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Sunny 
Sunny and cool. High, near 
40. 
Low 
tonight, 
25. 
High 
yesterday, 43; low, 31. High 
Friday, 45. 
T he Circleville Herald 


Thursday February 20, 1969 
20 Pages 
10c Per Copy 
86th Year— 43 


FULL SERVICE 


Associated Proas teased wire 
for state, national and world 
news. Central Presa Pleine 
serries, leading cotemnlsts and 
artiste, tall local news cover­ 
age. 


Sertoma Presents 
Service Awards 
At Annual Banquet Think Inflation 
Curbs Possible 
Without Harm 


No Increase 
In Joblessness 
Said Necessary 


Paris Peace Deadlock Deepens 


YOUTH AWARD — Miss Nancy Benzenberg (left) was presented 
the La Sertoma Yonth Service Award by Mrs. Gary George, 
club president, daring a joint Awards Banquet of Sertoma and 
La Sertoma Wednesday. 


The Circleville Sertoma and 
La Seitoma Clubs- honored two 
outstanding 
citizens at their 
annual “Service to Mankind” 
and 
“Youth 
Service Awards 
Banquet.” The dinner meeting 
was held at Wardell’s Party 
House on Wednesday evening. 
The La Sertoma Club Youth 
Service Award went to Miss 
Nancy Benzenberg, 526 Nor­ 
thridge Road. The recipient of 
this year’s “Service to Mankind 
Award,” sponsored by the local 
Sertoma 
Club, 
was 
Pauline 
(Tommy) Kirkpatrick. She was 
selected 
from 
a 
group 
of 
nominees for her outstanding 
civic and humanitarian service 
to the Circleville community. 
Mrs. Charles Kirkpatrick, the 
former Pauline Thomas, is from 


Stoutsville. She is a graduate 
of Lancaster Municipal Hospital 
and has practiced nursing since 
1933. 
After doing private nursing in 
and 
around 
Circleville, 
she 
joined 
the 
staff 
at 
Berger 
Hospital. While working at the 
hospital, she met her husband, 
Charles. She continued working 
at Berger until she started her 
family, which consists of three 
sons, Michael, Tim and Craig. 
In addition, she is the grand­ 
mother of two grandsons and 
a granddaughter. 


Storm Spills 
Into Plains 


I 
From Rockies 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
A 
growing 
winter 
storm 
spilled out of the Rockies today 
and swept the great plains with 
an assortment of snow, wind 
and rain. 
A lingering storm in the At­ 
lantic punished the Northeast 
with 
a 
similarly 
unpleasant 
mixture, and one added element 
—sleet. 
Blowing .and drifting snow 
brought travelers warnings for 
an eight state area from Wyo­ 
ming and Nebraska to New 
Mexico and the Texas Panhan­ 
dle. 
Two to 3 inches of snow whis­ 
tled into the warning region 
during 
the 
night. 
Lesser 
amounts ranged into the Dako­ 
tas and Kansas. Thunderstorms 
boomed over eastern New Mexi­ 
co and West Texas at the 
storm’s southern edge. 
The storm had dumped up to 
la inches of snow into north-cen­ 
tral Arizona through Wednes­ 
day. 
Warnings 
of 
additional 
heavy snow remained in effect 
for mountain areas of Colorado 
and New Mexico. 
The Atlantic storm, which 
hammered the Southeast with 
record snows last weekend, left 
the mainland early in the week 
but its effects lingered for a 
fourth day. 
Snow whitened eastern New 
York. Pennsylvania and New' 
England 
while 
rain 
washed 
coastal areas. Sleet pelted New 
York City during the night and 
brought warnings of hazardous 
driving before dawn. 
Temperatures 
moderated 
slightly in the Southeast after 
several days of early morning 
frost. 
Zero cold hung onto portions 
of the northern plains. Hibbing, 
Minn., chilled down to 7 below. 


DUE to the shortage of nurses 
during the war, it would not 
have been uncommon to find 
“Tommy” in the O.B. wing of 
Berger 
Hospital 
att 2 
a.m., 
bathing the babies and fixing 
formulas. Since she lived across 
the street from Berger, she 
was en call most of the time. 
On May I, 1958, Tommy was 
appointed City Health Nurse by 
John 
Himrod. 
She 
is 
still 
holding this job, which consists 
of numerous duties; including 
the health program 
for six 
elementary schools, junior and 
senior 
high 
school 
and 
St. 
Joseph’s school. She has been 
very instrumental in setting up, 
with her good friend, Eileen 
Foster and others, the Family 
Life Education Program for the 
city schools. 
Tommy wras on the original 
steering committee for starting 
the Parent Teacher Association 
in the city schools, and is 
presently on the PTA executive 
board. Another endeavor for 
Tommy is the Mental Health 
Association. Tommy worked on 
this committee 
before 
funds 
were raised for the necessary 
projects. Later, Tommy helped 
start the Shelter Work Shop and 
Brooke - Yates School. She is 
also a member of the Crippled 
Childrens’ Society, and works 
with and secures workers and 
professional 
help 
for 
the 
Saturday Speech Clinic held at 
Mound Street School. 
Mrs. Kirkpatrick has been a 
trustee 
for 
the 
Commiinitv 
Chest Fund since 1960. She is 
also a trustee for the Com­ 
munity Action Group which is 
a program for training health 
aides. 
Tommy 
wrote 
the 
first 
program “Operating for Head 
(Continued on Page 20) 


By STERLING F. GREEN 
Associated Press Writer 
WASHINGTON (AP) — Secre­ 
tary of Labor George P. Shultz 
said today there is “ substantial 
evidence” that inflation can be 
curbed without marked increase 
in unemployment. 
Shultz told the joint House- 
Sfenate 
Economic 
Committee 
that foremost among the factors 
supporting his belief is the ad­ 
ministration’s 
aim 
to 
work 
gradually—not abruptly—to re­ 
duce inflation. 
“Our aim is not to achieve a 
zero price rise this year,” he 
said 
in 
prepared 
testimony. 
“This could not occur short of a 
sizeable recession.” 
Shultz said the other two fac­ 
tors are a growing proportion of 
workers now employed in indus­ 
tries not affected by seasonal or 
other periodic layoffs and an in­ 
creasing variety of manpower 
programs. 
The labor secretary added, 
however, that there is a need 
for focusing 
manpower 
pro­ 
grams on Negro youth which he 
said have the most serious em­ 
ployment problems over the 
past decade. 
Shultz was the first high ad­ 
ministration official to appear 
before the committee not strict­ 
ly finance oriented. The com­ 
mittee opened hearings Monday 
on economic issues facing the 
nation. 
After eight witnesses ranging 
from members of the Council of 
Economic Advisers to Treasury 
Secretary David Kennedy, Dem­ 
ocratic 
committee 
members 
were showing irritation at what 
they consider vague tentative 
and sometimes unresponsive an­ 
swers from high Nixon adminis- 
ration officials on policy ques­ 
tions. 
The vice chairman, Sen. Wil­ 
liam 
Proxmire, 
D-Wis., 
said 
Wednesday after hearing cau­ 
tious testimony from Kennedy: 
“I am disappointed that offi­ 
cials of this administration have 
taken President Nixon’s inaugu­ 
ral warnings so literally. He ad­ 
vised the people to lower their 
voices. 
“Your answers are so low, in 
terms of substance, that we can 
hardly hear them.” 


iimiiimiiiiiiiiitiniiimiiiiiiiiimti 
Roundtown 


iiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
THE 
purchase of voting 
machines will usher in a new 
era in politics in Pickaway 
County. . . The excitement of 
election night will be a thing 
of the p a st. . . 
There will be no need for 
keeping the results posted on 
the old blackboard in the 
Court House lobby . . . The 
complete tabulation will be in 
an hour after tile polls close 


Candidates will no doubt 
save money on sleeping pills. 
Vie! Cong Flag 
Is Hoisted 
At Oberlin 


Government To Give Food 
To South Carolina Hungry 


Handgun Bill 


Introduced 


By STEPHEN ll. MILLER 
Associated Press Writer 
OBERLIN, Ohio (AP) — A 
Viet Cong flag was hoisted over 
the town square in Oberlin to­ 
day while Oberlin College stu­ 
dents staged a sit in to block 
Marine 
Corps 
recruiters 
on 
campus. 
, 
The recruiters did talk to four 
students, then were asked to 
leave Peter’s Hall by college 
officials. 
The recruiters were not able 
to reach the placement office 
in Peter’s Hall because over 
200 students blocked the way. 
The Marines did reach another 
office and four students got 
through the crowd to talk to 
them. 
When the students came out 
of the office they removed their 
shoes and walked over the 
heads and shoulders of the 
protesters. 
The recruiters were in the 
hall about VA hours. They had 
scheduled 13 interviews. 
George Langeler, dean of stu­ 
dents, said the Marines were 
asked to leave and they did. 
The crowd in the hall then 
broke up. 
College president Robert K. 
Carr scheduled an afternoon 
news conference. The college 
had 
said 
disciplinary 
action 
would be taken against students 
who took part in the “disrup­ 
tive” demonstration. 
While the demonstration was 
eoing on, someone hoisted the 
Viet Cong flag over the town 
square, which adjoins the cam 
pus. The rope was then cut. 
Oberlin police said no Amen 
can flag was put up today be 
cause they anticipated possible 
trouble. City maintenance men 
used a ladder to reach the Viet 
Cong flag and took it down after 
it had flown a short time. 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The 
Nixon 
administration, 
under 
prodding by senators investigat­ 
ing himger in tile nation has act­ 
ed to relieve the severe malnu­ 
trition 
afflicting 
two 
rural 
Southern counties. 
Agriculture Secretary Clifford 
Hardin agreed to make free 
food available to the two South 
Carolina counties by providing 
food stamps to eligible citizens 
at no cost. 
Hardin agreed to allow th e 
free stamps, subject to state 
and local approval, in a meeting 
Wednesday with Sen. George S. 
McGovern, D-S.D., chairman of 
the Select Committee on Nutri­ 
tion and Human Needs, and Er­ 
nest F. Holiings, D-S.C. 
McGovern, 
who 
originally 
urged 
the 
administration 
to 
send surplus food directly to 
Beaufort and Jasper counties, 
said the stamp plan “will be a 
pilot program that will give us 
some operating experience” in 
meeting hunger problems. 
“I think this is a healthy way 
to do it,” McGovern told a re­ 
porter, adding “I think it was a 
real break through.” 
Holiings, who Tuesday said 
fedeial red tape was standing in 
the way of feeding the hungry in 
his state, also indicated he was 
satisfied with the quick action. 
It was understood the federal 
government would pick up the 
cost et the stamps, which usual­ 
ly cost the recipient a small 
charge. 
Testimony before the commit­ 
tee this week indicated a sub­ 


stantial malnutrition problem in 
South Carolina, complicated by 
widespread 
disease 
including 
substantial infestation of intesti­ 
nal worms, especially in Negro 
children. 
Before Hardin agreed to pro­ 
vide the free stamps, McGovern 
slid “there is not the slightest 
doubt in my mind that the gov- 
enment has the authority” to 
provide 
the 
emergency 
food 
shipments. 
The South Dakota Democrat 


called for the emergency help 
after the head of a medical 
team from the University of 
South Carolina, Dr. John Lease, 
slid that immediate food ship­ 
ments would be helpful even 
though it would take much long­ 
er to educate the people on 
proper health practices. 
“ For the complete eradication 
of these practices,” Lease said 
“ifs going to take IO years. Blit 
tile food should go down there in 
IO days.” 
County To Buy 
Voting Machines 


Keeping Score 


On The Rainfall 


Rainfall for a 24 Hour Period 
na ai 
Actual since reb. I 
........... 
Normal sine* Fab I 
BEHIND .19 INCH 
Normal since January I 
Actual since January I 
River 
.................................. 
Sunrise 
...................... 
Sunset 


.00 
M 
1.69 


Bundy Defends 


Ford Foundation 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The 
head of the gigantic Ford Foun­ 
dation said today proposals to 
restrict the stock holdings of 
foundations might impede sev­ 
eral social action programs his 
institution is considering. 
McGeorge Bundy also said the 
proposal 
to 
limit 
foundation 
holdings to no more than 20 per 
cent of the stock of any one 
company would have prevented 
establishment of the Ford Foun­ 
dation and several others. 
His remarks came in pre­ 
pared 
testimony 
before 
the 
House Ways and Means Com­ 
mittee. which is studying the 
tax-exempt position ot founda­ 
tions as part of a general review 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A 
gun control bill which would re­ 
quire registration of gun own­ 
ers rather than weapons is in the 
Ohio House of Representatives. 
It was offered by Reps. John 
Gaiibraith R-76 Maumee and 
Robert Maiming R - 94 Akron 
Thursday. It would deny pos­ 
session and use of firearms to 
fugitives from justice, persons 
under indictment or convicted of 
a felony, those addicted to alc­ 
ohol or drugs and to persons 
judged 
to 
be 
mentally 
in­ 
competent. 
Persons seeking permits could 
apply to local law enforcement 
agencies for a “firearms own­ 
ers identification card.” Record 
of card holders would be kept 
by local police and the state 
Bureau of Criminal Identifica­ 
tion and Investigation. 
One card would be issued to 
each person requesting it re­ 
gardless of the number of hand­ 
guns tile person might possess. 
Fees for cards would be $3. 
Fines for initial violations of the 
law would range up to $50 or 
six months imprisonment. 


Violence Hits 


Berkeley Again; 


25 Arrested 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
Twenty sheriff’s deputies ar­ 
riving to supervise a picket line 
at the University of Cailifornia’s 
Berkeley campus were met by a 
barrage of rocks, bottles, fruit 
and stinkbombs from a crowd of 
500 militant protesters. 
Police 
charged 
the 
crowd 
Wednesday and the ensuing vio­ 
lence, described as the worst to 
hit the campus during a month­ 
long demonstration for more 
minority 
studies, 
resulted in 
five minor injuries and 25 ar­ 
rests. 
During the day university offi­ 
cials announced the dismissal of 
one student in the first discipli­ 
nary action stemming from the 
current disorders. Sixty others 
are on interim suspension and 
face hearings. 
Elsewhere there was relative 
calm in the wave of student un­ 
rest on the nation’s campuses. 


Laird Says 
Soviets Push 
ABM System 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Secre­ 
tary 
of 
Defense 
Melvin 
R. 
Laird, citing increased Soviet 
and 
Chinese missile threats, 
said today he wants to be free to 
order deployment of a U.S. anti 
ballistic missile system even if 
disarmament talks were going 
on. 
Laird reported the Soviet Un­ 
ion is going forward with tests 
on a “ sophisticated new antibal­ 
listic missile system” and this 
will weigh heavily in the U.S. 
decision on a missile shield. 
Laird told the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee the Unitec: 
States might want to go ahead 
with its suspended $5.5 billion 
Sentinel system even if the two 
major nuclear powers agree to 
begin talks on strategic arms 
limitations. 
He stressed that no decision 
has been made on whether to go 
ahead with deployment of the 
controversial ABM system. 
But speaking in support of the 
nuclear nonproliferation treaty 
under consideration by the com­ 
mittee, Laird was pressed by 
Chairman J. W. Fulhright as to 
whether 
he 
would 
engage 
immediately 
in 
disarmament 
talks once the treaty is ratified. 
It was at this point Laird re­ 
vealed the Soviet Union not only 
has gone forward with its own 
ABM system, but “It is testing 
a sophisticated new ABM sys­ 
tem, on the basis of the best in­ 
formation available to me.” 


Pickaway County Board of 
Elections today recommended 
to commissioners that 60 nine- 
party AMV Printomatic voting 
machines be obtained by a 
rental purchase agreement. 
The machines will be paid for 
in IO annual payments at 5H 
per cent interest. The first 
payment of 11,358 Is doe when 
the machines are delivered. 
The AMV firm has promised 
delivery in time for the May 
Primary. 
The bid submitted by AMV 
was for $1,893 per machine — 
a total of $113,580. Interest over 
the IO year purchase period will 
total $28,111.05.* * # 


T H E 
first 
payment 
is 
budgeted 
within 
Board 
of 
Election funds for 1909. Election 
officials anticipate the purchase 
will add about $3,000 to $5,000 
a year to the budget during the 
IO year purchase period. 
After that the board should 
realize a savings which will 
more than pay for the machines 
during their lifetime. Expected 
life of a voting machine is 40 
years, election officials have 
been told. 
With 
the 
machines, 
the 
number of poll workers will be 
reduced by four per precinct. 
In explaining the purchase to 
The 
H e r a l d 
Commission 
Chairman Charles Morris said, 
“This is just one of those things 
you can’t duck. We’ll have to 
buy them sooner or later, and 
the cost will be very little more 
initially. If we pat off baying 
them, the price could increase 
a couple of hundred dollar in 
just a 
few 
years.” 
Com- 
missioners Wayne Hines and 
Dick T. 
Tootle agreed 
with 
Morris. 
William Stout, spokesman for 
the election board, informed 


commissioners tile board had 
made a thorough study of the 
machines and the bids before 
reaching a conclusion. 
Other members of the board 
of Elections at the meeting 
today 
were 
Ned 
Dresbach, 
Lucille Dumm, Frank Marion 
and 
Thelma 
Trimmer, 
the 
clerk. 
«* $ * 
ALLAN Berger, local attorney 
reprsenting 
the 
AMV 
Com­ 
pany, was also present. 
Commissioners 
s a i d 
the 
transaction would be completed 
when County Prosecutor Roy 
Huffer had reviewed the bids 
and prepared the proper legal 
papers. 


Madge Blake Dies 
HOLLYWOOD (AP) — Madge 
Blake, 69, a movie and televi­ 
sion actress who didn’t begin 
her career unitl after she be­ 
came 
a 
grandmother, 
died 
Wednesday after suffering a 
heart attack. She had appeared 
in various TV roles, among 
them as Bruce Wayne’s Aunt 
Harriet in “Batman.” 


School Bill 
Coming Up 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)-Leg- 
islation 
to 
combine 
existing 
school districts into county units 
is expected to be introduced in 
the 108th Ohio General Assembly 
within two weeks. 
Rep. James Thorpe R-90 Al­ 
liance, a member of a legisla­ 
tive study committee that look­ 
ed into the proposal, will spon­ 
sor the legislation. 
Manv legislators oppose con­ 
solidation. Among them is Sen. 
Oakley C. Collins, R-18 Iron­ 
ton, who is also a member of a 
study committee. 
Gov. James A. Rhodes orig­ 
inally suggested such a move, 
I but 
his 
administration 
later 
dropped its plan. 
The legislative study commit 
tee 
report 
recommends 
one 
school district per county, with 
provisions for two or more dis­ 
tricts in a county in certain cas­ 
es. It also recommended coor­ 
dination of some services such 
as transportation at regional le­ 
vels. 


Iraq Executes 
7 As Spies 


Expect Israel 
To Deny Charges 


DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) 
Iraq executed seven young men 
as spies for Israel today, but 
there were do Jews among them 
and the bodies were not put on 
display until after toe execu­ 
tions. 
Israel was expected to issue a 
denial of any complicity, but it 
appeared unlikely that there 
would be a repetition of toe 
storm of foreign protests which 
followed the public execution 
last month of nine Iraqi Jews 
and five Moslems as spies for 
the Jewish nation. 
Baghdad Radio canceled reg­ 
ular programs this morning and 
broadcast repeated announce­ 
ments of the executions in what 
appeared to be an invitation to 
crowds o go to the capital’s lib­ 
eration Square, where toe bod­ 
ies were hanging. 
The seven Iraqi Moslems, all 
between 19 and 24 years of age, 
were condemned after a three- 
week trial before Iraq’s revolu­ 
tionary court. The government 
radio said two were soldiers, 
and they were shot by firing 
squads, while five civilians were 
hanged at Baghdad’s central 
prison. 
A third soldier also was sen­ 
tenced to death, the broadcast 
said, but his sentence was com­ 
muted to life imprisonment by 
President Ahmed Hassan 
a1 
Bakr because he “helped au­ 
thorities uncover the detailed 
activities of the ring.” 
The court said the eight men 
had collected information about 
Iraq's air force bases and radar 
screens 
and 
communicated 
them to Israel through a non­ 
com missioned officer who is 
still at large. He was said to 
have headed the group. 


Reds Insist 
On Complete 
HS. Pullout 


PARIS (AP) — The United 
States insisted today that com­ 
mon ground exists at the Viet­ 
nam peace talks to bring toe 
conflict to an end. but the at­ 
mosphere of deadlock deepened 
as Hanoi and the National Lib­ 
eration Front stuck by their all- 
or-nothing demands. 
U.S. Ambassador Henry Cab­ 
ot Lodge told the North Viet­ 
namese and tile NLF that the 
1954 Geneva accords provide tho 
common ground, and that it was 
in the spirit of the basic princi­ 
ples of those accords that the 
Americans had made their pro­ 
posals for a military dc-esca!a- 
tion. 
Lodge claimed the other side 
recognized last week that the 
solution of military issues is “an 
absolutely essential first step” 
for the creation of conditions in 
which political problems can be 
resolved.” He recalled that the 
Hanoi-front side had called the 
withdrawal of troops a “funda­ 
mental question.” 
“Thus,” he said, “your side 
and our side seem to agree that 
military issues and particularly 
the question of withdrawal of 
military' forces are of key im­ 
portance to an over all settle­ 
ment.” 
Tran Buu Kiem, chief of toe 
National Liberation Front dele­ 
gation, declared that the United 
States “ must end its war of ag­ 
gression, unconditionally with­ 
draw all their troops and those 
of their satellites,” and permit 
a South Vietnamese settlement 
“according to toe political pro­ 
gram” of the NLF. 
Only this way, he said, can 
Vietnamese problems be settled 
“correctly.” 
There was nothing new in 
Kiem’s statement except an e»> 
caution in name-calling. The 
NLF delegate compared toe 
United States unfavorably with 
the former Fascist regimes of 
Germany, Italy and Japan, and 
again heaped scorn on the “pitp- 
(Continued on Page 2) 


Property Tax 
Equalization 
Hearing Set 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A 
move to equalize property taxes 
at a level of 38 per cent to 42 
per cent of market value will 
come March 24* at a hearing of 
the Ohio Board of Tax Appeals. 
The hearing results from an 
Ohio Supreme Court ruling in 
December that property must 
be assessed for taxation at a 
uniform 
rate throughout toe 
state. 
Purpose of the hearing is to 
change a board rule establish­ 
ing market value and taxable 
value of real estate. 
The 
proposed 
rule 
change 
would retain an annual review 
clause, something the Supreme 
Court said the board had failed 
to enforce. 
The annual reviews will be in 
April. 
The rule would order each 
county auditor to review the 
taxable value of each parcel in 
his county every year. 
Variations of the rule could 
set the level of assessment at 
either, 38, 39, 40, 41, or 42 per 
cent of real value. 
The board would retain the 
right to annually order changes 
in the percentage figure with­ 
out further public hearing. 


No Donkey Taxes 
LYNDEBORO, N.H. (AP) - 
Although a Republican, State 
Rep. Edward Warren has filed a 
bill to repeal an old legislative 
act permitting towns to levy 
taxes on donkeys. 
Viet Reds Build Up Strength Near Saigon 


4.83 
4.16 
4.83 
7*19 
«: ii of the federal tax code. 


SAIGON (AP) — U.S. mid- 
tary advisers said today the 
Viet Cong have more fores now 
for an attack on Saigon and the 
provinces around it than they 
had for the big Tet offensive a 
year ago. 
The 
A m e r i c a n 
officers 
conceded they were uncertain 
when, where or if the Commu­ 
nist command would launch its 
long anticipated big push. But 
they said captured documents 


and prisoners of war still point 
to an offensive in toe 3rd Corps 
Area, which is made up of Sai­ 
gon and ll provinces around i t 
Assessing the current military 
situation around the capital, the 
analysts said either toe enemy 
has not been able to get his 
troops, munitions and food sup­ 
plies into position because of 
U.S. 
and 
South 
Vietnamese 
spoiling actions, or be is await­ 
ing advice from Hanoi’s diplo­ 


mats at the Paris peace talks. 
“The 
enemy’s 
o v e r -a I 
strength in 3rd Corps has in­ 
creased about 7,500 over the last 
13 months to 65,000,” said one 
source. About 20.000 to 30,000 of 
these are considered 
assault 
troops, the rest support forces 
The total includes several thou­ 
sand operating from bases just 
across the border In Cambodia 
who move in and out of South 
Vietnam at will and arn within 


easy striking distance of Saigon. 
The allies have roughly 50,000 
combat 
infantrymen 
in 
toe 
area. 
At least one of four North 
Vietnamese divisions in toe 3rd 
Corps Area is said to be moving 
into attack positions through 
War Zone D northeast of Saigon. 
Three outer divisions remain 
about where they were a month 
ago, along the Cambodian bor­ 
der west, northwest and north of 
Saigon. 
. 


One analyst said this disposi­ 
tion of enemy forces suggests 
assaults on outlying areas rath­ 
er than on Saigon itself, at toast 
in the initial phases of any of­ 
fensive. The most likely initial 
targets appear to be Tay Ninh 
City, northwest of Saigon, and 
the big American bases at Long 
Binh, Bien Hoa and La! Khe, 
north and northeast of the capi­ 
tal. 


Plimpton Tells 


Of RFR Slaying 


LOS ANGELES (AP) — Au- 
thor George Plimpton says he 
lacked toe courage to look at 
dying Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, 
but instead lunged against the 
senator’s assailant—a man he 
describes as “composed and 
peaceful.” 
“My eyes were solely on the 
hand of the defendant which had 
the gun,” 
Plimpton testified 
Wednesday at the trial of Sirhan 
Bishara Sirhan, charged with 
Kennedy's murder. 
“He struck me as enormously 
composed,” Plimpton said of 
the young Jordanian who has 
been pictured as disturbed with 
Kennedy for supporting Israel. 
The senator was felled ihortly 
efter midnight last June 5 hi tho 
flush of his California presiden­ 
tial primary victory. 


The Circleville Herald. Thur. Feb. 20, 19t>y 
Orclpvllle. Ohio 
Postal Shakeup 
To Affect 2,700 
Postmasterships 


TODAY |Armed Robbery Reduced 
In Washington | x0 Larceny On Technicality 


WASHINGTON VAP, — About 
2.200 acting postmasters—plus 
467 
Johnson 
administration 
nominees who never were con­ 
firmed—are out of their jobs 
with the disclosure that the new 
administration 
considers 
all 
current Civil Service lists void. 
The 
announcement 
c a m e 
Wednesday 
from 
Postmaster 
General Winton M. Blount, giv­ 
ing patronage-conscious mem- 
!>ers of his party something to 
cheer about. It means Republi­ 
cans will have at least an equal 
chance with Democrats to com­ 
pete for the jobs. which pay 
from $5,600 to $27,000 annually. 
These jobs, Blount explained, 
will be filled under new non-po* I experience, 
litical procedures based on m er­ 
it and developed to implement 
the new administration’s pro­ 
gram to put the postal system 
on a sound management basis. 
The Post Office, under every 
postmaster general since Benja­ 
min Franklin, has been the pri­ 
mary 
governmental 
agency 
through which the party in pow­ 
er could reward its faithful. 
The policy prevailed during 


the Johnson administration bul 
President Nixon changed it. He 
said postmasters would be cho­ 
sen on merit. 
Blount also announced anoth­ 
er major shakeup Wednesday. 
He said only those regional post­ 
al directors “with managerial 
experience ’ are remaining in 
their present positions. 
Consequently, only two of 13 
regional 
directors—two 
other 
spots are vacant—are staying in 
their assignments. 
“Two or three” elected to re­ 
tire, Blount said, and the others 
were assigned to jobs more in 
line “with their background and 


Reds Insist 


Berger 
Hospital News 


(Continued 'ruin Base t) 
I pet Saigon administration.'' 
Kiem said the NLF would 
! never stop fighting as long as 
the 
A m e r i c a n s 
continue 
“aggression” and the Saigon re- 
I gime continues as a “lackey” of 
; the 
United States. Again he 
spurned “ so-called concrete pro­ 
posals” by the United States to 
make military de-escalation as 
; a primary order of conference 
, business. 
j 
U.S. delegate Henry Cabot 
I Lodge planned to challenge the 
other side to seek some form of 
j agreement on interpretation of 
4- j the 1954 Geneva accords which 
ended the French war in Indo­ 
china. 
As he left the U.S. Embassy 
for the session, Lodge noted that 
last week the North Vietnamese 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. 
I Edmund S. Muskie of Maine, 
tile 
Democrats’ 
unsuccessful 
candidate for vice president last 
| year, says he is more and mare 


j interested in his party's presi­ 
dential nomination in 1972. 
But, 
Muskie 
told 
a 
news 
conference Wednesday, “what­ 
ever enthusiasm I am able to 
generate may cool off.” 
He said a presidential race is 
“quite an undertaking for a 
man without means. It becomes 
more awesome the more I con­ 
template it.” And he said he is 
not surprised at recent polls 
showing that Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy of Massachusetts is 
the leading prospect. 


