techniques 

A79-41237 

Honstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 


AXISTHBBTBIC BODIES 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisymmetric cylinder 

A79-43711 


AZIHOTH 

The DHE-based Azimuth System /DAS/ as a commercial 
navigation aid 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-038] A79-42364 


B 


BALAHCE 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 
. imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 
caused by rotor blade loss 

H79-27171 


6ALAHCIHG 

Hew techniques in jet engine balancing 

A79-40314 

BALLISTIC BADGES 

Development of a research plan for the improvement 
of aerodynamic models for analysis of ballistic 
range data 

[ AD- A067950 ] N79-26029 

BALLOOH FLIGHT 

The ATHOSAT Program 1975-78 manned 

superpressure balloon flights for atmospheric 
monitoring 

[AIAA 79-1608] A79-42399 

BALLOOH-BOBIE IHSTBUHEITS 

Hind study for high altitude platform design 

[AIAA 79-1607] A79-42398 

Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-42400 

BIBD-AIBCBAFT COLLISIOHS 

An evaluation of the bird/aircraft strike hazard 
Dyess Air Force Base, Texas 

[AD-A068026] H79-26039 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
impact of foreign bodies 

H79-27174 


BLADE TIPS 

Bigh tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum fan 
blades 

A79-43332 

A method of computing the pressure distribution on 
a single-bladcd hovering helicopter rotor 

H79-26044 


BLOCKIBG 

Aircraft obstruction of microwave links 

[PB-292372/0] H79-26288 

BLUET BODIES 

Numerical methods for solution of 

radiative-convective heat transfer problems - 

Badiative boundary layer for hypersonic 

blunt bodies in dense atmosphere 

A79-42971 

BODIES OF BETOLUTIOH 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution 

computerized design 

[AD-A067927] N79-26031 

BODT-HIHG AID TAIL COHFIGDBATIOHS 

Simplified calculation method for subsonic 
airloads on wing-body combinations 

A79-40200 

BODT-HIHG COHFIGDBATIOHS 

Numerical evaluation of transonic equivalence rule 
[AD-A067902] H79-27101 



SOBJBCT ISDBX 


CBB&HICS 


BOBIBG 747 AIBCBiPf 

Ground- based measureaents of the vake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
configurations 

(HiSA-TH-80474] N79-26016 

Boeing 747 aircraft vith large external pod for 
transporting outsixe cargo 

[ NftSi-CB-159067} H79-26063 

BOBOB-BPOXT COBPOOHOS 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-conposites 
on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire 

*79-43272 

BOOBDBBT IITEB COBTBOL 

& viscous/potential flow interaction analysis for 
circulation-controlled airfoils 

[*D-*067913] H79-26030 

Perfornance of a 7/STOl tilt nacelle inlet with 
bloving boundary layer control 

[HiS*-TM-791761 R79-27093 

BOUHO&BT LBTBB EQUATIOIS 

On a property of the linearized boundary layer 
equations with self-induced pressure 

A79-41568 

BOOHOABT LATBB BLOB 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 

OptinuB tail fairings for bodies of revolution 

computerized design 

[AD-A067927] N79-26031 

BOBRDABI LATBB SBPABATIOH 

Split-film anemometer measurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 

A79-42029 

BOBHOABI LATBB TBABSITIOB 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading 
edge 

[NASA-CB-152276] H79-26024 

BOUHDABT L AT BBS 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the Rational Transonic 
Facility 

[HASA-TH-80085] H79-26064 

BOOBOABT 7ALUB PBOBLBHS 

Simplified calculation method for subsonic 
airloads on wing-body combinations 

A79-40200 

Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equation 

A79-43135 

Region of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 


BB0ADCASTIR6 

Tethered telecommunications » broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-42400 

BUOTAHCT 


Structural loads due to gusts on semibuoyant 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1581] A79-42384 

The productivity of airships in long-range 
transportation 

[AIAA 79-1596] A79-42390 

BOBRBBS 

Progress on Tariable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1312] A79-40759 

BTPASSBS 

General Electric Company variable cycle engine 
technology demonstrator programs 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1311] A79-40758 


C 


C-130 AIBCBAFT 

The structural effects and detection of variations 
in Hercules 3501-5A and Avco 5505 resin systems 

A79-43261 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins — for quality control 

A79-43264 

C-141 AIBCBAFT 

C-141 hybrid composite leading edge materials 

and fabrication methods 

A79-43244 


CAHADA 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 
[AIAA 79-1585] 


A79- 42386 


CABADAIB AIBCBAFT 

Canadair Challenger business jet subsystems 

and structural design 

A79-40313 

CABABB C0BFI6UBATI0SS 

Aerodynamic characteristics of the close-coupled 
canard as applied to lov-to-moderate swept 
wings. Tolume 2: Subsonic speed regime 

[AD-A067122] H79-26025 

YF-17/ADEH system study 

[HASA-CB-1 44882] H79-27126 

CAHOPIBS 

Aircraft transparency failure and logistical cost 
analysis. Volume 1: Program summary 

[A0-AO68719] H79-27131 

CABBOS FIBBBS 

Bon destructive evaluation /HDE/ of impact damage 
in thick graphite composite aircraft structures 
for dropped tools on airfields 

A79-43257 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins — for quality control 


Applications of metal-matrix composites, 
emerging structural materials 

CABBOB BOBOXIDB 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 


A79-43264 

the 


A79-43320 


A79-43436 


CABGO AIBCBAFT 

British lighter-than-air activity - A review 

[AIAA 79-1583] A79-42385 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 

[AIAA 79-1585] A79-42386 

Japanese lighter-than-air mission studies 

[AIAA 79-1587] A79-42387 

Flight dynamics analyses and simulation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-42388 

The productivity of airships in long-range 
transportation 

[AIAA 79-1596] A79-42390 

Lighter-than-air craft for strategic mobility 

[AIAA 79-1597] A79-42391 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

CASCADB FLOB 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

Honstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 

Heasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

^ A79-42891 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

Supersonic unstalled flutter 

CASCADB RIHD TGRRBLS 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

B79-27178 

CATHODE BAT TDBBS 

An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The 

coordinated cockpit display 

[BASA-TH-78559] F79-27136 

CAUCBT PBOBLBB 

Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equation 

A79-43135 

CAVITATIOI FLOW 

Axial compressor stall effects on aircraft 

engines 

H79-27435 

CEBABICS 

Ceramic mainshaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

[ AD-A067904] H79-27516 


A79-43679 


H79-27180 


H79-27181 


A-9 



CH&BBIHG 


SOBJSCT IlDBI 


CH&BBIBG 

ftnalytical nodeling of ran jet coobnstor heat 
transfer modes 

[»IiA PAPEB 79-1124] A79-40476 

CBEHICAL &H&LTSIS 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins for quality control 

A79-43264 

CHEBICAL COHPOSITIOB 

Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels 
[ HASA-CB-158773 ] H79-27321 

CHIBA 

CKS - Taiwan's 21st century airport 

A79-41849 

Civil AVIATIOH 

Hew air service and deregulation - A study in 
transition 

A79-40172 

Problems of increasing the efficiency of Balev- II 
- — airline operations 

A79-41168 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79-42394 

CLSAB AIB TOBBOIEHCE 

Heteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear 
air turbulent sampling missions with an 
instrumented B-57B aircraft. Volume 2, appendix 
C; • Turbulence missions 

[NASA-TM-80045] H79-27772 

COASTAL HATEB 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

COAXIAL HOZZLES 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1312] A79-40759 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles; Comprehensive data report 
nozzle transfer functions 

[BASA-CB-159628] B79-27933 

COCKPIT SIHOLATOBS 

A simulation investigation of cockpit display of 
aircraft traffic during curved, descending, 
decelerating approaches 

[HASA-TH-80098] H79-26052 

COCKPITS 

An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The 

coordinated cockpit display 

[BASA-TH-78559] B79-27136 

COLIISIOH AVOIDAHCB 

Technical calculation methods for automatic 

collision recognition and avoidance in air traffic 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-035] A79- 42362 

Experience in the analysis of real and simulated 
collisions and dangerous encounters in German 
airspace 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-036] A79-42363 

Report of the EAA task force on aircraft 

separation assurance. Volume 1: Executive summary 

[AD-A067905] H79-26042 

COBBUSTIOH CBAHBBBS 

Analytical modeling of ramjet combustor heat 
transfer nodes 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1124] A79-40476 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine combustor 

A79-42207 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 

A79-42558 

Through-heating of chambers with regenerative 
cooling for aircraft engines 

A79-42570 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 
[AD-A067709] H79-26224 

COBBOSTIOB BFFICIEBCT 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine combustor 

A79-42207 


COBBOSTIOB PBODOCTS 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1327] A79-40761 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A79-43272 

COBBOSTIOB TEflPBBATOBB 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

COBET 4 AIBCBAFT 

A study of smoke movement in an aircraft fuselage 
[BAE-TB-EP-613] H79-26040 

COBBBBCIAL AIBCBAFT 

CFH56 - Fran CO -American ten-tonne turbofan 
production launch 

A79-41207 

Hissed approach of commercial aircraft regarding 
wind shear in the ground boundary layer 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-028] A79-42355 

Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 
structure for subsonic transport aircraft 

A79-43245 

Special sandwich constructions for the interior of 
commercial aircraft 

A79-43270 

COBBUBICATIOB CABLES 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79-42395 

COHPASSBS 

Sources and magnitude of radio compass 
instrumental errors 

A79-43503 

COBPOIEBT BBLIABILITT 

Service life parameters of turbine blades 

A79-40684 

COBPOSITB BATBBIALS 

C-141 hybrid composite leading edge materials 

and fabrication methods 

A79-43244 

Hon destructive evaluation /NDE/ of impact damage 
in thick graphite composite aircraft structures 
for dropped tools on airfields 

A79-43257 

Advanced composites in sailplane structures: 
Application and mechanical properties 

H79-27079 

Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels in wide-bodied commercial 
transport aircraft 

[ H AS A-CB- 159071] H79-27246 

COBPOSITB STBOCTQBBS 

Effect of variances and manufacturing tolerances 
on the design strength and life of mechanically 
fastened composite joints 

[AD-A069170] H79- 27518 

COBPBBSSBD GAS 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type "slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 


COBPBESSIBLE FLOW 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 

COHPBBSSOB BLADES 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[ AD-A067969 ] H79-26060 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

H79-27158 


COBPBBSSOB BOTOBS 

Rotor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip 
speed fan. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

[ HAS A-CH-1 59596] H79-260SS 

COHPBBSSOBS 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

Handling problems through compressor deterioration 

B79-27169 


A-10 



SOBJBCT IHDSX 


CB&SHBS 


Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in conpressors 

H79-27178 

COHPOTBB GB&FHICS 

&n advanced cockpit instrunentation system The 
coordinated cockpit display 

t NASl-TH-78559] H79- 27136 

COBPOTBB PBOGBABS 

Structuring of data systeas: Psychophysiological 

data from the dynanic flight siaulator 
tiD-A067175] H79-27014 

Summary of results for a twin-engine, low-wing 
airplane substructure crash impact condition 
analyzed with program KBISH 

( AD-&069171 ] H79-27116 

COBPOTEB STSTEBS DESIGB 

Prospects for airborne computer systems 

A79-43502 

COBPOTEB TECBBIQOES 

Technical means for automation of air navigation 

A79-43513 

Engine/aircraft structural integration: An overview 

H79-27167 

COBPOTEBIZED OESIGH 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

Computer calculation of steady-state temperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 

A79-42553 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution 

computerized design 

[ AD-A0679271 H79-26031 

COBPnTBBIZED SlflOLATIOB 

Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

. [AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

Flight dynamics analyses and simulation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-42388 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[ BASA-CR-152286] H79-26067 

The computation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[BE-577] B79-27128 

Aeronautical research into vertical problems in 
V/STOL aircraft approach landing 

[IFD-4-78] N79-27134 

COEPEBEHCES 

Hater ials problems in gas turbine engine 

technology; Colloguium, Bunich, West Germany, 
October 27, 28, 1977, Beport 

A79-40676 

Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference, 

Palo Alto, Calif., July 11-13, 1979, Technical 
Papers 

A79- 42378 

Stresses, vibrations, structural integration and 
engine integrity (including aeroelasticity and 
flutter) 

[ AGABD-CP-248] H79- 27148 

Review of the AGABD S and H panel evaluation 
program of the HASA-lewis SBP approach to 
high-temperature LCF life prediction 

H79-27179 

CONICAL BODIES 

Supersonic flow past conical bodies with nearly 
circular cross sections 

[ AD-A068004 ] H79-26027 

GOBI CAL FLOW 

Region of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 

OOEICAL SHELLS 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 

COBS TBAI ITS 

Development of an inflatable head/neck restraint 
system for ejection seats, update 
( AD-A067124] H79-26038 

COBTBOL COBPIGOBED 7EHICLES 
Preparing for the TKF 90 

A79-40326 

COBTBOL EgniPBEBT 

Flight control. II - Control system design 

German book 

A79-40155 


COBTBOL SIBOLATIOB 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor-based 
flight control systems 

A79-40664 

COBTBOL SOBFACES 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2,36, and 3.70 

Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail conducted in 

Langley Dnitary Plan wind tunnel 

[HASA-TB-80097] 879-27099 

COBTBOLLAEILITf 

A comparison of the V/STOL handling qualities of 
the VAK-191B with the requirements of AGABD 
report 577 and HIL-F-83300 

[ HASA-TP-1494] 879-27182 

COBTECTITB HEAT TBABSFEB 

Humerical methods for solution of 

radiative- convective heat transfer problems - 

Radiative boundary layer for hypersonic 

blunt bodies in dense atmosphere 

A79-42971 

C0HVBB6EBT-DITEB6EBT BOZZLES 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

Effect of several geometric parameters on the 
static internal performance of three 
nonazisymmetric nozzle concepts 

[HASA-TP-1468] 879-26022 

COST ABALTSIS 

Aircraft transparency failure and logistical cost 
analysis. Volume 1: Program summary 

[AD-A068719] 879-27131 

COST EFFECTITEBBSS 

Problems of increasing the efficiency of Halev. II 
airline operations 

A79-41168 

Analysis of Coast Guard missions for a maritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 

COST ESTIHATES 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 
[DGLB PAPER 79-052] A79-42348 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 

the transporter design stage military aviation 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-054] A79-42349 

Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

[AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 

[AIAA 79-1585] A79-42386 

COST BEOnCTIOB 

Contribution of the engine BSD community to 
reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1360] A79-40764 

TC-14 thermoplastic/graphite elevator 

A79-43241 

COSTS 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
aviation gasoline from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

[DOE/EBA-0024] 879-27336 

CBACK IBITIATIOB 

Elimination of friction induced thermal cracks in 
landing gear components 

A79-43273 

CBACK PBOPAGATIOB 

Effects of geometric variables on stress intensity 
factors for crack gages 

[AD-A068631] 879-27533 

CBACKS 

Oltrasonic inspection of engine nacelle structure 
searching for cracks 

[BEPT-7610.909] 879-27522 

CRASH IBJDBIES 

What makes a plane crash DC-10 crash 

investigation 

A79-41727 

CRASHES 

. Summary of results for a twin-engine, low-wing 
airplane substructure crash impact condition 
analyzed with program KRASH 

[AD-A069171] 879-27116 


A-11 



CBEBP AIALTSIS 


SUBJECT IHDEZ 


CBEBP AHALTSIS 

Estiaation of fatigue life of Al-alloy used for 
con pressor disc of jet engine 

A79- 4262a 

CHOP DUSTIBG 

Systen design reguirenents for advanced 
rotary-ving agricultural aircraft 

[HASA-CH-1589381 H79-26046 

CBUDE OIL 

Findings and views concerning the erenption of 
aviation gasoline froB the mandatory petroleuo 
allocation and price regulations 

[ DOE/EBA-0024] H79-27336 

CBYOGEVIC HIHD TUIHBLS 

Pull* scale aircraft sinulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the Rational Transonic 
Facility 

[HASA-TH-80085] H79* 26064 


D 


DACBOR (TBADEEABK) 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 


A79-41945 


DATA COBBELATIOI 

Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 

dissimilar materials hypersonic heating 

simulation 

fHASA-TH-72865] R79-27088 

DATA LIHKS 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
ground/board/ground data link 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-050] A79-42376 

DATA PBOCESSIRG 
Fly-by-light 

A79-43458 

DATA BBDUCTIOR 

Structuring of data systems: Psychophysiological 

data from the dynamic flight simulator 
[ AD-A067175] H79-27014 

DC 10 AIBCBAFT 

Hhat makes a plane crash DC- 10 crash 

investigation 

A79-41727 


DEAD BBCKOHIBG 

A simple integrated navigation systen based on 
multiple DHE 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-041] A79-42367 

DBCELEBATIOI 

Decelerated approach - Comparison of different 
procedures 

. [DGLB PAPEB 79-045] A79-42371 

DEITCEBS 

Helicopter Icing Symposium 

[ AD-A067981 ] N79-26048 

Icing tests of a 0H-1H helicopter with an 
electrothermal ice protection system under 
simulated and natural icing conditions 
‘ [ AD-A067737] R79-26050 

DELTA BIBGS 

Further advancements in the concept of 
delta-winged hybrid-airships 

[AIAA 79-1599] A79-42393 

Lee side flow field over slender delta wings of 
finite thickness 

[ILB-23] H79- 27103 

DBSIGH AHALTSIS 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 
the transporter design stage — military aviation 
[DGLB PAPER 79-054] A79-42349 

Airship dynamic stability 

[AIAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

Extension of running time in the BAE hypersonic 
shock tunnel 

[ 00 EL- 1 260/7 8 ] H79- 27 191 

DETEBIOBATIOB 

Handling problems through compressor deterioration 

B79-27169 


DBTELOPIBG BATIOBS 

Sharjah - An airport 
innovative airport 


Hombasa - Relcome to 
and construction 


out of Arabian Nights 

design 

A79-43732 

a new airport planning 

A79- 43733 


DIFFEBBHTIAL EQUATIOBS 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor-based 
flight control systems 

A79-40664 

DIGITAL BATIGATIOB 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor-based 
flight control systems 

A79-40664 

A simple integrated navigation system based on 
multiple DHE 

[DGLB PAPER 79-041] A79-42367 

Solution of navigation problems in aircraft 

onboard systems equipped with digital computer 

A79-43506 

Technical means for automation of air navigation 

A79-43513 

DIGITAL SIHDLATIOI 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[AD-A067549] B79-27129 

DIGITAL STSTBBS 

Increasing guidance accuracy through use of an 
integrated digital piloting system 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-043] A79-42369 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 
modern methods of digital signal processing 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-046] A79-42372 

New paths for the development of aircraft 
equipment opened up by the use of modern 

computer technology digital systems for 

civil aviation 

A79-43501 

An experimental comparison of the readability of 
two digital altimeters 

[ ABL/SYS-BOTE-60] H79-26053 

DILATATIOBAL BATES 

Dilatational model of noise from a moving jet in 
terms of arbitrary jet structure and observer 
motion 

A79-42053 

DISCRETE ADDRESS BBACOB STSTEB 

Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) Air Traffic 
Control Badar Beacon System (ATCBBS) 
interference analysis 

[AD-A068565] B79-27119 

DISPEBSIB6 

Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which form 
in the oil-system mains of gas-turbine engines 

A79-42571 


DISPLAY DSTICBS 

Display monitoring problems for aircraft pilots 

A79-40315 

New onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLB PAPEB 79*049] A79-42375 

A simulation investigation of cockpit display of 
aircraft traffic during curved, descending, 
decelerating approaches 

[HASA-TH-80098] H79-26052 

An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The 

coordinated cockpit display 

[NASA-Tfl-78559] H79-27136 

Application of color-coding in airborne tactical 
displays 

[AD-A067558] N79- 27137 

DISTANCE BEASUBIIG EQUIPHEBT 

The DHE-based Azimuth Systen /DAS/ as a commercial 
navigation aid 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-038] A79-42364 

Possibilities for increasing distance measurement 
accuracy of DHE — - Distance Heasuring Equipment 
[DGLB PAPER 79-040] A79-42366 

A simple integrated navigation system based on 
multiple DHE 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-041] A79-42367 

Theory and experiments on precision L-band DHE 

[FOB-44-1977] N79-27124 

DISTBIBOTOBS 

A pneumatic distributor for the control systen of 
a turbojet engine 

A79-42574 


DOPPLER BATIGATIOB 

Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAB navigation through frequent change 
of TACAN stations 

A79-41778 


A-12 



SUBJECT IHDBT 


EH6IHE BOISE 


DBAG HEISUBEHEBT 

Effects of Reynolds naaber and other paraaeters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft aodel 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1167] A79-40«I81 

Experiaental investigation of the aerodynaaic drag 
of siaple bodies in two-phase flow 

A79-43172 

DRAG REDUCTIOa 

Ringlets are no drag enhanceoent of 

aerodynamic efficiency with vertical wingtip 
extensions 

A79-43457 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisyametric cylinder 

A79-43711 

DROP TBAHSFEB 

Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which fora 
in the oil-system mains of gas-turbine engines 

A79-42571 

DROPS (LIQUIDS) 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine coabustor 

A79-42207 

DUCTS 

An experiaental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[HASA-TM-80109] N79-27931 

DURABILITY 

Plight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels in wide-bodied comaercial 
transport aircraft 

[HASA-CR-159071] H79-27246 

DTBABIC LOADS 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship aodel 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

Dynamic pressure loads in the air induction system 
of the tornado fighter aircraft 

B79-27168 

DTHAHIC PRESSURE 

Dynamic pressure loads in the air induction system 
of the tornado fighter aircraft 

F79-27168 

DTHAHIC RESPOBSE 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[AD-A067549] N79- 27129 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 

imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 
caused by rotor blade loss 

F79-27171 

DTHAHIC STABILITY 

Airship dynamic stability 

[AIAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

DTHAHIC STRUCTURAL ABALTSIS 

A dynamic analysis of landing impact 

A79-41768 

Hew methods for ground-testing aeronautical 
structures 

[OHERA, TP HO. 1979-47] A79-43620 


EARTH OBSERTATIOHS (FROH SPACE) 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 

[AIAA 79-1606] A79-42405 

ECHOES 

Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars 

[NASA-CASE-HPO-14361-1] H79-26253 

ECOHOHBTHICS 

Airfreight forecasting methodology and results 

H79-27114 

ECOHOHIC AHALYSIS 

Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems and 
perspectives 

[DGLR PAPER 79-026] A79-42354 

ECOHOHIC FACTORS 

New air service and deregulation - A study in 
transition 

A79-40172 

EJECTIOH SEATS 

Feasibility of non-catapult ejection and hazard of 
an ejection seat rocket plume 

[AD-A067080] H79-26036 

Development of an inflatable head/neck restraint 
system for ejection seats, update 
[AD-A067124] H79-26038 


ELASTIC PROPERTIES 

Improvement of hang glider performance by use of 
ultralight elastic wing 

H79-27082 

ELASTOHERS 

Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels 
[HASA-CR-1 58773] H79-27321 

ELBCTBOHIC COHTROL 

Hew onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLR PAPER 79-049] A79-42375 

ELETATORS (COHTROL SURFACES) 

TC-14 thernoplastic/graphite elevator 

A79-43241 

A general method for the layout of ailerons and 
elevators of gliders and motorplanes 

R79-27076 

EHBRGY COHSBRTATIOH 

Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 

Fuel-conservative guidance system for powered-lift 
aircraft 

[ NASA-TH-78595] H79-26009 

BHERGT COHTBRSIOH BFFICIEHCY 

Energy efficient aircraft engines 

[HASA-TH-79204] H79-27141 

BHGIHE COHTROL 

Hultivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

Decelerated approach - Comparison of different 
procedures 

[DGLR PAPER 79-045] A79-42371 

BHGIHE DBSIGH 

General Electric Company variable cycle engine 
technology demonstrator programs 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1311] A79-40758 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1312] A79-40759 

Hultivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

CFH56 - Franco-American ten-tonne turbofan 
production launch 

A79-41207 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79-42555 

Garrett ATF 3 

A79-43469 

Engine performance considerations for the large 
subsonic transport 

H79-27139 

Aircraft engine design using experimental stress 
analysis techniques 

H79-27151 

BHGIHE FAILURE 

Error loccHization in turbojet engines through 
determination of the characteristics of 
structural members German thesis 

A79-41827 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
impact of foreign bodies 

H79-27174 

BHGIHE IHLSTS 

V/STOL performance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on. 
experimental data 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1286] A79-40487 

Ultrasonic inspection of engine nacelle structure 
searching for cracks 

(BEPT-7610.909] H79-27522 

EHGIBE HOHITOBIHG IHSTRUHEHTS 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1280] A79-40486 

BHGIHE HOISE 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 


A-13 



BIGIHB P&BTS 


SUBJECT IHDEX 




EHGIHB P&BTS 

Hew tecbnigaes in jet engine balancing 

&79- 40314 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[&I&& P&PEB 79-1280] &79-40486 

Development of materials and processes for engine 
components - Current and future points of interest 

&79-40680 

CPS jet engine performance deterioration 

[&I&& P&PEB 79-1233] &79-41175 

Error localization in turbojet engines through 
determination of the characteristics of 
structural members German thesis 

&79-41827 

& contribution on thermal fatigue in cooled 
turbine blading 

H79-27153 

Forecasting engine life 

H79-27154 


Application of engine usage analysis to component 
life utilization 

H79-27160 

Boundary- integral equation analysis of an advanced 
turbine disk rim slot 

H79-27161 

Engine rotor burst contain ment/control studies 

879-27 162 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

H79-27163 


EHGIHB ST&BTEBS 

Heasuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 


EHGIHB TESTS 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA P&PEB 79-1149] A79- 40480 

A summary of HASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Research programs using the FlOO engine 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1308] A79-40488 

Further test results with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1185] A79-40752 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1312] A79-40759 

Regenerator matrices for automotive gas turbines 

A79-42981 

Evaluation of a simplified gross thrust 

calculation technique using two prototype FlOO 
turbofan engines in an altitude facility 
[HASA-TP-1482] H79-26057 

