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of  the 

University  of  Toronto 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2012  with  funding  from 

University  of  Toronto 


http://archive.org/details/cangrocerjulydec1921toro 


Members   of   The    Association    Business    Papers — Only    Weekly    Grocery    Paper    Published    in   Canada 

THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 
VOL.  XXXV. 


PUBLICATION  OFFICE:  COLLINGWOOD,  ONT.,  JULY  8,  1921 


No.  27 


A  SERVICE  THAT  COVERS  THE  DOMINIO 

From  Halifax,  Nova  Scotia,  to  Victoria,   British    Columbia,    reputable     b 
tiers  have  secured  bottling  rights  for 


and  are  now  serving  the  ever-increasing  demand  for  these  pure  fruit  beverages. 
Wherever  Orange  Kist,  Lemon  Kist  and  Lime  Kist  appear,  they  become  tremen- 
dously popular  with  young  and  old.  They  must  be  good  drinks  to  have  attracted 
so  many  bottlers. 

This  is  the  season  for  big  sales  of  Kist  Drinks.      Order   now    from    your   nearest 
bottler — it  means  quicker  service  and  lower  cost. 
Sold  in  bottles  or  in  syrup  form  for  fountains. 


Wfrelan  and  Fprirusson, 

Halifax,   N.    S. 
Amhorsi,  Mineral  Water  Co., 

Amherst,  N.   S. 
R(>i>illiar(l  and   Cn., 

M<tntreal,  Que. 
Spring  Water  RdUling  Work.s. 

Niacrara  Kails.  Ont. 
Hinds  F.  P.  &  Son. 

Orillia.  Ont. 
Cochrane   Rottlinc   Works, 

Cochrane,    Ont. 
Mack  Mineral  Sprinprs, 

St.   Catharines.   Ont. 
Cobalt   Aerated  Water  Co.. 

Cobalt.  Ont. 
Montffomery  Mineral  Water  Co., 

Brantford,   Ont. 
Lonjjfoot  G.    K. 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Thomas    Brothers, 

Gait,  Ont. 
Silver   Foam    Bottling   Works, 

Sudbury,    Ont. 
Daw   and    Peterson. 

Chatham,    Out. 


Brown,    J.    D. 

Gravenhiirst.    Ont. 
Robertson,    Alex., 

Mount    Forest.    Ont. 
Bishop    and     Pringle, 

Owen    .Sound.    Ont 
Soo    Falls    Brewing    Co., 

Sault    Ste.    Marie.    Ont. 
Royal     Bottling     Works. 

F'ort    Frances.   Ont. 
Kakabcka    Falls    Brewing    Co.. 

Ft.    William.   Ont. 
E.    L.    Drewry.    I<imitcd, 

Winnipeg,    Man. 
Portage    Soda    Water    Works, 

Portage    La    Prairie,    Man. 
Crown    Bottling    Works, 

Dauphin,    Man. 
Chippewa    Water    Co., 

Estevan,    Sask. 
Paschals    Bottling    Works, 

Yorkton,    Sask. 
Thompson    Bottling    Works, 

Moo.se   Jaw,   Sask. 
Prince    Albert    Mineral    Water 

Prince    Albert,    Sask. 


Co.. 


.Swift    Current    Bottling    Works. 
Swift  Current,    Sask. 

Blue    Label    Bottling   Co.. 
Calgary,    Alta. 

Knterprise    Brewing    Co., 
Revelstoke,    B.C. 

Bowne.ss   Exnorf    Co., 

Cranbrook,    B.C. 
Fernie    &    Fort   Steele    Brewing    Co. 

Fernie,    B.    C. 
Nelson     Brewing    Co. 

Nelson.   B.    C. 
A.    McCulloch    &    Co. 

Vernon.    B.    C. 
Henley,    J. 

New     Westminster,     B.C. 
Cross  and    Co., 

Vancouver,    B.    C. 
Pioneer    Bottling    Works, 

Nanaimo,    B.   C. 
Fairalls    Limited, 

Victoria,   B.  C. 


Bottled  under  the  Authority  of 

CITRUS  PRODUCTS  COMPANY 


WINNIPEG 


MANITOBA 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


Dye 
Soap 

Colors  ds  it  Cleans 


and  cleans  as  it  colors 

As  a  test  in  your  own  home  will  prove  to  you,  the 
well-known  slogan  we  use  in  advertising  Aladdin  Dye 
Soap  is  based  on  an  important  truth. 

It  means  much  to  all  women  when  dyeing  any 
garment  to  be  able  to  start  right  in  and  dye  it  without 
having  to  wash  it  first. 

Aladdin  cleans  and  dyes  at  one  and  the  same 
time — a  strong  talking  point  for  this  remarkable  pro- 
duct. 


CHANNELL  LIMITED    -    TORONTO 

Distributors  for  Aladdin  Dye  Soap 
Manufacturers  of  0-Cedar  Products 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


CLARK'S 

Tomato  Ketchup 


Mr.  Grocer,  makes  a  ^ood  feature  line  at 
this  season.  During-  the  warm  months 
your  Customers  naturally  eat  more  of  the 
foods  that  are  usually  accompanied  l^y  a 
"relish".  Suggest  CLARK'S  TOMA  TO 
KETCHUP  to  them.  It  means  sales — and 
repeat  orders. 

CLARK'S 
SPAGHETTI 

With    I'omato  Sauce  and  (Cheese 
is  another  front  line  Seller.     Deliciously 
prepared,  cooked  and  put  up  in  convenient 
and  attractive  containers  it  is  one  of  the 
most  popular  "light  meal"  dishes. 

See  the  CLARK  list  for  "OTHLR  GOOD 
THINGS". 


W.  CLARK,  Limited    -   MONTREAL 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


r> 


I 


"TRUE    FRUIT" 

Syrups  and  Fountain  Supplies 


"TRUE    FRUIT" 
QUALITY    LINES 

Fountain   Syrups 

Crushed    Fruits 

Orangeade 

Rocliester    Root    IJeer 

rerfection    Coolers 

and      complete      fountain 

accessories. 


tiecognized  as  (lie  leaders  in  Ihcir  line  tor  ovei- 
Ihirty-tive  years,  J.  HIJNGERFORU  &  SMITH'S 
Syrups  and  Fountain  Supplies  offer  grocers  and 
general  merchants,  who  have  fcnuid  out  the  great 
))ro(it  in  ice  cream,  an  unusually  high-grade  line  of 
fountain    requisites. 

■■TRIiy  FRUJT-  FOUNTAIN  SUPPLIES  will  make 
a  name  for  your  ice  cream  business  and  speedily 
increase  your  profits  just  iHs  they  have  done  for 
Ihousands    of    Canada's    leading   dispensers. 

For  complete  satisfaction  specify  "TRUE  FRUIT" 
brands. 


THE    J.    HUNGERFORD    SMITH 
COMPANY,   LIMITED 

Makers  of  "True   Fruit'   Soda   Foutitain   P-eqvnsiies 

TORONTO,    CANADA 


^ 


A 
ft 

Q 

i 


^ 


O 


July  8,  1921 


;anadian  grocer 


Langley,    Harris    &    Company,    Limited 


Montreal 


TORONTO 

Successors  to  Machire  c-  Langley  Limited 


Winnipeg 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


Every 
Housewife 
Will   Want 
One  ! 


Retails  for 


5c 


ANCHOR  OPENER 


"I{«'iij(M«'s  \\\v   (  iij»   Mitliitut  -Uishap'' 


Fi!ls  a  Long-felt  Want 


Here  is  a  chance  to  sell  your  customers  the 
handiest  and  mo.st  satisfactory  opener  ever  made 
for  removing  caps  from  jars  and  tumblers  sealed 
with  "Anchor"  and  similiar  caps. 

You  know  that  goods  sealed  with  "Anchor 
Caps"  are  the  best  to  handle.  They  don't  leak  and 
they  don't  spoil.  Your  customers  like  them,  too, 
for  this  same  reason.  And  they  will  like  them  all 
the  more  when  they  learn  that  these  snug-fitting 
caps  can  now  be  lifted  off  in  less  time  than  it  takes 


to  tell  it,  by  means  of  the  "Anchor  Opener."  That  is 
why  you  should  have  a  supply  of  "Anchor  Openers" 
on  your  counter. 


The   "Anchor   Opener"  fills  a  long-felt  want. 
Your  customers    will  actually    be    grateful    to  you 

for  selling  them  this  ingenious  device  that  takes 
lids  off  without  fuss,  muss  or  trouble-  Every  "Anch- 
or Opener"  you  .sell  makes  a  satisfied  customer — 
and  a  satisfied  customer  is  our  best  advertisement. 


By  displaying  the  handsome  "Anchor" 
Carton  on  your  counter  you  should  sell 
an  "Anchor  Opener"  to  practically  every 
customer,  and  many  of  these  will  pass 
the  good  word  along  to  their  friends. 


Order  a    Display  Carton  of   Anchor   Openers 
for    your    counter 

rackcrl  Ilirt'P  tlozeii  in  ;i  luitulsoiiu-  Cniiiiler  Displnv 
Carton,  i|)1.2i)  per  Carton  net  to  you.  Sellng  price, 
5  cents  each.    You  make  60  cents  on  each  carton  - 

a  profit  of  50  per  cent- 

DON'T  DELAY     SEND  IN  YOUR 
OKDER    TO.DAY  ! 


Anchor  Gap  6  Closure 

of  Canada,    Limited 
WALLACE  AVE.         ^         .         ,         TORONTO 

THE  ANCHOR  OPENER   MEANS   PROFIT  TO   YOU 


^CHOK 


opmsn 


GET   BUSY! 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


N^kV.^<N^^>^V"C;^  m  .^^^^^^^^^^ 


BRITISH 


^HE  sales  of  Matdonald's  Tobaccos  are 
sure  P'or  over  sixty  years  Macdonald's 
has  been  the  outstanding  success  in  Canada- 
The  sales  of  Macdonald's  are  profitable. 
Speedy  turnover  and  generous  profit  margin 
have  made  them  so. 

Now,  as  a  result  of  the  present  enormous 
advertising  campaign,  the  demand  for 
Macdonald's  is  greater  than  ever.  Depend- 
able as  always  is  Macdonald's,  but  much 
quicker  its  turnover  and  much  more  profiit- 
able  its  sales. 
Don't  lose  your  share  of  this  bigger  business. 


(^T^accou^^  ^^^^ea/it 


==i^ 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


Think  About  Your 
Oil  Room 


Think  of  the  many  minutes  you  lose  in  a  day,  hand- 
ling g-asoline  and  oil,  minutes  you  could  save  by 
the  use  of  up-to-date  equipment. 

Has  each  sale  made  actually  paid  you  a  profit,  or 
have  the  profits  gone  glimmering,  because  of  over- 
measure,  oil  spilled  or  lost  through  leakage  and 
evaporation  and  too  much  time  spent  in  handling? 

A 


Sii miner  Oi)eiis    up    Some   More    Opportunities 

For  Som-Mor  Sales 

Too  hot  to  eat  heavy  food — 

Your  customers  will  gratefully  accept  your  suggestion  that  they  buy 
Som-Mor  Biscuits- 

__They  know  the  light,  crisp,  freshness  of  the  biscuit  in  the  strip- 
ed package  and  appreciate  its  appetizing  and  nourishing  qualities.  Your 
suggestion  will  be  all  that  is  needed  to  make  the  sale. 

Tie  up  with  our  consumer  advertising  by  displaying  the  attractive 
striped  packages  prominently,  and  make  the  most  of  the  opportunities 
for  Som-Mor  summer  sales. 


NORTH-WEST  BISCUIT  COMPANY  LTD., 


Bdmontoii,  Alta. 


Winnipeg 
Moose  Jaw 


Regina 
Saskaloou 


Calgary 

Nelson 


Vancouver 
Victoria 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


OUIM-R    H\   XAMI 


Order  Stickney  &-  Poor's 
Prepared  Mustard  Now! 


Tliis  is  the  season  for  cold   meats,  salads, 
and   sand^s'iches.     This   means  Big  Sales   of 


STICKNEY 
PREPARED 


&     POOR'S 
MUSTARD 


Your  customers  will  like  this  Mustard  be- 
cause of  its  purity,  and  fine  flavor.  When  you 
order — be  sure  and  say  "Stickney  &  Poor's" 
to  your  jobber. 

Your  Co-operating  servant, 

MUSTARDPOT. 


9 


STICKNEY  &  POOR  SPICE  COMPANY 

1815  Century  Old  -         Century  honored  1921 

HALIFAX 

Mustards     -     Spices     -     Seasonings 


« 


Imperial  Grain  and  Milling 
Co.,  Limited 


VANCOUVER,  B.C. 


lAM  RIC 

Vancouvm.B.C.   3^ 


We  are  offering  the  best  value 

in  Rice  on  the  Canadian 

market  to-day. 


^\IJISE/^ 


REFRIGERATORS 

are  so  built  that  a  con- 
stant, positive  circula- 
tion of  :Col<l,  dry  air  is 
maintained.  Thia  fea- 
ture fully  covered  by 
paten  t.s. 


Your  customers  will  appreciate  the 
care  you  give  to  keep  your  perish- 
ables sweet  and  wholesome. 
Don't  repeat  last  summer'.s  waste. 
Get  a  Eureka. 

Write  for  our  new  catalogue. 


Eureka  Refrigerator  Co.,  Limited 

Head  Office:  Owen  Sound 

Branches:  Toronto,   Montreal,   Hamilton 


lUilllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH^ 

I       rill'.  '  HKsr  Hl•^■  ■  in  riii-;  si.ickr  ma  rki:i 

I  DOMINION    SLICER 


M  \in-:  I\ 

C  \\  \I>.V 


Doiiiiiiioii  SliitTs  have  tewcr 
\vi>rkiiij4^  parts,  arc  more  easily 
eleaiK'd  ami  * 'per  a  ted  and  are 
nu>re  sanitary  than  other  mach- 
ines. Thc\  do  anything  that 
other  sliccrs  will  dt>  and  are 
miicn     ess  expensive. 


Oominion  Siicers  are  made  ir*>irt 
the  finest  materials  by  skilled 
Cnnadians.  They  arc  the  most 
efficient  and  most  reasonably 
priced  slicer  made,  and  are  g^aar- 
antced  for  one  vear' 


I  WRITE  FOR    ILLl'STRATED    ROOkLET 

f       Dominion     Slicer     Corporation 

i  IIO  Church   St.,  Toronto 

iiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiyiiuiiiiiiiiiHiiniiiyiiiiyiiii 


CANADIAN    GHOCEk 


July  8,  1921 


WFSTEIJN   CANADA 


FRANK  H.  WILEY 

Mfrs.'    Agenl    and    Importer 
GKOCERIES    and    (IIEMKAI.S 
Salesmen    covering    Manitoba.   Saskalchewan, 
Albera  and    British   Columbia. 

533-537  Henry  Ave.,  Winnipeg 

C.  DUNCAN  &  SON 

Manufrs.'  Agenta  and  Grocery  Brokers 

Cor.  Princess'and  Bannatyne 

WINNIPEG                          Estab.  1899 

W.  L.  Mackenzie  &  Co.  Ltd. 
Head  Office:  Winnipeg 

Branches 

REGINA,  SASKATOON,    CALGARY, 

EDMONTON, VANCOUVER 

THE  McLAY  BROKERAGE  CO. 

WHOLESALE   GROCERY    BROKERS 
and  MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 

Take  advantage  of  our  Service 
WINNIPEG                                              MANITOBA 

When  Writing  to  Advertisers 
Kindly  Mention  this  Paper 

I 


Le  75  French  Cigarette  Papers 


finest 


Quality 


White  Gummed 

Paper 

That  Will 

Satisfy 

Your  Trade 


Thi.cuti^" 


actual  P«<^''««* 


100  Leaves  to  Book 

Automatic 
Doubles 

50  Books  to  Box 


Order 
to-day  from 
your  jobber 


CANADIAN  DISTRIBUTORS: 


DONALD  H.  BAIN  CO. 

Wholesale  Commission  Merchants,  Brokers  and  Importers 

Head  Office,  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches: 
SASKATOON       REGINA      CALGARY       EDMONTON       VANCOUVER        MONTREAL     LONDON,    ENG 


I 


Standard  Goods^Win  Abiding  Trade 


Cottam  Bird   Seed 

The  Standard  of  Bird  Keepers  and  Grocers  Since   1881 


I 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


WF.STERN  CANADA 


H.P.PENNOCK&CO.,LTD. 

WHOLESALE      COMMIS^SION       BROKERS  ' 

H£AP    WINNIPEC    omcE 


MANITOBA 

SASKATCHEWAN 


ALBERTA 
WESTERN    ONT 


Watson  &  Truesdale,  Winnipeg 

have  live  men  doing  detail  work  throughout  our  territory — Manit  "a,    Saskatchewan    and    Alberta.      They 
get  the  business,  and  can  get  it  for  you.       Write  us,   and  we  will  <!xplain  our  system. 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 


TRACKAGE 

STORAGE 

mSTRIBU- 

TIOxN 


The  Largest 

in  Western  Canada 


We  are  the  largest  Storage, 
Distributing  and  Forwarding 
House  in  the  Western  field. 
Total  Storage  rpace  ninety-six 
thousand  square  fe>!t  of  Bonded 
or  Free  Storage.  lYeated  ware- 
house. Excellent  Tivick  facili- 
ties. The  Western  House  for 
SERVICE. 

Williams  Storage  Co. 

WINNIPEG 

and 

Winnipeg  Warehousing  Co. 


WALLACE'S  HERRINGS 


Like  Wallace's  Salmon  and 
Pilchards,  Give  Splendid 
Sadsfaction. 

Your  Jobbers  Can  Get  Them 
For  You 

WALLACE  FISHERIES  limitcd 

VANCOUVER 


10 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


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WESTERN  CANADA 


il/i'V 


^., 


arketing  Products  in  a  '^Big  Way" 


The  House  of  "Scott-Bathgate"  holds  an  18  year  old  rs- 
putation  for  producing  big  results  in  the  rich  Western 
Provinces.  —  a  reputation  that  you  should  investigate  bofore 
you.  assign  your  product. 

We'll  place  your  product  on  the  market  for  you  in  the 
same  successful  manner  as  we  have  done  for  Christie's  Bis- 
cuits, Robertson's  Confectionery  and  Hungerford  and  Smith's 
Fountain   Supplies.     Write  us. 

Scott-Bathgate  Company,  Limited 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 

149  Notre  Dame  Ave.  East,  Winnipeg 


W.  H.  ESCOTT  CO. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers— Manufacturers' 
Agents — Commission  Merchants 

Manufacturers  of  Food  Products  and 
Specialties  of  merit  seeking  increased  dis- 
tribution in  Western  Canada,  are  invited 
to  investigate  our  constructive 

SALES  FORCE 

Your  account  entrusted  to  us  receives  the 
personal  attention  of  experienced  and 
efficient  heads. 

We  make  ourselves  your  Business  Right 
Arm  in  our  territory. 

We  are  more  than  Brokers,  we  are  Busi- 
ness Builders. 

WRITE  US  TO-DAY 

HEAD  OFFICE 
WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches  with  Resident  Sales  Managers  at 

Regina,  Sask.  Saskatoon,  Sask. 

Calgary,  Alta.  Edmonton,  Alta. 

Fort  William,  Ont. 


OAKEY'S 

"WELLINGTON'' 
KNIFE  POLISH 

The  original  and  only  reliable  prepara- 
tion for  Cleaning  and  Polishing  Cut- 
lery, etc, 

John  Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

Manufacturers  of 

Emery,  Black  Lead,    Emery  Glass  and 

Flint  Cloths  and  Papers,  etc. 

Wellington  IVHUs,    London,  S.E.I,  Eng. 

Agerxtt: 

F.  Manlcy.  147  Barmatyne  Ave.  East. 
Winnipeg 

Sankcy   and   Mason.  839*  Beatty  Street 
Vancouver 


jMly  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


11 


ONTARIO 


Jos.  K.  McLauchlan 

Manufacturers'   Agent  and    Grocery    Broker. 

Warehoi^se  and  Distributing 

275-77-79  King  Street  West,  Toronto 

Reliable   reoresenution.      Centrally    located. 


Langley,  Harris  &  Co.,  L(d. 

Manufacturers'  Ageni>> 

Grocers,  Corrfectioners   and    Drug 

Specialties 
12  FRONT   ST.   EAST,   TORONTO 


CHADWICK-AVRIGHT 

28  Duke  St.  Toronto. 


Frost,  Moorman  &  Co. 

BELLEVILLE,  ONT. 

Grocery  Specialty  Brokers 
Agencies  Wanted 

SatUfaclory  Repretentation  Guaranteed 


JOHN  J.  O'DONNELL  COMPANY 

Commissifrn  Brokers,  Manufacturers'  Agents 

REPRESENTING 

J.  H.  Wethey,  Limited;     Imperial  Grain 

and    Millrng   Co.,   Limited,    Vancou'er; 

Harry  Hall  &  Co.,  Vancouver,  and  others 

Correspondence  Solicited       Agencies  Wanted 

LAING  BUILDING,   WINDSOR,   ONT. 


W ANTKD 

Oiu'   or   two   !?.  oJ    il(<^.•llcil■^  ill  Food  Hri>Juii^i 

Give  paiticuli  r>  in  fir-ir  letter.     Ui-lercncc.-. 

furnished. 

LAING  &  WATERS 

28  Wellington  St.  E.,  Toronto 


1 

1 

D. 

W.  Clark  &  Sons 

248  Avenue  Road 

TORONTO 

Grocery  Brokers  and 

Commission      Agents 

Uo 

invite*'' corri'spoiidi'iuf      from 

Di)iin'slii-     or     I'oivijfii     maimfaot- 

urers  wiio  desire  to  scctiri'    proper 

tUstr 

buLioii. 

HAMBllN-BRERETGN  CO.,  Limited 

ClKOt  KKV  and  C  ONI- ECTIONKK  V 

ac;i:nts  atid  lmi'okikrs 

Toronto    atid    Kilihi'inT,   C^m. 
Wiiiiiipeji'  and  Caljjarv 


W.  G.  PATRICK  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

Manufacturers'  Agents 

and  Importers 

51-5.?  \\ellington  St.  W.,  Toionto 

<'■  '  I'ax.    N  .S.  :   WinnipeK,    Man. 


Let   T.    ASHMORE    ICIDD 

Brok^r 

KINGSTON,  ONTARIO 

Superintend    the  successful    merchandising   of 
yoar    hnes   in  Kingston  and  district. 


l*  WE    COVEK    OTTAWA     DISTKICT  g 

fj  I.A-t    i«s   demonstrate   wVuit  we  can  do  for  >out  ^ 

*J  pr.-dutt  in  lliii- rich  territory.     V\'e  are  espwally  gg 

?J  «qiiipcd  to  produce  the  rtsidts  \  oil  are  l»x>krinj  lor  gg  . 

*•  E.    .N     &    W.    E.     S<»I'EI«  § 

^  Manufaciuriii.-.'  .\(ftTit»  &•  *-^''n. mission   Urokers  gg 

!•  «,■{  SparkH  St.,  <*t<Hwa  2» 

'4  f>» 


BRAND 


G.  T.  MICKLE 


The 

CROWN 

Trade- Mark 

on  a  bag  of  white  beansis  a  guarantee 
of  their  uniform  lize  and  choice 
quality 

Only  the  very  finest  hand-picked 
Canadian  White  Beam  go  into  bags 
tnarked 

CROWN  BRAND 

Foryour  own  protection  insist  upon 
having  this  line  of  linown  quality. 

Ridgetown,  Ont. 


AQEINCIES 

We  are  open  to  accept  sole  agencies  for  first 
class  lines  in  connection  with  General  Wholesale 
Groceries.  We  cover  Neva  Scotia.  Our  affiliateJ 
friends  have  branches  in  all  parts  of  the  world. 

HOWARDS'   LIMITED 

W'liolewile  Grocers  Impo-rt  ajid   E.xport 

Dobrees'   Wharves....    Dartmouth....    Nova    Scotia. 

Affiliated   with  Messrs.    Samuel   Dobree   &   Son^, 
London         England 


12 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


EASTERN  CANADA 


VICTOR  A.  LEMIEUX 

Labrador  Lobster  in    I    (one)   pound    tin, 

S:uaranteed  best  qualitj-  on   tlic  market, 

Write  for  Quotations. 

Wholesale  Dealer 

631  coRisniNE  bloc;..  montre.\l 


GEO.  D.  LACHAINE 

Manufacturers'   Af^vnt   and   Commission    Broker 

Ilfpresentinc  : 
The    Dominion    Molasses    "o.,    Ltd.,    Halifax,    N.S. 
H.    R.    Silver    Ltd..    Halifax.    N.S. 
Jos.    Dufresne.    Biscuits,   Chocolates  and    Confectionery, 

Joliette.     P.O. 
Over    30    years    in    Business.        Beat    References    and 
Connections. 

18    Dalhousic    Street,    QUEBEC. 


TIPPET  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

Importers  and 
Manufacturers'  Agents 

8  Place  Royale,  Montreal 

Established  IS76 
Telephone  Main   1581 


When    Writing   to    Advertisers 
Kindly  Mention  this  Paper 


TELEPHONE    MAIN    7143 

ST.  ARNAUD  FILS  CIE 

GROCERY   BROKERS 


Importateurs 

&    Exportatean 
Pois  et  Fevee 
Produits  Alimentaires 


Importers 

&    Exporters 
Peas    and    Beans 
Food     Products 


ST.     NICHOLAS     BUILDING,    MONTREAL 


MAPLE  SUGAR 

I  solicit  your  orders  for. pure   Maple  Sug^ar.     35  years  ex- 
psiTCiice  as  wholesale  dealer.      Open   tor  agencies  of  all  kinds. 
Ag^ent  for  Mes.srs  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull;  Gunns  Ltd., 
Toronto;  St. -Lawrence  Starch  Co.,  and  several  others. 

Hardware  Expert.      Correspondence  solicited  if  interested. 

W-irehoi'se  rapacity,  10,000  feel  floor  sp.ice.      Best  spot  in  town 
on   Main  Street. 

JOS.  EMOND 

2  &  4  rue  St. -Joseph,  Quebec.  P.  Q. 


Be  Sure  You  Ask 
Your  Jobber  for 

Dominion   Spring   Clothes    Pins 


Manufa':*ured  by 

The  J.   H.   Hanson  Co.,   Ltd. 


MONTREAL 


B.  &  S.  H.  THOMPSON  &  CO. 

LIMITED 
Head    MONTREAL    Office 


Agents  for  Canada  for  the  HOMCO  Prcducts,  including: 
Hard  and  Soft  Soaps,  Soap  Chips,  Salad  Oils, 
Compound  Lard,  Castor  Oils,  Sanctuary  Oil,  etc. 


ENQUIRIES  INVITED 


MANUl ACTURERS ! ! 


Do  you  want  excel- 
lent storage  and 
first-class  distribution 
in  OTTAWA 
and  District 


Our  larjjfe  Ottawa  «n rehouse  on 
till-  V.  P.  R.  is  larger  than  our 
usual  stock  demamls.  We  are 
wilh'ng-  to  carry  !>:oojs  in  storage 
for  .1  in.anufactrircr.-  deliver  or 
ship  from  Ottawa-  slock,  and 
possihiy  take  care  of  sales  for 
Ottawa  and  and  District. 
If  interested,  get  in  loticli  with 
us  at  once. 


J.    B.    HUNT 

Manufacturer  of  High  Grade  Flour  and  Feed 
BROAD  ST.,  OTTAWA.  OIVT. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


13: 


Canadian  and 
British  Made 

PRODUCTS 

for  the 

Canadian  Trade 

Vanillin  "BUSH" 

Emulsions 

Oil  Vanilla 

Pure  Fruit  Extracts 

Butter  Flavor 


^4«(TJ|^M 


We  guarartee  (he  quality  of  all  these  lines. 
Write  us  for  quotations. 


The  W.  J.  Bush  &  Co.  Canada,  Ltd. 


MONTREAL 


TORONTO 


WINNIPEG 


ture 


will^put  your  tobacco  sale^ 
on  a  firm  footing 

And  tobacco  selling  is  a  money-makinp:  line 
that  every  grocer  should  carefully  consider. 

People  there  are  in  every  community  who  are 
"strong  for  a  real,  good  Chewing  Tobacco  such 
as  King  George's  Navy."  They  like  the  paiate 
tickling  goodness  of  King  George's  Navy.  A 
first  purchase  brings  them  back  for  more  and 
clinches  their  tobacco"  trade  for  the  King 
George  dealer. 


ili"iHiiiiiiiJlllliiJll|ll||||||lllllll||||||||liilllllllJllllllli mmm 

Rock  City  Tobacco  Co.,  Ltd. 


Quebec 

and 
Winnipeg 


14 


ANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


i       U' 


Help  to  Conserve  the 
Nation's  Health 

All  Insects,  to  greater  or  less 
extent,  are  a  menace  to  human 
well-being.  Infant  mortality — 
particularly  in  summer — is  often 
directly  traceable  to  this  cSuse. 
Healthy  citizens  are  a  national 
asset .     By  recommending. 

KEATING'S    POWDER 

you  are  actually  perfroniing  a  service  of  value  to 
the  whole  community.  No  insect  can  live,  once 
it  comes  into  proper  contact  with  KEATIXG'S.  It 
is  fatal  to — 

Flies  Ants  Burs 

Fleas  Wasp**  Cockroaches 

]tfos({nilos        ~  Beetles  Mollis 

— but  b.-jmiless  to  human  or  animal  life.  Every 
home  needs  KEATIXG'S.  Keep  your  shelves  well 
stocked . 


Made  1)}    TIIOM.VS  KE.VTINO,  London, 
Kiitrlnnd.     KstablNhed  17S8 

Sole  Aselits  for  Canada:  1 

Harold  F.  Rilchie  &  Co.,  Limited       | 

10  IVlcCaul  Street,  Toronto  J 

IIBIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!ll!llii:!llll!lllll<lllll»^ 


C.A.MANN  COMPANY 

Strictly  New  Laid  Eggs 
Choice  Creamery  Butter 
Fancy   Dressed   Poultry 

special   Attention  to  Grocers'   Orders. 
Satisfaction  Assured 

LONDON,  ONTARIO 

PHONE   1577 


COLLECtlONS 

Our   ability   to   collect    ae- 
couata  has  been  higtjly  praia- 
ti\    by    iniMCIianti    a!l    over 
Canada.       We    collect    any- 
where   in    Canada    and    the 
United    State.?    on    a  .strictly 
commis.sion   basi.s.     Ton   are 
under  no  oWiKation  to  us  if 
we  do  not  collect.    We  guar- 
antee yon  a  thoroughly  hon- 
est  service.      Prompt    remit- 
tances.    Give  as  a  trial.    We 
collect     where     others    fail. 
Established   1300. 

Nagle  Mercantilo  Agency 

Laprairie  (Montreal)  Quo 

It  has  been  brought  to  our  attention  that 
some  houses  connected  with  the  grocerj 
trade,  are  under  the  impression  that  Mer- 
chants Consolidated  Limited  sells  only  to  a 
restricted  list  of  retail  merchants  in  Western 
Canada . 

THIS    IS    NOT    A    FACT 

Merchants  Consolidated  Limited  sells 
groceries  in  wholesale  quantities  only  to  the 
legitimate  trade  in  open  competition  with 
other  jobbers.  Further,  Merchants  Consolid- 
ated Limited,  is  selling  and  will  continue  to 
sell  to  any  legitimate  retail  merchant  in 
good  standing,  on  its  regular  terms. 

The  purpose  of  this  announcement  is  to 
correct  any  false  impressions  held  by  any 
firm  or  individual. 


Merchants    Consolidated 
Limited 


Winnipeg 


T 


oronto 


FIBER -GLASS 
DISPLAY  COVERS 

Will     •        -1   lip  sales  of  bulk   lines    and    prevent 
cwipi-ration   and  deterioration. 


Mamilactiirod  liy  Flhfr-LW.is.,  Food  CuMt  Co.,  Cli'cag-o    111. 


Soil'  nistrlhutors  for  Ontario 


Ebv-Hlaiii   Limited 

Wholesale  Grocers  Toronto 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


15 


A    Very    Effective    Example  of    The    "SINGLE    IDEA"    In     Seasonable    Display    in    a    Montreal    Store. 

This  Window  Sold  Over  One 

Thousand  Pounds 

-"-Figure  The  Profit  Yourself 


r\\]R  Ottawa  Manager  sent  in  a  small 
^^  pliototicraph  some  time  ago,  showing: 
a  window  display  in  a  pood  location.  It 
featured  Cocoanut  Cakes  and  sold  3i) 
<lozen  1-lb.  packages  and  about  200  lbs. 
bulk  during  the  week! 

The  display  was  not  at  all  elaborate 
nor  did  it  demand  any  particular  outlay. 
But  it  pulled  "like  a  dentist"  on  account 
of  its  sheer  simplicity.  The  window  dis- 
play that  exhibits  a  single  idea  is  the 
most  effective.  The  spectator  gets  a 
single  iinpression  that  is  compelling.  The 
advertising  high-brows  call  it  "Fifth 
Avenue"  selling,  because  it  first  proved 
its  value  on  that  famous  street. 

When  Mr.  Petrie,  our  Montreal  Man- 
ager, got  hold  of  the  photograph,  ho 
decided  to  make  a  little  exi;cMime";t  r 
his  own  account.  So  he  arr:int,cd  to  pi:: 
in  the  above  display.  Wl  .  n  l:s.  hjci:a 
from,  over  a  thousand  pounds  of  the 
Cocoanut  Cakes  had  been   soldi 


A  FRIENDLY  rivabu  hetweci 
Mr.  Louis  Foitruier,  Gano)u/'s 
Oftuiva  Manufjer  niicf  Mr.  J.  11'. 
Pitrie,  Montreal  Manager  of  the 
same  finn,  uncovered  an  enor»(Oiif< 
public  appetite  for  that  prot'ifuhlc 
Slimmer  spccialfn — Ganong's  Toadi- 
ed Cocoanut  Cakes. 

It  a'so  proved  another  import- 
ant point — the  simpler  and  more  di- 
/■((•'  the  u-iudn)r  disj>laii,  the  qv'ckrr 
tin    hitfici's   reaction. 

For  any  candy  store  seeking  a  v^arni 
v;eather  specialty  that  sells  at  sight  and 
turns  "passers-by"  into  "comers-in,"  we 
suggest  if  not  a  full  window  disp'.iy  cf 

Ganong's  Toasted 
Cocoanut   Cakes 

In  l-lb.  Pkgs.     In  20-lb.  Tubs 
30c  lb.  27c.  lb. 


Ganong's  famous  Toasted  Cocoanut 
Cakes,  at  least  a  good  counter  display.  A 
price  card  clearly  marked  adds  the  clos- 
ing touch. 

As  the  trade  already  knows  and  the  buy- 
ing public  is  quickly  finding  out,  no  one 
but  Ganong's  has  yet  discovered  the  secret 
of  the  crusty  luscious  freshness  of  these 
Cocoanut  Cakes.  We  call  them  "cakes" 
because  they  are  oven-baked  like  cakes,  be- 
cause oi'  their  crisp  exterior  and  the  moist 
freshnccs  of  the  interior  that  lasts  till 
caton.  Outcide  of  ice  cream  and  soft  drinks, 
we  know  of  nothing  that  appeals  as  strongly 
to  the   sluggish   summer  appetite. 

You  might  mention  to  your  store  trade 
that  Ganong's  import  their  cocoanuts  direct 
from  Trinidad  and  shell  tliem  at  St. 
Stephen.  The  nuts  are  still  dripping  in 
their  own  milk  when  grated,  and  the  cakes 
are  toasted  to   retain  the  full  flavour. 

They  sell  on  sight  and  "repeat"  on  taste! 
Don't   let   the   season   go   by.     Send   your 
order  in  early  for  prompt  service. 


Ganong  Brothers,  Limited,  St.  Stephen,  N.  B. 

Branch  Offices:  Halifax  Montreal  Ottawa  Toronto  Winnipeg  Calgary 

Sales  Agents:    St.  John,  N.  B.,  Emery  Bros.    Quebec,    Albert    Dunn.    Vancouver,     Knowler  &   Macaulay 


16  CANADIANGROCER  July  8,  1921 


The  Wild  Carnival  of 

High  Prices  is  Over 

The  rrinler.«'  I'liion.s  of  Toronto  pay  their  dues  ami  take  their  orders  from  their  head  office 
in  the  United  States. 

Some  time  ago  lliey  got  in-truetions  from  their  head  office  in  Indianapolis,  Ind..  to  demand 
shorter  hours  and  more  wages,  and  if  these  orders  were  not  acceded  to,  to  strike. 

The  Toronto  Puhlishcrs  and  Employing  Printers  refused  to  grant  tlic-c  demands.  So  on 
June  1st,  tlie  Prin(er<  struck. 

There  is  no  use  in  (he  Toronto  Printers,  or  any  other  body  of  men.  Mindly  failing  to  realize 
that  the  wild  carnival  of  High  Prices  is  o\er. 

If  the  memliers  of  the  Printers'  Union  go  out  to  huy  hoots  to-day,  they  do  not  expect  to  pay 
more  than  they  did  a  year  ago. 

They  demand,  and  get,  cheaper  boots. 

They  are  not  willing  to  pay  more  for  clothe.s,  or  foodstuffs,  or  any  olhc:'  <    inmodity. 

They  expect  to  pay,  and  do  pay,  less. 

.\nd  the  jiulilic  is  not  tolerant  of  any  scheme  or  arrangement  wliieh  is  going  to  make  its 
printing  cost  more.  It  is  lower  |)rices  tliey  are  looking  for.  Why  shouM  printing  co-is  ad- 
\ance,  when  prices  of  everything  else  are  going  down?  That  is  why  the  Pulili-hers  and 
rhiiploying  Printers  are  resolutely  and  nnaUeral)ly  (-])po.-cd  to  the  g;-antiug  of  shorter  hours 
and  more  jiay,  because  it,  of  n8ce.-\sity,  means  dearer  ])rinting,  and  the  public  will  not  buy 
dearer  printing. 

That  i>  why  we  are  rcsi-ting  and  refusing  to  obey  the  mandate  from  the  United  States  that 
the  Local  Printers  demand  more  wages  and  shorter  hours. 

The  Purchasing  Agents'  Association  of  Toronto  at  their  meeting,  hehl  June  Sth.  10-21, 
I'assed  the  bdlowing  re.solution: 

'AVe  endorse  the  attitude  of  the  Toronto  Typoihclae  in  their  efforts  to  prevent  increased 
cost  of  printing  and  deplore  the  action  of  some  Employing  Printers  in  granting  the 
Unions'  demands,  which,  nece.s,sarily  will  result  i'.i  an  increised  e  )-t  of  production,  when 
at  this  period  economic  conditions  demand  that  produ.etion  costs  be  lowered  rather  than 
increased." 

The  ^fa(d.e;•n  Pulilishin'^  Company  are  figlr  iiig  tlicsc  unreasonable  demands  not  only  in  the 
interests  of  their  own  busin(>ss  (and  this  incdudes  tlie  employee  ■■  who  are  on  strike)  liut  in 
the  interests  of  business  conditions  generally. 

(uHu]  times  and  healthy  business  conditions  cannot  return  uidcss  we  ail  do  our  part  to  get 
through  the  readjustment  period  in  a  sane  and  reasonable  way. 

THE    MACLEAN    PUBLISHING    CO.,   LIMITED 

TORONTO  MONTREAL        WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER       NEW  YORK.         BOSTON         CHICAGO  LONDON,  ENG. 

TRADE  AND  TECHNICAL  NEWSPAPERS  AND  MAGAZINE  PUBLISHERS 

MACLEAN'S     MAGAZINE  DRY    GOODS    REVIEW  POWER    HOUSE 

FARMER'S     MAGAZINE  MENS    WEAR     REVIEW  CANADIAN      FGUNDRYMAN 

THE     FINANCIAL    POST  BOOKSELLER    &.    STATIONER  MARINE     ENCNEERING 

CANADIAN    GROCER  DRUGGISTS'     WEEKLY  SANITARY    ENGINEER 

HARDWARE     &     METAL  CANADIAN     MACHINERY  "RINT'ER    &.    PUBLISHER 

CANADIAN  MOTOR.   TRACTOR   AND    IMPLEMENT   TRADE    JOURNAL. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


19 


KEEP  UP  YOUR  STANDARDS 


Have  you  ever  noticed  how  much  your  attitude  towards  your  business  plays  in  its 
success?  If  you  think  good  times,  you  will  show  it  in  your  face,  most  likely,  and  dis- 
play it  in  your  actions. 

It's  a  great  thing,  don't  you  think,  to  show  your  customers  your  quality,  and,  do 
you  know,  you  do  this  best  by  the  character  of  the  goods  you  sell.  High  class  articles 
go  well  with  a  cheerful  disposition  and  a   desire  to  serve. 

Your  customers  have  known  for  years  the  quality  of  RKD  ROSE  TEA.  They 
naturally  look  for  it  in  your  store.  The  sight  of  it  there  makes  them  say  to  them- 
selves: "This  grocer  knows  a  good  tea,"  and  it  follows  that  you  must  be  selling  other 
good  things,  too- 

Don't  be  tempted,  when  so  many  poor  teas  may  be  had  for  a  song,  to  cater  to  a 
cheap  trade  and  lower  your  standards.  Your  success  in  the  long  run  depends  on 
more  than  an  extra  cent's  profit.  It  is  based  on  a  continued  and  satisfied  customer  gain- 
ed and  held  through  such  quality  lines  as  RED  ROSE  TEA. 

T.  H.  ESTABROOKS  CO.,  LIMITED 

St.  John  Montreal  Toronto  Winnipeg 

Calgary  Edmonton 


"DOMINION"  BRAND  TOMATO  SOUP 

Delicious,    Appetizing 
All   Canadian   Made 


Here,  fellow  citizens,  is  an  all  Canadian  Tomato  Soup 
which,  to  say  the  very  least,  is  the  equal  to  any  imported 
.soup. 

Dominion  Brand  Tomato  Soup  is  made  the  best  we  know 
how.  You  simply  can  not  make  better  soup-  It  has  color 
and  body  and  flavor — such  flavor — and  honest  to  goodness 
appetizing  flavor  that  makes  friends  for  life  after  one  trial- 

Stock     it.     Display     it.     Sell     it. 
Wholesalers  !   Fall    Orders   Should  be   Placed   Now. 

DOMINION  CANNERS  Limited 


■l«BI 


Hamilton,  Ontario 


20 


CANADIAN     GHOCER 


July  8,  1921 


pXFORD 


The    Safest     Brand 

to  Recommend 

Keen's 
Oxford    Blue 

(liiiinfii.'iii  liouscwivc's  lia\c  (iiilh  in  Keen's 
Oxford  i)liie.  Tliey  know  lluit  Uxhiy  il 
si  ill  le;i(ls  in  (|unlil\  and  dependability  jnsl 
as  il  did  in  llieii"  i;randin()lliers'  day.  .InsI 
say  "Keen',-:"  lo  Nour  enslonier — il's  llie 
hesi  bland  lo  handle  and  reconiinend. 


Maj^or,  Son   &  Company,  Limited 

1{)1   Si.  Paul  Sf.  West,  M0:M1{I':AL  '2:i  Sc<.H  S<reef,  TOHONTO 

AGEMS  FOR  THE  DOMIMON  OF  CAi\ADA 


Wisdom  is  the  better  part  of  Trading 

"Satisfaction   to   your   Customers   speiis   Profit   to  Yourself" 

Furthermore  you  cannot  gain  profit  unless  you   DO  satisfy  your  customers,  for  they  are  the 
source  of  your  trade.  ^ 


11 


mADA 


II 


is  the  PERSONAL  CHOICE  of  the  great  majority  of  tea-drinkers.  No  one  is  forced  to  drink 
any  particular  tea,  there  is  a  wide  choice'  and  the  majority  choo-e  "Salada."  I?  it  not  wisdom, 
therefore,   to  satisfy  the  majority?     for  what  pleases  them  will  satisfy  all. 

RECOMMEND     ICED     SALADA     TEA 


VOL.  XXXV. 


COLLIXGWOOD,  JULY  8,   1921 


No.  L'7 


Maintaining    Volume    of   a    Business 

Fiaiik  SlockfJale,  Becoi^iiized  Expert  On   Merchandisiui^,  Tells 

Toronto  Retailers  How  To  Faee  Present  Day  Conditions — 

Tips  On   Hnviiii^,  Selling,   .\d\erlising     And     Display 

Featured.  "Let  Goods  Be  Stolen  and  Sold,  '  He  Said 


A/fany  Points  of  interest  to  the  retail 
^  mti chant,  no  matter  in  what  line 
of  business  he  may  be  engaged,  were 
brought  out  by  Frank  Stotkdale.  conduct- 
or of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Institute. 
Chicago,  and  formerly  chief  of  the  Lect- 
ure Bureau  of  the  Assciciated  Advertising 
Clubs  of  the  World,  in  addressing  a  body 
of  retail  merchants  in  con'/cntion  in 
Toronto,  but  the  greatest  enthusiasm, 
peiliaps,  was  occasioned  when  the  speak- 
er dwelt  for  some  time  on  the  advant- 
:iges  of  display.  A  catchphrase  that 
caught  tho  popular  fancy  was  hi.s  ad- 
monition to  "buy  in  cold  blood  and  .sell 
with  enthusiasm."  Some  retailers,  add- 
ed Mr.  Stockdale,  got  their  wires  cross- 
ed at  times.  They  bought  with  enthusi- 
asm and  sold  in  cold  blood.  This  policy, 
he  pointed  out,  could  not  fail  to  be  dis- 
astrous. Mr.  Stockdale  discussed  in  de- 
tail the  subject,  "Meeting  Present-Day 
Conditions  in  Merchandising,"  his  ad- 
dress, which  should  be  read  and  studied 
by  every  man  in  business  today,  being 
in  part  as  follows: 

.Vvoitl    J)':il(Mis    ( Oiiipelitioii 

"There  is  so  much  legislation  being 
proposed  and  passed  nowadays  that  it 
is  timely  to  refer  to  it  in  passing.  We  all 
know  that  the  man  in  good  health  does 
not  api)i'eciate  his  health.  So  the  mer- 
chant doe,  not  appreciate  his  freedom 
from  legislative  annoyance  until  he  feels 
I  he  string  of  adverse  legislation.  In  this 
connection,  too.  1  might  say  that  the 
most  unfortunate  thing  that  can  happen 
to  a  meichant  is  lor  him  to  get  into 
jealous  competition  with  his  ojjpo.sition. 
Mitterness  in  business  should  not  be 
allowed  to  exist.  Get  acquainted  with  the 
other  fellow  and  you'll  find  he's  not  such 
a  bad  fellow,  after  all.  He  will  also 
find  that  you  are  not  such  a  bad  fellow, 
after  all.  Think  well  of  the  other  fellow 
and  let  him  see  it,  and  there's  no  doul)t 
but  that  he'll  think  well  of  you.  In  these 
times  the  retailer  is  losing  a  good  deal 
of  business  to  department  stores.  The 
chain  store,  too,  is  taking  quite  a  bit 
of  trade.  The  chain-store  man  gets  a- 
long  O.K.  and  because  he  is  winning 
out  his  methods  are  all  wrong.  If  he 
were    losing    out,      he    and    his    methods 


would    be    all    right. 


Day    of    <>rijaiii/ed    Fi'iort 

"This  is  asuredly  the  day  of  organ- 
ized effort.  The  man  who  does  not  work 
;.long  organized  lines  has  small  chance 
to  succeed.  Half  the  failures  in  the  retail 
business  today  would  be  wiped  out  if 
retailers  would  get  into  their  minds  that 
a  surplus  in  the  bank  is  the  greatest 
bulwark  a  merchant  can  have.  The  same 
thing  applies  to  the  association  with  a 
surphis.  One  idea  is  sometimes  of  more 
value  than  all  the  efforts  of  all  men  for 
centuries.  Hustle,  it  must  be  remembered, 
is  in  the  head  and  not  in  the  feet.  The 
man  who  really  outthinks  his  competitor 
is  the  one  who  is  winning  out.  But  organ- 
izatin  is  needed  as  a  backing.  The  idea 
market  is  the  one  to  go  to  now  when  a 
man  is  staying  in  business  on  his  merits. 
During  the  war  a  nian  stayed  in  business 
because  he  happened  to  be  there.  At  the 
present  lime  he  is  in  business  because 
he  is  a  good  merchant.  Supposing,  for  a 
moment,  you  jiavp  nierchandi.-e  and  ! 
have  a  dollar.  I  go  to  you  and  hand  over 
my  dollar  for  some  of  your  goods.  Von 
rre  glad  to  hand  over  some  of  your 
goods  for  my  dollar.  In  the  end  you 
have  the  dollar,  but  not  the  goods,  while 
1  have  the  goods,  but  not  the  dollar. 
But  supposing  you  have  an  idea  and  1 
I'.ave  an  idea.  We  meet.  You  give  me 
your  idea  and  I  give  ycu  mine.  We  each 
have  two  ideas  where  each,  of  us  had  l)u" 
(jue. 

"Now  for  a"  brief  analysis  of  the  re- 
tailer's position:  Three  things  are  to  he 
taken    into   consideration.    They  are: 

"1.     Buying. 

"2.     Selling. 

":!.     Control. 

"The    second     of    these     I     would     ■  iih 
divide   as    follows: 

"i.     Display. 

"2.     Advertising. 

"Z.     Personal    Selling. 

"The  third  1  would  also  put  ini<>  iIikc 
classes: 

"1.     Cash. 

"2.     Help. 

".3.     Stock. 

Art  of  Riiyiiig  And  Sellini^ 

"Now,  It  depends  on  how  you  do  tUesa 


things  how  many  customers  come  in 
and  come  back.  John  W^anamaker  and 
M,arshall  Field  still  hang  on  because 
they  have  mastered  the  policy  of  giving 
satisfaction.  As  a  rule,  customers  are 
not  interested  in  details.  You  are  reallv 
compelled  to  find  out  what  vour  cus- 
tomer's idea  of  .satisfaction  is  and  then 
hnd  out  how  to  give  this.  The  average 
retail  merchant  is  where  he  is  in  his 
business  today  more  because  of  the  big- 
ness of  the  job,  than  because  of  the  lit- 
tleness of  the  man.  It  is  true  that  we 
lack  organization  in  our  stores,  in  our 
towns,  in  our  provinces,  in  the  Domin- 
ion. We  must  start  with  organization 
in   the  store. 

"Now  I  am  almost  pr«j|pared  to  wager 
that  many  men  here  today  are  much 
better  buyers  th.an  they  are  sellers.  It 
is  true  that  some  are  better  sellers  than 
buyers,  but  very  few  of  us  combine 
these  two  in  a  high  degree.  There  are 
not  very  many  of  us  who  can  both  buy 
well  and  sell  well.  The  average  retail- 
er carries  just  about  twice  jas  much 
stock  as  he  should,  to  take  care  of  the 
business  he  is  doing.  When  he  does 
this  he  cripi)les  hmself,  puts  shackles  on 
his  feet  and  a  load  on  his  shoulders. 
My  advice  would  be  to  always  buy  in 
cold  blood  and  sell  with  enthuslam. 
Quite  often  the  retailer  gets  his  wires 
crossed  and  buys  with  enthusiasm  and 
sells  in  cold  blood.  What  the  merchant 
should  do  is  analyze  and  plan  in  cold 
blood.  Train  yourself  to  lay  out  your 
plans  and  you  will  always  do  it  in  a 
cold,  calculating  manner.  Your  success- 
ful competitors  are  doing  this.  The  best 
thing  a  travelling  salesman  c,an  do  is 
to  get  a  man  buying  on  a  right  basis. 
Such  a  man  will  sell  the  instjtutiou  be- 
iiind   him. 

Cost  of  Doing  Kusiiicss 

"Again,  the  man  who  conducts  a  small 
store  on  ^a  big  store  basis  is  bucking  a 
game  he  cannot  successfully  meet.  As 
for  the  small  man  who  buys  direct,  I 
may  say  that  he  will  in  the  end  pay  the 
manufacturer  a  good  deal  more  than  he 
does  the  wholesaler.  Remember,  also, 
that  the  big  money  is  not  made  on  the 
things  you  buy  for  fifty  cents  and  sell 

(Continued  on  Page  17). 


22 


Canadian  grocer 


July  8,  1921 


No  Heavy  Movement  of  Sugar  is  Reported 

But  Price  is  Firm  at  Recent  Decline 

Manufacturers  who  are  large  users  of  sugar  at  this 
time  are  pretty  well  supplied  with  considerable 
carry-over  of  finished  and  semi-finished  products 
and  their  demand  for  sugar  is  comparatively  light. 


JN  hjpite  of  the  fact  that  the  season  for 
the  largest  consumption  of  sugar  is 
at  hand,  there  has  been  no  heavy  move- 
ment from  refiners,  according  to  reports 
Certain  manufacturers  who  are  usually 
large  usei's  of  sugar  at  this  time,  find 
themselves  with  coniderable  carryover 
of  finished  and  semi-finished  products, 
and  their  wants  therefore  are  compar- 
atively light. 

Refiners  have  again  resumed  oper- 
ation after  being  closed  for  some  weeks, 
during  wiiich  time  there  has  been  a  re- 
duction of  stocks,  indicating  that  there 
has  been  some  business  passing.  There 
has  been  no  further  decline  since  June 
25,  and  there  is  reason  to  believe  that 
all  refiners  (are  holding  firm  to  the  basis 
of  $8.75  per  hundred.,  Montreal.  So 
far  as  can  be  learned  the  jobbers'  sel- 
ling price  is  being  generally  mantained 
in  accordance  with  the  Quebec  conven- 
t.-'on .  It  would  therefore  seem  to  be  the 
interest  of  the  entire  trade,  both  whole- 
sale and  retail  th,at  iprices  should  be 
held  steady,  thus  eliminating  the  dis- 
trust   that   has   prevailed   for   so   long. 


The  raw  market  has  maintained  a 
quiet,  steady  to  firm  bjasis,  with  some 
advances  recorded  principally  on  full 
duty  sugars  which  sold  recently  at  2V^ 
and  then  2%  c.i.f.  New  York,  including 
2,000  bags  San  Domingos  due  to  arrive 
and  1,500  bags  Surinams  at  the  latter 
figure,  lalso  a  sale  of  600  tons  Porto 
Ricos  for  .Inly  and  August  shipment  at 
41/8  cents  to  New  Orleans.  Since  then 
5,000  tons  Porto  Ricos  sold  to  a  New 
York  refiner  at  4  cents,  at  which  price 
the  market  stands  steady  to   firm. 

Rainy  weather  still  continues  in  Cuba 
and  there  now  remains  only  15  central 
factories  in  operation.  Factories  which 
have  ceased  working  lately,  closed  with 
a  production  less  than  estimated  for  the 
season,  and  in  some  cases  less  than  the 
production   for  the  two  previous  years. 

Shiippers  of  West  India  sugars  are 
still  firm  with  their  ideas,  jand  we  are 
informed  that  business  with  Jamaica  is 
practically  impos.sible  as  they  appear  to 
be  doing  better  in  the  United  Kingdom 
markets   than    possible   in   Can^ada. 


Prices   of    Better    Grade 

Brooms    Are    Holding    Up 

Quotations  on  corn  for  broom  manufacturing  are 
still  at  fairly  high  levels— indications  so  far  point 
to  a  decreased  acreage- -a  great  many  prices  are 
being  quoted  on  the  poorer  grades  of  brooms. 


Tlierc  is  a  steady  demand  for  brooms, 
but  not  quite  so  heavy  as  last  year 
nor  for  some  years  past.  Like  other 
commodities,  everyone  has  been  reducing 
their  stocks  to  as  low  a  point  as  possible. 
Manufacturers  are  also  reducing  their 
stocks  so  as  not  to  get  caught  with  high 
priced  stock,  should  the  new  crop  be 
cheaper.  The  new  crop,  however,  will 
not  be  ready  tor  the  market  until  well 
into  the  month  of  November,  and  with 
present  conditions,  holding  prices  up. 
due  to  the  limited  quantity  of  good  broom 
corn  available,  there  cannot  be  expected 
to  be  much  change  before  the  end  of 
Die  year. 

"Prices  are  holding  up  on  the  better 
grades,"  stated  M.  S.  Snyder  of  the 
Waterloo  Broom  and  Brush  Conii)any, 
Ltd.,  Waterloo,  Ont.,  to  Canadian  Grocer. 
"In  the  poorer  grades  all  kinds  of  prices 
are  being  quoted,  but  we  tind,  if  we 
want  corn  that  will  make  even  a  good 
looking  cheap  broom,  we  have  to  pay  a 
fair  price  for  it.  What  the  acreage  or 
tonnage  of  the  new  crop  will  be,  no  one 
can   correctly   foretell   at   this    time,   but 


reports  thus  far  indicate  a  decreased 
acreage  in  nearly  all  districts.  However 
since  broom  corn  ^an  be  planted  in  some 
districts  as  late  as  July  1  to  15,  there 
may  be  some  changes  in  the  situation 
by  the  time  planting  is  entirely  over. 
The  matter  of  tonnage  cannot  be  esti- 
mated tor  another  few  months.  About 
September  15  or  October  1  usually  re- 
veal the  situation  pretty  correctly  so  far 
as  tannage  is  concerned." 

"The  price  of  the  new  crop  will  no 
doubt  be  governed  very  largely  in  the 
first  place  by  deiiiand,  and  also  by  the 
l)ri<'es  prevailing  for  other  farm  pro- 
ducts," continued  Mr.  Snyder.  "There 
does  not  appear  to  be  any  heavy  carry 
over,  of  I'eally  choice  corn  from  last 
year's  crop,  but  even  this  report  may 
be  proved  to  be  entirely  incorrect,  for  if 
opening  pi-ices  on  new  crop  should  be 
low,  there  will  no  doubt  be  a  great  rush 
to  unload  what  corn  has  been  carried 
over.  Practically  everything  depends  as 
to  what  kind  of  weather  they  will  have 
from  now  until  the  time  the  broom  croj) 
is  harvested." 


Prize     Winners 

In     Winnipeg 
Travellers'  Parade 

The  prize  winners  in  the  commercial 
travellers  industrial  parade  on  Saturday, 
July  2,  have  been  announced,  the  judges 
giving  credit  spcially  to  the  exhibitors 
in  the  industrial  class  for  the  care  and 
expense  that  they  had  given  to  their  ex- 
hibits. 

The  following  are  the  winners  in  the 
four   sections: 

Industrial — Dominion  Rubber  company, 
first  prize.  Bathing  girls.  This  float  also 
wen  second  prize  in  the  sporting  class. 
Second  prize  Hudson's  Bay  company— 
a  float  representing  a  York  boat.  Third 
prize,  Institute  of  the  Blind—exhibit  of 
brooms  manutactured   by   the  inmates. 

Sperling — First  prize,  Manitoba  Curl- 
ing Association — a  huge  curling  stone, 
.f3:>5.  Second  prize.  Dominion  Rubber 
company — bathing  girls,  $15. 

Aut(  mobile— First  prize.  Western  Can- 
ada Motors — Packard  bride's  car,  50  gal- 
lons electro  gasoline.  Second  prize, 
Western  Canada  Motors — decorated  Stud- 
ebaker. 

Comic— First  prize,  D.  F.  Reid— cheese 
ct  police,  and  lieu  Watson,  hootch  in- 
spector, $25.  Second  prize,  hoboes'  band 
!fl5. 

The  gorilla  police  collected  $84  in  the 
course  of  the  parade  in  "fines."  The 
money  is  being  given  to  the  Knowles' 
Home   lor  Boys. 


CO-OI'KKATIVE     STORE 

.VA.>.4GER    IN    DIFFICFLTIES 

Hamilton,  July  4. — A  warrant  has  been 
issued  for  the  arrest  of  Manager  Pritch- 
ett  of  the  Georgetown  and  Glen  Williams 
c;o-operative  Society.  The  case  was 
heard  at  Oakville,  before  Magistrate 
Shields,  and  the  charge  was  that  of  issu- 
ing  a   false    financial    statement. 

Frank's  Grocery  has  changed  location 
from  .\icholas  Street,  to  791  Bank  Street, 
Bank  and  Tliirrt  Ave.  Ottawa. 


READER'S  NOTICE 

Regarding 
CHANGE  OF  ADDRESS 

A  Request  For  Change  of 
Address  must  reach  us  at 
least  thirty  days  before  the 
date  of  the  issue  with  which 
it  is  to  take  effect.  Dupli- 
cate copies  cannot  be  sent  to 
replace  those  undelivered 
llii'ougli  failure  to  send  this 
advance  notice.  Be  sure  to 
^i\e  your  old  address  as  well 
as  the  new  one. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


23 


Another  Grocer  Who  Believes  a 

Gasoline  Tank  Helps  Sale  of  Groceries 

W.  W  Templeman,  North  River,  Ont.  states  that 
.since  he  has  installed  a  gasoline  tank,  a  number  of 
automobile  owners  now  buy  groceries  from  him, 
whereas  before  they  went    elsewhere  for  them. 


\\!  W.  Teir^pleman,  North  River,  Ont. 
•  is  another  grocer  who  believes 
that  a  gasoline  tank  Ls  profitable  invest- 
ment. Mr.  Templeman  has  a  fine  generial 
^1  ne,  situated  in  the  north  country,  six 
miles  from  Coldwater,  in  the  township 
of  Matchadach.  It  is  a  thriving  farming 
community.  Since  the  installation  of  the 
tank,  Air.  Templeman  has  done  a  large 
trade  in  gasoline.  But  as  Mr.  Temple- 
man pointed  out,  the  other  day  to  a 
Canadian  Grocer  representative,  it  is  not 
only  the  .sale  of  gasoline  that  has  been 
helped  by  the  installation  of  the  tank, 
but  the  fact  that  peolple  come  here  for 
their  gasoline,  has  meant  more  sales  ot 
groceries.  "Since  I  put  in  the  tank," 
Mr.  Templeman  remarked,  "a  great 
many  farmers  who  formerly  went  to 
town  for  their  weekly  supplies  of  gro- 
ceries )are  buying  them  from  me.  While 
the  profit  on  sales  of  gasoline  are  small, 
the  fact  that  I  am  selling  more  groceries 
makes  the  investment  in  the  tank  well 
worth    while." 

.>fiik('s  the  Store   AUractivo 

Mr.  Templeman  has  a  gener,al  store 
that  is  worthy  of  a  much  larger  place 
than  this  little  country  centre  of  North 
River.  It  is  a  spacious  building,  well 
kiioi,  and  well  equipped  with  proper 
facillities  for  rendering  the  best  pos- 
sible service  to  his  trade.  Mr.  Temple- 
man has  seen  the  profitable  results  tlyit 
have  resulted  for  making  his  sore  as 
attractive  ,  as  it  is  possible  for  him  to 
do.  He  has  two  windows  and  even  in 
country,  he  states,  that  these  can  be 
used  to  advant,age  for  display  purposes, 
and  can  assist  materially  in  the  selling 
of  goods.  Everything  that  tends  to  pro- 
mote trade  and  increase  his  turnover 
.\lr.   Templeman  is  keen  to  ado^it. 

(  lit-csc  CufttT  is  IiiTaliiable 

He  has  ,-v  cheese  cutter  that  has  been 
invaluable  to  him,  in  the  way  of  in- 
creasing sales.  In  fact  he  states  that  a 
glass  enclosed  cutter  is  the  only  way  to 
sell  cheese,  and  he  would  not  go  back  to 
the  way  .again  for  anything.  The  cheese 
is  kept  at  all  times  in  first-class  condit- 
ion. The  case  enclosing  it,  stands  on 
the  counter  in  a  conspicuous  place,  and 
liiis  too,  Mr.  Templeman  claims,  is  an 
important   factor   in    the   way   of   sales. 

Mr.  Templenijan  is  doing  a  business 
of  about  thirty  thousand  dollars  an- 
nually, averaging  about  $2,.'')00  per 
month.  He  pays  iparticular  attention  to 
the   matter   of   turnover,   and   endeavors 


to  turn  his  stock  once  in  every  month 
and  a  half.  Quick  turnovers,  he  realizes 
constitute  the  best  method  of  profitably 
constructive  business.  In  the  readjust- 
ment that  has  taken  place  in  values, 
it  has  been  Mr.  Tem pieman's  policy  to 
follow  the  market  downward,  to  take 
his  losses  as  soon  as  possible,  and  to 
give  his  customers  the  benefit  of  declin- 
ing markets.  Following  this  plan  he 
got  back  normal  quicker  than  the  fel- 
low who  continued  to  sell  his  goods  at 
the  old  prices,  and  was  slow  to  take 
his  losses. 


.MKSSINA   l,KMO\S  IUKK(  T  KHOM 

ITAI.V    AKHIVH    AT    .^lONTKKAL 

.\lontrtal. — The  S.  S.  Canadian  .Miller, 
of  the  Canadian  Government  Merchant 
Marine  service,  arrived  in  Montreal 
early  last  week  with  a  cargo  of  Messina 
lemcns  direct  trcm  Italy.  This  marks 
practically  the  opening  of  Montreal  as  a 
point  of  distributiim  for  fruit  for  the 
Dominion  of  Canada.  Although  there  was 
;i  tuU  cargo  of  fruit,  only  600  crates 
were  consigned  to  Montreal  and  the  rest 
were  billed  for  dealers  west  of  here  as 
far  as  Braiuh.n.  Man.  One  dealer  stated 
that  this  undertaking  sc  far.  has  proved 
satisfactory  and  may  mean  that  Canada 
will  be  more  independent  in  the  future 
as  lar  as  the  fruit  exchange  is  concerned. 
At  the  time  of  the  arrival  of  these  lem- 
ons prices  are  soaring.  California  lem- 
ons are  alinc^t  done,  and  within  twc 
days  the  price  went  from  $9  per  case  to 
ifll  with  every  indication  that  it  will  go 
highei-  with  a  scarcity  of  lemons. 


L!VK  KKTAILEH  \0W 

A    CLOSK    KADEK    OF 

TKAIH;  I'l  BLICATION 

"How  many  of  you  r<'jul  a  trade 
])ubIication  rcff ularly  J"  asked  Mr. 
Slockdalc,  and  like  a  flash  ,  all 
hands   shot  skywards. 

"That's  fjood,"  said  the  speaker. 

"YoH  will  get  in  your  trade  puh- 
licafioii  a  lot  of  thiiif^s  you  can- 
not >jet  anywli<«re  else.  It.  fol- 
lowed carefully,  a  good  tragic 
]Hil)lication  should  he  a  decided 
asset.  1  want  to  cougratulate  you 
ou  being  such  good  readers  of 
trade  puhlicatious. 


New  Goods  Column 

Grape -O-Phos  is  a  new  product  being 
placed  en  the  Ontario  market.  It  is  man- 
ufactured by  the  Grap-0-Phos  Company, 
Limited,  of  Toronto.  It  is  a  summer  bev- 
erage made  from  grapes.  The  drink  is 
made  by  putting  a  teaspoontul  of  Grap-0- 
Plios  in  a  glass  of  water  with  sugar  add- 
ed. The  company  also  manufactures 
fountain  syrups  fc>i'  fountain  use.  The 
president  of  the  company  is  W.  J.  Ruth. 
and  G.  Holden  ot  \'ancouver  is  the  man- 
aging director.  Grap-0-Phos  has  been 
n.anufactured  in  Vancouver  for  some 
lime. 

The  National  Casii  Register  Company 
have  designed  a  new  cash  register.  The 
new  machine  is  called  "Class  1100".  It 
is  l)uilt  in  several  different  models,  a- 
(lapted  for  use  in  varied  lines  of  busi- 
ness. At  each  operation  of  the  register, 
;i  receipt  is  printed  and  issued.  This 
receipt  shows  the  merchant's  name  and 
address,  the  amount  and  number  of  the 
transaction,  and  the  date.  It  is  a  lower 
priced  machine,  the  manufacturers 
pionting  out  that  it  is  designed  to  sell 
lo  merchants  starting  in  business  who 
perhaps  cannot  afford  or  do  not  wish  to 
invest  a  large  amount  of  money  in  a 
cash  register,  such  as  the  standard 
models. 


HAVK    VtM     HEAKI)   THESE 

(Being,  on  this  occasion,  advertise- 
ments and  signs  found  ,at  various  times 
in  various  newspapers  and  places,  and 
which  were  funny  without  the  authors' 
intent.) 

Wanted:  Real  estate  broker,  desires 
jiartner,   >iutoniobile   preferred. 

.Middle  aged  man  of  no  habits  wishes 
position. 

First-class  ready  to  wear  saleslady 
wanted. 

$250  buys  a  late  model — This  car 
won't  last  over  a  day. 

-Annual  sale  now  on.  Don't  go  else- 
where  to   be   cheated.   Come   in   here. 

Wanted:  room,  by  two  gentlemen  a- 
bout  thirty  feet  long  and  twenty  feet 
l)road . 

Brown  the  furrier  beg.s  to  announce 
that  he  will  make  up  cloaks,  caps,  etc. 
for   ladies  out  of  their  skins. 

Bulldog  for  sale;  will  eat  anything; 
very  fond  of  children. 

Wanted  a  boy  who  can  open  oy.sters 
with   reference. 

Bella  Meads  Sweats  in  the  Corner 
Drug   Store.. 

Clothes  pressed  while  you  wait.. 
Please  don't  stand  in  the  doorway. 

Sign  on  a  Restaur;ant:  Closed.  Gone 
home  to  dinner. 

Sign  on  Butcher  Shop:  I  butcher  my- 
self every  Saturday. 

In  a  music  shop:  "Keep  your  eye  on 
the  girl   you  love"  and  thirty  others. 

Wanted,  a  boy  to  be  partly  outside 
and  ipartly  behind  the  counter. 


ANADtAN    GROCEk 


July  8,  1921 


Providing  UniqueService  to  Farmers  in  District 

(iroccr  in  Ilumberslone,  Onl.,  goes  al'kr  l)usincss  with  aulo- 
in()l)ile  rilled  as  a  grocery  store — covers  fanners  in  all  direc- 
tions williin  a  radius  of  ten  miles — slarled  with  serving  collag- 
ers  on  Lake  Erie,  biil  extends  ()j)eiations  to  take  in  rural 
sections. 


/'^oiiiR  after  business  with  an  aiitomo- 
^-'  bile  fitted  as  a  grocery,  moving  here, 
there  and  everywhere  in  the  country  sur- 
rounding Humberstone,  Ont.,  G.  E.  White 
of  this  place  is  building  a  trade  that  is 
increasing  revenue  in  the  most  gratfying 
mannei-.  Covering  a  radius  of  ten  miles 
on  all  sides  of  the  tov/n,  the  patronage 
extended  to  this  moving  grocery  store, 
'las   exceeded    all    exi)ectations. 

Takes    Well    Willi    Hiinii   Seclions 

Mr.  White  has  a  grocery  stoie  in  llum- 
lierstone,  and  it  is  just  a  year  ago  this 
summer  that  he  first  conceived  the  idea 
of  seiving  the  summer  residents  along 
Lake  Krie,  in  this  novel  manner.  Having 
been  encouraged  with  the  results  of  his 
first  venture,  lie  extended  operations  to 
the  rural  sections,  and  now  the  farms  in 
all  the  surrcninding  country  are  vsiited, 
and  the  whole  system  of  calls  is  working 
smoothly.  The  regular  schedule  that  Mr. 
White  has  outlined  is  bringing  increased 
business  all  the  time.  Each  morning  Mr. 
White  starts  out,  covering  a  different 
section  each  day,  and  giving  tiie  people 
(j{  the  district  a  weekly  service  that  is 
very  much  appreciated.  Mr.  Whitte  ad- 
heres closely  to  his  schedule  of  calls,  so 
that  people  always  know  just  when  he 
is  likely  t(j  turn  up,  iind  they  can  de- 
pond  upon  a  certain  time  in  which  to 
givV-   their   orders,  and    they   know    pretty 


accurately  just  when  the  same  will  be 
delivered.  Mr.  White  uses  a  large  Max- 
well  car. 

Ciinies  Slock  With  Him 

The  car  is  fitted  with  a  number  of 
cupboard  like  compartments,  on  both 
sides,  with  space  down  the  centre  for 
moving  about.  A  full  stock  of  goods  is 
carried,  and  the  assortment  of  course 
is  such  as  to  please  the  most  fastidious. 
Everything  that  can  be  purchased  in  the 

(ore  can  be  bought  from  this  car,  and 
Mr.  White  pays  parti<;ular  attention  to 
his  stock,  assuring  his  trade  of  his  desire 
to  get  them  what  they  want  in  the  way 
of  groceries,  and  if  he  happens  not  to 
have  the  particular  goods  requested,  he 
gets  it  for  the  customer,  and  the  same  is 
delivered  on  the  next  trip.  In  calling  on 
the  farmers,  he  also  makes  a  practice  of 
accepting  farm  produc?  in  exchange  for 
groceries.  In  the  summer  months,  in  ad- 
dition to  carrying  the  staple  lines,  he 
carries  fresh  fruits  in  season,  ice  cream 
and  othei'  seasonable  lines  that  take  well 
with   tlie   public  in    the   hot   weather. 

Appr<'(iale  llie  Seriicc 

The  service  to  the  summer  collagers 
along  Lake  Erie  is  much  appreciated  l)y 
them,  and  it  is  the  accomodation  tln.t  has 
meant    so    niucli    in    tlic    ur(rwth    of    .\li-. 


White's  trade.  One  satisfied  customer 
has  told  another,  and  so  the  business 
has  grown.  The  fact  too  that  farmers 
can  get  groceries  delivered  right  to  their 
(lo(,r  has  influenced  a  good  many  cust- 
(miers  to  place  their  orders  or  to  buy 
direct  from  the  travelling  car.  In  the 
busy  hot  days,  when  farmers  are  in  the 
liiick  of  the  harvest,  it  is  frequently 
impossible  to  make  a  trip  to  town  for 
supi)lies.  Mr.  White  realized  this  and  the 
solution  of  this  problem  of  the  busy 
farmer's  wife,  is  found  in  the  trips  that 
he   makes   daily   into   the   country. 

Kp(iHir<s   a   Second   Truck 

This  motor  grocery  trade  of  Mr. 
White's  has  grown  to  such  a  degree  that 
this  summer,  in  order  to  handle  the 
Ijcach  trade,  it  was  necessary  to  add 
an(  ther  truck  to  look  after  the  summer 
re-idents.  The  difficulty  appeared  to  be 
one  of  getting  the  right  man  to  handle 
this  business,  Mr.  White  having  looked 
after  the  farmers'  trade  in  the  daily  trips 
out  through  the  country. 

".Vly  car  is  really  bringing  the  biggest 
share  of  my  .trade,"  Mr.  White  told  a 
representative  of  Canadian  Grocer  the 
otiier  day.  While  Mr.  While  has  a  clean, 
liright,  attractive  little  store,  it  is  chief- 
ly patronized  by  the  townspeople,  the 
farmers  giving  their  trade  largely  to 
tile  car. 


Where   Equipment   Improves   the   Service   And    Has   Meant   A 

Great   Deal    In   Building   And   Increasing  Trade 


Interior  view  of  the  store  of  Adams  Bros.,  Lindsay    Ont.  Dust    proof   pivoted    bins,    computing    scales, 
credit  register,  biscuit  cabinet  and  other  accessoriea  have  had  a  great  deal  to  do  with  building  up  the 
bualnesB  of  this  firm    by  enabling  them  to  give   a  hotter  service  to   the  cuslomer  increasing  the  turn- 
over aud  cuttiug  down  waste  which  ns  lower  overhead  expense. 

naturally  mea 


July  8,  1921 


canaCian  grocer 


26 


Stray    Thoughts    on    Present    Conditions 


(joods  arc  worth  present  value  and  no  more- — 
f  ieials  make  the  statement  that  "grocers  are  the 
ness  men,"  clauning  that  they   take    earnings 
that    few    of    them    make    anything. 

By   Henry      Johnston,  Jr. 


f  am  not  going  to  talk  about  the  war, 
"optimism"  or  '•inspiration";  unless, 
indeed,  it  be  the  continual  war  of  busi- 
ness—for. "business,  is.  war"  as  the 
famous  "Iron  Woman"  said— and  for  the 
rest,  I  hope  to  put  down  homely  com- 
mon sense,  perhaps  a  little  logical  "re- 
:4piration."  I  say  this  because  In  so 
many  gatherings  and  conventions  I  get 
such  blasts  of  super-heated  atmosphere 
which  gets  us  nothing  in  particular,  and 
I   am   heartily   sick   of   it  all. 

Some  months  ago  a  government  offic- 
ial made  an  investigation  of  our  busi- 
ness and  concluded  from  what  he  found 
that  "Grocers  are  the  poorest  of  busi- 
ness men."  He  showed  how  not  only 
have  we  not  followed  prices  up  but 
that  we  take  earnings  so  inadequate  that 
few  of  us  make  anything.  His  story  was 
copied  far  and  wide  and  wus  eagerly 
devoured  as  a  sort  of  justilicalion  of  the 
grocer.  Why  did  it  not  rather  make  us 
Hang  our  heads  in  shame  that  he  should 
be  relating  the  truth  about  us?  We  are 
l)0()r  business  men;  but  let  us  not  brag 
ul)out  it!  Let  us  r,ather  seek  the  reasons 
and  determine  to  improve.  Let  us  rem- 
'  ;-ihf>!-.  too.  that  fact.s  are  pitiless  and 
unforgiving.  We  may  cry  "unfair",  but 
so  long  as  we  cannot  cry  "nntrne"  It  is 
up  to  U.S  to  win  inside  the  rules  of  our 
lulling.    Let    us,    then,   face    issues. 

(jloods  Worth  I'resi'iit    Value— ^  No  More 

The  manufacturer  of  an  advertised 
chocolate  has  priced  his  goods  ou  the 
decline  so  the  grocer's  cost  is  '.lHVz  cents 
the  pound  tin.  The  highest  price  reach- 
til  during  the  war  was  around  41c. 
<'urtain  other  similar  goods  cost  the 
grocer  SO  cents  to-day.  Both  are  sold 
;it  60c.  and  sales  are  rejported  as  "slow"' 
Of  course,  they  are!  One  is  slow  be- 
cause it  pays  the  grocer  only  16  2-3  per 
( out  gross.  The  other  because  the  gro- 
!•(  r  tries  to  get  the  impossible  margin 
of  40  per  cent .  One  grocer  says,  in  pal- 
liation, "perhaps  what  I  have,  cost  me 
more  than  to-day's  prite."  If  it  did,  then 
he  bought  too  much,  of  with  bad  judg- 
ment. In  either  case,  market  must  rulo 
or    sales    cannot    result. 

F'or  justification  of  my  contention  let 
nie  say  that  the  commonest  experience 
I  had  during  the  ytars  1918  and  1919 
wa.s  for  grocers  to  ask  me  whelhe^r  mar- 
ket values  should  rule,  or  actual  cost. 
1  replied  "inarkei  value".  And  every 
lime  1  did  tkat,  I  was  applauded  vigor- 
ously. More  than  a  year  ago  a  United 
States  judge  ruled  that  a  grocer  v/as 
entitled  to  market  value  as  his  basis  of 
figuring  "because  he  is  just  as  much 
entitled  to  profit  by  enh«tnced  values  in 


his  goods  as  anybody  else".  That,  too, 
was  heartily  approved.  But  if  you  say 
the  same  thing  to-day,  you  will  have 
applause  greet  you.  Xo:  you  will  have 
silence  so  thick  you  might  cut  it! 

Result  is  that  grocers  everywhere  are 
losing  sales  to  department  stores  and 
chains.  They  are  playing  right  into  the 
hands  of  those  who  are  more  wakeful 
to  business  rules  than  ourselves. 

Glance  at  the  Department  Store 

Look  at  the  department  store.  Do  you 
shy  off  and  cry  "unfair  cmpetitior"  and 
otherwise  play  the  baby  act!  Just  face 
department  store  is  heer  and  heer  to 
condtions.  For  it  is  a  condition  that  the 
stay.  Note,  too,  that  it  succeeds  almost 
universally,  while  grocers  succeed  only 
live  per  cent  worth-meaning  that  five  ia 
one  hundred  are  money  makers.  Yet  the 
a\'«rage  department  store  expense  is  a- 
round  twenty  seven  per  cent  while  that 
of  the  grocer  is  around  sixteen  -ten  to 
eleven  handicap  on  the  defljarlment 
store.  How,  then,  does  the  department 
store  man  succeed  so  universally?  Three 
vital    reasons: 

He  knows  how   to   figure. 

He  faces  facts  and  does  figure. 

He    sells    goods. 

Per  contra: 

The  grocer  does  not  know  how  to 
figure;  he  dodges  facts:  he  does  not 
sell — he  only  buys! 

Knowing  the  fatality  of  being  out  to 
line  on  any  staple  article,  or  on  any 
article  not  exclusively  conirolled,  tne 
department  store  keeps  "shoppers'  busy 
all  the  time.  These  are  women — Irom 
three  to  a  dozen  in  a  store  force — whose 
sole  business  it  is  to  buy  competitors' 
goods  and  bri.ig  them  in  for  comiparison. 
This  close  observation  is  carried  to  the 
finest  point  admitted  by  each  depart- 
ment manager'.s  knowledge  and  skill, 
and  remember  we  are  talking  of  the 
best  trained  retailers  there  are. 

You  may  be  "right"  on  sugar,  flour 
and  butter,  but  if  your  customer  is  ask- 
ed 60  cents  by  you  for  a  tin  of  chocolate 
and  kriows  the  department  man  has  it 
advertised  regularly  for  50  cents,  you 
are  apt  to  find  that  such  irregularities 
ar^  fatal.  Better  sell  at  50  cents,  getting 
full  29  per  cent  on  the  sale — and  get- 
ting it  often  on  a  rapid  turn — and  keup 
your  customer's  confidence,  rather  than 
keep  it  indefinitely  on  your  shelves, 
earnng  you  little  or  nothing  and  losing 
your  trade. 

The  FACT  is  that  this  kind  of  mer- 
chandisins    PAYS   and   the   other   DOES 


government  of- 

poore:^!  of  busi- 

so    inadequate 


.NOT  PAY.  Look  again  at  the  depart- 
ment store.  Study  the  antecedents  of 
any  of  the  Ihem  and  you  will  find  they 
began  small — "came  into  this  town  with 
a  |i)ack  on  his  back,"  is  the  usual  story. 
Those  meH  have  had  no  special  privil- 
ege. They  have  just  worked  hard,  tak- 
ing the  rules  as  they  found  them;  and 
they  are  rich  now.  The  way  is  open  to 
any  grocer  if  he  will  but  follow  it. 

Again,  it  is  only  practicing  the  same 
rules  as  you  approved  when  merchand 
ise  was  on  the  advancing  line —  and 
it's  a  poor  rule  that  does  not  work  both 
ways ! 

A  Horrfble  Example 

One  grocer  in  a  large  city  does  a 
prosperous  meat  biLsiness,  keeping  good 
meats  and  getting  good  prices  for  them. 
At  the  peak  of  the  rise  in  prices  he  sold 
a  certain  can  of  pineapple  for  60  cents. 
.Months  afterwards  his  price  remained 
60  cents,  though  his  neighboring  chain 
units  were  getting  39  cents  for  the 
identical  brand  and  size.  When  he 
learned  this  fact,  he  made  his  price  50 
cents.  Can  you  beat  that  for  future 
folly? 

At  60  cents,  when  the  market  wai 
high,  he  was  getting  a  legitimate  (jrice. 
Toi-day  at  50  cents  he  s  a  flagrant  pro- 
that  is  worthy  of  a  much  larger  placa 
fiteer,  considering  replacement  value. 
Who  will  be  to  blpme  if  he  keeps  his 
stock  and  the  chain  store  steals  a  lot 
of  his  profitable  business?  1  leave  it  to 
you. 

Let  us  draw  an  example  from  recent 
history.  Tiie  tragic  coasetiuences  en- 
tailed by  the  poor  merchandising  of  our 
surplus  ships  holds  a  striking  lesson  for 
every  grocer.  When  the  war  ended  the 
British  government  had  many  ships  it 
(lid  not  need.  Those  shjips  had  cost  out- 
rageous prices,  but  that  "nation  of 
shrewd  shopkeepers"  knew  that  cost 
could  not  be  realized  and,  like  all  good 
traders,  they  also  knew  it  was  the  best 
business  to  take  their  loss  quickly  and 
start  over  without  false  values  on  their 
hooks.  So  they  priced  them  at  $100  the 
ton,  regardle;;s  of  the  fact  that  they  had 
paid  $250.  Rapidly  they  got  rid  of  the 
surplus — and   everybody   was   satsfied. 

Our  shipping  board  was  like  a  lot  of 
grocers,  feeling  that  they  "could  n»t 
sell"  at  such  figure*?.  They  priced  our 
ships  at  $230,  came  down  to  $200,  then 
$175.  They  lagged  behind  real  values 
and  sold  few  ships.   Such  as  were  sold 

(Continued  on  Page  28). 


26 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN  GROCER 

MEMBER  OF  THE  ASSOCIATED  BUSINESS  PAPERS 
ESTABLISHED  1886 


1  he  Only   Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 


Published  Every  Friday  by 

THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 
MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 


VOL.  XXXV.        GOLLINGWOOD,  JULY  8,  1921  No.  27 


El  FECTIVE  WINDOW  DISPLAYS 

T^HE  importance  of  window  displays  is  everywhere 
*  admitted  by  progressive  merchants,  and  all  are 
of  the  opinion  that  window  displays  go  hand  in 
hand  with  newspaper  advertising  in  the  successful 
merchandising  of  goods.  The  show  window  is  a 
great  silent  salesman,  often  selling  more  goods  than 
a  staff  of  highly  ti'ained  clerks-  It  reminds  the 
great  buying  public  of  its  necessities,  and  keeps 
people  informed  with  new  suggestions  and  prices. 
A  good  window  is  inexpensive  and  effective  in  pro- 
moting sales. 

Tffe  well  dressed  window  is  the  merchant's  point 
of  contract  with  the  public.  It  reflects  the  policy 
and  personality  of  the  business.  Effective  advert- 
ising and  show  window  displays  are  the  eyes  of 
your  store.  Careless,  ill-arranged  window  displays 
are  fatal  to  business.  Attractive  window  dsplays 
have  become  a  necessity.  The  inclination  to  buy  is 
aroused  in  the  customer's  mind,  not  his  pocket 
books. 

It  is  up  to  the  grocer  to  make  the  most  of  his 
windows.  Every  opportunity  for  the  displays  of 
seasonable  lines  should  be  taken  advantage  of.  The 
value  of  a  good  display  has  been  proved  time  and 
time  again,  and  constitutes  one  of  the  big  factors 
in  stimulating  and  increasing  sales. 


THE  POSTMAN,  THE  DELIVERY  BOY 

THE  problem  of  delivery  is  one  that  gives  the  gro- 
cer a  good  deal  of  concern,  but  the  merchants  of 
Los  Angeles,  California,  have  found  the  solution  of 
the  difficulty,  and  henceforth  the  postman  is  to  be- 
come the  grocer's  delivery  boy-  It  appears  that  the 
experiment  has  proved  to  be  a  .success  in  St-  Paul, 
Minnesota-  Under  this  system  all  merchandise  will 
be  delivered  by  j^arcel  post.  The  post  office  installs 
depots  in  various  localities  for  the  assembling  and 
distributing  of  parcels  in   the  familiar  mail   way. 


According  to  reports  from  St.  Paul,  this  plan  has 
proved  a  real  boon  to  the  grocery  trade,  and  likewise 
to  the  houswife.  The  latter  knows  that  her  order 
must  be  in  at  a  certain  hour,  and  also  the  time 
at  which  her  goods  will  arrive. 

It  has  proved  to  be  a  real,  economy  to  the  grocery 
trade  and  the  entire  community  has  benefitted  by  the 
experiment.  Such  a  plan  has  not  been  considered 
in  this  country,  but  undoubtedly  retail  merchants 
in  Canada  will  follow  with  interest  the  working  out 
of  the  plan,  as  it  is  gradually  adopted  in  the  United 
States.  Anything  that  will  result  in  economy  for 
the  retail  merchant  in  the  matter  of  delivery  as 
well  as  give  real  service  to  the  public,  will  meet  with 
approval  by  merchants  generally. 


GOOD     ADVERTISING 

Most  dealers  think  of  their  advertising  as 
.something  that  they  must  do  in  their  own  behalf 
and  overlook  the  fact  that  store  news  is  something 
people  are  entitled  to,  to  justify  their  continued 
trade. 

Next  to  good  store  service  nothing  benefits 
customers  so  much  as  good  advertising.  When  it 
expresses  the  definite  convictions  of  the  dealer  it 
multiplies  his  usefulness.  That  is  the  reason  good 
advertising  pays.  It  multiplies  opportunities  of 
service. 

One  grocer  who  at  every  opportunity  denounces 
the  practice  attempts  to  compromise  with  the  evil 
by  stipulating  that  his  "advertised  bargains"  can 
only  be  .secured  along  with  an  order.  It  is  very  doubt- 
fid  if  this  plan  succeeds,  since  two  other  grocers 
within  a  block  of  him  play  "follow  the  leader"  on 
every  move  he  makes.  No  one  is  any  further  ahead. 
The  public  laugh  to  themselves  at  this  wholesale  cut- 
throat business,  and  distrust  in  the  fairness  of  the 
general  grocery  price  is  bred  in  the  m  inds  of  those 
who  are  carefully  watching  for  the  high  cost  of  liv- 
ing to  come  down . 

Let  the  merchant  base  his  selling  price  on  his 
present  csts  and  get  rid  of  any  surplus  stock  he  may 
have.  But  price  cutting  should  be  done  with  "kid 
gloves." 


EDITORIALS  IN  BRIEF 

Do  you  ever  take  a  look  at  the  outside  and  the 
inside  of  your  store  wth  eyes  of  a  customer?  There 
are  many  things  you  see  every  day  and  do  not 
notice  at  all 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


21 


CURRENT  NEWS  OF  THE  WEEK 

Canadian  Grocer  Will  Appreciate  Items  of  News  from  Readers  for  This  Page 


^Taritimes 

The  Maritime  salesmen  of  the  Dayton 
Scale  Division  of  the  International  Busi- 
ness Machines  Co.,  'I'oronto,  Ont.,  held 
their  annual  mid -summer  convention  re- 
cently at  their  Maritime  Headciuarters, 
44  Granville  Street,  Halifax,  N.S.  The 
salesmen  attending  were:  George  Bonny- 
castle,  Sales  Mgr.;  C.  H.  Good,  Maritime 
Mpr. ;  J.  R.  Clarke,  Northern  New  Brun- 
swick; E.  F.  Lawlor,  St.  John,  N.B.; 
N.  E.  Myrer,  Charlottetown ;  H.  E.  Bridge, 
Sydney;  George  Harmeyer,  St.  Johns, 
Nfld.;  J.  S.  Thompson,  Halifax;  S.  G. 
Mifklewright,  Halifax;  J.  M.  Stein,  Hali- 
fax. The  Convention  lasted  for  two  days 
anfi  on  Saturday  evening  a  banquet  was 
given  the  Salesmen  at  the  Queen's  Hotel. 


Quebec 


E.  P.  Roberts,  representing  the  whole- 
sale brokerage  firm  of  John  T.  McBride 
&  Co.,  Montreal,  is  in  England  on  a  busi- 
trip. 

P.  M.  Gerard,  of  the  wholesale  grocery 
firm  of  Hudon  Herbert  &  C;ie  Ltd..  of 
Montreal,  is  on  his  holidays  and  will  be 
absent  from  his  office  until  July  IS. 

C.  G.  Gray,  manager  of  the  tea  de- 
partment of  Harrison's  and  Crossfield, 
Ltd.,  of  Montreal,  will  return  from  his 
trip  to  England  and  Scotland  on  the  S. 
S.   Carmania  on  the  fifteenth  of  August. 

Geoiges  Patry,  a  grocer  of  the  City 
of  Quebec,  doing  business  at  22  Fabrique 
Street,  was  drowned  in  the  Jaques  River 
at  Tewkesbury  early  a  few  days  ago, 
when  ills  daughter.  Georgette,  aged 
eighteen,  and  his  son  Henri,  aged  ten, 
also  perished. 


Ontario 


N.  Cohen,  Alliston,  Ont.,  has  opened  a 
new  general  store. 

Two  Russians,  Walter  '  Scholte  and 
Fred  Rutage,  are  charged  in  Milton,  Ont., 
with  burglarizing  Taylor  Bros.'  store  at 
Burlington.  They  were  placed  un;!er 
>Trest  a  few  nights  ago.  and  are  novv  o.i 
a  week's  remaiui. 

The  Christie  Brown  Biscuit  Co.,  To- 
ronto, ha:;  purchased  the  old  De  La  Salle 
Institute  at  Duke  and  George  Stieets, 
Toronto,  and  will  us«  the  same  for  stor- 
age purposes. 

James  Long,  for  ia.uiy  years  in  the 
flour  and  feed  and  grocery  bu  iness  ui 
Whitby,  Ont.,  passed  away  in  hi;  7kh 
year,  o.i  Wednesday,  Ju'.y  6th.  He  \\a;  lij 
years  in  business.  He  is  aurviveil  by  hia 
wife,  two   soiiS  and  live  Caugiiterj. 

The  New  Liikeara  Farmer;'  Co  Optr- 
ative  Co.  of  New  Liskeard,  Ont,  i;  nov/ 
doing  busineis  in  their  new  quarters, 
lilt'  old  Watso.i  retail  store  premises  L. 


A.   Lapointe  is  the  new  manager. 

The  Guelph  Retail  Grocers'  Association 
will  hold  its  Fourth  Annual  Picnic  on 
Wednesday  afternoon,  August  10th,  to 
Puslinch  Lake. 

The  Border  Cities  Retail  Merchants' 
Association  is  arranging  for  its  second 
annual  Pure  Food  and  Electric  show 
which  takes  place  in  Windsor,  Ont.,  the 
week  beginning  October  17th. 

C.  A.  Bartosh  who  for  11  years  has 
conducted  a  meat  market  at  Essex,  Ont., 
has  disposed  of  his  business  to  Hubert 
Asscltine. 

Joseph  Vickers  of  Coatsworth,  Ont., 
is  rushing  work  on  a  new  general  stcn-e 
and  expects  to  be  ready  for  opening  a- 
bout  the  end  of  the  month. 

R.  C.  Rathwell  of  Strathroy,  Ont., 
has  sold  his  grocery  business  to  T.  M. 
Davis,  of  Petrolea.  Mr.  Rathwell  plans 
to  go  more  extensively  into  the  baking 
and    confectionery   trade. 

James  Mclnlyre  has  been  appointed 
manager  of  the  new  general  store  at 
Waidsville,  Ont.  Work  is  being  rushed 
on  the  building  and  it  will  be  ready  for 
opening  in  a  few  days. 

James  H.  Cardy,  Broadview  Ave.,  To- 
lonlo.   has   sold    to    Israel    Gimbel. 

Phillips,  Forrin  &  Kieiman,  Hamilton, 
have  dissolved.  Myer  Kieiman  is  con- 
tinuing the  business. 

John  -Muir,  grocer  at  262  Danforth 
avenue,  Toronto,  pioneer  merchant,  of 
the  Danfoith  district,  was  awarded  first 
Ijrize  for  the  best  decorated  store  window 
ill  connection  with  the  Danforth  dis- 
trict "gala  week". 


ONK  IDFA  OFTEN  BHI.NGS  .YIOKK 
THAN   SIBSCKII'TION    PKICE 

"We  have  taken  Canadian  (iro- 
cer  for  2S  years,  ">V.  >V.  'I'enijtle- 
nian  ui  North  liiver,  Ont.  tol<l  a 
representative  of  Canadian  <Jroeer 
the  other  daj.  .Mr.  \V.  W .  Teniple- 
nian  lias  only  Iteen  eonductiiip;  the 
store  for  the  jtast  eltfht  years, 
])art  of  which  time  was  spent 
overseas,  hut  his  father  for  twenty 
years  liefore  that,  was  reading; 
Canadian  (inieer.  "It  only  means 
a  cost  of  eig'ht  cents  a  week,"  .>Ir. 
Tenipleton  added,  "and  sometimes 
one  idea  or  sug'^estion  from  ('an> 
adian  (Grocer,  to  say  nothing  of 
the  valne  of  the  market  informat- 
ion, is  worth  the  price  of  an  entire 
year's  SHbscrii)tion.  We  are  quite 
a  distance  from  other  grocers,  and 
Canadian  Grocer  serves  to  keep 
lis  informed  as  to  what  other 
tfrocers  are  doing." 


The    Culture    And 

Manufacture     Of 

Tea     Is     Subject 

All  interesting  address  was  given  re 
cently  before  the  Rotary  Club,  St. 
Jolin,  N.B.,  by  W.  R.  Miles  of  the  T. 
H.  Estabrook  Co.  Ltd.,  the  subject  be- 
ing the  culture  and  manufacture  of  tea. 
The  speaker  said  that  tea  had  beei. 
grown  in  China  in  3,000  B.C.,  but  it  was 
not  until  alter  the  restoration  that  it 
was  introduced  into  Europe.  It  was  first 
gi(,\vn  in  (Miiiia  and  Japan  and  later, 
under  European  culture,  in  Sumatra 
.lava,  Ceylon  and  India.  Europeans  lirst 
started  to  raise  the  China  plant  in  India, 
but  it  was  not  successful.  Later  a  tea 
shrub  was  found  growing  wild  in  the 
Himalaya  UKnintains  and  the  present 
plant  was  produced  from  this.  It  took  a 
plant  three  years  to  c(;nie  to  bearing,  and 
seven  years  to  full  bearing.  The  size 
of  the  estates  ranged  from  100  acres  to 
more  than  1,000  acies.  There  are  about 
.VJO.OOO  acres  under  cultivation  now  in 
India.  The  shrub  is  picked  every  tea 
days  during  the  growing  season,  and  is 
allowed  to  grow  to  a  height  ot  from  two 
to  four  feet.  Cultivation  is  carried  on 
much  the  same  as  otlier  farming  elss- 
where. 

Plucking  was  the  only  operation  done 
by  hand,  all  the  lest  being  done  by 
machinery.  The  gathering  is  all  done  by 
women  and  children.  The  sea.50ii  lasts 
ill  China  three  months,  in  India  eight 
months  and  in  Java,  Cleyloii  and  Sumatra 
all  the  year  round.  After  plucking,  the 
leaf  is  brought  into  the  factory,  and  the 
manufacturer  can  make  eitb^.-  green  or 
black.  Green  tea  isproduced  by  arti- 
licial  withering.  Black  tea  is  produced 
by  fermentation.  During  fermentation  the 
leaf  turns  from  a  green  to  a  copper  color, 
and  during  the  drying  prcccss  it  turns 
lilack. 

One  plant  in  a  season  v.'ill  produce 
four  ounces  ol  finished  lea.  An  acre  will 
produce  ."JOO  ix  unds  in  a  season,  but  in 
some  districts  a  plant  will  only  produce 
(lie  and   a  half  ounces. 

Mr.  Miles  told  how  tea  is  (li.strihiited, 
and  said  that  St.  John  lankc'd  with  Mon- 
treal and  Toronto  as  a  port  of  entry  for 
tea  of  all  grades  and  I  hat  more  black 
tea  passed  Ihrciigh  St.  John  than  any 
other  Custom  house  in  ("anada. 


The  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of 
Mai'ito'oa  has  moved  into  a  larger  and 
nil  I  ^  ^•^lCiou'  office  and  is  now  located 
in  Room  402,  Canada  Building,  352  Don- 
ald  Street,   Winnipeg. 


28 

Annual 
In 


Turnover 
This   Store 

Is     $46,000 

Vancouver.  July  6.  -Cloverdale  is  typ- 
ical of  the  towns  on  the  lower  mainland 
ill  British  Columbia.  Su-rroumled  by 
prosperous  fruit,  dairy  and  poultry 
farms,  where  used  to  be  heavy  timber, 
the  town  is  one  of  the  oldest  in  the  Pro- 
vince. Of  the  four  pioneerins  families 
tiiat  first  settled  in  the  community,  long 
before  the  City  of  Vanccuver  was  thought 
of.  it  is  interesting  to  note  that  all  have 
prospered  and  representatives  of  the 
pioneer  stock  are  today  piomineiit  in  the 
community's   life. 

The  proprietor  of  the  leading  Clover- 
dale  general  store  is  one  of  such.  H.  V^ 
Parr  came  into  the-  district  as  a  boy  of  6 
years  and  today  he  owns  the  H.  V.  Parr 
general  store  with  a  turnover  of  $46,000 
per  annum,  farms  a  little  tract  of  three 
acres  ris^ht  in  th'e  town  limits  and  recent- 
ly sold  another   holding   for  $35,000. 

Talking  to  a  representative  of  Can- 
adian   Grocer,    Mr.    Parr    remarked: 

"My  business  has  been  built  up,  and 
has  paid  me  because  I  have  been  person- 
ally present  in  contact  with  all  my  cust- 
omers all  the  lime.  Through  good  years 
and  bad  years  we  have  pulled  along  to- 
gether and  \s(-  always  come  cut  all 
right.  Last  year  this  district  suffered 
an  almost  total  loss.  The  crops  on  the 
flats  were  inundated  by  an  overflow  of 
the  Fraser  and  tributary  rivers,  and  the 
crop=;  rn  the  hills  were  caught  iinharv- 
ested  by  an  early  heavy  rain  that  did 
not  let  up  tor  weeks.  Thousands  of  tons 
of  potatoes  were  never  dug  and  acres 
ot  grain  were  never  harvested — but  we 
have  every  prospect  of  a  bumper  crop 
this  year  and  everything  will  come  out 
a!)  right.  Invincible  optimism  pays  well 
here." 


Maintaining    Volume 

Of   A   Business 

(Continued  from  Page  ;!7). 
"(Jiinine"    Store    Described 

"Perhaps  some  of  you  have  he,ard  of 
the  'Gimme'  store.  Men  who  conduct 
this  class  of  business  will  stock  any- 
thing about  which  (people  come  in  and 
say  'Gimme'.  There  are  some  cases 
where  the  'gimmie'  is  so  strong  and  so 
insistent  that  the  retailer  cannot  buck 
it,  but  he  should  do  ;all  in  his  power 
to  prevent  himself  from  falling  under 
its  spell.  On  of  the  first  essentials  in 
real  selling  is  assortment.  Some  small 
(kalers  keep  stationery  hidden  away  in 
a  caise  lor  the  man  who  comes  in  and 
ifiys  "Gimme  a  box  of  stationery".  He 
does  not  try  to  sell  this  line,  but  keeps 
it  hidden  away  with  his  money  lied  up 
in  it  until  such  time  as  he  is  asked  for 
it. 

"The  man  whose  turnover  is  increased 
two  and  a  half  times  or  more  reduced  his 
cos»t  of  doing  business  to  25  per  cent. 
The  slower  the  turnover  the  larger  the 
cost    of    doing    business.    The    man    who 


CANADIAN   GROCER 

(Imiblos  his  liini()V(M'  brings  bis  ('osl  of 
doing  business  down  to  30  per  cent.  It 
must  lalways  be  remembered  that  things 
done  by  halves  are  never  done  right. 
Go,  back  then,  to  your  stores  and  figure 
out   what  you  are  doing  by  halves. 

Fool-Hardy  Competition 

"There  are  places  where  such  and 
such  an  article  is  not  to  be  found  in 
the  town.  One  merchant  thinks  he  can 
cre,ate  a  demand  and  he  stocks  this  line. 
His  opposition  follows  suit,  and,  per- 
haps, in  a  short  time  three  men  are 
trying  to  do  business  on  something  In 
which  there  is  not  enough  for  even  one. 
Now,  for  the  question  of  display,  if  you 
want  to  learn  something  about  this,  go 
to  the  Greeks.  They  pile  the  stuff  so 
high  on  the  counters  that  it  is  hard  for 
them  to  get  at  their  goods.  However, 
there  is  a  lesson  for  you  in  their  meth- 
ods. Arrange  your  store  for  the  cus- 
tomer. The  five  and  ten  cent  stores  h^ve 
shown  just  w'hat  there  is  in  this.  Put 
your  goods  out.  They  may  get  stolen, 
but  they  get  sold.  Supposing  I  put 
my  goods  out  and  some  one  takes  five 
out  of  every  hundred  I  put  out.  If  I 
increase  my  sales  a  hundred  per  cent., 
who  is  better  off?  Am  I  or  is  the  man 
who  does  not  do  this?  Put  it  down  that 
you  are  going  to  lose  one  or  one  and  a 
half  per  cent.  But  don't  worry  labout 
your  losses  through  stealing.  Let  your 
profits  be  as  high  as  your  losses  in 
your  mind.  If  the  stuff  is  stolen  you 
will  know  that  you  are  displaying  the 
right  goods.  If  the  goods  stay  there 
until  they  get  soiled,  get  rid  of  them 
at  any  price,  and  don't  put  them  out 
again . 

Put  (Joods   Up  High 

"There  are  some  retjajilers  who  do 
not  advertise  enough.  Printed  matter 
rolled  up  around  (parcels  helps  to  tell 
customers  about  the  goods  in  stock,  but 
advertising  and  the  display  first  help  to 
sell  the  goods.  So  in  placing  goods  in 
the  window  don't  put  them  where  peo- 
ple have  to  crane  their  necks  to  look. 
Get  the  goods  up.  The  depths  of  thv^ 
window  does  not  cut  much  ice.  The 
height  does.  A  window  trimmed  from 
tc|j)  to  bottom  sells  goods.  And  don't 
forget  that  goods  eat  up  rent  whether 
they  sell  or  not.  The  lower  you  get 
goods  in  the  window  or  Qase  the  less 
effect.  The  upper  shelves  of  a  floor  case, 
if  well  lighted,  will  sell  goods.  But 
they  must  aways  l)e  up  where  they  can 
be   seen. 

"With  regard  to  nationally-advertised 
goods  we  all  know  that  some  advertisers 
take  advantage  of  the  retailer.  There 
are  some  advertised  lines  I  would  un- 
hesitatingly put  in  the'gimme'  class. 
But  in  choosing  between  nationally-ad- 
vertised and  non-advertised  lines  1 
should  take  care  to  first  anialyze  both 
carefully." 

"What  is  a  safe  percentage  for  the 
retailer  to  spend  in  advertising,"  asked 
W.  M.  Maltby.  president  of  St.  Clair 
Avenue  Business  Men's  Association, 
Toronto. 

"I  should  S|ay  about  two  iper  cent,  of 
sales,  if  done  wisely,"  replied  Mr.  Stock, 


July  8,  192i 


(laic,  adding;  "The  iiv(M-age  retailer  can 
spend  wisely  al)out  two  per  cent,  of  his 
sales.  If  he  lifts  his  volume  ten  per 
cent,  he's  ahead  of  the  game." 
liUCiition  of  Cash  Register 

"Wh,at  would  you  consider  the  best 
location  in  the  store  for  the  cash  reg- 
ister?" asked  another  retailer.  "Do  you 
believe  in  the  psychology  of  following 
their  money?" 

"The  best  place  for  the  cash  regster," 
was  the  reply,  "is  where  it  will  bring 
the  most  business  to  the  store.  If  you 
can  bring  the  ^people  back  into  the  store 
so  much  the  better.  But  don't  try  to 
overdo  it,  and  lead  them  back  too  ^r." 


Stray    Thoughts    On 

Present   Conditions 

(Contiiuu-d  ficm  Page  2')). 
cost  the  purchaser  so  much  that  profit 
ill  competition  with  cheaper  ships  was 
impossible.  Buyers  everywhere  went 
liankrupt  and  instalment  payments  were; 
not  made.  Only  now,,  thirty-two  months 
after  the  armistice,  we  have  a  new 
( hairman  of  the  board  whose  prime 
duty  it  is  to  "liquidate" — that  is,  sell — 
those  ships!  Can  you  see  how  much  wc 
have  lost  that  was  needless,  becjause  we 
hesitated  to  take  our  lose  quickly? 

Yes,  any  thoughtful  merchant  could 
have  foretold  that  the  British  way  was 
logical  and  best;  but  we  do  so  hate 
Ic)  take  the  medicine  ourselves.  Yet  face 
the  issue  we  must — now  and  always — 
that  goods  are  worth  replacement  value 
and  no  more!  Not  to  beat  the  market 
down — not  to  indulge  in  careless,  indis- 
ciiminate  price  cutting  nor  to  imitate 
those  who  do  that,  but  to  follow  values 
promptly  either  way.  That  is  the  les- 
sdii  we  can  absorb  with  profit  from  llie 
experience  of  the  Shipping  Board. 

A  Case  in   Point 

"O.  but  government — that's  different", 
say. you.  Not  a  bit,  as  this  will  show. 
A  bright  grocer  found  200  bushels  of 
jjotatoes  on  hand  last  -inventory.  They 
li;-id  cost  him  $2  the  bushel  laid  in;  but 
the  market  then  was  $1.  He  took  them 
in  at  $2.00  and  priced  them  at  $1.25. 
Then  he  figured  he  was  making  twenty 
per  cent  gross  on  them — and  he  was. 
They  had  "cost"  him  on  his  new  invent- 
ory $1  and  no  more.  He  said  he  could 
not  afford  to  fool  himself.  And  it  is 
interesting  to  note  th,at  ne  is  prosper- 
ous and  grows  rapidly.  All  around  him 
are  old  fogies  who  "can't  sell  below 
cost"  who  are  driving  up,  withering,  and 
will  one  day  blow  away^  while  this  man 
will   liourish! 

This  business  rule  is  good  every  day 
ill  every  year. 


T.  M.  Conron,  manager  of  the  oleo- 
iiiirgarine  department  of  Swift  Canadian 
Limited,  Winnipeg,  is  on  a  vacation  to 
<  'liicago. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


29 


!llllllilllllllllllllilllllllllll,linti:i'^; 


WEEKLY  GROCERY  MARKET  REPORTS 


Statements  from  Buying  Centres 


^iiiii.iiiiiiiiiiihiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiii!;ii):iiii:iiiiiiiiiii!i!:;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'.,iiiiiii'iiiiiiii 


QUEBEC    MARKETS 


I 

yiVTONTREAL,  July  6. —  The  grocery  market  is  quiet  this  week  as 
■  far  as  price  changes.  Business  in  some  lines  shows  improvement 
but  during  this  warm  season  buying  is  light  and  business  too  is 
misettled.  The  fruit  and  vegetable  market  is  brisk  with  a  good  de- 
mand and  fair  supplies  arriving.  New  potatoes  are  advanced  with 
lifhter  supplies  and  smaller  potatoes  offered  Lemons  have  taken 
a  big  jump  in  one  week  and  supplies  are  limited.  Ontario  tomatoes 
are  arriving  in  larger  quantities  through  the  week  This  will  mean 
lower  prices.  Cherries  are  in  bigger  supply  but  it  is  expected 
that  the  season  will  be  short.  The  sugar  market  is  unchanged  but 
lacks  the  confidence  of  the  buyers.  Canned  tomatoes  are  higher  in 
price  and  supplies  are  limited.  There  is  no  change  in  the  tea  or 
coffee  market.  Rice  is  improved  with  a  stronger  market  and  a 
better  demand.  Lower  prices  are  quoted  on  molasses.  Package  goods 
are  steady  in  price  and  the  cereal  market  is  quiet  Walnuts  and 
peanuts  are  stronger  and  raisins  are  short  on  spot  stocks. 


Canned  Tomatoes  Hii^her 


CANNED  GOODS.  Pr:u;lit;illy  tlie  on- 
l.v  change  in  the  canned  Roods  ni.arket  is 
nnother  advance  in  tiie  price  of  Icmatoe.s. 
Supplies  are  limited  to  a  few  wholesale 
houses  with  a  big  demand  at  this  season. 
The  large  size  has  already  advanced  and 
No.  2  is  now  quoted  at  trom  .fl. :'.;'»  u  $1.40, 
i.Mi  advance  of  ten  cents  a  do/pn.  It  is 
rjot  unlikely  that  the  price  v/ill  so  still 
higher.  There  is  a  good  demand  f<  r  near- 


ly   ::ll    lines    of    canned 
prices   are   steady. 
Montreal. 


roods 


the 


CANNED  VEGETABLES 
Asparagus      (Amer.)      mam- 
moth graen   tips    

Asparagus.  Imported  (2V^s)    .... 

Beans,  golden  wax   2   10 

Do.,  Refugee    2  10 

Corn,   2s    1  ^>0 

Carrots    (sliced),   2s    1   45 

Corn   (on  cob),  gallons   ....   7  00 

Spinach,   .'!s    2  85 

Squash,  2V-;-lb.,  doz 

Succotash,  2  lb.,  doz 

Do.,    Can.     (2s)     

Do.,  (;aliforni".i,   2s    .'!  1.") 

Do.    (wine  gals.)    8  00 

Sauerkraut,  2V2  H'-  tins 1 

Tomatoes',  Is 

Do.,    2s    

Do.,    2V2K    1   fi") 

Do.,  gallons    .5  70 

rnmpkins.  2y2S   (doz.)    1   50 


40 

00 

15 

15 

60 

75 

7  50 

29  0 

1    50 

1   80 

1    80 

::   50 

0  00 

1  65 
1  40 
1  70 
5  75 


Do., 
Peas, 
Do., 
Do., 
Do., 
Do., 


1  55 
gallons   (doz.)    ....      4  00 


1   80     1 


Standard    

early  June    2 

extra  fine.  2s    .3 

Sweet  Wrinkle 1 

2-lb.   tins    2 

Peas,  New   Pack — 

Standard.    2-lb 1 

Choice,  2-lb 1 

Early  June,  choice 2 

Do.,    standard    2 

Fine  French,  2-Ib 2 

CANNED  FRUITS 

Apricots,  21/2  lb.  tins 4 


90 
00 
00 

57  V2 
75 

821/2 

871/2 

05 

00 

80 

75 


Apples.   2'/2S.   doz 

Do.,  :Js.  doz 

Do.,    gallons,    doz 

Currants,  black,  2s,  doz. 


1  4U 
1  60 
4  75 
4  00 


1  05 
1  70 
5  00 
4  05 


Do.,  gals.,  doz 16  00 


Split  Peas,  per  bag 

Cherries,    red,    pitted,   heavy 

syrup,  doz..  1-lb.    . .  •  " 

Do.,  2'/2    lb 5 

Do.,    2-lb 4 

Do.,   white,  pitted    50     4 

Gooseberries,  2s,  heavy  sjnraft 

doz 2 

Peaches,  heavy  syrup — 

2-lb 

2y2-lb.    5  00     5  25 

1-lb 2  90 

Pears,  Is   .3  20 

10 
75 


5  00 

10 
00 
00 

75 

75 


.3  90 


Do.,    2-lb 4 

Greengage  Plums,  liy.  syrup  2  65  2 
Lombard         Plums,        heavy 

syrup,    2-lh.    2 

Do.,    light    syrup    2 

Pineapples   (grated  and  slic- 
ed),  21/2    lb 4 

Do.,    2-lb 3 

Do.,    1-lb 2 

Hod  lUispberries   4  25  4 

Strawberries    4  00  4 

New  Pack  Strawberries — 

Standard   No.   2,   per   doz 4 

Choice    grade    4 

Fancy   Preserved    5 

Rhubarb,   preserved    2 

Do.,    gallon     5 

Canadian  Pineapp'o  (sliced)   ....  4 

New  niueberrio".  2  lbs 2  25 

Do.,    1    gal 12  00 

Coffee  Prices  Stead v 


Montreal. 

COFFF,R. — There  is  no  change  in  the 
I>ri(e  (|uoted  by  wholesalers  on  coffee. 
The  market  is  firm  and  steady  with  a 
good  movement  of  supplies. 

White  Beans  Hijj^her 


.Montreal. 

CEREALS. 


-There      is    no    chanj-e 


cpieals  this  week.  The  d(*in;ni(l,  on  :i(- 
(  ount  of  the  warm  weather  is  low.  While 
licar.s  have  been  advanced  6  cents  per 
pound  by  a  number  of  the  local  whole- 
salers. 

Oatmeal,  gran.,  fine  slanUard    ....  3  60 

Rolled  Oats,   90    lbs 3  15 

Pearl   Hominy   3  25 

Cornmeal,    Gold    Dust    Brand    3  25 

Graham  Flour,  9S  lbs 7  65 

.\i'w  Buckwheat  Flour   6  75 

I'ot    Barley    4  25 

Pearl   Barley    5  25 

Beans,  Ont 3  50 

Do.,  Can 3  30 

Lima  Beans      0   10 

Green   Peas,  dried    0    17 

Ground  Oil  Cake,  per  bag 3  00 

Raisins  Stronger 

Montreal. 

DRIED-  FR["ITS.  The  feature  of  the 
dried  fruit  market  is  the  strength  of 
raisins.  Smyrnas  are  scarce  and  supplies 
of  muscatels  on  spot  are  short.  The  larg- 
er supplies  of  raisins  in  New  York  are 
being  held  by  banks  and  dealers  cannot 
get  shipments.  The  whole  dried  fruit 
market  is  firm  with  a  go'.d  movement  of 
supplies. 

Apricots,  fancy    0  33 

Do.,  choice    0  27 

Do.,  slabs    0  22 

Apples   (evaporatal)    0   12'^  0  15 

Peaches   (fancy)    0  23 

Do.,  choice,  lb 0  25 

Pears  (choice)   0  22 

Do.,  fancy   0  27  0  28 

Peels — 

Choice     0  26 

Ex.   fancy    0  30 

Lemon,  new  pack  ....  0  46  0  47 
New  Pack — 

Orange    0  48  0  49 

Citron   0  76 

Choice,   bulk,   25-lb.   boxes, 

lb 0  22 

Peels  (c«t  mixed),  do/. 3  25 

Raisins   (seeded) — 

Valencias    0  23 

Muscatels,  2  Crown 0  22'/2 

Do.,  3  Crown 0  23 

Do.,  4  thrown 0  23'/2 

Turkish  Sultana,  5  frown  0   27  0  30 

Fancy  seeded   (hulk)    0  26  0  28 

Do.,  16-oz 0  25  0  27 

Cal.    Seedless    cartons,    12 

oz 0  21  0  23 

Do.,  16  ounces    0  27»4 

Cal.  Seedless,  in  bulk  .  .  0  I814  0  191/2 

Cluster,  20  1-lb.  pack 6  75 

Currants,   loose    0  15 

Fard,  12-lb.  boxes   3  25 

Packages  only   0  19  0  20 

Dromedary    (36-10   oz.)    0  19 

Loose   0  11  0  14 

Figs    (layer),      10-lb.    boxes, 

2s,  lb 0  32  0  36 

Do.,   2ViS,    lb 0  40 

Do.,  21/2S,  lb 0  4.3 

Do,,   2%,  lb 0  45 


30 


Figs,  white  70  4-oz.  boxes)  ....  5  40 
Do.,  Spanish  (cooking),  22- 

Ib.  boxes  each 0  11 

Do,.     Tmkisli,     S     crown, 

lb 0  22 

Do.,  5  crown.lb 0  28 

Do.,  7  crown,  lb 0  30 

Do.,    10-lb.    box    2  75 

Do.,  mats    3  00 

Do.,  22-lb.  box 1  90 

Do.  (12  10-oz.  boxes) 2  20 

Prunes    (25-lb.    boxes)  — 

20-30;;   0  25 

30-40S   0  19 

40-50S    0  17 

50-60S   0  131/2 

60-70S   0  121/2 

70— 80s    0  111/2 

80-903    0  101/2 

90— 100b    0  091/2 

Lemons  Go  Higher 


FRIHT.— The  most  striking  feature  of 
•  the  fruit  market  is  the  sudden  advance 
i.i  the  price  of  lemons.  Inside  of  one 
week  the  price  has  advanced  from  iflO.OO 
to  $15.00  per  crate  with  a  limited  supply. 
Oranges  are  in  good  demand  with  a  firm 
price,  but  the  quality  is  not  up  to  the 
mark.  Bigger  supplies  of  cherries  are 
on  the  market  with  lower  prices,  but  the 
r.iJinion  is  that  the  very  hot  weather 
will  cause  a  quick  ripening  and  a  short 
K'iason  with  big  losses  in  the  crop.  More 
trouble  seems  to  be  facing  the  fruit  deal- 
rs  this  year  with  regard  to  the  accomo- 
dation of  refrigerator  cars  and  there  is 
seme  fear  during  these  hot  spells  of  a 
tie-up  in  -jome  lines  of  fresh  fruit.  Such 
r  tie-up  \vill  affect  (he  price  of  fruit 
to  a  great  extent  in  a  very  little  time. 
FRUIT- 
APPLES— 

Boxes,    175s,    216s    4  50 

Bananas  (as  to  grade),  bunch  7  00     8  00 
Grapefruit,  Jamaican,  64,  SO,  96 5  75 

Do.,    Porto    Rico    5  00 

Lemons,    300s    15  00 

Cal    Navel   Oranges,   12(>-250s    6  00     7  25 

Do.,   Florida.   l.')0-216s    6  00 

Do.,  Blood  Oranges,  %  boxes 3  75 

Tangerines    4  25 

Strawberries,   per  pint 0  18 

Pineapples,  24s,  30s,  36s,  crate 8  00 

Watermelons,    C'lch    1  10 

California   Cherries,   per   box    5  50 

Georgia    Peaches,   crate    5  00 

California  Peaches 3  25 

Cantaloupes    5  00 

California  Plums 3  00 

Package  Goods  Steady 


Montroal. 

PACKAGE  GOODS.— There  is  no 
change  in  the  price  quoted  on  package 
goods  this  weeiv.  The  market  is  steady 
with  a  fair  demand  in  all  lines,  but  a 
particularly  good  movement  of  prepared 
cereals. 

Breakfast  food,  case  IS 3  50 

Cocoanut,  2oz.  pkgs.,  doz 0  ISVz 

Do.,  20-lb.  cartons,  lb 0  36 

Cjrn  Flakes,  3  doz.  case  '.'.  40     3  ,")5     3  75 
Cornmeal,  yellow,  24s    ,1  00 

Do..  36s    4  Ig 

Oat  Flakes,  20s    .,  [[     4  80 

Rolled  oats,  20s 5  00 

Do.,  18s    2  00 

Oatmeal,  fine  cut.  20  pkgs  6  75 

^'■'■''^      '  :     5  70 


CANADIAN    GROCER 

Puffed  Wheat   4  40 

Farina,  case,  24s 3  25 

Hominy,    pearl    or    gran.,    2 

doz 3  00 

Health  Bran  (20  pkg.),  case 2  85 

Pancake  Flour,  case 3  60 

Do,,  self-rising,   doz 1  50 

Wheat  Food,  IS-li^s 3  25 

Wheat  Flakes,  case  of  2  doz 2  95 

Porridge  Wheat,  36s,  case 6  40 

Do.,   20s,  case    6  50 

Self-rising  Flour  (3-lb.  pkg.), 

doz 2  75 

Do.  (6-lb.  pack.),  doz 5  40 

Do.,   Buckwheat   flour,   per 

doz 1  50 

Corn   Starch    (preparde)    0  lOVa 

Potato    Flour    0  12y2 

Starch    (laundry)     0  O814 

Flour,    Tapioca    0  15  0  16 

Shredded  Krumbles,  36s 4  35 

Shredded  Wheat  4  95 

Cooked   Bran,   12s .  2  25 

Euamel  Laundry  Starch,     40 

pkgs.    case    

Celluloid    Stares,      -15    pkgs., 

„     ,ca«e     '. , .  .  4  20 

Package  Cornmeal 3  oo 

Malt  B'kfast  Food  (36  pkgs.) g  50 

Quaker   2-Minute   Oat   Food    1  80 

Puffed  Rice  Pancake  Flour  2  90 

Egg  Noddles,  case  24 .'  2  25 

Macaroni    '  2  25 

Quaker  Quakies    ' ' " .  3  40 

Rice  Market  Improved 

RICE.— There  is  no  change  in  the  rice 
market  this  week  although  the  tendencies 
point  towards  higher  prices  with  a  much 
stionger  market  throughout.  The  im- 
provement in  tlie  demand  is  noticeable 
as  a  result  of  the  improved  market  con- 
ditions. Dealers  express  the  opinion  that 
the  market  will  steadily  improve  both 
in  price  and  in  movement  of  supplies. 

RICE— 

Carolina,  extra  fancy 0  07 

Do.    (fancy)    ." ' '  0  06 

Honduras,  fancy 0  05 

Rangoon  CC,  pre  cwt.   .......  3  90 

Do.,  B,  per  cwt 4  15 

T.ex'is  '-'te ;;  0  041/2 

^  ^'.*^"^    0  06 

Tapioca,  per  lb.  (.seed)    ....   0  08  0  O91/2 

Do-    (pearl)    0  08  0  09 1/2 

Do.    (flake)    0  08  0  O91/2 

Honduras    0  07 

siam ■/.;;  ;;;;  q  ^^y^ 

NCDTE— The  rice  market  is  subject  to 
frequent  change  and  the  price  basis 
IS  quite  nominal. 

Sugar  More  Steady 

SUGAR.— Sugar  prices  have  remained 
steady  through  the  week  following  the 
recent  declines.  The  falling  market  has 
not  increased  the  confidence  of  the  buy- 
ers in  the  market  and  buying  is  limited 
to  immediate  requirements. 
Granulated  Sugar,  per  cwt g  75 

Do.,   barrels    g  yj 

Granulated  gunnies,  20/5   ...  9  15 

Do.,    gunnies,    lOalO     ...'.'    .'.'.""     92"; 

Do.,    cases,    20/5-lb.    cartons  9  3.5 

Do.  rases.  r.O/2   lb.   cartons    ..  9  50 

Yellow,    light,    per    cwt 9  55 

Do.,  medium,  per  cwt g  r/c, 

Do.,    dark,    per   cwt ,'.',]     g  15 

Another  Drop  in  Molasses 

MOLASSES.— Further    reductions    are 


July  8,  1921 

made  by  the  local  wholesalers  in  the 
prices  quoted  on  molasses.  The  molasses 
market  has  been  weak  for  some  time 
and  the  number  of  rapid  reductions  is 
mainly  accounted  tor  by  the  desire  to 
get  stocks  moving.  The  price  new  quoted 
for  the  city  is  61  cents  and  outside  the 
city  58  cents.  Corn  syrups  are  steady 
in  price  with  a  fair  movement  in  stocks. 

CORN  SYRUP— 

Barrels,  about  700  lbs 2  06",^ 

Half     barrels,     about   350 

lbs 0  06% 

Quarter  barrels,  about  175 

lbs 0  0714 

2  gals.,  25-lb.   pails  each    2  25 

3  gal.,  381/2  lb.  pails,  each 3  2.t 

5    gal.,    65-lb.   pails,   each    5  20 

2-lb.  tins,  per  case 4  00 

5-lb.  tins,  per  case    5  30 

10-lb.  tins,  per  case 5  00 

Price  for 
Barbadoes  Molasses—      Isld.  of  Montreal 

Puncheons     0  61 

Barrels    0  64 

Half    barrels     0  66 

Puncheons,  outside  city 0  5X 

P'ancy  Molasses    (in  tins) — • 

16-oz.   tins,     2   doz.     case, 

per  doz 2  40 

2-lb.   tins,   2    doz.    in   case, 

case    4  40     7  25 

3-lb.   tins,   2   doz.   in   case, 

case     5  75  10  75 

5-lb.   tins,   1   doz.   in   case, 

case 8  95 

10-lb.  tins,  1/^  doz.  in  case, 

case    8  60 

Walnuts  and  Peanuts  Higher 


NUTS.- The  feature  of  the  nut  market 
this  week  is  the  added  strength  in  wal- 
nuts with  an  advance  cf  2  and  3  cents 
per  pound.  Supplies  on  hand  are  very  low 
and  no  more  shipments  can  come 
til  rough  from  France  until  September  at 
least  on  account  of  the  warm  weather. 
There  has  been  a  big  demand  for  peanuts 
with  Virginia  in  shells  very  strcmg.  Other 
lines  are  steady  with  a  good  demand. 

Almonds,  Tarragona,  per  lb.  0  20  0  24 

Do.,    shelled     0  54 

Valencia    Shelled    Almonds    ....  0  44 

Chestnuts    (Italian)    0  18 

Cocoanut    (shredded,    bulk)    0  33  0  36 

Filberts  (Sicily),  per  lb.  ...  0  17  0  18 

Brazil  nuts    (new)    0  15 

Do.,  Barcelona 0  15i/4 

Peanuts,   .himbo    0  18 

Do.,  shelled,  No.  1  Spanish  0  18  0  20 

Do.,  Java,  No.  1   0  lli/^ 

Do.,  salted,  red    0  21  0  23 

Do.,  shelled,  No.-Virginia  0  I61/2  0  18 
Peanuts   (salted)  — 

Fancy,  wholes,  per  lb 0  38 

Fancy  splits,  per  lb 0  35 

Pecans,  new  Jumbo,  per  lb 0  75 

Do.,  large,  No.  2,  polished  0  29  0  30 

Pecans,   shelled    1  00  1  50 

Walnuts,  Grenoble,  in  shell   ....  0  29 

-Alarbot  Walnuts    0  24  0  28 

Do.,    new    Naples    0  26 

Do.,  shelled,   Manchurian    ....  0  68 

Do.,  Bordeaux   0  63  0  68 

Do.,  Chilean,  bags,  per  lb 0  40 

Do.,  Spanish,  shelled 0  60 

NOTE — Jobbers  sometimes  make  an  add- 
ed charge  to  above  prices  for  broken 
lots. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


31 


Tea  Market  Unchanged 


.Monfroal. 

TKAS.— There  is  d  steady  demaiul  for 
supplies  ill  small  (luantities  since  the 
market  is  still  lacking  the  confidence  of 
I  ho  trade.  Thsi  feature  is  perhaps  to  a 
leat  extent  responsihle  tor  the  tailure 
1)1  the  niiirket  to  re-ipond  tc  ihe  improved 
strength  in  the  primary  maikets  in  In- 
dian and  Ceylon  teas.  Some  dealers  ex- 
pect low  prices  on  Japan  teas  since 
large  Quantities  still  remain  in  the  hands 
of   the   producers. 

Ceylon  and  Indians — 

Pekoes     0  22  0  26 

Broken    I'ekoe«    •)  ;;2  0    JO 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes   ....  0    18  0  55 

Javas — 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  ....  0  48  0  5.5 

Broken   Pekoes    (j  35  0  40 

China — 

Common    u  24  0  35 

.Medium     0  42  0  48 

Choice    0  50  0  (JO 

JAPAN  TEAS  (new  cropi    0  77 

Above  retail  prices  range  of  ([uotations 
to  the  retail  trade. 
JAPAN  TEAS    (new  crop)  — 

Choice   (to  medium)    0  55  0  60 

Early  picking    0  60  0  75 

Finest  grades    0  75  0  90 

Javas — 

Pekoes   0  ?.5  0  40 

Orange  Pekoes 0  37  0  45 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes   0  37  0    15 

Inferior  grades  of  broken  teas  may  be 
had  from  jobbers  on  request  at  favorable 
prices. 

Spices  Steady 

Montreal. 

SPICES.— There  is  no  change  in  the 
(luctations  made  on  spices.  The  market 
is  quiet  at  this  season  and  prices  are 
.-leadv. 

Allspice    0   18  0  20 

Cassia    (pure)    0  27  0  30 

Cocoanut,    pails,   20    lbs.    un- 
sweetened,  lb 0  40 

Do.,  sweetened,  lb 0  36 

Chicory    (Canadian),   lb 0  14 

Cinammon — 

Rolls    0  35 

I'urc.    grounil    0  35 

Cloves    (gunindi     ('      40  0  45 

Cream     of     tartar      (French 

pure)    0  65  0  70 

Do.    American  high  test   ...   0  75  0  SO 

Cinger    (Jamaica)    0  30 

Ginger   (Cochin)    0  27 

Mace,   pure,   1-lb.   tins    0  60  0  65 

Mixed  spice    0  30  0  32 

Do.,    2>^    shaker    tins,    doz 1   15 

Nutmegs,   whole — 

Do.,    64,    lb 0  40 

Do.,    80,    lb 0  3S 

Do.,  100,   lb 0  35 

Do.,   ground,   1-lb.  tins    0  45 

Popper,   black    0  25 

Do.,  white   0  33 

Do.    Cayenne    ^   0  32  0  34 

Pickling  spice    0  25  0  28 

Do.,  package,  2  oz.,  doz 0  35  0  40 

Do,,  package,  4  oz.,  doz 0  65  0  70 

I'.Tprika    0  50 

Turmeric    0  28  0  30 

Tartaric   arid,    per   lb.    (cry- 
stars  or   powdered)    ....    0  95  1  00 


Cardamon  seed,  per  lb.,  bulk, 

nominal   2  00 

Carraway   (nominal)    0  25  0  30 

Mustard  seed,  bulk    0  35  0  40 

Celery  seed,  bulk  (nominal)   .  .  0  70  0  75 

Pimento,   whole    0  15  0  20 

Lampwicks  Reduced 

LAMPWICK. — Lower  prices  are  quot- 
ed on  lampwick.  Xo.  2s  are  quoted  at 
50  cents  and  No.  Is  at  25  cents.  The  large 
size  D  is  listed  at  80  cents  and  No.  0 
at   30   cents. 

Local  Vejretables  iVrrive 


\'K(;ET.\BL>:S.— The  anival  of  local 
and  Ontatrio  vegetables  is  the  feature 
of  the  vegetable  market  and  witii  it  lower 
Iirices  on  cabbages,  cucumbers  and  to- 
matoes. .Mississippi  tlats  are  lower  in 
price  on  account  of  the  competition  ex- 
pected ircm  local  gardens.  These  arc 
selling  at  $2.25.  (Quebec  cabbages  are 
(|U()ted  at  11.5(1  per  dozen.  The  next 
week  or  ten  days  will  make  quite  a  dif- 
lerence  bi;tb  in  the  |)rices  ipioted  and  in 
quantities   offered.   Th   sup|)ly   is   smaller 


both    on    account    of   stunted    growth   and 
curtailment  in  shipping. 

New    cabbage,   per   dcz 1   50     2  (m) 

Celery,  Florida,  per  crate  ....  4  00     475 

Do.,  California    11  Of 

Carrots,  per  bag 0  75     1  00 

Cucumbers,  per  hamper    5  00 

Garlic,  lb 0  50 

Tlorseradish,   lb 0  60 

Leeks,   doz 4  00 

Lettuce    

P.Trsley    

Mint    0  60 

Mushrooms,  lb 1   00 

Oyster  plant,  per  doz 1  50 

Parsnips,  bag    1  00 

Penpers,  green,  doz 0  50 

Potatoes,    Mtrl.      (90-lb.    bag)    0  90     1  00 
New    potatoes,   bbls.,   190   11)S 5  25 

Do.,   sweet,   hamper    5  50 

.New    potatoes,    per    bbl 6  5(» 

.New  potatoes,  per  bbl 5  00     7  00 

Spinach,  box  

Spanish  Onions,  per  case  ....   5  00     5  50 

Turnips,  per  bag 0  75     1  00 

Red    Onions,   cwt 3  00 

Texas  Onions,  per  crate 3  5(. 

Yellow  Onions,  cwt 3  25 

.\'ew  Tomatoes,  per  crate 5  00 

Dc.    .Mississippi    Flats    2  25 

Ontaiio  Tomatoes.   11   qt.   l)kt 3  50 


ONTARIO    MARKETS 


TORONTO,  July  6.—  Sugar  relin 
few  weeks  have  again  conimen 
so  far  is  very  light.    The  refiners 
tained  and  although  there  is  still 
the  irregularity  in  price  that  was 
the    past    several    months.     New 
at  lower  quotations.     Cereals  are 
cereals    show    some   price   cutting 
facturers    are    firmly    maintaing 
under  an  active  demand.     Syrups 
ses  has  easier  tendencies.    Fruits 
a    ready    demand    and    generally 

New  Jam  Offered 


Toronto. 

CA.V.NKD  GOODS.  Canned  vegetables 
continue  in  a  lirni  position  with  stocks 
of  tomatoes  and  i)eas  gradually  becom- 
ing cleaned  up.  The  pack  cf  strawberry 
jam  promises  to  be  a  small  one  with 
mannfactuters  generally  cutting  their 
make  75  per  cent.  Seme  new  strawberry 
jam  has  appeared  and  one  wholesaler  is 
ottering  it  at  70  cents  for  fours.  The 
majority  of  manufacturers  and  whcle- 
saUrs  are  fairly  .well  cleaned  up  on 
strawl)erry  jam  and  with  the  short  pack 
thiv  year  there  is  a  tendency  lor  a  short- 
iige  on  this  line  this  coining  season. 

Salmon — 

Sockeye,  Is,  doz 5  60 

Do.,  Vss,  doz 3  00 

Cohoe.   Is,   do;^ 

Do.,  i/^s,  doz 

Pinks,    Is   do/, 

Lobsters,    Vo-lb.,   doz 3  25 

Do,.    Vt-  lb-   itns    2   25 

Whale  Steak,  Is,  flat,  doz.  1  75 
Pilchards,   1-lb.   tails,   doz.   1  80 

Canned   Vegetables — 

Tomatoes,  2i'2S,  doz I    ii5 

Peas,  standard,  doz 1   65 

Do.,  Early  June 

Beets,  2s  doz 1  45 


5  80 
3  20 

2  90 
1  90 

1  15 

3  50 

2  40 
1  90 


1  70 

1  70 

2  15 
2  45 


ers  after  being  closed  for  the  past 

ced  operations  but  the  movement 

list  price  is  being  fairly  well  main- 
some  price  cutting  there   is   not 

manifested  on  this  commodity  for 
pack  strawbeny  jams  are  offered 

steady  to  fii'm,  while  package 
among     wholesalers    but     manu- 

their  lists  Nuts  continue  strong 
are  quiet  and  steady  while  molas- 

and  vegetables  are  meeting  with 
prices  tend  easier. 


Beans,   golden   wax,  doz 

Asparagus  tips,  doz 

Do  ,  butts,  doz 

Canadian    corn    

Pumpkins,  2i4s,  doz 1  45 

Spinach.   2s,   doz 

Pineapples,  sliced,  2s,  doz.  4  00 

Do.,  shredded,  2s,  doz.  .  .  4  75 
Rhubarb,  p'served,  2s,  doz.  2  01  Vz 

Do.,  preserved,  214s,  doz.  2  65 

Do.,  standard,  10s,  doz 

.\pples.  gal.,  doz \  75 

Pears,  2s,  doz 3  00 

Peaches,   2s,  doz 

Plums,    Lombard,    2s,    doz.    3  10 

Do.,   Green   Gage    3  25 

Cherries,  pitted,  H.S 

Blueberries,  2s    2  .".5 

Strawberries,  2s,  H.S 4  50 

Raspberries,    2s 4  50 

Jams — 

Apricots,  4s,  each 

Blk.  Currants,  16  oz.,  doz.  . . 

Do.  4s,  each  

Gooseberry,  4s,  each  

Do.,  16  oz.,  doz 

Peach,  4s,  each  

Do.,  16  oz.,  doz 

Red  Currants,  16  oz.,  doz.  . . 

Do.,  4s,  each  

Raspberries,    16    oz.,   doz.    . . . 

Do.,    4s.    each    

Strawberries,    16    oz.,   doz.    . . 


2 

20 

5 

50 

6 

60 

1 

50 

1 

50 

1 

60 

4 

90 

5 

25 

2 

10 

4 

52 1^ 

5 

00 

.'1 

00 

4 

25 

3 

50 

3 

25 

3 

40 

4 

25 

'> 

45 

5 

00 

'•) 

00 

0 

90 

4 

GO 

0 

94 

0 

89 

4 

10 

3 

75 

0 

83 

4 

40 

0 

94 

4 

60 

0 

94 

4 

60 

32 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  8,  mil 


New  Peels  Offered 


Toronto. 

DRIED  FRT'ITS.— New  make  of  candi- 
ed peels  are  being  offered  by  the  manu- 
farturers.  The  prices  are  somewhat,  low- 
er than  last  year.  Lemon  and  orange 
around  40  cents  and  citron  55  cents  per 
pound.  Prunes  and  apricots  continue 
steady  with  other  lines  at  unchanged 
quotations. 