WASHINGTON (AP) - New 
York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefel­ 
ler says broad legislation to re­ 
vamp the system of federal aid 
to the states must be passed to 
meet a fiscal crisis that is re­ 
sulting in “ annual rounds of tax 
increases facing state and local 
governments.” 
He 
outlined 
his 
proposal 
Wednesday to the District of Co­ 
lumbia Chapter of the American 
Society for Public Administra­ 
tion. 
Rockefeller proposed a plan to 
c o n s o l i d a t e “categorical” 
grants into bloc grants for gen­ 
eral purposes, create a national 
contributory health 
insurance 
system and establish federal 
standards and financing for wel­ 
fare programs. 


ADMISSIONS 
Jam es 
Alcorn, 
Route 
medical 
Mrs. Arnold Fannin. Route 4, 
medical 
M r s . 
Thomas 
Willard, 
Tarlton, medical 
Mrs. Roy Purcell, 123 Mingo 
St., medical 
Frank Williams, 118 E. High 
S t, medical 
David 
and 
Mary 
Payne, 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Logan 
Payne, 
153 
Fairview 
Ave., 
tonsillectomies 
DISMISSALS 
Mrs. Duicie Sheppard, 603 E. 
Mound St. 
Mrs. 
Doyle 
Painter 
and 
daughter, 1010 Lynwood Ave. 
Mrs. 
Daniel 
W. 
Hall 
and 
daughter, 1188 Atwater Ave. 
Mrs. Paul Lovenshime and 
daughter, 531 Elm Ave. 
Miss Peggie Reed, Route I 
Mrs. Gary Valentine, Amanda 
Bruce Sowers, 369 E. Union 
S t 
EMERGENCIES 
Blaine Gaines, 3, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Gaines, 417 Ruth 
Ave., 
received 
a 
puncture 
wound of the left side of his j mats on the sidelines 
pointed 
mouth from a toy. 
out that nothing had changed on 
Mrs. Tonnie Hoey, Tarlton, the battlefield or in the princi- 
1 ac era ted her forehead when j pal capitals to warrant such ex- 
she slipped cm a rug at home. 
I nectations. 
Mrs. Eileen Ward, 118 C 
o l l i n s _________________ 
Court, lacerated two fingers of 
her left hand at home. 
David Whaley, 60, Route 2, j 
was treated for a lacerated 
scalp caused by a tree limb i 
falling while he was cutting it 
down. 


and the NLF had 
discussed 
I their positions cm the 1954 agree- 


I merits. 
j “ So today,” Lodge said, “ I 
I am going to state the U.S. posi- 
j tion on the essential elements of 
these accords, 
and the part 
! which we think they can play in 
a future settlement. We hope 
! and believe it is useful for each 
side to set forth is position cm 
j various m atters.” 
I 
South Vietnamese Ambassa­ 
dor Pham Dang Lam went into 
i the meeting with a long speech 
calling on Hanoi and the NLF to 
present serious counter propos­ 
als instead of dismissing the 
U.S. suggestion that peacemak­ 
ing begin with military de-esca­ 
lation. 
However, there was no reason 


WASHINGTON (AP) - Only 
immediate government action 
will prevent the death of tile na­ 
tion’s railway passenger serv­ 
ice, the Interstate Commerce 
Commission says. 
In 
a 
report 
to 
Congress 
Wednesday, the ICC said only 
575 passenger trains are now op- 
| ©rating, compared to 1,448 a 
decade ago. And during the past 
fiscal year, it said, applications 
for discontinuance were more 
than double the number of any 
previous 12-month period. 
“The steadily mounting defi­ 
cits of most passenger trains 
made it difficult to make the 
necessary findings to require 
their continuance.” the report 
said. 


Capital Quote 
“We already have in opera­ 
tion the most efficient tax-gath­ 
ering machinery in the world, 
but our problem is that after it 
is collected, we are not putting 
the tax revenues where the 
problems 
are.”—New 
York 
Gov. 
Nelson 
A. 
Rockefeller, 
calling for a change in the sys 


A legal technicality resulted 
in a reduced charge Wednesday 
against Donnie Farthing, in­ 
dicted for aiding in the Nov. 
l l armed robbery of Krogers. 
The three judge panel hearing 
the case in Pickaway County 
Common Pleas Court ruled that 
the wording of the indictment 
against him was incorrect. 
The 
Ohio 
Revised 
Codo 
requires that the words “ putting 
in fear, force, or violence” be 
used in an indictment involving 
armed robbery. None of the 
required three terms were used 
in 
the 
indictment 
against 
Farthing. 
The judges also ruled, in a 
two to one decision with Judge 
William Ammer dissenting, that 
the mistake was so m ajor as 
to prevent an amendment of the 
indictment during the trial. 
« • « 
LARCENY, not a crim e of 
violence, was the only charge 
that could be considered under 
the indictment as written by 
previous 
county 
prosecutor 
Robert Huffer, the judges ruled. 
A plea of guilty was entered 
to the reduced charge by Cir 
c I e v i 11 e 
Attorney 
Cheries 
Wilburn in behalf of his client 
Farthing 21, was sentenced to 
1*7 years at the Ohio Peniten 
tiary by Judge Ammer. Con 
viction on the armed robbery 
charge would have carried a 
sentence of 10-25 years. 
Two 
other 
men, 
David 
Montgomery and Daniel Hawks, 
were also charged with 
the 
Kroger 
robbery. 
Montgomery 
had entered a plea of guilty 
to the charge of armed robbery. 
However the indictment against 
him has the legal flaw in it 
as 
the 
indictment 
against 
Farthing. 
Montgomery 
will 
probably 
have to be brought back for 
retrial because of the incorrect 
indictment, according to Judge 
William Ammer. 
Montgomery had been sen­ 
tenced by Judge Ammer to a 


term of 10-25 years at Mansfield 
State Reiformatoiry for his part 
in the robbery. 
Montgomery 
was also sentenced to 1*5 years 
for jail rioting. 
* * # 
THE charge against Daniel 
Hawks will probably not have 
to be 
reviewed 
as 
the in­ 
dictment 
against 
him 
was 
amended to that of unarmed 
robbery. Hawks was sentenced 
to 1-25 years. 
Wilburn made his statements 
concerning 
the 
improper in­ 
dictment at the beginning of his 
remarks for the defense. 
Prior to presentation of the 
case for the defense, County 
Prosecutor 
Roy 
Huffer 
had 
rested the state’s case without 
submitting his items of evidence 
to the 
bench 
for 
approval. 
Huffer was granted permission 
to resume his case so that he 
could enter the evidence. 
Several 
items 
of 
evidence 
were not accepted by the bench 
due to failure by the arresting 
Chillicothe police to 
properl 
mark for identification purposes 
articles 
removed 
from 
the 
Montgomery car. 
During the trial Wednesday 
the three judges viewed the city 
jail cell in which Farthing was 
held prior to the time he signed 
a confession. 
The cell lacks running water, 
toilet facilities and has only a 
wood bench for a bed. 
* * * 
DEFENSE Attorney Wilburn 
pointed out that his client was 
held in this cell 23 hours before 
he made 
a 
confession. 
The 
attorney stated that Farthing 
had not been properly arraigned 
before a m agistrate at the time 
of his arrest, was not given the 
aid of an attorney at the time 
of his questioning and was not 
properly informed of his right 
to remain 
silent. 
Such 
cir 
cumstances indicate a possible 
confession by coercion stated the 
local attorney. 


The three judges hearing the 
case 
against 
Farthing 
were 
Pickaway 
County 
Common 
Pleas Judge William Ammer, 
Fayette County Common Pleas 
Judge 
Evelyn 
Coffman 
and 
retired 
Ross 
County 
judge 
Howard M. Golds berry. 
The trial by a panel of judges 
rather 
than 
by 
jury was 
requested by the defense at­ 
torney. 
The 
two 
additional 
judges were assigned to tile 
local bench to hear the case 
by the Ohio Supreme our! 


Mainly 


About People 


Miss Thelma Minor, Route I, 
Kingston, has been dismissed 
from Chillicothe Hospital. 


Mrs. Walter Tagg, Route I, 
has 
been 
dismissed 
from 
Chillicothe Hospital. 


Mrs. 
Walter 
E. 
Huffer, 
Stoutsville, has been dismissed 
f r o m 
Doctor’s 
Hospital, 
Columbus. 


Mrs. Oscar (Rosie) Atwood, 
Route 2, 
Williamsport, is a 
surgical patient .in Riverside 
Methodist Hospital, Columbus. 
She is in room 414. 


Ted Culp Found 
Dead At Home 


Theodore 
Culp, 
58, 
East 
Ringgold, was found dead on 
his bedroom floor about 9:25 
p.m. Wednesday following an 
investigation 
at 
his 
home 
requested by neighbors. 
Howard Allison, Route I, Ash­ 
ville, requested that a deputy 
be 
dispatched 
from 
t h e 
P i c k a w a y County Sheriff’s 
Department to check on the 
condition of Culp. 
The neighbors stated that they 
had not seen any activities in 
the house for several days and 
they knew that Culp had been 
rn. 
Deputy Warren Straley gained 
entrance to the house and found 
Culp’s body. 
There were no indications that 
Culp’s death was caused by 
anything 
other 
than 
natura 
causes, according to a report 
by County Coroner Ray Carrol. 


BORN Dec. 25, 1910 in Athens 
County, he was the son of John 
and Rose Sark Culp. 
Survivors include his mother 
Mrs. Rose Culp of Logan; me 
son, 
Ronald, 
Columbus; 
one 
d a u g h t e r , 
Mrs. 
Barbara 
Peoples, St. Louis, Mo.; three 
b r o t h e r s , 
Leonard 
Culp 
Bethany, Okla.; Clarence Culp, 
and Victor Culp of Marion; one 
sister, Mrs. William- Lemmon 
Logan. 
Funeral 
arrangements 
are 
b e i n g 
completed 
by 
the 
Defenbaugh Funeral Home. 


The Third national Bank will 
be open with regular banking 
hours on Saturday, Feb. 22.—‘ad. 


Three Injured In 2-Car 
Accident On Route 56 


to suspect'that any movement! tem <* federal ald to the states. 
in the talks was at hand. Dlpto- 
Capiu, Footnote 


The 
Interstate 
Commerce 
Commission has ordered the 
Norfolk & Western Railway to 
operate the famed old Wabash 
Cannonball for at least four 
more months. The N&W sought 
to discontinue the Detroit-to-St 
Louis service because of declin 
mg patronage, but the ICO or­ 
dered public hearings and an 
investigation before July 3. 
Tax Forms 
Being Mailed 


MARKETS 


Hog prices, nil net, were re­ 
ceived by the Bowling Stock 
Yards Co. here today as fol­ 
lows: 
190-220 
lbs., 
$20.65 ; 
220-240 
lbs., $20.15; 240-260 lbs., $19 63, 
260-280 lbs., $19.15; 280-300 lbs., 
$18.65; 300-350 lbs., $17.65; 380- 
400 lbs., $16.65; 
180-190 lbs., 
$20.15; 160-180 lbs., $18.63. 


Thaw Brings 


Three 
area residents 
were 
injured in a two-car accident 
at the intersection of Route 56 
and Zaoe Trail Road about 8:25 
a<. rn. Thursday. 
Taken to Berger Hospital for 
emergency treatment were Roy 
N o n g e s t e r , 23, Route 2, 
Laurelville, driver of the one 
car; Mildred Kelly, 
37, Route 
2, Laurelville, passenger in the 
Nungester 
car 
and 
Peggy 
Wilson, 17, Roots 4, driver of 
the second car. 
Nungester and Miss Wilson 
were treated at Berger Hospital 
for lacerations to their legs and 
were 
released. 
Mrs. 
Kelly, 
suffering leg lacerations and a 
neck injury, was admitted to 
the hospital. 
The Wilson 
car was north­ 
bound 
on Z a n e Trail Road. 


J. E. Davis, Circleville in­ 
come tax consultant, announced 
today that a 5-mill withholding j 
A H s i m **sur­ 
tax deduction chart is being MOOG U d lig e r S 
malled today to every business 
# 
in Circleville having employees. 
| q G f C O t B r i t a i n 


Deaths 


CASA prices pate to (armers ta 
C' I* vn Ile: 
E ar C o rn ............................... 
• 
Shelled Corn ......................... 
Barley ............................... 
W heat 
.................................... 
Soy Bean-. 
.......................... 
Oats 
............................. . 
Spelt! .......................... 
........ 
Heavy H e n s 
............... 
Eggs 
................................... 


LONDON (AP) — A thaw in 
much of Western Europe and 
southern England brought flood 
dangers today after days of bliz- 
MRS. ELIZA GRAHAM 
/ards and freezing cold. An 
Mrs. Eliza Graham, 83, 164 American airman was among 
Hayward ‘Ave., died 4 
a.m. five who lost their lives in an 
Thursday in the Smith Nursing overnight blizzard, now working 
Home. 
Born Aug. 20, 1883 in Hocking 
she was tile daughter 
1.07 
1 1 2 ; County, 
‘ 
of 
Mr. 
and 
Mrs. 
Stephen 
1.21 
.lo Bur goon. She was preceded in 
M death by her husband, Charles 
*is I Graham. 
•j2 I 
I 
Survivors 
include one 
son, 
Casa p a c ts paid to (arm ers In 
Charles A. Graham, 306 North- 
w £ 5 r n: 
. 1.23 ridge Road; three daughters, 
shell corn 
: .1 2' m r s . E v e r e t t P e t e r s , 
O atsCorn 
1.70 Chillicothe; 
Mrs. 
Dean Hoff* 
soy Beani ............................ 
2.4« man, 170 Hayward Ave.; Mrs. 


its way northward. 
S. Sgt. Max Sylvester, 43, at­ 
tached to U.S. Air Force trans­ 
port office at Harwich Docks. 
was found in a snow drift near 
Horsley Cross in Essex Wednes­ 
day night by a patrolling police 
car. He was dead on arrival at 
Essex County Hosoital in Colch­ 
ester. The Air Force said his 
home is in Indianapolis, Ind., 
and his wife lives in Richmond, 
Va. 
The 
blizzard 
and 
howling 
Ca eh pneei paid to farmers in James Dancy, Pompano Beach, I winds 
piled 
up 
snow drifts 
Flu. 
across much of southern Eng- 
Serviees will be 10:30 a.m. 
land but at dawn the situation 
Monday 
in 
the Defenbauvb ! changed drastically with a sud- 
Funeral Home. The Rev. Alonzo i den thaw. 


St©ut«vlU«: 
Wheat 
Shell Corn 
J.ar Corn 
Oulu ..... 
Soy Beane 


.1.23 
1.12 
1.08 
.70 
2.43 


COM M BC* 
COLUMBUS, 
Ohio 
IAF) 
- 
Hog* 
(85 central and western 
Ohio market* reporting to the 
Ohio Dept, of Axil.) 9,050 esti­ 
mated butcher hogs mostly 13 
een u higher, sows ateady, grad­ 
ed Ko. I meat types 200-220 lbs 
Sh.50-21.15. Sow* under 3V3 lh* 
it.00-17.50, over 350 lh* 13.Chi - 
16.00, 
ungraded 
butcher 
hogs 
360-190 lbs 18.15-18.65; *>20 . 240 
lr* 1V.65-20 15; 240-260 ins IS 90- 
IM 40; 260-280 lbs 18.15 • 18.65; 
280-300 lb* 17.66-18.15. over 300 
lb* 17.16-17.65 


Cattle 
(from 
columbus Pro­ 
ducer* Livestock Co • operaUve 
Assn.) Steady. Slaughter Kteer* 
and yearlings; choice 28.00-2M.fc0; 
good 2« 25-28.00, standard 22 OO- 
28.00; 
utility 21.00-22 OO. Butch­ 
er stock; choice heifer* 25 JO • 
27.40; good .2300-25 75: stasdard 
21.00-23 25 
utility 18 50 - 21.00. 
Commercia! bull* 20.00 • 26,40. 
Co**: standard and Commercia] 
18 00-21.60; 
utility 14 00 - 18.00; 
Canners 14.00 down 
Veal 
calve* 
steady 
choice 
and prune 
veal* 35.00 - 40.00; 
Choice and 
good 2M.OO • 35.00; 
atandard 
and good 26.00-20.00; 
Utility 16.00 down 
(Man* 
and 
lamb* 
steady; 
strictly choice M 00-28 OO; 
good 
and cholee 22 00 26 00; comm er­ 
cia) and food 10.00-22.00; utility 
13.00 down; slaughter sheep 8.00 
(down. 


The blizzard moved on north­ 
wards during the morning and 
police reported 80 main roads in 
the Midlands, northern England 
and Wales blocked by snow. 


Confesses Robbery 
CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP) 
Federal 
authorities 
said 


Hill will officiate with burial in 
Forest Cemetery. 
Friends 
may 
call 
at 
the 
funeral home beginning 7 p.m. 
Saturday. 


MR. H. T. WELLINGTON SR. 
Mr. HaTTv T. Wellington Sr., 
89, of Ashville died Thursday 
in 
Monterey 
Nursing 
Home, 
Grove City. 
He was preceded rn death by 
his wife, Clara, and a daughter, 
Gladys. 
He is survived by thro, sons, I 
— 
Harry Jr., Columbus; Howard 
Honda 
was 
an 
lee 
Age 
and Ralph of Circleville; two 
resort” 
for 
man, 
daughters, 
Mr*. 
John 
(Rita) mammoths 
and 
mastodons 
R h o a d e s , Circleville; Mrs I tbouwnd* 
of 
years 
before 
Vernon 
(Georgia) 
Hutchison, Miami and Palm Beach existed. 
Ashville; a bister, Mrs. Nannie 
Miller, Columbus; nine grand- 


Stock List 
Down Again 


NEW YORK (AP) - The Dow 
Jones industrial average dipped 
below its theoretical resistance 
line of 920 today as selling again 
prevailed 
on the descending 
market. 
At noon the Dow barometer 
W88 at 919.19, off 5.91 for the 
day and 32.72 for the week. It 
was at its lowest point this year. 
The Associated Press average 
of 60 stocks eased 1.3 to 346.9. 
Industrials were off 2.0, rails 
were off .8, and utilities slipped 
.5. 
Analysts said the market was 
supercautious in this last ses­ 
sion before the three-day break 
in trading because of Washing­ 
ton’s birthday. 
They cited the lack of encour­ 
aging news needed to spark an 
advance. At the same time, they 
called attention to a continuing 
guessing game about what mo­ 
netary authorities were likely to 
do 
in 
the 
continuing 
battle 
against inflation. 
Declines 
led 
advances 
by 
more than 2-to-l on the New 
York Stock Exchange. 
Trading was not active and 
5.65 million shares were sold by 
noon, compared with 5.36 mil­ 
lion Wednesday. 


the Nungester car was west­ 
bound on Route 56 when the 
accident occurred, according to 
P i c k a w a y County Sheriff’s 
Deputy Bill Dountz. 
Miss Wilson stated that she 
stopped 
at 
the 
intersection, 
looked in both directions and 
then pulled into the intersection. 
Her car was then struck in the 
side by the Nungester vehicle. 
Nungester stated that he saw 
the car pulling out of the side 
road and that he tried to stop 
but was unable to avoid the 
collision. 
Miss Wilson has been arrested 
and charged with failure to 
yield the right of way. 


Pontious 
Methodist 
Church 
will hold an Old Fashioned Song 
Festival, 
Sun., 
2 until 
4. 
Several quartets and trios, also 
musical numbers. 
—ad. 


A n n u a l South Bloomfield 
Booster 
Chih 
Pancake 
and 
Sausage Supper in Municipal 
Bldg. 4-8 p.m. Sat. Adults $1.50. 
Children 75 cents. All you can 
eat. 
' ad. 


The Second National Bank 
will not be open for business 
on Sat. Feb. 22 in observance 
of Washington’s Birthday.—ad. 


The First National Bank will 
be closed Sat. Feb. 22 in ob 
servance of Washington’s Birth 
day. 
—ad 


H ie Savings Bank will be 
closed 
Sat. 
Feb. 
22 in ob­ 
servance of Washington’s Birth 
day. 
—ad. 


First 
30 
customers 
who 
purchase 
2 
or 
more 
kites, 
receive a kite winder and cord 
free. Gard’s, 236 E. Franklin. 


Court News 


Sport Wheel Stolen 
Adam Haynes, 1075 Georgia 
~ | Road, 
told 
Circleville 
Police 
troubled conscience made David 
* a "heel and tire were 
taken from the trunk of his 
ilurdges, ‘ii), walk into the FBI 
office here and confess to tile 
$573 holdup Feb. 3 of the Na­ 
tional Bank of Detroit. 


automobile between Feb. 16 and 
Feb. 19. 


16 
g r e a t 
several nieces 
c h i l d r e n 
grandchildren; 
and nephews. 
Funeral 
arrangement* 
are 
being 
completed 
by 
Bastian 
Funeral Home. Ash Mi« 


HARRY PUFFINBARGER 
Invites You To Try 
DAVID DAVIES 
Hog k Cattle Market 
Williamsport, Ohio 
FOR MORE NET MONEY 
AND NO EXTRA EXPENSE* 
Mod. thru FrL 7 A.M. -3 P.M. 
Telephone 986-2271 


CLIFTONA 
THEATRE 
Phone 4714*11 
Adult* $1.30, Child 75c 
STARTS TONIGHT 
Steve McQueen — In 
"BUUITT 
(End* Feb. 23th) 


Issue Finding 
For $13,178 


LCI Business 
Manager Named 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (A P)-The 
state auditor’s office issued a 
supplemental state examiner’s 
report today listing findings for 
recovery of $13,178.91 from the 
Lebanon 
Correctional Institu­ 
tion in Warren County. 
State Auditor 
Roger Cloud I 
said the amended report, fo r1 
the period from Jan. I, 1960 to 
Nov. 30, 1968, covered three 
areas of institutional operations. 
In a report issued last No­ 
vember 
examiners 
returned 
findings f o r recovery of $2,- 
622.15 from the business man­ 
ager, Weldon D. butcher, and 
the Buckeye Union Casualty Co. 
of Columbus, his surety. 
This finding was linked by 
the examiners with Butcher’s 
failure to account for receipts 
from the sale of fat and bone­ 
meal 
by-products 
from 
the 
slaughter operations at tho in­ 
stitution. 
(loud said the amended find­ 
ings, 
which 
also covered 
a 
period of seven years and ll 
months, resulted from Butcher’s 
failure to account for postage 
money amounting to $10,135. 
Butcher told the examiners 
he kept no records of postage 
purchases and that he was not 
aware that receipts should be 
secured for such purchases. 
Tile report said that in addi­ 
tion, Butcher failed to account 
for $421 
in 
cash confiscated 
from a prisoner as the result of 
a check of all inmates ordered 
July 18, 1968. 


Scioto Building and Loan will 
be closed Feb. 22 in observance 
of Washington’s Birthday, —ad. 


Jane K. Speakman announces 
the opening of her real estate 
office, located at 129% W. Main 
St., to buy or sell, call 474*2898. 
—ad, 


Early Detection Cancer Clinic 
for Pickaway County women, 
Monday Feb. 24, 7-9 p.m. at 
Berger Hospital. 
—ad. 


50-50 Dance in Eagles Hall for 
Eagle members and guests, Sat. 
Feb. 22 from 9 • 12:30. Music 
by 
Holiday 
Parker and the 
Roundtowncrs. 
—ad. 


ROUNDTOWN 
PLAYERS 
Present 
SPLENDOR IN 
THE GRASS 
By WUUam hue 
Feb. 21-22, 8:30 P.M. 
Jr. High Auditorium 
Price 82.00 Adults, 
75c Students 
Tickets at Biufmans, 
porter's It Rlsrh’i 
Lindsey's Bakery 


TURTLE­ 
NECK 
SHIRTS 


and 
SWEATERS 
25% 


OFF 


• Orlons 


• Cottons 


• Wools 
o 
Caddy 
Miller’s 
MEN’S $H0P 


Estate Inventories 
Ambrose E. Moul, Circleville 
personal goods 
and chattels 
$150; 
accounts 
and 
debts 
r e c e i v a b l e , $8,313.10; rea! 
estate, $6,250; total, $14,713.10 
Anna 
R. 
Fausnaugh, 
Cir 
cie Ville: real 
estate, 
$3,000 
total, $3000 
C h a r I e s E. Fausnaugh Cir 
deville: real 
estate, 
$3,000 
total, $3,000 
Real Estate Transfers 
Myrtle P. Weese (deceased) 
by administrator to George C. 
Barnes, 
lots 
14-18, 
Block 
I, 
H e i s k e 11 Park Subdivision, 
V llliamsport 
Bessie 
S. 
Funk 
to 
Oliver 
Forsythe, lr ad, New Holland 
Florence P. Hitter (deceased) 
to 
Stewing 
Hitler, 
undivided 
one-eiglith interest 105 acres, 
Pickaway Twp, certificate of 
transfer 
undivided 
one-half 
interest 160.92 acres, Washin 
ton Twp. 
Sterling Hitler to Richard W. 
Penn 
undivided 
one-eighth 
interest 105 acres, 
Pickaway 
Twp. 


Evening dr«sei, parties, beaux,- 
all still new to her were exciting 
enough—but now, best of all flow­ 
ers, tool Her excited fingers will 
lift the fresh corsage for a raptur­ 
ous sniff and sparkling eyes will 
shower bim with thanks for mak­ 
ing everything just perfect. 
Send your young lady a corsage 
for the dance. You'll help make 
her grand evening even more 
unforgettable when you- 


M 
b 
' 
BREHMER 
GREENHOUSES 
M u . IMT 


Winter 


The world’s first “newspaper” 
was published by Julius Caesar. 
The Roman ruler had his record 
of public business posted daily 
in the Forum. 


Stock up now on qual- 
tty beef at a low, low] 
price! 


Graft Fire 
Harrison Twp. Fire Depart-1 
merit responded to a grass fire | 
at the home of Mrs. Jam es 
Garret, Route 3, about 1:20 p.m.j 
Wednesday. 
Mrs. Garret stated that the I 
fire 
was 
apparently 
started 
from sparks blown by the wind! 
front trash she was burning. 
The fire burned about one I 
acre of grass behind the house! 
on Old Water Works Road. 


U. S. Choice 
HIND 
Quarters 
- ?/ • 
4 
125-150 Lb. Average 
69* 


pound 


Cut, Wrapped 


and Frozen - 


Ready for 


Your Freezer! 


BEEF 
LOINS 


(T-Bones and Sirloins 
40-60 Lb. Average 


pound 


Cut, Wrapped 


and Frozen - 


Ready for 


Your Freezer! 


Good Selection 
Fruits 
& Berries 
Sweetened and Frozen 


NOTICE: 
No Slaughtering 
Except by 
Appointment! 
CIRCLEVILLE 
FAST FREES 
Edison Ave. 
474-2701 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
Circleville, Ohio 


Pickaway Grange Report 


STAR GRANGE 
Star Grange met in regular 
session Tuesday evening in the 
Monroe School auditorium with 
worthy master 
F l e m 
Blair 
presiding 
over 
the 
business 
meeting. 
Mrs. Helen Hammel read a 
letter of appreciation for our 
Christmas 
contribution 
from 
Sgt. Joe Panned in Vietnam. 
Mrs. Francis Fumiss, home 
economics chairman announced 
that Star Grange had been 
asked to help at a luncheon at 
the 4-H and Grange Building 
Thursday and they are also 
planning 
a 
bakie 
sale 
and 
m a r k e t 
on 
Saturday 
at 
Kochheiser’s Hardware Store in 
Circleville beginming at 9 a.m. 
All grange members are asked 
to contribute something to help 
make it a success. Star Grange 
will 
serve 
the 
Bloodmobile 
Canteen on Sept. ll this year. 
Mrs. Paul 
Dawson, County 
Junior Matron reported on the 
all county meeting held last 
Sunday at the 4-H and Grange 
Building. She also announced 
that the youth are practicing 
every Monday evening, getting 
ready 
to participate 
in the 
District contest at Laurelville 
March 22 and the State finals 
which will be beld at Teays 
Valley March 29. 
She also announced that 
county wide Banquet is planned 
for April 
19 
at the grange 
building. The theme will be 
“Town 
and 
Country’' 
ais 
members are to bring guests 
organizations in the county. 
This banquet will be in the 
form 
of a 
carry-in dinner 
beginning at 6:30 p.m. and the 
home economics committee will 
be in charge of the preparation 
of beverages and the dining 
room. 
The lecturer, Mrs. Otha Lewis 
opened her program, “Valen­ 


tine’s Day" with group singing, 
“Let Me Gail You Sweetheart” . 
Each member answered roll 
call in alphabetical order with 
something 
pertaining 
to 
a 
valentine. 
Laura Long read “The Origin 
of Valentines Day” and Mrs. 
Flem Blair read, “Will You Be 
My Valentine?” A song contest 
with the answers being either 
man or woman’s name was 
conducted and Mrs. Flem Blair 
and Helen Hammel tied for first 
place. 
‘There’s no Friend like an Old 
Friend” was read by 
Mrs. 
Wilbur 
Beathard 
and 
Mrs. 
Clinton Ritchie read, “The Old 
Valentine”. A contest on a 
Lincoln penny was held with 
Mrs. Blair having the most 
correct answers. 
Seasonal refreshments were 
served by Mrs. Clanton Ritchie 
and her committee. 