A new facility for structural engine testing 

H79-27173 


EHVIBOHHBHTAL HOHITOBIHG 

Analysis of Coast Guard missions for a maritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 

EHVIBOHHBHTAL T6STS 

Icing tests of a OH-IH helicopter with an 
electrothermal ice protection system under 
simulated and natural icing conditions 
[AD-A067737] H79-26050 

EPOXT BBSIHS 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins — - for quality control 

A79-43264 


Plight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels in wide-bodied commercial 
transport aircraft 

[ HASA-CR-159071 ] H79-27246 

BBBOB AHALTSIS 

Possibilities for increasing distance measurement 
accuracy of DHE — — Distance Heasuring Equipment 
[DGLB PAPER 79-040] A79-42366 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 

relationships with optimal filters in 

inertial navigation system 

[DGLP PAPER 79-048] A79-42374 

BOBOPB 

The European helicopter industry and cooperation 

A79-42064 


The new European subsonic aerodynamic testing 
facilities aircraft wind tunnels 

&79-42066 

Euromissile - An example of cooperation with 
respect to missiles 

A79- 42067 


EUBOPBAH AIRBUS 

The European Airbus has 
the world market 

EVAPOBATIOH BATE 

Theoretical approach to 
turbine combustor 


definitively penetrated 

A79-42062 

spray combustion in gas 

A79-42207 


EXCLUSIOI 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
kerojet fuels from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

CDOE/EB&-0023] H79-28058 

EXHAUST GASES 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

EXHAUST HOZZLBS 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

nozzle transfer functions 

[HASA-CB-1 59628] H79-27933 

BXPEBIHEHTAL DESIGH 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[HASA-CB-1 52286] H79-26067 

BXTBBHAI STOBBS 

Heapon/aircraft interactions 

879-27 205 


EXTBUDIIG 

Experimental investigation 
an extruded wing 


into the feasibility of 

H79-27077 


F 


P-14 AIBCBAFT 

The computation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[RE-577] H79-27128 

P-15 AIBCB&PT 


The computation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[RE-577] H79-27128 

F-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-&067765] M79-27188 

P-16 AIBCBAPT 


Hybrid Ring Box structure 

A79-43331 

P-18 AIBCBAPT 

Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 

installed on an P-18 propulsion wind tunnel model 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1164] A79-41174 

P&BBICATIOI 

C-141 hybrid composite leading edge materials 

and fabrication methods 

A7 9-43 244 


Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 

structure for subsonic transport aircraft 

A79-43245 


FABRICS 

Aircraft passenger seat material development for 
airline fire safety 

A79-43271 


P&IL-S&PB STSTEHS 

The requirement of damage tolerance. An analysis 
of damage tolerance requirements with specific 
reference to HIL-A-83444 

[HLB-TB-77 005-0] H79-27135 

PAILUBB AHALTSIS 

Error localization in turbojet engines through 
determination of the characteristics of 
structural members — German thesis 

A79-41827 


PAIBIHGS 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution - — 
computerized design 

[AD-A067927] B79-26031 

PAHS 

Performance of two-stage fan having 

low- aspect -ratio first-stage rotor blading 
[ HASA-TP-1493] H79-27143 

FATIGUE LIFE 

Estimation of fatigue life of &l-alloy used for 
compressor disc of jet engine 

A79-42624 


Allowable notch effectivity criterion for aircraft 
structures 


A79-43515 


A-14 



SUBJECT IHDEX 


FLIGHT P&THS 


LCF life prediction for a flight-by-flight load 

sequence of a turbine disc Low Cycle Fatigue 

J79-43600 

Three-diaensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

E79-27156 

Application of engine usage analysis to component 
life utilization 


H79-27160 

Review of the AGABD S and H panel evaluation 
program of the HASA-Iewis SRP approach to 
high-temperature LCF life prediction 

N79-27179 

Effect of variances and manufacturing tolerances 
on the design strength and life of mechanically 
fastened composite joints 

[AD-A069170] H79-27518 

FEEDBACK 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage motion 

[NASA-CR-158770] B79-27125 

FEEDBACK COETBOL 


nultivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

FIBER COHPOSITES 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601 j A79-42395 

The fibre composite helicopter blade 

A79-43712 

FIBEB OPTICS 


Ply-by-light 

A79-43458 

Aircraft fiber-optic interconnect systems project 
[AD-A068366] H79-27978 

FIBER STBEEGTH 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79-42395 

FI6HTEB AIBCBAFT 


Preparing for the TKP 90 

A79-40326 

Can Europe choose a common fighter 

A79-41209 

Fundamentals of design. Ill - Y-G for combat 
aircraft 


A79- 43725 

TF-17/ADEH system study 

[HASA-CR-144882] H79- 27126 

Integration of an airframe with a turbofan and 
afterburner system 

B79-27172 

FILB COOLIHG 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

FIBITE DIFFEBEECE THEQBT 

The transonic integral equation method with curved 
shock waves 


A79-41407 

Numerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 

An exploratory study of a finite difference method 
for calculating unsteady transonic potential flow 
[HASA-TH-80105] B79-27096 

FINITE ELEHEHT HETHOD 

Simplified calculation method for subsonic 
airloads on wing-body combinations 

A79-40200 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

B79-27156 


FIBE DAB AGE 


Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite- fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A79-43272 


FIBE PBEYEETIOB 

Recent advances in fire resistant materials in 
aircraft construction 


Aircraft passenger seat 
airline fire safety 


A79-43269 

material development for 


A79-43271 


Preventing fires in aviation fuel 
transport systems. II 

FIXED EIHGS 


storage and 

A79-43734 


Summary of results for a twin-engine, low-wing 
airplane substructure crash impact condition 
analyzed with program KRASH 

[AD-A069171] B79-27116 

FLABBABILITT 

Aircraft passenger seat material development for 
airline fire safety 

A79-43271 

FLAT PLATES 


Bunerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 

Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a flat 
plate at a large free-strean Bach number 


A79-42989 

Bear field problems in three-dimensional panel 

methods mathematical modeling of flow 

characteristics 


A79-43779 

FLEXIBLE IIBGS 

Calculation of rotor impedance for 

articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight 

A79-42799 

Wind tunnel tests of four flexible wing ultralight 
gliders 

B79-27084 

FLIGHT CBABACTEBISTICS 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 
[DGLR PAPER 79-052] A79-42348 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79-42394 

FLIGHT COEDITIOES 

Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems and 
perspectives 

[DGLB PAPER 79-026] A79-42354 

Gas curtain. in gas turbine engines 

A79-42547 

FLIGHT CONTROL 

•Thruster control for airships* 

[ AIAA 79-1595] A79-42389 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 


A79-43314 

Hinimum altitude-loss soaring in a specified 
vertical wind distribution 


B79-27071 

A Study of course deviations during cross-country 
soaring 

B79-27072 

On global optimal sailplane flight strategy 

B79-27073 

Effects of control system dynamics on fighter 
approach and landing longitudinal flying 
qualities, volume 1 

[AD-A067550] ' B79-27183 

FLIGHT HAZABDS 

Hissed approach of commercial aircraft regarding 
wind shear in the ground boundary layer 
[DGLR PAPER 79-028] A79-42355 

Influence of delay time and dead tine on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLR PAPER 79-029] A79-42356 

FLIGHT lESTBDBEHTS 

Plight control. II - Control system design 

German book 


A79-40155 

An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The 

coordinated cockpit display 

[ BASA-TH-78559 ] B79-27 136 

FLIGHT LOAD BECOBDEBS 

LCF life prediction for a flight-by-flight load 

sequence of ? turbine disc Low Cycle Fatigue 

A79-43600 

FLIGHT PATHS 

Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems. I 

A79-41167 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPER 79-044] A79-42370 


A-15 



FLIGHT PL&HS 


SOBJECT IBDSX 


A Study of coarse 
soaring 

On global optiaal 


deviations daring cross-coantry 

H79-27072 

sailplane flight strategy 

H79-27073 


FLIGHT PLAIS 

Possibilities and linits of the application of 
estiaation aethods for developaent costs and 
egaipaent unit prices of flight systeas in 
preliainary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-052] A79-92348 

FLIGHT SAFETY 

Possibilities and liaitations of air traffic control 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-023] A79-42351 

Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems and 
perspectives 

(DGLB PAPEB 79-026] A79-42354 

Experiaental study of the flight envelope and 

research of safety reguirements for hang-gliders 

N79- 27003 


FLIGHT SIHOLATIOH 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the Rational Transonic 
Facility 

[ NASA-TH-80085] H79-26064 

FLIGHT SIHOLATOBS 

Structuring of data systems: Psychophysiological 

data froB the dynamic flight simulator 
[AD-A067175] H79-27014 

F-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[ AD-A067765 ] H79-27 188 

FLIGHT TESTS 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the guiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/ 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1313] A79-40760 

Hilitary-technology-related flight testing in the 
framework of DFVLB/BWB cooperation - Status and 
perspectives 

A79-41233 

Advanced instrumentation and data evaluation 

technigues for flight tests of aircraft 

navigation systems 

A79-41777 

High altitude altimeter flight test 

[ AD-A066904 ] H79-26054 

A flight investigation of basic performance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attack 
helicopter 

[ HASA-TH-80112] H79-27097 

Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing 
with liguid hydrogen 

[BASA-Tfl-79196] H79-27140 

FLOW CHABACTE6ISTICS 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 


FLOi DISTOBTIOH 

Further test results with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1185] A79-40752 

FLOW DISTBIBHTIOH 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[NASA-CR- 152212] H79- 26374 

Lee side flow field over slender delta wings of 
finite thickness 

[ILB-23] N79-27103 

FLOW GEOHETBT 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisymmetric cylinder 

A79-43711 


Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[ HASA-TB-79208] U79-27930 

FLOI HEASDBEHEHT 

Experimental studies of axial and radial 

compressors by means of new measurement technigues 

A79-41237 


Split-film anemometer measurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 


A79-42029 


FLOI STABILITY 

Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets 

A79-41414 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

H79- 27178 


FLOI TISOALISATIOH 

Application of a laminar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 

A79-41304 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

A simple method of adapting a wind tunnel 
Schlieren system for interferometry 
C AD-A067233] H79-26073 

FLOID OYIAHICS 

Design of shock-free transonic flow in 
turbbmachinery 

[AD-A067703] H79-27144 

FLOTTEB 

Treatment of the control mechanisms of light 
airplanes in the flatter clearance process 

179-27078 

Stresses, vibrations, structural integration and 
engine integrity (including aeroelasticity and 
flatter) 

[ AGAED-CP-248] B79- 27148 

FLOTTEB ABALTSIS 

A summary of HASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Research programs using the FIDO engine 
(AIAA PAPEB 79-1308] A79-40488 

On the transonic-dip mechanism of flatter of a 
sweptback wing 

A79-41763 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

H79-27150 

FOREST FIBS DBTECTIOH 

Applications of a high-altitude powered platform 
/HAPP/ 

[AIAA 79-1603] A79-42397 

FOBGIBG 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al alloy forgings 

A79-42245 

FBACTOBE HECBAIICS 

Bethodological considerations on the service life 
design of turbine disks 

A79-40687 

Trends in reliability modeling technology for 
fault tolerant systems 

[HASA-TH-80089] B79-26810 

FBACTDBE STBEI6TH 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10Y-2Fe-3Al alloy forgings 

^ A79-42245 

Fracture toughness in titanium alloys 

[AD-A067785] H79-26176 

FBAGHEHTATIOI 

Engine rotor burst containment/control studies 

H79-27162 

FBEE FLIGHT 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of. inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 

FBEQUEICY HEASUBEBEIT 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

F0EL COBBOSTIOI 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

FDEL COBSQBPTIOB 

CF6 jet engine performance deterioration 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1233] A79-41175 

The productivity of airships in long-range 
transportation 

[AIAA 79-1596] A79-42390 

Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 

Energy efficient aircraft engines 

[NASA-TB-79204] H79-27141 

FUEL COBBOSIOI 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 


FUEL OILS 

Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which form 
in the oil-system mains of gas-turbine engines 

A79-42571 


A-16 



SUBJECT IHDBX 


GLIDBBS 


FOBL SPB&TS 

Theoretical approach to spray coabastion in gas 
tarbine combustor 

A79-02207 

FUEL TASKS 

Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 
transport systems- II 

A79-43734 

FULL SCALE TESTS 

A summary of HASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Research programs using the FIDO engine 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1308] A79-40488 

FUSELAGES 

Hybrid Bing Box structure 

A79-43331 

Fuselage surface pressure measurements of a 

helicopter vind-tunnel model with a 3 -15-meter 
diameter single rotor 

[HASA-TH-80051] H79-26015 

A study of smoke movement in an aircraft fuselage 
[EAE-TH-EP-613] N79-26040 

Engine/aircraft structural integration: An overview 

H79-27167 


G 


GAS DTBABICS 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type 'slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 

Gas curtain in gas turbine engines 

A79-42547 

GAS FLOV 

Gas curtain in gas turbine engines 

A79-42547 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 

Region of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 


GAS GEBBBATOBS 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1327] A79-40761 

GAS TUBBIHE BHGIBBS 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

Baterials problems in gas turbine engine 

technology; Colloquium, Hunich, Best Germany, 
October 27, 28, 1977, Report 

A79-40676 

Development of materials and processes for engine 
components - Current and future points of interest 

A79-40680 

Service life parameters of turbine blades 

A79-40684 

Methodological considerations on the service life 
design of turbine disks 

A79- 40687 

Contribution of the engine BSD community to 
reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1360] A79-40764 

Gas curtain in gas turbine engines 

A79-42547 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79-42555 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 

A79-42558 

Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which form 
in the oil-system mains of gas-turbine engines 

A79-42571 

Estimation of fatigue life of Al-alloy used for 
compressor disc of jet engine 

A79-42624 


Regenerator matrices for automotive gas turbines 

A79-42981 

Structural analysis of a gas turbine impeller 
using finite-element and holographic techniques 

H79-27149 

A contribution on thermal fatigue in cooled 
turbine blading 

B79-27153 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

H79-27156 

Ceramic mainshaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

[AD-A067904] H79-27516 

GAS TUB6IIES 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine combustor 

A79-42207 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 

A79-42560 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

A79-43679 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 
[AD-A067709] B79-26224 

An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 

H79-27164 


GAS FALVBS 


Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 

Fast-acting valves for use in shock tubes- II - 
Formation of shock waves 


A79-43153 


GEHEBAL AVIATIOB AIBCBAFT 

Canadair Challenger business jet subsystems 

and structural design 

A79-40313 


First flight imminent for new technology wing 

A79-40327 


Garrett ATF 3 

A79-43469 

A consideration of general aviation in the OK 

[TT-7902] H79-26010 

GBOOBST 

The basic geodetic shapes and position lines 

A79-43507 


6EBHABY 

Wind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Republic 

[IFD-5-78] H79-27107 

GIHBALLESS IBBBIIAL HATIGATIOB 

Use of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 
suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors 

A79-43511 


GIHBALS 

Effect of several geometric parameters on the 
static internal performance of three 
nonaxisymmetric nozzle concepts 

[ BASA-TP-1 468 ] N79-26022 

GLASS FIBEB BEIBFOBCED PLASTICS 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A79-43272 


GLIDERS 

Hinimum altitude-loss soaring in a specified 
vertical wind distribution 


H7 9-27071 


A study of course deviations during cross-country 
soaring 

H7 9-27072 


On global optimal sailplane flight strategy 

H79-27073 

A general method for the layout of ailerons and 
elevators of gliders and motorplanes 

H79-27076 

Experimental investigation into the feasibility of 
an extruded wing 

H79-27077 

Advanced composites in sailplane structures: 
Application and mechanical properties 

H79-27079 


The ultralight sailplane 


H79-27080 


A-17 



GB&PBITE-BPOXT COHPOSITB HlTBBUtS 


SOBJBCT IBDBZ 


Analytical and scale aodel research aised at 
inproved hangglider design 

H79-27081 

Inproveient of hang glider perfornance by ose of 
nltralight elastic ving 

H79-27082 

Experisental study of the flight envelope and 

research of safety reguirements for hang-gliders 

H79-27083 

Wind tunnel tests of four flexible ving ultralight 
gliders 

H79-2708fl 

An exploratory, investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical-netal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[HASA-TH-80092] H79-27098 

GBAPHITE-SPOIT COHPOSITB HATEBIAIS 


YC-14 thernoplastic/graphite elevator 

A79-43241 

Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 

structure for subsonic transport aircraft 

A79-43245 


Overage indicators for prepreg products 

materials performance for military aircraft 

A79-43253 

The structural effects and detection of variations 
in Hercules 3501-5A and Avco 5505 resin systems 

A79-43261 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins for quality control 

A79-43264 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite- fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A79-43272 

Hybrid Wing Box structure 


A79-43331 


GRIT 6&S 

Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a flat 
plate at a large free-stream Hach number 

A79-42989 


GREAT BBITAIH 


British lighter-than-air activity - A review 

[AIAA 79-1583] A79-42385 

GRODHD EFFECT (ABBODTHAHICS) 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-41767 

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
[NASA-CR-1 52239] H79-26056 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale Y/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[HASA-CB-152212] H79-26374 

GSOnHO EFFECT HACHIBES 

Air cushion landing gear applications study 

[HASA-CB-159002] B79-26045 

6B0QHD HABDLIH6 

Hater ial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 

Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 
transport systems- II 

A79- 43734 

The 1990 direct support infrastructure 

H79-27115 

GBOUHD STATIOHS 


Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAH navigation through frequent change 
of TACAB stations 


6BOOBD TESTS 


A79-41778 


Hew methods for ground-testing aeronautical 
structures 

[OBEBA, TP HO. 1979-47] A79-43620 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
con f igur at ions 

[ HASA-TH-80474] H79-26016 

6B0nn>-AIS-GB0UID COSB0BICATIOBS 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
ground/board/ground data link 

'DGLR PAPER 79-050] A79-42376 

GDIDA^JB SEBSOBS 

Increasing guidance accuracy through use of an 
integrated digital piloting system 
[DGIB PAPER 79-043] A79-42369 


Ose of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 
suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors 

A79-43511 

GUIDE YAIBS 

V/STOL performance comparisons with variable .pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1286] A79-40487 

Further test results with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1185] A79-40752 

Heasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 

GUST ALLBTIATOBS 

A wind-tunnel investigation of tilt-rotor gust 
alleviation systems 

[HASA-CR-152264] H79-26062 

GUST LOADS 

Structural loads due to gusts on semibuoyant 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1581] A79-42384 

GTBOCOHPASSBS 

Compass system for small aircraft 

A79-43510 

GYROSCOPES 

Use of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 
suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors 

A79-43511 

H 

HABDLI16 BQUIPHEBT 

Handling problems through compressor deterioration 

H79-27169 

HAZARDS 

Feasibility of non-catapult ejection and hazard of 
an ejection seat rocket plume 

[AD-A067080] B79-26036 

HEAT EXCHABGEBS 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 

BEAT FLUX 

Heasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 

HEAT HEASUBBHBBT 

Heasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 

HEAT OF COB BUST lOH 

Enthalpy of combustion of BJ-6 

[ AD- AO 67968] H79-28037 

HEAT PIPES 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 

HEAT TBARSFEB 

Analytical modeling of ramjet combustor heat 
transfer nodes 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1124] A79-40476 

HEAT TBAfSFBR COEFFICIBBTS 

Bonstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 

HEAT TBABSHISSIOH 

Through-heating of chambers with regenerative 
cooling for aircraft engines 

A79-42570 

HELICAL FLOR 

Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets 

A79-41414 

HELICOPTER EB6IBBS 

Contribution of the engine B & D community to 
reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1360] A79-40764 

Prediction of aeroelastic instabilities in 
rotorcraft 

H79-27159 


A-18 



SUBJECT IHDBZ 


IHP&CT D&fl&GB 


HBLICOPTBB PBBFOBBABCB 

A flight investigation of basic perfornance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attach 
helicopter 

[BASA-TH-80112] K79-27097 

Beviev of airworthiness standards for 

certification of helicopters for Instrument 
Flight Rules (IFH) operation 

[ AD-A068397 ] R79-27 127 

HBLICOPTEBS 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-ai767 

The European helicopter industry and cooperation 

A79-a2064 


Calculation of rotor impedance for 

articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight 

A79-42799 


Fuselage surface pressure measurements of a 

helicopter wind-tunnel model with a 3,15-neter 
diameter single rotor 

[ HASA-TH-80051 ] S79-26015 

A method of computing the pressure distribution on 
a single-bladed hovering helicopter rotor 

H79- 26044 


Helicopter Icing Symposium 

[ AD-A067981 ] H79-26048 

Icing tests of a UH-IH helicopter with an 
electrothermal ice protection system under 
simulated and natural icing conditions 
[ AD-A067737] H79-26050 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage notion 

[HASA-CR- 158778] S79-27125 

HIGH ALTITUDE BALLOOHS 

Hind study for high altitude platform design 

[AIAA 79-1607] A79-42398 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 

[AIAA 79-1606] A79-42405 

HIGH ALTITUDE TESTS 

High altitude altimeter flight test 

[AD-A066904] K79-26054 

HIGH PBESSUBB 

Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 


The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 


A79-43315 


HIGH SPEED 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[HASA-CR-1 59075] N79-27185 

HIGH TEHPEBATUBB 

Review of the AGARD S and B panel evaluation 
program of the HASA-Lewis SRP approach to 
high-temperature LCF life prediction 

H79-27179 


HIGH TBBPBBATUBE GASES 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 


HOIETCOBB STBUCTUBES 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 


A79-43314 


The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 


A79-43315 


HOT-FILH AHEBOHETEBS 

Split-film anemometer measurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 

A79-42029 

HOT-VIBE AHEBOHETEBS 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[ AD-A067969 ] H79-26060 

HOTEBIHG 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 

ceG-Culated results from helicopter rotors in 

an anechoic chamber 

A79-43499 

A method of computing the pressure distribution on 
a single-bladed hovering helicopter rotor 

H79-26044 


An evaluation of linear acoustic theory for a 
hovering rotor 

[RASA-TH-80059] H79-26881 

BUHAB FACTORS EHGIHBBBIHG 

Display monitoring problems — - for aircraft pilots 

A79-40315 

Study of the theoretical to real correspondance of 
an optimal control model and the significance of 
this model for the description of working 
methodology with partly automated aircraft 
guidance and control systems 

[ ILB-35] H79-27184 

HTBBID HATIGATIOB STSTBHS 
. Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAH navigation through frequent change 
of TACAB stations 

A79-41778 

HIBBID STBUCTUBES 

Hybrid Wing Box structure 

A79-43331 

HTDBOFOILS 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 

BTDBOGEE FUELS 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 
[ AD-A067709] H79-26224 

HTPBBBOLAS 

An experimental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[HASA-TH-80109] H79-27931 

HTPBBSOHIC FLIGHT 

Humerical methods for solution of 

radiative-convective heat transfer problems - 

Radiative boundary layer for hypersonic 

blunt bodies in dense atmosphere 

A79-42971 

BTPEBSOHIC FLOV 

Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 
finite-span wing 

A79-41S67 

BTPEBSOHIC HEAT TBAHSFBB 

Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 

dissimilar materials hypersonic heating 

simulation 

[HASA-TB-72865] H79-27088 

BTPEBSOHIC VEHICLES 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

HTPEBSOHIC VIED TUHHELS 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type “slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 

Extension of running tine in the RAE hypersonic 
shock tunnel 

[OUBL-1 260/78] H79-27191 


I 

ICE FOBHATIOH 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice- detect ion capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAR) system and its 
applicability to Havy-wide use 

[ AD-A067174] H79-26037 

Helicopter Icing Symposium 

[AD-A067981] H79-26048 

IDEAL FLUIDS 

Hodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

A79-42806 

IDEAL GAS 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

ILTUSBIH AIBCBAFT 

Ilyushin 'Candid* Soviet transport for 

enhanced air mobility and logistical support 

A79-42423 

IHPACT DAHA6E 

Hon destructive evaluation /HDE/ of impact damage 
in thick graphite composite aircraft structures 
for dropped tools on airfields 

A79-43257 


A-19 



IHP&CT BESISTAICB 


SUBJECT IHDBX 


IHP&CT RESIST&HCE 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
iapact of foreign bodies 

H79-2717a 

IHPACT TESTS 

& dynasic analysis of landing iopact 

A79-41768 

IBPED&HCE HBhSUBEHEHTS 

Calculation of rotor inpedance for 

articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight 

179-42799 


IHPELLEBS 

Structural analysis of a gas turbine impeller 
using finite-element and holographic techniques 

H79-27149 

some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

H79-27158 


IBOUSTBIAL SIFETT 

Haterial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

179-43277 

IHEBTXIL HITIGITIOH 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 

relationships with optimal filters in 

inertial navigation system 

[DGLB PIPEB 79-048] 179-42374 

IHFtlTlBLB STBOCTUBES 

Development of an inflatable head/neck restraint 
system for ejection seats« update 
[lD-1067124] H79-26038 

IBGBSTIOH (EHGIHBS) 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
impact of foreign bodies 

N79- 27174 


IHLBT FLOW 

lerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
tur bine 

179-42560 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

179-42562 

Performance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with 
blowing boundary layer control 

[HASA-TH-79176] H79-27093 

IVLBT HOZZIBS 

lerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 

179-42560 

IHLBT PBESSOBE 

Further test results with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[1111 PIPES 79-1185] 179-40752 

Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

179-42564 

IHSTBUHEHT EBBOBS 

Possibilities for increasing distance measurement 

accuracy of DUE Distance Heasuring Equipment 

[DGLB PIPEB 79-040] 179-42366 

Sources and magnitude of radio compass 
instrumental errors 

179-43503 

IHSTBUHEHT FLIGHT. BULBS 

Beview of airworthiness standards for 

certification of helicopters for Instrument 
Flight Buies (IFR) operation 

[AD-1068397] N79-27127 

IHTIKB SYSTEHS 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

H79-27176 

Distortions, rotating stall and mechanical 
solicitations 


H79-27177 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 


H79-27180 

In experimental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[NASA-TM-80109] H79-27931 

