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The 



May 2006 



Old Radio Times 

The Official Publication of the Old-Time Radio Researchers 

1,500 readers and growing! Number 6 



Contents 

Special Features 

The Brighter Day 1 

Robert Arthur 3 

Johnny Dollar's 
Expense Account 5 

Cincinnati Con 7 

Duz Soap 13 

Music Radio 15 

Nostalgia Con 16 

REPS 19 

The Marriage 20 

Rotary Golden 
Theater 22 

Stand by for Crime 
24 

Be on the Alert 26 

Distro Tracker, Pt. 2 

27 

Regular Features 
Wistful Vistas 6 
Crossword 18 
Librarian's Shelf 27 
Web Report 23 

Technician's Toolbox 

23 

Buy-Sell-Trade 29 
Sushi Bar 21 



The Brighter Day 

Danny Goodwin 

The Brighter Day was a story of a family 
that was a close knit bunch, but every family 
member had different and very unique 
personalities. 

The patriarch of the family is the Rev. Dr. 
Richard Dennis - or "Papa" (played by Bill 
Smith) as he was fondly referred to by his 
children. Rev. Dennis was soft spoken, maybe 
a little forgetful at times (who isn't?), but a 
man his family and his community looked to 
for comfort and guidance. 

Liz Dennis (played by Margaret Draper), 
the program's heroine (25 years old when the 
program began), had her father's warm 
personality and beliefs. She loved her family 
very much. Liz also had a heart as big as all 
outdoors, and she had the ability to see the 
good in everything and everyone. On the 
outside, Liz was friendly, soft spoken, shy, 
and a bit naieve. On the inside, Liz's faith gave 
her the inner strength of steel to help her 
family and friends. 

When her mother died, Liz had to step into 
her place and keep the family going in a 
harmonious manner. Liz sacrificed her own 
happiness to look after Rev. Dennis and her 
three sisters and one brother. This was no easy 
task for the pretty soap heroine - and it was 
surprising that there weren't a few white hairs 
appearing among the bright red hair on her 
head. I specifically mention this little fact 
because red headed characters during radio's 
golden age were mentioned specifically by the 
announcers for having red hair - and I have 
red hair myself. 

Patsy Dennis (a.k.a. "Patty") and Barbara 
Dennis (a.k.a. "Babby") were Liz's youngest 
sisters. When the program began, they were 

The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * 



both school age. 

Patsy, 15 (played by Pat Hosley), was a 
very smart girl - so smart that she had a high 
IQ and was more than willing to display it. 
She also had something of a tomboy 
personality and was known for wearing horn 
rimmed glasses. Patsy bristled at the thought 
of any boy who wanted to take her to a school 
social event. What made it even more 
irritating, her tomboy armor was starting to 
crack in favor of being a young lady. From a 
personal viewpoint, Patsy was the character 
that provided some humor to the program. 




Patsy Dennis 

Babby, 13 (played by Lorna Lynn), was the 
youngest of the Dennis children. She loved to 
eat (wouldn't it be nice to eat, yet keep the 
slim figure as Babby did in the enclosed 
picture). At this age, other teenagers were 
going through the typical growing pains. 
Oddly, Babby was an exception. She had a 
placid demeanor and was very obedient to her 
elders - but whether or not Babby's hearty 

(Continued on page 2) 

Number 6 1 



The Brighter Day (Continued from page 1) 

appetite concealed some internal problems with growing 
up, Rev. Dennis and Liz weren't quite sure. 




Lorna Lynn 

Grayling Dennis, 22 (played by Bill Redfield), was the 
only boy among the Dennis children. With all sisters 
around him, Grayling was already in a tough position. 
He had a restless personality, loved to write poetry, and 
enjoyed an occasional drink or two that was a bit stronger 
than tea. Grayling was also spoiled, pampered, and 
something of a ladies man. 




Bill Redfeld 

In her role of big sister/substitute mother, Liz had her 
hands full looking after Patsy, Babby, and Grayling - but 



that was child's play compared to her sister Althea, 19 
(played by Jay Meredith). She was the black sheep of the 
family. Althea thought of herself as the next great 
Hollywood actress. She definitely had the looks, but she 
also had a definite shortcoming - a lack of talent. 
Althea was the exact opposite of her sister Liz. She 
thought only of herself and was ruthless enough to use any 
means possible to get what she wanted - even if it meant 
scandalous problems for Rev. Dennis and Liz (which it 
did for both in later years). Althea was troublesome, but 
Liz was always there when she needed a shoulder to cry 
on. 




Jay Meredith 

You might come to the conclusion the Dennis family 
was a large one. Believe it or not, there was yet another 
member of the family. There was another sister, Marcia, in 
the story. She was the oldest of the Dennis children. 
Before the program began she married and left home. 
Marcia's name was mentioned on the program, but I don't 
know if she ever appeared. 

In a nutshell, this is the Dennis family - all unique, 
different, and very interesting characters. When you think 
about it, with the strengths and weaknesses that make up 
each member of the Dennis family, they might be like a 
family you and me might know in real life. 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



Mutual' s Secret Weapon: 
The Arthur / Kogan Collaboration 

Mike Thomas 

On May 2, 1969, one of radios premier writers passed 
away. Many people knew him as Bob, but we know him 
as Robert Arthur, Jr. The list of accomplishments 
attributed to the imagination and pencil of this golden-age 
great are numerous. In honor of these works, I would like 
to present a short synopsis of his distinct career. 

Robert Arthur was obviously born with a writing gift; 
he was able to support himself as a young adult, through 
the Great Depression and the rest of the thirties as a pulp 
fiction writer for a plethora of well known magazines. 
Stories printed in these colorful old pulps ranged from 
mystery, crime, and drama, to some brilliant science 
fiction and more. 

A few of these magazines that published his stories 
were Detective Fiction Weekly, The Shadow, Black Mask, 
Weird Tales, Thrilling Wonder Stories and also one named 
Pocket Detective Magazine, which he created himself for 
Street & Smith Publications in the 1936-37 period. He 
was published under no less than 14 pseudonyms in his 
time, including Robert Forbes. 

In 1940 he took a radio writing class at Columbia 
University. It was there that he met and became friends 
with David Kogan. Together they produced hundreds of 
premium radio scripts for several different shows. 

Prolific, steadfast and consistent would be the 
trademark of their careers, as they produced a steady diet 
of prime radio drama for many, many years. Talk about a 
one-two punch! 




Arthur's first radio program to hit the airwaves was 
called Dark Destiny and played on WOR Mutual from 
August of 1942 to March of 1943. It ran for 27 shows with 
only one surviving today. Many of those shows were used 
later on for Mysterious Traveler, and others were adapted 
from stories previously published in the pulps like "The 
Cat from Hell." Dark Destiny marked the beginning of a 
long and fruitful career in radio. In late 1942 Robert 
Arthur wrote the audition show for a drama called Just 
Five Lines. Little is known about this show at this point in 
time and the one title known to exist is the only survivor. 

The majority of people may remember Arthur and 
Kogan for their superior efforts year after year as writers 
for the award winning Mysterious Traveler. Mysterious 
Traveler graced the airwaves from December 1943 to 
September 1952 and totaled approximately 370 shows 
(less than half have surfaced to date). This wonderful 
show was nominated for the Edgar Award by The Mystery 
Writers of America as The Best Radio Drama three times. 
It lost to Inner Sanctum one year and Dragnet another, but 
the year it did win in (1952) - was a hands down win; no 
other show was even nominated. 





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The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



(Continued on page 4) 

3 



Mutual's Secret Weapon (Continued from page 3) 

As The Mysterious Traveler approached its one year 
anniversary, the Arthur/Kogan tandem used shortened 
scripts from the series for a brand new program called The 
Strange Dr. Weird. This collection ran for 29 weeks and 
played anywhere from 1 1 to 15 minutes in length. Maurice 
Tarplin, who was the voice of the Mysterious Traveler, 
was again a perfect fit as the creepy voice of the Strange 
Dr. Weird. Close to the end of its run the creative duo 
once again formed a new show called The Sealed Book. 
This was apparently developed as a summer replacement 
for The Shadow and also used Mysterious Traveler scripts 
but with a different cast of people. The Sealed Book ran 
for 26 weeks and at one point all three shows were on the 
radio at the same time. 

Another display of their talent and ability came in the 
realm of freelancing. To write a script for an already 
established character had to take skill. The Arthur/Kogan 
collaboration had plenty of it as they teamed up to write 
several scripts with Lamont Cranston (aka The Shadow) 
as their leading man. 

"Death to the Shadow," which aired March 12, 1944, is 
the only circulating copy out of the five they contributed 
to this famous series. Arthur is also known to have written 
a nine-part serial for Nick Carter, Master Detective which 
aired in April of 1944, and was titled "Kidnap For Sale" or 
"The Mystery Of The Missing Babies." 

This team was, in the author's opinion, Mutual 
Broadcasting Systems "secret weapon." In June 1949, 
Murder By Experts was born. It ran for two and one-half 
years and was broadcast 130 times, yet, sadly only a 
handful of them are available. This show was conceived 
by the Arthur/Kogan collaboration and had an immediate 
positive impact in radio society. The hosts for these shows 
were writing greats Jon Dickson Carr and Brett Halliday. 

After only six months of air time, Murder By Experts 
was nominated for an Edgar award. The other shows 
nominated and running against Murder By Experts that 
year were greats Suspense, The Fat Man, and This Is Your 
FBI. Murder By Experts won and took home the Edgar 
that year. This was monumental, as the team were 
producing and directing on this particular series and not 
writing. 

To his credit, Robert Arthur also won a writing award 
for a story titled "The Adventure Of The Single Footprint" 
which was published in the July 1948 issue of Ellery 
Queen's Mystery Magazine. This was indeed a story that 
sounded like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle himself. The award 
was aptly named the best "Sherlockiana." That was 




another blue ribbon in the chronicles of Mr. Arthur's life. 

In the early 50' s, the collaboration embarked on a new 
pulp magazine project. This was The Mysterious Traveler 
Magazine and lasted a total of five issues with cover art 
done by the famous Norman Saunders. A lot of these 
stories feature d Robert Arthur written material and the 
use of several of his pseudonyms. Many world famous 
authors were also printed in these and ranged from the 
already mentioned Halliday and Carr to Craig Rice, Ray 
Bradbury and even Agatha Christie. 

As the 50' s progressed, Robert Arthur continued to 
write stories for magazines and was also working as one 
of the producers for ABC Mystery Time. Unfortunately, 
this is another old radio show with very few surviving 
episodes known to exist. Another conundrum that has 
been solved (thanks to the timely help of Ian Grieve) is in 
regards to the Adventure Into Fear radio shows. 

It turns out that in 1956 this show aired in Australia for 
52 episodes with the writing credits given to Robert 
Arthur and all scripts were from The Mysterious Traveler. 
There is more research in process now as to the possibility 
of other Adventure Into Fear information. 

By the end of the 1950's Arthur's name is credited to 
another drama, this one with fewer than 20 known 
episodes existing; Five Star Matinee. The shows all seem 
just as good as any other drama and the sound quality is 
fine, yet not a lot of information on the show seems to be 
had. It took a long time to locate the surviving episodes 
from this series. The final years of old-time radio as we 
know it saw Robert Arthur' s name in several Suspense 
episodes and later Theater Five. He also wrote a pulp style 
novel under two titles - one of which is named 
Somebody' s Walking Over My Grave published by Ace in 
1961. 

The information gathered and placed in this article is 
not the complete writing history of the Arthur/Kogan 

(Continued on page 5) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



Mutual's Secret Weapon (Continued from page 4) 

collaboration. Research goes on and will eventually be 
grasped and shared with anyone else interested as far as 
OTR is concerned. This does not include all the great stuff 
accomplished in television and even later as the creator of 
the famous Alfred Hitchcock and The Three Investigators 
series of books. To do that justice, a novel or encyclopedia 
should be written. 

In closing, my question for fans of OTR is this - 
shouldn't these two talents at least be mentioned with the 
likes of Corwin, Morse, or Oboler? Or how about Spier or 
Robson? It sure seems like mere statistics stand on their 
own, and the Arthur/Kogan collaboration was a winning 
bet. These were Mutual's "secret weapon." That's my 
story and I am standing by it! 