Lemon    

Orange   

Citron     

Candied  Peels — 

Lemon    ^ 

Orange   , 

Citron    

Currants — 

G-eek,  Filiatras,  cases 0  17 

Do..   Amalias    0  17 

Do.,  Palras   0  17 

Do.,  Vostizza   0  231/2 

Dates — 
Excelsior,   pkgs.,   'i  doz.   in 

case    5  50 

Dromedary,  3  doz.  to  case  ....  7  00 

Fard,  per  box  ap.  12  lbs 3  25 

Hallowee  dates,   per   lb Oil 

Figs— 

Smy.'-na  lavers,  4  Crn.,  lb.  0  30  0  V^ 

Do.,  layer:^,  6  crn.,  lb.  0  36  0  38 

Natural    pulled,   in   bags    0  10V4 

Prunes — 

30- 10s,   25s    0  20 

40-508,   25s    0  16 

50-60S,  25s    0  13 

B0-70S,   25s    0  10 

70-SOs,  25s 0  091/2 

80-90S,   25s    0  09 

90-lOOs,  25s   0  08 

■Reaches — 

Standard,  25-lb.  box,  pid.  0  261/2  0  28 

Choice,  25-Ih.  box,  peeled  0  27  0  30 

Fancy,  25-lb.  boxes    0  19  0  30 

ipricots — 

Fancy    0  46 

Choice    0  42 

Standard    0  34 

Raisins — 

California,   bleached,   lb 0  271/2 

Seedless,   If.-oz.    packets    ....  0  29 

Seeded.    L)-oz.    packets     ....  0  28^4 

Crn.  MuE  atels,  No.  1,  25s 0  26 

Turkish   Sultanas,   pkgs 0  27 

Thompsons,  Seedless 0  28i^ 

Valencia    0  23 

Evaporated  apples  0  14  0  15 

Cereah  Steady  To  Firm 

Toronto. 

CEREALS.— The  market  is  ruling 
'Steady  with  quotations  generally  firmly 
held  although  there  appears  to  be  some 
price  cutting  inore  especially  among  the 
smaller  mills  and  some   wholesalers. 

F.o.b.  Toronto 

?  irley,    pearl.   9Ss    5  50 

Barley,   pot,  98s 4  75 

Barley   Flour,   9S.s    6  25 

Buckwheat   Flour,   98s    6  00 

Cornmeal,  Golden,  9Ss 2  75 

©atmal.  9Ss    4  50 

Corn   Flour,   98s    3  75 

Rye  Flours,  98e 6  00 

Rolled  oats,  90s 3  20  3  30 

Rolled  whent.  100  lb.  bbls.  ......  6  75 

r'T-nr>i-e'i  ■'''bo.nt.  hag 5  00  • 


Breakfast   Food,   No.    1    6  00 

Do.,   No.    2    6  00 

Rice  Flour,  100  lbs 10  00 

Linseed  meal,  98s 6  50 

Flaxseed,  98s   7  00 

Peas,   split,    98s    5  75 

Marrowfat   green    peas    0  05i/i   0  06 

Graham    flour,   98s    4  75 

Whole  Wheat  Flour 4  85 

Wheat  Kernels,   8s    fi  "-, 

Farina,  98s   ^  31; 

Fruits  Move  Freely 


PcauiilB,    Spanish,    lb 0  10' 

Brnzil   nutK,   lb 0  75 

Pecans,  lb 140 

Package   Cereals  Unchanged 


Toronto. 

FRUIT. — Raspberries  are  commencing 
but  the  heaviest  shipments  will  not  ar- 
rive for  a  couple  of  weeks  yet.  The  hot 
dry  weather  is  having  a  serious  effect 
upon  the  crop  and  there  is  likely  to  be 
a  =^mall  crop  this  season.  Cherries  are 
arriving  fairly  plentiful  with  prices 
gradually  casing.  Lemons  are  firmer  and 
higher  while  oranges  are  steady. 
Oranges,       Valencias,     100s, 

126s    5  50     6  00 

Do.,  200s,  216s,  250s    6  50     7  50 

Grapefruit,  Cubans 6  00 

Bc^nanas,  Port  Limons 0  09V^ 

Lemons,  Cal 

Do.,    Verdillis    9  00   10  00 

Apples — 

Winesaps,  per  box 4  00 

Watermelons,  each 1  25 

Peaches,  fi  baskets  to  crate   ....     4  50 
("antaloupes.    Standard,   45s    ....      fi  OO 

Dri..  Pony,  -15s   '. 5  oO 

Do.,  Flat,  I5s 2  50 

Cal.    Plums,  pe.r  box   3  50     4  50 

r'n)     A  irir'o'':.   :^-  ■•  ho":    ....  '   ' 

Cherries,  sour,  lis   115     1   25 

Do.,  sour,  fis   0  60     0  65 

Do.,  bleak.   6s    1  75 

Do.,  white.   6s    1  25 

Gooseberries,   Os   0  50     0  75 

Do.,   lis    1   25     1   75 

Raspherr-es    0  30 

Blueberries    2  50     3  00 

Nuts  Hold  Strong 


Toronto. 

NUTS. — This  market  continues  to  rule 
firm  with  shelled  Bordeau  walnuts 
steadily  moving  upward  in  primary 
markets  under  a  strong  demand.  Man- 
churian  walnuts  halves  are  also  firmer 
with  spot  quotations  ranging  from  60  to 
65  cents  per  pound.  Cocoanut  in  prim- 
ary markets  is  firmer  with  prices  high- 
er,   spot   quotations   are   unchanged. 

Do.,   broken    0  47     0  52 

Almonds,  Tarragonas,  lb 0  22  0  23 

"Walnuts,  Bordeaux,  lb 

Walnuts.    Grenobles,    lb 0  23  0  24 

Do.,   Marbot    0  22  0  23 

Do.,    California    0  39  0  40 

Filberts,  lb 0  15  0  16 

Pecans,    lb.    .: 0  28  0  30 

Cocoanuts,   Jamaica,    saok 7  50 

Cocoanut,  unsweetened,  lb 0  30 

Do.,  sweetened,  lb 0  35 

Do.,  shred 0  25 

'♦"anuts.    Spanish,    lb 0  21  0  25 

Jrazil   nut",  large,  lb 0  20  0  22 

Mixed  ni'ts,  large,  lb 0  32  0  34 

Mixed  nuts,  bags  50  lbs 0  32 

Shelled- 
Almonds,  lb 0  42  0  47 

Filberts,  lb.    q  35 

Walnuts,  Bordeaux,  lb 0  73  0  75 

Do.,    Manchnrian     0  60  0  65 

Do.,  broken    0  45  0  50 


Toronto. 

PACKAGE  GOODS.— There  arc  no 
chiinges  in  manufacturers  Ust  but  Ih^rc 
stil!    appears    to    be    considerable    pricr 

cutting  among  wholesalers  and  the  fol- 
lowing quotations  can  be  consjiil«red  as 
nominal . 

PACICAGB   GOODS 

Rolled   Oats,   20s,  rd.,  c3««    5  00 

Do.,  20s,  square,  case 5  00 

Do.,  18s,  case    2  00 

Do.,  Aluminum  Prem.,  20s  ....  S  40 

Corn  Flakes,  36s,  case   3  35  5  T.^ 

Porridge  Wheat,  36s,  regular 

case 6  00^ 

Do.,  20s,  family,  case 6  SO 

Cooker   Pkg.    Peas,    363-    cs    .  .  .  .  2  85 

Cornstarch,  No.  1,  lb.  crtns 0  10% 

Do.,  No.  2,  lb.  cartons 0  09% 

Laundry  Starch    0  08 '/, 

Do.,  in  1  lb.  cartonB 0  08% 

Do.,   in   6-lb.    wood   boxes'    0  08% 

Do.,  in  6-lb.  tin  canisters    0  12% 

Celluloid   Starch,   case    4  15 

Potato    Flour,    case    20    1-lh. 

pkgs 2  50 

Do.,   case   24   12-oz.   pkgs 2  30 

Fine  oatn)eal,  20s    5  7S 

Cornineal,  248    3  00 

Farina,   24s    3  26 

Barley,  24s 2  75 

Wheat  Flakes,  24s   5  00 

Wheat    kernels,   24s    4  50 

Self-rising  p'cake  flour,  24s 3  00 

Buckwheat  flour,  24s 3  50 

Two-minute   Oat  Food,    24s    1  80 

Puffed   Wheat,   case    4  4tf 

Puffed  Rice,  case    5  7(1 

Health  Bran,  case 2  8.5 

F.S.  Hominy,  gran.,  case 3  00 

Do.,  pearl,  case    3  00 

Scotch  Pearl  Barley,  case 2  70 

Self-rising  Pancake  Flour,  30 

to  case    4  20 

Do.,   Buckwheat   Flour,   30 

to   case    4  20 

Self-rising  Pancake  Flour,  36 

to   case    7  15 

Do.,    Buckwheat    Flour,    18 

to  case    3  65 

Do.,  Pancake  Flour,  18  to 

case 3  65 

Puffed  Rice  Pancake  Flour, 

24s    2  90 

Rice  Holds  Firm 

"^ 

Torento. 

UICE.   -The  primary  markets  continue 

to  hold  a  strong  position.  Spot  quota- 
tions are  unchanged  and  there  appears 
to  l)e  a  lighter  demand  than  there  has 
lieen  for  some  time  past. 

Honduras,  broken,  per  lb.  0  07i^  0  08 

Blue   Rose,  lb 0  O61/2  0  07 

Siam,  per  lb 0  06  0  06 14 

Japans,  per  lb 0  07  0  07i^ 

Do.,    broken    0  05 

Chinese,  XX 

Do.,  SImiu    0  11  0  12 

Do..  Mujin.  No.   1    0  10  0  11 

Do,   Pakling    0  09  0  10 

Hangoon    0  07  0  OT/2 

White  Sago    0  07  0  071/3 

Tupioca,  per  11) 0  07^  0  OS 


uly  8,  1921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


33 


Syrups  Are  Quiet 


)r(iiito. 

SYRUPS. — There  is  no  change  in  this 
The  demand  is  quiet  with  prices 
4    steady   to  firm  on   corn   syrups, 
es  is  somewhat  easier,  but  quota- 
re  unchanged. 
)rn   riyrups — 

Bbls.,  about  700  lbs.,  y'low 0  0G% 

ilf  barrels,  ^Ac  over  bbls.; 

1,4   bbls.,  V^c  over  bbls. 

r       s   2-lb.   tins,   white,   2 

/..  in  case   4  oO 

Cu>es,    5-lb.    tins,   white,    1 

doz.  in  case   5  90 

r-  -s,  lO-lb.  tins,  white,  Vs 

'..  in  case  5  60 

'_.      s,  2-lb.  tins,  yellow,  2 

doz.  in  case   4  00 

Cases,  5-lb.   tins,  yellow  1 

doz.  in  case   5  .30 

C;r  es,    10-lb.    tins,    yellow, 

y..  in  case   5  00 

;..    Syrups — 

Barrels  &  half  barrels,  lb 

^   barrels,   14c  over  bbls.; 

14  bbls.,  i^c  over. 
Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  in 
,    case  G  00     6  50 

Dlasses — 

Fey.,  Barbadoes,  bbls..  gal 1  G5 

Choice  Barbadoes,  burrels  ....     1  35 
New   Orleans,    bbls.,   gal.   0  46     0  56 

Do.,   half   blls.,   gal.    . .    0  46     0  48 
Tins,    2-lb.,      table    grade, 

case  2  doz.,  Barbadoes    ....     7  75 
%Mns,    3-lb.,      table    grade, 

case  2  do2.,   Barbadoes    ....   10  75 
Tins,  5-lb.,  1  doz.  to  case, 

Barbadoes   S  95 

Tins,  10-lb.,  '/_.  doz.  to  case, 

Barbadoes 8  60 

Tins,  No.  2,  Laking  grade. 

case  2  doz 4  20 

Tins,  No.'  3,  baking  grade, 

rnse  of  2  doz 5  50 

No.  5,  baking  grade, 

-e  of  1  doz 4  60 

Ti:i.s,  No.  10,  baking  grade, 

case  of  1 V2  doz 4  25 

"U".  St   Indies,  IVaS,  4Ss    . .    4  6Q     6  95 

Spice  Quotations  Steady 


BPICES. — The  market  is  steady  under 
Quiet   demand. 

llspice   0  19  0  22 

issia    0  26 

Innamon    0  41 

loves     0  55  0  60 

iyenne  0  35  0  37 

Inger,  Cochin    0  30 

Do.,  Jamaica 0  45 

ustard,  pure   0  50 

astry     0  28 

ickling  spices 0  19 

ace  .• 0  55  0  65 

eppers,  black   0  19  0  20 

Do.,    white    0  29  0  30 

aprika,  lb 0  60  0  70 

Allies,   lb 0  60 

utmegs,  selects,  whole,  100s   ....  035 

Do.,  80s   0  45 

Do.,  ground    0  35 

'ustard  seed,  whole 0  25 

elery  seed,  whole 0  40 

oriander   seed    0  18 

arraway  seed,  whole   0  30 

umeric    0  30 

urry  Powder 0  35 


Cream  of  Tartar — 

French,    pure    0  40 

American,  high-test,  bulk 0  40 

2-oz.  packages,  doz 1  25 

4-oz.   packages,   doz 2  00 

8-oz.   packages,  doz 3  50 

The  above  quotations  are  for  the  best 

quality.  Cheaper  grades  can  be  purchased 

for  less. 

Sugar  Market  Quiet 


Ceylons  and  Indians — 

Pekoe  Souchongs  0  35  0  50 

Pekoes  0  32  0  60 

Broken  Pekoes 0  50  0  64 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  ....  0  58  0  66 
Javas — 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes 0  45  0  65 

Broken    Pekoes    0  45  0  50 

Japans  and  Chinas — 

Early  pickings.  Japans 0  90  1  00 

Do.,  seconds  0  55  0  55 

Hyson,  thirds    0  45  0  50 

" Do.,  pts 0  58  0  67 

ST'GAR.— Rofinors  have  again  resum^.d  Do.,  sifted  0  67  0  72 

operations  but  there  does  not  appear  to  Above  prices  give  range  of  quotationa 

be    a    heavy    movement    principally    be-  to  the  retail  trade, 

cause  many  of  the  neavisst  users,- — man- 
ufacturer.^—tiiid  themselves  with  consid-       Outdoor  Toitiatocs  Offered 

erable   carryover   of   finished   and    semi-  

finished    product  <.    Refiners    are   holding 

to  their  list  with   wholesalers   generally  Toronto. 

doing  the  same,  although  we  have  heard  VEGETABLES.— Leamington      outdoor 

of   price    cutting    in    some    quarters.    The  g,.own  tomatoes  are  arriving  at  $3.00  per 

raw  sugar  market  during  the  week  has  \^  q^^j.,   basket.  Hothouse  tomatoes  are 

been  quiet  with  quotations  stejuly  to  firm  selling    freely    at    35    cents    per    pound. 

and  with  sr,:ne  slight  advances  recorded  Qrcen    peas     beans,    beets,    carrots    and 

principally  on  full  duty  sugars.  cabbage   are   all    lower   in   price.   Celery 

St.  Lawrence,  extra  gran.,  cwt.   . .     9  09  from    .Michigan    is    oifered    at    85    to    90' 

Atlantic,   e.xtra    granulated    9  09  cents    per    bunch      of    about    one    dozeiu 

Acadia  Sugar  Refinery,  extra  gran.  9  09  heads.  Hamper  cucumbers  are  slightly 
Dom.  Sugar  Refinerv,  extra  gran.  9  09  easier  at  $5.50,  while  the  hothouse  van- 
Canada    Sugar    Refinerv,    gran.    ..      9  09  ety  is  bringing  $2.uO  to  $3.00  per  11  quart 

Differentials:       Granulated,      advance  basket.  Old  potatoes  have  little  demand, 

over  basis;  50-lb.  sacks,  25c;  barrels,  5c;  but   new   potatoes   have   a  ready  sale  ali 

gunnies,  5/20s,  40c;  gunnies,  10/lOs.  50c;  ?5.75  per  barrel  for  No.  Is. 

cartons,   20/5s,   60c;    cartons,  50/2s,   75c.       Cabbage     4  50) 

Differentials  on  yellow  sugars:    Under      Potatoes,  per  bag  0  70     0  80 

basis.  No.  1  40c;   No.  2  50c;   llo.   3  60c.       Head  Lettuce,  crate   1  00     1  50 

Tomatoes,   4-bkt.   crates    2  8u 

Ceylon  Teas  Again  Advance       W'^^TTu  ''^'"  u n  f t 

•'  '^  Do.,  Hothouse,  lb 0  35 

Leamington,   11-qt.   bkt 3  Oa 

TE\S—A.dvices  from  primarv  markets       New  Beets,  per  dozen    0  40 

state  that  Cevlon  teas  have  again  moved       New  carrots,  per  doz 0  40 

upward,  with   mere   difficultv   in   procur-  Green   Peas,   11  qt.   basket    .  .    0  90  1  OO 

ing  the  finer  grades.   Indias  are  holding  Wax  &  green  beans,  11-qt.  bkt.  1  00  1  2o. 

firm   on   all   grades.    Importers   have   not       Cucumbers,   hamper    5  50- 

changed   quotations   to   the    rg tail    trade.  Do.,  Hothouse,  11-qt.  bkt.  . .  2  50  3  OO 

but    there      are    indciations    for     higher      New   Potatoes,   bbl 5  75 

prices  before  the  end  of  the  year.  Celery,  bunch    0  "85  0  9a 

WINNIPEG    MARKETS 

\VINNIPEG,  July  6.—  Although  there  are  few  price  changes  the 
^*  markets  generally  have  a  steadier  undertone-  Wholesalers  have 
been  cutting  prices  on  sugar  below  refiners  lists.  There  is  a  good 
demand  for  fresh  vegetables  and  fruits.  Lemons  are  advanced  in 
price,  while  California  fruit  has  shown  a  slight  decline.  There  is 
no  change  in  canned  goods  prices.  The  rice  market  continues  firm 
and  higher  prices  are  expected  locally.  Tea,  coffee  and  spice  mar- 
kets continues  firm  and  higher  prices  are  expected  locolly.  lea. 
coffee  and  spice  markets  are  steady.  Nuts  and  dried  fruits  are  firm 
with  the  exception  of  raisons  which  are  showing  an  easier  tone- 
The  demand  for  light  breakfast  cereals  is  showing  an  improve- 
ment.    Cane  syrup  declined  slightly  during  the  week.  ^ 

Coffee  Market  Advances  J>-!-^;  IJ;  ;::;:;::::  2  g    S  S 

Bogotas,   lb 0  45       0  48; 

TrJnninon-  :\Iocha   (types)    0  49      0  51. 

Winnipeg.  Santos,  Bourbon,  lb 0  28       0  30, 

COFFEE.— Reports  from  the  Brazilian  santos    lb        0  27       0  29t 

market   state    there    is   a    strong    upward  ''       "'       ,,   "^'V     j-,. 

movement  in  Brazil  coffees  and  that  both  rSUlR  UatS  t  irmcr 

Rios  and  Santos  are  affected.  New  crop  

Santos      are    now    coming      forward    and  CEREALS. — Bulk      oats    advanced      lO 

growers  are     demanding  and     getting  a  cents  per  80  pound  bag.  New  quotations 

higher   price   than   what   tl>»  old   crop   is  are  $2.65  per  bag.  Heavy  sales  are  being 

selling  at  in  New  York.   It  is  anticipated  made  on  the  lighter  cereals  such  as  corn 

that  the  New  York  market  will   have  to  flakes,  etc.,  and  while  jobbers  have  made 

follow    Santos    prices.    The    demand    for  concessions  on  these  lines  it  is  expected 

coffee  on  the  local  market  is  showing  an  that  in  a  very  short  while  higher  prices 

improvement.  will  prevail. 

COFFEE—  PACKAGE  CEREALS 

Rio,   lb 0  191/2  0  201/2  Rolled  oats,  20s,  rd.  cartons  4  75       5  OO 


84 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


Do.,  36s,  Gs,  square,  bkts ?>  50 

Do.,    18s,    case    2  10 

Corn  Flakes,  36s,  case 3  .JO  3  80 

Cornnieal,  2  doz.  case,  case  ....  3  40 

Puffed  Wheat,  3  doz.  cs.,  cs  . .  .  .  4  4.5 

Puffed  Rice,  3  doz.  cs,  case  ....  5  75 

Grape  Nuts,  2  doz.  cs.,  case  ....  3  80 

Package  Peas.  3  doz.  cs.,  cs 3  00 

Cream  of  Wh.,  3  doz.  cs,  cs 9  1.5 

BULK  CEREALS 

Rolled   Oats,   80s,  per  bag    2  6." 

Do.,  40s,  per  bag   1  40 

Do.,  20s,  per  bag   0  73 

Do.,  10-8s,  per  bale 3  50 

Do.,  15-6s,  per  bale 4-05 

Oatmeal,  98s,  gr.,  std.,  bag  3  40  4  50 

Wheat   Granules,   98s,   bag    ....  6  50 

Do.,  16-fis.  per  bale 7  05 

Peas,    whole,    green,      100-lb. 

bag.    per   bush 4  50 

Do.,  split,  yellow,  98s.  bag  ....  7  95 

Do.,  split,  yellow,  49s.  bag 4  00 

Cornmeal,  98s,  per  sack 3  25 

Do.,  49s,  per  sack 1  65 

Do.,  2  Is,  per  sack 0  85 

Do.,  10s,  per  bale 3  65 

Buckwheat  grits,   whole,  98- 

Ib.  bags,  per  bag 8  75 

Beans.  100-lb.  bags,  bushel  3  70 

Lima  Beans,  100-lb.  bgs.,  lb 0  10% 

Barley,  pot,  98s 3  S5 

Do.,   49s,    192 

Do., 24s ;;;;  ^  oo 

B!■'r^v.       '-^o.^,.]     OSs 

Do..  Pearl,   49s    2  •")2 

Do..   Pearl,   24s    1  28 

Canned  Goods  Unchanged 


Winnipeg'. 

CANNED  GOODS.- The  canned  goods 
situation  remains  unchanged.  There  is 
a  good  demand  for  sardines  and  odd 
lines  of  salmon  are  cleaned  up.  The 
market  is  in  a  good  shape  to  absorb  the 
mew  pack  when  ready.  Prices  continue 
firm  and  local  stocks  are  reported  small 
and  not  suf0cient  to  last  until  t!ie  new 
pack  arrives.  There  is  a  fair  demand  for 
all  lines  of  canned  fruit  more  especially 
canned  pineapple.  New  packed  canned 
goods  are  not  expected  until  September 
and  from  present  indications  the  pack 
■will  be  small.  The  local  market  is  hold- 
ing firm  on  canned  fruits.  Although  no 
advances  are  anticipated  declines  mav  be 
in  order  when  the  new  pack  arrives.  A 
stronger  tone  is  being  shown  on  all  lines 
of  canned  vegetables.  Peas,  tomatoes 
and  corn  are  selling  freely.  Packers  who 
have  for  months  been  sacrificing  these 
lines  are  practically  cleaned  up  and  the 
small  stocks  are  being  held  bv  whole- 
salers are  ruling  at  firm  prices.  Ship- 
ments of  high  grade  American  corn  have 
arrived  and  are  quoted  at  $4.00  per  case 
Shrimps,  Is,  4  do?;,  case,  doz.  2  70  2  75 
Finnan  Haddie,  Is,  4  doz.  case  9  35  12  00 

Do.,   Vzs,  8  doz.  case,  case  10  50  13  00 
Herring   (Can.),     Is,     4  doz. 

case,  case   7  OO     8  00 

Do.,  imp.,  Yzs,  100  doz.  case  30  00  3-'  50 
Lobsters,  %s,  8  doz.  case,  doz 2  45 

Do.,    i/^s,    4   doz.   case,   doz.    .  4  20 

Oysters,  Is,  4  oz.,  4  doz.  cs.,  cs  9  40 

Pilchards,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  cs,  cs  . .    "     7  10 

Do.,   i^s,  flat,  8  doz.  cs.,  cs   9  oo 

Salmon — 

Sockeye,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  case 21  00 

Do.,  i/^s  flat,  8  doz.  in  case  ....   22  00 

R.  Spring,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  cs 16  75 

Do.,   i/zs  flat,  8  doz.  case   18  25 

Cohoe.  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  case   14  65 

Do.,   Vzs  flat,  8  doz.  case   16  50 


Pink,   Is,   tall,   4   doz.   case    6  50 

Do.,   1/28  flat,  8  doz.  case   8  25 

CANNED  P^RUIT  (Canadian) 

Apples,  6  tins  in  case,  per  case  2  SO  3  10 

Blueberries,    2s,    2    doz.    case    ....  6  65 

Cherries,  Is,  4  dcz.  case   7  00  8  00 

Cherries,  Is,  4  doz.  case    7  00  8  00 

Peaches.  2s,  2  doz.  case 6  50  7  50 

Pears.  2s,  2  doz.   case    7  75  8  00 

Plums,  Greengage,  2s,  2  doz.  cs  6  50  7  00 
Do.,  Lombard,  light  syrup. 

2s,  2  doz.  case 4  75  5  25 

Do.,  heavy  syrup,  2s,  2  doz. 

case     6  00  6  50 

Raspberries,   2s,   2   doz.    case'  8  50  9  00 

Strawberries,  2s,  2  doz.   case  8  00  8  50 

CANNED  FRUIT  (American) 

Apricots,  Is,  4  doz.  case 11  00 

Peaches,  21/38,  2  acz.  case 12  00 

Do.,  sliced.  Is,  4  doz.  case 12  40 

Do.,  halved.  Is,  4  doz.  case   ....  12  40 

Do.,  2s,  2  aoz.   case   8  25 

Pears,  Is,  4  doz.  case   12  00 

Pineapples,  sled.,  2s,  2  doz.  cs 7  60 

CANNED  VEGETABLES 
Asparagus   Tips,   Is,   tins,   2. 

doz.  case,  per  do.7 5  00 

Beans,  Golden  Wax.  Is,  doz.  4  75  5  00 

Beans,  Refugee,  2s,  2  doz.  case  4  75  5  00 

Corn,  2s,  2  doz.  case  3  00  4  00 

Peas,  Early  June,  2s,  2  doz.  cs.  4  50  4  80 

Sw't  Potatoes,  2-i^s,  2  doz.  cs 7  00 

Pumpkins,  2-I/2S,  2  doz.  case  3  00  3  75 

Sauer  Kraut,  'Z-VsS.  2  doz.  case  ....  4  10 

Spaghetti,  2  doz.  case   2  15 

Tomatoes.  2-1/38,   2   doz.   case   3  75  4  00 

Spinach,  2-%s.  2  doz.  case 6  55 

Raisin  Market  Easier 


DRIED  FRUIT.— The  raisin  market  is 
slightly  easier  and  lower  prices  are  quot- 
ed for  new  crop.  The  prune  market  con- 
tinues firm  and  is  showing  an  improve- 
ment in  the  demand  at  the  low  levels  of 
values.  A  firm  market  is  looked  for.  There 
is'  not  much  change  in  present  prices  on 
dried  peaches.  The  demand  is  fair.  Evap- 
orated apples  s-how  no  change  and  there 
is  no  likelihood  of  further  advances.  The 
arrival  of  new  pack  apricots  is  expected 
during  the  next  30  days.  Some  of  the  old 
crop  is  still  available. 

DRIED   FRUIT 

Evaprrated  Apples,  per  lb 0  143  _ 

Currants,  90-lb.,  per  lb.   . .   0  IS  0  19 
Do.,  8  oz.  pkgs.,  6  doz.  cs, 

lb 0  16"4 

Dates,  Hallowee,  bulk,  lb 0  II14 

Do.,  pkg.,  3  doz.  case,  lb 0  15% 

Figs,  Spanish,  per  lb 0  15 

Do.,  Smyrna,  per  lb 0  12Vi 

Do.,  black,  cartons,  crtn 0  60 

Loganberries,  4  dz.  cs.,  pkt 0  30 

Peaches,  standard,  per  lb.  0  20  0  21 

Do.,  choice,  per  lb 0  23  0  24 

Do.,  fancy,  per  lb 0  24  0  2." 

Do.,  Cal.,  in  cartons,  cart 1  10 

Do.,   unpitted,  per  lb 0  10 

Pears,  extia  choice,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,   Cal.,   cartons,   cart 1  25 

Prunes — 

30-40S,  25s,  per  lb 0  21 

40-50S,  25s,  per  lb 0  I614 

511-6OS,  25'-,,  per  lb 0  14 

60-70S.  25s,   per   lb 0  12% 

70-80S,   25s,  per  lb 0  llVo 

80-90S   25s,  per  11) 0  lliA 

90-lOOs,  25s,  per  lb 0  10% 

In   5-lb,    oartrins,   carton    ....  0  68 

Raisins — 

Cal.,    pkg.,  seeded,    15    oz.. 


fey.,  3  uoz.  to  cs..  pkg 0  29 

Choice  seeded,  15  oz.,  3  doz. 

to  case,  per  pkg 0  27 

Fancy,    seeded,    11    oz..    4 

doz.  to""  case,  per  pkg.    ....  0  23 
Choice    seeded,      11    oz.,    4 

doz.  to  case,  per  pkg 0  22% 

Cal.,    bulk,     seeded,    25-lb. 

boxes    0  29 

Do.,  pkt.  .:;eedless,  11  oz.,  3 

doz.  to  case,  per  lb 0  22 

Do.,    buk,    seedless,    25-lb. 

boxes,   per   lb 0  28 

Apricots,  choice,  25s,  l"; 0  30 

Po.,    10s,    lb 0  31 

Do.,  Standard,  25s,  lb 0  27 

Do.,  fancy,  25s.  lb 0  35 

Do.,  fancy,  10s.  lb 0  36 

Sugar  Prices  Lower 


of 

;ir, 

ote 

ly 

to 


SUGAR. — There  has  been  a  decline 
"•)  cents  per  hur.dredweight  on  sus; 
bringing  refiners"  prices  to  $10. 2S  i.v 
Winnipeg.  Wholesalers  continue  to  qv. 
below  refiners"  lists  and  it  is  not  lik 
tliat  they  will  continue  much  longer 
sell  at  these  reduced  prices. 
Extra   gran.,    bags,   100    lbs 10  25 

Do.,  gunnies,  5/20  lbs    10  i;5 

Do.,  gunnies,  10/10  lb". 10  7". 

Do.,  cartons,  20/5  lbs 10     S 

Do.,  cartons,  50/2  lbs 11    T.' 

Yellow.  No.  1  It,  bags.  100  lbs !»   ^:> 

Do.,  golden,  barrs,  100  lbs 9  ;:. 

Powdered  Sugar,  bbls lo  :',5 

Do.,  boxfe.s.  50  lbs 10  '." 

Do.,  boxes,  25   lbs 10   ,  .'> 

Icing,    barrels    10   '■<> 

Do.,  boxe.-;,   50   lbs 10  cr. 

Do.,  boxe«.  25  lbs 10  S5 

LUMP  SUGAR— 

Soft  Lump^  bo-^-^,  100  lbs 10  95 

Do.,  boxes,  50  lbs 10  o", 

Do.,   25   lbs 11  1'5 

Do.,  casc«,  20  cartons ".  12  00 

Do.,  cases,  40  half  cartons   ....  11  75 

Small  Lumi     boxes,  100  lbs 10  85 

Do.,  boxes,  50   lbs 11  70 

Do  ,  boxes.  2."  lbs 11  15 

Do.,  cartons.  50/2  lbs 12  2B 

Hard    Lump    Sugar,    barrels    ....  11  15 

Do.,  boxes.  100  lbs 11  15 

Do.,  boxes,  50  lbs 11  25 

Do.,  boxes.  25  lbs 11  40 

Spice  Market  Steady 

Toronto. 

SPICES. — There  is  on  the  whole  a 
steady  tone  to  the  spice  market  though 
here  and  there  holders  who  are  anxious 
to  clean  up  aro  inclined  to  shade  prices 
more  or  less.  There  is  a  normal  demand 
for  seasonable  varieties  with  buying  in 
small  lots  only. 
Allspice,  Jamaica,  best  qual., 

lb 

Cassia,  Batavia,  per  lb.    ....    . 

Do.,  China,  per  lb 

Chillies,  per  lb 

Do.,  No.  1,  per  lb 0  53 

Cinnamon,  Ceylon,  per  lb.    . .    . 

Do.,  No.  0,  carton,  doz 


0  28 
0  38 
0  25 
0  55 


0  85 

1  00 


Cloves,  Penang.  per  lb 0  95 

Do.,  Amboyna,  per  Ih 0  90 

Do.,  Zanzibar,   per  lb 0  55  0  60 

Ginger,  washed,  Jamaica,  No.  1  . . . .  0  65 

Do.,  Jamaica,  No.  2    0  40 

Do.,  Japan  or  Africa,  lb 0  30 

Mace,  extra  bright  Penang,  lb 0  80 

Nutmegs,  extra  large  brown, 

70  to  lb.,  per  lb 0  70 

Do.,  Ig.  l)rown.  S.")  to  lb.,  lb 0  40 

Do.,    med.,    brown,    110    to 

lb.,  lb 0  38 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


35 


Do.,  carton  of  six,  per  doz 0  80 

Pepper,  blk.,  Singapore,  ex.,  lb.  0  17  0  19 

Do.,  white,  per  lb 0  30  0  35 

Pickling,  li-ib.  pkg.,  per  doz 1  00 

Do.,  bulk,  No.  1,  per  lb 0  28 

GROUND  SPICE 

Ulspice,  bulk,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  Xo.  2,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  2  oz  cartons 0  80 

Do.,   4  oz.   cartons    1  20 

Jassia.  No.  X   bulk,  per  lb 0  30 

Do.,  No.  2,  bulk,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  No.  1,  2  oz.  cartons 1  00 

Do.,  No.  1,  4  oz.  cartons 1  50 

3innamon,  bulk,  per  lb 0  45 

Do.,  2  oz.  cartons   1  15 

Do.,  4  oz.  cartons 1  75 

Jloves,  bulk,  per  lb 0  65 

Do..  2  oz.,  cartons   '. 1  45 

4  oz.  cartons   2  00 

I     Cane  Syrups  Reduced 


Gloss.  1-lb.  pkgs..  per  lb.  . . 
Celluloid,    1-lb.    pkgs.,   case 


0  lOTg 
4   3.5 


SYRUPS. — Rogers  can  svrup  is  r^duc- 
d  30  cents  per  case  on  2s,  40  cents  on 
B  and  3i^  cent"^  per  case  on  10s  and  20s. 
lorn  syrups  remain  unchanged,  but  there 
i  every  likelihood  of  an  advance  as  it 
1  generally  Jthought  that  manufacturers 
re  losing  money  mi  this  line. 
lANE  SYRI.'P- 

No.  2« G  55 

No.  OS   7  50 

No.    10s    7  00 

No.  20s   6  SO 

ORS  SYRUP— 
Cases.    2-lb.    tins,    white.   2 

doz.  in  case   4  >>5 

Cases.   5-lb.   tins,   white,   1 

doz.  in  case   5  75 

Cases.  lO-lb.  tins,  white,  V2 

doz.  in  case   5  50 

Cas'3s.  20-lb.  tins,  white.  V4 

do3.  in  'a' e   .'50 

Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  yellow,  2 

doz.  in  ca' e   .";  40 

Cases.  5-lb.  tins,  yellow.  1 

doz.  in  case 4  53 

Cases,    10-lb.    tins,    yellow, 

Vs  doz.  in  case 4  30 

Cases,    20-lb.    tins,    yellow. 

Vi    doz.   in   case    4  30 

[APLE  SYRUP— 

Pure,  2V2S.  tins,  cs.  of  2  doz 24  85 

Pure.  5s,  per  case  of  1  doz 22  65 

Pure.  10s.  per  case  of  V2  doz 21  05 

ABLE   SYRUP— 
Maple    flavdr,    2i^s,    tins, 

per  cas3  of  2  doz 13  75 

Do..  2s.  tins,  case  of  1  doz 12  00 

Dc,  Is,  tins,  ca'se   ^/2  doz 11  50 

[GLASSES.  BARBADOES— 

2-lb.   tins.   2   doz.   case    S  30 

3-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  case    11  60 

5-lb.   tins,   1   doz.   case    9  50 

10-lb.  tins,  1  doz.  case 9  20 

Molasses   quotations   subject    to   5   per 
?ri.  'li«count. 
[GLASSES,  BLACKSTRAP— 

I'/ys.   4  doz.   in   case    5  25 

2s.    1  do.'.,  in  case   5  00 

2V^s,  4  doz.  in  case   4  80 

5s,  4  doz.  in  case   4  50 

10s,  4  doz.  in  case 4  20 

Starch  In  Demand 


STARCH. — There  is  a  big  improvpment 
1  fro  demand  for  starch  and  quobnions 
snnin  unchanged.  It  is  not  likely  that 
le  rrosnertive  change  in  syrups  will 
ave  air-  ci'ect  on  the  price  of  starch, 
ornstarcl.'.    1-lb.    pkgs..   lb 0  O914 

Do.,  No.  1  quality,  per  lb 0  10% 


Nuts  Continue   Strong 

NUTS. — Shelled  walnuts  continule  to 
hold  :i  stror.g  position  under  an  active 
demand  and  limited  stocks.  Almonds  also 
continue  in  a  strong  position  due  to  the 
fact  that  Germany  is  now  buying  these 
lines.  Shelled  peanuts  are  showing  a 
firmer  tone  while  pecans  remain  scarce 
and  high . 
NUTS,    SHELLED— 

Almonds,  per  lb 0  45     0  47 

Spanish  Peanuts,  No.  1,  lb 0  1214 

Pecans,   per   lb 1  40 

Walnuts,  per  ib 0  7.') 

NUTS  IN  SHELL— 

Peanuts,  rsted..  Jumbo,  lb 0  25 

Walnuts,  per  lb 0  25 

Almonds,  per  lb 0  25 

Brazils,  per  lb 0  25 

Pecans,   per   lb 0  28 

Cocoanuts,  per  doz 1  50 

Cocoanuts,  per  sack 11  Oit 

Flour  Unchanged 

FLOUR. — There  are  no  new  develop- 
ments in  the  flour  market.  IMerchants 
still  continue  to  buy  in  small  quantities 
to  meet  their  pre^^ent  requirements.  9S- 
Ib.  sacks  delivered  are  quoted  at  $5.47V2. 
FLOUR— 

9S-lb.  sacks   5  ilVs 

Two  49-lb.  sacks .''.  i>6 

Four   24-lb.    sacks    5  65 

Jam  Selling  Freely 

JAMS. — Only  two  cr  three  packers  have 
named  their  opening  prices  en  strawberry 
jam  and  figures  quoted  are  higher  than 
wholesalers  ar  asking  for  present  stock. 
Other  packers  prices  no  doubt  will  be 
ju'^i  as  high  and  new  packed  strawberry 
will  be  offered  to  the  retail  trade  at  or 
r.bout  S5  to  90  cents  for  4  pound  tins. 
At  the  present  time  there  is  a  compar- 
atively small  pack  and  it  is  expected  that 
nigher  price'--  will  prevail  later  in  the 
season. 

Eastern 

Strawberry,  4s,  per  tin    0  86 

Black  Currant,  4s  per  tin 0  SG 

Raspberry,  4s,  per  tin   0  86 

Apricots,  4s,  per  tin   0  SO 

Cherry,  4s,  per  tin 0  SO 

Peach,  4s,  per  tin   0  80 

Compound  (all  flavors),  4s,  tin  0  53  0  58 

Western 

Strawberry,  4s,  per  tin 0  95 

Black  Currant,  4s,  per  tin 0  95 

Raspberry,  4s,  per  tin    0  93 

Apricot,   4s,   per   tin    0  90 

Cherry,   4s,   per   tin    0  90 

Peach,  4s,  per  tin    0  90 

Rice  Market  Firm 


RICE. — The  rice  market  continues  firm 
and  whi'e  'ccal  quotations  remain  un- 
changed it  is  expected  that  prices  will 
advance  within  the  next  few  days  from 
ri  to  V2  cent  per  pound  on  Carolina,  Si-nm 
and  Japan  rice. 


Slam,  100-lb.  bags 0  OG 

Do..  30-lb.  bags 0  06% 

feago.    sack    lot'^.    130    to    150 

lbs.,  per  lb     0  09 

Do.,  in  less  quantities,  lb 0  09^4, 

Tapioca,  .pearl,  per  lb 0  08  0  08  Va 

Raspberries  On  Market 

FRUITS.— W.'^.'^hington  raspberries  have 
arrived  on  the  market  and  are  selling 
freely.  The  demand  for  California 
peiuiies  and  plums  is  good.  Peaches  are 
quoted  at  ?3.00  with  plums  at  $3.50  to 
.S4.i)0  per  case.  Washington  brings 
cherries  declined  50  cents  per  lug  and 
are  now  quoted  at  *t^.00.  California  cant- 
aloupes and  Georgia  watermelons  are  in 
good  demand.  Oranges  remain  unchang- 
ed at  5:7.00  per  case.  Lemons  have  ad- 
vanced,and  are  new  quoted  at  ?11.50  per 
case.  Bananas  are  in  good  demand  at 
11  cents  per  pound.  New  green  apples 
are  expected  shortly  and  will  range  about 
f'lAM)  per  box. 

riiprries,  bings  in  lugs,  case    ....  6  00 

Plums,    Califcrnia,    per    ca^e    3  .50  4  00 

Apricots,  per  case   3  30  4  00 

Peaches,  per  case   3  00 

Cantaloupes,    tlats.    per   case    ....  3  00 

Do.,  standards,  per  case  —   ....  7  00 

Watermelon,  per  lb 0  07 

B.  C.  Celery  On  Market 

VEGETABLES.— The  first  shipments  of 
B.C.  celery  has  arrived  on  the  market 
and  is  quoted  at  12  cents  per  pound  by 
the  case  and  13  cents  for  smaller  quan- 
tities. Mississippi  tomatoes  are  lower  in 
pi  ice  and  are  quoted  at  $3.00  per  case. 
Ontario  tomatoes  in  11  quart  baskets 
jire  arrivintr.  and  are  being  offered  at 
S4.50.  Local  vegetables  such  as  spinach, 
loaf  and  head  Lttuce.  radishes  and  green 
onions  are  in  good  demand  at  greatly 
reduced  prices. 

Rhubarb,  local,  per  lb 11  02% 

Spinach,  per  lb 0  11 

Cabbage,   by   the   crate,   11) 0  07 

Do.,   broken   lots,   per  lb 0  07*/^ 

Hci.'d    Lettuce    

Do.,  per  dozen   1  25 

Leaf  Lettuce,  per  dozen 0  25 

Radi^hes,  per  -loz 0  25 

Green  Onions,  per  dcz 0  25 

Cucumbers,    Davids'   hoth'se, 

doz 3  50 

Toma'ces 3  00 

Onion?.   Valencia,   per   case    ..,.  H  50 

Do.,  New  Texas,  Bermudas 

crt 3  00 

Do.,  B.C.,  per  sack    2  00 

New  Carrots,  Beets  and  Par- 
snips, per  lb 0  06 

Potatoes,  per  bushel   1  00 

Do.,    25    bush.    lots,   bush 0  90 


RICE— 

No.  1  Japnn.  100-lb.  sacks, 

lb 

Do.,  50-lb.  sacks,  lb.   . .   . 


0  08 

0  08 1/3 


Further    Exemptions 
From     Sales    Tax 

Are      Announced 

Rolled  wheat,  buckwheat  meal  and  pea 
meal  are  now  exempted  from  the  Sales 
Tax.  Coffee  beans,  green,  not  roasted, 
;M-e  placed  in  the  list  as  seeds  in  their 
natural  state  and  are  also  exempted  from 
the  sales  tax.  Butchers  who  sell  cured 
and  smoked  hams  and  bacon  and  retail 
same  from  stalls  on  the  market  are  not 
required  to  obtain  a  Sales  Tax  License 
nor  pay  a  Sales  Tax  thereon. 


36 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


WEEKLY  MARKET  REPORTS  BY  WIRE 


^ifliiiiiiiiiij 


Statements  from  Buying  Centres  East  and  West 


Alberta  Markets 

FROM   CALGARY,  BY  WIRE 


CAGAUY.  Aliii  .  July  G.— Business  is 
holding  steady  l)ut  splendid  rains  have 
occurred  during  the  week  which  \i  mak- 
ing merchants  more  cptiniistir.  B.  C. 
syrup  declined  30  cents  per  case  on  twos 
and  35  cents  on  other  sizes.  One  brand 
of  marmalade  4s  advanced  trcra  $9.50 
per  case  to  J10.50.  Lard  advanced  to 
$10.50  for  threes.  Smoked  meats  have 
higher  tendencies.  Eggs  are  firm  at  un- 
changed fiuotations.  Small  white  beans 
are  selling  at  $4.95  to  $."5.50.  B.  C.  rasp- 
berries  are   arriving   at   $5.50   per   crate. 

Lard,   pure,   3 10  50 

Beans.   B.C.,   per  hundred   4  95       5  50 

Rolled  oats   S  80 

Rice,  Siam    5  50       6  00 

Japan,  Xo.  1    7  50       8  00 

Tapioca     6  75       7  25 

Sago    6  75       7  25 

Sugar,     pure     cane,     gran., 

cwt 11  52 

Cheese,  No.  1,  Ont.,  large  0  20i^  0  22% 
Alberta  cheese,  twins 0  20 

Do.,    large    0  20       0  21 

Butter,  creamery,   lb 0  35 

Do.  dairy,  lb 0  25       0  30 

Lard,    pure,    3s    10  50  11  10 

Eggs,  new  laid,  local,  case  9  50  10  25 

Tomatoes,  2y3S    4  00       4  25 

Corn,   2s,   case    3  15       3  85 

Peas,  2s,  standard  case  . .   3  60       4  00 
New  early  June  peas,  case  ....       4  50 

Strawberries,  2s,  Ont.,  case  9  90  10  30 

Raspberries,  2s,  Ont.,  case  10  40  11  00 

Gooseberries,    2s    11  30 

Cherries,  2s,  red,  pitted  . .  9  00       9  50 
Apples,  evaporated,  50s   ..  0  14       0  15 V^ 

Do.,    25s,    lb 0  141/2   0  161/2 

Peaches,  evaporated,  lb.  . .  0  22       0  221/^ 

Do.,  canned,  2s   7  45       7  90 

Prunes,  90-lOOs 0  OS      0  08% 

Do.,   70-80s    0  OSi/i   0  11 

Do.,   60-70S    0  12       0  12% 

Potatoes,    local    ton    ....    25  00       0  00 


New  Brunswick  Markets 

FROM  ST.  JOHN,  BY  WIRE 


ST.  JOHN,  N.B.,  July  6.— Business  is 
about  as  usual  with  some  slight  price 
changes.  Granulated  ccrnnieal  is  quoted 
at  $3.50  to  $3.75  and  ordinary  at  $2.30. 
Rolled  oats  are  selling  at  $8.xo.  Molas- 
ses is  easier  at  60  cents  per  gallon.  Gran- 
ulated sugar  declined  to  $8.95  and  yellow 
to  $8.45  per  hundred.  Cheese  is  easier  at 
17  to  IS  cents.  Fresh  eggs  are  finoted  at 


35  to.  36  cents  per  dozen.  Pure  lard  is 
quoted  at  16%  to  17  cents  and  compound 
at  13%  to  14  cents  per  pound.  Canned 
tomatoes  are  slightly  higher  at  $4.00  per 
case,  corn  at  $3.50  and  peas  at  $3.80. 
Cc-rnmeal,    gran.,    bags    ....    3  50       3  75 

Do.,    ordinary     2  30 

RoUde  oats 8  80 

Rice.  Siam.  per  100  lbs.   . .   6  50       7  00 

Tapioca,   100  lbs 8  00     10  00 

Molasses    0  60 

Sugar — 

Standard,  granulated    8  95 

No.  1,  yellow   8  45 

Cheese,  new,  twins   0  17  0  18 

Eggs,  fresh,  doz 0  35  0  36 

Lard,  pure,   lb 0  16%  0  17 

Do.,  compound    0  13%  0  14 

Tomatoes,  2%s,   std.,  case    ....  4  00 

American  clear  pork 31  00  33  00 

Beef,  corned.  Is 3  45 

Breakfast   bacon    0  45  0  48 

Butter,  creamery,  per  lb.  . .  0  30  0  33 

Do.,    dairy    ' 0  25  0  2i) 

Do.,   tub    0  24  0  28 

Corn,  2s,  standard,  case 3  50 

Peas,   standard,  case    3  80 

Apples,  gal.,  N.B.,  doz 5  00 

Strawberries,  2s,  Ont.,  case 

Lemons,  case  11  00  12  00 

Oranges,  California   6  50  8  00 

Bananas,    lb 0  08  0  10 

Grapefruit,    case     8  50  9  50 


Nova  Scotia  Markets  t 

FROM  HALIFAX,  BY  WIRE 


HALIFAX.  X.  S.,  July  6.— Business 
continues  goo'.l  in  all  lines.  Butter, 
cheese  and  eggs  all  show  advances. 
Creamery  butter  is  quoted  at  32  cent.s 
and  dairy  at  25  cents.  Cheese  is  selling 
at  20  cents  per  pound.  Eggs  are  quoted 
at  42  cents  per  dozen.  Regular  grocery 
lines  show  few  price  changes  over  last 
week. 

Flour,  No.  1  patents,  bbl 11  00 

Cornmeal,   bags    2  50 

Rolled  oats,  per  bag 3  85 

Rice,  Siam,  per  100  lbs.  . .  0  06%  0  10 

Tapioca,    100    lbs 10  00 

Sugar,     standard,     gran 10  70 

Do.,  No.  1,  yellow 10  20 

Molasses,  gal 0  70 

Cheese,  Ont.,  twins    0  20 

Eggs,  fresh,  rtoz 0  42 

Lard,  compound    0  14 

Do.,   pure,    lb 0  16 

American  clear  pork,  bbl 31  00 

Tomatoes,      2%s,     standard, 

doz 1  90 

Breakfast  bacon   0  48 

Hams,  aver.  9-12  lbs 0  38 

Do.,  aver.  12-18  lbs 0  38 

Do.,  aver.  18-25  lbs 0  37 

Roll  bacon 0  33 


Butter,  creamery,  lb 0  32 

Do.,  dairy   0  25 

Raspberries,  2s.  Ont..  doz 4  00 

Peaches,  2s,  standard,  doz 3  00 

Corn,  2s,  standard,  doz 1  65 

Peas,  standard,  doz 1  80 

Strawberries,  2s,  Ont.,  doz 4  00 

Salmon,    Red    Spring,    flats, 

cases    .... 

Do.,   Pinks 7  00 

New  Beets,  per  dozen 0  75- 

New  carrots,  hamper   3  50 

New  spinach,  bushel 0  75 

Do.,  Chum=?   6  00 

Evaporatted  apples,  per  lb 0  15 

Dried  peaches,  per  lb 0  26 

Potatoes,    Nat.,      90-lb.    bag    1   2.S- 

Oiions,    Bermuda,    case    3  50- 

Beans,  white   3  35 

Do.,  yellow  eye    7  50 

Banans,  lb 0  10       0  11 

Lemons,  Cal 12  00 

Oranges,    all    sizes    7  00       8  00 

Grapefruit,   Florida,   case    ....         8  50 

Do.,  Jamaica    7  00       7  50 

Oats,  per  bushel    0  75 


BRITISH  COLUMBIA  3IARKETS 

VANCOUVER.  B.C.,  July  6.— Straw- 
berries are  moving  freely,  some  46  cars 
have  been  shipped  from  Fraser  Valley 
and  29  from  Victoria  at  prices  around' 
S1.50.  Raspberries  are  appearing  at  $2.65. 
Clierries  are  selling  at  25  cents  for  bings 
;!nd  black  tartarians  at  $2.00  per  crate. 
Cabbage  is  quoted  at  five  cents  per 
p(nind  and  green  peas  at  eleven  cents. 
.\uw  apricots  are  $3.50  per  box.  B.C. 
( heese  is  quoted  at  22%  cents  and  On- 
tario at  23  cents.  Fresh  eggs  advanced 
to  42  cents  per  dozen.  Lard  is  iirni  and 
expected  to  advance.  Old  potatoes  are- 
selling  at  $1.00  and  new  at  $2.75. 


COFFEE    PAINTED    TO    ORDER 

Bra.3ilian  coffee-dealers  will  paint  cof- 
fee any  color  desired.  There  is  black, 
coffee,  brown  coffee,  yellow  coffee,  blue 
coffee,  and  green  coffee. 

The  health  authorities  of  some  coun- 
tries will  not  permit  the  entrance  of 
painted  coffee.  Its  entrance  is  not  allow- 
ed in  the  United  States.  However,  many 
of  the  South  American  countries  prefer 
colored  coffee,  and  certain  states  in 
South  Africa  also  like  to  use  coffee  color- 
ed to  suit  their  taste. 

The  coloring  matter  is  applied  in  big 
revolving  cylinders  provided  with  pad- 
dles. Each  cylinder  holds  about  six  bags 
of  coffee.  Vegetable  coloring  matter  is 
I'sed. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


37 


How  A  Meat   Deparment   Can 

Help   The  Sale   Of   Groceries 

W.  J.  Penaligon,  King  Street-  E.  Hamilton,  Ont.  has 
a  Meat  Department  in  connection  with  his  grocery 
store,  and  he  says  the  two  work  well  together. — A 
Meat  Slicer  Increases  Sales. 


/Conducting  a  fresh  meat  department  in 
^^  connection  with  a  grocery  store  has 
proved  a  good  combination  in  a  great 
many  instances.  W.  .J.  Penaligon,  King 
Street,  E.,  Hamilton,  Ont.  has  a  grocery 
store  with  a  meat  department,  and  he 
finds  the  two  work  well  together.  Mr. 
Penaligon's  store  is  situated  on  a  cor- 
ner, with  the  grocery  part  fronting  on 
King  Street,  and  the  meat  depiartment 
at  the  rear,  with  an  entrance  from  the 
side  street.  "One  department  helps  the 
other",  Mr.  Penaligon  told  Canadian 
Grocer.  "Very  often  when  people  are 
in  the  store  for  groceries,  knowing  that 
they  can  also  purchase  meat  here,  they 
step  into  the  meat  department  and  buy 
their  meat  supply.  It  is  in  this  way  that 
the  grocery  section  helps  the  sale  of 
meats,  and  vice  versa.  It  is  the  same 
with  the  telephone  orders.  If  fx  cus- 
tomer is  ordering  meat,  the  suggestion 
of  some  sipecial  lines  of  groceries  fre- 
quently results  in  an  order,  and  like- 
wise  meats    can    be    sold   in    the    same 


way  along  with  groceries." 

Mr.  Penaligon  looks  after  the  meat 
department,  and  his  wife  has  charge 
of  the  groceries  with  the  assistance  of 
a  clerk'.  Of  course  in  the  summer 
months  the  sale  of  fresh  meats  falls  off 
very  considerably  on  account  of  the  hot 
weather,  but  sales  of  cooked  meats  are 
very  heavy.  Mr.  Penaligon  has  a 
modern  meat  slicer,  that  he  declares,  has 
meant  a  good  deal  in  the  way  of  increas- 
ing his  turnover  both  in  cooked  and 
smoked  meats.  In  the  busy  seiason, 
particularly  when  there  is  a  big  de- 
mand for  cooked  meats,  the  slicer  fac- 
illitates  service,  enabling  Mr.  Penaligon 
to  serve  people  much  more  r,apidly  than 
he  otherwise  would  be  able  to  do. 

In  addition,  he  thinks  it  is  an  econ- 
omic saving,  and  he  is  able  to  sell  cook- 
ed and  smoked  meats  on  a  more  profit- 
able basis.  "Pec(ple  too",  he  said,  "like 
to  get  their  meat  nicely  sliced,  and  of 
course  a  slicer  makes  for  unform 
slicing." 


Maintaining  Volume  of  a  Business 


(Continued  from  Page  21) 

lor  a  dollar.  The  money  is  made  on 
the  goods  you  buy  for  fifty  cents  and 
■sell  for  seventy-five  cents.  The  jeweller 
gets  the  largest  margin  of  any  man  in 
lousiness,  but  long  m,argins  do  not  neces- 
sarily mean  long  net  profits.  Now, 
with  regard  to  the  tendency  of  price 
decline,  it  is  evident  that  some  have 
to  step  backward  or  step  ,to  one  side. 
When  wages  drop  twenty  per  cent,  a 
man  can  pay  only  80  cents  where  be- 
fore he  p,aid  a  dollar.  This  is  a  point 
to  be  remembered. 

"You  are  now  faced  ^■sith  holding  up 
the  vclume  of  your  business.  What 
happens  when  you  do  not  succeed?  Sup- 
pose $10,000  is  the  volume  of  a  business. 
Say  the  average  cost  of  doing  busiaess 
is  27.6  per  cent.  If  this  is  the  cost  of 
doing  business  it  costs  me  in  dollars 
$2,760.  Divide  the  cost  of  doing  busi- 
Hess  by   the  volume   and  you  get  your 


percentage  cost  of  doing  business.  Xow, 
this  brings  the  volume  of  business  down 
to  $8,000.  How  (about  reducing  ex- 
ipenses  ?  There  is  just  one  way  in  which 
you  can  cut  down  on  your  rent.  That  is 
to  take  your  stock  to  one  side  and  rent 
the  other  half  of  the  store  to  a  florist  or 
some  other  dealer  of  this  kind.  But  such 
a  plan  is  not  practiqal  for  a  red-blooded 
man.  Here,  too,  the  question  of  price 
enters.  Today  the  customer  asks  about 
the  price  of  a  thing.  It  shows  we  are 
getting  back  to  normal.  Can  we  reduce 
selling  expenses?  We  might  cut  wages 
like  the  other  fellow,  but  it  is  hard  to 
do  this  in  a  sm,all  organization  where 
personality  counts.  Cut  out  your  ad- 
vertising, then.  If  you  do  this,  though, 
your  volume  dwindles  because  advert- 
ising brought  some  of  it.  How  about 
getting  along  with  fewer  clerks?  This 
is  hardly  feasible,  as  people  wait  just 
so  long  in  a  store  and  then  go  away. 
This  would  cut  in  ,again  on  the  volume. 


In  the  face  of  all  this,  it  looks  as  though 
it  is  quite  a  man-sized  job  to  cut  down 
that  $2,760  without  hurting  the  $8,000. 
Bui  unless  you  do  something  your  cost 
of  business  is  liable  to  rise  to  34.50  per 
cent  .  This  means  that  something  has 
to  be  done. 

Perpetual  Inventory  Proposed..    .. 

"In  the  first  place,  most  of  us  aim 
for  a  certain  m^argin  and  then  never 
check  up  to  see  how  close  we  come  to 
it.  How  many  of  you  do  not  know  at 
the  end  of  the  month  just  how  much 
money  you  have  made  or  have  not 
made? 

Here  there  was  what  appeared  to  be 
a  unanimous  showing  of  hands,  and  J. 
E.  W.  Lescours,  of  Montreal,  asked: 
"How  can  you  know  this  monthly  with- 
out   taking   inventory?" 

"The  only  way,"  replied  Mr.  Stock- 
dale,  "is  to  keep  perpetual  inventory. 
It  is  one  of  the  simplest  pieces  of 
machinery  that  can  be  devised  in  book- 
keeping." 

"Is  it  practical"?  masked  F.  J.  Roag, 
of  Kingston. 

"Absolutely  and  easily  attended  to," 
replied  Mr.  Stockdale,  going  on  to  say: 
"Those  who  have  a  perpetual  inven- 
tory know  just  what  they  have  in  stock, 
should  there  be  a  fire  or  anything  like 
th,at,  while  others  only  guess.  A 
perpetual  inventory  is  as  good  as  an  in- 
surance policy.  The  only  thing  to  watch 
in  keeping  record  is  that  you  do  not  pay 
more  for  a  record  than  it  is  worth. 
Sometimes  we  find  a  retailer  who  is  a 
iCial  bug  on  system,  and  he  will  invari- 
ably pay  out  too  much  for  what  he  gets. 
"I  have  in  mind  a  retailer  who  would 
not  handle  anything  at  less  than  fifty 
cents.  Later  on  he  put  in  five  and  ten 
cent  stuff  and  he  steadily  doubled  his 
business.  In  this  connection  let  me  point 
out  that  there  is  a  great  opportunity 
for  increasing  volume  in  the  handling 
of  hair  nets.  There  are  numerous  other 
lines,  too,  which  might  be  pushed  to  ad- 
vantage . 

(Continued  on  Page  28) 


>E\V  FRUIT   (  ANMX; 

FACTORY  AT  FEXOBSQULS 

Sussex,  N.B.,  July  7. — The  Acadia  Pro- 
ducers, Ltd.,  is  considering  the  advisa- 
bility of  erecting  a  fruit  canning  factory 
at  Penobsquis,  X.B.  The  concern  owns  a 
large  tracts  of  blueberry  lands  at  Dun- 
sinane,  between  Penobsquis  and  Anag- 
ance.  W\  B.  Fawcett  of  Sackville,  is 
president  of  the  company,  J.  Herbert 
Morey  of  Penobsquis,  vice-president  and 
B.   A.  Keith  of  Anagance,  a  director. 


38 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 


Produce,   Provision  and  Fish    Markets 


QUEBEC    MARKETS 


Lard  Prices  Firm 


AjONTREAL,  July  6—  The  prov 
■'^  -^or  strong  tendency  in  almost 
alone  shows  weakness.    Following 
two  weeks  live  hogs  are  lower  in 
smoked   and   cooked   meats   keeps 
more  active  market  for  both  butt 
for  export.     Butter  is  up  another 
have  started  upward.     Eggs  are 
but  the  demand  for  both  domestic 
is  no  change  in  fish  prices.     The 
with  a  bigger  demand  and  an  adva 
twenty  pound  pails. 

Butter  Goes  Higher 


Montreal. 

BUTTER.— All  the  influences  that  taeai- 
on  the  butter  market  tend  to  strengthen 
up  prices.  The  demand  both  tor  home 
consumpticn  and  exportation  has  notice- 
ably increased  and  the  hot  dry  spell  does 
not  tend  to  increase  the  supply  of  butter 
offered  on  the  market.  There  is  a  keen 
demand  for  creamery  butter  and  prices 
are  strong  with  an  upward  tendency. 
Creamery  butter  in  prints  is  now  selling 
at  34  cents  per  pound. 

.      0  34 

.      0  33 


Creamery    prints,    qual..    new 
Do.,   «clids,  quality,  new    . . 


Montreal. 

Cooked  Meats  Steady 

COOKWn  MEATS.— The  hot  weather 
has  n;>ticeably  increased  the  demand  for 
cooked  meats.  Packers  state  that  sup- 
plies are  quite  sufficient  to  meet  the 
demand   a,nd  prices  are  firm  and   steady. 

Jellied  pork  tongues 0  38 

Jellied  pressed  beef,  lb 0  37 

Ham  and  tongue,  lb 0  42 

Veal    0  30 

Hams,  cooked    0  54  6  57 

Pork  pies   (doz.)    0  80 

Mince  meat,  lb 0  IIV2  0  19 

Sausage,  pure  pork 0  25 

Bologna,   lb 0  14 

Ox  tongue,  tins 0  59 

Head   cheese,  6-lb.  tins,   per 

lb 0  16 

Do.,    25-lb.    tin    pails,    lb 0  15 

Cheese  Market   Stronger 


CHEESE. — The  cheese  market,  like  the 
butter  market  has  during  the  past  week 
increasd  in  strength.  Prices  paid  at  the 
cheese  boards  show  an  advance  of  from 
one  to  four  cents  a  pound  during  the 
past  week.  The  wholesale  price  on  new 
cheese  is  not  yet  changed,  but  it  is  evi- 
dent that  prices  will  score  an  advance. 
Old  cheese  is  steady  in  price.  There  is  a 
keener  demand  for  export  for  the  new 
Canadian  cheese  and  as  p.  result  a  firmer 
cheese  market  may  be  expected  for  the 
future . 

Large,  per  lb 0  18     0  19 

Twins,  per  lb 0  18     0  19 

Triplets,  per  lb 0  18     0  19 


ision  market  is  marked  by  a  steady 
all  lines.     The  fresh  meat  market 

the  sharp  advance  of  the  past 
price  but  the  summer  demand  for 

that  market  strong.  There  is  a 
er  and  cheese  with  a  better  call 

cent  a  pound  and  cheese  prices 
firm  with  good  .supply  continuing 

and  export  trade  increased.  There 
lard  market  continues  to  improve 
nee  of  half  a  cent  a  pound  on  the 


Stilton,   per   lb 0  35 

Fancy,  old  cheese,  per  lb.    0  34  0  35 

Quebec    0  21  0  22 

Eggs  Are  Steady 


EGGS. — The  egg  market  has  remained 
steady  and  strong  rluring  the  week  and 
prices  have  held  with  a  keen  demand  for 
supplies  both  fcr  home  consumption  and 
export.  The  supplies  of  eggs  arriving  on 
this  market  continue  good  despite  the 
warm  weather  and  the  demand  for  ex- 
port is  mainly  respoiw;ible  for  the  up- 
ward tendency  of  the  market. 
EGGS— 

Fresh,   selects    0  40 

Do.,  No.  1    0  36 

Fish  Prices  Unchanged 


FRESH  FISH.— There  is  no  change  in 
prices  quoted  on  the  fish  market.  The 
supply  of  Gaspe  salmon,  halibut  and 
I'.addock  nre  good  with  a  fair  den  and. 
The  supply  o(  lake  fish  is  only  sufficient 
to  meet  requirement.-;. 

Hog  Prices  Easier 


FRESH  i\(EATS.— A  weaker  feeOng 
prevailed  in  the  Canadian  live  hog  mark- 
et through  the  week  and  prices  generally 
have  scored  a  decline,  due  to  the  in- 
creased offerings.  The  high  prices  quoted 
early  in  the  week  did  not  hold  and  fell 
off  with  a  decline  of  fifty  cents  a  hun- 
dred to  $13.50  for  selects  weighed  off 
cars.  There  is  no  improvement  in  the 
beef  market.  Packers  still  have  large 
supplies  of  front  quarters  on  hand  since 
the  demand  has  almost  been  entirely  for 
hind  quarter;.  The  offerings  have  been 
good  and  price-;  are  easy. 

FRESH  MEATS 
Hogs,  live  (s'cted  off  cars)  13  00  13  50 

Hogs,  live  (s'cted  off  cars)  13  50  14  00 
Abattoir  killed,  65-90  lbs 0  21 

Fresh   Pork — 

Legs   of   pork    (foot  on)    0  28i^   0  29 

Loins    (trimmed)    0  29       0  30 

Bone  trimmings 

Trimmed  shoulders   ....   0  20       0  22 
Untrimmed     0  16     018 

Pork    sausage    (pure)     0  25 

Fresh   Beef — 

(Cows)  (Steers) 

0  19       0  24    Hind    quarters    0  21       0  36 

0  08       0  11    Front    quarters    0  09       0  13 

0  27       0  30     . . .     Loins     ...     0  33       0  36 


LARD. — A  much  better  feeling  has 
incvailed  in  the  lard  market  throughout 
tlie  week  owing  to  the  increased  demand 
lor  supplies  for  export  accounts  ai-.d  the 
large  trade  being  done  for  domestic  and 
( ountry  accounts.  There  is  no  change  ia 
the  price,  but  there  is  a  noticeable  addi- 
tion o  strength  to  the  present  prices. 
LARD— 

Tie4-ces.  360  lbs 0  15 

Tubs,  60  lbs 0  1514. 

Pails,  20  lbs 0  16 

Bri<k<; 0  17     0  18 

Barrelled  Meats  Unchanged 

BARRELLED  MEATS.— There  is'  n* 
change  in  the  prices  quoted  on  barrelled 
meats.  The  demand  is  limited  in  this  line, 
but  prices  hold  steady. 
Barrel  Pork — 

Canadian  Short  cut   (bbl), 

'  30-40 40  06 

C4ear    fat    backs    (bbl.), 

40-50  pieces 30  00 

Heavy  mess  pork  (bbl.) 31  00 

Plate   beef    23  00' 

Smoked  Meats  In  Demand 


SMOKED  MEATS.— There  has  been  a 
marked  increase  in  the  consumption  of 
smoked  meats  during  the  past  few  weeks, 
which  is  attributed  to  the  very  hot 
weather.  The  rfsult  is  an  urgent  demani 
fcr  supplies  from  all  points  and  conse- 
quently a  stronger  and  more  aetive  mark- 
et. There  is  no  change  in  price  although 
there  is  every  indication  of  a  rising 
market. 
BACON 

Breakfast,  best 0  36     0  39 

Smoked  Breakfast  0  41     0  44 

Cottage   Rolls    0  29 

Picnic    Hams    0  24 

Wiltshire    0  33     «  37 

MEDIUM   SMOKED   HAMS— 

Weight,  8-14,  long  cut 0  34 

Do.,    :4-20    0  34     0  35 

Do.,   20-25    0  38 

Over  35  lbs ©30 

D3.,  25-35    e  30 

Fish  Prices  Steady 

FISH.— There  i.s  very  little  change  itt 
the  fish  market.  The  demand  for  fresh- 
fis4i  is  good  and  the  supply  of  Gaspe- 
salmon  is  improved  with  a  price  of  25 
cents  per  pound  quoted.  Other  lines  of 
fish  are  in  good  supply  with  prices  un- 
changed. 

Gaspe   Salmon    0  25 

FROZEN  FISH 

Halibut,  large  and  chicken  0  20  0  23 

Haddock    0  07 

Mackerel    0  15  0  16 

Do..   Western,     medium    0  21  0  22 

Steak  od    0  07i^  0  08%. 

Market  Cod 0  OSVa  0  07 

Sea  Herrings  0  06  0  07 

Salmon,    dr.,    B.C 0  20  0  21 

Do.,   Cohoes,  round    ....    0  18  0  19 

Do.,  Qualla,  hd.  and  dd 0  11 

Doree     0  12  0  17 

Smeks    0  15  0  20» 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


89 


ONTARIO    MARKETS 

TORONTO,  July  6. —  The  hog  market  has  developed  an  easier 
tone  with  quotations  lower  under  a  small  demand.  On  the  other 
nand,  fresh  pork  cuts  are  higher  which  i.s  claimed  is  due  to  these 
goods  b^eing  bought  at  the  higher  level.  Smoked  hams  and  bacon, 
also  cookd  hams  are  higher  attributed  to  the  same  reason  as  the 
above.  Butter  is  fairly  steady  although  the  tone  of  the  market 
is  slightly  firmer.  Cheese  has  advanced  considerably  during  the 
week.  Egg  prices  are  unchanged  but  there  is  an  easier  tendency 
with  dealers  bidding  a  lower  price  at  country  points.  Lard  and 
shortening  are  somewhat  higher.  Fresh  whitefish  is  lower  but 
otherwise  fish  quotations  are  unchanged-  Spring  chickens  are  low- 
er but    heavy    fowl    are  slightly  higher. 


Toronto. 

Butter  Markets  Firm 


BKTTKR. — The  market  continues  firm. 
Quotations  stand  steady  at  31  to  i'i  cents 
per    pound    en    creamery    prints. 

butter- 
Do.,  No.  2   0  31 

Creamery  prints.  .\'o.  1   0  32     0  33 

Cheese    Prices    Higher 

Torontou 

t'HEESE.— The  market  made  an  ad- 
vance of  from  IVz  to  2  cents  per  pound, 
briiising  the  price  to  the  retail  trade  to 
29  and  21%  cents. 

CHEESE— 
Large,   new    0  20     0  201^ 

Eggs  Tend   Easy 

EGGS. — There  is  an  easy  tendency  to 
the  egg  market.  Dealers  are  offering 
lower  prices  at  country  points  claiming 
that  there  is  a  great  deal  of  waste  on 
account  of  the  warm  weather  and  also 
the  lact  that  American  eggs  can  be  laid 
down  at  a  lower  price.  Quotations  to  the 
trade  are  unchanged,  but  the  feeling  is 
tor  lower  prices. 
EGGS— 

Selects    0  40     0  41 

No.  1    0  38     0  39 

Selects  in  cartons    0  42     0  43 

Cooked  Hams  Higher 

COOKED  MEATS.— This  market  is 
very  firm  under  an  active  demand.  Boil- 
ed hams  are  quoted  at  .53  cents,  but  there 
are  some  packers  quoting  as  high  as  5.5 
cents.  Square  trimmed  pressed  hams  are 
quoted  at   .591/2    cents   per  pound. 

Boiled    hams,    lb 0  .53     0  55 

Do.,  square  pressed 0  59% 

Boiled    shoulders,    lb 0  42% 

Head  cheese,   6s,  lb 0  12 

Choice  jellied  ox  tongue,  lb 0  63 

Jellied    pork   tongue    0  37 

Bologna   0  16     0  18 

Macaroni  &  cheese  loaf,  lb 0  23 

Above  prices  subject  to  daily  fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 

Hog  Market  Easier 

FRESH  MEATS.— The  hog  market  has 
further  developed  an  easier  tone  under 
light  receipts,  but  a  likewise  small  de- 
mand. Quotations  on  live  hogs  dropped 
iO  cent-s  during  the  week  with  a  still 
further  drop  in  prospect.  Cattle  is  also 


in  an  easy  position  due  to  the  light  de- 
mand during  the  hot  weatheir.  Fresh 
perk  cuts  are  advauced  one  to  three 
cents  per  pound.  Calves,  sheep,  lamb  and 
beef  aw  lower. 
Hogs — 

Dressed,    light,    per    cwt 17  00 

Do.,  Iieavy,  pr  cwt.   . .   12  00  14  00 

Live,   off  cars,  per  cwt.   11  75  12  00 

Live,  fed  Sk  watered,  cwt.  11  50  11  75 

Live,  f.o.b..  per  cwt.   . .   10  75  11  06 

Fresh   Pork— 

Leg-^  of  pork,  up  to  18  lbs 0  ^ioVo 

Lci'is  of  pork,  lb    f>  31 

Frsh  hams,  lb *>  0  37 

Tenderloins,  lb 0  55 

Spare  ribs,  lb 0  12 

Picnics,   lb 0  19 

New   York   shoulders,    lb Q  20 

Montreal  shoulders,  lb 0  21 

Boston    butts,    lb e  24 

Fresh  Beef — from  Steerj'  and  Herfers — 

Hind  quarters,  lb 0  21  0  24 

Front   quarters,    lb 0  06  0  o« 

Ribs,  lb 0  18  0  26 

Chucks,    Ih 0  06  0  07 

Loins,  whole,  lb «  28  «  30 

Hips,   lb 0  18  0  22 

Cow  beef  quotations  about  2c  per  pound 
below  above  q>;otations. 

Calves,    lb 0  12     0  16 

Spring    lam,b,    li; 9  28     0  30 

Yenrlrng  lamb,  lb 0  12     0  15 

Sheep,    whole,   lb 0  10     0  12 

Above   prices   sHbject   t»  daily   fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 

Whitiefish  Lower 


FISH. — Heavy  shipments  of  whitefi*h 
are  arriving  which  has  resulted  in  lower 
prices.  Whitefish  a  few  weeks  ago  was 
quoted  as  high  as  20  cents  per  pound 
while  this  week  quotations  are  down  to 
11  Va  cents  per  pound.  There  are  no  other 
changes  in  quotations,  the  market  i« 
steady  under  a  seasonable  demand  which 
is  quiet. 

FRESH    SEA   AND    LAKE    FISH 
Cod   Steak,   lb 0  09       0  10 

Do.,    market,    lb 0  09 

Halibut,   chiicken    0  16       0  17 

Do.,   medium    0  22       0  23 

Whitefish,  Government 0  11% 

Do.,   Georgian    Bay    6  11% 

Frsh  Herring 0  10      0  11 

Flonnders,    lb 0  10      Oil 

Fresh   Trout,   lb 0  16       0  17 

Haddock    0  10       Oil 

Spring   Salmon    0  24       0  2.5 

Mackerel    0  11       0  12 

FROZEN  FISH 
Halibut,  medium    0  22      0  23 

Do.,    Qualla    0  09       0  12 

Flounders    0  09       0  12 


Pike,    round    «  06  0  07 

Do.,  headless  and  dressed  ....  0  08 

Salmon.   Cohoe 

Do.,  Red  Spring ©  23  0  24 

Sea   Herring    0  07%   0  08 

Brill    0  10  0  11 

SMOKED  FISH 

Haddies,  lb 0  10  0  12 

Fillets,   lb 0  17 

Kippers,  box    2  25  2  75 

Bloaters    2  00 

PICKLED  FISH 

Salmon  Snacks,  lb 0  24 

Labrador  Herrings,  kegs,  100 

lbs 6  25 

Do.,  bbls.,  200  lbs 11  75 

Do.,  pails,  20  lbs '. . . .  2  00 

Holland  Herrings,  Milchers  ....  1  15 

Do.,   Mixed 1  OO 

Lard  Quotations  Up 


LARD. — The  market  cwitinues  to  show 
the  effect  of  the  higher  hog  market  and 
prices  are  again  advanced  during  the 
week.  In  some  quarters  as  high  as  18 
cents  is  asked  for  one  pound  prints  while 
others  are  quoting  16  ceiits.  On  the  tierce 
basis  quotations  range  from  14%  to  15 
cents  per  pound, 
LARD— 

1-lb.  prints   0  16       0  18 

1-lb.  Tierces,  400  lbs 0  14%  0  15 

In  60-lb.  tubs,  %  cent  higher  than 
tierces,  pails  %  c*ent  higher  than  tierces, 
and    1-lb.    prints,   2c. 

Shortening  Firmer 

SHORTKXING.— A  firmer  feeling  is 
notL'd  in  the  market  in  sympathy  with 
lard  and  hogs.  Some  packers  have  ad- 
vanced quotations  cue  cent  per  pound, 
but  others  are  unchanged.  Quotations  on 
one  pound  prints  are  15  to  16  cents  and 
en  the  tierce  basis  12  to  12%  cents  per 
poHnd. 

SHORTENING- 

1-lb.    priw'.s    0  15     0  16 

Tirecos.   100  lbs 0  12     0  12% 

Margarine    Dull 


:M.ARGAR1NB.— There  is  little  demand 
for  margarine  with  quotations  continu- 
ing around  19  cents  for  the  best  quality. 

Smoked  Bacon  Firm 


PR0\'lS10Na.— The  market  is  some- 
what higher  with  quotations  on  hams  and 
baccn  advanced.  This  is  the  result  of 
the  higher  priced  hogs  how  arriving  in 
the  finished  state.  The  condition  how- 
ever cannci  be  considered  a  strong  one 
in  view  cf  the  fact  that  the  hog  market 
has  again  reached  a  lower  basis.  Barrel 
pork  is  also  slightly  higher. 
Hams — 

Small,  6  to  12  lbs 0  37     0  39 

Small,  6  to  12  lbs 0  S7       0  30 

Large,  20  to  25  bs.  ea.,  lb.  0  34     0  37 

Heavy,  35  lbs.  &  upwards 0  3a 

Backs — 

Boneless,    per   lb 0  46     0  48 

Rolled,  per  lb 0  iS 

Peameal     0  41     0'  43 

Bacon — 

Breakfast,    ordinary,    lb.    0  30     0  42 

Do.,  special  trim 0  45 

Roll,  per  lb 0  2,?     0  2T 

Cottage    rolls    0  30     0  3J 

Wiltshire,  smkd.  sides,  lb 0  28 

Do.,  three-q'rter.  cut 0  33 

Do.,   middle    0  35 


40 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  8,  192| 


Dry  Salt  Meats 

Long   clear  bacon,  a  v.   SO- 
TO lbs 0  191/2 

Do.,  av.  80-90  lbs 0  171/2 

Clear  bellies,  15-39  lbs 0  191/2 

Fat  backs,  10-12  lbs 0  13% 

Out    ot    pickle    prices   range   about    2c 

per  pound  blow  corresponding  cuts  above. 

Barrel  Pork — 

Mess  Pork 33  00 

Short  cut  backs,  200  lbs 40  00 

Picked   rolls,  bbl.,  200  lbs.— 

Lighweight   46  00 

Heavy    41  00 

Above   prices   subject   to   daily   fluctu- 

;ations  of  the  market. 

Spring   Chickens    Lower 

POULTRY. — The     receipts    of     spring 
chickens    continue    to    increase    with    the 


result  that  prices  are  lower.  While  on 
the  other  hand  heavy  fowl  has  advanced 
under  small  receipts.  Quotations  on  other 
lines   ar3   unchanged. 

Prices  Paid  by  Dealers 

Live       Dssd. 

Turkeys    0  30     0  40 

Chickens,  spring    0  30     0  40 

Roosters     0  14     0  IS 

Fowl,   over   5   lbs 0  23     0  23 

Fowl,  4  to  r,  lbs 0  20     0  20 

Fowl,  under  4  lbs 0  18     0  18 

Ducklings 0  35     0  35 

Guinea  hens,  pair   1  2.'j     1  50 

Pries  quoted  to  retail  trade:    Dressed 

I'urkeys 0  55     0  '1O 

Hens,    heavy    0  30     0  32 

Do.,   light    0  28     0  30 

Chickens,  spring 0  50     0  55 

DucklingK    0  48 


WINNIPEG    MARKETS 

"YyiNNIPEG,  July  8 —  The  hog  market  is  slightly  easier  due  to  the 
heavy  receipts.  The  butter  market  is  showing  strength. 
There  is  a  good  demand  for  smoked  and  cooked  meats  and  prices 
remain  unchanged.  Lard  and  shortening  are  firmer  and  higher. 
Eggs  are  arriving  freely  and  are  meeting  with  a  heavy  demand- 
Fresh  lake  fish  are  arriving  and  are  selling  freely.  The  cheese 
market  remains  unchanged  and  a  slight  improvement  is  being 
shown. 


Butter  Market   Firmer 


>Viniiii»es'. 

BUTTER.— The  butter  market  has  de- 
veloped a  firmer  tone  and  best  table 
grade  creamery  advanced  2  cents  per 
pound  and  is  quoted  at  35  cents.  Large 
supplies  are  arriving  with  a  big  demand 
for  this  line. 
BUTTER— 

Creamery,  best  table  grade 0  35 

Una.Lry.  best  table  grade 0  21     0  26 

Margarine 0  24 

Hog  Market  Easier 

FRESH         MEATS.— Heavy       receipts 

-coupled  with  inferior  quality  has  caused 

-an   easier   tone    to   the    hog  market   and 

■.selected   live   hogs   are   quoted   at  .$11.25 

per  cwt.  Good  butcher  heifers  are  being 

sold   from   $fi.00    to   $7.00    and    real    good 

cows   are    realizing   from   $5.00   to   $6.00. 

Veal    calves    shared    in    the    decline    and 

ar   quoted   $2.00    less   than   a  week   ago. 

Best   quality   are    ranging    from    $8.50    to 

■$9.50   with     fair   to  good   from      $6.00   to 

$7.50.    The    sheep    and    lamb    market   is 

reported  weak  and  good  sheep  are  selling 

from  $5.00  to  $5.75.    Best  quality  lambs 

•are  quoted  at  $11.00. 

Selected,  live,  cwt 11  25 

Heavier     8  25     10  25 

Light 11  25 

Sows   6  25       7  25 

yresh  Pork 

Legs  of  pork,  up  to  35  lbs. 

lb 0  25       0  31 

Spare  ribs    0  18 

Loins  of  pork,  lb 0  29       0  32 

Fresh  hams,  lb 0  18 

Picnics,  lb 0  16       0  20 

Shoulders     0  13       0  19 

Fresh  Beef — from  Steers  and  Heifers-- 

Hind  quarters,  lb 0  07       0  09 

Front  quarters,  lb 0  07       0  09 

Whole  carcass,  good  grade, 

lb 0  10'/^  0  13 

Mutton — 

Choice,  lb 0  17 


0  26 
0  10 

0  22 


Choice  long  hinds  (leg  and 

loin)    

Choice  Stews   

Lambs — 

Choice,  30-45  lbs 

Veal- 
Good  veal,     40  to  80  lbs., 

hind  quarters 0  16 

Smoked  Meats  Steady 

PROVISIONS.— There  is  a  good  trade 
being  done  in  most  lines  of  smoked  and 
curod  mats  i-rid  hams  have  shown  a  slight 
decline  with  bacon  remaining  practically 
x:nchanged. 
Hams — 

8  to   16  lbs.,  per  lb 0  43  "o  44 

16   to  20   lbs.,  per   lb 0  43 

Boneless,  8-16  lbs.,  per  Ibb 0  48 

Skinned,   14-18  lbs.,   per   lb 0  47 

Skinned,   18-22   lbs.,  per  lb 0  44 

Bacon — . 

Back,  6   to   10  lbs.,  lb 0  54 

Cottage  Rolls,  boneless 0  31 

Bellies,  6  to  3  0  lbs.,  per  lb 0  40 

Cooked  Meats  Active 


COOKED    MEATS.— Cooked    meats    are 
in  big  demand  and  are  selling  freely  at 
imcha'.^ged  quotations. 
Bset  q'lty.  skinned,  8-13  lbs 0  57 

Do.,  13-16  lbs 0  52 

Rost    Ham,    lb 0  56 

Ro?.st  shoulders,  lb 0  38i/^ 

Head  Cheese,  1-lb.  tins 0  16 

•Jellied  Ox  Tanf.ues,  lb 0  65 

Pork  tongue.n,  lb 0  42 

Luncheon  Cooked  Meats,  lb 0  22 

Lard  Advances 


LARD. — The  lard  market  is  showing 
an  improvement  with  prices  advanced 
one  cent  per  pound.  No.  1  quality  pure 
lard  is  quoted  at  16  cents  per  pound  and 
20  pound  wooden  pails  are  offered  at 
$3.60  per  pail.   Shortening  also  advanced 


and  is   quoted   at   13i^    cents   per  poun 
in   tierces   of  400   pounds. 
Pure  lard,  No.  1  qualty,  per 

lb.   (in  tierces  400  lbs.)    0  16 

Do.,    wooden    pails,    20-lb. 

pails    :;  60 

Shortening     (wooden     pails, 

20-lb.  pails),  per  pall 3  10 

Short'ing,  tierces  of  400  lbs.  •. . . .     0  13^ 

Poultry  Unchanged 


POULTRY.— Receipts     of  live   poulfa: 
are  very  light  and  in  consequence  si 
age   stocks    are    practicallv   cleaned 
D.P.  Chickens,  31/2  lb.  &  under 0 

Do.,  ZV2  lbs.  and  over 0  3!l 

D.P.  Fowl,  3^4  lbs.  and  under 0  33 

Do.,  31/^   lbs.  and  over 0  3^ 

Turkeys,  mixed  weights    ....    0  48     0  5(1 

Cheese  Unchanged 

CHEESE. — Quotations    are    unchangei 
but    the    situation    is    showing     a   firmeil 
feeling.  Production  is  steadily  increasing 
and  a  larger  consumptive  demand  is  not- 
ed at  the  low  prices. 
CHEESE— 

Stilton   cheese,  large,   lb 0  24 

Ont.,  large,  lb 0  20 

Ont.,  twins,  lb 0  2014 

Ont.,  triplets,  lb 0  21 

Eggs  Selling  Freely 

EGGS. — Eggs  continue  to  sell  freely 
and  heavy  shipments  are  arriving.  Ecl;s 
are  quoted  in  cartons  at  40  cents  pei 
dozen.  No.  Is  at  34  cents  per  dozen  ;iih! 
fresh  candled  at  30  cents. 

Whitefish   In   Demand 


FISH.^ — Good  shipments  of  lake  Winni- 
peg white  fish  are  arriving  and  are  meet- 
ing with  a  good  demand  and  are  quoted 
at  16  cents  per  pound  scaled.  Kenora 
white  fish  is  also  in  active  demand  and 
is  quoeed  at  14  cents  pr  pound  scaled. 
Fresh  red  spring  salmon  is  selling  freely 
at  26  cents  per  pound  with  cohoe  at  24 
cents.  Frsh  halibut  is  quoted  at  18  cents 
per  pound. 

Black  Cod,  lb 0  13 

Brills,  lb 0  09 

Herring,  Lake  Superior,    100 

lbs,    sacks,    new    stock    ....     3  50 
Halibut,  chicken,     cases  300 

lbs 0  151/3 

Do.,  broken  cases    0  16i/^ 

Jackfibh,    dressed    

Pickerel,  case  lots 

Salmon — 

Cohoe,  full  boxes,  300  lbs 0  19 

Do.,  in  broken  cases 0  20 

Red  Spring,  in  full  boxes 0  24 

Do.,  broken  cases   0  25 

Soles    0  09 

r?aby  Whites  or  Tulibbees 

Whitefish,  dresf  ed,  case  lots 0  131/; 

Do.,  broken  cases 0  14i/^ 

SMOKED  FISH 

Bloaters,    Eastern    National, 

case    3  50 

Do.,  Western,  20-lb.  boxes, 

box    2  10 

Haddies,  30-lb.  cases,  lb 0  14 

Do.,  in  15-  lb.  cases-.,  lb.  ..   .;..     0  14 
Kippers,  East,  Nat.,  20  count, 

p.?r  coiiLt    3  75 

Do.,    West.      20-lb.    boxes, 

box 2  25 

P'lliets,  15-lb.  boxes,  lb 0  30 


July  8,  1921  C  A  N  A  D I A  N  G  H  0  C  E  R— Provision  Section  41 


PERFECTION    BRAND 

Smoked   Bacon 

This  is  the  new  brand  name  for  Davies 
highest  grade  product,  replacing  in  our 
Smoked  Meats  our  former  Dialstone 
brand.  The  quaHty  is  of  the  same  high 
standard  and  dealers  will  profit  by  buying 

DAVIES 

Perfection 

PRODUCTS 

Send  for  a  trial  order  of  Perfection  Brand  Smok- 
ed Hams,  Backs,  Breakfast  Bacon,  Rolls,  Cooked 
Hams,  etc- 

Special — 


This  is  the  season  of  the  year  to  book  standing  orders  for  Bologna.  Al- 
ready numerous  dealers  have  covered  their  weekly  requirements  of  Davies' 
Parrafin  and  Bung  Bologna, 


Ask  our  Salesman  for  prices,  or  write  us  direct. 
Special  attention  given  to  Mail  Orders 


WIlLIAMLr/W  IJClOLIMnED 


Montreal  Sydney  v  Hamilton 

Head  Office    Toronto,  Ont. 


42 


CANADIAN   G  R  0  C  E-R— Provision  -Section 


July  8,  1921 


WEST  TORONTO 


"EASIFIRST" 

As  fast  as  you  gei  it  in 
Your  customers  carry  it  away 
Leaving  you  Profit  and 

Goodwill 


'•The  more  they  have 
The  more  they  want" 


►I" 


ORDER  TO=DAY 


I'hone  June.  ^4()() 


EASIFIRST 
^RtENIJ>lS 


K!iiyi*i^fL^*i^<fyy?^i*ZffZf^yyx^ 


il'llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllilllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 


5;i5 
11 


ill 


The  Business   Builder 

The  grocer  who  keeps  a  close  check  on  his  bext 
selling;  most  pi-ofitable  lines  recognizes  the  steady 
all-llia-year-round  denuind  there  is  for  Windsor 
iirand  -the  salt  which  lor  years  has  had  first  place 
in  purity,  quality  lUnd  fiavor.  It  is  a  permanent 
husinpss-lmilder .      Is  your  stock  complete? 

WINDSOR   BRAND 

WINDSOR  TABLE  SALT 

(for   general    Hoiisehold    Purposes) 

REGAL  TABLK  SALT 

(free   running     in    cartons) 

WINDSOR  DAIRY  SALT 
WINDSOR  CHEESE  SALT 

Made  in  Canada  by 

The  Canadian  Salt  Co.,  Limited 

Windsor.  Ontario 


DWIGHT'S 


cow     BHAND^ 


/•_  BICARBONATE  -\ 

Baking  sod  A 


CoW 

Brand 

Baking 

5oda 


II 1 1:  RE'S  a  gfjar- 
anloi'  b;icU  ol  i-very 
sale  lit  Cow  Brand 
Baking  Scula  —  a 
iLfuaranlee  of  over 
^e\entv  years'  eiis- 
l(Mnei'  eoiifidenee 
and  posiiixi'  salis- 
l.u-lion. 

I.  i\\"  Brand  is  jnsl 
as  bit;-  a  iavorid- 
lo-ila\'.  \'on  t'an 
sell  il  easily  and 
"liaidi  on  "  slejidy 
repeals. 


CHURCH  &DWIGHT,  LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN  GHOCER— Provision  Section 


43 


For  Dainty  Summer  Lunches  Recommend 


U    Oil   Sardines 
I'i  Mnstard  Sardines 
Finnan   HaddJes 
(Konnd  Tins) 
Kippered  Herring 
Herring  in   Tomato   Sauce 
Clams 


Checlt  oyer  jonr  stock  to- 
day  and  order  a  good  sup- 
ply   of    tliese    popular    Lines. 


^Brunswick  Brand' 

Sea    Foods 


Brunswick  Brand  Sea  Foods  require  no  cook- 
ing and  are  therefore  ideal  for  preparing  warm 
weather  luncheons  and  hurry  up  meals.  Keep 
your  stock  well  displayed  as  their  advantages 
are  so  obvious  that  a  mere  display  and  a  little 
reminder  will  increase  >our  profits  enormous- 

ly. 


Connors  Bros.,  Limited 

BLACKS  HARBOR,  N.  B. 

Winnipeg  Representatives: 

Chas.  Duncan  &  Son,  Winnipeg",  Man. 


44 


CANADIAN    G  R  0  C  E  R— Equipment  Section 


July  8,  m 


•o«c>*o«o»o»o»o»o«o»o«o»o«o»o»o»o»o»o«o«o»o»o*o«o»o«o»o»o«o»o«o»o»o»o»o«o»o«o»o»o»o»o»c»o»o»o»o»o»o»o»o»o»^^ 


II 


GALT'S 


I 
I 
I 

QUAIJIY 

TEAS  and  COFFEES 

"Satiifattion  or  Money  Back"   ' 


When  Was  Your  Coffee  Roasted? 

Likely  the  same  day  it  was  shipped,  if  Gait  sent 
it.  Most  coffee  sold  in  Canada  is  stale  before  it  is 
sold.  You  can't  build  up  a  really  good  business  on  stale 
coffee.  Why  not  try  the  Gait  way.  Order  25  lbs.  at 
the  price  you  now  pay  and  if  it  isn't  miles  ahead  of  any 
you  have  ever  had,  send  it  back  collect. 


?8 


G  ALT 

107  FRONT  ST.  E.  TORONTO 


■S8sss?s;ssssssssssssi;s;s;2!s;sss;£%rs»s;sss?.s*2!s?sr*!5i;2;s?s;j*s!s;s;^ 


rz 


Mm'ii    Voii   Alt'   III    .\»M'(I   Of 

GRAPE    .JUICE 

1{K>IKMBKI{  Til  AT 

MARSH'S 

(iRAPE     JUICE 

Is  priced  to  enable 
you  to  sell  at  popular 
prices  and  that  the 
result  o  f  stocking 
INIarsh's  is  larger  sales 
and    more    profit. 


ORDER   MARSHS 
Tlie  ((iinlity  is  right  tiiii 


The  Marsh  Grape 
Juice  Company 

.Niagara    Falls,    Out. 

Al;\m,1s  tor  t\.l;.rio.  QiuIxt  aiul 
Al.irlll.iu-  l',.,%i,ui-.: 

Tlie    Macliaren    Wrlglil, 
Ltd. 

Toronto    and    Montreal 

Asjiiils    IVt    Hrilisli     Cnhimlil.i  : 

F.  G.  EVANS  CO.  Ltd. 

T(>ri-'nIo  .-iml  Moiuri-.il 


SAMUEL   DOBREE 
^  SONS 

LONDON,    ENGLAND 

LsUihlislic'd   17lli  (Iciilury 

Growers  and  Producers  of 

SUGAR    '     MOLASSES 
COCOA 

IMPORTERS  AND  EXI'DRTERS 

I'.raiiclic'     in    ;ill    jiarls    of    liie    civilized    world 

Caiiiulian    IJrancli 

UPPER  WATER  STREET 
HALIFAX,  N  S. 


PRIDE  OF  CANADA 

Pure   Maple   Syrup 

Will  plef.fs  your  most  particular  customers. 

Gu^.ranteed  Absolutely  Pure. 

Have  a  good  Stock  on  hand  for  the  Sprinti  and  Summer  Trade. 

KKPRE.SENTATIVES:  W.  I,.  Markeizie  &  Co.,  LimiteJ   Wn  lipeg,  Regina.  Saskatoon.  Calgary  and  Kdmon- 
Kri;     Oppeuheimer  iiroc,  LimiraJ,  Wncoiiver,  B.  C;     S.  H.  P.  .\4ackenzie  &  Co..  33  Yong«  Si.,  Toronto,  Can. 
].  W.  Cn>.ba'j.i  &.  Co.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

MAPLE  TREE  PRODUCERS  ASSOCIATION  LIMITED 

OFFICES:  S8  WELLIiNGTON  ST.W.,  MON 


uly  8,  1921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


45 


l*ZKK*l*X*l*X*l*X*l*XKK!*l*l^^ 


The  Leading  Line  in  Patents 

BEECHAM*S  PILLS 

The  I^aryosl  Sale  of  any  Propriolory  MtMlieliio  in  tli<»  ^Vorlcl 

The  Proprietor  of  Beecham's  Pills  begs  to  notify  the  Retail  Trade  of 
Canada  that  in  consequence  of  the  liberal  advertising  which  is  appear- 
ing in  the  press  throughout  the  Dominion  and  the  fact  that  Beech- 
am's Pills  are  so  well  known  and  valued  by  the  residents  who  havo 
come  from  the  British  Isles,  the  demand  is  rapidly  increasing  and 
retailers  are  recommended  to  purchase  Beecham's  Pills  in  larger  quan- 
tities and  obtain  the  advantage  of  a  better  price. 

In  boxes,  25c.  and  50c. 

Prepared  by  the  Proprietor,  THOMAS   BEECHAM,  St.   Helens,   England- 


V 


►J 

V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 

V 
V 

V 


HAROLD  F.  RITCHIE  &  CO..  LTD.,  Sole  Agents,  Toronto.  Ont.,  Canada  » 

V 
V 
V 

, ij 


Selling  Products 

Your  Customers  Know 


EDDY'S  Matches  and 
EDDY'S  Indurated  Fibre- 
ware  are  known  to  every- 
body, everywhere  in  Canada. 

With  most  people,  to  think  of  Matches  is  1o  IhinU  of 
EDDY'S.  The  Eddy  name  to  them  is  a  symbol  of  that 
Match  (luality  which  some  seventy  years  of  match-making 
experience  has  made  possible. 

.    EDDY'S  Indurated  Fibreware  Utensils  are  etiually  i)opii 
lar — and   deservedly   so.     Lighter  than    wood    and     more 
durable  than  metal,  they  are  ideal  for  household  or  farm 
use.     Leak-proof,   bulge-proof,   rust-proof.. 

EDDY'S  PRODUCTS  are  made  in  Canada,  by  Canadians, 
for  Canadians. 


The  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Limited,  Hull,  Canada 


46 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  192^ 


* •0«0*0*0«O«0«0«C*0«0«'J*0«0*O«0*O«0»U«O«O«0«0«0*0*0*0«0«0«0«0«0«O*C*O*O*O*0»O*O«0«0«O 

t  o« 

>  •o 

>  o« 

12th  JULY 

*  o* 

:>  #0 

■  o* 

5     Hot  Woadier    Fruits  I 


INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 


Q»  . 
•Q 

3§ 


fS 


!8 

■  O 
0« 

•o 
c* 
•o 
c» 

!S 

•Q 

o* 

?8 


Le.iions  Watermelons  I 

•o 
o« 

Oranocs  California  Plums     | 

o» 

•o 

Gcori'ia    Glberta   Peaches  I 

Cantaloupes  §§ 

•o 
o* 

•o 

Tomatoes  Cherries         P 

o« 
•o 
o* 

Raspberries  | 

•o 
o« 
•o 
o* 

Full  fresh  stocks  for  prompt         | 

•o 

Shipment         ^  | 

•o 
o* 

©o 

o» 

WHITE  &  CO.,  LTD.  I 

•o 

Fruits  of  Quality 


TORONTO 


Car  of 


Paprus 

Pie 
Plates 

Price  Right 

WALTER  WOODS  &  Co. 

Hamilton   and  Winnipeg 


A 

Anchor  Cap  &  Closure 

Corp 4 

Artist  Supply  Co 47 

B 

Birdland    Society    8 

Bain  &  Co.,  Donald  H.    . .    8 

Beecham's   Pills    45 

Bush  &  Co.,  W.    J 13 

Bowser  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  S.   F.   6 

C 

Canada  Barrels  &  Keg 

Ltd    47 

Canadian   Salt  Co 42 

Chjadwick  &   Wright    11 

Channel  Limited,  Inside 
Front  cover 

Church    &   Dwight    42 

Citrus  Products  Co.  front 
cover. 

Clark  &  Sons.  D.  W 11 

Clark   Ltd.,  W 1 

Codvllle    Co 10 

Connors  Bros.,  Ltd 43 

D 

Davies  &  Co.,  Wni.  Ltd.  41 
Dayton  Scale  Co.  back  cover 
Dominion  Canners  Ltd.    .   19 

Dominion    Slicer    7 

Dobree  Samuel  &  Sons  44 
Duncan  &   Sons,  C 8 

E 

Eby-Blain    Limited    14 

Eddy  Co.,  E.   B 45 

Escott  Co.,  Ltd.,  W.  H.  10 
Estabrooks   Co.,   Ltd.,   T. 

H 19 

Eureka   Refrigerator   Co. 

Ltd 7 

Edmond  Jos 12 


Frost  Moormpn  &  Co  ....  11 

G 

Gait    D.    A 44 

Ganongs    Ltd 17 

Grimsly   Brokerage    17 

Gunns   Ltd 42 

H 

Ltd 11 

Hamblin-Brereton   Co. 

Hanson,   Co.,   Ltd.,   J.    H.  12 

Hayne,    John    47 

Howard's    Ltd H 

Hunt  J.    B.,  &  Co.   ...'.'.'.  12 
Hungerford-Smith,  The 

J.    Co 2 

I 

Imlperial  Grain  &  Mill- 
ing  Go 7 

Inger.soll  Ice  Cream 
Cone   Co.,    Ltd.     .      .        ig 


K 

Keating  Ltd 1^ 

Kidd,  T.    Ashmore   11 


Lachaine,    Geo.    D 12 

Langley,  Harris  &  Co. 

Ltd    3-11 

Laing  &  Waters   11 

Lemieux,  Victor   A 12 


M 


Mann  Co.,  C.   A 

Magor  Son  &  Co 

McLauchlan,  J.  K 11 

McLay    Brokerage   Co    ...    8 
Macdonald      Reg.,    W.    C.    5 

Mackenzie,    W.    L.     8 

Maple   Tree   Producers' 

Assn.,    Ltd 44 

Marsh  Grape  Juice  Co.   .    .44 

Mickle,   Geo.  T H 

Moore  &  Co.  R.    M 47 

Merchants    Consolidated 

Ltd 14 


N 


Nagle    Mercantile   Agency    14 
North   West  Biscuit  Co.    .  .    fi 


Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  John  10 
O'Donnell  &  Co.,  John  J.    11 

P 

Patrick  &  Co.,  W.  G.  ..  11 
Pennock  &  Co..  H.  P.  . .  9 
Procter   &   Gamble    48 

R 

Red    Rose    Tea    19 

Robertson    Murphy    Co. 

In=ide   back   cover 
Rock  City  Tobacco  Co.    .  .    1.3 
Ross   Can    Co 47 

S 

Salada   Tea   Co 20 

Scott    Bathgate    Co.,    Ltd.    10 

So-Clean    Ltd .      47 

Soper  E.    N.   &  W.    E.    ..   11 

St.    Arnaud   Fils  Cie    12 

Standard   Computing   Scale 

Co.  of  Canada  Ltd.,  The  18 
Stickney  &  Poor  Spice  Co.  7 


Thum    Co.    (Tanglefoot) 

O.    &    W 41 

Tippet  &  Co..  Ltd 12 

Toronto  Pottery  Co.,  Ltd.  47 

Toronto  Salt  Works   47 

Trent    Mfg.,    Co 47 

-Wallace      Fisheries,    Ltd.  9 

Watson    &  Truesdale    ....  9 

White    &    Co.     . .- 46 

White- Cottell's    47 

Woods   &   Co.,  "Walter    ..  46 

Williams    Storage    Co.     . .  9 

Wiley,   Frank  H S. 


July  8,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


47 


BUYERS'  My\RKET  GUIDE 

Latest  Editorial  Market  News 


_^  STONEWARE  JARS 

New  Stoneware  Catalogue 
just  out,  prices  effective 
April  1st.  Yours  for  the 
asking. 

Ti  e  TORONTO  POTTERY 

CO,  Lim.fed 

6C8-9  Temfle  BIdg. 

Toronto 


We  are  now  located  in  our  new  and 
rrorc  spacious  ware'ouse  at 

60-62  JARVIS  STREET 
TORONTO  SALT  WORKS 

GEO.  J.  CLIFF 

WHITE-COTTELL'S 

Best  Enolish  Malt  Vinegar 

QUALITY  VINEGAR 

\V!ii:c,    Co'.U'll    &    Co..    C'ainbcr-.vfli.    Londnn.    Kng. 

.\K:rnls 

\V.    V.    COI.CI.OIH.II,    Koom     20!  2!    Scott    St. 

Toronto 

STFJOY.AN-ntNWOOnY    fO. 

Confcdc.-alion    Life    Htii!ilini; 

Winnipeg.  r.Jan. 

OfPENJl.KIMER    BKOS..    I.TI). 
V'.Tncniiver,   f).   ('. 
».AIUD  &  CO..  Mcrclianls.  St.  Jthn's,   NflH. 

Order    from    your    Jobber    (odii.v 

♦'SOCLEAN" 
SOCLEAN,   LIMITED 

M.inufac  urcrs  TORONTO,     Ont. 

.Mnntrf:!!     Aicnts :      Viirnc;iult     &     M  !pGillivr;!y 

7    Donsec!:u:'s   .'^t..    Mor.'r.al.    CJue. 

()n.iu:i    Attent.';:-    W.    R.    BarnRid.    37  1    fi.nnk    St. 

BARRELS 

l'"inii,    .■>    (ii    'Ai    (iaToriN.    I-'.ir    l.i(|uid    Con'irni'rs 
I-KOMt'T     SIlll'.VIION  rS 

CANADA  BARRELS  &  KEGS,  Limited 

WATERLOO,  ONT. 


Your  Wants 

a  I"  e  many  here 
below.  Use  the 
Want  Ad.  page 
■xnd  get  rid  of  a 
few  of  them. 


ITALIAN  OLIVE  CROP 
REDUCED 

Lucien  iMemminger,  con- 
sul at  Leghorn,  Italy, 
states  that  growers  at 
Lucca  report  that  the 
olive  crop  of  Tuscany  for 
the  year  1920-21  is  gener- 
ally below  the  average.  In 
certain  zones  the  olive  fly 
has  caused  injury,  thereby 
limiting  the  quantity  of 
the  extra  fine  product.  On 
this  account  an  unusually 
high  price  is  being  obtain- 
ed for  this  grade,  while 
the  inferior  grades  are  sell- 
ing at  a  reduction.  Since 
olive  trees  do  not  bloom 
until  ,Iune  no  estimate  can 
yet  be  made  of  next  sea- 
son's crop. 


SMALL    CARRYOVER 
OF  SOUTHERN  RICE 

Only  1,028,000  bushels 
of  rice,  rough  and  clean 
will  be  carried  over  into 
the  season  of  1921-22.  ac- 
cording to  calculations 
made  by  Michael  Lelong 
&  Co.,  rice  dealers  of  New 
Orleans.  "The  situation  as 
to  the  prospects  of  the  rice 
business,  in  view  of  the  35 
per  cent  curtailment  of  the 
next  crop,  places  this  com- 
modity in  a  very  strong 
and  safe  position,"  said 
Mr.  Lelong.  "The  1921-22 
crop  will  be  grown  at  a 
low  cost  and  the  superior 
prices  and  quality  will  al- 
low us  to  compete  with  the 
Asiatic  product." 


NO  FEAR  I  IT'S  AN  Pj.M  .  FLEXIBLE! 


'   <.  AF..     rcm^  GAS  MANTLES. 

1,  THE  MANTLES  THAT  YOU — 
CAK  TIE  IN  AI^MOT  WITHOUT 
DAMAC»;-SUPERSEDE  ALL 
OTHER   STYLES  FOmH»ERIfP_ 

CAS  LIGHTS  „  ^        ..oOVCr 


PACIFIC   COAST  MANTLE   FACTORY 


.50    DOZEN    CASE   FILLERS 
ONE    DOZEN    CARTON    FILLfIus 
•4-IN(  H    cr8HK)N    FILLERS 
<  t»i;Kr(:ATK[)   FLATS 

The  TRENT  MFG.  CO.,  LTD. 

TRENTON,  ONT. 


-  CANS 

-Ml  paper,  all  tin  ami  coiiibin 
a  I  ion  tin  and  paper  for  paints, 
jam,  cocoa,  spices.  diUK  -special- 
ties   and    luMLselioUl    utilities. 

ROSS  CAN  CO.  LIMITED, 

Bowmanville,    Qui. 


BARRELS 


I'or  all  puriioses.  Tite  best  p.ick 
ajre  for  e.xpoiiinff.  1  can  make  tiicm 
to   suit   your   proods. 

JOHN  HAYNE 

Imperial  Bldg.  SARNIA,  ONT. 


Sticky  Fly  Paper.  Sticky  Fly Ribbo.v. 
TreeTasglffoot.  Roach -Axt Powder. 

TheOsW.Thum  Co., Manufacturers. 

GRANDRAPIDS.Mich.  WAUaRVlLU.CAKADA. 


SIGN  WRITING 

Do  your  own  Card  Writing 

Wrile    for    our    ('ala'osue    »hir'.i    v.i:i    (;ll        >u 
what    you    need.    liosl     ithikIs    at     ('  o  e  .s    I'li-.-s. 

ARTIST'S  SUPPLY  CO. 

77     York    St.,    Toronlti 
Mrnlion   thin  paprr   when    wriline 


• 

The: 

=e     one 

■int 

li 

^^I 

aces 

(iiily 

$2.20 

per 

in 

«ei 

tioti 

if  lb 

cil  cai-l 

i.<.- 

-no 

ill 

the 

yoar. 

48 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  8,  1921 ! 


Wherever  mail  is  delivered  = 


There  is  no  point  in  the  Dominion,  no  mat- 
ter how  remote,  that  is  out  of  reach  of 
the  Procter  &  Gamble  Products — and  of 
the  Procter  &  Gamble  representatives. 
The  Procter  &  Gamble  salesman  goes 
wherever  mail  is  delivered. 

And  every  one  of  these  thousands  of 
stores  is  a  subject  of  vital  interest  to  the 
Procter  &  Gamble  Company.     Our  organ- 


ization is  prepared  to  be  of  real  help  to 
every  grocer,  in  merchandising  counsel 
successful  in  other  stores. 

Backing  this  personal  service  is,  of  course, 
the  standard  Procter  &  Gamble  Products, 
known  to  every  household.  This  unequal- 
led line  of  products  alone  means  profitable 
business  for  any  .store.  With  the  help- 
ful service  of  our  traveling  represent- 
atives it  means  definite  success- 


s./^  va^mCuX,  f^y^^^-^-^.^^^ 


^ 


-oo. 


of  Canada,  Ltd. 
50  Bay  Street,  Toronto,  Canada 


Send  mail  orders  to  nearest  address 


Gold 
soeup 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


k 


Inexpensive,  Effective  Advertising 
that  will  be  read  and  re-read — 


Made  of 
Extra 

Quality 
Rubber 


»» 


MOHICAN 


Adi)ertisin^  Balloons 


With 

Special 
Enduring 
Qualities 


uce 
esM 


Ptr 

Thousand 

Ui   00 

28.  UU 

32   50 

35.  JU 

42   UO 

50  UO 

:I5   50 

62   50 

125  00 

250.00 


PRICES 

(Including   Printing) 

Appiox.  Sue  When  Inftaled 

No,      Shape     Circumference     Lenflh 

20      Airship  »Mf  12' 

35  "  1BV4  — 

40         "  22     "  — 

45  "  24V2"  — 

50    Round  26     "  — 

«0  "  30     •  — 

65   Med.    Airship      IIM:"  18 

SO    L'ee    Airship    16     '  24" 

150    Ei.    Vge    Air.    20     "  25' 

300     Giant     Airship     32"  32 

Special     quotations     on     quantity     orders. 

Grocers,  General  Stores,  Packers  and  Man- 
ufacturers will  find  MOHICAN  ADVER- 
TISING BALLOONS  a  most  effective 
advertising  medium  at  trivial  cost.  One  of 
the  strongest  features  of  Balloon  advertis- 
ing is  the  fact  that  your  imprinted  ad.  or 
message  will  be  read  every  time  the  bal- 
loon is  inflated  while  printed  pamphlets 
and  folders  are  very  often  thrown  away 
un-read. 

Few  people  can  resist  the  natural  impulse 


For     special     quotations 
on     quantity      orders — state 
quantity,    size    of    balloon,    and 
rinting  desired. 


to  blow  up  these  attractive  balloons  conse- 
quently their  messages  make  impressions 
times  without  number.  MOHICAN  BAL- 
LOON ADVERTISING  is  being  used  with 
great  effectiveness  by  many  enterprising 
business  men.  Comparing  their  cost  with 
other  forms  of  advertising  the  results  they 
produce  are  surprising.  Send  a  few  out  to 
your  mailing  list  and  see  what  excellent 
results  they  produce. 


Robertson  &  Murphy  Limited 


247  St.  Paul  Street  West 


MONTREAL,  CANADA 


(SOLE  CANADIAN  REPRESENTATIVES  FOR 

MOHICAN  RUBBER  CO.,  ASHLAND,  OHIO) 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


'-^^^ 


X 


il^'     '^ 


AGGURACYt 


A  gentle  push 
swings  it 

Would  you    waste    the 
time    of   the    customer 
you  are  serving  and  the 
customer       who        is 
waiting  to  be  served,  as 
well  as  your  own    time, 
by     walking      the     full 
length  of   the    counter 
and  back  again  — 
—  would  you    do    this, 
not  once,    but    many 
times  a  day,  if — 
— IF  you  could   with    a 
gentle  push   swing    the 
scale  around  to  face  you 
while   you    are    selling 
goods    ON   THE    OUT- 
SIDE  OF    THE 
COUNTER  ? 

if  you  have  on  your  counter 
the  low-platform  Swivel- 
base  Dayton^  you  can  do  this 
but  not  otherwise. 


IF  IT'S  A 
DAYTON 
ITS  RIGHT 


YOU  WON'T  NEED  SO  MUCH 
MONEY  FROM  THE  BANK 

If  you  let   the  Dayton   save   Dollars 
in  your  store 

p\AYTON  SCALES  on  the  merchant's  counter  work  all  day  and  every 
*~^   day,  for  the  benefit  of  the  merchant's  bank  balance. 

In  these  days,  when  competition  is  quickening  in  every  branch  of  trade, 
the  merchant  must  ask  himself:  "How  can  I  make  LARGER  bank  de- 
posits on   SMALLER  profit  margins?" 

To  this  man  we  suggest:  Don't  waste  energy  and  time  trying  to  do  what 
a  machine  can  do  better. 

Dayton  Scales  will  weigh  your  goods  and  compute  their  prices  instantane- 
ously and  with  hairsbrcadth  precision. 

Dayton    Scales    I'id    your    business   of    the    multiplied    careless,    inaccurate 
weighings   and   computations  which   eat  dt'ep   into   your   profits. 
An   investment  in   Daytons   is  an  investment  backed   by  the  soundest  busi- 
ness judgment — an  investment  which  works  every  business   hour  to   fatten 
your  bank  balance. 

International  Business  Machines  Co. 

LIMITED 

FRANK  E.  MUTTON,  Vice-President  and  General  Manager 
Royce  and  Campbell  Avenues,  Toronto. 


IT  IS 
MADE  IN 
CANADA 


For  your  convenience  we  have  Service"  and  Sales  Offices  in  Vancouver,  Cateary,  Edmonton. 
Saskatoon,  Winnipeg,  Walkerville,  London,  Hamilton,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Quebec, 
Halifax,    St.    John's,    Nfld. 

Mh'i  miniiifiii:!  iirrrn  uf  liitcniiitiriiiiil  Timi    Hi  <iiitln-s  innl  I  nici  iiiiti(iii</l  l.'lirliir  '/'nliiildlni  x  :/ii(l  Snrtrrt 


Members  of  The  Associated  Business  Papers  —  Only  Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 
THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 
VOL.  XXXV. 


PUBLICATION  OFFICE:  COLLINGWOOD,  ONT.,  JULY  15,  1921 


No.  28 


5c  bars      packed      24     to     a     box 
10c  bars     packed     12      to     a      box 

90c  per  box 

Thr««|h  jreiir  Wholculer 


LORAINE  CHOCOLATE  CORPORATION 

LIMITED 

Toronto — Canada 

"Chocolate  Products  of 
Incomparable  Quality" 


Harold  F.  Ritchie  &  Co. 


10-12  McCAUL  ST. 


LIMITED 


TORONTO 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    G  R  0  C  E  R 


YOUR  CUSTOMERS  TO-DAY 

cannot  afford  new  blouses  and  new  lingerie  as  often  as  they  may 
desire  these  things.  But — they  can  all  afford  to  give  frequent 
color-change  to  such  garments,  by  the  use  of  ALADDIN  DYE 
SOAP. 

You  will  be  doing  the  women  a  favor — and  multiplying  profits 
for  your  store— every  time  you  bring  this  unique  product  to  the 
attention  of  your  customers.  ALADDIN  does  what  it  claims  to  do 
—thoroughly.  Its  18  colors  are  all  delightful  shades.  It  makes 
repeat  sales  because  of  the  perfect  results  it  gives. 

CHANNELL  LIMITED    -   TORONTO 

Distributors  for  Aladdin  Dye  Soap 
Manufacturers  of  O- Cedar  Products 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCEii 


SI.  CHARU5 


For    those   week-end 

fishing   trips  — 


Whether  your  customers  go  fishing',  camp- 
ing, or  spend  their  vacation  at  a  summer 
resort  or  at  home,  the  great  convenience, 
economy  and  deliciousness  of  Borden's 
Milk  Products  makes  them  ahnost  an  ab- 
solute necessity. 

When  you  dress  your  summer  windows  be 
sure  you  include  Borden's  St.  Charles  Milk 
(with  the  cream  left  in),  Borden's  Eagle 
Brand  Condensed  Milk,  Borden's  Rein- 
deer Coffee  and  Borden's  Reindeer  Cocoa. 

These  four  popular  Borden  lines  are  es- 
pecially good  sellers  during  the  vacation 
season. 


MONTREAL 


jAe^  IScffden/  ^o^^«^i!5gW^  Vancouver 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July   15,   1921 


PuttheMacdonald  packets 
Where  Tliey  Will  be  Seen 

£VERY  tobacco-user  in  Canada 
knows  the  Macdonald  line  by 
sight.  The  extensive  advertising  and 
the  long  standing  of  these  tobaccos 
have  brought  Macdonald's  to  his  no- 
tice- He  looks  on  them,  unconscious- 
ly perhaps,  as  old  and  trustworthy 
friends . 

Put  them  where  he  can  see  them— 
in  your  display  case  and  show-win- 
dow— on  your  counter. 

Your  profit  depends  on  your  turn- 
over; your  turnover  on  your  grasp- 
ing the  opportunity  to  build  up  sales. 

Our  advertising  has  increased  our 
sale  of  Macdonald's  Tobacco.  It  will 
increase  yours  if  you  turn  it  to  vour 
advantage. 

Only  a  very  slight  sales- 
effort  is  needed  to  make 
^lacdonald's  the  leading 
profit-maker  of  your  busi- 
nes.    It  is  worth  trying. 


1    "*''^.v>V^ 


I 


July   15,   1921 

^  -    -      ■ 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


3- 


CLARK'S 


Pork  and 


EANS 


[Clark's 


The  ever  popular  Can- 
adian Dish  is  well  worth 
your  attention  during 
the  summer  season. 


ALWAYS    READY 


and  always  in  demand,  with  abso- 
lutely the  highest  reputation. 

They  will  turn  over  your  money 
quicker  and  to  belter  advantage 
than  any  other. 


W.  CLARK,  Limited    -  MONTREAL 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,   1921 


By  Appoin  tment 


to  h.M,  the  King 


Crossed  Blackwell 

have  the  highest  reputation  for 
quality.  There  is  always  a  ready 
market  for  goods  that  are  of  the 
best,  and  it  is  recognized  the 
world  over  that 


Crosse  &  Blackwell 

maintain  a  unique   reputation    for 
consistently    supplying    the    best. 


Price  lists  are  obtainable  from 

Stewart    Me  n  z  i  e  s    & 

32  Front  Street  West 
TORONTO 


Co 


Dominion  Building,  Vancouver,  B.C. 
209   McDermot  Avenue,  Winnipeg 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


Anybody  can  cut  prices  but  it 
takes  brains  to  make  a  good  article 


Price  cutting  will  move  an  article,  but  when  reputation  and 
quality,  alone,  will  keep  a  product  moving-  rapidly,  it  cer- 
tainly is  a  tribute  to  the  high  standard  quality  of  that  art- 
icle. When  we  tell  you  that  our  entire  "carry  over"  stock 
of  Stuart's  Pure  Strawberry  Jam  was  completely  sold  out, 
along  with  most  of  our  other  lines,  before  June  7th  last,  it 
certainly  proves  to  you  more  convincingly  than  words  can 
tell,  of  the  sterling  quality  and   populaiity  of  Stuart's  Jams. 

This  season's  strawberry  pack  will  be  only  a  small  per- 
centage of  last  year's  pack  and  grocers  whose  stock  of  Stu- 
art's rapid-selling  jams  is  low,  will  be  well  advise  ■  to  .~)rder 
at  once.  Be  sure  you  specify  Stuart's  to  your  v/hO-f;:iler. 
They  insure  steady  profitable  sales  and  fresh,  pure  Jams. 


STUART  LIMITED 

SARNIA,  ONT. 


6  CANADIAN    GROCER  July  15,  1921 

llilllllltllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilillllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll^ 


It  Pays  ^, 

To  Feature 


In  Warm  Weather 


All  that  is  needed  to  bring  you  profitable  .sales  of  O'Keefe's  refreshing 
Eeverages  in  warm  weather,  is  the  suggestion  which  is  given  by  window 
or  coGnter  display. 

Quality,  purity  and  distinctive  flavor  have  made  O'Keefe's  the  univer- 
sal favorite,  whether  it  is  our  Imperial  Ale.  Lager  or  Stout,  or  our  famous 
Carbonated  Beverages,  such  as  —  O'Keefe's  Ginger  Ale,  Sarsaparilla,  Cola, 
•Orangeade,   Special   Pale  Dry   Ginger  Ale,  Lemon  Sour,  etc- 

We  anticipate  the  biggest  season  in  our  history  for  these  refreshing 
beverages . 

O'KEEFE'S    -    TORONTO 


iSS5SSSSSSiS»SS!i?*;*?iSSSSSSSS!!SSSSSSi!iSiSi;JSS?SSSSSSS8iiSSSiiSiSi;i 


■8S 


i 


ss 

C* 

S8 

•  mo 

ss 

o* 

•  -ma 
o* 

•  ma 
c* 

•  ma 
om 

•  mK* 
c« 

ss 

'  m> 

•?a 


g 


If  You  Can  Add 

just  one  single  quality  line  to  your 
stock  this  month  it  will  increase  your 
prestige  will  it  not? 

If  you  can  give  that  pernicity  cust- 
omer macaroni  that  she  will  really 
enjoy  it  will  help  your  standing  with 
her.    Now  won't  it- 


1 


S^mi 


kMaramir 


Th^ 


Columbia   Macaroni 
Co.,  Ltd. 

Lethbridge,  Alberta 


8S 


SS 


^<^---2JSSiri!SSSSSSSSS?iSS;sr»S85SS888S8S8SS;SSi;8?S?SS8SSS8S8SSSSSSSSS2^^^ 


QUAKER 
BRAND 


Quaker  Brand  canned  fruits 
and  Tegetables  are  the  choic- 
est products  of  the  fertile 
valleys  of  British  Columbia. 
Canneries  are  located  at 
strategic  points  throughout 
the  I'rovlnce  in  the  centres  of 
each  district  where  certain 
fruits  or  vegetables  reach 
their  higlieat  perfection. 
In  stocking  Quaker  Brand 
you  offer  your  customer  the 
best  canned  goods  Canada 
"an   produce. 


Dominion  Canners  B.  C.  Ltd. 

Head  Office:  Vancouver,  B.C. 


Q 


Q 


«S?«SSSSSi!S:)iSio»Si5» 


July   15,   1921 


SELL 
MORE 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


■OUDF.R   RV   NAME! 


TAPIOCA 

You  can--ir  you   will 
stock  and   push     .    .   . 


STICKNEY  &  P00R;S 

RAPID  COOKING  "^ 

TAPI  OCA 


This  tapioca  needs  uo  soak- 
ing, and  is  ready  in  a  minute. 
Tell  your  customers  about  it. 
It  comes  Tjacked  in  the  familiar 
Stickney  &  Poor  packages 
that  st,and  out  prom- 
inently on  shelves  and 
counters.  Order  a  sup- 
ply   of 

Stickney   &   Poor's 
tapioca   to-day. 
Your  co-operating  ser- 
vant, 

MrSTARDPOT. 


STICKNEY  &  POOR  SPICE  COMPANY 

1S15  Century  Old  -         Century  honored  1921 

HALIFAX 

Mustards     -     Spices     -    Seasonings 


« 


I 

A  Virile,  Robust 

Fighting  Fish 


^Of^DS 


>LlAC£"?gMERlC< 


The  Pinks 
packed  under 

"Kiltie" 

BRAND 

are   caught   in 
the  cool  depths 

around  the 

Queen  Charlotte 

Islands 


Caught   in  Deep 
Salt  Water 


,UJISEi^ 


REFRIGERATORS 

are  so  built  that  a  con- 
stant, positive  circula- 
tion of  cold,  dry  air  is 
maintained.  This  fea- 
ture fully  covered  by 
patents. 


Your  customers  will  appreciate  the 
care  you  give  to  keep  your  perish- 
ables sweet  and  wholesome. 
Don't  repeat  last  summer's  waste. 
Get  a  Eureka. 

Write  for  our  new  catalogue. 


Eureka  Refrigerator  Co.,  Limited 

Head  Office:  Owen  Sound 

Branches:  Toronto,  Montreal,  Hamilton 


Imperial  Grain  and  Milling 
Co.,  Limited 

VANCOUVER,  B.C. 


We  are  offering  the  best  value 

in  Rice  on  the  Canadian 

market  to-day. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


WF^JTKfl-X    rAXAOA 


FRANK  H.  V/ILEY 

IVIfrs.'    Acrnt   and    Importer 

cii()ci:uii;s  ai«(i  c;iiemica;.s 

Salesmen    coverins:    ^;.^^■t<»ba,    Saskalchcwan, 
A'bcr-.i  and   liriiish  Columbia. 

533-537  Henry  Ave.,  Winnipeg 


C.  DUNCAN  &  SON 

Manufrs,'  Agents  and  Grocery  Brokers 

Cor.  PrinceasOand  Bannatyne 

WINNIPEG  Estrab.  1899 


W.  L  Mackenzie  &  Co.  Ltd. 
Head  Office:  Winnipeg 

Branches 

REGINA,  SASKATOON,    CALGARY, 

EDMONTON,  VANCOUVER 


THE  McLAY  BROKERAGE  CO. 

WHOLES  \LE   GROCERY    BROKERS 
and  MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 

Take  advantage  of  our  Service 

wjyyivi.r,  Manitoba 


Stroyan-Dunwoody  Co. 

Whi^lfsal?  Brokers  and  Commission  Agents 

Confederation  Life  BIdg.     -      Winnipeg 

Service  coupled  with  Reliability  brings  Results 
We  want  your  business.  Write  us. 


Say  you  saw  it  in  Canadian 

Grocer;  It  will  help  to 

identify   you. 


Le  75  French  Cigarette  Papers 


finest 

Quality 


White  Gummed 

Paper 

That  Will 

Satisfy 

Yoar  Trade 


Thi* 


facstr"» 


* L     actual  pac 

^f  the  «ci" 


100  Leaves  to  Book 

Automatic 
Doubles 

50  Books  to  Box 


Order 
to-day  from 
your  jobber 


CANADIAN  DISTRIBUTORS: 


DONALD  H.  BAIN  CO. 

Wholesale  Commission  Merchants,  Brokers  and  Importers 

Head  Office,  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches: 
SASKATOON      REGINA      CALGARY      EDMONTON       VANCOUVER        MONTREAL    LONDON,    ENG 


^iiiiiiiiMiriiiiiiiiiPiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniKiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 


Illllllllll!lllllllllllll1lllllllllllllllllllllllll11llllllllll1llll!i 


YOUR  WANTS 


are   many  here   below.     Use  the  Want 
Ad.  page  and  get  rid  of  a  few  of  them. 


^wuiWiViiiiuiiaituiiywiHiiiiiiKUiiHiMiiiiititwiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


Jifly   15,   1921 


"ANADIAN    GROCER 


WRSTERN  CANADA 


H.P.P  E  N  N  0  C  K  aC  O..LTD.k 


MANITOBA 
SA^ATCHEWAN 


WHOLESALE      ^iOMMIS'SION       BfTOKCRS 

H£AP     WINNIPEC      OFFKE 


r 

V^DSTBiag    ON  T.I 


Watson  &  Truesdale,  Winnipeg 

have  live  men  doing  d<>tail  work  throug+iout  our  territory — Maniv    ''■a,    Saskatchewan    and    Alberta.      They 
get  the  business,  ;ind  can  get  it  f-or  you.       Write  us,   and  we  will  explain  our  system. 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 


TRACKAG-E 
STORAGE 
DISTRIBU- 
TION 


ATTE  N  T  I  O  N 

.V(iKMS.    M.VNlIF.VC.nUI'KS.    KTC. 
WIIOLKS.VM':  tiHOCJKHY  --  Sppfially   IIoiinp 

ill   XanciHiViT,    Hrilish   Coliiiiihi.i 

DcTlinir  ill  liitcli-il-iss  fooJ  prodmi-,  iaiv  ,  '  .  'riifjH;'*'''  "•i"''''"^*' 
mnfc-ttioiiery.  oti-..  ilcslrt-  io  n-pn-^i-nt  ii-li:  I'l-  j  .  .  .iL-tiirfrs  or  .-ijfeiits 
.'I  high  gr.iJi- I'ojJ  pro-Uu-is  .'!•  ot;ur        ui  ....),e  to  their  husint-ss. 

Several  speci.nlty  nu'ii  ,ii»a>s  in  ili  ..vi  unuli  with  the  tr.ide. 

Speiial  arrangements  can  be  maJc  tv'  do  det.iil  work  on  any  jrooil 
I'le  in  return  lor  excUi'.ive  lepresentalion  in  Hritisli  Coiinnhi.i. 

First-clus>  fmanci.'il  and  otlier  rcUrences  supplied. 

Apply  in  first  instame  to  AI)\  ICK  iJblNl.;  MAN  At.KU. 


I'UONlNLi;  l.>FFI(i;. 


\AN\  OUVKR.   H    >-■. 


The  Largest 

in  Western  Canada 


We  are  the  largest  Storage, 
Distributing  and  Forwarding 
House  in  the  Western  field. 
Total  Storage  rpace  ninety-six 
thousand  square  fe'.'t  of  Bonded 
or  Free  Storage,  lleated  ware- 
house. Excellent  Trick  facili- 
ties. The  Western  House  for 
SERVICE. 

Williams  Storage  Co. 

WINNIPEG 

and 

Winnipejr  WarehousinR  Co. 


OAKEY'S 

"WELLINGTON" 
KNIFE  POLISH 

The  original  and  only  reliable  prepara- 
tion for  Cleaning  and  Polishing  Cut- 
lery, etc, 

John  Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

Manufacturers  of 

Emery,  Black  Lead,    Emery  Glass  and 

Flint  Cloths  and  Papers,  etc. 

Wellington  Mills,    London,  S.E.I,  Eng. 

Agents: 

F.  Manlcy,  147  Bannatyne  Ave.  East. 
Winnipeg 

Sankcy    and   Mason.  839   Bcatty   Street 
Vancouver 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


WESTERN  CANADA 


k        Marketing  Products  in  a  '^Big  Way" 


[.Ill 


'*^',''i 
1''.;:; 


The  house  of  "Scott-Bathgate"'  holds  an  18  year  old  re- 
putation for  producing  big  results  in  the  rich  Western 
Provinces.  —  a  reputation  that  you  should  investigate  before 
vou  assign  your  product. 

We'll  place  your  product  on  the  market  for  you  in  the 
same  successful  manner  as  we  have  done  for  Christie's  Bis- 
niits,  Robertson's  Confectionery  and  Hungerford  and  Smith's 
Fountain  Supplies.     Write  us. 

Scott-Bathgate  Company,  Limited 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 

149  Notre  Dame  Ave.  East,  Winnipeg 


W.  H.  ESCOTT  CO. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale  Grocery  BroJiers — Manufacturers' 
Agents — Commission  Merchants 

Manufacturers  of  Food  Products  and 
Specialties  of  merit  seeking  increased  dis- 
tribution in  Western  Canada,  are  invited 
to  investigate  our  constructive 

SALES  FORCE 

Your  account  entrusted  to  us  receives  the 
personal  attention  of  experienced  and 
efficient  heads. 

We  make  ourselves  your  Business  Right 
Arm  in  our  territory. 

We  are  more  than  Brokers,  we  are  Busi- 
ness Builders. 

WRITE  US  TO-DAY 

HEAD  OFFICE 
WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches  with  Resident  Sales  Managers  at 

Regina,  Sask.  Saskatoon,  Sask. 

Calgary,  Alta.  Edmonton,  Alta. 

Fort  William,  Ont. 


SAl.iCI)    I'lANi    I 


|P'^'J^-.lSr« 


E    THOMPSON 


Thompson's   Sealed 
Salted    Peanuts 

Packed  in  drum-shaped  packages 
lo  retail  at  5c.  Forty  packages  to 
a  carton.     M  cartons  to  a  case. 

Order  from  your  jobber  To-day 

"Nifty  Brand"  whole  blanched 
Ji;mbcs,  in  5  lb.  tins,  with  envelopes. 
Packed  in  Canada  by 

A.  E.  THOMPSON 

Box  2015  WINNIPEG 

G.  B.  THOMPSON  &  CO.,  Western  Distributors.   Winnipei 

£<i5(crn/?c,orescn(a.'r't  •  Waltjr  3.  3  «/!e/,  2  )  F  ■  >  i :  5:.  E  ,  T  >->i-  >    O  i 


iji  f^Jyyn/ Vi€LcOl/  <AH^  tfffiA/.Co-cfiM^idi/. 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


11 


ONTARIO 


Jos.  K.  McLauchlan 

Manufacturers'   Agent  and   Grocery   Broker. 

Warehouse  and  Distributing 

275-77-79  King  Street  West,  Toronto 

Reliable    reoresentalion.      Centrally   located. 


Langlcy,  Han 's  &  |Co.,  Ltd. 

Manufacii  riTs'  Agents 

Grocers,  Conleiii oners  and    Drug 

Spttuilties 
12  FRONT   ST.   EAST,   TORONTO 


CHADWICK^^WT^IGHT 

WHQLESAli:  CROC£/^r  B/K>K£QS 

28  Duke  St.  Toronto. 


eniratfid  representation  within 
|V>*.   Province  of   Ontario 


Frost,  Moorman  &  Co, 

BELLEVILLE,  ONT. 
Grocery  Specialty  Broilers 

Agencies  Wanted 

SatUfactory  Repreaentation   Guaranteed 


M.*iuit:ii"tiircr^ 


32  Front 

TORONTO 


w 

.  G. 

PATRICK  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

51- 

Manufacturers'  Agents 
and  Importers 
53  Wellington  St.  W.,  Toronto 

Hnlif: 

IX.    N.S.  :   Winnipeg,   Man.                      1 

We  Cover  Western  Ontario  Thoroughly 

Nou-  ri-pri-snilinj;  Sainvlmrv    Mros  ;  |.  H.  W'c- 
tlii'V.  Limiti.'>i;  II;irry  Hall  &( 'o.:  Impcti.il  Grain 
.i.ui  RiiH-  .Milling  t\>.;  a.KlclHTs. 
Wl.Io  D.Iail   Work  (.ill  in  tiMuh  willl  us 

JOHN  J,  O'DONNELL  COMPANY 

Commisxion  Brokers,  Manufacturers'  Agents 
LAING  BUILDING,    WINDSOR,   ONT. 


SCOTT  &  THOMAS 

Manufacturers'  Agents 

Confectionery  and  Grocery  Brokers 

32   Front  St.  West, 
TORONTO 


Let   T.   ASHMORE    KIDD 

Broker 

KINGSTON,  ONTARIO 

Superintend    the  successful    merchandising   of 
yOur   lines  in  Kingston  and  district. 


WANTED 

Ouv   or    t w»,>   (^t>oJ    aRcnfics  in   Fin>il  Product*^ 

Give  pailiculars  in  first  Iftlcr.      Ivitircnccs 

furni>hcd. 


LAING  &  WATERS 

28  Wellington  St.  E.,  Toronto 


HAMBIIN-BRERETON  CO,,  Limited 

(IROCKRV  and  CONFECTIONKU V 
ACIKNTS  and  IMPORTERS 

Toronto    and    Kitchener,   Om. 
Wiiniipej;-  and  Caltjary 


..«•:••  «  .  •  •,...o«u.o.o.o.j.c..o..:'...:.:«':>.ui»o.3 

JO 

:?     K.  N.  &  W.  K.  SOPKR    '- 

*♦  ManiiracluriTs'  .\(;i-nli  &•  Coir.nii^si.i.  lirokcrs 
%  B.'J  SpnrkH  St..  01l«wa 

5*  Li't  US  dcmonslrato  what  wc  cm  do  ior  ;>our 
*8  pr>-Jutt  ill  this  liili  terrilorv.  We  arc  tspcc-ially 
*2     cquipt'tl  to  prouucc  ihf  rcsuhs  you  arc  lov'kiiitj  tor 


BRAND 


G.  T.  MICKLE 


The 

CROWN 

Trade- Mark 

on  a  bag  of  white  beansis  a  guarantee 

of   their   uniforrii    size   and    choice 

quality 

Only    the    very     finest     hand-picked 

Canadian  ^X  hite  Beans  go  into  bags 

marked 

CROWN  BRAND 

Fcryour  own  protection  insist   upon 
having  this  line  ot  known  quality. 

Ridgetown,  Ont. 


Let  Us  Quote  You  on  Our 

HIGH  GRADE 

BROOMS 

Long   life   and     great    strength  are 
built  into  every  one  of  our  brooms 


STANLEY 

5  siring,  fancy 
corn,  all  selected 
stock,  pjlis[i;^d 
handle. 


BEAVER 

S    string,    good 
f|uality 


CANUCK 

4  ."itrin?,  from 
cheaper  slocl(,v%ell 
made,  and  worth 
the  price. 


house 

h  r  o  o  m,  popular 
weight.  Stands 
up  to  every  test. 

We  also  make  a  number  of  other  lines,  inclu  lin; 
Toy  Brooms  and  Whisks. 