IHTBGBIL BQUITIOHS 

The transonic integral equation method with curved 
shock waves 

179-41407 

Boundary-integral equation analysis of an advanced 
turbine disk rim slot 


H79-27161 


IHTBBFBBOHETHT 

1 simple method of adapting a wind tunnel 
Schlieren system for interferometry 
[ID-1067233] H79-26073 

IHTEBHIL COHPBBSSIOH IHLETS 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[lD-1067969] H79-26060 

IHTEBHITIOHIL COOPEBITIOH 

Can Europe choose a common fighter 

179-41209 

The European helicopter industry and cooperation 

179-42064 

CFH56 - In act of cooperation, a new class of 

engine, a path towards the aeronautics of tomorrow 

179-42065 

Euromissile - In example of cooperation with 
respect to missiles 

179-42067 

Review of the IGIBD S and n panel evaluation 
program of the HlSl-Lewis SBP approach to 
high-temperature LCF life prediction 

H79-27 179 

IHTBBBOGITIOH 

Uplink ITCBBS environment measurements along the 
Boston-iashington corridor. Volume 2: 

Interrogator characteristics 

[AD- 1067944] H79-26041 

IHTEHTOBT HIHIGBHBHT 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[1111 PIPES 79-1280] 179-40486 

IHVISCID FLOH 

region of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

179-43136 

ISOTHEBRIL PBOCESSBS 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Fe-311 alloy forgings 

179-42245 


J 

JIPIH 

Japanese lighter-than-air mission studies 

[AIAl 79-1587] 179-42387 

JET IIBCBIFT 

Canadair Challenger business jet subsystems 

and structural design 

179-40313 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

179-43436 

JET IIBCBIFT BOISE 

Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets 

179-41414 

Dilatational model of noise from a moving jet in 
terms of arbitrary jet structure and observer 
motion 

179-42053 

JET IHPLIFIBBS 

The amplification factor in the two-dimensional 
interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow 

179-42565 

JET EHGIHB FUELS 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

179-42275 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 
[ID- 1067709] H79-26224 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
kerojet fuels from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

C DOE/EBl-0023 ] H79-28058 

JET EHGIHBS 

Hew techniques in jet engine balancing 

179-40314 

Estimation of fatigue life of 11-alloy used for 
compressor disc of jet engine 

179-42624 

J6T FLOW 

Laser velocimetry measurements on high temperature 
round and rectangular twin-jet flows 

179-42061 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 

179-42558 


1-20 



SUBJECT IHDSX 


LIHB&B EQOATIOIS 


JET IBPIHGEBEHT 

Farther test resalts with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[AIAA PAPEH 79-1185] A79-40752 

Batheoatical nodel of the oscillatory cycle 
associated with oonsteady interaction of a 
supersonic jet with a barrier 

A79-42007 

JET BIXIH6 FLOB 

The amplification factor in the two-dimensional 
interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow 


A79-42565 

JET STBBAflS (BETE0B0L06X) 

The characteristics of the spray generated by the 
efflux of various aircraft propnlsors impinging 
normally on water 

[AD-A067742] H79-26049 

JOISTS (J0SCTIOHS) 

Effect of variances and manufacturing tolerances 
on the design strength and life of mechanically 
fastened composite joints 

[AD-A069170] S79-27518 

Ultrasonic inspection of wing spar attachment 
joints and lugs in viscount aircraft 
[ EEPT-7610.910] H79- 27523 

JOUBSAL BEABIHGS 


An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 


H79-27164 


K 

KEBOSEBB 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79- 42275 

KEVLAB (TBADEBABK) 

Plight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels in wide-bodied commercial 
transport aircraft 

[NASA-CB-159071 ] H79-27246 


L 

LAKE ICE 

Applications of a high-altitude powered platform 
/HAPP/ 

[AIAA 79-1603] A79-42397 

LABI BAB BOUHDABT LATEB 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a flat 
plate at a large free-stream Bach number 

A79-42989 

LAHIBAB FLOV 

numerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading 
edge 

[HASA-CR-152276] H79-26024 

LABI BATES 

Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 
structure for subsonic transport aircraft 

A79-43245 

LABDIHG 6BAB 

A dynamic analysis of landing impact 

A79-41768 

Elimination of friction induced thermal cracks in 
landing gear components 

A79-43273 

Air cushion landing gear applications study 

[ HASA-CB- 159002 ] B79- 26045 

LABDIBG LOADS 

A dynamic analysis of landing impact 

A79-41768 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 

LASEB DOPPLEB TELOCIBETEBS 

Laser velocimetry measurements on high temperature 
round and rectangular twin-jet flows 

A79-42061 

Investigation of a laser Doppler veloci meter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[HASA-CR- 152212] B79-26374 


LATEBAL STABILITY 

Airship dynamic stability 

[AIAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

LEADIIG EDGES 

C-141 hybrid composite leading edge materials 

and fabrication methods 

A79-43244 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil on 

wind tunnel models to reduce spin entry after 
stall 

[ BASA-CB-158717] H79- 26013 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 
configuration — - wind tunnel tests 
[ HASA-TP-1434] H79-26020 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading ' 
edge 

[HASA-CR-152276] H79-26024 

LEAB JET AIBCBAFT 

Ringlets are no drag enhancement of 

aerodynamic efficiency with vertical wingtip 
extensions 

A79-43457 

LEE BAVES 

Lee side flow field over slender delta wings of 
finite thickness 

[ILH-23] H79-27103 

LIFE (DUBABILITY) 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 


Forecasting engine life 

LIFE CYCLE COSTS 

Contribution of the engine R 8 
reduced cost of ownership of 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1360] 

C-141 hybrid composite leading 
and fabrication methods 


A79-43317 

H79-27154 

D community to 
Army helicopters 

A79-40764 

edge materials 


A79-43244 

LIFT 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 

A79-41945 

Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil 
lift 

[ HAS A-TB-78566 ] H79-27 100 

LIFT DEYICES 

Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equation 

A79-43135 

LIFTIBG BOTOBS 

Unsteady aerodynamic pressure measurements on 
rotating lifting systems 

A79-41494 

Honlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41573 

LIGHT AIBCBAFT 

Some possibilities for the navigation of small 
passenger aircraft 


A79-43508 

navigation instruments for small passenger 
aircraft of the 1980s 


Compass system for small aircraft 


A79-43509 


A79-43510 

Allowable notch eff activity criterion for aircraft 
structures 


A79-43515 

Treatment of the control mechanisms of light 
airplanes in the flutter clearance process 

H79-27078 

LIBE OF SIGHT COBflUBICATXOB 

Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-42400 

Aircraft obstruction of microwave links 

[ PB-292372/0] H79-26288 

LIHEAB EQUATIOBS 

On a property of the linearized boundary layer 
equations with self-induced pressure 

A79-41568 


A-21 



LIIB&B STSTBBS 


SOBJBCT IHOBX 


LIBBAB STSTBBS 

Obtaining solntions of the lifting-sorface equation 

»79-43135 

LIHIBGS 

On the attennation of sound by three-diaensionally 
segmented acoustic liners in a rectangular duct 
[ HASA-TB-80118] H79-27932 

LIQUID BLOB , 

Beasuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

LIQUID HTDBOGBB 

Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing 
with liquid hydrogen 

tHASA-TH-79196] H79-27140 

LOAD TBSTS 

Beviev of the AGABD S and fl panel evaluation 
program of the HASA-Levis 5BP approach to 
high-temperature LCP life prediction 

H79-27179 

LOGISTICS HAHA6BBBHT 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA's developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[AD-A0684013 N79-27118 

LOBGITDDIHAL STABILITY 

Airship dynamic stability 

(AIAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

LOHAB 

Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems. I 

A79-41167 


LOB ASPBCT BATIO 

Performance of two-stage fan having 

low-aspect-ratio first-stage rotor blading 
[BASA-TP-1493] H79- 27143 

LOB ASPBCT BATIO BIB6S 


Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 

configuration wind tunnel tests 

[NASA-TP-1434] H79- 26020 

Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and 
geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 
swept arrow-wing configuration - — langley 7 by 
10 foot tunnel 

[HASA-TB-80083] B79-27095 

LOB SPBBD STABILITY 


•Thruster control for airships* 

[AIAA 79-1595] A79-42389 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 

configuration wind tunnel tests 

[HASA-TP-1434] H79-26020 

LUBBICAT1B6 OILS 


An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 


B79-27164 


LUBBICATIOB 


Ceramic mainsbaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

C AD-A067904] B79-27516 


M 

BACH BUBBBB 

Calculation of pressure distribution for a 

wing-body combination at subsonic flacb numbers 
[PFA-TH-AU-1091] H79-27110 

BAIBTBBABCB 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1280] A79-40486 

CF6 Jet engine performance deterioration 

[AIAA PAPBB 79-1233] A79-41175 

BABAGBBBBT IBFOBBATIOB STSTBBS 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

TAIAA PAPEB 79-1280] A79-40486 

BAIUFACTUBIBG 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al alloy forgings 

A79-42245 

BABIBB BBTIBOBBBBTS 

Analysis of Coast Guard missions for a maritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 


BABKBTIBG 

The European Airbus has definitively penetrated 
the world market 

A79-42062 

BASS FLOB 

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
[ HASA-CB-152239] B79-26056 

BASS TBABSFBB 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air Jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 


A79-42558 

HATBBIALS HAB0LIB6 

flaterial developments for airline safety - impact' 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 

BATBBIALS SCIBBCB 

flaterials problems in gas turbine engine 

technology; Colloquium, Bunich, West Germany, 
October 27, 28, 1977, Be port 

A79-40676 

Advances in materials technology through the BBVg 
- Goals, problems and main points of interest 

A79-40677 

Development of materials and processes for engine 
components - Current and future points of interest 

A79-40680 

BATBBIALS TBSTS 

High strength fibers for lighterrthan-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79-42395 

Overage indicators for prepreg products 

materials performance for military aircraft 

A79-43253 

BATBBBATICAL BODBLS 

Analytical modeling of ramjet combustor heat 
transfer modes 


[AIAA PAPEB 79-1124] A79-40476 

Bathematical model of the oscillatory cycle 
associated with nonsteady interaction of a 
supersonic Jet with a barrier 

A79-42Q07 

Dilatational model of noise from a moving Jet in 
terms of arbitrary jet structure and observer 
motion 


A79-42053 

Hear field problems in three-dimensional panel 

methods mathematical modeling of flow 

characteristics 

A79-43779 

Development of a research plan for the improvement 
of aerodynamic models for analysis of ballistic 
range data 

[AD-A067950] H79-26029 

Trends in reliability modeling technology for 
fault tolerant systems 

[HASA-TB-80089] H79-26810 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

H79-27180 

BBASDBIBG IBSTBUBBBTS 

Effects of geometric variables on stress intensity 
factors for crack gages 

[AD-A068631] H79-27533 

BBCHABICAL PBOPBBTIBS 

The structural effects and detection of variations 
in Hercules 3501-5A and Avco 5505 resin systems 

A79-43261 

Advanced composites in sailplane structures: 
Application and mechanical properties 

H79-27079 

BBTAL BATBII C0BF0SITB5 

Applications of metal-matrix composites, the 
emerging structural materials 

A79-43320 

BBTAL SUBFACBS 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical- net a 1-construction sailplane airfoil 
[HASA-TB-80092] H79- 27098 

BBTAL-BBTAL BOBDIBG 

Demonstration of an improved method for repair of 
bonded aircraft structure 


The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 


A79-43276 

A79-43315 


A-22 



SUBJECT I1DBZ 


BTBP 


HETEOROLOGICBL CB&BTS 

Heteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear 
air tarbalent saapling aissions with an 
instrnoented B-57B aircraft. ?olane 2, appendix 
C: Turbulence aissions 

[BAS&-TH-80045] H79-27772 

HBTEOBOLOGICU. P&B&BBTBBS 


Heteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear 
air turbulent saapling aissions with an 
instruaented B-57B aircraft- Voluae 2, appendix 
C: Turbulence aissions 

[HASA-TH-80045] H79-27772 

BBTBOBOLOGICAL 6&DBB 

Geneva, Zurich get fine-grain 3-D color weather 
radar 


BICBOCBABBSLS 


A79-41850 


An approxiaate nethod for calculating a laainar 
boundary layer in aicronozzles 


A79-42559 


BICBOFBOCBSSOBS 


Siaulation of distributed aicroprocessor-based 
flight control systems 

A79- 40664 

Multivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

BICBOSTBIP TBBHSfllSSIOl lIBBS 

Hicrostrip antenna elements for use in 
heaispherically scanned arrays 

[ AD-A068566 ] H79-27366 

BICBOBATE LABDIBG STSTBHS 


Application oriented siaulation as a tool for the 

planning of radio beacon systems for 

aircraft coaaunications 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-042] 179-42368 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systeas by 
modern nethods of digital signal processing 
[DGLB PAPBB 79-046] A79-42372 

Onboard net hods for increasing landing approach 
capacity upon introduction of HIS 

JDGLB PAPEB 79-047] A79-42373 

Theory and experiments on precision L-band DHE 

(EUB-44-1977 ] H79-27124 

BICBOBATB TBABSBISSIOB 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 

[AIAA 79-1606] A79-42405 

Aircraft obstruction of microwave links 

[ PB-292372/0 ] H79-26288 

BIDAIB COLLI SIOBS 

Technical calculation methods for automatic 

collision recognition and avoidance in air traffic 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-035] A79-42362 

Experience in the analysis of real and simulated 
collisions and dangerous encounters in German 
airspace 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-036] A79-42363 

Report of the PAA task force on aircraft 

separation assurance- Volume 1: Executive summary 

[ AD-A067905 ] B79- 26042 

BILITABT AIB FACILITIES 


An evaluation of the bird/aircraft strike hazard 
Dyess Air Force Base, Texas 

C AD-A068026] H79-26039 

BILITABT AIRCRAFT 


Contribution of the engine BSD community to 
reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1360] A79-40764 

nuclear aircraft innovations and applications 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-0846] A79-41913 

Alpha Jet - The Franco-German training and 
tactical support aircraft 

A79-42063 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-052] A79-42348 

Ilyushin "Candid* Soviet transport for 

enhanced air nobility and logistical support 

A79-42423 

Overage indicators for prepreg products 

materials performance for military aircraft 

A79-43253 

Fundamentals of design. II - VTO for combat aircraft 

A79-43724 


Application of engine usage analysis to component 
life utilization 

B79-27160 

BILITABT ATIATIOB 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 

the transporter design stage military aviation 

[DGLB PAPER 79-054] A79-42349 

BILITABT BELICOPTEBS 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an AH/ALQ-144 jammer 
[AD-A067757] H79-26047 

A flight investigation of basic performance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attack 
helicopter 

[HASA-TH-80112] B79-27097 

BILITABT OPEBATIOBS 

Lighter-than-air craft for strategic mobility 

[AIAA 79-1597] A79-42391 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air vehicles 
[AIAA 79-1570] A79-42403 

BILITABT TECHB0L06T 

Advances in materials technology through the BH?g 
- Goals, problems and main points of interest 

A79-40677 

Hilitary-technology-related flight testing in the 
framework of DFVLR/BiB cooperation - Status and 
perspectives 

A79-41233 

HIHIHUB DRAG 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 


A79-43166 

BISSILE COBPOBEBTS 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 

Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail conducted in 

Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel 

[HASA-TH-80097] H79-27099 

BISSILE C0BFI6UBATI0VS 

Effect of nose bluntness and afterbody shape on 
aerodynamic characteristics of a monoplanar 
missile concept with bodies of circular and 
elliptical cross sections at a Hach number of 2.50 
[BASA-TH-80055] H79-26023 

BISSILE OESIGB 


Heapon/aircraft interactions 

B79-27205 

BISSILE TBAJECTORIES 

Wind tunnel simulation of the firing of missiles 
carried under aircraft 

[OBEBA, TP BO. 1979-65] A79-43622 

HISSILBS 

Euromissile - An example of cooperation with 
respect to missiles 

A79-42067 

BISSIOB PLAB1IB6 

Analysis of Coast Guard missions for a maritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 

Hodern rigid airships as sea control escort 
platforms 

[AIAA 79-1575] A79-42382 

HODAL BBSPOBSB 


Hew nethods for ground-testing aeronautical 
structures 

[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-47] A79-43620 

BOHEHT DISTBIBUTIOB 

Measuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

HOBBITS OF IBEBTIA 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 

HRCA AIBCBAFT 

Dynamic pressure loads in the air induction system 
of the tornado fighter aircraft 

H79-27168 


BTBF 


Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1234] 


A79-40483 



H0LTIPB0CSSSIB6 (COHPOTBBS) 


SQBJBCT IBDBX 


HULTIPBOCESSIBe (COBPOTEBS) 

Solation of navigation probleas in aircraft 

onboard systeas equipped with digital coapater 

A79-43506 


N 


B&CBILSS 

Deteraining the dynaaic response dne to an 

iabalance at the attachaents of a aotor on a pod 
caused by rotor blade loss 

H79-27171 

Ultrasonic inspection of engine nacelle structure 
■ searching for cracks 

[HEPT-761 0,909] B79-27522 

BBSA PBOGBAHS 

Quiet propulsive lift for coaauter airlines 

[ HASA-TH-78596 ] H79-26035 

State of the art survey of technologies applicable 
to RASA'S aeronautics^ avionics and controls 
prograa 

[HASA-CR-159050] R79-27087 

■AVI6ATI0B AIDS 

Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems. I 

A79-41167 

Advanced instrumentation and data evaluation 

techniques for flight tests of aircraft 

navigation systems 

A79-41777 

CKS * Taiwan's 21st century airport 

A79-41849 

The DHE-based Azimuth System /DAS/ as a commercial 
navigation aid 

[DGLR PAPEB 79-038] A79-42364 

A simple integrated navigation system based on 
multiple DHE 

[DGLR PAPER 79-041] A79-42367 

Quasi-autonomous navigation system for 

aircraft position indication 

A79- 43505 

The basic geodetic shapes and position lines 

A79-43507 

Some possibilities for the navigation of snail 
passenger aircraft 

A79-43508 

Ravigation instruments for saall passenger 
aircraft of the 1980s 

A79-43509 

Compass system for small aircraft 

A79-43510 

Use of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 
suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors 

A79-43511 

Technical means for autoaation of air navigation 

A79-43513 


BATIGATIOR IBSTBDHEBTS 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation ^ detection, 
telecommunications, and instrumentation 
[ORERA, TP BO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

BEAR FIELDS 

Near field problems in three-dimensional panel 
methods - — mathematical modeling of flow 
characteristics 

A79-43779 

BOISE BEASOBSBEBT 

Dilatational model of noise from a moving jet in 
terms of arbitrary jet structure and observer 
motion 

A79- 42053 


BOISE PB0PA6ATI0B 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles; Comprehensive data report 
nozzle transfer functions 

[BASA-CR-159628] B79- 27933 

BOISE BEDOCTIOH 

General Electric Company variable cycle engine 
technology demonstrator programs 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1311] A79-40758 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/ 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1313] A79-40760 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 


Hovering. impulsive noise - Some measured and 

calculated results from helicopter rotors in 

an anechoic chamber 

A79-43499 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43500 

On the attenuation of sound by three-dimensionally 
segmented acoustic liners in a rectangular duct 
[BASA-TH-80118] B79-27932 

BOISE SPBCTBA 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43S00 

Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[HASA-TB-79208] B79-27930 

BOBDESTBUCTITB TESTS 

Ron destructive evaluation /BDE/ of impact damage 
in thick graphite composite aircraft structures 
for dropped tools on airfields 

A79-43257 

BOSE COBES 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

BOTCH STBBB6TB 

Allowable notch effectivity criterion for aircraft 
structures 

A79-43515 

BOZZIB DESIGB 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79-42555 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 

YF-17/ADEB system study 

[HASA-CR-I 44882] R79-27126 

BOZZIB BFFICIBBCI 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 

A79-42560 

NOZZLE FLOB 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1312] A79-40759 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 

NOZZLE 6B0HETBT 

Effects of Reynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1167] A79-40481 

Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 

installed on an F-18 propulsion wind tunnel model 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1164] A79-41174 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

BOCLBAB PBOPOLSIOB 

Nuclear aircraft innovations and applications 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-0846] A79-41913 

BUHEBICAL ABALTSIS 

Bumerical methods for solution of 

radiative-convective heat transfer problems - 

Radiative boundary layer for hypersonic 

blunt bodies in dense atmosphere 

A79-42971 

BUHEBICAL FLOB TISOALIZATIOB 

Nonlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41573 

BTLOB (TBADBBABK) 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 

A79-41945 

O 

0CBAH06BAPBT 

The potential role of airships for oceanography 

[ AIAA 79-1574] A79-42381 

0HE6A BATIGATIOH STSTBB 

The distribution pattern of Onega observations 

A79-40647 

Onega navigation system signal processing 

methods 

A79-43504 


A-24 



SUBJECT IHDEX 


POL&B BB6I0HS 


OHBOABO EQOIPflBn 

Onboard nethods for increasing landing approach 
capacity upon introdnction of HIS 
[DGLR PIPES 79-0a7] 479-42373 

OPTICAL COBBUHICATIOH 
Ply-by-light 

A79-43458 

Aircraft fiber-optic interconnect systens project 
[AD-A068366] H79-27978 

OPTICAL COUHTEBBEASOBBS 

Prelininary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an AH/ALQ-144 janner 
[AD-A067757] S79-26047 

OPTIBAL COBTBOL 

Study of the theoretical to real correspondance of 
an optinal control nodel and the significance of 
this Bodel for the description of working 
methodology with partly automated aircraft 
guidance and control systems 

[ILH-35] H79-27184 

OPTIBIZATIOH 

Leading-edge slat optimization for mazlDuo airfoil 
lift 

[HASA-TH-78566 j H79-27100 

Extension of running time in the BAE hypersonic 
shock tunnel 

[00 EL- 1260/78] H79-27191 

OSCILLATOBS 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation, detection, 
telecommunications, and instrumentation 
[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

OZIDATIOB BESISTAHCE 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 

P 


PABBLS 

Plight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels. in wide-bodied commercial 
transport aircraft 

[NASA-CR-159071] N79-27246 

PABALLBL PBOCESSIH6 (COBPUTEBS) 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor-based 
flight control systens 

A79-40664 

PABTICLE TBAJECTOBIES 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79- 43678 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

A79-43679 

PASSEBGEB AIBCBAPT 

Aircraft passenger seat material development for 
airline fire safety 

A79-43271 

Some possibilities for the navigation of small 
passenger aircraft 

A79-43508 

Navigation at high latitudes 

A79-43514 

PAILOADS 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

PEBFOBBABCB PBBOICTIOB 

Height and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

[AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 

[AIAA 79-1585] A79-42386 

Plight dynamics analyses and simulation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-42388 

PEBPOBBAHCB TESTS 

V/STOL performance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1286] A79-40487 

Ceramic mainshaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

[AD-A067904] H79-27516 

PEBTOBBATION TBEOBT 

On a property of the linearized boundary layer 
equations with self-induced pressure 

A79-41568 


PETBOLEOB PBODOCTS 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
kerojet fuels from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

[DOE/EBA-0023] H79-28058 

PBOSPHOBIC ACID 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond, 
surface treatment 

A79-43317 

PBOTOBAPPIIG 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

PILOT PBBPOBBAICB 

Influence of delay time and dead time on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-029] A79-42356 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-044] A79-42370* 

New onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-049] A79-42375 

PILOT TBAIBIBG 

P-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-A067765] N79-27188 

PILOTS (PEBSOBBBL) 

Air traffic control strategies for handling air 
traffic in the terminal area 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-032] A79-42359 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
ground/board/ground data link 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-050] A79-42376 

PIPELIBES 

Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 
transport systens. II 

A79-43734 

PISTON TBEOBT 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type 'slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 

PITCHING BOBSHTS 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

PLABETABT ATBOSPBEBES 

The ATHOSAT Program 1975-78. manned 

superpressure balloon flights for atmospheric 
monitoring 

[AIAA 79-1608] A79-42399 

PLASTIC COATINGS 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical-metal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[NASA-TB-80092] H79-27098 

PLATFOBBS 

Hind study for high altitude platform design 

[AIAA 79-1607] A79-42398 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 

[AIAA 79-1606] A79-42405 

PLUBES 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

PHEUBATIC COBTBOL 

A pneumatic distributor for the control system of 
a turbojet engine 

A79-42574 


PHEUBATIC EQUIPBEBT 

Past-acting valves for use in shock tubes. II - 
Formation of shock waves 

A79-43153 

PODS (EZTEBHAL STOBES) 

Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for 
transporting outsize cargo 

[ NAS A-CB-1 59067] N79-26063 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 

imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 
— - caused by rotor blade loss 

N79-27171 

POLAB BEGIOBS 

Navigation at high latitudes 

A79-43514 


A-25 



POBOUS BU.LS 


SUBJECT IIDBZ 


POBODS WALLS 

Eerodynaalcs of airfoils with porons trailing edges 

A79-43710 

POSITIOH EBBOBS 

The distribution pattern of Oaega observations 

A79-40647 

POSITIOH IHDICATOBS 

Quasi-autononous navigation systea for 

aircraft position indication 

A79-43505 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation, detection, 
telecoiBunications, and instrunentation 
[OHEHA, TP HO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

POTEHTIAL FLOW 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

A viscous/potential flow interaction analysis for 
circulation-controlled airfoils 

[AD-A067913] H79-26030 

POWEB TBAHSBISSIOH 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 

[AIAA 79-1606] A79-42405 

POWEBBD LIFT AIBCBAFT 

Fuel- conservative guidance system for powered-lift 
aircraft 

tHASA-TH-78595] H79-26009 

PBBDICTIOH AHALTSIS TECBHIQUES 

Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal 
aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind 
tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane 
[HASA-Cfi-158753] H79-26018 