Johnny Dollar's Expense Account . . . 
in 2006 Dollars 

Joseph W. Webb, Ph.D. 

One of my weekly tasks is to write an economics 
column for the printing industry. Though not an economist 
by trade, I've been fascinated by the topic since high 
school, and understanding economics has been a key part 
of my career in business research and forecasting. 

In the course of the years, I've become interested in 
how inflation distorts our perception of things. For 
instance, these "record high" gas prices we've been seeing 
aren't even close. They'd have to hit $5.80 a gallon to 
equal what we paid in the late 1970s after adjusting for 
inflation and our more efficient use of energy through 
technological advances. But that's not our topic at all. 

When I recently listened to the full Bob Bailey Johnny 
Dollar run, I found myself chuckling every time an 
expense account item would be mentioned. I figured I'd 
take an episode, keep track of the prices, and calculate 
what they would be today. 

I chose the "Burning Car Matter" of December 9, 1956, 
because it's about 50 years old, as I will soon be, too. 
Using the consumer price index inflation calculator on the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics site ( www.bls.gov ), it turns out 
that you have to multiply prices of that year by 7.3 to get 
what today's price would be. So if it was $1 then, it's 
$7.30 in 2006. 

But that's doesn't work for everything. For airfare, a 
combination of technological advances and deregulation 
have kept airfares well below inflation. At the time Johnny 
Dollar traveled, air travel was a luxury for consumers and 
a major expense for businesses. Because it was so high- 
priced, it was for elites or very special occasions. 
Remember, there was no Southwest or AirTran airlines at 
that time. Airplanes were not considered buses with wings 
in Johnny Dollar's time. 

Getting prices for everything is nearly impossible, such 
as the 2006 price for a 1956 $1.00 taxi ride. Johnny was 
also well-known for padding his expense account, and 
burying items into things like "incidentals." We know that 
he was very good at that, and that makes complete 
comparisons difficult. 

The table below shows Johnny's expense account in 
dealing with the Burning Car Matter was $385.26. In 
today's dollars that would be $2,814.36. But when I 
compared what I could to today's prices, it came out to 

(Continued on page 6) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



Johnny Dollar's Expense Account (Continued from 
page 5) 

$1,681.45. Yes, today, having Johnny solve the case 
would be $1,132.92 cheaper, almost all because of airfare. 
And we know that Johnny would never eat at a Denny's, 
so I probably underestimated his cost for breakfast. And 
who knows what the costs of those incidentals would be. 
Even if today's prices were less, that would only serve as 
encouragement for our favorite expense account padder to 
spend even more. 



Item # Description 


Price 


Inflation-adjusted 


1 Hartford-Sarasota airfare 


$129.00 


$942.36 


2 Taxi 


$1.00 


$7.31 


3 Gas 


$5.15 


$37.62 


4 Breakfast 


$3.25 


$23.74 


5 Phone call 


$1.30 


$9.50 


used Skype 






6 Gas, incidentals 


$9.80 


$71 .59 


7 Sarasota- Hartford airfare 


$129.00 


$942.36 


Undocumented incidentals 


$106.76 


$779.89 


TOTAL 


$385.26 


$2,814.36 




Bob Bailey 

2006 price Difference Comments 



$350.00 

$7.31 

$61.58 

$15.00 

$0.50 

$117.17 
$350.00 
$779.89 
$1,681.45 



-$592.36 

$0.00 

$23.95 

-$8.74 

-$9.00 



Expedia.com 
Not compared 
.23 cents a gallon 
Denny's, big tip 
Could be zero if he 



$45.58 .23 cents a gallon 
-$592.36 Expedia.com 
$0.00 Not compared 

-$1,132.92 



Wistful Vistas 

Ryan Ellett 

Looking back on the Cincinnati convention, a week 
later now, I can honestly say it was everything I'd hoped it 
would be. I've been involved in old-time radio nearly six 
years now and except for dinner with another OTR fan 
several months back, I have never had the opportunity to 
talk in person with others who share my love of this 
hobby. 

I must admit to some worries as I made the 650-mile 
trek. What if the chemistry between myself and the others 
I was planning on meeting there just didn't work? What if 
the convention's scheduled line-up was a bust? I'd been 
wanting to get out to this convention for the last four 
years; what if it didn't meet the expectations I'd built up 
over all that time? There certainly was the chance that the 
weekend would be a dud. 

I am so glad to say it was anything but. You have the 
chance to read the reflections of some of us who attended. 
For me, much of the thrill was simply being able to talk 
old-time radio for hours on end. Be assured my wife 
doesn't let me get away with that. 

The chance that this would be the last year prompted 
many of us to make the trip. Fortunately, it was successful 
enough that Bob committed to at least one more year. 



However, as has been discussed in other forums, the 
future of the old-time radio conventions should not be 
taken for granted. 

Much of the programming is based on former radio 
actors who, obviously, can't continue to do the 
convention circuit forever. Further, many of the 
organizers of the conventions are getting grayer and it's 
not getting any easier to put on events of this size. Old- 
time radio will continue with or without the conventions, 
but much of the community that is so much a part of 
these events is built and strengthened through them. 

It is not too early to look ahead to conventions of five, 
ten, and fifteen years out. My personal view is that old- 
time radio afficianados will need to build bridges with 
other like-minded nostalgia groups and combine efforts. 
Lo and behold, enter Martin Gram's upcoming nostalgia 
convention in Maryland. I would be there in a heartbeat 
if I lived closer to the coast. 

In any case, Martin's on the right track. There is a lot 
of natural overlap between OTR, pulp, serials, old-time 
Hollywood, and even old television. These hobbies 
present endless opportunities for OTR fans to expand 
their knowledge and interest in related fields as well as to 
introduce OTR to others who would be well-disposed to 
appreciating it. 

(Continued on page 17) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



! ! ! 



Special Cincinnati Convention Coverage 



! ! ! 



Cincy OTR Convention Thoughts 

Jim Beshires 

For the first time in more years than I care to remember 
we were convention bound. For a period of about ten 
years, a nostalgia convention was held in Atlanta twice a 
year and this was always a highlight for me. I really 
enjoyed meeting all the old stars and browsing the dealers 
tables, usually spending way more money than I intended. 

After hearing that this might be the last convention to 
be held in Cincinnati, we decided to attend, hoping to 
meet many of the people in the Old-Time Radio 
Researchers group, folks I've chatted with in the Cobalt 
Club, and other friends who I only knew by their 'handles' 
on Yahoo as we discussed and shared old-time radio 
programs. 

We made a date to meet Archie Hunter (from Canada) 
in the bar at 7 p.m. Thursday night for drinks. When my 
good trading buddy, Scott Carpenter (Ohio) found out we 
would be there early, he suggested dinner as well. This 
sounded good to me! 

I was pleasantly surprised to receive a call from 
Stewart Wright, one of the most esteemed researchers I 
know, shortly after arriving. Stewart has been of immense 
help to me in many ways. 

Scott, Ron Speegle (Georgia) and I, broke in the bar 
Thursday, with Archie coming in after the first round. We 
had a great time exchanging war stories and putting back a 
few before adjourning to dinner. Several people had 
suggested trying Cincinnati chili, so we went to Skylines 
for dinner. Some of us liked the chili and some didn't. 

Friday morning found us perusing the dealers' tables 
very early, trying to score some great bargains. I was a bit 
disappointed with a number of dealers; it seemed that the 
majority were selling movies and serials instead of OTR. 
Terry Salmomonson, who I really enjoyed meeting and 
chatting with for a while was well represented as was 
Radio Memories. It was disappointing not to be able to 
talk with Ted Davenport, but due to illness, he was not 
able to attend. Both Terry and Ted are members of the 
OTRRG. 

I did make some purchases, most finds coming from 
the $1.00 cassette bins on some of the OTR dealers tables. 
But I did think that I was back in the olden days with the 
mp3s I bought. None of them had a dealers address on 
them and the majority just had the programs listed as #1, 



#2, #3, etc! Shades of purchasing on E-Bay! That was 
really a bummer. 

George Imm (Michigan), one of our members was 
there Friday and I had a brief chance to chat with him. As 
the weekend progressed more and more Researchers came 
trickling in and by the end of the first day, Ron Speegle, 
Doug Hopkinson, Travis Connor, Phlipper376, Archie 
Hunter, Stewart Wright, Scott Carpenter and Ryan Ellett 
had showed up. We kept looking for Roger Hohenbrink 
and his famous cowboy hat, but he left it at home and we 
didn't find him until Staturday morning. Saturday also 
brought us Bill Wood and Andrew Steinberg. 

OTRRG furnished a number of series to be used as 
door prizes to help defray convention expenses. I think 
that all together we gave away about 90 discs. 

The panel was excellent as were the re-creations of 
shows, but I felt like we needed a bit more going on as 
there was a lot of free time. Martin Grams, Jr., was there 
and bouncing all over the place, as usual. Maybe next year 
he and Stewart Wright could be convinced into giving a 
talk. I sure would love to hear their experiences ! 

The hotel did leave something to be desired as it was 
very hot and the a/c in our room quit working Friday 
night. They fixed it, but it broke again Saturday. Only one 
of the elevators seemed to be working full time. The 
resturant certainly was lacking, with too little wait staff 
and much too long a wait for breakfast. Neither did it 
serve lunch or dinner, so you had to leave the hotel in 
order to eat! Thankfully we had Scott with his soccer van 
to chauffeur us around! 

I must say, though, that the resturant did allow us 
Researchers to congregate there Friday night and kept us 
well supplied with drinks and snacks. The bar was hosting 
a ladies bowling party and it was not condusive to OTR 
conversation. I also was surprised at the lack of chairs or 
couches in the lobby. That seems to be a no-brainer when 
you are hosting conventions. People do like to congregate 
and talk. 

We had our own reserved table for the Saturday night 
banquet, and we seemed to be the only ones who did. That 
was a very nice touch on Bob Burchetts part. He and his 
staff deserve a round of applause for their hard work. 

The highlight was meeting with all my good friends 
from Reseachers and just talking about OTR. Maybe next 
year we can persuade more to attend and we can have a 
mini-convention of our own. We're already making plans 
to attend! 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



My First Old Time Radio Convention 

Roger Hohenbrink 

I headed out to the Cincinnati Old-Time Radio 
Nostalgia Convention on Friday about 10:30 am with my 
wife Norma. As this was my first convention, I just didn't 
know what an OTR convention was all about, or if it was 
something I would like. 

A number of Old-Time Radio Researchers group 
members talked me into it and as this was to be the last 
radio convention at Cincinnati, I thought I would give it a 
shot. Also, as Cincinnati was only about one hour and 45 
minutes away and a easy drive for me, I said why not. 

My wife and I arrived at the convention about 1:15 
p.m. but were unable to check into the hotel until 3 p.m. 
While waiting for the room to become available we met 
Steward Wright and got to know him. I had talked to him 
by e-mail from time to time. I then when to sign up for the 
convention and the Saturday night banquet which cost me 
less then $50.00 total. 

I found a lot of old-time radio shows for sale and a 
ticket raffle for many OTR shows, books and other things. 
I signed up for a few raffle tickets with the hopes of 
winning. The Old-Time Radio Researchers Group had 
about 100 certified CDs donated for the raffle which was 
the most anybody donated. The raffle had about 300 
things to give away so everyone had a good chance to win 
something. 

I looked around for other members of the OTRR group 
but was unable to find them as I did not know what they 
looked like. By that time I was able to sign in for 
my room but it had started raining cats and dogs so it was 
not fun getting things out of my car. After getting settled 
in our room we went out to get something to eat. 

Back at the convention and the search to find OTRR 
members continued with no luck. At 7:30 p.m. the 
convention had an old-time radio show recreation of the 
series Let George Do It, so I sat in on it. The way the 
show was set up, on the stage were about six microphones 
at the front of the stage with a row of chairs behind them 
for the actors to siton. When the recreation was started the 
actors all had scripts to read from. Each actor stepped up 
to a mike and read from the script when it was time for his 
or her part. There was a sound effects man that would 
provide all the music and sound effects during the show. I 
was impressed by the recreation and enjoyed the show. 