Darbyville 


Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Neff 
visited Saturday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Neff end 
sons of Columbus. 


Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Brigner 
were Saturday evening dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Hartman of Royalton. 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Peters 
and children of Columbus were 
Sunday dinner guests of Mrs. 
Roscoe Peters. 


SCS Sponsors 
Award Event 


The Pickaway Soil and Water 
Conservation District Board of 
Supervisors will 
sponsor the called bo St. Joseph’s Cemetery 


Firemen Douse 


Two Grass Fires 


The Circleville Fire Depart­ 
ment doused two grass fires 
Wednesday afternoon. 
At 3:55 p.m. firemen were 


Saltcreek Valley Grange 


The 
Ohio 
State 
Grange 
Secretary 
and 
Mrs. 
John 
Dowler were guests at the 
Saltcreek Valley Grange last 
evening and presented a slide 
tour of Alaska as a portion of 
the literary program. 
The lecturer, Paul Dunkle, 
formulated this program around 
states both in song and contests. 
A 
large 
attendance 
was 
present for the meeting con­ 
ducted by Francis Fraunfelter 
and 
his 
core 
of 
officers. 
Following the regular reports of 
the committees and officers, the 
county grange deputy reported 
on the officers meeting held 
earlier in the month. 
After some discussion 
the 
inspection date for degree work 
was set for the first meeting 
in 
April. The second meeting 
of that month will be conducted 
by the home economics com­ 
mittee and wBi feature the 
annual 
baking 
and 
sewing 
contests. This will be directed 
by Mrs. Fred DeLong who is 
the woman’s activity chairman 
for the current grange year. 
Upcoming 
events 
for 
the 
grange will be the open meeting 
for non-grange members to be 
held on Mardi 18, and the youth 
ritualistic contests both on the 
district and the state levels. 
At the close of the meeting 
refreshments were served by 
the Fraunfelter family who used 
a 
Lincoln 
and 
Washington 
theme 
in 
their 
menu 
and 
decorations. 


Projects Awards Program again 
this year. 
The program will be held in 
early March with both junior 
high and senior high divisions. 
Plaques will be awarded* to 
first place winners. Hie senior 
high winner will go on to an 
area contest to be held at 
Hillsboro. The area winner will 
be eligible to compete on a state 
level for a $500 scholarship. 
I n f o r ma t i o n 
about 
the 
program can be obtained at the 
Pickaway SCS Office, 1440 N. 
Court St. 
New 
cooperators 
recently 
accepted 
by 
the 
board 
of 
Supervisors are Dale Gifford, 
223 acres, Wayne Twp.. Donald 
Davis, 227 acres, Wayne Tvp.; 
William Richards, 
340 acres, 
J a c k s o n 
Twp.: 
Guv 
H 
Leatherwood, 75 acres, Harrison 
Twp. 
Farm plans were approved 
for Homer Cromley, Harrison 
Twp.; 
David federator, Salt- 
creek 
Twp.; 
Harold 
Defen- 
baugh, Pickaway Twp.; George 
Selmer, Saltcreek Twp.; Chaney 
Vance, Dalby Twp.; 
Martin 
Barr, Walnut Twp.; Jay Hay, 
Walnut Twp. 
Special plans were approved 
for Lincoln Molded Plastics, 
D a r r e l l Carter, 
Pickaway 
County 
Airport 
Commission, 
Deercreek Wildlife Project. 
Members of the district board 
of 
supervisors 
are 
David 
Bolender, Chaney Vance, Frank 
Graves, 
Ralph 
Dunkel 
and 
George Hanuman. 


where leaves and dry grass 
were burning. They were there 
for 15 minutes. 
At 4:43 p.m. they were called 
to extinguish a grass fire on 
Charles Walter’s farm at the 
edge of the city on the Lan­ 
caster Pike. 
Firemen were there for 30 
minutes. 


OHIO CASH GRAIN 
COLUMBUS, 
Ohio (AP) — 
Ohio Dept. of Agri. cash grain 
prices: No. 2 red wheat mostly 
unchanged 1.18-1.23, mostly 1.20- 
1.22; No. 2 yellow corn mostly 
spokes- unchanged 1.03-1.07, mostly 1.04- 
man. “It’s probably the worst! i.07; No. 2 oats unchanged to I 
mess we’ve ever faced.” 
lower .62 - .72. mostly .62- 65; 
The error was detected by an I soybeans mostly unchanged 24C 
engineer for the W. P. Dicker-! 2.52. mostly 2.45-2.47. 


south end of the project,” said | match. 
John McCasick, an official of: 
“Ifs a mathematical error 
the firm. 
! that can be rectified,” he said. 


New Bridge Out Of Line With Ramps, Approaches 


PITTSBURGH (AP) — The! son, Co., the subcontractor han-|rock cut being made at the [way, and the blueprints didn’t 
story of the bridge that missed dling construction, 
came to light Tuesday. 
j 
"We 
were 
putting 
in 
the 
Ifs a 800-foot span that was1 bridge piers when one of our en- 
supposed to carry Interstate 79 ginecrs noticed that they didn’t 
across a valley in suburban Col-1 seem to be in line with a huge 
lier Township. 
I ------------------------------------ 
But state highway officials 
say the bridge is 13 feet out of 
line with connecting ramps and 
roadways, halting all construc­ 
tion. 
“Ifs a nasty situation.'’ said a 
highways department 


“ It can happen to anybody. En­ 
gineers are only human, you 
know.” 


Surveyors were called in and 
they made a “terrible discov­ 
ery,” said McCasick. “ it was 
confirmed that the bridge was 
Lining up as much as 13 feet out I Ohio Soldier Killed 
of kilter with base lines estab-j 
WASHINGTON (AP) — Army 
Ushed for the roadway. 
| Spec 4 Robert H Parcher Jr. 
Work on the project was 
stopped 
and 
engineers have 
gone to work to redesign ramps 
and roadways. 
A highway spokesman said 
two private consultants drew up 
plans for the bridge and road- 


of Toledo, Ohio, has been killed 
in recent action in Vietnam, the 
Defense Department reported 
Wednesday. 


USE THE CLASSIFEDS 


Nome New Mon 
To Election Boo rd 
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)—Sec­ 
retary of State Ted W. Brown 
Wednesday appointed Norton D. 
Henry of North Ridgeville to the 
Lorain County Board of Elec­ 
tions. 
Henry, a Republican, succeeds 
Robert J. Coils of Elyria, re­ 
cently appointed to the Ohio Stell­ 
ate to fill the vacancy created 
by the resignation of Harry V. 
Jump to become new deputy 
state insurance director. 


Anaesthesia was used during 
surgery in China as early as 
the 3rd century A.D. when Hua 
T’o gave patients wine, which 
acted as a general anaesthetic. 


Mrs. Carl Cathel is spending 
the week with her sister Mrs. 
Mary Lanman and family of 
Newark. 


Miss Saralee Grabill spent 
Wednesday evening with Mrs. 
Bertha Porter of Williamsport. 


Miss Becky Overly of New 
Holland spent the weekend with 
Roxanne Hulse. 


Mr. and Mrs. Dick Mitchell 
and family of South Charleston 
visited Sunday afternoon with 
Mr. and Mrs. William Wright. 


Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hott of 
Harrisburg visited Sunday with 
Mrs. Jennie Calvert. 


Mr and Mrs Ernest Ankrom 
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Bill 
Ankrom and daughter and Mrs. 
Charles Allison and daughter all 
of Circleville visited Sunday 
afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. 
Roy Ankrom. 
O 
Mr. and Mrs. Otha Lewis 
visited Sunday afternoon with 
Mrs. Cleve Crawford of Mt. 
Sterling. 


Mr. and Mrs. Don Conley of 
Columbus were Sunday evening 
dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Otha Lewis. 


Mrs. Holland Carlson spent 
Friday with 
Mr. 
and Mrs. 
William Grubb of Columbus. 


Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Brigner 
and children of near Grove City 
and Mr. and Mrs. James Ed­ 
wards 
of 
Lancaster 
were 
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Floyd Brigner. 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard Caudill 
and 
children 
were 
Monday 
evening guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie Bowsher and family of 
Derby. 


Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Neff 
and son of Columbus were 
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wendell Neff. 


People Will Crowd 
Into Boone County 
FLORENCE, 
Ky. 
(AP) — 
Boone County, Ky.- across the 
Ohio River from Cincinnati, will 
be billed aa “Boone Country” 
with the opening of a family 
entertainment park there by the 
summer of 1970. 
Fess 
Parker, 
television’s 
Daniel Boone, is investing $13.5 
million in the park, to be called 
“Frontier World.” The park is 
to depict the various frontiers 
in American history, from the 
Pilgrims up to contemporary 
science and apace frontiers and 
beyond. 


Special Group of 
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Automatic upper oven plus all these features: waist- 
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A c c o r d i n g T o B o y l e 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
Qrcievllle, Ohio 


Laff-A-Day 


By HAL BOYLE 


NEW YORK (AP.) — Who 
wants to live to be IOO? 
Optimistic s c i e n t i s t s al­ 
though b.s no means ad scien­ 
tists—hold out the possibility 
that the traditional biblical span 
of human life, 70 years, may be 
increased by another three dec­ 
ades. 
This hope meets with popular 
applause. Practically everyone 
seems to harbor a yearning to 
become a centenarian. One won­ 
ders why 
Reaching such 
an extreme 
age would not appear in itself to 
be a personal victory of great 
virtue and would probably add 
few laurels to the annals of hu­ 
manity. 
Productivity is, except for the 
gifted few’, largely limited to 
youth and the middle years. 
“ The effective, moving, vital­ 
izing work of the world is done 
between the ages of 25 and 40,” 
once wrote Sir William Osier, 
one of the greatest of m xiem 
physicians. 
‘ My second fixed idea is the 
uselessness of men above 60 
years of age, and the incalcula­ 
ble benefit it would be in com­ 
mercial, political, and in profes­ 
sional life, if as a m atter of 
course, men stopped work at 
this age.” 
Dr. Osier didn’t quite practice 
what he preached. Most men 
don’t. He worked assiduously 
until he succumbed with care 


cheerfulness and fortitude at 70 
of a bronchial condition which 
he himself had diagnosed as ter­ 
minal. 
When 
one 
glances 
at 
the 
record of human history, howev­ 
er. it is hard to see why many 
should aspire to reach IOO. The 
golden years get pretty well tar­ 
nished by then. 
Can you recall any person 
who. after his 100th birthday, 
won a war, was elected to the 
presidency, 
became 
a 
pope, 
painted a great picture, w’rote a 
famous poem, invented a useful 
household gadget, fathered a 
child or even ran away with a 
chorus girl? 
No, indeed. Hie performance 
record of centenarians is mea­ 
ger and Weak. 
A few do manage to remain 
gracious 
and 
respect-worthy. 
But, for the most part, their 
only remaining occupation is to 
renum ber the past a .cmd and to 
explain how they managed to 
survive 
so 
long, 
punctuating 
their memories with such quaint 
exclamations as “By gum, and 
“Dad gum it!” 
Think how dreary the world 
would be if we all managed to 
make it to IOO, sitting in our 
blanket-covered 
wheel chairs, 
supping or. thin soup, and boring 
each other with tall tales of 
times gone by. 
No one should want to live a 


long time just to be old. Longev­ 
ity should have a goal of some 
kind, even if it be but a simple 
human desire to outlast one’s 
enemies or confound one’s cov­ 
etous heirs. 
I have such a goal. My goal is 
to live to be 88, not IOO. 
It is based on a simple wistful 
wish I have had since childhood 
—the wish to live in twro centu­ 
ries 
The changing of the guard of 
the centuries is always a trem u­ 
lous moment to mankind. When 
the 19th century ended there 
was a booming of guns and a 
sounding of bells. Great balls 
were held at which women wept 
openly and men wiped tears 
from their eyes. Something old 
was passing, something new be­ 
ginning—and everyone felt its 
landmark significance. 
I should like to drink cham­ 
pagne on the last night of the 
20th century and then wake up 
on the first morning of the 21st 
century and say: 
“Well, it was a grand party, 
but I can't see that this new 
century is so much different 
than the last ©ne.” 
Then I’d like to turn my face 
to the wall, mistake noon for 
sunset, and expel a final grate­ 
ful breath, serene with fate. 
But to live to be IOO—why on 
earth? 


The Business World 


By JOHN C U N N IFF 


on ice. Gently he, taps through the availability of noua-f 
ss, easing up before the vailability of credit. 
, 
lrl/4 o 
a1 tar (I mr 
WI ii int'l in. 
rni. 
Lno 
f 


I^C, Kiu* feslur** S} tidier lur. ]9bQ. World ti*hu mirv od > 


“YouTl like the teamwork here!” 


7,’iO 


Nixon’s advisers and the Stet 
serve Board is likely to assure 
better relationship between fis­ 
cal and monetary policy. 
lf limitations on the supply 


Try and Stop Me 


---------- By BENNETT CERF------------- 


H i c k e l S h o u l d L o o k A t E a s t 


By JOHN CHAMBERLAIN 
The conventional view is that 
it is good to have a Westerner 
in charge of the Department r f 
the Interior because most of the 
still unexploited public lands of 
the 
nation 
lie 
west of the 
Mississippi. 
This 
involves 
a 
subtle distortion of the truth 
that 
the 
“interior” 
of 
the 
country 
also 
includes 
the 
populous Northeast. Personally, 
I am happy that Walter Hickel, 
who, as former Governor of 
Alaska, is as “western” as they 
come, is our Secretary of the 
Interior. But my reason for 
saying this is unconventional; 
I think the part of the nation’s 
“ interior” 
that 
most 
needs 
attention is not the West but 
the Northeast and a western 
Secretary of the Interior 
may 
have fewer inhibitions 
about 
getting action on smog and 
pollution. 
The Sierra Club is making a 
big to-do about the “danger” 
to our remaining 
wilderness 
areas posed by the Walt Disney 
Productions 
in 
planning 
an 
“Alpine village” ski resort at 
Mineral King in the Sequoia 
National 
Forest. 
Generally 
speaking, the Sierra Club does 
commendable work. But, since 
Walt Disney designs are always 
distinguished for their taste, 
there can be no real argument 
that it is wrong to accommodate 
the thousands who will flock to 
Mineral 
King 
once 
an 
all- 
weather access road is ready 
to take them there. Our land 
is for our people to enjoy, and 
the handful of pack-rats and 
professional 
woodsmen 
who 
want to keep the high Sierras 
to themselves are selfish to 
oppose the Disney project. 
Similarly, the argument that 
Hickel might “ give away” the 
public domain of Alaska 
to 
“ special interests” is as far­ 
fetched as the idea that one 
tastefully 
conceived 
Alpine 
vdlage will ruin the California 
Sierras. The Federal govern­ 
ment controls over ninety per 
cent of the total land area of 
Alaska, and 
it would take 
a 
couple of generations of Hickels 
in the Department of the In­ 
terior to parcel out all of the 
Alaskan 
goodies 
to 
private 
enterprisers. 
Si ru e tile Federal gov ernment 
has been selling the timber cut 
of the Alaska Tongas* National 
Forest to the Japanese at prices 
that native woodworking plants 
cannot afford to pay, it would 
Vie only a mark of patriotism 
for Hickel to let some of the 
public 
forest 
domain 
go to 
Americans. 
Instead 
of 
worrying 
about 
what Secretary of the Interior 
nickel 
might 
do 
in 
the 


The Herald 


\ Olivia Newspaper 


lr v. ROL)EN!• ELS 
Publlsfier 


ii. L. DAVIS 
Editor and Manager 
A dally newspaper conauUdatlnf 
Die Circ ie vi lie Herald and the Daily 
Union Herald. 
Entered at second ciat>t matter 
at tilt Circleville Pott Office under 
the act of March 3, 1879. Sec or id 
CUM pottage paid at Circleville, 
Ohio 
Published every afternoon e*,«u' 
sunday at the Herald Building 210 
North Court Street, Circleville. Ohio 
b> 
tilt 
Circleville 
Publishing 
Company. 


hlBfcCKlPTION PRICES 


My carrier in Circleville 50c per 
week By mail in Pickaway County, 
$12 per J tar 
Elsewhere In Ohio, 
$14 per year. Outside Ohio, $1$. Mal) 
rates 
apply only 
where 
cinder 
M-moe ti not available. 
Telephone* 
business 474-3131 
News 474-3133 
Postmaster: Send Form 57$ to: 
box 440, Circleville. Ohio, 43113. 


AMERICAN NEWSPAPER 
REPRESENTATIVES, in c . 
Atlanta — Chicago — Detroit 
bes Amfetes — New York 
National 
Advertising 
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tab'* 


California Sierras or in Alaska, the people of northern Ohio — 
I think we should ask him to and Hickel as our overseer cl 
focus 
his 
attention 
on such Ute nation s interior — to <j<> 
eastern plague wots as Lake 
about cleanmg up 
Erie or Long Island Sound or 
Ll ke. Erl*‘ . 
. 
. th 
F t 
Chesapeake Bay or the Hudson 
Take a *?°k a* 
River. 
These 
have 
become Secretary Hickel. Those of u 
sewers 
for 
the 
disposal 
of whom have to s w i m i n 
factory and big citv wastes. wai®rs* 
®a^ ,^ s 
. 
Even the small rivers of the breathe its air, will back you 
Northeast have been ruined. As u*>ln a t h i n g you may do. 


I-1* 


You're 


Telling Me 


By William Bitt 
Central Press Writer 


Ifs hard to believe — that 
news item to the effect that the 


a boy I used to eat mussels 
from the rocks at the mouth 
of the Branford River in Con­ 
necticut, but I wouldn’t dare to 
do it today. Lake Erie, they 
t e l l 
mc, 
is 
becoming 
uninhabitable for fish, and you 
can’t drink water in any of the 
Northeastern lake cities without 
gagging on tile chlorine. 
Something can assuredly oe 
done about all this, and Hickel, 1969 military budget of the tiny 
who doesn t owe a tong to municipality ot Andorra is orJy 
special 
interest:,. 
ccidd be ^ imagine: — just five bucks 


He* mlgb™ begin by* taking11 a tor toe ^ ^ b o o t i n g m „cb: 


Slate T 
o 
l X 
i S f s o le ™ , Andorra bas a 2 0 -m a n ^ to e 
end of the state there has been 
some effort to clean up the Ohio 
“ “ 
J * 
River. In the past the big steel 
eyen “ "“ P 
companies dumped their “ pickle em *■“ > Pea-toootere. 
l i q u o r , ’ ’ 
used 
rn 
steel 
, 
processing, into the Ohio and 
Six 
gamecocks, 
valued 
at 
its two source rivers in Penn- 81.000 
apiece, 
were 
recently 
Sylvania, the Allegheny and the shipped from Texas to Mexico 
Monongahela The “down river City. Thoseare mighty fine— 
people in Ohio, West Virginia, as well as fighting — feathers! 
a n d 
Kentucky 
complained. 
-------- 
Prodded, the steel companies 
Thanks to all those Western 
discovered that bv recirculating series 
on 
television. 
says 
their pickle liquor they could Graodpappy 
Jenkins, 
today’s 
simultaneously save money and youngster sees far more horses 
reduce the pollution. 
than his daddy did when he was 
The fact that several states a b°y- 
had an interest in cleaning up 
—— 
the Ohio mav have helped. Lake 
An eastern judge once ruled 
Erie, on the other hand, in- it was O.K. for a man to swear 
volves the communities of only in his own home whenever he 
one 
state, 
if the 
minuscule felt like it. An old family cuss- 
littoral 
possessed 
by 
the tom? 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
------- 
at 
Erie 
be 
discounted. 
But 
Since 
the 
beginning 
of 
Canada’s Ontario Province oc- recorded 
history the 
volcano 
cupies the northern shore of Mount Etna has erupted some 
E r i e . 
Wily 
doesn't 
the 80 times. Now, that’s what we 
Parliament 
in 
Ottawa 
start call 
a 
downright 
lava-ish 
yelling? Maybe this would force display! 


r 


' TAKES A LOT to shock residents in. the neighborhood 
of the U. of California campus in Berkeley these days. A 
prof emerged from the campus swimming pool recently to 
discover that some mis­ 
creant had hooked his 
shoes and socks from his 
locker. The weather was 
balmy, so he decided he 
could walk barefoot to 
the nearest shoe store, 
attired in his regular suit, 
shirt, and tie. 
Nobody, 
including the shoe store 
clerk, gave him a second 
glance. The clerk, in fact, 
after fitting him with 
shoes and socks, inquired 
casually, “Care to wear 
them, sir, 
or shall I 
wrap them up?” 
• 
• 
* 
“There are no such things as decorum and good manners in 
society any longer,” wailed a Boston hostess recently. “A t m y 
last dinner party, one of my guests launched forth on a decidedly 
off-color story and I told him he could just get his hat and leave 
my house.” 
"Good for you,” enthused her even more strait-laced friend. 
“What happened?” 
“AU my other guests went with him,” wailed the hostess, "to 
hear the rest of the story.”rn 
e 
• 
QUOTABLE: 
If the average man saves for the next 20 years at the rate he’s 
been saving for the past six months, he’ll be able to retire at the 
age of sixty owing only $100,000—Jack E. Leonard. 
C HW, by Bennett Cert. Distributed by King Features Syndicate. 
Speaking Of Your Health 
By Laster L. Coleman, M.D. 


NEW YORK (AP) — Even be- speeding 
fare the Nixon administration his brakes, 
took office it made known its be- vehicle skids, always maintain- 
There has been criticism of 
lief that the first order of busi- ing control with a light foot. 
the Fed’s role in inflation tiring { 
ness was the control of inflation. 
“Steadily and gradually,” is the past few years, and som e! 
The question was: How would it the way Paid W. McCracken, economists blame it for the per-I 
do it? Now the answers are in. 
chairman of the Council of Eco- sistenee of inflation despite a re-3 
Budget deficits will be avoid- nomic Advisers, described the (faction in federal spending ands 
ed if possible, the surtax may anti-inflation attitude. The goal, the implementation of an in-jl 
be retained beyond July I, at- he told a congressional commit- come surtax. 
J 
tempts will be made to control tee; “ should be to assure the 
By permitting too much moth! 
the money supply moire tightly rate of inflation declines persis- ev to enter the economy re la tiv e 
than in the past, and perhaps tently . 
. 
to the amount of goods the econ-* 
—unemployment will be permit- 
Despite intentions, this slow- omy was capable of producing,^ 
ted to inch up. 
down may not be accomplished these critics say, demand was* 
The worst of the tumors are without a loss of jobs. In his overfed. Too many dollars w e re 
likely to be avoided: The over- first presidential news confer- sent chasing too few goods. Aiu|| 
heated 
economy 
won’t 
be ence, Nixon emphasized it was prices rose. 
5 
brought under control at the ex- possible 
to 
control 
inflation 
Even the President can’t die** 
pense of a big increase in job- without 
increasing 
unemploy- tale to the nearly autonomi 
lessness, 
and neither, it ap- men! 
substantially. 
But 
he Fed. but good rapport betwc 
pears, will many federal pro- didn’t define the term, 
grams be rolled back. 
McCracken was more reluc- 
Onc 
technique 
that 
has tant to make a positive state- 
worked in the past, although for ment. “I wish I could say we 
only a limited period of a few can stabilize the price level with 
years, is likely to be avoided, absolutely no effects on jobs," money do indeed seem to brings 
That technique: guideposts, or he said. But he added he could more stability to the economy US 
the abitrary setting of limits for not safely make that statement, .will be a great victory for a? 
wage and price increases. 
More 
apparent 
with 
each school of economists, led largess 
The Nixon economic advisers, news'conference or statement is by Mi I to n t tied rn a n o fth e U !f| 
the realization that the amount verslty of Chicago, which has* 
of money permitted to circulate insisted that money supply is 
must be controlled more effec- the chief influence on the econo- 
tiveiy if other anti-inflation poll- my, 
cies are to succeed. 
The intention of guiding the 
Money supply largely is a role economy without guideposts will 
of the Federal Reserve Board, be watched with equal interest, 
crw . 
- 
which 
decides 
when 
funds for there are some critics who 
murs to the effect ^ 
tarftattoii should »*.Pe™ «*ed to «<>* !» " .a tta in their use cannot I * 
would be slowed by permitting 
job layoffs. A loss of jobs is, in 
the 
nature 
of 
the 
problem, 
usuahy one of the consequences 
of a slowdown. 
Nixon s advisers, 
h o wever 
appear to be giving top priority 
to a reduction of inflation with­ 
out a large loss of jobs. Danger­ 
ous as inflation is, they seem to 
be saying, it must be reduced so 
slowly that great unemployment 
is avoided. 
Their aim seems similar to 
that of the automobile driver 
who awakens to the danger of 


and there are perhaps more 
serving Nixon than served any 
other president, appear during 
the first month or so to be sensi­ 
tive, 
cautious and nondoctri­ 
naire. 
When Nixon was elected there 


the expanding economy, largely avoided. 


T O D A Y 
In History 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
Today is Thursday, Feb. 20, 
the 51st day of 1909. There are 
314 days left in the year. 
Today's highlight in history: 
On this date in 1792, President 
George Washington signed an 
act creating the federal post of­ 
fice system. 
On this date: 
In 1809, tile U.S. Supreme 
Court Hued that the power bf 


"MUtF THI SURF” actually Jack Murphy (left), and cohert 
Jack Griffith go to court hi Fort Lauderdale, FI&* for a 
session of their trial in the murder of two secretaries whose 
bodies were found in nearby W hisky Creek. The girls wars 
suspects in the theft of $500,000 in securities from a Los An­ 
geles brokerage. “Murf the Surf” won unenviable fame sev­ 
eral years ago by engineering theft cf a famous gam from 
the American Museum of Natural History hi New York. 


state. 
In 1895, a revolt against Spain 
broke out in Cuba. 
In 1920, the American explor­ 
er 


Men Should Work 
The search for the fountain 
Physicians are on the con- 
of youth started centuries ago stant 
lookout 
for 
allergic 
and continued through to the reactions 
to 
the 
antibiotics. 
historical one of Ponce de Leon. Strange, unexpected reactions the federal government is great- 
The source of constant vigor do occur from time to time even er than that of any individual 
and unchanged virility seems to in those people who have had 
elude 
those 
who 
sought 
it no 
previous 
awareness 
of 
hardest. The process of aging unusual 
sensitivity 
to 
these 
is not a simple one. There are drugs. It is important that any 
jn 192o, the American explor- work; 
it just ain’t natural not 
many physical, environmental, unexpected reaction from a new er Rear Adm. Robert Edwin to.” So says Andy Griffith, 
and 
social, 
economic, 
geographic, drug indicates to the user that p eary died. 
lest he get the reputation for 
h e r e d i t a r y and emotional it 
should 
be 
stopped im- 
(n 1938 
Anthony Eden 
re- being lazy, he’ll be back on tele- 
reasons for premature 
aging mediately. Only the 
doctor 
signed as British foreign aecre- vision Thursday night 
and for delayed agmg. 
should decide on its further use. tary, charging Prime Banister 
Eight years th e 'star of “The 
T h e 
hereditary 
tendency 
Neville Chamberlain with a poi- Andy 
Griffith 
Show,” 
he 
towards longevity is undeniable 
Ear wax is normal. The 
only ^ 0f appeasement 
dropped off the weekly rating 
although not all members of the bann ca® come with “do lt 
In 1962 
astronaut John H. race this season while he was 
family may inherit it. 
The search for youth 


AP T elevision-M ovie W riter 


By BOB THOMAS 


HOLLYWOOD 
(AP) 
—• 
‘I he ll be on Thursday night with 
think every grown man should buddies Don Knotts and Tennes- 
see Ernie Ford. I found the trio 
rehearsing in a catering hall 
near the CBS studios, and that’s 
when Andy made his remark 
about working. 
“I haven’t been doin’ a thing 
for a few months, and it’s been 
drivin’ 
me 
crazy,” 
he 
re­ 
marked. “We were supposed to 


CROSSWORD PUZZLE 


ACROSS 
I. -— -o f 
living 
index 
5 Old 
relation, 
for short 
9. Leaf of 
book 
IO. Ignited 
once more 
12. /.line 
^trance 
13 First 
bidder 
at bridge 
14- Bulgarian 
coin 
16 Pay 
attention 
IS Inc.’s 
partner 
17. Restrict 
2 wda 
I® Anthem 
writer 
ac. Half an em 
21. Like 
strong beer 
22. Greek 
letter 
23. Type of 
theatrical 
entertain 
ment 
35. Before clip 
or tiger 
J®. Jewish 
month 
29. Pale 
80. Clock 
numbe; 
31. SU tut* 
33. Shaker 


Jetty in 
Ohio) 
36. Exclam* 
Hon 
36. Having 
stature 
37 Min* 
eot pill 


38. Give or 
IU. Lamp 
grant 
with 
40. Armadillo 
dawn 
41. Facial 
moist­ 
decor 
ure 
42. Ky*>gla^b«*; 
1$. Golf­ 
informal 
er's 
43 ijegal delay 
ob­ 
44 Kxamina- 
ject­ 
tior. 
ive 
DOWN 
18. Paint 
I. Prescription 
badly 
drug 
19. Un­ 
I Branch 
tanned 
of peace 
hide of 
3. Convene 
calf 
4 Toward 
22. Spasm 
h. — • 
24. Large 
Beret 
cask 
«. Peruse 
36. Milk 
7. Entire 
maid’r 
% Aunt's 
burden 
favorite 
26 Pry out 
9 Stumble 
27 Steam 
11 New York 
pipes 
city 
29 Fuse 


Ye»ter4a> '• Aa awee 
31. “Moby 
Dick” 
character 
32. Coffee 
houses 
33. Robust 
14. Wants and 
expects 
18. The Pcn- 
Uteuch 
19. Portly 
40. Mimic 
42. Thorough­ 
fare: abbr. 


d 
-*> |4™ 
i 


5 
b 
T " r ~ 


•» 


~ 
I 
~ 
ll 


.4 


* “■ 


IT" 
•6 
19 


m w m a m w v m w v m 


T h I 
24 


y Z 
. 