Waterloo  Broom  &  Brush  Company,  Limited 

Telephone  286  Waferloo,   Ontario 


Special 
aiteimon 
to  ma: I 
orders 


12 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


EASTERN  CANADA 


VICTOR  A.LEMIEUX 

Labrador  Lobster  in  i   (one)   pound   tin, 

gruaranteed  best  quaKty  on   the  market, 

Write  for  Quotations. 

Wholesale  Dealer 

'  6*1  f;oRisTiNE  aux;..  Montreal 


GEO.  r>.  LACHAINE 

Mannfacturers'   A-'ffnt   and    Commission   Broker 

R»pre«entnn(r  : 
The    Dominion    Molasses    ^o..    Ltd.,    Halifax,    N.S. 
H.    B.    Silver   Ltd.,    Halifax.    N.S. 
Jos.    Dufresne.    Biscuits,    Chocolates   and    Confectionery, 

Joliette,     P.Q. 
Over    .10    years    in    Business.        Best    References    and 
Connections. 

18    Dalhousie   S*ieet,    QUFBEC. 


TIPPET  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

Importers  and 

Manufacturers'  Agents 

8  Place  Royale,  Montreal 

Established  1876 
Tcleplione  Main  1581 


When   Writing-   to    Advertisers 
Kindly  Mention  this  Paper 


TELEPHONE    MAIN    7143 

ST.  ARNAUD  FILS  CIE 

GROCEKY    BROKERS 


Importatenrs 

&    Exportateurs 
Pois  et  Feves 
Produits   AlimeBl-aires 


Importers 

&    Exporters 
Peas    and    Beans 
Food    Products 


ST.     NICHOLAS     BUIIDING.    MONTREAL 


MAPLE  SUGAR 

I  solicit  your  orclers  tor  pure  Maple  Sug-ar.     35  years  ox- 
pariencc  as  wholesale  dealer.     Open   for  ag-eiicies  of  a'l  kinds. 

Asjent  for  Messrs  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull;  ^.unus  Ltd., 
Toronto;  St. -Lawrence  Starch  Co.,  and  several  others. 

Hardware  Expert.      Correspondence  soliciied  if  interested. 

Warehoi.iso  capacity,  10,000  feet  floor  space.      Best  spot  in  town 
on   Main  Street. 

JOS.  EMOND 

2  &  4  rue  St. -Joseph,  Quebec,   P.  Q. 


Be  Surr  y'ou  Ask 
Yovr  Jobber  for 

Domidon   Spring   Clothes    Pins 


Manufac'-ured  by 

The  J.  H.   Hanson  Co.,  Ltd. 

^'l  ONTREAL 


B.  &  S.  H.  THOMPSON  &  CO. 

LIMITED 
Head    MONTREAL    Office 


Agents  for  Canada  for  the  HOMCO  Products,  including* 
Hard  and  Soft  Soaps,  Soap  Chips,  Salad  Oils, 
Compound  Lard,  Ca.stor  Oils,  Sanctuary  Oil,  etc. 


ENQUIRIES  INVITED 


MANUFACTURERS !  ! 


Do  you  want  excel- 
lent storage  and 
first-class  distribution 
in  OTTAWA 
ar.d  District 


Our  l.irffe  Ott.iwa  Hari.hmiM'  on 
tile  ('.  P.  R.  is  larg-cr  tliati  Dur 
usual  stock  demands.  V\'c'  ;iro 
willing  to  carr\  ^iioJs  in  stt>rag:e 
for  a  maiuitacturcr.  deliver  or 
sliip  from  Ottawa  stock,  and 
possibly  take  care  (.>f  s.alcs  for 
Ottawa  and  and  District. 
If  interested,  ^et  in  touch  wiih 
us  at  iMice. 


J.    B.    HUNT 

Manufacturer  of  Hig-h  Grade  Floin-  and  Feed 
ItHOAD  ST.,  OTTAWA,  ONT. 


J-uly  15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


13 


HARRISONS 


Coristine  Bldg. 
Import  Dept. 


OSFIELD 


IMPORTERS    OF    EASTERN    PRODUCE 


Montreal 
Teleohone  Main  6959. 


Allied 
('oni|>aiii<'S 

»w    York 
l>liila<l('l|)lriii 
San    Francisco 
Shiinfp'hai 
Haukon 


F«i(tcli<>u 

SintMMxirc 

rename 

Kiiantan 

.|(>sk<'l1:in 

Santlakaii 

McllMiHnu' 

SvdiM'V 


Hri<l»ane 

Adelaide 

I'erth 

Welliiiffton 

Auckland 

Dnnedin 

Cliristcluirch 


Head    Office 
Luiidon,  En^. 

Branches 
( ()lonil)<» 
(^ilcntta 
(  uli(  ut 
Cochin 


()iii' 111 

fiafavia 

Haiidoentr 

Taimjonw    Haley 

hiiain    l.tinipiir 

Medoii 

Kolte 

Tangier 


BZPORTATIONS 

Enquiries  Soliciie^ 

FCR 

ALL  ^^ixxJDS  OiL^'  h'P.^ o 

TAr.O.'.>AS 

SAGOS 

MILD  COFFEES 

COCOAS 

Desiccated  COCOANUT 

Etc. 


Canadian  and 
British  Made 

PRODUCTS 

for  the 

Canadian  Trade 

Vanillin  "BUSH" 

Emulsions 

Oil  Vanilla 

Pure  Fruit  Extracts 

Butter  Flavor 


We  guarantee  the  quality  of  all  these  lines. 
Write  us  for  quotations. 


The  W.  J.  Bush  &  Co.  Canada,  Ltd. 


MONTREAL 


TORONTO 


WINNIPEG 


14 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,   1921 


Supply  the  Consumer  Demand 

All  newspapers  of  prominence  throughout  the  Dominion  carry  Carna- 
tion Advertising. 

Ycur  customers  are  constantly  reminded  of  the  advantages  of  Carna- 
tion evaporated  milk — and  of  the  convenience' of  obtaining  it  from  you 

— the  JModern  Milkman. 

Are  you  in  a  position  to  meet  the  growing  demand  for  Carnation  Milk? 
Increase  your  sales — link  yourself  with  the  Carnation  campaign — get  a 
share  of  this  new  business. 

Carnation  advertising  material  is  free.  Ask  our  representative  or  write  for  some 
of  the  following  pieces: 

Suggestions  for  Window  Trims — Giant  Carnation  Carton — Counter  Cutout — Coun- 
ter Stand — Story  of  Carnation  Recipe  Book — Carnation  Streamers  or  Hangers. 


Address— CARNATION  MILK  PRODUCTS  CO.,  LIMITED 

Remember — your  jobber  can  supply  you. 


Carnation 


Aylmer,  Ont. 


Now  in 
"Hotel"  Size 


Carnation  Milk  is 
now  also  put  up  in 
a  82  oz.  can.  Tins 
''hotel."  size  can 
opens  up  big  new 
possibilities.  Comes 
packed  24  cans  to 
the  case.  A  nd  it 
ivill  pay  you  ivell  to 
push  it. 


"From    Contented    Cows" 


Milk 

The  label  is  red  and  white 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 


Tiic  Biscuits  that  always  open  out 

I'RESH,    CRISP   and 

DELICIOUS 


"Meadow  Cream'' 
SODAS 


Write  for  quotations  on  our  com- 
plete lines  of  f.ancy  sweet  biscuits 
and  chocolate  bars.  You'll  find 
them   popular  -sellers. 


You  can  always  depend  on  Crothers'  Meadow  Cream 
Sodas .  They  are  (packed  in  attractive  air  proof 
cartons  and  tins,  (from  6  oz.  pkgs.  up)  that  retain 
every  particle  of  their  fine  flavor  and  oven  crispness 
until  they  reach  your  customers'  table.  You'll  never 
have  to  make  excuses  if  you  specify  "Meadow 
Cream"  to  your  wholesalers. 


The  W.    J.    Crothers    Co.,    Limited 


KINGSTON,  ONTATIO 


wawa:. 


July  15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


15 


J)j>  Special  Royal  "Rermissior?  ^ 

<i(i)4G  65CAR5RANP 
-'       0 -SARDINES*  J 


>fAt*C  OSCAR 
BRAN  D 


1 


You  give  your  customers  the 

best  when  you  supply 

them  with 

KING  OSCAR  SARDINES 


These  high-grade  sardines  have  won  a  national  re- 
putation as  the  finest  flavored,  highest  quality 
brand  on  the  market.  They  are  packed  from  only 
the  finest  selected  Norwegian  caught  bristlings-  in 
the  purest  olive  oil  under  the  most  hygienic  con- 
ditions. When  your  customers  ask  for  sardines, 
give  them  King  Oscar  Brand — it  pays  to  give  them 
the  best. 

Order  your  requirements 
from  your  wholesaler. 

Canadian  Agents: 

John    W.    Hifkh*    &    Grooiiini^ 

Iliiiiiilloii.   <)iil:iri(> 


A  Big  Seller  with  the  Grocery  Trade 


SANATAS  TONIC 

A  body  builder  and  a  wonderful  bloori  purifier. 
'  SANATAS  TONIC  will  be  in  great  demand  by  Hospitals  and 
Invalids. 
Every   bottle   guaranteed  by  Expert  Chemists. 
Buy  Sanatas  Tonic  the  profits  are  big. 
Packed  1  dozen  bottles  to  the  case,  2  sizes,  16  or  32  oz. 
Watch  for  our  travellers  or  order  iirect. 

SANATOR  LIMITED 

20  Jacques  Cartier  Square 
Montreal 


■^^ontierfulObaic  I 
^•">^'Bloo6puririfiK 


Western  Agents 

Richardson    Green    Ltd., 
170   Market    St.,   Winnipeg 


Quebec    Agents 

Hudson    &   Orsali, 
St.    Paul    St.,     Montr^l 


Ontario  Agents 

McGillivray   Bros. 
123    B^y    St.,     Toronto 


Agents  required  for  Maritime  Provinces     and     P.     E.     Island 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 


16 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July   15,  1921 


Li>^*» 


Brings    Health   to   Your 
Customers    and    Profit 
FRUIT  SALT  to  You 


Just  as  Good  Health  is  your  customers'  great- 
est asset.  ,so  is  ENO  your  greatest  asset.  If 
you  stock  ENO  you  can  sell  it  with  confidence 
that  your  stock  will  move  quickly,  for  ENO 
customers  are  satisfied  customers  and  know 
the  value  of  a  reputable  article  which  has  held 
universal  favor  for  more  than  fifty  years. 


Are  you  ready  to  participate  in  the 
profits  created  for  you  by  this  ever- 
growing volume  of  ENO  business? 


The  demand  for  this  unrivalled  Health  Drink  is  increasing  bv 
leaps  ami  bounds,  for  the  great  national  ENO  advertising 
campaign  is  daily  creating  new  customers  for  progressive  re- 
tailers all  over  the  country. 

Prepared  only  by 
J.   (".    EX),   LTD.,  "Fruit   Salt"    Works,  LONDON    England 

Agents  for  Xorth  America: 
HAKOLD   F.  KITt  HIE  k  CO.,  Liinitod.  10  ircCniil.    St.,  TORONTO 
Also  at  New  York  and  Sydney,  Aiistrulia 


•■'-n^ 


---  '^ 


GOOD   BUSINESS   MEN 

PURCHAASE  OUR  SCALES 
BECAUSE  BOTH  ARE  RELIABLE 


BRAINS  AND  MONEY 
CANNOT  PRODUCE  BETTER  SCALES 


Will  Be  Pleased  To  Show  Them  To  You 


No.  Ill— The  Uorlds   Ucsi   Coni^-iutiiig 
Scale. 


WANTED  Salesmen 

For  All  Provinces 
Find  Out  What  We  Offer 

The  Standard  Computing  Scale  Co. 

OF  CANADA,   LIMITED 

301  Davis  Block,  Windsor,  Ontario 


srs 


>:=c 


^ 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


17 


Children  of  W.  A.  G.  Love.  224 
4th  Avenue,  Saskatoon.  Sask., 
snarc)ed  while  having  their  after- 
noon cup  of  RED  ROSE  TEA. 


Sell  a  Tea  That  Makes  Your 
Customers  as  Satisfied  as  This 

It  places  your  business  on  a  real  foundation — good 
will . 

For  it  means  that  your  customers  are  not  shopping 
here  for  a  thing,  and  there  for  a  thing,  but  are  coming 
to  you,  steadily  for  all  the  good  things  you  sell,  includ- 
ing RED  ROSE  TEA. 

Then  they'll  be  like  W.  A.  G.  Love  of  Saskatoon, 
Sask.,  who  likes  our  teas  so  well  he  photographed  his 
three  boys  drinking  it,  and  wrote  to  our  head  offke  in 
St.  John,  N.  B. 

"We  have  been  users  of  RED  ROSE  TEA  for 
some  time.   WE  ARE  QUITE  SATISP^IED-" 
Isn't  this  the  kind  of  tea  you'd  like  to  sell? 
It'll    bring    you     the    kind    of    customers     you'd 
like  to  have. 

T.  II.  ESTAHKOOKS  CO.,  LIMITKl) 

St.  John,  N.  B.,  Montreal.  Que..  Toronto.  Ont..  Winnipeg 
Man.  Calgary.  Alta- 


iiiiiiir^iKiiH 


i;vi!!i'--'ini'j';  ji"ii; 


m 


Write  to-day  for  our  illust- 
rated catalogue.  Thers's  a  G 
&  JMcC  safe  for  every  need 


G.  &.    McC. 
SAFES 

—  PROTECT  YOUR   VALUABLES   AND 
BOOKS  FROM  FIRE  AND  BURGLARS 


If  burglars  should  visit  your 
store  tonight  or  (ire  should 
break  out  while  you  slept, 
would  your  papers  and  valu- 
ables be  safe  and  intact  in 
the   morning? 


A     (Joldle     &     :»rc('iilloch 

Safe  will  protect  them  from 
Ihene  daily  menaces  G  & 
McC  safes  are  strongly  built 
to  resist  fire  and  burglars. 
For  over  forty  years  they 
have  successfully  passed 
through  Canada's  Greatest 
fires.  Get  your  G  &  McC 
Safe  l;efore  it  is  too  l.ate. 


THE    GOLLiE   &    McCULLOCH  CO.,  LIMITED 

Head  Office  and  Works:  GALT,  Ontario,  Canada 


TOHONTO  OFFICE:  WESTEUX   BT{.\>(  H: 

Suite   1101-2,  248    .HcDcrmott    Ave., 

Bunk  of  llamilt(m  Bldg.  Wiiinipef?,   Man. 

M.VHITIME   SAFE   AGENT:    E 

ffliiGiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


B.   (  .   SAFE  ACCENTS:  QUKKKt'  AGENT: 

r.    L.    Ford.  Ross  &  Grieg, 

5(!!)  Ri«lianls  St..  VaiicouTer        400  St.  James  St.  Montreal 
StoJUns*    Box    423,   Halifax,  IV. S. 

Illilllllilllllllllliil 


IIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIII 


18 


CANADIAN    CROCER 


July  15,  1921 


Nation -Wide  Rapid  Sellers 


ilARlEY 


MANUFACT'JRED    BY 


ieMMWt&c^p 


^ 


0>*t.  v»«:>vir*\»    tASTT 


\ 


Robinson's  "Patent"  Barley  and 
Robinson's  "Patent"  Groats  are 
the  Best  Foods  for  Infants  and 
Invalids  and  have  won  a  promin- 
ent place  in  the  Canadian  market. 
It  will  pay  you,  Mr.  Grocer,  to 
stock  these  products  and  replenish 
frequently  through  your  whole- 
saler . 


MAGOR,  SON  &  COMPANY  LIMITED 

191  St.  Paul  St.  West,  Montreal  23  Scott  St.,  Toronto 

Agents  for  the  Dominion 


lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllIU^^ 


1    MONTH'S    INCREASE 


The  Sales  of 


II 


SALADA" 

in  June  1921  were  greater  than  those  in  June  1920  by 

198,189    POUNDS 

This  is  the  increase  in  one  month's  sales.  During  the  first  six  months  of 
this  year  we  have  sold  918,671  (or  nearly  one  million)  pounds  more  SAL- 
ADA  than    in  the  corresponding    six  months  of  last  year. 

THE     PEOPLE    WflT.    HAVE    QUALITY 


Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiinii 


llllllliillllllllllllllllllllllliniiiii:!::;i;;;;;i:!i!;:illlliiiililllillllll Ill Illlllll I lllllll lllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllillllllllllllllllliilliilllllllllllllilllllllllllllllin^^ 


VOL.  XXXV. 


COLLINGWOOD,  JULY  15,  1921 


No.  28 


''Are  You  Well  Stocked  With  Summer  Lines?'' 

TendtMicv  on  the  part  of  loo  many  grocers  is  to  stock  too  iiglillr 
these  (lays,  with  Ihe  resnll  thai  goods  asked  for  are  not  avail- 
able— how  one  grocer  lost  an  o|)norlunity. 


"Y^U  are  certainly  out  of  luck  aren't  you  ?"  replied 
a  grocer  the  other  day  to  a  customer,  when  the 
latter  had  asked  for  three  different  articles,  hot 
weather  specials  they  might  be  called,  and  was  un- 
able to  get  them .  It  was  one  of  those  sizzling  hot 
days,  when  the  thermometer  was  hovering  around 
100  degrees,  and  people  were  only  buying  foods  that 
either  were  already  prepared  or  required  very  little 
energy  on  the  part  of  a  housewife  to  put  them  in 
readiness  for  serving  to  a  .sweltering  family. 

The  Grocer  Out  of  Luck 

According  to  this  grocer  the  customer  was  'out 
of  luck.'  Rather  wasn't  it  the  grocer  himself,  who 
was  out  of  luck?  It  was  he  who  had  not  prepared 
for  the  hot  weather,  and  had  neglected  to  stock 
those  lines  that  bring  a  brisk  inquiry,  at  a  time, 
when  people  are  looking  for  light  foods  and  replac- 
ing many  of  the  heavier  articles  of  diet,  such  as 
meats,  potatoes,  etc..  with  fresh  fruits  and  veget- 
ables. 

Returning  to  this  customer  who  in  the  grocer's 
opinion  was  'out  of  luck',  she  first  asked  for  fresh 
fruit.  The  grocer  did  not  have  any.  Next,  a  tin 
of  potted  chicken  was  requested.  This  too  was  not 
in  stock.  "Have  you  any  ginger  ale?"  was  the  third 
quiry.  and  the  reply  again  was  a  negative  one.  It 
was  here  that  the  merchant  proffered  the  remark 
a  referred  to  above,  and  it  impressed  the  customer 
who  afterwards  related  the  circumstance  to  a  re- 
presentative of  Canadian  Grocer,  that  the  merchant 
should  be  so  shortsighted  as  to  fail  to  see  that  it  was 
he  who  had  lost  an  opportunity  to  maite  sales,  and 
perhaps  gain  a  permanent  customer. 

The  Grocer's  Opportunity 

The  hot  weather  is  the  time  to  pu.sh  a  number 
of  lines  that  represent  appetizing  and  cooling  re- 
freshment to  people,  to  whom  the  regular  lines  of 
diet  do  not  appeal.  It  is  the  grocer's  opportunity, 
and  it  is  up  to  him  to  make  the  most  of  it.  It  is 
only  necessary  to  show  these  goods  in  order  to  sell 
them .  Fresh  fruits  and  vegetables  mean  a  quick 
turnover  and  the  profit  is  worth  while.  Soft  drinks 
and  ice  cream  too.  as  has  been  shown  by  the  ex- 
perience of  numerous  enterprising  grocers,  and  as 
told  in  Canadian  Grocr,  are  proving  remunerative 
sidelines-  According  to  one  merchant,  in  the  course 
of  a  conversation  with  Canadian  Grocer,  the  sum- 


mer meant  increased  business  to  him.  and  he  avail- 
ed himself  of  every  opportunity  to  push  and  sell 
lines  that  have  a  special  appeal  in  the  hot  days. 

Forty  Hams  in  Five  Days 

"We  have  sold  forty  hams  in  about  five  days." 
the  manager  of  the  meat  department  of  F-  Simpson 
&  Sons.  Yonge  Street,  Toronto,  told  Canadian  Grocer 
on  a  day  when  the  terrific  heat  wave  was  at  its 
peak.  This  was  in  addition  to  large  quantities  of 
tongue  and  two  other  kinds  of  cooked  meats.  "We 
have  paid  particular  attention  to  our  cooked  meat 
department  in  this  hot  weather,"  the  manager  add- 
ed. People  are  looking  for  something  already  pre- 
pared and  cooked  ham  or  tongue  seem  to  be  the 
most  popular.  F-  Simpson  &  Sons,  have  a  nice  dis- 
play of  cooked  meats  under  glass  on  the  counter, 
and  the  manager  asserts  that  this  showing  of  meats 
has  increased  the  turnover  materially.  Picking  up 
a  potted  chicken,  that  was  standing  close  at  hand 
the  Canadian  Grocer  representative  inquired  as  to 
the  demand  for  the  same.  "Since  the  hot  weather 
has  reached  such  intensity."  the  manager  replied, 
"I  have  noticed  a  very  marked  increase  in  its  sale- 
I  have  been  recommending  and  suggesting  it  to 
people.  It  is  a  high  priced  line.  b5t  it  sells  well, 
nevertheless-  In  fact  all  our  packaged  delicacies, 
such  as  bottled  shrimps,  olives  and  such  like  are 
brisk  .sellers  these  days.  People  are  in  a  quandary 
as  to  what  to  have  for  meals  in  this  hot  spell,  and  a 
suggestion  of  potted  chicken,  or  other  lines  of  a 
similar  character  are  appreciated  .iust  now,  W^hen. 
brought  to  the  attention  of  the  customer,  a  sale  is 
usually  the  result." 

No  Let  Up  In  Bacon  Sales 

Asked  if  the  sale  of  bacon  had  fallen  off  in  the 
hot  weather-  the  manager  remarked  that  bacon  was 
one  thing  that  the  customers  appear  to  buy  all  the 
time.  "It  is  easily  cooked  of  course,"  he  said,  "and 
people  want  it  for  their  breakfast  all  the  year 
through.  We  are  averaging  over  one  thousand 
pounds  of  bacon  every  week,  and  we  have  not 
noticed  any  perceptible  falling  off  since  the  advent 
of  the  hot  spell." 

Soft  Drinks  Sells  Well 

Other  retail  grocers  were  visited  in  Toronto  on 
this  .same  hot  day  and  all  told  the  story  of  increas- 

(Continued  on  Page  20) 


20 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


The  Jam  Pack  This  Year  Will  Be  Light 


The  siluatioii  in  jams  is  vastly  different  from 
ago — with  stocks  fairly  well  cleaned  up  and 
year,  prices  should  be  more  stabili/.ed. 


re  situiition  in  jams  is  vastly  different 
than  that  of  a  year  ago.  Last  season, 
manufacturers  were  packing'  heavily, 
even  far  beyond  their  actual  orders.  This 
jam  was  put  up  with  sugar  at  the  highest 
priee,  labor,  fuel,  containers  and  other 
incidentals  all  being  at  the  peak  price. 
Consequently  the  opening  price  on  jams 
reached  a  high  altitude.  Manufacturers, 
however,  had  hardly  finisihed  their  pack 
when  business  depression  set  in.  High 
prices  commenced  to  topple.  People  start- 
ed to  curtail  buying  and  manufacturers 
were  facing  heavy  cancellation  of  orders. 
Manufacturers  were  therefore  forced  to 
take  one  of  two  alternatives,  lower  their 
price  immediately  and  ciean  up,  take  a 
heavy  loss  or  hold  stocks  for  another 
seasin  and  take  the  chance  of  at  least 
getting  their  money  back.  Tiiey,  however, 
chose  the  first  and  although  the  amount 
of  money  lost  was  appalling,  the  price 
was  dropped  to  such  a  figure  that  jams 
commenced  to  sell,  hut  not  until  late  in 
the  season . 

Heavy   ('onsuiHptloH 

The  ronsumptiou  of  jams  this  past 
season  has  been  heavy,  in  spite  of  the 
fact  that  some  manufacturers  are  still 
carrying  fairly  heavy  stocks.  It  must  be 
remembered,  too,  that  when  the  new 
pack  of  jams  was  ready  for  delivery  last 
fall,  both  wholesalers  and  retailers  were 
carrying  big  stocks  from  the  previous 
year,  which  '  undoubtedly  accounts  for 
the  cancellation  of  orders  on  the  new 
pack . 

Slocks  are  now  pretty  well  absorbed. 
The  manager  of  a  large  departmental 
store  recently  stated,"  we  have  sold 
double  the  amount  of  jams  this  season 
than  we  ever  did  before,  simply  because 
we  were  able  to  pick  up  large  parcels 
at  a  special  sales.  These  prices  undoubt- 
edly did  not  represent  the  cost  of  pro- 
duction and  manufacturers  must  have 
had    a   heavy    loss." 

Shcnld  Tie  a  Good  Demand 

This  brings  us,  then,  to  the  present 
situation.  With  stocks  fr^.irly  well  cleaned 
up  and  with  a  liglit  pack  this  year,  there 
should  be  a  good  demand  this  coming 
season,  and  at  a  price  that  will  show  a 
fair  profit  to  all  concerned. 

In  past  years  it  was  the  custom  of 
the  retail  and  wholesale  trade  to  cover 
their  requirements,  thus  giving  the  man- 
ufacturer some  idea  of  the  quantity  to 
be  packed.  This  year  there  is  practically 
no  buying  of  futures  which  has  resulted 
in  manufacturersx  wjth  their  heavy 
losses  cf  last  season  in  view,  proceeding 
very  cautiously.  Manufacturers  are  mak- 
ing on  contracts  for  fruits,  nor  are  they 
packing  any   quantity,  just  sufficient  to 


cover    what   they    actually    sold. 
1-ack  Onr-Third 

The  pack  will  probably  only  be  about 
one-third  of  ether  years,  and  perhaps 
even  less  on  some  line^.  The  strawberry 
I)ack  is  now  practically  completed  and 
with  the  extremely  hot  weatlier  having 
its  effect  upon  the  crop,  the  curtailment 
of  the  pack  asd  little  carry  over  from 
la'^t  season,  there  is  a  strong  possibility 
c!  a  shortage  of  strawberry  jam  by  the 
end  of  the  year. 


REGULATION  IN  REGARD  TO 

A3I0UNT    OF    ri:('!!N    IN    JA.>I 

The  ffillowing  letter  was  recently  sent 
to  all  jam  manufacturers  in  Canada. 

Gentlemen: — I  beg  to  advise  you  that 
our  attention  has  been  drawn  to  the  fact 
that  jam  is. being  manufactured  in  Can- 
ada and  labelle<l  pure  jam  and  that  it  is 
heavily    loaded    with    Pectin. 

I  would  drav/  your  attention  to  Section 
12  of  regulations  which  permits  o-f  the 
use  of  not  mnre  than  t-^  ^^rr  cent,  of 
fruit  juice  instead  of  v.aer  i.i  V^e  manu- 
facture cf  Pure  Jam. 

I  would  remind  you  that  th",  means 
ten  per  cent,  of  natural  fruit  j"i-f>.  not 
ten  per  cent,  of  fruit  pectin.  Whe  in 

is  used  only  such  an  amount  a.i  in  e  'v.v- 
alent'  to  ten  per  cent,  unconcent-ate:! 
fruit  juice  may  be  used,  or  not  mor^  -han 
two  and  one  half  per  cent,  o!  Fos'  ■ 

I  would  advise  ycA  further  V"  '  ',  in 
future,  it  is  found  that  jam  i"  -i''>c;eil  on 
the  market  and  marked  Pnrc,  r  '  i.  it  ii 
found  to  contain  an  excessi vo  am^nnt  of 
foreign  fruit  juice  or  pectin.  '  "''•  a  pro- 
duct will  be  plpced  under  dcto.aon  and 
held    until    labelled    correctly. 

1  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sirs, 
Your    obedient   -Servant, 
T.   TORRANCE, 
Veterinary   Director   General. 


C.\LIFORNIA  PRUNES 

Sixty-four  years  ago  Louis  Pellier, 
I'"'rench  immigrant,  brought  with  him  to 
California  from  his  native  d'Agen,  in 
France,  two  prune  cuttings,  which  he 
planted  on  his  brother's  ranch  near  San 
Jose,  thus  beginning  the  prune  industry 
in   California. 

Today  Calilornia  produces  an  annual 
prune  crop  of  225,000,000  pounds,  grows 
85  per  cent,  of  all  the  prunes  eaten  in 
the  United  States  and  exports  hundreds 
of  thousands  of  pounds,  some  of  which 
goes  back  to  the  very  fruit-growing  dis- 
tricts of  France  from  where  the  original 
plantings  were  brought  hardly  more 
than   three   score   years   ago. 


I  hat  of  a  year 
light  pack  this 

Retires    After 

65   Years   In   The 

Grocery    Trade 

John  Owens,  of  Fredericton,  N.B.,  who 
is  in  all  probability  the  oldest  grocer  in 
Eastern  Canada,  having  been  in  business 
for  sixty-five  year.s,  has  retired  from 
business.  He  has  disposed  of  his  stock. 
Mr.  Owens,  who  is  now  past  the  three 
score  and  ten  years'  mark,  is  a  native 
of  Queen's  County,  and  worked  on  a  farm 
until  lie  was  twenty-one  years  of  age. 
Ho  started  business  in  Fredea-icton  in 
18.55,  and  was  continuously  in  the  busi- 
ness   up   until   the   present. 

Mr.  Owens  during  his  long  business 
career  supplied  groceries  to  the  grand 
parents  of  many  people  now  prominent 
in  the  commercial  life  of  the  city.  Rail- 
ways were  unknown  in  this  section  when 
he  started  business,  communications  with 
outside  poinf^  being  kept  up  by  means  of 
steamboats  and  stage  lines.  In  speaking 
of  the  good  o'.d  days  he  said  when  he 
started  business  of  every  one  hundred 
people  who  asked  for  and  obtained  crdit 
ninety   of  them   were    sure    to    pay. 

Mr.  c  ■'■-■  •  one  of  Fredericton's  old- 
est a'  ^  i,eemed  citizens  and  his 
lont  '  areer  has  been  charact- 
erized ; .  r.lcrliiig  honestly  and  fair  deal- 
ing. He  feels,  and  rightly,  too,  that  he 
had  done  his  bit  and  is  now  entitled  to 
spend  the  evening  of  his  life  in  retire- 
ment. 


"ARR    YOU    WELL     STOCKED    WITH 
SUMMER  GOOD.S?" 

Continued  from  Page  19) 

ingly    Large    sales    of   cooked    meats. 

"We  biTe  sent  out  over  fifty  cases  of 
soft  drinks  in  the  last  three  of  four 
days,"  one  merchant  told  the  Grocer 
man.  "Our  delivery  man  is  down  at  the 
factory  now,  endeavoring  to  get  a  fresh 
supply,  in  order  that  we  might  keep  up 
with  the  demand",  he  added.  "We  are 
selling  it  in  case  lots  and  also  in  small- 
er lots  of  two,  three  and  half  dozen 
bottles,  and  our  turnover  in  the  past 
week   has  exceeded   all   previous   sales." 

The  grocer  who  is  not  pushing  sum- 
mer lines  with  some  effort  these  days, 
is  losing  golden  opportunities  to  build 
new  business.  What  are  you  doing  in 
this  regard? 


July  15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


21L 


^^Ctjstomers  Want  i  heir  Groceries  Delivered^^ 


Alte*^ipts  to  establish  cash  and  carry  stores  or  groceterias  iii 
Saskatoon  have  failed,  says  T.  F.  Carson  of  i3utchcr  and  Car- 
son, Saskatoon — the  people  like  to  give  their  orders  over  the 
teleplione,  and  have  the  same  deii-xered — f'f)  a  credit  business. 


THERE  have  been  two  attempts  to  est- 
ablish cash  and  carry  and  groceteria 
stores  in  Saskatoon,"  said  T.  F.  Carson 
of  Butcher  &  Carson,  to  Can,ndian  Gro- 
cer. 'Each  has  failed.  The  groceteria 
only  lasted  four  wee4is.  The  people  here 
want  to  have  their  goods  delivered.  They 
want  to  be  able  to  order  over  the  tele- 
phone. They  want  to  have  n  good  gro- 
cer's advice  about  their  food  purchases, 
and  they  will  not  carry  home  their 
purchases,  nor  come  down  town  with 
their  money  when  tliey  want  a  few 
groceries." 

Does  A  Credit  Business 

Mr.  Carson  sriys  that  he  does  a  credit 
husiness,  by  which  he  nie;iiis  that  he 
does  not  make  it  an  invariable  rule  that 
he  must  have  cash  over  the  counter  be- 
fore the  goods  leave  the  store.  "At  the 
same  time,"  says  this  merchant,  "the 
credit  I  extend  to  30  per  cent  of  my 
cutomers  is  really  not  credit,  but  ac- 
commodation. I  don't  think  that  there 
is  orie  of  my  charge  customers  who 
could  not  pay  me  any  time  I  asked  her. 
As  a  matter  of  fact  I  am  very  strict  with 
the  arrangements  I  make.  I  do  not 
hesitate  to  insist  o.i  immeiate  payment 
at  the  end  of  thirty  days,  and  I  have 
no  trouble.  The  first  loss  is  the  best 
if  there  is  going  to  be  a  loss  at  all." 

Is  A  Dranini^  Power 

Mr.  Carson  is  a  firm  believer  in  the 
trade  drawing  power  of  good  equipment. 
He  has  two  refrigerators.  One  large 
one  thafe  stands  ten  feet  high,  which 
holds  all  manner  of  perishal)les,  also  a 
small  display  refrigerator  fixture  which 
keeps  the  cooked  meat  in  o'erfect  coh- 
dition.  Computing'  scales,  machine  sHcer, 
etc.,  all  add  to  the  efficiency  of  the 
sf.aff.  Oak  fixtures  beautify  the  store 
throughout,  the  counters  extending  the 
entire  length  of  the  store  on  both  sides. 
Back  of  the  counters,  the  bins  have  g»ass 
fronts  displaying  the  merchandise  there- 
iH,  and  the  spice  drawers  have  mirror 
fronts  that  lend  a  great  deal  of  bright- 
ness to  the  general  effect. 

Mr.  Carson  has  had  considerable  ex- 
perience in  outlaying  stores,  and  states 
that  for  such  a  store  depending  on  wage 
eariMjrs'  trade  the  credit  accounting 
system  is  necess.ary.  "I  think,"  said  Mr. 
Carson  that  the  retailer  owes  it  to  the 
customer  to  show  a  total  on  every  bill. 
It  is  a  flag  of  warning  to  him  to  keep 
within  his  means,  if  his  account 
is  likely  to  become  a  risk.  It  keeps  hini 
from  getting  beyond  his  depth.  It  keeps 
the    retailer    from    leaving    to    sustain    a 


The    )i((4ac<iu'    interior    «i     ihc     uiain    st:)re  <»!  Hufehcr  :ind  (arson.  Saskatoon. 


loss  or  lose  a  paying  customer.  My  pre- 
sent trade  is  with  very  few  exceptions 
well  to  do,  but  even  so  I  am  seriously 
considering  the  installation  of  one  ef  the 
modern    accounting    systems. 

Use  Advertising:   Space 

Butcher  and  Careon  are  regular  ad- 
vertisers in  the  daily  papers.  They  use 
space  practically  every  day.  It  is  not 
their  idea  to  make  sen.sational  advert- 
isements, offering  goods  at  cut-rnte 
.•prices  and  such  like,  but  they  always 
keep  their  advertisements  fresh  and 
timely,  featuring  some  seasonable  lines. 
It  is  their  policy  to  advertise  about  20 
articles,  that  is  giviiig  the  prices  of  that 
number,  each  day.  They  always  mention 
prices,  and  believe  grocery  advertise- 
mejits  that  do  not  mention  prices  are 
not  woijth  while.  This  firm  sells  high- 
grade  foodstuffs  that  are  particularly 
known  as  reputable  and  trustworthy. 
Selling  these  lines  is  a  regular  thing  in 
their  stores,  and  selling  effort  that 
brings  results  is  applied  to  new  goods 
that  can  be  recommended  by  the  man- 
agement. "It  is  no  trouble  to  sell  &  new 
line  if  you  are  convinced  that  it  is 
worth  reeommending.  At  once  you  have 
established  the  confidence  of  your  cust- 
omers, the  salesaian  can  make  sales." 
remarked  Mr.   Carson. 

A  Mail  Order  Trade 

Butcher  &  Carson  have  a  large  ware- 


house i:  Sa:;r.'oon.  and  it  is  from  it 
that  I!.  ■  big  :'-;  ii  order  business  of  the 
firm  is  carried  o.i.  This  mail  order  busi- 
ness is  really  getting  after  the  farm 
trade.  The  catalogue  circulated  through 
the  f.Trmir.g  communities  for  mitch^  a- 
round  is  an  attractive  and  comprehen- 
sive booklet,  giving  in  detail  informat- 
ion ,-ind  prices  of  every  line  carried  by 
this  firni.  Butcher  &  Carson  slate  thai 
they  have  built  up  a  business  with  the 
farmers  that  is  now  reaching  a  very 
large  turnover.  All  orders  are  filled  on 
the  Fame  day  ,is  received,  and  if  goods 
asked  for  are  not  in  stock,  sub.stitutes 
are  sent  unless  in.s.tructions  are  other- 
wise. Trading  with  the  farm  involves  a 
recprocal  arrangement,  the  fanii  buy- 
ing large  q-i.-intities  of  butter  and  eggs 
from   them . 


CAN   YOU  liEAT   IT 

The  United  States  imported  1,7QS,731 
dozen  eggs  in  1920.  Of  this  amriiut,  816,- 
863  dozen  came  from  far  distant  China; 
276,600  dozen  from  Canada;  26ft,o00  dozen 
from  Hong  Kwig;  209,718  do-je:i  from 
Australia;  84,7r>5  from  Japan,  an;l  Zl,9d0 
dozea  from  Argemtina.  The  rest  of  the 
eggs  used  were  laid  by  American  hens. 
that  not  only  provided  all  needed,  but  a 
considerable  quantity  in  excess  of  home 
requirements. 


.22 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


Official  Text  of  Sales  Tax  Legislation 

Full  Text  Of  Amendnients  To  Special  War  Revenue  Act  Deal- 
ing Willi  Sales  Tax  As  Applied  Since  May  10th 
— List  Of  Exempted  Articles. 


^he  full  text  of  the  amendment  made 
to  The  Special  War  Revenue  Act, 
and  which  deals  with  the  tax  on  sale 
as   it   now  exists,  is  as   follows: 

'•lOBBB  (1)  In  addition  to  the  present 
duties  of  customs  and  excise  there  shall 
be  imposed,  levied  and  collected  an  ex- 
cise tax  of  one  and  one-half  per  cent., 
on  sales  and  deliveries  by  Canadian  man- 
ufacturers or  producers,  and  wholesale- 
ers  or  jobbers,  and  a  tax  of  two  and  one- 
half  per  cent,  on  the  duty-paid  value  of 
goods  imported,  but  in  respect  of  sales 
by  manufacturers  to  retailers  or  con- 
sumers, including  sales  to  His  Majesty, 
whether  in  the  right  of  His  Majesty's 
•  Govenimenl  of  Canada  or  His  Majesty's 
Government  of  any  province  of  Canada 
for  the  purpose  of  re-sale,  the  excise  tax 
payable  shall  be  three  per  cent.,, and  0!i 
;goods  impc  rted  by  retailers  or  consumers, 
.including  importations  by  His  Jlajesty. 
wiiether  in  the  right  of  His  Majesty's 
Government  of  Canada  or  His  Majesty's 
Government  of  any  province  of  Canada 
for  the  purpose  of  re-sale,  the  excise  tax 
3)ayable  on  the  duty-paid  value  shall  be 
furnished  with  a  written  invoice  of  any 
sale,  which  invoice  shall  state  separately 
the  amount  of  such  tax  to  at  least  the 
extent  of  one-half  per  cent.,  but  such 
tax  must  not  be  included  in  the  manu- 
facturer's, producer's^  or  whole,saler'R 
*osts  on  which  profit  is  calculated;  and 
4he  tax  shall  be  payable  by  the  purchaser 
to  the  wholesaler,  producer  or  manu- 
facturer at  the  time  of  such  sale,  and  by 
the  wholesaler,  producer  or  manufactur- 
er to  His  Majesty  in  accordance  with 
such  regulations  as  may  be  prescribed, 
and  such  wholesaler,  producer  or  manu- 
facturer shall  be  liable  to  a  penalty  not 
exceeding  five  hundred  dollars,  if  such 
Bayments  are  made,  and  in  addition  shall 
be  liable  to  a  penalty  equal  to  double 
the  amount  of  the  excise  duties  unpaid; 
the  term  "duty  paid  value"  means  the 
value  of  the  article  as  it  would  ))e  de- 
termined for  the  purpose  of  calculating 
an  ad  valorem  duty  upon  the  importation 
of  same  into  Canada  under  the  laws  re- 
lating to  the  Customs  Tariff  whether 
such  article  be  in  fact  subject  to  ad 
valorem  or  other  duty  or  not,  and  in  ad- 
dition the  amount  of  the  Customs  duties, 
if  any,   payable   thereon. 

Provided  that  in  respect  of  lumber  as 
excise  tax  of  two  per  cent,  shall  ))e  im- 
posed, levied  and  collected  on  sales  and 
deliveries  by  the  Canadian  manufacturer 
and  of  three  per  cent,  on  importations, 
and  that  no  further  excise  tax  shall  be 
payable   on    re-sale. 

List  of  Exemptions 

Provided  that  the  taxes  specified  in 
4hi3  section  shall  not  apply  to  sales  or 


importations  of:— Certain  foodstuffs, 
ores  of  metals  of  all  kinds,  fuels  of  all 
kinds;  gold  and  silver  in  ingots,  blocks, 
bars,  -drops  s-heets  or  plates  unmanu- 
factured; logs  and  round  unmanufact- 
ured timber;  fence  posts,  railroad  ties, 
pulp-wood,  tan  bark,  and  other  articles 
the  product  of  the  forest,  when'  produced 
and  sold  by  the  individual  settler  or 
(farmer;  materials  for  use  only  in  the 
construction,  equipment  and  repair  of 
ships;  calcium  carbide;  electricity;  gas 
manufactured  from  coal,  calcium  car- 
bide or  oil  for  illuminating  or  heating 
purposes;    settlers'  effects. 

Not  Fayable  on  Exports 

Provided  further  that  the  excise  taxes 
specified  in  this  section  shall  not  be 
payable  on  goods  exported,  or  on  sales 
of  goods  made  to  the  order  of  each  in- 
dividual customer  by  a  business  which 
sells  exclusively  by  retail,  under  regula- 
tions by  the  Minister  of  Customs  and 
Inland  Revenue  Vv'ho  shall  be  sole  judge 
as  to  the  classification  of  a  business; 
and  a  drawback  may  be  granted  of 
ninety-nine  per  cent,  of  the  said  taxes 
paid  on  materials  used,  wrought  into  or 
attached  to  articles  exported. 

(2)  The  Minister  may  require  every 
manufacturer,  producer,  wholesaler  or 
jobber  to  take  out  an  annual  license  for 
the  purposes  aforesaid,  and  may  pre- 
scribe a  fee  therefor,  not  exceeding  two 
dollars,  and  the  penalty  for  neglect  or 
refusal  shall  be  a  sum  not  exceeding 
one    thousand   dollars. 

(3)  Any  such  tax,  costs  or  penalties 
may,  at  the  option  of  the  Minister,  be  re- 
covered and  imposed  in  the  Exchequer 
Court  of  Canada  or  in  any  other  Court 
of  competent  jurisdiction,  in  the  name  of 
His  Majesty. 

(4)  The  provisions  of  this  section  re- 
specting a  tax  on  sales  shall  be  deemed 
to  have  come  into  force  on  the  tenth  day 
of  May,  nineteen  hundred  and  twenty- 
one,  and  to  have  applied  to  all  goods 
imported  or  taken  out  of  warehouse  for 
consumption  on  and  after  that  day,  and 
to  have  also  applied  to  goods  previously 
imported,  for  which  no  entry  for  con- 
sumption was  made  before  that  day." 

Federal  Court  decrees  holding  that 
quantities  of  nitric  acid  imported  by  the 
Aetna  Explosives  Company  from  Can- 
ada during  the  war  were  entitled  to 
entry  without  payment  of  duty  were 
affirmed  to-day  Ijy  the  Ru'irome  Court. 
The  acid,  intended  for  use  in  the  manu- 
facture of  explosives  for  the  navy,  was 
mixed  with  sulphuric  acid  in  order  that 
it  might  be  shipped  in  compliance  with 
the  law.  Customs  officials  ruled  that  this 
mixture  formed  a  I'cw  compound  which 
was  dutiable. 


New    Stock    Issue 

By     Canadian 
Sanitary  Can  Co. 

The  Canadian  Sanitary  Can  Company, 
Ltd.,  is  disposing  of  a  new  issiie  of  pre- 
ferred and  common  stock,  the  former  to 
the  amount  of  $1.'J0,000,  and  the  common 
to  the  extent  of  $210,000.  The  president  of 
tile  company  is  James  Dixon,  Hamilton, 
director  and  treasurer  of  the  Dominion 
Power  and  Transmission  Company.  The 
first  vice-president  is  Henry  S.  Gooder- 
ham,  Toronto,  and  other  dir'^ctors  are 
W.  H.  Millman,  of  W.  H.  Millman  & 
Sons,  wholesale  grocery  brokers,  Toron- 
to, and  vice-president  and  general  man- 
ager of  the  Canadian  Evaporated  Apples, 
Ltd.,  Wm.  M.  Turnley,  Toronto,  George 
H.  Babcock,  and  J.  Gait  Kingsmill,  To- 
ronto. B.  N.  Barrett,  Toronto,  is  the 
secretary-treasurer . 

The  Canadian  Sanitary  Can  Company 
has  been  organized  for  the  purpose  of 
manufacturing  sanitary,  solderless,  seal- 
ed food  or  packers'  cans,  complying  with 
pure  food  laws  of  Canada.  The  products 
of  the  company  will  be  marketed  chiefly 
in  Toronto  and  Ontario. 


Retail    Merchants 

In   Sask.   Plan 
Get-together   Meeting 

Regina,  July  11. — Plans  are  under  way 
for  the  holding  of  a  get-together  meet- 
ing for  all  retail  merchants  of  Saskatch- 
ewan, in  Regina,  Monday,  August  29.  The 
v,eek  previous  to  this  meeting,  the  an- 
nual Dominion  convention  of  the  retail 
merchants  will  be  held  in  Winnipeg,  and 
several  of  the  speakers  there  will  after- 
wards go  to  Regina  lo  speak  at  the  Cap- 
ital. Among  them  will  be  J.  A.  Banfield, 
Winnipeg,  Dominion  president  of  the 
Association,  and  E.  M.  Trowern.  Ottawa 
Dominion  secretary.  Several  other  mem- 
bers of  the  Dominion  board  are  also 
expected   to   be    present. 

Invitation^  will  be  extended  to  mem- 
bers of  the  Association  from  Moose  Jaw, 
Weyburn,  and  other  towns  in  the  south- 
ern part  of  the  province.  This  will  be 
an  opportunity  for  all  men  in  this  part 
who  were  unable  to  attend  the  provincial 
convention  in  Saskatoon,  to  meet  the  Do- 
minion president,  and  hear  accounts  of 
the  association's  work  throughout  the 
province. 

The  evening  meeting  on  August  29, 
will  take  the  frra  of  a  banquet,  where 
the  various  addresses  will  be  given. 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


23 


Cash  Basis  Versus  a  Credit  Policy  is  Discussed 

J.  F.  Clarke  of  Watrous,  Sask.,  and  W.  R.  Phillips  of  Kind- 
crslev,  Sask,,  believe  that  the  cash  system  is  the  onlv  l)asis 
on  which  to  do  business  successfully,  G.  W.  Stockton-  of 
Carl  vie,  Alta.,  after  trying  the  cash  way  returns  to  a  credit 
policy,  and  as  he  states  to  a  greater  turnover. 


/^XE  of  the  most  interesting  discus- 
^-^  sions  in  connection  with  the  con- 
vention of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Assoc- 
iation of  the  Province  of  S,asl<atchewan, 
at  Saskatoon,  recently  was  that  of  a 
cash  business  versus  a  credit  policy. 
J.  F.  Clarke  of  Watrous,  Sask.  and  W. 
R.  Phillips  of  Kindersley,  Sask.  spoke 
in  favor  of  ,a  cash  system,  and  G.  W. 
Stockton  of  Carlyle,  Alta.,  defended  the 
credit  policy. 

Mr.  Clarke  in  speaking  for  the  cash 
system  contended  that  the  present  sy- 
stem of  world  finances  is  such  that  all 
good  government  is  advocating  the  cur- 
tailment of  further  borrowings,  and  a 
return  to  more  conservjative  methods 
of  carrying  on.  "What  is  good  business 
for  our  country  is  good  business  for 
■each  individual  in  the  country,"  he  re- 
marked. 

Only  7  I'tT  Cent  Decrease 

Mr.  Clarke  changed  from  a  credit 
busines*  to  a  cash  basis  last  year  in 
his  own  business,  and  his  records  show 
rx  decrease  in  the  amount  of  turnover 
of  only  7  per  cent.  "When  it  is  recall- 
ed that  the  decrease  in  commodity 
prices  now  averages  40  per  cent,  it 
will  be  seen,"  the  speaker  continued, 
"that  we  have  really  made  a  gain  in 
business  on  a  cash  biasis  acts  and  en- 
courages his  trade  to  act  in  a  sounder 
manner.  Each  purchaser  realizes  that 
•when  he  buys,  he  is  actually  handing 
^noney  over  the  counter,  land  each  mer- 
chant realizes  that  when  he  orders 
^oods  he  is  handing  out  the  equivalent 
for  them  in  actual  currency.  A  short 
lime  ago,  I  had  an  actual  inventory  tak- 
en of  each  item  of  stock  th,at  could  be 
dispensed  with,  without  either  impair- 
ing my  assortment  or  giving  my  trade 
a  restricted  choice. 

$1.>.00()  III  Siiriilus  Stock 
All  this  stock  was  then  shifted  to  a 
special  department  and  a  concentrated 
•affort  made  to  dispose  of  it.  This  I 
found  to  be  a  most  healthy  move,  as  it 
released  from  bondage  a  really  size- 
able amount  of  capital  I  did  not  put 
this  back  into  surplus  stock,  but  I  con- 
tinue to  maintain  as  high  a  turnover, 
without  this  qapital  investment.  To 
those  who  still  mantain  a  credit  busi- 
ness I  urge  a  "coinpon  system"  whereby 
each  account  is  covered  with  negotiable 
j)aper.  The  government  will  not  per- 
mit the  banks  to  operate  in  such  a  slip 
shod  and  dangerous  m,anner  as  most 
stores  are  operated". 

An  extract  from  the  Financial  Post, 
wherein  H.  T.  Hunter  outlines  the  busi- 
mess  trend  of  the  present  time  was  here 
Jead  as  follows:  — 


"The  day  is  past  when  ,a  merchant 
will  gain  more  by  holding  goods  than 
he  will  by  selling  them." 

Ca.sh  Store  Ghes  Better  Values 

The  trend  of  agriculture  in  Sraskaiche- 
wan,  according  to  Mr.  Clarke  is  away 
from  a  straight  gamble  on  wheat,  and 
towards  mi.xed  farming,  dairying,  stock 
raising  ,and  other  lines  that  give  the 
farmer  a  steady  income.  The  merchant 
is  advised  to  fall  in  line  and  get  steady 
cash  from  these  farmers.  The  cash 
store  gives  better  values.  With  all 
stores  on  a  cash  business,  said  the 
speaker,  every  one  will  have  to  work 
for  a  living  instead  of  workiiig  the  gro- 
cer for  a  living.  The  credit  merchant 
cannot  buy  as  well  as  the  merchant  with 
ready  cash,,  and  consequently  must 
either  charge  more  for  his  goods,  or  be 
content  with  less  profit.  The  cash 
store  gives  the  public  close  prices.  The 
credit  basis  in  any  town  is  an  invitation 
to  the  large  eastern  chain  store  corp- 
orations to  step  in  with  their  branch. 
This  is  being  done  in  the  east  and  this 
movement  will  work  west,  if  a  cash 
b,asis  is  not  adopted  to  guard  against 
it.  Increased  bu.-iness  aiwiiys  followj; 
reduced  prices,,  and  the  increased  busi- 
ness more  than  overtakes  the  losses," 
Mr.  Clarke  asserted.  He  instanced  many 
cases  of  motor  car  companies  and 
others  who  reduced  their  iprices,  and 
even  in  these  times  are  forced  to  aug- 
ment their  staffs  considerably  to  care 
for  the  increased  business  that  flowed 
to  them. 

Ca.sh  The  Ideal  to  be  Striycn  For 

Jlr.  Phillips  followed  with  the  claim 
that  cash  business  was  tho  ideal  to  be 
striven  for,  and  each  new  business  op- 
erating on  a  cash  basis  contributed  to 
the  education  of  the  public  toward  this 
end.  At  present,  the  speaker  asserted, 
the  farmer  and  the  town  credit  cus- 
tomer hold  the  whip  hand.  Qash  busi- 
ne.ss  gives  the  merchant  the  control  of 
his  own  money.  A  survey  of  the  meet- 
ing at  this  point  revealed  the  fact  that 
the  average  on  the  books  of  the  mer- 
chants present  was  around  $20,000.  The 
convention  of  250  delegates  represent- 
ed therefore,  .$5,000,000  of  the  merchant's 
money  over  which  the  nierch;ants  had 
absolutely  no  immediate  control;  which 
was  not  covered  by  any  negotiable  in- 
strument; the  amount  of  which  indebt- 
edness was  not  acknowledged  in  the 
eyes  of  the  law  without  court  proceed- 
ings 

How  Much  Haye  You  Written  Off 

Mr.  Phillips  further  stated,  "If  you 
ask  a  merchant  who  has  been  in  busi- 


ness up  to  seven  years  how  much  he 
has  to  write  off,  he  will  tell  you  he  has 
not  written  off  anything  yet.  He  is  kidd- 
himself.  Ask  the  dealer  who  has  been 
in  business  twelve  years.  He  will  say 
he  wrote  off  $800  last  yetiv.  That  was 
not  contracted  in  the  last  five  years. 
Most  of  that  eight  hundred  was  what 
he  thought  was  gilt  edge  five  years  be- 
fore. And  so  it  goes.  At  the  fifteenth 
milestone  he  is  probably  writing  off 
$1,200  for  the  preceding  year,  and  it 
increases  as  he  learns  from  year  to 
year  that  there  is  no  hope  of  collecting 
much  that  he  thought  was  good.  He 
has  been  showing  these  book  debts  as 
assets  to  his  tjanker,  and  has  likely 
been  paying  income  ta.\  on  them  for  the 
last  year  or  so. 

The  wholesalers  will  soon  get  to  the 
point  asserted  Mr.  Phillips,  of  dictatin<< 
how  the  merchants  shall  conduct  their 
business,  if  the  merchants  do  not  soe 
the  light  for  themselves  in  the  mean- 
time. When  the  time  comes  that  you 
wish  to  sell  out,  how  much  can  you 
realize  on  all  these  sterling  book  debts. 
My  experience  in  handling  estates,  help- 
ing fellow  merchants,  and  observing  my 
neighbors,  all  point  to  the  figure  of  25 
per  cent.  As  soon  as  you  sever  your 
connection  with  your  trade,  your 
chances  of  collecting  are  1  in  4. 

The  Merchant  Waits 

With  all  the  exemptions  that  the 
farmer  enjoys,  the  dealer  has  a  slim 
chance  protecting  his  accounts  unless 
he  has  notes:  The  grocers  and  dealers 
generally  ,are  financing  many  a  farmer 
while  he  experiments.  Many  a  farmer 
buys  another  quarter  section,  or  at  least 
makes  the  first  payment  on  it  with  your 
money.  And  you  have  to  wait.  If  he  has 
eight  he,ad  of  cattle,  and  you  decide  to 
make  a  .seizure  for  your  account,  plast- 
er the  whole  eight,  or  you  will  find  he 
will  sell  the  four  that  are  his.  and  keep 
the  four  that  you  siezed,  by  exemption 

Follow  Their  Procedure 

Oil  companies  and  implement  manu- 
facturers are  ch,anging  their  policy  and 
procedure  is  a  good  thing  for  the  mer- 
chant to  follow.  It  is  not  basically  sound 
business   to   do    what   a   banker   cannot 

bank      Th"".         '\^'^'  '"  ""^'^^^  ''  the 
tiank.    The    merchant    should    have    the 

use  and  absolute  control  of  his  capital. 

t  shou  d   be   either  in   the   bank   or  on 

the   shelf.    When    it   is  any   other  place 

the   merchant  never  knows   when  or  To 

What  extent  he  can  count  upon  it  at  all. 

We  five  merchants  in  Kindersley  h,ad  a 

little   get-together   meeting   one   day   to 


24 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


A  Cash  Basis  Versus  A 

Credit  Policy  Is  Discussed 

(Contimied   from   Page   23) 

•discuss  various  customers,  the  name  of 
one  man  wa*  mentioned.  He  owed  me 
$400.  Slips  were  dropped  in  a  hat  by 
each  merchant  of  the  indebtedncsss  of 
that  consumer  to  him .  The  total  was 
$2500.  Further  investigation  revealed  to 
the  interesting  fact  that  the  total  in- 
debtedness of  that  farmer,  to  every  one, 
for  lani,  implements  and  store  bills, 
was  $35.0GO.  "Yet,"  said  the  speaker, 
"the  merchants  were  bJissfully  handing 
out  their  capitpl  over  the  counter  to 
this  customer.  And  we  were  doin.^  it 
every  day,  and  yovi  credit  merchants 
are  doing  it  yet.  AikJ  your  customer 
ices  not  worry  at  the  amount  he  owes 
you.  He  does  i'.jc  pay  you  smilingly. 
But  e.'pecls  you  to  be  profuse  in  your 
gratitude  for  getting  your  own  money. 
— when  you  get  it — and  expects  you  to 
hand  out  a  tea  pot,  or  jacknife  for  the 
privilege  of  paying  interest  on  the 
money  that  it  has  cost  you  to  carry  him. 
In  closing  the  case  for  caah,  Mr. 
Clarke  invited  the  next  convention  to 
come  to  the  Manitou  Ljake  Resort  at 
Watrous.  "If  you  do  a  cash  business 
you  will  have  the  funds  to  enable  you 
to  take  i\  litlla  holiday.  If  y®ii  retain 
the  credit  system,  you  wi-ll  require  a 
little  bracer  to  give  you  strangth  for  the 
strenuous  work  of  attempting  to  make 
your  collections,"  was  the  debater's 
Piarting  shot. 


The  Case  For  Credit 

Speaking  in  defence  of  the  credit  busi- 
ness, Mr.  Stockton  of  Carlyle  instanced 
his  own  attempt  to  conduct  a  cash 
business.  After  two  years  he  found  he 
had  reduced  his  turnover  by  h,alf,  did 
not  have  one  customer  that  he  could 
konestly  call  his  own,  and  had  lost  three 
thousatd  dollars  in  cash.  His  effort  had 
been  pretentious  enough.  He  called  his 
best  credit  customers  into  his  confid- 
ence three  months  before  he  made  the 
change.  He  made  an  arr^ngesient  with 
his  railway  payroll  eustomers  whereby 
he  would  carry  the  current  months  ac- 
count until  convenient  to  pay  and 
would  ask  them  to  pay  cash  with  the 
current  cheque  and  then  carry  on,  a 
cash  basis.  Still,  as  Mr.  Stockton  gtjat- 
ei,  "In  a  community  auch  as  ours  there 
is  not  one  customer  who  does  not  at 
one  point  or  other  in  the  year  reqwiro 
credit.  I  found  that  customers  whose 
business  was  worth  $600  la  year  may  do 
$575  for  cash  and  at  some  time  need 
$2S  credit.  Because  your  principle  will 
not  permit  you  to  do  that  $25  credit  ac- 
commodation, you  lose  the  rest. 

CH!*4oiners  Drop  Off 

On  the  opening  day  a  big  celebration 
was  held,  and  a  band  employed.  The 
biggest  crowd  that  Carlyle  ^ver  had  be- 
fore or  after  came  into   town  and  with 


appropi,ate  ceremony.  King  Credit  was 
buried,  and  King  Kash  was  crowned. 
("I  believe  v^e  must  have  buried  King 
CredR  with  his  face  ufp,  because  he  dug 
out"   interjected    the   speaker.) 

For  a  while  everything  hummed  a- 
long.  Gradually,  however,  they  dropped 
off,  one  by  one.  If  taxed  for  a  re,ason, 
they  said  that  they  had  to  have  a  little 
accommodation  one  month,  or  that  they 
did  not  like  to  have  the  hired  men 
carrying  their  cash  to  town  to  make 
their  purchjases,  etc.  But  soon  not  one 
actual  account  regularly  came  to  the 
store. 

Price  Means  Little 

"I  maintain  as  la  cardinal  truth  in 
merchandising,"  said  Mr.  Stockton, 
"thiat  price  means  little  in  the  ultimate 
analysis.  Service  means  everything.  The 
impression  gains  favor  among  your  cus- 
tomers that  you  sell  cheap,  but  (they 
whisper)  he  sells  cheap  goods.  Price 
does  not  combat  mail  order  competition. 
You  are  attempting  to  fight  their  game, 
find  they  have  the  best  of  that.  Service 
is  the  rrinedy.  Where  the  nierchancs 
are  aggressive,  courteous  and  give  ser- 
vice, the  mail  order  house  cannot  g.iin  a 
foothold.  Credit  customers,  with  few  ex- 
ceptions are  loyal.  Cash  customers  are 
indqicndent,   fickle   and  cranky. 

Gasli   Cnstomers  Impatient 

To  do  a  cash  business  you  must  c,arry 
a  larger  stock,  and  greater  variety.  The 
cash  customer  is  impatient  of  any  other 
brand  than  the  one  she  fancies,  and 
will  not  laccept  an  equal  brand  that  you 
have  in  stock.  The  credit  customer  is 
not  so  cranky.  Credit  bAisiness  main- 
tains the  personal  contact  that  makes 
steady  customers.  In  the  old  days  of 
credit  we  had  a  dozen  customers  who 
did  not  know  what  the  inside  of  the 
other  merchant's  stores  W|as  like.  In 
the  days  when  we  were  attemjpting  the 
cash  business  we  did  not  have  one  cus- 
tomer who  did  not  give  a  share  of  his 
business  to  the  other  stores.  Now  we 
have  reverted  to  what  is  commonly  call- 
ed a  credit  business.  A  recent  analysis 
of  our  business  disoiosed  the  following: 
60  per  cent  is  cash  over  the  eounter, 
25  per  cent  is  short  term  credit,  10  to 
30  d|ay?,  15  per  cent  is  credit  business. 
One  of  our  credit  customers  pays  in 
full  and  without  fail. 

Breaking   Faitlj   With    Custom-ers 

There  are  eircumstances  when  I 
would  recommend  a  strictly  cash  busi- 
ness. Those  are  the  times  when  a  doctor 
would  recommend  strychnine  when  a 
radical  ckange  is  necessitated  by  a 
kick  into  a  heart  that  is  about  to  give-uj 
serious  condition.  It  will  put  la  little 
and  probably  tide  over  and  ipermit  of 
recovery." 

In  opening  his  remarks  Mr.  Stoskton 
attempted  to  give  a  definition  of  cash 
business.  It  means  currency  over  the 
counter  ;at  the  time  of  purchase.  Some 
merchants    imagine    that    a    thirty    day 


charge  system  is  cash.  Others  that  the 
clo.-^iHg  of  accounts  by  note:^  i  ■■  cash. 
:\Ir.  Stofekton  disagees  with  the:,2  mer- 
chaHtri'  definition,  and  stressed  the 
point  that  some  merchants  advertised  a 
change  to  cash,  and  merely  used  it  as 
an  excuse  to  drop  undesireable  risks, 
which  he  referred  to  "as  breaking  faitlt 
with  the  cash  customers ." 


Changes   In 

Freight    Ratings 
May  Be  Effective 

The  Manitoba  Board  of  the  Retail  Mer- 
chants' Association  of  Canada,  Inc.,  is 
calRng  attention  of  members  to  the  pro- 
pr.  cd  Canadian  Freight  ("lassitication 
Xo,  17,  which  will  eventually  be  made 
effective.  There  have  been  several  pro- 
po-ed  changes  from  the  old  Classifica- 
tion, No.  16,  now  in  effect.  A  number  of 
the-c  changes  will  bring  higher  ratings 
on  different  commodities  it  they  are  al- 
lowed to  stand  as  proposed.  A  Committee 
ha ;  !;een  appointed  by  the  Association  to 
nir.Vc  recommcndaticns  to  be  presented 
on  t);ha!f  ot  the  Manitoba  Beard  of  The 
Retail  Merchants'  Association  at  a  meet- 
ing oi  the  Classi-fication  Committee  and 
the  Board  of  Railway  Commissicners  of 
Cans  da  which  will  be  held  in  Winnipeg 
in  the  near  future. 

The  Retail  Zilerchants'  Association  i» 
(T.-operating  with  the  Winnipeg  Board  of 
Trade  in  tfatfie  matters,  as  they  believe 
thtir  interests  are  common.  Tlie  Commit- 
tee acting  for  the  Manitoba  Board  con- 
sists of  S.  Kautman,  Manager  of  Traffic 
Division  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Co.,  Chair- 
man, H.  H.  Shields.  Freight  Auditor  with 
The  Retail  Merchants'  Association  at 
Winnipeg,  and  J.  H.  Curie,  Secretary. 

RGccmmendaticns  or  suggestions  from 
?iiy  of  the  members  will  be  given  fuH 
consideration  by  th  committee. 


( AXADIAN    W.   I.   TRADE 

AGREE.IIENT    IS    RATIFIED 

Ottawa.  Ont.,  July  13.— The  Department 
of  Trade  and  Commerce  announces  the- 
receipt  of  a  cablegram  from  the  Govern- 
or of  Barbados,  stating  that  the  Canada- 
West  Indies  trade  agreement  had  been 
ratiiied  and  that  the  new  tariff  became 
effective  as  from  July  1.  Imports  from 
Canada  into  Barbados  are  now  given 
preference  of  at  least  50  per  cent,  over 
imports  fj-om  any  foreigm  country. 

It  is  also  announced  that  a  bill  has 
been  introduced  in  the  Legislature  of 
Antigua,  the  purpose  of  which  is  to  give 
effe-t  to  the  povisions  of  the  Cai|aila- 
West  Indies  agreement  so  far  as  thejj^ 
affect  that  coiony. 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


25 


Get  More  Lines  and  Get  Better  Ones" 

This  merchant  is  advised  to  do  a  Hltle  more  selling,  rather 
than  just  hand  out  goods  for  which  there  alreacW  is  a  demand 
— the  solution  of  his  problem. 


(By  Henry  Johnson,  Jr.) 

r\ear   Sir;—   We   enelose   statement   of 
our  affairs     for     your  criticism.     It 
shows  a  net  gain   of  $840   for  the  year 
ending  May  1st.   This  is  a  country  busi- 
ness, is  a  small  community  of  about  250 
population.   There  are  three  other  small 
stores  so  competition  is  very  keen.  Dur- 
ing the  year  we  saved  $240  discounting 
invoices.  As  our  average  stock  is  about 
$4500    and    our    turnover    $2620    (?j    we 
figure    that    we    turn    our    stock    abo«t 
five  times.  Are  we  right?  stock  consists 
of  flour,  groceries,  dry  goodss,  boot*  and 
and  shoes,  etc.    Inventory   taken   at  re- 
placement   cost,    not    invoice    cost.    For 
fnstance,  fifty  barrels  flour  at  fifty  cents 
less   than    cost,   ten    boxes   soap   j\x   $2.00 
(per   box    less    than    cost,   on   account  of 
.deciine  in   prices;    same  on   other  lines, 
particularly  shoes  and  dry  goods.   Rea- 
son for  smaller  stock  this  year,  we  were 
low  on  flour.     Last  year  at  stoek  taking 
time   we   had   just   received   a   carload. 
Fixtures   which    we   value   at   only   $220 
cover  a  safe,   typewriter,   scales,     show 
cases,   oil   tanks,   etc.    Worth    fully   fifty 
dollars  more.    In  our  bills   received  we 
have  not  included  any  doubtful  accounts. 
While  there  is  an  increase  of  about  $250 
over  last  year  this  is  not  out  of  jjroport- 
ion    *o    the    increase    Ih    sales.    Postage 
stamps  item  of  expense  may  seem  high. 
We  sometimes  maM  circulars  outside  of 
the  place.  Have  a  mailing  list  of  heads 
of     families     within  a  radius  of     about 
fifteen  miles.  We  are  not  using  this  list 
perhag)s  as  often  as  we  should .    Salary 
to    partner    of    $1200:    As    we    also    get 
$350  per  year  for  keeping  the  postoflBce, 
we   consider  this   a  fain  salary — enoMgh 
to  live  on.    I  put  in  all  my  time  in  the 
business,   however,   and   work   hard.   My 
father  (the  other  partner)   puts  in  little 
time.    He   does   a   little    farming.    Have 
our  own   team   which   we   use   on  small 
fkrm.  Our  stand  is  near  railway  station 
so  our  trucking  is  a  small  matter.   Our 
store  is  small  and  requires  a  lot  of  im- 
provement ^v^^ich  we  cannot  afford  yet. 
My   father   started   here    nineteen   years 
ago    with    three    hundred    dollars,    with 
which  he  bought  the  -building,   then  fif- 
teen   by    twenty    feet^we    added    to    it 
since — and    a    small    stock    of   groceries 
I  read  Camadian  Grocer  and  find  it  very 
helpful. 

Yours  very   truly    

STATEMENT 

Assets,  May  1st,  1920  M,ay  1st,  1921 

Store                     $  300.00  $  300.00 

Fixtures                i  225.00  220.00 

Warehouse                 75.00  75.00 

Mdge  Inv*itry     6695.00  3890.00 


Bills  Rec. 
Cash 


2375.00 
665.00 


9735.00 
LIABILITIFJS 

Bills  Pay.  3112.00 


Net  Worth  6623.00 

Deduct  WorLk   1920 


Shows  Increase 

848.00 

EXFE.NSE   ACCOUNT 

Postage  Stamps 

%     74.15 

Interset 

31.30 

Newspaper  Advtsg. 

*          44.80 

Salaries  to  Partners 

1200.00 

Insurance 

58.96 

Coal  and  Ught 

41.00 

Taxes  aiW  Subscriptions 

19.00 

Bags,   Paper,  Twine 

41.00 

Bad  Dc^ts 

52.00 

Collecting  accts. 

8.63 

Stationery  etc. 

77.30 

Trucking 

15.00 

Other  Expenses 

42.00 

1705.00 
Ifcord   Sfom.s   rraotically   ill   lll^U 

It  is  very  difficult  to  offer  construct- 
ive criticism  on  a  business  of  such  a 
character  because  there  appears  to  be 
a  little  space  in  which  to  construe  t. 
Here  is  a  town  of  one  quarter  thousand 
population.  With  four  stores  in  it  I 
can  imagine  that  "competition  is  very 
keen."  It  is  unlikely  tl^at  anyone  can 
get  away  with  anything  much  except 
the  giving  of  solid  value  where  so  many 
are  grasping  for  the  dollars.  I  should 
say  the  pennies,  perhaps.  The  chief  re- 
quirements should  seem  to  be  met,  per- 
haps when  the  manager  keerps  accounts 
which  make  possible  the  rendering  of 
such  a  statement  as  he  has  sent  to  me, 
for  this  shows  that  he  knows  where  he 
iB  goin'g.  V 

And  yet  there  is  more  to  it  than  thrt. 
There  \s  the  fact  that  this  man  writes 
to  me,  asking  for  suggestions  and  he 
does  that  after  he  has  diligently  read 
this  paper  ztnd  another  for  a  long  time 
Hence,  he  is  a  thinker,  and  as  such  has 
possibilities  which  I  do  nrot  waHt  to 
overlook.    So  let  us  analyze  a  bit-. 

The  total  earnings,  net,  for  the  y§ar, 
are  $848— for  theugh  he  says  he  saved 
$304  in  discounts,  that  item  appears  to 
be  absorbed  in  the  848,  for  ho  other 
earnings  appear  in  any  surplus.  He 
says  hrs  "tmrnover"  is  $2,620.  But  that 
cannot  be  right.  Maybe  he  meant  to 
say  $26,000;  yet  I  find  $2,620  is  the  sum 
of  accounts  outstanding,  so   I   think  he 


2620.00  has    simply    slipped    on    this.    He    states 

1591.00  that  his   expenses   of   $1705    equal    '-just 

about  61^   per  cent  on  sales,"  so  I  cap- 

8696.00  italize   that   and   «nd    sales    run    to   just 

short   of  29,000.    On   that  basis,   his   net 

1225.00  P'lrnhigs  is  a  trifle  under  tlM-ee  per  cent. 

_^ That  added  to  the  expense  ratio,  makes 

7471.00  '^'^   ^°*^'   gross   nine   and   one   half  per 

6623.00  cent^— and   that   seems   ricViculously   low. 

Turnover  Ahout  5  1-3 

T  de  not  want  to  be  unmindful  of  the 
fact  that  some  shrinkage  was  taken  in 
the  inventory.  He  shows  two  items 
whereon  thirty  dollars  was  taken,  and 
he  mentions  other  lines  which  run  into 
greater  values.  So  here  we  may  find 
another  $200  or  possibly  $300.  But  even 
that  would  only  yield  a  not  of  between 
three  and  four  per  cent  net. 

Margrins  Too"  :Tarrow— H«t\   Oef  More 

Such  net  earnings  are  not  bad  for  th 
grocery    line    alone,    but    for    a   misceli 
aneeus     stock,     they     certainly  are  nc 
good  enough.   Means  should  be  found  i 
»<Kh    surroundings    whereby,    with    sue. 
Kght    expenses,    not    less    th^in    ten    per 
cent   n«t    should    be    shown— Hnd    I    feel 
it  can  be  done. 

Turn   to   this   paper  of  last  week  and' 
maybe   you    will    find    the    suggestion.    I 
ask  you   to   study   the  deparfmeat   store 
man,  and  emulate  him  in  !*e!liiig  goods. 
But  to  sell   goods,  you   must  think  and 
plan;   and  you  cannot  do  that  if  you  are 
alone  handling  nearly   $:J0,0«0   worth  of 
goods  a  year.   If  I  have  not  missed  any- 
thing, you  are  practically  the  omly  man 
im  the  store,  for  I   find  no  ofcher  wages 
or   salary   charged    ip.      Prebably   your 
fatker  is  too  old  to  do  much.   If  that  be 
so,  he  should  be  retire*  on  a  pemsion— 
not  sT)eaking  flippantly,  now,  understand 
and    you    should    hire    some    assistants 
It  should  be  ea.sy  for  you  to  get  a  gir 
for  full  time  and  another  to  eome  in  o:^ 
Sattfcrdays,    for    little   money.    Then   yon 
•an   do   more   head    work. 

I  think  I  know  what  you  are  doing 
now.  You  are  carrying  lines  for  which 
"there  is  a  demand."  That  means  that 
your  customers  run  to  your  store,  and 
they  run  it  in  "keen  competition"  with 
your  neighbors'  stores.  Thus  ^1  of  you 
are  scratchiag  gravel  and  making  & 
bare   living. 

I  believe  thiat  if  you  give  youBself  a 
little  chance,  you  can  get  ki  some  lines, 
not  carried  by  your  neighbors.  Get  a 
few  numbers  of  things  "just  a  little 
better"  than  theirs.  Go  slow,  but  go 
steadily  in  that  direction.  You  are  in 
(€oHtinue<l  on  Page  27) 


26 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN  CROC  EjR 

MEMBER  OF  THE  ASSOCIATED  BUSINESS  PAPERS 
ESTABLISHED  1886 


The  Only  Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 


Published  Every  Friday  by 

'THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY.  LIMITED 
MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 

-VOL.  XXXV.  COLLINGWOOD,  JULY  15,  1921  No.  28 

THE  EXCHANGE  SITUATION 

ITHERE  has  been  much  criticism  by  merchants,  of 
J-  the  exchange  situationexisting  between  Canada 
and  the  United  States  and  on  many  occasions  this 
has  been  raised  as  a  reason  why  trade  in  U.  S. 
goods  in  Canada  should  be  curtailed.  It  has  even 
i'been  hinted  by  some  merchants  who  become  parti- 
cularly exasperated,  that  the  United  States  is  mak- 
ing a  profit  because  of  the  discount  which  is  made 
on  Canadian  funds  in  that  country.  Similarly,  Can- 
adian trade  with  Europe  is  falling  off,  due  to  the 
depreciation  of  European  funds  in  Canada,  but  no 
one  suggests  that  this  is  an  advantage  to  Canada. 
'These  critics  do  not  realize  that  the  currency  of  one 
country  has  no  legal  status  in  another  country  and 
that  a  Canadian  dollar  is  not  a  legal  dollar  in  the 
United  States,  but  merely  a  promise  to  pay  a  dollar 
in  Canada. 

■  Similarly  a  U-  S.  dollar  in  Canada  is  only  a  pro- 
mise to  pay,  which  must  be  collected  in  the  United 
States.  It  is  at  a  premium  in  Canada  because  our 
^currency  is  depreciated  to  the  extent  of  our  inabil- 
ity to  redeem  our  promises  to  pay  in  specie.  This 
is  no  fault  of  the  United  States,  and  they  are  doing 
their  best  to  correct  it  by  the  purchase  of  Canadian 
vsecurities.  Of  the  total  Canadian  bond  sales  last 
,^ear  more  than  two-thirds  were  sold  in  the  United 
^•States . 

The  premium  on  New  York  funds  with  Canada  is 
^a  destinct  detriment  to  U.  S-  trade  with  Canada, 
and  the  fact  that  a  number  of  hotels  and  shops  in 
that  country  are  advertising  their  willingness  to 
take  Canadian  money  at  par,  is  sufficient  evidence 
of  their  desire  to  retain  it.  even  fore-going  a  con- 
siderable part  of  their  profit  to  do  so.  Much  of 
the  criticism  is  due  to  the  trade  which  exists  for 
certain  classes  of  U.  S.  goods  in  Canada.  True  this 
lielps  to  swell  the  balance  of  trade  against  us.  but 
this  is  another  matter,  due  entirely  to  the  belief 
of  the  public  and  some  distributors  that  they  are 
getting  better  value  in  quality  and  style,  for  their 
money.    Those  who  prefer  to  buy  U.  S.  goods  in 


Canada  must  be  willing  to  buy  at  the  retail  prices 
in  Canada  which  must  allow  for  the  duty  as  well 
as  the  premium  on  U-  S.  funds.  As  long  as  this 
willingness  lasts,  trade  will  continue  along  much 
the  same  lines. 


STRIKE  ACCOUNTS  FOR  DELAY 

THE  continuance  of  the  strike  that  has  been  in 
effect  among  the  printing  trades  in  Toronto  since 
the  beginning  of  June  is  still  responsible  for  the 
fact  that  Canadian  Grocer,  is  reaching  you  some- 
what behind  time-  The  men  struck  for  a  forty-four 
hour  week  instead  of  forty-eight,  and  higher  wages 
as  well.  The  management  asks  your  further  in- 
dulgence in  this  situation.  While  a  few  days  late 
each  week,  we  are  endeavoring  to  give  subscribers 
the  same  service  in  the  way  of  market  reports  and 
reading  matter  as  in  the  past.  Our  editors  are  all 
at  work  and  endeavoring  to  give  the  latest  news 
of  the  trade,  as  well  as  practical  ideas  of  merchand- 
ising. 

We  trust,  that  understanding  the  circumstances 
of  delay,  you  will  bear  with  us  yet  a  while,  and  pro- 
mise that  in  the  near  future  your  copy  will  again 
reach  you  on  time. 


EDITORIALS  IN  BRIEF 

A  grocer  offered  a  line  of  very  low-priced  high- 
.grade  goods  and  put  up  this  saying:  "If  the  price 
was  double,  the  quality  could  not  be  improved." 
That  inspires  confidence  and  makes  buyers  feel  that 
they  are  getting  "more  than  their  money's  worth." 


Because  your',s  is  a  big  store,  don't  think  you  are 
a  greater  man  than  the  chap  running  the  small 
store .  He  may  net  more  money  profit  annually 
than  you  do. 


Do  you  ever  take  a  look  at  the  outside  and  the  in- 
side of  your  store  with  eyes  of  a  customer?  There 
are  many  things  you  see  every  day  and  do  not 
notice  at  all. 


If  you  try  only  half  as  hard  as  you  might  to  make 
good  on  your  job,  you  cannot  expect  to  achieve 
more  than  half  a  success. 


Perhaps  the  reason  you  have  made  good  only  in 
a  small  way  is  because  you  have  never  had  "any 
real  opposition  to  overcome,  nothing  to  make  you 
put  in  your  best  licks. 


July  15,  1921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


27 


CURRENT  NEWS  OF  THE  WEEK 

Canadian  Grocer  Will  Appreciate  Items  of  News  from  Readers  for  This  Page 


^Hllli 


Ontario 

John  Thomas  Ostrom,  of  Banner  and 
■Ostrom,  grocery  merchants  in  .North  Bay, 
passed  a\vay  at  his  home  in  North  Bay 
the  other  day,  following  a  very  brief 
Illness.  The  late  Mr.  Ostrom  had  spent 
practically  all  his  life  in  North  Bay.  He 
was  born  in  Clareton,  Que.,  but  went  to 
North  Bay  with  his  parents  when  very 
young.  Twelve  years  ago  he  went  into 
business  with  Mr.  Banner.  He  was  in  his 
thirty-fifth  year. 

Herbert  Pritchett,  formerly  manager 
of  the  Georgetown  and  Glen  Williams  Co- 
operaiive  Society.  Limited,  appeared  be- 
fore Magistrate  Shields  at  Oakville,  Ont, 
the  other  day  and  was  remanded  until 
July  14th.  He  wa«  summoned  lor  In- 
formation and  explanation  of  certain 
transactions  on  which  charges  had  been 
laid. 

J.  Roberts  has  opened  in  the  grocery 
business  at  1641  St.  Clair  Ave.,  Toronto. 

Sainsbury  Bros.,  Toronto,  have  moved 
their  offices  from  the  Board  of  Trade 
Building  to  3.5  Front  St.  East. 

Dan  Carter,  Richmond  Street,  London, 
Ont.,    has    sold   to    Garfield    McCormick. 

John  Hamilton,  Toronto,  has  sold  to 
•T.   N.   Farr. 


Quebec 

E.  A.  Whyte.  manager  of  the  Snap  Co. 
Ltd.  of  Montreal  is  out  of  the  city,  spend- 
ing a  two  weeks'  holiday  on  a  motor  trip. 

A.  C.  Cavanagh,  store  manager  of 
Goodwin's  grocery  department  wa^  ab- 
sent from  the  store  during  the  first  two 
weeks  in  July  while  he  is  on  his  holidays. 

McVitie  &  Price,  biscuit  manufacturers 
■of  England,  have  opened  an  agency  in 
Montreal  in  charge  of  William  Henry, 
with  offices  in  the  New  Birks  buildng. 
Mr.  Henry  also  carries  the  agency  for 
other  English  firms  in  this  province. 

Mr.  Roberts,  representing  John  T.  Mc- 
Bride  &  Co.,  merchandise  brokers,  Mon- 
treal, is  in  England  on  a  business  trip. 

E.  W.  Wallace,  a'^sistint  sales  man- 
ager of  Aciulia  -jajar  Refineries,  Ltd., 
Montreal,  is  away  from  his  office  for  a 
few   weeks'  vacation. 

West  .'III 

C.  W.  Law,  of  tlie  Swift  Canadian  Co., 
Winnipeg,  has  been  transferred  to  Re- 
gina  as  Manager  of  that  Branch. 

John  E.  Hunter,  of  the  California  As- 
sociated Raisin  Co.,  was  a  visitor  to 
Winnipeg  last  week,  and  renewed  ac- 
quaintance with  his  firms'  western  re- 
presentative. The  Donald  H.  Bain  Co. 

W.  B.  Carter,  Crystal  City,  Man.,  has 
opened  a  new  grocery  store,  also  carry- 
ing ice  cream. 


ilirAlVV    FAKIK    Sr((  EEDS 
I\   GETTING  AWAY 
WITH   SlXTY-EKiHT   DOLLARS 

Kitchener,  July. — A.  cheque  artist  suc- 
ceeded in  getting  away  from  here  the 
other  day  with  $G8  in  money  and  goods 
secured  from  two  King  street  merchants, 
after  being  refused  accomodation  in  the 
way  of  getting  cash  for  cheques  from  a 
number  of  other  merchants  along  the 
street. 

'The  stranger  used  the  cheque  forms  of 
the  Union  Bank.  At  the  bottom  there  was 
a  rubber  stamping  with  the  words.  Pro- 
vincial Government  Highways  per  T.  B. 
Black,  and  besides  this  the  wods,  written 
in  ink.  Superintendent  R.  H.  Soger.  The 
cheques  were  payable  to  "Gorge  Alder- 
son"  which  was  "the  name"  of  the  bear- 
er who  wrote  this  name  across  the  back 
in  the  usual  manner.  This  signature, 
whfle  not  exactly  like  the  signature 
"Supt.  R.  H.  Soger,"  seemed  fictitious 
and  had  some  traces  of  resemblance  to 
it.  Each  cheque  was  for  $34.  The  scheme 
apparently  was  to  have  it  appear  that 
these  were  wage  cheques  issued  by  the 
provincial  department  of  highways  which 
is  constructing  roads  in  this  district. 


(TT  I\  I.  S.  APPLE  CROP  IS 

.MARKED,   SAYS   REPORT 

Reduction  in  the  apple  crop  is  marked, 
according  to  the  T'.  S.  report  of  June  1st. 
This  production  is  estimated  at  107,698, 
000  bushels  and  the  condition  of  41.8  per 
cent.  The  production  last  year  was  240,- 
422,000  bushels  of  the  ten-year  average 
condition  on  June  ],  69.2  per  cent.  Maine 
has  a  98  per  cent,  normal  crop.  New  York 
48,  Pensylvania  24,  Ohio  3.3,  Indiana  2.5 
and  of  the  Far  Western  States  Washing- 
ton has  93  per  cent.,  Oregon  90,  Idaho  85 
and   California   58. 

Of  the  normally  heavy  apple  producing 
states  east  of  the  Mississippi  River  Vir- 
ginia has  a  condition  of  7  per  cent..  West 
Virginia  9,  Maryland  16,  Tennessee  17, 
Kentucky  18  and  other  states  report  the 
crop    killed    almost    entirely    by    freezes. 


"GET  MORE  LINES  AiVl)  GET  BETTER 
ONES." 

(Continued    from    Page   25) 

good  shape  to  begin  that  right  now  be- 
cause you  have  more  cash  on  hand,  and 
less  stock,  than  a  year  ago.  So  you  are 
free  to  start  now  on  the  new  basis. 
Suppose  you  try  three  or  four  numbers 
of  better  neckties  than  you  have  had. 
But  only  two  or  three  of  each — go  slow! 
clean  out  one  of  your  windows  and  de- 
corate  it   with   a   sutable    background — 


lis 


the  tie  salesman  can  give  you  some 
ideas.  Then  in  that  window — in  the 
center— dartp  ONE  TIE.  Put  it  there, 
alone,  in  ,a  clean  window,  without  a 
price.  Do  not  display  it  inside  at  all. 
Then  tackle  the  first  likely  looking 
young  man  who  comes  in.  Say  to  him: 
"Say,  Henry,  I  have  something  pretty 
nice  I  want  to  show  j'ou."  Take  him 
over  and  select  one  tie  from  the  lot — 
keeping  stock  under  the  counter— and 
fold  it  attractively  for  display  as  you 
bring  it  out.  Let  him  admire  it.  If  he 
asks  "How  much"  as  he  probably  will, 
dodge  the  question.  Keep  pointing  out 
its  beauties  and  cut,  and  style,  showing 
him  how  it  looks  from  every  angle, 
until  he  just  must  have  it!  Then  tell 
him  as  a  sort  of  after  thought  the  price 
and  make  as  if  it  were  too  fine  for  him, 
and  as  if  you  are  going  to  put  it  away. 

Try  The  Angler's  Art 

Do  not  attempt  to  thrust  it  on  him — 
"pretty  fine,  but  too  expensive  for  you, 
probably,  Henry" — and  never  mind  if  he 
does  not  bite.  Go  about  your  business 
and  wait  for  another  nibble.  Be  very 
choice  about  those  few  ties.  Get  them 
thinking  nothing  about  price  at  all,  but 
about  your  fine  ties — "something  diff- 
erent from  anybody  else  has."  Go  to 
plenty  of  trouble  and  never  permit 
yourself  to  think  whether  all  the  work 
is  going  to  pay.  For  now  you  are  not 
merely  selling  those  ties  —  you  are 
elevating  your  business  to  a  more  pro- 
fitable level,  and  it  cannot  be  done  in  a 
day! 

In  similar  ways,  pick  out  fine  looking 
shoes,  and  put  one  pair  in  the  window. 
Keep  things  clean  CLEAN  and  snappy 
looking.  Alw,ays  have  something  to 
show  every  customer  who  comes  In. 
Just  as  soon  as  the  usual  order  is  dis- 
posed of,  say:  "now  I  want  to  show  you 
something  new — and  pretty  nice!"  If 
you  keep  smiling  and  keep  this  up  for  a 
few  months— MONTHS,  I  said,  note- 
results  will  begin  to  come.  People  will 
look  to  you  for  something  out  of  the 
ordinary.  Then  you  will  get  out  of  the 
class  of  price-competition,  you  will  be 
on  a  basis  of  taste,  selection,  orgininal- 
ity,  style.  It  matters  not  how  small 
the  community.  These  things  can  be 
done  in  some  measure  everywhere.  You 
can  never  know  the  measure  until  you 
get  into  this  work,  nor  need  you  think 
the  limits  are  set,  for  they  are  not.  Try 
this  plan  of  SPELLING,  and  I  believe 
your  next  statement  will  show  bigger 
profits. 


28 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,   1921 


Head    of    Large    Grocery    House 

Celebrates  50  Years  in  Winnipeg 

Alexander  MacDonald,  wholesale  grocer  in 
Winnipeg  buikls  up  a  big  business  from  a 
small  beginning — annual  lurnover  is  now 
around  twenty  millions. 


liriXNIPEG.  July.—  Alexander  Mac- 
'^'  Donakl,  wholesale  grocer  of  thif? 
city,  the  other  day,  celebrated  the  fif- 
tieth annirers.ary  of  his  arrival  in  Win- 
nipeg. Mr  MacDonald's  first  engagement 
in  Fort  Garry  as  Winnipeg  was  then 
called,  was  in  a  general  store  conduct- 
ed by  Palmer  Clark,  where  he  rem,ain- 
ed  for  a  period  of  three  years,  leaving 
to  enter  the  employment  of  Higgins  & 
Young,  pioneer  merchants.  It  was  when 
this  last  mentioned  firm  went  out  of 
business  that  he  ventured  into  trading 
on  his  own  account.  His  first  WArehouse 
■was  located  on  Market  Street  east.  Im- 
porting articles  and  other  fruits  '.and 
products  from  eastern  points  for  local 
consumption,  his  dealings  extended  by 
le,aps  and  bounds.  Ultimately  he  devised 
and  organized  a  wholesale  business,  al- 
though his  available  capital  was  but 
little  more  than  $30,000. 

Without  Travellers 

Mr.  M.acDonald's  ideals  were  ambit- 
ious a»  they  were  novel.  The  fact  was 
that  he  had  calculated  on  the  possibility 
new  to  the  west,  or  perha<ps  to  ajiy 
other  country  at  that  time,  of  transact- 
ing a  wholesale  grocery  business  with- 
out the  aid  of  travellers  or  solicitors  of 
any  kind. 

"The  plan  ultimately  worked  well," 
Mr.  MacDonald  commented  recently. 
"The  principles  on  which  we  worked 
■were  the  right  ones.  'Cash  or  30  days — 
one  price  only,  and  that  the  lowest  that 
the  goods  could  be  sold  for  on  these 
terms.'  Notwithstanding  the  fact  that 
for  the  first  five  years  there  was  no  pro- 
fit, no  interest  on  capital  invested  and 
th,at  the  salaries  paid  ranged  from  $45 
to  $75  i.per  month,  although  we  worked 
from  7  a.m.  to  11p.m. — our  rent  being 
$25  per  month — we  felt  confident  that 
the  system  on  which  we  were  working 
■would  proTe  a  success  eventually.  And 
our  confidence  was  well  rewarded.  Our 
expansion  was  rapid  because  the  prin- 
ciple we  had  adopted  was  the  right  one. 
At  the  end  of  21  years  we  had  Avorked 
vfp  a  business  of  over  $9,000,000  and  we 
hiad  a  paid  up  capital  of  $1,600,000, 
which  we  sold  at  a  premium  of  50  per 
cent.,  or  equal  to  $2,400,000. 

The  Business  To-day 

"Our  present  business  was  started  a- 
bc|ut  eight  years  ago  by  my  old  m^anager 
to  whom  I  gave  financial  aseistance. 
The  business  has  prospered  in  equal 
fiToportions,   and    such    an    extent   I   be- 


lieve, that  to-day  it  is  the  largest  of 
its  kind  in  the  Dominion.  We  have  12 
wholesale  wai-ehouses  and  three  fact- 
ories; our  turnover  to-day  is  about 
$20,000,000  per  annum,  and  it  is  still 
growing  by  leaps  and  bounds. 

His  Other  Activities 

Mr.  M;acDonald  in  addition  to  being 
head  of  the  greatest  wholesale  grocery 
organization  in  Canada,  occupies  other 
important  offices.  He  has  been  presid- 
ent of  the  Great  Western  Life  Assur- 
ance company  since  th^t  corporation 
was  established  in  1894:  he  is  also  dir- 
ector of  the  Northern  Mortgage  company 
and  he  was  associated  in  the  establish- 
ment of  the  Canadian  Fire  Insurance 
company.  In  1910  he  was  elected  (presi- 
dent of  the  Canada  Free  Leaguf.  His 
public  offices  have  included  those  of 
alderman;  he  was  chairman  of  the  fin- 
ance committee  1887-88  and  was  elected 
to  the  mayoralty  in  1892. 

Although  76  years  olil,  Mr.  MacDonald 
is  still  young  and  hearty  in  spirit,  and 
the  active  head  of  his  business. 


Will  Look  After  * 

The  Marketing 

Of   B.  C.    Fruits 

Vernon,  B.C.,  July.— The  British  Col- 
umbia Traffic  and  Credit  association  has 
recently  been  organized  to  look  after  the 
marketing  of  B.C.  fruits  and  vegetables. 
Represented  in  the  association  are  the 
British  Columbia  Berry  Growers'  associ- 
ation, Hatzic,  the  B.C.  Growers'  Ltd., 
Kolowna,  the  Co-operative  Farmers'  of 
B.G.  Ltd.,  Vernon;  the  Co-operative 
Fruitgrowers'  Association  of  Wynndel, 
Creston  Fruit  Growers'  Union  Limited, 
Creston,  Duggan  and  Davies  Ltd.,  Kel- 
owna,  Keremees  Packing  Co.,  Ltd.,  Kere- 
mees.  The  Kootenay  Fruit  Growers'  Uu- 
ioTi,  Limited,  Nelson,  McDonald  &  Co., 
ArmstroHg,  Wm.  McNair,  Armstrong, 
Mutual  Fruit  Co.,  Ltd.,  Vernen,  Oecident- 
al  Fruit  Co.,  Ltrt.,  Kelowna,  Okanagan 
United  Growers,  Lmited,  Vernon,  Salm- 
on Arm  Farmers'  Exchange,  Salmon  Arm, 
B.C.,  the  Vernon  Growers'  Limited, 
Vernon,  The  Wallaehin  Apple  Growers' 
Association,  Wallaehin,  and  Willow  Point 
Emit  Growers'  Association,  Willow  Point. 

The  president  of  the  association  is  E. 
Doberer,  the  vice-president  B.  C.  Skin- 
ner, and  the  secretary-manager  is  R.  M. 
Winslow.  The  headquarters  are  in  VerM- 
on,   B.C.    The   arrangements  aud   detaite 


of  the  marketing  problems  of  all  these 
concerns  are  being  directed  by  thin  As- 
sociation. The  first  steps  towa.ds  the 
lormatifflu  of  this  association  were  taken 
at  the  annual  conventions  last  winter  of 
the  B.  C.  Growers'  association  and  the 
Western  Canada  Fruit  Jobbers'  Associ- 
atieu. 


Elliott's     Grocery 

In   Vancouver 

Has   Been   Sold 

After  11  years  in  business,  W.  Elliott, 
at  3283  Main  Street,  Vancouver,  has  sold 
the  business  known  as  "Elliott's  Grocery" 
to  G.  W.  Bell  of  Revelstoke,  B.C.  This 
business  has  been  commented  upon  in 
Canadian  Grocer,  and  recently  a  picture 
of  the  store  was  shown.  Mr.  Bell  has 
purchased  a  bright,  clean  and  attractfve 
store.  He  has  been  in  the  grocery  busi- 
ness in  Revelstoke  for  23  years.  Old  tim- 
ers there  will  remember  him  first  with 
Bourne  Brothers,  later  in  partnership, 
with  Mr.  Hobson,  and  for  the  last  eleven 
years  as  G.  W.  Bell  Ltd.  Mr.  Elliott  is 
going  to  holiday  for  a  while. 


Cuba  Now  Lifts 

The  Embargo   On 

Southern   Rices 

A  despatch  from  New  Orleans  states 
that  Cuba  ha,s  lifted  the  embargo  on  rice, 
and  that  the  large  stocks  of  rice  may  now 
find  a  legitimate  outlet  in  Cuba.  About 
a  year  ago,  the  Cuban  Government  pro- 
hibited further  importations  of  rice  in 
order  to  protect  Cuban  rice  merchants, 
who  were  faced  with  great  losses  from 
over  supply  and  falling  prices.  Now  that 
stocks  in  Cuba  are  cleared  up  and  the 
embargo  lifted,  a  brisk  trade  is  likely 
to   develop. 

On  top  of  this  report  comes  the  em- 
bargo placed  by  the  British  Government 
on  shipments  of  rice  from  Burma.  This 
is  the  result  of  the  limited  supply  of 
rangoon  rice  in  India  and  it  is  feared 
that  the  native  population  would  suffer 
privation  if  further  rice  exports  were  al- 
Ipwed. 

The  closing  of  rangoon  rice  from  this- 
country  and  the  opening  up  of  another 
market  for  Southern  rice  has  already 
had  the  effect  of  greatly  stimulating  the- 
market  in  the  South,  with  buyers  assur 
ing  themselves  of  stocks  in  anticipation 
of  advance's. 


TEXAS  PEAC«  CROP  GOOD 

The    Texas    pejich    crop    is    generally- 
good,    according      to   the      United    States 
Bureau  of  Markets.  About  1,200  cars  will 
be   shipped   from   Jacksonville   and   Sul 
phur   Springs   districts. 


July   1§,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


lllllini; 


29 


WEEKLY  GROCERY  MARKET  REPORTS 


Statements  from  Buying  Centres 


^fH 


QUEBEC    MARKETS 

ATONTREAL,  July  13.—  The  grocery  market  is  fairly  quiet  this 
'  -^week,  principally  on  account  of  the  summer  season  and  the 
very  warm  weather.  Buying  is  limited  to  supplies  for  immediate 
requirements  and  speculation  is  not  entering  into  market  condit- 
ions. The  trade  however  is  steady  and  good  business  is  passing. 
The  American  sugar  refineries  have  slightly  advanced  their  prices, 
which  goes  to  stabilize  this  market.  Canned  tomatoes,  peas  and 
corn  are  in  big  demand  with  an  advance  of  five  cents  per  dozen . 
There  is  a  feeling  that  the  new  .supplies  will  not  be  large  and  the 
drain  on  local  stocks  is  being  felt-  In  the  tea  market  the  only  change 
is  a  slightly  easier  feeling  in  Japan  teas  which  are  expected  to  go  a 
little  lower.  Coffee  remains  firm  in  yrrice.  The  improved  condition  of 
the  rice  market  continues  but  no  change  in  wholesale  prices  arc 
made.  The  cereal  market  is  quiet  and  package  goods  are  unchang- 
ed- The  most  striking  features  of  the  market  is  the  big  advance  in 
the  price  of  lemons.  Oranges,  imported  peaches  and  plums  are 
lower.  Montreal  melons  are  on  the  market  but  prices  are  un- 
steady. New  potatoes  are  higher  with  doubtful  prospects  for  the 
crop.     Cucumbers    and    cabbage  from  local  gardens  are  lower. 


Dried  Fruits  Steady 


C'Orn  and  Peas  Higher 


M(mtreal. 

CAXXED  GOODS. — Canned  tomatoes 
iw  further  strength  with  another  ad- 
c-e  of  .')  f  :nts  per  do-'on,  2Vj'r  are  now 
>ted  at  .fl.'i'O  per  dozen  with  a  short- 

.  on  the  market.  Canned  corn  and 
s  also  advanced  5  cents  per  dozen 
h  the  expectancy  of  a  shortas^e  in 
.V  of  the  adverse  weather  conditions 
the  crop  of  new  peas.  There  is  a  big 

■iiaiid  for  these  three  canned  lines, 
ined  fruit  is  steady  in  price  with  no 
lUgHS   of   note. 

CANNED  VEGETABLES 

Asparagus      (Amer.)      mam- 
moth  green  tips    

AflparaguH,  Imported  (2i^s)    .... 

Beans,  golden  wax   2  10 

Do.,  Refugee    2  10 

Corn,   2s    1  50 

Carrots  <sliced),  2s    1  45 

Corn   (on  cob),  gallons   ....  7  00 
'  Spinach,   3s    2  85 

Squash,  2%-lb.,  doz 

Succotash,  2  lb.,  doz 

Do.,    Can.     (2s)     

Do.,  California.  2s    3  15 

Do.   (wine  gals.)    8  00 

Sauerkraut,  2V^  lb.  tins 

[  Tomatoes,  Is 


Do.,    2s    

'       Do.,    2V2S    1  65 

!       Do.,  gallons   5  70 

,  Pumpkins.  2i^s   (doz.)    1  50 

Do.,  gallons  (doz.)   

'  Peas,    Standard    1  80 

Do.,  early  June    

Do.,  extra  fine,  2s   

■'->.,  Sweet  Wrinkle 

Do .   2-lb.   tins    

Pens.  ^'<~^-■   Pack — 
'       Standard.   2-lb 

Choice,  2-lb 

Early  June,  choice 

Do.,   standard    

Fine  French,  2-lb 


4 

40 

6 

00 

2 

15 

2 

15 

1 

60 

1 

75 

1 

50 

29  "0 

1 

50 

1 

80 

1 

80 

0 

.-)0 

10 

oa 

1 

m 

1 

65 

1 

40 

1 

70 

5 

75 

1 

55 

4 

00 

1 

90 

2 

00 

3 

00 

1 

57 1^ 

2 

75 

1 

821/2 

1 

87% 

2 

05 

2 

00 

2 

80 

CANNED  FRUITS 

Apricots,  2\^  lb.  tins 

Apples,   21/28,  doz 1  40 

Do.,  3s,  doz 1  60 

Do.,    gallons,    doz 4  76 

Currants,  black,  2s,  doz.   . .   4  00 

Do.,  gals.,  doz 

Split  Peas,  per  bag 

Cherries,    red,    pitted,   heavy 
syrup,  doz.,  1-lb.    . .  ■  - 

Do.,  2V2   lb 

Do.,   2-lb 

Do.,  white,  pitted    ','  50 

Gooseberries,  2s,  heavy  syra^ 

doz 

Peaches,  heavy  syrup — 

2-lb 

2y2-lb 5  00 

1-lb 

Pears,  Is 

Do.,   2-lb 

Greengage  Plums,  hy.  syrup  2  63 
Lombard        Plums,        heavy 

syrup,    2-lb 

Do.,   light    syrup    

Pineapples   (grated  and  slic- 
ed), 2'/2    lb 

Do.,    2-lb 

Do.,   1-lb 

Red  Raspberries 4  25 

Strawberries    4  00 

Now  Pack  Strawberries — 

Standard  No.   2,  per  doz 

Choice    grade    

Fancy  Preserved    

Rhubarb,   preserved    

Do.,    gallon    

Canadian  Pineapple  (sliced)  .... 
New  Blueberries,  2  lbs 

Do.,  1   gal 


4 

75 

1 

65 

1 

70 

5 

00 

4 

05 

16 

00 

5  00 

Q. 

10 

5 

00 

4 

00 

4 

l:^ 

2 

75 

3 

90 

5 

25 

2 

90 

3 

20 

4 

10 

2 

75 

2 

25 

2 

00 

4 

20 

3 

20 

2 

00 

4 

35 

4 

10 

4 

GO 

4 

70 

5 

50 

2 

80 

5 

75 

4 

80 

2 

25 

12  00 


Coffee    Market    Firm 


Montreal. 

COFFEE. — The  coffee  market  remains 
steady  and  firm  with  a  good  demand  and 
shows  more  stable  conditions  than  a 
number  of  other  line.?  in  the  grocery 
trade.  ^ 


.MrtHtreal. 

DRIED  FRUITS.— There  is  no  change 
;n  the  dried  fruit  market.  Business  is 
reported    good    as    far    as    movement    in 

wholesale    circles    is    concernsd.  Raistns 

are  the  strongest  feature  of  the  market 
and  ire  short  in  supply.  Other  lines  are 
steady  with  prospects  of  a  firm  and 
-^!t;uly    ii-.arket    ahead. 

Apricots,  fancy   0  3-3 

Do.,  choice   0  27 

Do.,  slabs   0  22 

Apples  (evaporated)    0  12%  0  15 

Peiiehes  (fancy)    0  23 

Do.,  ehoice,  lb 0  25 

Pears  (choice)   0  22 

Do.,  fancy  0  27  0  28 

Peels- 
Choice     0  26 

Ex.  fancy   0  30 

Lemon,  new  pac4c 0  46  0  47 

New  Pack — 

Orange    0  48  0  49 

CitroH 0  76 

Choice,  bulk,  25-lb.  boxes, 

lb 0  22    . 

Peels  (c«t  mixed),  doz 3  25 

Raisins  (seeded)  — 

Valencias    0  23 

Muscatels,  2  Crown 0  22% 

Do.,  3  Crown 0  23 

Do.,  4  Crown 0  23% 

Turkish  Sultana,  5  Crown  0  27  0  30 

Fancy  seeded  (bulk)    ....  0  26  0  28 

Do.,  16-oz 0  25  0  27 

Cal.    Seedless    cartons,    12 

oz 0  21  0  23 

Do.,  16  ouHces 0  27% 

Cal.  Seedless,  in  bulk  . .  0  18»4  0  19% 

Cluster,  20  1-lb.  pack 6  75 

Currants,   loose    0  15 

Fard.  12-lb.  boxes   3  25 

Packages  only  0  19  0  20 

Dromedary    (36-10   oz.)    0  19 

Loose   0  11  0  14 

Figs    (layer),     10-lb.    boxes, 

2s,  lb 0  32  0  36 

Do.,  214s,  lb 0  40 

Do.,  2%s,  lb 0  43 

Do.,  2%,  lb 0  45 

Figs,  white  70  4-oz.  boxes)  ....  5  40 
Do.,  Spanish  (cooking),  22- 

Ib.  boxes  each   0  11 

Do.,     Turkish,     3     crown, 

lb 0  22 

Do.,  5  crown.lb 0  28 

Do.,  7  crown,  lb 0  30 

Do.,    10-lb.    box    2  75 

Do.,  mats    3  00 

Do.,  22-lb.  box 1  90 

Do.  (12  10-oz.  boxes) 2  20 

Prunes    (25-lb.   boxes) — 

20-30S 0  25 

30-40S 0  19 

40-50S    0  17 

50-60S   0  13% 

60-70S   0  12% 

70— 80s    0  11% 

80— 90s    0  10% 

90— 100s    0  09% 


30 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


Package   Goods  Unchang:ed 


.  Montreal. 

PACKAGE        GOODS.— There  is      no 

change    in    the    package    goods  market. 

Prices  are  rteady  with  a  fair  demand 
which  is  mo.^tIy  to  cover  immediate  re- 
quirements. 

Breakfast  food,  case  18 3  50 

Cocoanut,  2oz.  pkgs.,  doz.  ......  0  78% 

Do.,  20-lb.  cartons,  lb 0  36 

Corn  Flakes,  3  doz.  case  3  40     3  55     3  75 

Cornmeal,  yellow,  24s    3  00 

Do..  36s    4  16 

Oat   Flakes,   20s    4  80 

Rolled  oats,  20s 5  00 

Do.,  18s    2  00 

Oatmeal,  fine  cut,  20  pkgs 6  75 

Puffed  Rice    5  70 

Puffed   Wheat    4  40 

Farina,  case,  24s 3  25 

Hominy,    pearl    or    gran.,    2 

doz 3  00 

Health  Bran  (20  pkg.),  case  ....  2  85 

Pancake  Flour,  case 3  60 

Do,,  self-ri,-,ing,   doz 1  50 

Wheat  Food,  IS-li-^s 3  25 

Wheat  Flakes,  case  of  2  doz 2  95 

Porridge  Wheat,  36s,  case 6  40 

Do.,   20s,  case    6  50 

Self-rising  Flour  (3-lb.  pkg.), 

doz 2  75 

Do.  (6-lb.  pack.),  doz 5  40 

Do.,   Buckwheat  flour,   per 

doz 1  50 

Corn  Starch    (preparde)    0  lO^^ 

Potato    Flour    0  121/^ 

Starch    (laundry)    0  08^4 

Flour,    Tapioca    0  15     0  16 

Shredded  Krumbles,  36s 4  35 

Shredded  Wheat   4  95 

Cooked  Bran,   12s    2  25 

Euamel  Laundry  Starch,     40 

pkgs.    case    

Celluloid    Stares,      45    pkgs., 

case     4  20 

Package  Cornmeal  3  00 

Malt  B'kfast  Food  (36  pkgs.) 9  50 

Quaker   2-Minute   Oat  Food    1  80 

Puffed  Rice  Pancake  Flour   ....  2  90 

Egg  Noddles,  case  24 2  25 

Macaroni    2  25 

Quaker  Quakies    3  40 

Rice   Market   Steady 


Montreal. 

RICE.--There  is  little  chance  in  the 
rice  market,  conditions  remaining  about 
the  same,  maintainiiig  the  sti-ength  that 
it  has  gained  during  the  pa'^'t  two  months. 
Tapioca  like  rice  shows  more  strength 
and  a  more  active  market  is  expected  as 
soon  ;is  buying  starts  for  the  fall. 

RICE— 

Carolina,  extra  fancy 0  07 

Do.    (fancy)    0  06 

Honduras,  fancy 0  05 

Rangoon  CC,  pre  cwt 3  90 

Do.,  B,  per  cwt 4  15 

Texas  rice 0  04 1/& 

Siam   0  06 

Tapioca,  per  lb.  (seed)   0  08  0  091/2 

Do.    (pearl)    0  08  0091/2 

Do.    (flake)    0  08  0  09i^ 

Honduras    0  07 

Siam   0  141/2 

KOTE — The  rice  market  is  subject  to 
frequent  change  and  the  price  basis 
is  quite  nominal. 


No  Change  In  Cereals 

CEREALS. — There  is  no  change  in  the 
rrir-es  cji  otcd  on  cereals.  The  market  i-; 
quiet  during  the  summer  season  and  buy- 
ing  is   light. 

Oatmeal,  gran.,  fine  standard   ....  3  60 

Rolled  Oats,  90   lbs 3  15 

Pearl   Hominy   3  25 

Cornmeal,    Gold    Dust    Brand    3  25 

Graham  Flour,  98  lbs 7  65 

New  Buckwheat  Flour 6  75 

Pot    Barley    4  25 

Pearl   Barley    5  25 

Beans,  Ont 3  50 

Do.,  Can 3  30 

Lima  Beans   0  10 

Green   Peas,  dried    0  17 

Ground  Oil  Cake,  per  bag 3  00 

Lemons  Quoted  Higher 


FRUIT. — The  most  notable  feature  of 
the  fruit  market  is  the  big  jump  in  the 
price  of  lemons.  Lemons  have  been  ad- 
vancing in  price  during  the  last  few 
weeks  with  a  shorlagp  of  supplies  until 
now  the  price  stands  at  .$14.00  per  crato. 
There  is  no  hope  for  a  dro))  for  at  least 
the  next  month  or  six  weeks  when  sup- 
plies may  be  replenished.  Other  fruits 
are  on  the  downward  trend.  Oranges  are 
lower  in  price,  principally  on  account  of 
their  quality.  Imported  peaches  and 
plums  are  lower  and  watermelons  are 
down  to  90  cents  Montreal  melons  are 
now  on  the  market  at  varying  prices. 
FRUIT- 
APPLES— 

Boxes,    175s,    216s    4  50 

Bananas  (as  to  grade),  bunch  7  00     8  00 
Grapefruit,  Jamaican,  64,  80,  96 5  75 

Do.,    Porto    Rico    5  00 

Lemons.    3o0-r!(;0s    14  00 

Cal.   Val.  Oranges,  200-250 5  75 

Do..   150-176    5  25 

Do.,  Blood  Oranges,  Yz  boxes  ....     375 

Tangerines    4  25 

Pineapples,  24s,  30s,  36s,  crate S  00 

Watermelons,    each    9  00 

California    Cherries,   per   box    ....     5  50 

Georgia    Peaches,   crate    5  00 

California    Peaches     3  00 

California  plums 3  50 

Cantaloupes    6  00 

California  Plums 3  00 

Good  Demand  For  Nuts 


NUTS. — There  is  very  little  change  in 
the  nut  market.  Walnuts  and  almonds 
are  strong  in  price  following  the  advance 
quoted  last  week.  The  peanut  market  is 
also  very  firm  with  Virginias  advanced 
slightly.  There  is  an  active  nut  market 
with  good  buying  on  all   sides. 

Almonds,  Tarragona,  per  lb.  0  20  0  24 

Do.,    shelled     0  54 

Valencia    Shelled    Almonds    ....  0  44 

Chestnuts    (Italian)     0  18 

Cocoanut    (shredded,    bulk)    0  33  0  36 

Filberts  (Sicily),  per  lb.  ...  0  17  0  18 

Brazil  nuts    (new)    0  15 

Do.,  Barcelona 0  15i/^ 

Peanuts,   Jumbcj    0  18 

Do.,  shelled.  No.  1  Spanish  0  18  0  20 

Do.,  Java,  No.  1   0  11% 

Do.,   salted,   red    0  21  0  23 

Do.,  shelled,  No.-Virginia  0  161/2  0  18 
Peanuts   (salted)  — 

Fancy,  wholes,  per  lb 0  38 

Fancy  splits,  per  lb 0  35 


Pecans,  new  Jumbo,  per  lb 0  75 

Do.,  large,  No.  2,  polished  0  29  0  30 

Pecans,   shelled    1  00  1  50 

Walnuts,  Grenoble,  in  shell 0  29 

Marbot  Walnuts    0  24  0  28 

Do.,    new    Naples    0  26 

Do.,  shelled,  Manchurian    ....  0  68 

Do.,  Bordeaux   0  63  0  68 

Do.,  Chilean,  bags,  per  lb 0  40 

Do.,  Spanish,  shelled 0  60 

NOTE — Jobbers  sometimes  make  an  add- 
ed charge  to  above  price.'"  for  broken 
lots. 

Japan  Teas  Weak 

TEAS. — The  tea  market  remains  prac- 
tically unchanged.  Conditions  in  prim- 
ary markets  show  an  improvement  for 
Cevlous  and  Indias,  but  Japan  teas  have 
v.'eaker  tendencies  on  account  of  the  big 
supplies  held  in  the  hands  of  the  growers. 
It  is  expected  that  lower  prices  will  be 
quoted  on  Japan  teas.  There  is  only  a 
lair  demand  for  teas  and  l)uying  is  con- 
fined to  quantities  for  immediate  re- 
(luirements. 

Ceylon  and  Indians — 

Pekoes    0  22  0  26 

Broken    Pekoes    0  32  0  40 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  ....  0  48  0  5S 
Javas — 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes   .  . . .   0  4S  0  55 

Broken  Pekoes    0  35  0  40 

China — 

Common    0  24  0  35 

Medium     0  42  0  48 

Choice  0  50  0  BO- 
JAPAN  TEAS  (new  crop)    0  77 

Above  retail  prices  range  of  quotations 
to  the  retail  trade. 
JAPAN  TEAS    (new  crop)  — 

Choice   (to  medium)    0  55  0  60 

Early  picking    0  60  0  75 

Finest  grades    0  75  0  90 

Javas — 

Pekoes  0  35  0  49 

Orange  Pekoes 0  37  0  45 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  0  37  0  45 

Inferior  grades  of  broken  teas  may  be 
had  from  jobbers  on  request  at  favorable 
prices. 

White  Pepper  Higher 


Montreal. 

SPICES. — The  spice  market  is  quiet  at 
this  fc;cason,  but  an  improvement  is  ex- 
pected in  August.  The  buying  for  the 
lall  trade  commences  in  that  month  and 
reports  from  primury  market  show  firm- 
er tendencies  for  white  pepper.  Black 
pepper  is  in  better  supply  and  prices  are 
fairly  easy.  Other  spices  remain  steady 
with   a  fair  movement   of  stock. 

Allspice   0  18     0  20 

Cassia   (pure)    0  27     0  30 

Cocoanut,  pails,  20   lbs.   un- 
sweetened, lb 0  46- 

Do.,  sweetened,  lb 0  36. 

Chicory   (Canadian),  lb 0  14 

Cinammon — 

Rolls    0  35 

Pure,    ground    0  35 

Cloves    (ground)     0     40     0  45 

Cream     of     tartar      (French 

pure)    0  65     0  7(i 

Do.    American  high  test   ...   U  75     0  SO' 

Ginger    (Jamaica)    0  30 

Ginger  (Cochin)   0  27 

Mace,   pure,   1-lb.   tins    0  60     0  6.> 

Mixed  spice    0  30     0  32 

Do.,    'ZYs    shaker   tins,   doz 1  IS 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


31 


Molasses  Steady 

iMOLASSES.— There  is  no  change  in 
Ihe  molasses  market.  Buyir?;  is  light 
h"th  on  account  of  the  lisht  demand  and 
oil  acco'int  of  the  weather  conditions, 
which  makes  the  handling  difficult. 
Prices  on  molasses,  like  the  sugar  mark- 
et,   have    a    firmer    tendency      following 

es    quoted    on    the    primary    market. 

1  synipp  remain  steady  in  price  with 
a     air  demand. 

CORN  SYRUP— 

Barrels,  about  700  lbs 2  06'^ 

Half     barrels,     about   350 

Ihs 0  06% 

Quarter  barrels,  about  175 

lbs 0  ''1714 

2  gals.,  25-lb.   palls  each    2  25 

".  gal.,  381,^  lb.  pails,  each 3  25 

•".   gal.,   65-lb.   pails,  each    ....  5  20 

2-lb.  tins,  per  case 4  00 

•"-lb.  tins,  per  case   5  30 

10-lb.  tins,  per  case 5  00 

Price  for 
Barbadoes  Molasses —      IsUl.  of  Montreal 

Puncheons     0  CI 

Barrels    0  64 

Half    barrels     0  66 

I'uncheons,  outside  city 0  58 

Fancy  Molasses   (in  tins) — ■ 

IG-oz.   tins,     2   d03.     case, 

per  doz 2  40 

2-lb.  tins,  2   doz.    in  ca.se, 

case    4  40     7  25 

3-lb.   tins,   2   doz.   in   case, 

case    5  75  10  75 

5-lb.   tins,   1   doz.   in   case, 

case S  95 

10-lb.  tins,  1/2  doz.  in  case, 

case    8  60 

Improved  Sugar  Market 


SUGAR.— There  is  no  change  in  th« 
price  of  granulated  su!;ar.  American  re- 
finers have  raised  their  price  10  cents 
per  100  with  the  result  that  it  gives  a 
firmer  tendency  to  the  Canadian  market 
A  higner  price  is  not  expnctcd  on  this 
market,  bui  indications  are  that  quota- 
lions  will  remain  steady  and  with  this 
an  improved  buying  on  the  part  jf  the 
retailers  und  the  public. 

Granulated  Sugar,  per  cwt S  75 

Do.,    barrels    S  80 

Granulated  gunnies,  20/5 9  15 

Do.,    gunnies,    lOa-iO     9  25 

Do.,    cases,    20/5-lb.    cartons    D  35 

Do.,  cases,  50/2  lb.  cartons   ....  9  50 

Yellow,  light,  per  cwt S  35 

Do.,  medium,  per  cwt S  40 

Do.,  dark,   per  cwt S  15 

Potatoes  Are  Higher 


VEGETABLES.— The  feature  of  the 
Vegetable  market  is  the  ariival  of  local 
vegetables  on  the  market  in  supplies  suf- 
ficiently large  to  make  a  noticeable 
change  in  the  prices.  Montreal  cabbage 
and  cucumbers  arc  now  selling  at  $1.75 
per  dozen,  which  although  lower  in  price 
on  the  imported  goods  is  still  high.  Yel- 
low onions  are  slightly  higher  in  price, 
quoted  at  .$2.50  per  hamper  of  50 
pounds.  New  potatoes  have  gone  up 
in   price  in  account  of  the  demand  that 


there  has  been  for  them  and  the  fact 
that  the  indications  for  the  crop  are 
not  as  promising  as  they  have  been. 
Missis.?ippi  flats  are  advanced  to  $2.73 
per  crate  of  six  boxes. 

New   cabbage    5  50 

Montreal  cabbage,  per  dozen  ....  1  75 
Celery,  Florida,  per  crate  ....  4  00     4  75 

Do.,   California    1 1  OC 

Carrots,  per.  bag 0  75     1  00 

Montreal  cucumbers,  per  doz 1  75 

Garlic,  lb 0  50 

Horseradish,  lb .  .     0  60 

Leeks,  doz 4  00 

Lettuce    

Parsley    

Mint    0  6U 


:\Iushroonis,  lb 1  00 

Oyster  plant,  per  doz 1  50 

P;>rsnips,   bag    1  00 

Peppers,  green,  doz 0  50 

Potatoes,   Mtrl.      (90-lb.   bag)    0  90  lOO 

Xew   potit03s.   bbls.,    190    lbs.   t"  T".  5  75 

Do.,   sweet,   hamper    5  50 

New    potatoes,    per    bbl 6  50 

New  potatoes,  per  bbl 5  00  7  00 

Spinach,  box  

Spanish  Onions,  per  case  ....  5  00  5  50 

Turnips,  per  bag 0  75  1  00 

Red   Onions,   cwt 3  00 

Texas  Onions,  per  crate 3  50 

Yellow  Onions,  hamper  50  lbs 2  50r 

New  Tomatoes,  per  crate 5  GO' 

Mi- sissipi.i  flats,  per  box 2  75- 


ONTARIO    MARKETS 


TORONTO,  July  13.—  There  is 
far    as     manufacturers'     list 
pears  to  be  a  great  deal  of  price 
wholesale   trade-     The   principal 
offered  at  50  to  60  cents  below  re 
pears  to  be  as  far  from  stabilizat 
also  featured  in  the  price  cutting 
the  price  on  certain  lines  as  much 
are  higher  with  a  stronger  feeling 
market.  Heavy  shipments  of  fruits 
prices  generally   tending   easier, 
quotations- 

Canned  Peas  Higher 

CANNED  FRUITS.— A  strong  feeling 
prevails  in  the  market  for  canned  veg- 
etabler;.  Opening  prices  have  not  been 
named  as  yet  on  the  new  pack  but  wiih 
the  old  pack  fairly  cleaned  up  and  the 
short  pack  this  season,  prices  are  ex- 
pected lo  be  as  high  or  even  higher  tlian 
those  prevailing  at  the  present  time. 
Standard  peas  have  advanced  to  .'F1.90 
per  dozen  in  some  quarters  while  others 
still  continue  to  quote  nt  the  old  figure. 
New  pack  lobster  is  offered  at  $3.45  to 
$3.75  for  halves  and  $2.40  for  quarters, 
.lam  manufacturers  have  not  named  a 
price  on  the  nc-w  pack  of  strawberry  jam. 
The  pack  this  year  is  not  above  a  25 
per  cent,  one,  £.nd  as  stocks  of  this  line 
is  practically  cleaned  up  Ihere  is  likely 
to  be  a  scarcity  before  the  end  of  the 
year.  It  is  expected  that  the  opening 
prices  will  range  around  80  to  90  cent-; 
for  fours,  although  there  is  some  new 
pack  strawberry  ofrerpd  at  pre.-ent  in 
some  quarters  at  70  cents. 

Salmon — 

Sockeye,  Is.  doz 5  20  5  60 

Do.,  i/^s,  doz 2  65  3  00 

Cohoe,  Is,  doz 2  90 

Do.,  i^s,  doz 1  90 

Pinks,  Is  doz 1  45 

Lobster.s,  i/.-lb.,  doz 3  45  3  60 

Do.,  14-lb.  ti  •'•.  1  95  2  40 

Whale  Steak,  Is,  flat,  doz.  1  75  1  90 
Pilchards,   1-lb.   tails,  doz.  1  80 

Canned  Vegetables — 

Tomatoes,  2yos,  doz 1  65 

Peas,  standard,  doz 1  65  1  90 

Do.,  Early  June 2  15 

Beets,    2s    doz 1  45  2  45 

Beans,  golden  wax,  doz 2  20 

Asparagus  tips,  doz 5  50 

Do.,  butts,  doz 6  60 

Canadian   corn    1  50 

Pumpkins,  21/2 s,  doz 1  45  1  50 


little  change  to  the  market  in  so 
prices  are  concerned.     Thei'e  ap- 

cutting  -however,  among  the 
one  being  sugar  which  is  being 
fmers'  list,  and  the  situation  ap- 
ion  as  ever.    Package  cereals  are 

campaign,  some  houses  cutting 
as  50  cents  per  case.  Canned  peas 

to  the  whole  of  the  canned  goods 

and  vegetables  are  arriving  with 
Lemons  are  quite  scarce  at  higher 


Spinach,  2s,  doz 1  60 

Pineapples,  sliced,  2s,  doz.  4  00  4  90 

Do.,  shredded,  2s,  doz.  . .  4  75  5  25 

Rhubarb,  p'served,  2s,  doz,  2  07%  2  10 

Do.,  preserved,  2V^s,  doz.  2  65  4  5214, 

Do.,  standard,  10s,  doz 5  00 

Apples,  gal.,  doz 4  75  5  00. 

Pears,  2s,  doz 3  00  4  25- 

Peaches,  2s,  doz 3  50 

Plums,   Lombard,    2s,    doz.    3  10  3  25 

Do.,   Green  Gage    3  25  3  40 

Cherries,  pitted,  H.S 4  25 

Blueberries,  2s   2  35  2  45 

Strawberries,  2s,  H.S 4  .'0  5  00 

Raspberries,    2s 4  50  5  OO- 

Jams — 

Apricots,  4s,  each 0  90 

Blk.  Currants,  16  oz.,  doz.  . .  4  60' 

Do,  4s,  each  0  94 

Gooseberry,  4s,  each  0  89 

Do.,  16  oz.,  doz 4  10 

Peach,  4s,  each  3  75 

Do..  16  oz.,  doz 0  83 

Red  Currants,  16  oz.,  doz.  . .  4  40 

Do.,  4s,  each  0  94 

Raspberries,    16   oz.,   doz.    ...  4  60 

Do.,    4s.    each    0  94. 

StraAvberries,   16    oz.,   doz.    . .  4  6(?j 

Cereals  Hold  Firm 


Toronto. 

CEREALS.— The  cereal  muxliet  |s 
firmly  held  although  we  hear  of  some- 
irregularity  in  prices  in  rolled  oats. 
Millers  are  generally  holding  firmly  to* 
.■^3.30  per  bag  in  single  bag  lots,  but  some.- 
wholesalers  are  offering  at  ?3.15. 

Rolled  o,ats,  90s   3  J  5       3  30> 

ilolled  wheat,  100  lb.  bbls 7  OO- 

F.o.b.  Toronto. 

Barley,    pearl,   98s    5  56' 

Barley,   pot,   98s    4  75- 

Barley  Flour,  9.is    6  25 


32 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


Buckwheat   Flour,    98s    6  09 

Conimeal.  GoldeH,  98s 2  75 

•atraal,   98s    4  50 

Corn    Flour,    983    3  75 

Rye  Flours.  98s 6  00 

Rolled  oat-s,  90s 3  20  3  30 

Rolled  wheat,  100  lb.  bbls 6  75 

Cracked  Wheat,  bag 5  06 

Breakfast  Food,  No.   1    6  00 

Do.,   No.    S    6  00 

Rice  Flour,  10«  lbs 10  00 

Linseed  meal,  98s 6  50 

Flax.'ieed,  SSs   7  OA 

Peas,   s^lit,    9§s    5  75 

Marrowfat   .grean    peas    ....    0  05*^   0  06 

Graham    flour,   98s    4  75 

Whole  Vvlieat  Flour 4  85 

Wheat  Kernels,   8s G  "; 

Farina,  98s  ^  35 

Dried  Fruits  Quiet 


Raisins — 

California,  bleached,  lb.    

Seedless,  If.-QZ.  packets  . . . 
Seeded,  15-oz.  packets  ... 
Cm.  Muscatels,  No.  1,  25s  ... 
Turkish   Sultanas,   pkgs.    ... 

Thompsons,   Seedless , 

Valencia    


0  21 V2 

0  29 

0  281/^ 

0  26 

0  27 

0  281/2 

0  23 


Toronto. 

DRIED  FRUITS.— Prices  on  this  sea- 
son's candied  peels  have  been  named  bv 
the  Canadian  manufactiTrers  as  follows. 
Citron  caps  in  12  pound  boxes  50  c-ents 
per  pound.  Lemon  caps  in  12  pound 
boxes  34  cents  per  pound.  Orange  caps 
in  12  pound  boxes  85  cents  per  pcund 
Mixed  in  12  pound  boxes  40  cents  per 
pound.  Drained  peel  mixed,  cut  ready 
for  use,  in  No.  Is  cartons,  3  dozen  in 
case  per  dozen  :?4.60.  These  prices  are 
lower  than  last  year,  Avhen  citron  Avas 
?ellin£:  at  72  cents  and  lemon  and  orawee 
at  12  cents.  The  market  for  other  dried 
fruits  is  quiet  with  no  change  in  quota- 
tions. 

Candied  Peels — 

Citron  cai^s.  12  lb.  boxes,  lb 0  50 

Lemon  caps.  12  lb.  box.,  lb 0  34 

Orange  caps,  12  lb.  box.,  lb 0  35 

Mixsd,  containing  4i^  lb. 
Lemon,    iVz    lb.   Orange,   3 

lb.  Citron,  Caps,  per  lb 0  40 

Drained  Peel,  Mixed,  cut 
ready  for  use  in  No.  I's 
cartons,  S  dozen  pe-r  case, 
per    dozen    4  (50 

Currants — 

G:'eek,  Filiatras,  cases 0  17 

Do.,  Amalias    0  17 

Do.,  Patms   0  17 

Do.,  Vostizza   0  23^^ 

Dates — 

Excelsior,  pkgs.,  3  doz.  in 

case    5  50 

Dromedary,  3  doz.  to  case 7  00 

Fard,  per  box  ap.  12  lbs 3  25 

Hallowee  dates,   per   lb Oil 

Figs— 

Sniy.'-na  layers,  4  Crn.,  lb.  0  30  0  32 

Do.,  layers,  6  crn.,  lb.  0  36  0  38 

Natural   pulled,  in  bags    0  10% 

Prunes — 

30-40S,    258   f,   20 

40-50S,  25s    0  16 

50-60s,  25s    0  13 

60-70S,   2os    «  10 

70-80)5,  35s 0  091/2 

80-90S,   25s    0  09 

90-lOOs,  25s 0  08 

Peaches — 

Standard,  25-lb.  box,  pld.  0  26i^  0  28 

Choice,  25-lb.  box,  peeled  0  27  0  30 

Fancy,  25-lb.  boxes   0  19  0  30 

Apricots — 

Fancy    0  46 

Choice    0  42  * 

Standard   0  34 


Evaporated  apples  0  14      0  15 

Nuts  Continue  Strong 


ToroHto. 

NITTS. — The  market  continues  with  a 
stiong  tone  with  quotations  unchanged, 
but  the  scarcity  is  gradually  increasing 
on   BorcTeaux  walnut;:. 

Almonds,  Tarragonas,  lb 0  23  0  23 

Walnuts,  Bordeaux,  lb 

Walnuts,    Grenobles,    lb 0  23  0  24 

Do.,  Marbot    0  22  0  23 

Do.,    California    0  39  0  40 

Filberts,  lb 0  15  0  16 

Pecans,    lb 0  28  0  30 

Cocoanuts,   Jamaica,    sack 7  50 

Cocoanut,  unsweetened,  lb 0  30 

Do.,  swestened,  lb 0  3S 

Do.,   shr&d 0  25 

eanutii,    Spasish,    lb 0  21  0  25 

iJrazil  nuts,  large,   lb 0  20  0  22 

Mixed  nuts,  large,  lb 0  32  0  34 

Mixed  nuts,  bags  50  lbs 0  3^ 

Shelled- 
Almonds,  lb 0  42  0  47 

Filberts,  lb 0  35 

Walnuts,  Bordeaux,  lb 0  73  0  75 

Do.,    Manchurian     0  60  0  65 

Do.,    broken    0  47  0  55 

Peanuts,    Spanish,    lb 0  10 

Brazil   nuts,   lb 0  75 

Pecans,  lb 140 

Packaije  Cereals  Cut 

PACKAGE  GOODS.— There  are  no 
piice  changes  insofar  as  manufacturers 
are  concerned,  but  wholesalers  continue 
to  cut  prices  considerably.  Shredded 
wheat  is  offered  in  some  quarters  at 
$4.^0  per  case.  Corn  flakes  range  in 
price  from  $3.25  to  $3.55.  Quaker  Oats 
Co.  have  dressed  their  Scotch  Health 
Bran  in  a  new  label,  a  little  larger  pack- 
age and  have  advanced  the  price  to 
S3.50  per  case  of  20  packages. 

PACKAGE    GOODS 

Rolled   Oats,    20s,  rd.,   case    5  00 

Do.,  20s,  square,  case 5  00 

Do.,  18s,  case    2  00 

Do.,  Aluminum  Prem.,  20s  ....  6  40 

Corn  Flakes,  36s,  case   ....    3  35  3  75 
Porridge  Wheat,  36s,  regular 

case 6  00 

Do.,  20s,  family,  case 6  80 

Cooker  Pkg.    Peas,   36s,   cs    2  85 

Cornstarch,  No.  1,  lb.  crtns 0  10% 

Do.,  No.  2,  lb.  cartons 0  09l^ 

L^indry  Starch    0  OSi/g 

t>o.,  in  1  lb.  cartons 0  08% 

Do.,  in   6-lb.   wood  boxes    «  OSyg 

Do.,  in  6-lb.  tin  canisters    ....  0  12% 

Celluloid   Starch,   case 4  15 

Potato   Flour,    case    20    1-lb. 

pkgs 2  59 

Do.,   case   24   12-oz.   pkgs 2  30 

Fine   oatmeal,   20s    5  75 

Cornmeal,  24s   3  00 

Farina,    24s    3  25 

Barley,  24s 2  75 

Wheat  Flakes,  24s   5  00 

Wheat   kernels,   24s    4  50 

Self-rising  p'cake  flour,  24s 3  00 

Buckwheat  flour,  24s 3  50 


Two-minute   Oat  Food,   24s    ....     1 

Puffed  Wheat,   case    4 

Puffed   Rice,   case    5 

Health   Pran,  case    

F.S.  HomiHv,  gran.,  case 3 

Do.,  pearl,  oase    3 

Scotch  Pearl  Barley,  case 2 

Self-risin.g  Pancake  Floar,  30 

to  case    4 

Do.,   Buckwheat  Flour,   SO 

to   ease    4 

Self-rising  Pancake  Flour,  36 

to   case    7 

Do.,   Buckwheat   Flour,   18 

to  case 3 

Do.,  Pancake  Flour,  18  to 

case 3 

Puffed  Rice  Pancake  Flour, 

24s    2 

Rices  Look  Firmer 


80 
40 

79 

3  59 
00 
0« 
7,0 

20 

20 

15 

65 

es 

90 


Toronto. 

RICES— There  is  no  c:hange  in  ty»e 
h-cal  'ituatioTi  but  with  the  British  Gov- 
trninciit  placing  an  embargo  on  ship- 
ments of  rice  from  Bvirma  on  account  of 
I  he  aliortage  of  Rangoon  rice  in  that 
(ountiy  and  the  fact  that  the  Cuban 
Goveriiment  has  lifted  the  embargo  on 
hnjiortation  of  rice  into  that  country  will 
in  doubt  have  the  effect  of  advancing 
I'lict^s   on    Southern   rices. 

Honduras,  broken,  per  lb.  0  07%  0  08 

Blue   Rose,  lb 0  0G%  0  07 

Siam,  per  lb 0  06       0  06% 

Japans,  per  lb 0  07       0  07% 

Do.,    bro«en    0  05 

Chinese,  XX    

Do,,   Simiu    «  11       0  12 

Do.,  Mujin,  No.  1    0  10       0  11 

Do.,    Pakling    0  09       0  19 

Rangoon    0  07       0  07% 

White  Sago   0  07       0  07% 

Tapioca,  per  lb 0  07%  0  08 

Syrups  Unchanged 

Toronto. 

SYRUPS.— There  is  a  moderate  con- 
siunptive  demand,  but  as  no  one  is  buy- 
in?-;  for  future  the  market  is  quiet,  but 
ruling  fairly  firm.  Mola-3ses  continues 
under  a  hand-to-mouth  demand. 

Corn   Syrups — 

Bbls.,  about  700  lbs.,  y'low 0  06% 

Half  barrels,  i^c  over  bbls.; 

14   bbls.,  %c  over  bbls. 
Cases,  2-lb.   tins,   white,   2 

doz.  in  case   4  60 

Cases,   5-lb.   tins,   white,   1 

doz.  in  case   5  90 

Cases,  10-lb.  tins,  white,  % 

doz.  in  case  5  60 

Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  yellow,  2 

doz.  in  case   ,    ....     4  oo 

Cases,  5-lb.   tins,  yellow  1 

doz.  in  case   5  30 

Cases,   10-lb.    tins,   yellow, 

doz.  in  case 5  00 

C  ne  Syrups — 

Barrels  &  half  barrels,  lb 

%   barrels,   14,0  over  bbls.; 

1/4  bbls.,  %c  over. 
Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  in 

case 6  00     6  50 

Molasses — 

Fey.,  Barbadoes,  bbls.,  gal 1  65 

Choice  Barbadoes,  barrels  ....     1  35 

New   Orleans,   bbls.,   gal.    0  46     0  56 

Do.,   half  blls.,   gal.    . .    0  46     0  48 


J«ly  15,  192] 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


8S 


Tins,  2-lb.,   table  grade, 

case  2  doz.,  Barbadoes  ....  7  75 
Tins,  3-lb.,   table  grade, 

case  2  doz.,  Barbadoes  ....  10  75 
Tins,  5-lb.,  1  doz.  to  case, 

Barbadoes  8  95 

Tins,  10-lb.,  y^  doz.  to  case, 

Barbadoes S  GO 

Tins,  Xo.  2,  baking  grade, 

case  2  doz 4  20 

Tins,  No.  ;'>,  baking  grade, 

case  of  2  dog 5  50 

Tins,   No.  5,  baking  grade, 

case  of  1   doz 4  60 

Tins.  No.  10,  baking  grade, 

case  of  Wi   doz 4  25 

West  Indies,  iy2S,  48s   ..   4  60     6  95 

Spices  Are  Steady 

SPICES. — There    are    no      chpnses      in 
quotations,  the  market  i.^  quiet  to  steady. 