Guest actors included Fred Foy (announcer for the 
Lone Ranger series), Bob Hastings (Archie Andrews on 
the old Archie Andrews radio series), Hal Stone (Jughead 
on the old Archie Andrews radio series), and Rosemary 
Rice (Betty on the Archie radio series). Also, some non- 
celebrities who were used to fill in for the other parts to 
complete the cast for the show. All and all it was a fine 
recreation and fun to hear and watch how a radio show 
was made. Afterwards, I was still unable to find any 
members of our group so I decided it had been a long day 
and went up to my room for a little TV and then bed. 

Saturday morning I went down to the motel check-in 
desk and asked for a room number of one of our OTRR 
group. Also, standing near the check-in desk was an 
OTRR member who overheard me ask for the room 
number and the search was over. I then went to breakfast 
with the group and was able to meet most of the OTRR 
group. I was told by the group that they could not find me 
and had been on the lookout for a member (me) with a 
cowboy hat on. I did not have my cowboy hat on that 
weekend. Anyway, it was great to be finally able to put a 
face with the people I had worked with in the OTRR 
group. 

After breakfast and a look around the dealers room it 
was time for a panel with the guest actors that started at 
10:00 a.m. So, up to my room to get the wife and down to 
the location of visit with the guests. The guests were the 
old-time radio actors Fred Foy, Bob Hastings, Hal Stone 
and Rosemary Rice, who gave a great talk and answered 
many questions about their work in old-time radio. 

Will Hutchins who played Sugarfoot and Dagwood on 
the TV did not make the convention. No reason was given, 
but my wife was looking forward to meeting him. After 
the panel there was time to talk and take pictures of the 
stars. I found all the stars to be very kind and willing to 
talk one on one and this was super. 

As my wife didn't get breadfast and to keep from being 
locked out of my hotel room I agreed to take the little 
woman out for food. We found a pizza place called Cici's 
Pizza where you pay $3.99 each and you can eat all the 
pizza you like. After filling up on pizza we went into 
Jungle Jim's, which was a shopping center-size 
supermarket with anything and everything that has to do 
with food. Foods from all over the world that I never 
dreamed people would eat. After spending some time at 

(Continued on page 11) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



8 



First Convention (Continued from page 10) 

Jungle Jim's it was back to the convention. 

At 1:30 p.m. it was time for some more old-time radio 
recreations. This time the recreations were Sam Spade and 
The Lone Ranger with Fred Foy as the announcer and 
also the part of the Lone Ranger. Hal Stone was Tonto, 
Bob Hastings was the outlaw, and Rosemary Rice played 
the outlaw's daughter. So with a fiery horse with the speed 
of light, a cloud of dust and a hearty Hi-Yo Silver! The 
Lone Ranger rides again. The voice of Fred Foy, in 
person, and the best known of the Lone Ranger 
announcers, made this recreation one of the best at the 
convention. 

Soon it was time for the raffle drawing with lots of 
Old-Time Radio prizes to give away. The first hundred 
prizes were the Old-Time Radio Researchers certified 
series. There were so many prizes to give away that they 
did not have time to draw one name at a time and they 
ended up drawing two or three at a time to speed things 
up. And yes I did win a prize; a set of Abbott & Costello 
tapes. With so many prizes it would have been better if 
they would have spread out the give-aways throughout the 
weekend. 

After the give-aways it was back to the motel roon to 
get cleaned up for cocktails and dinner at 5:30. Fred Foy, 
Bob Hastings, Hal Stone and Rosemary Rice were all at 
the cocktail time and it was a great time for picture taking 
and talking with the stars one on one. I found them all 
available and willing to talk about anything and 
everything. This was just great and you could not ask for 
more. 

During the dinner the Old Time Radio Researchers had 
a table reserved just for our group. The dinner was great 
and we had time to talk about our work before the 
evening's recreations. The presentations started off with 
Dan Turner, Hollywood Detective, written and performed 
by a Michigan recreation group who did a great job. The 
next recreation was Suspense and was an episode that 
Rosemary Rice originally starred in. 

At the end of the banquet came awards and many were 
given out. The banquet did not get over until about 10:30 
and then it was back to the hotel room to call it a night. 
The next morning I checked out of the hotel and was off 
for home. 

So what did I think of my first Old-Time Radio 
Convention? I loved it! And as it was announced there is 
to be another convention next year, I plan on going again. 
So with a Hi-Yo Silver, away! I will see all next year. 

The Old Radio Times * 




Hal Stone, Dave Siegel (standing), Bob Hastings, 
Rosemary Rice, Fred Foy 




Front Row: Roger Hohenbrink, Andrew Steinberg, 

Stewart Wright, Ryan Ellett 

Back Row: Archie Hunter, Jim Beshires, Phlipper376 




Scott Carpenter and Ron Speegle 
May 2006 * Number 6 




Bob Burchette (convention organizer) and Doug 
Hopkinson 




Bill Wood 




Travis Conner 

The Old Radio Times 



Convention Memories 

Scott Carpenter (Woody) 

It's been a week since the Cincinnati OTR convention. 
I had never been to one before so this was a new 
experience for me and I wasn't sure what to expect. Like 
most things in life, I liked some parts and I didn't like 
others. 

It was a real pleasure in meeting many of the people I 
chat and trade with on-line. Yes, there really are people 
behind the nicknames with the little heads from the hubs 
and the cartoon avatars from the Cobalt Club. I thought 
this was the best part of the convention. There was never a 
pause in the conversation as we all had our love of OTR. 

The radio recreations were great and they mixed the 
guest actors with some of the people attending. It was very 
entertaining to hear the banter between Hal Stone and Bob 
Hastings. I can't leave out Fred Foy or Rosemary Rice. 
They all had stories they were happy to share about their 
experiences in radio and television. 

I was surprised by the dealers. Not that there weren't 
enough, but that many sold mainly old movie serials. 
There were around 1 8 dealers present and I was able to 
find a few shows I had never heard of as well as some I 
had been looking for. Prices were reasonable and the 
quality seems to be okay from what I have heard so far. 

What I didn't enjoy was the lack of any planned 
activities or seminars between performances. Yes, it gave 
you time to do some shopping, but you can only shop so 
much. I think it would have been better if some short 
seminars were offered, for instance on encoding cassettes 
to digital files. Since the Radio Researchers group only 
exists in cyber space, maybe we can think about 
combining efforts with the Cincinnati OTR group and 
make the Cincinnati convention an annual pilgrimage. I 
am sure they would be happy with the help. I belong to a 
couple of community groups and can attest to the fact that 
there is always more work than volunteers. 

The facilities at the hotel also left something to be 
desired. The restaurant wasn't open at lunch so if you 
wanted to eat you had to leave the convention. The 
absolute worst part was the bar didn't open until 5:00 pm. 
Somehow I managed to survive even with the crazy 
woman bowlers. 

Will I be back next year? You bet and all I can say is that 
most of you should be there too. Who knows maybe we'll even 
tell you about those women bowlers. So to Jim, Ron, Archie, 
Phil, Travis, Ryan, Doug, Stewart, Don, Ted and Andrew it was 
great actually meeting all of you. Oh, and Archie, I'll buy the 
first round next year. 

May 2006 * Number 6 10 



Cincinnati Blitz 

Ryan Ellett 

Thursday, April 20 

2:59 p.m. I squeal out of the school parking lot where I 
work one minute before kids are out so I miss the after 
school traffic crush. I'm gassed up and on the highway by 
3:10. 

6:27 p.m. I stop on the east side of Columbia, Missouri, to 
get supper at McDonald's. Supper on the road is always 
the same; two double-cheeseburgers and a medium fry. I 
love that $1 menu. Gassed and back on the road in 13 
minutes. 

8:05 p.m. I grit my teeth all the way across Illinois. The 
other lads from the Researchers are meeting this evening 
for preliminary drinks. 

10:13 p.m. I cross into Indiana. My evening listening 
menu has consisted of Fibber McGee and Molly, Great 
Gilder sleeve, Gunsmoke, andX-1. That leaves one series 
to break into my rotation, and I've been saving it for the 
nighttime drive; Suspense. Just as the announcer opens the 
program I hit thick fog. I figure that's just perfect 
Suspense weather. 

12:00 a.m. I'm rounding Indianapolis. The home stretch to 
Cincinnati is ahead of me and my excitement is really 
starting to build. 

Friday, April 21 

1:30 a.m. (2:30 Cincinnati time) I stand in front of Travis' 
apartment complex but the outer doors are locked and I 
have no cell phone to call and tell him I'm here. 

3:30 a.m. (Cinci time) I finally manage to track down a 
pay phone (but not the fifty cents necessary to make a 
call) and call Travis. Collect. He kindly agrees to open the 
door for me as soon as I can get back to the apartment 
complex. 

4:00 a.m. After quick introductions it's time to get some 
shut-eye. 

8:00 a.m. We're up and at 'em. Travis makes some 
gourmet scrambled eggs. 

1:30 p.m. Travis and I make our grand entrance to the 
convention. A circuit through the dealer room gives me 
my first sightings of legends Terry Salmonson, Martin 
Grams, and the Siegels. I sneak in late to the Blue Coal 



Trio. It doesn't take long to spot Doug and Jim B. Security 
is struggling to remove them from the room. We share 
hardy handshakes after the row, meeting in the flesh for 
the first time. 

3:00 p.m. By now we have hooked up with Archie Hunter 
and Phillip. Twenty-five handsome copies of the April 
Times are deposited on a table for interested bypassers. 
We don't have enough jewel cases for the 100 
Researchers CDs we've brought for door prizes. Seven of 
us pile into Scott's van and the hunt is on for cases. 
Several people comment that perhaps Archie would like to 
pick up some deodorant. 

5:15 p.m. The Researchers settle into a local Chinese dive 
and totally geek out. The old-time radio conversation is 
heavy and thick. New episodes discovered, transcription 
this, reel-to-reel that. I'm in heaven. 

7:30 p.m. Tonight's recreation is Let George Do It. 
Unfortunately, I can't follow the recreation any better than 
I can follow most detective shows. P.I. shows are low on 
my listening list. 

8:00 p.m. The Researchers retire to the bar for drinks and 
more geek talk. Once again the OTR conversation spews 
forth. Until we're drowned out by the DJ. Check please. 

10:00 p.m. Doug, Travis, and I end up at Skyline's, a 
Cincinnati chili joint. You can't beat $1.50 coney dogs in 
my opinion. 

1 1:00 p.m. Back at Travis' pad. This is my one good 
night's sleep of the weekend. 

Saturday, April 22 

8:00 a.m. I feel good after a full night's rest. I go ahead 
and load my stuff in the car, not knowing where I'll be 
sleeping that night. 

10:30 a.m. I successfully navigate Cincinnati on my own 
and make it back to the convention. I'm just in time to get 
the last half of a panel with Hal Stone, Rosemary Rice, 
and Bob Hastings. 

1 1:00 a.m. Roger Hohenbrink has arrived and joined our 
little circus. 

12:30 p.m. Archie and I lure Hal Stone into our lair and he 
signs our copies of his book. Hal is every bit the scholar 
and gentleman. Buy his book if you have not done so 
already. 

(Continued on page 14) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



11 



Cincinnati Blitz (Continued from page 13) 

1:30 p.m. Back-to-back recreations: Sam Spade and Lone 
Ranger. Legend Fred Foy gives his famous rendition of 
the western's opening. 

3:00 p.m. The raffle commences and dozens of lucky 
winners grab copies of the Researcher's releases. Doug, 
who through various nefarious schemes cheats his way to 
three door prizes, is foiled when they all turn out to be our 
releases. Crime never pays. 

4:15 p.m. A quick return to the dealer room nets me Dave 
Siegel's autograph on my Flashgun Casey book. 

5:30 p.m. Doug's cheating ways are forgiven when he 
finagles Convention organizer Bob Burchette into giving 
the Researcher's their own table at the evening dinner. 
Interestingly, we are in the very back corner of the room. 
Coincidence? 

6:35 p.m. Dinner is under way. Our table boasts an all-star 
lineup: Myself, Doug Hopkinson, Roger Hohenbrink, 
Stewart Wright, Travis Conner, Archie Hunter, Phillip, 
Jim Beshires, and Ron Speegle. 