Forecasting engine life 

H79-27154 


PBESSUBB DISTBIB0TIOB 

A method of computing the pressure distribution on 
a single-bladed hovering helicopter rotor 

H79-26044 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 

Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail conducted in 

Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel 

[HASA-TH-80097] H79-27099 

Calculation of pressure distribution for a 

wing-body combination at subsonic Bach numbers 
[FFA-TH-AO-1091] H79-27110 

PBESSUBE EFFECTS 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 


PBESSUBE GBADIEHTS 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 

Distortions, rotating stall and mechanical 
solicitations 


H79-27177 


PBESSUBE HBA5UBBHENTS 


Unsteady aerodynamic pressure measurements on 
rotating lifting systems 


A79-41494 


Fuselage surface pressure measurements of a 

helicopter wind-tunnel model with a 3.15-meter 
diameter single rotor 

[HASA-TH-80051 ] H79-26015 

PBESSUBE OSCILLATIOHS 


On a property of the linearized boundary layer 
equations with self-induced pressure 

A79-41568 


PBESSUBB SBHSOfiS 

A erop repulsion systems test facility rake 
calibration test in tunnel A 

[AD-A068975] H79- 27189 

PBOCUBBHEHT POLICY 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
aviation gasoline from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

[DOE/EBA-0024] H79-27336 

PBOOUCTIOH EH6IBEBBIH6 

Engine/aircraft structural integration: An overview 

H79-27167 


PBODUCTITITT 

The productivity of airships in long-range 
transportation 

[AIAA 79-1596] A79-42390 

PBOPELLAIT GBAIIS 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1327] A79-40761 

PBOPELLEB FABS 

V/STOL performance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1286] A79-40487 

PBOPBLLEBS 

Honlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41573 

PBOPULSIOB STSTEH COHFIGUBATIOIS 

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
[HASA-CB- 152239] H79-26056 

Aerodynamics of a tilt-nacelle V/STOL propulsion 
system 

[HASA-TH-78606] H79-27138 

PBOPULSIOB STSTEH PEBFOBBABCB 

General Electric Company variable cycle engine 
technology demonstrator programs 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1311] A79-40758 

PSTCBOPHTSI0LO6T 

Structuring of data systems: Psychophysio logical 

data from the dynamic flight simulator 
[AD-A067175] H79-27014 

PULSE BADAB 

Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars 

[HASA-CASE-HPO- 1436 1-1 ] B79-26253 

Q 

QUALITY COITBOL 

The structural effects and detection of variations 
in Hercules 3501-5A and Avco 5505 resin systems 

A79-43261 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins for quality control 

A79-43264 

QUIET EB6IBB PB06BAS 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSBA/ 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1313] A79-40760 


R 


BADAB BEACOBS 

Uplink ATCBBS environment measurements along the 
Boston-Washington corridor. Volnme 2: 

Interrogator characteristics 

[AD-A067944] H79-26041 

Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) Air Traffic. 
Control Badar Beacon System (ATCBBS) 
interference analysis 

[AD-A068565] H79-27119 

BADAB IRA6BBY 

Geneva, Zurich get fine-grain 3-D color weather 
radar 

A79-41850 

BADAB HEASUBEHEBT 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 
modern methods of digital signal processing 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-046] A79-42372 

BADAB BBSOLUTIOH 

Geneva, Zurich get fine-grain 3-D color weather 
radar 

A79-41850 

BADAB TBACKIBG 

Hanoeuvre handling in a multiradar, a.t.c. system 

A79-41176 

Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars 

[HASA-CASE-HPO- 1436 1-1] H79-26253 

BADIAL FLOW 

Experimental studies of axial and radial 

compressors by means of new measurement techniques 

A79-41237 


BADIATIVE BEAT TBABSFBB 

Numerical methods for solution of 

radiative-convective heat transfer problems - 

Hadiative boundary layer for hypersonic 

blunt bodies in dense atmosphere 

A79-42971 


A-26 



SUBJECT IBDSZ 


BOT&BT VIB6S 


e&DIO ALTIHBTBBS 

High altitude altiaeter flight test 

[AD-A0669043 H79-26054 

BAOIO B6ACOVS 

Application oriented sinnlation as a tool for the 

planning of radio beacon systeas for 

aircraft conannications 

[DGLB PAPER 79-042] A79-42368 

RADIO COBBDBICATIOH 

Air traffic control strategies for handling air 
traffic in the terminal area 

tDGlR PAPER 79-032] A79-42359 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
gronnd/board/gronnd data link 

[DGIR PAPER 79-050] A79-42376 

RADIO FBBQUEHCT IHTBRPBBBBCB 

Application oriented simulation as a tool for the 

planning of radio beacon systems for 

aircraft com man icat ions 

[DGLF PAPER 79-042] A79-42368 

Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) Air Traffic 
Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS) 
interference analysis 

[AD-A068565] N79-27119 

RADIO BAVI6ATI0B 

Sources and magnitude of radio compass 
instrumental errors 


A79-43503 

BABJBT EBGIBBS 

Analytical modeling of ramjet combustor heat 
transfer nodes 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1124] A79-40476 

Enthalpy of combustion of RJ-6 

[AD-A067968] H79-28037 

BABGB PIBDBBS 

Echo tracker/reinge finder for radars and sonars 

[ HASA-CASE-HPO-14361-1 ] H79-26253 

BBCTABGtILAR BIBG5 

Optimization of the weight of a wing with 
constraints on the static aeroelasticity 

A79-42410 

BBFBBBBCB SYSTB8S 

The basic geodetic shapes and position lines 

A79-43507 

BEGEBEBATIVB COOLIBG 

Through-heating of chambers with regenerative 
cooling for aircraft engines 

A79-42570 

BBGEBBBATORS 

Regenerator matrices for automotive gas turbines 

A79-42981 

BEGDIATIOBS 

Hew air service and deregulation - A study in 
transition 

A79-40172 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
kerojet fuels from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

t DOE/EB A-0023 ] H79-28058 

RELIABILITY 

RAM projections for aircraft rotor blades 

[ AD-A068822 ] B79-27130 

RELIABILITY AHALYSIS 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

Trends in reliability modeling technology for 
fault tolerant systems 

[HASA-TH-80089] N79-26810 

BELIEF VALVES 

Onloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 


BEBOTB SEBSOBS 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

Applications of a high-altitude powered platform 
/HAPP/ 

[AIAA 79-1603] A79-42397 

BEBOTBLY PILOTED VEHICLES 

Onmanned mini-blimp system 

[AIAA 79-1610] A79-42401 

BESEABCH AIRCRAFT 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/ 
(AIAA PSPER 79-1313] A79-40760 


RESEARCH ABD DEVBLOPHEBT 

A summary of BASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Research programs using the P100 engine 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1308] A79-40488 

Contribution of the engine BSD community to 
reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1360] A79-40764 

The DFVLH-P4 transonic wing as European test model 

A79-41234 

BESEABCH PROJECTS 

Advances in materials technology through the BHVg 
- Goals f problems and main points of interest 

A79-40677 

BESILIBBCB 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading 
edge 

[HASA-CH-1 52276] B7 9-26024 

BBSIBS 


The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 

BBSOBABT FBBQDEBCIES 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

BESOIABT VIBBATIOB 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter' ground resonance 

A79-41767 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

H79-27150 

BESODBCB ALLOCATIOB 

Findings and views concerning the exemption of 
aviation gasoline from the mandatory petroleum 
allocation and price regulations 

[DOE/EH A- 002 4] H79-27336 

BBTB0FITTIB6 

CFH56 - Franco-American ten-tonne turbofan 
production launch 

A79-41207 

BBYBOLDS BOBBER 


Effects of Reynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
(AIAA PAPER 79-1167] A79-40481 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 


RIGID BOTOB HELICOPTERS 

The fibre composite helicopter blade 

A79-43712 


BIBG STBOCTORES 

Rotor bust protection; Design guidelines for 
containment 


H79-27166 

BOCKET EIBAOST 

Feasibility of non-catapult ejection and hazard of 
an ejection seat rocket plume 

[AD-A067080] B79-26036 

ROLLER BBARIB6S 

Ceramic mainshaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

[AD-A067904] H79-27516 

ROTARY BIBG AIRCRAFT 

Prediction of aeroelastic instabilities in 
rotorcraft 

H79-27159 

ROTARY VIBGS 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 

Nonlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41573 

Rotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-41767 

Calculation of rotor impedance for 

articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight 

A79-42799 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 

calculated results from helicopter rotors in 

an anechoic chamber 

A79-43499 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43500 


A-27 



BOT&TIHG DISKS 


. SUBJECT IHDEX 


System design requirements for advanced 
rotary-ving agricultural aircraft 

[HKSA-CB-158938] H79-26046 

Helicopter Icing Symposium 

( AD-A067981 ] N79-26048 

Icing tests of a 0H-1H helicopter with an 
electrothermal ice protection system under 
simulated and natural icing conditions 
tiD“A067737] H79-26050 

B0T&TI16 DISKS 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

H79-27163 

BOTATIIG STAIIS 

Distortions, rotating stall and mechanical 
solicitations 

H79-27177 

Axial compressor stall effects on aircraft 

engines 

H79-27435 


BOTOB AEBODTBAHICS 

V/STOI performance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1286] A79-40487 

Unsteady aerodynamic pressure measurements on 
rotating lifting systems 

A79-41494 

Nonlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41573 

Botor blade stability in turbulent flows- II 

A79-41751 


Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 


A79-41752 


A flight investigation of basic performance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attack 
helicopter 

[NASA-TB-80112] N79- 27097 

Axial compressor stall - — effects on aircraft 
engines 

N79- 27435 


BOTOB BLADES 

Rotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 

A method of computing the pressure distribution on 
a single-bladed hovering helicopter rotor 

N79-26044 

Icing tests of a OH-IH helicopter with an 
electrothermal ice protection system under 
simulated and natural icing conditions 
[AD-A067737] N79-26050 

BOTOB BLADES (TUB60HACBIHEBT) 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

An evaluation of linear acoustic theory for a 
hovering rotor 

[NASA-TH-80059] N79-26881 

RAM projections for aircraft rotor blades 

[AD-A068822] N79-27130 

Performance of two-stage fan having 

low-aspect-ratio first-stage rotor blading 
[NASA-TP-1493] N79-27143 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

N79- 27163 


Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

N79-27176 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

N79- 27180 

Supersonic unstalled flutter 

N79-27181 

BOTOBS 

New techniques in jet engine balancing 

A79-40314 

Engine rotor burst containment/control studies 

N79- 27162 

Rotor bust protection: Design guidelines for 

containment 

N79-27166 


RONVAT CONDITIONS 

Factors influencing runway capacity as typified by 
the Bunich-Riem airport 

[DGLR PAPER 79-030] A79-42357 


An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAN) system and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use 

C AD-A067174] N79-26037 

BUHNATS 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[ NASA-CB-1 59075 ] H79-27185 

BUPTOBIHG 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

H79-27163 


S 


S-3 AIBCBAFT 

Application of color-coding in airborne 
displays 
[AD-A067558] 

SAFETY FACTOBS 

The requirement of damage tolerance. An 
of damage tolerance requirements with 
reference to HlL-A-83444 
[ NLB-TB-77 005-0] 

SAFETY BANAGEHBNT 


tactical 

N79-27137 

analysis 

specific 

H79-27135 


Haterial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 


SAILNIBGS 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 


A79-41945 


SANDWICH STBOCTOBES 

Special sandwich constructions for the interior of 
commercial aircraft 


A79-43270 


SCALE BODELS 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1149] A79-40480 

Analytical and scale model research aimed at 
improved hangglider design 

N79-27081 

Investigations of interference effects in a wind 
tunnel caused by a model support strut on a 
reflection plane mounted half model 
[ FFA-TN-AU-1335:2 ] N79-27109 

SCHLIEBEB PH0T06BAPBY 

A simple method of adapting a wind tunnel 
Schlieren system for interferometry 
[ AD-A067233] N79-26073 

SEAPLANES 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 


The characteristics of the spray generated by the 
efflux of various aircraft propulsors impinging 
normally on water 

[ AD-A067742] H79-26049 

SEATS 


Aircraft passenger seat material development for 
airline fire safety 


A79-43271 


SEGHENTS 

On the attenuation of sound by three-dimensionally 
segmented acoustic liners in a rectangular duct 
[NASA-TH-80118] N79-27932 

SEPARATED FLOW 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 

Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets 

A79-41414 

Hodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

A79-42806 


SEBYICE LIFE 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1280] A79-40486 

Service life parameters of turbine blades 

A79-40684 

Hethodological considerations on the service life 
design of turbine disks 

A79-40687 

CF6 jet engine performance deterioration 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1233] A79-41175 


A-28 



SUBJECT IBDEX 


STOKES L&B (FLUID HECHKHICS) 


The reqaireaent of danage tolerance- An analysis 
of daaage tolerance requirements with specific 
reference to HIL-A-8344a 

[ HLB-TE-77005-0 ] H79-27 135 

SEBTOCOHTBOL 


Ply-by-light 


A79-43458 


SHALLOW SHELLS 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisymmetric cylinder 

A79-43711 


SHELL STABILITT 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 


SHIBLDIHG 

Engine rotor burst containment/control studies 

H79-27162 

SHIPS 

Technology requirements and readiness for very 
large vehicles 

[HASA-TH-80127] H79-27086 

SHOCK TUBES 

Fast-acting valves for use in shock tubes. II - 
Formation of shock waves 

A79-43153 


SHOCK TUHHELS 

Extension of running tine in the BAE hypersonic 
shock tunnel 

[OOEL-1 260/78] H79-27191 

SHOCK HATE PB0PA6ATI0B 

The transonic integral equation method with curved 
shock waves 

A79-41407 

Begion of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 

Wave propagation associated with wings three 

dimensional unsteady flow analysis for 
supersonic aircraft 

A79-43597 


SHORT HAUL AIBCBAFT 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSBA/ 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1313] A79-40760 

SHORT TAKEOFF AIBCBAFT 

First flight imminent for new technology wing 

A79-40327 

Quiet propulsive lift for commuter airlines 

[HASA-TH-78596] H79- 26035 

SI6HAL PROCESSIBG 

Application oriented simulation as a tool for the 

planning of radio beacon systems for 

aircraft communications 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-042] A79-42368 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 
modern methods of digital signal processing 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-046] A79-42372 

Omega navigation system — signal processing 
methods 

A79-43504 


SILICOHE RUBBER 

Recent advances in fire resistant materials in 
aircraft construction 


A79-43269 


SIHULATIOH 

Application oriented simulation as a tool for the 

planning of radio beacon systems for 

aircraft communications 

[DGLB PAPER 79-042] A79-42368 

SIHULATORS 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1149] A79-40480 

SIHGULAB IHTE6BAL BQUATIOBS 

Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equation 

A79-43135 

SKIH (STRUCTURAL HSBBER) 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 
YP-12 skin structures 

A79-43243 

Hybrid Wing Box structure 

A79-43331 


SKIl PBICTIOH 

Indirect measurement of turbulent skin friction 

A79-40770 

SLEIDEB WIHGS 

Slender wings for civil and military aircraft 
/Eighth Theodore von Karman Hemorial Lecture/ 

A79-41766 


Further advancements in the concept of 
delta-winged hybrid-airships 

[AIAA 79-1599] A79-42393 

SBOKE 

A study of smoke movement in an aircraft fuselage 
[BAE-TB-EP-613] N79-26040 

S0ABIB6 

A study of course deviations during cross-country 
soaring 

H7 9-27072 

SODIUB AZIDES 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1327] A79-40761 

SOLID PBOPELLABTS 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1327] A79-40761 

SOBAB 

Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars 

[NASA-CASE-HPO-14361-1 ] B79-26253 

SOBIC BOOBS 

Wave propagation associated with wings three 

dimensional unsteady flow analysis for 
supersonic aircraft 

A79-43597 

SOUHD PRESSURE 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 

calculated results from helicopter rotors in 

an anechoic chamber 

A79-43499 

SOUHD PBOPAGATIOH 

An experimental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[ BASA-TB-80109] B79-27931 

SPACECRAFT COIF IGOR ATIOHS 

Technology requirements and readiness for very 
large vehicles 

[ BAS A-TB-80127 ] H79-27086 

SPACECRAFT ELECTBOHIC EQUIPBEHT 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation, detection, 
telecommunications, and instrumentation 
[OHBBA, TP HO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

SPOILERS 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 

A79-43314 

STABLE OSCILLATIOHS 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-41767 

STATIC DEFOBBATIOH 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 

STATIC LOADS 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

STATIC TESTS 

Effect of several geometric parameters on the 
static internal performance of three 
nonaxisymaetric nozzle concepts 

[BASA-TP-1468] H79- 26022 

STATISTICAL AHALTSIS 

An experimental comparison of the readability of 
two digital altimeters 

[ ABl/SIS-HOTB-60 ] H79-26 053 

STATISTICAL DISTBIBUTIOHS 

The distribution pattern of Onega observations 

A79-40647 

STATOR BLADES 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[AD-A067969] H79-26060 

STEAD! STATE 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

H79-27176 

5TIFFBESS 

The fibre composite helicopter blade 

A79-43712 

STOKES LAW (FLUID BECHABICS) 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

A79-43679 


A-29 



STOB&GE TASKS 


SOBJSCT ISDBl 


STOBA6E TASKS 

Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 
transport systeas. II 

679-43734 

STBAPDOSB ISEBTIAL 60IDASCS 

Havigation at high latitudes 

A79-43514 

ST6BSS ASALTSIS 

LCP life prediction for a flight-by-flight load 

segnence of a turbine disc Low Cycle Fatigue 

A79-43600 

Stresses, vibrations, structural integration and 
engine integrity (including aeroelasticity and 
flutter) 

( AGABD-CP-248] H79- 27148 

Aircraft engine design using experimental stress 
analysis techniques 

B79-27151 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

H79-27158 

Boundary- integral equation analysis of an advanced 
turbine disk rim slot 

B79- 27161 

STBESS COBCBHTBATIOB 

Effects of geometric variables on stress intensity 
factors for crack gages 

( AD-A068631) H79-27533 

STBESS HBASUBBaSHT 

Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 

dissimilar materials hypersonic heating 

simulation 

[HASA-TH-72865] H79-27088 

STBESS-STBAIH BEIATIOBSHIPS 

LCF life prediction for a flight-by-flight load 
sequence of a turbine disc — — Low Cycle Fatigue 

A79- 43600 

STBUCTUBAL ABAIYSIS 

Structural loads due to gusts on semibuoyant 
airships 

(AIAA 79-1581] A79-42384 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79- 42555 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 

The structural effects and detection of variations 
in Hercules 3501-5A and Avco 5505 resin systems 

A79-43261 

stresses, vibrations, structural integration and 
engine integrity (including aeroelasticity and 
flutter) 

t AGABD-CP-248] H79-27148 

Structural analysis of a gas turbine impeller 
using finite-element and holographic techniques 

H79-27149 

STBBCTUBAL DESIGH 

Canadair Challenger business jet subsystems 

and structural design 

A79-40313 

A new facility for structural engine testing 

B79-27173 

STfiOCTHBAL DESIGH CBITEBIA 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79- 42394 

STBOCTTJBAL BEHBEBS 

Error localization in turbojet engines through 
determination of the characteristics of 
structural members — German thesis 


A79-41827 

STHOCTTOAl STABILITI 

Rotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-41767 

STBOCTOBAL VIBBATIOH 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-41767 

Hew methods for ground-testing aeronautical 
structures 

[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-47] A79-43620 


STBDTS 

Investigations of interference effects in a wind 
tunnel caused by a model support strut on a 
reflection plane mounted half model . 
[FFA-TH-A0-1335:2] H79-27109 

SOBSOHIC FLOf 

Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic drag 
of simple bodies in two-phase flow 

A79-43172 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 

Alternate subsonic low-cost engine 

tAD-A067277] H79-26058 

Calculation of pressure distribution for a 

wing-body combination at subsonic Hach numbers 
[FFA-TH-AO-1091 ] B79-27110 

SUBSOHIC SPEED 

Simplified calculation method for subsonic 
airloads on wing-body combinations 

A79-40200 

Aerodynamic characteristics of the close-coupled 
canard as applied to low-to-moderate swept 
wings. Volume 2 : Subsonic speed regime 

tAD-A067122] H79-26025 

Engine performance considerations for the large 
subsonic transport 

H79-27139 

SOBSOIIC HIID TOVHSLS 

The new European subsonic aerodynamic testing 
facilities aircraft wind tunnels 

A79-42066 

SUPEBCBITICAL HIH6S 

The DFVLB-F4 transonic wing as European test model 

A79-41234 

SUPEBPBESSOBE BALLOOHS 

The ATHOSAT Program 1975-78 manned 

superpressure balloon flights for atmospheric 
monitoring 

(AIAA 79-1608] A79-42399 

SDPEBSOIIC AIRCBAPT 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 
— - IF- 12 skin structures 

A79-43243 

Have propagation associated with wings three 

dimensional unsteady flow analysis for 
supersonic aircraft 

A79-43597 

SUPEBSOHIC BOOHDABI LAISBS 

Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a flat 
plate at a large free-stream Hach number 

A79-42989 

Lee side flow field over slender delta wings of 
finite thickness 

ClLH-23] H79-27103 

SOPEBSOBIC FLOB 

numerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 

The amplification factor in the two-dimensional 
interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow 

A79-42565 

Region of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 

Supersonic flow past conical bodies with nearly 
circular cross sections 

[AD-A068004] H79-26027 

Aeropropulsion systems test facility rake 
calibration test in tunnel A 

[AD-A068975] H79-27189 

SOPEBSOBIC FLOTTEB 

Rathe mat ical model of the oscillatory cycle 
associated with nonsteady interaction of a 
supersonic jet with a barrier 

A79-42007 

The effect of intake conditions on supersonic 
flutter in turbofan engines 

H79-27175 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 


Supersonic unstalled flutter 


H79-27180 

H79-27181 


A-30 



SOBJBCT IBDEX 


TBBBIBU. GOID&BCB 


SnPBBSOHIC JET FLOW 

flathenatical aodel of the oscillatory cycle 
associated with nonsteady interaction of a 
supersonic jet aith a barrier 

R79-42007 

Dilatational aodel of noise froo a aoving jet in 
terns of arbitrary jet strnctare and observer 
notion 

A79-42053 

SUBVEILLBHCE 

Analysis of Coast Guard aissions for a oaritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 

Rodern rigid airships as sea control escort 
platforas 

[AIAA 79-1575] A79-Q2382 

SWEPT VIBGS 

Aerodynaaic characteristics of the close-coupled 
canard as applied to lon-to-noderate swept 
wings. ?olume 2: Subsonic speed regiae 

[ AD-A067122] H79- 26025 

SWEPTBACK VIEGS 

On the transonic-dip necbanisa of flutter of a 
sweptback wing 

A79-41763 

Fundaaentals of design. Ill - V-G for coabat 
aircraft 

A79-:43725 

Rear field problems in three-diaensional panel 
methods — - aatheaatical modeling of flow 
characteristics 

A79-43779 

STETHETIC FUELS 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 

[AD-A067709] R79-26224 

STSTEB EFFECTITEEESS 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 

[ NASA-CB- 159075] B79-27185 

STSTEHS EEGIHEEBIEG 

Airport engineering Book 

A79-40139 

System design requirements for advanced 
rotary-wing agricultural aircraft 
[RASA-CB-158938] B79-26046 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[HASA-CB-152286] B79-26067 


T 

TACAB 

Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAH navigation through frequent change 
of TACAN stations 

A79-41778 

TAIL ASSEBBLIES 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution 

computerized design 

[AD-A067927] H79-26031 

TAIL SOBFACES 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 

Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail conducted in 

Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel 

[HASA-TM-80097] H79-27099 

TAKEOFF 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[HASA-CB-159075] B79-27185 

TAZIIBG 

Development of specifications for taxiing guidance 
and control systems 

[DGLB PAPER 79-034] A79-42361 

TECHH0L06ICAL FOBECASTIBG 

The 1990 system characteristics and requirements 

H79-27113 

Airfreight forecasting methodology and results 

H79-27114 

TECHB0L06T ASSESSHEBT 

Development of materials and processes for engine 
components - Current and future points of interest 

A79- 40680 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1312] A79-40759 


Hilitary-technology-related flight testing in the 
framework of DFVLB/BWB cooperation - Status and 
perspectives 

A79-41233 

British lighter-than-air activity - A review 

[AIAA 79-1583] A79-42385 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 

[AIAA 79-1585] A79-42386 

Recent advances in fire resistant materials in 
aircraft construction 


A79-43269 

Hew paths for the development of aircraft 
equipment opened up by the use of modern 

computer technology digital systems for 

civil aviation 


A79-43501 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[BASA-CB-152286] B79-26067 

State of the art survey of technologies applicable 
to RASA'S aeronautics, avionics and controls 
program 

[ HAS A-CR-1 59050] B79-27087 

The 1990 system characteristics and requirements 

H79-27113 


TBCHIOLOGl OTILIEATIOB 


Unmanned mini-blimp system 

[AIAA 79-1610] A79-42401 

Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air vehicles 
[AIAA 79-1570] A79-42403 

Applications of metal-matrix composites, the 
emerging structural materials 


A79-43320 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation, detection, 
telecommunications, and instrumentation 
[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

Air cushion landing gear applications study 

[HAS A-CR-1 59002] H79-26045 

TEETEBIB6 

A flight investigation of basic performance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attack 
helicopter 

[ HASA-TH-801 12 ] B79-27097 

TELECOHHUBICAtlOB 

Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-42400 

Aerospace applications of oscillators for 

location navigation, detection, 
telecommunications, and instrumentation 
[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

TBHPEBATOBE DISTBI6DTIOB 


Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 


A79-42551 

Computer calculation of steady-state temperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 


A79-42553 

TEBSILE STBEBGTB 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Pe-3Al alloy forgings 