35 
24 
Z I 


75“ 
n 
40" 
ii 
42 
ii 
S r 


is 
44 
57 


h i 
40 
4l 
Se 


4T 


2 2 
ST 


takes 
many 
people 
into 
dangerous 
areas, all seeking the physical 
aspects of youth without ever 
learning that young spirits can 
keep “time” in check. 
C h r o n i c diseases, excess 
alcohol intake, overuse of drugs, 
tobacco and disrespect for body 
fatigue may make middle age 
grow sharply into old age. 
Hormone creams, expensive 
vitamin supplements and oils 
extracted from bats' tails do not 
interrupt 
the 
aging 
process. 
Instead, these expensive traps 
cheat the buyer of his time and 
his mono 
and 
distress him 
without halting his advancing 
age. 
There is an art to growing 
o,d gracefully and that art can 
be 
learned 
by 
youth 
in 
preparation for growing older. 
Aging becomes more apparent 
wlien one continues to live in 
competition with the memory of 
himself, 
without 
learning the 
gentle joys of any age group. 


Lumbago is a dull aching pain 
across the base of the spine 
which is caused by any sudden 
shift of position or exposure of 
tile lower back muscles to in­ 
jury or changes of heat. Ac­ 
tually it is not a disease but 
rather 
a 
description 
of 
a 
complaint 
confused 
causes of low back 


£SL'2siL“ 
- : - 
= r sr a srjaTsssr. J. n a w 
r s 
safety pins and paper dips. 


Letter T o 
The Editor 


American to orbit th* earth. 
wasn’t allergy to work 
that 
Ten years ago 
— President made him quit a show that was 
Sukarno of Indonesia asked for still one of television’s winners, 
strong executive power to rule 
“It was strictly an arbitrary 
the nation aa a “ guided democ- decision 
on 
my 
part,” 
said 
racy.” 
Andy. “I just figured it was 


EDITOR’S 
NOTE 
— 
We 
welcome letters to the editor. 
In order to be considered for 
publication, they must bear the 
correct name and address of 
the writer. Anonymous letters 
and 
those 
signed 
with 
the 
request 
that 
signatures 
be 
withheld will not be accepted 
for publication. Opinions ex- 
pressed In this column are those 
of 
the 
writers 
and 
not 
necessarily those of The Herald. 


postpone until now. I ’m tollin’ 
you. I’m pleased to be workin’.” 
Still, he has no regrets about 
leaving the weekly grind. And 
he’s delighted that his succes- 
jrvTA-.sxt s a r . a s . w c E S ? 's a w 
der differences which had result* show. 
But 
eight 
years 
was 
ed in desert frontier fighting enough.” 
four months earlier. 
A major reason for his deci- 
Onc year ago — There was Bion was the yen to go into fea- 
heavy fighting at the Citadel in lure movies again—he had an 
earlier career in such films as 
“No Time For Sergeants,” “ A 
Face in the Crowd,” “Second 
Time Around,” etc. Universal 
came along with a sweet deal 
for his own starring films, the 


the South 
Hue. 
Vietnamese city of 


Dear Editor, 
I'd 
like 
to take 
this 
op­ 
portunity to say thanks to the 
freshman 
and 
seventh 
and 
eighth grade basketball teams 
of Circleville Junior High School 
for making this season the best 
ever. 
Although we may not have 
won 
all of the gam es 
bol Ii 
teams put forth a lot of effort 
and had a lot of determination 
Special 
thanks 
go 
to 
the 
coaches 
of 
these 
two 
great 
teams, 
Mr. 
Kouts 
and 
Mr 
winch 
is frequently 
young. I’m sure the student 
with 
a variety of 
jUujur high school 
__ 
. 
all agree that they arc tile 
Hie mux b's ut tin- lower hack neatest coaches that ever hit 
go into spasm and almost plead uur school 
to be given some rest and some 
A very special thanks go to 
heat. This is nature’s cry to the 
great 
many 
fans 
that 


According to a survey by the 
P i t t s b u r g h Corning Corp., 
manufacturers of solid 
glass 
bricks, 
school system paid 
to varous manufacturers to re­ 
place 202-712 broken windows 
during 1968. 


the 
New 
York 
City first of which is being released 
id $1,013,560 now: it s called “Angel in My 
Pocket.” 
Gritfith is also committed to 
CBS for occasional specials, and 


in the ratings. 
He retains a connection with 
show, 
acting 
as 
adviser on 
scripts—“I tell ’em what I think 
and they can take my advice or 
not, as they wish.” There had 
been reports that Andy might 
return for an occasional visit to 
Mayberry, but he doubted it. 
“There would have to be a 
pretty good reason for it.” he 
said. “ Unless the story idea was 
surefire, I think It would be a 
mistake. After all you’d have 
Ken 
and 
me 
together—two 
straight men—and how would 
we gel any laughs?” 


Ratio's l hey’11 Do It Every Time 


That afternoon 
RIDGEPOLE SEES 
THE OROOPLEYS 
EMERGING PROM 
AN OLD 
MONSTROSITY 
WITH ANOTHER 
AGENT- • • • 


prevent serious complications of 
neglected 
chronic 
low 
back 
pain. 
There 
arc 
now 
many 
drugs and sprays that can relax 
Hic muscles and free Hic body 
of pain. Often, support of the 
low back area with girdles and 
belts and simple stra fin g is 
sufficient. When the condition 
p e r s i s t # 
o r 
b e c o r n e a 


supported the teams whether on 
the road or at home. 
Last hut not least thanks go 
to the cheerleaders that helped 
leat! the teams on to victory 
DEBBIE GAINE# 
Milden! 
Circleville Junior High behoot 


WW WE NEVER 
THOUGHT WE 
COULD GET A 
BIG HOUSE UKE 
THIS FOR ONLY 


VOO BOUGHT 
'S V 
THIS? B*BUT YOU \ 


The postcard celebrates 
its 
progressively worse there is a 
centennial 
thk year. 
the 
need for X»ray studies to rule 
National Geographic says. 
It 
out the possibility of a slipped 
was introduced on Ort I, 1869. 
dis* or other abnormalise; 
in Austria 


ffra* AMP MATI Off I t 
EDWIN BROWN 
504 KKNSIN9T0N AV*. I 
BUFFALO, N.V., 
B 
O 
S 
® SIM 
hrmu*. U», 
I A I 
•JUUL 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
Circleville. Ohio 
Astronaut Ready For Space Walk On Apollo 9 Mission 


EDITOR’S NOTE-Three as- 
tronauts are scheduled to be 
launched into space on Feb. 28 
in another step toward the goal 
of landing U.S. spacemen on the 
moon by mid-1969. The Apollo 9 
mission, 
probably 
the 
most 
complex of the manned flights 
yet, will test the lunar module 
which eventually will take as­ 
tronauts to the moon surface 
from their orbiting spacecraft. 
Here, in the second of three ar­ 
ticles on Apollo 9, civilian astro­ 
naut Russell L. Schweickart de­ 
scribes what his mission space 
walk is expected to be like. 


By JIM STROTHMAN 
APAerospace Writer 
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (AP) 
— Standing in golden slippers 
outside orbiting Apollo 9, the 
next Am erican to walk in the 
loneliness of space 
plans 
to 


pause and let the thrill of the 
m om ent sink in. 
‘ When you are in it, you get 
so snarled up with details that 
you have to sort of sit back for a 
minute 
ana 
stop yourself to 
realize what it is that you are 
doing and how beautiful it is,” 
said red-haired Russell L. “ Rus- 


to provide the answer. After suit connection and plug into 
easing out the LEM ’s outside! LEM system s when he arrives 
hatch, tile astronaut is to move minutes later, 
hand over hand on rails to the 
goth crewm en will return to 
crnim and sh ip s open door and ule command ship to spend the 
slip into tile sister ship up to h is; night, then return to the LEM 
waist. 
the third day for Schweiekart’s 
“ This is the only tim e, except! space walk. 
in 
an 
emergency 
condition, 
ty” 
Schweickart. 
as he pon- u here this extra vehicular trans- 
dered the two hours he plans to * fe.* will be m ade,” the space 
spend outside Apollo 9. 
j walker said. “ This is it. After 
“ I 
think 
it’s 
probably 
the this- ether people look at it, see 
greatest view in the world. I’m I tho way I did it, learn from it 
looking forward to it,” the 33-1 and perhaps do it a different 
year-old civilian astronaut said way 
with a smile. 
“ But at least they will see the 
“ There, of course, is always a way 
I did it. and that hope- 
risk. but it’s no more or less 
will be of, assistance in 


A DOG'S LIFE la better-protected with this new seat belt 
custom in Sydney, Australia. They come in various sizes 
and colors to match upholstery or dog. 
Abby 
Dear 


His Wife Deserved The Truth 


By Abigail Van Buran 
/ 


DEAR 
ABBY: 
Due 
to 
a 
serious 
illness 
during 
my 
childhood, I was advised that 
I cauld never have any children. 
Physically, things 
aren’t any 
different with 
me than with 
other men,* and my condition 
has been kept a secret between 
me and my parents. 
I was m arried two years ago 
to a beautiful, outgoing girl. She 
never mentioned anything about 
having a family, so I saw no 
Reason to tell her about the 
way things are with me. 
Well, she is now pregnant, 
and makes believe that I am 
the father, but I know different. 
My mother says if m y wife 
doesn’t tell me who the father 
is, SHE will ask her. 
Of course, I would like to 
get things straightened around 
with my wife, but I don’t know 
how to handle it. 
Should I go on pretending to 
believe the baby is mine? What 
if my m other says something 
to my wife even after I warn 
her not to? 
I love my wife, but I am 
sure bewildered. 
NO NAME. NO TOWN 
DEAR NO NAME: First go 
to 
a 
doctor 
(urologist, 
if 
possible). Men have been known 
to father children after having 
been told they were unable. If 
the child can’t possibly be yours, 
YOU tell your wife the whole 
sto rv . and ask her to tell you 
JfERS. And tell your mother 
to stay out of it. (P.S. It’s 
not 
to your 
credit to 
have 
married the girl without having 
told her of your condition.) 
DEAR ABBY: There is this 
man in whom I could be very 
much interested, but he has one 
outstanding fault. He talks about 
himself all the time. 
He is nice looking, successful 
in his business and is verv good 
company, but he doesn’t wait 
for a person to finish a sentence 
before he jum ps in and turns 
the 
conversation 
around 
to 
h i m s e l f 
a n d 
h i s 
accomplishments. Is there some 
way I cain tell him about it 
so he could correct it? He’d 
m ake a good catch. 
“ MYRA” 
DEAR MYRA: First, get him 
to listen by enumerating bis 
admirable qualities, then tell 
him he’d be practically perfect 


if his *Ts” weren’t so close 
together. If he makes no effoit 
to improve, forget him. He’s 
not as good a catch as yoa 
think. 
DEAR ABBY: Do yoa have 
any male reader who will give 
me their honest opinion? 
4 was taught that the m oil 
precious: gift a w om ai could 
give to the man she loved and 
m arried was having kept her 
body just for h im ; that he would 
respect and honor her for Having 
wailed. 
More and more I’m accused 
of 
being 
“ Victorian.” 
Just 
recently a man told me, “ You ve 
got lo wise up for your own 
good. If you don’t give a man 
what 
he 
wants, 
he’J 
go 
elsewhere.” 
Even 
the 
m an 
whom 
I 
recently loved deeply said be 
thought that after a half ao/.en 
dates, sex was in order. 
I believe the proper setting 
foe sex is love and m arriage. 
This v'ay it is something sacred 
and meaningful. There is a real 
com m itm ent on both sides, not 
just 
a 
satisfying 
of 
one’s 
appetite tem porarily—until the 
next time. 
I am not a young provincial 
lass tied to her m other’s apron 
strings. I am 41 and have been 
'completely “on my own” since 
17. i ’ve lived in many large 
American 
cities 
and 
several 
foreign countries, and havo been 
ex nosed to a.l kinds of templing 
social situations. I am romantic 
and sensitive and I’m not ugly. 
What is a m an’s opinion’ 
WAITING 
DEAR WAITING: Well, we 
shall see. Men? 


COMMON PLEAS COLHX 
PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE 
All interested parties are hereby 
notified that the following Guardian 
and Executors have filed their ac­ 
counts in the Common Pleas Court 
Probate 
Division 
of 
Pickaway 
County, Ohio: 
N o . 
22456 
Ruth 
Pettibone, 
Executrix of the estate of Charles 
L. Pettibone. deceased. First, Final 
Distributive account. 
No. 20477 Jam es P. Shea, Guar­ 
dian of Charles Eugene Wolfe, an 
incompetent person. Sixth 
Partial 
Account. 
No. 
23019 
Harry 
Ray 
Miller. 
Executor of the estate of Muriel 
I. Miller, deceased. Final Account. 
No. 
22870 
Dorothy 
L. 
Wells, 
Executrix of the estate of Claude 
Wells, 
deceased. 
First 
and 
Final 
Account. 
And that said accounts will be 
for hearing and settlem ent before 
the Court on Monday March IO. 1969 
at 9 o’clock A.M. Exception to said 
accounts, 
if 
any, 
must 
be 
filed 
herein on or before March 4. 1969. 
W itness m y hand and the seal 
of 
said 
Common 
Pleas • Court 
Probate Division this 4th day of 
February. 1969. 
Guy JO. Cline, Judge 
Common Pleas Court 
Probate Division 
Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27 


than 
we’ve 
experienced 
pre­ 
viously” in space walks during, 
the two-man Gemini program , 
Schweickart said. 
If all goes well on Apollo 9, 
the freckle-faced father of five 
will be the last man to stroll 
outside an American spaceship! 
during a mission until astro­ 
nauts walk on the moon. 
The IO days of Apollo 9 sched­ 
uled to begin Feb. 28 — with 
Schweickart and Air Force Lt. 
Cols. Jam es A. McDivitt and 
David R. Scott—will be the first 
manned flight of a lunar mod­ 
ule, LEM, the ungainly looking 
craft that will taxi future astro­ 
nauts from an Apollo ship in 
moon orbit to the lunar surface, 
possibly in June or July. 
Project officials 
and 
astro­ 
nauts want to know how space­ 
men can transfer from the LEM 
back to the Apollo mother ship 
i: hatches in a connecting inter­ 
nal tunnel do not open properly 
when the two ships rendezvous, 
and dock in moon orbit. 
It’s up to Schweickart, who 
has never flown in space before, 


Wearing a 
spacesuit nearly 
identical to the one astronauts 
will have on when they walk on 
the moon’s surface. Schweickart 
will slip feet first through the 
LEM’s open outside hatch. On 
his back will be a portable life 
support system , worn like a 
knapsack, filled with oxygen to 
keep him alive. 
He will roll to his left .90 dc- 


to the moon s surface. 
McDivitt then will pass out a 
standard movie camera, which 
Schweickart mounts on a front 
porch railing, while Scott aims 
another camera out the com­ 
mand 
ship’s ha fell 
to photo­ 
graph Schweickart from the oth­ 
er end of his 15-foot transfer 
path. 
Only the space walker s grasp 
on the hand rail, plus a 25-foot 
rope-like safctv line attached to 
him from the LEM will keep the 
astronaut from floating away. 
Carefully aiming his legs so 
he doesn’t kick a hole in the 
I.EM’s 
thin-skinned 
outside 
thermal cover, Schweickart is 


to get out of breath, but I expect 
my muscles to get tired” from 
hanging onto handrails, he said. 
“ i’m looking forward to it a 
great deal. I hope it’s going to 
be as exhilarating and exciting 
aa it looks in the various film s.” 


Next: Scott, Hie driver 


case anybody has to do this un­ 
der emergency conditions.” 
It’s worth spending tim e on 
developing 
these 
em ergency 
procedures. IV hen you have to 
use them, you don’t w ant to 
have to think about them . You 
.just want to be able to call on 
them, and there they are, and 
they work, and you come back 
and 
say: 
‘Well, 
that 
was 
interesting.’ ” 
In Am erica's first attem pt to 
transfer astronauts from 
one 
spaceship to another, Schweick­ 
art and McDivitt are to float 
through 
the 
internal 
tunnel, 
formed 
when 
the 
LEM 
and 
three-man Apollo 9 command 
ship are docked, during their 
second day in earth orbit. 
Kept alive by a long hose con­ 
necting his 
spacesuit to the 
mother ship’s oxygen supply, 
Schweickart will enter the LEM 
first. 
After 
turning 
on 
the 
LEM’s life-support and electri­ 
cal systems, he will switch his 
suit to LEM 
system s. Then, 
with both craft properly venti­ 
lated, 
McDivitt 
will 
float 
through the tunnel without any 


grees and grab a handrail on i to make his w ay hand over hand 
the left side of the LEM hatch, 
then sit on the top rung of a lad­ 
der 
that 
extends 
from 
the 
LEM’s “ front porch.” During 
the lunar landing mission, astro­ 
nauts will walk down this ladder 


COMMON PLEAS COURT 
PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE 
All interested parties are hereby 
notified that the following Trustee 
and Executors have filed their ac­ 
counts in the Common Plea.* Court 
Probate 
Division 
of 
Picktw uy 
County. Ohio: 
No. 
8877 
Harry 
L. 
MarguHs. 
Testam entary 
Trustee 
under 
the 
WU' of George VV. Litten, deccasen. 
Eighth, 
Final 
and 
Distributive 
Account. 
No. 
21921 
Marjorie 
R. 
Maiden. 
Administratrix 
of 
the 
Estaio 
of 
Maude 
E. 
Watts, 
deceased. 
First 
and final account. 
No. 
23060 
Mary 
A. 
Millirons, 
Executrix of the estate of John E. 
Millirons, deceased. First and Final 
Account. 
And that said accounts will be 
for hearing and settlement before 
the Court on Monday March 24, 1969 
at 9 o’clock A.M. Excep'ions to .‘■aid 
accounts, 
if 
any. 
must 
he 
filed 
herein on or 
before 
March 
18th, 
1969. 
Witness my hand and the seal 
of 
said 
Common 
Pleas 
Court 
Probate 
Division 
this 18th day of 
February. 1969. 
Guy G. Cline. Judge 
Common 
Pleas Court 
Probate Division 
Feb. 20. 27; Mar. 6. 13 


along rails to the 
command 
module hatch, 
slip 
inside so 
Scott can grab his leg. then re­ 
turn to tile LEM. 
At the conclusion of tile trans­ 
fer, Schweickart plans to turn 
on a television cam era outside 
the LEM “ and go up and down 
the handrail a couple of feet” to 
give earthlings below- a better 
idea what it is like. 
The actual transfer is expect- 
I cd to take only 20 minutes. The 
! rem ainder of his two hours out- 
! side will be consumed by rest 
periods and picture-taking as he 
is held securely in the golden 
sappers. 
While outside, he intends to 
pluck paint and glass “ therm al 
sam ples” attached to the LEM 
and Apollo 9 com m and ship, so 
scientists can later determ ine 
what kind of contam inants coat 
the OUtside Of the spaceship and I c Moore late of Piekdwa 
• 
i 
e 
, 
Ohio. deceased. 
its windows iron! tilings such as 
Dated this 27th day of January 
engine firings. 
“ Physically, 
the 
prim ary 
challenge is to the hand muscles 
and arm muscles. I don’t expect 


Buddha's W ords 
Written In Gold 
GANGTOG, Sikkim (AP) — 
The 
Bhutan 
government 
has 
decided to bring out a set of 
225 volumes of commentaries on 
tho teachings of the Buddha, 
written in gold. 
King Jigme Dor ii Wangchuk 
of 
this 
hermit 
kingdom will 
contribute a third of the 400 
pounds of gold needed for the 
purpose. 


N O IR E OI 
MM’OIN I MEN I 
NO. 231 III 
Estate of Harry It. (lard, Deceased 
Notice is hereby kin en that Marc 
M. Card whose Post Office address 
is 236 E. Franklin Street, Circleville. 
Ohio 
has 
been 
duly 
appointed 
E xeuitnx of the Estate of Havre 
R 
Ga rd late of Pickaway County. 
Ohio, deceased 
Dated tills 27th da' 
cf .Tamiqr* 
1969. 
Guy G. Cline. Judge 
Common Pleas Court 
Probate Division 
Pickaway 
County, 
Ohio 
Feb. 20, 27; Mar. 6 


NOTICE 


E stJlr 


OE 
APPOINTMENT 
NO. 23392 
of 
Myrtle 
C. 
Moore. 
Deceased 
Notice 
is 
hereby 
given 
that 
Beatrice H. Casey whose Post Office 
address is P 
O. Box 349. Buckeye 
Lake. Ohio has liecn du'y appointed 
Executrix of the Estate* of Myrtle 
County. 


I 15)69. 
Guy G. Cline. Judge 
Common Pleas Court 
Probate Division 
Pickaw ay County, Ohio 
1 Fob. 20. 27; Mar. 6 


Art Treasures 
Stored I ii Jail 
WILLIAMS, Ariz. (AP) - The 
Williams 
jail 
has 
unusual 
lodgers when art shows come 
to town. 
C h a m b e r 
of 
Commerce 
M anager Bob Sharp and City 
M anager Mike McNulty were 
worried about $50,000 worth of 
paintings from Taos, N.M., in 
Williams for a week before a 
weekend 
art 
carnival. 
They 
agreed that the safest place for 
the 
treasures 
was 
the 
local 
pokey. 


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from date of original consum er purchase. 
W arranty covers repair of color picture tube, 
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rebuilt color picture 


PICTURE TUBE WARRANTY 


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6 -------------------------------------------------- 
Circleville 
474-7419 


W om en's Page 
6 
The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
Ctri'ievUle. (Thin 


DAR Honors Winners 


CITIZENSHIP AWARDS — Receiving awards for the citizenship 
contest held recently by the Pickaway Plains Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution are shown from left to 
right: Barbara Fenstermaker of Westfall High School, Brenda 
Mills of Logan Elm, Elaine Campbell of Teays Valley, and 
Linda Cook of Circleville High School. 


Logan Elm 


Garden Club 


Meeting Held 


The February meeting of the 
Logan Elm Garden Club was 
held recently in the home of 
Mrs. Lawrence McKenzie with 
e i g h t 
members 
present. 
Meditation was given by the 
hostess. 
The business meeting was in 
charge 
of 
Mrs. 
Lawrence 
McKenzie, president. She read 
a communication concerning a 
meeting to be held in the home 
of Mrs. Bernard Savey on Feb. 
18, when plans for the Flower 
Show at the Pickaway County 
Fair will be made. Mrs. Judson 
Beougher 
was 
appointed 
to 
represent 
the 
club 
at 
the 
meeting. 
Announcement was made that 
the club will host the spring 
meeting of the Pickaway County 
Council 
of 
Garden 
Clubs. 
Arrangements for this meeting 
were discussed with definite 
plans to be announced at a later 
date. 
During the 
program 
hour, 
Mrs. Clarence Maxson read an 
a r t i c l e concerning kitchen 
utensils that can be used in 
gardens. 
A 
poem 
especially 
appropriate for club members 
w a s 
read. 
Mrs. 
Judson 
Beougher gave a demonstration 
on 
making 
a 
terrarium. 
A 
humorous story was read to 
conclude the program. 
Refreshments were served by 
the hostess at the close of the 
meeting. 


CAROLYN “ANN LEIST 
Leist-Bresler 


Engagement 


Is Announced 


Mr. and Mrs. Gail Leist, 827 
Pershing Drive, announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Carolyn Ann, to William Junior 
Bresler, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
William J. Bresler, 1550 Quimby 
Road, Route 3. 
Miss Leist is a graduate of 
Circleville High School and is 
presently employed by DuPont 
Co. Her fiance is employed by 
Buckeye Mart, Lancaster Pike. 
No definite date has been set 
for the wedding. 


Berger Guild 6 


Meets In 


Wagner Home 


Mrs. 
Keith 
Wagner 
en­ 
tertained ll members of Berger 
Hospital Guild 6 and one guest 
in her home, 226 Walnut St, 
Tuesday evening 
Marilyn Brunton, chairman, 
conducted the business session 
Members 
agreed 
to 
work 
another year at tile hospital gift 
shop. Reports were read and 
t h e 
yearly 
project 
was 
discussed. 
Mrs. Brunton reported on the 
General 
Guild 
meeting 
held 
r e c e n t l y . 
She 
named 
a 
n o m i n a t i n g committee to 
present a new slate of officers 
for election at the next meeting. 
Committee members 
are Jo 
Ann Wagner, chairman; Vangie 
Campbell and Shirley Wolfe. 
The traveling prize was won 
by Mrs. Campbell. 
Refreshments were served by 
the hostess. The next meeting 
will be held in the home of 
Mrs. Rosemary Horn, 129 W. 
Mil* St. 


AFL-CIO Accuses Firms 
Of Using 'Cheap Labor' 


ESSAY WINNERS — Winning first place In the recent DAR 
sponsored essay contest are shown above from left to right, 
Barbara Bolender. fifth grade; Bonnie Bolender, seventh grade; 
Vanessa Mills, eighth grade, and Julie Pahst, sixth grade. 


MORE WINNERS - Other essay contest winners among the 
171 entries submitted from all county and city schools are from 
left to right on the first row, Elizabeth Goeller, Michael O’Hara 
and Molly Hamrick; second row, Joyce LaFontaine, Becky 
Marie Goode, Lois McCoy and Donna Milburn; third row, William 
Wyatt Fraas, Ann Elizabeth Yates and Daylene Smalley. All 
winning entries will be submitted in the state DAR essay contest. 


Calendar 


Roundtown 


C-Bers Meet 


Committees 
were 
named 
during the second meeting of 
the 
Roundtown Citizen Band 
Club Saturday evening in the 
home of Mrs. Erma lies, 350 
Logan St. 
The ll members present for 
the second meeting of the group 
were Pearl Anderson, Connie 
Can-mean, Opal Barnhart, Judy 
Crist, 
Marvine 
Young, 
Joan 
Sanders, Sue Lockard. Shirley 
Tatman, Pat Francis, Jewel 
Thornton and the hostess. 
Many plans for future ac 
tivities 
of 
the 
club 
were 
discussed. 
Committees named were Pat 
Francis and Marvine Young, 
entertainment: 
Connie 
Car- 
mean, Opal Barnhart and Joan 
Sanders, 
ways 
and 
means; 
Jewel Thornton, cheer: Shirley 
Tatman 
and 
Sue 
Lockard, 
refreshments. 
The traveling door prize was 
won by Judy Crist with games 
won by Pat Francis and Sue 
Lockard. 
Refreshments were served by 
the hostess. 
The next meeting will be held 
7:30 p.m. March 15 in the home 
of Shirley Tatman. 380 Nicholas 
Drive. 
Interested C-Bers may call 
Erma lies at 474*5159. 
Julia 
Willi son, 474-5862. or Judy Crist, 
474-2379 for 
any 
information 
regarding the club which now 
is composed of 13 members. 


Berger Guild 19 


Changes Date 


For Meetings 


Berger Hospital Guild 19 met 
Tuesday evening in the home 
of Mrs. John Kelchner, 310 
Lewis Road. 
Mrs. Paul Roan, chairman, 
conducted the business meeting. 
A list of items needed by the 
hospital was reviewed. A vote 
was taken to change the guild 
meeting time from the third 
Tuesday to the last Wednesday 
of the month because of con­ 
flicting times of other meetings. 
Members 
worked 
on 
the 
Bazaar scrapbook during the 
evening. Mrs. Paul Roan won 
the travel gift. 
The need meeting will be held 
in the home of Mrs. Roan, E. 
Union St., 8 p.m. March 26. 


Family Dinner 


Celebrates 


79th Birthday 


M r s . 
Albert 
Fausnaugh, 
Stoutsville, was honored Sunday 
with a family dinner in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Noble 
E. Baar, 160 Town St. 
Mrs. 
Fausnaugh 
celebrated 
her 79th birthday on Feb. 12. 
Present for the occasion were 
Albert 
Fausnaugh, 
Mr. 
and 
Mrs. Lewis A. Selmer, Mr. and 
Mrs. 
Neil 
A. 
Selmer, 
and 
Robert Selmer, 
all of Lan­ 
caster; Miss Joyce Hoffman, 
Pleasantville and Mrs. Viola 
Selmer, Amanda. 