10:30 p.m. A great evening of dinner, recreations, and 
awards is done. The convention is officially over, though 
without Bob's assurance there would be at least one more 
next year (Mark your calendars now). 

10:50 p.m. Not quite ready to call it quits, myself, Ron, 
Jim B., Doug, and Travis adjourn to a White Castle. Talk 
centers around the latest OTR gossip picked up over the 
weekend. My downing of a large coffee will come back to 
haunt me. 

Sunday, April 23 

3:30 a.m. I'd love to get a few winks before heading home 
but the Java was potent. I'm wide awake. Bidding a quiet 
farewell to Jim and Ron, I slip out of Cincinnati at 3:30. 

12:30 p.m. (Kansas time) A brutal drive home, but I arrive 
safely. As much as I'd like to crash for a bit, I've got 
pictures to look at and emails to check. Plus I've got to get 
next year's dates on my calendar; I won't miss it for 
anything. 



Reflections on Cincinnati 

Phlipper 

The intimacy of the smaller venue and the schedule 
with several unstructured times left me with an experience 
I hadn't anticipated. Meeting online and web people in 
person was most enjoyable, though not all appeared as 
imagined. As Dan Hughes related after receiving the Dave 
Warren Award, telling of his bringing home a video of 
"Burns and Allen," his daughter of 12 covered her eyes 
and exclaimed, "they don't look like that." 

The comradeship of our group members took off from 
the moment we met. We managed to further our 
relationships through conversations, dinners, and 
breakfasts as well as a night at Rox zzzzzzzzzzz's. Thanks 
to our chauffeur Woody for being our guide to Cincy. 

The recreations of shows was most impressive; I had 
no idea how they would pull if off. The stars were 
approachable people and would talk with you and pose for 
snapshots. I really appreciate Bob Hastings insisting not 
only getting his pic, but being in it with him. Fred Foy, 
while waiting in the lobby Sunday morning for his airport 
shuttle, quite in character chatted with me about his 
current life and other trivialities. Hal Stone was quite the 
character and after promising me an autographed copy of 
his book and not having as many with him as he had 
thought, is sending me one anyway. Dave Zwengler of the 
Blue Coal Trio was another amateur I was most impressed 
with his many voices and his nonchalant relating to me 
that I was one of the audience he was keying on, as he 
picks out two or three audience members during his 
presentations. 

Will I go again? Yes, in a word. I encourage all 
members who can to attend. You will not be disappointed. 
Attend REPS June in Seattle, FOTR October in Newark 
and next April again in Cincinnati. 




Terry Salmonson 
The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



12 



It's A Bird . . . It's A Plane . . . 
It's Superman . . . Selling Soap! 

Danny Goodwin 
"Duz does everything!" - Clayton "Bud" Collyer 

OK, I may have exaggerated a wee bit about the 
famous "Man of Steel" selling soap on the radio. On his 
own serial program, Superman had other things on his 
mind, like saving the world from crime, corruption, and 
destruction. Even for a super hero of Superman's caliber, 
fighting crime was a dirty business. Since it was dirty, I'm 
sure even Superman needed his attire washed from time to 
time. More than likely, he washed his laundry in Duz. 

If you're not familiar with who did what during radio's 
golden age, you might be wondering what I am trying to 
prove. On the other hand, if you know your old-time 
radio, you should have an idea on how Superman and Duz 
were linked together. Superman didn't sell Duz on the 
radio, but the man who portrayed him on radio did. 

The man in question was Clayton "Bud" Collyer. 
During his lifetime, Collyer had a very distinguished 
career in radio and TV. There are other websites on the 
Internet that have paid tribute to his numerous 
achievements in broadcasting, but since the subject matter 
here is radio advertising, this article will pay tribute to 
Collyer as a commercial spokesman. Sharing the spotlight 
in this tribute is the product Collyer was famous for 
selling on the radio - (in his own words), "the one and 
only Duz." 

Many old-time radio fans will remember Duz for its 
sponsorship of the long running Road of Life serial 
program. The program opened to the sound of a churning 
washing machine. As the washing machine was happily 
churning the laundry inside it, a female singer sang the 
famous "D-U-Z Does Everything" jingle to the beat of the 
washing machine. When the singer and the washing 
machine finished their business over the microphone, 
Collyer introduced the serial this way: "Yes, it's The Duz 
Program, Road of Life." 

Instead of just reading the Duz commercials off the 
script, Collyer displayed excitement and enthusiasm in 
describing the soap and the wonderful things it did for the 
laundry. His enthusiasm about Duz could easily influence 
the ladies in the listening audience to run down to the 
grocery store and buy a box - preferably after the Road of 
Life broadcast was completed. 

If you're wondering if Duz was something to get 
excited about, here is a brief description of the product. 



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Duz was a granulated soap made by Procter & Gamble. 
It was the soap that made washday easier and faster. 
Needless to say, many other soap brands also made 
washday faster and easier, but Duz had a definite 
advantage over the competition. Instead of excelling in 
washing some types of laundry and lack of interest with 
other types of laundry, Duz thrived on washing anything 
and everything that was considered laundry. 

It took on the dirtiest, grimiest, and most disgusting 
looking laundry and washed it all clean. Duz was mean on 
dirt, yet it was safe for fine fabrics that needed gentle care. 
Since Duz washed all the laundry, there was a clever 
saying that came out of all this: "Duz Does Everything." 
Of course, the saying referred to washing all kinds of 
laundry. However, the radio comedians of that time had a 
field day poking fun at "Duz Does Everything." 

In addition to the laundry, Duz was the soap to use for 
dishwashing. On this particular subject, Collyer 

(Continued on page 14) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



13 



Duz Does Everything (Continued from page 13) 

introduced a series of Duz commercials with the Duzem 
family (not sure of spelling). Collyer described a situation 
concerning a large stack of dishes patiently waiting for a 
Duzem family member to wash them. There was usually a 
minor conflict as to who "volunteered" to wash them. 

Despite the large stack of dishes, it didn't take much 
time to wash them - provided the Duzem family member 
used Duz. Before the "lucky" Duzem family member 
realized it, the dishes were draining on the strainer*, and 
the dishwashing chore was done. Although the Duz box 
was bright red, Collyer made it clear that the hands were 
never red after washing dishes with Duz. It was rough on 
grease, but gentle on hands. 

Collyer' s enthusiasm about Duz didn't go by unnoticed 
with the people in charge of the soap's advertising. When 
Duz signed on to sponsor The Goldbergs and The Guiding 
Light, Collyer was the program's announcer and 
commercial spokesman. For a brief time, he was also the 
announcer of the unpredictable Truth or Consequences. 

When I say "unpredictable" about Truth or 
Consequences, it was just that! If you think "Duz Does 
Everything" is nothing more than a clever saying, the 
following incident might change your mind. 

On a particular Truth Or Consequences broadcast, 
there was a consequence involving a male contestant and 
the infamous hot seat. He was to sit on the hot seat 
throughout the program. The contestant's task was to 
predict the temperature of a major city within 5° (more or 
less) of the actual temperature. When it was time for the 
contestant to guess the right temperature, M.C. Ralph 
Edwards called the NBC Radio affiliate of the city in 
question by telephone. 

If the prediction was wrong, the contestant's backside 
fell victim to the sudden and jolting heat of the hot seat. 
In consideration that his derriere was in peril of being 
roasted more than once during the program, the contestant 
had a solution to his dilemma. To Edwards' surprise, the 



contestant placed a box of Duz on the hot seat and sat on 
it. We already know "Duz Does Everything" for the 
laundry, but it's very doubtful it protected the contestant 
from the hot seat. 

To sum all this stuff up, it was fitting for Clayton 
"Bud" Collyer to sell Duz on the radio. Just as "Duz Does 
Everything" for washday, Collyer did everything in front 
of the radio microphone and TV camera - and, like Duz, 
he did it all well. I'm sure Superman would be very proud 
of him. 

This article was originally published at 
http://www.dgl25.com/Shadow/InTheShadow.htm . It is 
reprinted here by permission of the author. 




Bud Collyer 



*- Author's note: The lady in the enclosed Duz magazine 
ad hung a plate and saucepan on the clothesline to dry. 
She was making a point that "Duz Does Everything" in 
the ad. That was good for advertising, but it's not a good 
idea to really dry dishes this way. It's more suitable to use 
a strainer or for the dishwasher to wipe the dishes dry with 
a dishtowel. 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



14 



Music Radio: The Great Performers 

and Programs of the 1920s through 

Early 1960s 

By Jim Cox 
Reviewed by Stewart Wright 

Radio brought live entertainment into American 
homes. Not only dramas and comedies, but also live music 
programs were broadcast during the Golden Age of Radio. 
Radio listeners could hear live music of every genre 
without ever leaving their homes. 

It is surprising that only a relatively few overview 
books have been written about the music programs and 
performers of Radio's Golden Age. With the publication 
of Music Radio: The Great Performers and Programs of 
the 1920s through Early 1960s, old-time radio authority 
and author Jim Cox has helped rectify this oversight and 
has significantly increased the body of knowledge of 
broadcast music. 

Music Radio covers the entire spectrum of radio 
musical programming starting in the 1920s and continuing 
through the early 1960s. Classical, operatic, gospel, 
sacred, pop, big band, jazz, country, western, and semi- 
classical music forms are explored in the entertaining and 
informative style that is a hallmark of Jim Cox books on 
American old-time radio. 

Jim has written extensive essays on ten representative 
major musical programs: The Bell Telephone Hour, The 
Bing Crosby Show, The Chamber Music Society of Lower 
Basin Street, Cities Service Concerts, The Fred Waring 
Show, Grand Ole Opry, The Kate Smith Show, The 
Railroad Hour, The Voice of Firestone, and Your Hit 
Parade. The treatment of each of these series includes 
extensive information on casts, writers, production 
personnel, sponsors, ratings, dates on the air, and time 
slots. 

In addition, he has provided additional chapters on The 
Big Bands, The Classics, The Contests, The Disc Jockeys, 
The Hummert Musicales, The Horse Operas, The House 
Bands, The Sacred Singers, and The Vocalists. These 
chapters provide significant insight into the origins and 
development of these music genres on the radio air waves. 
Also included is extensive information on many radio 
series in these various genres. 

Interspersed throughout his book, the author provides 
extensive biographical and program credits information on 
more than 125 prominent performers and groups, 
conductors, producers, announcers, hosts, and disk 



jockeys from the Golden Age of Radio Broadcast Music. 
For example, The Big Bands chapter includes information 
on the signature and hits tunes, leaders, arrangers, 
vocalists and sidemen, and radio series of the big bands of 
Xavier Cugat, Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Eddie 
Duchin, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Woody 
Herman, Sammy Kaye, Wayne King, Guy Lombardo, 
Vincent Lopez, Freddy Martin, Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw 
and Paul Whiteman. 

Jim Cox is one of the most prolific writers on the 
Golden American Age of Radio. He has written 
authoritatively and entertainingly about radio soap operas, 
audience participation shows, detective and police shows, 
the programs of Frank and Anne Hummert, and the final 
decade of the Golden Age of Radio. With his new book, 
Music Radio, Jim has added much to our knowledge of 
this important segment of old-time radio. 

Music Radio: The Great Performers and Programs of the 

1920s through Early 1960s, by Jim Cox 

ISBN 0-7864-2047-2 

photographs, notes, bibliography, index 

380pp. hardcover 2005 

$55 

McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers 

Box 611 

Jefferson, NC 28640 

800-253-2187 

Fax Order: 336-246-4403 

http://www.mcfarlandpub.com 




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The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



15 



The Mid- Atlantic Nostalgia 
Convention 

Michelle Vinje 

On September 14 - 17, 2006, the small town of 
Aberdeen, Maryland will be host to the first annual Mid- 
Atlantic Nostalgia Convention. This convention will 
feature classic movies, antique cars, magicians, celebrities, 
and old-time radio. Holding a new convention is not 
something you do without a great deal of forethought. 
Martin Grams, who got the ball rolling for this event, 
admitted that the financial expense to put a convention on, 
especially his first, will be risky. So to garnish some 
attention, an "open door policy" was established for the 
subject matter presented at the convention. 