A79-42245 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79-42395 

TEBHIBAL FACILITIES 

Air traffic control strategies for handling air 
traffic in the terminal area 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-032] A79-42359 

Sharjah - An airport out of Arabian Bights 

innovative airport design 

A79-43732 

TEBHIBAL 6UIDABCE 


Development of specifications for taxiing guidance 
and control systems 

[DGLB PAPER 79-034] A79-42361 

Investigation of different system configurations 
for a THA navigation system taking special 
account of traffic load and channel requirements 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

Fundaaentals of navigation in the terminal 
maneuvering area 

A79-42377 


A-31 



TEST FICniTIBS 


SOBJBCT IBDEX 


Fnel-conservative guidance systea for poaered-lift 
aircraft 

[HASA-TH-78595] H79-26009 

TEST FACILITIES 

Evaluation of a siaplified gross thrust 

calculation technique using two prototype FIDO 
turbofan engines in an altitude facility 
[HiSA-TP-1482] B79-26057 

A new facility for structural engine testing 

H79-27173 


TETHEBED BALLOOHS 

Tethered telecoaaunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systeas 

[AIAA 79-1609] A79-92400 

TEXAS 

An evaluation of the bird/aircraft strike ha 2 ard 
Dyess Air Force Base, Texas 

[AD-A068026] H79-26039 

TF-34 EE GIBE 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition aaintenance 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1280] A79-40486 

THEBBAL BOOBDABT lATEB 

Numerical aethods for solution of 

radiative-convective heat transfer problems - 

Badiative boundary layer for hypersonic 

blunt bodies in dense atmosphere 

A79-42971 

THEBBAL CTCLIBG TESTS 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 
TF-12 skin structures 

A79-43243 

TBEBBAL FATI60E 

A contribution on theraal fatigue in cooled 
turbine blading 

N79-27153 


THEBBAL STBSSSES 

Elimination of friction induced theraal cracks in 
landing gear components 


A79-43273 


Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 

dissimilar materials hypersonic heating 

simulation 

[NASA-TH-72865] H79-27088 

THEBBOBTBABIC PBOPEBTIES 


Calculation of the working process in a 

piston- type ‘slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 


THEBBOPLASTIC BBSIHS 

IC-14 thermoplastic/graphite elevator 


A79-43241 


THIN FILHS 

An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 

N79-27164 


THIS HIBGS 

Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 
finite-span wing 


A79-41567 


Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equation 

A79-43135 


THBEE DIBEBSIOBAL FLOB 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

Have propagation associated with wings three 

dimensional unsteady flow analysis for 
supersonic aircraft 

A79-43597 

Near field problems in three-dimensional panel 

methods mathematical modeling of flow 

characteristics 

A79- 43779 

Numerical evaluation of transonic equivalence rule 
[AD-A067902] N79-27101 

THHOST 

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
[NASA-CB-152239] N79-26056 

TBBUST AOGBENTATIOB 

A summary of HASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Besearch programs using the FI 00 engine 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1308] A79-40488 


THBUST BBASUBEBEBT 

Evaluation of a simplified gross thrust 

calculation technique using two prototype FI 00 
turbofan engines in an altitude facility 
[NASA-TP-1482] N79-26057 

THBOST fECTOB COBTBOL 

Type A 7/STOL propulsion system development 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1287] A79-40755 

Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 

installed on an F-18 propulsion wind tunnel model 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1164] A79-41174 

Fundamentals of design. II - TTO for combat aircraft 

A79-43724 

TILTED PBOPELLEBS 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage motion 

[NASA-CB-1 58778] N79-27125 

TILTIBG BOTOBS 

A wind-tunnel investigation of tilt-rotor gust 
alleviation systems 

[NASA-CH-1 52264] N79-26062 

TIBE LAG 

Influence of delay time and dead time on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-029] A79-42356 

TIP DBITEB BOTOBS 

Botor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft /sec tip 
speed fan. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

[NASA-CH-1 59596] B79-26055 

TIP SPEED 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 

calculated results from helicopter rotors in 

an anechoic chamber 

A79-43499 

TITABIDB ALLOTS 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Fe-3 A1 alloy forgings 

A79-42245 

Fracture toughness in titanium alloys 

[AD-A067785] N79-26176 

TOIICITT ABD SAFBTT HAZABD 

Haterial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 

TBACKIB6 BETHOBSS 

Manoeuvre handling in a multiradar, a.t.c. systea 

A79-41176 


TBAFFIC 

A simulation investigation of cockpit display of 
aircraft traffic during curved, descending, 
decelerating approaches 

[NASA-TB-80098] N79-26052 

TBAILIB6 EDGES 

Numerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 


TBAILIBG-ED6E FLAPS 

Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[NASA-TB-79208] N79-27930 

TBAIBIBG AIBCBAFT 

Alpha Jet - The Franco-German training and 
tactical support aircraft 

A79-42063 


TBAJBCTOBT ABALTSIS 

Hind tunnel simulation of the firing of missiles 
carried under aircraft 

[ONBBA, TP BO. 1979-65] A79-43622 

The calculation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[NPL-DNACS-11/78] N79-26051 

TBAJBCTOBT OPTIHIZATIOB 

The calculation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[NPl-DNACS-11/78] N79-26051 

The computation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[BE-577] H79-27128 

TBANSFEB FOBCTIOBS 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles; Comprehensive data report 
nozzle transfer functions 

[NASA-CE-1 59628] N79- 27933 

TBABSLATIOBAL BOTIOB 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

N79-27180 


A-32 



SUBJECT IBDBX 


TOBBOFARS 


TB&HSOHIC FLIGBT 

On the transonic-dip nechanisa of flutter of a 
sveptback ving 

i79-ai763 

TR&HSOHIC FLOV 

The transonic integral equation method with curved 
shock waves 

A79-41407 

The amplification factor in the two-dimensional 
interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow 

A79-42565 

An exploratory study of a finite difference method 
for calculating unsteady transonic potential flow 
[ RASA-TH-80105] H79-27096 

Numerical evaluation of transonic equivalence rule 
[AD-A067902] N79-27101 

Design of shock-free transonic flow in 
turbomachinery 

[AD-A067703] H79-27144 

TBAHSPOBT AIBCBAFT 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 

the transporter design stage military aviation 

fDGLR PAPEB 79-054] A79-42349 

Lighter-than-air craft for strategic nobility 

[AIAA 79-1597] A79-42391 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

Ilyushin *Candid* Soviet transport for 

enhanced air mobility and logistical support 

A79-42423 

New paths for the development of aircraft 
equipment opened up by the use of modern 

computer technology digital systems for 

civil aviation 

A79-43S01 

Engine performance considerations for the large 
subsonic transport 

N79-27139 


TBASSPOBTATIOR 

The 1990 system characteristics and requirements 

N79-27113 


TUBBIRB BLADES 

Service life parameters of turbine blades 

A79-40684 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 

Nonstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 

Measurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cas cade 

A79-42891 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

A79-43679 

A contribution on thermal fatigue in cooled 
turbine blading 

N79-27153 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

N79- 27156 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

F79-27158 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 

imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 
caused by rotor blade loss 

R79- 27171 


TURBIBE BH6IHBS 

Further test results with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1105] A79-40752 

Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing 
with liquid hydrogen 

[HASA-TH-79196] H79-27140 


The analysis of engine vibrations 
Forecasting engine life 


R79-27150 


B79-27154 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

H79-27163 

Rotor bust protection: Design guidelines for 

containment 

N79-27166 

Small turbine engine integration in aircraft 
installations 

N79-27170 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 

imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 
caused by rotor blade loss 

R79-27171 

TUBBIRB EXHAUST ROZZLES 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79-42555 

TUBBIRB PUHPS 

Measuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

TUBBIRB RBBBLS 

Methodological considerations on the service life 
design of turbine disks 

A79-40687 

Computer calculation of steady-state temperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 

A79-42553 

LCF life prediction for a flight-by- flight load 

sequence of a turbine disc Low Cycle Fatigue 

' A79-43600 

TUBBOCOBPBBSSOBS 

Experimental studies of axial and radial 

compressors by means of new measurement techniques 

A79-41237 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[AD-A067969] B79-26060 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

H79-27 176 

Distortions^ rotating stall and mechanical 
solicitations 

S79-27177 

Review of the AGARD S and H panel evaluation 
program of the RASA-Lewis SBP approach to 
high-temperature LCF life prediction 

R79-27179 

Axial compressor stall effects on aircraft 

engines 

R79-27435 

TUBBOFAR ERGIRES 

A summary of NASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Research programs using the FIDO engine 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1308] A79-40488 

Type A V/STOL propulsion system development 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1287] A79-40755 

Multivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

CF6 jet engine performance deterioration 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1233] A79^41175 

CFH56 - Franco-American ten-tonne turbofan 
production launch 

A79-41207 

High tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum fan 
blades 

A79-43332 

Garrett ATF 3 

A79-43469 

Evaluation of a simplified gross thrust 

calculation technique using two prototype FlOO 
turbofan engines in an altitude facility 
[NASA-TP-1482] N79-26057 

Integration of an airframe with a turbofan and 
afterburner system 

R79-27172 

The effect of intake conditions on supersonic 
flutter in turbofan engines 

H79-27175 

TUBBOFABS 

Gas curtain in gas turbine engines 

A79-42547 


A-33 



fOBBOJBT BB6IHBS 


SOBJBCT IBDEX 


TOBBOJBT E8GIBES 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion sianlators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[Alii PiPEB 79-1ia93 A79-a0480 

Error localization in turbojet engines through 
deteraination of the characteristics of 
structural menbers Geraan thesis 

A79-41827 

CFH56 - in act of cooperation, a new class of 

engine, a path towards the aeronautics of toaorrow 

179-42065 

A pneuaatic distributor for the control systea of 
a turbojet engine 

179-42 574 

Alternate subsonic low-cost engine 

CAD-A067277] H79-26058 

TaBBOHACHIBB BLADES 

Probleos associated with flows in aerodynamic 
wakes of blade cascades 

179-43607 

TUBBOHACHIHBBT 

Design of shock-free transonic flow in 
turbomachinery 

[AD-1067703] B79-27144 

TOBBULEHCE HETEBS 

Laser velocimetry measureaents on high temperature 
round and rectangular twin-jet flows 

179-42061 

TOBBULEHT BOUHDABT LATEB 

Split-film aneaoneter aeasurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 

A79-42029 

T0BBDLBBT FLOW 

Indirect measurement of turbulent skin friction 

A79-40770 

Application of a laminar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 

179-41 30 4 

fiotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

179-41751 

Fumerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

179-41771 

Laser velocimetry measurements on high temperature 
round and rectangular twin-jet flows 

179-42061 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 


TD6B0LEBT JETS 

Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets 

179-41414 


TOBBULEHT HAKBS 

Hodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

179-42806 

Problems associated with flows in aerodynamic 
wakes of blade cascades 


179-43607 


THISTIHG 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 


TWO DIHEHSIOHAL FLOW 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisymmetric cylinder 

179-43711 

TWO DIHEHSIOHAL JETS 

The amplification factor in the two-dimensional 
interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow 

A79-42565 

TWO PHASE FLOW 

Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic drag 
of siaple bodies in two-phase flow 

179-43172 


U 

OLTBAHIGH FBEQUBHCIES 

Theory and experiments on precision L-band DUE 

[FOB-44-1977] H79-27124 

ULTBASOHIC TESTS 

Ultrasonic inspection of engine nacelle structure 
searching for cracks 

[HEPT-761 0,909] H79-27522 


Ultrasonic inspection of wing spar attachment 
joints and lugs in viscount aircraft 
[BEPT-7610.910] H79-27523 

UHITBD KIH600H 

A consideration of general aviation in the OK 

[TT-7902] H79-26010 

UHSTEADT FLOW 

Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 
finite-span wing 

179-41567 

Nonlinear aatheaatical siaulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

179-41573 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

179-43223 

In exploratory study of a finite difference aethod 
for calculating unsteady transonic potential flow 
[HlSi-TH-80105] H79-27096 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

H79-27176 

Distortions, rotating stall and mechanical 
solicitations 

H79-27177 

USEB BEQUIBB8BHTS 

Can Europe choose a coaaon fighter 

179-41209 


T/STOL AIBCBAFT 

V/STOL perforaance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAl PAPBB 79-1286] 179-40487 

Type 1 V/STOL propulsion system development 

[AIIA PIPEB 79-1287] 179-40755 

Thrust and nass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diaaeter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
[HlSl-CB-1 52239] H79-26056 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter 

systea to aeasure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
CNASA-CB-152212] H79-26374 

Perforaance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with 
blowing boundary layer control 

[NlSl-TH-79176] H79-27093 

Aeronautical research into vertical problems in 
V/STOL aircraft approach landing 

[IFD-4-78] H79-27134 

Aerodynamics of a tilt-nacelle V/STOL propulsion 
system 

[HASl-TH-78606] . H79-27138 

A coBparison of the V/STOL handling qualities of 
the VAK-191B with the reguireaents of IGABD 
report 577 and HIL-F-83300 

[HASl-TP-1494] H79-27182 

VABIABLB CYCLE BHGIHES 

General Electric Company variable cycle engine 
technology demonstrator programs 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1311] A79-40758 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1312] 179-40759 

Multivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

VABIABLB GEOBBTBT STBUCTUBES 

1 general method for the layout of ailerons and 
elevators of gliders and aotorplanes 

H79-27076 

VABIABLB FITCH FBOPBLLBBS 

V/STOL performance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAA PIPEB 79-1286] 179-40487 

VABIABLB SWBBF WIH6S 

Fundaaentals of design. III - V-G for combat 
aircraft 

179-43725 

VELOCITY DISTBIBUTIOB 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles; Comprehensive data report 
nozzle transfer functions 

[ HASl-CB-159628] H79-27933 


1-34 



SUBJECT IHOEI 


BIRD TUBBEL TESTS 


7B10CITT BBISUBEflEHT 

Laser velocinetry measurements on high temperature 
round and rectangular twin-jet flows 

A79-a2061 

VSBTICAL AIB CUBBEBTS 

flininum altitude-loss soaring in a specified 
vertical wind distribution 

H79-27071 

TEBTIC&L LABDIBG 

The characteristics of the spray generated by the 
efflux of various aircraft propulsors impinging 
normally on water 

[AD-A067742] H79-26049 

VEBTICAL TAKEOFF AIBCBAFT 

Fundamentals of design* II - VTO for combat aircraft 

A79-43724 

Wind-tunnel investigation of highly maneuverable 
supersonic 7/STOl fighter 

[ HASA-TH-78599] H79-26017 

• The characteristics of the spray generated by the 
efflux of various aircraft propulsors impinging 
normally on water 

[AD-A067742] B79-26049 

A comparison of the V/STOL handling qualities of 
the VAK-191B with the requirements of AGABD 
report 577 and BIL-P-83300 

[HASA-TP-1494] H79-27182 

7HF 0HBIBAB6S BA7IGATIOB 

Navigation at high latitudes 

A79-43514 

71BBATI0H 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

H79-27158 

VIBBATIOB ISOLATOBS 

An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 

H79-27164 

VIBBATIOB BODE 

Hathematical model of the oscillatory cycle 
associated with nonsteady interaction of a 
supersonic jet with a barrier 

A79-42007 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

W79-27150 

VISCOOBT AIBCBAFT 

Ultrasonic inspection of wing spar attachment 
joints and logs in viscount aircraft 
[REPT-7610.910] H79-27523 

VISCOUS FLOW 

A viscoos/potential flow interaction analysis for 
circulation-controlled airfoils 

[AD-A067913] H79-26030 

VISIBILITY 

A study of smoke movement in an aircraft fuselage 
[HAE-TH-EP-613] H79-26040 

VISUAL FLIGHT 

Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 
region 

[DGLB PAPER 79-033] A79- 42360 

Experience in the analysis of real and simulated 
collisions and dangerous encounters in German 
airspace 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-036] A79-42363 

VOBTEI BBEAKDOHB 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
con figurations 

[HASA-TH-80474] B79-26016 

VOBTEI STBEETS 

Hodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

A79-42806 

VOBTICBS 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
con figurations 

[HASA-TH-80474] H79-26016 

VOHTICITY 

Near field problems in three-dimensional panel 
methods — - mathematical modeling of flow 
cha ract erist ics 

A79-43779 


W 

BAKES 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
• on blade wake transport and interaction 
[AD-A067969] H79-26060 

BALL JETS 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 

BABBIBG STSTEBS 

Report of the FAA task force on aircraft 

separation assurance. Volume 1: Executive summary 
[AD-A067905] N79-26042 

HAVE DISPEBSIOB 

An experimental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[NASA-TB-80109] H79-27931 

BEIGBT ANALYSIS 

Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

[AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

Structural loads due to gusts on semibuoyant 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1581] A79-42384 

BEIGBT BEDUCTIOB 

Optimization of the weight of a wing with 
constraints on the static aeroelasticity 

A79-42410 

BIND fBETEOBOLOGY) 

Hlnimum altitude-loss soaring in a specified 
vertical wind distribution 

H79-27071 

BIBD EFFECTS 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 

relationships with optimal filters in 

inertial navigation system 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-048] A79-42374 

BIND BEASUBEBEBT 

Wind study for high altitude platform design 

[AIAA 79-1607] A79-42398 

BIBD SBEAB 

Hissed approach of commercial aircraft regarding 
wind shear in the ground boundary layer 
[DGLB PAPER 79-028] A79-42355 

Influence of delay tine and dead time on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLR PAPER 79-029] A79-42356 

BIBD TUBBEL APPABATOS 

Wind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Republic 

[IFD-5-78] N79-27107 

BIBD TUBBEL DRIVES 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type ’slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 

BIBD TUBBEL BODELS 

Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 

installed on an F-18 propulsion wind tunnel model 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1164] A79-41174 

The DFVLR-F4 transonic wing as European test model 

A79-41234 

A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil on 

wind tunnel models to reduce spin entry after 
stall 

[HASA-CH-158717] H79-26013 

BIBD TUBBEL TESTS 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1149] A79-40480 

Effects of Reynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1167] A79-40481 

Application of a laminar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 

A79-41304 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 

Heasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 


A-35 



WITO TUHBBLS 


SUBJECT IHDEZ 


Hind tannel sianlation of the firing of missiles 
carried under aircraft 

[OHEBA, TP BO- 1979-65] A79-43622 

Hind-tunnel investigation of highly naneuverable 
supersonic V/STOL fighter 

[HASA-TH-78599] B79-26017 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynanic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 
configuration wind tunnel tests 

[BASA-Tp-iaaa] H79-26020 

Effect of nose bluntness and afterbody shape on 
aerodynamic characteristics of a nonoplanar 
Dissile concept with bodies of circular and 
elliptical cross sections at a Nacfa nunber of 2-50 
[HASA-TM-80055] H79-26023 

A wind-tunnel investigation of tilt-rotor gust 
alleviation systems 

[ BASA-CB-15226a] H79- 26062 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility: Summary 

[BASA-CR-1 52286] B79-26067 

A simple method of adapting a wind tunnel 
Schlieren system for interferometry 
[AD-A067233] H79-26073 

Hind tunnel tests of four flexible wing ultralight 
gliders 

H79- 27084 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical-metal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[ NASA-TH-80092] B79-27098 

Hind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Republic 

[IFD-5-78] N79-27107 

Investigations of interference effects in a wind 
tunnel caused by a model support strut on a 
reflection plane mounted half model 
[FFA-TH-AD-1335:2] B79- 27109 

Small turbine engine integration in aircraft 
insta:ilations 

B79-27170 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

H79-27178 

Aeropropulsion systems test facility rake 
calibration test in tannel A 

[AD-A068975] N79-27189 

HIED TOBBEIS 

Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and 
geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 

swept arrow-wing configuration langley 7 by 

10 foot tannel 

[HASA-TH-80083] N79-27095 

HIBDOHS tAFEBTQRES) 

Aircraft transparency failure and logistical cost 
analysis. Volume 1: Program summary 
[AD-A068719] H79-27131 

HIBDSHIELDS 

Aircraft transparency failure and logistical cost 
analysis. Volume 1: Program summary 
[AD-A068719] B79-27131 

HIBG OSCXLLATIOBS 

On the transonic-dip mechanism of flutter of a 
sweptback wing 

A79-41763 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

HIBG PAH ELS 

Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 

structure for subsonic transport aircraft 

A79- 43245 

Hybrid Wing Fox structure 

A79-43331 

HIBG PLABFOBHS 

First flight imminent for new technology wing 

A79-40327 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading 
edge 

[ NASA-CR-152276] B79-26024 

HIBG PBOFILES 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 


Allowable notch effectivity 
structures 

Have propagation associated 
dimensional unsteady flow 
supersonic aircraft 

HIBGIETS 


criterion for aircraft 

A79-43515 

with wings three 

analysis for 

A79-43597 


Hinglets are no drag enhancement of 

aerodynamic efficiency with vertical wingtip 
extensions 


A79-43457 


HIHGS 

A general method for the layout of ailerons and 
elevators of gliders and motorplanes 

H7 9-27 076 

Experimental investigation into the feasibility of 
an extruded wing 

H79-27077 

Improvement of hang glider performance by use of 
ultralight elastic wing 

H79-27082 


Ultrasonic inspection of wing spar attachment 
joints and lugs in viscount aircraft 
[BEPT-7610.910] H79-27523 

HOBKLOADS (PSTCHOPHISIOLOGT) 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-044] A79-42370 


Y 


IF-12 AIBCBAFT 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 
IF-12 skin structures 


A79-43243 


A-36 



PERSONAL AUTHOR INOEX 


AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING / A Continuing Bibliography (SuppL 114) 


OCTOBER 1979 


Typical Personal Author Index Listing 


I PERSONAL author] 

&CKBB, L- I. ‘ 

— Aerodynanic and acoustic effects of eliminating 
core swirl from a fall scale 1,6 stage pressure 
ratio fan (QF-5A) 

[NASA-TH-78991 ] N79-11001 


1 


REPORT 

NUMBER 


NASA 

ACCESSION 

NUMBER 


Listings in this index are arranged alphabetically by personal author. The title 
of the document provides the user with a brief description of the subject matter. 
The report number helps to indicate the type of document cited (e.g., NASA 
report, translation. NASA contractor report). The accession number is located 
beneath and to the right of the title, e g. N79-11001. Under any one author s 
name the accession numbers are arranged in sequence with the !AA accession 
numbers appearing first. 


A 


AABHBS, S. 

Engine/aircraft structural integration: An overview 

N79-27167 

ABDBAKHH&BOT, SH. SH. 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

ADAH, 7. 

Increasing guidance accuracy through use of an 
integrated digital piloting system 
[DGIB PAPEB 79-043] A79-42369 

ADAHCZTK, J. J. 

Supersonic unstalled flutter 

H79-27181 

ADCOCK, J. B. 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of. the national Transonic 
Facility 

[BASA-TH-80085] H79-26064 

ADfilAB, B. J. 

Dilatational model of noise from a moving jet in 
terms of arbitrary jet structure and observer 
motion 

A79-42053 

ABUJA, K. K. 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

[HASA-CB- 159628] H79-27933 

AKHHEDIABOTA, F. A. 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

ALDEBSOB, B, G. 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

B79-27156 

ALLAB, B. D. 

General Electric Company variable cycle engine 
technology demonstrator programs 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1311] A79-40758 

ALLBS, B. 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-044] A79-42370 

ABDEBSOB, J. D., JB. 

A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil 

[ NASA-CE-158717] N79- 26013 


ABDEBSOB, B. J. 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAN) system and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use 

[AD-A067174] H79-26037 

ABDEBSOB, S. B. 

A comparison of the 7/STOL handling qualities of 
the VAK-191B with the requirements of AGABD 
report 577 and HIL-F-83300 

[ NASA-TP-1494] N79-27182 

APPLEGATE, W. C« 

Haterial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 

ABAVAHUDAB, K. S. 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and redaction 

A79-43500 

ABIABATBA8, S. T. 

Rotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 

ABHSTBOBG, K. B. 

The repair of adhesively bonded aircraft 
structures using vacuum pressure 

A79-43315 

ABBOLD, D. B. 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 

A79-43317 

ASBFOBD, B* 

Airport engineering 

A79-40139 

AUBBET, E« 

Canadair Challenger 

A79-40313 


B 


BABB, C. D. . 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 
Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail 

[ NASA-TH-80097 ] N79-27099 

BABB, L. H. 

P-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-A067765] N79-27188 

BABBST, C. F«. 

Alternate subsonic low-cost engine 

t AD-A067277] H79-26058 

BAILES, E« B. 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an AN/ALQ-144 jammer 
[AD-A067757] . N79-26047 

BAILET, G. L- 

Hybrid Bing Box structure 

A79-43331 

Engine/aircraft structural integration: An overview 

N79-27167 

BAILET, B. 0. 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1149] A79-40480 

BAKOS, P. 

Quasi-autonomous navigation system 

A79-43505 


BALABIB, B. A. 

Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic drag 
of simple bodies in two-phase flow 


B-1 


A79-43172 






BILDVIB, B. 


S. 


PBBSOH&L &OTBOB IBDBX 


B&LDVIB, B. S. 

Haaerical solution 
trailing edge of 


for supersonic flow near the 
a flat plate 

179-41771 


B&LBSr T. 7. 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 

X79-43243 

B&BAKAT« B. 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 


BABBBB^ H* B« 

Ground-based aeasureaents of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
con figurations 

[HASA-TI^-80474] H79-26016 

BABD, B. D. 

IP-17/ADBH system study 

[NASA-CE-144882] H79- 27126 

BABLOW, a. B. 

A study of the drooped leading edge airfoil 

[HASA-CR-158717] H79- 26013 

BARBBBB, J. 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
impact of foreign bodies 

H79-27174 


BATT, D. L. 

An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The 

coordinated cockpit display 

[HASA-TM-78559] H79- 27136 

BA?QSO, S. J. 

Trends in reliability modeling technology for 
fault tolerant systems 

tHASA-T«-80089] H79-26810 

BBAUPOIL, B. 