Lemons  Very  Scace 


Toronto. 

Allspice  0  19  0  22 

Cassia    0  26 

Cinnamon    0  41 

Cloves     0  55  0  60 

Cayenne 0  85  0  37 

Ginger,  Cochtn    0  30- 

Do.,  Jamaica 0  45 

Mustard,  pure   0  50- 

Pastry     0  28 

Pickling  spices S  19 

Mace   0  55  0  65- 

Peppers,  black   0  19  0  20' 

Do.,    white    0  29  0  30- 

Paprika,  lb 0  60  0  70' 

Chillies,   lb 0  OO' 

Nutmegs,  selects,  whole,  100s   ....  0  35 

D».,  80s    0  45- 

Do.,  ground    0  35 

Mustard  seed,  whole 0  25- 

Celery  seed,  whole 0  40 

Coriander   seed    0  18 

Carraway  seed,  whole 0  30 

Tumeric    0  SO' 

Curry  Powder  0  35 

Cream  of  Tartar — 

Frenck,    pure    0  40- 

American,  higli-test,  bulk 0  40 

2-oz.  packages,  doz 1  25 

4-oz.   packages,   doz 2  00 

8-oz.   packages,   doz.    . ._ 3  59 

The  above  quotations  are  for  the  best 
quality.  Cheaper  grades  oan  be  purchas;ed 
for  less. 

SMsar  Prices  Cut 


SUGAR — The  lopal  market  ai^peart  to 
be  as  far  from  stabilization  as  erei'.  The 
majority  of  wholesalers  are  not  hoicHng 
to  refiners"  list  and  p.riees  are  being  cut 
con.sidrably.  The  general  quotation  is 
$8.50  per  hunrirccl  aliious^h  refiners  are 
firmly  nuiintainins,  tiieir  prite  of  ?9.69. 
To  wh:U  cause  this  is  attributed  eaMno* 
be  determined  as  there  does  not  appear 
1,0  be  any  gre?.fe  <;tGcks  on  hand  among 
the  tr-ufc  tl'.fit  should  be  cleaned  up  in 
anticJTiation  of  a  further  decline. 

St.  Lawrence,  extra  gran.,  cwt.    .  .      9  69 

Atlantic,   extra    granulated    9  09 

Acadia  Sugar  Refinery,  extra  gran.  9  09 
Dom.  Sugar  Refinery,  extra  gran.  9  09 
Canada   Sugar    Refinery,    gran.    .  .      9  09 

Differentials:  Granulated,  advance 
over  basis;  50-lb.  sacks,  25c;  barrels,  5c; 
gunnies,  5/20s,  40g;  gunnies,  10/lOs,  50c; 
cartons,   20/os,   60c;    cartons,  50/2s.   75c. 

Differentials  on  yellow  sugars:  Under 
basis.  No.  1  40c;   No.  2  SOc;   No.    3  60g. 


Toronto. 

FRtr'IT. — Deliveries  of  Iruit  were  rath 
er  light  the  first  of  the  week  on  acc-ount 
of  tne  stcrm  through  ihe  Niagara  belt, 
which  kept  many  cf  the  pickers  from 
workins.  Heavier  shipments,  however, 
arc  oromised  for  the  balance  oi  the 
week.  Raspberric'-.  sold  at  32  cents  for 
the  bf.st  quality  although  some  sold  at 
28  cent'^.  Canadian  peaches  are  starting 
to  arrive  at  75  to  $1.00  per  small  basket. 
Canadian  nrples  are  offered  Jt  Sl.OO  per 
11  qn;irt  basket.  There  is  no  change  in 
oraneiis,  but  lomor.s  are  q',;ite  scarce 
and  have  advai'sed  t»  .?15.00  per  box. 
Oranges,  Valercies,  100s; 5  50 

126s 6  00 

Do.,   200s.   216s,  .25«5    6  25     C   75 

Grapefruit,  Cubans 6  00 

Bananas,  Port  Limons 0  09*4 

Lemons,  Cal 

Do..    Verdillis    15  00 

Wfttermc.lons,    each    1  9^     \   'i^ 

Peachts.  6  baskets  to  cratf    ....     5  50 
\\Tn^]ou))es,    Standarl.    4?is    ....      7  00 

Dc.   Flat,   15s    3  50 

C;^     Plums,    per    box    3  OiO 

Cal.   Pears,   per  box    9  00 

Gooseberries,    lis.   per   bkt 1   25 

Do..  6s,  per  bkt 0  65 

Chtrrio*.    sweet,    6s    1  50  1   75 

Do.,    Sour.    6s    0  65 

Do.,    Sc-ur.    lis    1    2»    • 

Ceylon  Teas  Strong: 


.    Pekoes    0  32  0  60 

Broken  Pekoes 0  50  0  64 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  ....  0  58  0  66 
Javas — 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes 9  45  6  65. 

Broken    Pekoes    0  45  0  50 

Japans   and   Chinas — 

Early  pickings.  Japans  ....  0  90  1  CO 

Do.,  seconds  0  55  0  55 

Hyson,  thirds    0  45  0  50 

Do.,  pts 0  58  0  67 

Do.,  sifted  0  67  0  7a 

Above  prices  give  range  of  quotations 
to  the  retail  trade. 

Prepared  Icing  Lower 


Toronto, 

MISCELLANEOUS.— Cowan's  prepared 
icings  are  reduced  ^o  %\Au  per  dozen. 
Seafoam  soap  chips  are  down  to  $4.50 
per  case.  Shirriffs  jelly  powder  is  re- 
duced to  $1  25  per  dozen.  Goblin  soap  is 
down  to  ^2.05  per  box  and  Lilac  Rose 
to   .$3.50. 

Vegetables  Tend  Lower 


TEAS.— There  is  nothing  new  derel- 
<.p(l  in  the  tea  situation.  The  nwjrket 
coHtiniies  strong  at  the  advanced  prices 
in    primary   markets. 

C'eylons  and  Indian* — 

Pekoe   Souchongs    0  35     0  SO 


WINNIPEG 

WLXNIPEG.  July  13.—  Reports 

ing  that  it  is  having  the  effect 
Merchants  generally  report  busin 
ned  goods  are  rrwving  steadily 
showing  a  firmer  tone.  Wholesal 
ers'  list.  Dried  fruits  are  quiet, 
fees  and  nuts.  The  demand  for 
showing  a  big  improrement  with 
higher. 

Canned  Vegetables  Steady 


VE:GETABLES.— Heavy  slu'pments  of 
local  vegeta!dc;-  are  arriving;  daily  and 
prices  generally  are  tending  lower. 
Cauliiiowers  are  offered  at  .'P2.00  to  $3.00 
per  dozen.  New  potatoes  are  slightly 
lirmer  at  $6.08  per  barrel  for  No.  1. 

Cabbage     4  sq. 

Potatoes,  per  bag  y  70  0  80. 

Head   Lettuce,  crate    l  50  2  OOi 

Toniatoos.    4-bkt.   crates    2  35 

Do..    Hothouse,    lb 0  35. 

New    Beets,   per  dozen    0  40 

.New  carrots,   per  doz 0  40 

Green    Peas,  11  qt.   basket    . .    0  75  0  80 

Wa«  A:  green  beans,  11  qt.  bkt 0  'iO. 

Cucumbers,  hfmper    .5  oo 

New    Potatoes,    bbl \\  6  00; 

MARKETS 

of  crop  conditions  are  so  promis- 

of  increasing  business  materially. 

ess  taking  on  a  better  t®ne.  Can- 

with     tomatoes,     pees     and  corn 

er.s  are  selling  sugar  belo\T  refin- 

There  is  no  change  in  teas,  cof- 

fresh     fruits     and     vegetables  is 

little  change-  Lemons  are  quoted 


IfMinipe^. 

CAN.NED  GOODS.— There  has  been 
fceavy  sales  of  all  canned  vegetable*. 
The  Eastern  market  is  showing  firmer 
tendencies  and  higher  prices  are  likely 
to  prcTail. 

Shrimps,  Is,  4  doe.  case,  doz.  2  70     2  7i 
Finnan  Haddie.  Is,  4  doz.  case  9  35  12  00 

Do.,  1/28,  8  doz.  ease,  ease  10  50  13  00 
Herring   (Can.),     Is,     4  doz. 

case,  case   7  00     8  00 

Do.,  imp.,  V2S,  100  doz.  cs  30  09  32  00 
Lobsters,  ^As,  8  doz.  case,  doz 2  45 

Do.,  V^s,  4  doz.  case,  doz ''4  30 

Oysters,  Is,  4  oz.,  4  doz.  cs.,  cs  .  . . .     9  40 
Pilchards,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  cs,  cs  . 

Do.,  i/^s,  flat,  8  doz.  cs.,  cs   . 
Salmon — 

Sockeye,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  case  . 
Do.,  Vi^  flat,  8  doz.  in  case  . 

R.  Spring,  Is,  tall.  4  doz.  cs.  . 


7  10 
9  00 


21  00 

22  00 
16  75 


Do.,   1^8  flat,  8  doz.  case   

Cohoe,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  case   

Pink,   Is,   tall,   4   doz.   ease    

Do.,   %s  flat,  8  doz.  case   

CANNED  FRUIT  (Canadi^) 
Apples,  6  tins  in  case,  per  case  2  90 

Blueberries,    2.:.    2    doz.    case    

Cherries,  Is,  4  doz.  cas«   7  00 

Chei-ries,  Is,  4  do«.  case   7  00 

Pears,  2s,  2  doa.  case   7  50 

Pears,  2s,  2  doz.  case    7  75 

Plums,  Greengage,  2s,  2  doz.  cs  6  50 
Do.,  Lombard,  light  syrup, 

2s,  2  doz.  case 4  75 

Do.,  heavy  syrup,  2s,  2  doz. 

ca«e     6  eo 

Raspberries,   2s,    2   doz.    case   8  50 

Strawberries,   2f5,   2   doz.   case  -8  00 

CANNED  FRUIT  (American) 

Apricots,  Is,  4  doz.  case 

Peaches,  2i^s,  2  doz.  case 

Do.,  sliced.  Is,  4  doz.  case 

Do.,  kalved.  Is,  4  doz.  ca'se    .... 


IS 

25. 

14 

65 

6 

50 

S 

25 

3 

10 

6 

65 

S 

00 

8 

00 

8 

00 

8 

00 

7 

00 

5 

25. 

r> 

.50> 

9>00 

8 

50) 

11 

0()» 

12 

Oft 

12 

40 

12 

40. 

34 


Coffee  Market  Firm 


COFFEE. — The  condition  of  the  coffee 
market  continues  strong,  and  althougii 
spot  prices  are  unchanged  at  present,  a 
"higher  level  of  values  can  be  expected. 
There  has  been  very  little  movement  of 
late,  but  locally  the  demand  is  showing 
an  improvement. 

COFFEE— 

Rio.    lb 0  191/2  0  20% 

Mexican,   lb 0  45  0  49 

Jamaica,  lb.    .' 0  28  0  30 

Bogotas,    lb 0  4. '5  0  48 

Mocha    (types)    0  49  0  51 

Santos,  Bourbon,  lb. 0  28  0  30 

Santos,  lb 0  27  0  29 

Cereals  Are  Firmer 


Winnipeer. 

CEREALS.— The  market  generally  has 
firmer  tendencies  which  is  noticeable  on 
wheat  and  oats.  Quotations  on  bulk  rolled 
oats  are  S2.80  per  80  pound  bag.  There  is 
a  steady  demand  for  the  lighter  break- 
fast foods,  and  quotations  remain  un- 
changed. 

PACKAGE  CEREALS 
Rolled  oats,  20s,  rd.  cartons  4  73       5  00 

Do.,  36s,  cs,  square,  bkts 3  50 

Do.,    ISs,   case    2  10 

Corn  Flakes,  36s,  case  ....  3  50       3  80 
Cornnieal.  2  doz.  case,  case  ....       3  40 

Puffed  Wheat,  3  doz.  cs.,  cs 4  45 

Puffed  Rice,  3  doz.  cs,  case  ....       5  75 
Grape  Xuts,  2  doz.  cs.,  case  ....       3  80 

Package  Peas,  3  doz.  cs.,  cs 3  00 

Cream  of  Wh.,  3  doz.  cs,  cs 9  15 

BULK  CEREALS 

Rolled   Oats,   SOs,  per  bag    2  80 

Do.,  40s,   per  bag   N    1  47 

Do.,  20s,  per  bag   0  75 

Do^  10-Ss,  per  bale 3  50 

Do..  15-6s,  per  bale 4  05 

Oatmeal,  98s.  gran,  or  stand- 
ard,  bag    3  40 

Wheat  Granules,   98s,  bag    6  50 

■    Do.,  16-6s,  per  bale 7  05 

Peas,  whole,   green,     100-lb. 

bag,   per  bush 4  50 

Do.,  split,  yellow,  98s,  bag  ....  7  95 

Do.,  split,  yellow,  49s,  bag 4  00 

.Cornmeal.  24s,  per  bag 0  75 

Do.,  10s.  per  bale 3  65 

Buckwheat  grits,  whole,  98- 

Ib.  bags,  per  bag   8  75 

Beans.  luO-lb.  bags,  bushel 3  70 

.Liima  Beans,  100-lb.  bgs.,  lb 0  lOV^ 

Barley,  pot.  9Ss 3  85     . 

Do.,   49s,    1  92 

Do.,  24s 1  00 

Br  ev,   H.    ■■•1.  

Do.,  Pearl,  49s   2  52 

Do.,  Pearl.  24s   1  28 

Barley,  Pearl.  9Ss,  per  bag 5  20 

Do.,  Pot.  9*;s.  per  bag 3  90 

Dried  Fruits  Quiet 

DRIED  FRUITS. — Dried  fruit  sales  are 
reported  small  on  all  liues  with  the  ex- 
ception of  raisins,  which  are  active  with 
prices  holding  firm.  Prunes  quotations 
are  maintained. 

DRIED   FRUIT 

Evaporan^d  Apples,  per  lb 0  143-, 

Currants.  90-lb..  per  lb.   . .  0  18      0  19 
Do.,  8  cz.  pkgs.,  6  doz.  cs, 


CANADIAN   GROCER 

lb 0  16"-4 

Do.,  Sn'.yrna.  per  lb 0  12Vn 

Do.,  black,  cartons,  crtn 0  60 

Dates,  Hallowee,  bulk,  lb 0  II14 

Do.,  pkg.,  3  doz.  case,  lb 0  lo'g 

Figs,  Spanish,  per  lb 0  l-"* 

Do.,  Smyrna,  per  lb 0  23 

Do.,  black,   cartons,   ctn 1  00 

Loganberries,  4  dz.  cs.,  pkt 0  3(i 

Peaches,  standard,  per  lb.  0  20  0  21 

Do.,  choice,  per  lb 0  23  0  24 

Do.,  fancy,  per  lb 0  24  0  2.' 

Do.,  Ca;.,  in  cartons,  cart 1  10 

Do.,  unpitted,  per  lb 0  10 

Pears,  extra  choice,  per  lb.  ... .  0  25 

Do.,   Cal.,   cartons,  cart 1  23 

Prunes — 

30-40S,  2os,  per  lb 0  21 

40-50s,  25s,  per  lb 0  l^ii 

511-6OS,  25s,  per  lb 0  14 

60-70S,  25s,  per  lb 0  12^ 

70-80S,   25s,  per  lb 0  ll^i 

80-90S.  9'"-..  per  !h 0  loyg 

90-lOOs,  25  ^,  per  lb 0  08 

In  5-lb.   cartons,  carton    ....  0  68 

Raisins — 

Cal.,   pkg.,  seeded,   15   oz., 

fc.v.,  3  doz.  to  cs.,  pksr 0  29 

Choice  seeded,  15  oz.,  3  doz. 

to  case,  per  pkg 0  27 

Fancy,    seeded.    11    oz..    4 

doz.   to  case,  per  pkg 0  23 

Choice    seeded,      11    oz..    4 

doz.  to  case,  per  pkg 0  22V2 

Cal.,    bulk,     seeded,    25-lb. 

boxes  • 0  29 

Do.,  pkt.  seedless,  11  oz.,  3 

doz.  to  case,  per  lb 0  22 

Do.,    buk,    seedless,    25-lb. 

boxes,    per   lb 0  28 

Apricots,  choice,  25s,  lb 0  30 

Do.,    10s.    lb 0  31 

Do..  Standard,  25s,  lb 0  27 

Di.,  Standard,  10s,  lb 0  29 

Do.,  fancy,  25s,  lb 0  35 

Do.,  fancy,  10s,  lb 0  36 

Teas  Hold  Firm 


July  15,  1921 
Corn  Syrups  Unchanged 


TEAS. — The  firm  tone  which  has  char- 
acterized the  primary  markets  for  some 
time  continues  to  be  much  in  evidence. 
Reports  from  Japan  state  that  the  first 
crop  of  Japan  tea  is  selling  about  twenty 
five  per  cent,  less  than  at  last  year's 
prices.  Locally  the  demand  is  moderate. 

INDIA  AND  CEYLON— 

Pekoe  Souchongs,  1st  qual.  0  35  0  40 

Do.,    second    quality    ....  0  32  0  35 

Pekoes,  first  quality    0  40  0  40 

Do.,    second    quality    ....  0  35  0  40 

Broken  Pekoe,  first  quality  0  42  0  4S 

Broken   Orange   Pekoe.  1st 

quality    0  50  0  60 

Japan   0  52  0  70 

JAVAS— 

Pekoe  Souchongs   .'. 0  30  0  32 

Pekoe    0  32  0  40 

Broken  Pekoe  0  33  0  45 

Broken  Orange  Pekoe  0  3S  0  48 

Refined   Sugar   Lower 


SYRUPS.— The  market  for  co-rn  and 
cane  syrups  is  holding  steady  at  un- 
changed quotations.  The  demand  is  only 
fair  at  this  season  of  the  year. 

CANE  SYRUP- 

No.  2s 6  55 

No.  5s   7  50 

No.    10s    7  00 

No.  2O3 6  80 

CORN  SYRUP— 

Cases,   2-lb.   tins,   white.   2 

doz.  in  case   4  65 

Cases,  5-lb.   tins,   white,   1 

doz.  in  case   5  75 

Cases,  10-lb.  tins,  white,  V2 

doz.  in  case   5  50 

Cases,  20-lb.  tins,  white,  14 

doz.  in  case  5  50 

Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  yellow\  2 

doz.  in  case  3  40 

Cases,  5-lb.  tins,  yellow,  1 

doz.  in  case   4  55 

Cases,    10-lb.    tins,    yellow, 

V2  doz.  in  case 4  30 

Cases,   20-lb.    tins,    yellow, 

1/4   doz.  in  case    4  30 

IMAPLE  SYRUP— 

Pure,  2y2S,  tins,  cs.  of  2  doz 24  85 

Pure,  5s,  per  case  of  1  doz 22  65 

Pure,  10s,  per  case  of  Vz  doz 21  05 

TABLE  SYRUP— 

Maple    flavdr,    2V2S,    tins, 

p?r  cas3  of  2  doz 13  75 

Do.,  2s,  tins,  case  of  1  doz 12  00 

Do.,  Is,  tins,  case  %  doz 11  50 

AlOLASSES,  BARBADOES— 

2-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  case 8  30 

3-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  case    11  60 

5-lb.  tins,  1  doz.  case    9  50 

10-lb.  tins,  1  doz.  case 9  20 

Molasses  quotations  subject  to  5  per 
cei:i.  discount. 

MOLASSES,  BLACKSTRAP— 

l%s,  4  doz.  in  case   5  25 

2s,    1  doz.  in  case   5  OO 

2I2S,  4  doz.  in  case   4  so 

"s.   4  doz.   in   case    4  .-,0 

10s,  4  doz.  in  case 4  20 

Jams  Moving  Steady 


SUGAR. — Refiners'  prices  on  refined  is 
$10.00  per  hundredweight,  but  wholesal- 
ers continue  to  sell  below  these  prices 
and  are  offering  same  at  $9.50. 


JAMS.— Jam  sales  are  moderate. 
Strawberry  pack  is  reported  much  small- 
er than  last  season  and  the  new  pack  is 
now  on  the  marke.t  which  is  quoted  at 
S3  cents  for  fours. 

Eastern 

Strawberry,  4s,  per   tin    0  86 

Black  Currant,  4s  per  tin 0  86 

Raspberry,  4s,  per  tin   0  86 

Apricots,  4s,  per  tin 0  80 

Cherry,  4s,  per  tin 0  80 

Peach,  4s,  per  tin   0  SO 

Compound  (all  flavors),  4s,  tin  0  53  0  58 

Western 

Strawberry,  4s,  per  tin 0  95 

Black  Currant,  4s,  per  tin 0  95 

Raspberry,  4s,  per  tin   0  95 

Apricot,  4s,  per  tin    0  90 

Cherry,   4s,  per  tin    0  90 

Peach,  4s,  per  tin    0  90 


July  15,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


35 


Flour  Reduced 

I     FLOUR. — The    demand      for    flotir      is 

'owing   no  improvement  and  a   decline 

15  cents  per  sack  is  noted  this  week. 

L!S-lb.  sacks    •'  321/2 

Two  4"^ -lb.  sacks r,  40 

Four  2i-lb.  sacks    5  .50 

Spice  Market  Quiet 

-PICES. — There   is   no   change    in    the 
e  market.  Prices  are  unchanged. 

Allspice,  Jamaica,  best  qual., 

lb 0  2S 

Cassia,   Batavia,   per  lb 0  38 

Do.,  China,  per  lb 0  25 

Chillies,  per  lb 0  55 

Do.,  No.  1,  per  lb 0  53 

Cinnamon,  Ceylon,  per  lb 0  S5 

Do.,  No.  0,  carton,  doz 1  00 

Cloves,  Penang,  per  lb 0  95 

Do.,  Amboyna,  per  lb 0  90 

Do.,  Zanzibar,  per  lb 0  55  0  60 

Ginger,  wa.shed,  Jamaica,  No.  1  . . . .  0  65 

Do.,  Jamaica,  No.  2    0  40 

Do.,  Japan  or  Africa,  lb 0  30 

Wace,  extra  bright  Penang,  lb 0  80 

Isutmegs.  extra  large  brown, 

70  to  lb.,  per  lb 0  70 

Do.,  Ig.  brown,  S5  to  lb.,  lb 0  40 

Do.,    med.,    brown,    110    to 

lb.,   lb 0  38 

Do.,  carton  of  six,  per  doz 0  SO 

Pepper,  blk.,  Singapore,  ex.,  lb.  0  17  0  19 

Do.,  white,  per  lb 0  30  0  35 

Pickling,  14-lb.  pkg.,  per  doz 1  00 

Do.,  bulk.  No.  1,  per  lb 0  28 

GROUND  SPICE 

Mlspice.  bulk,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  No.  2,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  2  oz  cartons 0  80 

Do.,  4  oz.  cartons   1  20 

assia.  No.  I   bulk,  per  lb 0  30 

Do.,  No.  2,  bulk,  per  lb 0  25 

1)0.,  No.  1,  2  oz.  cartons 1  00 

Do.,  No.  1,  4  oz.  cartons 1  50 

nnamon.  bulk,  per  lb 0  45 

Do.,  2  oz.  cartons   1  15 

Do.,  4  oz.  cartons 1  75 

oves,  bulk,  per  lb 0  65 

1)0.,  2  oz.,  cartons   1  45 

Do..   4  oz.  cartons    ; 1   75 

Nuts  Continue  Stron«^ 


Rice  Continues  Firm 


NUTS.— The  market  for  nuts  continue 
0  maintain  a  strong  tone  with  stocks 
miall. 

UTS,    SHELLED— 

Almonds,  per  lb 0  45  0  47 

Spanish  Peanuts,  No.  ],  lb 0  I'^Vz 

Pecans,  per  lb 1  40 

Walnut'--,  per  I'l 0  75 

UTS  IN  SHELL— 

Peanuts,  rsted.,  Jumho,  lb 0  25 

ilValnuts.  per  lb 0  25 

Almonds,  per  lb 0  25 

IBrazil.-i.  per  lb 0  25 

Pecans,    per    lb 0  28 

Cocoanuts.  per  doz 1  50 

Cocoanuts,  per  sack 11  00 

Starch  In  Demand 

STARCH. — The  starch  market  con- 
tinues under  a  good  demand.  No  change 
in   quotations. 

Cornstarch.   1-lb.    pkgs.,   lb 0  09Vs 

Gloss.  1-lb.  pkgs.,  per  lb 0  lOys 

Celluloid,    1-lb.    pkgs..   case    4  35 


RICES. — There  are  no  changes  in  this 
market,     but   advances   locally     are  ex- 
pected. The  primary  markets  continue  to 
hold  firm. 
RICE— 
No.  1  .Japan,  lOO-lb.  sacks, 

lb 0  08 

Do.,  50-lb.  sacks,  lb 0  08% 

Siam.  100-lb.  bags 0  06 

Do.,  50-lb.  bags   0  00% 

Sago,   sack   lots,    130   to   150 

lbs.,  per  lb 0  08% 

Do.,  in  les.s  quantities,  lb 0  01)^4 

Tapioca,  pearl,  per  lb 0  OS       0  OSVa 

Raspberries  Selling 


FRUITS.— Shipments  of  B.C.  rasp- 
berries are  arriving  and  are  in  good  de- 
mand at  ?5.00  per  case.  As  the  season 
advances  lower  prices  will  be  in  order 
on  this  line.  Lemrns  have  advanced  con- 
siderably and  pre  quoted  at  $15.00  per 
case.  B.C.  cherries  are  offered  at  $5.^0 
per  case,  and  .$3.50  per  basket.  California 
peaches  and  plums  are  selling  freely  at 
?3.00  to  .$3.75  per  case.  Fresh  fruits  of 
all  kinds  are  in  active  demand. 

Oranges,  all  sizes,  per  case  ....  0  700 

Lemons.  Cal..  per  case 15  00 

flrape   Fruit,  per  case 

Bananas,  per  lb Oil 

APPLES— 

Winesap.   larger,  cs 3  75 

216s,  per  case   2  75 

Raspberries,   per   case    5  00 

Cherries,    baskets    3  50     4  00 

Phuns,  per  case    3  00     3  50 

Peaches,  per  case    3  00 

Cantaloupes,   flats    :',  OO 

Do..  Standards 7  oo 

Watermelons,  per  lb 0  06>^ 

Vegetables  In  Demand 


VEGETABLES.— The  first  shipment  of 
Virginia  cobbler  potatoes  has  arrived 
and  are  offered  at  $7. .50  per  bushel.  Local 
cauliflower  is  in  good  demand  and  is 
quoted  at  $1.00  per  dozen.  Both  Texas 
and  Ontario  tomatoes  are  selling  freely 
at  $3.00  per  case  for  Texas,  and  $4.00 
per  basket  for  Ontario. 


BEFORK  THEY'D  GROWN 

Mrs.  Newlywed  was  determined  not  to 
show  her  inexperience  when  she  started 
off  on  the  shopping  round  for  the  first 
time. 

Her    first    victim    was    the    grocer. 
"These     eggs     are     very  small,"     she 
said. 

"I  know  it,"  answered  the  grocer,  "but 
that's  the  kind  the  farmer  supplies  me 
with.  They  only  arrived  this  morning." 

"Yes,"  said  the  bride,  seeing  her  op- 
portunity to  show  that  in  spite  of  her 
youthful  appearance,  she  was  not  to  be 
trifled  with.  "That's  just  the  trouble 
with  these  farmers;  they  are  so  anxious 
to  get  those  eggs  of  their's  sold  that 
they   take   them   too   soon  off  the   nest." 


Canned     Pineapple 

Industry     Grows 

Iliiwaii's  Pack   Sold   or  $31,000,000  Last 
Year 

The  rapid  growth  of  the  Hawaiian 
canned  pineapple  industry  is  described 
in  a  bulletin  issued  by  the  Natonal  Cam- 
ners'  Assocation.  In  1920,  144,000,000 
cans  of  fruit  were  packed,  while  nineteen 
years  ago  there  was  only  one  cannery  in 
Hawaii  and  this  had  a  capacty  of  48,000 
cans. 

The  increase  in  production  is  indicated 
by   the   followng   figures: 

Number   of   cans 
Date —  packed  in  Hawaii 

1901  48,000 

190G  2,000,000 

1911  17,520,000 

1915  64,070.784 

1920  144.000,000 

As  in  other  industries  improvement^ 
have  been  brought  about  in  pineapple 
packing.  Canneries  equipped  with  mod- 
ern machinery,  expressly  for  the  handl- 
ing of  pinapple,  and  with  a  capacity  run- 
ning up  to  900,000  cans  a  day  from  one 
cannery  alone,  work  smoothly  and  effic- 
iently to  supply  the  demand.  The  four 
outstanding  innovations  which  have  con- 
trKjuted  most  to  the  advancement  of  the 
cultivation  and  canning  of  this  fruit  in 
Hawaii,  are:  The  utilization  of  the  iron 
sulphate  spray  to  offset  the  lack  of  iron 
in  the  soil,  the  development  of  a  mechan- 
ical coring  and  peeling  machine,  the  in- 
vention of  the  slicer  and,  finally,  the 
development  of  the  "eradicator,"  which 
recovers  the  pineapple  left  on  the  skin  of 
the  fruit,  after  the  first  rough  peeling 
has  been  done  by  machine. 

In  the  packing  of  pineapple,  the  fruit 
is  practically  never  touched  by  the  hu- 
man hand  from  the  time  it  is  peeled,  the 
rubber  gloves  of  the  sorter  being  the 
nearest  approach  to  it.  As  the  pineapple 
canning  industry  is  of  recent  growth  all 
the  factories  and  equipment  are  new. 

To  supply  pineapple  containers  there 
already  are  two  can  making  plants  in 
operation  in  Hawaii.  It  required  about 
126,000,000  cans  from  these  plants  to 
take  care  of  the  1920  pack.  The  pine- 
apple business  in  Hawaii  is  second  only 
to  the  sugar  industry.  In  1920  Hawaii\s 
pneapple    pack    sold    for    $31,000,000 

Approximately  20,000  people  are  en- 
gaged in  the  pineapple  industry  n  Ha- 
waii, according  to  a  recent  report.  It  is 
said  that  the  industry  occupies  about 
4G,000  acres  of  land  and  that  the  number 
of  people  employed  in  the  various  oper- 
ations of  the  industry  range  from  a 
minimum  of  5,000  in  the  slack  season  to 
a  maximum  of  about  15,000  in  the  busy 
season. 


36 
g? 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July   15,   1921. 


!ll!ll'|i|ll!l 


WEEKLY  MARKET  REPORTS  BY  WIRE 

Statements  from  Buying  Centres  East  and  West 


^HMiiiniiitii 


Alberta  Markets 

FROM   CALGARY,   BY   WIRE 


CALGARY,  Alta.,  July  13.— Flour  de- 
clined 30  cents  per  barrel.  Cheese  market 
is  strong  with  higher  <iuotations.  Ontario 
large  is  selling  at  22i/i  to  23  cents  and 
Alberta  at  22  to  23  cents.  New  laid  eggs 
are  in  short  supply  and  are  now  quoted 
at  $10.00  to  $10.50.  BMtter  is  unchanged, 
but  as  cream  pri'ces  have  advanced  a 
higher  price  is  expected.,  New  pack  B. 
C.  strawberry  jam  fours  is  offered  at 
$10.50  per  case  and  gooseberry  at  $9.75 
per  case.  American  granulated  sugar  is 
offered  at  ;);9.20.  New  pack  lobsters, 
quarters  is  quoted  at  2.30  to  $2.45  Prunes 
are  one  cent  per  pound  higher.  B.C. 
raspberries  are  selling  at  $4.00  to  $4.25 
per  crate. 

Lard,   pure,    3    10  50 

Beans,   B.C.,  per  hundred   4  95       5  50 

Rolled  oats   8  80 

Rice,   Siara    '. . .    5  50       6  00 

Japan.   No.   1    7  50       8  00 

Tapioca     6,  75       7  25 

Sago    6  75       7  25 

Sugar,     pure     oane,     gran., 

cwt 11  52 

Cheese,  No.   1,  Ont.,  large  0  201/2  0  22% 
Alberta  cheese,  twins   0  22       0  23 

Do.,    large    0  22i^   0  23 

Butter,  creamery,  lb 0  35 

Do.  dairy,  lb 0  25       0  30 

Lard,    pure,    3s    10  50  11  10 

Eg.^s,  new  laid,  local,  cs.   10  00  10  50 

Tomatoes,  21/28   4  0«       4  25 

Corn,   2  5,   case    3  15       3  85 

Peas,  2s,  standard  case  . .   3  60       4  00 
New  early  June  peas,  case  ....       4  50 

Strawberries,  2g,  Ont,  case  9  90  10  30 

Raspberries,  2s,  Out.,  case  10  40  11  #0 

Gooseberries,    2«    11  30 

Cherries,  2s,  red,  pitted  . .  9  00       9  50 
Apples,  evaporated,  SOs   . .   0  14       0  15% 

Do.,    25s,    lb 0  14%   0  I61/3 

Peachefi,  evaporated,  lb.  . .  0  22       0  22% 

Do.,  canned,  2s   7  45       7  90 

Prunes,  90-lOOs 0  OS       0  08% 

Do.,  70-80S    0  08%   0  11 

Do.,  60-70S    0  12       0  12% 

Potatoes,    local    ton    25  00       0  00 


New  Brunswick  Markets 

FROM  ST.  JOHN,  BY  WIRE 


to  17%  to  IS  cents  and  compound  14% 
to  15  cents.  Corned  beef  is  easier  at 
'tis. 45  to  J3.50.  Creamery  butter  is  firmer 
at  32  to  35  cents.  Potatoes  are  selling 
at  $1.75  to  $2.25  per  bag.  Lemons  jumped 
to  $16.00  to  $18.00  per  case.  New  Cali- 
fornia peaches  are  offered  at  $3.0(1  to 
$3.50  and  plums  at  $3.50  to  $4.00  per  case. 
Cheese,  Out.,   twins    0  23       0  24 

Cornmeal,    gran.,    bags    ....    3  50       3  75 

Do.,    ordinary     2  30 

RoUde  oats 8  80 

Rice.  Siam,  per  100  lbs.   . .   6  50       7  00 

Tapioca,  100  lbs 8  00     10  00 

Mplasses    0  60 

Sugar — 

Standard,   granulated 8  95 

No.  1,  yellow   8  45 


Cheese,  new,  twins    0  17       0  18 

Eggs,  fresh,  doz 0  35       0  36 

Lard,   pure,  lb 0  16%  0  17 

Do.,  compound    0  13%  0  14 

Tomatoes,  2%s,   std.,  case    4  00 

American  clear  pork  ....   31  00     S3  00 

Beef,  corned.  Is 3  45 

Breakfast    bacon    0  45       0  48 

Butter,  creamery,  per  lb.  . .  0  30       0  33 

Do.,    dairy    0  25       0  20 

Do.,    tub    0  24       0  28 

Corn,  2s,  standard,  case 3  50 

Peas,  standard,   case    3  80 

Apples,  gal.,   N.B..  doz. 5  Od 

Strawberries,  2s,  Ont.,  case 

Lemons,  case  11  00     12  00 

Oranges,  California 6  50       8  00 

Bananas,   lb 0  08       0  10 

Gra/pefruit,    case     8  50       9  50 


ST.  .lOHN,  N.B.,  July  I.*,.  -There  was 
a  general  trend  upward  in  prices  during 
the  week.  Granulated  cornmeal  is  firm 
at  $3.75.  Cheese  advanced  to  23  and  24 
cents  per  pound.  Eggs  are  up  to  40  and 
41   cents  per  dozen.   Pure  lard  advanced 


CANNED  GOODS  WRONGLY  BLAMED 

pROM  time  to  time,  reports  crop  up  of  ptomaine 
poisoning  alleged  to  have  been  caused  by  eating 
canned  foods.  A  recent  one  comes  from  George- 
town Medical  School  in  Washington  D.  C.  The 
.statement  was  made  that  "twenty-six  students  were 
in  a  serious  condition  from  ptomaine  poisoning 
supposed  to  have  been  caused  by  eating  canned 
foods."  Upon  investigation,  however,  it  was  found 
that  the  trouble  was  produced  from  bread  pudding 
which  contained  "a  toxic  producing  organism." 

While  it  is  true  that  there  have  been  some  cases 
of  ptomaine  poisoning  due  t©  some  chemical  action 
taking  place  in  the  can  after  it  was  sealed,  the 
number  of  actual  cases  is  infinitely  small  in  com- 
parison with  the  alleged  cases  of  illness  and  which 
usuaHy  turns  out  to  be  the  result  of  other  causes- 

Recently  it  came  to  the  writer's  attention  of  a 
a  family  of  four  were  taken  ill.  and  the  case  where 
medical  man  was  called  in,  laid  the  blame  of  the  ill- 
ness to  having  eaten  canned  salmon.  The  writer 
personally  investigated  this  case  and  found  that  the 
family  had  partaken  of  canned  salmon  two  days 
prior  ■"■)  their  illness,  but  not  consuming  the  whole 
contents,  the  balance  was  left  in  the  can  and  placed 
aw.-iy  for  future  use.  Two  days  afterwards  the 
balance  was  consumed — after  remaining  in  the  open 
can  for  nearly  sixty  hours — with  the  result  that 
the  household  was  taken  ill,  but  happily  with  no 
carious  consequences. 

This  appears  to  be  chiefly  the  reason  why  people 
become  sick  from  eating  canned  foods-  It  is  usual- 
ly due  to  carelessness  in  allowing  the  contents  to 
remain  in  the  can  after  being  opened,  in  spite  of 
the  fact  that  a  warning  appears  on  the  label  of  each 
can  stating  "to  empty  can  as  soon  as  possible." 


Tilly   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


37 


Butter  and  Cheese  Markets  Show 

Advances  in  the  Past  Few  Weeks 

Scarcity  of  i^ocd  pasture  is  said  to  be  the 
cause  of  ilit  liigher  quotations — Creanierv 
l)utter  advances  seven  cents  i)er  i)oun(l  in 
hvo  weeks — trend  of  tlie  market  is  towards 


strouf^er  levels. 

Toronto,  July  11. — Fiirth»r  advani  e5  are 
recorded  in  the  butter  and  cheese 
markets.  The  best  grades  of  creamery 
butter  are  quoted  to  the  retail  trade  at 
"6  cents  per  pound,  an  advance  of  seven 
cents  during  the  past  couple  of  weeks. 
The  scarcity  of  good  pasture  is  given  as 
the  main  reasoH  lor  the  strength  of  the 
market. 

I'rk'Ps    Show    Sliarp    .Vdvain-*' 

Abfjnt  t'.^c  beRinnins;  of  June,  eheese 
■was  selling  to  the  trado  around  !•">  cents 
and  at  country  boards  around  2V;  cents. 
Today  the  price  to  the  re. ail  trade  is  23 
cents  per  pound.  Country  boards  quoting 
2oi/^  to  'l')  cents,  the  first  quotation  being 
at  Brockville  and  the  second  at  Perth.  At 
the  Toronto  Produce  Exchange  one  lot 
of  110  large,  not  paraffined  June  cheese, 
was  offered  at  23 V^  cents,  also  another 
lot  of  77  were  offered  at  the  same  price, 
but  no  bid  was  received,  both  lots  being 
on  spot.  The  peculiar  feature  of  this  was 
the  fact  that  both  these  lots  were  offered 
at  almo.st  the  szfme  level  as  those  paid 
iit    outside    points,    and    yet    no    bid    was 


made. 

In  some  quarters  it  is  stated  that  thene 
high  prices  on  cheese  are  the  result  of 
the  action  of  «ome  eastern  exporters  who 
sold  short  on  orders  to  the  United  King- 
dom and  were  endeavcrinf^  to  obtain 
supplies  to  cover  their  contract.s.  Otherx 
state  that  the  strength  of  the  market  is 
the  result  of  e.xpcrt  business  together 
with  the  shortage  of  milk  created  by  the 
drought  Cndoubiedly  the  extremely  hot 
weather  has  something  to  do  with  the 
situation,  but  if  it  Ik  the  former  rea.son, 
an  easing  off  in  the  market  can  be  ex- 
pected when  the  overseas  contracts  are 
filled. 

Still   .Vt  Low  Lerels 

"Prices  on  both  butter  and  cheese  are 
still  considerably  below  the  high  levels 
of  last  year,  but  with  business  not  as 
yet  showing  any  signs  of  recovery  and 
with  the  possibility  of  a  great  deal  of 
unemployment  this  coming  winter,  I  do 
not  think  the  high  prices  are  justified, 
r.nd  that  declines  can  be  expected,"  statetl 
one  dealer  in  close  touch  with  the  situ- 


ation. "Furthermore  the  prices  received 
by  local  dealers  from  Old  Country  deal- 
ers do  not  give  any  basis  for  the  high 
prices   now    bei«g   asked." 

Butt*r   Production    In    1920 

Canada's  production  of  creamery  but- 
ter during  1928  amounted  to  110,030,399 
pounds,  according  to  the  report  issued 
l3y  the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics. 
Returns  were  received  from  3,165  dairy 
factories,  comprising  1.053  creameries,  1,- 
(174  c^ieese  factories,  410  combined  butter 
and  cheese  factoi-ies  and  28  condonsories. 
Cheese  production  ajuounted  to  149,521,- 
008  pounds,  a  decrease  of  16,900,863 
pounds  from  last  year.  The  average  price 
at  the  factory  was  26  cents  a  pound,  as 
against  26i^c  in  1919.  Production  of  con- 
densed milk  was  53,980,993  pounds,  valu- 
ed at  ?10,217,803;  evaporated  milk  was 
produced  to  the  amount  of  30,469,642 
pounds,  valued  at  $3,809,653  and  milk 
powder  7,574, (ioS  pounds  at  $2,178,176. 

$144,483,188  In  Value 

The  total  value  of  all  products  of  dairy 
factories  in  1920  was  $144,483,188,  an  in- 
crease of  nine  millions  over  the  previous 
year.  Capital  invested  in  dairy  factories 
was  $32,767,317.  Employees  numbered 
11,211  and  the  aggregate  of  salaries  and 
wages  was  $8,776,676.  Quebec  led  in 
creamery  butter  production,  with  a  total 
of  40,037,692  pounds,  against  37,148,898 
pounds  for  Ontario,  but  Ontario  was  an 
easy  leader  in  factory  cheese  output, 
with  92,847,769  pounds,  against  52,441,504 
for  Quebec. 


Produce,  Provision  and  Fish   Markets 


QUEBEC    MARKETS 


L 


lyiONTREAL,  July  1.3. — The  provision  market  show.s  more  strength 
this  week,  principally  as  a  result  of  the  hot  dry  spell  which  has 
prevailed  over  the  country  effecting  meats,  butter,  cheese,  and  eggs. 
The  demand  for  smoked  and  cooked  meats  has  .shown  a  big  improve- 
ment and  a  stronger  market-  Hog  prices  are  a  little  lower  but  fresh 
pork  and  beef  is  unchanged.  Lard  maintains  its  strength  with  a  good 
demand  both  for  local  and  countrytrade-  There  is  a  feeling  that 
the  supply  of  butter  will  be  cut  down  on  account  of  the  hot  season 
and  coupled  with  a  keen  demand  for  both  local  and  export  trade 
i'*  has  advanced  the  price  by  four  and  five  cents  a  pound.  The  cheese 
i^'^rket  is  much  firmer  on  the  same  account  but  wholesale 
pric' ^io  not  show  a  change  as  yet.  The  egg  market  shows  stronger 
tendencies  with  a  wider  range  of  prices  quoted-  The  receipts  show 
no  decrease  but  the  demand  for  cold  storage,  export  and  local 
trade  has  grown  and  prices  have  advanced  on  strictly  fresh  eggs. 
The  fish  trade  has  been  quiet  but  supplies  show  improvement  with 
more  white  fish,  lake  trout  and  gaspe  salmon  on  the  market. 


Higher  Prices  For  Butter 

MonYreal. 

BCTTER.— The  butter  market  has  ex- 
perienced in  the  past  week  a  great 
strengthening  up  in  prices  due  largely 
to  the  keen  demand  for  supplies  both 
for  local  and  export  account.  Although 
the  receipts  are  larger  than  one  week 
ago  the  demand  has  increased  and  the 
( nntinuing  spell '  ot  hot  weather  has  to 
some  extent  curtailed  the  make  and  lent 
a  feeling  of  strength  to  the  market  with 
the  natural  expectancy  of  lighter  sup- 
plies and  resulting  keener  demand. 
Prices  jumped  in  a  few  days  to  39  cents 
per  pound  for  creamery  butter  in  prints. 
II  is  the  feeling  among  the  produce 
dealers  that  prices  will  go  still  higher. 
Creamery,    prints    0  37     0  39 

Do.,  solids    0  35     0  37 


38 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


Cheese  Market  Strong 


CHEESE. — Although  the  cheese  market 
shows  more  strength  hoth  on  account  of 
weather  conditions  and  a  bigger  demand 
local  wholesale  prices  are  unchanged  on 
new  and  old  cheese.  The  higher  prices 
being  paid  lor  cheese  will  no  doubt  ef- 
fect the  wholesale  market  as  the  supply 
of  milk  is  poorer  and  higher  prices  must 
follow.  The  tendency  throughout  the 
market  is  towards  an  advance  in  price. 

Large,  per  lb 0  23 

Twins,   per   lb 0  23 

Triplets,    per    lb 0  23 

Stilton,   per  lb 0  35 

Fancy,  old  cheese,  per  lb.    . .    0  33  0  34 

Quebec    0  2*)  0  23 

Cooked  Meats  Strong 


COOKED  MEATS.— There  is  a  good 
market  for  all  lines  of  cooked  meats  on 
account  of  the  warm  weather.  The  mark- 
et is  steady  with  a  tendency  towards 
higher  prices  as  a  result  of  the  keen 
demand   for   supplies. 

Jellied  pork  tongues 0  38 

Jellied  pressed  beef,  lb 0  37 

Ham  and  tongue,  lb 0  42 

Veal    0  30 

Hams,  cooked    0  54  0  57 

Pork  pies   (doz.)    0  80 

Mince  meat,  lb 0  171/^  0  19 

Sausage,  pure  pork 0  25 

Bologna,   lb 0  14 

Ox  tongue,  tins 0  59 

Head  cheese,  'G-lb.  tins,   per 

lb ...  0  16 

Do.,    25-lb.    tin    pails,    lb 0  15 

Egg  Prices  Go  Higher 


EGGS. — Although  the  receipts  of  eggs 
are  not  as  large  as  they  have  been  in 
the  past  few  weeks  the  demand  for  ex- 
port has  fallen  off  to  some  extent  on 
account  of  the  weakness  of  sterling  ex- 
chan-g.  The  local  demand  however  is 
good  and  prices  still  maintain  strength 
with  a  little  wider  margin  in  prices 
quoted  on  the  Montreal  market.  Strictly 
fresh  eggs  are  selling  at  from  40  to  44 
cents  per  dozen. 

EGGS— 

Fresh    selects    0  40     o  44 

Do.,    No.    1    0  35     0  36 

Smoked  Meats  In  Demand 


SMOKED  MEATS.— There  has  been  an 
active  market  for  smoked  meats  with  a 
big  demand  in  consequence  of  the  warm 
weather.  This  market  is  very  firm  but 
prices  are  unchanged.  The  weakness  of 
the  hog  market  to  some  extent  counter- 
balances the  stronger  tendencies  result- 
ing   from    the    demand. 

BACON 

Breakfast,  best 0  3G  0  39 

Smoked  Breakfast  0  41  0  44 

Cott;igo   Rolls    0  29 

Picnic    Hams    0  24 

Wil'shiro    0  33  0  37 


MEDIUM   SMOKED   HAMS— 

Weight,  8-14,  long  cut 0  34 

Dc,    :4-20    0  34  0  35 

Do.,   20-25    0  ;iO 

Over  35  lbs u  30 

Do.,  25-35    0  30 

Live  Hogs  Easier 


Fresh   Beef- 
(Cows) 


(Steers) 


FRESH  MEATS.— The  very  warm 
weather  has  caused  a  weaker  feeling  in 
the  hoR  market  as  the  demand  for  the 
live  hogs  has  fallen  off  a  little  and  with 
it  prices  dropped  50  cents  to  $1.00  per 
hundred.  The  offerings  are  more  than 
sufficient  to  meet  the  demand  and  this 
lends  a  weaker  tendency.  Prices  on  fresh 
pork  have  held  as  that  market  has  been 
very  firm  since  the  recent  advances.  The 
b^ef  market  is  unchanged  with  g*Dod 
offerings  of  live  stock  and  strength 
shewn  in  some  lines  of  fresh  beef  and 
weakness  in  others. 

FRESH  MEATS 

Hogs,  live   (selected  off 

cars)     2  50       13  00 

Abattoir  killed,  65-90  lbs 0  21 

Fresh    Pork — 

Legs  of  pork    (foot  on)    0  28%  0  29 

Loins    (trimmed)    0  29       0  30 

Bone  trimmings 

Trimmed  shoulders   ....   0  20       0  22 

Untrimmed     0  16     0  18 

Pork    sausage    (pure)     0  25 


0  19       0  24    Hind    quarters    0  21  0  26 

0  08       0  11    Front    quarters    0  09  0  13 

0  27       0  30     .  .  .     Loins     ...     0  33  0  36 

Lard  Market  Firm 


Lard. — There  is  no  change  in  the  lai'l 
market,     the  strength     of   the   past   fev. 
weeks    being    fully    maintained    under     i 
good  demand  with  active  business  pa.^- 
ing   both  for  local  and  country  account . 

LARD— 

Tierces,  360  lbs 0  15 

Tubs,  60  lbs 0  15»A 

Pails,  20  lbs 0  16 

Bricks 0  IT  0  18 

Fish  Prices  Easier 


FISH. — The  fi.-h  market  has  been  quiet 
owing  to  the  number  of  people  who  are 
leaving  the  city  during  the  hot  weather 
and  the  fact  that  as  little  down  town 
shopping  as  possible  is  being  done.  The 
supply  of  fish  oifered  shows  improve- 
ment and  prices  are  a  little  easier.  Gaspe 
salmon  is  quoted  at  20  csnts  and  a  better 
supply  C'f  lake  trout  and  white  fish  is  oiv 
the  market  at  from  18  to  'M  cents  per 
pound. 

ONTARIO    MARKETS 

TORONTO,  July  13.—  The  buttei'  and  cheese  markets  continue 
•1  firm  with  quotations  advanced-  but  there  is  some  difference  of 
opinion  expressed  by  dealers  whether  the  higher  prices  will  be  main- 
tained. Egg  prices  are  fairly  steady,  receipts  are  not  heavy  but 
as  the  demand  has  .somewhat  slackened  and  the  hot  weather  is 
effecting  the  quality,  dealers  are  showing  much  activity.  Lard  and 
shortening  are  steady  to  firm.  Cooked  hams  are  inclined  to  be 
scarce  under  higher  prices  and  an  active  demand-  Smoked  hams  are 
active  demand.  Smoked  hams  active  demand.  Smoked  hams  are 
higher  while  bacon  show.s  reductions.  The  hog  market  is  easier 
while  fresh  hams  and  legs  of  pork  cuts  showing  reductions.  Beef, 
veal  a  nd  lamb  are  steady.  Fish  and  poultry  are  unchanged  under 
a  seasonable  demand. 


Butter  Prices  Higher 


Cheese  Quoted  Higher 


Toronto. 

BUTTER.— The  market  continues 
strong  with  quotations  advanced  three 
cents  per  pound  bringing  the  price  to 
35  and  36  cents.  There  is  considerable 
uneasiness  among  produce  men,  some 
claiming  that  the  high  prices  will  not 
hold  and  in  view  of  the  present  business 
conditions,  the  advances  that  have  taken 
place  in  the  past  tew  weeks  are  not 
justified. 


BUTTER— 

Creamery  prints,  No.  1   .  . 


.   0 


0  36 


Toronto. 

CHEESE.— The  market  has  again  ad- 
vanced with  large  cheese  quoted  at  23 
cents  to  the  trade.  It  is  stated  that  these 
advances  arc  due  to  the  export  demand, 
which  may  be  partly  true,  but  the  bids 
received  recently  bv  local  dealers  from 
Old  Country  buyers  does  not  give  any 
basis  for  the  prices  being  paid  at  country 
boards.  In  other  quarters  It  is  stated  that 
these  high  prices  are  the  result  of  a 
certain  Eastern  exporter's  having  sold 
short  of  cheese  to  the  United  kingdom 
and  are  not  endeavoring  lo  obtain  suf- 
ficient supplies  to  cc  ver  their  contracts. 
If  thii  is  true  it  m.ay  be  po:sible  for  an 
easing  in  the  situation  in  the  near  tuture. 
CHEESE— 

Large   0  23 


July   15,   1921 

Cocked  Hams  Higher 


COOKED  MEATS.— There  has  been 
such  a  heavy  demaml  tor  cooked  hams 
that  a  scarcity  is  noted  and  in  tact  one 
packer  stated  that  thy  were  out  of  hams 
about  three  days  a  week.  This  iias  re- 
sulted in  prices  again  moving  upwards. 
Ordinary  trimmed  hams  are  quoted  at  57 
cents  and  square  pressed  at  61  cents 
with  a  tendency  for  even  higher  prices. 
Jellied  ox  tongue  is  also  firm  at  higher 
prices.  Other  cooked  meats  show  little 
change. 
Boiled  hams,  lb 0  57 

Do.,  square   pressed    0  61 

Boiled    shoulders,    lb 0  42 

Head  cheese,  6s,  lb 0  12 

Choice  jellied  ox  tongue,  lb 0  66 

Jellied  pork  tongue    0  37 

Bologna    U  16     0  18 

ilacaroni  &  cheese  loaf,  lb 0  23 

Above   prices  subject  to   daily   fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 

Eggs  Hold  Steady 


EGGS.— The  market  is  practically  un- 
changed from  last  week.  Dealers  are  not 
buying  heavily  on  account  of  the  waste 
and  the  fact  that  hoc  weather  eggs  are 
not  good  for  keeping  purposes.  The  de- 
mand has  also  fallen  oft  considerably. 

EGGS-. 

Selects     0  40  0  41 

No.    1    0  .37  0  38 

Selects  in  cartons    M  42  0  43 

Hog  Market  Ea.  ier 


FRESH  MEATS.— The  hog  market 
opened  the  first  oi  the  week  at  prices 
about  the  same  as  last  week.  Tne  offer- 
ings were  light  and  most  of  the  buying 
was  done  by  outsiders  who  mane  pur- 
chases on  the  basis  of  ^l(i.7;i  F.O.B.  The 
big  pa(;kers,  hcnvever,  are  ottering  oO 
cents  lower  for  the  balance  of  the  week. 
Fresh  legs  of  pork  and  hams  are  up  two 
cents  per  pound,  but  other  cuts  are  re- 
duced one  to  five  cents  per  pound.  There 
is  practically  no  change  in  beef,  veal 
and  lamb. 

Hogs — 

Dressed,  light,  per  cwt 17  00 

Do.,    heavy,    per    cwt.    10  Oo  12  00 

Live,    off    cars,    per   cwt 11  75 

Live,  fed  &  watered,  cwt 11  50 

Live,  f.o.b.,   per   cwc 10  75 

Fresh  Pork- 
Legs  of  pork,  up  to  18  lbs 0  28 

Loins  of   pork,  lb 0  30 

Fresh  hams,  lb o  39 

Tenderloins,  lb 0  50 

Spare  ribs,  lb 0  12 

Picnics,   lb 0  18% 

New    York    shoulders,    lb OS 

Montreal    shoulders,      lb 0  20 

Boston  butts,  lb 0  221/^ 

Fresh  Beef — from  Steers  and  Heifers — 

Hind  quarters,  lb 0  21  0  24 

Front    quarters,    lb 0  06  0  08 

Ribs,  lb 0  IS  0  26 

Chucks,    lb 0  06  0  07 


CANADIAN    GROCEii 

Lcins,    whole,    lb 0  28     0  30 

Hips,   lb 0  18     0  22 

Cow  beef  quotations  about  2c  per  pound 
below  above  qv.otations. 

Calves,   lb 0  12  0  16 

Spring  lamb,  lb 0  28  0  30 

Yearling  lamb,  lb 0  12  0  15 

Sheep,  whole,  lb 0  10  0  12 

Above   prices   subject   to   daily  fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 

Fish  Quotations  Steady 


FISH. — Shipments  of  whitefish  are  be- 
coming heavier  and  has  resulted  in  low- 
er prices,  llie  demand  fcr  fish  at  this  sea- 
son is  not  large,  but  quotations  generally 
remain  unchangeci. 

FRESH    SEA    AND    LAKE    FISH 

Cod   Steak,   lb 0  09  0  10 

Do.,    market,    lb 0  09 

Halibut,    chicken    0  16  0  17 

Do.,   medium    0  22  0  23 

Whitefish,  Government 0  1H4 

Dc,   Georgian    Bay    '»  llVi 

Frsh  Herring 0  10  0  11 

Flounders,    lb 0  10  0  11 

Fresh  Trout,   lb 0  16  0  17 

Haddock    0  10  Oil 

Spring  Salmon   0  24  0  2.'> 

Mackerel    0  11  0  12 

FROZEN  FISH 

Halibut,  medium    0  22       0  23 

Do.,    Qualla    0  09       0  12 

Flounders    0  09       0  12 

Pike,    round    0  06       0  07 

Do.,  headless  and  dressed  ....       0  08 

Salmon.   Cohoe 

Do..  Red  Spring 0  23       0  24 

Sea   Herring    0  07^^   0  08 

Brill    0  10       Oil 

SMOKED  FISH 

Haddies,  lb 0  10  0  12 

Fillets,   lb 0  17 

Kippers,  box    2  25  2  75 

Bloaters    2  00 

PICKLED  FISH 

Salmon  Snacks,  lb 0  24 

Labrador  Herrings,  kegs,  100 

lbs 6  25 

Do.,  bbls..  200  lbs 11  75 

Do.,  pails,  20  lbs 2  00 

Holland  Herrings,  Milchers 1  15 

Do.,   Mixed    1  00 

Lard  Unchanged 


LARD.— The  market  is  steady  to  firm 
with   quotations   unchanged. 

LARD— 

-  1-lb.    prints    0  16       0  18 

1-lb.  tierces,  400  lbs 0  14i^ 

In  60-lb.  tubs,  V2  ^-ent  higher  than 
tierces,  pails  %  cent  higher  than  tierces, 
and    1-lb.   prints,  2c. 

Hams  Up,  Bacon  Down 


39 

ive  demand  for  cooked  hams,  which  has 
caused  a  real  shortage  on  that  product. 
Smoked  bacon,  however,  is  slightly  easi- 
er with  prices  down  one  to  two  cents 
per  pound.  Barrel  and  salt  meats  are  un- 
changed. 
Hams — 

Small.    6   to    12    lbs 0  41 

Medium.  12  to  20   lbs (i  41 

Large.  20  to  35  lbs.  ea..  lb.  0  :io     0  37 
Heavy.  35  lbs.  and  upwards   ....     0  34 

Backs — • 

Boneless,  per  lb 0  45 

Rolled,    per    lb 0  50 

Peameal 0  40 

Bacon- 
Breakfast,  ordinary,  per  lb.  0  27  0  41 

Do.,  special  trim    0  45 

Cottage    rolls    0  32 

oil.  per  lb 0  21  0  2(> 

Wiltshire  (smoked  sides),  lb 0  32 

Do.,  three-qharter  cut 0  37 

Do.,   middle    0  39 

Dry  Salt  Meats 

Lend  clear   bacon,   av.   50- 

70    lbs 0  20" 

Do.,  av.    SO-90   lbs 0  18- 

Clear  bellies,  15-30  lbs 0  20' 

Fat  backs.  10-12  lbs U  14  0  Ift 

Out    of    pickle    prices    range    about    2c 
per  pound  blow  corresponding  cuts  above. 

Barrel  Pork — 

Mess    Pork    33  OO 

Short  cut  backs,  200  lbs 40  00 

Picked   rolls,  bbl.,  200  lbs.— 

Lighweight   46  GO 

Lightweight    46  00 

Heavy    40  00 

Above    prices    subject    to    daily    fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 

Poultry  Prices  Hold 


POULTRY.— The  market  is  quiet  with 
quotations   unchanged. 

Prices  Paid  by  Dealers 

Live  Dssd 

Turkeys    •. 0  30  0  40 

Chickens,  spring    0  30  0  40 

Roosters     0  14  0  18 

Fowl,   over   5   lbs 0  23  0  25 

Fowl,  4  to  'j  lbs 0  20  0  20 

Fowl,  under  4  lbs 0  IS  0  18 

Ducklings 0  35  0  35 

Guinea  hens,  pair   IS,  1  50 

Pries  quoted  to  retail  trade:    Dressed 

1  urkeys   0  .j5  0  60 

Hens,   heavy    0  30  0  32 

Do.,   light    0  I'S  0  30 

Chickens,  spring 0  50  0'  55 

Ducklings    O/  4i8. 

No  Change  In  Shortening 


PROVISIONS.— Smoked  hams  are  up 
two  cents  per  pound,  bringing  the  price 
on  small  and  medium  sizes  to  39  cents 
per  pound.   This  is  the  result  of  the  act- 


SHORTENING.— The  market  is  un- 
changed with  quotations  remaining  at  15 
to  16  cents  for  one  pound  prints  and  12i/^ 
cents  on   the  tierce   basis. 

SHORTENING— 

1-lb.   prints    0  16 

Tierces,    40    lbs 0  12^6 


-40 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


WINNIPEG    MARKETS 

"YYINNIPEG,  July  13. —  There  is  a  strong  tone  to  the  produce 
'*^  and  provision  markets.  Cooked  meats,  bacon  and  ham  have  ad- 
vanced. Butter  is  stronger  also  cheese.  Egg  receipts  are  lighter 
with  higher  prices  expected  under  a  heavy  demand.  Shortening  has 
advanced  while  lard  prices  are  holding  holding  firm.  Fish  and 
poultry  are  unchanged. 

Bacon — 

Back,  6   to  1»  lbs.,  lb '..  0  54 

Cottag's  Rolls,  boneless 0  31 

Bellies,  6  to  10  lbs.,  per  lb 0  48 


Butter  Market  Firm 


Winiupec, 

BUTTER.— The  butter  market  is  show- 
ing a  firmer  tone.  Xo.  1  table  grade 
creamery  is  quoted  at  35  cents  per  pound, 
a   further   advance   is    expected. 

BUTTER— 

Creamery,  best  table  grade  . .    . 

Dairy,  best  table  grade 

Margarine    


Shortening  Advanced 


0  35 
0  23 


Cheese  Prices  Steady 


""OHKESE.— The  cheese  marttet  is 
^wady  with  the  local  market  showing  a 
iff.mer  tendency  and  higher  price=(  are 
xpected  very  shortly. 

-Stilton   cheese,   large,   lb 0  24 

tSHEEiSE— 

StiUon   cheese,  large,   lb 0  24 

'Ont.,  large,  lb 0  20 

•Ont.,  twins,  lb 0  20i/4 

•Ont.,  triplets,  lb 0  21 

Egg  Prices  Higher 


EGGS.— The  egg  market  continues  to 
liold  a  strong  position  with  quotations 
advanced.  Receipts  have  fallen  off,  but 
the  demand  is  very  active.  New  laid  are 
quoted  at  40  cents  per  dozen.  No.  1  candl- 
ed at  ZTy  cents  and  fresh  candled  selling 
at  35   cents   per  doeen. 

Cooked  Hams  Higher 

COOKED  MEATS.— Cooked  hams  have 
advanced  and  ar©  now  quoted  at  57 
cents  per  pound.  Roast  shoulders  have 
also  shown  an  advance  and  are  quoted 
at  381^  cents  per  pound.  Head  cheese  is 
down  one  cent  per  pound.  Jellied  pork 
tongires  are  selling  freely  at  42  cents  per 
pound.  The  sales  of  cooked  meats  of  all 
kmds  are  showing  a  big  improvement. 
Hams — 
Beet  q"Ity.  skinned,  8-13  lbs.  o  57 

Do.,  13-16  lbs 0  52 

Rest    Ham.    lb 0  56 

'Ro.?.st  shoulders,  lb 0  38i/^ 

Head  Cheese,  6-lb.  tins,  lb 0  16 

Jellied  Ox  Tont:ues,  lb 0  65 

Pork  tonguei5,  lb 0  42 

I.uncheon  Cooked  Meats,  lb.  . . ! !     0  22 

Smoked  Meats  Higher 

PROVISIONS.— Following  the  trend  of 
^lie  hog  market,  there  is  a  strong  tone  In 
evidence  in  the  market  for  smoked  meats, 
and  both  ham  and  bacon  have  advanced. 
There  is  a  steady  demand  for  these  lines. 

8  to   16  lbs.,  per  lb 0  43  0  44 

16  to  20  lbs.,  per  lb.    ...• 0  38 

Boneless,  8-16  lbs.,  per  Ibb 0  48 

Skinned,  14-18  lbs.,  per  lb 0  47 

Skinned,   18-22  lbs.,  per  lb 0  44 


LARD. — There  has  been  an  advance 
of  half  cent  per  p»und  on  shortening, 
and  is  now  quoted  at  14  cents  per  pound 
in  tierces  of  400  pounds  with  20  pound 
wooden  pails  offered  at  $3.20  per.  pail. 
The   lard   market   continues   steady. 

Pure  lard,  No.  1  qualty,  per 

lb.   (in  tierces  400  lbs.)    0  IC 

Do.,    wooden    pails,    20-Ib. 

pails    3  60 

Shortening      (woodes     paiis, 

20-lb.  pails),  per  pail 3  20 

Short'iiig,  tierces  o'  400  lbs 6  14 

Poultry  Unchanged 


POULTRY.  -Tlie  market  is  quiet  under 
light   receipts  and  little  demand.  Quota- 
tions remain  unchanged. 
D.P.  Chickens,  3^2  lb.  &  under 0  36 

Do..  31/2   lbs.  and  over    0  39 

D.P.  Fowl,  3y2  lbs.  and  under 0  32 

Do.,  31/2   lbs.  and  over 0  34 

Turkeys,  mixed  weights   0  48     0  50 

Hog  Market  Steady 


FRESH  MEATS.— Hog  quotations  have 
adyanced  and  selected  live  hogs  are 
quoted  at  |11.25  per  hundredweight. 
Choice  killing  steers  are  selling  at  %(i.2^t 
to  $6.75  while  those  of  fair  to  good 
quality  are  ranging  from  $4.75  to  $8.00. 
Butcher  heifers  of  good  choice  quality 
are  offered  from  $5.00  to  $6.50.  Sheep 
and  lambs  are  lacking  in  quality  and 
are  quoted  at  $2.50  to  $3.50  with  just  a 
few  of  the  better  grade  selling  at  $5.50. 

Selected,    live,   cwt 11  25 

Light 11  00  11  50 

Sows   6  06     6  50 

lb 0  23     0  31 

Fresh  hams,  lb 0  25     0  33 

Picnics,    lb 0  18 

Shoulders    0  16     0  20 

Hind    quarters,    lb 0  14     0  20 

Front   quarters,  lb 0  0«i/^  0  08% 

Choice,  lb "   0  24 

hoice  Stews    0  08V& 

hind   quarters    0  25 

Selected,  live,  cwt 11   25 

Heavier     8  25     10  25 

Light 11  25 

Sows   6  25       7  25 

Fresh   Pork 

Legs  of  pork,  up  to  35  lbs. 

lb 0  25       0  31 

Spare   ribs    0  18 

Loins  of  pork,  lb 0  29       0  32 

Fresh  hams,  11) 0  18 

Picnics,  lb 0  16       0  20 

Shoulders     0  13       0  19 

Fresh  Beef — from  Steers  and  Heifers — 

Hind  quarters,  lb 0  07       0  09 

Front  quarters,  lb 0  07       0  09 

Whole  carcass,  good  grade, 

lb 0  101/2  0  13 


MutlOH — 

Choice,  lb 0  17 

Choice  long  hinds  (leg  and 

loin)    0  26 

Choice  Stews   0  10 

Lambs- — 

Choice,  30-45  lbs 0  22 

Veal- 
Good  veal,     40   to  80   lbs., 
hind  quarters 0  16 

Western  Sir.elts  Arrive 


FISH. — A  small  shipment  of  Western 
smelts  have  arrived  and  are  selling  freely 
at  20  cents  per  pound.  There  is  a  fair 
demand  for  all  kinds  ef  fish  with  quota- 
tions Hnchanged. 

Wack  Cod,  lb 

Brills,  lb 0  09 

Herring,  Lake  Superior,    100 

lbs,    sacks,    new    stock    ....     3  80 
Halibut,  chicken,     cases  300 

lbs 0  15'^ 

Do.,  broken  oases    0  16% 

.lacktish,  dressed 

Pickerel,  case  lots 

Salmon —  ' 

Cohoe,  full  boxes,  300  lbs 0  19 

Do.,  in  broken  cases 0  30 

Red  Spring,  in  fill  boxes 

Do.,  broken  cases 

Soles   e  09 

P.Hby  Whites  or  Tubilees 

Whitefish.  dressed,  case  lots  ....     0  13% 
Do.,  broken   casrs 0  14% 

SMOKED  FISH 
Bloaters.    Eastern    National, 

case    3  50 

Do..  Western,  20-lb.  boxes, 

box    2  10 

Haddies,  30-lb.  cases,  lb 0  14 

Do.,  in  15-lb.  cases,  lb 0  14 

Kippers,  East,  Nat.,  20  count, 

p.?r  cov.i-t    3  75 

Do.,    West.      20-lb.    boxes, 

box 2  25 

Fillets,  1.5-lb.  boxes,  lb 0  20 

SALT  FISH 

Steak   Cod.   2s,   Seely's,    lb 

Acadia      Strip      Cod,      30-lb. 

boxes,  lb 

Acadia     Cod.      12-as,     wood 

boxes,  lb 

Do..  20-1  s,  tablets,  lb ..'.      ..[', 

Holland  H'ring,  Milkers,  9-lb. 

Do.,  pails,  per  pail 1  35 

Do.,  mixed,  9-lb.  pails,  per 

pail    1  25 

Labrador     herrings.     100-lb. 

bbls.,  per  barrel   7  OO 


GETTING  TOGETHER 

A  country  store*teeper  was  standing 
in  front  of  hi.s  place  one  morning  when 
a  man  came  along  leadin,-;  a  couple  of 
old  and  weary-looking  nags. 

"Want   a    boss?"   he   inquired. 

"Guess  not." 

"I'll  trade  yon  one  for  goods,"  said 
the  man. 

"I'll  take  it  out  in  terbaccer,  in  fact." 

"Alight  make  a  dicker  along?  those 
lines."  said  the  storekeeper,  "provided 
we  kin  agree  on  a  basis." 

"What's    your   babsis?" 

"Well,  I'll  trade  with  you  plug  for 
plug." 


July  15,  1921  CANADIAN  G.ROCE R— Provision  Section 


41 


HEADCHEESE 

Now  that  the  weallier  is  becoming  so  iiuicii  warmer,  there  is  every  opportunity  lor  a 

dealer  to  increase  Jiis  voIunHs  l)y  featurinii;  a  line   of  cold  luncheon   delicacies, 

which  are  admirably  suitable  for  summer  trade.    Davies  Headcheese  is  one 

of  these  jellied  meats  which  commands  ready  sale,  l)ecause  of  its  (jual- 

ity  and  consistency-    being  of  good  texture,   with   no  small 

particles  of  bone  or  gristle. 

There  are  many  other  lines  of  Cooked  and  Jellied  Meats  wliich  can  be  featured  to 
good  aiivanlage  as  cold  luncheon  specials,  and  which  are  bound  to  create  demand. 
Make   vour   customers   know   vou    carrv  them. 


A  few  of  these  are 


(< 


Peerless"  Bung  Bologna,  ''Perfection"     Cooked     Square 

Davies  Jellied  Hocks  Hams, 

Davies  Pressed  Beef,  im     r     .-      >>     r^     i     i      o 

r\     •       I  11-  J  D     IT-  Perfection        Cooked     bquare 

Uavies  Jellied  Pork  longue, 

Davies  Jellied  Veal,  ^^^**' 

Davies  Ox  Tongue,  "Perfection"  Roast  Hams, 


We  solicit  your  enquiries  for  any  of  the  above,  or  will  gladly  supi)ly  you  wilii  a 

list  of  our  complete  lines,  upon  recjuest. 

Write  us  to-day.  Special  attention  given  to    Mail  Orders. 


"  THE  Tl  m\  7f  fjQCOMPM 
WILLlAMLfiW  lEOuMlTED 

TORONTO 
MONTREAL  Sfc'DNEY  HAMILTON 


'/ 


42 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


7  Direct  Lines  Out  of  Stratford 

Make  It  tlie  Quickest  Shipping  Centre 

We  carry  full  lines  of  Staple  Groceries,  Foreign  and  Domestic  Fruits  in  Season. 

"Buy  your  fruits  where  you  buy  your  groceries  and  your  groceries  where 
you  buy  your  fruits"  —  saving  double  freight  and  double  cartage. 

Phones— Office  297  and  298.  Residence  310,  Shipping  Room  256.  Nighl  Call  897. 

James  Lloyd  &  Son         box  no.  266         Stratford,  Ont, 


When  You  Are  In  Need  Of 
GRAPE   JUICE 

KEMEHBER  THAT 

MARSH'S 

GRAPE     JUICE 

Is  (priced  to  .enable 
you  to  seU  at  popular 
prices  and  that  the 
result  o  f  stocking 
Marsh's  is  larger  sales 
and   more   profit. 

ORDER  MARSH'S 

The  quality  is  right  too 


The  Marsh  Grape 
Juice  Company 

Niagara    Falls,    Ont. 

Agfiits  lor  Ont.nrio,  Quebec  and 
Maritime  I'ruvince-.: 

The   MacLaren   Wright, 
Ltd. 

Toronto    and    Montreal 

Agents    for    Rritish    CoUimhia  : 

F.  G.  EVANS  CO.  Ltd. 

T.-ronlo  anil  iMontre.il 


Slllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinimillllllira 

y         THE  'HKST    lUV   IX  THK  SI.ICEK   MARK  F.  T  1 

i  DOMINION    SLICER  | 


>IADE  IN 
CANADA 


'.ir 


S225 


Dominioti  Slirers  have  tewcr 
workiny^  parts,  are  niore  easily 
cleaned  and  operated  and  are 
more  sanitary  rhan  other  mach- 
ines. They  do  anything:  that 
other  sheers  will  do  and  arc 
much     ess  expensive. 


nomtnion  Slicers  aire  m-ade  trom 
the  finest  materials  by  skilled 
(Janadtans.  They  are  the  most 
efficient  and  most  reasonably 
pnVetl  slieer  made,  at^ui  are  g"aar- 
anteeJ  for  one  year* 


I 


WRITE  FOR   ILLUSTRATED   BOOKLET 


Dominion     Slicer     Corporation 

110  Church  St.,  Toronto 

III 


uiiiiian: 


^^J 

1 

T|||i 

CANADA 

1  MAPLESYRUP 

II 

f^^r^-J'?- 

III 

-""■-=7— " 

IP 

jpr 

PRIDE  OF  CANADA 

Pure   Maple   Syrup 

Will  please  your  most  particular  customers. 
Guaranteed  Absolutely  Pure. 
Have  a  good  Stock  on  hand  for  the  Summer   and  Fall  Trade 

REPRESENTATIVES:  W.  L.  Mackenzie  &  Co.,  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Regina,  Saskatoon,  Calgary  and  Edmon- 
ton-   Oppenheimer  Bros.,  Limited,  V»ficouver,  B.  C;     S.  H.  P.  Mackenzie  &  Co..  33  Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 
J.  \V.  Gorham  &  Co.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

MAPLE  TREE  PRODUCERS  ASSOCIATION  LIMITED 

OFFICES:  58  WELLINGTON  ST.W.,MONTREAL 


k 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


43 


iiiiiiiii iiniiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiuiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^^^^^ 

PURiry  pmuR  I 


f'URiTy  FLOUP 


98  Lbs. 

BRANDON      ""-LS^T     eomQN' 
_^  GOOEBICH  ^ 


Window    Displays 

All    the    material    for    a   successful    window    trim    by 
first  mail,  after  we  receive  your  request. 

Attractive    windows    mean    better    business. 

Drop  us  a  line. 

Western   Canada   Flour  Mills  Co., 

Limited 

Toronto  -  -  Winnipeg 


OATS 


PURITY   OATS 


Is  Your 

Guarantee 


This  name  is  your  assurance  of    freshness  —  Pure    sweet     milk. 
Do    your    customers    like  things  fresh? 
Drimilk    made    to-day    and  delivered  to-morrow. 
This  means  something. 

THE  DRIMILK   CO,,   LIMITED 
Cortland,    Ont 


I 

■ 


Donald  H.  Bain  C!o., 
Winnipeg 

Western   Distributors 


Executive  Offices  :  Spadina  Crescent,  Toronto 

Eastern  Offices    :    10  Ste.   Sophie  Lane,  Montreal. 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuBuiiyii^ 


44 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


Cane's  Pencils,  extensively  advertised, 
are  as  good  as  represented  to  be  both 
as  pencils  and  as  profitable  sellers.  The 
counter  or  window  display  box  illus- 
trated here  is  in  colors  and  particularly 
adapted  for  attractive  advertising  pur- 
poses. 

Every  Wholesale  Grocer  in  Canada 
stocks  these  standard  lines.  Order 
through  Your  Wholesaler. 

Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Co.,  Ltd. 

Newmarket,  Ontario 


CHARM 

is  making  a  "hit" 
everywhere 


This  ^^'ondt•rf^ll  new 
cleaner  is  proving  an 
unusually  rapid  selltT. 
Sales  everywhere  injdi- 
catc  that  housewives  are 
quickly  finding  out  that 
CVann  fills  a  long-felt 
want' 


"CHARM    cleans    Everything'' 

It  SAVES  SOAP,  CUTS  GREASE,  SOFTENS  WATSK  and 
will  not  injure  tabrics  or  the  skin.  L'se  it  on  anything  Ask  your 
wholesaler    fi>r   a   trial   order. 


Gait  Chemical  Products,  Ltd. 


Gait,  Ontario 


I  SAMUEL   DOBREE 
I  ^  SONS 


m 


:»■ 


■Si 


LONDON,   ENGLAND 
Eslahhshed  17lh  Centurv 


Growers  and  Producers  of  m 

I   SUGAR    '    MOLASSES   | 
COCOA  I 


IMPORTERS  AND  EXPORTERS 

Branches    in    all   parts   of   the   civilized   world 

Canadian    Branch 

UPPER  WATER  STREET 
HALIFAX,  N.S. 


'M 


^ttUiVAlliuklVAii^iiiiKililUiUii^^^^^ 


-OR„5TOVES 

SHEET  lROf<  AMD 

STOyt  PIPES 


GUARANTEED 

N0N5UGH  M"F'GC°LiMiTED 
TORONTO 


NONSUCH 

Liquid  Stove  Dressing  is  guar- 
anteed to  make  for  you  satis- 
fied customers,  it  being  the 
highest  grade  and  best  polish 
manufactured. 

Also  manufacturers  of 

LILY    WHITE    SHOE    DRESS- 
ING 

LILY  WHITE   CAKE    (for   can- 
vas  shoes.) 

NONSUCH   BLACK  CAT   SHOE 

DRESSING 

"Made  in  Canada" 


Selling  Agenls  tor  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan  and  Alberta 

Stroyan,    Dunvvoody    Co. 

Confederation  Lite  Bldg. 

Winnlpep^ 

THE  NONSUCH  MFG.  CO. 

LIMITED 
TORONTO,   CAN. 


July  15,   1921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


45 


iiiiiiiiiflniiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiinyiuiiiu! 


True   Orange 
Marmalade 

This  delicious  preserve  has  be- 
come a  favorite  in  thousands  of 
Canadian  homes.  It  is  a  mar- 
malade you  can  safely  recom- 
mend to  those  customers  who 
appreciate  quality  combined 
with  value. 

Manufacturers 

EtfPERIAX    EXTRACT    COMPACT 
TORONTO 


iiiiiHiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiii!iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


A    LINE 

WORTH 

PUSHING 


Jelly  Powders 
and  Extracts 

Two  members  of  the  Shirriff 
"quality"  group  that  it  will  pay 
you  well  to  push. 

SHIRRIFF'S    Jelly    Powders 

offer  exceptional  opportunities 
during  the  summer  months. 

Sole   Selling  Agents 

IIAHOLD   F.  RITCHIE   &   CO.  LTD. 

Toruiito  und  Montreal 


Car  of 


Papnis 

Pie 
Plates 


Price  Right 

WALTER  WOODS  &  Co. 

Hamilton   and  Winnipeg 


4-ONE-BOXES 
and  CRATES 

"SEALED  TIGHT  —  KEPT  RIGHT" 


"We  challenge  even  an  expert  to  re- 
move goods  from  our  cases  after  they  have 
been  properly  sealed  without  leaving  trace 
of  such  tampering." 

Wm.  Wrigley  Jr.  Co. 

They  are  Strong,   Light,   Economical. 
Bound  with  steel  wires —  4-One  Boxes 
simply  cannot  come  apart. 

They    meet    every  requirement  of  the 
domestic  or  export  shipper. 

Write  for  literature  to  Dept-  "G" 


CANADIAN    WIREBOUND    BOXES, 
LIMITED 

1000  Gerrard  St.  East,  Toronto 


46 


ANADIAN    GROCER 


July   15,  1921 


INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 


Cool  Fruits  for 

the  Hot  Weather 


Watermelons 


Cantaloupes 


California 
Peaches       Pears 

Canadian 
Cherries      Raspberries 

ALSO 

Lemons  Oranges 


Plums 


Blueberries     m 


Bananas 


—Special  Prices  on  Ice  Cream  Cones- 
Order  your  requirements  early  to 
avoid  disappointments 


I    HUGH  WALKER  &  SON,  LTD.  | 

1  The  House  of  Quality  ■ 

I  GUELPH        -        ONTARIO  | 

liiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^'oiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


I   For    the    Tourist 

o* 
•o 

o* 

i  Trade 

•o 
•o 

§8        __________ 

•o 
o* 
•o 

o» 

i     California  Plums,     all  good  varieties 

'§ 

o« 

11  Georgia  Peaches      Cantaloupes 

ss 

Watermelons  Tomatoes 

Bananas         Oranges         Lemons 


^ 


The    best   of   everything   in  | 

•o 

Imported    &    Domestic  | 

•o 

Fruits  &  Vegetables  | 

•o 

-  ss 

^o 

o* 

WHITE  &  CO.,  LTD.   I 

•o 

Fruits  of  Quality  TORONTO     I! 


A 

Acadia    Sugar    Refining 

Co.,  Ltd.    Inside  backcover 
Artist  Supply   Co 47 

B 

Bain  &  Co.,  Donald  H.    . ,    8 

Baker,  Walter  &  Co 48 

Bickle  &   Greening,   John 

W.   &   Co 15 

Borden    Co.,    Ltd 1 

Bradstreet's     48 

Bush   &   Co..   W.    J 13 

C 

Canada  Barrels  &  Keg 

Ltd    47 

Cane  Wm.  &  Sons  Co.,  Ltd  44 

Carnation    Milk    14 

Can.  Nashua  Paper  Co.  . .  ^8 
Can.  Wire  Bound  Boxes 

Ltd 45 

Ch<ad\vick  &  Wright    11 

Channel  Limited,  Inside 
Flront  cover 

Codville    Co 10 

Clark    Ltd.,    W 3 

Columbia  Macaroni  Co.    ..   6 

Crosse   &   Blackwell    4 

Crothers  W.   J.  &  Co.    ..   14 

D 

Davies  &  Co.,  Wm.  Ltd.  41 
Dayton  Scale  Co.  back  cover 
Dobree  &  Sons    .........   44 

Dominion    Slicer    42 

Dominion   Canners   B.    C. 

Ltd 6 

Drimilk   Co.,   Ltd 43 

Duncan  &  Sons,  C 8 

E 

Emond    .Jos 12 

Eno  J.   C.    Co.    Ltd 16 

Elbs,  John  G 42 

Escott  Co.,  Ltd.,  W.  H.  10 
Estabrooks   Co.,   Ltd.,   T. 

H 17 

Eureka   Refrigerator   Co. 

Ltd 7 

F 

Frost  Moorm;an  &  Co  ....  11 

G 

Gait  Chemical  Co 44 

Goldie  &  McCullough  Co.   17 

H 

H.arablin-Brereton     .....  11 

Harrisons  &  Crosfield  ...  13 

Hayne,   John    47 

Hanson,   Co.,   Ltd.,   J.    H.  12 

Howard's    Ltd 48 

Hunt  J.    B.,  &  Co IZ 

I 

Imperial  Grain  &  Mill- 
ing  Co 7 

Imperial  Extract  Co 45 

Island  Lead  Mills  Ltd.    ..  16 

K 
Kidd,  T .   Ashmore   11 


L 

Lachaine,    Geo.    D 12 

Laing  &  Waters   11 

Langley  Harris  &  Co.  Ltd.  11 
Laurane   Chocolates   Front 
Cover. 

Lemieux,  Victor  A 12 

Lloyd  Jas.   &  Son    42 

Loggie   Sons  &   Co 11 

M 

McLauchlau,  J.  K 11 

McLay    Brokerage   Co    ...    8 
M,acdonald   Reg.,   W.    C.    .    2 

Mackenzie,    W.    L.     8 

Mickle,  Geo.  T 11 

Moore  &  Co.  R.    M 47 

Magor,  Son  &  Co 18 

Marsh  Grape  Juice  Co.   ..  42 
Maple   Tree   Producers' 
Assn.,    Ltd. 42 


N 
Nonsuch    Mfg.,    Co. 


O 


44 


Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  John  9 
O'Donnell  &  Co.,  John  J.  li 
O'Keefe's    Ltd e 


Patrick  &  Co.,  W.  G.  ..  1' 
Pennock  &  Co.,  H.    P.    . .    :* 

R 

Red  Rose  Tea    17 

Rock  City  Tobacco  Co.   In- 
side   backcover 
Ross   Can   Co 47 

S 

Salada    Tea   Co.    Ltd.     ..    18 

Sanator    Limited    15 

Scott   Bathgate    Co.,    Ltd.    10 

Scott  &  Thomas   11 

So-Clean    Ltd.     47 

Soper  E.   N.   &  W.   E.    ..   11 

St.   Arnaud  Fils  Cie    12 

Standard    Computing 

Scale  Co.  Ltd 16 

Stickney  &  Poor  Spice  Co.  7 
Stroyan-Dunwoody  Co.  . .  8 
Stuart    Limited     » 

T 

Thompson,  A .    E 10 

Thum    Co.    (Tanglefoot) 

O .   &  W 47 

Tippet  &  Co.,  Ltd 12 

Toronto  Pottery  Co.,  Ltd.  47 

Toronto  Salt  Works   47 

Trent    Mfg.,    Co 47 

W 

Walker  Hugh  &  Son 46 

Wallace   Fisheries,   Ltd    . .    7 

W^atson    &   Truesdale    » 

Waterloo    Broom    and 

Brush  Co 11 

Western  Can.  Flour  Mills  43 

White    &    Co 46 

White    Cottell's    -47 

Woods  &  Co.,  Walter  . . .  4S 
Williams  Storage  Co.  . .  9 
Wiley,  Frank  H & 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


47 


BUYERS'  MARKET  GUIDE 
Latest  Editorial  Market  News 


S<oiie>varo   ilnrs 

FI«>w«T    I'ols 

I  oil    I'cits 

tilassware 

Please  ask  for  copy  of 
latest  catalogue 

The  TORONTO  POTTERY 

CO,  Limited 

Toronto 


We  are  now  located  in  our  new  and 
more  spacious  warehouse  at 

60-62  JARVIS  STREET 

TORONTO  SALT  WORKS 

GEO.  J.  CLIFF 

WHITE-COTTELL'S 

Best  English  Malt  Vinegar 

QUALITY  VINEGAR 

White,    Cottell    &    Co,    Cat^tbrrwell,    London,    Eng. 

Agents 

W.    Y'.    COLCLOUGH.    Room    203-23    Scott    St. 

Toronto 

STROYAN-DUNWOODY    CO. 

Confederation    Life    Buildini; 

Winnipeg,  Man. 

OPPENHEIMEK    BROS..    LTD. 
Vancouver,  U.  C. 
BAIRD  &  CO..  xrerchcnts,  St.  Jotin's,   Nfld. 

Order    f   ;ini    your    Jobber    today 

"SOCLEAN" 

the    dustTcss    sw?  sn^np    componntl 

SOCLEAN,  LIMITED 

Manufacturers  TOKUNTO.     Ont. 

.M'jiitrcal     Agents: — Vigneault     &     MucGillivray 

7    Bonsecours  St.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Ottawa    Agents:  — W.    R.    Barnard,    Zl  \    Bank    St. 


BARRELS 

From    5    to   50   Gallons.   For   Liquid    (Dnlaincrs 
PROMPT     SHFPME.NTS 

CANADA  BARRELS  &  KEGS,  Limited 

WATERLOO,  ONT. 


Your  Wants 

are  many  here 

below.    Use  the 

Want  Ad.    page 

and  get  rid  of  a 

few  of  them. 

CALIFORNIA    FRUIT 
PACK  LIGHT 

PRICES    LOWER 


Opening  prices  on  the 
1921  pack  of  California 
canned  fruits  are  not  yet 
announced;  but  an  an- 
noucement  to  this  effect  is 
expected  any  time.  Up  to 
the  present  time  there  are 
only  eleven  factories  pack- 
ing The  prices  paid  for 
fruit  is  only  about  one- 
third  of  the  amount  paid 
last  season.  This  would 
indicate  that  prices  on  can- 
ned fruits  can  be  expected 
to  be  considerably  below 
that  of  last  year. 

The  packing  of  aspara- 
gus is  practically  at  an  end 
in  California,  Early  in  the 
season,  it  was.  announced 
that  the  crop  was  coming 
on  in  poor  shape,  and  the 
hope  was  expressed  that 
this  condition  would  mend 
but  such  did  not  prove  to 
be  the  case  and  the  pack 
will  be  even  below  the 
early  estimates. 


GAS  MANTLES. 

THE    MANTLtS   THAT  YOU-" 
CAN  TIE  IN  A  KNOT  WITHOUT 

damact.tSuperscde  all 

OTHER  STYLES  FomH«RTK>_ 


PACIFIC  CdAST  MANTLE  rACTORY 


.30   DOZEN   C.\SE   FILLERS 
ONE    DOZEN    C.VHTON    FILLERS 
%-lNCH    CUSHION    FILLERS 
<(>iIi:rGATED  FLATS 

The  TRENT  MFG.  CO.,  LTD. 

TRENTON,  ONT. 


CANS 

All  paper,  all  tin  and  combin 
ation  tin  and  paper  for  paints, 
jam,  cocoa,  spices,  drug  special- 
ties   and    household    utilities. 

ROSS  CAN  CO.  LIMITED, 

Bowmanville,    Ont. 


BARRELS 


For  all  purposes.  The  best  pack 
age  for  exporting.  I  can  make  them 
to  suit   your  goods. 

JOHN  HAYNE 

Imperial  Bldg.  SARNIA,  ONT. 


^PRODUCTS  § 

Sticky  Fly  Paper. StickyFlyRibbo.v, 

TREeTaNGLEFOOT.  ffOACH---'A\T POWDLR. 

TheO*W.Thum  CcManufacturers. 

CRANDRAPIDS.Micu.  WAIK£KVILL£,Cai(ASA. 


SIGN  WRITING 

Do  your  own  Card  Writing 

Write    for    our    Catalogue    whicli    will    tell    ;  nil 
what   you    need.    Best    i<:oods    at    Closets    Price-. 

ARTIST'S  SUPPLY  CO. 

77    York    S..,    Toronto 
Mention  this  paper  when   writinir 


These 

one-inch 

spaces 

only  $2 

.20  per  in 

sertion 

if  used 

eacli  issue 
year. 

in  the 

48 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  15,  1921 


WANTED 


*Tpwo  experienced  butchers  wanted  in  a 
-*•  brusy  county  town  store.  Give  refer- 
-ences  and  previous  experience,  also 
"wjages.  Apply,  Box  56  Canadian  Grocer 
153    University    Ave.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

"^orthern  Ontario  Salesmjan  residing  in 
■^  ~  ,the  territory  seeks  Candy  and  Drug- 
gists lines,  if  you  want  regular  and  con- 
^sistent  trade  get  in  touch  with  Box  60 
Canadian  Grocer,  153  University  Ave., 
Toronto,  Ont. 


POR  SALE 


l^or  Sale: —  General  store,  groceries, 
■*  boots  and  shoes  and  drygoods,  also 
ice  cream  parlor  attached.  Doing  very 
goofl  busines^s,  located  in  best  stand  in 
town  near  C.  P.  R.  roundhouse  and 
station  and  chemical  plant.  Stock  will 
"be  reduced  if  desired.  All  new  fixtures 
and  most  uip-to-date  general  store.  Must 
be  sold  quickly.  Owner  going  on  ex- 
tended trip,  reason  for  selling.  Apply 
Box  939,   Trenton,  Ont. 

j*'~^eneral  store  for  sale  in  small  village 
^in    country    near    town    of    Renfrew, 
«jnt.,  five  miles  from  station.   No  oppos- 
ition.   Power  line  passes  door.    Eleccric. 


lights  about  to  be  installed.  Situated  on 
country  highway.  School  and  Presby- 
terian Church  in  village.  Turnover  about 
ten  thousand  could  be  increased  to  six- 
teen or  seventeen  thousand.  Apply  Box 
58.  Canadian  Grocer,  153  University  Ave. 
Toronto,  Ont. 

Tj^very  merchant  who  seeks  maximum 
■^  efficiency  should  ask  himself  whether 
a  Gipe-Hazard  Cash  Carrier,  as  a  time 
and  labor  saver,  is  not  worth  more  than 
the  high-priced  labor  which  it  liberates. 
Are  you  willing  to  learn  more  about  our 
carriers?  If  so,  send  for  our  new  Cata- 
logue J.  Gipe-Hazard  Store  Service  Co., 
Limited,  113  Sumach  St.,  Toronto. 


ESTABLISHED   1849 

Brad  street's 

OfficesThroufihout  the  Civilized  World 
We   Present   a   Record 
N.«»t   a   I'rospectus 

Reputation  gained  by  years  of 

vigorou.<i,  c'onscientlrus  and 

sucessful  work. 

John    A.    Thompson 

General  Maoatrer  Western  Canada 
TORONTO 


Good  Sellers 
make  business  easy 

BAKER'S 

Cocoa  and  Chocolate 

on  the  market  and  con- 
sistently adver- 
tised for  years, 
are  the  recog- 
nized  standards 
of  the  trade. 
They  are  the 
first  choice  of' 
good  housekeep- 
ers. 

Made  in  Canada  by 

Walter  Baker  &  Co.  Limited 

Dorchester.  Mass.  Montreal,  Can, 

Established  1780 


Say  You    Saw  It  In    CaiiadiSan    Grocer, 
It  Will  Help   To  Identify  Ton. 


AQENCIES 

We  are  open  to  accept  sole  agencies  for  first 
class  lines  in  connection  with  General  Wholesale 
Groceries.  We  cover  Nova  Scotia.  Our  affiliated 
friemis  have  branches  in  all  parts  of  the  world. 

HOWARDS'   LljVIITED 


Whole.sale  Grocc 
Oobrees'   Wharves.. 


Import  and    Export 

Dartmouth....    Nova   Scotia. 


Affiliated  with  Messrs.   Samuel  Dobree  &  Sons, 
London        England 


Triangle 
Sanitary 


Waxed 
Papers 


A  Quality  line,  winch  Oualily  Wholesale  Grocers  will  wart 
to  handle.      Our   I'rices  are  competative  and  Service  unexcelled. 
Enquiries  Solicited. 

CANADIAN    NASHUA    PAPER    CO. 

LIMITED 

Peterborough        =        ONT. 


CANADIAN    G  R U C K K 


ROYAL 


^CADI/J 
SUGAR 


What  Brand  of  Sugar  Do  You  Recommend? 

The  grocers'  recommendation  is  usually  the  deciding  factor 
in  sugar  sales. 

Sugar  as  a  rule  is  not  asked  for  by  name.  But  the  dealer  is 
always  justified  in  recommending  ROYAL  ACADIA — the 
sugar  that's  always  good. 

Every  Grain  Pure  Cane.  When  she  asks  for  sugar  give  her 
Royal  Acadia  brand. 

Acadia  Sugar  Refining  Co.,  Ltd. 

Montreal,  Que.  -  -  -  Halifax,  N.S. 


Master  Mason 

The  Plug  Smoking  Tobacco  which 
MAKES  AND   HOLDS 
CUSTOMERS 


There  is  more  real  "smoke  joy" 

in     a     pipe     packed     tight  with 

Master  Mason  than  your  cus- 
tomers ever  dreamed  of. 

If  you're  anxious  to  please  them, 
with  excellent  profits  to  yourself, 
just  recommend  Master  Mason — 
the  peer  of  "Joy  Smokes." 


Rock  City  Tobacco  Co. 

Limited 
QUEBEC    and    WINNIPEG 


C  A  X  A  D  I  A  N    G  R  0  C  E  R 


i 


Confidence 


The  confidence  that  customers  have  in  the  grocer 
and  his  clerks  is  based  upon  confidence  in  the 
equipment  the  store  employs. 


High  Grade  Business  Machinery 
assures  a  customer  automatic  pro- 
tection. 

Dayton  Scales,  Dayton  Meat  Slicers 
and  Dayton  Cheese  Cutters  are  the 
highest  grade  store  service  givers  in 
the  world.    They  have  stood  the  test 


of  time  and  have  established  a  bond 
of  confidence  and  good  will  between 
customers  and  merchants  in  a  mil- 
lion stores. 

Dayton  equipment  assures  to  the 
customer  full  value  for  money  spent 
and  assures  to  the  merchant  his  full 
profits  to  the  fraction  of  a  cent. 


DAYTON 

INTERNATIONAL  BUSINESS  MACHINES  Co., 

Limited 

FRANK   E.  MUTTON,  Vice-President  and  General  Manager 

HEAD  OFFICE  and  FACTORY,         -        -         300  Campbell  Avenue.  Toronto. 

For  your  convenience  we  have   Service  and  Sales  Offices   in   Vancouver.    Caleary.    Edmonton, 
Regina,     Saskatoon,    Winnipeg,    Walkerville,    London,    Hamilton,    Toronto,     Ottawa,    Montreal, 
Quebec,    Haifax,    St.   John's,    Nfld. 

Also    manufacturers    of   Internati    :ud    Time   Recorders   and   International 
Elecinc    Tabulators    and    Sorters. 


^AGGURACYt 


Dayiom     satt       motions,      minutes 
money.  They  enable  fewer   clerlis 

to.gite  bellt    serciee    in  less   lime. 


(ANAMAN  Grocer 

Members  of  The  Associated  Business  Papers  —  Only  Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 


VOL.  XXXV. 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

PUBLICATION  OFFICE:  COLLINGWOOD,  ONT.,  JULY  22,  1921 


No.  29 


K<ii?^l??^lif^it<^lr?^lff^!yit[t;^li?^ltrii!??^lT<^li^ 


CANADIAI<I    GROCER 


^MuiriiriiiiiiMiniriiiiiiiriiiMiMiitiiMiiMiii 


INIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIli       i 


A    BEAUTIFUL    WARDROBE 


is  no  longer  beyond  the  reach  of  the  average  woman — she 
can  do  such  wonderful  things  with  Aladdin  Dye  Soap;  re- 
newing old  dresses,  adding  a  touch  of  color  to  under-gar- 
ments,  effecting  any  desired  color-change  in  a  blouse  that 
has  become  faded. 

Aladdin  is  a  wonderful  economizer — instead  of  buying 
new  garments,  the  modern  woman  merely  washes  her  old 
ones  with  Aladdin — which  gives  them  the  freshness  of  a 
delightful  color-transformation. 

It  is  this  economy  feature  that  has  so  much 
to  do  with  Aladdin  saleability. 

The  Revolving  Display  Stand  we  supply  is 
a  potent  factor  in  directing  your  customers' 
attention  to  the  goods. 

Put  one  of  these  Stands  on  your 
counter — let  Aladdin  display  its 
power  of  sales-attraction. 


CHANNELL    LIMITED 


TORONTO 


Distributors  for  Aladdin  Dye  Soap 

Manufacturers  of  O-Cedar   Products 


^IIHUIIUIIMIMIMIIIIIMMIMIIIIIIIMMirillMIIMIIIMIIMIIMIMMMMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIinilllUIIMIMIMIMIIMMJMMJIIHINIMIMIIIIMMIIMMMIMIIllllMIIIIMIMIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIM 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


The  grocer  who  works  from  the 
neck  up— never  labors  from  the 
neck  down. 


As  Andrew  Carnegie  did  more  thioking,  the  less  phys- 
ics.! labor  he  indulged  in. 

The  time  for  the  grocer  to  do  his  best  thinking  is  when 
he  buys. 

That  it  takes  ten  times  the  labor  and  effort  to  move 
certain  unknown  or  poorly  advertised  goods  is  a  fact 
well  known  to  every  gf'Ocer. 

The  k'cason  for  the  national    popularity    of    Postum, 

Grape-Nuts  and  Post  Toasties  is  not  accidental. 

Advertising  with  the  Jostum  Cereal  Company  is  not  a 
fad.     It's  a  clean  business   policy. 

That's  why  the  sale  of  Postum,  Grape- 
Nuts  and  Post  Toasties  is  guaranteed 
— insuring  to  the  grocer  positive  and 
profitable   turnover  on  a  line   of 
leading,   wholesome   fcods   uneq- 
ualled in  quality. 

Canadian    Postum  Cereal  Co»,  Ltd. 

Windsor,  Ontario,  Canada 


ANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


THE      ^^OUALITV"      THAT     SELLS 


CLfARK*S 

Prepared  Foods 


Corned  Beef  ^ 

Roast     Beef 
English     Brawn 

Irish     Stew 
Ox     Tongue 

Lunch     Tongue 


Pork   and   Beans 
Soups  (13  kinds) 

Potted     Meats 

Cambridge  Sausage 

Veal    Loaf 
Beef     Loaf 


Tongue  Ham  &  Veal,     Canadian   Boiled  Dinner,    Sliced  Smoked  Beef 

Tomato  Ketchup,     Peanut  Butter,     Table  Syrup 

Spaghetti   with  Tomato   Sauce   and   Cheese 

And  other   good  things 


Mado  In  Canada — By  a  StricUy  Canadian  Company 


Sell   Clark's 


Make   Satisfied   Customers 


Increase   Your   Business 


W.   CLARK,    LIMITED 


iV\ont  real 


4 


CANADIAN    GROeER 


Jaly  22.  1921 


Give  a  receipt 

and  get  all  yoisr  money 

The  right  way  to  handle  a  sale 

1.  Collect  the  goods  at  the 
w.rapping  counter  beside 
the   register. 

2.  TeJl  the  customer  the  price 
and  get  the  money. 

3.  Register  the  sale. 

4.  Wrap  the  receipt  in  the 
parcel. 

5.  Give  parcel  and  change  to 
the  customer. 

The  customer  gets  quick  service. 

The  clerk  gets  credit  for  making  the 
sale. 

The  merchant  gets  all  of  his  profits. 


*A-1.50    -0126   JUM 18-21 

"V,::'         Amounr       ''.'.X"  Dale 

THIS  IS  A  RECEIPT  FOR  YOUR 
•  PURCHASE. 

THE  RANO-JOHNSON  CO. 

NEW  YORK 


Wrap  this  receipt  in  the  parcel 


Get  thia  receipt  inside  the  register 


/f^JOonal 


And  get  all  your  money 


We  make  cash  re^isteS^s  for  every  line  of  business 

NATIOTSTAL 


REGISTER 

OF    CANADA    LIMITED 


Jttiy  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


e 


A 
to 


Quarter  Million  Dollars 
Teach  Women  io  Bake 


And  more  baking  means  more  buying 

Figuring  our  total  investment  in  Five  Roses  Books  on  the  basis  of  to- 
day's actual  net  cost  (over  40  cents  per  copy),  the  600000  books  in  dis- 
tribution would  total  over  a  quarter  million  dollars. 

This  is  effective  educational  work  on  a  big  scale,  practical  work  that  costs 
you  nothing  as  a  distributor-  Yet  it  affords  the  consumer  a  constant 
source  of  grocery-consuming  sugges  tions.  the  point  of  origin  of  countless 
retail  profits,  because  flour  is  only  one  ingredient  in  baking. 
When  you  consider  that  out  of  Cana  da's  one  and  a  quarter  million  fam- 
ilies, every  other  home  has  one  of  these  famous  Five  Rose:=;  Cook  Books, 
using  it  daily,  learning  to  bake  from  its  pages,  is  it  surprising  that  Five 
Rose  Flour  has  such  a  tremendous    prestige? 

If  you   don't   handle   this    famous    brand,  it  is  merely  because  you  don't 
realize  its  tremendous  sales  influence. 

How  much  easier  and  more  profitable  to  go  with  the  current !  Some  day 
you'll  get  tired  of  rowing! 

To  any  legiiiniaie  dtaler  who  has  not  \e:  seen  the  famous  h'iv '  !^\,.s    -  ..;A 
Book,    we  will  send  Oi\B  free  on  request  The  crnsuni   r  r-  w      •  «       -''" 

cents  each. 


,„i,...ii.i«"""i""' ., 


>'■' „ 


LAKE  OF  THE  WOODS  MILLING  CO.,  LIMITED 

Makers  of  Five  Roses  Flour 

Montreal  and  Winnipeg 


W._   ■"■l!'(fi(i5.|jr""'"" 


i'llllll,  ,,         ,,,,    ;|l';i.''      ,ll      'iPl,,, 


Branches  in: 

Montreal,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  London,  St, 
John,  Quebec,  Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Sudbary, 
"Winnipeg,  Kceyyatin,  Fort  William,  Port  la 
Prairie,  Regina,  Medicine  Hat,  Moose  Jaw, 
Calgary,  Edmonton,  Yancouver,  Victoria. 


I 


6 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


Inipcrial  Floor  Dressing  comes  in  one 
and  four-gallon  lithographed  scaled  cans 
anl  in  half-barrels  and  barrels.  Ask 
tha  Imperial  Oil  salesman  for  prices  and 
a  demonstration. 


Draws  Trade—Holds  Trade 


Floor  Dressing 


A  spotless  store  advertises  itself.  It  draws  steady 
trade  from  old  customers  and  creates  new  customers.  Free- 
dom from  dust  is  the  first  essential  of  a  spotless  store — 
Imperial  Floor  Dressing  will  do  the  job  quickly  and  effectively. 

Why?  Because  Imperial  Floor  Dressing  holds  dust  to 
the  ffoor.  It  cleans  and  preserves  floors  and  prevents  warping 
and  checking.  It  fills  in  the  pores  and  cracks  of  wood,  and 
regular  sweeping  with  a  stiff  broom  removes  all  the  accumu- 
lated dust  and  dirt. 

Imperial  Floor  Dressing  does  not  gum  or  evaporate. 
One  gallon  is  sufhcicnt  for  treating  upward  of  700  square 
feet.     One  application  will  last  for  several  weeks. 

It  is  the  most  sanitary  and  economical  dressing  you  can 
buy  for  your  floors.  It  is  also  a  fast-selling,  profitable  line 
to  handle. 

The  Imperial  Oil  salesman  will  gladly  demonstrate  the 
superior  quality  of  Imperial  Floor  Dressing  the  next  time  he 
calls  on  you. 


IMPERIAL    OIL    LIMITED 

PoAver  -  Heat  -  Light  -  Lubrication 

BRANCHES   IN  ALL  CITIES 


July  22,  1921 


ORDER  BV  NAMK: 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


\f^^ 


For  Bigger,  Better  and 
More  Satisfactory  Mus- 
tard Sales,  order 

STICKNEV  &   POOR'S 
MUSTARD 

It  is  a  good  trade  builder,  because  it  never 
varies  in  strength  or  quality  and  never  disai)points 
your  customers. 

When  you  order  mustard,  spices  or  seasonings 
it  pays  to  order  by  name. 

For  this  reason   ask  your  jobber  for 
STICKXEY  &  POOR'S  PRODUCTS 

Your  co-operating  servant 

MTSTARDPOT 


J^    STICKNEY  &  POOR  SPICE  COMPANY 

1815  Century  Old  -         Century  honored  1921 

HALIFAX 

Mustards     -     Spices     -     Seasoninfj^g 


« 


Imperial  Grain  and  Milling 
Co.,  Limited 

VANCOUVER,  B.C. 


We  are  offering  the  best  value 

in  Rice  on  the  Canadian 

market  to-day. 


,\V]ISiiEi^ 


REFRIGERATORS 

are  so  built  that  a  con- 
stant, positive  circula- 
tion of  cold,  dry  air  is 
maintained.  This  fea- 
ture fully  covered  by 
patents. 


Your  customers  will  appreciate  the 
care  you  give  to  keep  your  perish- 
ables sweet  and  wholesome. 
Don't  repeat  last  summer's  waste. 
Get  a  Eureka. 

Write  for  our  new  catalogue. 


Eureka  Refrigerator  Co.,  Limited 

Head  Office:  Owen  Sound 
Branches:  Toronto,   Montreal,  Hamilton 


SAPHO  FLY  and  liNSECT  POWDER 

K.T  llus.  .\K.M|uiUns.  Ki-J  Hui^^.  Kkv.  C.h  kri>;uhes.  Moths.  Mi!!,  .-.in  Mr.il.  cW 
P.'ukrd  in  all  si/.».*s 


SAIMIO   I'lJ-KKK 

Si./.S  |H*r  ilt>/.,  ,i  do/.,  per  cas 


No.  2  i-i  i-S  ll>.  net  $s-<^  per  dt>/. .  .?  do/,  per  case 
\<>    i        1-4  Ih.  nrt  S5.00  per  do/.,  i  doz.  per  case 
N\>.  4  —  io  oy .  lU'l  $12.00  per  do/.,  i  doz,  per  case 


lU'Lii  sPK  \vi:k 

It  is  our  latest  in-         J      v 
vent  ion  and  is  quick  \    ■  ,^ 

.irid  convenient.  I-  Ji;' 

C.-m"t  ^^et  out  o\'  or  \t^ 

vier. 

$1.00  eaci)  -.^y.oo  per  do/. 
Filled  tVoni  packaj^^es 


...  ^ 


POWOKR  GLNS 


For  Sail-   by  all   Whok-saK'i  s 
MaiK-   Siil.-ly   by 

The  Kennedy  Manufacturing  Co. 

588  Henry  Julien  Ave.,  Montreal,  Can. 


:anadian  grocek 


July  22,  1921 


WESTERN   CANADA 


FRANK  H.  WILEY 

Alfrs.*    Aeent  and   Imporicr 
GRO<Ji.l'.li.b    and    CIllMlCALS 
Salesmen    covcrin!,'    JVIiinitnha.    Sn   salchcwan. 
Alhcr-a  and    Rrili'^h  Columbia. 

.33-537   Henry  Ave.,  Winnipeg 


THE  McLAY  BROKERAGE  CO. 

WHOLES-\!.F.   GROCJ-RY    BROKERS 
and  MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 

Take  advantage  of  our  Service 
WINNIPEG  MANITOBA 


C.  DUNCAN  &  SON 

Manufrs.'  Agents  ai»d  Grocery  Brokers 

Cor.  Princess  and  Bannatyne 

WINNIPEG  Estab.  1899 


W.  L.  Mackenzie  &  Co.  Ltd. 
Head  Office:  Winnipeg 

Branches 

REGINA,  SASKATOON,    CALGARY, 

EDMONTON,  VANCOWVER 


When  Writing  to  Advertisers 
Kindly  Mention  this  Paper 


1 


Silxcrji: 


E  75  French  Cigarette  Papers 


Finest 


Quality 


White  Gummed 

Paper 

That  Will 

Satisfy 

Your  Trade 


rhi*  c«* 


3  a  facs.mnc 


tu«I  P-*^'^"^^ 


of  the  ac 

CANADIAN  DISTRIBUTORS 


100  Leaves  to  Book 

Automatic 
Doubles 

50  Books  to  Box 


Order 
to-day  from 
your  jobber 


DONALD  H.  BAIN  CO. 

Wholesale  Commission  Merchants,  Brokers  and  Importers 

Head  Office,  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches: 
SASKATOON      REGINA      CALGARY      EDMONTON       VANCOUVER        MONTREAL    LONDON,    ENG 


f 


Standard  GoodsJWin  Abiding  Trade 


Cottam  Bird   Seed 

The  Standard  of  Bird  Keepers  and  Grocers  Since  1881 


I 


July   15,   1921 


ANADIAN    GROCER 


WESTERN  CANADA 


H.P.PENNOCKaCO.,LTD.k 

\A/i-ir>i  rciAi  r      rn  m  Mic;-<lir>  kj        DDnvr-oc.  '  -SSS 


WHOLESALE      COMMIS-SION       BROKERS 


MANITOBA 
SASKATCHEWAN 


HEAP 


WINNIPEC 


Watson  &  Truesdale,  Winnipeg 

have  live  men  doing  detail  work  throuffhottt  our  territory —  Maniv   %a,    Saskatchewan    and    Alberta.      They 
get  the  business,  an.1  can  get  it   for  you.       Write  us,    anil  we  will  explain   our  .sy.stem. 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 


T.RACKAGE 
STORAGE 
DISTRIBU- 
TION 


The  Largest 

in  Western  Canada 

We  are  the  largest  Storage, 
Distributing'  and  Forwarding 
House  in  the  Western  field. 
Total  Storage  ppace  ninety-six 
thousand  square  fe';t  of  Bonded 
or  Free  Storage,  lieated  ware- 
house. Excellent  Track  facili- 
ties. The  Western  House  for 
-    SERVICE. 

Williams  Storage  Co, 

WINNIPEG 

and 

Winnipeg  Vy'arehousing  Co. 


WALLACE'S  HERRINGS 


Like  Wallace's  Salmon  and 
Pilchards,  Give  Splendid 
Satisfaction. 

Your  Jobbers  Can  Get  Them. 
For  You 

WALLACE  FISHERIES  limited 

VANCOUVER 


10 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


WESTERN  CANADA 


Marketing  Products  in  a  '^Big  Way" 


\ 

) 


The  house  of  "Scott-Bathgate"  holds  an  18  year  old  re- 
putation for  producing  big  results  in  the  rich  Western 
Provinces.  —  a  reputation  that  you  should  investigate  bofore 
vou  assign  your  product. 

We'll  place  your  product  on  the  market  for  you  in  the 
same  successful  manner  as  we  have  done  for  Christie's  Bis- 
"uits,  Robertson's  Confectionery  and  Hungerford  and  Smith's 
Fountain  Supplies.     Write  us. 

Scott-Bathgate  Company,  Limited 

V/holesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 

149  Notre  Dame  Ave.  East,  Winnipeg 


W.  H.  ESCOTT  CO. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale  Grocery  Broilers — Manujadurers 
Agents — Commission  Merchants 

Manufacturers  of  Food  Products  and 
Specialties  of  merit  seeking  increased  dis- 
tribution in  Western  Canada,  are  invited 
to  investigate  our  constructive 

SALES  FORCE 

Your  account  entrusted  to  us  receives  the 
personal  attention  of  experienced  and 
efficient  heads. 

We  make  ourselves  your  Business  Right 
Arm  in  our  territory. 

We  are  more  than  Brokers,  we  are  Busi- 
ness Builders, 

WRITE  US  TO-DAY 

HEAD  OFFICE 
WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches  with  Resident  Sales  Managers  at 

Regina,  Sask.  Saskatoon,  Sask. 

Calgary,   Alta.  Edmonton,   Alta. 

Fort  William,  Ont. 


OAKEY'S 

"WELLINGTON" 
KNIFE  POLISH 

The  original  and  only  reliable  prepara- 
tion for  Cleaning  and  Polishing  Cut- 
lery, etc. 

John  Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

Manufacturers  of 

Emery,   Black   Lead,    Emery  Glass  and 

blint  Cloths  and  Papers,  etc. 

Wellington  Mills.    London,  S.E.I,  Eng. 

Agents: 

F.  Manlcy.  147  Bannatyne  Ave.  E^st. 
^X'innlpeg 

Sankcy    and    Mason.  839   Beatty   Street 
Vancouver 


7  ;i,  nuMamy  ^t^AJtn^xkXy  oa/iy 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


11 


ONTARIO 


Jos.  K.  McLauchlan 

Manufacturers'   Aeent  and    Grocery    Broker. 

Warehouse  and  Distributing 

275-77-79  King  Street  West,  Toronto 

Reliable    recresentation.      Centrally   located. 


Langley,  Han  s  &  Co.,  Lid. 

Manufant.riTs'  Agents 

Grocers,  Confi-iii  oners   and    Drug 

Specialties 
12  FRONT   ST.   FAST.   TORONT® 


W.  G.  PATRICK  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

Manufacturers'  Agents 

and  Importers 

51-53  Wellington  St.  VV.,  Toronto 

Halifax.   N.S.  ;  Winnipeg,  Man. 


Frost,  Moorman  &  Co. 

BELLEVILLE,  ONT. 

Grocery  Specialty  Brokers 
Agencies  \\antcd 

Satitfactory  Representation   Guaranteed 


We  Cover  Western  Ontario  Thoroughly 

N.n^   r>-pr.-<.»-iilini:  S,,iTi~l.i:rs    i!ro^.:|.ll     \\\- 
lluy.   Lulil.cl;   ll.irrv   1  Lill  &  (   ». ;  1  mpc,  i.iU.riii.l 
aiui  xiie  Milling  Co.:  ;ind  loluTs. 
Wc  d.>  Ufiail  Work  Oct  In  touch  'villi  ii> 

JOHN  J.  O'DONNELL  COMPANY 

Commission  Brokers,  Manufacturers'  Agents 
LAING  BUILDING.   WINDSOR,    ONT. 


D.  W.  Clark  &  Sons 

248  Avenue  Road 
TORONTO 


Grocery  Brokers   and 
Commission      Agents 

Wo  invite  correspomlence  from 
Domestic  or  Foreijfii  mauufact- 
tirers  who  desire  to  scctire  proper 
tlislribiitioii. 


Let   T.   ASHMORE    KIDD 

Broker 

KINGSTON,  ONTARIO 

Superintend    the  successful    merchandising   of 
ydur    lines   in  Kingston  and  district. 


O.c»:.o.c>.o«5.0.o.o.o.o.:-.ojo.o.c.o.o<>£.o.o.o.j<^^50gogog 
.0.0.0*3.0.0.0.0.0*OWJ.C.U.O.O.O*3.0.0.0.0.0.0.Q*0»0*0»0 

i     B.  N.  &  W.  E.  SOPKR    I 


?8 


MaiiulailiirirN'  .\(iiMili  6-  Cor.  iiil>slon   lirokers 
H.'t  Sparks  St.,  uttbwa 

Let  us  dfiiionstratc  wliat  we  can  do  lor  >our 
product  in  this-  i  ich  territory.  We  are  especially 
cquipcd  to  produce  the  results  you  are  looking  for 


\\".\.\  TK[) 

One   or    two   good   ajfencies  in   Food   Products 
Give  paiticulars  in  tir-sr  letter.     References 

furnislu-d. 


LAING  &  WATERS 

28  Wellington  St.  E.,  Toronto 


HAMBIIN-BRERETON  CO.,  Limited 

CROC  Ki;V  .likI  C(.).\l-r.CTIOM;K\' 
.\c;i:.\T.S  and  IMPORTKR.S 

Toronto    ai>d    Kitchener,   Ont. 
Winnipejj  and  Caljjarv 


W.  G.  A.  LAMBE  &  CO. 

TORONTO 
Established   1883 


SUGARS 


FRUITS 


BRAND 


G.  T.  MICKLE 


TV 


le 


CROWN 

Trade- Mark 


ansis  a  guarantee 
size    and    choice 


on  a  bag  of  <*liitc  ! 

of   their    uniform 

quality 

Only    the    very    finest     hand-picked 

Canadian  ^'hite  Beans  go  into  bags 

marked 

CROWN  BRAND 

Fcryour  ov»n  protection  insist   upon 
having  this  line  oi  known  quality. 

Ridgetown,  Ont. 


C.  A.  MANN  COMPANY 

Strictly  New  Laid  Eggs 
Choice  Creamery  Butter 
Fancy   Dressed   Poultry 

Special  Attention  to  Grocers'  Orders. 
Satisfaction   Assured 

LONDON,   ONTARIO 

PNONE   1577 


12 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22.  1921 


EASTERN  CANADA 


ARSENIS  &  CO. 

Patrus,  Greece 

Established   1893. 

"Wholesale     (T'RRA^T    and   Dried 

Fruit  Exporters. 


Grocery   Broker   Wanted 

in  Western  Canada  and  Ontario 

Write  us  just  now. 

First-class  References  upon  re 
quest. 


GEO.  n.  LACHAINE 

Manufacturers'   A>'ent   and   Commission   liroker 

Rvpresentine  : 
The    Dominion    Molasses    "o..    Ltd.,    HaMfax,    N.S. 
H.    R.    Silver    Ltd..    Halifax.    N.S. 
Jos.    Dufresne,    Biscuits,   Cliocolates  and   Confectionery, 

Jolie<te.     P.Q. 
Over    30    years    in    Business.        Best    RcfereRces    and 
Connections. 

l.s    Dalhousie   S.i-ecl,    QlirBEC. 


When  writing  xA.d- 

vertisers  kindly 
mention  this  paper 


TIPPET  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

Importers  and 
Manufacturers'  Agents 

8  Place  Royale,  Montreal 

Established  1876 
T  i'  !  >  I  .  1  ;    M  »in     l581 


TELEPHONE    MAIN    7I4.-J 

ST.  ARNAUD  FILS  CIE 

GROCEHY   BROKERS 


Importatenrs 

&    ExportatcarB 
Poig  et   Feves 
Produils  Alimen^aires 


Importers 

&    Exporters 
Peas    and    Beans 
Food    Products 


ST.    NICHOLAS     BCILDING,    MONTREAL 


MAPLE  SUGAR 

I  solicit  youi-  ordei.s  lor  piite   Maple  Sut^ai-.      35  \  eai.s  ox- 
pirienco  as  wholesale  dealer.     Open  for  ag-eiicios  of  all  kinds. 

.Aj<-eiU  for  Me.ssr.s  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull;  Guiiiis  Ltd., 
Toronto;  St. -Lawrence  Starch  Co.,  and  several  others. 

Hardware  Expert.      Correspondence  soliciteil  if  interested. 

Warehoiise  capacity,  10,000  feet  flo.ir  space.      Best  spot  in  town 
on  Main  Street. 

JOS.  EMOND 

2  «&  4  rue  St  -Joseph,  Quebec.  P.  Q. 


Be  Sure  You  Ask 
Your  Jobber  for 

Dominion   Spring   Clothes    Pins 


Manufac'-ured  by 

The  J.  H.   Hanson  Co.,   Ltd. 

MONTREAL 


B.  &  S.  H.  THOMPSON  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

Head    MONTREAL    Office 


Agents  for  Canada  for  the  IIOMCO  Products,  including" 
Hard  and  Soft  Soaps,  Soap  Chips,  Salad  Oils, 
Coinpound  Lard,  Castor  Oils,  Sanctuai'v  Oil,  etc. 


ENQUIRIES  INVITED 


When  Writing  to 
Advertisers  Kindly 
Mention  this  Paper 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


IS: 


f ||||||||siB!...p^  ai  u  r  e 


will  put  your  tobacco  sales 
on  a  firm  footing 

And  tobacco  selling  is  a  money-making:  line 
that  every  grocer  should  carefully  con.<idcr. 

People  there  are  in  every  community  who  are 
"strong  lor  a  real,  good  v^hewiiig  iooac.j  s^,.. 
?.s  King  George's  Navy."  Tney  like  the  pji^ce 
tickling  g;oodiiess  ot'  King  George'^  i\a\i.  .A. 
first  purchase  brings  ihem  back  lor  more  and 
Clinches  their  tobacco  trade  for  tne  King 
George  dealer. 


m 


iiii 


Rock  City  Tobacco  Co.,  Ltd.        wi 


uebec 

and 

nnipeg 


!  SAMUEL   DOBREE  y 

I  ^  SONS  I 

j  LONDON,   ENGLAND  I 

i  Hslal)Iishe(l  17lh  Century  1 1 

II  Growers  and  Producers  of  |rj 

I  SUGAR    '     MOLASSES  [j 

I  COCOA  I 

I  IMPORTERS  AND  EXPORTERS  Ij 

all  Branches  in   all   parts  of  the  civilized   world  y 

II  Canadian    Branch    .  | 

I  UPPER  WATER  STREET  | 

1  HALIFAX,  N.S.  | 


f  miiiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiu!iiiuiiiiiiiiiifliiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiii!uii!ii»i:L!i;i;!iiDiiiiii 

I  III:     •■i'.KSr   BLV   IN   THK  SLICER   MARKKr-  j 

I   DOMINION    SLICER   I 


MADE  IN 

i  A  > / DA 


^  Dominion     SHrcrs    have    tewer 

s  working  parts,  arc  more  easily 

^  cleaned    and   operated    and    are 

=  more  sanitary  than  other  mach- 

M  ines.      They   do   anything    that 

§  other    slicers    will    do    and   are 

^  niuch     ess  expensive. 


Dv>niinion  Slicers  .'ire  inatle  rri'i» 
the  tint-st  materials  hy  skilled 
l^anadians.  They  a-^e  the  most 
efficient  and  niosi  reason;*  hi  y 
priced  slieer  made.  ;ind  are  g^iar- 
anteed  for  one  \ear' 


WRITE  FOR   ILLUSTRATED    BOOKLET 

Dominion     Slicer     Corporation 

110  Church  St.,  Toronto 


14 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22.  1921 


Selling  Products 
Your  Customers  Know 


EDDY'S  Matches  and 
EDDY'S  Indurated  Fibre- 
ware  are  known  to  every- 
body, everywhere  in  Canada, 

With  most  people,  to  think  of  Matches  is  to  think  of 
EDDY'S.  The  Eddy  name  to  them  is  a  symbol  of  that 
Match  quality  which  some  seventy  years  of  match-making 
experience  has  made  possible. 

EDDY'S  Indurated  Fibreware  Utensils  are  equally  popu- 
lar— and  deservedly  so.  Lighter  than  wood  and  more 
durable  than  metal,  they  are  ideal  for  household  or  farm 
use.     Leak-proof,  bulge-proof,  rust-proof. 

EDDY'S  PRODUCTS  are  made  in  Canada,  by  Canadians, 
for  Canadians, 


The  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Limited,  Hull,  Canada 


Canadian  and 
British  Made 

PRODUCTS 

for  the 

Canadian  Trade 

Vanillin  ''BUSH'' 

Emulsions 

Oil  Vanilla 

Pure  Fruit  Extracts 

Butter  Flavor 


We  guarantee  the  quality  of  all  these  lines. 
Write  us  for  quotations. 


The  W.  J.  Bush  &  Co.  Canada,  Ltd. 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


15 


wmnvumt.^!Am 


Did  You  Get  Any  of  the  Million? 

Canada  has  a  million  more  customers  for  the  grocers  in  1921  than  in  1911, 
scattered  all  over  the  country. 

Hardly  a  community  but's  had  its  increase  yours  among  'em.  New 
trade  went  to  somebody-     Did  you  get   you  share? 

Maybe  there'll  be  a  gain  of  two  millions  in  the  next  ten  years.  How 
many  new  customers  do  you  think  you'll  get — this  week-  this  month-  this  year? 

It  depends  on  the  quality  of  goods   j'ou  sell. 

If    it's    tea,    you'll  have  noticed   already   how   tired   people   are   of   the 

trash    they've    been    buying.     They've   had  enough  of  it.     Indian  and  Ceylon 
gardens  are  anxious  to  produce  quality   as  against  quantity . 

You  you'll  always  have  new  people  to  do  business  with-  Sell  them  a  real 
tea.  one  that's  been  on  the  market  for  than  26  years — RED  ROSE  TEA.  the 
tea  other  Canadians  like  to  drink. 


T.  H.  ESTABR0OKS  CO.,  LIMITED 


St.  John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Q3B 


Calgary 


Pkiyit  Sales  ThaLt  Pay  a 


Yen  want  a  profit  on 
every  sale,  and  you 
should  have  it.  But  with 
the  present  high  cost  of 
paint  oils  you  stand  a  big 
chance  of  losing  your 
profits,  unless  3'^our  me- 
thods of  handling  are 
systematic  and  free  from 
loss  of  time,  labor  and  oils. 


One  unit  or  as  mi  ■  . 

in  a  compact  row 


tulips  on  Salesroom  Floor,      i 


lESTABLISHED  18851 


I 


Paint  Oil  Storage  Systems 

prevent  paint  oil  losses.  The  pumps  measure  accurate  quantities:  no  over  measure,  no  leakage,  no 
spilling,  or  evaporation.  Everything  is  exact,  systematic  and  saving.  The  sooner  you  install  a  Bowser 
System  tne  sooner  you  will  begin  to  reap  the  profits  from  proper  storage  equipment, 

S._F.^BO\A^ER    CO.,    LIMITED 

~"^  --  66-68,;FRASER    AVE  .   TORONTO.  ONT. 

Sales  offices  in  all  centres  Representatives    everywhere 


I 


16 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


The  Very  Best  Selling 

Infant's    Food 


Especially  During  the  Summer 
Months 


You  will  appreciate  the  satisfaclorv  resulls  in 
handling  Robinson's  Patent  Barley.  Every  pur- 
chase means  a  contented  custonier. 

Rci)!enish   your   slcidv    of  Robinson'o    "Patent" 

Barley  and  "Patent"  Groats  now. 

C  an.'uliaii   Aiji'nts  i 

MAGOH,  SON  &:  CO.,  I.I  M  ITEl),    191    St.  Paul   Street.   MONTREAL 

TOUONTO     lUJANC.II:     2.'?  S(  O  T  T  STH  KKT 


KLIM  Preverts  Waste  of  Valuable  Milk  Food 

Warm  weather  means  more  sour  milk—KIim 
will  not  turn  sour  in  hottest  weather 


r^URIXG  the  summer  months,  KLIM  whipping  briskly  uiiMl  dissolved.  KLIM 
sales  are  larger  than  at  any  other  pasteurized,  skimmed  milk  in  powder 
time  of  year,  because  it  remains  sweet  form — fills  most  needs  in  the  home.  It 
and  fresh  until  all  used.  Not  a  bit  is  gives  .satisfactory  results  in  cooking, 
wasted.  For  breakfast,  lunch  and  din-  Many  people  use  it  altogether  for  table 
ner  just  the  required  quantity  can  be  use  and  in  tea,  coffee  and  cocoa.  Direct- 
prepared  by  placing  a  few  tablespoon-  ions  for  use  are  printed  on  every  tin — 
fulls  of  KLIM  on  top  of  pure  w.ater  and  half  pound,  pound  and  ten  pound  sizes. 

Ptis/i  Klim  sales  no:v--It  will  pay  yon.      Order  from 
your  wholesale  grocer. 


CANADIAN     MILK     PRODUCTS     LIMITED 

Head  Office        -        TORONTO 
St.  John  Montreal  Winnipeg 


i 


VOL.  XXXV. 


COLLIXGWOOD,  JULY  22.  1921 


No.  29 


Merchants  Conform  with  Replacement  Values 


Results  of  analysis  of  a  questionaire    sent   lo 
reveal  this  tact — merchants  have  made 
able  i)r()gress  since   the  I'irsl  of  the 
— results  bv   Provinces. 


bank    managers 
consider- 
vear. 


TT  will  be  remembered  that  the  Finan- 
cial  Post  in   one  of  its   issues   in   the 
arly     part     of     the     year     analyzed     a 
uestionnaire     submitted     to  bank  man- 
ners all   over  Canada  in   which   it   was 
'  laimed    that    the    retailer   at    that    time 
ad   not   taken   his   loss,   having   in   view 
he   replacement  value   of     merchandise 
arried   on   his   shelves.       This   was   the 
pinion  of  bank  ma.iagers   all   over   the 
I  ountry  at  that  time  and   the   inferewce 
was  th.at  the  retailer  was  holding  up  de- 
flation more  or  less. 

A  second  questionnaire  has  been  sub- 

I  .itted  to  bank  managers  across  Canada 

id  the  analysis  p^ppearing  in  the  issue 

f  tl:e     Financial     Post     recently  shows 

t'lat  a  different  conclusion  has  been  a,r- 

1  ived  -it  by  managers.    They  are  of  the 

pinion    that    the    retailer    has    taken    a 

)ng  step  toward  marking  his  goods  on 

placement  value  basis  and  that.,  since 

he  first  of  the  ye.-ir.  he  has  made  con- 

iderable  progress  in   this  direction. 

What  the  Post  Sars 

Here  is  what  the  Financial  Post   says 
in   its   general   analysis   of  the  question- 
naire submitted  to  the  bank  m,nnagers: 
The    Financial    Post    is    in    receipt    of 
-ome  hundred  or  more  replies  to  a  ques- 
Monnaire    submitted    to    bank    managers 
cross   Canad.i.      Several   phases   of   the 
usiness  situation  are  discussed  particu- 
.rly     applying   to     industry,     to   retail 
rade.    to    building    and    to    agriculture, 
rom  ,a  careful  analysis  of  these  replies 
may  be  stated  definitely  that  business 
n   the  whole   throughout  Canada   is   be- 
ing conducted  along  restricted  lines.  The 
retailer  is   meeting     altered     conditions 
nd  is  marking  his  goods  dow.i   to  con- 
irm    more    closely     with      replacement 
values.   The  extent  of  this   reduction   of 
course  varies,  but  on  the  whole  substan- 
tial progress  has  been  made.  One  ho::.-. 
Eul  feature  of  the  situation,  a^   vever'-l 
through  these  replies  is  ,,"_'.3  fac;  tlir.t  LLj 
retail  trade  has  not  suffered  to  be  same 
e.xtent  as  industrial  lines  of  enterprise. 
The  reports  indicate  that  retail  sales  are 
continuing  in  practically  as  large  -i  vol- 
ume as   for  the   corresponding   period  a 
year  ago.  In  a  number  of  instances  re- 
duction is  reported  but  when  it  is  con- 
sidered that  the  prices  have  been  reduc- 


ed since  a  year  ago  it  is  quite  probable 
that  the  volume  of  goods  actually  handl- 
ed is  as  large  or  larger.  This  condition 
removes  from  the  consumer  the  onus 
of  responsibility  for  the  "buyers'  strike." 
There  is  no  strike  among  the  consuming 
pul)lic  although  there  is  no  doubt  that 
the  individual  is  buying  more  carefully, 
and  in  smaller  quantities,  but  he  comes 
back  to  the  market  oftener.  The  retail- 
ers are  however,  ailopting  a  conservat- 
ive policy  .nnd  are  strictly  limiting  pur- 
chases to  meet  immediate  needs  onlv. 
Stocks  in  retailers'  and  wholesalers' 
hands  must  be  cleaned  up  before  manu- 
facturers will  again  find  anything  like 
a  normal  demand. 

Siiiiunnr.v  of  ProriiK-es 

The  article  in  the  Post  is  a  lengthy 
one.  but  such  ^parts  of  it  as  deal  with 
the  retail  trade  are  of  considerable  in- 
terest. Conditions,  generall.iy,  in  British 
Columbia  are  improving  and  there  is  a 
feeling  that  the  worst  is  over.  "In  the 
smaller  centres  of  British  Columbia." 
says  the  Financial  Post,  "the  retail 
de.ilers  have  been  loath  to  cut  prices, 
but  the  fact  that  a  large  lunnbQr  of 
consumers  have  been  sending  to  the 
larger  cities  for  their  supplies  has  com- 
pelled action  in  this  respect." 

From  the  prairie  provinces,  reports 
come  that  the  crop  outlook  is  favorable. 
"Retail  prices."  it  says,  "are  slowly  de- 
clining and  there  is  room  for  further 
movement  yet.  Sales  on  the  whole  are 
on  a  smaller  scale  than  last  year,  one 
correspondent  estimating  the  total  for 
the  first  three  months  of  the  year  at 
least  2.5  per  cent,  below  the  correspond- 
ing period  of  last  year.  Stocks  in  the 
hands  of  retailers  are  generally  much 
lower  than  at  this  time  last  year  and 
Western  retailers  are  not  entering  the 
markets   freely   for  goods." 

A  correspondent  from  Kamsack, 
Sask..   writes: 

Retailers  are  m.arking  down  their 
goods  somewhat,  but  they  have  to  mark 
them  down  a  good  deal  yet  before  the 
public  can  be  induced  to  see  that  they 
are  getting  real  barr.ains.  So  far  as  I 
can  see,  retailers  are  buying  very  little, 
in  fact  only  enough  to  replace  sold  out 
lines.    Payments    of   all    kinds    are   very 


slow  except  .among  those  merchants 
who  have  been  conducting  business  Oii 
cash  lines. 

Ontario 

The  most  hcjpeful  phase  of  the  situa- 
tion in  Ontario  is  the  fact  that  the  retail 
dealers  are  doing  ,as  large  business  as 
in  the  other  provinces  of  the  Dominion. 
At  no  time  since  the  adverse  turn  In 
trade  materialized  last  fall  has  the  turn- 
over of  the  retailer  suffered  any  drastic 
decline.  The  turnover  iji  without  doubt 
above  the  average  of  the  previous  year. 
Profits  have  suffered,  but  in  the  fact  that 
the  dealer  is  able  to  sell  his  goods  freely 
lies  the  solution  of  the  present  situation. 
With  the  distributing  agencies  rapidlr 
depleting  their  own  stocks,  they  must 
cme  into  the  market  more  and  more  for 
news  goods  and  this  will  in  time  be  re- 
flected upon  the  industrial  field. 

The  replies  without  exceiption  indicated 
that  retail  trade  was  at  or  near  last 
ye.ar's  level,  and  in  some  few  cases 
distinctly  above.  There  ajppears  to  be 
room  for  a  still  further  adjustment  of 
piice.s,  btit  on  the  whole  merchants  hdve 
made  progress  in  the  movement  toward 
normal  price- levels.  At  the  moment, 
however,  retail  buying  is  proceeding 
cautiously,  and  there  is  ,a  tendency  to 
buy  only   for   immediate   i-equirements. 

Qiielipc 

Reperts  from  a  number  of  centres  ia 
the  province  of  Quebec  lead  to  the  con- 
clusion that  retail  trade  has  on  the 
whole  been  very  s.atisfactory.  As  yet  no 
decided  improvement  can  be  traced,  but 
there  is  a  feeling  of  hopefulness  for  the 
future.  Accounts  ajjipear  to  have  been 
met  in  a  satisfactory  manner  in  this 
proTince.  At  Gaspe,  however,  a  town 
which  depends  largely  on  the  fishing  in- 
dustry, the  report  is  distinctly  unfavor- 
able. Our  correspondent  writes  that 
business  is  largely  at  a  standstill  in  this 
district.  The  fl,at  failure  of  the  fisher- 
ies last  Summer  coupled  with  the  col- 
lr<pse  of  the  market  has  wiped  out  a 
large  number  of  the  smaller  merchants. 
These  that  survive  are  not  in  a  iposition 
to  grant  credit  for  fitting  out  boats,  etc. 

(Continued  on  Page  25.) 


18 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


Ten   Per  Cent,  of  Sales  Constitute  Expense  in 
Wholesale  Grocery  Business 

Some  interesting  facts  are  revealed  in  rela- 
tion to  the  wholesale  grocery  business  both 
in  Canada  and  the  United  States — reports 
are  gathered  from  322  wholesale  grocers. 