"Anyone who wants to offer a presentation on a subject 
they feel strongly about is more than welcome," Mr. 
Grams said. "We actually have a teenager from upper 
New York state driving down to play some vintage 
animated cartoons from his 16 mm reel collection. I have 
a magician offering a fascinating introduction to Harry 
Houdini in American cinema, and an antique car club 
plans to bring in a display of their recent restorations. If 
someone called me up and said they wanted to do a 
presentation about Sky King on radio and television, I'd 
arrange for a time slot so they can do their presentation. 
The door is open for everyone." 

Among the old-time radio related events scheduled for 
the weekend is Terry Salomonson discussing the history 
of The Green Hornet on radio. Ken Stockinger, a fan of 
baseball broadcasts from the Golden Age of Radio, will 
be revealing the importance of such broadcasts, for their 
historical appeal, and play excerpts from his private 
collection. Dan Riedstra will be offering a presentation 
about Coca Cola Spotlight Bands, a musical/variety 
program that aired over the radio and the subject of Dan's 
ongoing research. 

Michael Hayde's presentation about the history of the 
Grand Ole' Opry was well received at the Metropolitan 
Washington Old-Time Radio Club, so he will be reprising 
his talk for a larger audience at the convention. Neil Ellis 
will offer radio excerpts from his personal collection of 
JFK's assassination news coverage. Karl Schadow plans 
to present a fascinating look at the invisible crime fighter, 
The Shadow. Bill McMahon will give a presentation on 
radio premiums. Described by Mr. McMahon as a 
presentation that will feature various radio premiums and 
explain why they were offered to listeners. Typical radio 
premium offers will be analyzed, and some common radio 

The Old Radio Times * 



premium myths will be discussed. 

At least two radio recreations are planned. On Saturday 
afternoon, a group of radio actors will be presenting an 
Amos n' Andy radio recreation on stage. On Sunday 
evening, Charlie Summers, moderator of the Old-Time 
Radio Digest on-line, will be directing an original X 
Minus One adapted from a 1950s short story. After 
Charlie's drama, Mr. Sunshine will be closing the 
evening dinner with a one-man vaudeville performance 
(which includes songs of the 1920s). 

Authors of old-time radio will be attending as well. 
Jack French will discuss female detectives on radio 
(pitching his superb book Private Eyelashes). Derek 
Tague and Michael Hayde (author of My Name 's 
Friday) will also spend an hour playing various Dragnet 
spoofs, from Jack Webb's classic "Copper Clangers" skit 
to Rocky and Bullwinkle's "Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son." 
Jim Cox, who has written a number of old-time radio 
books, will also be a guest at the convention. Martin 
Grams will offer a presentation about Sam Spade on the 
radio, offering behind-the-scenes trivia about the program, 
from his up-coming book on The Adventures of Sam 
Spade. 

Although these presentations (and many others) deal 
with old-time radio, the convention is being billed as a 
"Nostalgia Convention." The purpose of the convention, 
according to Mr. Grams, is to expose old-time radio to a 
market of people who otherwise would not attend a 
convention geared mainly toward OTR. "I enjoy attending 
old-time radio conventions and have admired how 
much time and effort everyone puts into the festivals to 
make them fun," Grams explained. "My father runs a 
magic convention every year and I am part of the staff, so 
I have an idea how much can be involved. But I do feel I 
need to return the favor by giving something meaningful 
to old-time radio fans. Last year I attended over 20 
conventions and I found that while some conventions are 
run smoothly, others fail to capture the spirit of the 
convention altogether. I also noticed that there was a 
different kind of crowd for each type of convention I 
attended. One crowd only attended western film festivals, 
another crowd only went to the pulp conventions, and 
so on. I saw very little crossovers where the same people 
went to more than one type of convention." 

"In response," Mr. Grams continued, "a few friends 
convinced me to put on a convention that includes a wide 
spectrum of nostalgic interests. A nostalgia convention. A 
weekend where people can watch a B -western movie in 
a movie room and later attend a panel about old-time radio 

(Continued on page 17) 

May 2006 * Number 6 16 



Nostalgia Convention (Continued from page 16) 



Wistful Vistas (Continued from page 6) 



western programs. Those who collect pulp magazines can 
enjoy a presentation about the history of pulps, and on the 
same day listen to a fascinating discussion about the 
Shadow radio program. Exposing old-time radio to people 
who wouldn't think twice about attending such a 
convention is one way - at least I think so - of exposing 
them to how good the nostalgic radio programs still 
are today." 

Even though Mr. Grams has plenty of support to keep 
the convention running smoothly, the financial expense 
isn't the only task Mr. Grams has to worry about. "The 
one thing I am hoping doesn't go around is the mentality 
that I am trying to compete against the already successful, 
established old-time radio conventions along the West and 
East Coast. I am putting on a nostalgia convention, not an 
OTR convention and there is a difference. And I am 
holding it during the only month where very little is going 
on anywhere else. Attendees can watch beach party 
movies in a movie room, checkout a classic car show 
exhibit, listen in on a variety of panels and all on the 
same day. Of course some old-time radio panels and 
recreations are tossed in among the events. I really love 
OTR and I couldn't possibly put on a convention without 
incorporating it into the schedule." 

So will this daring move bring about an annual 
nostalgia convention? Mr. Grams and those helping him 
think so. Even if they do not break even from their first 
venture, they plan to try, and try again until they succeed. 
The hotel where the convention is being held (off 
Interstate 95) and the motel next door were already getting 
bookings before January 1st, and Mr. Grams admitted that 
early pre-registration signs are favorable. The attendance 
may exceed his expectations, proving that sometimes a 
little effort to bring back the good ol' days can keep the 
spirit of the past alive. 

Anyone wanting further information (including guests 
and list of events) can consult the Convention web-site at 
http://www.midatlanticnostalgiaconvention.com 
or phone Martin direct at (717) 456-6208. 



I've stated in earlier issues of the Times that this 
magazine has a three-fold purpose: First, to publicize the 
work of the Radio Researchers. Second, to raise 
awareness of events and news throughout the greater old- 
time radio hobby. And, third, to make connections with 
other nostalgia hobbyists so we can mutually encourage 
and support each other. 

Naturally, we want to have a lot of fun doing it, too. In 
the months and years to come I hope those of you that 
have interests in other radio- and nostalgia-related genres 
will share those interests with the group. I think opening 
these lines of communication will only strengthen the 
old-time radio community. 

In this issue you'll find four reflections on the 
Cincinnati convention, plus some great photos. There's 
nothing like putting a real face with a name or handle 
you've known for a long time. 

I'm especially tickled to present Mike Thomas' first 
contribution to the Times. He's put together a great piece 
of research on OTR writer Robert Arthur, a man few of 
us probably know much about. 

As usual, read and reread your Times, pass it on to a 
friend and consider how you can lend a hand. 

News and Notes 

* Researcher Jay Reel wrote and directed the new film 
Dawn. J.R. Bookwalter, owner of Tempe Home Video 
(which is releasing the film), mentions the film in an 
interview which can be heard here: 

www.b- 

movie.com/home/index.php?option=com content&task= 

view&id=220&Itemid=40 

* For anyone interested in old cylinder recordings, 
Barbara Watkins brought this sight to our attention via a 
post to the Old-Time Radio Internet Digest. 
http://cylinders.library.ucsb.edu/index.php and 
http://cvlinders.librarv.ucsb.edu/audiotheater.php 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



17 



Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar 



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7. The pilot episode was broadcast on (abbr) 8, 1948 

9. Network carried Johnny Dollar for its entire 820 episode run. 

11. was the very first Johnny Dollar making only one appearance (words) 

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14. Early on in the series, Johnny Dollar worked for the Adjustment Company. 



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2. In the early days, Johnny had a habit of tipping people with (2 words) 

3. O'Brian took over the part from the First Johnny Dollar (# ) 

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5. (2 words) was the first actor to portray Johnny Dollar on an on-going basis. 

6. (2 words) assumed the lead in these 15 minute daily episodes. 

8. (2 words) took over the part in Nov., 1952 and left the show in Sept., 1954. 

10. A total of actors played Johnny Dollar, including the one who did the pilot and the one who did an audition which never 

aired. 

12. Mohr recorded an audition in august, 1955 (which never aired). 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



18 



Last Month's Puzzle Solution 



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"Kids Again!" REPS Radio 
Showcase - Not Just for Kids 

June 23-24 

Diverse Program With Fun For All Ages 
Anticipation is high as the home stretch begins for the 
June 23-24 OTR gathering at Seattle Center. It is clear that 
the program will include so many components that 
attendees will be sure to have fun. 

"Kids Again!" Is A State of Mind 

Maybe you recall radio from your youth and this can 
be flashback time. Maybe you weren't there during the 
Golden Age of Radio, but you love the aspect of using 
your imagination . . . like a kid! So, let's all become kid- 
like and play together for the weekend. 



Stratton, Jr. Esther McVey and Herb Ellis carrying major 
roles. Some child actors will be Jimmy & Judy. 

The Adventures of Superman 
Maybe you can imagine Hal Stone as the Man of Steel, 
but how about Rosemary Rice as a villaness with Donald 
Buka as Batman and Tommy Cook as Robin? 

Family Theater... 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea 
This classic tale has a classic cast of OTR veterans, 
supplemented by other talent. Wonder who Nemo will 
be? 

The Adventures of Harry Nile 
Current high quality radio from Jim French, featuring 
Alan Young and Dick Van Patten. Of course, Larry Albert 
will be Harry Nile. 



Reminders of the Shows and Stars 

Here are a few reminders to help us all look forward to 
what we'll be hearing/seeing on the Showcase weekend 

The Cinnamon Bear 
Starring Dick Beals as Paddy O'Cinnamon with Gil 

The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



/ Remember Mama 
What a tender and gentle show ! Rosemary Rice and Dick 
Van Patten will re-create their original roles as they are 
joined by a powerful cast. Don't miss the classical music 

(Continued on page 20) 



19 



REPS (Continued from page 19) 

part. 

Duffy's Tavern 
No one would call this a kid's show, would they? With 
Dick Van Patten in a bratty kid's role and Gil Stratton, Jr. 
as Archie, aided by Frank Buxton as Finnegan, this will be 
highly entertaining. 

Adventures in Odyssey 
This gigantic current radio hit will star Alan Young and 
Paul Herlinger in their original roles. A great story that 
will tug at the heart of all in attendance. 

What Else Will Be Going On? 

From the return of the much acclaimed Improv Radio, 
headed by Frank Buxton, to "Flashbacks With Frank" 
featuring Frank Bresee looking at radio history there is 
much diversity. 

Interviews with Alan Young and Dick Van Patten will 
get us close to these great entertainers and a Cold Read 
with the stars will show in detail how a radio show is 
rehearsed and finalized. 

"Don't Try This at Home" is the title of a fast moving 
audience involvement segment and we'll all settle in for a 
back and forth discussion between East Coast and West 
Coast actors. 

Add in a panel on Kid's Radio Shows at the Movies . . 
. warm and friendly mingling room with vendors plus 
superb items for the Silent Auction ... a total change of 
pace in our Dinner With the Stars . . . 

You might ask, "Can they really get all of this done in 
two days?" The answer is "Absolutely!" See you there. 



The Marriage 




JtSSICA 

TANDY 

AhJV 

HUhAt 

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orn.$ 



THE 
MAKKIAQE 



The Logs Researchers and Database compilers of the 
OTR Researchers Group have thoroughly researched this 
Old-Time Radio Series, utilizing information found on the 
Internet, books published on this series and old-time radio 
in general. They have determined that, as of 16 April, 
2006, this series is as complete as possible, with the most 
current information included as to broadcast dates, episode 
numbers, episode titles, and number of episodes broadcast. 

Each file has been named in accordance with the 
Uniform Naming Code as based on the OTR on-line 
database found at - 
http ://groups . yahoo . com/group/Otr-Proj ect/ 

The Old-Time Radio Researchers Group now declares 
this series (The Marriage) to be CERTIFIED 
ACCURATE. 

These disk(s) are Release #(1) and represent the most 
up to date and accurate version endorsed by the OTRRG. 
We have researched the series and are confident the 
information is complete as possible. Any previous 
versions should be discarded. 