DIANE E. MARTIN 
Diane Martin, 


Ronald Allen 


Are Engaged 


Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Pat­ 
terson, Route I, Londonderry, 
are announcing the engagement 
of Mrs. Patterson’s 
daughter, 
Diane E. Martin, to Ronald L. 
Allen, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald 
L. 
Allen, 
Route 
I, 
Kingston. 
Miss Martin attended South­ 
eastern High School and is em­ 
ployed by the U.S. Shoe Factory 
in Chillicothe. 
Mr. Allen is a senior at Logan 
Elm High School. He works part 
time at Koch’s Sohio Service 
Station. 
No definite date has been set 
for the wedding. 


MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) - 
AFL-CIO officials accused ma­ 
jor U.S. corporations today of 
running away to Mexico to take 
advantage of cheap wages in a 
growing trend that could soon 
cost the American 
economy 
hundreds of thousands of jobs. 
“We’re pickings fight with 
some of the biggest corporations 
in America,” said a spokesman 
ie labor federation in out- 
plans to protest the State 
Department and Congress. 
The executive council of the 
13.6 million member federation 
is slated to bear a report from a 
special committee on the matter 
of American firms setting up 
plants on both sides of the Mexi­ 
can border and sending their 


products to Mexico tor assem­ 
bly at wages far cheaper thai* 
paid in this country. 
>? 
“There are a couple of hum 
dred plants down there now and 
more coming where the work Ik 
done at wages ranging from 
cents to a little more than 
cents 
per 
hour,” 
said 
one 
source. 
The assembled products are 
then shipped back into the Unit­ 
ed States and sold at normal 
American prices, officials said! 
“The thing is still fairly new, 
involving about 20,000 jobs,’1 
said one official of the AFL-CIO. 
“But we are convinced thil 
thing is going to explode and lh 
a couple of years it could bd 
300,000 jobs.*’ 


Right Category? 
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — A 
topical index of bills published 
by the Washington legislature 
has this entry under “insects:” 
“Bar flies, female, HB70.” 
House bill 70 would permit 
women to sat at bars in cocktail 
lounges. 


THURSDAY 
Beta 
Rho Chapter of Delta 
Kappa Gamma 7:45 p.m. in ( 
home of Mrs. Robert Tacv, 
150 Hillcrest Drive. 
Hospital Guild 37, 7:30 p.m. 
Guild Room, Berger Hospital, j 
Pythian 
Sisters 
of 
Majors I 
Temple 516, 7:30 p.m. in Kl 
of P Lodge Had. 
Berger Hospital Guild 30, 6:30.! 
p.m. in the home of Mrs. I 
Lawrence McKenzie, Route 4. 
FRIDAY 
Berger Hospital Guild 13, 12:30 ! 
p.m. at Pickaway Arms. 
Practical 
Nurses 
Assn. 
7:30 
home of Mrs. Anna , 
203 W. Mound St. 
MONDAY 
County 
Women’s I 


Republican Club 12 noon 
in 
the 
home 
of 
Mrs. 
Elmer 
Siegle, 221 N. Long St., Ash­ 
ville. 
Berger Hospital Guild 41, 8 p.m. 
in 
home 
of 
Mrs. 
Donald 
Gaines, 226 Nicholas Drive. 
TUESDAY 
Circleville Chapter 90 OES 8 
p.m. in Masonic Temple. 


Annual Silver Tea 


Slated By W S C S 
The Annual Silver Tea of the 
Women’s Society of Christian 
Service 
of 
Hedges 
Chapel 
| United Methodist Church will be 
I held from 24 p.m. Saturday at 
the church. 
The public is invited to at* 
I tend. 


Sailor Feted 


On Birthday 


A 
birthday party honoring 
David Greene was given Sunday 
by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Austin Greene, in their home, 
Route 2. 
Attending were Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur 
Greene, 
Greg 
and 
R o n n i e ; 
Richard 
Greene, 
Melissa, Billy and Steven, and 
Carol Blanton. 
David is presently undergoing 
training with the U.S. Navy at 
the Great Lakes Naval Center 
on Lake Michigan. 


Mon Is Ordered 
To Support Victim 
FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) - 
William Young, 32, of Fort 
Wayne, convicted of a 1964 
shooting which left a man para­ 
lyzed, received a suspended jai! 
sentence Wednesday “so that he 
will be able to support his vic­ 
tim.” Judge W. O. Hughes sus­ 
pended the 1-5 year sentence 
and said the amount of support 
; will be set by a county welfare 
I agency. He said Young will con- 
! tribute to Joe C. Ridley’s sup- 
port “ as long as I’m on 
bench. When he stops paying 
starts his prison term.” 


SPECIAL FRIDAY and SATURDAY 


FIRST QUALITY 
Solid Brass 
Planters 


West Africans believe all food 
must be cooked. 


See Our Selection! 


LOU DEALS 
FLOWERS & GIFTS I 


PUPPET POSTER — Pupils of the morning kindergarten class 
at Nicholas Drive School are shown beside a poster advertising 
the poppet show “Hansel And Gretel.** The poppets are one-half 
life size and will be presented by Miss Kathy Piper I p.m. Sat­ 
urday at the Senior High School under the sponsorship of the 
Child Conservation League. 


147 VV. Main St. 


Circleville 


474-8612 


204 Long St* 


Ashville 


983-2424 


p.m. in 
M&nkev 


Pickaway 


Brian Boysel 


Feted With 


Birthday Party 


A party was held Saturday 
afternoon observing the second 
birthday 
of 
Brian 
Edward 
Royse] in the home of his 
mother, Mrs. Carolyn Boysel, 
Route I, Stoutsville. 
Games 
were 
played 
with 
prizes presented to Sue Ellen 
Brown, Chuckie Brown, Kaye 
Le master and Cathy Chatfield. 
Refreshments were served by 
Mr*. Carolyn Boysel and Mrs. 
Saundra 
Nunley 
after 
the 
honored guest opened his gifts. 
Present for the event were 
Mrs. 
Louise Leinaster, 
Kay, 
Ellen and Jerry; Mrs. Barb 
Torminson, Darcy and Stevie; 
Mr* 
Carol 
Brown 
and Sue 
Ellen, 
Danny, 
Leanne 
and 
Chuckie; Mrs. Saundra Nunley 
and Cathy, Mrs. Charles O. 
Davis and Mrs. Emma Adkins, 
the celebrant’s grandmother. 
Sending gifts were Julia and 
Christy 
Davis, 
Jennie 
and 
Jimmie Brown, Beverlee Renee 
and Kimberlee Kaye Boysel, 
and 
Edward 
Boysel, 
Brian’s 
father. 


When you are preparing fried 
scallops, 
you 
can cook and 
brown them in either shallow 
fat or deep hot fat. 


HOOVER 
LIGHTWEIGHT 
2 Cleaners in One! 


# Triple-Action 


Cleaning Power 


• Converts Easily 


For Use With 


Attachments 


• Large Throw-Away 


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• Convenient 


Toe Switch 


• Hood Only 


5%” High 


Model 1330 


M A C S 
113 E. Main Si. 


106 VV. Main St. — Downtown Circleville 
Washington's Birthday 


JEWELRY 


RIOT! 


SHIRTS 


by "Lady Arrow" 


pins, earrings, ropes, | one last shipment of Ox- 


necklaces, novelties. 
| ford, button-down shirts 
I 
I 
reg. to $3 


. perma-iron. 


reg. $7 


STORE HOURS: 


Monday thru Thursday 9:30 • 5:30 
Friday 9:30 • 9:00 
Saturday 9:30 • 5:30 


famous maker 


SHELLS 


helenca stretch shells, 


wash ’n wear, not every 


color and size. 


reg. $4.50 


FRIDAY and SATURDAY ONLY! 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 


drcleviUfc cjt'io 


Questions Taxpayers Ask 


E D I T O R ’ S NOTE: 
This 
c6iumn of questions and an­ 
swers on federal tax matters 
is provided by the local office 
of the U.S. Internal Revenue 
Service and is published as a 
public service to taxpayers. The 
column answers questions most 
frequently asked by taxpayers. 
Q. My boss still hasn’t given 
me a W-2 statement. 
What 
snould I do? 
A. Employers are required to 
issue withholding statements to 
their employees by January 31, 
so it would be advisable to ask 
your employer about it. 
Q. I received a package of 
estimated tax forms in the mail. 
Poes that mean I have to fill 
one out and send it in? 
A. You oo not have to file 
an estimated return for 1969 
U n l e s s 
you 
meet 
the 
requirements as explained in 
he instructions that came with 
e estimated forms. 
Estimated tax forms have 
n sent to every taxpayer 
ho filed an estimated return 
or 1968 as well as to those 
axpayers who had a balance 
lue of $40 or more when' they 
lied their 1967 return. Tile 
brins are ..identified with the 
;axpayer’s name, address and 
social security number just as 
they appear in IRS files. 
If you are required to file an 
estimated return, be sure to use 
the forms sent you. It will 
assure that your estimated tax 
payments are properly credited 
to your account. 
t 


Q. 
Can 
I 
deduct 
the 
ssessment I had to pay for 
new sidewalk? 
T A. No, the law generally does 
{not 
permit 
deductions 
for 
^assessments for local benefits 
rthat tend to increase the value 
{of your property. The amount 
{of 
the 
assessment 
can 
be 
{capitalized, however, and added 
Ho the basis of your property. 
J Q. Where can I get a copy 
Jof “ Your Federal Income Tax? 
* A. This publication can be 


Mayors Get Pollution Plan; Pension issue Still Alive 


{ 


purchased for 60 cents at local 
IRS 
offices 
pl 
upcrintendent 
or 
of 
from 
the 
Documents, 
S . 
Government 
Printing 
Office, Washington, D. C. 20402. 
Ask for Publication 17. 
\ Q. What records should I keep 
Ion my 1968 return in case I’m 
* audited? 
* A. Keep whatever you need 
*to substantiate the income and 
{deductions 
in 
your 
return. 
{Cancelled checks, paid bills, 
J Forms W-2 (Wage and Tax 
( 


Statement), 
and 
1099 
(U.S. 
I n f o r m a t i o n Return for 


similar records in addition to 
a copy of the return, will be 
helpful. 
Q. I’ve got a refund coming. 
Where should I send my return? 
A. Send it to your regional 
service 
center. 
An envelope 
addressed to the center was 
provided 
in 
all 
1040 
tax 
packages. If you don’t have an 
envelope, check the tax return 
instructions for the address of 
your IRS service center. 
Q. Can I deduct my medicare 
premiums 
A . 
Yes, 
premiums 
for 
Medicare 
and other medical 
insurance are deductible if you 
itemize 
expenses 
on 
your 
return. 
Don’t 
forget 
that 
medical 
insurance premiums are han­ 
dled 
differently 
than 
other 
medical expenses. One half of 
these 
premiums 
up 
to 
a 
maximum 
of $150 may be 
deducted without regard for the 
3 percent limitation generally 
imposed on medical expenses. 
Details on deducting medical 
insurance premiums and other 
medical expenses can be found 
in the 1040 instructions. 
Q. To help out my daughter, 
I took care of several* of the 
mortgage payments on her new 
house. Can I deduct anything 
for this? 
A. No. The law does not allow 
you any deduction for taxes and 
interest paid for someone else, 
if you are not legally liable. 
If the mortgage was in your 
name, you may deduct the 
interest when you itemize your 
deductions. 
Q. I cashed in some U.S. 
Savings Bonds last year. What 
do I report as interest on them? 
A. 
Report as interest the 
difference between what you 
paid for the bonds, the issue 
price, and what you received 
when you turned them in. Some 
cash basis taxpayers elect to 
report the interest earned each 
year on their bonds rather than 
all at once when they redeem 
the 
bonds. 
Either 
way 
of 
reporting this interest income 
is acceptable. However, once 
the election to report the in­ 
crement each year is made, you 
must continue to do so for all 
discount bonds you own or 
acquire later. 


COLUMBUS. Ohio (AP)—The! 
The 
meeting 
with 
Rhodes 
mayors of Ohio nine largest ; came after the mayors and 
cities got some encouragement 0^ er officials spent two hours 
Tuesday in their efforts to solve 
urban and water pollution prob­ 
lems, but had the sticky Police 
and Firemen’s Pension Fund is­ 
sue tossed right back at them. 
Gov. James A. Rhodes told 
the mayors he would arrange to 
take them to Washington to 
make personal pleas for federal 
assistance 
in 
solving 
urban 
problems. 
And he outlined a flVe-year 
plan for constructing water pol­ 
lution control facilities, using 
federal funds and $100 million 
from state bond money. 


behind closed doors with Repub­ 
lican legislative leaders to dis­ 
cuss how to pay off the $413 
million in accrued liabilities that 
the cities owe the statewide pen­ 
sion fund. 
Neither tile mayors nor House 
Speaker Charles 
F . Kurfess, 
R 4 Bowling Green, and Senate 
Majority Leader Theodore M. 
Gray, R-3 Piqua, offered speci­ 
fic proposals. 
• 
“ We had no specific proposals 
to make and the mayors didn’t 
either,” Kurfess said. “ We ask­ 


ed them if they couldn’t come 
up with specific suggestions.” 
Mayor John S. 
Ballard of 
Akron said the mayors will pre­ 
pare a bill proposing recom­ 
mendations for solving the prob­ 
lem. 
He said the measure to be 
submitted to the legislature will 
contain a tax proposal to help 
the cities. He said this could in­ 


clude an income tax. 
j would try to arrange a meeting 
The meeting, termed by parti- j within 30 days in Washington 
cipants as successful, was the I " ’‘th Sec. George Romney of 
second by the m ayors in two 
weeks to seek an answer to the 
pension fund problem. Repre­ 
sentatives were here from Cleve­ 
land, Columbus. Cincinnati, To­ 
ledo, Akron. 
Dayton, 
Canton, 
Springfield and Youngstown. 
Rhodes told the group that he 


Health, Education and Welfare. 
Rhodes said he wanted the big- 
city mayors to “ show a united 
front” in seeking federal assist­ 
ance in solving urban problems. 
Regarding 
water 
pollution, 


money with municipalities to 
build pollution control facilities. 
Distribution of the funds will re­ 
quire legislative approval. 
Rhodes’ five-year plan would 
cost an estimated $450 million. 
with $100 million coming from 
Issue I, $300 million from Ohio 
Water 
Development Authority 
Rhodes offered a plan to share (OWDA) revenue bonds and a 
the 
State 
Issue 
No. 
I 
bond : $50 million federal grant. 


Stoutsville News 
By Mrs. A. B. Wynkoop 


Rev. George M. Meyers Jr. 
of Belknap, 111., called on Mrs. 
John Schumann and Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Metzger Wednesday 
evening. 


Mike McCain of Columbus 
Spent Friday with his grand­ 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. C. 
Conrad. 


meeting of the Lancaster Music 
Club at the Mumaugh Memorial 
i n 
Lancaster 
Wednesday 
evening. 


Use The 


Classifieds 
I Calendar Year), bank books and 


Sherry Peters of Chicago. 111., 
spent the weekend with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gene 
Wynkoop 
and 
sons. 
Their 
Saturday supper guests were 
Mrs. Georgia Zeimers and Mr. 
and Mrs. Merle Ratcliff, Steve 
and Monte Kay. 


The Heidelberg Class of the 
United Church of Christ met at 
the home of Mrs. Harry Met­ 
zger Thursday afternoon. The 
president, Mrs. Ralph Adams, 
presided. Devotions were by 
Miss Elsie Adams. Poems were 
read by Mrs. Roy Harden and I 
Miss Elsie Adams. A reading I 
was 
given 
b y 1 Mrs. 
Harry 
Metzger. The meeting closed 
with the mizp&h benediction. 
Lunch 
was 
served 
by 
the 
hostess. 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul McCain 
of Columbus, Mr. and Mrs. 
Estell Salyers and family were 
Sunday dinner guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. G. C. Conard. 


Sunday visitors of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Biggs were Miss 
Idalene 
Biggs, 
Mrs. 
Edna 
Harvey, Mrs. Dorothy Holtz, of 
Columbus 
and 
Mrs. 
Hazel 
McKinny and Eleanor of Hem­ 
lock. 


Mrs. J. H. Schumann and 
Mrs. Harry Metzger attended a 


Mr. and Mrs. Terry Rife of 
Circleville called on Charles 
Stein and Mr. and Mrs. A. B. 
Wynkoop Thursday evening. 


Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Thorne 
of Gahanna w'ere Sunday dinner 
guests of Mrs. Roy Harden. 


Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Wynkoop 
and 
sons 
and Mon ta 
Kay 
Ratcliff were Sunday visitors of 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Rhodebach 
of Pataskala. 


I 


I 


WASHINGTON’S 
BIRTHDAY 
Shoe Clearance 
• 39 Pair Misses' Straps & Oxfords.. $2.22 


Assorted Sizes and Styles 


• 8 Pair Misses' Shoe Boots...... $1.22 


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• 49 Pair Misses' Keds 
I $2.22 


Tennis Shoes — Oxford and Strap Style 


Final Clearance — Save 60% to 70% 
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* 3 - * 5 - * 7 


• IO Pair Women's Golf Shoes 
$5.22 


Lazy Bones and Hush Puppies 


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$5.22 


Various Styles — Broken Sizes 


• 26 Pair Children's Shoes 
$1.22 


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Biafran Soldiers Train With Stick - Rifles 


Bv DAVID MAZZARELLA 
Associated Press Writer 
UMUAHIA, Biafra (AP) — 
“ Left-right-left, 
left right-left” 
bellowed 
the 
drill 
sergeant. 
Grouped in a wide square, the 
50 recruits marched in step. 
Their left knees began pump­ 
ing higher than the right. Their 
shaved heads dipped lower. A 
slight rotating movement began 
with their shining black shoul­ 
ders. 
“Don’t 
dance. 
Dont 
dance,” screamed the sergeant. 
Getting new army men to 
abandon their instinctive re­ 
sponses to rhythm in favor of 
military precision is only one, 
and a relatively minor, problem 
iii a camp training Biafran sol­ 
diers. 
A visit to a camp holding 400 
recruits provided an insight into 
Hie nature and preparation of 
the common fighting man in the 
Nigerian civil war. 
The installation contained a 
mixture of hefty youths and hol- 
glow-chested, scrawny boys. For 
tile most part, the recruits ap­ 
peared to be in the late teens 
and early 20s. 
Under a tree, 50 youths sat 
holding long sticks—which sub­ 
stitute for rifles in Biafran 
camps of this sort. 
A sergeant was showing them 


Views On 
TV - Radio 


the parts of a real weapon—a 
Madison automatic rifle. “And 
this is the plunger,” he cried. 
“The . . . ” he demanded. 
“ Plunger,” the men yelled 
back in unison. 
Under another tree, stick-tap­ 
ping recruits were singing as 
the camp “jester”—a rubber- 
legged soldier with a baggy uni­ 
form 
and 
a 
crooked 
c a p - 
danced barefoot. 
“A young man is 
a fine 
thing,” the men chanted. 
Another number consisted en­ 
tirely of the repetition of the 
phrase “Holy, holy, holy, Odu- 
megwu Ojukwu another sav- 
iur.“ They were singing about 


the Biafran head of state. 
In a field among palm fronds 
stuck in the ground to camou­ 
flage the camp against air at­ 
tacks. men were learning to aim. 
They were in four lines. The 
man at the front of each line 
had 
a 
rifle. 
The rest had 
sticks. 
“Close the bloody left eye,” 
cried 
the 
instructor 
as 
the 
youths sat and squinted down 
their sticks toward a row 
Of 
bu'lejes. 
“And the muzzle shouldn’t be 
in the back of the man in front 
of you or you will kill him. 
What’s the matter with you?” 
Capt. Vincent Onuoha, head of 


the camp, said the recruits are 
here three weeks before being 
sent to forward areas for what 
he called “battle inoculation.” 
They get to fire three to five 
bullets here. 
“We need the ammunition for 
the real thing,” he explained. 
“And besides,” interjected a 
lieutenant, “the real fighting is 
done with this.” 
He grabbed his shirt over the 
heart. 
The recruits who had been 
learning to aim began whooping 
and running in circles around 
the palm frond field. At an or­ 
der 
they 
dropped 
on 
their 
chests, aimed their sticks and 


shouted: “ Pah-pah-pah, 
pah- 
pah, boom.” 
After 19 months of war, the 
Biafran regime has begun to in­ 
tensify a civil and military mo­ 
bilization. 
The effort appears to have al­ 
ternative purposes— to live out 
a long siege by surrounding 
Nigerian forces if that should 
become the course of the strug­ 
gle. or to beat back any new of­ 
fensive by the Nigerians aimed 
at crushing this last major town 
under Biafran control. 
The Biafrans say the mobilza- 
tion demonstrates their avowed 
intention never to enter into a 
formal surrender. 


The Circleville Herald, 
I 
Thur. Feb. 20, 1069 


Prejudice Taught 
In African Schools 
JOHANNESBURG, South Af* 
r i c a 
(AP)—South 
African 
schools face children with the 
injunction “Thou shalt be preju­ 
diced,” former Transvaal Prov- 
i n c e 
Teachers’ 
Association 
President 
F. 
E. 
Auerbach 
thinks? Auerbach said in a lec­ 
ture that history lessons in par­ 
ticular encourage “group pride 
and animosity against other ra­ 
cial and national groups.” Much 
of the prejudice is not delib­ 
erate. 
Badly 
selected works 
such 
as Shakespeare’s “The 
Merchant of Venice” reinforce 
race hate, he said. 


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NEW YORK (AP) — The 
awards program of the Acade­ 
my 
of 
Professional Sports 
Wednesday night on NBO kicked 
off the statue-giving season with 
something that looked like an 
alarming innovation: The spon­ 
sor ran a commercial between 
each category. 
However, after dropping in 
four during the first half hour of 
the live show, the pace slowed 
to wily two during the second 
half. 
Since there were but six pro­ 
fessional sports involved, the 
lavish lacing of sponsor mes­ 
sages was only mildly interrup­ 
tive and annoying. It would be a 
real hardship for viewers if the 
practice spread to the Oscar or 
Emmy shows where there are 
wholesale categories. 
The p r o f e s s i o n a l sports 
awards hcid for the average 
viewer the same appeal as the 
movie and TV awards shows—a 
chance to see the stars hi ac­ 
tion. It was amusing to note that 
most of the acceptance speeches 
of basketball, football and hock­ 
ey stars sounded exactly like 
those of the movie and TV stars 
—they* thanked 
their teams, 
without whom they never would 
have made it. 
Jockey Johnny Longden, ac­ 
cepting the horse racing award 
for absent winner Angel Corde­ 
ro, drew one of the evening’s 
biggest laughs when he thanked 
flit horses, without whom the 
jockey could not have made it 
Perry Cc mo was the easy- 
mannered host. The program 
started out at a very leisurely 
pace. At one point Jack Benny 
and Sam Snead were involved in 
a long golf. story. In fact it went 
along so casually that most of 
the lins! 20 minutes moved at a 
gallop in order to leave time for 
the final commercial and get off 
the air on time. 
Denny McLain of baseball’s 
Detroit 
Tigers 
was 
elected 
professional Athlete of the Year 
as well as top player in the 
American League. 
Bob Gibson of the St. Louis 
Cardinals 
won 
the 
National 
League nod. In football, it was 
Joe Namati! of the New York 
Jets for the AFL and Earl Mor­ 
ral! of the Baltimore Colts for 
the NFL. 
Billy Casper was 
jacked for golf; Wes Unsold of 
the Baltimore Bullets for bas­ 
ketball and Bobby Hull of the 
Chicago Blackhawk for hockey. 
The winners were elected by 
their colleagues and competi­ 
tors except for the athlete of the 
year, who was voted by sports 
writers. 


201 LANCASTER PIKE 
Open Daily IO to 9 — Saturday 
CIRCLEVILLE 
9 to 9 — Sunday I to 6 


:T' 


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Give your new season wardrobe special atten­ 
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melange of prints and patterns in the latest 
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Other 
Styles 
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CONG FLU SHEK — Holding a 
flashlight 
and 
pistol, aa 
American “tunnel rat” em­ 
erges from hole leading ta 
an underground cache of 
Viet Cong weapons and docu­ 
ments during an operation 2# 
miles southeast of Chu Lai 
in South Vietnam. 


Among the most primitive of 
fish are the sharks, which have 
sifts instead of movable gill 
coverings, cartilage skeletons 
•r than bone and a tough 
dotted with tiny denudes. 


a. Women’s & Children’s 
TENNIS OXFORDS 
Wear ’em, wash 
'em . . . fabrics 
SALE PRICE 
stay shapely and 
color • bright. 
Red, blue, black. 
Women’s sizes 4 
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5 to 8. 


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bottom cradles 
your foot. Swivel 
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upper part of 
shoe to flex free­ 
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Brown or grey 
light brown. Genu­ 
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Latest hardware 
look with square 
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Sizes 5 to IO. 
d. Men’s 
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jr. boy’s 
SLACK SETS 


Completely washable. Sizes 3-7 


girl’s 
SLACK SET 


Assorted pastels. Sizes 3-6x. 


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The Circleville Herald, Thtir. Feb. 20, 1969 
Ctrtievlllc. Ohio 
Kingston News Report 
Composers Get Chance To Show Off Wares 


Mrs. Phillip Wilson is back 
bopie after spending a week at 
the home of her ! soo-to-law and 
daughter, Mr. and Mn. James 
Patterson and daughter, Susan 
%nd their new baby son, David 
Wilson 
P a t t e r s o n 
in 
Chesterland. David W. was born 
February 3. His mother is the 
former 
Nancy 
Wilson. 
Hie 
paternal grandparents are Mr. 
and Mn. Sam Patterson, also 
af Chesterland. Three great 
grandparents are Mrs. Austin 
Wilson, Logan Elm Road and 
Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Brown, 
William sport. 


Mrs. Roger 
Meadows 
and 
Tracy, of Tarlton spent Sunday 
at the home of Mrs. Jaimes 
Seymour. Two other Meadows 
children, 
Rhonda and Mike 
spent the weekend with their 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Don Townsend in Columbus. 


Mr. Edwin Schiller is a new 
teacher in the Zane Trace 
Junior High School and is 
t e a c h i n g 
Math, 
Physical 
Education end Science. Mr. 
Schiller, who attended Ohio 
University 
and 
his 
wife, 
Deborah, live at Ray, Ohio. 


Mr. and Mrs. Jaimes Davis 
and sons, Jim and Shawn of 
Grove City were Sunday guests 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs 
Phillip 
Davis 
and 
Gloria 
Weatherly. Two other eons 
Bruce and Gary returned home 
with them after visiting their 
grandparents since Thursday. 


Mr. Russell Parrish is the 
chairman in charge of the 
Fellowship meeting preceded by 
dinner, to be held February 26 
at 6:30 p.m. at the Kingston 
Presbyterian Church for the 
purpose of forming a men’s 
organization in the community 
and surrounding area. Mr. Myrl 
Shoemaker, State Representa­ 
tive for the district will be the 
guest speaker. AR men from the 
community and neaiby area are 
Invited and tickets may be 
gotten from E. V. Graves, 
James Umsted, Ed Umsted, 
Gene Parker, Lloyd Hupp or 
Mr. Parrish. 


A Spelling Bee was held 
February ll la the Junior High 
School 
to determine 
the 
ffcpreeeutaftives for the '/th and 
8th grades to the Ross County 
Spelling Bee, March 5. They are 
Debbie Burton, 7th grade and 
Tony Dresbecfa for the 8th 
grade. 


Seymour, Don Upton,' Mark 
Snowden, 
Joe 
Cyrus, 
Rick 
Clark, 
Keith 
Stewart, 
Alan 
Damron, Steve Snowden and 
Jack Banks. These boys enjoy 
sieging together, and at the 
preseht time are singing “pop” 
numbers. 


Kingston Hospital Guild met 
Wednesday night at the home 
of Mrs. William Streber for a 
pot luck supper before the 
meeting. Mrs. Charles Carper, 
the new president presided and 
two 
new 
members 
were 
w e l c o m e d , 
Mrs. 
Edgar 
Stonebumer 
and 
Mrs. 
Ted 
Kempton. Other new officers 
are Mrs. Donald Thompson, 
vice 
president; 
Mrs. 
Dale 
P a t t e r s o n , 
secretary 
- 
treasurer; Mrs. Onley Parsons, 
calling committee; Mrs. Donald 
Whitsel, dinner fund treasurer 
and Mrs. Carper, purchasing 
committee. It was decided to 
give a money donation to the 
Hospital Guild Association in­ 
stead of participating in the 
jrecent Bazaar. A bake sale was 
discussed for the month of 
AprR. The March meeting will 
be 
held 
at the 
Chillicothe 
Hospital. 


derland 
and 
the 
topic 
for 
discussion 
was, 
“Will 
Non- 
a g r i c u l t u r a l Corporations 
Dominate Agriculture.” During 
the discussion which was led 
by Mr. E. V. Graves^ it was 
brought out that many fear the 
non-agricultural 
corporations 
will dominate agriculture and 
aire in that direction. Members 
decided that people should be 
concerned and that the trend 
toward corporation farming is 
continuing and are a serious 
threat but feel the family farm 
can 
be A strengthened. 
The 
business session was conducted 
by Fred Dean. A dinner will 
be held at the next meeting. 