Application of a laminar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 

A79-41304 

BBCHEBT, D. 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 

BBCK BB f A* 

Investigation of different system configurations 
for a THA navigation system taking special 
account of traffic load and channel requirements 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

BBSKSR^ 6a Ga 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA*s developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

CAD-A068401] H79- 27118 

BBBtBB, Da Ba 

High tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum fan 
blades 

A79-43332 

BBIIABV, Ha H. 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 

BELOTSBBKOVSKII, Sa Ha 

Honlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41S73 

Hodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

A79-42806 

BBHOBB, 6a Ita 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an 'AH/ALQ-144 jammer 
[AD-A067757] H79-26047 

BBIHBTT, Ba H. 

An exploratory study of a finite difference method 
for calculating unsteady transonic potential flow 
[HASA-TH-80105] H79- 27096 

BBBBZOVSKII, A. Ba 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type *slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 

BEBBIEB, Ba 1. 

Effect of several geometric parameters on the 
static internal performance of three 
nonaxisymmetric nozzle concepts 

[NASA-TP-1468] H79- 26022 

BBTZ, Va 

Service life parameters of turbine blades 

A79- 40684 


BBTZIHA, Ha Da . 

Aerodynamics of a tilt-nacelle V/STOL propulsion 
system 

[HASA-TH-78606] 879-27 138 

BETEB, Ba 

Hew onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-049] A79-42375 

BISSIIGBB, Ha Ca 

Dynamic pressure loads in the air induction system 
of the tornado fighter aircraft 

879-27168 

BLAKB, Ha Aa 

Report of the PAA task force on aircraft 

separation assurance. Volume 1: Executive summary 

[AD-A067905] 879-26042 

BIAHD, Sa Ba 

An exploratory study of a finite difference method 
for calculating unsteady transonic potential flow 
[ HAS A-TH-80 105 ] 879-27096 

6LASCHKB, G* 

The DRE-based Azimuth System /DAS/ as a commercial 
navigation aid 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-038] A79-42364 

BLAZOISKI, Ha Sa 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 

[AD-A067709] 879-26224 

BLECH, Ja . Ja 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

879-27158 

BLI8C0, Ba Ka 

Small turbine engine integration in aircraft 
installations 

879-27170 

BOCK, Da Ba 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAB) system and its 
applicability to Havy-wide use 

[AD-A067174] 879-26037 

BOGATKO, V. la 

Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 
finite-span wing 

A79-41567 

BOLDHAH, Da 

Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[8ASA-TH-79208] 879-27930 

BOBSTELL, H. 

The structural effects and detection of variations 
in Hercules 3 50 1-5 A and Avco 5505 resin systems 

A79-43261 

BOTHAH, Ha 

Small turbine engine integration in aircraft 
installations 

879-27170 

BOXBEB6BB, H. 

Hew techniques in jet engine balancing 

A79-40314 

BOXIEIL, Da Aa 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 
calculated results 

A79-43499 

BOIEB, Ba Ba 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al alloy forgings 

A79-42245 


BBABHHSTBOBH, Ba 

Investigations of interference effects in a wind 
tunnel caused by a model support strut on a 
reflection plane mounted half model 
[FFA-T8-A0-1335:2] 879-27109 

BBASHEABS, H. B. 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
configurations 

[8ASA-TH-80474] 879-26016 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[8ASA-CR-152212] 879-26374 

BBEBHBB, 6. 6. 

Heapon/aircraft interactions 

879-27205 

BBBITBACB, B. 

Treatment of the control mechanisms of light 
airplanes in the flutter clearance process 

879-27078 



PBBSOB&L ftOTHOB IHDBX 


COLPIB, J. 


BBEHEB, S. 

Analysis of plane rise fron jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

BBEIBBHAH, J. J. 

Material developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 

BBEVBB, B. D. 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A7 9- 43 272 

BBEVEBr «. H.. 

The productivity of airships in long-range 
transportation 

[AIAA 79-1596] A79-42390 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

BBOCKBADS, B- 

Flight control, II - Control system design 

A79-40155 

BBOKOF, O. 

A simple integrated navigation system based on 
multiple DH6 

[DGLR PAPEB 79-041] A79-42367 

BBOT, A. 

A dynamic analysis of landing impact 

A79-41768 

BBOBH, 6. J. 

Unmanned mini-blimp system 

[AIAA 79-1610] A79-42401 

BEOBB« H. D. 

Tri- rotor Coast Guard airship 

[AIAA 79-1573] A79-42380 

BBOBHv S. S. 

Aircraft transparency failure and logistical cost 
analysis. Volume 1: Program summary 

[AD-A068719] N79-27131 

BB0BHIB6, B. G. E. 

Canadian interest in modern LTA transport 

[AIAA 79-1585] A79-42386 

BROBEB, G. 

Alpha Jet - The Franco-German training and 
tactical support aircraft 

A79-42063 

BBUBHEB, D. 

Technical calculation methods for automatic 

collision recognition and avoidance in air traffic 
[DGLR PAPER 79-035] A79-42362 

BBTKIH, B. V. 

Numerical methods for solution of 

radiative-convective heat transfer problems - 
Radiative boundary layer 

A79-42971 

BODDIB, A. 1., Ill 

An evaluation of the bird/aircraft strike hazard 
Dyess Air Force Base, Texas 

[AD-A068026] N79-26039 

BORHHAB, D. C. 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
configurations 

[NASA-TB-80474 ] H79-26016 

BOBHS, B. B. A. 

Fundamentals of design, II - VTO for combat aircraft 

A79-43724 

Fundamentals of design. Ill - V-6 for combat 
aircraft 

A79-43725 


C 

CALB, D. B. 

Contribution of the engine R 6 D community to 
reduced cost of ownership of Army helicopters 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1360] A79-40764 

CALHAH, J. 

Analysis of plume rise fron jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

CAPOBE, F. J. 

Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 

installed on an P-18 propulsion wind tunnel model 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1164] A79-41174 

CABBICHAEl., B. H. 

Summary of past experience in natural laminar flow 
and experimental program for resilient leading 
edge 

[HASA-CR-152276] H79-26024 


CABBOB, B* 

Effects of geometric variables on stress intensity 
factors for crack gages 

[AD-A068631] R79-27533 

CASPAR, J. R« 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 


A79-43679 

CAVES, B. B. 

A consideration of general aviation in the OK 

[TT-7902] H79-26010 

CERBOBOBSKI, J. 

Navigation at high latitudes 

A79-43514 

CHABBEBLIB, B. 

Energy efficient aircraft engines 

[ HASA-TB-79204 ] N79-27 14 1 

CBAHG, L. S. 

Analytical and scale model research aimed at 
improved hangglider design 

H79-27081 

CHBl, C. C* 

Practical considerations for manufacturing 
high-strength Ti-10V-2Pe-3Al alloy forgings 

A79-42245 

CBBH, I« 

Binimum altitude-loss soaring in a specified 
vertical wind distribution 


H79-27071 

CBEBBTI, G. 6. 

Theoretical and experimental Investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 


A79-43166 

CBEBVAKOV, V. V. 

Reasuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

CHBSBOTT, J. C- 

Fracture toughness in titanium alloys 

[AD-A067785] N79-26176 

CHIABIBI, F. 

Theory and experiments on precision L-band DHE 

[FOB-44-1977] H79-27124 

CBO, I. C, 

An experimental study of sound radiation from 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[HASA-TH-80109] H79-27931 

CBORLBV, R. A, 

Display monitoring problems 

A79-40315 

CHU, S, 

Simplified calculation method for subsonic 

airloads on wing-body combinations / 

A79-40200 

CBOBACBEVKO, V. G. 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 

A79-42558 

CIiABK, I* Ba 

An experimental study of sound radiation fron 
hyperboloidal inlet ducts 

[BASA-TB-80109] N79-27931 

COCBBABB, J* Aa 

Quiet propulsive lift for commuter airlines 

[ NASA-TB-78596 ] N79-26035 

COB, P. 1., JB. 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 
configuration 

[ NASA-TP-1 434 ] N79-26020 

Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and 
geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 
swept arrow-wing configuration 

[ HASA-TB-80083 ] H79-27095 

COBEB, B. Sa 

Hew air service and deregulation - A study in 
transition 

A79-40172 

C0LLII6B, Ka S* 

Structural analysis of a gas turbine impeller 
using finite-element and holographic techniques 

H79-27149 

COLPIB, Ja 

Distortions, rotating stall and mechanical 
solicitations 

N79-27177 


B-3 



COBHBB, D. «. 


PSBSOH&L AOTHOB IHDEX 


COBHEB« D. «. 

Technology reguireaents and readiness for very 
large vehicles 

[BASA-TH-80127] H79-27086 

COBHEB, B. L., JB« 

Application of color-coding in airborne tactical 
displays 

[AD-A0675581 B79-27137 

COBBAD, E. ■. 

Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing 
with liquid hydrogen 

[ NASA-TH-79196] H79-27140 

COBSTABTIBIDBS, H. J. 

Echo trackcr/range finder for radars and sonars 

[HASA-CASE-HPO-1h361-l] N79-26253 

COSTE, J, 

Hind tunnel simulation of the firing of missiles 
carried under aircraft 

[OHERA, TP BO- 1979-65] A79-43622 

COTTA, B- 

Fly-by-light 

A79-43458 


COTTOB, B. H. 

Icing tests of a OH-IH helicopter with an 
electrothermal ice protection system under 
simulated and natural icing conditions 
[AD-A067737] B79-26050 

COUBTEB, B. B. 

Development of a research plan for the improvement 
of aerodynamic models for analysis of ballistic 
range data 

[AD-A067950] H79-26029 

CBOSBT, B. A. 

A erop repulsion systems test facility rake 
calibration test in tunnel A 

[AD-A068975] H79-27189 

CUBBAB, B. S. 

Performance of two-stage fan having 

low-aspect-ratio first-stage rotor blading 
[BASA-TP-1493] H79-27143 

CDBTIS, P. E. H. 

The calculation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[BPL-DBACS-11/78] H79-26051 

COBTISS, H. C., JB. 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage motion 

[NASA-CR-158778] H79-27125 

CZODBUCH, J. 

Lee side flow field over slender delta wings of 
finite thickness 

[ILR-23] B79-27103 


D 


DAHL, G. 

Error localization in turbojet engines through 
determination of the characteristics of 
structural members 

A79-41827 

DABIELS, L. C. 

Beasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 

DABILAET, P. 6. 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

DAVIES, V. 

Hombasa - Welcome to a new airport 

A79- 43733 

DE BOFF, B. L. 

Bultivariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle turbofan engine 

A79-41113 

DEAB, P. D. 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

[ NASA-CP-159628] H79-27933 

DEBSKI, R. T. 

High tip speed/FOD resistant boron-aluminum fan 
blades 

A79-43332 

DEGABI, D. 

Numerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 


DEGABCIA, 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[AD-A067549] B79-27129 

DEJ0B6E, 3. B-. 

The requirement of damage tolerance. An analysis 
of damage tolerance requirements with specific 
reference to HIL-A-83444 

[HLB-TR-77 005-0] H79-27135 

DBLAOBIEB^ J. 

Airship dynamic stability 

[ATAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

DELOCIA, B. A. 

Rotor bust protection: Design guidelines for 

containment 

B79-27166 

DELOCIEB, A. 6* 

Review of airworthiness standards for 

certification of helicopters for Instrument 
Flight Buies (IFR) operation 

[AD-A068397] H79-27127 

DESKIB, 8. J. 

A summary of BASA/Air Force Full Scale Engine 
Research programs using the FlOO engine 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1308] A79-40488 

DETEBHABB, O. 

Bind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Republic 

[IFD-5-78] B79-27107 

DEOTSCB, B* (U 

Recent advances in fire resistant materials in 
aircraft construction 

A79-43269 

DIATLOV, I. B. 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

DIBI, D. 

Prediction of aeroelastic instabilities 
rotorcraft 

DODGE, p; 0. 

Definition, description, and interfaces 
FAA*s developmental programs. Volume 
facilities and interfaces 
[ AD-A068401] 

DOB, T. C. 

Helicopter Icing Symposium 
[AD-A067981] 

DOBOVAB, B. H. 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1280] A79-40486 

DBEXLEB, J. 

Allowable notch effectivity criterion for aircraft 
structures 

A79-43515 

DBIBG, B. P. 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

A79-43679 

DUBOIS, B. J. 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins 

A79-43264 


A79-42549 

in 

B79-27159 

of the 
2: ATC 

B79-27118 
H7 9-26048 


DOECK, E. G. 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

DOLOV, Vw 6.. 

Bathe mat leal model of the oscillatory cycle 
associated with nonsteady interaction of a 
supersonic jet with a barrier 

A79-42007 


DOBBIBG, T. E. 

Engine/aircraft structural integration; An overview 

H79-27167 


DVOB AK, F« A* 

A viscous/potential flow interaction analysis for 
circulation-controlled airfoils 

[AD-A067913] B79-26030 

DVORETSKII, V^ B. 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 


DYKHTA, V. V« 

Obtaining solutions of the lifting-surface equation 

A79-43135 


B-4 



PBBSOH&L &UTHOB IHDEl 


GL&SGOB, E. B. 


E 


B&BL, T. D. 

iir cushion landing gear applications study 

[NiS4-CR^159002] N79-26045 

EBSLIB6, P. 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design# planning# and evaluation tasks 
[DGLB PAPER 79-052] A79-42348 

ECKLOHDI# H. 

Application oriented simulation as a tool for the 
planning of radio beacon systems 

[DGLR PAPER 79-042] A79-42368 

ELPSTROH, G. B- 

Indirect measurement of turbulent skin friction 

A79- 40770 

ELSHEB, J. B. 

Problems associated with flows in aerodynamic 
wakes of blade cascades 

A79-43607 

EBICKSOB, J. B. 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[HASA-CR-159075] H79-27185 

EBSHOV# H. S. 

Reasuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

EBZBEBGEB# H. 

Fuel-conservative guidance system for powered-lift 
aircraft 

[NASA-TH-78595 ] N79-26009 

ESCOE, D. 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

ESKEB# D. W. 

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
tNASA-CR-152239] H79-26056 

BSSLIHGEB# P. 

Rater ials problems in gas turbine engine 

technology; Colloquium# Runich# Rest Germany# 
October 27# 28, 1977# Report 

A79-40676 

Development of materials and processes for engine 
components - Current and future points of interest 

A79-40680 

EVAHS# D. B. 

F-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-A067765] N79-27188 

ETIH# 0. A. 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

F 


FAKHBOTDIBOV# B. D. 

Computer calculation of steady-state temperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 

A79-42553 

FAIIBSKI# H. S. 

Bind-tunnel investigation of highly maneuverable 
supersonic V/STOl fighter 

[HASA-TH-78599] H79-26017 


FABIEB, D. 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

FEDOBS# B.F. 

Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels 
[HASA-CB-158773] N79-27321 

FEBBABIS# G* 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

H79-27150 

FEBTBEIL# B. E. 

Elimination of friction induced thermal cracks in 
landing gear components 

A79-43273 


FIREB# J. 

Omega navigation system 

A79-43504 

FLEETEB# S. 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

R79-27180 

FOBB# P. 

Fundamentals of navigation in the terminal 
maneuvering area 

A79-42377 

FOSTEB# J. B. 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical-metal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[HASA-TB-80092] B79-27098 

F00EILLASSAB« J. B. 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

B79-27163 

FOOBBIEB# B. H«, 

Effect of nose bluntness and afterbody shape on 
aerodynamic characteristics of a monoplanar 
missile concept with bodies of circular and 
elliptical cross sections at a Hach number of 2.50 
[ BASA-Tfl-80055 ] R79-26023 

FOBLKES# J. C. 

Definition# description, and interfaces of the 
FAA*s developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[AD-A068401] 1179-27118 

FBABKEL# B. S. 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[HASA-CR-159075] H79-27185 

FBABKEBBEB# C. E.# JB. 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an AN/ALQ-144 jammer 
[AD-A067757] H79-26047 

FBEEBAH# C. E. 

Fuselage surface pressure measurements of a 

helicopter wind-tunnel model with a 3.15-meter 
diameter single rotor 

[HASA-TH-80051] N79-26015 

FBICKE# B. 

Aircraft guidance in the ATC sector - Problems and 
perspectives 

[DGLR PAPER 79-026] A79-42354 

FBITCBBAB# B. D. 

Structuring of data systems: Psychophysiological 

data from the dynamic flight simulator 
[AD-A067175] B79-27014 

FBOES# F. H. 

Fracture toughness in titanium alloys 

[AD-A067785] H79-26176 

FUJIBOBI# T« 

Rotor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 


Aerodynamics of a tilt-nacelle V/STOL propulsion 
system 

[HASA-TH-78606] H79-27138 

FALCIASECCA# 6. 

Theory and experiments on precision L-band DHE 

[FOB-44-1977] H79-27124 

FALEBI, J.-P. 

Application of a laminar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 

A79-41304 


FABASSAT# F. 

An evaluation of linear acoustic theory for a 
hovering rotor 

[NASA-TR-80059] H79-26881 


G 

GALLEITHBEB# B. 

Hilitary-technology-related flight testing in the 
framework of DFVLR/BBB cooperation - Status and 
perspectives 

A79-41233 

GAB60# S. P. 

Effect of variances and manufacturing tolerances 
on the design strength and life of mechanically 
fastened composite joints 

[AD-A069170] H79-27518 

GLAS60B# E. B. 

Type A V/STOL propulsion system development 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1287] A79-40755 



GLIDBVELL, B. J. 


PBBSOH&L lOTHOB IHDBl 


GLIDBBELL, B. J. 

Effects of Beynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0,11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAi PAPER 79-1167] A79-40aS1 

GLOD, J- E. 

Airship potential in strategic airlift operations 
[AIAA 79-1598] A79-42392 

GOGOLEV, I. G. 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 

A79-42560 

GOLDSTEIH, B. E. 

Supersonic unstalled flutter 

H79-27181 

GOBBELL, T. 

Performance of two-stage fan having 

low-aspect-ratio first-stage rotor blading 
(HASA-TP-1493] H79-27143 

GOVADIi, B. S. 

TP-17/ADEH system study 

[ NASA-CR-144882] H79- 27126 

GBAH&H, J. fl., JB. 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[ HASA-CR- 1 59075 ] R79-27 1 8 5 

GBAVDO0LIEB, D. 

Forecasting engine life 

H79-27154 

GBASSO, A. 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

H79-27158 

GRAVES, E. 6. 

Effect of nose bluntness and afterbody shape on 
aerodynamic characteristics of a monoplanar 
missile concept with bodies of circular and 
elliptical cross sections at. a Bach number of 2.50 
[HASA-TB-80055] H79- 26023 

GBAT, 0. V. 

Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy 
lift airships 

[AIAA 79-1577] A79-42383 

GBAZIAHI, D. 

Theory and experiments on precision 1-band DBE 

[FOB-44-1977] H79-27124 

GREBB, D. L. 

Review of airworthiness standards for 

certification of helicopters for Instrument 
Flight Rules (IFR) operation 

[ AD-A068397] B79-27127 

GBEBBE, J. B. 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[ AD-A067549] H79-27129 

GBIB, A. A. 

Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 
finite-span wing 

A79-41567 

GRISWOLD, H. 

Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal 
aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind 
tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane 
[ HASA-CH- 158753] B79-26018 

60EBBEB, H* P* 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA's developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[ AD-A068401] B79-27118 

GUEST, C. J- 

Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil 
lift 

[HASA-TM-78566] H79-27100 

60SABOV, A. A. 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

H 

BABA SHI, W. G. 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

HABEBLABD, H. 

First flight imminent for new technology wing 

A79-40327 


BAPEB, X. 

Wind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Republic 

[IFD-5-78] H79-27107 

HAFEZ, B. E. 

Numerical evaluation of transonic equivalence rule 
[AD-A067902] H79-27101 

BALL, B« fU 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the Rational Transonic 
Facility 

[ HAS A-TH-80085 ] B79-26064 

HALLIHELL, 0. 6. 

The effect of intake conditions on supersonic 
flutter in turbofan engines 

H79-27175 

HALLOCK, J. ■*.. 

Ground-based measurements of the wake vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
configurations 

[HASA-TH-80474] H79-26016 

HAH, B. D. 

A wind-tunnel investigation of tilt-rotor gust 
alleviation systems 

[NASA-CH-152264] H79-26062 

HAHBOBG, G* H« 

Ceramic mainshaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

[AD-A067904] H79-27516 

BABEL, P. 

Hilitary-technology- related flight testing in the 
framework of DFVLB/BWB cooperation - Status and 
perspectives 

A79-41233 

BABSEB, H« 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 
[DGIR PAPER 79-052] A79-42348 

BABSEB, B. 

Haterials problems in gas turbine engine 

technology; Colloquium, Hunich, West Germany, 
October 27, 28, 1977, Report 

A79-40676 

HABBAUGH, R. H. 

The hydrofoil sea-plane as high-speed naval craft 

A79-43456 

HABKOBEB, D. L. 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/ 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1313] A79-40760 

BABHAB, H. H* 

Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) Air Traffic 
Control Radar Beacon System (ATCRBS) 
interference analysis 

[AD-A068565] H79-27119 

HARPBB, B. 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1149] A79-40480 

HARRIS, 6« L* 

Unmanned mini-blimp system 

[AIAA 79-1610] A79-42401 

BABBIS, W. L. 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43500 

HABTHABB, H. J. 

Supersonic unstalled flutter 

H79-27181 

HEALI, H. 

V/STOL performance comparisons with variable pitch 
and variable inlet guide vane fans - A report on 
experimental data 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1286] A79-40487 

HEDHAB, So 

Calculation of pressure distribution for a 

wing— body combination at subsonic Hach numbers 
[FFA-TH-AU-1091] H79-27110 

HEDOB, Do 

The integrity of aircraft jet engines under the 
impact of foreign bodies 

H79-27174 


HEIBSBEIHBB, T« F. 

The ATHOSAT Program 1975-78 

[AIAA 79-1608] A79-42399 


B-6 



PEBSOBAL iOTHOB IBDBZ 


JOBBS« B. G« 


BEBBI, B. 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

H79-27150 

HILLBB, H. H. 

& general nethod for the layout of ailerons and 
elevators of gliders and motorplanes 

B79-27076 


HIBL, J. P. 

Tethered telecommunications, broadcast, and 
monitoring systems 

[AIA& 79-1609] A79-42400 

HIBSCHBEBG, H. H. 

Review of the &GABD S and H panel evaluation 
program of the HASA-lewis SRP approach to 
high-temperature LCP life prediction 

H79-27179 


HIRST, H. 

Garrett ATF 3 


A79-43469 


aOFFHAB, E. L. 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 

A79-43243 


HOFFBEB, T. 

Sources and magnitude of radio compass 
instrumental errors 

A79-43503 

HOLBROOK, G. J. 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[AD-A067969] H79-26060 

HOLHES, H. 

Application of engine usage analysis to component 
life utilization 

B79-27160 


HOLHES, B. 

An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 

R79-27164 


HOBB, B. H. 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79-42395 

HOBTOB, B. B. 

Demonstration of an improved method for repair of 
bonded aircraft structure 

A79-43276 


HOSFOBD, J. E. 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[NASA-CR-159075] H79-27185 

HOTOP, H- J- 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 
relationships with optimal filters 
[DGLB PAPER 79-048] A79-42374 

HOUSE, E. E. 

IC-14 thermoplastic/graphite elevator 

A79-43241 


HOHLETT, B. A. 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1312] A79-40759 

HOBBABD, B. B. 

Aircraft obstruction of microwave links 

[PB-292372/0] N79-26288 

HHFFHAB, J. K. 

Influence of optimized leading-edge deflection and 
geometric anhedral on the low-speed aerodynamic 
characteristics of a low-aspect-ratio highly 
swept arrow-wing configuration 

[KASA-TH-80083] H79-27095 

H0HES, B. 

An investigation of vibration dampers in 
gas-turbine engines 

B79-27164 


HUBDIS, H. 

Integration of an airframe with a turbofan and 
afterburner system 


H79-27172 


BURR ASS, K. 

A simple integrated navigation system based on 
multiple DHE 

[DGLR PAPER 79-041] A79-42367 

HUBRELL, H. 6. 

A summary of BASA/Air Force Pull Scale Engine 
Research programs using the FlOO engine 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1308] A79-40488 

HHSSAIBI, H. T. 

Numerical solution for supersonic flow near the 
trailing edge of a flat plate 

A79-41771 


I 

IAKOVLEV, 7. P* 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 

lABKOVSKII, f. H. 

Study of the nonuniformity of the temperature 

field of a homogeneous combustion chamber as the 
parameters of the primary zone vary 

A79-42549 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 

A79-42558 

I60E, B. B. 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the National Transonic 
Facility 

[NASA-TH-80085] H79-26064 

IIHDBA, K. 

Japanese lighter-than-air mission studies 

[AIAA 79-1587] A79-42387 

IKOI, T. 

Fast-acting valves for use in shock tubes. II - 
Formation of shock waves 

A79-43153 

ISOGAI, K. 

On the transonic-dip mechanism of flutter of a 
sweptback wing 

A79-41763 

IVABOV, A. 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 

IVABOV, H. IA« 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

IVABSHIB, IB. B. 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

IVERSEI, J* D. 

Autorotating flat-plate wings - The effect of the 
moment of inertia, geometry and Reynolds number 

A79-41418 

J 

JACKSOB, T. tu, 

Fuel hydrogen content as an indicator of radiative 
heat transfer in an aircraft gas turbine combustor 
[AD-A067709] H79-26224 

JABBETTA, T. 

Evaluation of turbo-propulsion simulators as a 
testing technique for fighter aircraft 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1149] A79-40480 

JEBKIBS, J. H. 

Correlation of predicted and measured thermal 
stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with 
dissimilar materials 

[ NASA-TH-72865] B79-27088 

JIBSA, V. 

Compass system for small aircraft 

A79-43510 

JISCHKE, H. C. 

Supersonic flow past conical bodies with nearly 
circular cross sections 

[AD-A068004] B79-26027 

JOHBS, A. L. 