As always, it is possible that more information will 
surface which will show that some of our conclusions 
were wrong, please e-mail us and let us know if any 
corrections are required. Also, if you have any better 
encodes of the series, or additional episodes, please let us 
know so that we can include it with the next release of the 
certified series. 

The Old-Time Radio Researchers Group would like to 
thank the following people who helped on this series - 

Series Compiler - Anita Boyd 

Listener(s) - Anita Boyd 

Series Coordinator - Bob Gilroy 

Audio Briefs Announcer(s) - Doug Hopkinson, Jim 

Beshires 

Audio Briefs Compiler(s) - Jim Beshires 

Pictures, other extras - Jim Beshires 

Artwork - Jim Beshires 

Other- Phlipper376 

And all the members of the OTRRG for their 
contributions of time, knowledge, funds, and other 
support. 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



20 



New Release 

Marriage, The 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Rotary Golden Theater 

Complete Ver. 1 

OTRR Certified Sets 

50 Years of Radio on NBC 

Complete Ver. 1 
Absolute Power 

Complete Ver. 1 
Adventures By Morse 

Complete Ver. 1 
Adventures of the Poll 
Parrot 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Alka Seltzer Time 

Complete Ver. 1 
An Evening with Groucho 

Complete Ver. 1 
Big Show 

Accurate Ver. 2 
Black Museum 

Accurate Ver. 2 
Blue Beetle 

Complete Ver. 1 
Box 13 

Complete Ver. 1 
Bright Star 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Candy Matson, Yukon 
28209 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Case Dismissed 

Accurate Ver. 1 



Librarian's Shelf 

Chet Chetter's Tales from 
the Morgue 

Complete Ver. 1 
Cinnamon Bear, The 

Complete Ver. 1 
Crime Classics 

Accurate Ver. 3 
Cruise of the Poll Parrot 

Complete Ver. 1 
Dark Fantasy 

Accurate Ver. 1 
The Devil and Mr. O 

Complete Ver. 1 
Dimension X 

Complete Ver. 1 
Dr. Kildare 

Accurate Ver. 2 
Family Doctor 

Complete Ver. 1 
Frontier Gentleman 

Complete Ver. 2 
In the Name of the Law 

Complete Ver. 1 
Incredible, but True 

Complete Ver. 1 
It Sticks Out Half a Mile 

Complete Ver. 1 
Luke Slaughter of 
Tombstone 

Complete Ver. 2 
Magic Island (2 discs) 

Complete Ver. 2 
Mr. Keen, Trace of Lost 
Persons 

Accurate Ver. 3 



Mystery House 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Philo Vance 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Planet Man, The 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Richard Diamond (4 discs) 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Rocky Fortune 

Complete Ver. 1 
Rogue's Gallery 

Accurate Ver. 2 
Sam Spade, The Adventures of (2 discs) 

Accurate Ver. 2 
Six Shooter, The 

Complete Ver. 4 
Smiley Burnette (4 discs) 

Accurate Ver. 2 
Stand By for Crime 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Tennessee Jed 

Accurate Ver. 1 
Victor Borge Collection 

Accurate Ver. 1 
You Can't Do Business with Hitler 

Accurate Ver. 1 

Complete - Set includes complete series. 
Accurate - Set includes all known episodes in 
existence. 

*These series are available on compact disc, via 
Streamload online delivery, and on our very own 
Internet Hub. Contact Alan Foster at 
( allanpqz @ gmail.com ) for more details.* 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



21 



Rotary Golden Theater Released 



Late in 2005 the Researchers came across this series in 
cassette form and decided to acquire it for our archives 
and to distribute to oru members. It is a small series 
consisting of thirteen fifteen-minute episodes produced by 
Rotary International in 1955 to celebrate its 50th 
Anniversary. Stories consist of various accounts and 
problems of everyday life and how Rotary could help 
solve those problems. 

Despite a thorough search in all available otr reference 
books and on the web, only a two-line sentence turned up. 
Hickerson's Ultimate Guide describes the program thusly 
- 'Rotary Golden Theater (3/1/55 - 3/18/55) 5t, 15 m, 
13 Shows available'. 

We then contacted Ms Francine Keyes, Archivist for 
Rotary, to see if they might have any additional 
information. Ms Keyes responded saying yes, that they 
found a two page information sheet offering this series to 
local Rotary Clubs for broadcast in their areas, plus copies 
of 13 additional scripts which were meant to be used as 
follow-up round table discussions after the broadcast of 
RGT. She very graciously offered to make copies of those 
scripts available to us as reference material. 

Additionally, she expressed interest in obtaining copies 
of the audio files of RGT when we released the archival 
set. It was her thought that they might be of interest to 
Rotarians world-wide as part of their history and even 
suggested that a mention might be made in their official 
magazine concerning the OTRRG and our research work. 
What a great opportunity to increase awareness of our 
work! 

We are pleased to announce the availability now of this 
archival series. The first copies were distributed at the 
Convention held April 21st and 22nd in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

We think that each of you will surely want to have a 
personal set so be sure to sign up when the OTTRG 
Distribution Group announces it next schedule! 




The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



22 



How to Properly Encode OTR, Part 2 

Travis Conner 

*this section is mainly for newbies, if you already know 
how to record, skip it. 

A). RECORDING 

1. plug your input device into your re-equalizer. I.e. reel 
deck or transcription turntable. The "line out" of the re- 
equalizer goes to "line-in" of your sound card. (I like 
SoundBlaster live 5.1). 

NOTE: On my Soundblaster 5.1, the manual had the 



different inputs in the wrong order. It's poorly labeled, so 
I had to experiment to find it. 

2. In "record properties" (speaker in tray by clock) select 
your line in. 

3. Record and time-correct 

See previous recording notes (Last issue). Be sure it's 44.1 
khz 16 bit mono). 

4. Save your file. 

-after saving the .wav, if you want to do .mp3, that's next, 



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The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



23 



Encode (continued from page 23) 

When I'm ready to burn a CD, I make a .txt file with information about the shows. Let's say it was some Let 
George do It episodes and they were from transcription. 

I use the descriptions from Goldin if it's there. The more information about the file, the better. Syndication 
companies, dates, program numbers, AFRS #'s, they're all important. 

(Continued on page 24) 



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Search by Program 

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Wltefe Do Old Radio 
Shows Come From? 

How to Obtain Copies of 
These Radio Programs 

How to Gel in To jch 
With Us 

Dedications and 
Acknowledgements 

The Men Who 

Saved Radio 



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George Valentin 
disappears, evei 
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Georgia Backus 



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48862. Let George Do It. May 14, 1946. sponsored by: standard oil, chevron 
gas. Audition snow. Mr. winters, George valentine's first client, is 
,. ( .i .-i . murdered right in George's office! The body disappears, Mrs. winters 
488o2. .Let (jeoi disappears, even George's secretary disappears! Polly Hopkins (writer) 
Hiestand (announcer), Charles Dant (composer, conductor), Owen Vinson 
(director), Bob Bailey, Shirley Mitchell, Eddie Firestone, Joseph Kearns, 
Georgia Backus, Howard McNear, Horace Murphy. 30:11. Audio condition: 
Excellent, complete. 

48881. Let George Do It. October 18, 1946. Mutual-Don Lee net. Sponsored 
by: standard oil, chevron, cousin Jeff Williams asks George to find him a 
girl friend, one who likes pigs! Bob Bailey, Frances Robinson, Eddie 

48881 Let GeOl Firestone, Polly Hopkins, Owen Vinson (producer, director), Frank Martin, 
" Jane Webb, Rita Craig, June Foray, Charles Dant (composer, conductor), Bud 

Jeff Williams asl Hiestand (announcer). 29:45. Audio condition: very good to excellent, 
complete. 






Charles Dant (c< 48882. Let George Do It. October 25, 1946. Mutual-Don Lee net. sponsored 

by: standard oil, chevron, cowboy star Jimmy Jones is afraid of horses. How 
will he do the benefit for the Brookdale orphanage? Anne Whitfield, Bob 
Bailey, Bud Hiestand (announcer), Charles Dant (composer, conductor), Eddie 
Firestone, Frances Robinson, Harry Bartell, Nina clouden, Owen Vinson 

48882. Let Geoi (producer, director), Polly Hopkins (writer), Stan waxman. 29:44. Audio 
condition: Very good to excellent. Complete. 



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■liitfield, 
mestancl (announcer), diaries Dant (composer, conductor), licldie .Firestone, Frances Robinson, 



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s 

liarles Dant 
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Harry Bartell, Nina Clouden, Owen Vinson (producer, director), Polly Hopkins (writer). Stan Waxman. 29:44. 
Audio condition: Very good to excellent. Complete. 

48883. Let George Do It. November 8, 1946. Mutual-Don Lee net. Sponsored by: Standard Oil, Chevron. An 
eccentric book dealer dies, and George is hired to find his missing money. The clue lies with Maty.. .and her little 
lamb! Bob Bailey r , Frances Robinson, Eddie Firestone, Jane Morgan, Evelyn Scott, Paul McVey, Hany Bartell, 



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The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



24 



Encode (Continued from page 24) 

Include as much info as you can in the id3 tag. I use id3 v2, for the comment box. Include what generation it 
is. Include if there were problems, such as dropouts. 



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Conclusion: 

Well, that's about all the basics there are. Following these fundamentals should yield good recordings every 
time. 

Where to get quality source material (I'm not associated with any of these individuals commercially, these are 
just my recommendations): 

• Ed Carr (look under 'sponsor" page of www.old-time.com). His CDs are inexpensive, and from the best 
quality stuff. His from reel stuff is generally a tad offspeed, but after speed-correction, superb. I get 90% of my 
commercial OTR from him. 

• Terry Salomonson/ Audio Classics (www.audio-classics.com) Very nice quality CDs. 

• First Generation Radio Archives, (www.radio-archives.org). Personal editorial here: Caveat emptor with this 
one; I don't personally care for this organization because they're getting more and more restrictive with the 
amount they dribble out to their members. Basically down to box sets, and old round robins. They have a rental 
low-gen library of good quality, but they used to have a first-gen rental library. When asked why they weren't 
doing new round robins/why 1st gen rental library was discontinued, they were very evasive. They have great 
quality stuff generally, but you're basically, in my opinion, financing their private collection, with limited 
(compared to what it used to be) public offerings. If you're happy with the selection that they have, the sound 

The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



25 



Encode (Continued from page 25) 

quality (except for the first few round robins) is quite good. I would recommend them on that basis. Many 
people are quite happy with them. Many are equally unhappy. Recommended on sound quality only. 

Some Honorable Mentions: 

• Radio Memories: www.radiomemories.com Middle of the road quality. Not great, but not awful. The 
proprietor is a nice guy, and does a lot for the OTR community. 

• SPERDVAC: (www.sperdvac.org) a club that rents out tapes and CDs. Their CDs, the ones I've heard, are 
generally good quality. 

• Shawn Wells: (www.otr-shop.com) Allegedly, his mp3s are pretty good. I've never tried him, just adding 
because of some recommendations. 

Be on the Alert 



It appears that the E-Bay sellers are at it again. 
Jay Reel, co-creator of Tales From The Morgue 
reports finding the OTRRG version of his set for sale 
on E-bay. There is only one source that it could have 
come from and that is from someone within the 
group, as the set included the extra episodes that 
were never broadcast and distributed only via the 
Researchers Group. 

Jay reports that he contacted the seller and asked 
him to remove them from his list. The seller told Jay 
that he got the set from an 'old-time radio dealer!' 
They have been removed from the auction. 

We urge all our members to be on the look-out 
for our materials being sold either on E-Bay or by an 
on-line mp3 dealer and report such to any moderator. 

We have no quarrel with the great dealers who do 
provide new materials at reasonable costs, either on 
cassette, or in audio form, or even mp3s, and are 
proud to count three such organizations in our 
membership - Radio Memories, Radio Archives and 
Audio Classics. We urge our members to support 
these dealers. 

The hard working members of Researchers 
provide all our releases for free distribution to all 
members of the OTR community and anyone selling 
them is in violation of copyrights that are attached to 
each of our releases. The copyright protects our sets 
as distributed. 

Plans are underway to digitally insert a signal into 
each set that will identify it and that will not be 
easily detected. 