COME  interesting  facts  in  relation  to 
^  the  wholesale  grocery  business  both  in 
Canada  and  the  United  States  have  just 
been  completed  by  the  Bureau  of  Busi- 
ness Research,  Harvard  University.  The 
report  says  in  part  : 

The  statements  from  three  hundred 
and  twenty-two  wholesale  grocers 
videdand  twenty-two  wholesale  grocers 
tf)rovided  the  data.  These  firms  were  lo- 
cated in  Canada  and  in  forty-five  states. 
Their  aggregate  sales  in  1920  were  $643,- 
949,000.  The  net  sales  of  the  individual 
firms  ranged  from  $176,000  to  $28,400,000. 
About  half  of  the  firms  had  sales  between 
$5000,000  and  $1,500,000. 


Smaller  Sales  Higher  Expense 

Grouping  the  firms  in  all  the  districts 
according  to  the  volume  of  their  net  sales 
it  was  tound  that  the  common  figure  for 
total  expense  was  highest — 9.5  per  cent 
in  the  case  of  firms  with  sales  less  than 
$500,000  and  the  firms  with  sales  exceed- 
ing $2,000,000  had  a  common  figure  for 
total  expense  of  9.3  per  cent  of  net  sales. 
The  intermediary  groups  showed  common 
figures  for  this  item  varying  from  8.6 
per  cent,  to  8.9  '.per  cent.  In  cities  with  a 
PQpulation  from  100,000  to  749,000,  9  per 
cent,  whereas  in  cities  with  a  population 
of  750,000  and  over  it  was  11.3  per  cent. 

Salp!')  Per   Salestiiaii 

For  average  annual  sales  per  s,ales- 
man,  which  have  a  direct  bearing  on 
salesforce  expense,  the  common  figure 
for  the  country  as  a  whole  w,as  $173,000 
in  1920.  In  cities  with  a  pqpulation  of 
750,000  and  over,  the  average  annual 
sales  per  salesman  were  $103,000  wihch 
is  less  th,an  750,000  population.  This  ap- 
parently is  one  of  the  chief  reasons  why 
the  total  expense  was  higher  in  the  lar- 
ger cities  with  less  than  750,000  Qiopul- 
ation. 

10   Per   Cent    Total   Expense 

A  comparison  of  the  annual  reports 
received  from  fifty-three  firms  for  the 
past  five  years  show  that  in  1916  the 
common  figure  for  total  expense  was  10 
per  cent  of  net  sales;  in  1920  it  was  9 
per  cent  which  is  less  than  in  any  of 
the  other  years.  This  probably  reflects 
the  unusual  efforts  that  were  made  to 
reduce  expenses  during  the  depression 
of  1920. 

8JJ  I'^-r  Cent  Grosis  Profit 

The    common    figure    for    gross    profit 


for  the  trade  as  a  whole  in  1920  was  8.5 
per  cent  of  net  sales,  varying  from  7.1 
per  cent  to  10.4  per  cent.  For  the  for- 
ty-three firms  for  which  complete  re- 
ports were  available  for  five  ye,ars,  gross 
profit  declined  from  13.5  of  net  sales  in 
1917  to  8.2  per  cent  in  1920.  Gross  pro- 
fit is  determined  by  deducting  net  cost 
of  merchandis'e  sold  from  net  sales.  It 
is  the  amount  out  of  which  expenses 
must  be  paid  and  in  normal  years  a  net 
profit  obtained.  Net  profit  is  the  amount 
that  remains  after  deducting  total  ex- 
pense from  gross  profit. 

Although  the  percent;age  of  total  ex- 
pense to  net  sales  was  generally  lower 
in  1920  than  in  other  years,  neverthe- 
less^  the  severe  slump  in  prices  reduced 
the  gross  profit  of  many  firms  to  a  point 
below  total  expense.  The  common  figure 
for  net  loss  shown  by  the  wholesale 
grocers  reporting  to  the  Bureau  for  1920 
was  0.5  per  cent  of  net  sales. 


THE  PRICE  OF  CARELESSNESS 

Carelessness  is  more  destructive  of 
profits  and  works  greater  injury  to  the 
character  of  a  grocery  store  than  to  any 
one  other  line  of  trade.  This  is  due  to 
the  tperishable  nature  of  a  large  part 
of  stock.  For  instance,  five  pounds  of 
butter  may  be  sent  to  the  wrong  address 
on  a  hot  and  muggy  day — when  the  mis- 
take is  discovered  the  butter  must  go 
back  to  the  store,  half  spoiled,  to  be 
sold  at  a  loss,  and  this  added  to  the 
first  coS(t  of  the  service  and  the  annoy- 
ance of  a  disappointed  and  veiced  cus- 
tomer, makes  the  mistake  costly. 

Careless  wrapping,  the  use  of  imper- 
fect containers,  thoughtless  handling  of 
goods  in  glass,  mistakes  in  weighing, 
whether  over  or  under  weight,  the  mix- 
ing of  orders,  putting  i:ip  a  grade  oi' 
goods  different  from  that  bought,  error:, 
in  calculations  or  footing,  making  wrong 
change,  non-observance  of  instructions 
about  d?livery,  are  only  a  few  evidences 
of  the  carelessness  that  marks  the  ser- 
vice of  every  store  and  costs  an  inest- 
imable loss.  The  contingent  expense  of 
carelessness  is  a  frightful  burden  for 
any  store  to  carry. 

A  good  rule  is  to  compel  clerks  to 
go  over  everything  twice,  and  another 
is  to  insist  on  good  penmanship,  plain 
figures  and  no  abbreviations.  Let  every 
address  be  distinct  and  specific,  and  if 
it  is  gone  over  twice  the  chances  are 
that  errors  in  delivery  due  to  a  wrong 
addrc  :;  will  be  few. 


MORE  ACTIVITY  MARKS  THE 
PRESENT  RICE  SITUATION 

Montreal. — The  rice  market  continues 
to  show  more  strength  and  with  it  comes, 
more  interest  on  the  part  of  buyers  ou 
all  sides  of  the  market.  Following  this 
for  supplies  and  so  the  circle  runs,  ever 
gaining  strength  and  the  mere  fact  that 
renewed  interest  comes  a  keener  demand 
interest  is  being  stiown  in  the  market 
is  strengthening  up  the  price.  But  this  is 
by  no  means  the  only  factor  that  is 
bringing  rice  back  into  prominence. 
There  are  indications  th,at  the  return  to 
a  higher  price  will  be  speedy  and  as 
soon  as  the  fact  is  established  buying 
will    become    more    energetic. 

Exports    JU'stricted 

The  Indian  Government  has  restrict- 
ed the  issuing  of  export  licenses  for 
consuniiption  in  that  country.  This  will 
keep  many  thousand  tons  of  rice  from 
the  western  market  and  .supplies 
counted  on  in  this  country  will  not 
be  as  large  as  expected.  Already,  th* 
very  mention  of  this  fact  on  the  mar- 
ket h,is  strengthened  up  the  price  bi 
from  three  quarters  to  1  cent  a  pound 

3Iore    Interest    In    Mairket 

With  the  imuirovement  in  the  pric<j 
fonie.s  more  interest  in  the  marke* 
and  an  air  of  speculation  which  meaii- 
ihat  heavier  stocks  will  be  bought. 
This  in  turn  results  in  a  gre0,ter  co.i- 
sumption,  although  the  Iwo  feaitaires 
do  not  seem  to  be  directl|y  related. 
When  the  merchant  buys  more  heavily 
perhaps  an  account  of  the  speculation 
he  takes  more  c.are  to  keep  the  stock 
moving.  His  mind  is  ever  centered  on 
his  venture  and  for  that  reason  he  is 
always  pushing  that  line  and  bigger 
i.ales  result.  There  is  no  doubt  that 
limited  speculation  in  business  is  ,a 
healthy  condition  and  with  its  return 
and  a  stronger  market  the  sluggishness 
should    leave    the    rice    market. 


KETALL  GKO(  KS  WILL  BE 

KEPRESE.MEl)  IX  THE  PARADE 

Toronto,  Ont.,  July  18.— There  will  be 
a  monster  iparade  for  the  grand  open- 
ing of  the  Central  Canada  Exhibition 
on  Sept.  9th.  In  the  procession  will  be 
a  car  representing  the  "Pure  Food  Show" 
which  will  be  arranged  by  the  Ottawa 
retail  grocers  who  are  members  of  the 
Association.  They  have  always  taken 
such  a  keen  interest  in  the  "Show"  that 
it  can  be  guaranteed  that  the  car  will 
he  one  to  attract  much  ,attentiou  and 
will  add  its  full  share  to  the  beauty  of 
the   parade. 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


19^ 


Lemons  Soar  in  Price  as  Supplies  Grow  Short 

Wholesalers  quote  lemons  at  from  $15  to  $18  per  case,  with 
the  prospect  of  even  higher  levels  if  the  hot  weather  continues. 
— California  crop  is  normal  but  the  hot  spell  has  rendered  the 
demand  abnormal. 

R.  M.   A.  Seeks   To 
Prove    Reductions 
In    Cost    Of    Living 


LEMONS  continue  to  soar  in  price  and 
the  s,upply  Ls  noticeably  lacking  in 
quantity.  A  few  weeks  ago  the  best 
quality  of  lemons  was  selling  around 
$4.00  to  $4.50  per  case,  but  since  then, 
with  the  rising  temiperature,  lemons  are 
at  a  premiun  even  at  the  high  figure  of 
from  $15  to  $18  per  case  with  a  pros- 
pect for  even  higher  levels  if  the 
hot  weather  continues.  This  (advance  in 
price  is  solely  attributed  to  hot  weather 
conditions,  which  has  created  an  except- 
ionally heavy  demand,  and  has  not  any 
thing  to  do  with  crop  conditions. 

Crop  Is  A  Normal  One    . 

The  crqp  in  California  this  season  is 
well  up  to  normal,  but  the  protracted 
heat  both  in  Canada  and  the  United 
States  has  brought  about  an  abnormal 
consumption  of  lemons  with  the  result 
that  the  demand  is  greater  than  the  sup- 
ply. California  -packers  are  doing  their 
utmost  to  get  a  supply  to  the  market, 
and  since  the  first  of  July  shipments 
averaging  70  cars  a  day  have  been  leav- 
ing California.  These  cars  contain  about 
405  boxes  of  lemons  each  which  means 
a  exceptionally  heavy  consumption  this 
season  as  compared  with  other  years 
when  average  shipments  were  only  about 
ten  to  fifteen  cars  a  day. 

Hot  Weather  Is  Responsible 

"The  high  prices  and  shortage  of  lem. 
ons  is  entirely  due  to  the  hot  weather," 
stated  J.  E.  Brownlow,  Toronto  District 
Manager  for  the  California  Fruit  Grow- 
ers' Exchange,  in  an  interview  with 
Canadian  Grocer.  "This  has  brought  a- 
bout  such  an  exceptionally  heavy  de- 
mand in  the  United  States,  that  it  has 
t  osome  extent  curtailed  shipments  to 
Canada.  The  Association  is  practically 
working  night  and  day  to  get  off  ship- 
ments but  the  demand  is  so  keen  that 
shipments  are  practically  sold  before 
they  leave  the  coast.  Last  week  lemons 
sold  at  auction  in  New  York  from 
$11.50  to  $13.00  per  c.ase  and  on  the 
„'s9jn3ij  aiuBS  aqi  punojB  jasiJBui  uojsoa 

The  supiply  of  lemons  is  very  limited, 
many  dealers'  being  entirely  out,  while 
others  have  a  few  cases  which  they  are 
dealing  out  in  half  c,ase  lots.  One  dealer 
in  Toronto  just  returned  from  Buffalo 
where  he  has  been  in  search  of  supplies 
and  was  fortunate  in  picking  up  a  few 
cases.  One  car  of  California  lemons  ar- 
rived in  Toronto  last  week  and  three 
or  four  are  expected  to  arrive  this  week. 
These,  however,  are  not  all  for  Toronto 
as  they  will  be  distributed  throughout 
this  district. 

Small  Crop  in  Italy 

The  Italian  crop  of  lemons  this  year 


isi  a  small  one  and  with  the  bigger  de- 
mand in  Eurctpe,  Italian  packers  are 
paying  more  attention  to  the  trade  in 
that  quarter  where  they  are  command- 
ing high  prices.  There  have  been  few 
shipments  to  New  York  this  summer 
which  in  other  years  has  been  a  clear- 
ing house  for  Messina  lemons.  Some  ar- 
rangements have  been  made  with  the 
Canadian  Merchant  Marine  for  direct 
shipments  to  Montreal. 

The  Canadian  Ranger,  one  of  the  fleet 
of  the  Canadian  Government  Merchant 
Marine  docked  in  Montreal  on  Wednes- 
day of  last  week  with  6,000  cases  of 
Mesina  lemons.  This  seems  ^  big  ship- 
ment but  when  it  is  realized  that  these 
are  to  supply  the  whole  of  Canada,  it  is 
seen  that  it  is  a  mere  drop  in  the  buck- 
et as  compared  with  the  demand.  Of 
this  shipment  only  eleven  hundred  cases 
are  for  :Montre,al,  not  enough  to  give 
every  legitimate  grocer  in  the  city  a 
the  new  shipment  had  arrived  in  poor 
case  each.  A  report  was  circulated  that 
condition  and  was  unfit  for  sale.  This  is 
entirely  false.  A  Canadian  Grocer  re- 
presentative inspected,  with  one  of  the 
buyers,  inart  of  the  shijpment  and  found 
that  the  whole  consignment  was  in  ex- 
ceptionally  good   condition. 

Prices'  Will  Kemain  High 

There  seems  every  indication  that  the 
price  of  lemons  will  remain  high  dur- 
ing the  summer.  Supplies  arriving  and 
booked  to  arrive  are  only  sufficient  to 
mejt  immediate  requirements.  There  is 
i  misunderstanding  with  regard  to  the 
shipment  that  has  just  arrived  that  leads 
to  talk  about  unfair  manipulation  of 
prices.  Because  these  6,000  boxes  of  lem- 
ons hainpened  to  be  transhipped  through 
Montreal  some  believe  that  they  are  for 
the  iruit  uealers  there.  Montreal  is  not 
even  getting  a  proportionate  share  of 
the  shipment  and  car  loads  h,ave  already 
left  for  points  as  far  west  as  Edmonton. 


FOURTEEN    PER  ( ENT  IS 

FREIGHT  EXCHANGE   RATE 

Ottawa,  July  .—The  Board  of  Rail- 
way Commissioners  announces  th,at,  in 
accordance  with  the  judgment  and  order 
of  the  board  dated  January  14,  1921,  the 
rate  of  exchange  in  connection  with 
shipments  of  freight  between  points  in 
("liiiada  and  the  United  States  from  July 
15  to  July  31,  inclusive,  will  be  14  per 
cent.,  and  the  rate  of  surcharge  of  the 
said  traffic  will  be  8  iper  cent.  The  rate 
of  surcharge  on  international  p.assengers 
busliness  will  be  based  on  14  per  cent, 
exchange. 


The  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of 
Canada  has  sent  to  all  grocers  in  Can- 
ada a  questionnaire,  in  an  effort  to  se- 
cure the  retail  prices  of  foodstuffs,  that 
existed  during  June  1-15,  1920,  and  June 
1-15,  1921,  for  the  purpose,  the  question- 
naire, states  whether  the  present  cost 
of  living  has  decreased  or  increased.  A 
letter  to  the  retail  grocer  trade  accom- 
panies the  questionn,aire  and  in  the 
same  it  is  pointed  out,  that  the  assert- 
ion is  made  by  a  great  many  workmen, 
claiming  tb.at  declines  that  have  taken 
place  in  a  wholesale  way,  in  a  number 
of  staple  commodities,  are  not  shown  in 
the  actual  prices  charged  by  the  retail 
triade. 

"It  seems  to  us,"  the  letter  continues, 
"to  be  the  old  story  of  trying  to  find 
someone  upon  whom  to  place  the  blame, 
and  of  course  the  retail  merchant  is 
again  selected  as  the  responsible,  al- 
though facts  prove  the  retail  merchant 
b,ns  been  doing  more  than  his  share  in 
responding  to  any  reductions  in  prices 
that  have  been  made." 


(;RAI»ES  WILL  BE  READY  THE 

LAST  IVEEK  IX  AUGUST 

Hamilton,  July  20. — Grapes  will  be 
picked  in  the  Niagara  district  about  the 
last  week  of  August,  stated  Thomas  J. 
Mahoney,  General  .Manager  of  the  Niag- 
ara   Penins,ul,a    Growers,    Ltd. 

While  the  extremely  warm  weatlier  had 
played  havoc  with  the  berry  and  other 
early  fruit  crops,  Mr.  Mahoney  said  tl^at 
the  strong  sun,  coupled  with  the  gener- 
ous rain  of  last  week,  was  most  pro- 
pitious fr  peaches  and  grapes.  These 
two  fruits,  he  continued,  were  farther 
advanced  at  present  than  they  had  been 
in  years.  Mr.  Mahoney  estimated  that 
both  peaches  and  grapes  would  be  'pick- 
ed from  three  to  four  weeks  earlier  this 
season  as  ,i  direct  result  of  weather  con- 
ditions. 

"Our  grapes  are  showing  remarkable 
progress.  We  expect  to  have  grapes 
which,  for  size  and  sweetness,  will  out- 
rival even  the  superior  [products  of 
southern  Italy.  The  gr,ape  crop,  to  my 
knowledge,  has  never  been  so  promising 
as  it  is  now.  We  honestly  expect  to  pick 
the  finest  grapes  in  the  world  right  here 
in  Niagara,  commencing  abouv  the  latter 
end  of  August,"  Mr.  .Mahoney  said. 

Positive  proof  of  the  earliness  of  the 

pe,ach  crop   was   cited  by   Mr.    Mahoney 

when  he  said  that,  beginning  next  week, 

carload   lots    of   Carman   peaches   would 

be  shipped  to  various  points. 


20  JANADIANGROCER  July  22.  1921 


The  Wild  Carnival  of 

High  Prices  is  Over 


Tlic  Printers'  Unions  of  Toronto  pay  their  dues  and  take  tlieir  orders  from  their  head  office 
in  the  United  States. 

Some  time  aiio  tliey  got  in-trnttions  from  their  liea4  office  in  Indianapohs,  Ind.,  to  demand 
shorter  hours  and  more  waoe^i.  and  if  these  orders  were  not  acceded  to,  to  strike. 

The  Toronto  Pubhshers  and  Emi>loyin2:  Printers  refuseil  to  i^rant  these  demands.  So  on 
June  Isl,  the  Printer^  struck. 

There  is  no  use  in  the  Toronto  Printers,  or  any  otlicr  l(ody  of  men,  hlindly  failini^  to  realize 
that  the  wild  ciMiiixal  of  High  Prices  is  over. 

If  the  members  of  the  Printers'  Union  go  out  to  buy  boots  to-day,  they  do  not  expect  to  pay 
more  than  they  did  a  year  ago. 

They  demiuid,  and  get,  cheaper  boota. 

They  are  not  willing  to  pay  mere  for  clothes,  or  foodstuffs,  or  any  other  commodity. 

They  expect  to  pay,  and  do  pay,  less. 

And  the  pulilic  is  not  tolerant  oi  aiiy  si  heme  or  arraiiienienl  which  is  .loin'f  to  mako  its 
printing  cost  more.     It  is  lower  price.s  they  are  lookin  ;  f  :r.     Why  shor"  ;ng  costs  ad- 

vanco,  when  prices  of  everythin'.;:  else  are  going   dounV      "''at    i<    wl;;  li-hers    and 

I'jmploying  Printers  are  resolutely  ;;nd  unalterably  opjn/.-c  .  :o  the  gran.i..:  'v.;  .-iU)rter  hours 
and  more  pay,  because  it,  of  nece.-sity,  means  dearer  printin'' .  and  the  pubhc  will  no;  buy 
dearer  printing. 


That  i-  why  we  are  resistinsi  and  refusing  to  obey  the  ;  i  ■.  d  ite  from  the  United  States  that 
the  Local  Printers  demand  more  wages  and  shorter  hour-. 

The  Purcl)a-im':  Agents'  Association  of  Toronto  at  I'^ei.'  mer-t;".'.  Iield  .Tmie  Sth.  1021, 
[la.ssed  the  following  resolution: 

"We  endorse  the  attitude  of  the  Toronto  Typolhciae  in  their  cfiV;rts  to  prevent  increased 
cost  of  printing  and  deplov;>  the  action  of  some  Employing  Printers  in  granting  the 
Unions'  demands,  which,  v.ecessarily  will  ro-ult  in  an  increaseil  c  >-l  of  production,  wher. 
at  thi-  ])eriod  economic  conditions  demand  that  jiroducticm  cost<  I'e  lowered  rather  than 
increased." 

The  M:uLo;;n  Publi.-hing  Company  are  figh' ing  these  unreasonable  demands  not  oniy  in  the 
interests  of  their  own  lousiness  (and  thi-  includes  the  em])loyees  who  arc  on  strike)  but  in 
the  interests  of  busine.s-  conditions  generally. 

■T.ood  times  and  healthy  business  conditions  cannot  return  unless  we  all  do  our  part  to  get 
through  the  readjustment  period  in  a  sane  and  reasonable  way. 

THE    MACLEAN    PUBLISHING    CO.,  LIMITED 

TORONTO  MONTREAL        WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER       NEW  YORK.         BOSTON         CHICAGO  LONDON.  ENG. 

TRADE  AND  TECHNICAL  NEWSPAPERS  AND  MAGAZINE  PUBLISHERS 

MACLEANS     MAGAZINE  DRY    GOODS    REVIEW  POWER    HOUSE 

FARMER'S    MAGAZINE  MENS     WEAR     REVIEW  CANADIAN      FOUNDRYMAN 

THE     FINANCIAL    POST  BOOKSELLER    &    STATIONER  MARINE     ENGNEERING 

CANADIAN    GROCER  DRUGGISTS'     WEEKLY  SANITARY    ENGINEER 

HARDWARE     &.     METAL  CANADIAN     MACHINERY  »RINT^R    &.    PUBLISHER 

CANADIAN  MOTOR,   TRACTOR   AND    IMPLEMENT   TRADE    JOURNAL. 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


21 


Maintaining    the    Turnover 

in    the    Summer    Months 

SeHiiii;  ice  cream,  suiiinier  drinks  and  kindred  lines,  solves  liie 
j)r()bleni  of  maintaining  i)nsiness  ai  a  lime  when  sales  ol"  regu- 
lar grocery  commodities  usually  show  a  falling-off.  Sales  of  ice 
cream  in  Fred  Crapper's  grocery  store,  Toronto,  average  $8"). 
per  week. 


THH  extresiely  hot  weather  of  th« 
p«st  few  weeks  has  been  particular- 
ly ravorable  from  the  standpoint  of  mer- 
chants who  sell  ice  cream,  summer 
drinks  and  sundry  lines.  Sales  en  these 
good.'i  have  been  exceptionally  heavy, 
but  on  the  other  h^nd  sales  on  gen- 
eral grocery  commodities  have  been 
quieter  than  is  usual  at  thre  season, 
unquestionably  the  result  of  weather 
conditions  which  have  turned  people's 
thoHghts  to  lighter  foods.  Merchants 
who  have  provided  for  this  contin- 
gency are  certainly  reaping  a  harvest 
■wilile  those  merchants  who  are  not 
taking  advantage  of  the  opportunity  to 
ipush  these  lines  are  no  doubt  show, 
ing  it  in  the  amount  of  money  in  the 
cash  register  at  the  cl-ose  of  the  day's 
business. 

A    Sstoeiis    (if   Ice    Creyni 

There  are  merchants  who  have  been 
selling  ice  cream  and  making  a  suc- 
cess of  it  for  several  years.  Some 
stores  just  sell  rt  by  the  brick  and  in 
bulk  'lOr  home  consumption.  while 
there  are  others  w'no  have  installed 
regular  fountain  equipment,  and  have 
set  aside  a  certai.i  portion  of  the  store 
for  the  sole  purpose  for  serving  tke 
pqpular  summer  refreshment.  The 
stories  of  the  methods  of  merchants 
who  have  successfully  conducted  an 
ice  cream  department  in  connection 
with  their  regular  grocery  business  is 
interesting  and  undoubtedly  h.ave  been 
an  inspiration  to  others  to  do  likewise. 
That  at  least  is  claimed  by  Fred  Crap- 
per,  Toronto.  Ont..  who  recently  stated 
to  a  representative  of  Canadian  Grocer 
-that  he  had  been  reading  the  stories  that 
iiave  been  appearing  in  Canadian  Grocer 
from  time  to  time,  with  much  inter- 
est, and  has  found  the  ideas  contained 
in  them  to  be  a  source  of  valuable  in- 
formation, even  though  Mr.  Crapper 
has  had  several  years'  experience  in 
selling  ice  cream. 

Gets  A  Better  Class  of  Trade 

"Outside  of  the  direct  profit  in  ice 
cream,  there  are  many  other  benefits 
that  affect  the  whole  business,"  said 
Mr.  Crapper  .  "I  find  that  selling  ice 
crejam  has  a  tendency  to  bring  a  better 
class  of  trade  to  the  store.  And  when 
you  get  them  started'  on  buying  ice 
cream,    we    have     a    chance    to   get   ac- 


quaiHted  which  eventually  leads  to 
other    business." 

In  this  store  the  ice  cream  dep.irt- 
ment  is  situated  next  door  to  the  gro- 
cery. There  are  really  two  stores,  in 
fact,  with  a  connecting  door  and  both 
having  street  entrances.  It  is  equipp- 
ed with  soda  fountain,  ice  cream  stor- 
age cabinets  and  all  that  is  necessary 
to  give  excellent  service  to  the  patrons. 
The  department  is  in  charge  of  a 
young  woman  who  has  assistance  as 
the     occasion       demands.  A     vegTil- 

ar  soda  sundae  list  is  provided  be- 
sides facilities  for  handling  brick  and 
bulk   ice   cream    for   home   consumption. 

Overriilul    Ol»jk?<lioii 

Sundaes  and  soda«  are  served  in 
sanitary  paper  cups  or  dishes,  held  in 
silver  holders  that  are  made  especiallv 
for  the  purpose.  The  use  of  these  pap- 
er cups  eliminate  costly  breakage 
and  the  expense  of  dish  washing.  In 
referring  to  the  use  of  these  sanitarv 
dishes,  Mr.  Crapper  recalled  an  incid- 
ent that  happened  shortly  after  this 
system  was  in  use.  "A  funny  thing  oc- 
curred when  I  first  started  to  use  the 
paper  dashes."  said  Mr.  Crapper. 
"There  was  a  customer,  a  middle 
aged  woman,  who  was  in  the  habit  of 
dropping  into  the  ice  cream  room  re- 
gularly for  a  dish  of  ice  cream,  accom- 
panied very  often  by  a  friend  and 
sometimes  there  would  be  three  of 
them.  The  firs't  time  we  served  her 
with  ice  cream  in  the  paper  dish,  she 
refused  to  take  it.  remarking  that  she 
did  not  intend  to  eat  ice  cream  from 
out  of  a  piece  of  dirty  paper.  I  ex- 
pilained  to  her  that  the  paper  was  as 
clean  and  perhaps  cleaner  than  glass 
dishes  often  are.  I  also  told  her  that 
the  cups  were  made  from  paper 
especially  manufactured  and  prepared 
for  that  purpose.  fThey  we're  absol- 
utely' waterproof,  wriild  not  absorbe 
any  moisture  and  that  no  hands  touch- 
ed them  from  the  time  the  raw  mat- 
erial went  into  the  machinery  until  it 
was  set  before  her.  I  also  told  her 
that  there  was  no  possibility  of  them 
being  used  the  second  time  as  they 
were  immediately  thrown  away  after 
being  used.  I  impressed  this  so  strong 
ly  upon  her  that  she  finally  became 
convinced,  and  do  you  know  that  she 
has   become   one   of  our   best   customers 


She  bi:vs  all  her  ':iipp!ies  here  an'V 
has  been  the  means  of  bri.;giu3  us 
other    customers." 

I  U'culiirizes    f ;ns(onirrR 

The  season  for  selling  ice  cream  is: 
short,  although  ice  creain  i^  gradullv 
becom.'ng  .ecogv.izoL  a.  an  all  the 
year  re  and  article  of  food.  Mr.  Crap- 
per, leiieves  in  '•n:.'vk!ns  hay  while  the 
sun  skinsj"  and  theref.:re  ktep.^.  the 
ice  cream  department  cicn  in  tJie 
evenings.  The  grocery  store,  however 
is  closed  every  evening  at  six-Uiirty 
o'^icck    excepting    Saturady    ev*;niugj3. 

Early  in  the  spring,  Mr.  Crapper- 
finds  it  a  splendid  pl.tn  to  mail  circul- 
;irs  to  customers  and  others  w'uom  he 
wishes  to  reach,  reminding  them  that 
the  ice  cream  season  is  about  to  opeo 
and  tha'  the  ice  cream  departmeDt 
v.ill  r. -:,;-i  le  at  their  service.  These 
circuL  -J  ,arc  also  placed  ii  parcels 
when  I  elive.ctl  and  when  handed  over 
the  counter. 

Averagres  $350  per  Week 

The  big  end  of  this  business,  is  nat- 
urally groceries.  Ice  cream  is  entirely 
a  side  i?sue,  a  medium  to  augment  sales 
when  business  in  general  grocery  com- 
modities is  practically  at  a  standstill. 
Sales  of  ice  cream  during  the  early  part 
of  the  season  ran  into  $150.  per  week 
but  during  the  past  three  of  four  weeks, 
or  since  the  middle  of  June  sales  aver- 
aged .$350.  per  week  and  have  every 
indication  of  continuing  so  for  the  bal- 
ance of  the  summer. 


WILL  ASK  POLK  E  TO  (iET 

AFTER  THE  GKOCEKV  PEDLEKS 

Ottawa.  Ont..  July  18.— The  Ottawia 
Retail  Merchants'  Association  has  taken 
up  with  the  police  officials  the  matter  of 
pedlers  in  groceries  and  simil,ar  liaes  in 
the  city  carrying  on  busines,-^  without 
taking  out  the  necessary  pedlers'  lic- 
enses. Competition  that  is  fair  and  a- 
bove  board  is  not  causing  annoyance 
but  as  retailers  have  to  keep  up  the  ap- 
pearance of  their  premises,  pay  high 
rents  and  taxes,  those  who  get  out  of 
all  these  expenses  are  not  paying  their 
iJhare  ©f  the  burden. 


^22  CANADIAN    GROCER  July  22,  1921 

iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


"pop  a  painy  Day"- 


The  man  who  consistently  invests  a  few 
hundreds  each  year  never  has  to  worry 
about  the  future — the  rainy  day  or  his  old 
age  has  no  financial  terrors  for  him. 

Whether  you  have  already  sufficient  invest- 
ed or  whether  you  are  still  looking  out  for 
probable  "buys,"  for  the  sake  of  your  own 
future  you  must  take  every  precaution  for 
safety. 

THE  FINANCIAL  POST  specializes  in  an 
Inquiry  Service  noted  for  its  accurate  and 
sound  replies  regarding  investments.  This 
service  is  free  at  all  times  to  subscribers. 

Write  now  for  a  copy  of  THE  FINANCIAL 
POST.  The  subscription  price — $5.00  a 
year  of  fifty-two  issues — is  really  insurance 
on  your  invested  money. 


THE     FINANCIAL     P03T 

143   UNIVERSITY  AVE.,  TORONTO 


■lllilffllliHlIlilllllliiliH 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


23 


Makes  a   Study  of    His    Customers'  Tastes 

H.  .1.  Buchan,  Barrie,  Out,,  l)elieves  in  i^iving  special  attention 
to  his  trade,  and  aims  to  give  tiieni  I  he  l)est  service  possible — 
a  well  pleased  customer  is  a  booster  for  the  store,  according  to 
his  theorv — always  keeps  his  store  atlraclive  with  goods  well 
displayed. 


Are  you  making  a  study  of  your  cus- 
tomers'  tastes? 

H.  J.  Buchan.  Barrie,  Ont.,  is  one 
grocer  who  has  followed  this  plan  in 
the  past,  and  still  adhering  to  it.  In 
his  opinion  it  pays  to  give  some  attent- 
ion to  this  subject,  to  learn  more  ac- 
curately just  what  pleases  certain  cus- 
tomer.'5,  and  if  not  give  them  the  very 
line  that  they  ask  for,  then  to  sell  them 
on  some  other  make  of  the  same  mer- 
chandise convincing  them  that  it  is 
«qually  good.  Mr.  Buchin  recently 
told  a  representative  of  Canadian  Gro- 
cer that  it  is  always  his  endeavor  to 
give  his  customers  the  very  best  of  ser- 
vice. To  do  this,  he  states,  requires 
something  more  than  merely  handing 
out  groceries  as  the  man  or  woman  at 
the  counter  or  on  the  phone  asks  for. 
"Women  are  waiting  for  their  grocer  to 
make  suggestions  of  groceries  to  them," 
he  remarked,  "and  the  grocer  who  is 
not  doing  this,  is  missing  a  big  opport- 
unity to  increase  his  sales,  and  at  the 
same  time  is  not  creating  that  confid- 
ence between  customer  and  merchant, 
that  is  so  essential  to  the  success  of 
his  business. 

IVill  Tell  Her  Friends 

"A  pleased  customer,  one  who  feels 
that  her  grocer  is  taking  a  real  inter- 
est in  her  purchasing,  will  do  a  whole 
lot  to  bring  the  trade  of  he-r  friends  to 
your  store.  I  have  found  that  it  always 
pays  me  to  specialize  in  the  best  goods 
obtainable.  Goods  of  a  high-class  order 
will  advertise  your  store,  and  will  bring 
a  certain  trade  to  your  place  that  is 
well  worth  handling.  I  allow  nothing  to 
go  out  of  my  store  I  do  not  know  that 
it  is  in  first-class  condition.  For  in- 
stance I  never  let  a  box  of  berries  go 
out  from  my  store  that  has  not  been 
picked  over.  It  is  the  same  with  all 
fruits,  vegetables  or  in  fact  anything 
that  goes  from  my  store  is  in  the  very 
best  condition.  When  I  receive  a  fresh 
consignment  of  fruit  I  take  the  trouble 
to  call  my  customers  on  the  telephone 
and  tell  them  about  it.  I  handle  a  great 
deal  of  fresh  fruit  in  the  summer  months 
and  in  the  winter  I  sell  large  quantities 
of  the  citrus  fruits.  These  display  tables 
down  the  centre  of  the  store  are  usually 
used  for  showing  these  fruits  and  tables 
of  this  kind  are  great  factors  in  selling 
oranges,  lemons  and  graipefruit  for  me." 
Mr.  Buchan  has  built  up  la  big  cof- 
fee trade  too  and  this  feature  of  his 
business  has  been  the  means  ®f  briag- 


ing  new  customers  to  the  store.  He 
buys  a  particular  blend  of  coffee  all  the 
them,  and  take  care  to  see  that  it  is 
always  the  same.  His  coffee  s,ales  are 
on  a  large  scale,  and  it  is  because  of 
the  special  attention  given  to  blending 
and  grinding.  He  has  an  electric  coffee 
mill,  and  like  a  good  many  other  gro- 
cers, Mr.  Buchan  is  of  the  opinion  that 
the  aroma  of  fresh  ground  coffee  is  an 
incentive  to  people  to  buy  it.  In  fact  he 
stated  th.at  ."leople  have  often  dropped 
into  the  store  for  the  sole  purpose  of 
buying  only  a  pound  of  coffee,  but  be- 
fore they  got  out,  Mr.  Buchan  or  some 
one  of  his  assistants,  had  sold  them 
other  goods.  In  fact  permanent  cus- 
tomers have  been  gained  for  the  store 
in   this  w,ay. 

A  Store  .Must  Be  Attraodve 

Believing  that  a  grocery  store  must 
be  attractive  in  order  to  first  secure  the 
patronage  of  the  public.  Mr.  Buchan  has 
alwyys  paid  more  than  ordinary  attent- 
ion to  the  matter  of  arrangi.ig  his  stock 
and  p.esenting  it  to  the  public  in  as 
neat  and  as  clean  a  way  as  possible. 
Well  ar.anged  displays  fill  the  windows 
and  he  has  fresh  flowers  in  the  windows 
and  on  the  counters  al  the  time.  This 
store  is  situated  on  the  main  thorough- 
fare of  the  town,  and  is  seen  by  the 
townspeople  two  and  three  times  a 
day,  as  they  pass  to  and  from  their 
work.  Consequently  the  value  of  keep- 
ing the  public  informed  and  attracted 
is  of  prime  in'jportance  according  to  Mr. 
Buchan .  "Good  window  displays  will 
sell  goods  all  the  time,"  he  asserted, 
and  he  has  proved  it  by  the  practical 
and  profitable  results  that  have  come 
from   catching   the   eye   of   the   public. 


"Statistics  prove  that  Marriage  is 
a  (Preventive  against  suicide,"  said  I\Irs. 
Gabb . 

"Yes,"  growled  Mr.  Gabb.  *'And  sta- 
tistics also  prove  that  suicide  is  a  pre- 
preventive  against  marriage." — Cincin- 
nati Enquirer. 


"In  some  parts  of  Africa  a  man  does 
not  know  his  wife  until  after  he  has 
m^arried  her,"  said  Mrs.  Gabb,  as  she 
looked  from  the  paper  she  was  reading. 

"Huh!"  replied  Mr.  Gabb.  "Why  men- 
tion   Africa    especially?" — Homelife. 


THE   HOrSE   OF   GKOC ERS 
IX     E1).>I0>T0X     IS 

DIVIDED  AGAINST  ITSELF 

Edmonton,  July  19. — About  a  year  ago 
the  Merchants'  Association  was  accord- 
ing to  several  merchants,  partially 
wrecked  on  the  rock  of  early  closing, 
and  a  half  holiday.  The  astute  City 
oflicials  passed  the  buck  "much  as  Great 
B'^itain  could  have  easily  done  in  Ire- 
land, my  saying,  "well,  when  yon  mer- 
chants decide  which  day  you  want  your 
half  holiday,  just  rush  over  and  lev  us 
know.  There  is  always  "WELCOME"  on 
the  civic  door  mat  to  the  good  merchant 
of  this  gateway  to  the  riches  of  the 
Xorth,  etc.,  etc." 

The  consequence?  Can  you  ask!  Half 
the  merchants  close  on  Wednesday,  and 
part  of  the  remainder  on  Saturday  noon. 
But  as  all  must  clo.se  at  6  o'clock  every 
night  there  is  still  some  disatisfaction 
Yet  a  tIJanadian  Grocer  representative 
ItVissed  a  grocery  store  at  10.30  of  a 
fine  Saturday  night,  and  the  said  grocer 
was  still  passing  out  the  odd  packet  of 
prunes,   which    leaves   one    wondering. 

It  is  a  long  hark  back  to  the  day 
when  every  merchant  kept  his  door 
open  till  the  last  laggard  bought  his 
packet  of  yeast  cakes,  but  it  is  not  such 
a  long  hark  to  those  benighted  days,  if 
there  is  no  cc-operation. 


steady 
steady 


THE  HEAL  SALESMAN 
By   Cahlwell   Henderson 

One   who   has   a   steady  eye,   a 
nerve,     a     ste.ady     tongue     and 
habits. 

One  who  understands  men  and  who 
can    make   himself    understand    man. 

One  who  turns  up  with  a  smile,  and 
still  smiles  if  he  is  turned  down. 

One  who  strives  to  out-look  the  buy- 
er rather  th,an  out-talk  him. 

One  who  is  silent  when  he  has  nothing 
to  say,  and  also  when  the  buyer  has 
something  to  say. 

One  who  takes  a  firm  interest  in  his 
firm's   interest. 

One  who  wins  respect  by  being  re- 
spectable and  respectful. 

One  who  can  be  courteous  in  the  ^ace 
of  discourtesy. 

One  who  keeps  his  word,  his  temper, 
and  his   friends. 

One  who  has  self-confidence,  but  does 
not  show  it. 

One  who  Is  loved  by  his  fellow  men. 


24 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


The  Segregation  and  Analysis  of  Expenses 

Grocers  are  too  a])l  to  think  that  if  Ihey  have  the  general  figure 
near  the  mark  of  the  average  coslof'operation  tliev  have  done 
well  enough— hindsight  turned  into  foresight. 


By  Henry  Johnson,  Jr. 

A  blanket  ratio  of  expense  is  useful 
as  a  very  broad  target  at  vvhich  to  aim. 
It  i5  inuch  better  than  nothing.  But  the 
next  step,  and  a  vital  one,  is  to  learn 
in  detail  what  items  make  up  the  blanket 
figure,  how  they  vary  from  season  to 
season,  aiid  how  they  can  be  controlled 
and    reduced.    For    surely    the    object    of 


ioned  not  to  make  his  estimate  too  lov.-. 
He  must,  make  it  wide  enough  so  that— 
except  in  certain  unforseable  circum- 
stances he  would  not  exceed  it.  With 
some  exceptions  that  are  worthy  of 
note,  the  thought  was  that  any  re- 
duction that  was  ma^e  would  be  pure 
gain. 

The   effect   as   reflected   in    the   report 

foi"  the  secoiKl  six  months  of  last  year 

keeping  track  of  expenses  is  to  control       *^  ^^^^  every  item  is  reduced  except  two 


them  GO  they  n3ver  get  beyond  safety, 
and  to  rs'Jv.cc  *■  .:  --  that  earnings  may 
be  increa  cd. 

Thi-;  q;;es,i,u  i.-j  not  new,  except  in 
thG  grocery  business.  Grocers  always 
resm  to  think  that  if  they  have  the  gea- 
oral  figure  near  the  mark  of  the  average 
cost  of  operation  over  the  country,  they 
have  done  "well  enough."  Of  course,  if 
a  nun  i ;  satisfied  with  "well  enough'' 
where  his  own  money  is  involved,  also 
his-  figure  prosperity,  the  rest  of  us 
should  n')t  find  fault,  maybe.  But  exam- 
ination show.?  that  such  men  act  that 
way  from  ignorance  and  are*  glad  ta 
have  light  cast  on  their  mistaken  ways. 

While  it  is  r.ot  a  new  question,  the 
few  who  have  dug  into  it  analytically 
have  kf)pt  their  findings  to  themselves. 
Few  grocers  h,ave  done  it,  and  they  have 
not  tke  means  of  spreading  the  iiiform- 
ation  widely.  Dry  good  merchanto  have 
gone  ?ar  in  this  work;  but  they  have 
exchanged  their  information  privateh, 
among  themselves,  where  they  could  get 
reciprocal  help. 

Hindsight   Turned   into   Fore«iisrht 

Accounting,  generally  speaking  is 
hindsight.  Your  books  show  what  hap- 
pened last  week,  last  mouth,  last  year. 
It's  nice  as  a  record,  but.  except  in  the 
crudest  way,  mostly  by  guess,  how  can 
you  .put  that  history  to  use  in  making 
your  business  more  prosperous? 

One  firm  .answered  that  question  by 
drawiHg  off  a  chart  of  the  various  items 
of  expense,  covering  several  months  .iust 
past,  and  getting  estimates  from  every- 
body for  a  basis  for  expenses  during 
the  coming  six  months. 

For  instance,  here  is  the  manager  of 
the  delivery  department.  It  costs  him, 
1.16,  1.33,  102,  .85,  .88,  and  .94  per 
cent  on  total  sales  to  deliver  all  orders 
during  the  first  six  months  of  1919. 
Taking  season  into  account,  allowing  for 
increased  volume  of  business,  what  is 
it    going    to   cost    him    during    the    next 


ched  things  closely  and  in  the  first 
week  in  August  he  had  his  expenses  for 
July.  They  should  have  been  about 
seventeen  per  cent  and  they  were  twen- 
ty-three! He  woke  ug)  to  the  fact  that 
by  being  easy-going  and  careless  he 
had  kept  his  sales  force  intact  from 
from  winter  and  spring  while  the  dull 
summer  months  had  resulted  in  greatly 
reduced  sales. 
.  -  Contrasted  with  the  reduction  of  sales 

with  the  result  that  the  average  exj)ense       expense   is   as   in    the    case    of   this    de- 


was    curtailed      almost      five    per    cent! 
That  is  some  gain,  you  will  observe. 

Lilural   WiMi   Advertisiner   Appropriation 

In  common  with  most,  in  not  all,  pro- 
frcssive  concerns,  this  house  is  liberal, 
with  i.s  advertising  money.  Why?  Be- 
cause the  reduciio.i  of  fixed  expenses 
can  be  accomplished  only  through  in- 
increased  volume.  Increased  volume  can 
be  obtained  only  throigh  greater  sales 
in  the  same  i^pace,  and  advertising  is  the 
g.eiitest  sales   force   there   is. 

Hence,  the  advertising  manager  v/as 
specially  cautioned  not  to  make  his 
estimates  too  low.  The  manager  says 
he  will  stretch  a  point  any  time  to  get 
increased  volume— and  surely  he  is 
right!  For  note  that  re.it  is  a  charge 
so  fixed  en  any  business  that  it  can  be 
reduced  in  three  ways  only.  You  can 
either  move  to  a  cheaper  location,  or 
you  can  curtail  your  rooms,  or  you  can 
increase  your  volume  of  sales  in  the 
present  space.  Heat  and  light,  ice,  ele- 
vators, office  and  buying,  cleaning,  in- 
surance and  telephones,  rep,airs,  re- 
ceiving room,  suiperintendence.  the  exe- 
cutive expenses — all  these  can  be  re- 
duced only  by  doing  more  business. 

Hence,  the  advertising  was  not  inter- 
fered with.  The  result  was  that  the 
advertising  expense  was  even  itself  re- 
duced seventeen  hundredths  per  cent  by 
increased  business. 

The  effect  on  the  other  departments 
is  also  noticeable.  Reductions  are  ap- 
parent in  decorating,  delivery,  heat  and 
power,  elevators,  office,  cleaning,  insur- 
ance,  telephones   and  the   rest. 

Decreased  Selling  Expense 

The  decreased  selling  expense  is 
especially  notable  under  this  plan  and 
it  reminds  me  of  a  story.  Some  years 
ago  a  grocer  moved  into  a  new  locat- 
ion, where  his  business  increased  very 
rapidly.  He  did  fine  dtiring  the  first 
year.  He  was  running  along  so  smoothly 
that  he  ran  into  his  first  mid-summer 
under  full  steam.  He  noted  that  business 


six    months?    The    same    question    was 

put  to  the  superintendent  of  decorations,  slackened  up  a  bit,  but  he  was  used  to 

of    the    office';    of    the    cleaning    depart-  customers  who  went  away  for  the  sum- 

menf    of    the    receiving    room;    of    the  mer  and  thought  the  lull  was  temporary, 

superintendeal's   office.    Each   wai^    caul-  Fortunately   he  was  a  man   who  wat- 


partment  store  whose  plan  is  here  out- 
lined from  six  to  four  and  one  half.  Then 
you  can  sense  the  utility  of  such  a 
system  as  is  in  use  in  the  department 
store. 

Of  course,  you,  as  an  average  groser, 
have  no  department  heads  to  whom  you 
can  go  with  instructions  ihat  they  make 
estimates  thus  and  so;  but  you  have 
something  much  better  and  more  easily 
kept  in  order — your  own  head! 

With  this  plan  as  a  guide — you  can 
lay  out  segretations  of  your  exipenses 
with  estimates  percentages  based  on 
what  experience  you  have.  When  you 
l?,ive  thus  laid  out  the  figures,  you  can 
total  them,  and  it  may  surprise  you  to 
find  that  you  have  overstepped  the  lim- 
its of  good  business  and  safety. 

Then  your  task  is  to  cut  and  trim 
the  estimate  until  it  fits  in  with  what 
you  know  is  safe  and  sane  and  then 
move  within  it.  After  that,  your  job  is 
to  make  your  business  grow. 

You  Cannot  Have  Too  3Iany  Clwrts  of 
Your  Business 

You  cannot  study  the  insides  of  your 
business  too  diligently.  If  you  keep 
track  of  various  items  of  expense  for  a 
year,  it  is  certain  that  you  cau  come 
closer  to  an  accurate  estimate  of  what 
your  expense  is  a^pt  to  be  in  any  month 
of  any  succeeding  year.  You  can  tell  in 
advance  what  is  should  be,  as  a  max- 
imum. Generally  speaking,  there  is  no 
minimum. 

Did  you  ever  try  this:  Figure  up  your 
daily  average  expenditure  for  all  things, 
and  take  in  everything — merchandise, 
expense,  living,  everything.  For  it  is 
obvious  that  the  sum  total  you  get  in 
must  exceed  what  you  pay  out,  or  you 
will  make  nothing.  This  is  a  crude  test, 
but  it  is  often  illuminating. 

Get  busy  and  study  your  expenses 
from  behind  your  own  desk.  Include 
in  it.  interest  on  your  own  capital,  nor- 
mal rent  whether  you  own  the  (place  or 
not;  your  own  salary  on  a  correct  basis 
compared  with  what  you  could  earn  in. 
a  similar  position  elsewhere.  Make 
charts.  Test.  Make  tbese  charts  work 
for  you. 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


2^ 


Brings  Business  Back  to  What   It  Was  When 
He  Quit  Five  Years  Ago 

W.  A.  Macdonakl,  Listowel-  Out.,  retired 
fixjiii  tlie  grocery  trade  five  years  ago,  but 
decides  to  enter  it  again,  and  in  less  tlian  one 
niontli  has  turnover  equal  to  what  it  was 
when  he  disposed  of  iiis  busmess, 

and  in  the  store  itself  is  not  lost  sight 
of.  in  Mr  Macdonalds  scheme  of  mer- 
chandising. Goods  are  displayed  all  the 
cb,anged.  Display  tables  are  used  to  ad- 
time,  and  displays  are  constantly  being 
vantage,  and  are  placed  down  the  centre 
of  the  store.  They  are  utilized  chiefly 
for  showing  fruits,  but  at  tmes.  other 
lines  of  merchandise  are  shown  on  them 
too.  From  them  Mr.  Macdonald  states 
tli.at  he  sells  large  quantities  of  fruits, 
particularly  oranges,  lemons  and  grape- 
fruit. Displays  on  floor,  well  to  the  front 
of  the  store  too  sell  goods.  In  fact  every- 
where that  it  is  possible  to  show  goods, 
they  are  prominent  before  the  eye  of  the 
customer.  Windows  are  changed  some- 
wlltinies  twice  a  week.  Good  window  dis- 
plays will  bring  pecjple  into  the  store. 
'"I  have  done  a  great  deal  in  building 
my  business  and  bringing  it  back,  after 
being  away  from  :he  trade  for  so  long, 
by  just  making  the  best  use  of  displays, 
and  they  always  bring  results  that  are 
well  worth  while."  Mr.  Macdonald  re- 
marked to  Canadian  Grocer. 


After  an  absence  of  five  years  from 
the  grocery  trade,  W  A.  Macdonald.  of 
Liistowel,  Ont..  again  took  up  the  reins 
of  business,  a  short  time  ago,  and  in  less 
than  ,a  month,  he  recently  told  Canadian 
Grocer,  he  had  his  trade  back  to  the 
point  where  he  had  left  off  five  years  be- 
fore. Mr.  Macdonald  has  a  bakery  in 
connection  with  his  grocery  trade,  sit- 
uated in  an  adjoining  building.  He  caters 
to  a  large  farming  community,  and  he 
has  gone  after  this  trade,  paying  par- 
ticular attention  to  giring  the  farmers 
the  best  possible  service,  ?is  well  as  mer- 
chandise at  reasonable  yet  profitable 
prices. 

Listing?  Prices  »«  Blackboard 

A  feature  that  Mr.  Macdonald  has 
found  very  satisfactory,  and  that  he  be- 
lieves has  helped  to  build  his  business, 
is  the  placing  of  prices  of  leading  staple 
commodities  on  a  blackboard  at  the  front 
of  his  store.  This  has  been  the  means  of 
very  frequently  attracting  new  customers 
to  the  store.  Passersby  stopping  to  read 
over  the  price  list  tabulated  on  the 
blackboard,  often  enter  the  store  to  make 
a  purchase.  At  once  they  are  in  the  store, 
Mr.  Macdonald  endeavors  to  sell  them 
other  lines  th|an  merely  the  ones  listed. 
In  this  way  sales  are  increased,  and  in 
some  instances  new  customers  are  gained 
for  the  store. 

I)is]»lay  Important  Factitr 

The  value  of  display  both  in  windows 


(alls  Customers  on  'I'liono'' 

Whenever  Mr.  .Macdonald  has  any 
special  line  of  goods  just  in  or  has  any- 
thing, in  fact,  to  offer  in  the  way  of  mer. 
chandise  at  a  special  price  or  just  new 
goods  he  calls  his  customers  on  the  tele- 
phone to  tell  them  of  it.  Invariably  this 
little  service  on  his  part  results  in  scle.s 
being  made,  and  it  is  particularly  appre- 
cated  by  the  peofple  who  are  in  the  habit 
of  making  his  store  their  buying  "centre 
for  groceries. 


Air  of  Mystery  Enshrouds  Sugar  Market 

Wholesale  Grocers  And  Most  Of  The  Refiners  Cannot  Explain 
Reason  For  The  Break.  Price  Claims  To  Be  Below  That 
Warranted  By  Raw    Market  And    American  Price. 


MONTREAL,  (Especial).—  More  trouble 
that  may  lead  to  other  developments 
is  in  sight  in  the  sugar  market.  Trouble 
,and  forebodings  are  rife  in  this  market 
with  regard  to  the  future.  Those  most 
closely  connected  with  the  sugar  market 
are  asking,  "What  will  happen  next?" 
"How  long  can  this  thing  last?"  "Who 
is  responsible  for  this  step  that  appears 
on  the  face  of  it  to  be  disastrous  to  the 
industry?"  It  is  only  natural  that  the 
topic  should  command  much  attention  in 
grocery  circles  in  view  of  tli.e  sharip 
declines  and  there  is  no  denying  the 
seriousness   of  the   situation. 

On    Wednesday    morning,    July    20,    ap- 


parently without  any  warning  and  little 
provocation  on  the  part  of  market  con- 
ditions for  raw  sugar,  the  price  of  re- 
fined dropped  to  $7.60  with  the  usual 
discount  to  wholesalers  which  makes 
the  refiners  price  $7.22  per  hundred. 
This  price  seems  to  be  away  out  of  line 
of  the  American  price.  It  is  figured  out 
according  to  list  prices,  that  sugar  from 
across  the  border  can  only  be  laid  down 
here  at  $7.59.  Prominent  men  in  the 
trade  therefore  think  that  a  new  reason 
must  be  looked  for  to  account  for  the 
sudden  break.  To  those  watching  this 
market  carefully,  it  does  not  seem  that 
any   of   the    refiners    are    in    a   financial 


po»itiom  to  foree  the  price  downward 
and  yet  it  has  been  done.  There  ar& 
many  suppositions  ex,pressed  by  those 
interested  but  nothing  official  can  be 
gathered  from  the  officials  of  the  refin- 
eries. In  the  opinion  of  those  who  dis- 
euss  the  matter  most  freely  one  refin- 
ery is  for  some  purpose  seeking  to  break 
the  market  and  yet  in  view  of  losses 
sustained  by  all  such  a  move  is  dilTieult. 
for  the  others  to  explain.  lu  the  first 
place  sugar  men  argue  that  present, 
(prices  of  raws  does  not  permit  of  such 
a  break.  These  who  are  selling  at  this 
new  price  are  evidently  loosing  money 
by  it  but  their  loss  is  for  some  pur- 
pose. \yh.at  that  purpose  is  can  only  be- 
surmised. 

Orocery    Trade   Suspicious 

Some  refiners  talk  candidly  about  the 
situation  and  profess  to  be  at  sea  for 
an  explanation  of  the  situation.  Others„ 
those  who  are  alleged  to  be  the  center 
of  the  move,  maintain  an  air  ©t'  mystery. 
The  president  of  one  of  the  wholesale 
grocery  firms  speaking  to  Canadian 
Grocer  about  the  situation  said:  "The 
sugar  situation  is  bad.  There  is  no 
reason  for  the  cut  and  .-tome  one,  yes 
everyone  is  losing  money  by  it.  I  am. 
sorry  to  see  the  thing  happen.  It  wrecks, 
the  confidence  of  tbe  trade  in  the  mar~ 
ket  and  creates  a  misunderstanding  of 
conditions  which  is  detremental  to  the- 
trade.  I  have  no  idea  of  the  underlying; 
cause  ef  this  break  in  price  and  I  auk 
sure  that  from  a  financial  standpoint 
there  ii*  Hone." 

There  is  every  reason  to  believe  that 
at  least  two  of  the  Montreal  refineries, 
do  jjot  understand  the  situation.  What 
the  next  move  will  be  it  is  hard  to  say. 
At  least  one  of  the  refineries  is  curtails 
ing  sales  at  the  present  price. 


Merchants  Conform  With 
Replacement    Values 

(Continued   from   Page   17.) 

Many    fishermen    will    not    be    able      to 
equip  themselves  in  consequence. 

The  Markimes 

With  the  balance  of  the  Dominion  the 
Maritime  provinces  ,are  suffering  from 
the  curtailment  of  business  operations. 
No  definite  trend  can  as  yet  be  traced, 
although  there  has  been  some  slight  in- 
dications of  improvement.  Retail  trade 
is  being  conducted  along  fairly  norm.al 
Ines,  and  merchants  have  made  progress 
in  marking  down  their  goods  and  stocks, 
appear  to  fee  fairly  well  reduced.  Orders, 
for  new  goods  are  restricted  as  rnuwh.  as: 
possible  however.  Accounts  on  the  whole- 
are  being  paid  for  fairly  but  not  as;  free- 
ly as   during   the  (previous   year. 

From  the  city  of  Sydney  Mines,  N.S.,, 
it  is  reported  that  business  during-  the! 
spring  and  early  summer  has  been  ^r- 
ahead  of  the  previous  months  of  thQ. 
year. 


:26 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


Ju!v  22.  1921 


CANADIAN  GROCER 

MEMBER  OF  THE  ASSOCIATED  BUSINESS  PAPERS 
ESTABLISHED  1886 


The  Only   Weel(ly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 


Published  Every  Friday  by 

THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY.  LIMITED 
MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 

'I'OL.    XXXV.        COLLINGWOOD,    JULY    22,    1921  No.    29 

BUSINESS  APATHY  AFFECTS  TAXES 


and  adding  the  revenue  of  the  year  would  appear 
likely  to  approximate  $57,822,000. 

That  figure  is  not  likely  to  be  an  under-estimate 
will  be  realized  when  it  is  recalled  the  decline  in 
prices  which  has  already  greatly  reduced  the  pro- 
fitableness of  the  tax  will,  in  all  probability,  affect 
the  new  rates  further  in  the  same  direction  in  order 
to  have  a  comprehensive  view  of  the  tax  revenue 
from  manufacturing  and  commodity  sales,  the  1920 
yield  from  the  1  per  cent,  manufacturers'  tax — 
being  approximately  $21,698000 — should  be  added 
to  the  above  $57,822,000,  making  a  total  minimum 
estimate  of  $79,422,000,  for  1921. 


IPHE  result  of  the    Sales    Tax    for  the  month  of 
*    May  at  the  old  rates  recently  made  public  the 
other  day  by  the  Minister  of  Customs  and  Inland 
Revenue  is  worthy  of  examination,  along  with  the 
eleven     months     in  which     it  was  in  force-     It  is 
evident  from  this  comparison  that  there  has  been 
a  big  falling  off  in  the  proceeds  of  this  tax  of  late, 
and  this  fact  suggests  speculation  as  to  what  will 
be  the  results  of  the  new  tax  in  the  year  now  cur- 
Tent.  The  revenue  from  the  sales  tax  for  April  was 
r$2.873.219,  of  which  $2,186,649  was  obtained  from 
the  tax  on  domestic  trad^  and  the  balance  on  im- 
jpijrts-    The  revenue  from  this  tax,  reached  its  peak 
,'in   October  last,  when  it  totalled  $5,020,474;  and 
■  with  the  exception  of  March,  ti  has  been  falling 
■steadily     since.      The     average   figure   of   the  ten 
:  months  contained  in  the  last  fiscal  year,  which  end- 
>3fl  with  March,  was  $3,802,516,  so  that  the  April 
returns  are  nearly  a  million  below  the  average.  The 
xeturns  for  March  were  $3,404,571.  and  this,  though 
it  was  an  exception  from  a  general  decline  was  con- 
siderably below  the  average  for  the  ten  months 
during  the  which  the  Sales  Tax  was  in  operation 
Jast  year. 

What  do  these  figures  suggest  as  to  the  fruitful- 
-jness  of  the  sales  Tax  under  the  new  scale  of  rates? 
Another  fact  that  has  to  be  taken  into  account,  is 
that  last  year,  imports  supplied  little  more  than 
one-quarter  of  the  revenue  obtained  by  the  sales 
tax.  The  total  revenue  of  the  ten  months  was 
$38,025,164;  of  which  $27,900,669  came  from  dom- 
estic sales.  Taking  these  two  considerations  into 
account,  it  would  look  as  if  the  proceeds  of  the  new 
tax  would  not  be  underestimated,  if  it  were  assumed 
that  the  domestic  taxes  are  increased  by  fifty  per 
cent.,and  the  tax  on  imports  by  one  hundred  and 
fifty  per  cent.  On  this  basis,  taking  the  April  figures 
as  a  starting  point,  you  get  the  total  revenue  for 
-eleven  months  under  the  new  rates  as  $54,949,367; 


VALUE  OF  A  PLEASED  CUSTOMER 

THE  value  or  service  to  customers  cannot  be  ever- 
estimated,  according  to  the  opinion  of  a  retail 
grocer  who  lays  special  stress  on  this  feature  of 
his  business.  There  is  no  doubt  but  pleased  cus- 
tomers will  do  much  to  increase  the  grocer's  trade. 
The  personal  endorsement  of  a  retailer's  goods 
serves  to  bring  new  business  to  the  store. 

Advertising  in  the  newspapers  will  attract  people 
to  your  store,  competent  salesmen  and  fair,  satis- 
factory prices  will  sell  the  goods  the  first  time,  but 
it  rests  with  the  service  and  courtesy  one  shows 
these  new  customers  together  with  the  trust  worthi- 
ness of  the  goods  whether  they  become  permanent 
ones.  It  is  transforming  an  occasional  purchaser 
into  a  regular  one.  that  should  be  the  particular  ob- 
ject of  every  merchant. 

In  the  selection  of  products  merchants  should 
have  in  mind  the  pleasing  of  their  customers.  Hav- 
ing his  relations  with  his  clients  so  pleasant  that 
they  will  pass  the  good  word  along,  will  create  a 
measure  of  good-will  that  will  prove  of  lasting  and 
profitable  good  to  one's  busines.s- 


EDITORIALS  IN  BRIEF 

Life  isn't  in  holding  a  good  hand,  but  in  placing 
a  poor  hand  well,  quoting  a  well  known  motto.  The 
same  can  be  applied  to  trade  at  the  present  time,  the 
moral  being  that  the  grocer  by  exerting  extra  sell- 
ing effort  to  certain  lines,  can  maintain  business  at 
levels  that  compare  favorably  with  a  year  ago. 

Real  Sales  ability  will  always  Iiold  old  and  at- 
tract new  customers.  Keep  a  watchful  eye  on  the 
man  who  has  not  this  gift 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


27 


& 


CURRENT  NEWS  OF  THE  WEEK 

Canadian  Grocer  Will  Appreciate  Items  of  News  from  Readers  for  This  Page 


Wu 


QUEBEC 

J.  L.  Kraft  of  Chicago  president  of 
the  Kraft-]VI,acLaren  Cheese  Co.  was  in 
Montreal  last  week  looking  over  the 
company's  new  plant  on  St.  Paul  St. 

Henry  Wright  of  Toronto,  one  of  the 
directors  of  the  Kraft-MacLaren  Cheesii 
•Co.,  Ltd.  was  in  Montreial  last  week 
on   business. 

J.  G.  Watson,  Montreal  was  recently 
elected  representative  of  the  Qubec  Re- 
tail Merchants'  Association,  on  the  Dom- 
.inion  executive. 


MARITIMES 

S.  Allan  Thompson.  Donald  W.  Arm- 
strong and  T.  :\I.  Bell,  all  of  St.  Jonn. 
N.B.  have  been  incorporated  as  McRae's 
Armstrong  and  Bell,  Limited,  to  take 
■over  the  brokerage  business  carried  on 
by  the  members  individually.  The  cap- 
ital stock  is  .$20,000,  and  the  head  office 
is  in  St.  John . 

Frederick  J.  McRae.  Allen  A.  McRae 
and  Hugh  A.  Carr,  all  of  Canipbellton, 
N.B.  have  been  incorporated  a.s  MlRae's 
Limited,  with  capital  stock  of  $40,000 
"With  he;id  office  in  Campbellton.  The 
company  is  authorized  to  carry  on  gen- 
eral wholesale  and  retail  mercantile 
business. 


ONTARIO 


As  a  means  of  encouraging  citizens  to 
spend  their  money  in  Hamilton  stores, 
the  Ch;amber  of  Commerce  of  that  city 
has  arranged  for  the  showing  of  films 
there,  with  the  argument  "Buy  in  Ham- 
ilton" well  emphasized. 

W.  J.  Leece,  has  opened  a  new  bak- 
ery in  Bracebridge.  Ont. 

The  resignation  of  Tred.  Mvason.  pres- 
ident of  the  Shredded  Wheat  Co.  N'ia- 
itara  Falls,  Ont.  is  announced.  Mr. 
Mason  has  been  elected  vice-|president 
of  the  Sugar  Refining  Co.,  New  York. 
He  will  continue  as  director  and  retain 
his  substantial  holdings  in  the  Shredded 
Wheat  Co. 

The  fourth  attempt  to  blow  up  build- 
ings in  St.  Catharines  since  a  year  ago 
last  spring  was  made  on  Sunday  last, 
-when  a  bomb  w.is  placed  at  Tittering- 
ton  Bros.'  fruit  warehouse  on  Balfour 
Street.  Two  Italians  caught  running  a- 
way  from  the  building  just  after  the 
explosion   are  being  held. 

The  Somerville  Paper  Box  Co.,  0-Pee- 
Chee   Gum     Company     land   the   London 


Paper  Box  Co.,  all  of  London,  Ont.  com- 
bined forces  on  Saturday  last  and  held 
a  very  enjoyable  ipicnic  at  Port  Stanley. 

The  council  of  New  Toronto  placed 
itself  on  record  ,at  a  recent  meeting  as 
favoring  the  licensing  of  businesses  in 
the  town,  the  licenses  to  vary  in  amount 
accoriiing  to  the  kind  of  business  con- 
ducted. A  by-law  is  to  be  prepared  for 
adoption  at  the  next  council  meeting. 

The  Roncesvalles  avenue  Business 
Men's  Associ,ition,  Toronto  rcently  held 
a  picnic  in  High  Park.  The  event  was 
very  largely  attended  by  the  merchants 
their  employees,  their  wives,  families, 
and  friends.  An  interesting  program  of 
sports  was  run  off,  ,as  well  as  a  base- 
ball match.  Donald  McLean  and  W.  R, 
McCaw,  grocer  on  Roncesvalles  avenue 
were  on  the  committee  that  looked  after 
the  arrangements. 

The  Canadian  Wholesale  Grocers  As- 
sociation have  moved  their  offices  from 
the  Board  of  Tr.ade  Building,  Toronto, 
to  35  Front  St.  East. 


WESTERN 


F.  H.  Semmens,  manager  of  the 
Western  Grocers  Ltd.,  Saskatoon,  was  a 
visitor  to  the  Office  at  Winnipeg,  during 
the  week . 

R.  B.  Campbell  of  the  W.  L.  MacKen- 
zie  &  Co..  Ltd.,  of  Saskatoon,  Sask., 
w,as  a  visitor  to  the  head  Office  last 
week . 

J.  Rollo,  manager  of  the  Regina 
Branch  of  the  W.  L.  MacKenzie  Co., 
Ltd.,  is  taking  a  months  vacation,  due 
to  ill-health,  .and  Harvey  Waters  of  the 
Winnipeg  Office,  is  filling  his  position 
during  his  absence. 


"The    World    Would 
Perish    If   Retailer 
Were  Done  Away  With 


>» 


Adressing  a  body  of  retail  merchants 
the  other  day  in  Toronto,  Wm.  Pidgeon, 
Jr.,  of  Rochester,  X.Y.  declared  that 
the  vetail  merchant  held  la  strategic 
position  in  the  world,  not  accessible  to 
anyone  else.  People  must  go  to  him,  he 
said,  because  he  is  the  collector  who 
makes  the  sensible,  orderly,  construct- 
ive grouping  of  materials  which  con- 
stitutes the  treasure  house  of  the 
world . 

The    retailer    alone    of    all    commercial 


agents  of  our  economic  system  is  able 
to  unlock  and  interpret  the  material 
things  of  life,"  he  added.  "He  alone 
touches  the  human  procession  from  the 
huma.i  standpoint.  In  this  he  may  be 
placed  on  a  par  with  the  preacher,  who 
interprets  spiritual  things  and  the  pro- 
fessor   who    interprets    mental    things". 

"If  to-morrow  some  sinister  power 
would  wipe  out  the  retailer  it  would  be 
only  a  few  days  till  the  world  would  be 
starving  and  freezing  and  dyi.ig". 

"The  retailer  has,  therefore,  one  of 
the  greatest  of  all  opportunities  to  pass 
out  courage,  patience  and  sympathy  ^d 
the  fine  spirit  of  fairness  through  the 
great  touch  of  human  hearts  with  other 
human  hearts." 


o 


ne 


Of  MontreaFs 
Oldest   Grocers 
Has    Passed    Away 

:»rO>TREAL,  (Special).—  The  death 
occurred  suddenly  at  Bic,  Quebec,  on 
Saturday,  July  16,  of  Alexander  For- 
rester Gr.aham,  proprietor  of  the  George 
Graham  retail  grocery  at  the  corner  of 
St.  Catherines  and  Drummond  Streets. 
Montreal.  Mr.  Graham,  who  was  in  his 
sixty-seventh  year,  had  not  been  in  good 
health  during  the  ipast  year  and  had 
gone  to  Bic  for  the  summer.  Three  of 
his  sisters  were  with  him  when  he  died. 

Mr.  Graham  entered  the  grocery  busi- 
ness, founded  by  his  fatherthe  lata 
George  Gr.aham,  sixty  years  ago,  at  the 
age  of  thirteen  years.  He  has  now 
been  in  the  grocery  business  for  fifty- 
four  years.  The  business  was  establish- 
ed on  Notre  Dame  Street  and  later  mov- 
ed to  Victoria  Square.  Thirty  years  ago 
the  present  store  was  built  on  the 
corner  of  St.  Catherine  and  Drummond 
Streets  and  up  to  a  few  months  ago 
Mr.  Graham  personally  .attended  to  the 
management  of  this  store. 

Mr.  Graham,  who  was  unmarried,  is 
suxvived  by  four  sisters.  He  was  not 
only  well  known  in  the  grocery  busi- 
ness in  Montreal,  but  through  his  con- 
nections in.  the  grocery  tr.ade  made 
many  friends  among  the  travellers  from 
other  places  who  come  to  Quebec. 


The  Bachelor:  "A  man  must  have  a^ 
lot  of  trouble  keeping  a  wife  properly 
gowned  these  days!" 

The  Married  One:  "Not  nearly  as 
much  as  he'd  h,ave  if  he  didn't. — Judge. 


28 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22.  1921 


Canned     Pineapple 

Industry     Grows 

Hawaii's  Pack   Sold  or  1^31 000,000  Last 
Year 

The  rapid  growth  of  the  Hawaiian 
canned  pineapple  industry  is  described 
in  a  bulletin  issued  by  the  Xatonal  Can- 
ners-  Assocation.  In  1920.  144.000,000 
cans  of  fruit  were  packed,  while  nineteen 
years  ago  there  was  only  one  cannery  in 
JHawaii  and  this  had  a  capacty  of  48,000 
cans. 

The  increase  in  production  is  indicated 
by   the   followng   figures: 

Number   of   cans 

Date —  packed  in  Hawaii 

1901  48.000 

1906   2.000,000 

1911    17,520.000 

1915    64.070.784 

1920    144,000,000 

As  in  other  industries  improvement^ 
have  been  brought  about  in  pineapple 
packing.  Canneries  equipped  with  mod- 
ern machinery,  expressly  for  the  handl- 
ing of  pinapple,  and  with  a  capacity  run- 
ning up  to  900,000  cans  a  day  from  one 
cannery  alone,  work  smoothly  and  effic- 
iently to  supply  the  demand.  The  four 
outstanding  innovations  which  have  con- 
trHjuted  most  to  the  advancement  of  the 
cultivation  and  canning  of  this  fruit  in 
Hawaii,  are:  The  utilization  of  the  iron 
sulphate  spray  to  offset  the  lack  of  iron 
in  the  soil,  the  development  of  a  mechan- 
ical coring  and  peeling  machine,  the  in- 
vention of  the  slicer  and,  finally,  the 
development  of  the  "eradicator,''  which 
recovers  the  pineapple  left  on  the  skin  of 
the  fruit,  after  the  first  rough  peeling 
has  been  done  by  machine. 

In  the  packing  of  pineapple,  the  fruit 
is  practically  never  touched  by  the  hu- 
man hand  from  the  time  it  is  peeled,  the 
rubber  gloves  of  the  sorter  being  the 
nearest  approach  to  it.  As  the  pineapple 
canning  industry  is  of  recent  growth  all 
the  factories  and  equipment  are  new. 

To  supply  pineapple  containers  there 
already  are  two  can  making  plants  in 
operation  in  Hawaii.  It  required  about 
126.000,000  cans  from  these  plants  to 
take  care  of  the  1920  pack.  The  pine- 
apple business  in  Hawaii  is  second  only 
to  the  sugar  industry.  In  1920  Hawaii's 
pneapple    pack    sold    for    $31,000,00« 

Approximately  20,000  people  are  en- 
gaged in  the  pineapple  industry  n  Ha- 
waii, according  to  a  recent  report.  It  is 
said  that  the  industry  occupies  about 
46,000  acres  of  land  and  that  the  number 
of  people  employed  in  the  various  oper- 
ations of  the  industry  range  from  a 
minimum  of  5,000  in  the  slack  season  to 
a  maximum  of  about  15,000  in  the  busy 
season . 


ArHAT   AI)VEKnSEME>TS 
OF   A    KETAIL    STORE 

MUST     ACCOMPLISH 

THE  ADVERTISEMENTS  of  a  re- 
tail store,  to  obtain  and  hold 
the  interest  of  the  reader,  must  do 
five  things,  according  to  an  auth- 
ority who  addressed  the  retail 
section  of  the  world  convention  of 
the  Associated  Ad.  Club  of  th*? 
World.    They   are: 

1. — Acquaint  people  with  un- 
tamiliar   goods. 

2. — Remind  people  of  things 
they  need. 

3. — Give  information  about  goods 
wanted. 

4. — Develop  a  sense  of  value  in 
the  goods. 

5. — Educate  people  how  to  use 
the  goods. 

Transl;'iting  this  into  terms  of 
the  store,  he  continued  it  means: 

1. — Move  goods  out  of  the  store 
by  telling  people  you  have  what 
they   want. 

2. — Stimulate  interest  in  dif- 
ferent kinds  or  similar  goods. 

3. — Sustain  people's  interest  in 
the  store  between  purchases  or  be. 
tween  visits. 

4. — Dveloips  a  sense  of  v,alue  in 
the  customer's  mind. 

5. — Multiply  the  customer's  buy- 
ing impulse.  That  is,  induce  the 
buying  of  merchandise  which  will 
leave  so  favorable  an  impression 
that  customers  will  come  back  to 
your  store  for  their  other  needs 
or  w.ants. 

In  the  prepar.ation  of  advertis- 
ing copy  he  said  department  man- 
agers and  others  could  make  their 
.advertising  interesting  by  follow- 
ing an  outline  like  this: 
chandise. 

1. — Tell  how  you   got   the  mer- 

2.— What  it  is? 

3.— What  it  is  used  for? 

4. — What  it  is  made  of. 

5. — What   colorings? 

6. — How   trimmed   or   ornament- 
ed? 

7.— What    size? 

8. — Prices? 

9. — Any  other  infrmation  that 
would  help  in  telling  an  interest- 
ing story  to  the  (public. 


J.  N.  HiiiUer,  with  the  California  As- 
sociated Raisin  Comipany,  Montreal,  has 
returned  from  an  extended  trip  to  Cali- 
fornia where  he  visited  his  principals. 
Mr.  Hunter  left  in  May.  He  returned 
home  by  way  of  Vancouver,  Winnipeg 
and  Toronto.  D.  H.  Bottrill  also  of  the 
Montreal  office  of  the  Associated  Rais- 
in Company  met  him  in  Toronto  (and 
spent  a  few  days  at  a  number  of  Ont- 
ario  points   before   returning. 


Oat    Market    Is 

Stronger  With 

Heavier    Demand 

The  oat  market  during  the  past 
month  has  been  showing  considerable 
strength.  This  strength  is  attril)ut9d  to 
the  fact  that  the  old  crop  is  becoming 
fairly  well  depleted  under  a  heavy  de- 
mand for  feeding  /purposes  The  hot 
Vv6|ather  bringing  about  a  drought,  es- 
pecially in  the  eastern  provinces  has 
created  a  demand  that  is  little  short  of 
What  will  develop  after  the  new  crop 
phenonimal  for  this  season  of  the  year, 
^nd  the  demand  which  under  preseat 
conditions  will  in  all  probability  be  a 
big  one.  The  crop  in  Ontario  appears 
to  be  light.  In  Western  Provinces  and 
in  some  parts  of  the  east  there  are 
indications  of  a  good  crop  but  ia  other 
I),arts  of  the  world,  the  crop  reports  are 
not  very  favorable. 

On  June  15,  cash  oats  were  selling 
at  Fort  William  at  46%  cents  per 
bushel  and  on  July  15  the  price  was 
53  cents  per  bushel. 

This  condition  is  reflected  in  a  strong- 
er market  for  rolled  o.ats,  both  in  bulk 
and  in  packages  with  a  tendency  for  an 
advance  on  these  lines. 


Inquiry 

Will   you   please   advise   me   names   of 
wholesale      tobacco      dealers      in    cigar- 
ettes in     Toronto     as  I  want  to  get  in 
touch   with    thera? 
Ans. 

Names  of  a  number  of  the  der.lers 
in  cigarettes  were  sent. 

Would  you  be  so  kind  to  (publish 
the  names  of  a  firm  who  manufacture 
raw  W09l  into   flannel. 

Answer —  W.  J.  Westwood,  &  Co.. 
Hamilton,  Ont.,  and  Porritts  &  Spencer 
(Canada)    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 


BEFORE   THEY'D   GR01VX 

Mrs.  Newlywed  was  determined  not  to 
show  her  inexperience  when  she  started- 
off  on  the  shopping  round  for  the  first 
time. 

Her    first   victim    was    the    grocer. 

"These  eggs  are  very  small,"  she 
said. 

"I  know  it,"  answered  the  grocer,  "but 
that's  the  kind  the  farmer  supplies  me 
with.  They  only  arrived   this  morning." 

"Yes."  said  the  bride,  seeing  her  op- 
portunity to  show  that  in  spite  of  her 
youthful  appearance,  she  was  not  to  be 
trifled  with.  "That's  just  the  trouble 
with  these  farmers;  they  are  so  anxious 
to  get  those  eggs  of  their's  sold  that 
they   take  them   too  soon  off  the  nest. 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


nmraii 


29 

musm 


WEEKLY  GROCERY  MARKET  REPORTS 


Statements  from  Buying  Centres 


^ii!ifi;imiiiiiiiiiiinii»iiiiiiiiriPii:i!iiiiiiiiiii::;iiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiii!i:;iiiii!iiyiiiiui^ 


QUEBEC    MARKETS 


\/f ONTREAL,  July.—  The  grocer 

in     nearly     all   lines   and   a 
More  confidence  is  demonstrated 
been  weak   in  the  past-     Rice  is 
this  since  the  market  has  streng 
fruit  lemons  are  still  the  feature 
pects  are  good  for  domestic  fruit 
be  heavy.     The  rains  of  the  past 
for    vegetables    and    already  the 
in  prospect  of  a  better  crop.     The 
cucumbers  and  other  market  gar 
market  is  offered  with  prices  vary 
good  market  for  canned  goods  and 
strong  at  the  advanced  price  in 
There  is  little  change  in  the  tea 

Canned  Tomatoes  Strong 


y  is  steady  with  a  good  movement 
noticeable  improvement  in  buying, 
by   the   trade   in   lines   that   have 

the  most  outstanding  example  of 
thened  up  with  better  buying.  In 

with  the  high  price.  The  pro.s- 
this  season  and  the  apple  crop  will 

week  have  improved  the  outlook 
prices  on  potatoes  are  easing  off 

supplies  of  local  cabbages  and 
den  produce  are  good  and  a  ready 
ing  from  day  to  day.     There  is  a 

tomatoes,  corn  and  peas  are 
view  of  the  limited  stocks  on  hand. 

market. 


Montreal. 

C.A.NXKn  GOODS.— There  is  no  actual 
change  in  quotations  on  canned  goods. 
The  supplies  of  canned  t(;matoes.  peas 
and.  corn  on  the  Icoal  market  warrant  a 
strong  price  with  a  tendency  towards  an 
advance.  Stocks  are  limited  to  a  few 
warehouse  .  Ofhc*  lin»  •.  of  canned  goods 
are  steadv  with  a  gor^  1  market  in  view 
of  the  prices  on  fresh  fruit  and  veget- 
ables. 

CANNED  VEGETABLES 

Asparagus      (Amer.)      mam- 
mot  ti   green  tips    

AsparaRUM.  Imported  (2V^s)    .... 
Beans,  golden  wax   2  10 

Do,.  Refugee    2  10 

Corn.  2s   

Carrots    (sliced),  2s    1  4.5 

Corn  (on  cob),  gallons  ....  7  00 

Spinach,   ?>s    2  So 

Squash,  2V^-lb.,  doz 

Succotash,  2  lb.,  doz 

Do.,    Can.     (2s)     

Do..  California,  2s    .?  1» 

Do.  (wine  gals.)    8  00 

■Sauerkraut.  2i^  lb.  tins 

Tomatoes,  Is 

Do.,    2s    

Do..    21/2S    1  6.5 

Do.,  gallons    5  70 

Pumpkins.  214s   (doz.)    1  50 

Do.,  gallons  (doz.)   

Peas,    Standard    1  80 

Do.,   early  June    

Do.,  extra  fine,  2s    

Do.,  Sweet  Wrinkle 

Do,,   2-lb.   tins    

Peas,  New   Pack — 

Standard,   2-lb 

Choice.  2-lb 

fairly  June,  choice 

^^'^..   standard    

Kine  French.  2-lb 


4  40 

6  00 
2  15 
2  15 

.      1   65 
1  75 

7  50 
29  0 
1  50 
1  80 
1  80 
.3  50 

10  00 


m 

65 
40 
70 
75 
55 


4  00 

1  90 

2  00 

3  00 


571/2 
75 


1  8214 

1  871/2 

2  05 
2  00 
2  80 


CANNED  FRUITS 


Apricots,  21/^  lb.  tins 4  75 

Apples,  21/^8,  doz 1  40     1  65 

Do.,  3s,  doz 1  60     1  70 

Do.,    gallons,    doz 4  75     5  00 

Currants,  black,  2s,  doz.   . .   4  00  4  05 


Do.,  gals.,  doz 

Split  Peas,  per  bag 

Cherries,    red,    pitted,   heavy 
syrup,  doz..  1-lb.    . .  -  - 

Do.,  21/2   lb 

Do.,   2-lb 

Do.,   white,   pitted    "e  50 

Gooseberries,  2s,  heavy  syni^ 

doz 

Peaches,  heavy  syrup' — 

2-lb 

2y2-lb 5  00 

1-lb 

Pears,  Is   

Do.,    2-lb 

Greengage  Plums,  hy.  syrup  2  65 
Lombard        Plums,        heavy 

syrup,    2-lb 

Do.,   light    syrup    

Pineapples   (grated  and  slic- 
ed). 2y2    lb. 

Do.,    2-lb 

Do..   1-lb 

Red  Raspberries  4  25 

Strawberries    4  00 

New  Pack  Strawberries — 

Standard  No.   2.  per  doz 

Choice    grade    

Fancy  Preserved    

Rhubarb,   preserved    

Do.,    gallon    

Canadian  Pineapp'e  (sliced)   .... 
New  Blueberrie",  2  lbs 

Do.,   1  gal 


16 

00 

5  00 

a 

10 

5 

00 

4 

00 

4 

75 

2 

75 

3 

90 

5 

25 

2 

90 

3 

20 

4 

10 

2 

75 

2  00 


4 

20 

3 

20 

2 

00 

4 

35 

4 

10 

4 

fiO 

4 

70 

5 

50 

2 

80 

5 

75 

4 

80 

2 

25 

12  00 


Dried  Fruits  Active 


Jlontreal. 

DRIED  FRUITS.— There  is  no  change 
in  tlie  prices  quoted  on  the  dried  fruit 
market.  The  trade  in  this  line  is  renorted 
to  be  in  excellent  condition  witli  an 
active  demand  on  all  sides.  Rai=ins  are 
tlie  strongest  feature  of  the  market  and 
are  holding  firm  in  price  with  stocks  on 
hand  light.  Other  lines  are  steady  except 
dried  apples,  which  are  easing  up  in 
prospect  of  the  new  crop. 

Apricots,  fancy    0  33 

Do.,  choice   0  27 

Do.,  slabs    0  22 

Apples   (evaporated)    ....   0  12%  0  15 

Peaches   (fancy)    0  23 


Do.,  choice,  lb 0  25 

Pears  (choice)   0  22 

Do.,  fancy 0  27  0  28 

Peels — 

Choice     0  26 

Ex.   fancy   0  30 

Lemon,  new  pack  ....  0  46  0  47 

New  Pack- 
Orange    0  48  0  49 

Citron 0  76 

Choice,  bulk,  25-lb.  boxes, 

lb 0  22 

Peels  (c«t  mixed),  doz 3  25 

Raisins   (seeded)  — 

Valencias    0  23 

Muscatels,  2  Crown 0  221,^ 

Do.,  3  Crown 0  23 

Do.,  4  Crown 0  23i^ 

Turkish  Sultana.  5  Crown  0  27  9  30 

Fancv  seeded  (bulk)    0  26  0  28 

Do.,  16-oz 0  25  0  27 

Cal.    Seedless    cartans,    12 

oz 0  21  0  23 

Do..  16  ounces   0  27^4 

Cal.  Seedless,  in  bulk  . .  0  18i,4  0  19% 

Cluster,  20  1-lb.  pack 6  75 

Currants,   loose    0  15 

Fard,  12-lb.  boxes   3  25 

Packages  only  0  19  0  20 

Dromedary    (:56-10   oz.)    0  19 

Loose   Oil  0  14 

Figs    (laver),      10-lb.    boxes, 

2s,  lb 0  32  0  36 

Do.,   214s,   lb 0  40 

Do.,  21/2S,  lb 0  43 

Do.,  2%,  lb 0  45 

Figs,  white  70  4-oz.  boxes)  ....  5  40 
Do.,  Spanish  (cooking),  22- 

Ib.  boxes  each 0  11 

Do.,     Turkish,     3     crown, 

lb 0  22 

Do.,  5  crown.lb 0  28 

Do.,  7  crown,  lb 0  30 

Do.,   10-lb.    box    2  75 

Do.,  mats    3  00 

Do.,  22-lb.  box 1  90 

Do.  (12  10-oz.  boxes) 2  20 

Prunes    (25-lb.   boxes)  — 

20-30S 0  25 

30-40S 0  19 

40-50S    0  17 

50-60S   0  13% 

60-70S   0  121/3 

70— 80s    0  11% 

80— 90s    0  10% 

90— 100s    0  09% 

Walnuts  and  Peanuts  Strong 


Montreal. 

XUTR.— The  nut  tniirket  in  firm  with 
strong  tendencies  continuing  in  walnuts 
and  peanuts  as  a  result  of  an  active 
,  ummer  business.  Prices  on  peanut.s 
vary  with  the  many  qualities  offered  on 
the  market.  Walnut  stocks  are  low  with 
little  prospect  of  replenishment  to  any 
great  extent  since  stocks  in  both  New 
York  and  France  are  reported  short. 
Almonds,  Tarragona,  per  lb.  0  20     0  24 

Do.,    shelled     0  54 

Valencia    Shelled   Almonds    ....     0  44 

Chestnuts    (Italian)    0  18 

Cocoanut    (shredded,   bulk)    0  33     0  36 


30 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  22.  1921 


Filberts  (Sicily),  per  lb.  ...  0  17     0  18 

Brazil  nuts    (new)    0  15 

Do.,  Barcelona 0  15^^ 

Peanuts,   Jumbo    0  18 

Do.,  shelled,  No.  1  Spanish  0  18     0  20 

Do.,  Java,  No.  1   0  11% 

Do.,  salted,  red    0  21     0  23 

Do.,  shelled,  No.-Virginia  0  I6V2     0  18 
Peanuts   (salted)  — 

Fancy,  wholes,  per  lb 0  38 

Fancy  splits,  per  lb 6  35 

Pecans,  new  Jumbo,  per  lb 0  75 

Do.,  large,  No.  2,  polished  0  29  0  30 

Pecans,   shelled    1  00  1  50 

Walnuts,  Grenoble,  in  shell  0  29 

Marbot  Walnuts    0  24  0  28 

Do.,    new    Naples    0  26 

Do.,   shelled,  Manchurian    ....  0  68 

Do..  Bordeaux   0  63  0  68 

Do.,  Chilean,  bags,  per  lb 0  40 

Do.,  Spanish,  shelled 0  60 

N0TE3 — Jobbers  sometimes  make  an  add- 
ed charge  to  above  pricer  ior  broken 
lots. 

Lemons  Hold  High  Prices 


Good  Market  For  Starch 


Montreal. 

FRUIT.-  Lemons  are  still  the  centre 
of  interest  in  the  fruit  market.  Prices 
are  tirm  at  the  high  level  and  the  demand 
is  still  good  with  light  supplies  at  hand. 
There  is  little  change  in  the  orange 
market.  Niagara  fruit  is  arriving  here, 
but  the  se.rvice  is  poor  and  heavy  losses 
are  being  experienced  which  keep  the 
prices  high.  Montreal  melons  are  plenti- 
ful and  prices  vary  considerably  as  the 
supplies  become  more  plentiful. 

FRUIT- 
APPLES— 

Boxes,    175s,   216s    4  50 

Bananas  (as  to  grade),  bunch  7  00  8  00 

Grapefruit,  Jamaican,  64,  80,  96  ... .  575 

Do.,    Porto    Rico    5  00 

Lemons,  :!0(i-.360s    14  00  1.^  00 

Cal.    Val.  Oranges.  200-250 5  7.5 

Do..   150-176    '■,2') 

Do.,  Blood  Oranges,  %  boxes  ....  3  75 

Tangerines    4  25 

Pineapples,  24s,  30s,  36s,  crate 8  00 

Watermelons,    each    9  00 

California   Cherries,   per   box    ....  5  50 

Georgia    Peaches,    crate    5  00 

California    Peaches    3  00 

Califoriiia  plums 3  50 

Cantaloupes    6  00 

California  Plums 3  00 

Cereal  Market  Quiet 


CEREALS.— There  is  no  change  in 
cereals  this  week.  Prices  are  steady  with 
the  usual  light  demand  during  the  sum- 
mer season  since  retailers  are  only 
carrying  stocks  for  immediate  require- 
ments. 

Oatmeal,  gran.,  fine  standard  ....  3  60 

Rolled  Oats.  90  lbs 3  15 

Pearl  Hominy   3  25 

Cornmeal,    Gold    Dust    Brand    ....  3  25 

Graham  Flour,  98  lbs 7  65 

New  P.uckwheat  Flour 6  75 

Pot    Barley    4  25 

Pearl   Barley   5  25 

Beans,  Out 3  50 

Do.,   Can 3  30 

Lima  Beans    0  10 

Green   Peas,  dried    0  17 

Ground  Oil  Cake,  per  bag 3  00 


PACKAGE  GOODS.— Package  {(bods 
are  steady  in  price  with  a  steady  sale 
in  all  lines.  The  only  change  is  a  slight 
advance  in  the  price  of  Health  Bran 
which  is  now  quoted  at  $3.50  per  case 
ot  twenty  packages.  The  reason  for  the 
new  price  on  this  cereal  is  that  it  is 
being  packed  in  a  new  package  with 
mere  weight.  There  is  a  good  trade  for 
all  starches  at  this  season  and  prices 
are   firm. 

Breakfast  food,  case  18 3  50 

Cocoanut,  2oz.  pkgs.,  doz 0  78% 

Do.,  20-lb.  cartons,  lb 0  36 

Corn  Flakes,  3  doz.  case  3  40     3  55     3  75 

Cornmeal,  yellow,  24s    3  00 

Do..  36s    4  16 

Oat   Flakes,   20s    4  80 

Rolled  oats,  20s 5  00 

Do.,  18s    2  00 

Aluminum  package,  20-. 6  10 

Oatmeal,  fine  cut,  20   pkgs 6  75 

Puffed   Rice    5  70 

Puffed  Wheat   4  40 

Farina,  case,  24s 3  25 

Hominy,    pearl    or    gran.,    2 

doz 3  00 

Health  Bran   (20  pkg.),  case 3  ."^0 

Pancake  Flour,  case   3  60 

Do,,  self-rising,  doz 1  50 

Wheat  Food,  18-1 V2S 3  25 

Wheat  Flakes,  case  of  2  doz 2  95 

Porridge  Wheat,  36s,  case 6  40 

Do.,   20s,  case    6  50 

Self-rising  Flour  (3-lb.  pkg.), 

doz 2  75 

Do.  (6-lb.  pack.),  doz 5  40 

Do.,  Buckwheat  flour,  per 

doz 1  50 

Corn   Starch    (preparde)    0  10% 

Potato    Flour    0  12% 

Starch    (laundry)    0  08% 

Flour,    Tapioca    0  15     0  16 

Shredded  Krumbles,  36s 4  35 

Shredded  Wheat  4  95 

Cooked   Bran,   12s    2  25 

Euamel  Laundry  Starch,     40 

pkgs.    case    

Celluloid    Stares,      45    pkgs., 

case     4  20 

Package  Cornineal  3  OO 

Malt  B'kfast  Food  (36  pkgs.) 9  50 

Quaker   2-Minute   Oat   Food    1  80 

Puffed  Rice  Pancake  Flour   2  90 

Egg  Noddles,  case  24 2  25 

Macaroni    2  25 

Quaker  Quakies    3  40 

Corn  Syrups  Steady 

CORN  SYRUP.— The  corn  syrup  mark- 
et is  holding  steady  with  a  fair  demand, 
considering  the  season.  There  is  no 
change  in  molasses  this  week  and  prices 
have  declined  twice  during  the  past 
month  and  are  new  fairly  steady  at  the 
prices  quoted  below. 

CORN  SYRUP— 

Barrels,  about  700  lbs 0  06% 

Half     barrels,     about   350 

lbs 0  06% 

Quarter  barrels,  about  175 

lbs 0  0714 

2  gals.,  25-lb.   pails  each   2  25 

3  gal.,  38%  lb.  pails,  each 3  25 

5   gal.,   65-lb.   pails,   each    ....  5  20 

2-lb.  tins,  per  case 4  00 

5-lb.  tins,  per  case    5  30 

10-lb.  tins,  per  case 5  00 

Price  for 
Barbadoes  Molasses —      Isld.  of  Montreal 
Puncheons     0  61 


Barrels    0  64 

Half    barrels     0  66 

Puncheons,  outside  city 0  58 

Fancy  Molasses    (in  tins)— 
16-oz.   tins,     2   doz.     case, 

per  doz 2  40 

2-lb.  tins,   2   doz.    in  case, 

case    4  40     7  25 

3-lb.    tins,   2   doz.   in   case, 

case     5  75  10  75 

5-lb.   tins,   1   doz.   in   case, 

case 8  95 

10-lb.  tins,  %  doz.  in  case, 

case    8  60 

Rice  Market  Improves 

Jlontreal. 

RICE. — The  rice  market  continues  to 
show  improvement  with  signs  of  a  good 
future  ahead.  Primary  markets  show 
mere  strength  and  buying  on  local  mark- 
ets show  improvement.  The  action  of  the 
Indian  Government  in  withholding  ex- 
port licenses  is  to  a  great  extent  respons- 
ible fer  the  strength  of  the  market. 
RICE— 

Carolina,  extra  fancy 0  OT 

Do.    (fancy)    0  06 

Honduras,  fancy 0  05 

Rangoon  CC,  pre  cwt 3  90 

Do.,  B,  per  cwt 4  15 

Texas  rice 0  04i,^ 

Siam   0  06 

Tapioca,  per  lb.  (seed)   0  08     0  09% 

Do.    (pearl)    0  08     0  09% 

Do.    (flake)    0  08     0  09% 

Honduras    0  07 

Siam   0  14% 

NOTE — The  rice  market  is  subject  ta 
frequent  change  and  the  price  basis, 
is  quite  nominal. 

Tea  Pricez  Unchanged 


TEA. — There  is  very  little  change  in 
the  tea  market.  Dealers  are  looking  for- 
ward to  a  lower  price  in  Japan  teas,  but 
Ceylon  and  Indian  stand  firm  with  a 
lair  trade  passing.  There  is  a  lack  of 
confidence  in  the  tea  market  which  is 
detremental  to  its  strength.  The  stocks 
of  teas  carried  by  importers  are,  like  the 
retail  stocks,  being  cut  down  with  th( 
result  that  in  the  future  the  tea  market 
will  be  more  sensiive  to  the  conditions 
in  the  primary  market.  At  the  preseni 
time  prices  are  steady. 
Ceylon  and  Indians — 

Pekoes     0  22     0  26 

Broken  Pekoes  0  32  0  40 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  0  48  0  55 

Javas — 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes 0  48     0  55 

Broken   Pekoes    0  35     0  40 

China — 

Common 0  24     0  35 

Medium     0  42     0  48 

Choice    0  50     0  60 

JAPAN  TEAS  (new  crop)    0  77 

Above  retail  prices  range  of  quotations 
to  the  retail  trade. 
JAPAN  TEAS    (new  crop)— 

Choice   (to  medium)    0  55     0  60 

Early  picking    0  60     0  75 

Finest  grades    0  75     0  90 

Javas — 

Pekoes   0  35     0  40 

Orange  Pekoes 0  37     0  45 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes 0  37     0  45 

Inferior  grades  of  broken  teas  may  be 
had  from  jobbers  on  request  at  favorable 
prices. 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


31 


Spice  Market  Quiet 

Montreal. 

SPICES. — Xo  change  is  reported'  in 
quotations  on  spices.  The  market  is 
steady  with  a  light  demand,  but  dealers 
are  looking  forward  to  a  more  brisk 
business  during  the  next  month  when  re- 
tailers and  wholesalers  will  be  looking 
up  for  the  Fall  trade.  Black  pepper  is 
ihe  strongest  teature  of  the  market  at 
the  present  time. 

Allspice    0  18     0  20 

Cassia   (pure)    0  27     0  :^0 

Cocoanut.   pails.  20   lbs.   un- 
sweetened, lb 0  46 

Do.,  sweetened,  lb 0  36 

Chicory   (Canadian),  lb 0  14 

Cinammon — 

Rolls    0  35 

Pure,   ground    0  35 

Cloves    (ground)     0     40     0  45 

Cream     of     tartar     (French 

pure)    0  f).T     e  TO 

Do.,  American  high  test  ...   0  75     0  SO 

Ginger    (Jamaica)    0  30 

Ginger  (Cochin)   0  27 

Mace,  pure,  1-lb.  tins    0  60     0  65 

Mixed  spice   0  30     0  32 

Do.,    'ZVs    shaker    tins,    doz 1  15 

Nutmegs,   whole — 

Do.,   64,  lb 0  40 

Dc,   80.   lb 0  38 

Do.,   100   lb 0  35 

Do.,  ground,   1-lb.   tins 0  45 

Pepper,   black    0  33 

Dc,    white    0  33 

Do.,   Cayenne    0  32     0  34 

Pickling    spic3    0  25     0  28 

Do.,  package.  2  cz.,  doz 0  35     0  40 

Do.,  package,  4  oz..  doz 0  65     0  70 

Paprika    0  50 

Tumeric   0  28     0  30 

Tartaric   acid     per    V").    (cry- 
stars   or   pt  Vile  red)    ....    0  95         00 
Cardaraon  seed,  per  lb.,  bulk. 

nominal    2  00 

Carraway     (mmnali     0  25     0  30 

Mustard   seed,   balk    0  35     0  40 

Celery  seed,  bulk  (nominal)   .  .  0  70     0  75 
Pimento,   v.hole    0  15     0  20 

ONTARIO 

TORONTO.  July  20.—  The  butter 
an  upward  trend  attributed  to 

in  churning  cream  advancing  four 
good   export   demand   wnich   has 
stronger  market.    Eggs  are  easier 
and    a    lighter    demand.     Cooked 
a  scarcity  noted  under  a  strong 
are  steady  to  firm     while     fresh 
spring   chickens   are   lower   with 
ening  are  firm  at  slightly  higher 

Canned    Meats    Lower 


Good  Crop  Of  Vegetables 


Toronto. 

CANXrOD  GOODS.— A  change  in  quota- 
tions is  made  on  Clark's  canned  goods. 
No  1/^  tins  roast  and  corn  beet  is  quoted 
at  $2.40  per  dozen;  all  soups  are  now 
$1.20  per  dozen  with  the  exception  Of 
chicken  which  is  $2.40  per  dozen;  pork 
and  be'.uis  are  also  slightly  easier.  No. 
1  tins  are  quoted  at  .$1.20  per  dozen.  No. 
IV2  at  $1.60.  No.  2  at  $2. SO  and  No.  3  at 
$2.45  per  dozen.  No  official  price  has  yet 
been  named  on  this  season's  pack  of 
strawberiy  jam,  but  some  wholesalers 
are  quoting  fcurs  at  671/2  cents  and  16 
ounce  jars  at  $3.00  per  dozen.  Tomatoes, 
corn  and  peas  are  firmer  at  slightly 
higher   quotations. 


VEGETABLES.— So  far  there  is  very 
little  change  in  the  vegetable  market, 
but  the  rains  of  the  past  week  should 
improve  local  conditions  with  a  better 
supply  in  view  and  consequent  easier 
prices.  Cabbages  and  cucumbers  are 
plentiful  and  are  tinding  a  ready  market. 
The  rains  have  so  improved  the  prospect 
for  the  potato  crop  that  market  prices 
have  already  begun  to  show  easier  tend- 
eno.eo  following  a  very  strong^  tone. 
There  is  everv  indication  that  the  local 
crtp  ct  tomatoes  will  be  large  and  prices 
on  imported  tomatoes  should  ease  up  in 
view  of  this.  Prices  however  show  little 
change,  but  there  should  be  an  easier 
trend  to  the  market   through  the  week. 

New    cabbage    5  50 

Montreal  cabbage,  per  dozen  ....  1  75 
Celery,  Florida,  per  crate  ....  4  00     4  75 

Do.,  California    11  OC 

Carrots,  per  bag 0  75     1  00 

JMontreal  cucumbers,  per  doz 1  75 

Garlic,  lb 0  50 

Horseradish,  lb . .     0  60 

Leeks,  doz 4  00 

Lettuce    

Parsley    

-Mint    0  60 

Mushrooms,  lb 1  00 

Oyster  plant,  per  doz 1  50 

Parsnips,  bag    l  00 

Peppers,  green,  doz 0  50 

Potatoes,  Mtrl.  (90-lb.  bag)  0  90  1  00 
New   pot  it03s.   bbls.,    190    lbs.   6  75     5  75 

Do.,   sweet,  hamper    5  50 

New    potatoes,   per   bbl 6  50 

New  potatoes,  per  bbl 5  00     7  00 

Spinach,  box  

Spanish  Onions,  per  case  ....  5  00  5  50 

Turnips,  per  bag 0  75  1  00 

Red   Onions,   cwt 3  00 

Texas  Onions,  per  crate 3  50 

Yellow  Onions,  hi'inper  50  lbs 2  50 

New  Tomatoes,  per  crate 5  00 

Mi'sisKipi.i  flats,  per  box 2  75 

MARKETS 

and  cheese  markets  continue  with 
the  drought  which  has  resulted 
cents    per    pound.     There   is   a 

also  something  to  do  with  the 
and  lower  under  smaller  receipts 
hams  have  again  advanced  with 

demand-  Smoked  hams  and  bacon 
meats  are  quiet.   Ducklings   and 

fowl  unchanged.  Lard  and  short- 
prices. 

Salmon — 

Scckeye.  Is.  doz 5  20  5  80 

Do.,  V^s,  doz 2  65  3  00 

Cohoe,  Is,  doz 2  90 

Do.,  V2S.  doz 1  90 

Pinks,  Is  doz 1  45 

Lobsters,  Vj-lb..  doz 3  25  3  60 

Do.,   14-Ib.  ti-.'S    1  95  2  40 

Whale  Steak.  Is,  flat,  doz.  1  75  1  90 

Pilchards,  1-lb.  tails,  doz.  1  SO       

Canned  Vegetables — 

Tcmatoes.  2I/2S.  doz 1  65  1   75 

Peas,  standard,  doz 1   70  1  90 

Do.,  Early  June 2  15 

Beets.    2s    doz 1   45  2  45 

Beans,  golden  wax,  doz 2  20 

Asparagus  tips,  doz 5  50 

Do.,  butts,  doz 6  60 

Canadian   corn    1  50  1  60 


Pumpkins,  2i/^s,  doz 1  45 

Spinach,  2s,  doz 

Pineapples,  sliced,  2s,  doz.  4  06 
Do.,  shredded,  2s,  doz.  . .  4  75 
Rhubarb,  p'served,  2s,  doz.  2  07 1^ 
Do.,  preserved,  2i/^s,  doz.  2  65 

Do.,  standard,  10s,  doz 

Apples,  gal.,  doz 4  75 

Pears,  2s,  doz 3  00 

Peaches,  2s,  doz 

Plums,  Lombard,   2s,   doz.   3  10 

Do.,   Green  Gage    3  25 

Cherries,  pitted,  H.S 

Blueberries,  2s   2  35 

Strawberries,  2s,  H.S 4  50 

Raspberries,    2s 4  50 

Jams — 


1 

50 

1 

60 

4 

90 

5 

25 

2 

10 

4 

52 1& 

5 

00 

0 

00 

4 

25 

3 

50. 

3 

25- 

3 

40. 

4 

25- 

2 

45- 

5 

00- 

5 

00> 

Apricots.  4s.  each  

Blk.  Currants.  16  oz.,  doz. 

Do..  4s,  each  

Gooseberry,  4s,  each  .... 

Do.,  16  oz.,  doz 

Peach,  4s,  each  

Do..  16  oz.,  doz.  ... 
Red  Currants.  16  oz..  doz. 

Do..  4s,  each  

Raspberries,  16  oz.,  doz. 

Do..  4*;.  each    

Strawberries,  16  oz.,  doz. 


Dried  Fruits  Quiet 

DRIED  FRUITS.-This  market  is  quiett 

locally,    with    a    small    movement  noted 
Brokers,  however,  report  a  good  business 
on  prunes  for  the  Western   provinces  in- 
preparation  for  the  harvest  season. 
Candied  Peels — 

Z,^^™""    0  .34 

■      ^,'^''^"   0  50 

Mixed    0  40. 

Mixed,   cut   ready   for   use. 

No.  1  cartons,  per  doz 4  60 

Currants — 

G-eek,  Filiatras,  cases 0  17 

Do.,  Amalias    0  IT 

Do.,  Patras  0  17 

Do.,  Vostizza 0  23^ 

Dates — 

Excelsior,  pkgs.,  3  doz.  in 

case    5  50 

Dromedary,  3  doz.  to  case 7  00 

Fard,  per  box  ap.  12  lbs 3  25- 

Hallowee  dates,   per   lb 0  11. 

Figs — 

Smyrna  layers,  4  Crn.,  lb.  0  30  0  32" 

Do.,  layers,  6  crn.,  lb.  0  36  0  38 

Natural   pulled,  in   bags    ....  0  10^, 

Prunes — 

30-40S,   2?3    f>  2% 

40-50S,  25s    0  16 

50-60S,  25s    0  13 

«0-70s,   25s    0  10' 

70-80S,  25s 0  09%: 

80-90S,   25s    0  09 

90-lOOs,  25s 0  08> 

Peaches — 

Standard,  25-lb.  box,  pld.  0  261/2  0  28: 

Choice,  25-Ib.  box,  peeled  0  27  0  30' 

Fancy,  25-lb.  boxes   0  19  '^  30' 

Apricots — 

Fancy    0  46; 

Choice    0  42. r 

Standard    0  34 

Raisins — 

California,   bleached,   lb 0  27% 

Seedless.    1.5-oz.   packets   0  2Y  0  29 

Seeded,    15-oz.     packets     ....  0  28% 

Crn.  Muscatels,  No.  1,  25s 0  26 

Turkish   Sultanas,   pkgs 0  27 

Thompsons,  Seedless 0  28% 

Valencia    0  2.3 

Evaporated  apples  0  14      0  IS 


32 


Marrowfat  Peas  Higher 

T»ront». 

CEREAIjS. — The  market  generaUr  ii 
holding  firm.  Marrowfat  peas  have  ad- 
vanced to  seven  cents  per  pouad.  Whole 
■wheat  flour  is  up  ten  cents  per  bag  now 
quoted  at  .'54. So.  Millers  are  holding  roll- 
ed oats  firm  at  $3.50  per  bag,  but  whole- 
salers prices  vary  from  $3.1.5  to  $3.30 
per  single  bag. 

F.o.b.  Toronto 

Barley,    pearl.    98s    5  50 

Barley,   pot,   98s    4  75 

Barley   Flour.   98s    6  25 

Buckwheat    Flour,    9Ss    6  00 

Cornmeal,  Golden,  9Ss 2  75 

^•atmal,  98s    4  50 

•CoTH   Flour,   98s    3  75 

Rye  Flours.  98s 6  00 

Rolled  oats,  9es 3  1-'.  3  30 

Rolletl  wheat.  100  lb.  bbls 7  00 

Cracked  Wheat,  bag 5  00 

Breakfast  Food,  No.   1    6  00 

Do.,    No.    2    6  00 

Rice  Flour,  100  lbs 10  00 

X.inseed  meal,  9Ss 6  50 

Si'laxseed,  98s   7  00 

iPeas,   split,   98s    5  75 

."^larrowfat    green    peas    0  07 

■Graham    flour.   9Ss    4  75 

"Whole  Wheat  Flour 4  9." 

"Wfreat  Kernels,  8s    «  "-, 

Parina,  98s  (;  35 

Lemons  High  And  Scarce 

Fruit.— Lemons  continue  scarce  al- 
though a  shipment  of  Verdillis  have  ar- 
rived thi.s  week.  Ttie  price,  however  is 
firm  at  m,M  per  case,  but  it  is  expected 
If  cool  weather  prevails  prices  wll  drop 
Oranges  are  somewhat  easier  at  $5.30  to 
?6.50  per  case.  Raspberries  have  been 
coming  in  poor  shape,  but  it  is  expected 
that  now  with  the  change  in  the  weather 
the  duality  will  be  better.  Lawton  ber- 
I^'rf''  ^"if  f '"■""&  at  20  to  25  cents  per 
box.  The  break  in  the  hot  weather  with 
rains  has  had  reviving  effect  upon  the 
fruit  crop  and  the  quality  arriving  i< 
very  much  improved. 

Oranges.      Valencias,      loOs 
12Bs    • 

Do.,  150s.  200s.  216s:  250s  ! ! ."  '  ^50 

Grapefruit.  Cubans    . .  P  00 

Bananas.   Port  Limons   ..      "    '  ,'  ftqi/ 

I-.emons.    Cal.  ^^ 

Do..  Verdillis  '.".'.'. ,;■;,• 

Watermelens,  each 1   ^a 

Peaches.  6  baskets  to  crate  5  00  5  ."o 

Do    Sflfs^"'""'''  '''  '  ''  '  »' 

^aj.    Plums',   per' box"  ■.■.■.•;   20.  4  2S 

tJal.  Pears,  per  box  .  o  ,[1 

■Cherries,  sour.,  lis    ..:."::   Toft  i  ," 

Do,,  sour,  6s   0  60  ri  rk 

Gcjoseberries.    «s    ....]:::    [^  2S 

BilSe"^-:. I'-l   iz 

l^awtcn  Berries V.' " '    0  20       n  "r 

^^o^-;]?-^'-    ••  00 

Black  Curantts'.'es". J  o?      7  ?? 

^^■•^i« :::  ..     l^ 

Nuts  Continue  Firm 


Toronto. 

NUTS. — There  is  nothing  new  develop- 
ed in  the  nut  market.  All  lines  continue 


CANADIAN    GROCER 

finn    snrter   a   fair   demand. 

Almonds,  Tarragonas.  lb 0  22  0  23 

Walnuts,  Bordeaux,  lb 

Walnuts.    Grenobles,    lb 0  23  0  24 

Do.,   Marbot    0  22  0  23 

Do.,    California    0  39  0  40 

Filberts,   lb 0  15  0  16 

Pecans,    lb 0  28  0  30 

Cocoanuts,  Jamaica,   sack 7  50 

Cocoanut,  unsweetened,  lb 0  30 

Do.,  sweetened,  lb 0  35 

Do.,  shred 0  25 

eanuts,   Spanish,   lb 0  21  0  25 

iJrazil  nuts,  large,  lb 0  20  0  22 

Mixed  nuts,  large,  lb 0  32  0  34 

Mixed  nuts,  bags  50  lbs 0  32 

Shelled- 
Almonds,  lb 0  42  0  47 

Filberts,  lb 0  35 

Walnuts.  Bordeaux,  lb 0  73  0  75 

Do..    Manchurian    0  60  0  65 

Do.,   broken    0  52  0  5" 

Peanuts.    Spanish,   lb 0  10 

Brazil   nuts,   lb Q  75 

Pecans,  lb l  40 

One  Line  Oats  Lower 


Toronto. 

PACKAGE  GOODS.— There  is  an  act- 
ive demand  for  package  cereals  with  the 

raiirket  generally  lickling  firm  at  un- 
changed quotations.  Tillsons  Aluminum 
package  is  reduced  from  $6.40  per  case 
to  .?t;.lO. 

package^'goods 

Rolled   Oats,   20s,  rd..  case    5  00 

Do.,  20s,  square,  case 5  00 

Do.,   18s.   case    2  00 

Do.,  Aluminum  Prem.,  20s  ....  6  40 

Corn  Flakes,  ^jf}^,  case   3  55  3  7.5 

Porridge  Wheat,  36s,  regular 

case 6  00 

Do.,  20s.  family,  case 6  80 

Cooker   Pkg.    Peas,   3Gs.   cs    2  85 

Cornstarch.  No.  1.  lb.  crtns 0  10% 

Do..  No.  2,  lb.  cartons 0  0913 

Laundry  Starch    0  OS^'g 

Do.,  in  1  lb.  cartons 0  08% 

Do.,  in  6-lb.   wood  boxes    0  08T4 

Do.,  in  6-lb.  tin  canisters   0  12% 

Celluloid  Starch,  case 4  15 

Potato   Flour,    case    20    1-lb. 

pkgs 2  56 

Do.,   case   24   12-oz.   pkgs 2  30 

Fine   oatmeal,   20s    5  75 

Cornmeal.  24s   3  60 

Farina.    24s    3  2i 

Barley,  24s 2  75 

Wheat  Flakes,  243   5  00 

Wheat   kernels,   24s    4  50 

Self-rising  p'cake  flour,  24s 3  00 

Buckwheat  flour.  24s 3  50 

Two-minute   Oat  Food,   24s    1  80 

Puffed  Wheat,  case    4  40 

Puffed   Rice,   case    5  7d 

Health  Fran,  case   3  50 

F.S.  Hominy,  gran.,  case 8  00 

De.,  pearl,   case    3  00 

Scotch  Pearl  Barley,  case 2  70 

Self-rising  Pancake  Flour,  30 

to   case    4  20 

Do.,   Buckwheat  Flour,   30 

to   case    4  20 

Self-rising  Pancake  Flour,  36 

to  case    7  15 

Do.,   Buckwheat   Flour,   18 

to  case    3  65 

24s    2  90 

Do.,  Pancake  Flour,  18  to 
Puffed  Rice  Pancake  Flour, 

case 3  65 


July  22,  1921 
Rice  Market  Strong 


RICES. — The  primary  rice  markets 
ccr.tii'ue  with  a  strong  tone.  It  is  re- 
ported that  many  of  the  Louisiana  rice 
■lills  have  sold  out  and  have  closed  for 
the  season.  If  this  is  correct,  with  the 
embargo  on  India  rice  and  the  opening 
cf  Cuban  markets  for  Southern  rice  there 
is  a  strong  possibility  for  higher  prices 
in  the  near  future.  Local  quotations  are 
unchanged,  but  there  is  a  strong  tend- 
encv  on  the  nart  of  wholesalers  to  hold 
prices  firm  and  there  is  a  more  stabilized 
toiie   to  the  situation. 

Honduras,  broken,   per  lb.   0  07%  0  08 

Blue   Rose,  lb 0  06%  0  07 

Siain.  per  lb 0  06  0  06% 

Japans,  per  lb 0  07  0  07% 

Do.,    broken    0  05 

Chinese,  XX    

Do.,   Simiu    Oil  0  12 

Do..  Mujin,  No.  1    0  10  0  11 

Do,.   Pakling    0  09  0  10 

Rangoon    0  07  0  07% 

White   Sago    0  07  0  07% 

Tapioca,  per  lb 0  07%  0  08 

Syrups  Unchanged 


SYRUPS,-^orn:  lyrupi  ai'e  stea^ 
under  a  quiet  demand  that  is  regulated 
by  consumption.  ;\I(ilasses  are  easy  and 
quiet. 

Corn  Syrups — 

Bbls.,  about  700  lbs.,  y'low 0  06% 

Half  barrels.  I/4C  nver  bbls.; 

1,4   bbls,.   %c  over  bbls. 
Cases,   2-lb.   tins,   white,   2 

doz.  in  case   4  60 

Cases,   5-lb.   tins,   white,  1 

doz.  in  case   5  90 

Cases,  10-lb.  tins,  white.  % 

doz.  in  case   5  60 

Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  yellow,  2 

doz.  in  case   4  00 

Cases,  5-lb.   tins,  yellow  1 

doz.  in  case   5  30 

Cases.    10-lb.    tins,   yellow, 

doz.  in  case 5  00 

C  ne  Syrups- 
Barrels  &  half  barrels,  lb 

%  barrels,   i/4c  over  bbls.; 

V4,  bbls..  %c  over. 
Cases.  2-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  in 
case 6  00     6  50 

Molasses — 

Fey.,  Barbadoes,  bbls,,  gal 1  65 

Choice  Barbadoes,  barrels  ,  . . .  1  35 
New  Orleans,  bbls.,  gal.  0  46  0  56 

Do.,  half  blls,.  gal.  .  .  0  46  0  48 
Tins,  2-lb..   table  grade, 

case  2  doz.,  Barbadoes  ....  7  75 
Tins.  3-lb.,   table  grade, 

case  2  doz.,  Barbadoes  ....  10  75 
Tins.  5-lb.,  1  doz.  to  case, 

Barbadoes  8  95 

Tins,  10-lb.,  %  doz.  to  case, 

Barbadoes 8  60 

Tins,  No.  2,  baking  grade, 

case  2  doz 4  20 

Tins,  No.  3,  baking  grade, 

case  of  2  doz 5  50 

Tins.   No,  5.  baking  grade. 

case  of  1  doz 4  60 

West  Indies,  l%s,  48s   ..   4  60     6  95 

case  of  1%  doz 4  25 

Tins,  No.  10,  baking  grade, 


J«ly  22,  i921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


33 


Pickling  Spice  In  Demand 


SPICES. — Alfhough  the  pickliKg  sea- 
son has  hiii-dly  commenced,  manuiactur- 
«rs  report  a  big  movement  in  pickling 
spices.  Chillies  are  scarce  and  quotatiens 
firm  at  50  cents  per  pound.  The  spice 
market  jjenerally  shows  little  change 
with  prices  fairly  steady. 

Allspice   0  19  0  22 

Cassia    0  26 

Cinnamon    . . . : 0  41 

Cloves     0  55  0  60 

Cayenne 0  35  0  37 

Ginger,  Cochin    0  30 

Do.,  Jamaica 0  45 

Mustard,  pur« 050 

Pastry     0  28 

Pickling  spices 6  18 

Mace  0  5')  0  Go 

Peppers,  black   0  19  0  20 

Do.,    white    0  29  0  30 

Paprika,  lb 0  60  0  70 

Chillies,  lb 0  50 

Nutmegs,  select^s,  whole,  lOOs   ....  0  35 

Do.,  80s    0  45 

Do.,  ground    0  35 

Wustard  seed,  whole *  20 

Celery  seed,  whole 0  40 

Coriander    seed    0  18 

Carraway  seed,  whole 0  30 

Tumeric    0  30 

Curry  Powder   0  35 

Cream  of  Tartar — 

French,    pura    0  40 

American,  high-test,  bulk 0  40 

2-oz.  packages,  doz 1  25 

4-oz.   packages,  doz 2  00 

S-oz.   packages,  doz 8  50 

The  above  quotations  are  for  the  bf-st 
(juality.  Cheaper  grades  can  be  purchased 
for  less. 

Sugar  Drops  50  Cents 


SUGAR. — Refiners  announce  a  reduc- 
titon  of  50  cents  on  refined  sugar.  For 
the  past  couple  of  weeks  there  has  been 
considerable  irregularity  is  quotations 
by  wholesalers.  It  is  understood  also 
that  some  of  the  refineis  have  b*en 
making  certain  concessions  or  rebates 
and  this  reduction  brillg^  the  price  on 
the  otficial  list  in  line  with  prices  which 
have  been  quoted  for  the  past  ten  days. 
There  is  only  a  fair  movement  of  re- 
fined sugar  locally  considering  the  sea- 
son of  the  year,  owing  to  limitation  of 
purchases  by  Hianufactnrors  who  are 
ordinarily  hrp.vy  buyers  at  this  time  of 
the  year.  The  raw  market  during  th« 
week  has  been  firmer  with  the  .American 
refiners  advancing  their  prices. 
St.   Lawrence,   extra   gran.,   cwt.    .  .    8  59 

Atlantic,    extra    granulated     Si  59 

Acadia  SNgar  Reiinery,  extra  gran.  8  59 
Dom.  Sugar  Refinery,  extra  gran  8  59 
Canada    Sugar    Refinery,    gran.    . .    8  59 

Differentials:  Granulated,  advaoce 
over  basis;  5e-lb.  sacks,  25c;  barrels,  5c; 
gunnies,  5/20s,  40c;  gunnies,  10/lOs,  50c; 
cartons,  20/5s,  60c;   cartons,  50/2s.   75c. 

Differentials  on  yellow  sugars:  Under 
basfs.  No.  1  41c;   No.  2  50c;   No.   3  60c. 

Teas  Unchanged 


TEAS. — Ceylons    continue      to    hold    a 
firm   position.   Indias  have   also  a   firmer 
tendeney.    The    local    situation,    however, 
is  unchanged. 
Ceylons  and  Indians — 

Pekoe   Souchongs    0  35     0  50 


Pekoes  0  32  0  60 

Broken  Pekoes 0  50  0  64 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes 0  *8  0  66 

Javas — 

Broken  Orange  Pekoes  ....  0  45  0  65 

Broken    Pekoes    «  45  0  60 

Japans  and  Chinas — 

Karly  pickings.  Japans  ....  0  90  1  00 

Do.,  seconds   0  55  0  55 

Hyson,  thirds    0  45  0  50 

Do.,  pts 0  58  0  67 

Do.,  sifted   0  67  0  72 

Above  prices  give  range  of  quotationa 
to  the  retail  trade. 

Potatoes  Higher 


Honey  Unsettled 


HONEY. — The  ideas  that  dealers  and 
prouucers  have  iin  regard  to  tne  pricp  o£ 
inis  year's  noney  uiiier  considerably. 
:';■' (iu:.eis  are  a-.Kiiig  .iiounU  16  ceuta 
per  pound,  out  ueaiers  claim  this  is  too 
Migh  and  are  oiiecing  11  to  12  cents.  As 
Lar  as  we  can  lear..,  so  tar  tiie*'e  has 
iiuc  been  any  .sales  maile  at  eitncr  price. 
11  IS  estiiuateu  mat  tne  carry  over  oi. 
last  years  crop  i*  about  15  per  cent, 
borne  ci  this  is  m  dealers'  haaids  and 
bome  reHiaiii  with   the  producers. 

Flour  Holds  Firm 


VEGETABLES.— New  potatoes,  im- 
ported Tariet\-.  have  adranced  50  to  75 
cents  per  barrel,  m«king  No.  Is  $7.00  to 
•$7.»0  per  barrel.  Lccal  new  potatoes  are 
starting  and  arc  selling  at  $3.00  per  hag 
The  crcp  of  early  potatoes  this  year  is 
a  light  one.  Out  door  grown  tomatces 
are  arriving  in  lair  size  shipments  both 
irc'in  Leamington  and  the  Niagara  dis- 
trict, prices  are  holding  around  $2.50 
to  12.75  per  11  quart  bnsket.  Beans  are 
plentiful  at  4(t  to  50  cents  per  basket. 
Green  corn  is  selling  at  •I2.2.J  per  bag 
containing  seven  dozen.  Celery  is  arriy- 
ing  ironi  Ircal  groners  Tt  75  to  i^l.OO 
per  bunch  of  12  heads.  Cabbage  is  plsnti- 
lul  and  tower  at  75  cents  to  $1.00  per 
dozen 


Cabbage,  per  dozen    0  75 

Potatoes,  per  bag  u  70 

Head  Lettuce,  crate    15* 

Toaiato*--,    11   qt.   bkt 2  50 

New   Eeets,  per   d  .zen    

New   carrots,   per  doz 

Green   Peas,  11  qt.  basket    . .    0  75 
Wax  &  preen  bsans.  ll-qt.  bkt.  0  40 

Cucumbers,    11    qt.    bkt 1   25 

New  Potatoes,  bbl 7  00 

Celery,  bunch  of  12   0  75 

Corn,  7  rioz.  to  bag    


1 

00 

0 

60 

2 

«t0 

•) 

T.'i 

u 

25 

0 

2« 

0 

80 

« 

50 

1 

5u 

7 

50 

1 

00 

FLOUR. — The  matket  coiit-iaues  firm 
under  a  demand  lor  immtiuute  require- 
ments. Whetner  tnis  sonuition  will  last 
will  depend  altcgiither  upon  the  wheat 
crop.  The  crop  lu  tne  West  has  every 
iiukcatiou  for  oeing  a  bumper  one,  tiut 
the  reports  lor  the  world  crop  in  general 
is  none  too  premising,  wnicn  will  have 
some  bearing  on  tlie  Hour  situatiou.  lu 
tne  meantime  flour  is  firmly  held  and 
will  proOauly  continue  to  tio  so  until  the. 
CMU   Li'  .August. 

FLOUR— 

Patents  firsts,  in  jute  bag3, 

ijarrel   10  5ft 

Do.,  seconds,  in  jute  bag*. 

per   barrel    10  Oft 

Milifeeds  In  Demand 


Toronto. 

MiLLFEEDS.— There  is  a  strong  de- 
iiKHid  Sor  milUeeds.  The  hot  weather 
drving  up  the  pastures  to  such  an  extent 
that  many  cattlemen  are  resorting  to 
dr.\  leeds.  Thi:-,  condition  evists  more  in 
the  Eastern  Provinces  than  in  Ontario 
and  the  Wc>t.  The  market  si  tirni  at 
quota'ions  given  below. 


WINNIPEG    MARKETS 


IVINNIPBG,  July  20—  Markets 

goods  on  spot  are  practically 
quoted  for  the    new    pack.     The 
with  the  exception  of  raisins  which 
kets  have    shown    an    advanec. 
practically    cleaned    up    and  new 
Western    manufacturers.      Raw. 
ing  on  the  primary  market,  have 
for  fruits  and  vegetables  is  active 

Coffee  Unchanji:ed 


Winnlpop. 

COFF'EE. — The  only  <.hange  en  the  spot 
coffee  market  is  a  nominal  advance  in 
the  prices  of  Rio  due  to  the  tirmness  of 
futures.  Santos  and  milds  are  also  un- 
changed and  the  market  for  all  kinds  is 
inactive.  Locally  the  demand  is  showing 
a  large  improvement. 

COFFEE— 

Rio,    lb 0  191/^  0  201-^ 

Mexican,   lb 0  45  0  49 

Jamaica,  lb 0  28  0  30 

Bogotas,    lb 0  45  0  48 

Mocha    (types)    0  49  0  51 

Santos,  Bourbon,  lb 0  28  0  30 

Santos,   lb 0  27  0  29 

Package  Cereals  Steady 


GBREALS.— There       are       no       price 


are  showing  a  firmer  tone.  Canned 
cleaned  up  and  higher  prices  are 
demand  for  dried  fruits,  is  quiet, 
advancing  on  the    primary    mar- 
Spot  stocks  of  old  pack  jam,  are 
prices  ai-e  by  both  Eastern  and 
and  refined  sugar,  while  advanc- 
shown    a    decline      The    demand 
with  little  change  in  quotation- 
changes  in  this  market,  and  the  situation 
is    fairly    steady.    There    appears    to   be 
price  cutting  among  the  wholesalers  on 
many  lines  of  piickage  cereals,  although 
no  price  changes  have  been  made  by  the 
manufacturer;:.      The    demand    fc'.i    the 
lighter    breakfast    foods    is    good.      Bulk 
rolled   oats   has   a     tendency   for   higher 
prices.  Beans  are  reported  firmer. 

PACKAGE  CEREALS 
Rolled  oats,  20s,  rd.  cartons  4  75       3  GO 

Do.,  36s,  cs,  square,  bkts 3  50 

Do..    ISs,    case    2  10 

Corn  Flakes,  36s,  case 3  50-      3  80 

Cornmeal,  2  doz.  case,  case 3  40'. 

Puffed  Wheat,  3  doz.  cs.,  cs 4  45, 

Puffed  Rice,  3  doz.  cs,  case  5  75, 

Grape  Nuts,  2  doz.  cs.,  case  3,80) 

Package  Peas,  3  doz.  cs.,  as 3.  OOi 

Cream  of  Wh.,  3  doz.  es,  cs 9»  1.5, 

BULK  CERE.4LS 

Rolled  Oats,  80s.  per  bag 2  65; 

Do.,  40s,  per  bag   1  4(k 


34 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


Do.,  20s.  per  bag    0  70 

Do.,  split,  yellow.  49s.  bag    4  03 

Do.,  15-6s,  per  bale 4  05 

Oatmeal,  98s,  gran,  or  stand- 
ard,  bag    3  40 

Wheat  Granules,   98s,  bag    6  50 

Do.,  16-6s,  per  bale 7  05 

Peas,   whole,   green,     100-lb. 

bag,   per  bush 4  50 

Do.,  split,  yellow,  98s,  bag  ....  7  95 

Do.,  split,  yellow,  49s.  bag 4  00 

Cornmeal,  24s,  per  bag 0  75 

Do.,  10s,  per  bale 3  65 

Buckwheat   grits,   whole,   98- 

Ib.  bags,  per  l)ag   8  75 

Beans,  100-lb.  bags,  bushel 3  70 

Lima  Beans,  100-lb.  bgs.,  lb 0  10% 

Dried  Fruits  Quiet 


Fine  Teas  Advance 


DRIED  FRUITS. — There  is  a  quiet  de- 
mand for  dried  fruits,  with  the  exception 
of  raisins.  New  apricots  will  be  arriv- 
ing shortly,  and  lower  figures  are  ex- 
pected. There  is  a  steady  demand  for 
prunes,  but  with  the  approach  of  the 
harvest  season,  an  improved  demand  is 
expected.  The  primary  marl^et  remains 
firm,  due  to  the  export  demand.  l)ut  local 
quotations  remain  unchanged.  Evaporat- 
ed apples  have  shown  a  firmer  tone  and 
local  wholesalers  have  advanced  their 
prices. 

DRIED   FRUIT 

Evaporated  Apples,  per  lb 0  15% 

Currants,  90-lb.,  per  lb.   . .   0  18  0  19 
Do.,  8  oz.  pkgs.,  6  doz.  cs, 

lb 0  16% 

Do.,  Sniyrna,  per  lb <•  12i/o 

Do.,  black,  cartons,  crtn 0  60 

Dates,  Hallowee,  bulk,  lb 0  II14 

Do.,  pkg.,  3  doz.  case,  lb 0  15% 

Figs,  Spanish,  per  lb 0  15 

Do.,  Smyrna,  per  lb 0  23 

Do.,  black,  cartons,  ctn 1  00 

Loganberries,  4  dz.  cs.,  pkt 0  30 

Peaches,  standard,  per  lb.  0  20  0  21 

Oo.,  choice,  per  lb 0  23  <»  24 

Oo„  fancy,  per  lb 0  24  i)  2" 

Do.,  Cal.,  in  cartons,  cart 1  10 

Do.,   unpitted,  per  lb 0  10 

Pears,  extra  choice,  per  lb 0  2.5 

Do.,   Cal.,    cartons,   cart 1  25 

Prunes — 

30-40S,  25s,  per  lb 0  21 

40-50S,  25s,  per  lb 0  16% 

5O-6OS,  25s,  per  lb <•  14 

60-70S,  25s,  per  lb 0  12% 

70-80S,   25s,  per  lb 0  11% 

80-90S,  25s.  per  lb 0  10% 

90-lOOs,  25s,  per  lb 0  08 

In  5-lb.  cartons,  carton    ....  0  68 

Raisins — 

Cal.,    pkg.,   seeded,    15    oz., 

fey.,  3  uoz.  to  cs.,  pkg 0  29 

Choice  seeded.  15  oz.,  3  doz. 

to  case,  per  pkg 0  27 

Fancy,    seeded,    11    oz.,    4 

doz.   to  case,  per  pkg 0  23 

Choice    seeded,      11    oz..    4 

doz.  to  case,  per  pkg 0  22% 

Cal.,    bulk,     seeded,    25-lb. 

boxes    0  29 

Do.,  pkt.  seedless,  11  oz.,  3 

doz.  to  case,  per  lb 0  22 

Do.,    buk,    seedless,    25-lb. 

boxes,    per   lb 0  28 

Apricots,  choice,  25s,  lb.  . .' 0  30 

Do.,    10s,    lb 0  31 

Do.,  Standard,  25s,  lb 0  27 

Di.,  Standard,  10s.  lb 0  29 

Do.,  fancy,  25s,  lb 0  35 

Do.,  fancy,  10s,  lb 0  36 


TEA. — Reports  from  the  primary 
market  state  that  there  has  been  a  sharp 
advance  in  prices  on  the  fine  grades  of 
Ceylon  teas;  all  teas  of  quality  have  been 
snapped  up.  There  is  very  little  move- 
ment of  the  lower  grades.  The  trade 
locally  is  quiet  and  merchants  are  buy- 
ing only  what  they  need  to  keep  up  their 
assortment. 

IXDIA  AXD  CEYLOX— 

Pekoe  Souchongs.  1st  qual.  0  35  0  40 

Do.,    second    quality    ....    0  32  0  35 

Pekoes,    first    quality    0  40  0  42 

Do.,    second    quality    ....    0  35  0  40 

Broken  Pekoe,  first  quality  0  42  0  48 

Broken   Orange  Pekoe.  1st 

qualitv     0  50  0  60 

Japan    0  52  0  70 

JAVAS— 

Pekoe  Souchongs  0  30  0  32 

Pekoe    0  32  0  40 

Broken  Pekoe   0  33  0  45 

Broken   Orange  Pekoe    0  38  0  48 

Jams  Moving  Freely 


JAMS. — Prices  on  the  new  pack  jam 
have  been  announced  by  both  the  Eastern 
and  Western  packers,  and  are  quoted  at 
88  cents  for  fours,  on  strawberry,  rasp- 
berry, black  currant  and  loganberry.  The 
old  pack  is  pretty  well  cleaned  up,  and 
wholesalers  expect  to  advance  their 
prices  to  the  above  basis  in  the  near 
future. 

Eastern 

Strawberry,  4s,  per  tin    0  86 

Black  Currant,  4s  per  tin 0  8G 

Raspberry,  4s,  per  tin   0  86 

Apricots,  4s,  per  tin 0  80 

Cherry,  4s,  per  tin D  80 

Peach,  4s.  per  tin   0  80 

Compound  (all  flavors),  4s,  tin  0  53  0  58 

Western 

Strawberry,  4s,  per  tin 0  95 

Black  Currant,  4s,  per  tin 0  95 

Raspberry,  4s,  per  tin    0  95 

Apricot,   4s,   per  tin    0  90 

Cherry,   4s,  per  tin    0  90 

Peach,  4s,  per  tin    0  90 

Flour  Market  Firm 


FLOUR. — The  market  continues  with 
a  firm.  ton§  under  a  fair  demand.  Quota- 
tions are  unchanged. 

98-Ib.  sacks    5  32% 

Two  49 -lb.  sacks 5  40 

Four  2-t-lb.  sacks    5  50 

Nuts  Hold  Firm 


NUTS.— There  is  little  change  In  the 
nut  situation.  Almonds  and  walnuts  con- 
tinue in  a  strong  position.  It  is  claimed 
that  there  is  not  more  than  three  to  four 
thousand  cases  of  walnuts  in  France. 
Reports  from  Spain  state  that  almonds 
are  very  scarce,  and  no  question  but 
higher  prices  will  rule,  as  the  new  crop 
does  not  reach  the  Western  market  much 
before  Christmas.  Spanish  shelled  pea- 
nuts are  slightly  easier.  '  Pecans  are 
scarce  and  high.  Brazils  show  no  change. 


NUTS,    SHELLED— 

Almonds,  per  lb 0  45  0  47 

Spanish  Peanuts,  No.  1,  lb 0  12% 

Pecans,  per  lb 1  40 

Walnuts,  per  lb 0  75 

NUTS  IN  SHELL— 

Peanuts,  rsted..  Jumbo,  lb 0  25 

Walnuts,  per  lb 0  25 

Almonds,  per  lb 0  25 

Brazils,  per  lb 0  25 

Pecans,   per   lb 0  28 

Cocoanuts,  per  doz 1  50 

Cocoanuts,  per  sack 11  00 

Syrups  Steady 


SYRUPS.— There  is  no  change  in  the 
syrup  situation.  Buyers  are  not  buying 
more  stock  than  is  actually  needed,  as 
the    demand    is    very    quiet. 

CANE  SYRUP- 

No.    2s    6  85 

No.  5s   7  90 

No.    10s    73.-. 

No.  20s   7  15 

CORN  SYRl'P— 

Cases,   2-lb.   tins,   white,   2 

doz.  in  case   4  65 

Cases,   5-lb.    tins,    white,    1 

doz.  in  case   5  75 

Cases,  10-lb.  tins,  white,  % 

doz.  in  case  5  50 

Cases,  20-lb.  tins,  white,  14 

doz.  in  case   5  50 

Cases,  2-lb.  tins,  yellow,  2 

doz.  in  case   3  40 

Cases,  5-lb.  tins,  yellow,  1 

doz.  in  case  4  5.5 

Cases,    10-lb.    tins,   yellow, 

%  doz.  in  case 4  30 

Cases,   20-lb.    tins,    yellow, 

14   doz.   in   case    430 

MAPLE  SYRUP— 

Pure.  2%s,  tins,  cs.  of  2  doz 24  85 

Pure,  5s,  per  case  of  1  doz 22  65 

Pure,  10s,  per  case  of  %  doz 21  05 

TABLE   SYRUP— 

Maple    flavdr,    2%s,    tins, 

per  cas3  of  2  doz 13  75 

Do.,  2s,  tins,  case  of  1  doz 12  00 

Do.,  Is,  tins,  case  %  doz 11  50 

MOLASSES,  BARBADOES— 

2-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  case 8  30 

3-lb.  tins,  2  doz.  case   11  60 

5-lb.  tins,  1  doz.  case 9  50 

10-lb.  tins,  1  doz.  case 9  20 

iMolasses  quotations  subject  to  5  per 
cer.'L.  discount. 