Performance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with 
blowing boundary layer control 

[ NASA-TH-79176] F79-27093 

JOHBSOB, B. V. 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

JOBBSOl, C. B« 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the National Transonic 
Facility 

[NASA-TH-80085] H79-26064 

JOBES, B. 6. 

Dilatational model of noise from a moving jet in 
terms of arbitrary jet structure aud observer 
motion 

A79-42053 


B-7 



JOBES, T. 


V. 


PBRSOH&L lOTHOB IBDBI 


JOHBS, T- V. 

Reasnreoent of heat transfer rate to tarbine 
blades and nozzle gnide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

479-42891 

JOBD4H, 1. J. 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocineter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[ HASA-CB-152212] H79- 26374 


K 


K&LF4T&1, S. H. 

Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels 
[ N4S&-CR-158773] H79-27321 

KALDGIH, V. T. 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 

KAHHAHUBILEB, G. 

Preparing for the TKF 90 

A79-40326 

KATO, K. 

Calculation of rotor impedance for 

articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight 

A79-42799 

KATSURI, B. 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine combustor 

A79-42207 

KBBLABI, F. S. 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA*s developmental programs. 7olume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[AD-A068401] N79-27118 

KBLLBB, G« B. 

Fracture toughness in titanium alloys 

[ AD-A067785 ] H79-26176 

KBBHT, D. P. 

Finite-element approach to compressor 
blade-to-blade cascade analysis 

A79-41752 

KEHT, J. S. 

An evaluation of the bird/aircraft strike hazard 
Dyess Air Force Base, Texas 

[AD-A068026] H79-26039 

KEBHBEIS, B. P. 

Hicrostrip antenna elements for use in 
hemispher ically scanned arrays 

[AD-A068566] H79-27366 

KHABIBULLIB, H. 6. 

A pneumatic distributor for the control system of 
a turbojet engine 

A79-42574 

KHBOSHCH, T. K. 

Deformation of a shell under the influence of a 
supersonic gas flow 

A79-43174 

KIEBAPPEl., K. 

Ons.teady aerodynamic pressure measurements on 
rotating lifting systems 

A79-41494 

KILGOBE, B. A. 

Full-scale aircraft simulation with cryogenic 
tunnels and status of the Rational Transonic 
Facility 

[ RASA-TH-80085 ] R79-26064 

KIBHET, D. G. 

Modern rigid airships, as sea control escort 
platforms 

[AIAA 79-1575] A79-42382 

KIBCBHOFF, 0. 

Study of the theoretical to real correspondance of 
an optimal control model and the significance of 
this model for the description of working 
methodology with partly automated aircraft 
guidance and control systems 

[ILF-35] H79-27184 

KLEBAHOVA, T. Y. 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 

KBEZOVIC, H. 

Prospects for airborne computer systems 

A79-43502 

KOCH, B. 

On the attenuation of sound by three-dimensionally 
segmented acoustic liners in a rectangular duct 
[ RRSA-TH-801 18] R79-27932 


KOEBIEB, B. 

Hilitary-technology-related flight testing in the 
framework of DFYLB/BBB cooperation - Status and 
perspectives 


A79-41233 

KOEBIG, B. 

Hissed approach of commercial aircraft regarding 
wind shear in the ground boundary layer 
[DGLB PAPEH 79-028] A79-42355 

ROFF, B« L. 

Aircraft engine design using experimental stress 
analysis techniques 


KOLTOB, G. A. 

Unsteady hypersonic gas flow past a thin 
finite-span wing 


H79-27151 


A79-41567 


KOHATSUEAKI, T. 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage motion 

[HASA-CB-1 58778] B79-27125 

KOBOLEY, P. V. 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 


A79-42560 

KOBRELL, P. 

Theoretical principles of long range navigation 
systems. I 

A79-41167 

KOSHEVOI, Y. B. 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 

KOTAS, J. 

Solution of navigation problems in aircraft 

onboard systems equipped with digital computer 

A79-43506 

ROYACHEYA, K. 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 

KOZLOY, ID. I. 

An analysis of air intakes in the boundary layer 

A79-42562 

KBAUSPE, P. 

Influence of delay time and dead time on wind 
shear landings 

[DGLB PAPEH 79-029] A79-42356 

KBEBS, Y. 

Increasing effectiveness of piloting systems by 
modern methods of digital signal processing 
[DGLB PAPER 79-046] A79-42372 

KBICHAKIB^ Y. I. 

Ronstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 

KBISBBA PRASAD, K. 

Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a flat 
plate at a large free-stream Hach number 

A79-42989 

KBISBTAL, Y. I. 

The amplification factor in the two-dimensional 
interaction between a transverse sonic jet and a 
supersonic flow 

A79-42565 

KBIYOSBBEY, I. A. 

Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 

RBOO, I. 

Analytical and scale model research aimed at 
improved hangglider design 

R79-27081 

KDDASBEY, lU. D. 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 


A79-42560 

RUHR, G* E* 

Hybrid Ring Box structure 

A79-43331 

RUBBER, B. B. 

Applications of a high-altitude powered platform 
/HAPP/ 

[AIAA 79-1603] A79-42397 

KOHHBB, J. 

Special sandwich constructions for the interior of 
commercial aircraft 

A79-43270 


B-8 


PEBSOI&L AUTHOB IHDBZ 


HABESCA, C. 


KOO, P. S. 

Structural analysis of a gas turbine impeller 
using finite-element and holographic techniques 

N79-27ia9 

KOPEBHAB, H. H. 

Structural adhesive bond repair of aircraft flight 
control surfaces 

A79-U3314 

KOBTEHBACB* F. J. 

Evaluation of a simplified gross thrust 

calculation technique using two prototype FlOO 
turbofan engines in an altitude facility 
[HASA-TP-1482] H79-26057 

KOTSABOVA. 8. 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-Q2275 

L 


LABOBTHS, C. 

Experimental study of the flight envelope and 

research of safety requirements for hang-gliders 

H79-27083 

LACET, D. «. 

Aerodynamic characteristics of the close-coupled 
canard as applied to low-to-moderate swept 
wings. Volume 2: Subsonic speed regime 

[AD-A067122] H79-26025 

tALABEB« H. 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

H79-27150 

LABB, H. 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 
Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail 

[NASA-TH-80097] N79-27099 

LAHKBBAn, H. 

Survey of the cost estimation process used during 
the transporter design stage 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-054] A79-42349 

LECBBEB, B. 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 
relationships with optimal filters 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-048] A79-42374 

LECHT, H. 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

H79- 27176 

LEE, A. 

An experimental study of high frequency noise from 
model rotors - Prediction and reduction 

A79-43500 


LEE, J. 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

LEE, P. S. 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor- based 
flight control systems 

A79-40664 

LEE, B. S. 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution 

[AD-A067927] N79-26031 

LEGBAHD, F. 

The European helicopter industry and cooperation 

A79-42064 

LEflOHT; B. B. 

System design requirements for advanced 
rotary-wing agricultural aircraft 

CHASA-CR-158938] 879-26046 

LBVEK, B. J. 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[AO-A067549] B79-27129 

LEVIH, V. A. 

Theoretical and experimental investigation of the 
aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional 
bodies 

A79-43166 

LIH, T. K. 

Botor blade stability in turbulent flows. II 

A79-41751 

LIICOLH, R. B. 

Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic 
simulation facility; Summary 

[BASA-CB-152286] H79- 26067 


LIRDAO, O. 

Investigations of interference effects in a wind 
tunnel caused by a model support strut on a 
reflection plane mounted half model 
[FFA-TH- AO-1335: 2] H79-27109 

LIBDSBT, T. B. 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

H79-27180 

LITT, F. I. 

On global optimal sailplane flight strategy 

B79-27073 

LBBHICKA, B. 

Rew paths for the development of aircraft 
equipment opened up by the use of modern 
computer technology 

A79-43501 

LOBKABP, «. 

Possibilities and limits of the application of 
estimation methods for development costs and 
equipment unit prices of flight systems in 
preliminary design, planning, and evaluation tasks 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-052] A79-42348 

LOBBAHl, B. P« 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1312] A79-40759 

LOISEAO, B. 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

S79-27178 

LOKAI, H. V. 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 


LOKAI, V. I. 

Computer calculations of steady-state temperature 
fields in air-cooled turbine rotor blades 

A79-42551 

Computer calculation of steady-state temperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 

A79-42553 


LOKTEV, B. B. 

Nonlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 


A79-41573 


LOTTEB, K. W. 

Dynamic pressure loads in the air induction system 
of the tornado fighter aircraft 


R79-27168 


10, P.-J. 

Simplified calculation method for subsonic 
airloads on wing-body combinations 


A79-40200 


M 

HACK, B. J. 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAR) system and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use 

[AD-A067174] R79-26037 

BACKBODT, P.-A« 

Further advancements in the concept of 
delta-winged hybrid-airships 

[AIAA 79-1599] A79-42393 

HAGALA, V. A. 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 

A79-42560 

HALBOUZ, J.-C. 

CFH56 - An act of cooperation, a new class of 

engine, a path towards the aeronautics of tomorrow 

A79-42065 

HABGAHO, G. J. 

Botor bust protection: Design guidelines for 

containment 

H79-27166 

HARSFIELD, B. B. 

The fibre composite helicopter blade 

A79-43712 

HAQOEBBBIHAH, B. 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

N79-27178 

HABBSCA, C* 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 


B-9 



HABTIH, D. V. 


PBBSOBAI &OTHOB IBDBX 


8&BTIH, D. B. 

The calculation of optisal aircraft trajectories 
C HPL-DBACS-11/78] H79-26051 

H&BTIB, B. G. 

High altitude altimeter flight test 

[ AD-&066904 ] H79-26054 

H&BTIBBLII, G. 

Some theoretical and experimental investigations 
of stresses and vibrations in a radial flow rotor 

N79-27158 

BATSDO, K. 

Past-acting valves for use in shock tubes. II - 
Formation of shock waves 

A79-43153 

aCDOB&LD, B. J. 

P-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-A067765] H79- 27188 

BCGOBAB, P. B. 

Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil 
lift 

[HASA-TH-78566] H79- 27100 

BCILTEBfl, B. B. 

Further test results with the airjet distortion 
generator - A new tool for aircraft turbine 
engine testing 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1185] A79-40752 

BCILVBBIA, 

Hicrostrip antenna elements for use in 
hemispherically scanned arrays 

[AD-A068566] H79-27366 

BCLBAH, J. D. 

Fuel-conservative guidance system for powered-lift 
aircraft 

f NASA-TM-78595] H79-26009 

BCBASTBBS, J. H. 

The ultralight sailplane 

B79-27080 

BCBILLAll, J. C. 

Aircraft service experience of bonded assemblies 
prepared with phosphoric acid anodized prebond 
surface treatment 

A79-43317 

BB&DB, L. S. 

Fabrication of thick graphite/epoxy wing surface 
structure 

A79-43245 

B6AD0B, T. A. 

Aircraft fiber-optic interconnect systems project 
[AD-A068366] H79-27978 

BBOTEDBVA, B. A. 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-42892 

HELD BOB, A. F. 

Sharjah - An airport out of Arabian Hights 

A79-43732 

HBLIA, P. F. 

Analytical modeling of ramjet combustor heat 
transfer modes 

CAIAA PAPBB 79-1124] A79-40476 

HBBBiHGEBp K. 

Introduction of Category IIIA at Deutsche 
Lufthansa A6 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-031] A79-42358 

HBTHTE9, T. J. 

A study of smoke movement in an aircraft fuselage 
[BAB-TH-EP-613] H79-26040 

HETBB, J. P. 

Euromissile - An example of cooperation with 
respect to missiles 

A79-42067 

BICHEL, 0. 

Sound absorption through flow separation - A new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

A79-41238 

HILLBB, 6. 

Energy efficient aircraft engines 

[HASA-TH-79204] H79-27141 

BILT0B« J. T. 

Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air vehicles 
[AIAA 79-1570] A79-42403 

BIBATA, 

Estimation of fatigue life of Al-alloy used for 
compressor disc of jet engine 

A79-42624 


BIHECK, B. B. 

Fuselage surface pressure measurements of a 
helicopter wind-tunnel model with a 3. 15-meter 
diameter single rotor 

[ HASA-TH-80051 ] H79-26015 

BITCHELL, J. 6* 

A new facility for structural engine testing 

H79-27173 

BITIOSHKIH, ID. I* 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 

BIZDTABI, T. 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine combustor 

A79-42207 

HOBEAO, B. 

Aerospace applications of oscillators 

[OHEBA, TP HO. 1979-48] A79-43621 

HOBBL, T. 

Effect of base cavities on the aerodynamic drag of 
an axisymmetric cylinder 

A79-43711 

BOBBLLI, P. 

Experimental investigation into the feasibility of 
an extruded wing 

H79-27077 

BOBISSBT, J. 

The European Airbus has definitively penetrated 
the world market 

A79-42062 

BOBITZ, B. B. 

Axial compressor stall 

H79-27435 

BOBBIS, C. B« K., JB. 

An evaluation of linear acoustic theory for a 
hovering rotor 

[HASA-TH-80059] H79-26881 

A flight investigation of basic performance 
characteristics of a teetering-rotor attack 
helicopter 

tHASA-TH-80112 ] H79-27097 

HOSIH, I. I. 

Choice of optimal parameters for a heat exchanger 
with heat pipes for a gas turbine engine 

A79-42552 

HOTEB, H. 6. 

The computation of optimal aircraft trajectories 
[RE-577] H79-27128 

BDEHIBAOBB, J. C. 

Huclear aircraft innovations and applications 

[AIAA PAPER 79-0846] A79-41913 

HQH6DB, P. 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

[HASA-CB- 159628] H79-27933 

HUSEB, D. . 

Advanced composites in sailplane structures: 
Application and mechanical properties 

H79-27079 

N 

HAGABHUSHAB, B. L. 

Flight dynamics analyses and simulation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-42388 

HA6T, F., JB. 

Uplink ATCBBS environment measurements along the 
Boston-Basbington corridor. Volume 2: 

Interrogator characteristics 

[ AD-A067944] IT79-26041 

HAKABOBA, H. 

Estimation of fatigue life of Al-alloy used for 
compressor disc of jet engine 

A79-42624 

HASITTA, K. g. 

Hethodological considerations on the service life 
design of turbine disks 

A79-40687 

HATLBB, A* H. L. 

British lighter-than-air activity - A review 

[AIAA 79-1583] A79-42385 

HEAL, B. D. 

Canadair Challenger 

A79-40313 


B-10 



PEBSOHU. AOTHOB IRDBX 


PBTBOfSKII, ▼. S, 


HBJSDLT, V. 

Allowable notch effectivity criterion for aircraft 
structures 

A79-43515 

VEISOH, J. G. 

Structuring of data systems: Psychophysiological 

data -from the dynamic flight simulator 
[AD-A067175] H79-27014 

HELSOH« B. B. 

P-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-A067765] H79-27188 

BEPOanCElO, L. X. 

Ultrasonic inspection of engine nacelle structure 
searching for cracks 

(REPT-7610.909] H79-27522 

Ultrasonic inspection of wing spar attachment 
joints and lugs in viscount aircraft 
[REPT-7610.910] N79-27523 

lEBHAH, B. G. 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 

A79-41945 

VIEDEBBATER, E, J. 

British civil airworthiness requirements for 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1600] A79-42394 

nSHTf H. I. 

Hodeling of turbulent wakes in ideal fluids 

A79-42806 

HITSCHB, X. 

Aeronautical research into vertical problems in 
V/STOL aircraft approach landing 

[IPD-4-78] H79-27134 

HIXOH, D. 

The transonic integral equation method with curved 
shock waves 

A79-41407 

HIZIOL, T. A. 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAN) system and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use 

[ AD-A067174] H79-26037 

lOBTOE, J. H. 

Rotor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip 
speed fan. 1 : Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

[NASA-CR-159596] N79-26055 

BUSSBAUH, I. 

RAH projections for aircraft rotor blades 

C AD-A068822 ] N79-27 130 

BTSTBOHr P. A. 

An evaluation of linear acoustic theory for a 
hovering rotor 

[NASA-TH-80059] N79-26881 


o 

OBEBBOLTZEB, J. 0. 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

OBBIEH, P. J. 

Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 

OCB, G. 

Factors influencing runway capacity as typified by 
the Hunich-Hiem airport 

[DGLR PAPER 79-030] A79-42357 

OGOBOHSKI, J. H. 

Effect of variances and manufacturing tolerances 
on the design strength and life of mechanically 
fastened composite joints 

[AD-A069170] H79-27518 

OHTA, H. 

Theoretical approach to spray combustion in gas 
turbine combustor 

A79-42207 

OKIISBI, T. B. 

The influence of compressor inlet guide 

vane/stator relative circumferential positioning 
on blade wake transport and interaction 
[ AD-A067969 ] H79-26060 

OLDFIELD, H. L. G. 

Heasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 


OLSEB, B. 

Trailing edge noise data with comparison to theory 
[ NASA-TH-79208 ] H79- 27930 

OLSOB, L. E. 

Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil 
lift 

[ HASA-TH-78566 ] H79- 27100 

OBLOT, V. X. 

Through-heating of chambers with regenerative 
cooling 

A79-42570 

OBHISTOB, B. A. 

Bind tunnel tests of four flexible wing ultralight 
gliders 

H79-27084 

OSEB, J. 

Bind tunnel measurements of dynamic derivatives in 
the German Federal Republic 

[IFD-5-78] N79-27107 

OSBATITSCB, K. 

Bave propagation associated with wings 

A79-43597 


P 


PACABOBSKT, E» J. 

Some recent developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1327] A79-40761 

PALHSB, B. A* 

Simulation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 

PAHFILOXICB, T. B, 

Calculation of the working process in a 

piston-type *slow* compression wind tunnel 

A79-42546 

PAPADALES, B. S., JR. 

The characteristics of the spray generated by the 
efflux of various aircraft propulsors impinging 
normally on water 

[AD-A067742] N79-26049 

PASQUET, G* Ai^ 

Lighter-than-air craft for strategic mobility 

[AIAA 79-1597] A79-42391 

PATRICK, B. P. 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

PATLECKA, V. H. 

•Thruster control for airships* 

[AIAA 79-1595] A79-42389 

PATBB, L. 

Fabrication research for supersonic cruise aircraft 

A79-43243 

PBCB, Z. 

The basic geodetic shapes and position lines 

A79-43507 

PEBEVOZBIKO?, A. V- 

Twisting of the blades of an axial turbine stage 
during tangential inclination of the nozzle blades 

A79-42569 

PBSCBBL, B. 

A contribution on thermal fatigue in cooled 
turbine blading 

B79-27153 

PETEBSOB, H. B. 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

N79-27156 

PETIT, J. B. 

Performance characteristics of a wedge nozzle 

installed on an F-18 propulsion wind tunnel model 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1164] A79-41174 

PBTBIB, J. A. B. 

Near field problems in three-dimensional panel 
methods 


A79-43779 


PETBO?, P. 

Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which form 
in the oil-system mains of gas-turbine engines 

A79-42571 


PETBOfSKII, X. S. 

Nonstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 


B-11 



PFIZEHi&IEB, E. 


PEBSOB&L AOTBOB IHDEX 


PFIZEHHilBBp S. 

Sound absorption through flow separation - i new 
possibility for acoustic attenuation of engines 

&79-ai238 

PHILBEBT, B. 

Application of a laninar lighting device to the 
smoke visualization of aerodynamic flows in wind 
tunnels 

A79-«n30h 

PI&ZZOLI* 6. 

New methods for ground-testing aeronautical 
structures 

[OHEBA, TP NO. 1979-47] A79-43620 

PIEBCE, N. J. 

Aircraft hydraulic systems dynamic analysis 

[ AD-A067549] N79-27129 

PIBBSOH, B. 1. 

Hininun altitude-loss soaring in a specified 
vertical wind distribution 

N79-27071 

PI6LIACAHPI, J. J. 

High strength fibers for lighter-than-air craft 

[AIAA 79-1601] A79-42395 

PLASCHKb, P. 

Helical instabilities of slowly divergent jets 

A79-41414 

PIOHBLEE, H..E. 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

[NASA-CH-159628] N79- 27933 

P06DE, 6. B. 

Some recent .developments in solid propellant gas 
generator technology 

[AIAA PAPBB 79-1327] A79-40761 

POISSON-QOIITON, P. 

Slender wings for civil and military aircraft 
/Eighth Theodore von Karman Memorial Lecture/ 

A79-41766 

The new European subsonic aerodynamic testing 
facilities 

A79-42066 

POLIAKOV, A. B. 

Nonstationarity of heat transfer in the blade 
cascade of an axial-flow turbine during engine 
start-up 

A79-42572 

POLLOCK, N. 

A simple method of adapting a wind tunnel 
Schlieren system for interferometry 
[AD-A067233] N79-26073 

POTONIDES, H. C. 

Performance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with 
blowing boundary layer control 

[NASA-TM-79176] N79- 27093 

POTTEB, B. G. 

Boundary-integral equation analysis of an advanced 
turbine disk rim slot 

N79-27161 

POTTEB, H. P- 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
PAA»s developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[AD-A068401] N79-27118 

POVABOV, 0. A. 

Study of the dispersity of oil droplets which form 
in the oil-system mains of gas-turbine engines 

A79-42571 

PBBSTOl, O. H. 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[NASA-CE-159075] N79-27185 

PBESZ, B. fl. 

Effects of Reynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0.11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAA PAPER 79-1167] A79-40481 

PRICE, B. L. 

A new analytic method for the study of classic 
helicopter ground resonance 

A79-41767 

PRICE, J. B. 

Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for 
transporting outsize cargo 

[NASA-CR-159067] N79- 26063 

PBOSAITIS, H. P. 

Ceramic mainshaft roller bearing performance in a 
gas turbine engine 

[AD-A067904] N79-27516 


Q 

QOABTEBO, C. B. 

Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for 
transporting outsize cargo 

[NASA-CB-1 59067] N79- 26063 

R 

BADVOGIB, ID. B. 

Region of a plane pointed profile in supersonic flow 

A79-43136 

BABOBIBA, V. V. 

Beasuring the moment imparted by a liquid pump in 
startup regime 

A79-42550 

BABSDEB, J. B. 

CPB56 - Franco- American ten-tonne turbofan 
production launch 

A79-41207 

BAPLET, C. B. 

Regenerator matrices for automotive gas turbines 

A79-42981 

BAPPOPOBT, H. K. 

Analysis of Coast Guard missions for a maritime 
patrol airship 

[AIAA 79-1571] A79-42379 

BE, B. J. 

Effect of several geometric parameters on the 
static internal performance of three 
nonaxisymmetric nozzle concepts 

[NASA-TP-1468] N79-26022 

BEBOBT, J* 

Experiments on an aerofoil at high angle of 
incidence in longitudinal oscillations 

A79-43223 

BEDEKEB, G* 

The DPVLB-F4 transonic wing as European test model 

A79-41234 

BEICB, B« 

Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAN navigation through frequent change 
of TACAN stations 

A7 9-4 1778 

BEIF, H. 6. 

An operational research investigation of the 
ice-detection capability and utility of the 
surface condition analyzer (SCAN) system and its 
applicability to Navy-wide use 

[AD-A067174] N79-26037 

BEILLT, B. 

Compatibility of elastomers in alternate jet fuels 
[NASA-CR-158773] H79-27321 

BEDTLIBGEB, B.-D. 

New techniques in jet engine balancing 

A79-40314 

BBODES, C. 6. 

Fracture toughness in titanium alloys 

[AD-A067785] H79-26176 

BICE, I). D. 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins 

A79-43264 

BICHABDSOB, J* H. 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

BIES, J. 

Sharjah - An airport out of Arabian Nights 

A79-43732 

BIETDOBF, 6. 

Air traffic control requirements from the 
viewpoint of the airport 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-025] A79-42353 

BIFFEL, B. Ew 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

N79-27180 

BI6TSBIBK, P. 

Potential applications of a high altitude powered 
platform in the ocean/coastal zone community 
[AIAA 79-1602] A79-42396 

BOBEBT, J. 

Lift and drag of sail aerofoil 

A79-41945 


B-12 



PEBSOI&L &UTBOB IHDBX 


SH&IKBOTDIROf, Z. 6, 


BOCK, S. H. 

HaltlTariable control design principles applied to 
a variable cycle tarbofan engine 

A79-41113 


BOD&L, J. J. &. 

Engine rotor burst contain me nt/control studies 

H79-27162 


B0DDI6EB, B. A. 

Thrust and mass flow characteristics of four 36 
inch diameter tip turbine fan thrust vectoring 
systems in and out of ground effect 
[ NASA-CR-1522393 H79-26056 

ROBST, B* G. 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

A79-a2892 

60HBO, G. 

Experimental investigation into the feasibility of 
an extruded wing 

B79-27077 

BOSKAH, J. 

Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal 
aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind 
tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane 
[NASA-CR-158753] F79-26018 

BOTBBOCK, H. D. 

The unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade in 
translation 

N79-27180 


BUBIII, L. 

Applications of metal-matrix composites, the 
emerging structural materials 

A79-43320 

BUSAK, A. H. 

Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 


BUSH, D. 

Haterial developments for airline safety - Impact 
on the safety of ground maintenance employees 

A79-43277 


BTEBOT, 0. S. 

On a property of the linearized boundary layer 
equations with self-induced pressure 

A79-41568 


S 

SALIKBOV, B. F. 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 

SALIKUDDIH, B. 

Studies of the acoustic transmission 

characteristics of coaxial nozzles with inverted 
velocity profiles: Comprehensive data report 

[HASA-CR- 159628] N79-27933 

SALLEB, G. P. 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1234] A79-40483 

5AL7IB0, J. T. 

Rotor bust protection: Design guidelines for 

containment 

R79-27166 

SAHPATB, S. G. 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

SABDBOBH, J. B. 

Alternate subsonic low-cost engine 

[ AD- A067277 ] H79-26058 

SAHDEB, G. J. 