By JOT MILLER 
Associated Press Writer 
NEW YORK (AP) — The dis­ 
tinguished 
woman 
composer 
smiled thinly. 
“They think they’re paying 
me the highest compliment 
when they tell me, after a per­ 


formance of one of my works, 
‘My, it sounds just like it was 
written by a man’!” said Elinor 
Remick Warren of Los Angeles. 
A 
pretty,* 
reddish-brown- 
haired mother of three, Mrs. 
Warren was one of five compos­ 
ers represented in a concert 


Woman Sentenced To Soviet Prison 
MOSCOWA(P)—A court Wed­ 
nesday sentenced 
a woman 
member of Moscow’s small 
group of dissenting intellectuals 
to a year in a labor camp for 
possessing leaflets 
protesting 
the arrest and trial last sum­ 


mer of another member of the 
group. 
The defendant, Irina Pelogo- 
rodskaya, SO, an engineer in a 
patent office when arrested last 
Aug. 7, was given' credit for the 
more than six months she has 
spent in jail. 


here Tuesday evening that one 
of the women called the best 
concentrated effort ever made 
in behalf of women composers. 
Besides Mrs. Warren’s “Son­ 
nets for Soprano and Strings,” 
the program included “Sonata 
for Viola and Piano,” by Eliza­ 
beth Gould of Toledo, Ohio; 
“Three Observations for Three 
Woodwinds,” by Mabel Daniels 
of Boston; “She Etudes for 
Piano,” by Louise Talma, pro­ 
fessor of music at Hunter Col­ 
lege, New York City and “Quar­ 
tet for Strings,” by Julia Smith, 
a Texas-New York composer. 
Of the five composers only 
Mabel Daniels, now in her 89th 


year and still composing, didn’t national reputations and per- 
make it to New York to hear haps more prizes won abroad 
her work performed. 
than at home, denied personal 
The 
capacity 
audience 
of discrimination, 
about 250 that crowded the audi- j 
But Miss Smith voiced a gen- 
torium of Donnell Library Cen- oral complaint: “Women don’t 
ter applauded all the composit got the opportunities for por­ 
tions enthusiastically. 
formances or commissions that 
Said Mrs. Maurice Honigmanj men do. “Opera houses, for ex- 
of Gastonia, N.C., president of ample, don’t seem to mind hav- 
the National Federation of Mu 
sic dubs, at a reception after 
the concert: “Women have been 
considered second-rate compos­ 
ers for too long. If men com vot­ 
ers heard this prgram they’d 
soon change their minds.” 
Composers Ta l ma . Smith. 
Gould and Warren—with inter-1 


ing flops with men composers— 
so why can’t they take a chance 
with women.” 


Use The 
Classifieds 


Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Kerns 
called on her sisters, Mrs. H. 
J. Swain and Mrs. William 
Shaffer at the latter’s home in 
Columbus 
Sunday 
afternoon 
Mrs. Swain is returning to 
Columbus to make her home 
after 
several years in Ft. 
Myers, Florida. 


Mr. and Mrs. Warren Cum­ 
mins, of Greenup, Kentucky had 
dinner with her father. Mr. 
John Cobb Sunday and then 
visited their 
son-in-law 
and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hart 
and family at their home in 
Circleville. 


Dean Edwwds was a guest 
of the Intermediate MYF when 
It met Sunday evening at tile 
home of Mn. Raymond Davis. 
Ten members were present and 
Jim Davis conducted a short 
business session during which 
a bake sale to be held after 
Easter was discussed and plans 
were made to assist the Senior 
MYF with the Easter Sunrise 
Service. This was “fun night” 
and after refreshments were 
served they had charades. The 
counsellors are Mn. Davis and 
Mrs. Dan VoHrnar. 


Mrs. Dane Patrick returned 
home Saturday after spending 
three weeks in West Palm 
Beach, Fit. 


Mr. and Mn. Ed Umphries 
and son, Tracy, of Chillicothe 
were 
visiting 
their 
grand­ 
mother,. Mrs. Claude Reynolds, 
Sunday afternoon. 


Mrs. Harry Rife Sr., of Ash­ 
ville was the Sunday overnight 
guest of her sister, Mrs. Wava 
Norman. 


Mr. and Mrs. Carl Phillips 
and family had as their guest 
from Thursday until Monday, 
Mrs. 
Phillips’ 
sister, 
Mrs. 
Donald 
Hoffman 
of 
Elgin, 
Illinois. On Sunday the Phillips, 
their guest, 
Mir. 
and Mrs. 
Sherman Edler and daughters, 
Amy and Christy, Mr. Charles 
W. Edler and Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Eelier, Sherry and Rick 
attended the wedding of their 
cousin Robert Williams and 
Miss Rebecca Conaway in the 
EUB Church in Chillicothe and 
the reception that followed. 


The 
Reverend 
and 
Mrs. 
Charles Hupp, former residents 
now living in St. Clairsville, 
were 
business visitors 
here 
Monday 
and Tuesday last 


. and Mn. Robert Bennett 
daughter, Marcia moved 
the 
Davis 
house 
on 
Bawn Avenue during the 
:end, to MassUon where Mr. 
att, 
a 
State 
Highway 
atman 
hot been 
trans- 


Mr.. Everett Speakman 
of 
Springfield was the Saturday 
overnight guest of his uncle and 
aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Phillips. 


Mr. Roger Smith, Music In­ 
structor at Zane Trace Junior 
High School has organized 
a 
Boys’ Glee auh in the school. 
The group is comprised ot 
twelve Junior High boys: Greg 
VanUooeer, Kenny Walk, Terry 


One hundred and ten persons 
attended the annual Blue and 
Gold Banquet for Cub Pack 33 
and 
Boy 
Scout 
Troop 
30, 
Monday might. The Boy Scouts 
were in charge of the opening 
ceremonies which included the 
Salute to the Flag, the Pledge 
of Allegiance and the Scout 
Oath. The four dens of the Cut) 
Scouts each presented a skit 
and six new members were 
admitted to the 
Cub 
Scout 
ranks; 
David 
Platz, 
Gregg 
Ireton, Nicky ' Pine 
Chuckie 
Kretsel, Alan Elward and Jeff 
Finley. Plans were made for 
another skating party for the 
pack 33 and families at the 
Cavalier Rink on March ll at 
4:30. The next Pack meeting is 
March 17 in Kingston gym and 
will be a race car derby. 
Dean Richardson, presently 
Oiibmaster, will take over as 
Scoutmaister next month. 
The closing ritual by the Boy 
Scouts was followed by the 
benediction. Boy Scout leader 
for the past year has been 
Richard Falls. 


Mr. and Mrs. Harley Jinks 
of Laurelville 
were 
Monday 
afternoon callers at the home 
of 
his 
sister, 
Mrs. 
Ella 
Welshimer. 


Mr. and Mrs. Delta Goodman 
spent the day Sunday with her 
mother, Mrs. Bessie Arledge at 
her home near Summit. 


IMPROVED —Resignation of 
Lowell K. Bridwell aa head 
of the Federal Highway Ad­ 
ministration paved the way 
for Francis C. Turner (a- 
bove) to be named to that 
post. Turner is director of 
the Bureau of Public Roads. 


The 
Ross 
County 
Farm 
Bureau Study Group 4 met 
Tuesday evening at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Sun- 


In 1968, 76 per cent of the 
appeals for variances before 
zoning boards in the nation's 
major cities were approved. 


bah $$$ s o m e OSK b k 
T a p p a n 


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Laurelville New s 
By Mrs. Roy Poling 


The 
WSWS 
met 
Thursday I United Brethren Church with 
evening 
at 
the 
Evangelical! Mrs. Norwood Jinks and Mrs. 


Norman Thompson as hostess. 
The opening song was “Master 
Let Me Walk With Thee.” 
Devotions were 28th chapter 
of Matthew and 12th chapter 
Mark and opening prayer by 
Mrs. Harry Martin. 
Lesson Subject was “Two in 


a Tussle” given by Mrs. Gay 
Ta tm an and Mrs. Martin. 
Memorial service for Mrs. Ida 
Defenbaugh was given by Mrs. 
Jack Notestone 
and 
Mrs. 
Claude Ghilcote. Spiritual Life 
was 
given 
by 
Mrs. 
Jack 
Notestone. 


Refreshments 
were 
served. 
Others 
present were: 
Mrs. 
Dwight Huggins, 
Mrs. 
Dick 
Karr, Mrs. Phylis Strous Mrs. 
Robert $wepston and daughter. 


The Adelphi and Laurelville 
W.C.T.U. 
met 
Tuesday 
af­ 


ternoon at the home of Mrs. 
Ray Poling. 
Devotions and meditations on 
“Christ Standard” were given 
by Mrs. Mary McClelland. A 
get well card was sent to Mrs. 
Ed Fetherolf who is a patient 
at Berger Hospital 


Those, present were: 
Mrs. 
Orland DeLong, Mrs. Dorothy 
Haynes, Mrs. Mildred Arm­ 
strong and Mrs. Rudolph Ebert. 
After the meeting gifts for 


Valentine Day were taken to tho 
South Perry rest home. 


USE THE CLASSIFIEDS 


IO 
The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
OretovlUe. Ohio 


KING’ S 
DEPT. STORE 


1 2 9 W . M a in S t. 


Circleville 


BANKAMERICARD. 


Prices Chopped 


Boys’ Plaid Flannel 
SPORT SHIRTS 
72 
Com pare at $1.49 


Tailored for comfort. Permanent 
collar stays machine washable. 
Sites 3-16. 


Prices Chopped 
Boys’ Quilt Lined 
or Nylon Quilted 
JACKETS 
Com pare a t $6.99 
$0.22 


Size 6-16 
W ash & W ear 


Prices Chopped — Boys’ 


Bulky Knit Cardigan 
Sweaters 


Compare at $4.99 


* 2 22 


Assorted Colors and 


Fancies — Sizes 4-6x 


Prices Chopped 


Men’s Bulky 


Knit Coat 
Sweaters 


Compare at $10.99 
$0.22 


Solid colors. 75% mohair, 25% 
wool. Sizes S-M-L-XL. 


Prices Chopped 
M en's Long Sleeve 
P erm a Press 
SPORT 
SHIRT 
Compare at $11.99 


* 
2 
2 
2 
Button down or regular collar 
Sizes S-M-L. 


Prices Chopped — G irls’ 


Cardigan or Slipover 
Sweaters 
Values to $3.99 
SO.22 


Sizes 4 to 14 


Assorted Colors and White 


PRICES 


Saturday til 8:09 P.M* 


FRIDAY 
A N D 
SATURDAY 


PRICES CHOPPED 
JUNIORS & MISSES BETTER 
COATS 


Values 


to $29.99 
S12.22 


Tweeds, solid colors, plaids and checks. Wool or corduroy. Regolar or 
for trimmed. 


Prices Chopped 
Lustre Vinyl 
Raincoats 
v 


Compare at $4.99 
$0-22 


Solid colors and patterns. Also 
white. Sizes S-M-L. 


PRICES CHOPPED 


Juniors and Misses and Half Sizes 
Better Dresses 


Values 


to $8.99 s3.22 


Bonded knits and shirtwaist styles. Dressy solid colors and patterns. Sizes 
7*15, 8-18, 14fe-24tt. 


Prices Chopped 


G irls’ 
BETTER 
COATS 


Values to $14.99 
$0.22 


Regular or fur trimmed. Wool 
or corduroy. 


Prices Chopped 


Ladies’ F irst Quality 


Seamless Mesh Nylon 
HOSE 


Compare at 79c 
22 


Sizes 8*2 to ll. Beige, Cima 
mon. 


Prices Chopped 


G irls’ Full or Waltz 


Length Flannel Granny 
GOWNS 


Values to $1.79 
$1.22 
I 


Sizes 3-Ox and 7-14 


Prices Chopped 


Ladies’ Acetate 


Nylon Tricot 
PANTIES 


Compare at 49c 
c 
22 


Assorted colors and white, 
elastic leg. Sizes 5-7. 


Prices Chopped 
LADIES' KNIT HATS 
n , 
Compare at $3.99........................................ 


Prices Chopf 
n PLASTIC I 
/ 
Compare at 


ted — 72x87 
TRAPES 
, , 
........................l i t 


Prices Chopped — Ladies’ 
SHOULDER STRAP or HAND BAG, 4 , 
Compare at $2.99 
\ | ij 


Prices Chopped — Silicone 
, IRONING BOARD PAD A COVER 


I 
Com pare at 89c 
................................................ 4**C 


Prices Chopped — G irls’ 
2-PIECE SLACK SH 
{ , . 
Compare at $5.99 
\ J | 


Prices Chopped — Room Size 
, TWEED RUGS 
. . . , , 


I 
Compare at $19.99 
\ | H 
l 
l 


$ 


Prices Chopped — Men’s 
Prices Chopped 
SUEDE CHUKKA BOOTS 
0 , , Mighty White TOOTHPASTE , 
, , 
Compare at $7.99........................................ \ j 
( £ £ 
Buy Now and S a v e ......................... 
£ for 
/ ^ f 


Prices Chopped — Men’s 
Prices Chopped — Ray-O-Vac 
PLAID FUNNEL ROBES 
( J , , FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES 
, 
, , 
Compare at $9.99 
g £ 
Size C o r D ....................................... 
/ 
for IIC 


Prices Chopped — 00x76 
PLAID SHEET BLANKETS 
Compare at $1.49........................... 


Prices Chopped — Get Set 
fln 
HAIRSPRAY 
Super, Keg. or H ard to Hold 
3 *or 92c 
■ u 


Prices Chopped 


V 
Ladies Bulky Knit 


Cardigan 
Sweaters 


Compare at $3.99 
$0-22 


Assorted Colors and 
White. Sizes 34-40 


Prices Chopped — Juniors’ and Misses’ 
NEHRU 
BLAZER 
With Chain Medallion 
Compare at $6.99 
$0-92 


Solid Colors and 
White. Sizes 7-15, 8-16 


Prices Chopped — Juniors’ 


and M isses’ — 2 Piece 
Slack Set 


Compare at $10.99 
$4.22 


Button or slipover style tops with 
matching or contrasting slacks. 


Prices Chopped — Ladies’ 
Slipover or Cardigan 
Sweaters 
Values to $6. 


$•9.22 


Prices Chopped 
Ladies’ 
Values to $3.99 
KNIT TOPS 


22 and 
SJI 22 


Turtlenecks, 
mock 
turtle­ 
necks and poor boys. Solid 
colors, stripes and floral pat­ 
terns. 


* 1 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
ll 
Circleville, Ohio 


Something To Think About . . . 
Tell It Like It Is 


As a rule, when writing my 
column, I try to deal with 
subjects which I feel will be 
of interest to many people. At 
times' it is difficult to find a 
subject and this week is one 
of those times. When 
this 
happens, I begin to think about 
the mental list of pet subjects 
that are of special interest to 
me personally and I am temp­ 
ted to be oblivious to the desires 
of my readers and satisfy my 
own desire to say what I think. 
Usually 
I 
am 
successful 
in 
suppressing this wish but this 
week I didn’t make it. So if 
you continue to read you will 
be 
subjected 
to 
a 
highly 
opinionated, prejudiced, and in 
all 
probability, 
controversial 
viewpoint of Ute results being 
produced by some of the most 
highly paid 
persons 
in this 
country- 
I refer to the persons who 


Draft Laws 


Explained 


By JEAN CRIST 


are 
responsible 
for or par­ 
ticipate *in the television shows, 
movies, theater and books that 
are proponents of the “sick 
sex’’ that has invaded the arts. 
Not a day goes by that I am 
not appalled and my sense of 


dictment would not be fair nor children. The great hue and cry 
true for there are greats in each 
of these fields and I have the 
upmost respect and admiration 
for those men and women who 
with talent and hard work have 
contributed to the enjoyment of 
living in this world by the 
sharing of their abilities through 
the arts. 
But this “sick” trend that 
That the scenes played and the continues to gain momentum 
words said are necessary to I each day must be dealt with 


decency offended at the way all 
types of sex indulgences and 
perversions are presented to the 
public 
in 
every 
conceivable 
manner of communication. To 
be free of this influence one 
would have to go into complete 
isolation. 
If you try to be 
c a r e f u l 
what 
television 
programs are watched in your 
home you may feel one is 
suitable and then get tripped 
up 
by 
the 
suggestive 
com­ 
mercial which implies that if 
you buy your wife a dishwasher 
she will be so delighted she will 
chase you into the bedroom. 
The evening talk shows have 
become a contest in “how dirty 
can you talk and still stay on 
the air?” 
As far as I’m concerned, the 
motion 
picture 
business 
has 
reached ifs lowest ebb since 
ifs inception. It is now the chief 
purveyor of overemphasis on 
sex and violence and tends to 
provide motivation and support 
for 
those 
already 
troubled 
minds, who can’t cope 
with 
their problems in a constructive 
way, to commit crimes as a 
release. It gives the impression 
that 
society 
now 
not 
only 
condones but commends those 
who live in complete freedom 
“doing their thing,” no matter 
how bizzare or perverted it may 
be. 
The legitimate theater 
and 
much of our writing 
reflects 
the same attitudes as television 
and 
the 
movies. 
The 
oft- 
repeated excuse for some of the 
sickening plots one is subjected 
to in the theater or in a book 
is that this is “true art form.” 


truly express the content of the 
story. I can’t conceive of any 
art form as being destructive 
in nature so this excuse 
for 
profanity and iewedness is not 
acceptable to me. 
To make this a blanket in- 


or it will eventually undermine 
the morality of the nation. 
Why am I so disturbed and 
angry 
about 
this 
situation? 
Because I am deeply concerned 
about the impact this type of 
culture 
will 
have 
on 
our 


we hear these days from our 
youth is to “tell it like it is.” 
Our children want the truth and 
some mis-informed persons be­ 
lieve that is 
what they 
are 
doing by explaining in living 
color many of the immoral and 
perverted 
sexual 
difficulties 
that a minority of persons get 
themselves involved in, leading 
the viewer to believe that this 
is the norm. 
Let’s heed the call of our 
youth and really “tell it like 
it is.” That we as apathetic 
adults have come to feel we 
are just very small cogs in a 
very large whee! 
and 
have 
turned over our initiative to 


a minority allowing them to I something constructive about it, 


EDITOR’S 
NOTE: 
In 
an 
effort to create a greater public 
understanding of the laws and 
regulations governing the in­ 
duction of personnel into the 
Armed Forces, the Selective 
Service System has prepared a 
series of pertinent questions and 
corresponding 
responses 
con­ 
cerning provisions of the draft 
law. Here is another in the 
series. 
Q. I will soon be 18 years 
old and will register for the 
draft. Where can I get any 
hooka about military life or 
careers 
A. At your local board of the 
Selective 
Service 
System. 
A 
booklet entitled, 
“Ifs 
Your 
Choice”, has been published by 
th e Department of Defense and 
n o t ic e to b id d e r s 
Ir 
«vAiilshlp 
u/ithrwiit 
pac! Scfllcd proposals will bo received 
IS 
avauaoie, 
Without 
cost, 
by the B£ard of Pickaway County 
throughout 
the 
country. 
It Commissioners 
at 
their 
office, 
contains information regarding g g 1*} Sr^viUe^c^i^unUMzfoo 
the 
various 
military 
choices o’clock noon E.S.T. Monday March 
open to young people who are S 
d 
I 
-so Z S 
L * 
contemplating 
entering 
t h e same day for the following: 
Armed Services. 
& & S T S f e t j f S 


i i . Where might I obtain in- 
^ f k Ton Pickup Truck 1969 
formation 
on 
previous 
court 
with trade-in one Va Ton Chevrolet 
cases involving the draft law 
S f g J S trucks may * 
in- 
A. 
A. 
publication 
entitled 
spected 
at the Pickaway County 
“Legal 
Aspects 7 
M e d t e g S T ' 
S‘“ C,rcl,viUe’ 
Service,” revised January 
I. 
Built up Trucks not acceptable, 
1116*1 
m av Iva 
tL im a11 trucks to ** * '* Ton series- 
1W>9 
may De purchased from 
Specifications may be obtained at 
the S u p e r i n t e n d e n t o f the County Engineer’s office in the 
Documents, 
U.S. 
Government C°comm°?sSioners reserve the right 
Printing Office, Washington, D. t 0 ™ Jec* anT or en t>lds 
r o A/i no 
pi da 
Thls le8al notice is in complin nee 
L, aftKUB tor *1.00. 
with Section 307.87 R C. of Ohio. 
O 
Mav 
a registrant a n tia r 
~ 
order of the Board of County 
JM-ay 
a registrant a p p e a r, commissioners 
of Pickawov County, 
in 
person 
before 
an 
appeal! Ohio. 
board 
Charles Morris, Jr. 


A. No. While Regulations do BOARD 
not provide an opportunity for 
a registrant to appear in person 
before • an appeal board, the 
person appealing may attach to 
h i s 
appeal 
a 
statement 
specifying the matters in which 
he believes 
the 
local 
board 
erred, may direct attention to 
a n y 
information 
on 
the 
registrant’s 
file 
which 
he 
believes the local board has 
failed to consider or to give 
sufficient weight, and may set 
out 
in 
full 
any 
information 
which was offered to the local 
board and which the local board 
faked or refused to include in 
his file. 


Dick Tootle 
Wayne Hines 
OF 
COUNTY 
MISSIONERS 
COM- 


Geneva K. Brink 
Clerk of Co. Comm. 
Feb. 13. 20 


COMMON PLEAS COURT NOTICE 
AU interested parties are hereby 
notified that the following Executrix 
filed her aceount In the Common 
Pleas Court of Pickaway County, 
Ohio: 
No. 24962 Ruth L. Cline. Executrix 
of the estate of Ann M. Hoover, 
deceased. First and final account. 
And that said account will be for 
healing and Battlement before the 
court on Monday March IO, 1069 
at 9 o’clock A.M. Exceptions to 
account, lf any. must be filed herein 
on or before March 4th, 1060. 
Witness my hand and th# seal 
of said Common Pleas Court this 
4th day of February. 1060. 
WlUiam Ammer, Jut! 
Common Pleas Cot 
Pickaway County, 
Feb. 6. IS. 20,27 


Rf.Judge 
Court 


See 
Us for Construction Grade 
DIMENSION 


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distort the truth. That we care 
what our children sec and read, 
but not enough to do any more 
than shake our heads in disgust 
and mutter “how times have 
changed.” That we have turned 
over our moral code to a youth 
that is caught up in a period 
of experimentation and let them 
set the pace. That appearing 
moral in an apparently immoral 
society might set you apart 
from others and we as adults 
no longer have the courage to 
stand alone with our convictions. 
Like it or not readers, that’s 
how it is. And until a great 
many of us get up off our seats 
o f 
complacency 
and 
do 


that’s the way it’s going to be 
Solutions? Simple and at the 
same time extremely complex. 
lf no one buys the first printing 
of a dirty book there won’t be 
a second printing if a movie 
is being shown based on a 
homosexual relationship as a 
plot, it can be boycotted and 
will soon be removed from the 
theaters, and if the television 
station received thousands of 
cards and letters denouncing a 
certain program as unfit for 
viewing it will go off the »ir. 
We know the seriousness of the 
problem, we know the solutions 
to it. This is the simple part 
of the solution. 
The 
complex 
part 
of the 


solution enters at this point. 
How to make ourselves take 
action on these solutions is the 
crux of the 
situation and the 
answer to that question can only 
be found in the heart of each 
of us. It involves a responsibility 
which we 
either reject and 
suffer 
the 
consequences 
of 
watching 
our 
children 
being 
brainwashed 
with 
distortions 
and misconceptions about sex, 
or accept and reap the reward 
of the knowledge that they have 
been given a fair appraisal of 
the part sex should play in their 
lives 
and 
armed 
with 
this 
knowledge they will be well 
equipped to make intelligent 
and responsible decisions in tills 
regard. 


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12 
The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
Circleville. Ohio 
Heart Fund Drive 
Balloon Sale, 
Canvass Set 


The Pickaway County Heart! 
Fund campaign will reach its 
peak this weekend with the 
heart balloon sale Saturday and 
the residential canvass Sunday. 
the Senior SOS of Circleville 
High School under the direction 
af Mrs. Lois Brobst will conduct I 
tile batoon Sale in the downtown 
area. 
Sunday about 200 girls under 
the supervision of Sue Schneider 
and Linda Davis. Heart Sunday 
campaign chairmen, will go 
from house to house soliciting 
contributions for the heart fund. 
Roahlenttal 
canvasses 
will 
also be conducted in William­ 
sport under the direction of 
Mrs. William Easterday 
in 
Tarlton under the supervision of 
Catherine Hawks; in Ashville 
with 
Joyce 
Gloyd 
heading 
collection; 
and in Pickaway 
Twp. with Hay Martin in charge 
of the canvass.• a* 
MIKE 
Brown, president of 
the Pickaway County Heart 
Assn., urges city and village 
residents to “Open up their 
hearts and give to the Heart 
Fund.*’ 


Lee W. Otto 
Joins Staff 
At GE Plant 


Democrats Meet 


To Plan 1970 


Election Drive 


COLUMBUS, 
Ohio (AP) — 
Democratic officeholders from 
25 counties met here Wednesday 
to kick off the party’s “victory 
in 1970*' program. 
State Chairman Eugene P. 
O'Grady said tile politicians dis­ 
cussed “revitalizing and reor­ 
ganizing county programs from 
the precinct up.” 
Speakers included Senate Min­ 
ority Leader Charles J. Carney, I 
D-33 Youngstown, and House 
Minority Leader John McDon- \ 
ald, D-19 Newark. 
O’Grady 
said 
Democratic leave 


Literature being distributed 
by Heart Sunday volunteers 
emphasizes the desirability of 
getting the benefit of presently 
existing 
knowledge 
in 
the 
cardiovascular field, and un­ 
derscores the need to support 
r e s e a r c h 
from 
which 
tomorrow’s dramatic advances 
may come. 
Under “what you should know 
today,” the pamphlet lists these 
points: 
“Know tile risk factors art 
reduce your family's risk of 
heart attack. 
“Hospital coronary care units 
are saving lives of thousands 
of heart attack victims. 
“New surgical techniques can 
correct 
most 
inborn 
heart 
defects. Damaged valves and 
blood vessels now can often be 
repaired or replaced. 
OOO 
“DISABILITY 
from 
stroke 
can be reduced and productive 
life prolonged. 
“High blood pressure — a 
leading cause of heart disease 
and stroke — can be controlled. 
“Rheumatic fever and the 
heart damage it causes can be 
prevented." 
“Looking to the future, the 
He a r t 
Sunday 
pamphlet 
suggested that these advances 
may come from expanded heart 
research: 
“The saving to 50,000 lives 
annually through extension of 
coronary care units. 
“Prevention and control of 
conditions causing heart attack 
auld stroke. 
O O O 
“SUCCESSFUL 
transplanta­ 
tion of hearts and other vital 
organs. 
“ D e v e l o p m e n t 
of 
a 
mechamcal pump to replace the 
human heart 
“Discover 
of 
causes 
and 
prevention 
of 
inborn 
heart 
defects.” 
The Heart volunteers will 
not-et-home" envelopes 


How Weather 
Looks Today 
Pueblos 'Chief To Testify Today 


OHIO WEATHER SUMMARY 
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Of­ 
ficial Weather Bureau summary 
for Ohio: 
A high pressure system ex­ 
tending from Wisconsin south­ 
ward to the Gulf of Mexico is 
very slowly moving eastward 
and will be the dominating fac­ 
tor in Ohio's weather for at 
least the next two days. 
This gives, assurance of sea­ 
sonable weather with mostly 
sunny days and clear nights. 
Skies will be clear tonight and 
the lows will dip into the 20s. 
Mostly sunny skies are forecast 
for Friday with highs ranging 
from the mid 30s to the upper 
40s. 
Saturday’s outlook shows in­ 
creasing cloudiness and a little 
Warmer weather. 


CORONADO, Calif. (AP) — 
Pueblo 
crewmen, 
in 
telling 
about their 11-month imprison­ 
ment and brutal treatment by 
North Koreans, frequently have 
described Quartermaster l.C. 


municipal 
officeholders 
meet in April. 


1st Woman Prof 
At Toledo Is Dead 
TOLEDO, Ohio (AP)—Rather- j 
ine Wemmer, the first woman 
faculty member at Toledo Uni­ 
versity, is dead at the age of 91. 
Mrs. 
Wemmer 
joined 
the 
achoo! in 1919. When she re­ 
tired 22 yeans ago, she was 
awarded the honorary tihe pro­ 
fessor emeritus. 
Mrs. Wemmer, who died Wed­ 
nesday in a nursing home, is 
survived by her husband, Wil­ 
iam. 


will at residences where the doorbell 
goes unanswered. These may be 
used to mail in contributions to 
, support research, education and 
I community service programs of 
the Heart Branch. 