MOLASSES,  BLACKSTRAP— 

l%s,  4  doz.  In  case   5  25 

2s,    t  doz.  in  case   5  00 

2%s,  4  doz.  in  case   4  80 

5s,  4  doz.   in   case    4  50 

10s,  4  doz.  in  case 4  20 

Starch  Selling  Freely 


STARCH. — The  sale  of  starch  is  show- 
ing a  marked  improvement.  There  is  no 
change   in    quotations. 

STARCH— 

Cornstarch,  1-lb.  pkgs.,  lb 0  0914 

Do.,  No.  1  quality,  per  lb 0  10% 

Gloss,  1-lb.  pkgs.,  per  lb 0  10% 

Celluloid,    1-lb.   pkgs.,  case    ....  4  35 


July  22,  1921 

Rice  Market  Firm 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


RICES. — The  rice  market  continues  to 
Tule  firm,  due  largely  to  buyers  taking 
the  cheaper  grades  for  export  to  France 
^nd  Germany.  Local  prices  remain  un- 
changed. The  demand  tor  tapioca  is  only 
.as  required  fcr  present  use,  but  the 
market  is  firm. 
RICE— 

Xo.  1  .TapiMi,  100-lb.  sacks, 

lb «  08 

Do.,  50-lb.  sacks,  lb 0  OSVa 

Siam,  100-lb.  bags 0  OG 

Do.,  50-lb.  bags   0  OSV4. 

.i;?o,    sack    lots,    130    to    150 

lbs.,  per  lb 0  08% 

Do.,  in  less  quantities,  lb 0  09^/4 

Tapioca,  pearl,  per  lb 0  08       0  OSI/2 

Spice  Market  Steady 


SPICES.— The  spice  market  is  quiet; 
some  lines  being  in  good  demand  while 
others  are  virtually  neglected.  Interest 
in  peppers  -s  s'.istained.  although  buying, 
is  on  a  moderate  scale.  Japanese  red 
peppers  are  reported  scarce.  Cloves  are 
showing  a  lirmer  tone,  but  I  he  (IcmanM 
is  quiet.  Jamaica  ginger  is  dull  and 
slightly  easier,  as  al>o  nutmegs. 

Allspice,  Jamaica,  best  qual., 

lb 0  28 

Cassia,  Batavia,   per  lb 0  38 

Do.,  China,  per  lb 0  25 

Chillies,  per   lb 0  55 

Do..  Xo.  1,  per  lb 0  53 

•Cinnamon,  Ceylon,  per   lb 0  S5 

Do.,  Xo.  0,  carton,  doz 1  00 

■Cloves,  Penang,  per  lb 0  9.") 

Do.,  Amboyna,  per  lb 0  90 

Do.,   Zanzibar,   per  lb 0  .')5  0  60 

-Ginger,  washed,  Jamaica,  Xo.  1  . . . .  0  65 

Do.,  Jamaica,  Xo.  2    0  40 

Do.,  Japan  or  Africa,  lb 0  30 

Mace,  extra  bright  Penang,  lb 0  80 

Kutmegs,  extra  large  brown, 

TO  to  lb.,  per  lb 0  70 

Do.,  Ig.  brown.  85  to  lb.,  lb 0  40 

Do.,    med.,    brown,    110    to 

lb.,  lb 0  38 

Do.,  carton  of  six,  per  doz 0  80 

Pepper,  blk.,  Singapore,  ex.,  lb.  0  17  0  19 

Do.,  white,  per  lb 0  30  0  35 

Pickling,  14 -lb.   pkg.,  per  doz 1  00 

Do.,  bulk,  Xo.  1,  per  lb 0  28 

GROUXD  SPICE 

Allspice,  bulk,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  Xo.  2,  per  lb 0  25 

Do.,  2  oz  cartons 0  80 

Do.,  4  oz.  cartons   1  20 

•Cassia,  Xo.  L  bulk,  per  lb 0  30 

Do.,  Xo.  1.  t.aU:.  p;T  U; 0  25 

Do.,  No.  1,  Z  oz.  cartons 1  00 

Do.,  Xo.  1,  4  oz.  cartons 1  50 

•Cinnamon,  l)ul;;,  per  i.) 0  45 

Do.,   2  oz.  cartons    1  15 

Do..  4  oz.  cartons 1  75 

Cloves,  bulk,  per  lb 0  65 

Do.,  2  oz.,  cartons   1  45 

Do.,  4  oz.   cartons    2  00 

Sugar  Prices  Lower 


SI'GAR.— The  Xew  York  market  on 
both  raw  and  refined  sugar  is  showing 
;a  firmer  tendency.  Canadian  refiners 
prices  on  refined  is  lower,  now  quoted 
■at  ?9.25  per  hundredweight  F.O.B  Win- 
nipeg. 


Extra    gran.,    bags.    100    lbs 9 

Do.,  gunnies,  5/20  lbs 9 

Do.,  gunnies,  10/10  lbs 9 

Do.,  cartons,  20/5   lbs 9 

Do.,  cartons.  50/2  lbs 10 

Yellow,  Xo.  1  It,  bags,  100  lbs 8 

Do.,  golden,   bags.   100  lbs 8 

Pc  wderod  Sugar,  bbls 9 

Do.,   boxo«,   .=;;0   IbF 9 

Dl..   boxes.   2.')   lbs 10 

Icing,   barrels    9 

Do.,   boxes,   50    lbs 9 

Do.,   boxes,   25   lbs 10 

LUMP   SUGAR— 

Soft  Lumps,  boxes.  100  lbs 10 

Do.,  boxes,  50  Ibi 10 

Dc,   25   lbs 10 

Do.,  cases,  20  cartons 11 

Do.,  cases,  10  Vz  cartons   ....  11 

Small  Lump,  boxes,  100  lbs 9 

Do.,   boxes.    50    lbs 10 

Do.,    bores.    25    lbs 10 

Do.,  cartons,  50/2  lbs 11 

Hard   Lump,   barrels    10 

Do.,  boxes,  100  lbs 10 

Do.,   boxes,   50   lbs 10 

Do.,  boxes,  25   lbs 10 

Canned  Goods  Firm 


25 
65 
75 
85 
00 
85 
75 
65 
85 
05 
75 
95 
15 


05 
15 
35 
00 
85 
95 
05 
25 
35 
25 
25 
45 
50 


00 
50 
45 
20 


2 
4 

9  40 


CAXXED  GOODS.— There  is  a  marked 
demand  for  all  lines  of  canned  goods. 
Retailers'  stocks  are  low,  and  present 
prices  on  many  lines  arc  bolow  the  pri<^^'es 
(  n  thi^  now  pack.  The  market  in  general 
is    firmer. 

Shrimps,  Is.  4  doz.  case,  doz 3  05 

Finnan  Uaddic,  Is,  4  doz.   js.  10  00  12  00 

Do..  %s,  8  doz.  case,  case  10  50  13  00 
Herring   (Can.),     Is,     4   doz. 

case,  case   7  00 

D)..  imp.,  i/os.  100  doz.  case  30  00 
Lobsters,  >4s,  8  doz.  case,  doz.  . . . 

Do.,  i/^s,  4  doz.  case,  doz.  . . . 
Oysters,  Is,  4  oz.,  4  doz.  cs.,  cs  . . . 
Pilchards,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  cs,  cs  . . . 

Do.,  V^s,  flat,  8  doz.  cs.,  cs  . . . 
Salmon — 

Sockeye,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  case  . . . 
Do.,  YnH  flat,  8  doz.  in  case  . . . 

R.  Spring,  Is,  tall,  4  doz.  cs.  ... 
Do.,   14s   flat,   8  doz.  case    .  .  . 

Cohoe.  Is.  tall,  4  doz.  case   . . . 

Do.,   lAs  flat,  8  doz.  case 

Pink,  Is.  tall,  4  doz.  case  ... 
Do.,  14s  flat,  8  doz.  case  . . . 
CAXXED  FRUIT  (Canadian) 
Apples,  6  tins  in  case,  per  case  2  90 
Blueberries,  2s,  2  doz.  case  .... 
Cherries,  Is,  4  doz.  case  ....  7  00 
Cherries,  Is,  4  doz.  case   ....   7  00 

Pears,  2s,  2  doz.  case    7  50 

Pears.  2s,   2  doz.   case    7  75 

Plums,  Greengage,  2s,  2  doz.  cs  6  50 

Do.,  Lombard,  light  syrup, 

2s,  2  doz.  case 4  75 

Do.,  heavy  syrup,  2s,  2  doz. 

case     6  00 

Raspberries,   2s,    2   doz.    case    8  50 

Strawberries,  2s,  2  doz.   case  8  00 

CAXXED  FRUIT  (American) 

Apricots,  Is,  4  doz.  case 

Peaches,   2s,  2  doz.  case    ....    6  50 

Do.,  sliced.  Is,  4  doz.  case  .  . 

Do.,  halved.  Is,  4  doz.  case 
Peach<:s,  'ZYon,   2  doz.  case  . . 

Do.,  2s,  2  doz.  case  

Pears.  Is,  4  doz.  case  

Pineapples,  sled.,  2s,  2  doz.  cs. 

CAXXED  VEGETABLES 

Asparagus  Tips,  Is,  tins,  2 

doz.  case,  per  doz 4  75 


21  00 

22  00 
16  75 
18  25 
14  65 
16  50 

6  50 

8  25 

3  10 

6  65 

8  00 

8  00 

8  00 

S  00 

7  00 

5  25 


6 

50 

9 

00 

8 

50 

11 

00 

7 

50 

12 

40 

12 

40 

10 

00 

8 

25 

12 

00 

7 

60 

35 

Beans.  Golden  Wax,  Is.  doz.  4  75  5  00 

Beans.  Refugee,  2s,  2  doz.  case  4  75  5  00 

Corn,  2s.  2  doz.  case  3  00  4  00 

Peas.  Early  June,  2s,  2  doz.  cs.  4  50  4  80 

Sw't  Potatces,  2-i^s,  2  doz.  cs 7  00 

Pumpkin'^,   2-ios,   2   doz.   case  3  00  3  75 

Sauer  Kraut,  2-i/^s,  2  doz.  case  ....  4  10 

Spaghetti,  2   doz.  case    2  15 

Tomatoes.   2-i,2S.   2   doz.   case   3  75  4  00 

Spinach,  2-V^s,  2  doz.  cape 6  55 

Fruit  Market  Active 


FRl'ITS.— The  market  is  fairly  active 
en  all  lines  with  prices  generally  tend- 
ing easier.  Raspberries  and  blueberries 
are  arriving  in  good  quantities  and  sell- 
inr;   freely. 

Oranges,  all  sizes,  per  case  ....     0  700 

Lemons,   per   case    14  00 

Bananas,  per  lb 0  11 

Watermelon,  per  lb 0  06 

Grapefruit.  California,  80s,  cs   7  00 

Apple.i.  l.>01]63.  per  case 4  00 

Do.,  216.  per  case    2  50 

Strawberries,  B.C.,  per  case    ....     4  00 

Cantaloupes,  flats    3  00 

Peaches,  per  case   3  00 

Per    bfisket    1   20 

Plums,  California,  per  case  . .  3  00     3  50 

Apricots,    pf-.T    case    2  50 

Cherries,  per  case   2  50     5  00 

Vegetables  In  Demand 


VEGETABLES.— There  is  very  little 
chn.nge  in  the  vegetable  market.  The  de- 
mand for  all  green  goods  is  excellent. 
B.C.  celery  is  quoted  at  12  cents  per 
j.ri:nd.  Xew  potatoes  are  in  good  demand 
nt   %~.')0   per   barrel. 

Rhubr.rb     0  02i''2 

Spinach,  per  lb 0  11 

Cabbasre.   by   tlie   crate,   lb 0  07 

Do.,    b-oknn    lets,   per   lb 0  07»A 

Head    Lettuce    

Do.,  per  dozen 1  2.i 

Leaf  Lettuce,  i)er  dozen 0  25 

Radishes,  per  dozen 0  25 

Green  Onions,  per  dozen 0  25 

Cucumbers,    Davids'   hoth'se, 

doz 3  50 

Tomatoes 3  50 

Onions,    Valencit,    per    lb 0  06 

Dc  Xew  Texas,  Bermudas 

crt 3  00 

Xew  Carrots,  Beets  and  Par- 
snips, per  lb 0  06 

Potatons-.  per  bushel   1  00 

Do.,    25    bush,    lots,   bush 0  90 


WH.VT  TO  DO? 

The  mother  of  the  young  husband  went 
to  the  bridal  nest  and  found  her  daught- 
er-in-law in  tears. 

"My  child,"  she  gasped,  'what  is  the 
matter?"  Has  anythiii''  happened  to 
George?' 

"Xo."  sobbed  the  young  wife;  "but  my 
heart  is  b-b-breaking.  He's  taken  to  stop- 
ping  out   late   at    night!" 

"What,  already!"  said  his  mother  in 
consternation.  It  doesn't  seem  possible. 
How  late  does  he  stop  out,  dear — very 
late?" 

"Well,*  said  the  bride,  "you  know  he 
usually  leaves  his  office  at  half  past 
five.  The  night  before  last  he  didn't  get 
home  till  half  past  six  and  last  night," 
she  sobbed  bitterly,  "last  night  it  was 
a  quarter  to  seven!  What  shall  I  do?" 


36 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  192] 


geniiii 


WEEKLY  MARKET  REPORTS  BY  WIRE 

Statements  from  Buying  Centres  East  and  West 


Alberta  Markets 

FROM   CALGARY,   BY  WIRE 


CALGARY.  ALTA..  July  20.— Creamery 
butter  advanced  three  cents  per  pound, 
the  market  is  firm  and  further  advances 
are  expected.  Criscc  is  up  cne  cent  per 
pound.  Campbells  ."^oups  are  50  cents  per 
case  hisjher.  Tomatoes  2y2S  are  quoted  at 
S4.00  to  .?4-20  per  case.  Corn  is  tirm  and 
standard  peas  have  advanced  tc  .$.3.80 
to  .$4.26  per  case.  Eggs  are  higher  at 
ijSll.SO  to  .$12.00  pr  case.  Choice  pack 
B.C.  raspberries  2s,  a-re  selling  at  $8.50 
per  case  and  strawberries  at  $8.40.  Lard 
threes,  adranced  to  -$10.80.  Smoked  hams 
are  one  cent  per  pound  higher.  B.  C. 
raspberries  are  selling  at  $;i.80  per  crate. 

Beans,  B.C.,  per  hundred  4  95       5  50 

Rolled  oats 8  80 

Rice,   Siam    5  50       6  00 

Japan,  Xo.  1    7  50       8  00 

Tapioca     6  75       7  25 

Sago    6  75       7  25 

Sugar,     pure     cane,     gran., 

cwt 11  52 

Cheese,  Xo.   1,  Ont.,   large   0  20V^  0  22i^ 
Alberta  cheese,  twins 0  20 

Do.,   large    0  29       %  1\ 

Butter,  creamery,   lb 0  38 

Do.,  dairy,  lb 0  25       0  30 

Lard,  pure,  3s   11  50  12  00 

Eggs,  new  laid,  local,  es.  10  00  10  50 

Tomatoes,  2Vis    4  00       4  25 

Corn,   2s,   case    3  15  3  S5 

Peas,  2s,  standard  case   . .   3  ?0  4  20 

New  early  June  peas,  case  ....  4  50 

Strawberrie-s,  2s,  Ont,  case  9  90  10  .50 

Raspberries,  2s,  Ont.,  case  10  40  11  00 

Gooseberries,    2s    11  30 

Cherries,  2s,  red,  pitted  . .  9  00  9  50 

Apples,  evaporated,  50s   . .   0  14  0  15% 

Do.,    25s,    lb 0  141/2   0  161/2 

Peaches,  evaporated,  lb.  . .  0  22  0  22i^ 

Do.,  canned,  2s  7  45  7  90 

Prunes,  9O-1O0S  0  08  0  0S% 

Do.,  70-80S    0  081^   0  11  " 

Do.,  60-70S    0  12  0  12% 

Potatoes,    local    ton    25  00  0  00 


New  Brunswick  Markets 

FROM  ST.  JOHN,  BY  WIRE 


ST.  JOHX,  X.B..  JulT  29.— Business  is 
steadily  improving,  this  past  week  being 
exceptionally  good.  The  markets  gener- 
ally are  showing  an  npwr.rd  tendency. 
Granulated  eornmeal  advanced  ten  cents 
per  bag.  Sugars  are  down  50  cents. 
Ch-^ese  firmer  at  25  to  26  cents  per 
pound.    Pure    lard    advanced    to   ISi^    to 


1S%  cents  per  pound.  Creamery  butter 
is  higher  at  35  to  3ii  cents,  dairy  at  28 
to  32  cents  and  tub  26  to  ,30  cents.  Old 
potatoes  are  in  demand  at  $2.50  to  $3.00 
per  bushel  and  new  at  $2.75  per  bushel. 
Oranges  are  easier  at  §6.50  to  $7.00  per 
case.  Bananas  are  slightly  firmer  at  SV^ 
to  10  cents  per  pound. 

Cornmeal,  gran.,  bags  ....  S  40  3  65 

Do.,    ordinary    2  30 

Rollde  oats 8  80 

Rice,  Siam,  per  100  lbs.  . .  6  50  7  00 

Tapioca,  100  lbs 8  00  10  00 

Molasses    0  60 

Sugar — 

Stiuulai'd.  granulated    S  4S 

Xo.  1,  yellow   7  95 

CJieesc,  now,  twins    0  25       0  26 

Eggs,  fresh,  do2 0  35       0  36 

Lard.   pure,   lb 0  I814   0  1$% 

Do.,  compound    0  131/2  0  14 

Tomatoes,   2i/^s,   std.,   case    ....       4  00 
American  clear  pork  ....  31  00     33  00 

Beef,  corned.  Is 3  45 

Breakfast  baco;i    0  45       0  48 

Butter,    creamerv,    per   lb.    #35       0  37 

Do.,  dairy   0  28       0  32 

Do.,    tub    0  26       0  30 

Corn,  23,  standard,  case 3  50 

Peas,   standard,   case    3  80 

Apples,  gal.,   X.B.,   doz 5  00 

Strawberries,  2s,  Oiit.,  ease 

Lemoos,  case   11  00     12  00 

Oranges,  California    6  50       7  00 

Bananas,  lb 0  O81/2   ')  10 

Gra>pefruit,    case     8  50       9  50 

Potatoes,  eld.  bushel    2  50      3  00 

Do.,  new,  bushel    2  75 


Novia  Scotia  Markets 

FROM   HALIFAX,   BY  WIRE 

HALIFAX,  X.S.,  July  26.— Another 
drop  in  sugar  is  noted  in  this  week's 
market.  Granulated  is  now  quoted  at 
$8.45  and  yellcw  at  $7.95.  Caniaed  goods 
are  generally  firmer;  tomatoes  are  ad- 
vanced to  $2.10,  corn  to  $1.90  and  peas 
to  il.'-J^i  per  dczen.  Creamery  butter  is 
firmer  at  38  cents  per  pound  and  dairy 
at  30  cents  The  seascn  for  Bermuda 
onions  is  ove.'  and  Jersey  take  their 
nlace  at  $4.00  per  basket.  Bananas,  or- 
aiise.s  and   r;-"-P3fruit  are   all   higher. 

Flour,  No.  1  patents,  bbl 11  00 

Cornmeal,    b:ngs    2  50 

Rolled  oats,  per  bag 3  85 

Rice,  Siam,  per  100  lbs.  . .  0  06%     0  10 

Tapioca,   100    lbs.    ; 10  00 

Sugar,     standard,     gran 10  70 

Do.,  No.  1,  yellow 10  20 

Molasses,  gal 0  70 

Cheese,  Ont.,  twins   0  20 

Eggs,  fresh,   doz 0  42 

Lard,  compound   0  14 

Do.,   pure,   lb 0  16 


American  clear  pork,  bbl 31  00 

Tomatoes,      2i/os,      standard, 

doz.   1  90 

Breakfast  bacon   0  48 

Hams,  aver.  9-12  lbs 0  38 

Do.,  aver.  12-lS  lbs 0  38 

Do.,  aver.  18-25  lbs 0  37 

Roll  bacon 0  33 

Do.,  dairy   0  25 

Butter,  creamery,  lb 0  32 

Raspberries,  2s.  Ont.,  doz 4  00 

Peaches,  2s,  standard,  doz 3  00 

Corn,  2«,  standard,  doz 1  65 

Peas,  standard,  doz 1  80 

Strawberries,  2s,  Ont.,  doz 4  00 

Salmon,    Red    Spring,    flats, 

cases    .... 

Do.,   Pinks    7  00 

New  Beets,  per  dozen 0  75- 

New  oarrots,  hamper   3  50 

New  spinach,  bushel 0  75 

Do.,  Chums  .- 6  00 

Evaporatted  apples,  per  lb 0  15 

Dried  peaches,  per  lb 0  26 

Potatoes,    Nat..      90-lb.    bag    1   li' 

Onions,    Bermuda,    case    3  .00' 

Beans,  white    3  35 

Do.,  vellow  eye    7  50 

Eanans.  lb 0  10       0  11 

Lemons.  Cal 12  00 

Oranges,   all    sizes    7  00       8  00 

Grapefruit,   Florida,   case    ....         8  80 

Do.,  Jamaica    7  00       7  50- 

Oats,  per  bushel    0  75 


Say  You    Saw  It  In    Canadian    Groeer^ 
It  Will  Help   To   Identify  Ton. 


READER'S  NOTICE 

Regarding 
CHANGE  OF  ADDRESS 

A  Request  For  Change  of 
Address  must  reach  us  at 
least  thirty  days  before  the 
date  of  the  issue  with  which 
it  is  to  take  effect  Dupli- 
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replace  those  undelivered 
through  failure  to  send  this 
advance  notice.  Be  sure  to 
give  your  old  address  as  well 
a:?  the  new  one. 


July   15,   1921 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


S7 


Selling  Cooked  Meats  Profitable  in  Summer 

J.  W.  Jones,  College  Street,  Toronto,  believes  cooked  meats  are 
profitable  lines  in  these  hot  days — has  a  sheer  which  he 
states  i-educes  waste  to  a  niininunn — increases  liirnover  in  past 
few  weeks  in  spite  of  the  fact   IhvA    many    grocery    lines  are 


moving  slowly. 


\\J^  have     been     selling     two     cooked 

hams   daily,     since     thi  s   hot   spell 

irted."    said    J.    W.    Jones,   grocer    at 

V  ;0   College   Street.   Toronto,    told   a   re- 

l>resentative     of     Canadian     Grocer  the 

her  d.ny.     "Tongue  is  not  such  a  hig 

Her  with  us,"  he  added.  "Onr  sales  of 

•iigHes   have   amounted   to   about  three 

week  in  the  hot  weather.   Pecjile  want 

the   foods   already   prepa»red   these  days, 

find  cooked  ham  is  called  for  more  than 

anything  else." 

Are   rrofitahlc   Linr^ 

Mr.  Jt)nei!  ha-;  solved  the  problem  of 
5e]ling  smoked  and  cooked  meats  at  a 
irofit.  He  has  very  little  waste  from 
ihe.se  lines,  and  believes  that  these 
meats  constitute  ,a  profitable  turnover 
well  worth  while.  He  has  a  good  slicer 
located  on  one  end  of  a  counter  running 
along  the  end  of  his  store.  Part  of  tliis 
counter,  along  side  the  meat  slicer  is 
enclosed  in  glass,  and  when  the  we-ither 
is  not  too  hot.  Mr.  Jones  displays  cook- 
ed and  smoked  meats  under  this  glass, 
resulting,  he  believes  in  greatly  increa.*- 
iiig  sales.  With  his  slicer,  he  states 
that  he  is  able  to  cut  up  a  ham  witheut 
any  waste  worth  speaking  of. 


Waste   Is   Very   Slicrht 

While  the  Canadian  Grocer  represent- 
ative was  in  the  store.  Mr.  Jones  placed 
a  ham  on  the  slicer  and  showed  just 
what  waste  there  is.  and  it  only  amount- 
ed to  a  couple  of  slices  of  fat  at  the  end. 
"I  handle  the  ?,ime  brand  of  bacon  and 
hams  all  the  time,,  he  stated.  I  can  de- 
pend pretty  well  o.i  the  quality  of  the 
same,  and  in  my  experience.  I  believe 
the  best  plan  is  to  adhere  to  a  brand 
that  I  know  is  giving  real  satisfaction 
to  my  trade.  In  these  hot  days  when 
there  is  such  a  demand  for  cooked 
meats,  the  slicer  renders  service  not 
only  more  economic,  but  quicker  than  in 
the  old  way  or  slicing  by  hand." 

Turnover  I«  Increased 

Discussing  tlie  matter  of  turnover  the 
summer  months  with  Mr.  Jones,  he  stat- 
ed that  business  w,is  well  maintained 
and  that  trade  had  even  increased  dur- 
ing tlie  second  week  of  July  as  com- 
pared with  the  first.  Certain  lines  of 
groceries  are  moving  slowly  at  the  pre- 
sent, he  remarked,  "but  cooked  me,nts, 
fresh  fruits,  canned  salmon  and  sardines 
are  selling  briskly." 


Gettincr   The   ( afcli    Trade 

Mr.  Jones'  store  is  situated  on  Coll- 
ege Street  near  the  intersection  of  Dor- 
good  deal  of  catch  trade  from  people 
ercourt  Road,  and  his  store  attracts  a 
waiting  for  cars  or  even  transfering 
from  one  line  to  another.  "I  use  nay 
window  altogether  for  the  display  of 
fresh  fruit,"  he  told  Canadian  Grocer. 
"Not  only  in  the  summer  months  but 
throughout  the  year,  I  display  fruits  and 
fresh  vegetables.  I  sell  a  lot  of  fruit 
twelve  months  of  the  year,  and  the 
window  assists  a  great  deal  in  the  sale 
of  it." 

Introducing  New  Lines 

.Discussing  the  introducmg  of  neir 
lines,  Mr.  Jones  spoke  of  recently  stock- 
ing a  line  of  pickles  including  pickled 
walnuts,  and  certain  relishes.  He  had 
never  before  had  them,  but  he  has  creat- 
ed a  very  encouraging  demand  for  the 
same.  They  are  high  priced  goods,  and 
their  reputation  for  quality  is  of  th« 
best.  He  introduced  them  to  his  cus- 
tomers by  shewing  them  over  the 
counter,  giving  them  his  personal  re- 
commendation. They  are  now  selling 
quite  readily  and  he  has  had  to  give  an 
order   for   another   supply. 


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38 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


Produce,   Provision  and  Fish   Markets 


QUEBEC    MARKETS 


A/fONTREAL,  July20.—  The  inte 
around  dairy  produce.   Butter 
sells  at  varying  prices  with   an 
abroad.    A  slight  falling  off  in  the 
to  be  the  only  factor  that  goes 
advance.     The     consumption     of 
and  the  production  remains  about 
strong  with  a  good  demand  for 
in  the  wholesale  price-  Hog  prices 
hogs  have  also  dropped  slightly, 
consequence  of  the  big  demand- 
market.  Lard  is  gaining  strength 
lines   of   fresh   fish   with   slightly 

Higher  Prices  For  Butter 

Montreal. 

BUTTER— The  butter  market  con- 
tinues to  hold  its  strong  position  and 
prices  were  advanced  through  the  week 
by  3  and  4  cents  a  pound.  Prices  vary 
for  the  different  qualities  and  a  margin 
of  three  cents  stands  between  pasteur- 
ized creamery  and  fine  creamery  butter. 
Pasteurized  in  prints  is  selling  at  43  and 
44  cents  per  pound.  Fine  creamery  in 
prnts  is  quoted  at  41  cents  while  solids 
are  selling  at  40  cents.  There  is  a  good 
demand  for  butter  l)0th  for  domestic  and 
export  trade  and  the  strength  of  the 
market  is   unimpaired. 

Pasteurized   Creamery    0  43     0  44 

Creamery,    prints    0  37     0  39 

Do.,   solids    0  35     0  37 

New  Cheese  Higher 


rest  in  the  produce  market  centres 
is   advancing   in   price   and   now 

active  market  both  at  home  and 
demand  for  eggs  for  export  seems 

to   keep   the   price   from   another 

fresh  eggs  locally  is  still  large 
the  same-    The  cheese  market  is 

export  and  an  advance  is  quoted 
are  a  little  easier  and  dressed 
Cooked  meats  are  stronger  in 
There  is  no  change  in  the  beef 

.  There  is  a  good  supply  of  all 

easier  prices. 

Smoked  Meats  Firm 


CHEESE. — Further  advances  are  quot- 
ed on  the  domestic  cheese  market  as  a 
result  of  an  improved  export  demand 
and  a  lighter  make  of  cheese  as  a  result 
of  the  very  warm  weather.  There  ap- 
pears to  be  a  fairly  stable  strength  to 
this  market  with  an  advance  in  the 
wholesale  price  to  25  cents  a  pound  for 
the  new  make  and  32  cents  a  pound 
quoted   for  year  old  cheese. 

Large,  per  lb 0  2.5 

Twins,  per  lb 0  25 

Triplets,  per  lb 0  25 

Stilton,   per  lb 0  25 

Fancy,  old  cheese,  per  lb 0  35 

Quebec    0  2.5 

Cooked  Hams  60  Cents 


COOKED  MEATS.— There  is  no  change 
in  the  quotations  made  on  cooked  meats 
although  the  whole  market  is  strong 
under  a  keen  demand  for  supplies  ow- 
ing to  the  hot  weather.  Cooked  hams 
are  selling  at  60  cents  a  pound  and  will 
likely  go  higher. 

Jellied  pork  tongues 0  38 

Jellied  pressed  beef,  lb 0  37 

Ham  and  tongue,  lb 0  42 

Veal    0  30 

Hams,    cookr-d    0  57       0  GO 

Pork  pies   (doz.)    0  80 

Mince  meat,  lb 0  ITV^     0  19 

Sausage,  pure  pork 0  25 

Bologna,   lb 0  14 

Ox  tongue,  tins   0  59 

Head   cheese,   6-lb.  tins,   per 

lb ...         0  16 

Do.,    25-lb.    tin    pails,    llj 0  15 


SMOKED  MEATS.— Prices  on  smoked 
meets  remain  steady  and  unchanged  with 
a  firm  tone  due  to  a  good  demand  for 
nearly  all  lines.  Prices  may  be  expected 
to  at  least  remain  steady  if  not  moving 
up.vard.  The  good  off?!;ngs  rf  hoirs  ^.nfl 
easier  prices  balances  up  the  tendency 
towards  a  higher  price  following  the  iii - 
creased  consun.ption. 
BACON 

Breakfast,  best 0  36     0  39 

Smoked  Breakfast   0  41     0  44 

Cottage    Rolls     0  33 

Picnic  Hams 0  23yo 

Wiltshire    0  34     0  39 

MEDIUM  SMOKED   HAMS— 

Weight,   8-14,  long  cut   .  .   0  37  0  38 

Do.,  14-20    (>  36 

Do.,  20-25    0  34 

Over  35  lbs o  30 

Do.,  25-35    0  31 

Halibut   Prices   Easier 


FRESH  FISH.— Gaspe  salmon  is  a 
little  cheaper  this  week  quoted  at  23 
cents.  Fresh  halibut  is  in  good  supply 
with  an  easier  price.  Mackerel  is  scarce 
hut  lake  lish,  trout  and  doree  is  in  good 
supply. 


FRESH    FISH 

Doree     

Lake  }''ish   

Gaspp  Salmon    

Halibut    

Whitefish    

INIackerel     


Shore  Haddock    

FROZEN  FISH 

Halibut,  large  and  chicken  0  20 

Haddock    

Mackerel    0  15 

Do.,    Western,      medium    0  21 

Steak   Cod    0  OlVz 

Market   Cod    0  OeVz 

Sea  Herrings   0  06 

Salmon,    dr.,    B.C 0  20 

Do.,  Cohoes,  round  ....  0  18 
Do.,  Qualla,  hd.  and  dd 

Finnan  Haddie    0  11 

Fillets,    15-lb.    box    

Rimeless  Herring,  per  box   .... 

Smoked  Herrings   

K'ppers,   new,   per  box    

Bloaters,  new,  per  box    

Smoked    Salmon     

SALTED  FISH 

Salted    Trout,    half   barrel    . 


0 

20 

0 

20 

0 

■>? 

0 

21 

0 

18 

0 

13 

0 

071/2 

0 

23 

0 

07 

0 

16 

0 

22 

0 

081/2 

0 

07 

0 

07 

0 

21 

0 

19 

0 

11 

0 

12 

0 

17 

1 

60 

0 

21 

2 

75 

2 

50 

0 

35 

Salted  Salmon,  barrel 27  00 

Boneless  Cod  (20),  per  lb.  0  16  0  20 

SMOKED 

Chicken  H'dies,  15-lb.   box    0  07 

Barrel  Meats  Unchanged 


BARRELLED    MEATS.— There      is    no- 
change  in  the  prices  quoted  on  barrelled 
meats.  The  demand  for  domestic  trade  is 
light,  particularly  at  this  season. 
Barrel  Pork — 

Canadian  Short  cut   (bbl), 

30-40    40  00' 

Clear  fat  backs  (bbl.),  40- 

50  pieces   30  00- 

Heavy  mess  pork   (bbl.) 31  00 

Plate  beef  23  00- 

Easier  Pork  Market 


12  00 


FRESH  MEATS.— The  hog  market  has 
cased  up  slightly  this  week  with  heavier 
otferings  and  a  lighter  demand.  Selects- 
are  now  selling  at  ^13. 00  per  cwt.  weigh- 
ed off  'Cars  and  dressed  hogs  are  also 
easier.  The  choicest  dressed  young  hogs 
are  offered  at  20  cents  per  pound.  There 
is  nothing  on  the  market  to  warrant  a 
liigher  price  at  tne  present  time.  Little 
change  is  noticed  in  the  beet  market. 
The  demand  is  light  at  this  season  and 
still  runs  in  one  direction  leaving  prices 
low  and  stocks  heavy  of  front  quarter 
cuts. 

FRESH  MEATS 
Hogs,      live      (selected      off 

cars)     12  00     13  00 

Abattoir  killed,  6-5-90  lbs.  0  15       0  20 
Fresh   Pork — 

Legs   of   pork    (foot  on)    0  28%  0  29 

Loins    (trimmed)    0  29       0  30 

Bone  trimmings 

Trimmed  shoulders   0  20       0  22 

Untrimmed     0  16     0 18 

Pork    sausage    (pure) 0  25 

Fresh    Beef — 

(Cows)  (Steers) 

0  19  0  24  Hind  quarters  0  21  0  26- 
0  08  0  11  Front  quarters  0  09  0  13 
0  27       0  30     .  .  .     Loins     ...     0  33       0  36 

More  Strength  To  Lard 

LARD.— The  strength  of  the  market 
has  been  maintained  with  a  tendency 
towards  another  advance.  There  is  a 
good  demand  tor  lard  and  buying  is  more 
free  and  heavier  principally  on  account 
of   the    upward    tendency    of  the   market. 

Tierces,  360  lbs 0  16 

Tub.",    60    lbs 0  161/^. 

Pails,   20    lbs 0  17 

Bricks    0  19     0  21 

Egg  Market  Steady 

EGGS.— The  '-eg  market  has  stood 
steady  through  the  week  and  may  be  ex- 
pected to  remain  the  same  for  a  little 
time.  The  receipts  have  kept  up  well 
and  the  domestic  ccnsumption  is  large, 
but  the  export  demand  which  was  re- 
sponsible tor  the  strong  position  has 
fallen  off  to  some  extent  and  the  strength 
of  the  market  is  not  so  pronounced. 
Specials  are  quoted  at  40  cents  and  fresh 
eggs  at  35  cents.  These  prices  vary  even 
in  the  city  limits  and  some  eggs  are 
quoted  as  high  as  44  cents. 

Fresh  eggs,  per  doz 0  40 

Xo.  1,  fresh   0  35 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN    G  ROC  Ell 


39 


ONTARIO    MARKETS 


Fish  Market  Quiet 


TORONTO,    July    20.—  Canned 
ed    higher.     These     lines  are 
liklihood  of  a  .short  pack  this  year, 
er  prices.     No  official  price  have 
pack  of  strawberry  jam  but  some 
considerably  lower  than  last  year 
firm  with  millers  firmly  maintain 
tinues  to  be  irregularity  in  quota 
me-nts   of   Messina   lemons   have 
are  still  high  but  if  cooler  weatner 
The  primary  rice  markets  show 
in  the'  local  situation  except  that 
hold  quotations  firm.  Refiners  an 
There  is  little  change  in  teas,  coff 
higher  but  other  vegetables  tend 

Butter  Prices  Higher 

Toronto. 

BUTTER.— The  market  continues 
strong  with  prices  again  advanced  four 
cents  per  pound,  bringing  tthe  price  to 
39  and  40  centts  per  pound.  Ontario 
stocks  of  creamery  butter,  July  first 
were  46,572  boxes,  compared  with  49,014 
same   date    last   year. 

BUTTER— 

Creamery   prints    0  29     0  40 

Cheese  Again  Moves  Upward 


tomatoes,  corn  and  peas  are  quot- 
inclined  to  be  scarce  and  with  a 

the  trade  is  looking  for  even  high- 
yet  been   named  on   this   seasons 

wholesalers  are  quoting,  which  is 

The  cereal  market  generally  is 

ing  their     prices     but  there  con- 

tions  by  wholesalers.   Some   ship- 

arrix'ed   during   the   week,   prices 

prevails,  a  drop  in  price  islikely. 
strength  but   there  is  no  change 

wholesalers  are  more  inclined  to 
nounce  a  reduction  on  sugar, 
ees   and   nuts-   New   potatoes   are 


easier. 


Egg  Market  Easy 


Toronto. 

CHEESE.— The  market  hclds  the  same 
strong  position  as  gained  a  couple  of 
weeks  ago.  Quciations  to  the  retail 
trade  are  advanced  to  2.")  cents  per 
pound.  Some  small  lots  of  old  cheese  is 
available  at  34  cents  per  pc;and.  There 
still  appears  to  le  a  diversity  of  opinion 
in  regards  to  ijture  condition  ot  the 
market.  Some  dealers  stale  that  the 
present  flurry  is  c.ily  temporary  and  that 
general  business  coudiliciis  dc  not  war- 
rant the  present  high  prices  and  that 
the  market  will  again  be  lower.  Ontario 
stocks  of  cheese  on  July  first  were 
9,835  boxes  as  against  8,440  at  the  same 
date  la«?'i  year. 
CHEESE— 

Large,  new   0  2.j 

Twins  Ic  higher  than  large. 
Triplets  IV2C  higher  than  larc?. 

Cooked  Hams  Scarce 


COOKED  .MEATS.— There  is  a  marked 
scarcity  of  hams,  some  packing  houses 
being  out  entirely  two  and  three  days 
a  week.  This  is  due  to  the  extra  demand 
since  the  hot  weather  prevailed  and  the 
fact  that  packing  houses  are  keeping 
purchases  of  hogs  down  to  the  lowest 
possible  point.  Cooked  hams,  ordinary 
round  trimmed  are  quoted  at  -59  cents 
per  pound,  an  advance  of  two  cents  over 
last  week,  with  square  trimmed  selling 
at  62  to  63  cents.  There  is  practically 
no  change  in  quotations  on  other  lines 
of  cooked  meats. 
Boiled    hams,   lb 0  59 

Do.,    square    pressed    ?...    0  62       0  63 

Boiled    shoulders,    lb 0  42 

Head  cheese,   6s,  lb 0  12 

Choice  jellied  ox  tongue,  lb 0  66 

Jellied   pork  tongue    0  37 

Bologna    0  15       0  17 

Macaroni  &  cheese  loaf,  lb 0  23 

Above    prices   subject  to    daily    fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 


EGGS.— The  market  continues  easy 
with  quotations  down  one  or  two  cents 
per  d07en.  The  quality  of  eggs  continues 
to  be  pt3r,  dealers  claiming  that  there  is 
a  great  deal  of  waste  and  consequently 
are  taking  little  interest  in  the  market 
outside  ot  buying  only  sufficient  quantity 
to  fill  immediate  wants,  which  has  been 
considerably  lessened  since  the  hot 
weather  ccmmenced.  Storage  stocks  in 
Ontario  on  the  first  of  July  were  9S.n03 
cases  against  121,351  cases  in  lii20  at  the 
same  date.  Stocks  of  fresh  eggs  on  July 
first  were  14,666  cases  compared  with 
12,677  cases  last  year  on  the  same  date. 

EGGS— 

Selects    0  41 

No.    1    M  37  0  38 

Selects  in  cartons    U  42  0  43 

Fre-:h  Meats  Quiet 


FRESH  -MEATS.- The  hot  weather  has 
caused  a  l)ig  slump  in  the  demand  for 
fresh  meats,  consequently  receipts  have 
been  light  during  the  week  which  per- 
haps has  something  to  do  with  the  mark- 
et holding  at  last  week's  quotations.  Il: 
heavier  receipts  had  been  offered  the  big 
packers  no  doubt  would  have  been  suc- 
cessiul  in  lowering  prices. 

Live,  off  cars,   per  cwt 12  00 

Live,  fed  &  watered,  cwt 11  7'. 

Live,    f.o.b..      per    cwt 1100 

New  York   shoulders,   lb 0  19 

Hogs — 

Dressed,  light,  per  cwt 17  00 

Do.,    heavy,    per    cwt.    10  00  12  00 

Live,    olf   cars,    per   cwt 11  75 

Live,  fed  &  watered,  cwt 11  '0 

Live,  f.o.b.,  per  cwt 10  75 

Fresh  Pork — 

Legs  of  perk,  up  to  18  lbs 0  38 

Loins  of  pork,  lb 0  30 

Fresh  hams,  lb 0  39 

Tenderloins,  lb 0  50 

Spare  ribs,  lb 0  12 

Picnics,   lb 0  18ii 

New    York    shoulders,    lb 0  9 

Montreal    shoulders,      lb 0  20 

Boston  butts,  lb 0  22V3 

Fresh  Beef — from  Steers  and  Heifers — 

Hind  quarters,  lb 0  21     0  24 

Front    quarters,    lb 0  06     0  08 

Ribs,  lb 0  18     0  26 

Chucks,    lb 0  06     0  07 

Loins,   whole,   lb 0  28     0  30 

Hips,   lb 0  18     0  22 

Cow  beef  quot.iticns  about  2c  per  pound 
below  above  qv.otations. 


FISH. — There    is    little    of    interest   to 
report   in    this    market.    The    demand   is 
quiet  and   quotations   are   unchanged. 
FRESH    SEA   AND    LAKE    FISH 

Cod   Steak,   lb 0  09  0  10 

Do.,    market,    lb 0  09 

Halibut,   chicken    0  10  0  17 

Do.,   medium    0  22  0  23 

Whitefish,  Government 0  11% 

Do.,   Georgian   Bay    0  11% 

Frsh  Herring 0  10  0  11 

Flounders,    lb.    0  10  0  11    • 

Fresh  Trout,   lb 0  16  0  17 

Haddock    0  10  0  11 

Spring  Salmon   0  24  0  2.5 

Mackerel    Oil  0  12 

FROZEN  FISH 

Halibut,  medium    0  22  0  23 

Do.,    Qualla    0  09  0  12 

Flounders     0  09  0  13 

Pike,    round    0  06  0  07 

Do.,  headless  and  dressed 0  08 

Salmon,  Cohoe 

Do.,  Red  Spring 0  23  0  24 

Sea   Herring    0  071/2  0  08 

Brill    0  10  0  11 

SMOKED  FISH 

Haddies,  lb 0  10  0  12 

Fillets,   lb 0  17 

Kippers,  box    2  25  2  75 

Bloaters    2  00 

PICKLED  FISH 

Salmon   Snacks,  lb 0  24 

Labrador  Herrings,  kegs,  100 

lbs 6  25 

Do.,  bbls..  200  lbs 11  75 

Do.,  pails,  20  lbs 2  00 

Holland  Herrings,  Milchers  ....  1  15 

Do.,  Mixed    1  00 

Lard  Market  Steady 

L.A.RD. — There  is  practically  no  change 
in  the  market.  Quotations  on  one  pound 
prints  remaining  at  17  cents  and  on  the 
tierce  basis  15  cents  per  pound. 
LARD— 

1-lb.  prints   0  17 

1-lb.  tierces.  400  lbs 0  15 

In  60-Ib.  tubs,  Vz  cent  higher  than 
tierces,  pails  %  cent  higher  than  tierces, 
and   1-lb.   prints,  2c. 

Hams  and  Bacon  Steady 

PROVISIONS.— There    is    little    change 

to   this   market,    whih    is    steady    to   firm 

under  an  active  demand. 

Hams — 

Small,   6   to   12   lbs 0  41 

Medium.  12  to  20   lbs 0  41 

Large,  20  to  35  lbs.  ea.,  lb.  0  35     0  37 
Heavy,  35  lbs.  and  upwards  ....     0  34 

Backs — 

Boneless,  per   lb 0  46 

Rolled,    per    lb 0  50 

Peameal    0  43 

Bacon — 

Breakfast,  ordinary,  per  lb.  0  27     0  41 

Do.,  special  trim    0  45 

Cottage   rolls    0  31 

Roll,   per   lb 0  26 

Wiltshire  (smoked  sides),  lb 0  32 

Do.,  three-qharter  cut 0  37 

Do.,  middle    0  39 

Dry  Salt  Meats 
Lond  clear  bacon,  a  v.  50- 

70    lbs 0  20 


40 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


Do.,  ay.  SO-90  lbs 6  2» 

Clear   bellies.    15-30    lbs 0  13 

J\»]t  backs.  10-12  lbs 0  16 

Out  of  pickle  prices  range  about  2c 
per  pound  blow  corresponding  cuts  above. 
Barrel  Pork — 

Mess    Pork    33  00 

Short  cut  backs,  200  lbs :i9  00 

Picked   rolls.   bl)l.,   200  lbs.— 

Lighweight   46  00 

Lightweight    46  00 

Heavy    41  00 

Above  prices  subject  to  daily  fluctu- 
ations of  the  market. 

Shortening  Up  Half  Cent 

SHORTENING.— The  market  is  firmer 
at  16  t-ents  for  one  pound  prints  and  12% 
cents   per   pound  on  the  tierce  basis. 

Ir-lb.    prints    0  16 

Tierces,    400    H>s 0  12% 

In  60-lb.  tubs  I/2  cent  higher  than 
tierc-vs,  pails  %  cent  higher  and  1-lb. 
^jrinrs  ?   (;ents   hi.slier   than    tierces. 


Duckling?  Lower 

POULTRY.— Receipts  of  ducklings  and 
spring  chickens  are  increasing  with 
prices  somewhat  lower.  Other  quotations 
are  unchangefl. 

Ducklings    0  24       0  ns 

Chickens,  spring   0  4.5       Q  50 

Ducklings 0  40       0  4' 

Prices  Paid  by  Dealers 

Live       Dssd. 

Turkeys    0  30  0  40 

Chickens,   spring    0  30  0  40 

Roosters'. 0  14  0  1 S 

Fowl,  over  5   Ib.s 0  23  0  25 

Fowl.  4  to  5  lb« 0  20  0  20 

Fowl,  under  4  lbs 0  IS  0  18 

Ducklings 0  35  6  35 

Guinea  hens,  pair   1  25  1  50 

Pries  quoted  to  retail  trade:   Dressed 

1  urKeys   • 0  55  0  '^0 

Hens,    heavy .  0  30  0  32 

Do.,   light    0  28  0  30 

Chickens,  spring 0  50  0  55 

Ducklings    0  48 


WINNIPEG    MARKETS 


\yiNNrPEG,  July  20.—  The  prod 

tinue  with  a  firm  tone  with 
lines.    Butter  and  cheese  are  high 
causing  advanced  prices.     Cooked 
under     a  heavy     demand.     Fi.sh 
Shortening    advanced    during  the 

Cheese  Market  Higher 

Winnipeg. 

CJJEESE.— Tliere  is  a  firmer  tone  to 
the  tfee«>se  market  witk  prices  advanced 
to  25  rents  per  pound. 

•Onr.,   large,   ft 0  25 

'Onl.,   twins,   lb 0  25y, 

Ont.,   triplets,    lb 0  26  " 

Stilton  cheese,  larga,  lb 0  30 

Higher  Prices  For  Butter 

BITTTER.— The  strength  which  kas 
^characterized  the  local  butter  situation 
lately  has  been  more  pronounced  and 
the  best  creamery  butter  has  advanced  to 
40  cents  per  pound,  and  tendencies  point 
to  higher  prices.  Good  supplies  are  ar- 
riving and  the  demand  is  showing  an 
increase. 
BUTTER— 

Creamery,  best  table  grade 9  40 

Dairy,  best  table  grade 

Margarine " " . "     q '  04 

Egg  Prices  Advance 

EGGS.— A  firmer  feeling  prevails  in 
the  egg  market  owing  to  smaller  receipts 
a  decrease  in  production  throughout  the 
country  and  higher  prices  being  offered 
by  Eastern  packers.  There  is  a  big  de- 
mand. Prices  quoted  show  an  advance 
New  laid  eggs  are  selling  at  44  cents 
per  flozen  with  No.  1  candled  quoted  at 
32   cents. 

Cooked  Hams  Higher 

COOKED  MEATS.— Under  stimulus  of 
an  active  demand  and  a  higher  and 
firmer  market  for  hogs,  cooked  meats 
have  iigain  advanced.  New  quotations 
are  as  follows: 
Hams — 
Bset  q'lty,  skinned,  8-13  lbs    .  0  57 

Do..  13-16  lbs 0  52 

Roast  Ham,   lb 0  57 

Roast  shoulders,  lb 0  381^ 

Head  Cheese,  1-lb.  tins 0  21 

Jellied  0.x  Tongues,  lb 0  85 


uce   and   provisions   markets   con- 
tendencies  for    advances    on  most 
er.     Light   receipts   of   eggs   are 
ham    is    showing  ,a   firmer   tone 
quotations    are    well    maintained- 
week- 
Pork  lonpuen.  lb 0  42 

Luncheon  Cooked  Meats,  lb 0  22 

Poultry  Unchanged 

POILTRY. — There  is  i(o  chang'e  in 
quotations  on  poultry.  Spot  stocks  are 
low.  and  few  live  poultry  is  rnrivi".? . 

D.P.  Cbickens,  31/2  lb.  &  under 

Do.,  3%  lbs.   and  over 0  49 

D.P.  Fowl,  31/2  lbs.  and  under 0  33 

Do.,  3V2  lbs.  and  over. 0  34 

Turkeys.  nii.\ed  wei^lus 

Smoked  Hams  Higher 

PROVISIONS.— Following  the  hii^her 
prices  on  ho^s,  smoked  hams  have  ad- 
vanced. Bacon  so  far  has  shown  no 
change,  as  the  demand  is  not  as  great 
as  for  hams. 

8  to  16  lbs.,  per  lb 0  44 

16  to  20  lbs.,  per  lb 0  43 

Boneless,  8-16  lbs.,  per  Ibb 0  48 

Skinned.  14-18  lbs.,  per  lb 0  47 

Skumed,    lS-22    lbs.,    ner    lb 0  47 

Back,  6  to  10  lbs..  I'b 0  53 

Cottage  Rolls,  boneless 0  31 

Bellies,  6  to  10  lbs.,  per  lb.   .....     0  40 

Shortening  Advances 


LARD. — The    shortening    market    coti- 
tinues    strong    with    quotations    ^lightly 
advanced,   now   ouoted   at    14 Vo    cents   in 
tierces.    Lard   shows   no  change. 
Pure  lard.  No.  1  qualty,  per 

lb.   (in  tierces  400  lbs.)    0  16 

Do.,    wooden    pails,    20-lb. 

pails    3  SO 

Shortening      (wooden     pails, 

20-lb.  pails,  per  pail 3  60 

Shorfing.  tierces  of  400  lbs 0  141/3 

Fish  Prices  Steady 

FISH.— There  is  very  little  change  in 
the  fish  market.  The  demand  is  good  for 
all  kinds  of  fish,  particularly  salmon 
and  halibut.  Quotations  remain  unchang- 
ed. 


Do.,  broken  cases 

Do.,  iu  lo-lb.  cases,  lb ©  1» 

Black  Cod,  lb 

Brills,  lb 0  09 

Herring,  Lake  Superier,    100 

lbs.    sacks,    new    stock    ....     3  50 
Halibut,  chicken,     cases  300 

lbs 0  15% 

Do.,  broken  cases    0  16% 

Jackiish,  dressed 

Pickerel,  case  lots 

Salmon — 

Cohoe,  full  boxes,  300  lbs 0  19 

Do.,  in  broken  cases 0  20 

Red  Spring,  in  fill  boxes 

Do.,  broken  cases 

Soles   0  09 

Baby  Whites  or  Tubilees 

Whitefish.  dresied.  case  lots 0  13% 

Do.,  broken  cases   0  14% 

SMOKED  FISH 

Bloaters,    Eastern    National, 

case    3  50 

Do..  Western,  20-lb.  boxes, 

box     2  10 

Haddies,  30-lb.  cases,  lb 0  14 

Do.,  in  15-lb.  cases,  lb 0  14 

Kippers,  East,  Nat.,  20  count, 

p.jr  cova.t    3  75 

Do..    West.      20-lb.    boxes, 

box 2  25 

Fillets.  15-lb.  boxes,  lb 0  20 

SALT  FISH 

Steak   Cod.    2s,   Seely's,   lb 

Acadia      Strip      Cod,     80-lb. 

boxes,   lb 

Acadia     Cod,      12-2s,     wood 

boxes,  lb 

Do..  20-ls.  tablet  .  lb '. . 

Holland  H'ring,  Milkers,  9-lb. 

Do.,  pails,  per  pail 1  35 

Do.,  mixed.  9-lb.  pails,  per 

pail    1  25 

Labrador     herrings,     100-lb. 

bblb..  per  barrel   7  00 

Hog  Market  Firmer 


FRESH  MEATS— The  hog  market  has 
fhown  a  firmer  tone  and  advanced  25 
centii  per  cwt.  Live  selected  hogs  are 
quoted  at  ?11.50. 

Selected,    live,    cwt 11  50 

Heavies    8  50  10  50 

Light 11  50  12  00 

Sows    5  50     7  50 

Fresh  Pork 

Legs  of  pork,  up  to  35  lbs. 

10 0  23  0  31 

Spare  ribs    0  18 

Loins  of  pork,  lb 0  29  0  32 

Fresii  hams,  lb 0  25  ©  33 

Picnics,   lb ...  -  -  0  IS 

Shoulders    0  16  0  20 

Fresh  Beef — from  Steers  and  Heifers — 

Hind  quarters,  lb 0  15     0  20 

Front   quarters,   lb 0  06%  0  08% 

Whole  carcass,  good  grade, 

lb 0  101/2  0  13 

Mutton — 

Choice   long   hinds    (legs  and 

lions)    0  26 

Choice   Stews    •     7% 

Lamb — 

Choice,  30-45   lbs 0  28 

Veal- 
Good  real,  40  to  80  lbs., 

hind    qiKirters    0  25 


Julr  22,  1921 

r 


CANADIAN  G R 0 C E R— Provision  Section 


DAVIE 


HEA 


41 

=1 


Now  that  the  weatlier  is  Ijecoming  so  mucli  warmer,  there  is  every  opportunity  for  a 
dealer  to  increase  his  vottime,  by  featuring  a  line   of  cold  luncheon   delicacies, 
which  are  admirably  suitable  for  summer  trade.    Davies  Headcheese  is  one 
of  these  jellied  meats  which  commands  ready  sale,  because  of  its  qual- 
ity and  consistency-    being  of  good  texture,   with  no  small 
particles  of  bone  or  gristle. 

There  are  many  other  lines  of  Cooked  and  Jellied  Meals  which  can  be  featured  to 
good  advantage  as  cold  luncheon  specials,  and  which  are  l)ou nd  to  create  demand. 
Make   j'our   customers   know   you    carry   tjiem. 


A  few  of  fliese  are  : — 


"Peerless"  Bung  Bologna, 
Davies  Jellied  Hocks 
Davies  Pressed  Beef, 
Davies  Jellied  Pork  Tongue, 
Davies  Jellied  Veal, 
Davies  Ox  Tongue, 


^'Perfection" 
Hams, 

"Perfection" 
Rolls, 

"Perfection"  Roast  Hams, 


Cooked     Square 
Cooked     Square 


We  solicit  your  enquiries  for  any  of  the  above,  or  will  gladly  supply  you  with  a 

list  of  ®ur  complete  lines,  upon  re(iuest. 

Write  us  to-day.  Special  attention  given  to   Mail  Orders. 


'THE 
WILLIAM 


DAVIES 


COMPANY 
IIMITEB 


MONTREAL 


TORONTO 
SYDNEY 


HAMILTON 


J 


42 


CANADIAN  G R 0 C E R— Provision  Section 


July  22,  1921 


M   Oil  Sardines 
M  Mustard  Sardines 
Finnan    Haddies 
(Round  Tins) 
Kippered  Herring 
Herring  in   Tomato   Sauce 
Clams 


Check  over  your  stock  to- 
day and  order  a  good  sup- 
ply  of   these   popular   lines. 


'Brunswick  Brand' 

Sea    Foods 


Brunswick  Brand  Sea  Foods  require  no  cook- 
ing and  are  therefore  ideal  for  preparing  warm 
weather  luncheons  and  hurry  up  meals.  Keep 
your  stock  well  displayed  as  their  advantages 
are  so  obvious  that  a  mere  display  and  a  little 
reminder  will  increase  your  profits  enormous- 

ly. 


Connors  Bros.,  Limited 

BLACK'S  HARBOR,  N.  B. 

Winnipeg  Representatives: 

Chas.  Duncan  &  Son,  Winnipeg-,  Man. 


For  Dainty  Summer  Lunches  Recommend 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN  GROCE  R— Provision  Section 


43 


What    Are   You    Going   to 
Sell    Her? 

It  is  for  you  to  say  whether  she  will  ever  come 
back  or  not  What  are  you  doing  to  sell  her?  The 
best  that  is  to  be  had — or  something  indifferently 
good?  Something  that  is  going  to  bring  her  back — 
or  something  that  will  send  her  elsewhere  in  fut- 
ure. Thousands  of  dealers — men  who  are  making 
money — have  solved  this  problem  by  selling  Rose 
Brand  Products — the  purest,  most  wholesome,  delic- 
ious and  appetizing  foods  human  skill  can  prepare- 
And  their  increased  sales — their  well  pleased  cust- 
omers bear  out  the  wisdom  of  their  course.  You. 
too.  will  find  it  profitable  to  carry  only  Rose  Brand 
Products . 

CANADIAN  PACKING  CO.,  LIMITED 


Toronto 


Ontario 


Packing   Houses 

Branches 

Brantford 

Fort  William 

Toronto 

Sudbury 

Peterboro 

Syrtney,  X.   S. 

Montreal 

Charlottetown,   P 

Hull 

Winnipeg,   Man. 

RAND 


44 


CANADIAN  GROCE  R— Provision  Section 


July  22,  1921 


l^^iiSfl^. 


"EASIFIRST 

Every  Package   Means 

A  Sure  Sale 

A  Good   Profit 

A  Pleased  Customer 


"The  more  they  have 
The  more  they  want" 


V 

V 

V 
V 
V 

V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 
V 

V 
V 
V 

V 
V 

» 


WEST  TORONTO 


ORDER  TO-DAY 


Phone  June.  3400 


EASIFIRST 

^rtening 


♦i<*i<*:o:<*io:o>>io:<*i€<'Co:<<*i<^^^^ 


The  Star 
System 


For  Safe 

% 
Handling 


EFFICIENT  DELIVERY   SERVICE    PAYS 


Gets  trade. 


Holds  trade. 


MAKE  your  delivery  efficient.  STAR 
EGG  CARRIERS  and  TRAYS  save 
time  in  the  store  and  on  the  wagon-  Most 
convenient  for  the  housewife. 
Prevent  breakage— eliminate  complamts. 
Let  us  show  you  how  in  actual  figures. 
Cost  less  to  use. 


JOHN  G.  ELBS 

STAR  EGG 
CARRIER  & 
TRAY  M'FG 
COMPANY 


ROCHESTER,  N.  Y 


1037 

JAY  STREET 

ROCHESTER 

EW   YORK 


SAL     SODA 


No  Wrapping 

No  Weighing 

Saves  Time 
and  Money 


Arm  and  Hammer  Brand 
Sal  Soda  in  handy  2"/^  lb. 
cartons  will  be  greatly  ap^ 
ipreciated  by  your  customers. 
Don't  waste  time,  paper  and 
twine  weighing  out  and 
packaging  Sal  Soda.  Give 
your  customers  Arm  and 
Hammer,  the  strongest  and 
best  in  convenient  cartons. 


There  are   36  of  these   2y2    lb.   packages   to  a   box. 
At  your  wholesalers   . 


CHURCH  &  DWIGHT,  LIMITED 

MONTRBAL 


July  22,  1921 
#1  


CANADIAN    GROCER 


^ 


BLISS 

NATIVE 

HERBS 


BLISS 

NATIVE 

OIL 

MADK     IN     CANADA 


BLISS 

NATIVE 

BALSAM 


Our  Advertising  Makes  Sales  Our  Free  Goods  Make  Profit 

We  Buy  Back  Unsaleable  Goods 

ALONZO   O.   BLISS  MEDICAL  COMPANY 

12  1   St.  Paul  Strt'ct   Fast,  Montreal,  Quebec 


•o  -• 


Hot  Weather  Fruits  for 
for  the  Tourist  Trade 


With  so  many  visitors  and  holiday  seekers  through- 
out the  province  the  following  fruits  find  quick 
sale 

BARTLETT  PEARS  and  PLUMS 
GEORGIA    PEACHES 
CANTALOUPES 
LEMONS  ORANGES  BANANAS 

Watermelons  Tomatoes  Corn 

CUCUMBERS      COCOANUTS  etc 

All  the  above  lines  are  received  regularly  from  the 
best  source  of  supply  and  are  priced  always  in  ac- 
cord  with   the   market   conditions. 

Prompt   and    efficient   attention    to   orders. 


WHITE  &  CO.,  LTD. 

Fruits  Of  Quality  TORONTO 


I 


n 

ss 


\ 


Car  of 


Paprus 

Pie 
Plates 


Price  Right 

WALTER  WOODS  &  Co. 

Hamilton   and  Winnipeg 


PRIDE  OF  CANADA 

Pure   Maple   Syrup 

Will  please  your  most  particular  customers. 
Guaranteed  Absolutely  Pure. 
Have  a  good  Stock  on  hand  for  the  Summer   and   Fall  Trade 

REPRESENTATIVES:  W.  L.  Mackenzie  8c  Co.,  LimiteJ,  Winnipeg,  Retina,  Sasltatoin,  Calgary  and  Edmon  - 
ton,    Oppenheimer  Bros.,  Limited,  V\ncouver,  B.  C;     S.  H.  P.  Mackenzie  &  Co.,  33  Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 
J.  W.  Goiham  &  Co.,  Halifax.  N.S. 

MAPLE  TREE  PRODUCERS  ASSOCIATION  LIMITED 

OFFICES:  58  WELLINGTON  ST. W., MONTREAL 


46 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  192L 


When  You  Are  In  Need  Of 
GRAPE   JUICE 

REMEMBER  THAT 

MARSH'S 

GRAPE     JUICE 


Is  [priced  to  enable 
you  to  sell  at  popular 
prices  and  that  the 
result  o  f  stocking 
IMarsh's  is  larger  sales 
and   more   profit. 

ORDER  MARSH'S 

Tlie  quality  is  right  too 


The  Marsh  Grape 
Juice  Company 

Niagara    Falls,    Out. 

Affents  for  Ontario.  Quebec  and 

]Waritinic  Provinces: 

The   3IaeLaren    Wright, 
Ltd. 

Toronto    and    Montreal 

Ag-cnts    for    Brhisli     Cohimhi.-i  : 

F.  G.  EVANS  CO.  Ltd. 

Toronto  and  Montreal 


£8 


THE  NEW  DISCOVERY  FOR    REMOV- 
ING RUST  .AND  IODINE  ST.AINS 


From  all  kinds  of  silks,  cottons,  wool- 
lens, colored  goods,  etc.,  without  in- 
jury to  the  most  delicate  fabric. 


ss 


ss 


?8 

•o 

i 

si 

?8 

•o 

i 

•o 

*? 


ERUSTO 


is  a  long  felt  want  in 
every  household.  Here 
is  your  chance  to  make  many  an  ex- 
tra dollar  by  supplying  your  trade 
with  this  wonderful  discovery.  Guar- 
anteed to  do  work  instantly  and 
satisfactorily . 

We  require  representatives  in  every 
province  —  "write    us" 


National  Specialty  Company 

95  Canning  Street,  Montreal 


NDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 


ERUSTO 


ti 


?8 
S8 

•O 

8! 


S8 


So»0«0*0«0«Q*D«0*0«;j*0«0«U»0»0«09U«0«U«0«0«0*0«a«0*0«0«0*0«0*U«0«0«0«C«U«C«0«0«0*6io  <>* 


A 

Arsenis  &  Co 12 

Artist  Supply  Co 47 

B 

Birdland    Society    8 

Bain  &  Co.,  Donald  H.    . .    8 
Bliss   Alonzo   Medical    Co.   45 

Bush  &  Co.,  W.    J 14 

Bowser  &  Co.  Ltd.,  S.   F     15 

C 

Canada  Barrels  &  Keg 

Ltd    47 

Can.    Milk    Products    Co.    16 
Can.  Postum  Cereal  Co.  Ltd  1 
Can.   Packing  Co.   Ltd.    . .    43 
Channel  Limited,  Inside 
Flront  cover 

Church  &  Dwight   44 

Clark  &  Sons,  D.  W.    ...  11 

Clark    Ltd.,    W 3 

Codville    Co 10 

Connors    Bros.,    Ltd 42 


Davies  &  Co.,  Wm.  Ltd.  41 
Dayton  Scale  Co.  back  cover 

Dominion  Slicer  Corp.   . .  13 

Dobree  Samuel  &  Sons  .  13 

Duncan  &   Sons,  C 8 

E 

Eddy  Co.,  E.    B 14 

Escott  Co.,  Ltd.,  W.  H.  10 
Estabrooks   Co.,   Ltd.,   T. 

H 15 

Eureka   Refrigerator   Co. 

Ltd , 7 

Edniond   Jos 12 


Frost  Moorman  &  Co  ....  11 

G 
Gunns    Ltd 44 

H 

Hamblin-Brereton  Co.  Ltd  11 
Hanson,  Co.,  Ltd.,  J.  H.  12 
Hayne,   John    47 

I 

Imperial  Grain  &  Mill- 
ing  Co 7 

Imperial    Oil    Co 6 

K 

Kennedy   Mfg.   Co 7 

Kidd,  T .   Ashmore   11 


Lachaine,    Geo.    D 12" 

Laing  &  Waters   11 

Lake  of  the  Woods  Mill- 
ing   Co 5 

Langley  Harris  &  Co.  Ltd.  11 
Lambe   W.    G.    A.    &   Co.    11 

M 

Mann  Co.,  C.  A 11 

Magor  Son  &  Co,   16 

McLauchlan,  J.  K 11 

McLay  Brokerage  Co  ...  8 
M,acdonald   Reg.,  W.    C.    .    2 

and    Front    cover. 

Mackenzie,    W.    L.     8 

Maple   Tree  Producers' 

Assn.,    Ltd 45 

Marsh  Grape  Juice  Co.    .    46 

Mickle,  Geo.  T 11 

Moore  &  Co.  R.   M 47 

N 

Nagel  Mercantile  Agency  48 
National  Cash  Register  Co.  4 
National    Specialty   Co.    .    46 

O 

Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  John  10 
O'Donnell  &  Co.,  John  J.   11 

P 

Patrick  &  Co.,  W.  G.  ..  11 
Pennock  &  Co.,  H.    P.    ..   » 

R 

Red  Rose  Tea   15 

Rock  City  Tobacco  Co.  .  13 
Ross  Can  Co 47 

S 

Scott   Bathgate    Co.,   Ltd.    10 

So-Clean    Ltd .     47 

Soper  E.  N.  &  W.  E.  ..11 
Star   Egg    Carrier    Co.    . .    44 

St.  Arnaud  Fils  Cie    12. 

Stickney  &  Poor  Spice  Co.  7 

T 

Thum    Co.    (Tanglefoot) 

O .   &  W 47. 

Tippet  &  Co.,  Ltd 12 

Toronto  Pottery  Co.,  Ltd.  47 

Toronto  Salt  Works    47 

Trent    Mfg.,    Co.     47 

W 

Wallace   Fisheries   Ltd.    . .    !( 

Watson   &  Truesdale    9 

White  &  Co 4'. 

White    Cottell's    47 

Woods  &  Co.,  Walter  . .  4.1 
Williams  Storage  Co.  . .  8 
Wiley,  Frank  H £ 


July  22,  1921 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


4T 


'^ 


BUYERS'  MARKET 

Latest  Editorial  Market  News^^B 


S(one\*-are   .lars 

Klo>vor   Pols 

I  ea    I'olN 

Glass>*-nro 

Pli'ase  ask  for  copy  of 
latest  cataloiiiii' 

The  TORONTO  POTTERY 

CO,  Limited 

Toronto 


We  are  now  located  in  our  new  and 
more  spacious  warehouse  at 

60-62  JARVIS  STREET 
TORONTO  SALT  WORKS 

GEO.  J.  CLIFF 

WHITE-COTTELL'S 

Best  English  Malt  Vinegar 

QUALITY  VINEGAR 

White,    Cottcll    &    Co.,    C'arr.borHell,    London.    Eng. 

Acents 

W.    Y.    COLCLOi;t;H,    Room    20.5-23    Scott    St. 

Toronto 

STROYAN-DUNWOODY    CO. 

Confederation    Life    Building 

Winnipeg,  Man. 

OPPENHEIMER    BROS..    LTD. 
Vancouver,  i;.   C. 
BAIRD  &  CO.,  .IcrchLnts,  St.  Jchn'»,   Nfid. 

Order    f.-om    your    Jobber    today 

"SOCLEAN" 

the    dustfess    swrrpincr    corrpound 

SOCLEAN,  LIMITED 


Manufacturers 


TOJJONTO.      Ont. 


.Montreal     Anents :— Vijrncault     &     MacGiiliviay 

7    Bonsecours  St.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Ottawa    Agents:— W.    R.    Rarn.nrrl.    Z'A    Rnn':    Pt. 


BARRELS 

From    5    to    50    (gallons.    For    Liquid    Containers 
PROMPT     SHIPMENTS 

CANADA  BARRELS  &  KEGS,  Limited 

WATERLOO,  ONT. 


Your  Wants 

are  many  here 

below.     Use  the 

Want   Ad.    page 

and  get  rid   of  a 

few  of  them. 

SiMYRNA  RAISIN  CROP 
LOOKS   PROMISING 

A  despatch  from  Turkey 
on  the  raisin  crop  says, 
"A  good  raisin  crop  is  ex- 
pected, which  should  total 
about  thirty  thousand  to 
thirty-five  thousand  tons. 
So  far  the  weather  has 
been  favorable,  although 
August  may  yet  spring 
some  surprise.  On  the 
whole,  however,  the  crop 
prospects  are  excellent." 


LEMON  SITUATION 

Lemons  continue  to  be 
quoted  at  a  high  figure; 
whether  this  will  continue 
will  all  depend  upon  weath- 
er conditions.  There  is  a 
good  crop  in  California. 
The  Italian  crop  is  not  a 
large  one.  but  there  is  a 
better  demand  in  Europe 
for  the  Italian  variety.  If 
the  weather  remains  hot 
for  the  balance  of  the 
summer,  lemons  will  likely 
continue  higher  on  account 
of  the  heavy  demand  but 
if  cooler  weather  prevails 
which  will  result  in  a  lesser 
demand,  then  lower  prices 
can  be  expected. 


GAS  MANTLES. 

THE  MANTLES  THAT  YOU"- 
CAM  TIE  IN  a  KNOT  WITHOUT 
OAMAGC-SUPERSEDE  ALL 
OTHER  STYLES  F0«  mvrwfo 

CAS  LIGHTS        f,        -nOVCr 


PACIFIC   COAST  MANTLE   f  ACTORY 


30    DOZEN   CASE   FILLERS 
ONE    DOZEN    CARTON    FILLERS 
%-INCH    CUSHION    FILLERS 
COinil  GATED  FLATS 

The  TRENT  MFG.  CO.,  LTD. 

TRENTON,  ONT. 


CANS 

All  paper,  all  tin  and  combin 
ation  tin  and  paper  for  paints, 
jam,  cocoa,  spices,  drug  special- 
ties   and    household    utilities. 

ROSS  CAN  CO.  LIMITED, 

Bowmanville,    Ont. 


BARRELS 

For  all  puri)oses.  The  best  pack 
age  for  exporting.  I  can  make  them 
to  suit   your  goods. 

JOHN  HAYNE 

Imperial  BIdg.  SARNIA,  ONT. 


It  products  y 


"^J^ 


Sticky  Fly  Paper. Sticky  Fly RjBBOff. 

Tree  Tasglefoot.  ffoACH-ANT  Powdeh. 

TheO&W.Thum  Co-Manufacturers. 
GrandRapids.Mjcu.  Walkirville.Canada. 


SIGN  WRITING 

Do  your  own  Card  Writing 

Write    for    our    Catalocue    which    will    tell    you 
what   you    need.    Best    coods    at    ('losets    Prices. 

ARTIST'S  SUPPLY  CO. 

77     York    S!.,    Toronto 
Mention  this  paper  when   writing: 


These 

one-inch 

spaces 

only  $2 

.20  per  in 

sertion 

if  used 

each  issue 
year. 

in  the 

'1 


48 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  22,  1921 


Rates  For  Classified  Advertising 

Advertisements  under  this  heading  3c  per  word  for  first  iiisertio<i;  He  for  each  sub- 
sequent insertion. 

Where  answers  co«ie  to  Box  number  in  our  care  to  be  forwarded,  5  cents  per  inser- 
tion must  be  added  to  cover  postage,  etc. 

Contractions  count  as  one  word,  but  five  figures  (as  $1,000)  are  allowed  as  one  word. 

Cash  remittance  to  cover  cost  must  accompany  aW  advertisements.  In  no  case  can 
ithia  rule  be  overlooked.  Advertisewents  received  without  remittances  cannot  be  acknow- 
ledged. 


WANTED 


l^xperieaoed  Grocery  Clerk  wants  pos- 
■■^il.ioiB.  At  present  in  charge  of  store 
in  Toronto.  Desires  change  in  wholesale 
or  retailer  anywhere  in  Ontario.  Refer- 
ences. Box  64  Canadian  Grooer,  153 
University  Ave.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


"VJortliern  Ontario  Salesman  residing  in 
■^  ^  the  territory  seeks  Candy  and  Drag- 
gists  lines,  if  you  want  regular  and  coa- 
Bistent  trade  get  in  touch  with  Box  flO 
Canadian  Grocer,  153  University  Ave., 
Toronto,  Ont. 

partner  wanted  for  Grocery  store  with 
•*■  $2,500.00  to  invest.  A  good  opport- 
unity for  live  man.  Replies  confidential. 
Box  62.  Canadian  Grocer  153  University 
Ave.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

•npwo  experienced  butchers  wanted  m  a 
■*■  bwsy  cpunty  town  store.  Give  refer- 
■ences  and  previous  experience,  also 
wiages .  Apply,  Box  56  Canadian  Grocer 
153    University    Ave.,    Toronto,    Ont. 


FOR  SALE 


T^or  Sale: —  General  store^  groceries, 
•*■  boots  and  shoes  and  drygoods,  also 
ice  cream  parlor  attached.  Doing  very 
good  business,  loeated  in  best  stand  in 
town  near  C.  P.  R.  roundhouse  and 
station  and  chemical  plant.  Stock  will 
be  reduced  if  desired.  All  new  fixtures 
and  most  ugi-to-date  general  store.  Must 
be  sold  quickly.  Owser  going  on  e:.;- 
tended  trip,  reason  for  selling.  Apply 
Box  939,  Trenton,  Ont. 


/General  store  for  sale  in  small  village 
^-^  in  country  near  town  of  Renfrew, 
Ont.,  five  miles  from  station.  No  oppos- 
ition. Fewer  line  passes  door.  Eleccric 
lights  about  to  be  installed.  Sitaatod  on 
country  highway.  School  and  Presby- 
terian Cfcurch  in  village.  Turnover  about 
ten  theusand  could  be  increased  to  six- 
teen or  seventeen  thousand.  Apply  Box 
58.  Canadian  Grocer,  153  University  Ave. 
Toronto,  Ont. 


COLLECTIONS 


®iiir  rtlltty  to  c»U*ct  »c- 
ooiints  had  been  tiisbly  praii- 
0*1  bf  niscehn»>Ei  all  o^er 
fauarta.  -We  oaBsct  »Dy- 
where  in  CRD*4a  a«A  the 
Ijwteil  SteUis  oi»  a  tt*i»t)y 
commHsioD  hisis.  You  ura 
iit*^  ne  obl(Bati(»n  to  ns  if 
wp  ^  mM  I'ollect.  VTe  (Oiar- 
antfc  T<Mi  a  l*foi-»iif!M4?  litwi- 
Rit  scr^irs.  Pmtaft  rwrrif- 
tooof";.  Ofvp  lis  n  trial.  We 
cnWi'Ct.  ?#HMe  othets  fail. 
RsfnkHshed    R03. 

NagJe  MercBBlJlo  Agenej 

La-prairio  (Montreal)  Quo 


r>ritish  Business — Do  you  want  a  good 
distributing  house  to  push  your 
goods.  Agents  all  over  Britain.  CommlB- 
sion  representation,  or  sole  buying  ar- 
rangement. Box  97,  MacLeans,  88  Fleet 
St.,   London,   Engl.and. 


Say  you  saw  it  in  Canadian 

Grocer;  It  will  help  to 

identify   you. 


Send 

For 
Your 

Copy 

To-day 


Because  of  an  unusually  well  balanced  and  complete  editorial 
service-  The  Financial  Post  of  Canada  is  carefully  read  of  Can- 
ada's foremost  business  executives — financial  directors  —  salesman- 
agers  and  investors.  It  contains  business  and  financial  information 
valuable    to    any    forward-looking   business  men. 

One  evening  spent  with  it  in  the  quiet  of  your  home  will  answer 
all     your     questions     about    The   Financial     Post. 

The  Financial  Post 

143    University    Avenue,    Toronto 


CANADIAN    GROCKR 


''r^^^^l^^-s^^^^^^.^^^^^^^N^^;^^^^^^^^ 


Feature  it  regularly 
and  add  dollars  to 
your  profit  column 

There  is  no  bigger  favorite  any- 
where than  Coca-Cola, 

^^ide-awahe  Grocers  are  selhng 
this  popular  drink— suggesting  it  by 
the  bottle  and  by  the  case — and 
putting  good,  sound  profits  in  their 
cash  registers  as  a  result. 

^^hy  leave  all  this  extra  business 
to  the  other  fellow? 

*'Get  in"  on  it  right  now.  Order  a 
stock  of  Coca-Cola  today.  Hang 
up  our  free  advertising  signs  in 
your  store.  Then  watch  it  move — 
and  your  increased  profits. 

The  Coca-Cola  Co. 

WINNIPEG 
TORONTO 


^:.^^^^^^^^:^:;^^^^^s^^^^^ 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


The  Fag-end  of  this  Pound  is  Yours 

—Why  give  part  of  it  away  in  overweights? 


JOBBERS 
SHARE 

75U52324< 


THIS 
SHOWS 

THAT 
8)CENTS 


REMAINS 
AFTERTHF 
JOBBER 
IS  PAID 


One  pound 

at 

32  cents 

The  package 
shown  on  the 
scale  weighs  one 
pound. 

We  have  divided 
it   into    four   parts. 

It  shows  hov/  a 
pound  of  merchan- 
dise is  divided  to 
meet    its    cost. 

We  have  given 
this  weight  a  val- 
ue of  32  cents  per 
pound  (the  aver- 
age cost  of  merch- 
andise). 

Each  item  of  ex- 
pense and  loss  is 
represented  by  a 
division. 

Note  carefully 
that  you  have  bat 
2  1-5  cents  remain- 
ing out  of  the 
pound  of  merchan- 
dise after  you 
have  accounted  for 
the  many  charges 
against  it.  Ten 
per  cent  of  the 
pound  is  rightful- 
ly  yours. 

10  per  cent  of  32 
cents — 3  1-5    cents. 


Consider  this  pound  of  goods  at  32  cents.  This  price  includes  10% 
or  3  Vs  cents  for  profit.  PAPER  profits  are  easily  made.  ACTUAL 
profits  must  come  from  "WHAT  IS  LEFT"  of  your  pound  after 
jobber  and  overhead  are  paid. 

"What  is  left"  depends  largely  on  the  correctness  of  your  weighings. 
Did  you  ever  figure  it  out  this  way : 

If  you  are  the  average  merchant  making  200  weighings  a  day  at  the 
average  value  of  32  cent,s  a  pound,  vour  profits  will  amount  to 
200x3  1-5    cents    or    $6.40    NET    PROFIT    BUSINESS    per    day    and 


.40,  or  $1,996.80  net  profit 


in  312  working  days  you  will  do  312  x 
business   for  the  year. 

IT'S  THE  HALF  OUNCE  YOU  MUST  WATCH. 

200  X  1-2   ounce,   at   32   cents   a   pound — $2   a   day. 

312  X  2— $624   for  a   year. 

Measure  this  against  the  price  of  a  Dayton  Scale  and  you'll  see  why 
the   Dayton   is  so   costly   to   be   without. 


INTERNATIONAL  BUSINESS  MACHINES  CO.,  LIMITED 

Frank  E.  MuHoti,  Vice-President  and  General  Manager  HEAD  OFFICE  AND  FACTORY  -  Royce  and  Campbell  Avenues,  Toronto 

For    your    convenience    we    have    Service    and    Sales    Offices    in    Vancouver,     Calgary.     Edmonton,     Saskatoon,     Winnipt-i;.     W'alkerville,     London, 

Hamilton,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Qu.^bcc    Halifax,  St.  John's,  Nfld. 

Also  Manufacturers  of  I nternational  Time  Recorders  and  International  Electric  Tabulators  and  Sorters 


(MDiAN  Grocer 

Members  of  The  Associated  Business  Papers  —  Only  Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 


VOL.  XXXV. 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

PUBLICATION  OFFICE:  TORONTO,  ONT.,  JULY  29,  1921 


No.  30 


THE  SPOON  INSIDE 

Will  start  a  sale  but  quality  is  necessary  to  bring  repeats.  MINTO 
shows  all  there  is  in  tea — quality  and  strength.  Poor  tea  at  any  price  will 
not  bring  a  second  order. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


mouncmd 


N0I5 


0€ii?:M»p 


M^f^MR 


To  Sell  at.  Complete^  $1.25 


To  meet  the  demand — which  we  believe  exists 
generally — for  a  Mop  as  good  in  every  particu- 
lar as  the  regular  O-Cedar  Polish  Mop,  but 
somewhat  lower  in  price. 

To  place  in  your  store  a  "Polish"  Mop  you  can 
sell  at  $1.25 — explaining  to  your  customers  that  it 
has  all  the  quality  of  the  larger  one — the  only  differ- 
ence being  that  it  is  i  1-2  inch  smaller  diameter  than 
the  Mop  you  sell  at  $2.00;  and  the  steel  centre  is  not 
japanned.    Price  includes  handle. 

To  enable  you  to  say  "Here's  the  best  Mop  value 
ever  offered  in  Canada — treated  with  0-Cedar 
Polish,  just  like  the  large  Mop  that  has  proved 
so  great  a  success  as  a  floor  polisher." 


We  are  now  ready  to  ship  this  new 
Mop — order  through  your  jobber. 


CHANNELL  LIMITED 

Toronto 


Julv  29.  1921. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N     G  11  f)  C  E  R 


SICHARLES 

Brand  Milk 

"  With  the  Cream  Left  in," 


jt.  CHARLES 
EVAPORATED  MaK 


— A  size  for  every  need 


Sells  itself 


You  don't  have  to  waste  any  selling  effort 
on  BORDEN'S  ST.  CHARLES  MILK. 
It's  half  sold  before  you  place  it  on  your 
counters. 

Years  of  quality  leadership  have  built  up 
for  it  a  reputation  from  coast  to  coast — a 
reputation  that,  backed  by  a  continuous, 
national  advertising  campaign  is  ringing 
up  unusually  good  profits  for  Grocers  who 
sell  this  rich,  pure,  country  milk  "with  the 
cream  left  in". 


i 


BORDEN'S  LINES 


"EAGLE  BRAND"  CONDENSED  MILK 
"ST.  CHARLES"  EVAPORATED  MILK 
MALTED  MILK- SQUARE  PACKAGES 
"REINDEER"  CONDENSED  COFFEE 
"REINDEER"  CONDENSED  COCOA 
"REINDEER"  CONDENSED  MILK 


Just  keep  your  ST.  CHARLES  stock  well 
displayed — it  will  sell  itself. 


The  Leader*  Since  I8S7 

Montreal  and   Vancouver 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


Every 
Housewife 
Will  Want 
One! 


July  29,  1921. 


Retails  for 


5c 


ANCHOR  OPENER 

"Removes  the  Cap  without  Mishap" 

Fill  a  Long-felt  Want 


Here  is  a  chance  to  sell  your  customers  the 
handiest  and  most  satisfactory  opener  ever  made 
for  removing  caps  from  jars  and  tumblers  sealed 
with  "Anchor"  and  similar  caps. 

You  know  that  goods  sealed  with  "Anchor 
Caps  are  the  best  to  handle.  They  don't  leak  and 
they  don't  spoil.  Your  customers  like  them,  too, 
for  this  same  reason.  And  they  will  like  them  all 
the  more  when  they  learn  that  these  snug-fitting 
caps  can  now  be  lifted  off  in  less  time  than  it  takes 


to  tell  it,  by  means  of  the  "Anchor  Opener."  That  is 
why  you  should  have  a  supply  of  "Anchor  Open- 
ers" on  your  counter. 

The  "Anchor  Opener"  fills  a  long-felt    want. 
Your  customers  will  actually  be   grateful   to  you 

for  selling  them  this  ingenious  device  that  takes 
lids  off  without  fuss,  muss  or  trouble. .  .  Every 
"Anchor  Opener"  you  sell  makes  a  satisfied  cus- 
tomer— and  a  satisfied  customer  is  our  best  adver- 
tisement. 


By  displaying  the  handsome  "Anchor" 
Carton  on  your  counter  you  should  sell 
an  "Anchor  Opener"  to  practically 
every  customer,  and  many  of  these  will 
pass  the  good  word  along  to  their 
friends. 


Order  a  Display  Carton  of  Anchor  Openers 
for  Your  Counter. 

Packed  three  dozen  in  a  handsome  Counter  Display 
Carton,  $1.20  per  Carton  net  to  you.  Selling  price, 
5  cents  each.  You  make  60  cents  on  each  carton — 
a  profit  of  50  per  cent. 


DON'T  DELAY— SEND  IN  YOUR 
ORDER  TO-DAY! 


Anchor  Cap  6  Closure  Gorporalion 

Of  Canada,  Limited 
WALLACE  AVE.     -    -    -    TORONTO 

THE  ANCHOR  OPENER  MEANS  PROFIT  FOR  YOU — GET  BUSYf 


July  29,  1921. 


C  A  X  A  D  I  A  X     G  R  0  C  E  R 


OPPORTUNITY 

TO  MAKE  REAL  MONEY 
IS  NOW  BEFORE  YOU 


As  we  have  decided  to  devote  all  our  time  to  the  sale  of  food  pro- 
ducts, we  are  going  to  sell  our  entire  stock  of  these  machines,  along 
with  the  moulds,  dies  and  patent  rights  and  machine  for  making 
Ball  Gum.  In  fact  everything  that  is  connected  with  the  machine 
and  the  gum.  The  business  is  already  well  established  and  will  make  a  bunch  of 
money  for  some  good  smart  man,  who  has  the  time,  money  and  energy  to  devote  to 
the  production  and  sale  of  this  little  money-making  silent  salesman,  which  has  al- 
ready proved  itself  a  success  on  the  market.  The  entire  Ball  Gum  business  with 
patents,  etc.,  will  be  sold  at  a  reasonable  figure,  with  reasonable  cash  payment 
and  teiTTis  arranged  for  the  balance. 

To  the  man  or  men  who  vant  to  i  lake  mone}-  honestly  and  quickly,  and  hax'e  at 
least  $2,ooo  to  invest  in  a  proposition  of  this  class,  communicate  with  Harry  Home, 
1297  Queen  St.  W.,  Toronto,  in  care  r>: 

THE  HARRY  HORNE  CO.,  LTD. 


Golden  Gate  (brand) 
SUMMER  DRINKS 

We  are  mighty  busy  at  the  moment  with  Golden  Gate  Summer  Drinks. 

8-oz.   Bottles  • $2.25  doz.     14-oz.  Bottles  3.25  doz. 

20-oz.  Bottles  $4-25  doz.        i-(jallon  Jars    $3-25  Gal. 

Golden  Gate  Brand  is  the  concentrated  Fruit  Juice,  added  to  a  heavv  Svrup  and  at- 
tractivelv  packed.  It  is  produced  in  ORANGEADE,  LEMONADE,  'LIMEADE 
and  CHERRYADE. 

It  is  built  up  to  a  strength  where  it  may  be  diluted  i  part  to  10  parts  of  water  and 
produce  a  real  Drink. 

For  fountain  use  and  use  in  coolers,  it  is  made  in  up  to  a  strength  of  16  to  i  and 
this  strength  is  sold  only  in  one-gallon  jars  in  the  four  varieties  above  mentioned, 
and  the  price  is  $4.50  per  gallon,  and  makes  16  gallons  of  finest  fruit  flavored  bev- 
erage.   Bottles  are  packed  2  doz.  to  case.     Gallon  jars,  2  jars  to  case. 

The  weather  man  figures  there  are  Two  Months  of  Hot  Weather  ahead  of  us,  so 
mail  in  your  orders  for  a  sample  case  of  each  line,  s''''  discount  will  be  allowed  if 
this  advertisement  is  attached  to  your  order.  Orders  shipped  same  day  as  received. 

THE  HARRY  HORNE'CO.,  LTD. 

Makers  and  Distributors  of  good  things  to  eat  and  drink. 

1297-99  Queen  St.  West  -  -  TORONTO,  CANADA 


111111111111111111 


!iiii 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    G  R  0  C  E  R 


Jiilv  29,  1921 


CLARK'S  SPAGHETTI 

With  Tomato  Sauce  and  Cheese 

Delicious  Eating  -  Reasonable  in  Cost 
Display  It  -  It  Sells  Itself 


CLARK'S   CORNED  BEEF 

The  Favorite  for  Cold  Lunch 

Let    your  customers    know   you 

have    it 


u**iaiaaa*i*aiaa«Ajk*nj 


SSSXSZXZBI 


CLARK'S  PORK  &  BEANS 

With  Tomato,  Chili  or  Plain  Sauce 

Just  as  good  as  ever, 
Just  as  popular,  and 
Just  your  best  seller. 


W.    Clark,    Limited 

MONTREAL 


July  29,  192 1 , 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  20,  1921. 


Increased  Sales — Quicker 
Turnover — More  Profit 


AT  the  present  time  Macdonald's 
Tobaccos  offer  the  retailer  greater 
inducements  than  any  other  com- 
modity. The  profit  on  Macdonald's— ■ 
always  a  generous  one — is  now  bigger 
than  ever  and  constantly  increasing. 

Macdonald's  Tobacco  shows  you  a  hand- 
some return  on  your  money.  Naturally 
this  return  is  multiplied  by  every  turn- 
over. The  Macdonald  turnovers  are  un- 
questionably rapid,  and  the  persistent, 
extensive  Macdonald  advertising  is  creat- 
ing a  still  greater  demand  for  these 
popular  tobaccos,  speeding  your  turnover 
and  increasing  your  profits. 


Then,  too,  there  is  the  extra  profit  from 
the  four  to  six  plugs   overrun   in   every 
10  lb.  caddy  you  buy. 

Three  sources  of  profit  surely  make  Mac- 
donald's a  line  worthy  your  sales-efforts. 


O 


July  29,  1021 .  CANADIAN    GROCER 

==^^==^=^  ORDER  BY  NAME  '" 


You  Can 
Depend  Upon 

gSTICKNEY  &  POOR'S 
CREAM  OF  TARTAR 

To  satisfy  your  customers,  because  it  is  a 
pure  leavener,  made  from  grapes,  that  has 
been  famous  for  its  quality  through  many 
generations. 

Next  time  you  order  Cream  of  Tartar,  be 
sure  and  say  to  your  jobber  "Stickney  & 
Poor's  Cream  of  Tartar."  It  will  pay  you  to 
order  by  name. 

Your  co-operating  servant. 
MUSTARDPOT. 


If 


STICKNEY*&  POOR  SPICE  COMPANY 

1815  Century^Old  -         Century  honored  1921 

HALIFAX 

Mustards     -     Spices     -     Seasonings 


« 


I 
A  Virile,  Robust 

Fighting  Fish 


^OILTDS 


The  Pinks 
packed  under 

"Kiltie" 

BRAND 

are   caught   in 
the  cool  depths 

around  the 

Queen  Charlotte 

Islands 


Caught    in  Deep 
Salt  Water 


0}umB^ 


REFRIGERATORS 

are  so  built  that  a  con- 
stant, positive  circula- 
tion of  cold,  dry  air  is 
maintained.  This  fea- 
ture fully  covered  by 
patents. 


Your  customers  will  appreciate  the 
care  you  give  to  keep  your  perish- 
ables sweet  and  wholesome. 
Don't  repeat  last  summer's  waste. 
Get  a  Eureka. 

Write  for  our  new  catalogue. 


Eureka  Refrigerator  Co.,  Limited 

Head  Office:  Owen  Sound 

Branches:  Toronto,  Montreal,  Hamilton 


Imperial  Grain  and  Milling 
Co.,  Limited 

VANCOUVER,  B.C. 


We  are  offering  the  best  value 

in  Rice  on  the  Canadian 

market  to-day. 


C  A  ?v  A  D  1  A  N     GROCER 


Julv  29,  1921. 


WKSTERN  CANADA 


FRANK  H.  WILEY 

Mfrs.'   Atrent  and  Importer 
GROCERIES   and    CHEMICALS 
Salesmen    corerinK    Manitoba,   Saskatchewan, 
Albert-a  and   British  Colombia. 

533-537  Henry  Ave.,  Winnipeg 


C.  DUNCAN  &  SON 

Manufra.'  Agents  and  Grocery  Brokers 

Cor.  Prinoessfand  Bannatyne 

WINNIPEG  Estab.  IS99 


W.  L.  Mackenzie  &  Co.  Ltd. 
Head  Office:  Winnipeg 

Branches 

REGINA,  SASKATOON,    CALGARY, 

EDMONTON,  VANCOUVER 


THE  McLAY  BROKERAGE  CO. 

WHOLESALE   GROCERY   BROKERS 
and  MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 

Take  advantage  of  our  Service 
WINNIPEG  MANITOBA 


Stroyan-Dunwoody  Co. 

Wholesale  Brokers  anil  Commission  Agents 

Confederation  Life  BIdg.     -     Winnipeg 

Sernts  couplsd  with  Ralisbititj  brin|<  Ruall* 
We  want  jeur  butinest.  Write  os. 


Say  You  Saw  It  In 
Canadian  Grocer, 
It  Will  Help  To 
Identify    You. 


Le  7S  French  Cigarette  Papers 


finest  .t  is  «'««=*•'"•'* 

Quality 


White  Gummed 

Paper 

That  Will 

Satisfy 

Your  Trade 


'"'^     actual  P«c' 
of  the  ac^" 


100  Leaves  to  Book 

Automatic 
Doubles 

50  Books  to  Box 


Order 
to-day  from 
your  jobber 


CANADIAN  DISTRIBUTORS: 


DONALD  H.  BAIN  CO. 

Wholesale  Commission  Merchants,  Brokers  and  Importers 

Head  Office,  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches: 
SASKATOON      REGINA      CALGARY      EDVIONTON       VANCOUVER        MONTREAL    LONDON,     ENG 


f 


Standard  Goods  Win  Abiding  Trade 


Cottam  Bird   Seed 

The  Standard  of  Bird  Keepers  and  Grocers  Since  1881 


I 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


WESTERN   CANADA 


H.P.PENHOCK&CO.,LTD 

WHOLESALE      COMMISSION       BROKERS  ' 

H£A£  WINNIPEC  2mL' 


MANITOBA 
SASKATCHEWAN 


ALBERTA 
WESTERN    ONT. 


Watson  &  Truesdale,  Winnipeg 

have  live  men  doing  detail  work  throughout  our  territory — Manitoba,   Saskatchewan,   and   Alberta. 
get  the  business,  and  can  get  it  far  you.       Write  ns,   and  we  will  explain  our  system. 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 


They 


TRACKAGE 
STORAGE 
DISTRIBU- 
TION 


The  Largest 

in  Western  Canada 

We  are  the  largest  Storage, 
Distributing  and  Forwarding 
House  in  the  Western  field. 
Total  Storage  ppace  ninety-six 
thousand  square  fe<it  of  Bonded 
or  Free  Storage.  I'leated  ware- 
house. Excellent  Truck  facili- 
ties. The  Western  House  for 
SERVICE. 

Williams  Storage  Co. 

WINNIPEG 

and 

Winnipeg  Warehousing  Co. 


Triangle 
Sanitary 


Waxed 
Paper 


A  Quality  line,    which  Quality  Wholesale  Grocers  will  want  to 
handle.  Our  Prices  are  competitive  and  Service  unexcelled. 
Enquiries  Solicited 

CANADIAN  NASHUA  PAPER  CO. 


LIMITED 

Peterborough 


Ont. 


OAKEY'S 

''WELLINGTON^ 
KNIFE    POLISH 

The  original  and  only  reliable  prepara- 
tion for  Cleaning  and  Polishing  Cut- 
lery, etc. 

John  Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

ManufacturerM  of 

Emery,  Black  Lead,     Emery  Glass  and 

Flint  Cloths  and  Papers,  etc. 

Wellington  Mills,    London,  S.E.I,  Eng. 
Agenti: 

F.  Msniey.  147  Banna tyne  Ave.  Eatt, 

Winnipeg 

Sankey    and   Mason.  839   Beatty   Street 

Vancouver 


10 


CANADIAN     GR0CP:R 


July  29,  1921. 


WESTERN   CANADA 


Marketing  Products  in  a  '*Big  Way'^ 


The  house  of  "Scott-Bathgate''  holds  an  18  year  old  re- 
putation for  producing  big  results  in  the  rich  Western 
Provinces.  —  a  reputation  that  you  should  investigate  bofore 
you  assign  your  product. 

We'll  place  your  product  on  the  market  for  you  in  the 
same  successful  manner  as  we  have  done  for  Christie's  Bis- 
cuits, Robertson's  Confectionery  and  Hungerford  and  Smith's 
Fountain  Supplies.     Write  us. 

Scott-Bathgate  Company,  Limited 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 

149  Notre  Dame  Ave.  East,  Winnipeg 


W.  H.  ESCOTT  CO. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers — Manufacturers' 
Agents — Commission  Merchants 

Manufacturers  of  Food  Products  and 
Specialties  of  merit  seeking  increased  dis- 
tribution in  Western  Canada,  are  invited 
to  investigate  our  constructive 

SALES  FORCE 

Your  account  entrusted  to  us  receives  the 
personal  attention  of  experienced  and 
efficient  heads. 

We  make  ourselves  your  Business  Right 
Arm  in  our  territory. 

We  are  more  than  Brokers,  we  are  Busi- 
ness Builders. 

WRITE  US  TO-DAY 

HEAD  OFFICE 
WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches  with  Resident  Sales  Managers  at 

Regina,  Sask.  Saskatoon,  Sask. 

Calgary,  Alta.  Edmonton,  Alta. 

Fort  William,  Ont. 


Thompson's   Sealed 
Salted    Peanuts 

Packed  in  drum-shaped  packages 
to  retail  at  5c.  Forty  packages  to 
a  carton.     30  cartons  to  a  case. 

Order  from  your  jobber  To-day 

"Nifty  Brand"  whole  blanched 
Jumbos,    in    5    lb.  tins,  with  envelopes. 


Packed  in  Canada  by    ,   J 


JtAkilS 


A.  E.  THOMPSON 

Box  2015  WINNIPEG 

G.  B.iTHOMPSON  &  CO.,  Western  Distributors.   Winnipeg 

Eastern     Reprutnlatioe  :  Walter  S.  Bayley,  20  Front  St.  E.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


'/jl  nuKumy 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


ONTARIO 


Jos.  K.  McLauchlan 

Manufacturers'   Agent  and    Grocery   Broker. 
Warehouse  and  Distributing 
275-77-79  King  Street  West,  Toronto 
Reliable  renresentation.      Centrally  located. 


Langley,  Harris  &  Co.,  hi. 

Manufacturer*'  Agents 
Grocers,  Confectioners  and   Drug 

Specialties 
12  FRONT  ST.  EAST,   TORONT© 


Let   T.   ASHMORE    KIDD 

Broker 

KINGSTON,  ONTARIO 

Superintend   the  successful    mercliandising  of 
our   lines  in  Kingston  and  district. 


Frost,  Moorman  &  Co. 

BELLEVILLE,  ONT. 

Grocery  Specialty  Brokers 

Agencies  Wanted 

SatU/aetory  Repretentation  Guarmntted 


w. 

G. 

PATRICK    &    CO- 
LIMITED 

Ma 

nufacturers'  Agents 
and  Importers 

51-53  Wellington  St.  W.,  Toronto     | 

Halifax.   N.S. ;  Winnipeg,  Man. 

We  Cover  Western  Ont.  Thoroughly 

Now   representing  Sainsbury    Bros:  J.    H. 
Wethey,    Limited ;    Harry    Hall    &    Co.  ;    Im- 
perial    Grain    and    Rice    Milling    Co.  ;    and 
others. 
We  do  Detail  Work.     Get  in  touch  with  us. 

JOHN    J.    O'DONNELL    COMPANY 
Commission  Brotkers,  Manufacturers'  Agents 

LAING   BUILDING,  WINDSOR.   ONT. 


HAMBLIN-BRERETON  CO.,  Ltd. 

Grocery  and  Confectionery 

Agents  and  Importers 

Toronto  and  Kitchener,  Ont. 
Winnipegjand  Calgary. 


E.  N.  &  W.  E.  SOPER 

Manufacturers'      Asents      &      Commission 
Brokers 
63  Sparka  St.,  Ottawa 
Let    us    demonstrate    what    we    can    do    for 
your    product    in    this    rich    territory.      We 
are  especially    equipped   to    produce    the    re- 
sults  you   are   lookinK    for. 


LAING  AND  WATERS 

Manufacturers  Agents  &  Grocery  Brokers 

28  Wellington  St.  East 
TORONTO 

Desire  correspondence  with  manufacturers 
unrepresented  in  this'dlstrict. 


SCOTT  &  THOMAS 

Manufacturers'  Agent* 

Confectionery  and  Grocery  Brokers 

32  Front  St.  West, 
TORONTO 


W.  G.  A.  LAMBE  &  CO. 


TORONTO 
Establishd  1885 


SUGARS 


FRUITS 


BRAND 


G.  T.  MICKLE 


The 

CROWN 

Trade-Mark 

on  a  bag  of  white  beansis  a  guarantee 

of  their  unifortn    gae   and    ohoic« 

quality 

Cbly   the   very    finest    hand-picked 

Canadian  White  Beans  go  into  bags 

mariced 

CROWN  BRAND 

For  >  our  own  protection  insist  upon 
having  this  Kne  of  known  quality. 

Ridgetown,  Ont. 


Let  Us  Quote  You  on  Our 

HIGH  GRADE 

BROOMS 

Long    life  and    great   strength  are 
built  into  every  one  of  our  brooms 


cheaper  stock,  well 
made,  and  worth 
the  price. 


STANLEY  BEAVER  CANUCK 

5  string,    fancr      5    airing,    good     4    airing,     from 
com,  all  aelected     quality     houae 
a  t  o  ck,  poliahed       broom,  popular 
handle.  weight.     Slanda 

up  to  tittj  teal. 
We  alao  make  a  number  of  other  linea,  iiKluding 
Toy  Brooma  and  Whiaka. 

Waterloo  Broom  &  Brush  Company,  Limited 

relephone  286  Waterloo,  Ontario 


Spulal 


12 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


EASTERN  CANADA 


TELEPHONE   MAIN   7143 

ST.  ARNAUD  FILS  CIE 

GROCERY   BROKERS 


Importatenrs 

&    Ehcportatenn 
PoiB  et  Perea 
Prodnits  Alimentair 


Importers 

&    Exporters 
Peas   and    Beans 
Food    Products 


ST.    NICHOLAS     BUILDING,    MONTREAL 


ARSENIS  &  CO. 

PATRAS,    GREECE 

ESTABLISHED  1893 

Wholesale  Currant  and 

Dried  Fruit  Exporters 

GROCERY     BROKERS    WANTED 
In  Western  Canada  and  Ontario 

Write    us    just    now.     First    class   refer- 
ences on  request. 


GEO.  D.  LACHAINE 

Manufacturers'   Agent  and   Commission   Broker 

Rrp resenting : 
The    Dominion    IHolasses   "N).,    Ltd.,    Halifax,    N.S. 
H.    R.    Silver   Ltd..    Halifax.    N.S. 
Jos.    Dufresne,    Biscuits,   Chocolates  and   Confectionery, 

Joliette,    P.Q. 
Over    30    years    in    Business.        Best    Reference*    and 
Connections. 

18    Dalhousie   Street,    QUKBEC. 


TIPPET  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

Importers  and 
Manufacturers'  Agents 

8  Place  Royale,  Montreal 

EMtabliihed  1876 
Telephono  Main  1581 


When   Writing-   to    Advertisers 
Kindly  Mention  this  Paper 


MAPLE  SUGAR 

I  solicit  your  orders  for  pure  Maple  Sugar.  35  years 
experience  as  wholesale  dealer.  Open  for  agencies  of  all  kinds. 
Agent  for  Messrs  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hull;  Gunns 
Ltd.,  Toronto;  St.  Lawrence  Starch  Co.,  and  several  others. 
Hardware  E.xpert.  Correspondence  solicited  if  interested. 
Warehouse  capacity,  ro,ooo  feet  floor  space.  Best  spot  in 
town  on  Main  Street. 

JOS.  EMOND 

2-4  Rue  St.  Joseph,  Quebec,  P.Q. 


Be  Sure  You  Ask 
Your  Jobber  for 

Dominion   Spring   Clothes    Pins 


Manufacf'ured  by 

The  J.  H.  Hanson  Co.,  Ltd. 

MONTREAL 


BUY     REINDEER      FLOUR 

Because  it  carries  an  absolute  guarantee  to  the 
baker,  the  merchant,  and  the  consumer,  for  its 
uniform  qualities  of  strength,  color,  big  yield,  fine 
flavor,  and  tempting  appearance. 

PETERBORO    CEREAL    COMPANY,   PETERBORO,   ONT. 


Getietal  Sales  Office,  Peterboro,  Ont. 


Branch  Mill,  Campbellford,  Ont. 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN   GROCEK 


13 


Canadas  Most  Famous  Dessert 

cJell-0 

(JlJliere  demand  pulls  so  strongly 
no  pushing  is  required. 

The  Genesee  Pure  Food  Company  of  Canada,  Ltd. 

Two  Fctctojries 

Drid<jebur(j,Ont. 


LeRotj.N-'Y. 


1  0  c 


L^^^^zAJm 


^ininjlllj|JMiii:iiiiiiliiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliilillillililiiiiiiiiiliiiiilllilililllililJiiiiiliiiiiiiliiiiliJiiniiiiiiiiiiNiiiillilliliiiiJilili!j 

I        THE    "BEST     BUY"     IN    THE    SLICER     MARKET        | 

I  DOMINION  SLICER  I 


ADE   IN 
NADa 


Dominion  Slicei-s  have  fewer 
working  parts,  are  more 
easily  cleaned  and  operated 
and  are  more  sanitary  than 
other  machines.  They  do 
anything  that  other  slicers 
will  do  and  are  much  lesM 
expensive. 


Dominion  Slicers  are  made 
from  the  finest  materials  by 
skilled  Canadians.  They  are 
the  most  efficient  and  most 
reasonably  priced  slicer 
made,  and  are  guaranteed 
for    one    year. 


I  WRITE    FOR    ILLUSTRATED    BOOKLET  I 

I        Dominion  Slicer  Corporation 

I  110  Church  St.,  Toronto  | 

JiiiniriiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii? 


If  You  Can  Add 

just  one  single  quality  line  to  your 
stock  this  month  it  will  increase  your 
prestige  will  it  not  ? 

If  you  can  give  that  pernicity  cust- 
omer macaroni  that  she  will  really 
enjoy  it  will  help  your  standing  with 
her.      Now  won't  it.? 


S^ll 


^^mm 


The    Columbia     Macaroni 
Co.,  Ltd. 

Lethbridge,  Alberta 


14 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


§\\*irnH's 


JELLY  POWDERS 


A  SUMMERTIME  DAINTY 

Your  customers  will  appreciate  your  suggesting 
Shirriff's  Jelly  Powder  as  a  hot-weather  delicacy.  De- 
liciously  cool  and  refreshing,  in  a  wide  selection  of  true- 
fruit  flavors,  Shirriff's  Jellies  become  a  regular  dessert- 
treat  in  any  home  where  they  have  once  been  used.  Here 
is  an  opportunity  to  build  up  a  profitable  summer's  busi- 
ness in  Shirriff's  Jelly  Powders. 


Made  by  the  makers  of 
Shirriff's  Extracts  and  Orange 
Marmalade. 

IMPERIAL     EXTRACT 
COMPANY 

Toronto,  Canada 

Sole      Selling      Agents 

Harold  F.  Ritchie  &  Co. 
Limited 

Toronto  -  Montreal 


^TQonderfulQonic 
I  anO^looftporiripn 


A  Big  Seller  with  the  Grooery  Trade 
SANATAS    TONIC 


A  body  builder  and  a  wonderful  blood  purifier. 
SANATAS  TONIC  will  be  in  gi-eat  demand  by  Ho.«pitals  and 
Invalids. 

Every  bottle  guaranteed  by  Expert  Chemists.    , 
Buy  Sanatas  Tonic — the  profits  are  big. 
Packed  1  dozen  bottles  to  the  case,  2  sizes,  16  or  32  oz. 
Watch  for  our  travellers  or  order  direct. 

SANATOR  LIMITED 

20  Jacques  Cartier  Square 
Montreal 


Western  Agents 

Richardson  Green  Ltd. 
170  Market  St.,  Winnipeg 


Quebec   Agents 
Hudson  &   Orsali 
St.  Paul  St.,  Montreal 


Ontario  Agents 

McGillivray  Bros. 
123  Bay  St.,  Tofonto 


Agents  required  for  Maritime   Provinc€s  and  P.  E.  Island 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


15 


Every  Bottle  of 


Represents  Quality 

All  that  quality,  purity,  skill  and 
absolutely  sanitary  conditions  of  man- 
ufacture can  contribute  to  refreshing 
beverages,  is  found  in  every  bottle  of 
O'Keefe's. 

There  is  a  constant  demand  for 
O'Keefe's  Imperial  Brews 

Ale— Lager— Stout 
O'Keefe's   Soft   Drinks 

O'Keefe's  Ginger  Ale— Cola 
Special  Pale  Dry  Ginger  Ale, 
Sarsaparilla — Lemonade. 


O'KEEFE'S,  TORONTO 

PHONE-MAIN  4202 


16 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


ROYAL 


ACADIA 
SUGAR 


What  Brand  of  Sugar  Do] You  Recommend? 

The  grocers'  recommendation  is  usually  the  deciding  factor 
in  sugar  sales. 

Sugar  as  a  rule  is  not  asked  for  by  name.  But  the  dealer  is 
always  justified  in  recommending  ROYAL  ACADIA — the 
sugar  that's  always  good. 

Every  Grain  Pure  Cane.  When  she  asks  for  sugar  give  her 
Royal  Acadia  brand. 

Acadia  Sugar  Refining  Co.,  Ltd. 

Montreal,  Que.  ...  Halifax,  N.S. 


HjllllinilMIIIIIMIMIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIillllll IIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIItnillllllllllllMllim 

I  SAMUEL  DOBREE  | 

I  &  SONS  I 

I  LONDON,  ENGLAND  | 

I  Established  1  7th  Century  i 

I  Growers  and  Producers  of  | 

I  SUGAR        MOLASSES  | 

I  COCOA  I 

I  IMPORTERS  AND  EXPORTERS  | 

I  Branches    in   all   parts   of   the   civilized   world  | 

I  •   Canadian     Branch  | 

I  UPPER  WATER  STREET  | 

I  HALIFAX,  N.S.  I 


Cane's  Pencils,  extensively  advertised, 
are  as  good  as  represented  to  be  both 
as  pencils  and  as  profitable  sellers.  The 
counter  or  window  display  box  illus- 
trated here  is  in  colors  and  particularly 
adapted  for  attractive  advertising  pur- 
poses. 

Every  Wholesale  Grocer  in  Canada 
stocks  these  standard  lines.  Order  < 

through  Your  Wholesaler. 

Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Co.,  Ltd, 

Newmarket,  Ontario 


ifillllllliiniiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiillliililiiiiiiiii iiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilililJiiiiiiiiii.-        1^ 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


17 


TRUE  ECONOMY 

People  are  getting  back^to  more  econonnical  ways.  When  you  hear  a  customer  ask 
for  something   "cheaper"  it  is  sometimes  a  good   answer   to  show^   something  a 
little  better.  True  economy  and  mere  *'cheapness"  are  not  the  same. 

Red  Rose  Tea  is  economical  because  of  its  extra  strength  and  quality.  It  makes 
more  tea. 


T.  H.  ESTABROOKS  CO.,  LIMITED 

St.  John,         Montreal,         Toronto,         Winnipeg,  Calgary,  Edmonton 


B.  &  S.  H.  THOMPSON  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

Head    MONTREAL    Office 


Agents  for  Canada  for  the  HOMCO  Products,  including 
Hard  and  Soft  Soaps,  Soap  Chips,  Salad  Oils, 
Compound  Lard,  Castor  Oils,  Sanctuary  Oil,  etc. 


ENQUIRIES  INVITED 


TEA   LEAD 

{Bett  Incorrodible) 

Buy  ♦♦PRIDE  OF  THE  ISLAND"  Brand 

as  extensively  used  for  years  past  by  most 
of  the  leading  packers  of  Tea  in   Canada. 

Island  Lead  Mills,  Ltd. 


Tel.  Address:   "Laminated,"  London. 
A..B.C.  Codes  used,  4th  &  5th  Editions. 


Canadian   Agents: 


LIMEHOUSE, 
LONDON,  E., 

England 

J.  HUNTER  WHITE.  ST.  JOHN,   N  B 
CECIL  T.   GORDON.  MONTREAL. 
HUGH   LAMBE  &   CO..   TORONTO. 


A     Phenomenal     Cleaner 
and  a  Remarkable   Seller 


Order  from  >-our  wholesa  er 


CHARM 

fills   a 

Long-felt 

need 


This  wonderful  new 
cleaner  is  proving  an 
unusually  rapid  .sell, 
er.  .Sales  everywhere 
"idicate  that  house- 
wives  are  quickly 
finding  out  that 
cliarm  fills  a  long- 
felt    need. 

Charm  Cleans  Every- 
thing, saves  soap, 
cuts  grease,  softens 
water  and  will  not 
injure  fabrics  or  the 
skin.  Cuts  grease 
hut  does  not  combine 
with  it — a  new  prin- 
ciple in  cleaning.  A 
little  goes  a  long 
ways.  Key  up  with 
champ  advertising  by 
keeping  Charm  well 
displayed. 


Gait  Chemical  Products  Limited 

Gait,  Ontario. 


18 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


Crue  ^lue 


^True  ^lue  Means  Reliable 

KEEN'S  OXFORD  BLUE— Is  That  In 
Every  Sense  Of  The  Word. 

The  Summer  Season  Brhigs  A  Big  De- 
mand For  Blueing. 

Feature -KEEN'S  OXFORD  BLUE- 
And  Make  The  [Best  Of  The  Op- 
portunity. 

It  Justifies  The  Reputation  Of  BeingI 


Magor,  Son  &i,Co.,  Limited 


191  St.  Paul  Street,  W. 

MONTREAL 


23  Scott  Street 

TORONTO 


A   Counter    Display    Stand   like   this 
will  make  your  sales  even  more  easy. 

We  will  gladly  send  you  one  of  these. 


SUPERLATIVE     QUALITY 

The  infallible  proof  that  this  is  the  GREEN  TEA  that  suits  the  public   taste 
is  in  the  figures  of  sales: 

Toronto  Branch,  (Ontario  and  N.  W.),  INCREASED  88% 
Montreal  Branch,  (Quebec  and  Maritime),  INCREASED  75% 

This  is  comparing  the  first  6  months  of  this   year   with     the    corresponding 
period  of  last  year. 

There  is  nothing  like  the  OuaUty  and  Flavor  we  are  giving  in   SALADA  GREEN 
TEA  on  the  market  at  any  price. 

—  Same  Prices  as  for  Salada  Black   Teas  — 


Canadian  Grocer 


VOL.  XXXV. 


TORONTO,  JULY  29,  192L 


No.  30. 


Dealers  Won't  Pay  Honey  Producers"  Price 

Honey  Producers'  and  Wholesalers'  Views  Differ  as  to  the  Cor- 
rect Price  This  Season — Producers  Asking  High  Prices — Stocks 
of  Last  Season's  Crop  Not  Yet  Cleaned  Up — Crop  Estimate  a 

Good  One. 


TORONTO  July  25.  (Special) — A  good  deal  of 
uncertainty  surrounds  the  honey  market  and 
bids  fair  to  display  as  much  difference  as  last 
year,  between  dealers,  Beekeepers'  Association 
and  honey  producers  in  general.  The  price  asked 
by  the  producers  is  around  18  cents  per  pound,  but 
dealers  have  an  entirely  different  idea  as  to  what 
the  price  should  be.  Dealers  are  offering  11  cents 
to  12  cents  per  pound  and  declare  they  will  not  pay 
any  higher.  They  point  to  the  uncertainty  pre- 
vailing in  business  conditions  and  claim  it  is  un- 
wise to  lay  in  any  stock  unless  the  price  is  a  safe 
one.  They  also  point  to  the  fact  that  the  sugar 
market  is  much  lower,  w-hich  also  tends  to  lower 
the  price  of  honey. 

Producers'  Price  Too  High 

"The  price  honey  producers  are  asking  for  this 
year's  crop  of  honey  is  beyond  all  reason"  stated 
one  dealer  to  Canadian  Grocer.  "They  want  18 
cents  per  pound,  country  points,  which  means  to 
the  consumer  around  25  cents.  People  will  not 
pay  any  such  price.  They  will  go  without.  Then 
everything  else  is  coming  down.  Sugar  is  less  than 
half  the  price  it  was.  Farm  products  are  away 
down,  and  honey  producers  will  also  have  to  take 
a  lower  price.  About  11  or  12  cents  would  be 
more  in  line  with  the  correct  price." 

Considerable    Carryover 

Another  factor  entering  the  situation,  is  the  fact 
that  there  are  still  considerable  stocks  of  last  year's 
honey  yet  to  be  sold.  Some  dealers  have  quite  a 
size  stock  upon  which,  no  doubt,  they  will  be  com- 
pelled to  take  a  loss.  Some  producers  have  also 
some  of  last  year's  crop  yet  to  dispose  of,  and  it  is 
estimated  that  the  carry  over  will  run  ten  to  fifteen 
per  cent. 

"The  fact  that  there  is  quite  a  stock  of  last  year's 
honey  still  on  hand,  just  proves  that  people  will  not 
buy  when  the  price  gets  beyond  a  certain  point." 
stated  another  dealer.  "If  the  price  had  not  been 
so  high  last  year,  there  would  have  been  no  carry- 
over, and  no  doubt,  honey  producers  might  have 
secured  a  little  better  price  this  year.  But  as  the 
situation  now  stands,  producers'  ideas  of  prices  and 
ours  are  altogether  different.  We  won't  pay  the 
price  they  want,  in  fact  we  would  sooner  not  handle 
honey  at  their  price". 

Imported  Honey  A  Feature  Last  Year. 

Last  year  one  of  the  features  of  the  market  was 


the  importation  of  a  considerable  quantity  from 
New  Zealand.  This  honey  was  laid  down  at  around 
23  cents  per  pound  when  Ontario  producers  were 
asking  as  high  as  28  cents  per  pound.  Later  in  the 
season  Ontario  prices  were  also  reduced,  and  around 
the  first  of  the  year,  dealers  state  they  were  able 
to  pick  up  honey  around  18  cents  per  pound,  coun- 
try points,  the  same  price  that  honey  producers  are 
asking  for  this  season's  crop.  While  dealers  have 
not  as  yet  received  offers  of  honey  from  outside 
quarters,  they  firmly  maintain  they  will  not  pay 
anywhere  near  the  price  that  producers  are  asking 
at  present. 

On  the  other  hand,  producers  claim  that  the  cost 
of  containers  has  not  come  down,  in  fact  they  point 
out  that  the  cost  of  containers  increases  the  price 
of  honey  just  3V2  cents  per  pound.  The  open  win- 
ter, much  to  the  surprise  of  many  people,  was  a 
detriment  to  the  wintering  of  the  bees  and  many 
colonies  were  lost.  This  past  summer,  being  dry 
and  hot,  they  claim,  has  also  been  a  detriment  to 
the  bees. 

Crop  Outturn  Not  Definite. 

In  regard  to  the  volume 
of  this  year's  crop,  noth- 
ing can  be  learned  with 
definiteness,  until  after 
the  meeting  of  the  Bee- 
keepers' Association.  It 
is  generally  considered, 
however,  that  the  crop  is 
a  good  one  and  it  appears 
probable  that  prices  will 
be  lower  than  those  of  last 
year.  Undoubtedly  the 
course  of  the  market  will 
be  watched  very  carefully, 
the  next  few  weeks,  by  all 
interested  in  the  merchan- 
dising of  this  commodity. 


20 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


Putting  the  Human  Interest 

Touch   in  Advertising 

Robert  Kirby,  Sarnia,  Ont.,  Embodies  Canadian  Grocer  Market 
Reports  in   His   Advertising   With    Telling   Effect— Believes  it 
Good  Plan  to  Keep  Customers  Advised  on  Market  Conditions- 
Specials  Arranged  Each  Week  but  Always  at  a  Profit. 


Advertising  is  the  education  of  the 
public,  as  to  who  you  are,  where  yon  are 
and  what  you  have  to  offer  in  the  way  of 
skill,  talent,  or  commodity.  The  only  ma^n 
who  should  not  advertise  is  the  man  who 
has  nothing  to  offer  the  world  m  the  way 
of  commodity  or  service,  —tlbert  Jtuo- 
bard. 

WHETHER  a  merchant's  store  is 
situated  in  the  heart  of  the  bus- 
iness section  or  off  to  one  side  of 
the  city,  the  judicial  use  of  advertising 
space  in  the  daily  newspaper  is  sure  to 
result  in  increased  sales.  If  the  adver- 
tisement contains  some  live  news  story 
that  will  hold  the  readers'  attention  and 
interest  and  cause  them  to  turn  over  the 
naees  when  the  next  copy  of  the  paper 
reaches  their  hands,  seeking  the  mer- 
chant's advertisement,  creating  a  desire  in 
the  reader's  mind  to  possess  some  of  the 
articles  mentioned  in  the  store's  an- 
nouncement, then  the  time  and  money 
spent  is  indeed  a  profitable  investment. 

Some  merchants  look  upon  advertising 
in  this  light,  but  some  consider  that  when 
they  buy  advertising  space,  it  is  just  a 
certain  amount  of  space,  to  fill  up  with 
any  announcement,  with  no  definite 
object  in  view.  The  latter  was  not  the 
view  of  Robert  Kirby,  Sarnia,  Ont.,  when 
he  hit  upon  the  idea  of  embodying  the 
market  reports  from  the  pages  of  Can- 
adian Grocer  in  his  daily  store  news  to 
the  public. 

People  interested  In  Prices 

"Next  to  the  actual  price  of  an  article, 
I  don't  know  of  anything  that  the  people 
are  more  interested  in  than  the  prospect 
of  prices,  whether  they  will  be  higher  or 
lower,  or  whether  articles  are  scarce  or 
plentiful,"  stated  Mr.  Kirby  to  a  repre- 
sentative  of   Canadian  Grocer. 

Mr.  Kirby's  plan  is  to  make  report  of 
some  article  or  articles  that  are  most 
seasonable,  and  use  it  word  for  word  in 
his  advertisement  as  it  appeared  on  the 
pages  of  his  trade  paper.  During  the 
summer  season  he  follows  the  fruit  mar- 
ket, mentioning  the  condition  of  the  var- 
ious crops,  when  certain  varieties  will 
arrive,  if  they  are  plentiful  or  scarce. 
Each  season  is  followed  up  in  a  like  man- 
ner, sugar,  canned  goods,  cereals  etc. 
Each  line  of  commodities  is  used  and  the 
market  gossip  published  'in  Canadian 
Grocer  each  week  is  used  in  the  store's 
advertisement.  This  acts  as  a  strong 
feature  in  building  up  more  confidence 
and  a  larger  list  of  steady  customers. 
Source     Of  Information 

"The  market  pages  of  Canadian  Grocer 


have  always  been  a  source  of  valuable 
information  to  me,"  continued  Mr.  Kirby 
"Not  only  a  benefit  to  me  in  the  buying 
end,  but  valuable  information  to  my  cus- 
tomers, which,  when  imparted  to  them  in 
a  proper  method,  comes  back  to  me  in 
increased  sales.  I  just  as  ireely  use  the 
reports  that  state  a  certain  article  is 
likely  to  decline  as  I  do  the  ones  that  show 
the  market  is  advancing.  If  an  article  is 
likely  to  be  lower  in  price,  then  I  think 
it  good  policy  to  tell  the  customers  that 
fact,  advising  them  to  buy  just  what  they 
need.  On  the  other  hand  if  an  article 
is  going  up,  then  I  advise  them  that  it  is 
good  buying.  In  this  way  I  have 
cemented  a  friendship  and  confidence 
with  the  trade  that  is  steadily  growing. 
An  advertisement  to  bring  the  best  re- 
sults should  contain  something  of  interest 
and   above   all    else    be    truthful.     If   an 


article  is  not  up  to  the  standard,  why  say 
so  and  more  business  will  materialize 
than  if  the  defects  are  covered  up  in 
flowery  terms." 

Mr.  Kirby  further  stated  that  even 
the  newspapers  were  commencing  to  look 
to  him  for  market  reports.  They  had 
got  the  habit  of  calling  him  on  the  phone 
for  information  on  market  subjects. 
Where   Salesmanship   Counts 

Mr.  Kirby  is  likewise  a  strong  believer 
in  window  displays.  The  windows  are 
changed  each  week  and  sometimes  twice  a 
week  as  the  season  and  occasion  requires. 
It  is  his  idea  to  have  a  special  each  week. 
These  specials  are  picked  up  from  time  to 
time  from  wholesalers  and  manufacturers 
who  are  willing  to  sacrifice  the  price  on 
lines  they  are  overstocked  with  in  order 

(Continued  on   page  38) 


Kihbys  Grocery 

Savings  on  Saturday 


Old  .Mill  Soap— 
3  bars  for 

,25c 

Glycerine  Soap — 
(5  bars  for  .  , 

25c 

Pork  and  Beans — 
(J  tins  for    .  .  . 

$1.00 

I'Lii'c  Lard— 
.{ lb.  Pail 


..95c 


Molasses  Snaps —  s 

2  lbs.  for 45c    S 


Cream  of  Peas  —  = 

.50  Bowls  for 25c  S 

Classic  Cleanser —  M 

3  tins  fqr-  ...    25c  M 

Queen  Flour —  = 

24  lbs.  for $1.81  i' 


^  Market  Reports. — Strawberries  nearly  done.  Early  Cherries  will 

M  be  on  next  week.    The  fruit  situation  in  this  district  never  was 

=  belter.    Crops  are  good  and  everything  has   been    most   favor- 

^  able  up  to  date. 

1  2— PHONES— 2  VAN  SUPPLIES  2— PHONES— 2 


=  54 


M.^RKET  REPORTS— Cherries  —  .Momrnorency,  the 
best  canncr.  now  on.  Richmond  fimshed.  _  Raspberries,  ciir- 
raots.  anJ  gooselicrries.  picking  delayed  by  heavy  rains.  We 
can  attend  to  all  your  orders  for  fruit. 

Kirby's  Grocery 

2      PT.  EDWARD  DELIVERY    2— Phones— 2 


Some  of  Robert  Kirby's,  Sarnia,  Ont.,  advertisements,  showing  how  he  embod- 
ies Canadian  Grocer  Market  reports  in  the  copy. 


July  29,  1021. 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


21 


Mutual  Fire  Insurance  for  Merchants 

Operation  of  Insurance  on  Mutual  Basis — Pay  Dividends  of  30 
to     35     Per     Cent. — Tariff     Rates     Collected — Advantage     of 

Inspection  Feature 

Address  by  Norman  S.  Jones,  Manager  Northwest  Mutual  Fire  Ass'n,  Before  a  Recent  Convention  of  Ontario  Retailers. 


I      WISH   to   express   my  appreciation   of 
having   the    opportunity    to    speak   to 
you  on  the  subject  of  insurance,  and 
to   thank    you    for   having   a   part    in 
your    convention    program. 

You  are  an  interesting  body  of  men  to 
any  insurance  man,  because,  as  retail  mer- 
chants, you  represent  the  largest  class  of 
business  men  in  any  community;  and,  with- 
out you,  no  real  community  could  exist. 
But,  you  are  especially  interesting  because 
you  represent  a  class  of  risk  which  has, 
in  this  Canada  of  ours,  been  contributing 
about  50  per  cent,  of  the  premiums  paid 
for  fire  insurance  protection,  and,  yet,  have 
been  producing  only  about  15  per  cent,  of 
the  losses. 

It  is  not  any  wonder  that  you  reached 
the  conclusion  many  years  ago  that,  as  a 
class,  you  were  paying  too  much  for  your 
insurance  and  that  the  subject  has,  in 
consequence,  been  a  lively  one  at  your 
conventions. 

Referring  to  the  program,  I  see  that  your 
secretary  has  indicated  the  subject  of  what 
I  am  to  say  to  you  as,  "Mutual  insurance 
as  carried  by  Retail  Associations,"  from 
which  I  take  it  that  I  am  expected  to  tell 
you  something  of  the  arrangement  which 
the  Northwestern  Mutual  Fire  Association 
has  made  with  the  various  Provincial 
Boards  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Associa- 
tion of  Canada,  Inc. 

I  come  now  to  the  definite  proposition, 
which,  as  manager  for  Canada,  of  the  North- 
western Mutual  Fire  Association,  I  have 
had  the  pleasure  of  concluding  with  the 
various  Provincial  Boards  of  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Association  of  Oanada,  Inc., 
from  coast  to  coast.  I  am  presuming  that 
while  you  are  the  members  of  your  own 
Ontario  Merchants'  Association,  the  great 
majority  are  also  members  of  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Association  of  Canada,  and,  as 
such,  you  will  have  been  aware  that  the 
matter  of  an  insurance  service  has  been  a 
very  prominent  topic  for,  at  least,  the  last 
ten  years,  in  the  councils  of  that  organi- 
zation. 

Insurance   on    Mutual    Basis 

The  basis  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Asso- 
ciation is  co-operation,  which  means  mu- 
tality  of  interest,  and  therefore,  the  logical 
insurance  for  the  Association  to  adopt  was 
one   modelled  on   Mutual   lines. 

The  agreement  provides  that  the  North- 
western Mutual  Fire  Association  shall  op- 
erate a  special  Retail  Department,  which 
is  known  and  registered  as  "The  Retail 
Merchants'  Underwriters  Agency."  No 
policy  will  be  issued  to  other  than  bona 
fide  members  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  As- 
sociation of  Canada,  but  policies  will  be 
available  to  only  such  members  that  have 
risks  that  measure  up  to  the  Northwestern 
Mutual   standard. 

In  discussing  the  matter  of  an  insurance 
service  with  the  officials  of  the  various 
Provincial  Board  Executives,  and  at  some 
of  the  conventions,  it  was  recognized  that 
no  plan  for  insurance  service  could  be 
considered  that  did  not  measure  up  to  the 
dignity  that  the  Retail  Merchants'  Asso- 
ciation had  itself  obtained.  The  first 
requisite  was  one  of  unquestionable  finan- 
cial responsibility.  The  second  was  un- 
derwriting or  line  capacity.  Any  service, 
that  did  not  include  these  two  important 
features  would  not  provide  the  service  re- 
quired nor  be  worthy  of  the  Association. 
Neither  of  these  two  features  are  obtain- 
able with  a  new  or  comparatively  young 
organization. 


It  is  necessary  that  the  Retail  Mer- 
chants' Association  insurance  service  shall 
have  the  ability  to  write  large  amounts. 
The  Northwestern  re-insured  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Com- 
pany, of  Saskatoon,  on  December  1st  last. 
The  main  reason  for  the  local  company 
concluding  such  an  arrangement  was  that 
they  had  found  that  as  they  could  safely 
write  a  policy  for  only  $2,000,  the  service 
was  too  small  to  interest  a  very  large  num- 
ber of  the  merchants.  It  was  therefore,  re- 
alized that  any  insurance  service  that 
would  be  of  real  value  to  the  Association 
membership  must  have  an  underwriting 
capacity   equal    to   the   largest   average   pro- 


NORMAN  S.  JONES 

Manager  Northwest  Mutual  Fire  Asso- 
ciation 


tection  required  by  an  individual  mer- 
chant. The  Retail  Merchants'  Underwrit- 
ers Agency  has  a  capacity  of  approximate- 
ly, $100,000,  subject  to  one  fire  area,  of 
which  85  per  cent,  will  be  re-insured  in 
other  Mutual  Companies,  who  contribute 
the  same  rate  of  dividend  and,  at  the  same 
time,  add  their  combined  assets  to  the  re- 
serve fund  of  the  Northwestern. 

The  Northwestern  Mutual  has  made  full 
government  deposit  at  Ottawa,  and  holds  a 
Dominion  license.  The  company  is  also 
registered  with  every  Provincial  Insurance 
Department. 

No  Mutual  Company   Has  Failed 

The  company  was  organized  19  years  ago, 
and  is  now  in  its  20th  year.  It  has  been 
very  successful,  right  from  the  start,  and 
is  now  the  largest  mutual  organization  in 
the  United  States.  The  financial  statement 
of  December  31st  last  showed  that  the 
company  had  a  reserve  fund  of  practically 
a  million  and  three-quarters,  more  than 
nine  times  the  amount,  having  which  no 
Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company  has  ever 
been   shown    to   fail. 

In  addition  to  building  up  such  a 
splendidly  strong  reserve,  the  company  has 


returned  to  its  policy-holders  in  dividends, 
over  SM  millions,  which,  in  a  stock  com- 
pany organization,  would  have  gone  to  the 
shareholders.  Mutual  insurance  in  Can- 
ada has  always  been  identified  with  the 
premium  note,  assessment,  or  contingent 
liability  of  some  kind,  and  most,  if  not 
all.  Mutual  Insurance  Organizations  in  the 
United  States,  except  the  Northwestern, 
operate  on  an  assessment  contract.  Some 
years  ago  the  Northwestern  reached  the 
point  where  its  reserve  was  sufficiently 
adequate  to  enable  the  company  to  issue 
its  policies  on  a  cash,  non-assessable  basis. 
As  a  result,  for  the  first  time,  in  the  history 
of  Canadian  insurance,  a  policy  is  offered 
which  is  on  an  absolutely  cash  basis — non- 
assessable, and,  yet,  participating  in  the 
profits  of  the  organization. 

When  it  is  understood  that  the  partici- 
pating feature  has  never  meant  less  than 
a  dividend  of  25  per  cent,  on  any  class  and 
that  the  average,  for  the  last  ten  years  is 
over  30  per  cent.,  some  idea  of  the  attrac- 
tiveness of  such  a  contract  may  be 
gathered. 

Dividend  of  35  Per  Cent. 
When  the  arrangement  with  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Association  of  Canada  was 
made,  it  was  intimated  that  a  dividend,  on 
the  retail  class,  of  30  per  cent.,  might  be 
expected  and  we  have  been  proceeding  on 
that  basis.  Last  week  I  received  a  tele- 
gram from  head  office  at  Seattle,  advising 
that  the  dividend,  on  the  retail  class  for 
this  year  had  been  struck  at  35  per  cent. 
It  is  also  important  for  you  to  know  that 
the  dividend  rates  have  never  been  changed 
except   to   be    increased. 

Some  of  you  may  wonder  how  such  a 
wonderful  dividend  can  be  paid.  I'll  tell 
you.  The  total  net  premium  income  of  the 
company  for  1920  was,  approximately,  $2,- 
149,000.  The  losses  amounted  to  only 
$538,000 — practically  25  per  cent,  as  against 
the  experience  of  the  average  company  of 
55  per  cent. — there's  30  per  cent,  of  a  dif- 
ference there.  As  a  matter  of  fact  the 
Northwestern  figures  show  that  only  60c 
of  each  dollar,  collected  for  premiums,  is 
used  in  the  payment  of  losses  and  expenses. 
Thus,  an  average  margin  of  40c  has  been 
the  record,  as  against  the  margin  of  5  and 
10c  of  the  average  company;  and,  remember, 
this  is  not  only  the  record  of  last  year, 
but  it  is  the  record  of  the  company  for  the 
past  20  years,  and,  surely,  20  years  is  long 
enough  to  establish  a  record  that  can  be 
relied   upon. 

The  Canadian  management  is  absolutely 
in  the  hands  of  Canadians.  All  Canadian 
premiums  will  remain  in  Canada.  All  loss- 
es are  passed  by  and  paid  from  the  Can- 
adian head  office.  No  loss  claims  are 
submitted  to  Seattle. 

I  am  well  aware  that  some  of  our  com- 
petitors are  endeavoring  to  make  capital 
for  themselves  by  "waving  the  flag"  and 
lamenting  that  the  Retail  Merchants'  As- 
sociation of  Canada  should  affiliate  with 
an  American  institution.  It  is  not  to  be 
supposed,  for  a  minute,  that  that  phase  of 
the  proposition  was  not  fully  considered. 
It  was  recognized  that  a  Mutual  organiza- 
tion, that  would  be  of  any  value  to  the  As- 
sociation membership,  could  not  be  created 
for  many  years  to  come.  The  experience  of 
the  local  company  at  Saskatoon  was  good 
evidence  of  that  fact.  As  already  explain- 
ed, everything  about  the  organization  in 
Canada  is  Canadian,  and,  therefore,  the 
only  feature  of  the  proposition  that  is 
American  is  the  guarantee  fund. 


22 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


Vancouver  Grocers  Enjoy  Picnic 

Annual  Event  is  Held  at  Bowen  Island  With  Twelve  Hundred 
People  in  Attendance— Sports  Are  Keenly  Contested  and  Many 

Win  Prizes. 

By  ROY  A.  HUNTER,  Resident  Correspondent 


Bowen  Island,  Vancouver,  B.  C, 

VANCOUVER  July  23  (Special)  The 
fourteenth  annual  picnic  of  the  Vancou- 
ver Grocers  was  held  a  few  days  ago  and 
was  without  doubt  the  finest  the.v  have 
ever  had.  Twelve  hundred  men,  women, 
and  children  disported  themselves  at 
Bowen  Island  as  the  guests  of  the  Gro- 
cers' section  of  the  Retail  Merchants' 
Association.  Three  steamers  were 
chartered  by  the  merchants  and  they 
were  all  required.  The  day  broke  fair 
and  from  8.30  until  the  ropes  were  cast 
off,  streams  of  picknickers  gathered  on 
the'  Union  wharf  from  all  parts  of  the 
city,  all  went  on  a  day  of  real  pleasure. 