On global optimal sailplane flight strategy 

N79-27073 

SAHJABA, Z. B. 

Overage indicators for prepreg products 

A79-43253 

SAPOZBKOV, I. E. 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79-42555 

SABTEB, «. €• 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 
Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail 

[NASA-TB-80097] B79-27099 


SCBBICBL, L. 

Preventing fires in aviation fuel storage and 
transport systems. II 

A79-43734 

SCBELLSIBDB, B« 

Special sandwich constructions for the interior of 
commercial aircraft 


A79-43270 

SCBBBCK, D* 

Airship dynamic stability 

[AIAA 79-1591] A79-42404 

SCBEBK, a*-D«. 

Investigation. concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
grou nd/boa rd/ground data link 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-050] A79-42376 

SCBICK, V, 

New onboard structure of display and control 
system for piloting and air traffic control 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-049] A79-42375 

SCBBIDT, B. 

The DFVLR-F4 transonic wing as European test model 

A79-41234 

SCBBITZ, F. a. 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 
calculated results 

A79-43499 

SCBHBIDBB, B. 

Determining the dynamic response due to an 

imbalance at the attachments of a motor on a pod 

B79-27171 

SCBBBIDBB, C. V. 

C-141 hybrid composite leading edge 

A79-43244 

SCBOELLBB, B. 

Increasing the accuracy of integrated 

Doppler/TACAB navigation through frequent change 
of TACAB stations 

A79-41778 


SCBOBB, B. L. 

Aircraft and avionic related research required to 
develop an effective high-speed runway exit system 
[NASA-CB-1 59075] N79-27185 

SCBBBIECK, B. 

A contribution on thermal fatigue in cooled 
turbine blading 

N79-27153 

SCBOBEBT, B. 

Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 
region 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-033] A79-42360 

SCBOLTZ, D. L. 

Beasurement of heat transfer rate to turbine 
blades and nozzle guide vanes in a transient 
cascade 

A79-42891 

Extension of running time in the RAE hypersonic 
shock tunnel 

[OOEL-1260/78] H79-27191 

SCBBABZOTT, B. P. 

Air traffic control strategies for handling air 
traffic in the terminal area 

[DGLB PAPER 79-032] A79-42359 

SEEBABB, 6. B. 

Unmanned mini-blimp system 

[AIAA 79-1610] A79-42401 

SEETHABAB, H. 

Split-film anemometer measurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 

A79-42029 


SBIFBBT, B. 

Onboard methods for increasing landing approach 
capacity upon introduction of BLS 

[DGLB PAPER 79-047] A79-42373 

SEIRABIAB, A. P. 

Optimization of the weight of a wing with 
constraints on the static aeroelasticity 

A79-42410 

SBTFRIED, A« 

Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 
region 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-033] A79-42360 

SBAIKHUIDIBOV, Z« G. 

Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 


B-13 



SHELDOB, B. B. 


PBBSOHAL AOTBOB IBDEX 


SHELDOH. B. H. 

Hon destructive evaluation /NDE/ of iopact damage 
in thicX graphite cosposite aircraft structures 

A79-H3257 

SHEHOI, K. B. 

& method of computing the pressure distribution on 
a single-bladed hovering helicopter rotor 

H79-26044 

SHIPBIB, B. A. 

Aerodynamic improvement of the inlet pipe of a gas 
turbine 

A79-42560 

SHOVLIB, fl. D. 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/ 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1313] A79-40760 

SHBIDEB, K. B. 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocioeter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[ NASA-CB- 152212 ] N79-26374 

SILHABEK, 7. 

Use of a gyroscope with adjustable torsion 
suspension in precise gyroscopic sensors 

A79-43511 

SIHBLEB, B. 

Advances in materials technology through the BBVg 
- Goals, problems and main points of interest 

A79-40677 

SIHPSOB, T. B. 

Definition, description, and interfaces of the 
FAA's developmental programs. Volume 2: ATC 

facilities and interfaces 

[ AD-A068401] H79-27118 

SIHKO, J. B. 

High altitude powered platform - A microwave 
powered airship 

[AIAA 79-1606] A79-42405 

SKABSBAOG, B. B. 

Type A V/STOL propulsion system development 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1287] A79-40755 

SKAVDAHL, H. 

Design and performance of the propulsion system 
for the quiet short-haul research aircraft /QSRA/ 
[AIAA PAPEB 79-1313] A79-40760 

SKEBJABEC, B. E. 

Aircraft obstruction of microwave links 

[ PB-292372/0 ] H79-26288 

SKOPIB, B. 

Investigation of different system configurations 
for a TMA navigation system taking special 
account of traffic load and channel requirements 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-039] A79-42365 

SLIBA« D. J. 

A study of course deviations during cross-country 
soaring 

H79-27072 

SLIBA, S. B. 

A study of course deviations during cross-country 
soaring 

H79-27072 

SBAKULA, F. K. 

Causes of high pressure compressor deterioration 
in service 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1234] A79-40483 

SBITH, A. B. O. 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution 

[AD-A067927] H79-26031 

SBITH, B. A. 

F-15 flight simulator: Development and analysis 

of computer scoring algorithm 

[AD-A067765] B79-27188 

SBITH, D. 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

SBITH, B. K. 

Enthalpy of combustion of BJ-6 

[ AD-A067968] B79-28037 

SBITH, P. B. 

Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for 
transporting outsize cargo 

[NASA-CR-159067] H79-26063 

SBITH, B. E. 

Effects of control system dynamics on fighter 
approach and landing longitudinal flying 
qualities, volume 1 

[ AD-A067550] B79-27183 


SBITH, B. K. 

State of the art survey of technologies applicable 
to RASA'S aeronautics, avionics and controls 
program 

[HASA-CB-159050] H79-27087 

SOBEI, A. J. . 

The fibre composite helicopter blade 

A79-43712 

SOBIECZKI, H* 

Design of shock-free transonic flow in 
turbomachinery 

[AD-A067703] H79-27144 

SOBERS, D. H* 

An exploratory investigation of the effect of a 
plastic coating on the profile drag of a 
practical- metal-construction sailplane airfoil 
[HASA-TH-80092] B79- 27098 

SPBIBG, S. C* 

Preliminary airworthiness evaluation AH- IS 
helicopter equipped with a Garrett infrared 
radiation suppressor and an AH/ALQ-144 jammer 
[AD-A067757] H79-26047 

STAGLIABO, T. R. 

Engine rotor burst containment/control studies 

R79-27162 

STAVOVCIK, B. 

Omega navigation system 

A79-43504 

STEIBBETZ, 6. G. 

A simulation investigation of cockpit display of 
aircraft traffic during curved, descending, 
decelerating approaches 

[ HAS A-TH-80098 ] H79-26052 

STBBKIB, B. Du 

Systematization of simple structural elements of a 
regulated gas turbine engine nozzle 

A79-42555 

STEVEBS, B. L. 

Effects of Reynolds number and other parameters on 
the throttle-dependent, nozzle/afterbody drag of 
an 0-11 scale single-engine aircraft model 
[AIAA PAPES 79-1167] A79-40481 

STEVEBSOB, B. E. 

The potential role of airships for oceanography 
[AIAA 79-1574] A79-42381 

STIELEB, B. 

Advanced instrumentation and data evaluation 
techniques for flight tests 

A79-41777 

Problems of onboard determination of wind 
relationships with optimal filters 
[DGLB PAPEB 79-048] A79-42374 

STOCETOB, B. J. 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

H79-27156 

STOKES, T. B. , JB. 

Optimum tail fairings for bodies of revolution . 
[AD-A067927] N79-26031 

STOBE, B- H. 

Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy 
composite panels in wide-bodied commercial 
transport aircraft 

[HASA-CR-159071] B79-27246 

STRGABAC, T. H. 

Hind study for high altitude platform design 

[AIAA 79-1607] A79-42398 

SOBDEBHEIEB, 

The influence of the amount of automation in a 
flight path guidance system on flight path 
deviation and pilot work load 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-044] A79-42370 

S0O, fl. 

Particle trajectories near an airfoil with a 
film-cooled leading edge 

A79-43678 

Particle trajectories in turbine cascades 

A79-43679 

SHAIB, B. L. B. 

A new facility for structural engine testing 

H79-27173 

SBAHSOB, B. B. 

The distribution pattern of Onega observations 

A79-40647 

SZECBEBII, E. 

Study in a straight cascade wind tunnel of 
aeroelastic instabilities in compressors 

H79-27178 


B-14 



PBBSOB&t AUtHOB IBDEZ 


H&HG, J< 


T 


TALABTOV« A- ¥. 

Study of mass transfer between the primary zone 
and secondary air jets in gas turbine engine 
combustion chambers 

A79-a2558 

TABI. 0. 

Rotor' redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip 
speed fan, 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

[HASA-CR-159596] H79-26055 

THOHAS, B. H. 

Hanoeuvre handling in a multiradar, a,t,c, system 

A79-41176 


THOHAS, J. 

Investigation concerning an Airborne Terminal /AT/ 
for pilot/controller communication over a 
ground/board/ground data link 

[DGLR PAPER 79-050] A79-42376 

THOHPSOB, B. B. 

Huclear aircraft innovations and applications 

[AIAA PAPER 79-0846] A79-41913 

TOBIAS, 1. 

Simnlation study of the operational effects of 
fuel-conservative approaches 

A79-42800 

TOHBACH, I. H. 

Ground-based measurements of the make vortex 
characteristics of a B-747 aircraft in various 
configurations 

[ HASA-TH-80474] H79-26016 

TOHLIBSOB, H. P. 

Flight dynamics analyses and simulation of Heavy 
Lift Airship 

[AIAA 79-1593] A79-42388 

TOHPKIBS, S- S. 

Effects of boron and glass hybrid epoxy-composites 
on graphite-fiber release in an aircraft fire 

A79-43272 

TOPPIBG, A. D. 

Structural loads due to gusts on semibuoyant 
airships 

[AIAA 79-1581] A79-42384 

TORBET, 1. 

Rhat makes a plane crash 

A79-41727 

TBABOLD, B. L. 

Aircraft passenger seat material development for 
airline fire safety 

A79-43271 


TBATBAB, J. J. 

The influence of feedback on the aeroelastic 
behavior of tilt proprotor aircraft including 
the effects of fuselage motion 

[HASA-CR-158778] N79- 27125 

Review of airworthiness standards for 

certification of helicopters for Instrument 
Flight Rules (IFR) operation 

[ AD-A068397] H79-27127 

TBEB, D. J. 

Three-dimensional finite-element techniques for 
gas turbine blade life prediction 

H79-27156 


TBOHPETTB, P- 

The analysis of engine vibrations 

S79-27150 


U 


BBAKAEV, I. H. 

Unloading the drive of gas distributor valves 
operating at high pressures 

A79-42564 

ORASBK, D. C. 

Performance of two-stage fan having 

low-aspect-ratio first-stage rotor blading 
[ H ASA-TP- 1 493 ] H79- 27143 

V 

VAIHDIHBB, A. A. 

An approximate method for calculating a laminar 
boundary layer in micronozzles 

A79-42559 


VABDAR, C« P. 6. 

Comparison of theoretical predicted longitudinal 
aerodynamic characteristics with full-scale wind 
tunnel data on the ATLIT airplane 
[ NASA-CR-158753] B79-26018 

VABBK, A. 

Technical means for automation of air navigation 

A79-43513 

VABLABDIBGHAfi, F. 

Simulation of distributed microprocessor-based 
flight control systems 

A79-40664 

fABGABOV, I. S. 

Gas curtain in gas turbine engines 

A79-42547 

VASIB, f. A- 

Monlinear mathematical simulation of unsteady flow 
past a helicopter rotor 

A79-41573 

fEJBAZKA, F* 

Omega navigation system 

A79-43504 

¥BK, ?• 

Navigation instruments for small passenger 
aircraft of the 1980s 

A79-43509 

VEBKATBSHAI, S. P. 

Radiating laminar boundary layer flow over a flat 
plate at a large free-strean Bach number 

A79-42989 

VBBTBBS, C« S. . 

Aerodynamics of airfoils with porous trailing edges 

A79-43710 

VICKBBS, T. K. 

Geneva, Zorich get fine-grain 3-D color weather 
radar 

A79-41850 

VILHOS, B. 

Problems of increasing the efficiency of Ralev. II 

A79-41168 

▼LBGBBBT, J. P. K. 

Handling problems through compressor deterioration 

B79-27169 

VOBLCRBBS, 0. 

Aspects of traffic flow control in the approach 
region 

[DGLR PAPER 79-033] A79-42360 

VOGBL, H, 

Possibilities for increasing distance measurement 
accuracy of DHE 

[DGLR PAPER 79-040] A79-42366 

?OIGT, J, 

The influence of the Terminal Control Area on 
airline operations 

[DGLR PAPER 79-024] A79-42352 

TOBDEBflDHlL, A* R, 

Small turbines: Experiences with disk ruptures 

B79-27163 

FOSBCKI, S. 

Some possibilities for the .navigation of small 
passenger aircraft 

A79-43508 

BOSS, e. 

Possibilities and limitations of air traffic control 
[DGLR PAPEB 79-023] A79-42351 

BOUGHT, C* D. 

Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale 7/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[NASA-CR-152212] B79-26374 

BTLKOVA, S, 

The chemical stability of kerosene fractions 

A79-42275 


W 

VACO, 0. B*. 

neteorological and operational aspects of 46 clear 
air turbulent sampling missions with an 
instrumented B-57B aircraft. Volume 2, appendix 
C; Turbulence missions 

[BASA-TH-80045] B79-27772 

HALKBB, G. I« 

Parts tracking and engine history recording for 
on-condition maintenance 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1280] A79-40486 

BAB6, J. 

CKS - Taiwan's 21st century airport 

A79-41849 


B-15 



V&HG, J. C. F. 


PBBSOBKL AOTHOB IVDBX 


BAH6, a. C. F. 

Laser velocimetry nea sure meats on high temperature 
round and rectangular tuin-jet flows 

A79-42061 

V&SHBUBH* G. F. 

Boeing 747 aircraft with large external pod for 
transporting outsize cargo 

[HiSA-CB-159067] H79-26063 

BASSaa, D. !• 

Pressure distributions on three different 
cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a 
wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 
Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail 

[HASA-TH-80097] H79-27099 

VATKIHS, H. L. 

An advanced cockpit instrumentation system: The 

coordinated cockpit display 

[HASA-TH-78559] H79-27136 

HBBEB, 0. 

Experience in the analysis of real and simulated 
collisions and dangerous encounters in German 
airspace 

[DGLB PAPEH 79-036] A79-42363 

BEBEB, B. H. 

Rotor redesign for a highly loaded 1800 ft/sec tip 
speed fan. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical 

design report 

[HASA^CR-159596] R79-26055 

VBBSTEB, J. S. 

A study of smoke movement in an aircraft fuselage 
[FAE-TH-EP-613] B79-26040 

BELCH, J. D. 

Discrete Address Beacon System (DABS) Air Traffic 
Control Badar Beacon System (ATCRBS) 
interference analysis 

[AD-A068565] H79-27119 

WELLEBH, I. 

Decelerated’ approach - Comparison of different 
procedures 

[DGLR PAPER 79-045] A79-42371 

BEHTZ, «• R., JB. 

Split -film anemometer measurements on an airfoil 
with turbulent separated flow 

A79-42029 

BBSTHOBELABO, J. S. 

Progress on Variable Cycle Engines 

[AIAA PAPER 79-1312] A79-40759 

BESFOH, B. P. 

Effects of wing leading-edge deflection on 
low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 
low-aspect-ratio highly swept arrow-wing 
configuration 

[ NASA-TP-1434] H79- 26020 

WETEB, H. B. 

Experimental studies of axial and radial 

compressors by means of new measurement techniques 

A79-41237 

Unsteady rotor blade loading in an axial 

compressor with steady-state inlet distortions 

B79-27176 

BHITAKEB, H. P. 

A wind-tunnel investigation of tilt-rotor gust 
alleviation systems 

[HASA-CR-152264] H79-26062 

WHITE, G. B. 

An experimental comparison of the readability of 
two digital altimeters 

[ ARL/SYS-NOTE-60] N79-26053 

HICKBAH, A. A. 

Chemical analysis of advanced composite prepregs 
and resins 

A79-43264 

WILCOX, D. E. 

Quiet propulsive lift for commuter airlines 

[NASA-TB-78596] H79- 26035 

WILCZTBSKI, J. 

Problems associated with flows in aerodynamic 
wakes of blade cascades 

A79-43607 

WILLIAHS, R. E. 

Coast guard missions for lighter-than-air vehicles 
[AIAA 79-1570] A79-42403 

WILLIABS, B. C. 

Performance of a V/STOL tilt nacelle inlet with 
bloving boundary layer control 

[BASA-TM-79176] H79- 27093 


BILSOB, B. B« 

Boundary-integral equation analysis of an advanced 
turbine disk rim slot 

H79-27161 

BIBTEB, B. 

Advanced instrumentation and data evaluation 
techniques for flight tests 

A79-41777 

BITHBB, E. A. 

Engine rotor burst containment/control studies 

B79-27162 

BITTLIB, U 

Summary of results for a twin-engine, low-wing 
airplane substructure crash impact condition 
analyzed with program KBASH 

[AD-A069171] H79-27116 

VOELTGE, C. 

Development of specifications for taxiing guidance 
and control systems 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-034] A79-42361 

BOLF, J. S. 

Improvement of hang glider performance by use of 
ultralight elastic wing 

H79-27082 

B0B6, J. R. 

Boundary-integral equation analysis of an advanced 
turbine disk rim slot 

H79-27161 

iOODIHG, B. S. 

Integration of an airframe with a turbofan and 
afterburner system 

H79-27172 

BOOTEE, W. B« 

YF- 17/ AD EH system study 

[HASA-CR-144882] H79-27126 

BOBRHAl, 6. B«. 

Determination of the natural frequency of an 
airship model 

[AIAA 79-1582] A79-42402 

BBI6HT, P« B« 

Airport engineering 

A79-40139 

WBIGLBT, B. 

Engine performance considerations for the large 
subsonic transport 

H79-27139 

WOEST, P* 

Decelerated approach - Comparison of different 
procedures 

[DGLB PAPEB 79-045] A79-42371 

WOLF, B. H« 

CF6 jet engine performance deterioration 

[AIAA PAPEB 79-1233] A79-41175 

Y 

TAHAHOTO, X. 

Fast-acting valves for use in shock tubes. II - 
Formation of shock waves 

A79-43153 

TAHAHE, T. 

Calculation of rotor impedance for 

articulated-rotor helicopters in forward flight / 

A79-42799' 

TAHABTIBO, fi* 

Analysis of plume rise from jet aircraft 

A79-43436 

TO, Y« H* 

Hovering impulsive noise - Some measured and 
calculated results 

A79-43499 

Z 

ZALAT, A« D« 

. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter 

system to measure the flow field around a large 
scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect 
[HASA-CB- 152212] B79-26374 

ZEBBEB, H. 

LCF life prediction for a flight-by-flight load 
sequence of a turbine disc 

A79-43600 

ZEHOBI, T. J. 

Feasibility of non-catapult ejection and hazard of 
an ejection seat rocket plume 

[AD-A067080] B79-26036 


B-16 



PBBSOl&L ftUTHOB IBDBX 


BTSIHB-BOLOZHBM, L. B< 


DevelopBent of an inflatable head/neck restraint 
systen for ejection seats, npdate 
[AD-a067124] H79- 26038 

2H0IK0?, ?. ▼. 

CoDpnter calculation of steady-state tenperature 
fields in cooled turbine disks 

A79-42553 

ZBOK , Ta I* 

On a property of the linearized boundary layer 
equations with self-induced pressure 

479-41568 


ZLOBIV, V. T. 

Ezperinental investigation of the aerodynamic drag 
of simple bodies in tuo-phase flow 

479-43172 


ZTSIH4-HOLOZHBH, 1. B. 

The influence of longitudinal pressure gradient 
and turbulence of the flow upon heat transfer in 
turbine blades 

479-42892 


B-17 



CONTRACT NUMBER INDEX 


aeronautical engineering ! a Continuing Bibliography (SuppL 1 14) 


OCTOBER 1979 


Typical Contract Number Index Listing 


HAS2-9460 H79-10038 


CONTRACT 


NASA ACCESSION 

NUMBER 


NUMBER 


Listings in this index are arranged alphanumerically by contract number. 
Under each contract number, the accession numbers denoting documents 
that have been produced as a result of research done under that contract 
are arranged in ascending order with the lAA accession numbers appearing 
first. The accession number denotes the number by which the citation is 
identified in either the IAAqt section. 


AP PROJ- 1995 

H79-26054 

AP PROJ- 2307 

H79-26029 

AP PROJ- 2403 

H79-27183 

AP PROJ. 3145 

N79-27129 

AP PROJ- 4600 

H79- 27366 
AP-AFOSR-0009-78 

R79-28037 

AP-APOSR-2916-76 

H79- 26060 
AP-aPOSR-3468-77 

H79- 26027 
AP-AFOSR-3489-78 

R79-26029 

DA PROJ- lL2-63209-I>-103 
F79-26050 
DAAG 29-7 8-G- 0039 

A79-41751 

DOT-PA71RAI-242 

H79-26041 

DOT-FA72WAI-261 

H79-27119 

D0T-FA75WA-3707 

F79-27116 

DOT-FA77WA-3966 

R79-27127 

DOT-FA79HA-4184 

R79-27118 
DOT- OS-3 0034 A79-42061 
DTCA-76/982 14-00 481-7586 
A79-43223 
ERI PROJ- 1204 

H79-26060 

FAA PROJ. 052-241-04 

H79- 26041 

FHy-PK-82223-73-009-730906 
H79- 27110 

FHV-FK-82223-76-002-2 1-001 
R79-27109 
Fl9628-78-C-d002 

H79-26041 

H79-27119 

F33615-73-C-3051 

H79-27183 

F33615-74-C-2012 

H79-27156 

P33615-74-C-2016 

H79-27129 

F33615-74-C-2059 

A79-40476 

F33615-76-C-2063 

H79-26058 

F33615-77-C-1222 

H79-26054 

F33615-77-C-2096 

A79-41113 

F33615-77-C-3060 

H79- 27131 
P33615-77-C-3140 

H79-27518 

HIPR-AHRDL-75-5 

H79- 27516 


RASA TASK 

HASR-2800 

HASH-2961 

HAS1-11621 

HASI-13500 

HAS1-15153 

HASI-15202 

HASI-15545 

HAS2-7262 

HAS2-8959 

RAS2-9690 

RAS2-9896 

HAS2-10113 

HAS3-20048 

HAS3-20061 

HAS3-20591 

HAS3-20602 

HAS3-20632 

HAS3-20797 

HAS4-2499 

HAS7-100 


A79-42397 

A79-42397 

H79-27087 

H79-27246 

H79-26063 

H79-26046 

H7 9- 26 04 5 

H79-27185 
H79-26062 
H79-26374 
H79-26056 
H79-26067 
H79-26024 
A79-40759 
A79-40759 
H79-26055 
A79-40759 
A79-40483 
H79-27933 
H79-27126 
H79- 26253 
H79-27321 


HGR-17-003-021 

A79-42029 

HGR-22-009-339 

H79-27162 
HRC A-3662 A79-41752 

HRC P-7901 A79-41752 

HSC-66E-0401-02(01) 

A79-40200 


HSG-1239 

HSG-1474 

HSG-1570 

HSG-1574 

HSG-2134 

HSG-2181 


A79-40664 
H79-26881 
H79-26013 
H79-26018 
A79-42029 
H79- 27125 


H00014-72-C-0351 

H79-27180 

H00014-76-C-0880 

H79-27101 

H00014-76-C-1104 

H79-27516 

H00014-77-C-0672 

H79-26031 

H00014-78-C-0284 

H79-26037 

H00019-76-C-0427 

H79-26176 

H00019-77-C-0247 

A79-43253 

H00600-76-C-1494 

H79- 26030 
H62269-77-C-0347 

H79-27014 
HF14142109 H79-26025 

HF41421091 H79-26049 

505-02-03-01 H79- 27098 
505-02-23-01 H79- 27096 
505-02-54 B79-27088 

505-03-13-18 H79- 27931 
H79-27932 
505-04 H79-27143 

505-04-13-02 H79-26022 
505-06-11 H79-26067 

505-06-31 H79-27100 

505-06-43-08 H79-26064 


505-07-11 H79-26009 

505-09-31 H79-27136 

505-10-22 H79-26062 

505-10-23-04 H79-26881 
505-10-23-05 H79-26015 
505-10-32 H79-27182 

505-11-23-03 H79-26023 
H79-27099 
516-50-23-01 H79-27086 

516- 58-21 H79-26017 

H79-27138 

517- 53-13-04 H79-27772 
517-53-43-02 H79-26020 

H79-27095 
769-02-01 H79-26035 

791-40-13-01 H79-26063 
791-40-43-01 B79-27097 


C-1 






1. Report No. 2. Government Accession No. 

NASA SP-7037 (114) 

4. Title and Subtitle 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

A Continuing Bibliography (Supplement 114) 


3. Recipient's Catalog No. 


5. Report Date 

October 1979 


6. Performing Organization Code 



9. Performing Organization Name and Address 


National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
Washington, D. C. 20546 


12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address 


15. Supplementary Notes 


8. Performing Organization Report No. 


10. Work Unit No. 


11. Contract or Grant No. 


13. Type of Report and Period Covered 


14. Sponsoring Agency Code 


This bibliography lists 394 reports, articles, and other documents 
introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information 
system in September 1979- 


17. Key Words (Suggested by Author(s)) 

Aerodynamics 

Aeronautical Engineering 
Aeronaut i cs 
B ibl iograph ies 


19. Security Qassif. (of this report) 

Unclassified 


18. Distribution Statement 


Unclassified - Unlimited 


20. Security Chis^if. (of this page) 

Unclassified 


21. No. of Pages 22. Price* £02 

122 $4.75 HC 


For sale by the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161 


NASA-Langley, 1979 
















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