Keep OTR free; report dishonest sellers. 




The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



26 



The Adventures of Distro Tracker, Pt.2 

Thomas Mandeville 

Chapter 4 
The Search Begins 

A lithesome Candy Matson-type young thing stepped 
out of the Air Frog plane into the cool March air of Here, 
Ohio. She collected her baggage at the terminal and went 
to the only auto rental called Frog Rentals. She signed for 
the keys to a green economy car and drove toward town. 
Up ahead was Brian's Tavern, a rather quiet place that 
looked suitable for a lone woman to be safe in. 

Inside were two men sitting next to each other at the 
bar. "I can't help but think, from listening to you, that you 
are from Ireland." 

The other man proudly responded, "That I am!" 

"So am I! And where in Ireland might you be from?" 

"I'm from Dublin, I am." 

"Sure and begora, and so am I! Where in Dublin?" 

"A lovely little place on McCleary Street in the central 
part of town." 

"Faith and it's a small world! So am I! What school did 
you go to?" 

"St Mary's of course!" 

"And so did I, class of 1964." 

"The Good Lord must be smiling down upon us! I can 
hardly believe our good luck at winding up in the same 
bar. I graduated from St Mary's in 1964 my own self." 

The bartender came over to our almost greatest hero 
and simply shook his head and said, "It's going to be a 
long day." 

Our hero smiled, "Why do you say that?" 

"The Murphy twins are drunk again!" 

Our heroine simply smiled and sipped her Arbor Mist. 
Yes, tomorrow must be St Patrick's Day. 

"Can you tell me where Elmer Putz might be living?" 

"Down two miles on the right. Just follow the road 
signs from Here to There. He might be in here in the next 
hour." 

Our hero glanced at the newspaper and saw the 
headlines. The major cities of Europe and United States 
were in unrest. She knew why her quest was so important. 
Whoever had killed the round robin had to be caught. 
Perhaps Elmer held the clue. Diamond, Spade, Marlowe 
and Vance needed to be contacted for any updates. She 
could trust those guys, they were certified by the 
Researchers Group itself. 

Elmer Putz arrived on time, an hour later. 



Elmer said to the bartender, "Pour me a stiff one - just had 
another fight with the little woman." 

"Oh yeah? And how did this one end?" 
"When it was over she came to me on her hands and 
knees." 

"Really? Now that's a switch. What did she say?" 

"She said, 'Come out from under the bed, you little 
chicken!'" 

Yes, it had to be St Patrick's Day as our hero looked at 
the Wallace Wimpole-type man. Will this mouse hold the 
key to the mystery? Should the Family Doctor approach 
be used or the Matt Dillon approach? Will the Chronicler 
stop laughing at his own wit? Well . . . 

Chapter 5 
A Big Little Man 

Our almost greatest heroine sat down next to Elmer 
Putz at Brian's Bar. He seemed a little nervous to have 
such a lithsome young thing do this. She spoke gently but 
to the point. 

"Elmer, there has been a breach in the Distro #9. You 
were the last to update the polls and were to send forward 
two copies to other members." 

He knew from the statement itself whom this person 
represented. Someone of that elite group was actually here 
to visit him! 

"Well, Miss, I did send forward those copies. Return 
with me and I will be able to give you those names." 

She already had the list but she returned to his home. 
She wanted to see what kind of a person this little man 
was. In the corner where his computer sat were many CDs 
and envelopes and letters. 

"Here is the postal receipt for each package I sent." 

"Looks like you got a lot going here, Elmer." 

"Yes, this package here is CDs I recently made so I 
could send them to a blind man in Sacramento. Been 
doing it now for two years." 

"And this one?" 

"I try to send a package or two each month to the 
Retirement Center over in There. They have a very low 
wattage radio station and the residents there are able to 
listen to music and radio programs that they still 
remember." 

"Here is a thank you note that I especially treasure. It 
reads, 'Thank you Mr. Putz, for sending me the CDs in 
mp3 format. They remind me very much of the OTR 
programs my dad would play for us, back when he was 
still alive.'" 
(Continued on page 28) 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



27 



Distro Tracker (Continued from page 27) 

She knew now just the kind of person Elmer was. She 
had met many other members of the Researchers Group 
and its subgroups. They were like this little man now. 
Only she did not see a little man - she saw a likeness to 
another little man - Johnny Appleseed was not considered 
a little man. This was a Big Little Man. Making a better 
place for tomorrow. She kindly said goodbye as his wife, 
Sweety Face, approached up the walkway to the house. 

"Who was that, Elmer? Girl pedaling magazine 
subscriptions to get through college?" 

"I just a had a visitor from the Old-Time Radio 
Researchers Group." His small chest swelled with pride. 
He showed her the picture - of a frog. "That was none 
other than -" 

Distro Tracker 

What will our heroine do now? Will Tadpole be left 
stranded at the airport? Will the Murphy twins finally 
sober up? 

Chapter 6 
Death by Transcription 

Tadpole has now joined our lovely damsel and they are 
pursuing the next link on the list. The two have a 
premonition that things are about to darken. This could be 
their worst case yet. A short stay in Here gave them time 
to call their associates before the next flight. Philip 
Marlowe was able to supply that an unknown hacker had 
been hitting the group's site and a sudden flood of 
newbies had been logging onto the Hubs. Sam Spade was 
able to supply a nickname- The Grabber, actual name still 
unknown. Richard Diamond had already begun the 
reseeding of the distro. Their next stop was to visit the 
missing link, Ivan Searchin. It began to turn cold and 
rainy. 

They stopped at the police station to get directions to 
Ivan's house. The small staff was scurrying about this 
night. There had been a 9 1 1 call from a supposed 
neighbor. 

"Calling all cars. Calling all cars. Proceed to 9 
Whitehall Street. Investigate possible homicide." 
The duo looked at each other - that was the address of 
Ivan, the missing link. They told the police sergeant, Joe 
Friday, just the facts and he volunteered to drive them 
there. 

The small house was in a nondescript area of the town. 
The duo wondered how anything sinister could happen 



here. The home was now alit with police cars around it. 
The Meat Wagon had already arrived. 

"What have you found from the body, Dr Kildare?" 

"A fatal gunshot to the back of the head and bruises 
from the fall. Definite homicide." 

The silent but always observant Tadpole looked around 
the crime scene. Silently she picked up a piece of paper 
from under the computer desk. She showed it to her 
partner. Near where the body had been was blood and 
what appeared to be the letters spelling something out. 
"Look here, Joe. Does that trail of blood look like letters 
to you?" 

"Appears to be a G and a R." 

The computer was still on and Ivan had been signed 
onto the Researchers Group. Had Ivan stumbled upon 
something? Had someone stumbled upon Ivan? Had he 
been trying to send out an email? CDs were strewn all 
about on the floor. Had he knocked down a stack of CDs 
or had someone been searching for something? 

Outside, in the spring rain, our two heroines looked 
carefully at the piece of paper purloined. Only these two 
knew the person whose name was on the paper. The name 
was 

The Big Man 
Can the duo arrive in time to prevent total world chaos? Is 
"GR" the attempt to spell "Grabber"? Is their revered 
group founder about to meet his demise? Should he have 
stayed with Budlight? Or gone on the wagon? 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



28 



Buy - Sell - Trade 



WANTED - Any appearances of the Everly Brothers on 

radio, especially the Grand Old Opry sometimes in mid 

1957. I'll take mp3s, cassettes, audios, etc. Jim Beshires 

(beshiresjim@yahoo.com). 

WANTED - PDFs or scans of Radio Guides or other 

magazines pertaining to radio broadcasts or series. Jim 

Beshires (beshiresjim@yahoo.com) . 

WANTED - Any radio appearance of Jack Kerouac . Jim 

Beshires (beshiresjim@yahoo.com). 



Don't throw away those old OTR newsletters or 
memorabilia from other groups. Contact Ryan at 
01dRadioTimes@yahoo.com. I can't pay much for them, 
but I can probably cover shipping. 

Anyone interested in trading raw ET .wav dubs please 
contact Cliff at cliff marsland@yahoo.com . 



The Old Radio Times is published monthly by the Old-Time Radio Researchers. All articles are the property of their 
respective authors and are printed by permission. The contents - outside legal "fair-use" guidelines - may not be 
reproduced in any format without the permission of the author. Unless otherwise indicated by the writer, it is assumed 
all comments received from readers of the Old Radio Times may be published at the editor's discretion. Mention of 
particular products and services does not imply endorsement by the Old-Time Radio Researchers. 

Contributors: 

Jim Beshires * Scott Carpenter * Ryan Ellett * Danny Goodwin * Roger Hohenbrink * Thomas Mandeville * Phlipper 

* Mike Thomas * Michelle Vinje * Joseph Webb * Stewart Wright 

Submissions and submission inquiries should be sent to Ryan Ellett, Editor, 01dRadioTimes@yahoo.com . Articles may 
be submitted as a word-processing file or in the body of an email. We are looking for regular contributors to 
Technician's Toolbox, Old-Time Radio Memories, and obscure series reviews. 



Visit us on the Web: 

http://www.otterproiectonline.info/ 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/01dTimeRadioResearchersGroup/ 

The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



29 



http://groups.vahoo.com/group/Otter-Proiect/ 
Old-Time Radio Researchers Information 

OTRR INFORMATION AND OFFICIAL BUSINESS 

123 Davidson Ave, Savannah 31419 
Telephone 912-961-7956 

GROUP LEADERS 

Jim Beshires ( beshiresj im @ yahoo. com) 
Doug Hopkinson ( atoning2003 @ yahoo.com) 

TREASURER 

Tony Jaworoski, 15520 Fairlane Drive, Livonia, MI 48154 ( tony senior@yahoo.com) 

ASSISTANT GROUP LEADERS 

Acquisitions (cassette) - Ed Sehlhorst ( ed.sehlhorst@gmail.com) 

Acquisitions (reel-to-reel) - Mark Mcclure ( perrymason61 @ yahoo.com) 

Acquisitions (paper-based items) - Ryan Ellett (OldRadioTimes @ yahoo.com) 

Certified Series Moderator - Bob Yorli ( yorli@yahoo.com) 

Webmaster - OTR Project - any ol one ( otrmail @ gmail .com) 

Webmaster - The STOAT Project - Ken Varga ( vargaken @ yaho.com) 

Webmaster - OTR Network Library - Ken Varga ( vargaken@yahoo.com) 

OTR Web Moderator - Jim Sprague ( sprocket] @ comcast.net) 

Missing Episodes Moderator - Clorinda Thompson ( cthompsonhsd@yahoo.com) 

Distro Moderator - Dee Detevis ( dedeweedy @ aol.com) 

Distro2 Moderator - Dave Tysver ( dave.tysver@verizon.net) 

OTR Project Moderator - Andrew Steinberg ( nightkey5 @ yahoo.com) 

Final Preparations Moderator - Roger Hohenbrink ( rhohenbrink@ earthlink.net) 

OTTER Moderator - Archie Hunter ( y know archie@hotmail.com) 

Hubmaster - Philip ( phlipper376@yahoo.com) 

Software Development - any ol one ( otrmail @ gmail.com) 

Streamload - Allan ( allanpqz@gmail.com) 

Mail Library - Doug Hopkinson ( atoning2003 @ yahoo.com) 

Wiki Master - Menachem Shapiro ( m.shapiro@gmail.com) 

Sound Restoration Moderator - Henry Morse ( spockl @yahoo.com) 

Sound Restoration Moderator - Anita Boyd ( synagogue @ yahoo.com) 

Newsletter Editor - Ryan Ellett (OldRadioTimes @ yahoo.com) 

RELATED GROUPS 

Old Time Radio Researchers 

OTR Project 

Distro 

Distro 2 

Purchasing 

Sound Restoration 

Software Development 

WEB SITES 
Project OTR 

The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 30 



The STOAT Project 
OTR Network Library 

Sushi Bar 

For Those Who Like Their Data Raw 



New Acquisitions By the Old-Time Radio Researchers 



COTY = Challenge of the Yukon 

Amos & Andy 49-12-18 Andy Gets Married (pt 2).mp3 
Amos & Andy 53-03-22 Kingfish Thinks Sapphire Is 
Pregnant.mp3 



Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Island.mp3 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Found.mp3 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 
Archie Andrews 



4605 1 1 Poison Candy.mp3 
460518 Jive Talk.mp3 
460601 The Elephant.mp3 
460608 A Story in Real Life.mp3 
460706 Masked Marvel.mp3 
460713 Stranded On Deserted 

460720 The Hammock.mp3 

460727 Drugstore Mixup.mp3 

460803 No Rest For Fred Andrews. mp3 

490331 Stuffed Dates.mp3 

500304 Archie Is Nowhere To Be 

501 1 1 1 Mouse in the House.mp3 
501 1 18 Charleston Contest.mp3 
510310 Mailing the Income Taxes. mp3 
510317 Too Much Noise.mp3 
510503 Jalopy Won't Start.mp3 



COTY 51-03-03 (855) Job For Jim Lackey.mp3 
COTY 51-03-04 (856) The Russian Rubles.mp3 
COTY 51-03-10 (857) Secret Of The Closed Room.mp3 
COTY 51-03-11 (858) Doctor Redcoat.mp3 
COTY 51-03-17 (859) The Third Strike.mp3 
COTY 51-03-18 (860) Never Be Missed.mp3 
COTY 51-03-24 (861) The Counterfeit Heiress.mp3 
COTY 51-03-25 (862) Old Faithful.mp3 
COTY 51-03-31 (863) Cabin 102.mp3 
COTY 51-04-01 (864) The Blue Scarf. mp3 
COTY 51-04-07 (865) Trapper's Trail.mp3 
COTY 51-04-08 (866) Take It Easy.mp3 
COTY 51-04-14 (867) The Blind Husky.mp3 
COTY 51-04-15 (868) Team Mates.mp3 
COTY 51-04-21 (869) Rowdy's Choice.mp3 
COTY 51-04-22 (870) Indian Dream.mp3 

The Old Radio Times * 



Cecil And Sally 30-xx-xx (1) 
op or cl).mp3 

Cecil And Sally 30-xx-xx (2) 
Dentures(no op or cl).mp3 
Cecil And Sally 30-xx-xx (3) 
Begins(no op or cl).mp3 
Cecil And Sally 30-xx-xx (4) 
Found(no op or cl).mp3 



Which Movie To See(no 



Uncle Thomas Lost His 



The Search For The Teeth 



The Dentures Are 



Cisco Kid xx-xx-xx Disaster At The Bridge. mp3 
Cisco Kid xx-xx-xx Vendetta Of Vengance.mp3 

Columbia Workshop 42-01-25 Man Without A 

Shadow.mp3 

Columbia Workshop 42-02-01 Jenny, The Bus That 

Nobody Wanted.mp3 

Columbia Workshop 42-05-31 The City Wears A Slouch 

Hat .mp3 



Dr Pepper Parade xx-xx-xx (1) Bravery.mp3 



Hearts 
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May 2006 



Harmony 
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* Number 6 



31 



Acquisitions (Continued from page 29) 



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In Harmony 
In Harmony 
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Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_18 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_21 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_22 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_23 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_24 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_25 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_28 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_29 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_30 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_31 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_01 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_04 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_05 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_06 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_07 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_08 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_11 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_12 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_13 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_14 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_15 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_18 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_19 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_20 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_21 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_22 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_25 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_26 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_27 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_28 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_11_29 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_02 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_03 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_04 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_05 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_06 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_09 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_10 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_11 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_12 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_13 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_16 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_17 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_18 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_19 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_20 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_23 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_24 
Hearts In Harmony - 1946_12_25 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



(Continued on page 30) 
- Program 1450. mp3 
Program 1451.mp3 
Program 1452.mp3 
Program 1453.mp3 
Program 1454.mp3 
Program 1455. mp3 
Program 1456.mp3 
Program 1457.mp3 
Program 1458.mp3 
Program 1459.mp3 
Program 1460.mp3 
Program 1461. mp3 
Program 1462.mp3 
Program 1463.mp3 
Program 1464.mp3 
Program 1465.mp3 
Program 1466.mp3 
Program 1467.mp3 
Program 1468.mp3 
Program 1469.mp3 
Program 1470.mp3 
Program 1471.mp3 
Program 1472.mp3 
Program 1473.mp3 
Program 1474.mp3 
Program 1475.mp3 
Program 1476.mp3 
Program 1477.mp3 
Program 1478.mp3 
Program 1479.mp3 
Program 1480.mp3 
Program 1481.mp3 
Program 1482.mp3 
Program 1483.mp3 
Program 1484.mp3 
Program 1485.mp3 
Program 1486.mp3 
Program 1487.mp3 
Program 1488.mp3 
Program 1489.mp3 
Program 1490.mp3 
Program 1491.mp3 
Program 1492.mp3 
Program 1493.mp3 
Program 1494.mp3 
Program 1495.mp3 
Program 1496.mp3 
Program 1497.mp3 
Program 1498.mp3 

32 



Hearts In Harmony - 1946_10_17 - Program 1449.mp3 
Acquisitions (Continued from page 30) 



(Continued on 



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The Old Radio Times 



Hear 1 
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Hean 
Hean 

* May 2006 



Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 
Harmony 



1947_ 
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1947_ 
1947 



03_04 
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03_10 
03_11 
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03_17 
03_18 
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03_24 
03_25 
03_26 
03_27 
03_28 
03_31 
04_01 
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04_03 
.04.04 
04_07 
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04_14 
04_15 
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04_21 
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04_24 
04_25 
04_28 
04_29 
04_30 
05_01 
05_02 
05_05 
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05_07 
05_08 
05 09 



Program 
Program 
Program 
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Program 
Program 
Program 
Program 



1547 
1548 
1549 
1550 
1551 
1552 
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* Number 6 



page 31) 

mp3 

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33 



Hearts In Harmony - 1947_03_03 - Program 1546.mp3 
Acquisitions (Continued from page 31) 



Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 
Hearts 



In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 
In Harmony 



1947_05_12 
1947_05_13 
1947_05_14 
1947_05_15 
1947_05_16 
1947_05_19 
1947_05_20 
1947_05_21 
1947_05_22 
1947_05_23 
1947_05_26 
1947_05_27 
1947_05_28 
1947_05_29 
1947_05_30 
1947_06_02 
1947_06_03 
1947_06_04 
1947_06_05 
1947_06_06 
1947 06 09 



Program 
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1596.mp3 
1597.mp3 
1598.mp3 
1599.mp3 
1600.mp3 
1601.mp3 
1602.mp3 
1603.mp3 
1604.mp3 
1605.mp3 
1606.mp3 
1607.mp3 
1608.mp3 
1609.mp3 
1610.mp3 
1611.mp3 
1612.mp3 
1613.mp3 
1614.mp3 
1615.mp3 
1616.mp3 



Movietown Theater xx-xx-xx Clown In The Home Stretch 
(no op or cl).mp3 

Movietown Theater xx-xx-xx Major Engagement(no op 
or cl).mp3 

Mr I A Moto 51-07-08 Sabatoge.mp3 

Mr I A Moto 5 1-07-1 1 Assighnment Rome (ending 

cut).mp3 

Screen Guild Theater 46-07-08 The Great 0'Malley.mp3 

Theatre Royale 53-10-25 (4) The Happy Hyprocrite (no 

op).mp3 

Theatre Royale 54-06-16 (36) The Man Who Could Work 

Miracles (no op or close). mp3 

Theatre Royale 54-06-23 (37) The Liar.mp3 

Theatre Royale 54-06-30 (38) My Uncle Toby (no op or 

close). mp3 

Theatre Royale 54-07-21 (41) Vanity Fair.mp3 

Theatre Royale xx-xx-xx When Greek Meets Greek(no 

op).mp3 

Tide Show 510827 ep01.mp3 
Tide Show 510831 ep02.mp3 
Tide Show 510903 ep03.mp3 
Tide Show 510907 ep04.mp3 



(Continued on page 32) 
Tide Show 510910 ep05.mp3 
Tide Show 510914 ep06.mp3 
Tide Show 510917 ep07.mp3 
Tide Show 510921 ep08.mp3 
Tide Show 510924 ep09.mp3 
Tide Show 510928 epl0.mp3 
Tide Show 511001 epll.mp3 
Tide Show 511005 epl2.mp3 
Tide Show 511008 epl3.mp3 
Tide Show 511012 epl4.mp3 
Tide Show 511015 epl5.mp3 
Tide Show 511019 epl6.mp3 
Tide Show 511022 epl7.mp3 
Tide Show 511026 epl8.mp3 
Tide Show 511029 epl9.mp3 
Tide Show 51 1 102 ep20.mp3 
Tide Show 511105 ep21.mp3 
Tide Show 511109 ep22.mp3 

1) Shopping Center Burglary.mp3 

2) Man With Dynamite.mp3 

3) Woman Threatening With A 

4) Possbile Purse Snatch .mp3 

5) Suspicious Juveniles. mp3 

6) Family Disturbance.mp3 

7) Woman Witness Assaulted.mp3 

8) Accident at 17th.mp3 

9) Woman Liquor Store Holdup. mp3 

10) Threatening Letter.mp3 

11) Attempted Suicide.mp3 

12) Loaded Gun And Burglar 

13) Possible Market Burglary.mp3 

14) Incomplete Phone Call.mp3 

15) Ambulance Follow-Up. mp3 

16) Woman Screaming. mp3 

17) Attempted Suicide At Drive-in.mp3 

18) Suicide Attempt At Tower 

19) Accident At 12th And E.mp3 

20) Following Speeders on Q 

21) Accident At 29th And J.mp3 

22) See Suspect At Bowling Alley.mp3 

23) Stolen Car And Burglary.mp3 

24) Investigate Prowler.mp3 

25) Boy Pulled From Car By 



Unit 99 57-08-23 
Unit 99 57-08-30 
Unit 99 57-09-06 
Gun.mp3 
Unit 99 57-09-13 
Unit 99 57-09-20 
Unit 99 57-09-27 
Unit 99 57-10-04 
Unit 99 57-10-11 
Unit 99 57-10-18 
Unit 99 57-10-25 
Unit 99 57-11-01 
Unit 99 57-11-08 
Tools.mp3 
Unit 99 57-11-15 
Unit 99 57-11-23 
Unit 99 57-11-29 
Unit 99 57-12-06 
Unit 99 57-12-13 
Unit 99 57-12-20 
Brodge.mp3 
Unit 99 57-12-27 
Unit 99 58-01-03 
Street.mp3 
Unit 99 58-01-10 
Unit 99 58-01-17 
Unit 99 58-01-24 
Unit 99 58-01-31 
Unit 99 58-02-07 
Officers. mp3 



The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



34 



Acquisitions (Continued from page 32) 



(Continued on page 33) 



Unit 99 58-02- 
Unit 99 58-02- 
St.mp3 

Unit 99 58-02- 
Unit 99 58-03- 
Unit 99 58-03- 
Unit 99 58-03- 
Street.mp3 
Unit 99 58-03- 
Unit 99 58-04- 
Unit 99 58-04- 
Unit 99 58-04- 
Car.mp3 
Unit 99 58-05- 
Unit 99 58-05- 
C.mp3 

Unit 99 58-05- 
Unit 99 58-05- 
Unit 99 58-05- 
Unit 99 58-06- 
Driver.mp3 
Unit 99 58-06- 



14 (26) Cutting.mp3 

21 (27) Meet Highway Patrol At 55th 

28 (28) Car Being Towed.mp3 
07 (29) Accident At 16th And Q.mp3 
14 (30) Disturbance At Drive-In.mp3 
21 (31) Attempted Suicide At W 

28 (32) Silk Stocking Bandits.mp3 

04 (33) Meet Citizen At 26th and D.mp3 

1 1 (34) Disturbance Call.mp3 

18 (35) Riding With Residential Patrol 

02 (37) Interview Burglar Suspect.mp3 
09 (38) Investigate Acident At 16th And 

16 (39) Robbery Victum.mp3 
23 (40) Stickup On 16th Street.mp3 
30 (41) Kidnappers Investigation. mp3 
06 (42) Incomplete Call From Bus 

13 (43) Investigate Three Stick Ups.mp3 




The Old Radio Times * May 2006 * Number 6 



35