After  ninety  minutes  sail  the  boats  ar- 
rived at  the  picnic  grounds,  where  many 
boilers  were  already  boiling  and  from 
then  until  noon  the  serious  business  of 
eating  kept  all  hands  busy.  Tea  and 
coffee,  milk  and  sugar,  ices  and  pop, 
-were  dispensed  to  the  hundreds  of  lun- 
cheon parties  seated  at  the  long  tables. 
Sports  Keenly  Contested 

The  sports  were  keenly  conte^taJ  and 
the  announcers  and  starters  made  it 
"snappy"  under  the  direction  of  Jack 
Merillees.  James  Harkness  was  chief 
picnic  officer,  and  the  popular  president 
-was  never  more  popular.  He  was  highly 
complimented  on  the  smoothness  with 
which  his  excellent  committees  managed 
their  several  tasks.  The  sun  was  hot, 
the  breeze  was  cool,  and  the  many  wlio 
brought  their  swimming  togs  claimed 
that  the  salt  water  of  the  "Sound"  was 
delightfully  warm.  The  butchers"pulled" 
the  grocers.  The  married  men  "pulled" 
the  single  men,  at  least  they  must  have, 
for  they  all  got  prizes. 

Dancing  in  the  Evening 

The  homeward  bound  boats  left  at  7 
o'clock^. 7.30  and  ^0.30  and  a  few  tire- 
leKs  fm6s  remained  ,to  enjoy  the  dancing. 
The  "pace  ho^i^fi^^r  had  been  so  fast  and 
furious  for 'the' kiddies  all  day  that  by 


showing  part  of  the     crowd   tlmt   accompanied   the   Retail   Grocers   on   their 
annual  picnic. 

far   the   larger   part   of  the    passengers 
returned  on  the  early  boats. 

It  was  a  good  picnic.  All  the  officers 
and  chairman,  and  all  the  important 
chaps  missed  the  last  boat  in  the  morn- 
ing   through    a    mis-understanding,    and 


the  boat  had  to  go  back  to  the  wharf  for 
them.  That  is  quite  the  traditional  way 
to  start  a  good  picnic.  Then  all  the 
kiddies  shrieked  madly  every  time  the 
whistles  blew,  which  is  quite  as  it  should 
be.     In  fact — it  was  a  great  picnic. 


Never  Store  Honey  in  the  Refrigerator 


LIQUID  or  extracted  honey  should 
never  be  allowed  to  remain  for  a 
length  of  time  in  the  cellar  or  re- 
frigator,  as  there  it  is  likely  to  absorb 
moisture  and  become  thin,  and,  in  time, 
sour.  With  comb  honey  the  case  is  even 
worse,  for  the  appearance  as  well  as  the 
quality  is  likely  to  become  damaged. 
Put  honey  where  it  will  be  dry  and 
warm  and  even  hot  will  not  hurt  it  any. 
Under  proper  conditions  honey  will  keep 
for  months  and  some  has  been  known  to 
keep  in  oerfect  condition  after  four  years 
had  elapsed. 

Occasionally  honey  will  be  found  to  be 
slightly  or  almost  entirely  granulated 
Or  "gone  to  sugar".  The  crystals  are  not 
a  mark  of  adulteration— far  from  it. 
Only  the  purest  honeys  will  solidify. 
The  presence  of  crystals  shows  simply 
that  under  conditions  of  cold  or  of  chang- 
ing temperature,  granules  of  sugar  have 
been  formed,  in  no  way  injuring  the  in- 
trinsic quality  or  wholesomeness  of  the 
honey. 

If  honay  has  gi-anulated  or  candied, 
place  the  can  containing  it  in  a  larger 
vessel  holding  hot  water,  place  on  the 
stove,  but  be  careful  not  to  allow  the 
water  to  become  too  hot,  that  is  boiling, 
as  that  tends  to  darken  the  honey.  Re- 
member th,a.1;,  honey  contains  the  most 
delicate  of  all  flavors,  the  perfume  of 
the  fl'o-wers  ft'om  which  it  is  taken.  This 
flavor   is''  io   e'asily   injured   that,   when 


a  can  of  honey  is  placed  in  water,  it  is 
better  to  support  it  with  a  block  of  wood 
half  an  inch  or  so  off  the  bottom  of 
the  vessel  containing  the  water.  The 
honey  should  not  come  too  close  to  the 
heat  from  the  stove  beneath. 


MONTREAL  GROCERS 


HOLD  PICNIC 


Montreal — The  grocers  and  clerks  held 
a  picnic  on  Sunday  July  24  to  Isle  Gros- 
Bois.  The  occasion  was  significant  since 
it  marks  an  effort  on  the  part  of  the  gro- 
cers and  their  clerks  to  come  closer  to- 
gether with  a  better  understanding?  even 
apart  from  business.  In  Montreal  each 
have  their  organization  which  is  united 
under  the  Grocer's  branch  of  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Association.  This  is  the  first 
picnic  of  its  kind  that  has  been  held. 

M.A.  Sarrazin  is  president  of  the  Re- 
tail Grocers'  Association,  M.J.E.  Poirer 
vice-president,  and  M.U.  Sansregret,  sec- 
retary. Of  the  Grocery  Clerks'  Union, 
A.  Fonlaine  is  president,  M.  F.  Lamere, 
vice-president,  and  M.E.  Boucher,  secret- 
ary. 


Instead  of  bemoaning  the  fact  that 
you  have  certain  bad  business  habits, 
why  not  determine  to  overcome  those 
habits?  No  habit  should  be  stronger 
than  you  i)'  you  are  a  man. 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


23 


Hamilton  Grocers  Make  Merry 

Annual  Picnic  of  Hamilton  Retail  Grocers  Proves 

Biggest  of  the  Season — Big  Program  of  Sports — 

Baby  Show  a  Feature — Travellers  Win 

Baseball  Match. 


Hamilton  July  20  (Special)— The  most 
successful  picnic  of  the  season  was  the 
Retail  Grocers  annual  picnic  held  to  day 
at  Wabasso  Park.  The  weather  was 
ideal  and  the  result  was  that  nearly 
10,000  people  attended  the  picnic.  The 
steamers  were  kept  busy  plying  back 
and  forth  transporting  the  men-y  pic- 
nicners  and  although  many  left  the  park 
between  five  and  six  o'clock,  the  crowd 
kept  surging  over  at  each  return  of  the 
boat.  Dancing  in  the  pavilion  continued 
throughout  the  afternoon  and  evening, 
and  dancing  was  one  of  the  most  pop- 
ular items  on  the  programme,  which  was 
a  lengthy  one  providing  sports  and  ath- 
letic evenLs  for  all. 

Baby   Show  A   Feature 

The  baby  show  was  one  of  the  fea- 
tures on  the  programme  and  there  was 
no  lack  cf  entrants.  Over  135  proud 
mothers  presented  gurgling  and  healthy 
looking  youngsters,  much  to  the  bewild- 
erment of  the  three  judges,  Dr.  McClen- 
ahan,  Mrs.  T.  Kelly  and  A.  A.  Adams. 
There  was  some  difficulty  in  selecting 
the  first  prize  but  the  final  outcome 
was  that  all  the  babies  carried  off  a 
prize. 

Travellers    Win    Baseball 

The  baseball  game  staged  between 
the  grocers  and  the  travellers  resulted 
in  the  former  losing  by  a  score  of  27 
to  18.  The  travellers  were  mighty  proud 
of  their  success  as  they  have  been  train- 
ing for  this  event  all  the  summer,  and 
well  may  they  have  been,  this  be- 
ing the  first  ball  game  they  have  been 
successful  in  winning,  having  always 
been  losers  at  previous  grocers 
picnics.  The  grocers  were  cap- 
tained by  Bob  Wilson  and  the  travellers 
by  A.  Platers. 

The  races  were  run  off  in  a  roped-off 


enclosure  which  was  surrounded  by  a 
crowd  of  interested  spectators.  There 
were  thirty-two  events  in  all  which  under 
the  able  management  of  the  sports  com- 
mittee composed  of,  Gus  Ante,  S.  Mit- 
chell, H.  Young,  Frank  Smith,  Fred 
White,  J.  Kenny,  Jas.  Dale  and  Wm. 
Lockhart,  were  run  off  in  about  four 
hours. 

The  third  Machine  Gun  Brigade  band 
accompanied  the  merry  makers  and 
rendered  martial  and  popular  airs  during 
the  afternoon. 

The  lost  and  found  booth  which  has 
become  an  institution  of  the  picnic  prov- 
ed its  value  on  more  than  one  occasion 
when  kiddies  were  lost. 


London  Grocers 

Hold  Picnic 


London  July  20.  (Special)  The  Re- 
tail Grocers  Association  held  their  an- 
nual picnic  at  Port  Stanley  today,  and 
as  usual,  proved  one  of  the  biggest  of  the 
season.  Over  10,000  people  attended  and 
thoroughly  enjoyed  the  long  list  of  games 
sporting  events  and  other  features  pro- 
vided by  the  energetic  committee,  and 
there  was  not  a  dull  moment  during  the 
entire  day. 

A  novelty  baseball  match  attracted 
much  interest,  while  a  remarkable  re- 
production of  the  Dempsey-Carpentier 
fight  was  in  itself  worth  the  journey  to 
the  Port. 

The  lovers  of  dancing  found  ample 
opportunity  to  gratify  their  desire,  while 
the  Port  board  walk  was  the  scene  of 
a  carnival  in  which  there  was  fun  for  all. 


Caterers  Hold 

Enjoyable  Picnic 


Winnipeg  Man.  (Special)  Fully  twelve 
thousand  caterers',  wholesale  and  retail, 
with  the  following  of  families,  relatives, 
and  friends  spent  Wednesday  at  Grand 
Beach,  it  being  the  35th  annual  caterers' 
picnic.  From  the  first  train  in  the  morn- 
ing, until  the  last  train  at  night,  crowds 
filled  every  car  of  the  11  trains  on  the 
Canadian  National  railway,  were  taken 
to  Grand  Beach,  and  there  witnessed  or 
took  part  in  the  games,  sports  and  dan- 
ces pi'ovided  in  the  programme  of  the 
day. 

During  the  games  in  the  afternoon,  a 
government  seaplane,  piloted  by  Major 
Basil  Hobbs,  D.S.C.,  flew  from  the  sta- 
tion at  Victoria  beach,  and  circled  over 
the  crowds,  dropping  papers  warning 
against  carelessness  in  leaving  camp 
fires.  So  anxious  were  some  of  the 
crowd  to  catch  the  leaflets  as  they  fell 
that  they  rushed  into  the  lake  before 
realizing  where  they  were  going.  The 
machine  circled  over  Grand  Beach  for 
more  than  half  an  hour,  swooping  over 
the  lake  and  beach,  taking  pictures  of 
the  crowds. 

The  athletic  competitions  began  at  1 
p.  m.,  a  large  programme  of  events 
starting  with  a  baby  boys'  race  and  end- 
ing with  a  baseball  game  between  the 
"Pork  and  Beans  athletes  and  the  Cherry 
Giants,"  the  first  team  winning. 


A  Tru3  I.  W.  W. 


Bicks — "Has  Jones  returned  to  his 
pre-war  woi-k  '' 

Hicks — "Yes.  he  is  looking  for  the 
same  job  he  was  looking  for  then." 


Are  you  getting  any  pleasure,  any 
recreation,  any  fun  out  of  life  further 
than  what  your  business  offers  If  not, 
why  not  get  your  nose  off  from  the 
grindstone  and  see  what  life  is  like? 


The  London  Retail  Grocers'  Picnic  at  Port  Stanley.  The  first  group  shotvs  the  committee  who  were  responsible  for  the 
success  of  the  outing.  Reading  from  left  to  right,  W.Carter,  H.  P.  Rosser,  Tom  Shaw,  Harry  RhMnahan,  Alf.  Thrower, 
Frank  Pearce,  Joseph  McLeod,  Aid.  Gordon  Drake  and  C.  F.    Lapthorne. 

The  second  group  shows  a  small  corner  of  the  big  audience,    ivatching  the  program  of  sports. 


24 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


Boosting  Tea,  Coffee 

and  Cocoa  Sales  During 

Hot  Days  of  Summer 

When  Business  is  Inclined  to  be   Quiet  Suggest 

Tea,  Coffee  or  Cocoa  Iced — Window  Displays 

Drive  Home  the  Point. 


DURING  the  hot  days  of  the  sum- 
mer the  merchant  puzzles  how  to 
increase  sales  when  there  is  a  ten- 
dency on  the  part  of  customers  to  lessen 
their  purchases  especially  on  lines  that 
come  under  the  heading  of  general  gro- 
cery commodities.  Even  the  confirmed 
tea"  coffee  and  cocoa  drinker  is  inclined 
to  do  without  his  daily  potation  of  the 
"cup  that  cheers",  and  substitute  a  cool- 
ing beverage  and  often  with  doubtful 
satisfaction. 

It  is  a  good  plan  during,  these  times  to 
push  the  sale  of  tea,  coffee  and  cocoa  as 
a  cold  refreshment  in  place  of  the  usual 
custom  served  hot. 

For  serving  tea  cold,  it  is  made  in  the 
usual  manner,  poured  off  the  leaves  and 
set  aside  to  cool.  Just  before  serving 
add  a  clash  of  lemon  juice,  a  piece  of 
ice  and  top  off  with  a  slice  of  lemon. 
Sweeten  to  taste.  Coffee  is  made  in  the 
same  manner.  With  cocoa  the  method 
of  serving  is  a  little  different.  A  good 
plan  is  to  make  a  syrup  of  one  cup 
each  of  cocoa,  sugar  and  water.  Place 
on  the  fire  until  ingredients  are  dissolved 
and  has  come  to  a  boiling  point.  A 
small  portion  of  this  syrup  is  placed  in 

Selling  Stunts 
For  Boosting 
Hot  Weather  Sales 


IT  IS  hardest  to  interest  people  in 
foods  when  the  thermometer  is  high. 
Therefore  it  is  all  the  more  necessary 
to  make  your  store  attractive. 

Keep  it  as  cool  as  possible  and  well 
aired  out  with  electric  fans. 

Have  a  sprinkler  on  your  fresh  vege- 
tables. 

Use  the  awning.  Do  not  let  the  di- 
rect sun  rays  reach  the  articles  in  your 
window  or  in  your  store. 

Keep  meats  and  all  other  perishables 
in  the  refrigerator  or  in  a  refrigerated 
show  case.  Make  use  of  plenty  of  at- 
tractive signs  to  tell  about  these  goods 
that  are  hidden  from  view. 

Get  a  neat  market  basket,  fill  it  with 
a  number  of  package  products,  and  put 
a  placard  on  it  "For  Your  Picnic  Lunch." 

Have  an  assortment  of  ready-to-serve 
items  on  a  counter  or  special  table  with 
a  sign  reading  "These  Do  Not  Have  To 
Be  Cooked." 

Make  an  assortment  of  drinks— Grape 
Juice,  Lime  Juice,  Ginger  Ale,  Root  Beer 
etc.,  with  a  card  "Put  a  Few  Bottles  in 
Your  Refrigerator." 


the  bottom  of  a   glass   and   then   filled 
with  ice  cold  milk. 

A  merchant  in  Toronto  recently  trim- 
med a  window  with  cocoa  that  was  in- 
teresting from  the  point  that  it  was  of 
an  educational  character.  Along  the 
front  of  the  window  and  next  to  the  glass 
were  show  cocoa  pods  in  the  natural 
state,  then  came  the  pods  broken  open 
showing  the  beans,  cocoa  beans.  Each 
stage  of  the  bean  had  a  neat  card  at- 
tached, explaining  what  it  was.  Be- 
hind this  display  were  arranged  cocoa 
in  tins  and  a  jar  containing  bulk  cocoa. 


There  were  also  shown  various  sized 
cakes  of  chocolate.  In  a  prominent  posi- 
tion was  placed  a  card  reading  "Direct 
from  the  Bean  to  You — Come  in  and  Get 
a  Refreshing  Glass  of  Iced  Cocoa". 

This  idea  could  also  be  worked  out 
with  tea  and  coffee.  Using  a  small  pile 
of  each  of  the  various  kinds  of  tea  or 
coffee  along  the  front  of  the  window 
and  backing  it  up  with  larger  packages. 
A  card  then  placed  in  the  center  sugges- 
ting that  they  be  used  as  an  iced  bever- 
age during  the  summer,  would  help  sales 
considerably  on  these  lines  that  other- 
wise might  fall  off  during  the  hot  days 
of  summer. 


CANADIAN  SUGAR  IN  ENGLAND 


A  shipload  of  Canadian  sugar  recently 
arrived  in  Manchester,  England,  and  an- 
other is  on  the  way.  This  marks  the 
resumption  of  a  trade  which  promised 
well  after  the  armistice,  when  large  or- 
ders were  taken  in  the  United  Kingdom 
by  Canadian  refiners. 


SUGGESTIONS  FOR  DISPLAY  CARDS  TO  STIMULATE 
SALES  ON  TEA,  COFFEE  AND  COCOA  DURING  THE  HOT 
WEATHER. 

An  Old,  Old  Drink  in  a  New  Form — Iced  Tea. 

When  Your  Collar  Starts  to  Wilt  Drink  Iced  Coffee. 

A  Delicious  Bracer — Iced  Cocoa. 

Try  Your  Daily  Dish  of  Tea  Iced — And  Get  a  Fresh  Start. 

In  the  Good  Old  Summertime  Drink  Iced  Cocoa. 

Cooling,  Refreshing,  Sustaining — Iced  Tea. 


Display  canned  meats  of  all  kinds;  al- 
so bottled  goods  such  as  pickles,  olives, 
relishes  and  condiments. 

Use  these  and  other  summer  touches' 
and  not  only  will  they  help  you  sell  more 
goods  but  they  will  also  make  your 
store  the  more  inviting  to  everyone. 


Watch  Cereal  Stocks 

During  Summer  Months 

Millions  of  dollars  are  lost  by  cereal 
manufacturers  each  year  through  dam- 
ages caused  by  cereal  insects. 

1:  Do  not  pile  new  stock  in  front  of 
old. 

2:  As  soon  as  a  shipment  of  cereals 
is  received,  mark  the  month  received  on 
each  case— figures  can  be  used  for  this 
purpose,  for  May  use  the  figure  "5," 
June,  "6",  July  "7",  and  so  on.  This 
will  enable  you  to  know  whether  or  not 
your  floormen  are  piling  new  stock  in 
front  of  old. 

3:  Have  floor  clean — a  good  scrub- 
bing with  soap  and  water  at  stated  in- 
tervals is  urged. 

4:  Sprinkle  lime  on  floor  and  in  the 
cracks. 

5:  Clean  up  on  broken  cases — do  not 
leave  open  cases  or  packages  in  regular 
stock — place  them  in  your  packing  room 
which  should  at  all  times  be  kept  clean 


and  the  stock  examined  at  stated  inter- 
vals. 

6:  Do  not  overstock  at  any  time,  es- 
pecially not  in  the  spring  or  summer 
months. 

7:  A  good  plan  is  to  change  the  cereal 
space  at  stated  intervals  and  not  always 
have  it  in  the  same  place.  It  is  also 
well  not  to  pile  the  different  cereals  to- 
gether— a  row  of  canned  goods  in  be- 
tween is  advisable. 

8 — We  suggest  that  once  or  twice  a 
year  your  warehouse  be  most  thoroughly 
fumigated.  This  will  not  only  clean  up 
on  cereals,  but  also  get  rid  of  mice,  and 
rats. 


PUTS  IN  SUPPLY  OF  GROCERIES 

Peterborough    (Special)  — 

So  numerous  has  grown  the  colony 
ofcampers  on  the  Otonabee  river  south 
of  the  city  that  H.  B.  Rye  is  stocking 
his  pavilion  with  a  complete  line  of 
groceries. 

Not  only  will  there  be  the  substantial 
foods  and  other,  groceries  required  in 
everyday  use,  but  also  the  relishes  a.nd 
specialties  that  have  a  special  appeal 
to  campers,  for  those  who  are  lunching 
on  the  river,  or  going  on  a  picnic. 

A  supply  boat  will  make  the  rounds 
of  the  tents  and  cottages  as  far  down 
as  the  more  populous  section  extends. 
Trips  will  be  made  at  least  once  a  day, 
and   if  necessary  twice. 


Julv  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


25 


Historic  Site  Now  Plant  of  Cheese  Company 

Kraft-MacLaren  Cheese  Co.  Occupies  Old  Mon- 
treal Building — J.  L.  Kraft  is  President  and 

C.  H.  Howell,  Vice-President. 

Montreal  (Special) — One  of  the  old 
historical  water  front  sites  On  St.  Paul 
Street,  Montreal,  that  dates  back  to  the 
days  when  stone  buildings  were  erected 
with  the  view  to  protection  from  the 
Indians  has  been  reclaimed  and  is  being 
used  as  a  commercial  and  manufact- 
uring plant.  This  stone  structure  built 
in  those  early  days  faces  on  Place  Roy- 
ale,  and  tf -day  has  been  reconstructed  in 
steel  and  concrete  as  the  new  home  of 
the  Kraft-MacLaren  Cheese  Company, 
which  has  recently  been  organized  by  the 
amalgamation  of  the  Canadian  cheese 
interests  of  the  MacLaren  Imperial 
Cheese  Company  Limited  of  Toronto  and 
the  Canadian  domestic  and  export  inter- 
ests of  the  J.  L.  Kraft  &  Brothers,  Com- 
pany, Limited  of  Chicago.  The  main 
offices  and  factory  will  now  be  in  Mon- 
treal but  other  plants  are  owned  and 
operated  in  Holmesville,  Woodstock  and 
Wellesley,  Ontario. 

Directors  of  Company 

The  officers  and  directors  of  the  new 
organization  are: — President,  J.  L. 
Kraft;  Vice-President,  C.  H.  Howell, 
who  is  in  charge  in  Montreal;  Secretary, 
Oliver  A.  Blackburn;  Treasurer,  Ernest 
Ridgeway.  Among  the  directors  of  the 
firm  are  W.  H.  Dunn  of  Montreal,  and 
Henry  Wright  of  Toronto.  W.  H.  Dunn, 
president  of  the  William  H.  Dunn  Lim- 
ited, Montreal,  is  the  general  agent  for 
the  Company  in  Quebec.  C.  H.  Howell 
comes  to  Montreal  from  Chicago  ttj  be 
active  head  of  the  concern  and  Neil 
Stronach,  also  of  Chicago,  will  be  super- 
intendent of  the  Montreal  plant. 
Old    Architecture 

The   old   architecture   of   the   building 


centre  of  the  city  and  almost  on  the 
docks  where  a  large  part  of  the  export 
trade  of  Canada  is  carried  on. 
A  Center  of  Interest 
Behind  the  factory  in  the  centre  of 
some  of  the  oldest  and  busiest  sections 
of  Montreal  are  the  historical  Seminary 
Gardens  which  although  they  have  been 
there  for  two  centuries  are  seen  by 
few  since  they  are  surrounded  by  the  old 
stone  wall  of  which  the  new  Ki-aft-Mac- 
Laren  Cheese  Company's  plant  forms 
a  r>art. 


India  Tea  Yield 

Shows  Decrease 


J.  L.  KRAFT 
President,    Kraft-MacLaren    Cheese    Co. 


lends  itself  to  the  business  of  its  new 
occupants  with  advantages  that  a  new 
building  might  not  have.  Being  built 
of  the  sturdy  type  of  the  old  days  with 
walls,  in  some  places  four  feet  thick, 
all  of  cold  stone,  the  building  is  always 
cool  and  presents  an  appearance  of  solid- 
ity. It  comprises  four  floors  and  a  base- 
ment entirely  of  concrete  and  of  fire- 
proof sanitary  construction  built  in  "L" 
shape  with  a  concrete  inner  court-yard 
which  now  facilitates  shipping.  In  view 
of  these  facts  it  is  readily  seen  that  the 
building  is  particularly  adapted  to  the 
manufacture  and  handling  of  cheese.  Be- 
sides   these    features    it    is    also    in    the 


A  recent  despatch  fi-om  the  London  tea 
market  says,  "The  India  Tea  Association 
announced  the  new  season's  crop  to  the 
end  of  May  is  23,750,000  lbs.,  in  con- 
trast with  the  yield  in  the  correspon- 
ding period  of  last  year  of  38,500,000 
lbs.,  or  a  decrease  of  14,750,000  lbs  com- 
pared with  last  year's  crop.  The  re- 
duction is  due  to  the  restricted  output 
of  tea  in  the  early  stage  of  the  Indian 
new  season's  ci-op.  Producers  reached 
an  agreement  recently  whereby  output 
was  to  be  restricted  by  reduced  planting 
and  finer  plucking.  The  tea  market  for 
a  long  time  past  has  been  inundated  with 
teas  of  more  or  less  indifferent  quality, 
poor,  mixed  and  nondescript  kinds,  which 
are  most  difficult  to  handle.  The  mar- 
ket is  in  a  most  irregular  condition  at 
the  present  time.  There  appears  no 
limit  to  the  price  of  best  teas,  whereas 
the  poorest  grades  seem  to  be  more  or 
less  unsaleable.  It  remains  to  be  seen 
what  effect  the  reduced  output  in  India 
will  have  upon  the  market." 


C.  H.  HOWELL 

Y  ice -J)  resident  and   general  manager  of 

the  new  company. 


THE  MENACE  OF  THE  PEDLAR 

Fourth  of  a  Series  by  A.B.C. 

IN  previous  articles  on  the  pedlar  question  the  point  has  been  made  that 
the  pedlar  goes  after  tea  business  first  and  foremost  because  he  can  make 
a  good  profit  on  tea.  Merchants  who  do  not  make  it  a  policy  to 
maintain  quality  and  blend  in  the  tea  they  sell  are  much  more  likely  to 
lose  out  through  the  pedlar  than  those  who  stick  to  uniform  blends  and 
quality.  The  average  tea  pedlar  does  not  make  much  of  an  effort  to  sell 
anything  but  just  "tea."  He  usually  quotes  a  sufficiently  low  price  to 
undersell  the  retailer,  and  by  aggressive  selling  methods  makes  the  house- 
wife believe  that  the  quality  is  superior  to  that  she  has  been  buying  from 
her  regular  merchant  at  a  higher  price. 

This  puts  it  up  to  the  dealer  to  make  sure  that  he  is  buying  and  selling 
uniform  grades  of  tea  from  week  to  week  and  month  to  month,  and  advis- 
ing his  customers  that  he  is  doing  this  and  that  this  is  the  only  way  in 
which  they  can  purchase  the  same  kind  of  tea  each  time. 

A  travelling  salesman  told  the  writer  recently  of  an  instance  showing 
the  careless  method  of  at  least  one  pedlar  of  tea.  He  found  the  tea 
pedlar  staying  at  the  same  hotel  in  a  certain  town  as  himself  on  one 
occasion.  He  had  two  or  three  chests  of  tea  with  him,  and  these  were 
warehoused  in  the  horse  stable  where  he  kept  his  horse.  He  weighed 
out  the  tea  from  these  chests  as  he  required  it  for  the  customers  to  whom 
he  had  sold  tea.  This  is  an  absolute  fact  and  is  just  another  reason  why 
the  pedlar  should  not  and  would  not  have  the  tea  trade  anywhere  if  every 
merchant  foUewed  the  proper  method  of  going  after  it  himself. 


26 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29.  1021. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 

MEMBER    OF    THE    .ASSOCIATED    BUSINESS    PAPERS 
ESTABLISHED    1885 


The  Cnly  Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 


Published  Every  Friday  by 

The  MacLean  Publishing  Company,  Limited 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 


VOL.  XXXV. 


TORONTO,  JULY  29,  1921. 


No.  30 


RUST  IN  WHEAT  CAUSE  FOR  ANXIETY 

"D  ECENT  reports  of  the  Western  wheat  crop  are 
not  SO  encouraging  as  they  were  a  few  weeks 
ago.  The  news  of  the  crop  had  been  highly  favor- 
able, although  it  was  realized  that  a  period  of  dang- 
er still  existed  and  would  continue  until  the  end  of 
the  harvest.  Reports  right  from  seeding  time  had 
been  so  favorable  that  the  recent  reports  of  rust  ap- 
pearing is  all  the  more  unexpected  and  regrettable. 

"The  crop  situation  is  not  so  favorable"  says 
a  report  from  the  Merchants  Bank  of  Canada, 
Winnipeg.  "Black  rust  is  in  evidence  in  Mani- 
toba and  Southern  Saskatchewan.  As  yet  it  is 
impossible  to  estimate  the  damage  done,  and 
future  damage  will  depend  largely  on  weather 
conditions  during  the  next  three  weeks.  There 
has  been  considerable  hail  damage  in  scattered 
sections.  The  total  damage  from  this  source 
is  above  the  average  for  the  past  ten  years. 

Although  the  later  reports  of  the  crop  are  some- 
what adverse  in  some  parts,  the  crop  on  the  whole, 
undoubtedly  will  be  good.  Even  supposing  the 
crop  will  not  come  up  to  last  year,  the  return  in 
money  should  go  a  long  way  to  restoring  business. 
Last  year's  wheat  crop  in  Canada  was  263,000,000 
bushels,  against  193,000,000  bushels  in  1919  and 
the  record  year  of  1915  which  was  393,000,000 
bushels.  The  average  price  paid  in  1915  was  91 
cents  per  bushel,  giving  a  return  of  $356,000,000 
whereas  the  average  price  in  1919  was  $1.89  mak- 
ing a  total  valuation  of  $364,000,000  or  $8,000,000 
greater  than  the  bumper  crop  of  1915.  Wheat 
prices  for  1921  are  still  in  the  making,  but  it  is  ex- 
pected that  the  total  value  of  last  year's  crop  will 
equal  that  of  1915.  This  does  not  mean,  however, 
that  the  buying  power  will  be  as  great,  because 
prices  of  commodities  have  not  yet  reached  the 
level  of  1915. 

Reports  of  the  wheat  crop  in  other  parts  of  the 
world  are  none  too  promising  and  there  is  altogeth- 
er likely  to  be  a  big  demand  for  Canada's  wheat 
that  should  dispose  of  it  speedily  at  a  good  price. 


RECOGNIZING  THE  TRADE  PAPERS 

J>  ECOGNIZING  the  fact  that  Business  and  Tech- 
nical newspapers  were  becoming  essential  fac- 
tors in  commerce  and  industry,  Herbert  Hoover, 
Secretary  of  the  Commerce  Department  at  Wash- 
ington, sent  an  invitation  to  the  heads  of  the  lead- 


ing Business  and  Technical  Newspapers  of  the 
United  States  to  meet  him  in  Washington  to  discuss 
the  problems  of  his  Department. 

Sixty-two  men  accepted  the  invitation,  and  at 
the  meeting,  Mr.  Hoover  gave  evidence  of  his  high 
appreciation  of  the  value  of  Business  papers  by 
saying :  "My  view  of  the  matter  is  that  we  may  well 
consider  the  trade  publications  of  the  country  as 
the  mouthpieces  of  the  Department  of  Commerce — 
the  contact  points  by  which  the  business  world  is 
to  know  what  we  are  doing  and  how  we  are  doing 
it,  and  also  to  carry  to  our  industry  this  message  of 
co-operation  which  it  is  my  hope  to  place  before 
every  manufacturer  in  every  industry  in  the  coun- 
try.". 

The  outcome  of  this  initial  conference  was  that 
monthly  meetings  were  arranged  and  Mr.  Hoover 
has  admitted  that  the  meetings  with  the  heads  of 
Business  and  Technical  Newspapers  are  of  mater- 
ial benefit  to  him,  giving  him  a  clearer  view 
of  the  situation  than  he  can  procure  from  any  other 
source. 

The  Minister  of  the  Canadian  Department  of 
Trade  and  Commerce  might  profit  by  the  experi- 
ence of  Mr.  Hoover.  A  conference  with  the  heads 
of  the  various  Business  papers  in  Canada,  would 
give  him  some  vitally  important  information  about 
trade  conditions  in  Canada. 


ADULTERATED    FOODSTUFF 

17  ROM  time  to  time  we  hear  of  merchants  being 
fined  quite  a  sum  of  money  for  selling  adulter- 
ated foodstuff.  A  recent  report  comes  from  Que- 
bec. Several  merchants  were  haled  before  the 
Court  and  fined  twenty-five  dollars  each  for  sell- 
ing adulterated  sausage.  The  charge  was  made 
by  the  Federal  Food  Inspector.  One  of  the  mer- 
chants claimed  he  was  hot  the  manufacturer  and 
asked  that  the  manufacturer  who  sold  him  the 
sausage  be  called  in  warranty.  This  was  granted 
and  the  case  was  held  over  for  a  week. 

This  instance  again  drives  home  the  point,  that 
merchants  when  buying  their  supplies  should  not 
fail  to  see  that  they  come  from  reputable  sources. 


EDITORIALS  IN  BRIEF 

If  people  have  less  inclination  to  buy  than' they 
had  a  year  ago,  are  you  trying  harder  to  interest 
them,  or  are  you  letting  up  on  your  efforts? 

The  trade  journal  that  comes  to  your  desk  is  an 
opportunity.  It  has  some  information  in  it  that 
will  help  you  do  more  business — if  one  follows 
that  information. 

Don't  waste  any  time  croaking  about  what  times 
were  a  year  or  so  ago.  If  you  have  the  energy  to 
tackle  the  job,  you  can  make  your  business  better 
than  it  ever  was  in  boom  times. 

You  haven't  time  to  listen  to  the  fellows  who 
want  to  talk  about  business  dullness.  You  are  too 
busy  making  your  own  business  lively. 

If  business  does  not  come  your  way,  put  the 
blame  where  it  belongs;  on  the  shoulders  of  the 
management  of  the  store.  Some  stores  are  getting 
business.     Why  not  you? 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


27 


Makes  Rapid  Computations  Easy 

Plan  of  Marking  Goods  With  the  Date  of  Their  Arrival  in  the 
Store  is  a  Good  One  and   is  Now  Being   Generally  Adopted- 
Suggestions  Which  Every  Merchant  Can  Adopt  With  Profit. 

by  HENRY  JOHNSON,  JR. 


To  make  rapid  computations  easy 
among  his  department  heads,  the 
owner  of  a  big  store  devised  the 
table  which  I  reproduce  herewith.  On  it  is 
shown  the  margin  on  the  sale  price  which 
•will  result  from  the  addition  of  a  percen- 
tage on  the  cost,  beginning  at  25  per  cent 
In  making  the  computations,  the  figure 
has  been  made  to  include  only  two  de- 
cimals in  each  case— which  is  plenty  fine 
enough  for  practical  purposes. 

This  is  one  of  the  most  convenient  and 
practical  helps  I  have  ever  seen.  The 
only  fault  I  can  find  with  it  is  that  the 
word  "profit"  is  used.  I  should  always 
say  "margin."  Why?  Because  margin 
means  the  total  spread  between  cost  and 
sale  price  out  of  which  all  expenses  must 
be  deducted  before  any  profit  can  be 
realized.  It  is  therefore  always  prpper 
to  talk  about  a  margin.  It  never  can  be 
proper  to  talk  about  a  profit  until  we 
are  sure  that  a  profit  is  realized.  But 
after  all  that  is  a  minor  fault. 

I  hope  you  will  cut  out  this  table  and 
use  it  regularly.  We  cannot  look  at  this 
matter  of  correct  computation  from  too 
many  angles'.  •  We  must  learn  it  so  well, 
and  absorb  its  principles  so  thoroughly, 
that  we  become  more  expert  in  its  use 
daily.  All  business  success  centers 
around  our  ability  to  arrive  at  correct  re- 
sults in  figuring  our  margins. 

"Speeding    The    Turnover" 

The  plan  of  marking  goods  with  the 
date  of  their  arrival  in  the  store  is  being 
adopted  more  generally  all  the  time.  I 
find  wideawake  merchants  everywhere 
'  with  merchandise  stamped,  say,  Jul-21, 
meaning  that  it  came  in  in  July,  1921. 
Any  clerk  who  is  looking  after  his  own 
advancement  through  promoting  the  pro- 
sperity of  the  store — and  let  me  say  that 
is  the  ONLY  highway  for  him  to  travel 
with  such  end  in  view,  whether  he  thinks 
so  or  not — will  sell  an  article  so  marked 
before  he  will  one  marked  Sep-21 

A  clothing  merchant  carries  this  plan 
further.  He  has  tags  on  which  are  prin- 
ted A,  B,  C,  D  in  big  capital  letters. 
A,  goes  on  goods  six  months  in  stock, 
B  on  goods  'a  year  in  stock,  C  on  what 
is  in  for  18  months,  and  D  marks  the 
deadline  of  two  years.  So  just  as  soon 
as  a  tag  appears  anywhere,  it  is  a  sig- 
nal to  speed  the  sale,  and  the  pressure 
gets  more  insistent  as  the  letters  ad- 
vance until,  when  D  shows  up,  the  goods 
so  marked  must  be  sold  no  matter  .what 
price   they  bring. 

Nor  is  this  idea  applicable  only  to  the 
-clothing  business.  It  is  a  system  which 
can  be  put  in  use  in  any  line.  For  there 
;is   no   line   in   which   dead   stock   is   not 


fatal,  and  none  in  which  dormant  stock 
is  not  a  serious  malady.  We  must  re- 
member not  only  that  no  profit  can  be 
realized  until  a  sale  is  made,  but  that  ex- 
pense and  deterioration  are  piling  up 
against  goods  with  every  passing  hour. 

This  same  merchant  has  another' plan 
which  we  might  adopt  with  advantage. 
He  has  a  daily  tickler  on  his  desk  into 
which  he  puts  his  invoices  as  received 
and  checked,  putting  each  into  the  sec- 
tion dated  when  he  expects  to  pay  it 
Each  day  he  opens  the  section  marked 
for  immediate  attention,  he  glances  over 
the  stock  covered  by  the  bill  to  see  if 
any  of  it  has  been  sold  and  if  so,  how 
much.  Then  the  paid  bill  is  put  away 
into  another  file  on  top  of  his  desk  di- 
vided into  months  only.  On  the  first  or 
second  of  each  month  he  takes  out  those 
bills  and  makes  another  inspection  ol 
the  stock. 

In  this  way,  he  is  kept  in  constant 
personal  touch  with  the  exact  condition 
of  his  stocks  and  can  put  pressure  on 
them  whenever  and  wherever  they  need 
it.  Such  systems  of  careful  marking 
not  only  have  their  immediate  and  ob- 
vious values,  but  any  thoughtful  mer- 
chant will  learn  a  lot  from  them.  For 
example,  he  will  know  intimately  just 
how  long  it  takes  him  to  move  a  given 
line  of  goods.  He  also  will  note  at  once 
whenever  the  popularity  of  any  line 
begins  to  wane — a  thing  which  happens 
constantly  and  is  generally  unobserved 


until  we  have  a  lot  of  unsaleable  stock 
on  hand. 

Wrong  Slant  On  Volume 

In  thinking  of  volume,  we  must  be 
careful  that  we  get  the  right  idea.  Mere 
volume,  or  size  of  sales,  is  valuable  even 
on  a  narrow  margin,  provided  the  mar- 
gin covers  expenses  and  leaves  a  pro- 
fit, but  not  otherwise.  Moreover,  while 
thinking  volume,  we  must  not  overlook 
things  which,  from  the  beginning  and  on 
small  turnover,  yield  big  returns.  The 
seller  of  a  device  for  making  orange 
juice  and  lemonade  illustrates  this  weak- 
ness as  follows:     , 

A  disadvantage  with  an  operative 
machine  that  makes  big  profits  for  the 
merchant  possible  is  that  most  merchants 
figure  on  volume  more  than  they  do  on 
profits.  They  are  more  interested  in 
$20,00  of  sales  that  may  not  pay  more 
than  15  or  20  per  cent  than  they  are  in 
$6.00  of  sales  that  make  them  70  or  80 
per  cent.  • 

The  ramifications  of  that  statement  are 
almost  endless,  if  we  stop  to  think  it 
over.  First  let  us  compare  the  fig- 
ures. 

Sales  of  $20.00  at  15  per  cent  yield 
$3.00;  at  20  per  cent,  $4.00.  Sales  of 
$6.00  at  70  per  cent  yield  4.20;  and  80 
per  cent,  $4.80. 

Next,  in  the  particular  case  mentioned, 
the  making  of  orange  and  lemonades  dis- 
continued  on   Page   38 


riOflT 

cou«t* 

MOriT 

lOttAL* 

■ 

PROPIT 

COUAL* 

P«0PIT 

tOUALS 

OM 

fuortj  OH 

OM 

raOPiT  ON 

OH 

PItOPtt  ON 

OH 

PHOPIT  ON 

COST 

(tkLIN« 

COST 

SCLLIM* 

CO*T 

SlkUNC 

COST 

SCLLINS 

Pl«  CmT 

Ml  Ciar 

Pit  ciar 

Pt*  Cf NT 

rt»  ciHT 

■  Pt*  C<aT 

Pt*  CINT 

PI*  CIRT 

25 

20 

44 

30.55 

63 

38.65 

82 

45.05 

26 

20.63 

45 

31.03 

64 

39.02 

83 

45.35 

27 

21.26 

46 

31.50 

65 

39.39 

84 

45.65 

28 

21.88 

47 

31:97 

66 

39.76 

85 

45.94 

29 

22.48 

48 

32.43 

67 

40.11 

86 

46.23 

30 

23.07 

49 

32.88 

68 

40.46 

87 

46.52 

31 

23.66 

60 

3Z% 

69 

40.82 

88 

46.80 

32 

24.24 

61 

33.77 

70 

41.17 

89 

47.08 

33^ 

25 

52 

34.21 

71 

41.52 

90 

47,36 

84 

25.37 

63 

34.64 

72 

41.86 

91 

47.64 

35 

25,92 

64 

35.06 

7t 

42^0 

92 

47.91 

36 

26.47 

65 

35.48 

74 

42.68 

93 

48.18 

37 

27 

56 

35.90 

76 

42.86 

94 

48.4$ 

38 

27.54 

67 

36.81 

71 

43.18 

96 

48.71 

89 

28.06 

68 

36.71 

77 

43.60 

96 

48.97 

40 

28.57 

69 

37.11 

78 

43.82 

97 

49.23 

41 

29.08 

60 

37.50 

79 

44.13 

98 

49.49 

42 

29.57 

61 

37.89 

80 

44.44 

99 

49.75 

43 

30.07 

63 

38.28 

81 

44.75 

100 

50 

Table  Slioiving  Easy  Computation  of  profit. 


28 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


CURRENT  NEWS  OF  THE  WEEK 

Canadian  Grocer  Will  Appreciate  Items  of  News  From  Readers  for  This  Page 


^/////y^/^/vyy//^/>V/vy^^^^^ 


ONTARIO 

John  Charles,  Toronto,  has  sold  to  V. 
Voisin. 

E.  0.  Rawson,  Coldwater  proprietor  of 
the  "Veterans  Store"  has  sold  to  C.  E. 
Stevens. 

J.  P.  Ramsey,  Tillsonburg  has  sold  to 
C.  E.  Nobbs. 

F.  Johnson  has  opened  a  store  at  136 
Davenport   Road,  Toronto. 

M.  Egeberg,  Fort  William,  has  opened 
a  grocery  store  at  the  corner  of  Brock 
and  Sprague  Streets. 

T.  J.  Brady,  Lindsay  is  giving  up  bus- 
iness and  has  removed  the  stock  to  the 
store  next  Victoria  Loan  &  Saving  Co. 
where  it  will  be  disposed  of. 

H.  N.  Schmidt,  109  Cambria  St.  Strat- 
ford, has  purchased  the  store  at  351 
Ontario  St.,  formerly  the  F.  Well's 
store. 

D.  S.  Perrin  &  Co.,  London,  held  their 
40th  annual  picnic  to  Port  Stanley  on 
Saturday  last.  Over  800  employees  and 
their  friends  attended  and  participated 
in  the  many  games  provided. 

The  canning  factory  at  Cobourg  have 
completed  their  pack  of  peas  for  the 
season.  The  pack  was  a  small  one, 
only  half  the  usual  amount  being  han- 
dled. 

The  Lake  Simcoe  Ice  Co.,  Toronto,  is 
planning  to  sell  ice  in  much  the  same 
manner  as  ice  bricks.  Their  plan  is  to 
establish  stations  throughout  the  city, 
where  people  can  go  for  their  ice. 

A  man  was  recently  arrested  in  Cha- 
tham for  being  intoxicated  and  explained 
that  he  became  that  way  through  drink- 
ing extract  of  lemon.  The  police  located 
the  merchant,  who  appeared  before  the 
court  charged  with  selling  six  bottles 
of  extract  of  lemon  without  using  a  re- 
venue stamp.  The  case  was  enlarged 
for  further  investigation. 


QUEBEC 

F.  M.  Lamere  asks  CANADIAN  GRO- 
CER to  state  that  although  his  name 
has  appeared  several  times  lately  in  the 
press  as  vice  president  of  the  Union  des 
Commis-Epiciers  de  Montreal  (Associa- 
tion of  Grocery  Clerks  of  Montreal) 
and  which  appears  as  such  on  the  letter 
head  used  by  the  organization,  that  he 
has  no  connection  with  the  same. 


WESTERN 

L.  J.  Johnson,  formerly  of  Bull  River 
B.  C,  where  he  was  engaged  with  Oscar 
Jostad,  general  merchant,  has  bought 
the  Anton  Dahl  business  at  Yahk.  Mr. 
Dal)l,  it  will  be  recalled  died  last  win- 
ter, and  the  business  has  since  been 
conducted  by  Mrs.  Dahl,  who,  having 
disposed  of  it  to  Mr.  Johnson,  has  left 
for  Europe. 


SEED  ELEVATORS  BURNED 


Chatham  —  Fire  of  an  unknown  or- 
igin, but  thought  by  some  to  have  been 
caused  by  spontaenous  combustion,  com- 
pletely destroyed  the  elevators  of  the 
Rennie  Seed  Company.  T^e  elevator, 
which  was  several  stories  in  height,  be- 
sides containing  a  complete  milling  out- 
fit, contained  several  hundred  bushels  of 
grain,  all  of  which  were  completely  de- 
stroyed. It  is  estimated  that  the  dam- 
age will  be  in  the  neighborhood  of  $20,- 
000. 


SARNIA     GROCERS     AND 

BUTCHERS    PLAN    PICNIC 

Sarnia. — The  assembly  room  in  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce  was  the  scene  of 
an  enthusiastic  meeting  of  the  butchers 
and  grocers  of  the  city  to  plan  their 
twelfth  annual  picnic.  This  mammoth 
affair  will  be  held  on  the  17th  of  August 
at  Lake  Huron  Park,  and  from  the  im- 
mense programme  that  was  outlined,  it 
will  be  one  of  the  season's  events.  The 
seventeenth  falls  on  Wednesday,  and  af- 
ter much  debate  the  entire  day  was  set 
aside  as  a  holiday.  Some  of  the  prizes 
advocated  are  worth  the  endeavors  of  the 
most  finicky  athlete,  and  it  is  anticipat- 
ed the  rich  prizes  will  draw  competitors 
from  the  entire  surrounding  country.  The 
following  officers  and  committees  were 
elected: 

Honorary  president,  William  Kenny; 
honorary  vice-president,  M.  P.  Clark; 
president,  Joseph  Lackie;  treasurer, 
Thomas  Gammon;  secretary,  R.  Kirby; 
assistant  secretary,  R.  Haynes. 


DOLLAR  DAY  A  SUCCESSFUL 
EVENT 

Kingston  (Special) — Over  65  mer- 
chants co-operated  in  the  Dollar  Day 
sale  and  proved  to  be  one  of  the  greatest 
single  days  of  business  ever  experienced 
by  many  merchants  of  the  city.  It  was 
as  if  two  or  three  Christmas  eves  had 
been  crammed  together  and  judging 
from  the  volume  of  trade  done  by  the 
merchants  in  the  Dollar  Day  area,  the 
sale  was  one  which  will  be  remembered. 


LIBBY     COMPANY  HOLD     ANNUAL 
PICNIC 

CHATHAM  (Special)  —  What  proved 
to  be  a  very  enjoyable  picnic  was  held  at 
Government  Park  by  Libby  McNeill  & 
Libby,  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  for  their  em- 
ployees, families  and  friends.  At  lunch, 
pickles,  olives  and  lemonade  were  fur- 
nished by  the  committee  to  all  those  on 
the  grounds,  and  there  was  plenty  of 
lemonade  for  everyone  for  the  entire  day. 
A  ball  game  was  held  before  noon,  the 
games  commencing  at  one  o'clock,  and 
lasting  until  4.30.  A  large  number  of 
contestants  took  part  in  every  event,  all 
eager  for  the  very  attractive  prizes 
awarded.  Dancing  was  enjoyed  by  the 
younger  set  from  seven  until  ten,  the 
feature  of  the  evening  being  the  prize 
waltz  and  fox  trot. 


PACKS  WILL  BE  SMALL 

Summerland  B.  C^  (SpecSal) — 'Hhe' 
Dominion  Canners,  B.  C.  Ltd.,  operating 
at  Penticton,  will  pay  the  growers  4c  a 
lb.  for  peaches.  No  cherries  have  been 
packed,  this  year  by  fhat  cannery, 
and  there  will  be  only  a  small 
pack  of  apricots,  for  which  the 
growers  will  be  paid  4  l-2c  and 
5c.  An  unsatisfactory  market,  with 
low  prices  being  paid  by  American  pack- 
ers, is  said  to  be  the  reason  for  the 
small    pack    by   the    Dominion    Canners. 


EMPLOYEES    OF    WOODWARD'S 
HOLD    PICNIC 

VANCOUVER.— July  24  (Special) 
The  numerous  employees  of  Woodward's 
Department  Store  held  their  annual  pic- 
nic the  other  day.  The  store  was  closed 
all  day  and  800  of  the  staff  and  friends 
boarded  the  'Princess  Patricia'  for  Sea- 
side Pai-k.  A  day  of  great  pleasure 
was  spent  by  ail,  water  sports,  games, 
and  music  and  dancing  and  good  eats, 
all  contributed  to  the  fun.  At  a  late 
hour  in  the  evening  everyone  voting  the 
affair  a  splendid  success.,  the  party  ar- 
rived home. 


WHICH  IS  WHICH 


A  cross-eyed  judge  was  trying  three 
cross-eyed  defendants.  The  judge  looked 
at  the  first  defendant  and  asked,  "Do  you 
plead  guilty  oir  not  guilty?" 

The  second  defendant  promptly  an- 
swered "Not  guilty." 

The  judge  looked  at  the  second  man 
and  said  sharply,  "I  didn't  speak  to 
you." 

Whereupon  the  third  man  remarked, 
"I  didn't  say  anything." 


July  29,  1921. 

Pioneer  Store 


Celebrates 
Golden  Jubilee 


Chilliwack,  B.  C.  —  (Special)  —  This 
month  the  Ashwell  department  store,  of 
which  G.  R.  Ashwell  was  the  founder,  is 
celebrating  its  50th  anniversary.  The 
first  Ashwell  store  was  opened  by  George 
R.  Ashwell  in  1871;  the  store  occupied  a 
portion  of  the  residence  on  the  farm 
which  was  situated  on  the  Yale  Road, 
and  embraced  the  property  where  the 
home  of  F.  B.  Stacey,  M.  P.,  now  stands. 
The  business  flourished  there  for  a  few 
years  until  Mr.  Ashwell  decided  to  buy 
out  the  store  and  stock  of  R.  C.  Garner 
at  the  Fraser  River  landing,  and  to 
carry  on  business  there;  the  landing 
at  that  time  being  about  a  quarter  of  a 
mile  east  and  half  a  mile  north  of  the 
present  river  bank  at  the  Beaver  landing, 
the  repeated  washing  away  of  the  bank 
necessitating  the  moving  of  the  store 
building  several  times. 

In  1890  Mr.  Ashwell  bought  out  the 
business  of  the  late  Uriah  Nelson,  who 
was  operating  a  store  on  the  present  site 
of  the  Ashwell  department  store.  The 
stock  at  the  landing  was  removed  to  the 
newly  acquired  premises  and  the  busi- 
ness established  at  its  present  location. 
In  1878  the  store  was  both  burglarized 
and  burned  down,  but  neither  flood,  fire 
nor  burglars  could  daunt  the  spirit  of 
Chilliwack's  pioneer  merchant,  and  as  the 
destructive  work  of  the  Fraser  had  only 
caused  him  to  move  to  more  convenient 
quarters,  so  the  havoc  wrought  by  fire 
only  resulted  in  the  erection  of  more 
permanent  and  commodious  store  prem- 
ises on  the  ashes  of  the  old. 

The  same  year  saw  the  entry  into  the 
firm  of  Messrs.  J.  H.  Ashwell  and  George 
H.  W.  Ashwell,  the  name  being  changed 
to  that  of  George  R.  Ashwell  and   Son. 


CANADIAN     GROCER 

On  the  death  of  Mr.  Ashwell,  Sr.,  in 
December,  1913,  Ashwell  Limited  was  in- 
corporated as  a  limited  liability  com- 
pany, with  George  H.  W.  Ashwell  as  pre- 
sident, N.  Allen,  M.D.,  vice-president, 
and  J.  H.  Ashwell  as  secretary. 

The  Ashwell  store  from  its  inception, 
has  always;  been  an  advocate  of  patron- 
izing home  industry,  Canadian  made  and 
B.  C.  merchandise  have  always  found  a 
prominent  place  on  the  shelves  and  in  its 
windows;  its  policy  being  to  utilize  B.  C. 
money  in  building  up  B.  C.  industries. 


29 


CHANGES  IN  N.  C.  R.  EXECUTIVES 


LIVE  STOCK  HATES  MAY 

SOON  BE  REDUCED 

Ottawa,  July  29. — An  important  re- 
duction on  live  stock  railway  rates  pn  all 
Canadian  lines  is  assured,  as  the  result  of 
a  conference  held  here  yesterday  between 
representatives  of  the  live  stock  industry 
and  the  railways.  A  basic  25  per  cent, 
decrease  is  probable.  In  view  of  the 
sympathetic  attitude  of  the  railway  com- 
panies, it  was  felt  that  an  order  of  the 
railway  rtommission  would  be  unnecess- 
ary. The  lailvvays  will  submit  their  offer 
to  the  board  wihin  one  week. 


FIRE    DAMAGES    VINEGAR   WARE- 
HOUSE 

Calgary,  Alta.,  July  (Special). — About 
$30,000  damage  was  done  by  a  fire  that 
razed  to  the  ground  the  storage  ware- 
house of  the  Standard  Vinegar  company 
on  12th  street  East.  Stocks  belonging  to 
the  Standard  Vinegar  company,  the  Roy- 
al Crown  Soap  company,  and  several 
other  firms,  were  completely  destroyed 
and  the  building  burned  to  the  ground. 


SPANISH  RAISIN  PACKER  DISCON- 
TINUES EXPORTING 

Owing  to  the  death  of  Ramon  Mar- 
sal,  successor  to  Wm.  Rogers  &  Co., 
Denia,  Spain,  the  export  business  of 
raisins  etc.  will  be  discontinued. 


John  H.  I'atterson  Resigns  as  President 
And   Is   Succeeded   By  His   Son 


John  H.  Patterson  has  resigned  as  pre- 
sident and  general  manager  of  the 
National  ^.  asn  Register  Company  but 
will  continue  actively  in  directing  the 
affairs  of  the  Company.  As  chairman 
of  the  Board  of  Directors,  Mr.  Patter- 
son will  advise  the  directors  and  help 
formulate  the  policies  of  the  Company. 
His  son,  Frederick  B.  Patterson,  was 
elected  to  succeed  him  as  President, 
while  J.  H.  Barringer  was  made  General. 
Manager. 

John  H.  Patterson  has  been  President 
of  the  National  Cash  Register  Company 
for  37  years.  He  is  regarded  as  one  of 
the  world's  greatest  business  leaders. 
He  built  the  present  factory  at  Dayton 
Irom  a  workshop  of  one  room  with  two 
employees  to  an  organization  employing 
more  than  ten  thousand  men  and  women. 

Frederick  B.  Patterson  is  29  years, 
old.  His  first  work  was  on  a  farm.  He 
attended  school  for  two  years  in  Eng- 
land, and  has  been  connected  with  the 
N.  C.  R.  for  11  years.  He  started  in  as 
a  workman  in  the  foundry.  He  has  vis- 
ited all  of  its  agencies,  except  Africa, 
Australia,  India  Ru.ssia  and  Mexico. 
He  was  manager  of  the  Foreign  Depart- 
ment for  two  years,  and  until  he  entered! 
the  service  of  his  country  in  1917.  In 
the  late  war  he  rose  from  a  private  in 
the  ranks  to  a  commission  in  the  air 
service. 

J.  H.  Barringer,  the  new  general  man- 
ager, was  promoted  from  the  ranks.  He 
started  with  the  company  14  years  ago, 
holding  a  minor  position.  He  earned 
promotion  rapidly  and  in  1918  was  made 
First  Vice-President  and  Assistant  Gen- 
eral Manager.  Mr.  Barringer  is  only  38 
years  old. 


M.  J.  E.  POIRIER 

Vice  President,  Montreal  Grocers  Associa- 
tion. 


M.   A.   SARRAZIN  M.   U.  SANSREGRET 

Frecident,  Montreal  Retail  Grocers  Ass-      Secretary,      Montreal      Retail      Grocers 
ociation.  Association. 


30 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


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WEEKLY  GROCERY  MARKET  REPORTS 


Statements  from  Buying  Centers. 


yMy/,///////M/y/////////////////W//////M/MMMM^^^^ 


QUEBEC  MARKETS 


MONTREAL  July  27. — The  attention  of  the  grocery  trade  is  cen- 
tered on  the  sugar  market  this  week  after  the  sudden  drop 
in  price  of  last  week.  Neither  the  price  quoted  by  the  Amer- 
ican refiners  nor  the  trend  of  the  raw  market  seems  to  warrant  the 
drop  and  as  some  of  the  refiners  are  declining  to  sell  at  the  present 
price  it  is  significant  that  they  nominally  quote  the  price.  It  is  the 
opinion  of  many  connected  with  the  trade  that  the  price  of  sugar  will 
advance.  There  is  no  change  in  the  prices  quoted  on  molasses  or 
corn  syrups.  Canned  fruits  are  a  little  easier  in  price  since  the  de- 
mand has  fallen  off  with  the  arrival  of  fresh  fruits.  Salmon  is  high- 
er since  stocks  are  light  and  canned  peas,  corn  and  tomatoes  hold 
their  advanced  price.  Despite  the  fact  that  latest  reports  on  Japan 
teas  show  increased  strength,  lower  prices  are  quoted  on  stocks  on 
hand  by  local  wholesalers.  There  is  no  new  report  on  black  teas. 
Higher  prices  are  quoted  on  rolled  oats  and  oatmeals.  Rice  continues 
to  gain  strength  with  three  advances  on  different  grades.  A  small 
drop  in  the  price  of  yellow  corn  meal  is  the  only  change  in  package 
goods.  Coffee  is  steady  with  a  good  demand.  There  is  an  improv- 
ed movement  of  spices  with  the  approach  of  the  fall  season. 


CANNED  FRUIT  LOWER 


Montreal 


CANNED  GOODS— The  movement  of 
canned  fruit  has  been  slow  lately,  on  ac- 
count of  the  fresh  fruit  on  the  market, 
and  wholesalers  have  dropped  prices 
slightly  on  some  lines,  such  as  a  reduc- 
tion of  50  cents  on  both  apricots  and 
peaches,  making  the  price  on  2  1-2's 
$4.50.  There  is  still  the  good  demand 
for  canned  peas,  corn  and  tomatoes,  and 
prices  hold  at  the  advanced  level.  On 
account  of  a  slight  shortage  in  the  sup- 
plies of  canned  salmon  on  the  local  mar- 
ket, wholesalers  have  advanced  the  price 
on  some  brands.  Clover  leaf  flats  are 
advanced  to  $2.60  for  the  halfs,  and  $4.85 
for  the  one  pound  tins.  Red  Spring 
salmon  is  also  advanced  to  $3.75. 

COFFEE  PRICES  STEADY 

Montreal  ■ 

COFFEE — There  is  no  change  in  cof- 
fee prices.  The  market  is  firm  and 
steady  with  a  good  demand.  No  change 
is  looked  for  in  the  near  future. 

ROLLED  OATS  HIGHER 

Montreal  

CEREALS — Higher  prices  are  quoted 
on  rolled  oats  and  oatmeals,  despite  the 
fact  that  this  is  the  quiet  season  for 
cereals.  Spot  stocks  are  low  and  the 
advance  in  price  is  general.  On  both 
rolled  oats  and  oatmeals  the  advance  in 
price  amounts  to  25  cents  a  bag.  There 
are  no  other  changes  in  cereals.  The 
market  is  quiet  with  only  a  small  move- 
ment. 

PRUNES  AND  CURRANTS  EASIER 

Montreal. 

'  DRIED  FRUITS  ^  The  market  for 
some  lines  of  California  dried  fruits 
shows  a  weakness,  particularly  in  prunes, 


which  have  been  lowered  in  prices  by 
some  local  jobbers  to  the  extent  of  from 
1-2  to  1  cent  per  pound.  This  and  a  drop 
on  Malaga  cluster  raisins  amounting  to 
50  cents  per  box  is  the  only  change  in 
the  price.  Raisins  are  firm  in  price, 
with  a  good  demand,  but  currants  have 
been  reduced  to  12  cents  and  15  cents 
per  pound  loose  by  some  of  the  whole- 
salers. For  other  lines  the  market  is 
firm. 

TEA  MARKETS  STRONG 


Montreal  

TEAS — On  the  local  market  there  is 
a  weakness  in  Japan  ieas  with  lower 
prices  qquoted  by  some  of  the  wholesal- 
ers, but  reports  from  primary  markets 
show  a  decidedly  stronger  tendency.  Ca- 
bles state  that  basket  fired  Japan  teas 
are  in  small  supply,  and  the  same  is  the 
case  in  fannings,  siftings  and  nibs.  The 
second  crop  is  coming  to  the  market  lat- 
er than  last  year  and  the  quality  is  not 
good.  The  market  is  therefore  strong, 
although  local  prices  on  present  stocks 
are  quoted  lower.  There  are  no  new 
reports  on  black  teas,  but  the  market 
is  steady  and  firm  with  prices  un- 
changed. 

IMPROVED   SPICE  MARKET 

SPICES — The  spice  market  has  begun 
to  show  improvement  in  prospect  for  the 
the  fall  trade.  Both  retailers  and  whole- 
salers have  begun  to  stock  up  for  the  fall 
demand  which  begins  in  September.  The 
demand  centres  around  mixed  spices, 
cassia,  peppers  and  cinnamon.  Prices 
are  unchanged,  but  are  firm  with  strong 
tendencies   in  peppers. 

HIGHER  PRICES   FOR   RICE 

RICE — The  strength  of  the  rice  mar- 
ket is  more     pronounced     with     higher 


prices  quoted  on  Honduras,  Texas  and 
Carolina  rice.  The  advance  is  from  1-4 
to  1-2  cent  a  pound.  Caroline  rice  is 
now  7  cents  and  Honduras  rice  is  5  1-2 
cents  a  pound.  Further  advances  are 
looked  for  with  improved  buying. 
RICE — 

Carolina    extra  fancy 0  07 

Do.,    fancy)     0   06 

Honduras,    fancy     0  051^ 

Rangoon    CC,   per   cwt 3  90 

Do..    B.,    per    cwt 4   1.5 

Texas   rice 0  05 

Siam 0  06 

Tapioca,     per     lb.     (seed)      0  08         0  O914 

Do.    (pearl) 0  08         0  09'/4 

Do.   (flake 0  08         0  09)Vi 

Honduras     0  07   " 

Siam 0  14'/^ 

NOTE — The    rice    market    is    subject    to    frequent 
r\iange  and  the  price  basis  is  quite   nominal. 

NUT  PRICES  UNCHANGED 

NUTS — There  is  no  change  in  the  nut 
market.  Prices  are  steady  vnth  a  little 
more  quiet  market.  Buying  has  fallen 
off  slightly,  but  the  strength  of  the  wal- 
nut and  peanut  prices  is  still  maintain- 
ed. 

NO  CHANGE  IN  MOLASSES 

SYRUPS— There  is  no  change  in  the 
molasses  market  this  week.  Prices  are 
steady  with  a  fair  trade  passing.  Corn 
syrups  are  steady  with  a  good  demand, 
and  as  far  as  can  be  seen  at  present, 
prices  will  hold  firm. 

SUGAR  FUTURE  INDEFINITE 

SUGAR — Although  the  sugar  market 
dropped  during  the  past  week  to  $7.60 
per  100  and  so  far  appears  to  be  steady 
at  that  basis,  there  is  an  undertone 
which  suggests  an  advance  at  the  slight- 
est provocation.  A  number  of  the  re- 
finers are  dissatisfied  with  the  present 
price,  and  in  comparison  with  American 
prices  on  refined  sugar,  they  claim  there 
is  no  reason  for  the  low  level.  The  mar- 
ket for  raws  has  been  firm  with  slight 
advances,  and  in  fact,  it  is  hard  to  ac- 
count for  the  present  drop  in  the  price. 
There  seems  to  be  every  reason  to  believe 
that  the  next  move  in  the  sugar  market 
will  be  upwards.  Some  of  the  refiners 
are  curtailing  their  sales  at  the  present 
price  on  account  of  the  loss  that  is  en- 
tailed in  such  sales. 

Granulated    sugar,    per   cvrt 7   60 

Do.,  barrels 7  60 

Granulated,    gunnies,    20-5    8  00 

Do.,    gunnies,     10-10    8   10 

Do.,    cases,    20-5-lb.    cartons     8  20 

Do.,   cases,    50-2-lb.    cartons    8  35 

Yellow,    light     per    cwt 7  20 

Do.,   medium,   per   cwt 7   20 

Do.,   dark,    per   cwt.    7  00 

LEMON  PRICES  HOLDING 

FRUIT— The  feature  of  the  fruit  mar- 
ket is  the  downward  trend  in  prices  due 
to  the  fact  that  our  own  fruit  is  nearing 
the  marketing  stage  and  imported  fruits 
•niust  come  down  to  something  like  a  com- 
petitive basis.  There  is  no  change  in 
the  price  of  lemons.       The  demand     is 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


•ineWgl*^ 


31 


still  big,  and  supplies  are  no  larger  than 
they  have  been  in  the  past  month.  Some 
local  apples  are  on  the  market,  but  they 
are  very  small  and  of  poor  quality.  The 
price  asked  is  two  dollars  a  bushel.  There 
is  a  good  supply  of  cherries  selling  at 
90  cents  for  the  six  quart  basket,  but 
reports  are  that  this  is  the  last  week  of 
the  season.  Although  the  last  of  the 
grapefruit  are  on  the  market,  prices 
stand  at  $6.25  a  case  and  the  quality  is 
good. 

APPLES— 

Boxes,    1758,  216s 4  50 

New  crop,   per  bushel 2  00 

Bananas    (as   to  grade),   bunch    ..      7  00  8  00 

Grapefruit,    Jamaican.    64.    80,    96      ....  6  25 

Do.,  Porto  Rico 6  00 

Lemons,    Cal.,    300-360s 5  25 

Do.,    176s    and   200s 10  00 

Cal.   Navel   Oranges     126-250s    .    .      6  00  6  75 

Do.,   Florida,   150-216s 6  50 

Do.,   Blood  Oranges,   half  boxes     ....  3  75 

Tangerines 4  25 

Watermelons,   each 0  90 

Cherries,  six-  qt 0  90 

VEGETABLES  LOWER 

VEGETABLES  —  Local  vegetables 
feature  the  market  with  lower  prices  on 
cabbage,  cucumbers  and  potatoes.  Mon- 
treal potatoes  are  selling  at  from  $2.50 
to  $3.00  per  bag,  but  it  is  expected  that 
as  soon  as  the  American  potatoes  are  off 
the  market  that  higher  prices  will  be 
asked  for  new  potatoes.  There  is  a 
good  demand  for  new  vegetables.  Mont- 


real     tomatoes     on   the     market     have 
brought  down  the  price  to  $3.50  per  box. 

New  cabbage,   per   doz 1   00 

Celery,    Florida,    per    crate     4  00  4  75 

Do.,    California     11  00 

Carrots.    p«r   bag 0  75  1   00 

Cucumbers,    per   doz 1   00 

Garlic,    lb 0  50 

Horseradish      lb 0  60 

Leeks,    doz 4  00 

Lettuce .... 

Parsley .... 

Mint 0  60 

Mushrooms,    lb 1   00 

Oyster    plant,    per    doz 1   50 

Parsnips,  bag 1   00 

Peppers,    green    .doz 0  50 

New  potatoes.   Mont.    (90-lb.   bag)      2  50  3  00.. 

Do.,    sweet,    hamper 5  50 

Spanish    onions,    per   case    6  25 

Turnips,  per  bag    0  75  1   00 

Egyptian   onions 5  00 

Red   Onions,    per   cwt 3  25 

Texas   Onions,   per   crate 3  60 

Yellow   onions,   per   cwt 2  50 

Montreal    tomatoes,    per    box     3  50 

CORNMEAL  REDUCED 

PACKAGE  GOODS-The  only  change 
in  package  goods  is  a  drop  in  the  price 
of  Quaker  yellow  cornmeal  to  $2.85  a 
case,  a  decline  of  fifteen  cents.  Other 
prices  are  steady  with  a  good  trade  pass- 
ing, particularly  for  starches. 

COTTON  TWINE  HIGHER 

COTTON  TWINES  —  An  advance  of 
one  cent  is  quoted  on  all  cotton  twines, 
making  the  price  for  the  1-4  inch  twine 
36  cents. 


ONTARIO  MARKETS 

TORONTO  July  27. — The  markets  generally  show  few  price 
changes  with  a  steady  movement  in  small  quantities.  Some 
lines  are  showing  firmness  in  primary  markets,  particularly  teas 
and  rices.  Canned  vegetables  are  firmer  under  recent  slight  ad- 
vances. This  season's  pack  of  peas  is  about  one-third  pack  and 
prices  are  expected  to  be  higher  than  last  season.  Rolled  oats  con- 
tinue firm  with  a  likelihood  of  higher  prices.  In  package  goods, 
some  price  changes  are  noted  on  one  brand  of  cornflakes,  pancake 
flour  and  cornmeal.  New  crop  apricots  are  rolling  and  prices  are 
some  lower.  Sugar  at  the  moment  is  steady  under  recent  declines. 
The  potato  market  is  firmer  under  higher  prices.  Lemons  are  easier, 
with  other  fruits  generally  showing  few  price  changes. 


CANNED    VEGETABLES  FIRMER 

CANNED  GOODS.— No  announcement 
has  yet  been  made  of  opening  prices  on 
this  years  pack  of  canned  vegetables,  but 
prices  are  expected  on  peas  within  the 
week.  The  pack  of  peas  are  only  ex- 
pected to  run  about  one  third  of  other 
years,  partly  on  account  of  the  short  crop 
and  partly  due  to  the  policy  of  the  ear- 
ners in  cutting  down  the  volume  of  pack- 
ing this  season.  Prices  on  canned  vege- 
tables are  expected  to  be  fairly  high  but 
upon  this  point,  a  great  deal  will  depend 
on  the  carryover,  upon  which  nothing  de- 
finite can  be  learned  at  the  moment.  New 
pack  Mephisto  lobster  ¥28  is  quoted  at 
$3.75  per  dozen.  Blue  Sea  Tuna  fish  V2S 
is  quoted  at  $4.35  per  dozen.  Gallon 
cans  of  apples  are  showing  signs  of  scar- 
city, and  in  some  quarters  the  price  has 
advanced  to  $5.50  per  dozen.  New  pack 
strawberry  jam  is  still  offered  around 
70  cents,  for  fours,  although  there  is  a 
tendency  for  higher  prices. 


Salmon — 

Sockeye  Is  doz 5  20    5  CO 

Do.,  V-js.  doz 2  65  3  00 

Cohoe   Is.  doz 2  90 

Do.,  %s,  doz 1  90 

Pinks,  Is  doz 1  45 

Lobsters,  Vj-lb..  doz 3  45  3  75 

Do.,  Vi-lb.  .tins  1  95  2  40 

Whale    steak.    Is.    flat,    doz 1   75  1   90 

Pilchards.    1-Ib.    tails,    doz 1   80  

Canned    Vegetables    — 

Tomatoes,   2'js,  doz 1   65 

Peas,    standard,    doz 1   65  1  90 

Do.,    Early    une 2   15 

Beets.   2s     doz 1   45  2   45 

Beans,    golden    wax.    doz 2  20 

Asparaprus    tips,    doz 5  50 

Do.,    butts,    doz 6  60 

Canadian   corn 1   50 

Pumpkins,    2\'iS,    doz 1   45  1  50 

Spinach,    2s.    doz 1  60 

Pineapples,    sliced,    2s,    doz 4  00  4  90 

Do.,    shredded,    2s.    doz 4  75  5  25 

Rhubarb,    preserved      2s,    doz.     ..      2  O714  2   10 

Do.,    preserved,     2yjs,    doz.     ...      2  65  4  52% 

Do.,    standard,    lOs.    doz 5  00 

Apples,  gal.,  doz 5  00  5  50 

Pears,    2s,    doz 3  00  4  25 

Peaches,    2s,    doz 3  50 

Plums,     Lombard,    2s,    doz 3   10  3   25 

Do.    Green    Gage 3   25  3   40 

Cherries,   pitted     H.S 4  25 

Blueberries,    2s 2  35  2   45 

Strawberries,    2s,    H.S 4  50         5  00 

Raspberries,    2s 4  50  5  00 


CEREALS  CONTINUE  FIRM 

Toronto.  

CEREALS— The  market  generally  is 
holding  firm  at  unchanged  quotations.  In 
some  quarters  an  advance  is  expected  on 
rolled  oats,  in  view  of  the  fact  that  oats 
are  becoming  scarce  and  the  big  demand 
for  feeding  purposes.  Rolled  oats  are 
quoted  at  various  prices  ranging  from 
$3.15  to  $3.30  per  bag.  Stocks  of  white 
beans  are  fairly  well  exhausted,  but  the 
demand  at  this  season  is  not  heavy  and 
prices  are  fairly  steady. 

F.o.b.  Toronto 

Barley,  pearl,  98s 5  50 

Buckwheat  flour,   98s 6  00 

Barley,  pot.  98s 4  75 

Barley    Flour,   98s 6  25 

Cornmeal,    Golden,    98s 2  75 

Oatmeal,    98s 4  50 

Corn  flour,  98s 3  75 

Rye    flour    9  85         6  00 

Rolled    oats,    90s 3   15         3  30 

Rolled    wheat,     100    lb.    bbls 7  00' 

Cracked    wheat     bag 5  00- 

Breakfast    food,    No.    1 6  OO 

Do..    No.    2    6  OO 

Rice  Flour.  100  lbs 10  00 

Linseed   meal.  988 6  50 

Flax.seed.    98s T  00 

Peas,    split,    98s 5  75- 

Marrowfat  green   peas 0  07  0  OS 

Graham    flour,    98s 4  75« 

Wlhole  wheat  flour 4  9B 

Wheat  Kernels,    8s 6  25 

Farina,  98s 6  86 

NEW  APRICOTS  ROLLING 

Toronto.  

DRIED  FRUITS— A  shipment  of  new 
crop  apricots  is  rolling,  which  is  expect- 
ed to  arrive  within  the  next  ten  days. 
Although  no  definite  price  to  the  retail 
trade  is  yet  announced,  the  prices  will  be 
considerably  lower  than  last  year's  op- 
ening; standard  grade  will  probably  be 
around  23  cents  and  fancy  around  35 
cents  per  pound.  Prunes  are  moving 
well  in  small  quantities,  but  there  is  a 
heavy  movement  for  the  western  prov- 
inces; one  broker  stated  he  had  booked 
12  cars  of  prunes  for  the  west  during  the 
past  week.  New  Valencia  raisins  are 
offered  at  23  cents  per  pound  to  arrive 
about  first  of  September.  A  new  pack- 
age of  Sunmaid  seedless  raisins  will  be 
on  the  market  in  about  ten  days;  this 
package  retails  for  five  cents,  packed  in 
cartons  of  24  packages  and  sells  for  85 
cents  per  carton. 

Candied    Peels — 

Citron  caps,  12  lb.  boxes,  lb 0  60 

Lemon    caps,    12    lb.    box,    lb 0  34 

Orange    caps,    12    lb.    box,    lb 0  36 

Mixed     containing   4Vi   lb.   lemon, 
4^2  Ih.  orange,  3  lb.  citron  caps, 

per  lb 0  40 

Drained    Peel,    mixed,    cut      ready  " 
for   use,    in    No.    I's   cartons,   3 

3    dozen  per   case,   per  dozen 4  60 

Currants — 

Greek,    Filiatras,    cases     017 

Do.,    Amalias 0  17 

Do.,   Patras 0  17 

Do.,   Vostizza 0  23i/^ 

Dates — 

Excelsior,    pkgs,    3    doz.    in    case      ....  6  50 

Dromedary     3  doz.   to  case 7  00 

Fard,    per   box   ap.    12    lbs 3  26 

Hallowee    dates,    per    lb 0  11 

Figs — 

Smyrna  layers,   4  Crn.,  lb 0  30  0  32 

Do.,    layers,    6    cm.,    lb 0  36  0  38 

Natural    pulled,    in    bags     0  10^^ 

Prunes — 

30-40S,  25s 0  20 

40-50S,   25s 0  16 

50-60S,   2os 0  13 

60-70,    2.5s 0  10 

70-80S,   2.5s 0  09'/i 

80-90S,  25s 0  09 

90-lOOs,   25s 0  08 

Peaches — 

Standard,   25-lb.    box      peeled    . .      0  26%  0  28 

Choice,    25-lb.    box,    peeled    ...      0  27  0  30 

Fancy   25-lb.   boxes 0  19  0  30 

Apricots — 
Raisins  — 


32 


STRENGTH   IN   WALNUTS   GROWS 

Toronto.  

NUTS — All  nuts  continue  strong  and 
as  the  season  advances  this  is  more  ac- 
centuated especially  on  shelled  Bordeaux 
walnuts,  as  the  small  stocks  are  grad- 
ually becoming  disposed  of.  In  Cali- 
fornia walnuts  and  almonds  there  is  a 
good  movement  in  futures  noted.  The 
California  Almond  Growers  Association 
announce  that  the  new  season's  crop  is 
practically  all  hooked. 

PACKAGE  GOODS  —  Price  changes 
are  announced  on  some  lines  of  Quaker 
goods,  cornflakes  are  now  at  $3.10  per 
case,  cornmeal  at  $2.8.5,  and  puffed  rice 
pancake  flour  $2.8.5  per  case.  Other  quo- 
tations on  package  cereals  and  starches 
are  unchanged. 

RICE   MARKET  STRONG 


Toronto.  

RICE — The  primary  markets  are  very 
strong.  Higher  quotations  are  noted  in 
the  southern  markets,  but  on  the  local 
market  prices  are  unchanged,  although 
the  feeling  is  decidedly  firmer  with  pros- 
pects for  advances. 

SYRUPS  UNCHANGED 


Toronto.  

SYRUPS — Corn  syrups  and  molasses 
continue  to  be  quiet  with  no  change  in 
quotations. 

SPICE  MOVEMENT  BETTER 

Toronto.  

SPICES — There  is  an  improved  move- 
ment in  spices,  especially  the  varieties 
for  pickling  and  preserving  purposes. 
Wholesalers  and  retailers  are  commenc- 
ing to  stock  up  in  anticipation  for  -the 
pickling  season.  Market  conditions  are 
ruling  steady  with  no  change  in  quota- 
tions. 

SUGAR  PRICES  DROP 


Toronto.  

SUGAR — As  we  were  going  to  press 
last  week  a  reduction  was  made  in  refin- 
ed sugar,  making  the  price  $7.94,  Toron- 
to, or  $7.60  Montreal  basis.  Whether 
this  price  will  hold  is  very  uncertain, 
some  of  the  refiners  claiming  that  they 
are  losing  money  at  this  price,  and  ac- 
cording to  the  price  of  raws  it  is  practi- 
cally at  replacement  cost.  On  the  other 
hand,  one  other  refiner  is  selling  25 
cents  below  the  $7.60  basis.  The  raw 
sugar  market  during  the  week  has  been 
particularly  active,  with  sales  for  the 
week  close  to  100,000  tons,  which  an-.ount 
is  greatly  in  excess  of  any  week  for  sev- 
eral months  past.  Prices  for  Cubans 
were  holding  firm  at  three  cents,  which 
figure*?  4.61  cents,  duty  paid.  Porto  Rico 
sugars  sold  so  freely  that  no  more  July 
shipment  is  available.  It  is  also  re- 
ported that  all  the  uncontrolled  sugars 
in  Cuba  are  about  cleaned  up,  and  al- 
though there  are  still  heavy  holdings  of 
Cuban  sugar,  what  remains  in  the  island 
is  under  the  control  of  the  committee. 

St.    Lawrenpe,    extra    granulated,    cwt 7  94 

Atlantic,    extra    granulated    7  94 

Acadia    Sugar   Refinery,   extra   srnulated    .  .      7  94 
Dom.    Sugar    Refinery,    extra    granulated    .  .     7  94 

Canada   Sugar    Refinery     granulated 7  94 

Differentials :  Granulated,  advance  over  basis ; 
r>0-lb.  Racks,  25c,  barreU,  5c;  gunnies,  5-20,  40c; 
Kunnies  10-lOs,  BOs  ;  cartons,  20-5s,  60c  ;  cartons, 
50-23,   75c. 


CANADIAN   GROCER 

TEA  MARKETS  CONTINUE  STRONG 

Toronto.  

TEAS — The  primary  tea  markets  con- 
tinue with  a  strong  tone,  with  prices 
again  advanced  on  the  better  grades. 
There  is  also  a  hardening  tendency  for 
the  lower  grades,  which,  with  the  de- 
crease in  the  pickings  of  Indians,  is  com- 
mencing to  reflect  in  higher  prices.  The 
local   situation  is  unchanged. 

BIG   SHIPMENTS   OF   FRUIT 

Toronto.  

FRUIT — Lemons  are  easier  at  $12.00 
to  $14.00  per  case.  Elberta  peaches  are 
arriving  and  selling  at  $6.50  to  $7.00  per 
bushel  basket.  Shipments  of  Montmor- 
encie  cherries  have  been  fairly  heavy 
during  the  week,  and  are  expected  to 
continue  for  this  week;  prices  on  6s 
range  from  65  to  75  cents  per  basket  and 
lis  at  $1.25  to  $1.50.  Red  and  black 
currants  and  gooseberries  are  in  good 
supply  at  slightly  higher  prices.  Huckle- 
berries are  cheaper  at  $2.50  to  $2.75  per 
basket.  Good  quality  apples  from  Mary- 
land are  offered  at  $5.00  per  bushel  ham- 
per. Lawton  berries  are  in  fair  supply 
at  20  cents  per  box. 

Oranges    Valencies    lOOs 5  50 

Do.,    126s    5  75  7  00 

Do.     150s  and  smaller 6  00 

and   smaller 5  75  7   00 

Bananas,     Port     Limons     0  09 

Lemons,    Messina 12  00  14  00 

Watermelons,    each    0  75  1   75 

Peaches,   6   baskets  to  crate 6  00 

Do.,    Elbertas      bus.    bkt    ....      6  50  7  00 

Canteloupes,    Standard,    45s    6  00 

Do.,    flat,    15s 3   00 

Cal.    plums,   per   box 3  00 

Cal.    Pears,    per   box    5   50  5  75 


July  29,  1921. 


Gooseberries,  lis,  per  bkt 1  QO 

Do.,  6s,  per  bkt 2  00 

Cherries,    Sour,    6s    0  65  0  75 

Do.,  sour,   lis 1  25  1  50 

Red    currants,   6s 0  75  1  00 

Do.,   lis 1  .50  2  00 

Black   currants     6s 1  25  1  50 

Do.,   lis 3  00 

Hucgleberries 2  50  2  75 

Lawton   berries 0  20 

POTATOES   FIRMER 

Toronto.  ■ 

VEGETABLES— Potatoes  are  com- 
mencing to  take  on  a  firm  and  higher 
feeling.  Virginians  are  about  over  and 
have  advanced  as  high  as  $7.50  per  bar- 
rel, although  $7.25  is  about  the  general 
price.  Local  new  potatoes  are  firm  at 
$3.50  per  bag.  The  first  shipment  of 
Spanish  opions  is  on  the  market  at 
$6.50  per  large  crate,  and  $3.50  for  half 
crates.  California  yellow  opions  are 
offered  at  $5.00  per  100  pound  sack.  To- 
matoes are  easier  at  75  cents  to  $1.25 
per  basket.  Cucumbers  are  lower  at 
$1.00  per  basket.  Butter  beans  have 
advanced  to  $1.00  per  basket,  while  a 
week  ago  they  were  selling  at  60  cents. 

Cabbage,   perjdoz 0  75  1   00 

Potatoes,    old,    per   bag 0  70 

Do.,  New  Virginia,  bbl 7   00 

Do.,    new    local,    per    bag    3  50 

Head   lettuce,    crate 1  50  2  00 

Tomatoes,   lis 0  75  1   25 

New  beets,  per  dozen 0  25 

New  carrots,  per   doz 0  25 

Green    peas,    11    cjt.    basket    0  75  0  80 

Wax  and  green  beans,   11   qt.  bkt 1  00 

Cucumbers,    lis 1  00  1   25 

Corn,   per   doz 0  30 

Onions      Spanish,    crate    6  50 

Do.,   Cal.,   sack,    100   lbs 5  0« 

Do.,  hampers 3  00 

Celery,  bunch 0  75 


California  Pack  of  Canned  Fruit  Light 

Many  Canning  Factories  Not  Operating — Heavy 

Carry  Over  at  First  of  Year — Stocks 

Now  About  Cleaned  Up. 


THERE  are  indications  that  the 
pack  of  California  fruits  and  veg- 
etables will  be  a  small  one  this 
season.  Many  of  the  factories  are  not 
operating  at  all  and  most  of  the  others 
are  operating  on  a  reduced  scale  and  the 
output  is  expected  to  be  considerably 
below  last  year. 

"The  carry  over  of  the  first  of  the 
year  was  very  heavy  but  during  the 
past  four  months  these  stocks  have  been 
moved;  most  of  them  on  a  basis  that 
represented  a  heavy  loss  to  the  owners, 
as  the  goods  were  sold  not  only  below 
the  cost  of  production,  but,  in  many 
cases,  actually  below  replacement  cost 
this  season."  stated  C.  H.  Bentley  of 
the  California  Packing  Corporation,  San 
Francisco,  Calif.,  to  Canadian  Grocer. 
"We  have  already  passed  through  the 
season  on  important  products  like  spin- 
ach, peas,  string  beans,  asparagus,  cher- 
ries and  strawberries,  so  that  we  are  in 
a  position  to  say  positively  that  the  pack 
has  already  fallen  way  below  normal 
conditions.  It  is  difficult  at  this  time 
to  give  accurate  figures,  but  on  canned 
peas  we  have  not  packed  in  California 
more  than  25  per  cent  of  the  normal. 
The  other  varieties  will  show  a  serious 


shrinkage,    although      probably   not     so 
great  as  that  on  peas. 

"Unfavorable  crop  conditions  as  well 
as  unfavorable  market  conditions  have 
brought  about  this  result.  In  a  general 
way,  the  same  conditions  will  affect  the 
pack  of  peaches  and  pears.  So  far  as 
tomatoes  are  concerned,  the  pack  cannot 
reach  50  per  cent  of  normal  and  pro- 
ably  not  30  per  cent  for  the  reason 
that  there  is  iconsiderably  Ijrss  thani 
half  the  normal   acreage    in   the   state"'. 


In  every  town  there  are  some  men 
who  have  a  lot  to  say  about  the  "good 
old  times."  Don't  degenerate  into  that 
class  until  you  have  ceased  to  feel  any 
interest  in  future  times. 

♦  *     * 

If  you  think  no  acquaintance  and  no 
trade  paper  can  tell  you  anything  about 
running  your  business,  you  are  going 
to  seed  and  you  need  advice  more  than 
you  know. 

♦  *     * 

It's  a  wise  merchant  who  knows 
enough  bo  give  his  employes  a  chance 
to  tell  him  what  they  think  about  the 
management  of  the  store. 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


33 


WINNIPEG  MARKETS 

WINNIPEG,  July  27. — Grocery  markets  are  quiet  as  far  as  price 
changes  are  concerned.  Business  in  some  lines  shows  an  im- 
provement but  buying  for  future  is  light  and  unsettled.  Sugar 
has  been  reduced  to  $8.50  per  cwt.  The  bulk  oat  market  is  firm 
and  advanced  slightly.  Sockeye  salmon  pack  is  reported  light  and 
spot  stocks  are  practically  cleaned  up.  Opening  prices  have  been 
named  on  California  peaches  and  figs  and  are  much  lovv^er  than  last 
year.  The  nut  market  is  showing  a  firmer  tone  and  walnuts  are  re- 
ported scarce  due  to  the  poor  crop.  The  rice  market  is  firmer  and 
spot  stocks  of  Siam  are  reported  light.  Latest  reports  from  Ceylon 
state  that  the  tea  market  is  showing  a  firmer  tone  and  an  advance 
of  20  per  cent  is  noted.  Fruits  and  vegetables  are  in  good  demand 
and  prices  are  slightly  easier. 


SYRUP  MARKET  QUIET 


SALMON  PACK  LIGHT 


Winnipeg.  

CANNED  GOODS_It  is  an  established 
fact  that  the  salmon  packers  at  the  coast 
are  buying  sockeyes  only.  The  pack  has 
been  extremely  disappointing  and  is 
much  lighter  at  the  present  time  than 
it  ever  has  been  previously.  Spot  stocks 
at  the  coast  have  been  considerably  re- 
duced during  the  last  60  days,  and  as 
France  has  bought  a  large  quantity  of 
pinks,  this  line  is  practically  cleaned  up. 
Chums  are  moving  slowly  and  heavy 
stocks  are  held  but  a  large  proportion  of 
same  are  not  of  the  best  quality.  Last 
year's  pack  of  red-springs,  sockeyes  and 
chums  are  practically  cleaned  up.  Can- 
ned fruits  are  showing  a  firmer  tone, 
and  gallon  apples  are  reported  scarce, 
and  have  advanced.  A  good  pack  of  rasp- 
berries is  expected  from  the  west.  Can- 
ned vegetables  have  advanced  and  spot 
stocks  are  light. 

BULK  OATS  FIRMER 


Winnipee.  — — 

CEREALS  —  The  market  is  ruling 
steady  with  quotations  generally,  firmly 
held  with  bulk  rolled  oats  advanced  10 
cents  per  bag  on  80s  and  other  sizes  in 
accordance.  There  is  no  change  in  quo- 
tations on  packed  cereals.  Light  cer- 
eals such  as  corn  flakes,  etc.,  are  in  good 
demand. 

COFFEE  RULING  STEADY 

Winnipeg.  , 

COFFEE— The  coffee  market  is  ruling 
steady,  but  very  little  activity  is  being 
shown  by  buyers.  Local  quotations  re- 
main unchanged  and  a  better  demand  is 
noted. 
COFFEE— 

Rio,    lb 0   191,2     0  20io 

Mexican,    lb 0  45         0   49 

Jamaica,     lb 0  28  0  30 

Bogotas,    lb 0  45  0  48 

Mocha    (types)    0  49  0  51 

Santos,    Bourbon,    lb 28  0  30 

Santos,    lb 0  26  0  29 

RAISINS  IN  DEMAND 

Winnipeg:.  

DRIED  FRUIT— Opening  prices  have 
been  named  on  peaches  and  figs,  and  they 
are  considerably  lower  than  last  year's 
prices.  The  difference  in  price  between 
peeled  and  unpeeled  is  only  about  one 
cent  per  pound  and  no  doubt  at  the  slight 
difference  the  peeled  will  be  greatly  in 
demand.  Raisins  and  evaporated  ap- 
ples are  in  good  demand  and  selling  free 
ly.  The  California  market  remains  firm 
on  prunes.  New  apricots  are  expected 
on  the  local  market  shortly. 

DRIED    FRUIT 

Evaporated    apples,    per    lb 0   15%     0  16 

Currants,    90-lb.,    per    b 0  18  0   10 


Do.,  8  oz.  pkRs.,  6  doz.  case,  lb. 
Dat«s,    Hallowee,    bulk,    lb 

Do.,  pkge.,  S  doz.  case  lb.  . 
Figs,    Spanish,    per    lb 

Do.,    Smyrna,    per    lb 

Do.,  black,  cartons,  per  carton 
Loganberries,    4    doz.    case,    pkt. .. 


0  16% 
0  14% 
0  15% 
0  15 
0  12% 
0  60 
0  30 


Peaches,    standard,    per    lb 0  20  0  21 

Do.,    choice,     per    lb 0  23  0  24 

Do.,    fancy,   per   lb 0  24  0  25 

Do.,  Cal.,  in  cartons,  per  carton    .  1  10 

Do.,    unpitted,    per    lb 0  10 

Pears,  extra   choice,  per   lb 0  25 

Do.,   Cal.,   cartons,   per  carton 1  25 

Prunes — 

30-40S,    25s,   per    lb 0  21 

40-50s     25s,  per  lb 0  16V4 

30-60s,   25s,   per  lb 0   14 

60-70S,    2.5s,    per   lb 0   12% 

70.80s,    25s,    per    lb 0  IIU. 

80-90S,   25s,  per  lb 0  lO'i 

90-lOOs,    25s,    per    lb 0  08 

In    5-lb.    cartons,    per    carton 0  68 

Raisins — 

Cal.,   pkg.,  seeded,   IS  oz.,   fancy, 

3  doz.,  to  case    per  pkB 0  29 

Choice  seeded,    15   oz.,   3  doz.   to 

case,    per    pkg 0  27 

Fancy   seeded,    11    oz.,   4   doz.    to 

case,  per  pkg 0  23 

Choice  seeded,   11   oz.,   4  doz.   to 

case,   per   pkg 0  22% 

Cal.,    bulk,    seeded.    25-lb.    boxes      0  29 

Do.,  pkt.,   seedless,    11   ozs.,   3 

doz.   to  case,   per   lb 0  22 

Apricots     choice,   25s,    lb 0  30 

Do.,    10s,    lb 0  31 

Co.,    standard,    25s,    lb 0  27 

Do.,   fancy,  258,  lb 0  35 

Do.,    fancy,    10s.    lb 0  36 

SUGAR  PRICES  LOWER 

Winnipeg.  -^-^— 

SUGAR — The  sugar  markets  are  firm 
in  both  United  States  and  Canada,  and 
Canadian  refiners  have  reduced  their 
prices  to  $8.50  per  cwt. 

Extra    gran.,    bags,    100    lbs 8  50 

Do.,   gunnes,    5-20    lbs 8  90 

Do.,  gunnies,    10-10   lbs 9  00 

Do.,    cartons,    20-5    bs 9   10 

Do.,    cartons,    50-2    lbs 9  2" 

Yellow,  No.   1   It.,  bags  100  lbs 8  10 

Do.,   golden,    bags.    100    lbs X  00 

Powdered    Sugar,    bbls 8  90 

Do.,   boxes,    50   lbs 9  10 

Do.,   boxes,    25    lbs 9  30 

Icing,  barrels 9  00 

Do.,   boxes,    50   lbs 9  20 

Do.,   boxes,   25   lbs 9  40 

LUMP   SUGAR— 

Soft  lumps,    boxes,    100   lbs 9  30 

Do.     boxes,  50    lbs 9  40 

Do.,  25  lbs 9  60 

Do.,    cases,    20    cartons 10  25 

Do.,  cases,  50  half  cartons 11   10 

Small    Lump,  boxes,    100   lbs 9  20 

Do.,    boxes,    50    lbs 9  30 

Do.,  boxes,  25   lbs 9  50 

Do.,  cartons,  50-2  lbs 10  60 

Hard    lump  sugar     barrels 9  50 

Do.,    boxes,     100    lbs 9  50 

Do.,   boxes,    50    lbs 9  70 

Do.,  boxes,  25  lbs 9  75 

SPICE  MARKET  STEADY 

Winnipeg.  

SPICE — The  market  for  spices  remains 
steady,  although  the  demand  from  con- 
suming channels  has  eased  off.  Latest 
cable  advices  from  the  East  and  Holland 
report  very  firm  markets  with  upward 
tendencies.  Peppers,  cassias,  cloves  and 
nutmegs  are  in  good  demand. 


Winnipeg.  

SYRUPS— The  market  is  quiet  with 
no  change  in  quotations  on  either  com 
or  cane  syrup. 

STARCH  SELLING  FREELY 

Winnipeg:.  

STARCH — There  is  a  big  improvement 
in  the  demand  for  starch  and  quota- 
tions remain  unchanged. 

STARCH— 

Cornstarch       1-lb.     pkgs.,     lb 0  09^^ 

Do.,    No.    1    quality,    per    lb 0  10% 

Gloss,    1-lb.    pkgs.,    per    lb 0  10% 

Celluloid,    1-lb.    pkgs.,    case 4  35 

SHELLED  WALNUTS  FIRM 

Winnipeg.  

NUTS — The  market  for  shelled  Bor- 
deaux walunts  halves  is  firm  and  further 
advances  are  expected  due  to  the  fact 
that  the  crop  is  very  light.  Shelled  al- 
monds are  showing  a  firmer  tendency, 
and  although  the  demand  is  light  at  the 
present  time,  higher  prices  will  prevail 
when  the  fall  crop  arrives.  No.  1  shell- 
ed Spanish  peanuts  are  slightly  easier. 
Shelled  pecans  continue  firm  and  higher 
prices  are  expected  for  future  deliveries 
on  shelled  Brazils. 

FLOUR  MARKET  STEADY 

Winnipeg.  

FLOUR — The  flour  market    continues 
steady  and     merchants     are     buying  in 
small  quantities  to  meet  their  present  re- 
quirements. 
FLOUR— 

98-lb.  sacks  5  32'4 

Two  49-lb.  sacks 5  40 

Four  24-lb.  sacks a  50 

JAMS  IN  GOOD  DEMAND 

Winnipeg.  

JAMS  —  Practically  all  prices  have 
been  named  on  new  packed  jams,  but 
jobbers  are  selling  old  stocks  at  the  old 
prices.  Higher  prices  will  likely  pi'e- 
vail  just  as  soon  as  the  balance  of  the 
old  pack  is  cleaned  up. 

RICE  MARKET  FIRMER 
Winnipeg.  — — — 

RICE — The  rice  market  is  firmer, 
and  higher,  and  has  advanced  about  $10 
per  ton.  The  quality  coming  forward 
is  only  fair  and  available  stocks  in  the 
Orient  consist  of  very  poor  grades.  Spot 
stocks  of  Siam  are  very  light. 

FRUIT  MARKET  ACTIVE 

Winnipeg.  

FRUITS— The  market  is  fairly  active 
on  all  lines,  with  prices  generally  tend- 
ing easier.  Raspberries  are  commenc- 
ing to  show  signs  of  the  end  of  the  sea- 
son, and  are  quoted  at  $4.25  per  case. 
Lemons  remain  high  at  $14.00  per  case.. 
Apricots,  cherries,  plums  and  peaches  are- 
selling  freely. 

Cherries,    bings    in    lugs,    case    ...      4  00  5  00 

Plums,    California     per   case    ....      3  00  3  50 

Apricots,    per   case 2   50  2  75 

Peaches,    per  case 2  75 

Cantaloupes,     flats,     per     case     3  00 

Do.,    standards,    per    case ("50 

Watermelon,    per    lb 0  07 

VEGETABLES  IN  DEMAND 

Winnipeg.  

VEGETABLES  —  Local  cucumbers 
have  arrived  on  the  market  and  are  sell- 
ing freely  at  50  cents  per  dozen.  Good 
shipments  of  tomatoes  from  Ontario  are 
arriving  and  are  quoted  at  $2.75  to  $3.00. 
TEA  MARKET  HIGHER 

Winnipeg.  ^— — 

TEAS  —  The  Ceylon  tea  market  is 
showing  a  firmer  tone  and  advanced 
about  20  per  cent.  There  is  no  change 
in  the  Indian  market.  Quotations  on 
spot  stocks  remain  unchanged  under  a 
light  demand. 


'34 


c  a'n^  D  I  a  i^  ''d  R  0  C  E -R 


July  29-,  1921. 


WEEKLY  MARKET  REPORTS  BY  WIRE 

Statements  from  Buying  Centres  East  and  West 


CALGARY  Alta.  July  27.— B.  C.  Sugar 
declined  25  cents  on  the  nineteenth  and 
75  cents  on  the  twenty-first.  In  some 
quarters  an  advance  is  looked  for  on 
sugar.  Rolled  oats  advanced  35  cents. 
Lard  is  up  to  60  ents  on  threes,  making 
the  price  $11.40.  Cooked  hams  are  one 
cent  per  pound  higher.  One  brand  of 
maple  syrup  is  quoted  lower.  Crisco  in 
bulk  is  slightly  higher.  Large  Ontario 
cheese  is  quoted  at  26  ta  26  1-2  cents 
per  pound.  Strawberries  2s,  are  selling 
at  $8.15  to  $8.40  per  case.  B.  C.  ripe 
tomatoes  are  now  on  the  market  at  $4.00 
per  crate.  Raspberries  are  selling  at 
$4.25  to  $4.50  and  California  lemons  are 
selling  at  $13.50. 


Alberta  Markets 

FROM  CALGARY,  BY  WIRE 


Lard,    pure,   3    10  fiO 

Beans      B.C.,    per    hundred     4  9.5  .5  .SO 

Rolled    oats 9   1 T) 

Rice,    Siam ,5  ,50         6  00 

Japan.    No.    1     7   50         8  00 

Tapioca 6  7.5         7  2.5 

Sago     6  75         7  25 

Sugar,    pure   cane,   gran.,   cwt 10  52 

Cheese,  No.   ],  Ont,  large 0  26         0  26',i 

Alherta   cheese,   twins 0  22         0  23   " 

Do.,    large 0  22"^      0  2.'? 

Butter,    creamery,    lb 0  .35 

Do.,    dairy,    lb 0   25  0  .30 

Lard,    pure     3s 11   40 

Eggs,    new    laid,    local,    case    ....    10  00  10  .50 

Tomatoes,    2'/js     4  00         4  25 

Corn,    2s,    case     3  15         3  85 

Peas,    2s,    standard    case    3  60         4  00 

New    early    June    peas,    case     4  50 

Strawberries,     2s,     Ont.,     case     . .      8   15         8   40 

Raspberries,     2s,     Ont.,     case     .  .    10  40  11  00 

Gooseberries,    2s     11   30 

Cherries,    2s,    red,    pitted     9  00         9  50 

Apples,    evaporated,    lb 0   14         0   15'/. 

Do.,    25s.     lb 0   1411,      0    IB'/I, 

Peaches,    evaporated,    lb 0  22  "      0  22'/{. 

Do.,    canned,    2s    7   45         7  90 

Prunes,    90-lOOs     0  08         0  08''. 

Do.,    70-80S     0  08%      0   11    " 

Do.,    60-70S 0   12         0   \2-% 

Potatoes,    local,    ton    25   DC  .30  00 

St.  John  N.  B.  July  27.— There  are  sev- 
eral changes  in  quotations  on  general 
grocery  commodities,  most  of  these  are 
upward,  with  one  or  two  exceptions. 
Sugar  decli'ied  65  cents  per  hundred. 
Lemons  are  also  sl'ghtly  easier  at  $14.00 
to  $15.00  per  case.  Granulated  cornmeal 
advanced  to  $3.75  to  $4.00.  Cheese  is  fir- 
mer at  27  cents  per  pound.  American 
clear  pork  is  higher  at  $32.00.  Canned 
vegetables  are  higher,  tomatoes  advanced 
20  cents,  corn  30  cents  and  peas  10  cents 
per  case.  Fresh  eggs  are  firmer  at  40 
to  42  cents  per  doz.  Old  potatoes  ad- 
vanced to  $3.00  to  $3.70  per  barrel  while 
new  potatoes  are  easier  at  $2.00  to  $2.25 
per  bushel. 


nnnnii 


New  Brunswick  Markets 

FROM  ST.  JOHN,  BY  WIRE 


Cornmeal      gran.,    bags 3   75  4   00 

Do.,   ordinary 2  30 

Rolled   oats 8   80 

Rice,    Siam,    per    100    lbs 6   50  7  00 

Tapioca,    100    lbs 8  00  10  00 

Molasses    0  60 

Sugar 

Standard   granulated    8  30 

No.    1,    yellow 7   80 

Cheese,    new,    twins     0  27 

Eggs,     fresh,    doz 0   40  0  42 

Lard,    pure,    lb 0   16';j  0   17 

Do.,    compound    0   13''i  0  14 

Tomatoes.    2'..s,    std.,    case     4  20 

American   clear   pork    32   00  35  00 

Beef,    corned.    Is 3  45 

BreaUfa.st   bacon    0  45  0  4S 

Butter      creamery,    per    lb 0  30  0  33 

Do.,    daii-y 0  25  0  29 

Do.,    tub    0  24  0  28 

Corn,    2s,    standard,    case 3  SO 

Peas,    standard,    case    3  90 

Apples,    gal.,     N.B..    doz 3  00 

Strawberries,    2s,    Ont.,    case    .... 

Lemons,    case     1 4   00  15  00 

Oranges,    California     6  50  8  00 

Bananas,    lb 0  08  0  10 

Grapefruit,    case    8  50  9  50 

Potatoes      old,     bbl 3  OO  3  70 

Do.,   new.    bush 2   00  2  25 

Halifax  N.  S.  July  27.— While  few 
cvianges  it!  price  are  shown  this, 
week,  staple  groceries  are  still  slid- 
ing downwards.  Granuated  and' 
yellow  sugars  show  the  greatest 
decline,  being  a  reflection  on  the 
flat  markets  of  Cuba  and  the  West 
Indies.  Local  wholesalers  state  that  the 
chaotic  condition  of  the  market  makes 
forecasts  extremely  difficult,  but  think 
that  there  is  still  a  further  decline  to 
come  before  sugar  will  get  back  to  the 
prices  that  were  obtained  this  spring. 
New  potatoes  are  now  on  the  market  and 
are  quoted  at  $2.50  per  bushel  which  is 
much  lower  than  last  season. 


Nova  Scotia  Markets 

FROM  HALIFAX,  BY  WIRE 


Getting  business  is  just  like  courting 
a  ■>gii'l — you  have  to  present  the  right 
kind  of  goods  and  keep  on  calling. 


Flour,     No.     1     patents,     bbl 11  00 

Cornmeal,    bags     2  50 

Rolled    oats,    per    bag     3   85 

Rice,     Siam,     per    100    lbs 0  0S%  0  10 

Tapioca,     100     lbs 10  00 

Sugar,     standard,     gran 7   80 

Do.,    No.    1,    yellow 7  30 

Molasses,     gai 0  63 

Cheese,    Ont.      twins 0  27 

Eggs,      fresh,     doz 0   36 

Lard,    compound 0   16 

Do.,    pure,    lb 0  20 

American    clear    pork,    bbl 32  50 

Tomatoes,    2'/js,    stan..    doz 2   10 

Breakfast    bacon 0  40 

Hams,    aver.    9-12    lbs 0  40 

Do.,    aver.     12-18    lbs 0  40 

Do.,     aver.     18-25     lbs 0  36 

Roll    bacon     0  25 

Butter,    creamery,    lb 0  38 

Do.,    dairy 0  30 

Raspberries,    2s      Ont.,    doz 4  00 

Peaches,    2s,    standard,    doz 3  00 


:!ifliiiiniii 


Corn,    2s,    standard,    doz ....  1  90 

Peas,    standard,    doz 1  95 

Strawberries,    2s,    Ont.,    doz 4  00 

Salmon,    Red   Spring,   flats,   cases     ....  .... 

Do.,   pinks 7  00 

Do.,     Cohoes     14  00 

Do..    Chums    6  00 

Evaporated   apples,    per   lb 0   15 

Dried    peaches,    per    lb 0  22 

Potatoes,    Nat.,    90-lb.    bag 1  25 

Onions,  Jersey 4  00 

Beans,    white 3  35 

Do.,    yellow   eye 7  25 

Bananas,    lb 0  09  0  10 

Lemons,    Ca 15  00 

Oranges,   all   sizes 7  00  8  00 

Grapefruit,    Florida,    case    9  50 

Potatoes,    local    ton     25  00  0  00 

Do.,    Jamaica    7  00  7  50 

Oats,   per   bushel    0  75 


WHITE  TUNA    FISH  PRICES 

Bluefin  packers  and  fishermen  have 
at  last  agreed  upon  prices  for  tuna  and 
$50  a  ton  will  be  paid  the  fishermen. 
The  Albercore  fishermen,  who  are  nearly 
all  Japanese  are  still  holding  out,  but 
opinion  in  Los  Angeles  is  that  these 
fishermen  will  soon  consent  to  terms 
that  the  packers  can  afford  to  pay 
Formal  opening  prices  cannot  yet  be 
named,  but  white  meat  tuna,  standard 
y2S,  should  be  about  $7,00  a  case  at  the 
coast  judging  from  prices  named  for 
other  canned  foods  of  this  season. 


JAPANESE  CRAB  MEAT  SHORT 
PACK 

Japanese  crabmeat  will  not  reach  a 
normal  supply  this  year,  according  to  the 
report  prepared  by  the  Yokahama  Board 
of  Trade.  Various  pickers  in  Saghalien 
have  combined  under  the  name  of  the 
Saghalien  United  Industrial  Corporation, 
and  will  operate  together  this  season, 
with  improved  methods  of  fishing  and 
packing. 

The  extensive  fishing  of  late  years  has 
seriously  depleted  the  crab  fisheries.  The 
crab  run  is  falling  each  year,  and  only 
65,000  to  75,000  cases  are  counted  upon 
this  year.  Added  to  poor  runs  of  crabs 
are  the  financial  troubles  of  the  packers. 
Many  of  the  small  packers  have  suspend- 
ed operations. 


TRUE  WORDS  SPOKEN  IN  JEST 


"Aren't  you  in  favor  of  the  spelling  re- 
form?" 

"Not  at  all,"  answered  the  young  steno- 
grapher.     "Many   a  man  would  be  writ- 
ing his  own  letters   if  he  knew  how  to 
spell  all  the  difficult  words." 
*     *     * 

Some  merchants  are  constantly  on 
the  watch  for  opportunities  to  add  new 
and  bef^er  equipment  and  fixtures. 
These  are  the  men  who  are  getting  the 
trade  away  from  their  old  fashioned 
comnetitois. 


July  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


35 


Selling  Eggs  by  Weight 

Again  in  the  Limelight 

Sherbrooke  Merchant  Believes  It  A  Good  Plan  to  Sell  Eggs  by 

Weight — Produce  Dealers  and  Montreal  Retail  Merchant  Says 

Present  Plan  of  Selling  Eggs  Cannot  be  Improved. 


THERE  are  varied  opinions  with  re- 
gard to  the  sale  of  eggs  by  weight. 
In  Sherbrooke  CANADIAN  GRO- 
CER representive  found  the  popular 
opinion  among  the  grocers  to  be  in  favor 
of  selling  by  weight.  One  merchant  sug- 
gested that  eggs  should  be  sold  not  by  the 
pound  but  by  the  dozen  at  a  price  of  so 
much  a  pound.  This  grocer  claimed  that 
the  computnig  scales  now  used  by  the 
grocer  has  made  such  a  system  very  sim- 
ple and  overcomes  what  would  be  an  an- 
noying mathematical  problem  He 
claimed  that  it  would  be  a  very  simple 
matter  for  the  wholesale  produce  mer- 
chants to  bill  the  eggs  to  the  grocer  at  so 
much  per  pound  for  the  net  weight  of 
eggs  in  the  crate.  This  grocer  was 
heartily  in  favor  of  the  scheme  although 
he  had  not  yet  adopted  it.  He  stated 
however  that  he  was  prepared  to  try  it 
out  in  the  near  future. 

Fairness  To  Customers 

Another  Sherbroke  grocer  said,  "To 
my  mind  it  seems  to  be  the  only  just  and 
fair  way  to  sell  eggs  from  the  stand- 
point of  the  producer,  the  grocer  and 
the  consumer.  The  public  are  quite  will- 
ing to  fall  in  line  with  any  plan  which 
they  can  see  is  giving  justice  to  every- 
one. I  feel  sure  that  there  would  not  be 
any  complaint  'rom  one  of  my  customers 
if  I  adopted  the  plan  and  at  the  same 
time  explained  the  idea  to  them.  If  the 
customer  comes  to  the  store  to  buy  her 
eggs  and  in  buying  one  dozen  claims  the 
right  to  pick  out  the  big  ones  it  is  only 
fair  that  she  should  pay  more  for  these 
than  the  customer  who  telephones  h  r 
order  and  takes  just  what  is  given  to  her. 
If  a  grocer  adopted  this  plan  it  would  in- 
crease the  confidence  his  customers  had 
in  his  fair  dealing.  For  another  thing  I 
am  sure  that  the  grocer  would  find  that 
he  was  getting  more  for  his  eggs  wnile  it 
would  not  work  a  hardship  on  anyone 
since  the  people  who  are  satisfied  with  a 
small  egg  have  the  satisfaction  of  know- 
ing that  they  are  paying  less  for  them 


than  they  would  pay  for  the  large  ones. 
I  can  see  nothing  but  an  advantage  in 
adopting  this  system  but  I  am  in  favor 
of  selling  at  so  much  per  pouna  per 
dozen  and  not  at  a  set  price  per  dozen. 
It  seems  to  me  too  that  it  would  mean 
bigger  sales  of  eggs  by  that  system." 
More  Interest  In  Poultry 

W.  Johnston  of  Lennoxville  brought 
out  another  point  when  expressing  his 
opinion  in  favor  of  selling  eggs  by  the 
pound  to  CANADIAN  GKUCER  repre- 
sentative. This  he  claimed  would  en- 
courage the  farmers  to  keep  better 
poultry.  As  Mr.  Johnston  said  "Some 
species  of  poultry  lay  better  eggs  than 
others.  It  is  only  fair  that  the  farmer 
should  get  a  better  price  for  these  than 
he  would  for  smaller  eggs.  This  system 
would  encourage  him  to  keep  the  better 
line  of  poultry.  This  system  is  not  only 
fai)'  to  those  who  want  to  buy  the  bigger 
eggs  but  also  to  those  who  are  quite  sat- 
isfied with  the  small  ones  since  they  are 
then  getting  them  cheaper  than  they 
would  if  they  were  buying  them  by  the 
dozen.  I  am  in  favor  of  selling  eggs  by 
the  dozen  at  a  given  price  per  pound." 

Produce   Men   Doubtful 

Some  of  the  Montreal  grocers  and  pro- 
duce men  do  not  look  upon  the  scheme  of 
selling  eggs  by  weight  with  as  much 
favor  as  do  the  merchants  of  the  smaller 
cities  in  Quebec.  The  manager  of  one  of 
the  wholesale  produce  fii-ins  in  this  city  in 
conversation  with  CANADIAN  GROCER 
representative  said,  "This  is  a  gooa  idea, 
I  believe  a  revival  of  a  plan  laid  before 
the  Federal  Government  some  years  ago 
by  Sir  George  Foster.  However  I  cannot 
see  how  it  will  work  out  in  general  prac- 
tice. For  the  grocers  who  buy  their  eggs 
direct  from  the  farmers  it  will  be  alright 
but  I  am  sure  that  the  wholesale  produce 
merchants  cannot  adopt  it  since  any 
system  that  is  adopted  for  domestic  trade 
must  necessarily  be  used  for  export  and 
that  is  out  of  the  question  in  this  case. 
It  is  impossible  for  dealers  to  weigh  all 


the  eggs  they  sell  and  as  the  weight  of 
crates  and  containers  vary  considerably 
there  is  no  way  of  determining  the  net 
weight  without  weighing  the  eggs  separ- 
ately. I  am  sure  that  the  public  would 
accept  the  plan  with  satisfaction,  as  they 
do  most  novel  schemes  and  I  am  also  of 
the  opinion  that  it  is  quite  fair  to  all  con- 
cerned. It  might  also  help  to  improve 
the  quality  of  the  eggs  produced.  We 
must  not  forget  that  there  is  already 
legislature  that  sets  a  minimum  weight 
on  a  dozen  of  eggs.  By  the  grading 
system  that  is  now  in  force  in  Canada 
No.  1  eggs  are  fresh  eggs  of  uniform  size, 
weighing  25  oz.  to  the  dozen  or  over  or 
47  pounds  net  to  the  30  dozen  case;  clean 
and  free  from  stain,  strong  in  shell;  air 
cell  small  not  over  3-16  of  an  inch  in 
depth ;  white  of  egg  to  be  firm  and  clear 
and  yolk  dimly  visible.  Every  grocer 
can  demand  all  these  qualifications  in 
eggs  bought  as  No.  I's.  Other  eggs  are 
graded     accordiingly.  Virtually     the 

grocer  is  already  buying  his  eggs  by 
weight.  He  can  at  least  count  on  that 
minimum  weight.  ,1  admit  the  fairness 
of  the  scheme  but  I  cannot  see  that  it  can 
be  adopted  generally  or  see  that  it  is 
even  practical  as  a  standard  system." 

The  manager  of  one  of  the  down  town 
grocery  stores  in  Montreal  also  disaproves 
of  the  scheme  on  the  ground  that  it  en- 
tails more  work  for  the  grocer  and  makes 
his  accounting  system  more  complicated. 
He  claims  that  the  public  and  the  grocer 
are  satisfied  with  the  present  system  and 
that  the  merchants  are  only  piling  up 
more  trouble  for  themselves  by  suggesting 
a  new  system. 


SAVING  THE  HOLES 

Commissioner  C.  B.  Connelly,  of  the 
Department  of  Labor  and  Forestry, 
Pennsylvania,  says  the  United  States 
Bureau  of  Engraving  and  Printing  is  ac- 
tually saving  the  "holes"  resulting  from 
perforating  postage  stamps.  Four  bar- 
rels of  these  tiny  disks  are  collected  ev- 
ery day  and  sold  to  pulp  mills. 


36 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


Produce,  Provision  and  Fish  Markets 


MONTREAL  July  27. — There  is  an  easier  trend  to  the  produce 
market  which  is  in  most  cases  traced  to  a  weaker  feeling  in 
sterling  exchange  which  has  caused  a  dropping  off  in  the  ex- 
port demand.  As  a  result  of  this  butter  is  two  cents  cheaper  this 
week  and  cheese  has  dropped  one  cent.  For  a  time  there  was  a 
movement  upward  in  both  of  these  on  account  of  the  very  dry  sea- 
son but  supplies  have  kept  up  and  now  that  the  export  trade  is  drop- 
ping off  prices  are  coming  down  slightly.  Eggs  are  also  a  little 
easier  and  receipts  are  larger  than  they  were  one  week  ago.  On  the 
other  hand  the  demand  for  live  hogs  is  greater  than  the  offerings  of 
selected  stock  and  prices  paid  have  advanced  giving  a  very  strong 
tone  to  smoked  meats  and  cooked  meats  both  of  which  have  been  in 
big  demand  lately.  Stocks  of  these  on  hand  are  light  and  the 
strength  of  the  pork  market  may  mean  higher  prices  on  these  lines 
if  the  strength  holds.  Lard  is  maintaining  its  strength  with  a  good 
movement.  There  is  only  a  small  demand  for  barrelled  meats. 
Fish  prices  are  unchanged  with  a  fair  demand. 


BUTTER  DROPS  TWO  CENTS 

BUTTER— The  feature  of  the  market 
has  been  a  decided  weakness  which  de- 
veloped in  the  market  through  lower 
prices  being  bid  at  the  country  boards. 
This  to  some  extent  was  attributed  to  the 
weak  market  for  sterling  exchange  and 
a  falling  off  in  the  demand  from  English 
importers.  There  is  also  an  increased 
supply  of  creamery  butter  on  the  mar- 
ket, especially  supplies  from  the  west. 
Prices  quoted  this  week  on  dairy  butter 
are  slightly  easier. 

BUTTER— 

Creamery,    prints,    qual.,    new.      0  .39         0  40 
Do.,    solids,    quality,    new    ...      0  38         0  39 

CHEESE  DOWN   ONE   CENT 

Montreal.  


CHEESE — A  much  weaker  feeling  has 
prevailed  in  the  cheese  market  through 
the  last  week,  resulting  from  the  same 
influences  that  have  weakened  the  but- 
ter market  mainly  the  smaller  demand 
from  English  importers.  Prices  paid 
at  the  cheese  boards  are  slightly  lower, 
and  whole.sale  cheese  prices  are  reduced 
one  cent  a  pound  to  24. 


Large,   per   io 

Twins,   per   lb 

Triplets,   per   lb . , 

'  Stilton,    per    lb.     ...     ...     . 

Fancy     old    cheese,  ,  per   b. 
Quebec 


0  24 

0  24 

0  24 

0  3.T 

0  34  0  35 
0  24 

SELECTED   EGGS    EASIER 

Montreal.  

EGGS — Receipt  of  eggs  on  this  market 
are  holding  up  well  with  an  increase  ov- 
er that  of  the  previous  week.  The  export 
demand,  however,  has  increased  and  the 
demand  for  home  consumption  is  also 
good,  making  the  market  firm,  with 
stronger  tendencies.  The  only  change 
in  the  local  market  is  a  drop  of  one  cent 
per  dozen  on  extras,  all  other  grades 
holding  firm. 
EGGS— 

Fresh,  selects 040 

Do.,   No.    1 0  3.") 

BARREL   MEATS   QUIET 


Montreal.  

BARRELLED  MEATS  —  There  is  no 
change  in  the  market  for  barrelled 
meats.  Prices  are  unchanged  under  only 
a  small  demand  for  local  trade. 

Barrel    Pork — 

Canadian   Short   cut    (bbl)    30-40 
Clear  fat  backs   (bbl)   40-50  pes 30  00 


Heavy    mess    pork     (bbl) 
Plate  beef  


31   00 
23   00 


SMOKED  MEATS  LOOK  HIGHER 

Montreal.  

SMOKED  MEATS  —  The  trade  in  all 

lines  of  smoked  meats  continues  active, 
owing  to  the  hot  weather  prevailing, 
and  a  large  home  consumption.  Stocks 
in  packers'  hands  are  kept  low  by  the 
demand,  and  if  the  hog  market  continues 
strong  higher  prices  may  be  looked  for 
in  the  near  future. 

BACON— 

Breakfast,  best 0  36  0  39 

Smoked    breakfast 0  41  0  44 

Cottage    rolls 0  29 

Picnic   Hams 0  24 

Wiltshire    0  33  0  37 

MEDIUM    SMOKED    HAMS— 

Weight,    8-14,    long   cut    0  31 

Do.,    14-20    0  34  0  3.5 

Do.,    20-2.5     0  30 

Over  35  lbs 0  30 

Do.,   25-35 0  30 

LIVE  HOGS  HIGHER 

Montreal  

FRESH  MEATS A  stronger  feeling 

prevails  in  the  live  hog  market,  which 
is  attributed  principally  to  a  keener  de- 
mand for  supplies  from  packers  and  to 
smaller  offerings.  Prices  paid  here 
range  from  $13.00  to  $13.50  per  100,  and 
in  some  cases  $14.00  per  100  paid  for  se- 
lect weighed  off  cars.  The  advance  in 
price  amounts  to  about  .50  cents  per  100 
with  a  firm  tendency. 

FRESH   MEATS— 

Hogs,    live     (selected    off    cars).      13  50       14  00 
Abattoir     killed,     65-90     lbs 0  21 

Fresh    Pork — 

Legs    of    pork     (foot    on) 

Loins    (trimmed)     

Trimmed    shoulders 0  20         0  22 

Untrimmed     0  IC         0   18 

Pork   sausage    (pure) 0  25 

Fresh    Beef — 


0  28  Vi     0  29 
0  29         0  30 


(Cows) 

0  19  0  24 

0  18  0   11 

0  27  0  30 


Hind  quarters 
Front  quarters 
.  . .    Loins    .  . . 


(Steers) 
0  21  0  2(; 
0  09  0  13 
0  33         0  36 


COOKED  MEATS  STRONG 

COOKED  MEATS  —  There  is  an  act- 
ive market  for  cooked  meats  with  a  good 
demand  for  home  consumption.  Prices 
are  firm  and  unchanged,  but  if  the  hog 
market  maintains  its  strength  higher 
prices  may  be  looked-  for,  since  supplies 
on  hand  are  only  sufficient  to  meet  im- 
mediate requirements. 

Jellied    pork    tongues 0  38 

Jellied    pressed   beef,    lb 0  37 


Ham   and   tongue,    lb 0  42 

Veal 0  30 

Hams,    cooked 0  51  0  57 

Pork    pies    (doz.)     0  SO 

Mince    meat,    lb 0   17Vi  0  19 

Sausage,    pure    pork     0  25 

Bologna     lb 0  14 

Ox    tongue,    tins 0  59 

Head    cheese.    6-lb.    tins,    per    lb 0  16 

Do.,   25-lb.   tin   pails,   lb 0  15 

LARD  HOLDS  FIRM 

Montreal  

LARD  —  The  lard  market  continues 
active  with  a  firm  undertone.  Prices  are 
unchanged,  but  are  steady  with  the 
strength  that  has  characterized  this  mar- 
ket for  some  weeks. 

LARD— 

Tierces.    360    lbs 0   18 

Tubs,  60  lbs 0  18Vi 

Pails.   20   lbs 0   19 

Bricks 0  20  0  21 

FISH  UNCHANGED 

Montreal  

FRESH  FISH— There  is  no  change  in 
the  prices  quoted  on  fresh  fish.  There 
is  a  fair  demand  and  the  supplies  of  hal- 
ibut, white  fish  and  Gaspe  salmon  are 
good. 

Gaspe   Salmon    ...    0  22 

White    fish 0  18 

Haddock 0  06 

Halibut 0  18 

Trout 0  18 

FROZEN   FISH    

Halibut,     large     and     chicken      .  .      0  20  0  23 

Haddock 0  07 

Mackerel 0  15  0  16 

Do.,    Western,    medium    0  21  0  22 

Steak    Cod 0  07%  0  OS'^ 

Market    Cod 0  06M!  0  07 

Sea    Herrings 0  06  0  07 

Salmon,    dr.,    B.    C 0  20  0  21 

Do.,    Cohoes,    round    0   18  0  19 

Do.,    Qualla,    hd.    and    dd    Oil 

Doree . .      0  12  0   17 

Smelts 0   15  0  20 

TEA  CONDITIONS  IN  JAPAN 


Tea  Street  is  busy,  says  a  despatch 
from  Shidzuoka,  Japan,  dated  May  24, 
1921.  The  working  fund  of  the  Central 
Tea  Association  is  raised  by  the  sale  of 
stamps  which  each  package  of  tea  must 
bear  that  is  shipped  out  of  Shidzuoka — 
a  31-sen  stamp  for  export  and  a  43-sen 
stamp  for  home  consumption.  To  date 
the  comparative  sale  of  stamps  has  been 
as  follows: 

1920  1921 

Pounds        Pounds 

Export     1,500,000  500 

Local    1,250,000     2,500,000 

Total     2,750,000     2,500,500 

This  2,500,000  pounds  for  domestic 
consumption  comprises  the  choicest  pick 
of  the  first  crop.  Some  of  the  rest 
may  reach  America  at  a  heavy  loss  to  the 
grower.  Already  where  the  picking  of 
first  crop  is  finished  it  is  20  to  30  per 
cent  short  of  last  season,  and  settlement 
for  export,  according  to  newspapers, 
foot  up  to  500,000  pounds. 


All   Wool 

"Are  caterpillars  good  to  eat?"  asked 
little  Tommy  at  the  dinner  table. 

"No,"  said  father;  "what  makes  you 
ask  a  question  like  that  while  we  are 
eating," 

"You  had  one  in  your  lettuce,  but  it's 
gone  now,"  replied  Tommy. 


Julv  29.  1921. 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


TORONTO  July  27. — The  butter  market  continues  in  a  strong 
position  with  quotations  again  advanced.  Cheese  is  also  strong 
while  eggs  are  tending  easier.  Lard  and  shortening  maintain 
the  strong  position  gained  a  couple  of  weeks  ago,  and  with  the  sur- 
plus stocks  fairly  well  disposed  of,  there  is  a  tendency  for  prices  re- 
maining firm.  Cooked  hams  are  again  advancing  under  a  heavy 
demand  and  limited  stocks.  Smoked  bacon  is  fairly  active  but  salt 
and  pickled  meats  are  quiet.  Live  hogs  are  steady  under  light  re- 
ceipts. Fresh  whitefish  and  trout  are  higher  but  other  lines  of  fish 
are  unchanged.  There  are  no  price  changes  in  poultry,  the  market 
is  fairly  quiet  but  there  is  an  active  demand  for  broilers  from  rest- 
aurants and  hotels. 


BUTTER    AGAIN    MOVES    UPWARD 

Toronto.  

BUTTER The   market   continues    in 

a  strong  position,  with  prices  advanced 
two  cents  per  pound,  bringing  quotations 
on  first  grade  ci'eamery  to  42  cents  and 
second  grades  to  40  cents  per  pound. 

BUTTER— 

Creamery  prints 0   40  0  42 

CHEESE     HOLDS  STRONG 

Toronto.  

CHEESE— Quotations  are  firm  and 
unchanged  at  2.5  cents  per  pound.  There 
are  still  small  lots  of  old  cheese  available 
which  is  quoted  at  34  cents  per  pound. 

CHEESE— 

Large,    new 0  23 

Do.,   old 0  34 

EGG  PRICES  STEADY 

Toronto.  

EGGS  —  Theie  are  no  new  develop- 
ments in  this  market.  Receipts  are  not 
heavy,  but  the  quality  continues  poor. 
The  demand,  however,  is  light,  and  the 
market  has  an  easy  tone. 
EGGS— 

Selects 0  40         0  41 

No.    1 0  37  0  38 

Selects    in    cartons 0  42         0  43 

COOKED    HAMS    MOVE    UP 

Toronto.  

COOKED  MEATS— There  appears  to 
be  no  slackening  in  the  demand  for  cook- 
ed hams,  which  has  resulted  in  a  scarcity 
on  this  line,  with  prices  advanced  one 
cent,  making  the  regular  round  trimmed 
60  cents  per  pound  and  the  square  press- 
ed 63  to  64  cents.  Other  lines  of  cook- 
ed meats  are  unchanged. 

Boiled    hams,     lb 0  KO 

Do.,  square  pressed 0  63  0  64 

Boiled    shoulders,    lb 0  42 

Head    cheese,    6s,    lb 0  12 

Choice    jellied    ox    tongue,    lb 0  66 

Jellied    pork    tongue    0  37 

Bologna 0  16  0  18 

Macaroni    and    cheese    loaf,    lb 0  23 

Above  prices  subject  to  daily  fluctuations  of 
the   market. 

HOG  PRICES  STEADY 

Toronto.  

FRESH  MEATS— An  unusually  heavy 
run  of  cattle  at  the  Union  Stock  Yard 
was  the  feature  on  Monday,  more  than 
twice  the  number  being  offered  than  for 
several  weeks  past,  which  resulted  in  the 
market  dropping  50  cents  per  hundred. 
In  the  hog  market  it  was  quite  the  re- 
verse, the  offerings  were  light,  with  the 
market  holding  fairly  steady  at  last 
week's  prices.  There  are  no  changes  in 
quotations  on  dressed  meats. 
Hogs — 

Dressed       light,     per     cwt 17   00 

Do.,     heavy,     per    cwt 10  00       12   00 

Live,   off  cars,   per   cwt 13  25 

Live,    fed   and    watered,    cwt 13  00 

Live,   f.o.b..   per   cwt 12   00 

Fresh   Pork — 

•       Legs   of   pork,   up   to    18    lbs 0  38 

Loins    of  pork,    lb 0  30 

Fresh   hams,   lb 0  39 

Tenderloins,   lb <       0  50 

Spare  ribs,   lb 0  12 

Picnics,     lb 0  18% 

New    York   shoulders,   lb 0  19 


Montreal   shoulders,    lb 0  20 

Boston    butts,    lb 0  22V, 

Fresh    Beef — from    Steers   and 
Heifers — 

Hind    quarters     lb 0  21  0  24 

Front  quarters,   lb 0  06  0  08 

Ribs.    lb 0   18  0  26 

chucks,    lb :     0  07  0  07 

Loins,   whole,   lb 0  28  0  30 

Hips,    lb 0   18  0  22 

Cow   beef   quotations   about  2c   per   pound  below 

above    quotations. 

Calves,    lb 0  12  0  16 

Spring    lamb,    lb 0  28  0  30 

Yearling    lamb,    lb 0  12  0  15 

Sheep?  whole,   lb 0  10  0  12 

Above    prices    subject    to    daily    fluctuations    of 

the  market. 

FRESH  TROUT  HIGHER 

Montreal.  

FISH — The  market  continues  with  the 
usual  summer  quietness.  All  lines  are 
well  represented  and  prices  are  unchang- 
ed, with  the  exception  of  Georgian  Bay 
whitefish,  which  has  advanced  to  13  and 
14  cents  per  pound.  Fresh  trout  is 
also  slightly  higher  at  17  and  18  cents 
per  pound. 

LARD  MARKET  STRONG 

Toronto.  

LARD  —  Surplus  stocks  of  lard  are 
practically  cleaned  up,  which  has  result- 
ed in  the  market  maintaining  the  strong 
tone  developed  a  couple  of  weeks  ago . 
Quotations  are  up  two  cents  per  pound, 
making  one  pound  prints  19  cents  and 
on  the  tierce  basis  17  cents  per  pound. 
LARD— 

l-lb.   prints 0  19 


1-lb.  tierces.  400  lbs 0  17 

In     60-lb.     tubs.     y>     cent    higher     than     tierces, 

pails   %   cent  higher  than  tierces,  and  1-lb.  prints, 

two   cents. 

NO  CHANGE  IN  SMOKED  MEATS 

Toronto.  

PROVISIONS. — There  are  no  changes 
in  this  market.  There  continues  to  be  an 
active  demand  for  smoked  hams  and 
bacon,  but  salt  and  pickled  meats  are 
quiet. 

BROILERS  ARRIVING  FREELY 

Toronto.  

POULTRY — Receipts  of  spring  chick- 
ens are  fairly  heavy,  but  small  on  heav- 
ier fowl.  There  is  a  good  demand  for 
broilers  for  restaurant  and  hotel  use,  but 
in  other  sections  of  the  trade  the  de- 
mand is  quiet.  Quotations  remain  as 
last  week. 

Prices    Paid    by    Dealers 

Live.  Dressed. 

Turkeys 0  30  0  40 

Chickens,    spring 0  30  0  40 

Roosters 0  14  0   18 

Fowl      over    5     lbs 0  23  0  25 

Fowl,    4  to  5   ibs 0  20  0  20 

Fowl,    under    4    lbs 0  18  0  18 

Ducklings 0  24  0  35 

Guinea    hens,    pair    1   25  1  50 

Prices  quoted    to   retail   trade :   Dressed : 

Turkeys 0  55  0  60 

Hens,   heavy 0  30  0  32 

Do.,    light    ......     0  28  0  30 

Chickens,    springs     0  45  0  50 

Ducklings     0  48 

SHORTENING  UP  HALF  CENT 

Toronto.  

SHORTENING — Following  the  strong 
situation  in  the  lard  market,  shortening 
is  advanced  one  half  cent  per  pound, 
making  one  pound  prints  16  1-2  cents, 
and  on  the  tierce  basis  13  14  cents. 


0  16  Ve 
0  13% 


SHORTENING—  , 
1-lb.  prints  . . .  ■ 
Tierces.   40   Ibs. 

BETTER  DEMAND  FOR  MARGARINE 

Toronto. 


MARGARINE  —  The  demand  for 
margarine  shows  a  slight  improvement, 
no  doubt  the  higher  prices  on  butter 
having  something  to  do  with  it.  The 
market  is  also  a  shade  firmer  with  the 
best  quality  quoted  at  20  cents  per  pound. 


MANITOBA  MARKETS 

WINNIPEG,  July  27. — The  provision  market  is  marked  by  a 
steady  to  upward  tendency  in  almost  all  lines.  Butter,  cheese, 
lard  and  shortening  have  advanced.  Eggs  are  in  good  de- 
mand and  prices  are  slightly  higher.  During  the  warm  weather  the 
demand  for  cooked  meats  has  been  exceptionally  good  and  packers 
report  a  scarcity  of  hams.  Indications  point  to  higher  prices  on 
these  lines.     Fish  is  in  good  demand  with  quotations  unchanged. 


HIGHER  PRICES  FOR  BUTTER 


Ont..   triplets     lb.    ...     .  . . 

Stilton    cheese,    large,    lb. 


0   ,^1 


0  28% 
0  .iO 


Winnipeg.  

BUTTER— The  market  continues  with 
a  firm  tone  and  creamery  butter  has  ad- 
vanced. There  is  a  good  demand  for 
creamery  butter  and  best  table  grade  is 
quoted  at  43  cents  per  pound. 

BUTTER— 

Creamery,     best     table     (Trade      0   42 

Margarine     0  21 

CHEESE  MARKET  STRONGER 


EGGS  ARE  STEADY 


0  25 


Winnipeg.  

CHEESE — The  cheese  market,  like  th^ 
butter  market,  during  the  week  has  in- 
creased in  strength.  The  market  ad- 
vanced from  1  to  1  1-2  cents  per  pound, 
bringing  the  price  to  the  retail  trade  to 
26  cents  per  pound. 


Winnipeg.  

EGGS  —  The  egg  market  remains 
steady  and  prices  are  holding  firm,  due 
to  the  keen  demand.  Good  supplies  of 
eggs  are  arriving  on  the  market  and  are 
selling  freely.  New  laid  eggs  are  quot- 
ed at  44  cents  per  dozen  in  cartons,  and 
32  cents  per  dozen  for  No.  1  candled. 

COOKED  MEATS  STEADY 


Ont.,    large,    lb. 
Ont.,    twins,    lb. 


0  26 

0  26  Va 


Winnipeg.  

COOKED  MEATS— The  hot  weather 
has  increased  the  demand  for  all  lines 
of  cooked  meats.  Packers  state  that 
supplies  are  not  sufficient,  especially 
hams,  to  meet  the  demand,  and  an  ad- 
vance is  expected  shortly. 


38 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


HAMS— 

Best  quality,  skinned     8-13  lbs 0  57 

Do.,    13-16    lbs 0  54 

Roast    Ham,    lb 0  58 

Roast    shoulders,    lb 0  38% 

Head    cheese,    1-lb.    tins    0  16 

Jellied    ox    tongues,    lb 0  66 

Pork    tongues,    lb 0  40 

Luncheon    cooked    meats.    lb 0  21 

SMOKED    HAM    IN    DEMAND 

Winnipeg.  ■ 

PROVISIONS There     has     been     a 

marked  increase  in  the  demand  for  smok- 
ed ham  during  the  week,  which  is  attrib- 
uted to  the  hot  weather,  with  the  result 
that  there  is  a  scarcity  of  ham  and  in- 
dications point  to  higher  prices.  Bac- 
on, while  in  fair  demand,  shows  no 
change. 

Hams — 

8  to  16    lbs.,   per  lb 0  43  0  44 

16  to  20   lbs.,   per  lb 0  43 

Boneless,   8-16   lbs.,  per  lb 0  48 

Skinned,    14-18   lbs.,   per   lb 0  47 

Skinned     18-22   lbs.,   per  lb 0  44 

Bacon — 

Back,    6    to    10    lbs.,    lb 0  54 

Cottage    Rolls,    boneless     0  31 

Bellies,  6  to  10  lbs.,  per  lb 0  40 

LARD   AND   SHORTENING   UP 

Winnipeg.  