LEE W. OTTO 


Lee W. Otto has joined the 
staff 
of 
General 
Electric's 
Circleville Lamp 
Plant, 
ac­ 
cording to an announcement 
made today by E. G. Grigg, 
plant manager. Otto assumes 
the position of Quality Control 
Project Engineer. 
A 
native 
of 
Kalamazoo, 
Michigan, Otto attended the 
University of Tampa and the 
U n i v e r s i t y 
of 
Florida, 
graduating from the latter in 
1965 with a Bachelor’s degree 
in industrial engineering. While 
in college, he was a member 
of 
the 
Kappa 
Kappa 
Psi 
honorary band 
society, 
Tau 
Kappa Epsilon social fraternity, 
and the Benton Engineering 
Society. 
Otto joined General Electric 
in 1965 at the Neutron Devices 
Department in St. Petersburg, 
F l o r i d a , 
where 
he 
had 
assignments in purchasing and 
quality control. He was af­ 
filiated with the Jaycees in 
Brandon. Florida, and was a 
Big Brother in Tampa. Otto's 
main outside interest is music. 
Before his transfer to Circleville 
he was a member of The 
Tampa Philharmonic Orchestra 
and was organist at the large 
First United Methodist Church 
in St. Petersburg. 
Otto, his wife Marvyn, and 
their son Shawn, age I, will 
reside on ShadweU Street in the 
Jefferson addition. 


—FORECASTS— 
OHIO — Clear tonight. Lows 
in the 20s. Fair with seasonable 
temperatures Friday. 
NORTHWEST AND NORTH- 
EAST OHIO — Clear tonight. 
Lows in the lower 20s. Fair 
with near seasonal tempera­ 
ture^ 
Friday. 
Highs 
mostly 
from the mid 30s to the lower 
40s. Outlook for Saturday: In­ 
creasing cloudiness and a little 
warmer. 
CENTRAL, EAST CENTRAL, 
SOUTHWEST 
AND 
SOUTH­ 
EAST OHIO — Clear tonight. 
Lows mostly in the mid 20s. 
Fair with seasonable tempera­ 
tures Friday. Highs from the 
upper 30s to the mid 40s. Out­ 
look for Saturday: Increasing 
cloudiness and a little warmer. 


New Auto 


Insurance 


Plan Given 


USE THE CLASSIFEDS 


Approve Grant 
For SE Ohio 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)—The 
Ohio Valley Health Services 
Foundation, Inc., Athens, will 
receive a $186,571 federal grant 
to continue planning the pro­ 
posed $41.9 million multi-county 
health demonstration project in 
seven southeastern counties. 
Albert G. Giles, director ct 
the Ohio Department of Urban 
Affairs, announced Wednesday 
approval of the grant by the 
Appalachian Regional Commis­ 
sion in Washington. 
The funds, extended through 
April SO, are being used to pay 
personnel 
researching 
health 
problems and to determine bas­ 
te health needs in the area. 
Counties involved are Athens, 
Hocking, Meigs, Gallia, Jack­ 
son, Lawrence and Vinton. 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — 
Auto insurance companies spend 
too much time worrying about 
who was responsible for an ac­ 
cident, the Ohio AFL-CIO Leg­ 
islative Conference was told 
Wednesday. 
Jeffrey O’Connell said his 
Basic Protection Plan offers a 
“simple solution” to the prob 
lem. 
O’Connell’s plan, now pending 
before six state legislatures, 
stipulates that an accident vic­ 
tim be compensated immediate­ 
ly by his own insurer. 
This way, he said, motorists 
would not have to buy extra 
liability insurance in addition to 
their own insurance. 
Calling 
modern 
insurance 
practices “wasteful,” O’Connell 
said accident victims should not 
have to file claims against “the 
other guy’s” company. 
“Once an accident occurs, a 
traffic victim will be automati­ 
cally paid by his own insurer for 
his medical expenses and wage 
loss up to $10,000 of loss,” O'Con­ 
nell said in outlining his plan. 
He said his system also would 
result in substantial reduction of 
insurance rates because there 
would be no duplication at bene 
fits paid by other insurance 
sources. 


Charles B. Law as a tower of 
strength and a natural leadier of 
men. 
“Law probably demonstrated 
the finest qualities of petty offi­ 
cer leadership I’ve ever seen,” 
Lt. J.G. Frederick Schumacher 
Jr., the ship's operations offi­ 
cer, testified. 
“Law was in charge of the 'en­ 
listed men,” said Lt. (J.G.) Tim­ 
othy Harris, 
supply officer. 
“The way he conducted himself 
was outstanding.” Law, 27 of 
Chehalis, Wash., was called to 
tell his own story today to the 
Navy court of inquiry investi­ 
gating the intelligence ship’s 
seizure and tile conduct of its 
crew as prisoners. 
The court may recommend 
anything from courts-martial to 
medals. 
Ijiaw relayed information from 
thd officers—each held in a sep­ 
arate room—to the 
enlisted 
men, who were held from four 
to eight to a room, in two com 
pounds near Pyongyang. 
Harris told the court “Any 
time anything went wrong the 
Koreans blamed Law. He took 
the brunt of the punishment. He 
was the contact between the of 
fleers and the enlisted men.’ 
Law was married here last 
week to a San Diego secretary, 
Marie L. Cherry. He met her at 
a party last December shortly 
after the crew was freed. The 
Pueblo was captured off North 
Korean in January 1968. 
Law told a news conference 
shortly after his return he was 
struck at leaist 25 times by the 
North Koreans with fists and 
boards. 
CWO Gene Howard Lacy, the 
ship’s engineering officer; Tim 


othy Harris and Lt Stephen 
Harris, who was in charge of 
the ship’s intelligence detail, 
testified Wednesday. 
Lacy and Stephen Harris said 
they were struck repeatedly by 
captors in quest of spy confes­ 
sions. Both said they felt they 
violated the U.S. Code of Con­ 
duct for prisoners. Both said 
they should give only name, 


rank, serial number and date af 
birth. 
Timothy 
Harris, 
however, 
gave the most dramatic testis 
mony. He burst into sobs as he 
said he wanted to commit sui­ 
cide while a captive but could 
not. He said instead he killed o 
potted plant they gave him be­ 
cause of his hatred for the 
North Koreans. 


THIS WEEK 
WARD'S 


Pork Loin Bib Quarter SUced ............................ lb. ^ 
Rib Pork Chops 
». 69c 


Loin Pork Chops 
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Boneless Pork Chops 
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Chopped Ham 
............ 
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Farm House Sliced Bacon 
59c 


WARD’S 
ROYAL BLUE 


Located in Downtown Circleville 


at 166 W. Main St. 


Cincy Man Faces 
Embezzling Charge 
CINCINNATI (AP) — A Cin­ 
cinnati man has been charged 
with embezzling $163,872.59 from 
a local paper firm over a 19-day 
period and was 
t o appear in 
Hamilton County Common Pleas 
Court today. 
Held in lieu of $10,000 bond 
was William C. Schaiblein, an 
accountant and bookkeeper with 
Merchants Paper Co. 


Boy It Drowned 
CINCINNATI (AP)—Jaimes F. 
Cope, IO, of near Terrace Park 
drowned in an excavation along 
the Little Miami River Wednes­ 
day when he fell through ice 
he was testing for skating. 


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Logan Elm School News 


Art Students 
Prepare For 
Spring Show 


Artistically speaking, Loean 
Elm shows real talent. And Mr. 
Chandler is taking advantage of 
this talent. 
He 
has 
several 
different 
projects going on now. About 
half of his 
art classes 
are 
working on papermache models 
of 
either 
human 
figures 
in 
action or abstract animals. 
Some of the 
students 
are 
working on designs. They are 
using a variety of mediums 
including string, acrilics, tissue 
paper and cardboard. 
One or two students are try­ 
ing their hand at portraits. An 
array 
of 
pictures 
of 
fellow 
classmates cain be seen hanging 
in the art room. One student 
las already advanced to oil 
portraits. 
All of these projects are being 
kept for 
the 
art 
show this 
spring. Mr. Chandler is already 
making great plans to display 
as much of the art as possible. 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
13 
Circleville. Ohio 
Area Queen, Varsity Cager 
Are LE Students Of Month 


HI-Y CLUB LEADERS — lli-Y Is a boys organization designed to promote character and spirit. 
The organisation plans to sponsor a swimming party at the Chillicothe “Y” in March. Officers of 
the Logan Elm organization are (left to right, back) Mr. Don Barger, advisor; Boyce Woolever, 
president; Pete Strawser, chaplain; Steve Swank, secretary‘treasure?; (front) Butch Spires, vice­ 
president; and Steve Sykes, program chairman. 


Two 
more 
Logan 
Elm 
students have been honored by 
being selected as students of the 
month. 
January’s top students are 
Janet Collins and Jeff Jones. 
Janet, a senior this year, has 
been active during her entire 
high school career; 
She has 
been in band for four years, 
playing clarinet, and also hi 
been a majorette all four years. 
She is an alto in choir and 
is finishing her third year as 
a cheerleader for the Braves. 
Janet is also a member of the 
n e w l y 
formed 
Tri-Hi* Y 
organization. 
Janet was. Miss Logan Elm 
and Miss Pumpkin Show of 1967. 
After lier graduation, Janet! 
hopes to attend 
TWA flight 
school to become an airline 
stewardess. 
Jeff, 
one 
of 
the 
varsity] 
basketball players this year, is 


TRI-H1-Y OFFICERS — One of the newest dohs at Logan Elm, the Trl-Hi-Y was organised to 
promote Christian character through social and charitable activities. Club officers an (left 
to right, front) Theresa Quince!, treasurer; Roxanne Swank, secretary; (back row) Mrs. Deanne 
Nsgy, advisor; Susan List, president; Cindy Karshner, chaplain; and Rath Crist, vice president. 
Not pictured are Donna Moss, program chairman, and Judy Ferguson, co-chaplain. 
Music Students 
Plan For Meet 


Teacher 
Feature 


Music 
students 
will 
par­ 
ticipate in the Ohio Education 
Assn. 
Solo 
and 
Ensemble 
Contest March I. It is not a 
new experience for most of the 
students. 
There are three girls entering 
in 
vocal 
solo 
competition. 
Melanie 
Dresbach 
will 
be 
singing a mezzo soprano solo 
entitled 
“Caro 
Mio 
Ben.” 
Brenda Mills will sing “Let All 
My Life Be Music”, also a 
mezzo-soprano 
solo, 
Penny 
Smith will sing a soprano solo, 
“Sure on This Shining Night.” 
Three 
piano solos will 
be 
performed. 
Lynn 
McCoy 
is 
playing “Second Impromptu in 
E 
flat” 
Peggy 
Wilson 
and 
Brenda Mills will be playing the 
same 
solo. 
It 
is 
the 
first 
m o v e m e n t of Beethoven’s 
“Sonata Pathetique” . 


Other instrumental solos will 
be by Melanie Dresbach, oboe, 
and Janice Kerns, saxophone. 
Melanie will play “Concerto for 
Oboe and Strings” and Janice 
will do 
“Contemper^) 
Suite,” 
Woodie Woods will be doing a 
snare 
drum 
s o l o 
entitled 
“Meteorite.” 
The 
Girls* 
ensemble 
will 
perform “Oh Dear! What Can 
the Matter Be?” The Boys Octet 
will sing “Wade in de Water.” 
Since alternates are not per­ 
mitted to sing at contest, only 
regular members of the en­ 
sembles will perform. 
Two 
ensembles 
will 
also 
participate in the contest. A 
saxophone 
quartet 
will 
play 
“Sarabande A 
Badinere.” A 
clarinet quartet will perform 
“ S c h e r z o 
and 
Trio” 
by 
Beethoven. 


- 


i ? v » 
* 
"< 
% 
rn \ 


New Student 


At Logan Elm 


JANET COLLINS 


a junior. His other activities at 
Logan 
Elm 
include 
Student 
Council and Elm Log staff. 
Riding his Honda heads the 
list of Jeff’s hobbies, but he 


JEFF JONES 


also enjoys coin collecting. 
Jeff, too, wants to fly after 
his graduation, but he plans to 
do it in the uniform of the 
United States Air Force. 


GOING UP Al DOWNS—An 
addition to the press box at 
Churchill Downs, Louisville, 
Kyn scene of the Kentucky 
Derby May 8, brought out 
the cameraman and this pic­ 
ture. The new enclosure la 
expected to hold some SO 
Republican 
governors and 
President Nixon Derby Day. 


There are more than sso.floo 
salesmen dealing hi wholesale 
transactions 
in 
tile 
United 
States, according to the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics. 


Oilers Wins 
Intramural 
Cage Title 


Oilie’s Oilers took the in­ 
tramural 
basketball 
cham­ 
pionship title last Friday in a 
close game 
as 
they 
edged 
Baylous’s Bombers in a 35-34 
game. 
The Oilers, champs of the 
first lunch period intra murals, 
aire managed by player-coach 
Ollie Twist, better known as 
Mike Rhodes. Other members 
of the team are Merle Valen-. 
tine, 
Jim 
Schwalbaeh, 
Ted 
Mogan, Claude Rutter and Tom 
Hunter. 
The Baylous Bombers were 
t h e 
second 
lunch 
period 
champs. 
Their 
team 
was 
composed 
of 
Jerry 
Baylous, 
Woodie Woods*, 
Rick 
Fogler, 
Omer 
Abner, 
Ralph 
Roby, 
Terry Hupp and Stevens. Their 
coach was Dan Fa/usnaugh. 
The entire student body was 
on hand to witness this exciting 
championship game. Although 
spirit ran high, the referees, 
Rod Riddle, P. D. Rhodes and 
K. C. Jones, kept everything 
under control. 


Logan Elm Music Teacher 
Plans Band, Choir Contests 


Music is tops with Mr. John j 
Ridzon, the Logan Elm teacher ! 
of the week. 
Mr. Ridzon started college in 
dentistry, butswitchedto music 
education because he missed 
music. 


wife. Judy, teaches music at 
Scioto Twp. School. 
Working 
with 
Logan 
students 
has 
been 
a 
challenge, but enjoyable for Mr. 
R i d z o n . 
He 
is 
presently 
preparing for both solo and 
ensemble contest and band and 
choir contest. 


LE Plans For 
Science Fair 


Mrs. Deanna Nagy is a new 
faculty member at Logan Elm 
this year. She resides at Route 
4 with her husband Frank. 
Mrs. 
Nagy 
attended 
Ohio 
University where she majored 
in 
English 
and 
minored 
in 
library science. 
At Logan Elm she has three 
English classes which consist of 
' sophomores ani juniors. 
She 
Elm i spends three periods of the d ^ 
real *n the Rhmry. She *s a,so 
advisor for the Tri Hi-Y at 
Logan Elm. 
Among her likes are animals, 
playing 
bridge, 
sewing, 
and 
decorating 
antique 
furniture. 
Her main dislike is hunters. 
Mrs. Nagy thinks the students 
at Logan Elm are very polite 
and sincere, and are always 
willing to help out at any time. 
In 
her 
five 
year 
teaching 
career, Mrs. Nagy finds Logan 
Elm the most favorable school. 


MR. JOHN RIDZON 


Mr. Ridzon not only has band, 
choir and ensem bles, but also 
teaches 
vocal 
music 
class, 
theory class for seniors, pep 
band and afternoon classes at 
Washington Twp. School. 
With all this, he finds time 
to play in t band in Columbus. 
Music seems to run in the 
family, because Mr. Ridzon’s 


Annual science fair at Logan 
Elm is getting under way. The 
dates 
for 
the 
preliminary 
judging are Feb. 19, 20 and 21. 
Preliminary judging will be 
under the supervision of science 
teachers - Mrs. Mills, Mr. Porn 
tious and Mr. Burger. 
Those 
rating 
high 
in 
the 
classroom judging will later be 
rated by judges selected from 
outside the school district. 
Students ranking high will 
then represent Logan Elm at 
district science day, March 29, 
at Ohio State University. 


Grade School 
Honor Roll 


PICKAWAY TWP. 
First grade — William Mark 
Adams. William Luther Archer, 
Beth Ann Bower, Linda I.ee 
Cain, 
Cann 
Anne 
Carisch, 
Angela 
Sue Clark, 
Debra 
Disbennett, Tamara Dreisbach, 
Philip Evans, David W. Haddox, 
Martin Hall, Jonathan Hatfield, 
Chris Hildenbrand, 
Christina 
M a r t i n , 
Kimberly 
Annette 
Nichols, Laura Anne Salyers, 
and Trina Valentine. 
Second 
Grade 
— 
Lane 
Beousher, John Betts, Renee 
Cavcnder, Sonya Daniels, Jeff 
Dnvis. 
Evanveline 
B r e n t 
Gifford, 
Grmenwalt. Kiln Ua' slip, Ray j 
Moats. Dianna Redman, Diana ; 
Weaver. 
Kimberly 
Williams, 
and Terre Wright. 
Th'H Grade — Sherri Brnst 
David Gain, Miehaelle Carroll, 
Marv 
CNrk, 
Jeffry 
Collins, 
Tony 
Crist. eJodv 
Feldman, 
r*' nth in Gifford, Krista Gifford, 
Kay 
Kekenes, 
Karen 
Kerns 
Pamela 
Honkie, 
and 
Patty 
Minshall. 
Fourth 
Grade 
— 
Pamela 
Adams, Bertha Bailey, Michael 
Davis, Timothy Fouch, Sabrina 
Haddox, Robin Manson, Nancy 
Myers, Randy Pontius, Darlene 
uincel, QDennis Redman, and 
Marsha Woolever. 
Fifth grade — Gene Adams, 
Keith Durn rn, Doug Honkie. 
Sixth grade — Jan Feldman, 
Laura Kerns, Philip Manson. 
Karen Myers, Kimberle Par­ 
mer, Chris Payne, Scott Pon- 


EDIE BLEVINS 


Another 
new 
student 
has 
joined the junior ranks at Logan 
Elm. 
She 
is 
Edie 
Blevins, 
daughter 
of 
Mr. 
and 
Mrs. 
Mitchel Blevins. 
Edie has already joined the 
choir as an alto. At Amanda 
Cleaircreek, Edie was a member 
of 
French 
Club, 
FFA, 
and I 
president of the Pep Club. 
Her hobbies include fishing 
and 
swimming, 
bpt 
Edie 
especially enjoys dancing. 
After 
she 
graduates, 
Edie 
wants to become an airline I 
stewardess. She attended the 
First 
Church 
of 
Christ 
in 
Laurelville before she moved. 
When she was asked who she 
would most like to meet, Edie 
replied, “Elvis” because he’s 
“groovy.” 


ADVERTISEMENT 
FOR 
SUB. 
MISSION OF PROPOSALS FOR IN- 
CINERATOR BERGER HOSPIT/ 
CIRCLEVILLE, OHIO 
The undersigned, representing the 
Board of Governors, will receive I 
proposals for furnishing constructing 
and installing an incinerator at a 
determined location on the premises 
of Berger Hospital. Circleville, Ohio. 
The specifications shall Include: 
Rate capacity ITS lbs-hr. Casing 
walls floor and roof of 14 gauge 
steel protected by proper insulation. 
Interior lining not less than 2'V 
thickness, first quality conforming 
to 
A.S.T.M. 
specifications 
C-106. 
latest revision and properly set in j 
high temDerature cement. 
Combustion 
chamber 
door 
of | 
heavy durtv cast iron. clean out 
door also cast iron with cast iron 
liner Dlate and frame. 
There shall be one 250,000 B.T.U. 
power gas burner controlled by a 
single 0-1 Hour timer. Burner shall 
have automatic gas control valve, 
pressure regulator, Automatic snark 
. ignition, IOO per cent pilot safety, 
Gallimore, positive blower safety, main cock. 
M-i reb a I b'lnt 
cock 
Hnd inout 
adtustm«nt 
! va)ve 
Breeching shall be 12” I.D., 
lfi” 
O.D. 
refrectorv 
lined, 
with 
aluminized 
steel 
exterior bearing 
TJX. lining, the barocetrio damper 
sh*1! be 12” I.D. 
Contractor 
furnishes 
6” 
thick, 
conr-rele pad 8'0” x 5’0”. 
pronosaic 
submitted 
will 
be 
studied and decision made in the 
office of the Hospital Administrator' 
after 
12:00 
Noon 
on 
Friday. 
February 21. 
1969. The Board of 
Governors 
reserves 
the 
right 
to 
reject anv or all bids submitted. 
Board of Governors 
Berger Hosnltal 
Bv Henry Schroeder, 
Building Committee Chairman 
James D. Stambaugh, 
Administrator 
Feb. 7. 13. 19 
............... 
■ ■ 
-----------— 
i i i ■■mm ii iii ■■ in PW i HST I 


Calendar 


Feb. 21 — Winter concert in 
LE eym — 8 p.m. free ad­ 
mission 
Feb. 22 — LE plays in TV a c ­ 
tional tournament 


Brenda Mills Is 
Good Citizen 


Brenda 
Mills was recently 
selected as the Good Citizen of 
Logan Elm High School by the 
Daughters 
of 
the 
American 
Revolution for this year. 
Brenda, the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. 
Robert Mills, was 
selected on the basis of her 
score on a citizenship test given 
several months ago and on her 
activities involving leadership, 
c o m m u n i t y 
service 
and 
patriotism. 
She will be the guest at a 
tea sponsored by the Pickaway 
Plains Chapter of the DAR later 
in February. 


tius, Denise Redman, Sherey 
Roush, and Sanndra Strewer. 
Seventh 
Grade 
— 
Scott 
B o w e r , 
Sandra 
Chambers, 
Dawn Redman, Creagh Hum­ 
phrey, Susan Mayberry, Jayne 
McAfee, Tim Pusey. 
Eighth 
Grade: 
Carl Dean, 
Carla Hobble, Debbie Bedman, 
Mike Williams. 


FRESHMEN CAGERS — Tim Hailey (left) and Wertle Teetp 
ire the Logan Elm players of the week. Both cagers are fresh* 
men. 


How l Valwi In m ry Jvpxrtiw—4 
TWO DAYS ONLY — FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 


LARGE ASSORTMENT 
JEWELRY ZZ 


CLOSEOUT 1 2 


Women’s 
HALF 
SLIPS 


27 Only 


8 Only 
Buy Now! 
INFANTS' $-1.64 
JACKETS 


22 Only — Infants* 
HALF 
SLIPS 


Reg. $1.00 
36 
c 


One Group 
Values 
WOMEN'S 
“’IT 
BLOUSES 
7 2 
WHILE THEY LAST! 


One Group 
Values 
WOMEN'S 
BLOUSES T 
3 
WHILE THEY LAST! 


17 Only — Boys’ Winter 
COATS & “ 


JACKETS S4“ 


IO Only 
Reg. $5.94 
BOYS' 
$034 


JACKETS I 


FABULOUS BUY! 
GREETING 
mc 
CARDS 4 


FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


WOMEN'S - IO 
SLIPPERS 


Reg. $1.94 
c 


WHILE THEY LAST! 


Men’s 
Reg. $3.96 
FLANNEL jq [j 
SHIRTS 
L 
WHILE THEY LAST! 


Men’s 
Reg. $2.99 
FLANNEL 
$-1^3 
SHIRTS 
I 
Only 3$ 


21 Only — Children’s 


Reg. $10.94 
Jackets 
and 
Snow Suits 
s o * 


1$ Only 
Reg. $9.94 
Children's j n j 
Jackets 
0 
Size 18 Mob. to Size 2 


5 Only — Smith-Corona Electric 
$75.00 Value 
ADDING r - ; 


MACHINE J I 
.94 


R.C.A. Portable 
$75.00 Value 
DECOUD .n j! 
PLAYED ‘H I 
2 Speakers 
8 Only 


14 
The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
AooHo 9 And G e » Reedy; I STONEROCK^ 14th 
Glenn Flight Anniversary 
/t 


CAPE KENNEDY. Fla. (AP) 
— On the seventh anniversary 
of John Glenn's historic orbit 
flight, the three Apollo 9 astro­ 
nauts have passed their final 
major preflight test and are 
ready to take man's naict step 
toward the moon. 
Air Force Cod. James A. Mc- 
Divitt, Air Force bt. Col. David 
H. Scott and civilian Russell L. 
Schweickart participated in a 
critical 
countdown 
rehearsal 


Wednesday. 
Launch 
officials 
termed it successful and gave 
the go-ahead to start the lengthy 


I final countdown at 11:30 p.m 
EST Saturday. 
Apollo 9 is to blast off on an 
earth orbit trip at ll a.m. Feb. 
28. 
The mechanics and machin­ 
ery for sending man into space 
have changed radically since 
Glenn blazed a space trail bv 
becoming 
die 
first 
orbiting 


Com m unity Contributes 


T o Players Production 


“It's hard to imagine the tota1 will 
be 
assisting 
with 
community effort which goes styling to go along with the 
into s t a g i n g a play like costumes. 
“ Splendor in the Grass," which 
opens 
Friday." 
So 
stated problem since the set could not 
William "Bud" Pike, president be built at the junior high. 
of the Roundtown Players. "If Through the help of Block’s 
it were not for numerous in- Shoe store, an empty building 
dividuals, 
organizations, 
and yeas provided rent-free for the 
businesses 
around 
Pickaway players. Mason’s Furniture also 
County, this play could not have helped the set committee by 
been produced for the com- providing storage for building 
munity with the style which is materials between plays. 
apparent in it.” 
The ticket committee needed 
As an example of the com- s assistance 
by having places 
rn unity effort. Pike pointed to where 
people 
could 
readily 
costuming. Authentic costumes | obtain tickets. Bingman’s and 
of the late 1920’s have been; Risch’s 
Drugs, 
along 
with 
loaned to the Roundtowners by i Lindsey’s Bakery and Porter’s 


American Feb. 20, 1962. 
The balding Marine lieutenant 
colonel was reaching for the 
first plateau in the exploration 
of space. American astronauts 
today stand on the threshold to 
the moon and may land there 
next summer. 
Glenn rode in Atlas rocket 
that stood 65 feet tall. The Apol­ 
lo 9 ship alone, with its three 
sections, measures SI feet, and 
the Saturn 5-spacecraft combi­ 
nation towers 363-feet above the 
launch pad. 
Fueled by kerosene and liquid 
oxygen, the one-stage Atlas gen­ 
erated 367,000 pounds of thrust 
Saturn 5’s three stages, burning 
i the same propellant, have total 
hair thrust of 9,082,000 pounds. 
Little use w as made of com­ 
puters during the countdown in ! 
, 
[Glenn’s day. Officials estimate! 
St l,, con!™ Cti C'n 
that if tte same physical means 
of checkout were used today, a 


individuals, 
b v 
Circleville 
High’s Curtain Callers, and by 
the Players Club of Columbus. 
But getting the costumes was 
only half the battle. They have 


Saturn 5 countdown might last 
as long as three months, instead 
of six days. 
Glenn orbited the earth three 
times in 4 hours 55 minutes. 
The Apollo 9 spacemen are to 
orbit for IO days in the most 
complex 
U.S. 
man-in-space 
j flight yet. It will be the first test 
of the lunar module (LEM) 
which is designed to land men 
on die moon. 
Schweickart plans a two hour 
space walk. 
L a u n d r y , 
provided 
this 
_ 
_ 
_ 
_ 
_ 
assistance free of charge. 
( C L * 
T 
L l 
A 
“Our 
publicity 
committee; J O D I ll 
I O M O G G 
operates almost exclusively on 
t h e 
basis 
of 
community 
to be returned clean, which is cooperation,” said Pike. “We 
a real problem with dresses j-dy qq the community service 
covered with thousands of beads policies of both the Herald and 
f a s t e n e d 
on 
by 
threads w nRE to make the news of 


Committee For 


Fluoridation - 


weakened with 40 or more years 
of age. Costume chairman Lois 
our productions available to the! 
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A 
citizenry.” Charges for l a y i n g I Pioneer in the development of 
Smith 
said the problem was put and printing the programsi a P01*0 vaccine was 
named 
solved by Porter’s Laundry,I have to be deferred by selling j Wednesday to head a citizens 
which 
researched 
how 
such j advertising. Many community i committee seeking fluoridation 
craning used to be done and businesses*' banks, and 
l o c a l 
01110 water. 
industry cooperated by buying j 
0 r- Albert Sabin of Cincinnati 
ads, even though 
most 
ad- ^ 
chau* to* 23-member Ohio 
v ersers rocognJzTthat ads are! Citizens Committee for Fluori- 
really 
more of a 
donation. [ dihon- Cochairmen are J. Wil-; 
Publicity 
photographs 
were I >?am Henderson, Columbus in-: 
taken, processed, and donated ^ 
tm list, 
former State 
Sen. Frank W. King, president 


WHI handle the job for the 
Players. Eileen’s Beauty Sh en 


Protest* Planned 
Against Recruiters 
OBERLIN. Ohio (AP)—Three by Ned Schreiner, 
student groups planned demon* I 
in addition to all of the above, 
strations today to greet military hundreds of hours of volunteer 
recruiters visiting the Oberlin labor are given by all of the 
Co.lege campus. 
Roundtown Players who are in 
Marine recruiters scheduled the cast and those who build, 
13 job interview's with students paint, sew, handle lighting, sell 
through 
the 
day, 
a 
college tickets, write news releases, 
spokesman reported. 
usher, and otherwise help out. 
I j 
I 
According to Pike, “Operating 
M a s te r P la n S e t 
on a small budget as we do. 
YOUNGSTOWN. Ohio (AP)— we depend 
on support and 
A new master plan for expan- assistance from the community 
aion of Youngstown State Uni- in 
order to 
provide live 
versify to accommodate 25,000 dramatic 
arts 
to the com- 
students by 1980 will be drawn munity. We owe a great debt r e s i g n e d 
his position 
as I 
up, it was announced Wednes- 
of thanks to all 
those whose1 Pickaway County 
Dunn 
and 11 
day. The school now has 14,500 participation 
enables 
us 
to \ Bradstreet 
correspondent, 
ef- 
students. 
j continue.” - 
- I fective February IO. 


of the Ohio AFL-CIO. 
The committee will work for ; 
passage of a Senate bill that 
would require fluoridation of all 
public water supplies that serve 
more than 5,000 people. 
Promoters say controlled flu­ 
oridation of water effectively re­ 
duces tooth decay. 