LARD — The  market  continues  to  show 
the  effect  of  the  higher  prices  quoted  for 
hogs,  and  advanced  during  the  week.  On 
the  tierce  basis  lard  is  quoted  at  17 
cents  per  pound.  Shortening  has  also 
advanced  and  is  now  quoted  at  14  cents 
per  pound  in  tierces  lots. 

Pure   lard,    No.    1    quality     per    lb. 

(in    tierces    of    400    lbs.)     0  17 

Do.,    wooden   pails,    20-lb.    pails 3  80 

Shortening    (wooden   palls),   20-lb. 

per  pail 3  20 

Shortening,  tierces  of  400  lbs 0   14 

POULTRY  UNCHANGED 

Winnipeg.  , 

POULTRY— There  is  no  change  in  the 
poultry  situation  and  quotations  remain 
unchanged. 


D.P.    chickens,    S^j    lb.    and   under      .... 

Do.,    3'/4    lbs.    and   over 

D.   P.  fowl.  3Vo   lbs.  and  under 

Do.,  3Vi   lbs.   and  over 

HOG   MARKET   STEADY 


0  36 
0  49 
0  33 
0  34 


Winnipeg.  

FRESH  MEATS— The  hog  market  is 
ruling  steady  and  selected  live  hogs  are 
quoted  at  $13.00  per  cwt.  Trading  on 
the  cattle  market  has  been  generally 
steady  with  a  liberal  demand  for  the  of- 
ferings. Good  steers  are  ranging  from 
$6.00  to  $6.50,  while  the  heavy  kind  are 
quoted  from  $3.50  to  $5.50.  Butcher 
heifers  are  quoted  at  $5.00  to  $5.50  with 
fair  to  good  finding  ready  sale  at  $3.00 
to  $4.50.  Veal  calves  are  reported 
scarce,  and  the  good  kind  ranging  from 
$6.00  to  $8.00,  with  the  common  $3.00  to 
$4.00.  The  sheep  and  lamb  market  has 
been  fairly  active.  The  bulk  of  good 
lambs  are  selling  at  $12.50  to  $13.00, 
with  good  mutton  sheep  being  quoted  at 
$6.00. 

Selected,    live     cwt 13  00 

Heavies 10  00  12  00 

Light 12  00  13  00 

Sows 8  00         9  00 

Fresh   Pork- 
Legs  of  pork,  up  to  35  lbs.,   lb.     0  23         0  31 

Sipare    ribs     0  13 

Loins  of  pork,    lb 0  27         0  30 

Fresh  hams,  lb 0  25         0  33 

Picnics,    lb 0  18 

Shoulders 0   15  0   18 

Fresh    Be^ef — from   Steers   and 
Heifers — 

Hind  quarters,   lb 0  14  0  21 

Front  quarters,  lb 0  061/2  0  08 1/2 

Whole  carcass,  good  grade,  lb.  0   lO'/a  0  ISMi 

Mutton — 

Choice,  lb 0  24 


Choice  long  hinds(   leg  and 

loin) 0  26 

Choice    stews 0  07% 

Lambs — 

Choice,     30-45    lbs 0  22 

Veal- 
Good   veal,   40  to  80  lbs,  hind 
quarters 0  15 

FISH    PRICES    STEADY 

Winnipeg.  

FISH — There  is  very  little  change  in 
the  fish  market.  The  demand  for  fresh 
salmon  and  halibut  is  good.  Other  lines 
of  fish  are  in  good  supply  with  prices 
unchanged. 

Black    cod,    lb 

Brills,  lb 0  09 

Herrings,    Lake    Superior,    100 

lbs.,     sacks,     new     stock     3  50 

Halibut,   chicken,   cases   300   lbs    0  LSV, 

Do.,  broken  cases 0  16^ 

Salmon — 

Cohoe     full  boxes,   300   lbs 0  19 

Do.,    in   broken    cases 0  20 

Soles 0  09 

Baby    Whites   or  Tulibees    0  09 

Do.,    broken    cases     0  14% 

SMOKED    FISH 

Bloaters,    Eastern    National,    case      3  50 

Do.,    Western,    20-lb.   boxes,   box      ....  2  10 

Haddies,     30-lb.     cases,     lb 0  14 

Do.,   in   15-lb.   cases,   lb 0  14 

Kippers,    East,   Nat,   20   count, 

I)er  count 3  75 

Fillets,    15-lb.    boxes,    lb 0  20 

SALT   FISH 
Steak   Cod,   2s,    Seclys,   lb.    ... 
Holland   Herring,    milkers,    9-lb. 

pails,   per   pail „; 

Do.,  mixed,  9   lb.  pails,  per  pail      1  2o 

Labrador    herrings,    100-lb.    bbls., 

per   barrel ^  00 


PUTTING  HUMAN  INTEREST  TOUCH 
IN    ADVERTISING. 

(Continued  from  page  20) 
to  clear  them  up.  These  specials  are 
then  advertised  by  newspaper  and  window 
display,  by  simply  stating  tne  pnce  and 
all  selling  ability  is  then  placed  on  some 
other  article  that  is  kindred.  For  in- 
stance, if  there  is  a  special  sale  on  maca- 
roni, then  every  effort  is  made  to  swell 
the  sale  on  canned  tomatoes,  soda  biscuits 
and  cheese.  "It  is  no  -trouble  to  sell  an 
article  at  a  reduced  price.  That  requires 
no  special  salesmanship  beyond  mention- 
ing the  price.  After  the  price  is  men- 
tioned my  plan  is  to  concentrate  on  other 
articles,  but  always  on  something  that  is 
required  in  the  preparation  of  the  spec- 
ial."   concluded    Mr.    Kirby. 

As  mentioned  above,  Mr.  Kirby  pur- 
chases the  articles  that  are  on  special 
sale  at  a  reduced  price,  therefore  he  is 
able  to  make  a  fair  profit  even  though 
the  retail  price  is  reduced.  He  does  not 
cut  the  price  on  lines  that  are  bought  in 
the  regular  way.  He  believes  in  making 
a  fair  profit  on  everything  he  sells. 


MAKES  RAPID  COMPUTATIONS 
EASY 

(Continued  from  Page  27) 
poses  of  all  stock  of  shriveled  and  under- 
sized fruit,  or  such  as  may  be  getting 
over  ripe,  thus  making  a  positive  econo- 
my through  working  out  a  by-product  of 
the  fruit  department. 

Again,  the  figures  of  70  to  fO  per  cent 
are  based  on  small  volume  and  a  stan- 
dard size  of  glass.  As  volume  is  in- 
creased, the  wideawake  merchant 
can  find  possibilities  in  serving  a  larger 


glass  for  the  same  money.  That  will 
tend  to  increase  volume  still  further  until 
first  thing  he  knows,  he  has  a  regular 
department  for  that  service  and  is  buy- 
ing oranges  and  lemons  in  large  lots 
out  of  which  he  is  selecting  a  big  propor- 
tion of  his  fruit  for  drinks  thus  making 
his  displays  of  whole  fruit  all  the  more 
attractive  and  therefore  profitable. 
So,  in  thinking  volume,  get  your  fac- 
tors all  into  the  equation. 

Extending  The  Inventory. 

It  may  seem  rather  late  to  say  any- 
thing about  inventory,  but  not  in  this 
connection.  I  have  suggest^ed  before 
that  you  extend  your  figures  both  ways 
— on  a  cost  basis  and  also  on  the  basis 
of  regular  retail  prices.  The  value  of 
this  is  many  fold. 

The  first  thing  that  will  strike  you 
when  you  add  the  two  columns  and  note 
the  wide  spread  between  the  two  totals 
is  that  something  must  be  wrong,  for  you 
will  be  sure  that  you  are  not  making 
any  such  margin  as  the  figures  indicate. 

Further  reflection  will  show  that  the 
reason  why  the  margin  seems  so  un- 
usually wide  is  because,  at  inventory 
time,  you  have  little  or  no  butter,  eggs, 
vegetables  and  other  perishables  on 
hand.  If  you  follow  the  course  of  the 
wise  merchant,  you  will  buy  sugar  week- 
ly hence  have  little  on  hand  at  any  time. 
Then  if  you  recall  that  these  narrow 
margin  goods  of  which  you  carry  such 
light  stocks  make  up  such  a  big  pro- 
portion of  your  daily  sales,  you  will  see 
how  your  sales-margins  are  pulled  do'wn, 
while  your  permanent  stock-margins  re- 
main high. 

Perhaps  you  will  think  of  other  things 
too.  Maybe  it  will  occur  to  you  that  a 
grocer's  life  would  be  happy  if  he  might 
confine  his  sales  only  to  staple,  dry  gro- 
ceries. But  the  true  thought  is  that 
the  wide-margin,  slow-moving  stock 
should  be  held  down  like  the  rapid-turn- 
ing stuff  and  that  attention 
should  be        devoted        to  turn- 

ing the  narrow  margins  still  more  ra- 
pidly. Anyway  you  look  at  it,  these 
studies  are  mighty  valuable. 


It  puzzles  a  horse  sometimes  to  know 
what  a  woman  is  driving  at. 
*     «     * 

Anybody  can  cut  prices,  but  it  takes 
brains  to  make  a  better  article. 


RULES  FOR  SUCCESS 

For  the  merchant  who  is  developing 
his  store  there  are  certain  definite  prin- 
ciples which  have  helped  and  may  also 
help  the  merchant  who  is  striving  for 
success.      Chief  among  these  are: 

"Give  a  square  deal  for  a  round  dollar." 

"Make  courtesy  the  keynote  of  the  en- 
tire store." 

"Keep  the  organization  wound  up  and 
running  properly  by  showing  friendship 
to  the  employees." 

"Absolute  integrity  in  every  verbal 
transaction  and  in  every  written  state- 
ment." 

"Use  plenty  of  printer's  ink." 


July  29. 1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


39 


HEADCHEESE 


Now  that  the  weather  is  becoming  so  much  warmer,  there  is  every  opportunity  for  a 
dealer  to  increase  his  volume,  by  featuring  a  line  of   cold    luncheon    delicacies, 
which  are  admirably  suitable  for  summer  trade.     Davies  Headcheese  is  one 
of  these  jellied  meats  which  command  ready  sale,  because  of  its  qual- 
ity and   consistency,   being   of  good    texture,   with   no   small 
particles  of  bone  or  gristle. 

There  are  many  other  lines  of  Cooked  and  Jellied  Meats  w^hich  can  be  featured  to 
good  advantage  as  cold  luncheon  specials,  and  which  are  bound  to  create  demand. 
Make  your  customers  know  you  carry  them. 


A  few  of  these  are : — 


"Peerless"  Bung  Bologna, 
Davies  Jellied  Hocks, 
Davies  Pressed  Beef, 
Davies  Jellied  Pork  Tongue, 
Davies  Jellied  Veal, 
Davies  Ox  Tongue, 


"Perfection"  Cooked  Square 

Hams, 
"Perfection"  Cooked  Square 

Rolls, 
"Perfection"  Roast  Hams, 


We  solicit  your  inquiries  for  any   of  the  above.,  or  will   gladly  supply  you   with   a 

list  of  our  complete  lines,  upon  request. 

Write  us  to-day.  Special  attention  given  to  Mail  Orders. 


THE 

WILLIAM 


DAVIES 


COMPANY 
LIMITED 


MONTREAL 


TORONTO 

SYDNEY 


HAMILTON 


40 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


SCHNEIDER'S  POPULAR  BOLOGNAS 


A  FAST  SELLING 
SUMMER  LINE 


16   VARIETIES   OF  SAUSAGE. 

If  you  want  to  offer  your  customers  a  real  treat  give  them  Schneider's  Bologna. 
Order  a  trial  supply  along  with  Schneider's  other  Cold  Luncheon  delicacies  such  as 
Ham  Sausage,  New  England  Ham  Sausage,  Jellied  Tongue,  Meat  Loaf,  etc.  You'll 
find  them  remarkably  fast-selling  summer  lines.  Special  attention  to  mail  orders. 
Satisfaction    guaranteed. 


J.  M.  SCHNEIDER  &  SON,  LIMITED 

KITCHENER,  ONTARIO 


For     large    stores 
or   small   stores — 

there    is    a 

special    type    for 

each. 


REFRIGERATORS 

are  dependable  because  a  perfect  circulation  of  cold,  dry   air   is 
assured   at  all   times. 

Write    for    Catalogue 

John    Hillock    &    Co.,   Limited 

Office   and   Factory 

154   George  St.,  Toronto    • 

Agencies: — A.  Tilley,  .54  McGill  College  Ave.,  Montreal:  George 
Cameron  Sparks  Street,  Ottawa :  J.  McMillan  280  Main  St.,  Win- 
nipeg ;    Western    Butchers'    Supply    Company,    Regina,    Sask. 


HEINZ 


OVEN 

BAKED 

BEANS 


Require  but  little  selling  effort  to  keep  them 
moving,  outbound,  over  your  counter.  Proper  dis- 
playing is  all  that  is  needed.  That  is  what  makes 
them  so  profitable  for  you  to  handle. 

Along  with  the  other  57  Varieties,  Heinz  Oven 
Baked  Beans  are  so  well  and  favorably  known  that 
people  buy  them  without  hesitancy,  feeling  sure  of 
their  goodness. 

H.  J.  HEINZ  COMPANY 


July  29,  1921.  CANADIAN    GROCER  41 


Says  a  Reader  of  Many 
Years  Standing: 


"I  do  feel  that  your  paper  is  the  most  interesting 
and  readable  financial  journal  published  in  this 
country  and,  perhaps,  in  the  entire  North 
American  Continent.  Each  week  I  somehow 
find  time  to  read  every  word  of  it — mostly  in 
bed,  late  at  night.  I  find  I  have  to  read  THE 
FINANCIAL  POST  in  order  to  maintain  myself 
properly  abreast  with  the  bigger  things  and 
movements  taking  place  in  this  country." 


THE  FINANCIAL  POST  is  published  for  men  who  are 
interested  in  big  things — not  necessarily  men  who 
personally  have  big  financial  interests  at  stake,  but  for 
men  who  are  eager  to  know  what  is  happening  that  will 
have  a  bearing  on  business  and  the  well-being  of  Canada 
generally. 

THE  entire  editorial  organization  of  the  MacLean  Pub- 
lishing Company  is  at  hand  to  co-operate  with  the 
editors  of  THE  FINANCIAL  POST.  Specialists  in  many 
businesses  write  for  THE  POST.  A  practical  farmer,  in 
constant  touch  with  the  farming  conditions,  deals  with 
crop  prospects. 

TPHE  POST  is  a  paper  edited  by  specialists  for  business 
-*-  specialists. 


The  Financial  Post 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 

128  Bleury  Street  143  University  Ave.  Union  Trust  Bldg. 

Subscription  Price  per  year  (52  Issues)  $5.00 


42 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N     r4  K  O  C  E  Jl 


July  29,  1921. 


The  Best  Display  We  Have  Ever  Seen ! 


'lw^m>m:m^mBmmmmmmmm 


bpecia!  bubscriplion  Agency  For  lj)e  Livest^Hz^agirtelnthompire 

^^'"^  MACLEAN'S  *3f 

1    I  'omKS  NATIONAL  MAGAZINE"       A  YEA? 


MONTH 


VVORLO  EVENTS -CANAWAM  PROBLEMS  -  BUSINESS  -FmAMCE 
POETRY-WIT-HUMOUR-BEST  STORIES  a  MACAaNE/wT^ryVHOli  FAMILY  I 


I  >4Aci,CA«vt 


ifllb 


MAcitxfsj 


The  Winnipeg  photogra- 
pher who  took  this  picture 
was  anxious  to  show  how 
the  whole  store-front  looked. 
So  he  had  to  set  his  camera 
away  out  near  the  curb — 
and  consequently  the  detail 
'a  the  window  does  not 
stand  out  clearly.  But  you 
get  the  splendid  general 
effect. 


THIS  great  window  display  of  MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  is  particu- 
larly noteworthy  for  two  reasons:  ist — It  is  the  best  display  we  have  ever 
seen,  of  MACLEAN'S  or  any  other  magazine;  2nd — It  was  put  on  by  Rus- 
sell-Lang, of  Winnipeg,  which  is  the  largest  bookstore  in  Canada. 

See  how  the  Union  Jack  was  used  in  the  window  to  emblematize  "Canada's 
National  Magazine."  Note  how  the  magazine  has  been  displayed  in  the  show 
cases  on  each  side  of  the  windows,  as  well  as  in  the  windows.  See  the  big  spec- 
ially-painted banner  which  stretched  across  the  entire  store  front,  also  the  spe- 
cial big  show  cards  in  the  window. 

Mr.  Druggist — When  it  pays  the  biggest  bookstore  in  Canada  to  boost  MACLEAN'S 
like  this  it  will  pay  you  also.  You  want  to  make  more  money,  naturally.  MACLEAN'S 
offers  you  that  opportunity. 

There's  a  good  profit  in  selling  single 
copies  of  MACLEAN'S  over  the  counter. 
Then,  we  furnish  you  with  a  handsome  card- 
board sign,  showing  that  you  take  yearly: 
subscriptions  for  MACLEAN'S  as  well — and 
on  each  of  these  yearly  subscriptions  we  pay: 
you  75c.  commission  ! 

And  remember  that  MACLEAN'S  is 
"  Canada's  National  Magazine,"  and  a  credit 
to  your  country. 

If  you  are  not  already  handling  MAC- 
LEAN'S, clip  the  coupon  and  mail  it    NOW. 


Circulation  Manager, 

MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE,  Toronto. 


I'm    interested. 
MACLEAN'S. 


Please   send   me   particulars   about 


Name 


Address 


D.   W. 


Julv  29,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


43 


7  Direct  Lines  Out  of  Stratford 

Make  It  the  Quickest  Shipping  Centre 

We  carry  full  lines  of  Staple  Groceries,  Foreign  and  Domestic  Fruits  in  Season. 

"Buy  your  fruits  where  you  buy  your  groceries  and  your  groceries  where 
you  buy  your  fruits"  —  saving  double  freight  and  double  cartage. 

Phones—Office  297  and  298.  Residence  310.  Shippini  Room  256.  Night  Call  897. 

James  Lloyd  &  Son         box  no.  266         Stratford,  Ont. 


Good   business  men  purchase  our 
scales — because  both  are  reHable. 


Brains  and  money  cannot  produce 
better  scales. 


WILL  BE  PLEASED  TO  SHOW  THEM  TO  YOU 


Wanted — Salesmen  for  all 
provinces.  Find  out  what 
we  offer. 


No.  Ill 
The  Word's  Best  Computing  Scale. 


The[ Standard  Computing  Scale  Co, 

OF   CANADA,  Limited 

301  Davis  Block,  Windsor,  Ontario. 


CAHAJ>A 


riAPLESYRUP 


PRIDE  OF  CANADA 

Pure   Maple   Syrup 

Will  please  your  most  particular  customers. 
Guaranteed  Absolutely  Pure. 
Have  a  good  Stock  on  hand  for  the  Summer   and   Fall  Trade 

REPRESENTATIVES:  W.  L.  Mackenzie  &  Co.,  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Regina,  Saskatoon,  Calgary  and  Edmon- 
t  n:    Oppenheimer  Bros.,  Limited,  V\ncouver,  B.  C;     S.  H.  P.  Mackenzie  &  Co..  33  Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 
].  W.  Gorham  &  Co.,  Halifax.  N.S. 

MAPLE  TREE  PRODUCERS  ASSOCIATION  LIMITED 

(II    (15     ff  V  IlLl^C^C^ST.W.,MONTREAL 


PRIDE  ' 
"A'.VJAD/ 


44 


CANADIAN    G  R  0  C  E  R 


July  29,  1921. 


Now  as  Never  Before — 

You  Need  Sound 
Financial     Information 

THERE   never  wa^  a   time  when 
business  merchants  needed  sound, 
sane,  financial  knowledge  of  com- 
mercial happenings  on  which  to  base 
present  and  future  investments  as  they 
do  right  now. 

For  your  bibsiness  profits  are  not  real 
profits  until  you  have  them  safely  in- 
vested in  reliable  securities. 

Why  not  invest  profits  from  your 
shop  and  the  coupons  from  your  Vic- 
tory Bonds  in  genuine  securities,  news 
of  which  you  will  find  every  week  in 
THE  FINANCIAL  POST  Investors^ 
Enquiry  Service,  a  feature  for  sub- 
scribers which  will  give  you  the  benefit 
of  investigators  in  all  the  big  financial 
centres?  This  service  is  just  as  if  you 
paid  a  man  $10,000  a  year  to  be  your 
own  personal  investigator  in  Toronto, 
Montreal,  Winnipeg — in  fact,  every 
city  in  the  Dominion. 

But  you  cannot  hire  the  services  of 
this  staff — you  get  them  free  with  a 
subscription  to  THE  FINANCIAL 
POST,  through  this  splendid  Investors' 
Enquiry  Service,  which  is  free  to  all 
readers. 

But  that  is  not  the  only  thing — this 
commercial  newspaper  gives  you  the 
financial,  industrial,  banking  news  of 
the  country  in  convenient  readable 
form — just  the  data  you  need  for  your 
business — just  the  facts  you  need  for 
your  investments — in  fact,  a  splendid 
partner  of  the  ambitious  merchant. 

When  8,425  merchants,  business 
executives,  bankers,  lawyers  find  in 
THE  FINANCIAL  POST  the  verv 
facts  which  will  help  them  in  their 
business,  will  you  not  find  a  weekly 
reading  of  its  pages  very  beneficial? 

THE    FINANCIAL   POST 

143-153  University  Ave.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


.192 


THE  FINANCIAL  POST, 

143-153  University  Ave.,  Toronto. 
On    the    understanding   that    THE    FINAN- 
CIAL POST  contains  just  the  facts  I  need  for 
safe  investment  of  profit,  you  may  send  me  a 
recent  issue. 


Name  . . 
Address 


IITIC 


NIISTER  N/ISON 


J 


It's^i 


|3|_UC    SMOKING 

'<?</  Tohcicco*'     ^^  A. 


\i^. 


The  man  who  smoke* 
the  big  plug  hat 
reaaont  aplenty,  atide 
from  the  real  pipe  en- 
joyment he  Qet«  from 
Matter  Maton.  There 
ii  no  waite:  there's 
no  lots  of  flavor:  and 
there's  the  satisfying 
economy.  For  the  big 
Matter  Maton  plug  it 
high  quality  tobacco  at 
the  rock  bottom  price. 

TheBigPlu^aO*^ 


Pays  the 
Biggest  Profit 

MASTER  MASON  Plug  Smoking  To- 
bacco pays  the  retailer  a  larger  margin 
of  profit  than  any  other  tobacco  on  the 
Canadian  market  to-day.  You  always 
make  more  money  on  the  MASTER 
MASON  you  .«ell.  NOW  you  can  sell 
more  MASTER  MASON— becau.^e  our 
advertising  campaign  running  at  pre- 
sent is  making  scores  of  new  frieni^s  for 
this  popular  tobacco.  The  ad  .•=li(i\vn 
aliove  is  one  of  a  series,  (erne  quculer 
actual  .-^ize)  now  appearing  in  the  Can- 
adian newspapers.  These  ads  are  mak- 
ing it  ea.^ier  for  you  to  .*ell  vaore 
MASTER  MASON,  and  get  more 
PROFIT.    Don't  delay.    Stock  up  now. 

ROCK  CITY  TOBACCO  COMPANY 
QUEBEC  -  CANADA 

MASTER 
IMSON 


PLUG       SMOKING 


Julv  29.  1921. 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


45 


Is  Your 

Guarantee 


This  name  is  your  assurance  of  freshness — Pure  sweet  milk. 
Do  your  customers  like  things  fresh  ? 
Drimilk  made  to-day  and  delivered  to-morrow. 
This  means  something. 

THE  DRIMILK  CO.,  LIMITED 
Cortland,  Ont. 


Donald  H.  Bain  Co., 

Winnipeg 
Western  Distributors 


Executive  Offices  :   Spadina  Crescent,  Toronto 

Eastern  Offices  :    lo  Ste.  Sophie  Lane,  Montreal 


liT^ 


H.'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIInlMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH IIIMItlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIi;' 


SAL 


SODA 


I  IN  THE  HANDY  23^  lb        | 

I  Carton — Saves  Wrapping  And- 1 

I  Weighing                                       1 

I  Don't    waste  time,   paper  and   twine   weighing      | 

i  out  and  packaging  Sal  Soda  when  you  can  give     | 

I  your  customers  Arm  and  Hammer,  the  strong-      | 

I  est  and  best,  in  handy  2  1-2  Ih.  cartons.                    | 

I  There  are  36  of  these  2   1-2   lb.   ])ackages    to      | 

I  a  box.                                                                               I 

I  CHURCH  &  DWIGHT,  LIMITED         1 

I  MONTREAL                            | 

7HIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIMIMIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 


Grocers  who  use 
p*  Q.Q^     the  N.  B.  Pulp 

Egg   Carrier 


Save 


Money,   Time 
Eggs 


ind 


Order   from  your   wholesale   grocer 
or  from 

Walter  Woods,  Limited 

Hamilton  Winnipeg 


4G 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


July  29,  W>\. 


WHITE  &  CO.,  LTD. 

Fruits  of  Quality  TORONTO 


•'MIMiMliyilMliyJ!}yJ!il^lMiiL^IMIU^lM^IMIiL«!MIMIMlMlMl^^ 


Hot  Weather  Fruits  for  the 
Tourist  Trade 


With'so  many  visitors  and  holiday  seekers  throughout  the  province 
the  following  fruits  find  quick  sale  -fj 

BARTLETT  PEARS  and  PLUMS 

GEORGIA  PEACHES 

CANTALOUPES 

LEMONS  ORANGES  BANANAS 

Watermelons  1  Tomatoes  Corn 

CUCUMBERS    COCOANUTS  etc. 

All  the  above  lines  are  received  regularly  from   the   best   source   of 
supply  and  are  priced  always  in  accord  with  the  market  conditions. 

Prompt  and  efficient  attention  to  orders. 


^1k'<lt7^l,^,lfrglgglj^l.?r,lfrr,l,7r,lt7^i??^lr^^ 


!5^  ^Iw-Tita^     The  popular  summer[sellers 

MARSH'S 

BEVERAGES 


You  can  depend  on  good  pro- 
fits and  steady  repeat  sales 
if  you  fill  your  customers' 
soft  drink  requirements  with 
Marsh's  Grape  Juice,  you 
can  sell  it  at  popular  prices 
and  secure  larger  sale  and 
profits. 


Marsh's    Grape   Juice. 
Unfermented    Port 
Black   Cherry    Wine 
Raspberry   Vinegar 
Marsh's   Pure   Apple 
Cider. 


The  Marsh  Grape 

Juice    Company 

Niagara  Falls,  Ont 

Agents    for    Ontario,    Quebec 
and    Maritime    Provinces : 

The  MacLaren  Wright, 
Ltd. 

Toronto   apd   Montreal 

Agents  for  British  Columbia  : 

F.  G.  Evans  Co.,  Ltd. 

Toronto   and  Montreal 


so^^iaaiJWiaaia^tvsaiaaiaijiayiaaiaaiaai^ 


INDEX    TO   ADVERTISERS 


Acadia  Sug*  Refining 

Co.,  Ltd 16 

Anchor  Cap  &  Closure 

Corp 2 

Arsenis  &  Co.   .........  12 

B 

Bain  &  Co.,  Donald  H.  . .  8 

Baker,  Walter  &  Co.   ...  48 
Bickle  &  Greening,  John 

W.  &  Co 15 

Birdland   Society      8 

Borden  Co.,  Ltd 1 


Canada    Barrels    &    Keg 

Ltd 47 

Cane  Wm.  &  Sons  Co.  Ltd.  16 

Can.  Nashua  Paper  Co...  9 
Channel    Limited,   Inside 

Front  Cover 

Church  &   Dwight  Co....  45 

Codville    Co 10 

Clark  Ltd.,  W 4 

Columbia  Macaroni  Co...  13 

D 

Davies  &  Co.,  Wm.  Ltd.. .  39 

Dobree   &   Sons    16 

Dominion  Slicer  Corp.   . .  13 

Drimilk    Co.,   Ltd 45 

Duncan  &  Sons,  C 8 


E 

Emend  Jos 12 

Eddy,  E.  B.  Co.,  Ltd.   .  . 

Outside  back  cover 

Escott  Co.,  Ltd.  W.H 10 

Estabrooks  Co.,  Ltd.,  T.H.  17 
Eureka  Refrigerator  Co. 

Ltd 7 

F 
Frost  Moorman  &  Co 11 


Gait  Chemical  Co 17 

Genesee  Pure  Food  Co. 

of  Canada    13 

H 

Hamblin-Brereton      11 

Hayne,  John   47 

Heinz,  H.  J 40 

Hillock,  John  &  Co 40 

Home,  Harry  Co 3 

Hanson,  Co.,  Ltd.,  J.  H..  .  12 

Hull  Oil  Mfg.  Co 17 


Imperial  Grain  &  Milling 

Co 7 

Imperial  Extract  Co 14 

Island  Lead  Mills  Ltd...   17 
Ingersoll  Ice  Cream  Co. 
Inside  Back  Cover 


K 

Kidd,  T.  Ashmore 11 

L 

Lachaine,  Geo.  D 12 

Laing  &   Waters    11 

Langley  Harris  &  Co.  Ltd.  11 

Lloyd  Jas.  &  Son 43 

Loggie  Sons  &  Co 11 

M 

McLauchlan,  J.   K X  11 

McLay,  Brockerage  Co. 
Macdonald  Reg.,  W.  C. 
Mackenzie,  W.  L.    ... 

Mickle,  Geo.  T 11 

Moore  &  Co.  R.  M 47 

Magor,  Son  &  Co 18 

Marsh  Grape  Juice  Co.  . .  46 
Maple  Tree     Producers 

Ass'n.,  Ltd 43 

Minto  Bros Front  cover 

O 

Oakey  &  Sons,  Ltd.  John     9 

O'Donnell  &  Co.,  John  J..  11 

O'Keefe's   Ltd 15 

P 

Patrick  &  Co.,  W.  G.   ...  11 

Pennock  &  Co.,  H.  P.  .  .  .  9 

Peterboro  Cereal  Co.   ...  12 

R 

Red  Rose  Tea    17 

Rock  City  Tobacco  Co...  44 

Ross  Can  Co 47 


Salada  Tea  Co.  Ltd 18 

Sanator   Limited    14 

Scott   Bathgate    Co.,   Ltd.  10 

Scott  &  Thomas  11 

So-Clean  Ltd 47 

Schneider,  J.  M.  &  Son.  .  40 

Soper,  E.  N.  &  W.  E 11 

St.  Arnaud  Fils  Cie 12 

Standard  Computing 

Scale    Co 43 

Stickney  &  Poor  Spice  Co.  7 

Stroyan-Dunwoody  Co.  . .  8 

T 

Thompson,  A.  E 10 

Thum  Co.  (Tanglefoot) 

0.  &  W 47 

Tippet  &  Co.,  Ltd 12 

Toronto  Pottery  Co.,  Ltd.  47 

Toronto  Salt  Works 47 

Trent  Mfg.   Co 47 

W 

Wallace  Fisheries,  Ltd.  .  .  7 

Watson  &  Truesdale  ....  9 
Waterloo  Broom  and 

Brush  Co 11 

Western    Salt   Co 15 

Western  Canada  Flour 
Mills.  . .  .Inside  back  cover 

White  &  Co 46 

White,   Cottell's    47 

Woods  &  Co.,  Walter  ...  45 

Williams  Storage  Co.   ...  9 

Wiley,  Frank  H 8 


July  29.  1921. 


C  A  X  .\  D  I  A  X     G  R  0  C  I-:  R 


47 


BUYERS'  MARKET  GUIDE 


j^, 


o 


\^ 


Latest  Editorial  Market  News  ^P_  , 


Sioue^-are  .lars 

Flo^ver   Puts 

I  ea    I'ntH 

Cilassware 

Please  ask  for  copy  <»f 
latest  catalogue 

The  TORONTO  POTTERY 

CO,  Limited 

Toronto 


We  are  now  located  in  our  new  and 
more  spacious  warehouse  at 

60-62  JARVIS  STREET 

TORONTO  SALT  WORKS 
GEO.  J.  CLIFF 

WHITE-COTTELL'S 

Best  English  Mall  Vinegar 

QUALITY  VINEGAR 

White,    Cottell    &    Co:,    Camberwell,    London,    Engr. 
Agents 
W.    Y.    COLCLOUGH,    Room    203-23    Scott    St. 
Toronto 
STROYAN-DUNWOODY    CO. 
Confederation    Life    Baildinr 
Winnipeg:,  Man. 
OPPENHEIMER   BROS..    LTD. 
Vancouver,  B.  C. 
BAIRD  &  CO.,  MerchanU,  St.  John'*,   Nfld. 

Order    from    yoar   Jobber   today 

"SOCLEAN" 

the    dastless    sweeping:    compound 

SOCLEAN,   LIMITED 

Manufacturers  TORONTO.     Ont. 

Montreal     Agents: — Vigneault     &     MacGillivray 

7   Bonsecours  St.,   Montreal,    Que. 
Ottawa    Agents:— W.    R.    Barnard.    374    Bank   St. 

BARRELS 

From   5   to   50   Gallons.   For   Liquid   Containers 
PROMPT     SHIPMENTS 

CANADA  BARRELS  &  KEGS,  Limited 

WATERLOO,  ONT. 


Your  Wants 

are  many  he  re 
below.  Use  the 
Want  Ad.  page 
and  get  rid  of  a 
few  of  them. 


RICE  PLANTING  LESS 

The  Rice  Millers  Asso- 
ciation, Los  Angeles  re- 
ports that  the  acreage  of 
rice  planted  this  year  is 
400,000  acres  less  than 
last  year.  In  1920  the 
acreage  planted  was 
1,300,000  and  900,000  for 
1921. 


TEA     PRICES 

MOVE     UPWARD 

The  Tea  Brokers  Asso- 
ciation of  London  report 
that  the  tea  markets  con- 
tinue to  rise.  Cables  were 
recently  received  advising 
the  partial  failure  of  the 
monsoon  and  consequent 
short  crops  and  rapidly  ad- 
vancing prices.  Ceylon 
teas  in  London  auctions 
during  June  and  July  have 
fetched  the  highest  aver- 
age prices  ever  recorded. 


CAS  MANTLES. 

THE  MANTLES  THAT  YOU"- 
CAH  TIE  IN  A  KNOT  WITHOUT 
DAMAGE-SUPERSEDE  ALL 
OTHER  STYLES  FO«INyERIEB_ 


PACIFIC   COAST  MANTLE   FACTORY 


30    DOZEN    CASE   FILLERS 
ONE    DOZEN    CARTON    FILLERS 
%-INCH    CUSHION    FILLERS 
C(»UR1  GATED   FLATS 

The  TRENT  MFG.  CO.,  LTD. 

TRENTON,  ONT. 


CANS 

All  paper,  all  tin  and  combin- 
atioil  tin  and  paper  for  paints, 
jam,  cocoa,  spices,  drug  special- 
ties   and    household    utilities. 

ROSS  CAN  CO.  LIMITED, 

Bowmanville,    Ont. 


BARRELS 

For  all  purposes.  The  best  pack 
age  for  exporting.  I  can  make  them 
to  suit   your  goods. 

JOHN  HAYNE 

Imperial  Bldg.  SARNIA,  ONT. 


^•products  y 


10 


Sticky  Fly  Paper. Sticky FLirRjBBOiif. 
Tree  Tanglefoot.  Roach --A  \r  Powder. 

ThEOiW.THUM  Ca.MANUFAaURERS. 
GRANDRAnDS.MlCH.  WAUCERVIUX.Cmum. 


MAKE  BUSINESS 
BETTER 

By  Boosting  Your 
Business 


These     one-inch    spaces 

only  $2.20  per  i»sertion 

if  used  each  issue  in  the 

year. 


48 


CANADIAN     G  R  0  C  E  K 


July  29,  1921. 


Rates  for  Classified  Advertising 

Advertisements  under  this  heading  3c  per  word  for  first  insertion;  2c  for  each 
subsequent  insertion. 

Where  answers  come  to  Box  number  in  our  care  to  be  forwarded,  5  cents  per 
insertion  must  be  added  to  cover  postage,  etc. 

Contractions  count  as  one  word,  but  five  figures  (as  $1,000)  are  allowed  as  one 
word. 

Cash  remittance  to  cover  cost  must  accompany  all  advertisements.  In  no  case 
can  this  rule  be  overlooked.  Advertisements  received  without  remittances  cannot 
be  acknowledged. 


WANTED 


pXPERIENCED  GROCERY  CLERK  WANTS 
position.  At  present  in  charge  of  store  in 
Toronto.  Desires  change  in  wholesale  or  retailer 
anywhere  in  Ontario.  References.  Box  64,  Can- 
adian   Grocer,    153   University    Ave.,   Toronto.   O.it. 


TVTORTHERN  ONTARIO  SALESMAN  RESID- 
ing  in  the  territory  seeks  Candy  and  Drug- 
gists' lines.  If  you  want  regular  and  consistent 
trade  get  in  touch  with  Box  60,  Canadian  Grocer 
153    University    Ave.,   Toronto,    Ont. 


PARTNER    WANTED    FOR    GROCERY    STORE 

with  $2,.t00.OO  to  invest.  A  good  opTJO'tunitv 
for  live  man.  Replies  confidential.  Box  62,  Can- 
adian  Grocer,    153   University    Ave.,   Toronto,   Ont. 


Y'OUNG  MAN,  28,  THOROUGHLY  BXPER- 
ienced  and  efficient :  a  hustler  and  one  who 
knows  what  to  do  and  how  to  do  it,  wants  posi- 
tion in  grocery  or  general  store.  Highly  recom- 
mended. Apply  Box  72,  Canadian  Grocer,  Uni- 
versity  Ave.,   Toronto. 


FOR  SALE 


gVERY  MERCHANT  WHO  SEEKS  MAXIMUM 
efficiency  should  as  himself  whether  a  Gipe- 
Hazard  Cash  Carrier,  as  a  time  and  labor  saver, 
is  not  worth  more  than  the  high-priced  labor 
which  it  liberates.  Are  you  wiling  to  learn 
more  about  our  carriers  ?  If  so,  send  for  jur 
new  Catalogus  J.  Gipe-Hazard  Store  Sers-ice  Co., 
Limited,    113    Sumach    St.,    Toronto. 


pENERAL  STORE  FOR  SALE  IN  SMALL 
village  in  country  near  town  of  Renfrew, 
Ont.,  five  miles  from  station.  No  oppositio.T. 
Power  line  passes  door.  Electric  lifrhts  about  to 
be  installed.  Situated  on  country  highway.  School 
and  Presbyterian  Church  in  village.  Turnover 
about  ten  thousand  could  be  increased  to  sixteen 
or  seventeen  thousand.  Apply  Box  58  Canadian 
Grocer,    153   University    Ave.,   Toronto.    Ont. 


Good  Sellers 
make  business  easy 

BAKER'S 

Cocoa  and  Chocolate 

on  the  market  and  con- 
sistently adver- 
tised for  years, 
are  the  recog- 
nized standards 
of  the  trade. 
They  are  the 
first  choice  of 
good  housekeep- 
ers. 

Mmdm  in  Canadm  by 

Walter  Baker  &  Co.  Limited 

Dorohetter.  Mass.  Montreal,  Can 

Establlshsd  1780 


Say    You    Saw    It    In     Canadian 
Grocer,  It  Will  Help  Identify  You 


Send 

For 

Your 

Copy 

To-day 


Because  of  an  unusually  well  balanced  and  complete  editorial 
service,  The  Financial  Post  of  Canada  is  carefully  read  by 
Canada's  foremost  business  executives — financial  directors — 
salesmanagers  and  investors.  It  contains  business  and  financial 
information  valuable  to  any  forward-looking  business  men. 

One  evening  spent  with  it  in  the  quiet  of  your  own  home  will 
answer  all  your  questions  about  The  Financial  Post. 

The  Financial  Post 

143  University  Avenue,  Toronto 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


When 

You  Think  of  Flour 

Think 

of 

PURIiy  FLOUR 

When 

You  Sell  Flour 

Sell 

PURIty  FtQUR 

Western  Canada  Flour  Mills  Company 

Limited 

TORONTO                     :                            :                     WINNIPEG 

INGERSOLL  ICE  CREAM  CONE  CO.,  Limited,  Ingersoll,  Ont. 


Every 

Cone 

Inspected. 

Made 

By 

Canadians 

In 

Canada. 


m^. 


CRYSTAL    CAKE 


DOMINION     CAKE 


HONEY    CAKE 


nw 


T^m 


In 

the 

heart 

of 

the 

dairy 

county 

of 

Canada. 


If  your  Jobber  cannot  supply  you  with  cones  of  Quality,  send  your  order  in  direct,  at  once. 

CRYSTAL  CAKE  4.50  per  1000      i      FREIGHT 

DOMINION  CAKE  4.25  per  1000      ' 

HONEY  CAKE  3.25  per  1000      '  PAID 

Every  cone  guaranteed  to  be  perfect.     Manufactured  from  the  purest  and  most  wholesome  ingredients  in  the  most  sanitary  cone  factory  in  the  British  Empire 
We  ship  same  day  as  order  is  received.     Please  state  how  you  wish  shipment,   Express  or  Freight. 


C  A  X  A  D I  A  X    GROCER 


Price,  Appearance  and  Utility 
Ensure  Sales  Of 

EDDY'S  ONLIWON 

Toilet  Paper  Holders 

Yf)u  have  merely  to  show  them  to  sell  them — a  fact  by 
which  merchants  everywhere  are  profiting.  Grocers., 
general  stores,  hardware  stores,  and  drug  stores  are  taking 
advantage  of  the  popularity  of  Eddy's  Onliwon  Toilet 
Paper  Holders  to  counteract  the  falling  off  in  other  lines. 
The  profits  on  Onliwon  sales  are  particularly  useful  at 
this  time. 

The  handsomely  nickelled  finish  of  the  Onliwon  stimu- 
lates inquiries.  Its  thousand  sheets  of  fine  toilet  paper 
seiTcd  but  two  at  a  time  to  prevent  waste,  appeals  to 
economy.  Its  strons  construction  and  moderate  price 
rarely  fail  to  close  a  sale. 

The  demand  for  Refills  which  it  creates  is  useful  business 
which  you  might  as  well  have.  Send  in  a  small  first 
order  to  your  jobber  and  watch  how  quickly  Eddy's  Onli- 
won Toilet  Paper  Holders  find  purchasers.  The  profits 
arc  good  enough  to  make  it  decidedly  worth  your  w^hile. 
ASK  YOUR  WHOLESALE  HOUSE 


D  Taking   The  Place 

I  Of  The  Old  Roller  Towel 

EDDY'S  ONLIWON 
y  Paper  Towel  Holder 

N  Your  women  customers  Avon't  need  much  convincing  to  see  the 

M         merits  of  Onliwon  Paper  Towels  and  Holder.     The  neat  white 
Q         enamelled  cabinet  with  its  extra  large,  Onliwon  Paper  Towels 

B         always  get  their  attention  and  interest. 
Women  quickly  see  the  economy  of  Onliwon  Paper  Towels — the 
,^         money  they  save  in  wear  and  tear  on  fabric  towels,  the  time  and 
labor  they  save  in  reducing  the  weekly  wash. 

There's  a  steady  demand  for  Refills  too,   from  every  Onliwon 
Paper  Towel  Cabinet  you  pell.    Try  out  a  small  quantity. 

Your   vhoh'sale    house   can   siipph/   you. 

The  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.  Ltd. 
D      Hull  Canada 


BRANCHES  AND   AGENCIES: 


Halifax 
St.  John 
Quebec 
Montreal 
Ottawa 


Brockville 

Kingston 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

London 


Fort  William 
Winnipeg 
Regina 
Moose  Jaw 
Saskatoon 
Victoria 


Calgary 

Lethbridge 

Edmonton 

Camrose 

Vancouver 


MARITIME  ISSUE 


Members  of  The  Associated  Business  Papers  —  Only  Weekly  Grocery  Paper  Published  in  Canada 
THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

No.  31 


VOL.  XXXV. 


PUBLICATION  OFFICE:  TORONTO,  ONT.,  AUGUST  5,  1921 


%    Oil    Sardines 
'4    Mustard  Sardines 
Finnan  Haddies 
(Round  Tins) 
Kippered  Herring 
Herring  in  Tomato  Sauce 
Clams 


Camping  time  is  Sardine  time — 

feature 

"Brunswick  Brand '* 

Sardines  in  Oil 


Sardines  form  an  important  part  of 
most  every  camper's  kit  and  there  are  few 
lunch  hampers  that  do  not  contain  a  good 
supply  of  them.  During  these    warm 

months  hundreds  of  people  in  your  locality 
will  be  going  on  camping  and  outing  trips 
w  here  the  great  convenience  of  these  pop- 
ular priced  BRUNSWICK  Brand 
SARDINES  will  make  them  much  in  de- 
mand. 


A  good  "campers'  supplies"  window  featur- 
ing these  low  priced,  fine  flavored  sardines  along 
with  the  other  popular  BRUNSWICK  Brand 
"ready  cooked"  Fish  Foods  will  bring  this  profit- 
able extra  campers'  trade  to  your  store.  Try  a 
window  of  this  kind.  Hundreds  of  Brunswick 
dealers  have  found  this  plan  most  successful. 


I 


I 


Connors  Bros.,  Limited 

Black's  Harbor,  N.  B. 

Winnipeg    Representative:    Chas.    Duncan    &    Son,    Winnipeg,    Man. 


Circulation  of  Canadian  Grocer  has  been  audited  by  the  Audit  Bureau  of  Circulation 
Copy  of  Report  will  be  sent   on  request  to  any  one  interested. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


UllllirrilrillMIIIMIMIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIinillllll 


MIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIJI':: 


18 

Beautiful 

Colors 


Retails 

15c 

per  Cake 


A    BEAUTIFUL    WARDROBE 


is  no  longer  beyond  the  reach  of  the  average  woman — she 
can  do  such  wonderful  things  with  Aladdin  Dye  Soap;  re- 
newing old  dresses,  adding  a  touch  of  color  to  under-gar- 
ments,  effecting  any  desired  color-change  in  a  blouse  that 
has  become  faded. 

Aladdin  is  a  wonderful  economizer — instead  of  buying 
new  garments,  the  modern  woman  merely  washes  her  old 
ones  with  Aladdin — which  gives  them  the  freshness  of  a 
delightful  color-transformation. 

It  is  this  economy  feature  that  has  so  much 
to  do  with  Aladdin  saleability. 

The  Revolving  Display  Stand  we  supply  is 
a  potent  factor  in  directing  your  customers' 
attention  to  the  goods. 

Put  one  of  these  Stands  on  your 
counter — let  Aladdin  display  its 
power  of  sales-attraction. 


CHANNELL    LIMITED 


TORONTO 


Distributors  for  Aladdin  Dye  Soap 

Manufacturers  of  0-Cedar   Products 


MIJIIIIIMIIIIIIirMIMIIIIIIMIM IIMMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIMIIMMMIMIflMIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIMIMIMIIIMMIMMIIIMIIMMIIMIMIIIIM  IIIIMIMIMIJMIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIJJIMirMIIJIIMIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIMIIMninillJHMMIIIinilMMIIiniMIIIIINMniMI^  IIIIIIMIJIIIIIIirun: 


August  5,  1921  CANADIAN    GROCER 


MR.  GROCER— MR.  BUTCHER 

Here  is  Something  to  Think  About  ! 

You're  going  to  lose  your  perishable  goods — your  customers — your  business — 
your  money — If  you  haven't  good  Efficient  Refrigeration  Equipment  to 

Protect  Yourself  with 

Eureka  Refrigeration  Equipment 

You  have  lost  money  in  the  past  on  account  of  improper  and  makeshift  refriger- 
ation equipment — BUT  why  keep  on  doing  it  when  you  can  have  the  best  possible 
protection  from  loss  through  installing  an  Eureka  refrigerator  or  Eureka   Freezer 
Counter   Case?      There   is  positively  no   doubt  attached   to  any  Eureka  refriger- 
ation products. 

It  is  the  safest  way  to  invest  your  money;  it  will  give  you  the  greatest  satisfaction 
and  security  from  loss  and  the  Eureka  Refrigerator  Co.  stands  for  the  greatest 
Service. 

You  are  still  our  customer  after  you  have  placed  your  order  with  us;  we  are  in- 
terested in  you  and  in  any  Eureka  equipment  you  may  have. 

It  is  therefore  to  your  advantage  to  let  us  know  what  difficulties  you  may  have ; 
wtth  your  refrigeration  problems. 

We  are  well  equipped  to  look  after  any  orders  for  any  refrigeration  equipment 
and  can  therefore  make  early  shipments  of  any  kind  of  special  butcher  refriger- 
ator, or  Eureka  Freezer  Counter  Cases,  etc.  We  also  have  a  large  variety  of  stock 
Grocers'  models  for  immediate  shipment. 


Model  105.     Size  40  in.  by  36  in.  by  10,  12,  14,  16  and  18  feet  lengths. 

Call  on  or  write  to  your  nearest  Eureka  representative  and  he  will  give  you  the 

benefit  of  his  wide  experience  as  all  our  salesmen  are  thoroughly  acquainted  with 
refrigeration  problems  and  their  equipment. 

EUREKA  REFRIGERATOR  CO.,  Ltd. 

OWEN  SOUND,  ONT. 

Agents   in   the   following   cities: 

St.   John,   N.B R.    R.    Rankine,    14   Prince    Arthur   Ave.        Hamilton.    Ont J.    H.    Galloway,   138    Erie.    Ave. 

Montreal.     P.Q. — Notre     Dame     Butchers     Supply     Co.,     882     Notre        Winnipeg,   Man J.   J.    Mcmillan,   280    Main   St. 

Dame  St..   W.  Regina,  Sask M.   Rigelhof,   1807   Cornwall   St. 

Kingston     Ont G.    C.   Gardhouse,   430   Princess   St.        Calgary,   Alta Butchers  and   Packers'   Supply   Co.,    Ltd. 

Toronto,  Ont F.  C.   Letts,   11   Colborne  St.        Vancouver,  B.C J.  J.  Gilmore,  2230  Cornwall   St. 

HEAD   OFFICE   AND   FACTORY.   OWEN   SOUND,    ONT. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


CLARK'S 
Canadian   Boiled   Dinner 


Dinner 
in 
five 
Minutes 


and 
a  good 
Dinner 

too 


That  is  what  Clark's  Canadian  Boiled  Dinner 
means  to  your  customers.  They  are  saved  the 
worry  and  labour  of  Preparation,  they  economise  in 
fuel  cost,  and  they  have  a  perfectly]  balanced  comb- 
ination of  the  choicest  beef,  a  variety  of  the  very  best 
fresh  vegetables,  with  pure  beef  gravy.  The  whole 
is  cooked  to  a  nicety  and  only  a  few  minutes  heat- 
ing is  required. 

The  price  is  popular  — 
Your  margin  is  right. 

W.  CLARK,  Limited 

MONTREAL. 


August  5,  1921.  CANADIAN    GROCER 


Kkovah 


OUR  GOODWILL 

and  your  goodwill  are  built  up  on 
g-iving  satisfaction.  We  will  not  en- 
danger our  goodwill  by  supplying 
inferior  goods.    Will  you? 


"KKOVAH" 

CUSTARD 

• 

Merits  your  attention.  Your  cus- 
tomers demand  the  best.  Full  par- 
ticulars from 

Langley  Harris  &  Company  Limited 

WINNIPEG  TORONTO  MONTREAL 

Manufactured  by 

Sutcliffe  &  Bingham,  Limited 

MANCHESTER,  ENG.  TORONTO,  ONT. 


C  A  X  A  D  1  A  X     G  R  0  C  E  I 


^  K 


August  5,  1921. 


^^Here^^  Mr  Grocer  is  a  Big  Seller 
Showing  a  Nice  Profit 


The  Children's 
DeHght 


A  Favorite 

with 
Grown-Ups 


At  Popular  Prices 

Packed  attractively  in  fancy  boxes  containing  several  sizes,  shapes  and  colors. 
Place  a  box  on  your  counter 

See  how  quickly  they  sell, 

Look  over  the  follow^ing  assortment — pick  out  your  requirements.    Then  order  from 
your  jobber.    Should  your  jobber  not  be  able  to  supply  you   write  us  direct. 

ASSORTMENT  "D"     Sells  for  $4.90  and  the  contents  bring  the  dealer 

$8.28.     It  contains  one    two-cent    compartment 
and  three  five-cent  ones. 

ASSORTMENT  "A"     Sells   fol-    $7.50   and   brings   $11.88.      Contains 

a  two-cent  compartment,  two  fives  and  one  ten. 

ASSORTMENT  "B"  Sells  for  $9.50  and  brings  $17.40.  This  assort- 
ment contains  three  five-cent  compartments  and 
one  ten. 

Don't  delay  —  Order  to-day 

and  get  your  share  of  this  New  Business. 

Robertson  and  Murphy  Ltd. 

247  St.  Paul  St.  West,    Montreal 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


^./^   ^J^cA^  /^A^-v.*^^^ 


Saving 
your  time 


and  your 

customer's 

time 


A  large  number  of  grocers  have 
adopted  the  "P  &  G.  Corner" 
— a  feature  which  not  only  saves 
their  own  time,  but  makes  shop- 
ping easier  and  quicker  for  the 
customer.  The  picture  at  the 
left  shows  a  typical  corner — all 
of  the  Procter  &  Gamble  pro- 
ducts being  displayed  effective- 
ly, yet  without  wasting  valuable 
store  space,  or  compromising 
any  other  goods  in  the  store. 
Our  sales  representatives  will 
gladly  help  you  install  such  a 
display  in  your  store.  The  re- 
sults will  prove  surprising  to  you. 


of  Canada  Limited 
50  Bay  Street,  Toronto,  Canada 

Send  mail  orders  to  any  wholesale  grocer 


^ 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


Increased  Demand  iBrings 
An  Increase  of  Profit 

As  the  result  of  over  sixty  years' 
leadership,  aided  by  successful 
advertising,  Macdonald's  is  in 
greater  demand  now  than  ever 
It  is  now  possible  for  the  retailer 
to  get  larger  returns  from  his  stock 
of  Macdonald's  Tobaccos  than 
from  almost  any  other  commodity 
on  the  market. 

Because 

— the  always  generous  Macdonald 
profit  is  increased  as  the  turnover 
is  speeded  up. 


— there  is   an  extra  profit  in  the 
four  to  six  plugs  overrun  in  each 
lo-lb.  caddy. 

— little  or  no  sales-effort 
is  required  to  move  Mac- 
donald's. 

So  keep  your  stock  of  Mac- 
donald's well  displayed  and 
see  that  the  increased  de- 
mand brings  an  increase  of 
profit  TO  YOU. 


August  5,  1921.  CANADIAN  GROCER 

Califorivia   Frttit  Grower^  Exchai\ge. 


10,500 
GROWERS 


206  PACKING    20  SUB-      CENTRAL       68SALES  2,500  400,000       UO.OOO.OOO 

ASSOCIATIONS     EXCHAN(iES     EXCHANGE      OFFICES        JOBBERS       RETAILERS      CONSUMERS 


UNITED  STATE5  &  CANADA 


What  "Sunkist"  Means 

It's  a  REAL  Service  to  Growers 
and  Sellers  of 

California  Oranges  and  Lemons 


THE  C.  F.  G.  E.  keeps  no  profits — de- 
clares no  dividends.      Does  business  at 
actual  cost. 

Twenty-seven  years  ago  it  was  formed  by  a  sturdy 
group  of  California  growers.  In  the  face  of  early  dis- 
aster, these  pioneers  saw  the  light  of  relief  which  uniform 
grading,  co-operative  packing  and  marketing  could  bring 
them.    And  their  dreams  came  true! 

Here's  the  C,  F.  G.  E. 

TODAY  the  Exchange  is  comprised  of  206  separate 
associations  or  shippers  handling  the  fruit  of  over 
10,500  members  and  has  its  own  representatives  in  88 
markets. 

Shipments  in  a  normal  year  are  ten  times  as  large  as 
when  the  organization  was  formed  and  when  growers 
believed  a  period  of  over-production  was  being  faced.  Its 
function  in  distributing  the  growers'  crops  is  a  national 
benefit. 

The  trade  finds  it  much  more  satisfactory  to  deal  with 
Ejcchange  representatives  on  the  ground  than  to  negotiate 
personally  with  many  individual  shippers  who  are  pos- 
sibly 3,000  miles  away. 

The  jobber  and  retail  merchant  find  that  the  fruit  keeps 
better,  is  more  uniformly  graded  and  more  attractively 
packed — hence  easier  to  sell — and  that  supplies  are  avail- 
able with  greater  regularity. 

"Sunkist"  is  a  household  word  in  America. 

Thirteen  years  of  faithful  advertising  to  increase  the 
consumption  of  California  oranges  and  lemons,  has 
brought  us, — growers, — and  you, — sellers, — better  busi- 
ness; and  we  both  have  benefited. 

—And  What  It  Does 

THE  C.  F.  G.  E.  is  a  co-operative  agency.  It  has 
placed  the  orange  and  lemon  business  on  a  sound 
merchandising  basis.  And  now  a  fraction  of  a  penny  per 
dozen  is  given  by  our  growers  to  establish  a  fund  for 
advertising  the  many  uses  of  oranges  and  lemons  to  the 


millions  of  housewives  and  for  helping  merchants  handle 
these  fruits  at  a  safe  profit. 

Wise   business  co-operation — nothing  else. 

We're  ready  to  help  the  trade  in  many  waj's.  For 
instance,  we  send  men  from  town  to  town  every  month  to 
help  retailers  make  profit-winning  fruit  displays  in  their 
windows.     Such  displays  are  the  life  of  a  fruit  business. 

Write  for  our  free  sets  of  Sunkist  cards,  "strings"  and 
banners  for  your  counters  and  windows.  They  have  been 
made,  after  careful  study,  to  meet  your  needs. 

Or  maybe  you  are  thinking  of  advertising  in  local  papers 
or  neighborhood  movies.  We'll  gladly  send  you  free 
"cuts  " — for  use  on  price  lists  and  letterheads — or  free 
Sunkist  lantern-slides  with  your  name  in  striking  colors. 

Write  us  your  problems.  Perhaps  we  can  help  solve 
them.  We've  an  experienced  retail  man  whose  job  is  to 
give  you  the  benefit  of  his  thirty-six  years  behind  the  coun- 
ter. His  name  is  Paul  Findlay.  Hundreds  of  grocers 
welcome  his  brass-tacks  talks. 

Anybody  who  sells  California  oranges  and  lemons  is 
entitled  to  our  help.  Last  year  more  than  10,000  retailers 
asked  for  our  services;  and  they  profited.  Were  you  one 
of  them? 

California  Fruit  Growers  Exchange 

A  Co-operative,  Non-profit  Organization  of  10,500  Growers 
Dealer  Service  Department 

Los  Angeles,  California 


California  Fruit  Growers  Exchange,  ag 

Dealer  Service  Department,  Los  Angeles,  Calif. 

Send  me  your  booklets  on  the  C.  F.  G.  E.;  also  your 
Dealer's  List  of  Selling  Helps,  and  your  booklet  on 
"Displays  That  Sell  Fruit,"  absolutely  free  to  me. 

Name 

Address 

City State ....- 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


WESTERN  CANADA 


FRANK  H.  WILEY 

Mfrg.'   Agent   and   Importer 
GROCERIES    and    CHEMICALS 
Salesmen    coTerino:    Manitoba,   Saskatchewan, 
Albert-a  and   British  Columbia. 

533-537  Henry  Ave.,  Winnipeg 


THE  McLAY  BROKERAGE  CO. 

WHOLESALE   GROCERY    BROKERS 
and  MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 

Take  advantage  of  our  Service 
WINNIPEG  MANITOBA 


C.  DUNCAN  &  SON 

Manufrs.*  Agents  and  Grocery  Brokers 

Cor.  Princess  and  Bannatyne 

WINNIPEG  Estab.  1899 


W.  L.  Mackenzie  &  Co.  Ltd. 
Head  Office:  Winnipeg 

Branches 

REGINA,  SASKATOON,    CALGARY, 

EDMONTON,  VANCOUVER 


If  you  have  anything  to  sell  to  the 
Trade,  you  should  advertise  it  in  this 
paper. 


Le  75  French  Cigarette  Papers 


Finest 


Quality 


White  Gummed 

Paper 

That  Will 

Satisfy 

Your  Trade 


rhi»  <:"* 


actvi'^^ 


CANADIAN  DISTRIBUTORS: 


100  Leaves  to  Book 

Automatic 
Doubles 

50  Books  to  Box 


Order 
to-day  from 
your  jobber 


DONALD  H.  BAIN  CO. 

Wholesale  Commission  Merchants,  Brokers  and  Importers 

Head  Office,  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches: 
SASKATOON      REGINA      CALGARY      EDMONTON       VANCOUVER        MONTREAL    LONDON,    ENG 


When  Writing  to  Advertisers  Kindly  Mention 

this  Paper. 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


WESTERN    CANADA 


H.P.PENNOCK&CO..LTD. 

WHOLESALE      COMMISSION       BROKERS 

H£A£      WINNIPEC      OTHKE 


T 


MANITOBA 
SASKATCHEWAN 


ALBERTA 
WESTERN    ONT 


Watson  &  Truesdale,  Winnipeg 


hav«  live  men  doing  detail  work  throughout  oar  territory — Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  and  Alberta.       They 
get  the  business,  and  can  get  it  for  you.       Write  as,   and  we  will  explain  our  gystem. 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 


TRACKAGE 
STORAGE 
DISTRIBU- 
TION 


The  Largest 

in  Western  Canada 

We  are  the  largest  Storage, 
Distributing  and  Forwarding 
House  in  the  Western  field. 
Total  Storage  ppace  ninety-six 
thousand  square  feiit  of  Bonded 
or  Free  Storage.  Tieated  ware- 
house. Excellent  Track  facili- 
ties. The  Western  House  for 
SERVICE. 

Williams  Storage  Co« 

WINNIPEG 

and 

Winnipeg  Warehousing  Co. 


WALLACFS  HERRINGS 


Like  Wallace's  Salmon  and 
Pilchards,  Give  Splendid 
Satisfaction. 

our  Jobbers  Can  Get  Them 
For  You 

WALLACE  FISHERIES  limited 

VANCOUVER 


10 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


WESTERN  CANADA 


Ml 


j^' 


Personal  Marketing  Service 


The     "House     of     Scott-Bathgate" 

offers  manufacturers  who  are  de- 
sirous of  successfully  placing  their 
products  in  the  rich  Western  field 
a  personal  selling  organization 
with  an  18-year-old  reputation  for 
producing  big  results. 


We  have  successfully  placed  such 
products  as  Christie's  -Biscuits, 
Robertson's  Confectionery  and 
Hungerford  &  Smith's  Fountain 
Supplies  and  we  can  do  the  same 
for  yours.    Write  us. 


Scott-Bathgate  Company,  Limited 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers  and  Manufacturers'  Agents 

149  Notre  Dame  Ave.  East,  Winnipeg 


W.  H.  ESCOTT  CO. 

LIMITED 

Wholesale  Grocery  Broilers — Manufacturers' 
Agents — Commission  Merchants 

Manufacturers  of  Food  Products  and 
Specialties  of  merit  seeking  increased  dis- 
tribution in  Western  Canada,  are  invited 
to  investigate  our  constructive 

SALES  FORCE 

Your  account  entrusted  to  us  receives  the 
personal  attention  of  experienced  '  and 
efficient  heads. 

We  make  ourselves  your    Business    Right 

Arm  in  our  territory. 

We  are  more  than  Brokers,  we  are  Busi- 
ness Builders. 

WRITE  US  TO-DAY 

HEAD  OFFICE 
WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

Branches  with  Resident  Sales  Managers  at 

Regina,  Sask.  Saskatoon,  Sask. 

Calgary,  Alta.  Edmonton,  Alta. 

Fort  William,  Ont. 


ASK  OUR  AGENTS  FOR  PRICES  OF 

PURNELL'S 

Tb.  Q.tfiy  PICKLES 

BV  FRUIT  SAUCE  IS  OUR  SPECIALITY 
Purnell  &  Panter,  Ltd.,  Bristol,  England 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


ONTARIO 


Jos.  K.  McLauchlan 

Hanofaeturers'  Agent  and  Grocery  Broker. 
Warehouse  and  Distributing 
275-77-79  King  Street  West,  Toronto 
Reliable    reoresentation.      Centrally   located. 


Frost,  Moorman  &  Co, 

BELLEVILLE,  ONT. 

Grocery  Specialty  Brokers 

Agencies  Wanted 

Satiafaetory  Reprttentation  Guaranteed 


We  Cover  Western  Ont.  Thoroughly 

Now   representinif  Sainsbury   Bros  ;  J.   H. 
Wethey,    Limited ;    Harry   Hall    &    Co.  ;   Im- 
perial   Grain    and    Rice    Milling    Co.  ;    and 
others. 
We  do  Detail  Work.     Get  in  touch  with  us. 

JOHN   J.   O'DONNELL   COMPANY 
Commission  Brokers.  Manufacturers'  Agents 

LAING   BUILDING,   WINDSOR,   ONT. 


LAING  AND  WATERS 

Manufacturers  Agents  &  Grocery  Brokers 

28  Wellington  St.  East 
TORONTO 

Desire  correspondence  with  manufacturers 
unrepresented  in  this  district. 


Langley,  Harris  &  Co.,  \XL 

Manufacruren'  Aftenta 
Grocers,  Confectioners  and   Drug 

Specialties 
12  FRONT  ST.  EAST,  TORONTO 


D.  W.  Clark  &  Sons 

248  Avenue  Road 
TORONTO 


Grocery  Brokers  and 
Cotntnission    Agents 

We  invite  correspondence  from 
Domestic  or  Foreign  manufact- 
urers who  desire  to  secure  proper 
distribution. 


HAMBLIN-BRERETON  CO.,  Ltd. 

Grocery  and  Confectionery 

Agents  and  Importers 

Toronto  and  Kitchener,  Ont. 

WinnipcB  and  Calcary. 


J.  R.  Wilson  &  Company 

BROKERS 

EXPORTERS  IMPORTERS 

Dried  Fruits--  Food  Products 

27  Wellington  Street,  East 

'TORONTO,  CANADA 


w 

.  G.  PATRICK  &  CO. 

LIMITED 

Manufacturers'  Agents 

and  Importers 

51- 

53  Wellington  St.  W.,  Toronto 

Halifax.  N.S. ;  Winnipeg,  Han. 

E.  N.  &  W.  E.  SOPER 

Manufacturers'      Agents     &     Commission 
Brokers 
63  Sparka  St.,  OtUwa 
Let    us    demortatrate    what    we    can    do    for 
your    product    in    this    rich    territory.      We 
are  especially   equipped   to   produce   the    re- 
sults  you   are   looking   for. 


W.  G.  A.  LAMBE  &  CO. 


TORONTO 

Establishd  1885 


SUGARS 


FRUITS 


BRAND 

G.  T.  MICKLE 


The 

CROWN 

Trade-Mark 

GO  a  bag  of  white  beantit  a  guarantee 

of  their   uniforni    OBt   and    choice 

quaUty 

Otoly   the    very    fineit    hand-picked 

Canadian  White  Bean*  go  into  bags 

marked 

CROWN  BRAND 

For  your  own  protection  inaitt  upon 
having  this  Une  of  known  quality. 

Ridgetown,  Ont. 


C.  A.  MANN  COMPANY 

Strictly  New  Laid  Eggs 
Choice  Creamery  Butter 
Fancy  Dressed  Poultry 

Special  Attention  to  Grocers'  Orders. 
Satisfaction  Assured. 

LONDON,  ONTARIO 

PHONE  1577 


12 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


July  29,  1921. 


EASTERN  CANADA 


TELEPHONE    MAIN    7143 

ST.  ARNAUD  FILS  CIE 

GROCERY   BROKERS 


Importateurs 

&    Ezportatenn 
Pois  et  Feves 
Produits   Alimentaires 


I  m  porters 

&   Ezporten 
Peas    and    Beans 
Food     Prodacts 


ST.     NICHOLAS     BUILDING.    MONTREAL 


TIPPET  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

Importers  and 
Manufacturers'  Agents 

8  Place  Royale,  Montreal 

Established  1876 


ARSENIS  &  CO. 

PATRAS,   GREECE 

ESTABLISHED  1893 

Wholesale  Currant  and 

Dried  Fruit  Exporters 


GROCERY  BROKERS  WANTED 

In  Western  Canada  and  Ontario 

Write    us    just    now.     First    class  refer- 
ences on  request. 


Say  You  Saw  It  In 
Canadian  Grocer, 
It  Will  Help  To 
Identify    You. 


^"-^4 

CANADA 

NAPLESYWIP 

Jr 

PRIDE  OF  CANADA 

Pure   Maple   Syrup 

Will  plente  your  most  particular  customers. 
Guaranteed  Absolutely  Pure. 
Have  a  good  Stock  on  hand  for  the  Summer   and   Fall  Trade 

REPRESENTATIVES:  W.  L.  Macksozie  &  Co.,  Limited,  Winnioeg,  Regina,  Saskatoon,  Calgary  and  Edmoo- 
uat    Oppenh«imer  Bros.,  Limited,  V^ncouver,  B.  C;    S.  H.  P.  Mackenzie  &  Co.,  33  Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 
J.  W.  Gorham  &  Co.,  Halifax,  N.S. 

MAPLE  TREE  PRODUCERS  ASSOCIATION  LIMITED 

OFFICESt  58  WELLINGTON  ST.W.,MONTREAL 


/JIMMIMIJLaMlMlMlMIMIMIiyJIiyJliL^IMIiL^IMliyJIMIMIM!^ 


BABY'S  OWN  SOAP 

SO  p.  c  Profit 

Buy  direct  from  the  factory.     Freight  prepaid.  Minimum  quantity,  2  gross. 
$38.40  less  20  p.c.  and  5  p.c.  -  $29.18       Sell  at  15c.  per  cake  -  $43.20 

on  Sask.,  Alta.  and  B.C.  add  60c.  per  gross  and  retail  at  50c.  per  box  of  3  cakes.  Ask  for  price  list  on  other  line 

ALBERT  SOAPS,  Limited.     168  McCord  St.  Montreal,  Que. 


.<&!^;ffl?'?J1Wfe^lfr^fl>fgl>g<lfrg^^ 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


13 


ESTABLISHED  1842 


COFFEE 


COFFEE 


We  specialize  in  this  line 

Our  Coffees  are  Imported,  Roasted  and  Ground  in  our  own  Plant 

Choicest  and  Purest  Produced 


PRIMUS  BRAND 

1   lb.  tins,   cases  30   lbs.  50c.    lb. 

Z     ,.  ••  ,•        ox)      •>  47C.      ,. 


RAJAH  BRAND 

1  lb.  cartons,  cases  24  lbs.  40c.   lb. 


ALSO 

COFFEES 

IN  BULK 

"OWL"  BLEND 


D 


1  POUND  NET 
IMPORTED 
ROASTED 

AND 

GROUND 


L.CHAPUT  FlLS5rClEJ.iniitee 

MONTREAL-  CANADA 


Roasted  Whole  or  Ground 

EXTRA  FANCY 50c  /b. 

A.l 42c   „ 

No.  10 40c    „ 

French  Roasted,  black,  No.  1 40c   ,, 

No.  30 38c  „ 

No.  40  (compound)  ground  only 35c  ,, 

French  Roasted,  black,  No.  2 33c  ,, 

AVA  (compound),  ground  only 30c  ,, 

RIO 25c  „ 

Put  up  in  5,  10,  15,  25  and  50  lb.  tins  and  cartons.      Freight  paid  on 
lots  of  200  lbs.,  one  kind  or  assorted. 

Try  them,  they  are  unequalled  and  will  please  you. 

SPECIAL  DISCOUNT  TO  JOBBERS 

Our  Motto,     "SATISFACTION  ALWAYS" 

L.    CHAPUT,    FILS    &    CIE,    LIMITEE 

DISTRIBUTORS,  IMPORTERS,  WHOLESALE  GROCERS  AND  MANUFACTURERS 

MONTREAL 


14  CANADIANGROCER  August  5,  1921. 


"Member  Audit  Bureau  Circulations" 

"Member  Associated  Business  Papers" 

"Member  of  Canadian  National  Newspapers 

and   Periodicals   Association" 

CANADIAN    GROCER 

CANADA'S  NATIONAL  GROCERY  PAPER 

Vol.  XXXV  TORONTO,  AUG.  5,  1921  No.  31 

EDITORIAL  CONTENTS 

The  Maritimes  are  rich  in  production 19 

Travelling  Grocery  store  serves  Halifax   20 

The  summer  camper  is  a  good  customer 21 

These  Grocers  believe  in  advertising 22 

Sales  Tax  is  Increased  50  Per  Cent 21-2o 

Neglecting  windows  is  a  bad  policy 23 

Sells  forty-five  barrels  of  vinegar    24 

Quebec  R.  M.  A.  convention 34 

Editorial  Page 35 

This  statement  reveals  no  profits 36 

Current  news  of  the  week   37-38 

B.C.  Provincial  Board  R.  M.  A.  meets 39-40 

General  markets 41-45 

Markets  by  wire 46 

Produce  section 47-50 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President  H.  T.  HUNTER,   Vice-President 

H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager 

Publishers  of  Canadian  Grocer,  Hardware  and  Metal,  The  Financial  Post,  Druesists'  Weekly, 
MacLean's  Magazine,  Farmers'  Magazine,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and 
Publisher,  Bookseller  and  Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing  Newe,  The  Power 
House,  The  Sanitary  Engineer,  Canadian  Foundryman,  Marine  Engineering  of  Canada,  The 
Canadian   Motor,   Tractor  and   Implement  Trade  Journal. 

Cable  Address :  Maepubco,  Toronto ;  Atabek,  London,  Eng. 
ESTABLISHED  1886. 

CANADIAN  GROCER 

B.   T.   HUSTON,  Manager.  H.  V.   STODDARD,  Montreal  Representative. 

J     L    WYCKOFF    Editor  ^'  ^'    M^^*^H'   Toronto   and   Hamilton    Re- 

•  '  presentative. 

P.    A.    CRANE,    News    Editor.  G.  G.    YORKE,    Ontario    Representative, 

w     A      wrr<oi»     A.  -  •  *     wj-4.  .»     i       .                                                   E.  H.   HAWKINS,   Western   Representative, 

H.    A.    WEBB,    Associate   Editor,  Montreal.  Winnipeg. 

R.    A.   HUNTER,    Vancouver   Representative. 

CHIEF  OFFICES: 

CANADA— Montreal,  Southam  Bldg.,  128  Bleury  St..  Phone  1004.  Toronto,  143-153  University  Avenue  Telephone 
Adelaide  5740.  Winnipeg,  Room  901,  Confederation  Life  Bldg.,  Main  Street,  Telephone  A.  3773  Vancouver  314 
Carter-Cotton    Bldg.,    198    Hastings    St.    W.,    Telephone    Seymour    4337. 

GREAT  BRITAIN— London,  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great  Britain,  Limited,  88  Fleet  Street  EC  E  J  Dodd 
Director,    Telephone   Central    12960.      Cable   Address:    Atabek,    London,    England.  ••      -      • 

UNITED  STApS— New  York,  Room  1606,  St.  James  Bldg.,  1133  Broadway,  Telephone  Watkins  5869  :  Boston,  Room 
734,  Old  South  Building,  Telephone  Main  1024;  Chicago,  Room  1401,  Lytton  Bldg.,  14  E.  Jackson  Street  Tele- 
phone Harrison  9133. 

SUBSCRIP-nON  PRICE— Canada,  M  a  year;  Great  Britain.  South  Africa  and  West  Indies,  16s.  a  year-  United 
States,    $4.50    a    year;    other    countries,    M    a    year;    single    copies,    25    cents.      Invariably    in    advance.     ' 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


15 


BLACK  TEA 

The  indisputed  leader  in  popularity  and  the  stan- 
dard bearer  of  "Quality." 

GREEN  TEA 

For  those  who  used  to  take  Japan  and  China  Greens. 
The  Quality  is  so  unique  that  the  sales  this  year  have 
practically  doubled  last  year's  to  date. 

MIXED    TEA 

Blended  "just  right."  There  is  a  tremendous  sale 
for  this  blend  in  city  and  country. 


Each  blend  in    all   grades--Brown, 
Blue,  Red  and  Gold. 

Don't  lose  business  through  haying  to  say:  "We  don't  carry  that.' 
always  good  stock  for  it  is  returnable  at  any  time. 


Do  you  stock  all  blends? 

SALADA  stock  is 


HARRISONS  AND  CROSFIELD,  LTD. 

IMPORTERS  OF  EASTERN  PRODUCE 


Bldg. 
Dept. 


Allied 
Companies 

New  York 
Philadelphia 


Foochow 

Singapore 

Penang 

Kuantan 

Je-sselton 


San   Francisco    Sandakan 
Shanghai  Melbourne 

Hankow  Sydney 


Brisbane 
Adelaide 
Perth 

Wellington 
Auckland 
Dunedin 
Christchurch 


Head    Office 

Quilon 

London, 

Eng. 

Batavia 

Branches 

Bandoeng 

Colombo 

Tangjong 

Calcutta 

Baley 

Calicut 

Kuala  Lumpur 

Cochin 

Medon 

Tangier 

Kobe 

Montreal 
Telephone  Main  6959. 


IMPORTATIONS 

Enquiries    Solicited 

FOR 

PEPPERS 

ALL  KINDS  OF  SPICES 

TAPIOCAS 

SAGOS 

MILD  COFFEES 

COCOAS 

Desiccated  COCOANUT 

Etc. 


16  CANADIAN    GROCER  August  5,  1921. 


An  Old  Stand-by 
in  Key  with  Modern  Methods 


When  Messrs.  Lea.  &  Perrins,  eighty  years  ago,  originated  "Worces- 
tershire Sauce,"  they  recognized  the  trade-value  of  Reputation  found- 
ed on  Quality.  They  not  only  invented  a  sauce  of  unique  piquancy 
— distinct  from  any  other  known  condiment' — but  made  it  a  prime 
requisite  that  the  quality  of  every  ingredient— the  care  taken  in 
every  process — should  be  irreproachable.  And  so  they  founded  the 
reputation  for 


The  Original 
Worcestershire  Sauce 


vvhich — even  before  the  era  of  modern  advertising — by  sheer  force 
of  inherent  merit — in  households  and  trade  circles  throughout  the 
world  had  come  to  typify  Quality  Supreme. 

To-day  Lea  &  Perrins'— the  original  Worcestershire  Sauce — still 
stands  without  a  peer.  To-day  it  is  more  than  ever  in  key  both  with 
consumer  demand  and  approved  business  methods,  which  unite  in 
stipulating  that  Quality  shall  be  considered  paramount.  Lea  & 
Pen-ins'  is  a  provedly  sure  and  steady  builder  of  prestige  and  profit. 


HAROLD  SEDDON 

C.  P.  R.  Building  TORONTO  Canadian  Agent 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN     GROCER 


17 


Be  on  the  Lookout  for  No.  One 


When  you  really  consider  it,  to  you  it's  not  what  we  gain  by  seUing  Red  Rose  Tea, 
but  it's  what  you  lose  by  not  selling  it  that  counts,  isn't  it?  Many  thousands  of  grocers 
throughout  Canada  have  answered  this  question  profitably.  Many  have  sold  Red  Rose 
Tea  e\'er  since  we  started  business  26  years  ago. 

If  it's  easy  for  you  to  sell  other  teas,  how  much  easier  for  you  to  sell  Red  Rose  Tea. 
As  soon  as  you  show  it  in  your  store,  you  benefit  from  years  of  advertising  that  has  car- 
ried the  name  into  e\ery  nook  and  corner  of  the  country,  so  it's  become  a  by-word  for 
goodness  on  the  tip  of  every  woman's  tongue. 

So  you  see  when  you're  selling  Red  Rose  Tea  you're  looking  out  for  No.  One, 
yourself.  People  like  Red  Rose  because  its  brimful  of  quality.  Give  them  what  they  want, 
and  send  them  home  happy  rather  than  have  them  go  elsewhere  for  it. 

Wouldn't  you  like  a  small  case,  and  test  the  truth  of  what  we've  said.^  If  you'd 
rather  not  wait  for  a  traveler,  you  can  mail  an  order  to  any  of  our  offices. 

T.  H.  Estabrooks  Co.,  Limited 

St.  John,  N.B.,    Montreal,  P.Q.,  Toronto,  Ont.,    Winnipeg,  Man.,    Calgary,  Alta. 


INGERSOLL  ICE  CREAM  CONE  CO.,  Limited,  IngersoU,  Ont. 


Every 
Cone 
Inspected. 

Made 

By 

Canadians 

In 

Canada. 


CRYSTAL    CAKE 


DOMINION     CAKE 


HONEY    CAKE 


In 

the 

heart 

of 

the 

dairy 

county 

of 

Canada. 


If  your  Jobber  cannot  supply  you  with  cones  of  Quality,  send  your  order  in  direct,  at  once. 

CRYSTAL  CAKE  4.50  per  1000      \      FREIGHT 

DOMINION  CAKE  4.25  per  1000      >    . 

HONEY  CAKE  3.25  per  1000     j  PAID 

Every  cone  guaranteed  to  be  perfect.     Manufactured  from  the  purest  and  most  wholesome  ingredients  in  the  most  sanitary  cone  factory  in  the  British  Empire 
We  ship  same  day  as  order  is  received.     Please  state  how  you  wish  shipment,  Express  or  Freight. 


18 


CANADIAN  GROCER 


August  o.  1921. 


YOU  MAY  BE 
SURPRISED 


O  find  what  a  demand  there 
is  for  a  special  food  for  in- 
fants and  invalids  among 
your  customers  if  you  rec- 
ommend to  them— 


Robinson's  "Patent"  Barley 

and 

Robinson's  "Patent"  Groats 


It  has  a  national  reputation  behind  it.     Thfe  summer  demand  is  always  largest  and  if  you  look  for  it,  in- 
creased sales  will  reward  the  effort.      Keep  a  fair  size  stock  always  on  hand. 

MAGOR,    SON    and    COMPANY,     LIMITED 

23  SCOTT  STREET.  TORONTO  191  ST.  PAUL  ST.  W.,  MONTREAL 


If  ever  your  customers  will  appreciate 
a  treat  in  canned  fish — it*s  NOW! 


Hot,  sticky  weather — the  cnjoyahlenes?:  of  a  cool 
meal — prepared  in  the  cool  kitchen  without  fire 
— the  keeping  qualities  of  (Tosse-Millerd  products 
throughout  this  trying  period — the  economy  of 
buying  in  quantities  and  being  prepared 
for  emergencies — these  are  talking  points  which 
should  help  you  do  profitable  business  when  folks 
are  not  in  the  mood  to  buy.  Try  it.  The  Gosse- 
Millerd  line  is  under  one  label  and  include^ — 


Sockeye  Salmon 
Pink  Salmon 
Kippered  Salmon 
Hand  Packed  Pilchards 


Herring.s  in  Tomato  Sauce 
Kippered  Herrings 
Fresh  Herrings 
Deep   Sea   Trout 


Every  can  guaranteed — and  we'll  back  you  to  the 
limit  in  giving  your  customers  genuine  satisfaction. 
Check  up  your  stock  now. 

Gosse  -  Millerd  Packing  Co.,  Ltd. 

Vancouver 


(Mdian  Grocer 


VOL.  XXXV. 


TORONTO,  AUGUST  5,  1921. 


No.  31 


The  Maritimes  Are  Rich  In  Production 

A  Review  of  the  Past  Year  Indicates  a  Wealth  of  Production  and 
Industry  That  Looms  Large  in  the  Sum  Total  of  Canada's  Resour- 
ces— New  Brunswick  Had  an  Agricultural  Production  in  1920  of 
Eighty-six  Million  Dollars. 


TX7ITH  this  issue  of  Canadian  Grocer,  interest 
^^  centers  in  articles  telling  of  merchants  in  the 
maritime  provinces.  This  eastern  part  of  Canada 
representing  the  older  settlements  of  the  Dominion, 
is  rich  industrially  and  in  its  production,  to  say  no- 
thing of  its  importance  in  having  within  its  borders 
two  of  the  chief  seaports  of  the  Atlantic. 

New  Brunswick,  the  largest  of  the  three  provinces 
constituting  the  maritimes,  looms  large  in  the  sum 
total  of  Canada's  wealth.  Great  and  growing  value 
is  realized  in  the  farm  products  of  this  province.  Ag- 
ricultural production  of  New  Brunswick  in  1920 
was  valued  at  $86,000,000,  a  majority  of  the 
people  engaged  in  farming,  owning  their  own  farms. 
Root  crops  flourish  and  the  New  Brunswick  potato 
iii  eminently  exportable.  In  1919  there  were  pro- 
duced 7,070,600  bushels  of  potatoes  that  were  sold 
for  consumption  in  other  provinces  of  the  Dominion 
and  in  the  United  States.  Mixed  farming  is  gen- 
erally engaged  in.  More  than  twenty-five  per  cent 
of  the  farm  land  areas  of  New  Brunswick  were  un- 
der cultivation  ten  years  ago,  and  a  steady  develop- 
ment is  being  made  annually  to  the  corresponding 
increase  of  the  assets  of  the  province,  and  the 
wealth  of  its  population  of  some  400,000. 
Its  Seaport  Situation 

New  Brunswick  is  well  situated  for  the  exporta- 
tion of  products  of  farm,  forest,  mine  and  factory. 
There  are  many  splendid  seaports  available,  and 
logs  can  be  run  by  water  from  almost  every  forest 
area  of  the  interior  to  the  sea.  Enterprise  bringing 
still  greater  development  of  abundant  resources  in 
timber,  pulpwood  and  water  power  meets  with  the 
confident  encouragement  of  capital.  Industries 
utilizing  raw  materials  available  and  very  access- 
ible in  the  province  are  securely  established  and 
flourish.  Besides  forest  resources  covering  eighty 
per  cent,  of  the  area  of  the  province  which  is  27,985 
square  miles.  New  Brunswick  possesses  coal  meas- 
ures estimated  to  be  equal  to  a  production  of  at 
least  another  150,000,000  tons;  and  water  powers, 
the  horse  power  of  which  has  hardly  yet  been  one- 
half  harnessed. 

Farming  Leads  In  Nova  Scotia 

Agriculture  is  the  leading  industry  of  Nova  Scotia, 
with  fishing  second  in  importance.  The  province 
is  favored  with  a  favorable  climate  and  all  the  hard- 
ier grains  can  be  grown  with  profit.     There  is  a 


vast  wealth  of  natural  resources  here  awaiting  de- 
velopment, and  lumbering  and  mining  operations 
are  steadily  expanding.  The  finances  of  the  prov- 
ince have  been  carefully  administered  for  many 
years  and  are  now  in  excellent  condition.  The 
municipalities  too  have  been  established  upon  a  firm 
basis,  and  there  is  a  large  measure  of  safety  behind 
their  securities. 

During  1920  the  total  market  value  of  the  fish- 
eries of  Nova  Scotia  was  $13,890,000.  21,598  per- 
sons were  engaged  *in  the  work  of  the  fisheries  on 
sea  and  shore. 

The  lumber  cut  for  1920  in  Nova  Scotia  is  esti- 
mated at  350,000,000  feet,  the  home  consumption 
about  100,000,000  feet. 

Nova  Scotia  had  2,147  manufacturing  establish- 
ments in  1917,  the  latest  year  for  which  figures  are 
available.  The  capital  invested  amounted  to 
$136,521,655,  and  the  value  of  products  $176,369,- 
025.  The  province  ranks  fourth  as  a  manufactur- 
ing province. 

A  Million  Acre  Farm 

Prince  Edward  Island,  the  "1,000,000-Acre 
Farm,"  in  the  most  intensively  cultivated  province 
of  the  Dominion.  A  comparatively  large  percent- 
age of  the  population  too  is  engaged  in  the  fishing 
trade,  for  Prince  Edward  Island  is  advantageously 
located  in  a  rich  fishing  belt. 

The  value  of  Prince  Edward  Island's  fisheries  in 
1920,  was  $1,645,939.  A  sum  of  $1,333,736  was 
invested  in  the  industry,  including  $411,386  in  lob- 
ster canneries.  Some  4,691  persons  in  all  were  em- 
ployed. 

Agriculture  is  one  of  the  chief  occupations  of  the 
people  of  the  island.  In  1920  the  yield  in  the  prin- 
cipal field  crops  were:  wheat,  2,477,993  bushels; 
oats,  5,298,945  bushels;  barley,  147,160  bushels; 
peas,  2,706  bushels;  buckwheat,  82,164  bushels; 
mixed  grains,  547,537  bushels;  potatoes,  6,174,740 
bushels;  turnips,   4,167,750   bushels. 

The  number  of  livestock  in  the  province  in  1920 
was:  horses,  35,567;  cattle,  139,143;  sheep,  72,- 
552;  lambs,  55,997;  swine,  49,917. 

In  1920  there  were  24  cheese  and  17  butter  fac- 
tories on  the  Island.  The  production  of  cheese 
amounted  to  2,081,276  pounds  which  was  valued 
at  $526,078.20;  production  of  butter  totalled 
1,157,527   pounds,  valued  at  $675,047.25. 


20 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


Travelling  Grocery  Store  Serves  Halifax 

Innovation  in  the  Way  of  Selling  Groceries  is  Introduced  in  the 

Maritime  City — Motor  Truck  Specially  Constmcted  and  Fitted  as 

Grocery  Store  Covers  the  City — Retail  Store  is  Base  of  Supply. 


HALIFAX— Halifax  from  a  busi- 
ness standpoint  has  always  kept 
up  to  the  times,  and  is  never  found 
lagging  behind  other  cities  in  tlie  Domin- 
ion. New  ideas  are  constantly  springing 
up  In  the  grocery  world  this  is  true,  as 
in  other  lines.  Here  there  is  the  "Cash 
and  Carry"  system,  various  "Co-opera- 
tive" stores,  and  the  "Serve  Yourself" 
grocery.  The  latest  innovation  however 
has  been  recently  introduced  by  the 
"Motor  Groceries  Limited."  It  is  the 
latest  idea  in  grocery  service. 
Is  Fitted  As  Grocery 

This  company  has  as  its  president,  J. 
M.  Granville,  formerly  of  the  B.  Houde 
Tobacco  Company,  the  shareholders  being 
a  number  of  business  men  of  the  city. 
The  idea  is  selling  groceries  from  a  motor 
truck,  fitted  up  as  a  grocery  store,  carry- 
ing all  the  regular  lines.  Their  rolling 
stock  at  present  consists  of  one  two  ton 
motor  truck.  The  promoters  of  the  idea, 
told  the  representative  of  CANADIAN 
GROCER,  that  while  the  large  two  ton 
truck  has  its  advantages,  the  one  ton 
truck  would  really  be  better. 

Instead  of  keeping  up  a  warehouse, 
they  have  conceived  the  idea  of  having  as 
their  base  of  supply  a  retail  grocery 
store,  which  is  situated  in  the  north  end 


How  Motor   Groceries  Ltd.,  serve  people   of  Halifax- 
motor  car. 


grocery  fitted   in   a 


of  the  city.  Thus  their  stocks  are  not 
lying  idle,  while  the  truck  is  covering  its 
various  routes.  The  principal  businiss 
lies  in  the  suburbs  of  the  city,  as  Halifax 
city  is  well  supplied  with  grocery  estab- 
lishments. The  city  has  been  divided  into 
routes,  and  by  advertising  in  the  local 
press,  the  public  are  informed  when  to 
expect  the  travelling  store. 

How  The  staff  Is  Constituted 
The   staff   consists   of   a   clerk   at   the 


supply  base  and  retail  store,  the  driver 
of  the  car,  and  the  grocery  clerk,  who 
makes  sales  from  the  car.  Thes'-e  men 
with  the  exception  of  the  driver  are  paid 
a  commission  over  a  certain  amount  of 
sales,  as  well  as  a  regular  salary.  Its 
final  success  is  not  yet  established,  and 
o"wing  to  the  peculiar  topography  of  the 
city,  it  IS  not  yet  icnown  whether  the 
venture  will  prove  a  success--  or  not. 
However,  the  idea  is  yet  in  its  infancy. 


'^Business  Looks  Brighter 

Than  a  Year  Ago'' 

Manager  of  Halifax  Chain  of  Stores  Has  no  Fear  For  the 

Future— Operates  Eleven  Stores— Capital  Stock  $50,000. 

— Stock  is  Taken  in  Each  Store  Once  a  Moiith. 


HALIFAX,  N.S.  (Special).— Thos. 
A.  McGill  is  president  and  manag- 
ing director  of  the  Economy  Gro- 
cery Company  of  Halifax,  Limited.  Mr. 
McGill  came  to  Halifax  in  1919  from  the 
United  States  to  form  a  ch'sin  of  grocery 
stores  in  the  city.  He  has  now  eleven 
stores  throughout  the  city. 

The  c<.'npany  is  incorporated  under 
the  Nova  Scotia  Companies  Act  and  is 
conducted  on  a  "cash  and  carry'  basis. 
Not  a  cent  of  credit  is  allowed  in  any  of 
the  eleven  stores.  The  capital  stock  of 
the  Company  is  $50,000. 

The  stores  are  scattered  in  every  dir-c- 
tion  in  Halifax,  and  two  of  the  stores  are 
in  Dartmouth  across  the  harbor.  Each 
store  is  numbered  and  has  the  name 
.stamped  on  the  window  in  gold  letters. 
Mr.  McGill's  aim  has  been  to  give  prompt, 
and  courteous  service,  and  a  careful  se- 
lection, aiid  attractive  display  of  goods 
has  obtained  many  customers. 


The  prices  to  be  charged  for  goods  in 
these  stores  are  fixed  at  the  main  store 
on  Young  Street,  and  when  on  special 
occasions  a  sale  is  held,  it  takes  place  in 
all  the  stores  at  once. 

The  advertising  is  done  by  Mr.  McGill 
himself  who  personally  writes  the  copy 
which  appears  in  the  local  press  unce  a 
week.  Instead  of  each  store  advertising 
separately  the  advertisement  covers  all 
the  stores  and  at  the  bottom  is  given  the 
addresses  of  all  the  branches,  so  when  the 
cost  of  the  advertisement  is  divided  a- 
mong  them  it  amounts  to  a  mere  trifle.  A 
large  amount  of  circular  advertising  is 
also  done.  When  business  seems  to  slack- 
en in  one  of  the  stores,  circulars  are  dis- 
tributed broadcast  in  the  neighborhood. 
Managers   Get    Commission    On    Sales 

The  management  of  each  store  operated 
by  the  company  is  in  the  hands  of  an  ex- 


perienced grocery  man,  who  in  addition 
to  his  salary  gets  a  commission  on  all 
sales.  The  .  managers  of  these  stores 
almost  without  exception  are  holders  of 
stock  in  the  company.  This  tends  in  the 
opinion  of  the  management  to  stimulate 
interest  and  create  aggressiveness  on  the 
part  of  the  managers.  In  addition  to  the 
manager,  each  store  has  a  clerk  or  clerks, 
according  to  the  volume  of  business  in 
that  particular  store.  On  Saturdays 
extra  help  is  hired  to  handle  the  larger 
volume  of  business. 

Take  Stock  Once  A  Month 

Stock  is  taken  in  each  of  the  stores  at 
the  end  of  every  month  by  a  method 
usd  by  the  large  chain  stores  of  the 
United  States. 

When  asked  as  to  the  future,  Mr.  Mc- 
Gill believed  there  was  no  limit  to  the 
possibilities  of  this  business.  Notwith- 
standing the  talk  of  hard  times,  business 
looks  brighter  than  a  year  ago,  and 
though  money  is  said  to  be  scarce  the 
a  few  more  stores  are  added,  a  central 
warehouse  is  to  be  established  in  which 
stocks  will  be  kept  for  all  the  stores  in 
the  city. 

Some  of  the  buying  is  done  direct  from 
the  farmers,  but  they  are  a  little  inclined 
not  to  sell  to  retail  stores,  as  they  would 
rather  sell  to  wholesalers.  In  time  Mr. 
McGill  says  he  hopes  to  buy  direct  from 
the  manufacturers  as  his  business  grows. 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


"Zi 


Summer  Campers  are  Good  Customers 

Beer  and  Goff,  Merchants  In  Charlottetown,  P.  E.  L,  Cater  To 

Large  Summer  Colony  And  Greatly  Increase  Turnover  By  So 

Doing— Give  Auto  Deliveries— A  Trade  Worth  Cultivating 


CHARLOTTETOWN,  P.E.I.  —  Op- 
portunity for  the  merchant  to  de- 
velop a  fine  summer  resort  trade 
is  not  lacking  in  Charlottetown,  Prince 
Edward  Island.  Beer  and  Goff,  mer- 
chants in  this  city,  have  gone  after  this 
summer  resort  trade  in  the  past  few 
years,  and  have  made  a  very  gratifying 
success,  in  the  way  of  developing  trade 
of  this  kind.  It  is  business  well  worth 
cultivating,  according  to  the  manage- 
ment of  this  firm,  and  time  devoted  to 
serving  tourist  and  summer  resort  peo- 
ple is  amply  repaid  in  the  greatly  in- 
creased turnover. 

The  City  of  Charlottetown,  Prince  Ed- 
ward Island,  is  fortunate  in  the  posses- 
sion of  two  summer  resorts  within  rea- 
sonable distance  of  the  city,  and  as  there 
is  rarely  any  excessive  heat  in  the  sum- 
mertime on  the  island,  the  residents 
do  not  have  to  go  far  afield  for  their 
summer  vacation,  but  need  only  seek  one 
or  other  of  the  summer  resorts  situated 
close  by  on  the  sea-shore.  The  Kep- 
pouch  resort,  a  colony  of  cottages  owned 
mainly  by  residents  of  Charlottetown, 
is  situated  at  the  mouth  of  Charlotte- 
town harbor  and  only  about  five  miles 
from  the  city.  The  other  colony,  known 
as  the  Charlottetown  Summer  Resort,  is 
just  on  the  opposite  side  of  the  harbor, 
and  is  reached  by  ferry  and  then  by  a 
drive  of  two  or  three  miles. 

Auto  Delivery  Weekly. 

The  customers  are  five  miles  distant 
instead  of  in  the  comparatively  imme- 
diate neighborhood,  and  they  have  to  be 
kept  track  of  and  encouraged  to  con- 
tinue their  trade  with  the  store. 

Deliveries  are  made  once  a  week  to 
each  of  these  resorts  at  certain  times, 
so  that  the  housewife  can  order  things 


by  mail  or  telephone,  and  be  sure  of 
having  them  delivered  at  a  certain  spe- 
cified time.  That  definite  time  of  de- 
livery, even  if  the  service  is  less  exten- 
sive tlian  the  housewife  has  been  accus- 
tomed to,  has  been  a  great  factor  in  re- 
taining the  trade  of  the  store. 

This  service  does  not  injure  the  regu- 
lar service  of  the  store  either,  and  auto 
delivery  truck  can  deliver  the  orders  in 
a  comparatively  short  space  of  time, 
and  with  everything  arranged  to  allow 
for  this  service  there  is  rarely  a  hitch. 

The  delivery  man  on  his  trip  also 
takes  orders  from  the  housewife  that  will 
be  delivered  on  his  next  trip,  and  in 
that  way  a  substantial  volume  of  trade 
is  secured. 

The   Householder  a   Good  Buyer. 

Then  there  is  a  nightly  movement  of 
business  men  between  the  city  and  the 
shore,  and  the  store  makes  a  strong  bid 
for  their  trade,  because  a  great  burden 
of  the  buying  of  most  summer  resorts 
falls  on  the  shoulders  of  the  man  who 
spends  his  day  in  the  city.  It  is  easy 
for  him  to  stop  at  the  store  in  his  car 
and  pick  up  an  order,  and  a  very  con- . 
siderable  amount  of  business  comes  from 
this  item  of  trade. 

The  store  makes  a  specialty  of  con- 
fectionery and  fruit,  two  lines  that  have 
an  unusually  strong  summer  appeal.  This 
appeal  is  given  every  opportunity  to 
exert  its  influence.  Window  displays 
are  extensively  used,  and  attractive  fix- 
tures for  displaying  fruit  are  given  a 
prominent  place  in  the  store. 

There  is  also  a  considerable  emphasis 
placed  on  the  stock  of  fancy  groceries, 
of  which  the  store  makes  a  feature. 
These  are  the  items  that  are  calculated 
to  interest  the  summer  buyer,  and  per- 


haps the  master  of  the  house  is  even 
more  subject  to  this  appeal  than  is  the 
mistress,  and  he  is  less  likely  to  weigh 
the  cost  of  these  goods.  So  it  is  that 
Mr.  Wellner  has  found  it  very  good 
business,  indeed,  to  exert  an  especial 
effort  at  this  time  of  year,  to  interest 
the  purchaser  of  summer  grocery  needs. 


CALIFORNIA  ALMOND  GROWERS 

WANT  PROTECTION  OF 

ALMONDS 

Virtually  all  of  the  agricultural  or- 
ganizations of  California  representing 
about  75,000  farmers,  are  either  urging 
on  their  lobbyists  in  Washington  or  send- 
ing telegrams  to  Congressmen  in  an  en- 
deavor to  raise  the  import  duty  on  for- 
eign almonds,  according  to  the  Los 
Angeles  "Examiner"  of  July  13.  Twenty- 
five  associations  are  insisting  that  Cali- 
fornia's almond  growing  district  shall 
be  protected  against  the  encroachments 
of  the  almond  growing  nations  of  south- 
ern Europe.  California  almond  acreage 
if  laid  out  compactly  would  nearly  cov- 
er a  bit  01  the  State  slightly  less  than 
13  miles  square,  and  to  protect  this  area 
California  demands  that  15  cents  a 
pound  be  added  by  the  tariff  to  the  price 
of   imported  shelled  almonds. 


Thief  Takes  Scale  to  Weigh  the  Meat 

Burglars  entered  a  butcher  shop  re- 
cently, carrying  off: 

One  roast  of  beef 

One  ham 

Two  chickens 

Three  butcher  knives  to  carve  them 

And  a  $235  scale  with  which  to  weigh 
them. 

Police  were  wondering  if  the  robbers 
took  the  scale  along  to  see  that  they  had 
not  short-weighted  themselves. 


Illustrating  the  provincial  highway  bridge  and  the  C.  P.  R.  cantilever  bridge  across  the  Reversing  Falls  to  the 
northwest  of  the  harbor  in  St.  John,  N.  B.,  and  showing  the  harbor  and  city  of  St.  John  in  the  distance. 


22 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


These  Grocers  Believe  In  Advertising 

Halifax,  N.S.,  Has  More  Grocers  Energetically  Advertising  Than 
Any  Other  Place  of  Similar  Size — Are  Getting  Turnover  as  a 

Result — The  Writing  of  an  Advertisement.  * 

Written  for  Canadian  Grocer  by  HOWARD  WALLACE  of  the  Wallace  Advertising  Agency 


To  begin  with,  Halifax  where  my  . 
pencil  is  poised,  has  more  grocers 
energetically  advertising  in  the  pa- 
per than  any  other  place  in  the  world. 
Pick  up  Thursday's  issue  of  the  chief 
home  journal  and  you'll  find  twenty  of 
them  getting  turnover  out  of  spaces  run- 
ning from  a  third  to  two  columns  at  ab- 
out a  dollar  an  inch.  Only  two  or  three 
are  big  fellows  in  area;  the  rest  are  just 
good,  average  sized  groceries  that  be- 
come uncommon  in  volume  of  sales. 

Post  war  reconstruction  brought  a  lot 
of  new  grocers  and  many  of  these  new- 
comers set  about  establishing  themselves 
with  "bargain"  offerings.  Cash  and  car- 
ry came.  Competition  cut  deep  into  the 
old  favorite  channels  of  trade.  Price 
counted,  especially  as  some  of  the  ar- 
ticles marked  down  were  well  known 
through  the  manufacturers'  national  ad- 
vertising and  some  through  long  use  by 
the  housewife.  Wherefore  the  old  local 
dealer  had  to  trim  his  sails  to  the  new 
business  breeze  or  see  his  sales  trimmed 
for  him,  those  situated  in  the  poorer 
and  middle  class  districts  had  to  meet 
this  new  competition  or  lose,  as  nine  in 
ten  did  lose  until  they  went  bankrupt  or 
retorted  in  kind.  And  there's  the  Gro- 
cery situation  in  Halifax  to-day;  a  low 
percentage  of  wide  quality-range  gro- 
cers maintaining  a  credit  and  delivery 
trade  and  thus  holding  much  of  the  com- 
fortably situated  and  particular  family 
trades,  with  the  great  majority  fighting 
for  gross  profits  and  getting  them  by 
advertising   prices. 

Produce  Results 

Price  advertisements  produce  immedi- 
ate results  and  satisfy  the  merchant  with- 
out any  fatally  important  wait.  But 
price  and  quality  can  be  equally  well  ad- 
vertised as  a  few  have  been  converted 
to  understanding  and  here  enters  more 
particularly  the  delicate  art  of  printed 
persuasion — putting  important  convinc- 
ing facts  forward  in  the  sequence  that 
catches  favorably  the  reader's  eye  and 
carries  her  interest  to  the  point  of  con- 
vincing her  you  have  good  fresh  stuff 
.inexpensively  marked. 

The  Writing  of  An   Ad. 

This  brings  one  to  the  writing  of  a 
grocery  ad.  There  is  room  here  to  deal 
with  the  printed  matter  only  and  the 
outstanding  practices  that  have  domin- 
ated the  Halifax  struggle  here  follow. 
If  you  are  a  war  price  dealer,  do  not 
use  flasn  phrases  such  as  "economy," 
"quality,"  or  "service."  Put  your  best 
leader  in  your  headline.  A  mere  list  of 
leaders  gets  results,  but  a  few  sensible, 
reassuring  words  of  accompaniment  help 
to  point  out  the  worth  of  the  article  and 
the  quotation.  Brevity  of  course  prevail- 
ing.     Variety    of    descriptive    words    is 


Good  Eating 

News 

Monk  Made 
Cheese 

For  a  new  sensation, 
Oka  cheese,  made  by 
Monks  in  Quebec.  75c 
lb.  and  worth  it.  Fresh 
shipments  of  Nippy 
and  Limberger  cheese. 
50c  lb. 

Chicken 

Olive 

Sandwiches 

Just  spread  them  light- 
ly with  Sandwichola 
and  yon've  chicken, 
olive  and  pimento 
sandwiches  in  a  wink 
of  an  eyo.    25c  tin. 

A  Saltier  Salt 

Even  the  taste  of  this 
English  table  salt  is 
richer.  Composed  of 
minute  salt  crystals 
that  dampness  Can't  ef- 
fect.    l\i  lb.  tins,  20c. 

Pickling 
Snaps 

Crisp  young  pickling 
onions,  5  lbs.  for  25c — 
a  quick  snap.  Besides 
everything  for  pickling 
and  preserving. 

£:  McDonald 

The  People's  Grocer. 
AROYLE  &  JACOB  STS 


necessary  because  "nice,  beautiful,  splen- 
did, reasonable,  etc.,"  get  worn  with  use 
and  lose  novelty  of  interest.  Pack  fact 
and  argument. 

Use  Selling  Talk. 

If  you  are  a  quality  and  moderate 
but  not  cut  and  slash  price  maker,  you 
must  afford  to  pay  for  stuff  that  is  just 
in  season  but  which  is  rather  high  as 
always  at  the  start.  Perhaps  you  have 
bought  it  while  the  "Cash  and  Carry" 
waited  for  the  low  price  point  to  come 
before  advertising  it.  Therefore  pub- 
lish the  news  and  watch  your  price  a 
little.  It  won't  hurt  to  make  a  few 
leaders;  if  it  is  impossible  because  you 
bought  new  goods  high,  then  dress  them 
up  with  selling  talk,  proclaiming  the 
offer  just  as  strongly  as  its  interest  as 
store  news  justifies.  But  get  the  inter- 
esting fact  into  the  headline  and  follow 
right  through  with  interesting  fact.  If 
the  fact  is  good  enough  to  make  you  en- 
thusiastic in  offering  it  it's  always  pos- 
sible to  rouse  the  enthusiasm  of  your 
reader  if  you'll  convey  description  of  out- 
standing features  in  each  article  accord- 
ing to  Jits  news  or  sale  importance. 
Breezy  suggestion  of  the  uses  of  the 
article  advertised  help  a  lot. 

Arouse  News  Interest. 

If  you  are  a  higher  price  but  higher 
class  grocer,  your  prices  won't  all  stand 
the  light  of  day,  but  the  pill  can  be  si^- 
ared  with  the  news  interest  of  the  reader 
being  reached  along  with  words  to  tease 
the  appetite.  For  that  matter  this  should 
enter  into  all  grocery  advertising.  The 
reader  does  not  want  a  dull  recital  only. 
Most  any  kind  of  an  advertisement  will 
get  some  results  but  the  effort  of  a  store 
or  salesman  (such  as  its  advertisement 
is)  is  to  attract  as  many  buyers  as  pos- 
sible and  put  them  all  into  a  confident, 
satisfied  fianio  of  mind.  He  must  tell 
of  his  wares  briefly  and  as  completely 
as  the  importance  of  its  interest  value 
justifies.  He  must  avoid  generalizing 
and  specify  what  is  inviting. 

Grocers  of  every 'class  advertise  regu- 
larly and  generously  in  Halifax  where 
it  costs  them  something  to  try  per  turn- 
over. 


Showing  how  R.  N.  McDonald  advertis- 
es daily  in  Halifax  papers.  His  ads.  arc 
pointed,  easily   read  and  quote  prices. 


About  the  hardest  thing  in  the  world 
is  to  persuade  people  who  knew  you 
when  you  were  a  boy  to  believe  you  have 

succeeded  strictly  upon  your  own  merits. 

*  *     * 

Among  the  blessings  of  peace  is  the 
feeling  that  one  can  howl  about  the  gov- 
ernment without  being  locked  up. 

*  ♦     * 

Why  will  dealers  sell  twenty-five  dol- 
lars worth  of  goods  on  credit  to  men 
to  whom  they  would  not  think  of  loan- 
ing five  dollars  ? 


August  5,  1921. 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    GROCER 


23 


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Illusti-ati)ig  one  of  the  beauty  spota  of  Halifax,  N  .S. — the  public  gardens.     These  gaidens  constitute  one 
of  the  most  beautiful  parks  '>  Canada. 

Neglecting  Windows  is  a  Bad  Policy 

This  Grocer  Gets  Most  of  His  Business  Over  the  Telephone  and 

Pays  Little  Attention  to  the  Appearance  of  His  Store — A  Grocer 

Should  Pay  Strict  Attention  to  Cleanliness. 


MONTREAL  AUG  4.— The  other 
day  a  representative  of  CANA- 
DIAN GROCER  stood  on  a  cor- 
ner of  one  of  the  main  streets  of  a  town 
which  borders  on  the  St.  Lawrence  Riv- 
er in  the  Province  of  Quebec.  The  street 
spoke  of  a  prosperity  that  had  almost 
come  over  night  during  the  early  years 
of  the  war.  Uniike  most  Quebec  towns, 
the  stores  and  dwellings  were  new  and 
judging  by  the  appearance  of  most  of 
the  stores,  business  in  that  town  was 
good.  On  one  corner  of  the  street  stood 
a  large  drug  store  with  three  carefully 
and  attractively  dressed  display  win- 
dows. Opposite  to  it  on  the  same  side 
of  the  street  was  an  imposing  stone 
building  with  a  clock  tower  the  very 
architecture  of  which  labelled  it  the  post 
office.  On  the  third  corner  was  a  three 
story  dry  goods  store,  built  of  red  brick 
with  lar^e  artistically  dressed  windows 
across  two  sides  of  the  store.  But  on  the 
third  comer  there  was  a  grocery  store 
that  presented  anything  but  an  attract- 
ive appearance.  The  store  was  not  small, 
but  it  was  in  a  very  poorly  kept  con- 
dition. It  had  every  advantage  of  a  good 
location  but  it  was  a  scar  on  the  main 
street  of  the  town.  Still  it  gave  the  im- 
pression that  a  good  business  was  being 
done  there.  A  big  covered  delivery  wag- 
gon stood  in  front  of  the  door  with  a 
half  fed  dejected  looking  horse  between 
the  shafts.  The  delivery  waggon  sig-ni- 
fied  prosperity  but  by  no  means  sug- 
gested any  business  aggressiveness. 
Even   less   inviting  than   the  weather 


beaten  approach  to  the  store  or  the  bony 
old  horse  were  the  two  display  windows 
that  migiit  have  represented  anything 
from  a  pawn-shop  to  an  east-side  res- 
taurant. The  window  bore  absolutely  no 
significance  and  the  hundred  and  one 
things  that  lay  there  looked  as  though 
they  had  been  thrown  there  and  for- 
gotten a  nionth  or  two  before.  Smacked 
up  against  the  glass  of  the  front  win- 
dow were  three  half  rotten  lemons,  that 
had  in  days  gone  by  fallen  down  below 
the  false  floor  of  the  window.  From  the 
inside  of  the  window  this  decayed 
fruit  could  not  be  seen,  but  on  the  out- 
side they  were  the  first  thing  that  caught 
the  eye  of  the  passer-by.  If  there  was 
any  attraction  to  the  window,  it  lay 
in  the  curiosity  that  was  aroused  in  what 
lay  beneath  the  dirty  lid  of  a  soap  box 
that  had  been  carelessly  thrown  into 
the  centre  of  the  window.  A  few 
cakes  of  ?oap  and  a  dozen  or  so 
tins  of  canned  vegetables  gave  an  ink- 
ling of  what  might  be  hidden.  A  careful 
glance  over  the  window  and  a  lit- 
tle thought  revealed  the  fact  that  some 
time  in  the  past,  some  one  had  had  en- 
terprise enough  to  cover  the  floor  of  the 
window  with  blue  crepe  paper.  A  tinge 
of  blue  showed  beneath  some  of  the  can- 
ned goods  where  the  sun  had  not  had  a 
chance  to  bleach  it  to  a  dirty  white. 
Dead  flies  lying  around  the  front  of  the 
window  gave  evidence  to  the  fact  that 
either  soir.eone  had  taken  a  few  min- 
utes off  tc  swat  them  or  that  they  had 
died  there  of  old  age.  Such  was  the  sor- 


did appearance  of  the  front  of  the  store. 
Hardly  m  inviting  advertisement  to  a 
new-comer  to  the  town  who  might  be 
seeking  a  place  to  buy  the  necessities  of 
life.  The  side  window  offered  an  ap- 
pearance no  more  pleasing.  In  fact  as 
far  as  could  be  determined  by  appear- 
ance it  was  used  as  a  storage  space  for 
empty  delivery  boxes,  more  evidence 
that  business  was  really  done  at  the 
store. 

A  Maze  Of  Foodstuffs 
The  interior  was  a  maze  of  food- 
stuffs that  offered  food  for  thought. 
One  with  any  imagination  could  not  help 
but  wonder  how  far  back  some  of  the 
cans  and  packages  dated.  Branded  lines, 
long  since  off  the  market,  still  held  their 
dusty  places  on  the  top  shelves  and  un- 
covered boxes,  of  biscuits  in  various 
stages  of  preservation  lined  both  sides 
of  the  store.  One  new  but  greasy  glass 
show-case  graced  the  front  of  the  store, 
but  piles  of  bread  and  a  few  cakes  on 
a  crumbly  shelf  above  a  shabby  assort- 
ment of  odd  and  ends  in  branded  lines 
alone  made  use  of  the  equipment  which 
was  intended  for  advertising  purposes. 
The  shelves,  cases,  counters  and  even 
the  old  step  ladder  that  leaned  up 
against  a  shelf  of  canned  goods  might 
have  in  the  past  been  painted  a  ma- 
hogany red  but  even  that  cannot  be  said 
with  any  certainty. 

Evidence  Of   Good   Business 

On  the  other  hand  there  was  evidence 
Continued  on  Page  38 


24 


CANADIAN    GROCER 


Augusi  5, 


1921. 


M^ 


w 


Sells  Forty-Five  Barrels 

Vinegar  In  Six  Weeks 

Hood  &  Bennalick,  Guelph,  Ont.,  Builds  Extensive 
Sales  on  Vinegar — Pushing  Pickling  and  Preserving 

Material. 


To  SELL  45  barrels  of  vinegar  in 
about  six  weeks,  appears  to  be  a 
big  task  especially  in  a  town  where 
the  merchants  are  all  alive  to  seasonable 
opportunities,  and  competition,  therefore, 
keen.  Such,  however,  is  the  record  of 
Hood  &  Bennalick,  Guelph,  Ont.  This 
firm  has  the  faculty  of  following  up 
every  season,  displaying  and  otherwise 
pushing  sales  on  goods  that  are  partic- 
ularly required  for  that  season  of  the 
year.  This  applies  equally  to  the  pickling 
and  preserving  season. 

During  last  pickling  season,  covering  a 
period  of  about  six  weeks.  Hood  &  Benna- 
lick, sold  45  barrels  ot  vmegar  or  over 
1100  gallons,  besides  several  hundred 
pounds  of  spices  and  other  pickling  in- 
gredients, to  say  nothing  of  the  car  loads 
of  vegetables  for  pickling  purposes. 

This  big  volume  of  business  was  ob- 
tained, by  the  simple  rule  of  salesman- 
ship, and  is  characteristic  of  their  meth- 
od of  conducting  business.  Selling  talks 
over  the  counter,  over  uie  pnone,  news- 
paper advertising  and  window  displays 
are  fundamentally  the  factors  in  building 
a  business,  and  in  this  instance  they  were 
the  ones  responsible  for  the  high  annual 
turnover  which  this  firm  enjoys. 

Window  Displays  A   Feature 

From  one  year's  end  to  the  other,  win- 
dow displays  In  the  store  of  T.  A.  Rowat 
&  Co.,  London,  Ont.,  are  always  a  feature 
and  a  point  of  interest  on  Dundas  Street. 
This  applies  equally  to  the  displays,  dur- 
ing the  pickling  season.  Large  glass  jars 
were  filled  with  the  difi^erent  varieties 
and  grades  of  vinegar  were  used  for  a 
background  for  a  pickling  display. 
Around  the  jars  of  vinegar  were  small 
trays  containing  the  different  sorts  of 
spices  and  other  necessary  ingredients, 
which  made  a  very  attractive  display  and 
together  with  advertising  have  built  up 
a  turnover  on  pickling  goods  that  has 
been  steadily  increasing  year  after  year. 
A  feature  of  the  firm's  vinegar  business 
is  the  fact  that  the  greater  percentage 
of  the  volume  of  sales  is  on  a  specially 
high  grade  vinegar  which  cost  the  con- 
sumer fully  one  third  more  than  other 
makes.  •  Sales  on  this  vinegar  alone  run 
into  30  barrels  for  the  season,  besides 
the  numerous  barrels  of  other  grades 
and  varieties. 


The  season  of  the  year  is  fast  aproach- 
isg  when  oceans  of  vinegar  and  tons  of 
spices  to  say  nothing  of  the  vast  quan- 
tities of  sugar,  jam  jars,  rubber  rings, 
sealing  wax  etc  that  will  be  needed  to 
supply  the  requirements  of  the  housewife, 
from  now   until   the   end   of    September. 

Whether  the  merchant  will  get  his 
share  of  this  business  or  not,  will  depend 
upon  the  effort  made  to  procure  it. 
There  are  merchants  who  have  been  mak- 
ing a  regular  business  of  going  after 
pickling  and  preserving  business  for  a 
number  of  years  and  their  success  is 
shown  in  their  sales  which  each  year 
shows  a  substantial  increase.  The  stories 
of  the  two  merchants  mentioned  above 
is  a  fair  example  of  what  can  be  done 
during  the  pickling  and  preserving 
season. 

Getting  Returns  On      Empties 

In  handling  vinegar,  one  of  the  biggest 
problems  and  probably  the  most  difficult, 
the  merchant  has  to  contend  with,  is  get- 
ting speedy  returns  on  jars  used  for  de- 
livery purposes.  Householders,  the 
country  over,  seem  to  think  that  when 
a  gallon  of  vinegar  is  sent  to  the  house 
in  a  jar  that  the  merchant  has  provided 
for  convenience  and  at  a  big  investment, 
that  she  has  a  perfect  right  to  retain  it 
as  long  as  she  likes.  Some  people  have 
even  been  known  to  fill  the  jugs  with 
catsup  etc., 

D.  W.  Clark,  Avenue  Road,  Toronto, 
Ont.,  has  an  admirable  system  for  check- 
ing empties,  which,  he  says  has  saved  him 
thousands  of  dollars  a  year.  The  system 
is  to  charge  every  jar  and  bottle  that 
leave  the  store  on  the  invoice  and  credit 
the  same  when  returned.  On  all  con- 
tainers that  are  returnable,  appears  a  la- 
bel on  which  is  stamped  the  value,  thus 
avoiding  errors  when  making  returns. 
Each  delivery  man  is  provided  with  a 
credit  book.  This  book  is  similar  to  a 
regular  counter  check  dook,  with  a  line 
for  every  style  of  container  with  the 
price  opposite.  The  driver  or  wh>.ever 
receives  the  empty,  fills  in  the  sheet  with 
the  customer's  name  and  the  container 
returned.  The  book  being  in  duplicate, 
one  slip  is  presented  to  the  customer  and 
the  other  remains  in  the  book.  Each 
nigfit  these  books  are  sent  to  the  book- 
keeper, who  makes  the  entries  in  the 
proper  place  in  the  ledger. 


R.  E.  Powell,  Ottawa,  Ont.,  charges  all 
containers  on  the  invoice.  In  the  case  of 
vinegar,  however,  Mr.  Powell  does  not 
provide  jars  for  delivery  purposes.  The 
vinegar  is  bottled  and  no  bulk  vinegar 
is  sold,  except  when  the  customer  pro- 
vides the  vessel.  During  quiet  hours,  the 
vinegar  is  put  up  in  quarts  and  pint 
bottles,  and  a  price  set,  that  will  cover 
the  cost  of  the  bottle. 


SUCCESSFUL   METHODS 

OF  GETTING   AFTER 

BUSINESS   NOW 

"Business  can  be  obtained  if  mer- 
chants will  go  after  it  in  the  right 
way,"  is  the  way  one  retail  gro- 
cer put  it  recently. 

He  outlines  his  successful  meth- 
od as  follows: 

1:  Good  specials. 

2:  Write  and  circulate  the  right 
kind  of  advertising. 

3:  Put  the  feature  goods  in  the 
show  v^rindows,  attractively. 

4:  Arrange  the  store  interior  to 
conform  to  advertising  and  show 
windows. 

5:  Use  plenty  of  price  cards  in 
the  store  and  windows. 

He  sells  close  and  advertises 
heavily.  He  turns  over  fast  in 
spite  of  heavy  buying  because  he 
is  far  from  a  market.  He  had  a 
display  recently  of  114  articles 
from  his  general  stock  which  a 
year  ago  sold  for  $67.  This  year 
he  is  selling  the  assortment  for 
?27.  Folks  know  when  they  read 
his  advertising  and  put  their  heads 
into  his  store  that  prices  are  low- 
er.    They  like  it. 

Last  year,  he  declares  the  big 
mail  order  houses  shipped  carloads 
of  catalogues  into  his  district, 
which  does  $90,000,000  of  business 
at  retail,  one  third  of  which  goes 
to  the  mail  order  houses.  It  goes 
largely,  he  says,  because  retailers 
don't  believe  in  advertising.  He 
says  only  15  per  cent  of  the  retail- 
ers really  do  intelligent  advertis- 
ing and  75  per  cent  do  none  at  all. 
They  quit  ^lay  down  on  the  job. 


-August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN  GROCER— Marithne  Section. 


25 


Campers  and  Picnickers  will  appreciate 

"BRUNSWICK  BRAND" 

SEA  FOODS 

These  exceptionally  fine  flavored  Sea  Food  deli- 
cacies are  perfectly  cooked  before  leaving  our 
plant,  and  are  ready  to  serve  on  opening  the  tin 
Keep  them  prominently  displayed  during  the 
warm  weather  months  and  suggest  them  for  camp- 
ers, picnickers,  fishing  trips  and  for  preparing 
tasty  summer  meals  and  hurry-up  lunches  that  re- 
quire no  cooking. 

Connors  Bros.,  Limited 

Black's  Harbor,  N.B. 


Winnipeg  Representatives 
Chas.  Duncan  &  Son,  Winnipeg,  Man. 


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SPD 


26 


TAXADIAX  GFJ)CVAl~-Marifiyi,e  SfcHon. 


August  5,  1921. 


Maritime  Merchants  -  are  you  selling 


MADE     ^ 
IN 
CANADA 


SUijSglNE    ' 


9 


If  you  have  never  before  sold  this  HIGH  GRADE 
MACARONI — it  will  pay  you  to  try  a  sample  order! 
Wherever  it  has  been  introduced,  it  has  proven  a  remark- 
ably fast  seller  with  continued  repeat  orders ! 

Not  a  pinch  of  cheap  soft  wheat  flour  is  used  in  mak- 
ing "SUNSHINE"  Macaroni— just  the  FINEST  CANA- 
DIAN HARD  3\^HEAT  SEMOLINA  containing  the 
maximum  and  best  gluten.  Our  plant  is  equipped  with 
the  most  modern  machinery  (imported  from  Italy)  and  a 
perfected  hygenic,  artificial  drying  system.  Consequently, 
"SUNSHINE"  Macaroni  has  the  required  qualities  found 
only  in  the  very  best  Macaroni,  namely — Strength,  elastic- 
ity, superior  taste,  and  retains  its  shape,  firmness  and 
tenderness  after  cooking. 

Packed  in  attractive,  dustproof  cartons  of  i6-oz.  net 
contents — 30  cartons  per  case. 


P.  Pastene  &  Co.,  Limited,  Mf rs.  Montreal,  Que. 

Sales  Agent :  J.  Hunter  White,  St.  John,  N.  B. 


Aug-ust  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN  GROCER— Maritime  Section- 


27 


MAKE 
THIS  TEST 


(ACTUAL  SIZE) 

their     success. 


Write  us  for  samples  of  our  im- 
proved Fig  Bar  Biscuits.  When 
they  arrive,  take  a  knife  and  cut 
one  in  two  across  the  centre 
and  you  will  see  the  reason  for 
The  lavish  filling  of  genuine,  finely 
ground  Smyrna  Figs, — we  don't  spare  the  filling, — 
and  the  texture   of  the  cake    that   holds    it    in     make 

HAMILTON'S 

FIG  BARS 

your  one   best   buy    in    a     Fig-filled     Biscuit.      They 
"taste  like  mother's  mince  pies." 


G.  J.  Hamilton  &  Sons 

BAKING  BISCUITS  SINCE  1840 
FACTORY  and  HEAD  OFFICE         :  :        PICTOU,  NOVA   SCOTIA 


CANADIAN  GB.OCER— Maritime  Section.  August  5,  1921. 


The  Business  Interests  of  the  Maritimes  will  be  strikingl)'  represented  at 
this  Big  Industrial,  Agricultural  and  Live  Stock  Display.  Every  business  man 
will  find  ideas  there. 

Manufacturers  of  Food  Products  should  not  lose  this  opportunity  of 
cultivating  this  rich  market.  Link  up  sales  and  advertising  plans  \vith  the 
first  and  biggest  of  Maritime  Fairs. 

Write  for  reservation.  Special  Railway  Rates. 

St.  John     Exhibition     Association 
St.  John,  N.  B. 


**The  Quality  Warrants  The  Name' ' 

Grocers  of  the  Maritime  Provinces  are  great  admirers  of  our  Family;  They  find  all  its  members  willing  to  get  out  and  hustle  for 
themselves,  and  they  are  called  back  on  the  job  time  and  again  by  the  pleased  housewife. 

All  members  bear  the 

"PERFECT/ 

Trade  -  Mark 

Some  of  the  lines  :- 

Perfect  Baking  Powdei*     «  -  -  -  Perfect  Prepared  Tapioca 

Perfect  Flavoring  Extracts  -  _  -  Perfect  Spices 

Perfect  Coffee  _  _  _  -  Perfect  Lemon  Pie  Filling 

Perfect  Shredded  Cocoanut  _  -  -  Perfect  Jelly  Powders 

Now  being  offered  to  the  Trade  of  other  parts  of  Canada.  Jobbers  inquiries  solicited. 

Canada  Spice  &  Specialty  Mills,  Ltd. 

St.  John  N.  B. 

C.  C.  Dennis,  Montreal  Representative. 
Open  to  Good  Connection  in  Toronto  for  Ontario  Representation. 


August  5,  1921. 


CANADIAN  GROCER— il/flnf/me  Section. 


29 


A  N  energetic  staff  of  Salesmen  each  with  a  connection,  always 
•^  ^  on  the  job,  is  bound  to  get  the  business.  That's  why  Pyke  Bros, 
have  earned  such  a  reputation  for  successfully  marketing  products 
through  Nova  Scotia,  New  Biunswick,  Prince  Edward  Island  and 
Newfoundland.  We  are  at  present  marketing  lines  for  the  under- 
mentioned firms  with  excellent  results.  Your  products  will  meet 
with  the  same  success  if  we  represent  them.     Get  in  touch  with  us. 


W.  C.  Macdonald  Regd.,  Inc. 

Carnation  Milk  Products  Co.,  Ltd. 

Canadian  Postum  Cereal  Co.,  Ltd. 

Canadian  Salt  Co.,  Ltd. 

British  Columbia  Fishing  &  Packing  Co., 

The  John  T.  McBride  Co.,  Ltd. 

Guggenhime  &  Co., 

Swift  &  Co., 

J.  C.  Whitney  Co. 


Dominion  Canners  Ltd., 
Chas.  B.  Knox  Co.  Inc., 
Robertson  Bros.,  Ltd., 
Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Co.,  Ltd., 
Ltd.   Peerles-s  Cereal  Mills,  Ltd., 
Dominion  Macaroni  Co.,  Ltd., 
L.  Schepp  Co., 

Megantic  Broom  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd. 
Dunbar-Dukate  Co. 


PYKE  B 

Wholesale  Grocery  Brokers 

Halifax^  N.  S. 


Sydney,  N.  S. 


St.  John,  N.  B. 


30 


CANADIAN  GROCER— il/flri^/me  Section. 


August  5.  1921. 


HALIFAX 
CANADA 

J.  W.  Gorham  &  Co. 

GROCERY 
BROKERS 


Meadow-Sweet 

Lemon 
Pie  Filling 


FOR 

PIES,     CAKES 

ICE  CREAM 

SAUCES 

ETC. 

A  quick-selling  popular-pric- 
ed   specialty    on    which     you 
can  make  good  money. 
One  package  makes  four  pies,  without  the    use  of 
Butter  and  Eggs.     Once  sold  it  repeats  regularly. 
Made  in  Chocolate  and  Vanilla  Flavors  too. 
Also  inquire  about  our  Peanut  Butter  and    Maple 
Butter. 

Write  for  samples  and  prices 
SELLING  AGENTS 

ANGEViNE  &  Mclaughlin 


St.  John 


Truro 


Made  in  Montreal  by 


Meadow  Sweet  Cheese  Mfg.  Co.  Limited 


APPLE  CIDER 

Made  from  the  Best  Nova  Scotia  Apples 


Guaranteed  to  be  absolutely  pure  and 
it  is  a  rare  treat  for  your  customers 
Sold  in  1-2  barrels,  kegs  and  bottles 
Place  your  order  for  Fall  requirements 


AnnapolisValley  Cyder  Company  Limited 


Bridgetown,  N.  S. 


August  5,  1921.  CANADIAN    GROCER  31 


Please  Investigate 

We  claim  that  the  five  following  products  are  of  the  highest  quality  ob- 
tainable, and,  as  such,  deserve  the  recommendation  of  the  Grocer. 

i^r.';:a:uu!l'iiiiiux::iiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

"NEPTUNE"  VICHY  \A  ATER 

Bottled  at  St.  Yorre.  Bassin  de  Vichy,  France. 
Recommended  by  the  Academy  of  Medicine,    Paris. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIJIIMIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIII.IIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIII 

"ROBERT"  \'ICHY  LIMONADE 

Bottled  at  St.  Yorre,  Bassin  de  Vichy,  France. 
Pure  Vichy  Water.    Pure  Lemon  Juice.    Pure  Cane  Sugar. 


(( 


iiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiijriiiiiininiiMiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiii 

EVIAN  CACHAT"  TABLE  WATER 

From  Evian  les  Bains,  France. 
120,000,000  bottles  sold  each  year. 

!iiiiiiiii'.i::jriiiriiiiiiii.ijiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

"JAMES  PLAGNIOL"  OLIVE  OIL 

From  Marseilles,  France. 

Pure  Virgin  Olive  Oil  of  the  Highest  Type. 
Really  Superior  to  All  Others. 

iiiiiliriJiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

"SOLEIL"  CASTILLE  SOAP 

From  F.  Milliau  Fils.,  Marseilles,  France. 
Absolutely  Pure. — 72%  Olive  Oil. 

Please  investigate.     Write  for  Samples,  giving  the  name  of  your  Grocer. 

LAPORTE  MARTIN  LIMITEE 

Importers 

584  St.  Paul  St.         --         Montreal 
Established  1870 


32  -    CANADIAN    GROCER  August  5,  1921. 


ASSOCIATED  GROCER 

— is  an  Association  of  Retail  Grocer 
pose  of  buying  on  as  economi 

Stores,  and  C 

CONSOLIDATION  IS  ES 


THE  Associated  Grocers  of  Ontario,  Limited,    make  ' 

it  possible  for  the  independent  merchant  to  successfully 
compete  with  any  retail  selling  organization. 

Buying    strength    is    essential  to    the   Grocers'    ability 
to  meet  all  competition. 

BECOME  AN  ASSOCIATED  GROCER.     BUY  RIGHT.    HCi 

into  other  channels,  cutting  your  business  to  « 


THE    Retail    Grocer   is  i 

Distribution.      Benefit  ad 

link  in  this  i 


Full  particulars  of  this  new  buying  and  distributing  power — r^ 

J.   G.  BEATY  i 

6  King  Street,  W.         -  - 

Let  us  get  together  and  place  our  buying  and  disti 


August  5,  1921.  CANADIAN    GROCER  33 


fof  ONTARIO,  Limited 

vho  have  established  for  the  pur- 
I  a  basis  as  Departmental 
n  Stores. 

SITIAL  TO  SUCCESS  ! 


THE  Associated  Grocers  of  Ontario,  Limited,  will 
establish  the  greatest  Buying  and  Distributing  Power 
of  the  Times  and  any  responsible  retail  Grocer  in  On- 
tario may  be  a  partner  in  this  powerful  organization. 

Great    savings    will    be    effected    and  the   progressive 
merchants  will  reap  the  benefit. 

YOUR  TRADE  and  remove  the  possibility  of  it  drifting 
h  proportions  that  it  becomes  unprofitable. 


essential  source  of 
ingly  by  becoming  a 
aization. 


be  had  by  communicating  with 

t  COMPANY, 

TORONTO,    ONT. 

dng  on  a  sound  practical  money  saving  basis. 


34 


CANADIAN   GROCER 


August  5,  1921. 


J.  E.  Sansregret  Chosen  in  Quebec 

Succeeds  G.  J.  A.  Filion  as  President  of  The   Quebec  Branch  of  The  Retail  Merchants 
Association  —  Enthusiastic     Interest  Shown  By  Members  In  Recent  Con- 
vention in  Montreal —  Matters  of  Interest  to  Every  Merchant  Taken  up 


GENERALLY  credited  with  being 
the  most  successful  convention  of 
its  kind  that  has  so  far  been  held, 
the  Fourteenth  Annual  Convention  of 
the  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of 
Canada,  Quebec  Provincial  Board,  is  now 
a  matter  of  history.  The  convention, 
which  was  well  attended,  was  held  in  the 
Place  Viger  Hotel,  Montreal,  P.Q.,  in 
mid-July. 

From  the  accompanying-  photograph, 
taken  on  the  steps  of  Frontenac  Brew- 
eries, Limited,  a  good  idea  may  be  se- 
cured of  the  class  of  men  who  were 
present.  There  were  a  good  many  more 
but  they  were  not  on  hand  when  the  pho- 
tographer pressed  the  button. 

Officers   of   the   Association. 

The  three  smiling  gentlemen  right  in 
the  centre  of  the  picture,  front  row, 
reading  from  left  to  right,  are:  Joseph 
F.  Elie,  First  Vice-President;  J.  E.  Sans- 
regret, President,  and  M.  Lapointe,  sec- 
retary of  the  Quebec  Branch  of  the  Re- 
tail Merchartts'  Association,  to  whom 
"Canadian  Grocer"  is  indebted  for  the 
information  conveyed  in  this  article.  E 
Sauve,  Second  Vice  President,  is  the 
gentleman  in  the  dark  suit  looking  over 
the  shoulders  of  Mr.  Sansregret  and  Mr. 
Lapointe.  Henry  Walters,  of  Ottawa, 
may  be  sccr,  in  the  grey  suit  to  the  left 
of  the  officials. 

The  convention  was  opened  with  an 
address  of  welcome  by  Aid.  J.  E.  Sans- 
regret, representing  Mayor  Martin  of 
Montreal. 

G.  J.  A.  Filion,  president  of 
the  Quebec  Provincial  Board,  occupied 
the  chair  and  extended  a  warm  welcome 
to  the  visiting  members.  He  thanked 
them  for  their  attendance. 

At  2.30  p.m.  of  the  first  day,  an  auto- 
mobile promenade  was  made  of  the  city 
and  from  4  p.m.  to  6  a  tour  of  the  Mont- 
real harbor  was  made  on  the  harbor  boat, 
Sir  Hugh  Allan,  through  the  courtesy 
of  the  secretary  of  the  Harbor  Com- 
mission, who  accompanied  the  party,  ex- 
plaining all  the  works  and  plans  for 
development.  At  the  conclusion  of  the 
trin  all  were  served  with  refreshments. 
At    8    p.m.    the    annual    banquet    was 


held  in  the  Place  Viger  Hotel  and  proved 
a  big  success. 

President  Filion  Retires 
Henry  Watters,  of  Ottawa  Ont., 
and  treasurer  of  the  Dominion 
Association,  assisted  with  the  ceremo- 
nies and  delivered  his  address  in  the 
French   language. 

The  Quebec  Government  was  repre- 
sented by  Mr.  Bladeau  who,  with  Presi- 
dent Filion,  also  spoke. 

The  convention  finally  got  down  to 
business  at  10  a.m.  on  Wednesday,  when 
the  election  of  officers  took  place. 

G.  J.  A.  Felion  who  has  so  ably  guided 
the  association  for  the  past  three  years, 
was  again  proposed  as  president,  but 
declined  to  stand,  as  he  thought  it  only 
fair  to  give  someone  else  a  chance. 

J.  E.  .Safnsregret  was  then  'elected 
President;  Joseph  F.  Elie,  First  Vice- 
President;  E.  Sauve,  second  Vice-Presi- 
dent; M.  Lapointe,  Secretary,  and  G. 
Filiatrault,   Treasurer. 

A  review  of  what  the  association  has 
done  for  the  retail  merchant  was  given 
the  members  and  problems  facing  the 
retail    trade    were    also    discussed. 

The  members,  as  a  whole,  took  a  more 
active  interest  in  the  association  than 
ever  before.  The  necessity  for  the  re- 
tail trade  being  organized  and  the  reali- 
zation of  the  work  done  by  the  associa- 
tion brought  about  this  feeling. 

Little   Behind  the  Times. 

An  interesting  case  brought  to  light 
during  the  convention  was  that  of  a 
man  in  a  town  in  Quebec  who,  until  he 
attended  the  convention,  did  not  know 
the  luxury  tax  had  been  removed  from 
patent  medicines,  etc.  He  had  con- 
tinued to  use  and  attach  war  tax  stamps 
on  his  sales.  He,  needless  to  say,  was 
not  previously  a