Business Briefs 


Raymond M. Anions Jr. has 


You're Invited to Free Clinic 
HOW TO INSTALL 
ROXITE 


Fiberglas Brick and Stone Paneling 
9 to 12 SATURDAY 
*3: 


I 


4 


ip* 
MORNING FED. 22ND 


at 150 Edison Avenue 
FREE COFFEE and DONUTS 


Factory representatives will show you how easy it is to beautify a room 
with pre-mortared Roxite brick or stone panels. 


SPECIAL SATURDAY ONLY . . . 


10% Off Roxite Panels, Reg. $3.84 to 


$4.55 ea. - 45,,xl0" and I by 4 Ft. 


DON'T FORGET 


Our February Fix-up Sale Lasts 


Through Feb. 28th — 10% Off Stock 


• Bruce Paneling 
• Armstrong Ceiling and 


• Johns-ManVille Floor Tile 
CIRCLEVILLE 
LUMBER CO. 


FOR OVER 55 YEARS — A BETTER PLACE TO BUY 
150 Edison Ave. — 474-3179 


CELEBRATION 
SALE CONTINUES - 


WITH 
IHE YEAR'S BIGGEST 
SAVINGS ON FAMOUS 
APPLIANCES! 


A ' 


BUY NOW 


WASHERS 
DRYERS 


Down Payment 
No Payment 


AS LOW 
AS 
IIP; 


AS LOW 
AS 


BIG FAMILY SIZE 


— 
Whirlpool Refrigerators 


As Low 
$ 


As 


Our First No-Frost 
REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER 


With Automatic Icc-Maker — 


p 
l l 
1 1 . 


^ & 
i i 


, 
W/s&m 
rn'im 
% Wk 
wm 


I w 


As Low as 


18,500 BTU's 


Air Conditioner 


Whirlpool 
AIR CONDITIONERS 


At Pre-Season Low Prices! 
s78‘°° 


s 
2 
1 
8 
0 
0 
STONEROCK’S 
TV & APPLIANCES 
124 E. Main St. 
474-4/56 


HERE’S A DOUBLE HAPPENING 
- STONEROCK'S 14th ANNIVERSARY 
CELEBRATION COINCIDES WITH THE 
l l f 
f 
l H 
i 
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with remote control. 
I Many models to choose trom. 
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Sylvania'* priceless Color TV features include: Color bright 85* 
picture tube with the industry's sharpest picture contrast— every set has 
one • Full 295 sq. in. viewable picture area • Adjust each VHF channel 
once— pre-set fine tuning will always “remember” that setting • “Picture- 
matjc” AFC Automatic Fine Tuning gives you precision tuning at your 
fingertips faster that you can tune manually • Convenient “no guesswork” 
color tuning controls • Advanced Gibraltar™ chassis with plug-in tran­ 
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$ 5 9 9 . 0 
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BCF466P Elegant Spanish Provincial style 
designed in Pecan veneers and select 
wood solids. Includes variable tone con­ 
trol for full rich sound from tv/in 7" oval 
•peckers. See Color TV features above 


*549- SAVE *50 
PCF521W Superb Contemporary style 
finished in luxurious “Cliffhouse” Walnut 
veneers and select wood solids. Variable 
tone control. See Color TV features men 
honed above. 


’650“ SAVE *45 
♦CF543W Distinctive Scandinavian style 
console on Scandia base finished in 
oiled Walnut veneers and select wooc 
solids. Gliding tambour doors revea 
viewing and control area. See Color TV 
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# CF523W Exciting Scandinavian style 
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veneers and select wood solids. Variable 
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sole of handcrafted Maple veneers and 
select wood solids. Deluxe overhang top 
and full credenza base. See Color TV 
features mentioned above. 


NOW 
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console in oiled Walnut veneers and 
select wood solids. Twin 7" oval speak­ 
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NOW 
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finished in Pecan veneers and select 
wood solids. Full credenza base and de­ 
luxe overhang top. See Color TV fea­ 
tures mentioned above. 


*529°“ SAVE *30 


CF512K Rustic Early American console 
in Maple veneers and select wood solids 
with deeply carved spooled legs and 
scalloped gallery. Variable tone control. 
See Color TV features mentioned above. 


*619- SAVE *31 


#CF540W Fresh Contemporary styling in 
Oiled Walnut veneers and select wood 
solids. Gliding tambour doors reveal 
viewing and control orea. See Color TV 
features mentioned above. 


•619" SAVE *31 
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sign of distressed ‘‘Fireglow" Maple 
veneers and select wood solids. Spooled 
legs and deeply scalloped gallery. Glid­ 
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ware. See Color TV features above. 


# Sylvanio's “Ultramatic" Full Function Remote Control 
Systom is fully transistorized for instant response and utmost 
dependability. You can tune your pictures perfectly with continu­ 
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immune to false triggering. 


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Sylvanio's pricoltss stereo features Include: Finest cabinetry (authenti­ 
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loudness control • Individual cut/boost bass and treble controls • Tape 
and extra speaker jacks. 


* *695- SAVE *100 


SC315W Distinctive Contemporary con­ 
sole. Cabinet of oiled Walnut veneers 
and select wood solids . Push button 
control center. Dual 1015 Automatic 
Turntable. 200 Watt (EIA) amplifier and 
PM Stereo/FM/AM tuner, all solid state. 


•650” SAVE *100 


SC298BT Regal louis XVI period styling 
in physically distressed Butternut veneers 
and select wood solids. Dual 1015 Auto 
matic Turntable. I OO Watt (EIA) solid state 
amplifier. FM Stereo/FM/AM tuner with 
d’Arsonval signal strength tuning meter. 


*439* SAVE *56 


SC277C Distinctive French Provincial 
styling in Cherry veneers and select 
wood solids. Overhang top and full cre­ 
denza base. Garrard Custom Profes­ 
sional Automatic Turntable. 50 Watt 
(EIA) amplifier, FM Stereo/FM/AM tuner 
with d’Arsonval tuning meter. 


’349°° SAVE *50 
SC271W Fresh Contemporary design 
crafted in Walnut veneers and select 
wood solids. Center panels of patterned 
Ash Burl. Garrard Custom Deluxe Auto­ 
matic Turntable. Powerful 50 Watt (EIA) 
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MANY OTHER MODELS, VALUES-AND SAVINGS. SEE THEM NOW. 
TM—Trod.iT.ork S,ivon.o El.clrlc Product* Inc. 
STONEROCK’S summa Dtaur 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
15 
CLrclevUle. Ohio 
Special Tax Breaks Eyed 
For Poverty War Workers 


WASHINGTON (AP) — The 
Nixon administration is mulling 
over the prospect of special tax 
breaks for both big business and 
the average housewife to enlist 
them as volunteers in the war 
on poverty. 
One suggestion would let tax­ 
payers deduct the value of time 
spent on charity work. 
Another would permit corpo­ 
rations to write off part of their 
costs on projects to improve 
employment, 
education 
and 
housing in the slums. 
The House Ways and Weans 
Committee, which has buried 
proposals for special tax credits 
in the past, is expected to be 
cool toward these ideas too. Its 
chairman. Rep. Wilbur Mills, 
D-Ark., is among the House’s 


leading opponents of such tax 
credits. 
Senate Republican Leader E v­ 
erett M. Dirksen of Illinois said 
after a White House meeting 
Tuesday that President Nixon 
plans a special message to Con­ 
gress on tax incentives to en­ 
courage efforts to fight poverty. 
Nixon was already sending 
Congress today a message to 
spell out a major reshaping of 


Arab 
Roadi-deth Kit 


The 2 P j r t M e t h o d [ h ot 


P r o f e s s i o n a l h t e r m i n a t o i s 


U s e on T o u g h R o a c h l o b s 


S 
’ 


whew ctlienA fault J 


•ort* immediate and 
i ^ 
^ 
lasting result*. Easy 
ta use. Guaranteed to 
give professional-exterminator 
re*u)t» when used at directed- 


JIM'S 


PAY and SAVE 


400 N. Court St. 


Interstate Meat 


Movement Eyed 


By Hardin, OFBF 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Secre­ 
tary of Agriculture Clifford M. 
Hardin told an Ohio farm leader 
Wednesdv that he felt present 
law might be changed to per­ 
mit interstate movement of fed 
orally approved meat. 
Morris Allton, vice president 
of the Ohio Farm Bureau said 
Hardin indicated “ that the pres 
cnt federal-state cooperative in­ 
spection program could be more 
flexible and still provide ade 
quate protection to consumers.*' 
Allton and Rep. Clarence M il­ 
ler, R-Ohio, met with Hardin to 
discuss changes proposed by the 
Farm Bureau in the 1068 Whole­ 
some Meat Law. 
The Farm Bureau says the 
law creates problems for live­ 
stock producers and meat pack­ 
ers because it prohibits inter­ 
state commerce, although the 
state’s new meat inspection pro 
gram meets federal standards 


the Office of Economic Oppor­ 
tunity, shifting two of the big­ 
gest 
antipoverty 
programs— 
Head Start and Jobs Corps—to 
different agencies. 
One source said the message 
included mention of tax breaks 
to bring more businesses and 
jobs to the slums. 
Among ideas that have sur­ 
faced at one stage or another in 
the Nixon administration: 
—A provision to “ permit vol­ 
unteers . . . to deduct the value 
of their charitable work from 
their income tax base.** 
—Changes to “ permit busi­ 
ness firms to deduct as tax cre­ 
dits 25 per cent of their outlays 
for such slum-area programs as 
job training, crime prevention, 
housing 
and 
education. 
The 
credit should not exceed one per 
cent of the organization’s an­ 
nual federal income tax.” 
—Other tax changes to en­ 
courage repair and replacement 
of time-worn buildings in the 
*slums. 
Tax deducations for 25 
per 
cent of college expenses. 
—More liberal deductions for 
gifts to non-profit organizations. 


FARM 
FENCING 


and Supplies 


BARB 


WIRE 


WOOD GATES 


METAL GATES 


STEEL POSTS 


Koppers Pressure- 


Treated Posts 
LANDMARK 
STORE 


312 W. Mound St. 


Saxbe Choice 
Is Fought 
By Solons 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — 
Five Republican congressmen 
may try to block appointment 
of U.S. Sen. W illiam B. Saxbe’s 
choice for U.S. Attorney in the 
Northern District of Ohio, it was 
reported Wednesday. 
Target of their attack is Rob­ 
ert Krupansky of Cleveland. A 
Republican, Krupansky pract­ 
ices law with a widely known 
Democrat. He served in the ad­ 
ministration of Gov. Frank J. 
Lausche. 
Reports from Washington in­ 
dicated the five congressmen 
felt Krupansky was “ too close 
to certain political cliques,” in 
Cleveland. 
Krupansky is a law partner of 
Howard M. Metzenbaum, promi- 
ent Cuyahoga Democratic lead­ 
er who has 
campaigned for 
Hubert Humphrey and U.S. Sen. 
Stephen M. Young. 
* Krupansky has the backing 
of Saxbe and Young as well as 
.the Cuyahoga County GOP or­ 
ganization. 
The 
congressmen 
include 
Reps. Frank P. Bow of Canton 
William H. Ayres of Akron, W il­ 
liam E. Minshall of Lakewood, 
W’illiam M. MeCulloch of Piqua 
and Charles A. Mosher of Ober­ 
lin. 


Real Estate Tax 
Hearing Scheduled 
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)—T ie 
Ohio Board of Tax Appeals hfs 
scheduled 
a 
public 
hearing 
March 24 to consider* proposed 
changes in board rules govern­ 
ing assessment and equalization 
of real estate. 
I 
The proposed changes are tie 
result of an Ohio Supreme Ccitt 
order last December that tie 
board amend its rules for tfe 
assessment of real property l>y 


I uniform rule according to valij;. 


SPE C IA L NOTICE TO O U R C O M P E T IT O R S ... 
STAND U P AND 
B E COUNTED I 


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ONLY LINDSAY HAS SOLID BRASS VALVES 


it other two hava plastic valuta, 
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See No Change Before 'IO Tucson Golf 
Redskins W hip Western Michigan 
In Ohio Cage Tourney Site 


By HAI. TARIS 
COLUMBUS, Ohio < AIM—The 
recent clamor to change the site 
of the Ciass AA regional basket 
ball tournament at Columbus ap­ 
pears to have stirred some ac­ 
tion in high circles. 
But the Ohio High School 
Athletic Association makes it 
clear that no changes in the cur­ 
rent format can be expected be­ 
fore 1970 at the earliest. 
In a terse statement issued 
Wednesday, the OHSAA said: 
“All plans and details for con­ 
ducting the 1969 Ohio high school 
sectional, district, regional and 
state 
basketball 
tournaments 
were completed well in advance 
of the tournaments. 


“With the tournament sched­ 
ule 
already 
under 
way, 
no 
changes in sites or dates will be 
made unless there is an em er­ 
gency such as fire, flood or 
some natural calamity. 
“The state board of control 
will give serious consideration 
to proposed changes in sites for 
the 1970 tournaments.’’ 
The mo\e to get the central 
regional out of the ancient state 
Fairgrounds Coliseum and into 
Ohio University's new Convoca­ 
tion Center was initiated by the 
Marietta Times. 
The cry for a change is based 
on two rn a tor factors: 
j 
I. Several Columbus schools, 
I including No. I ranked Colum- 


Tournament 
Opens Today 
bus East, play some of their 
regular season games in the 
Coliseum. This gives the central 
Ohio teams a home court ad­ 
vantage both in district and reg­ 
ional play. 
2. The Convocation Center in 
Athens provides a much more 
modern facility in which to hold 
the regional tournament. 
Schools in the eastern and 
southeastern districts, who com- were 
among 
those 
pete in the central regional,; prominently 
in 
the 
figure they would get a better 
break playing in Athens. It has 
been years since a Class AA 
school from the east or south­ 
east has been able to capture 
a regional title. 
SPORTS 


16 
The Circleville Herald. Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
C ircleville. Ohio 


EXERCISING THEIR RIGHTS—AND LEFTS—Three members of 
the St. Louis Cardinals give it the early gym exercise bit la 
S t Louis aa they await the opening of the Cards’ camp at 
S t Petersburg, Fla. From left are pitchers Nelson Briles 
and Steve Carlton and third baseman Mike Shannon. 


The Results 


Ohio College BasketbaU 
By THE 
ASSOCIATED 
PRESS 
(W ednesday Night) 
M iami 
68. 
W esetrn 
M ichigas 
62 
M arshall 
85. 
Toledo 
8.i 
Bluffton 78 
D efiance 74 
Cincinnati 96. Dayton Go 
Central 
State 
61. 
Findlay 
39 
Walsh 79. Urbana 66 
Ohio High School BasketbaU 
(W ednesday N ight) 
Sectional 
Tournam ents 
CLASS \ \ 
At Cuyahoga F alls 


QUESTIONS 
1—Norm D r n c k e r , Earl 
Strom, Manny Sokol and Men* 
Ay Randolph all have the aune 
Job in aporia. What sport? 
2—What is the name et the 
backwards high Jumper who 
won the Olympic title? 
3—Who la Bos Moebacher In 
•porta? 
HOOHIE? 
A FORMER 
football star at 
Minnesota, 
h e 
became a famed 
football coach, 
entered politics, 
became a TV 
c om m entator 
and now is a 
m e m b e r 
of 
M 
President Nix- 
B i "' 'Mn. JMI 0118 team. 
ANSWERS 
‘tnrtusttpvA Sin yea pourer—g 
•Xanqsoj JPK! ~ Z 
•ivpiwo VEN 
aa/»UX 
TTeqiaifsvq 
oi«j— I 
(-uosuiiHbVt PUS :»qooH* 
D istributed by Central Press 


St. Louis Blues 
Beat Philadelphia 
The 
N a t i o n a l 
Hotkey 
League 'a battle for playoff spots 
is tight just about everywhere 
except in St Louis, where the 
happy-go-lucky Blues serenely 
roll towards the West Division 
pennant. 
The Blues assured themselves 
of the inevitable playoff spot 
Wednesday night, beating Phila­ 
delphia 
3-1 
and 
maintaining 
their West lead at 25 points over 
Oakland, which treat Chicago 5* 
2 


In other AHL action. Montreal 
and Lesion both lost and re­ 
mained lied for the East Divi­ 
sion 
lead. 
The 
Bruins 
were 
blanked by Pittsburgh 3-0 fo r 
their third straight ioss and 
Montreal s seven-game unbeat­ 
en siring was ended by Toronto. 


Kent R oosevelt 35, Akron Ho- 
ban 32 
Akron North 47, Akron W alsh 
44 
At Canton 
Canton M cKinley 101, Lake 40 
W est Branch t,2. 
M inerva 52 
At 
Cloverleaf 
Triw ay 61. Medina 57 
At 
E astlake 
North 
E astlak e North 86, E. C leve­ 
land Collinwood 46 
At Akron Firestone 
Akron Buchtel 63. 
R evere 45 
Akron Kenm ore 72. G reen 47 
At Youngstown 
Youngstown B o r d m a n 72, 
Cam pbell-M em orial 45 
Salem 47, Youngstown E ast 48 
Class \ 
At 
New 
Concord 
Zanesville R osecrans 74. Rrs«. 
Ville 51 
N ew Athens 75. B arnesville 73 
At North R idgeville 
Firelands 69. W ellington 56 
Avon 71. Cleveland st. John 
At W ooster 
Dalton 66. Black River an 
Sm ithville 81. M apleton 62 
At Steubenville 
Dillonvale 71, Pow hatan 62 
Stanton 
39. 
Shadvsuie 
?s 


Scholastic Sidelights: 
Collins W e s t e r n Reserve, 
fourth ranked in Class A, finish­ 
ed 18-0 for its first unbeaten sea­ 
son in school history. But Col­ 
lins had to survive a 67 - 66 
scare from Class AA Edison to 
stay unbeaten. 
Euclid won its second straight 
Lake Erie League title Friday 
when it defeated Parma 62-50. 
Cleveland John Adams whipped 
Cleveland West Tech 67-65 in a 
city championship tiff. Adams, 
15-2, reeled off ll straight points 
in the final two minutes while 
Tech was going scoreless. 
Joe Bowers, a Sebring High 
senior, will move into tourney 
play with 44 straight from the 
free throw' line. The string ex­ 
tends through the past ll games. 
The 
Butler County 
scoring 
race wras settled by a single 
point. Gary Cameron of Oxford 
Talawanda won honors with 379 
points while Gary Dees of New 
Miami finished with 378. 
Luke Witte of unbeaten Mar- 
lington won the Stark County 
< scoring race with 594 points in 
; TS games but the nifty seven- 
footer fell short of the 600 mark 
desoite 59 points in a pair of 
victories 
last 
weekend. 
Nick 
Weatherspoon of second ranked 
j Canton McKinley was runnerup 
I with 444 points. 
Licking Valley could be the 
I team to watch in Class A cen­ 
tral 
Ohio 
tournaments. 
The 
Panthers, 
gunning 
for 
their 
sixth straight sectional title, wal­ 
loped Newark Catholic 69 - 45 
Saturday, Valiev is 90-18 over 
the last five years. 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS I can Conference basketball cham- 
Miami—apparently sparked by pionship by defeating Western 
a halftime pep talk—clinched at i Michigan 68-62 Wednesday night. 
least a share of the Mid-Ameri- 


Floridians Top 


Colonels, 119-115, 


In ABA Action 


46 


Bullets Down 


Lakers, 110-88; 


Big Wilt Mad 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
The Los Angeles Lakers won 
the war of words hut the Balti­ 
more Bullets took the battle of 
baskets. 
The amazing Bullets survived 
a tongue-lashing from 
moun­ 
tainous Wilt C h a m b e r l a i n 
Wednesday night and shot down 
the 
Lakers 
116-88. 
That 
in­ 
creased their lead in the Nation­ 
al 
Basketball 
Association’s 
Eastern Division to four games 
over New York and 4' 2 over 
I Philadelphia, both of which lost 
The Knick'- dropped a 110-100 
decision to Cincinnati while San 
Francisco blasted the 76ers 134- 
117. 
In the only other NBA 
game 
Detroit downed Seattle 
131-124. 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
The Miami Floridians are not 
exactly pulling away in the I 
bunched Eastern Division race j 
of the American Basketball As­ 
sociation, but they are putting 
some daylight between them 1 
and three challengers. 
The 
Floridians 
edged 
IM*, 
games ahead of idle second 
place Minnesota with a 119-115 
s q u e a k e r 
over 
Kentucky 
Wednesday night, dropping the 
Colonels into fourth place V i 
games 
back. 
Idle 
Indiana 
moved up to third, two games 
behind. 
In other games New Orleans 
downed Houston 112-107 and Los 
Angeles edged Dallas 116-114. 


TUCSON, Ariz. CAP) — Golf’s 
younger brigade takes another 
swing at the big money with the 
opening today of the $100,000 
Tucson Golf Tournament 
Jack Ewing, Larry Ziegler, 
Jerry Abbott and Jim Wiechers 
figuring 
Phoenix 
Open last week and there are a 
host of others in the 144 player 
field to challenge the stars. 
Still most of the interest here 
centers on Gene Littler, the 
tournament winner at Phoenix 
with 263 and leading money win­ 
ner on the tour this year at 
$48,028 and defending champion 
George Knudson of Canada. 
A year ago, Knudson won both 
at Phoenix and Tucson duplicat­ 
ing Littler’s feat of 1959. 
They play over the 7,305-yard 
Tucson 
National 
Golf 
Club 
course, a par 36-36—72 layout 
where 
Wednesday’s 
pro-ama­ 
teur ran into foul weather prob­ 
lems. 
Bill Ogden of Tucson and Bob­ 
by Mitchell of Danville, Va., set 
the pace among the individual 
pros with five-under-par 67s. 
Dave Stockton carded 68 while 
both Rod Funseth and Paul Har 
nev were at 69. 
The pro-am team competition 
proved 
unusual. 
Terry 
Dill 
started with Tucson amateurs 
Chuck and Frank Ostermau and 
Jim Watson. At the end of nine 
holes. Dill was forced to with­ 
draw because of the weather 
and because he is recovering 
from a recent illness. 
Terry Wilcox agreed to ac­ 
company the amateurs as a sub­ 
stitute pro but his score would 
not count. Dill had even par but 
the trio of amateurs finished 17 
under at 55. They all had hefty 
handicaps. Frank Osterman at 
18, his brother Chuck at l l and 
Watson nine. 
At Phoenix, 
Ew'ing, 24, of 
Bakersfield, 
Calif., 
carded 
rounds of 67-66-66-68—267, one 
stroke below the previous tour­ 
nament record, but had to be 
content with a tie for fifth place 
and $3,633. Ziegler, 29, of Bonne 
Terry, Mo., was at 269. Abbott. 
27, 
Boca 
Raton, 
Fla., 
and 
Wiechers, 24, of Atherton, Calif., 
each finished 270. 
Veteran Billy Maxwell, who 
deadlocked for 
second place 
with Don January and Miller 
Barber, said of the new crop, 
“They’re bigger, taller and can 
really hit the long ball.” 
That long ball probably will 
be more valuable in Tucson 
than in Phoenix since the course 
measures 
nearly 
1,000 yards 
longer. 


QUITTING TIME—A veteran 
of the pro football w a n for 
a dozen years, Forrest Gregg, 
offensive tackle of the Pack- 
en , has announced he is re­ 
tiring as a player. He said 
he’d like to coach. 


New Cracks 


In Baseball 
Fight Seen 


Ralph Eagan Leads 
PBA Cougar Open 
PARAMUS, 
N J. 
(AP) 
- 
Ra-ph Engan, Monsey, N.Y 


NEW YORK (AP) — The ma­ 
jor 
league 
players’ 
boycott 
shows some signs of cracking, 
but not enough to keep their 
representatives from rejecting 
another pension offer from the 
club owners. 
A number of name players, 
such as Pat Jarvis, Tom Seav- 
er, Jerry Grote and George 
Scott, 
said 
Wednesday 
they 
would report to spring training. 
And owner Francis Dale of 
the Cincinnati Reds says that’s 
just the beginning. 
“The real test of the players 
hasn’t come yet,” Dale said in 
Cincinnati. “I cain tell you there 
are a lot of players signed and 
lot more ready to. We really 
haven’t tested (Marvin) Miller’s 
control of his men.” 
That brought a response from 
Miller, the executive director of 
the Major League Players Asso­ 
ciation. “Ibis proves it is all a 
stalling tactic to try to break 
the 
Association 
wide 
open,” 
Miller said in New York. 
Earlier in the day the player 
representatives had overwhelm­ 
ingly turned down the latest 
proposal by the owners to hike 
the pension $1.2 million to $5.3 
million. 
The players had rejected a 
previous $1 million increase by 
a big margin and Dick Moss, 
counsel for the Association, said 
player representatives did not 


Coach Tates Locke said he 
told his boys during the inter­ 
mission to loosen up and “just 
throw the ball into the hole.” 
Locke said his team was tight 
during the first half from title 
pressure that “ sarted last week 
at Ohio U.” when the second- 
place Bobcats upended* Miami 
Little Mike Wren, the Red­ 
skins’ 5-foot-8 sophomore guard, 
agreed his teammates were tight 
and said strategy also slowed 
them down a bit. 
“We put something new in this 
week (to battle the zone) and 
we wanted to make sure we 
were set up,” he said. “We were 
reluctant to shoot.” 
Miami trailed much of the 
first half and managed a 30-30 
haltime tie on Ray Loucks’ tip- 
in with 30 seconds left. 
The lead seesawed until mid­ 
way through the second period 
when Frank Lukacs, who top­ 
ped the Redskins with 18 points, 
put Miami ahead for good 50-49 
on a jump shot. Miami then 
reeled off 12 more points to the 
Broncos’ three during the next 
five minutes of play. 
Western Michigan’s Gene Ford 
had a game-high 20 points. 
The victory gave Miami a 9-2 
MAC record with only one game 
left to play. Challenging Ohio 
University, now 7-3, has two 
games left. 
In another MAC coolest, last- 
place Marshall edged Toledo, 
83-82. Toledo, preseason favorite 
to win the MAC title, now is 4-6 
and in fifth place. 
Marshall won the game on a 
20-foot jump shot by Dan D’An- 
toni with 12 seconds left to play. 
The shot came after the Thund­ 
ering Herd stalled for nearly a 
minute to set it up. D’Antoni led 
scorers with 33 points. Steve Mix 


was tops for Toledo with 24. 
Cincinnati humiliated Dayton 
96 • 60 in the Bearcats’ 13th 
straight victory over the Flyers. 
Cincinnati erupted for 22 straight 
points early in the game and had 
a 34-9 lead midway through the 
first period. Dan Ogietree paced 
the Bearcats with 20 points; Dan 
Sadder led the Flyers with 16. 
The Mid - Ohio Conference 
standing tightened up as Bluffton 
knocked Defiance off its lonely 


perch in first place by defeating 
the Yellow Jackets 79-71. 
The 
loss dropped Defiance into a lead 
tie with Cedarville with 7 - 3 
marks. Bluffton is in second 
place at 6-3. Bluffton’s Denny 
Langhals was the game’s lead­ 
ing scorer with 31 points. Fred 
Wierwiile was high for Defiance 
with 28. 
In other games, Central State 
clobbered Findlay 61 - 39 and 
Walsh downed Urbana 79-66. 
ffiird’jrhfibmpfire 
By BILL BERO 
For Those Who A re Going South You Might 
Fry * of 1 ti' 


AMBERJACK 
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GROUPER 
IM GULF AND THE BAY, 
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AROUND GULF SAND­ 
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BAIT IS USED. LIVE 
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DURING MASON FEBRUARY 
FURNITURE SALE 
A 
d d an Extra Bedroom with a 
Hide-A-Bed Sofa by Simmons 


Hide-A-Becf sofas look like a conventional sofa, sit like a conventional sofa— and 
also contain a very comfortable full length bed. Even super size and Beautyrest 


mattresses are available. Timely styling, fine tailoring details, attractive decorator 


fabrics— all treated to resist soil. W ide variety of sizes, styles and prices. Ask about 
our convenient budget terms. 


think the new offer significant 
to>k 
4 20-pin lead after 
tw o (enough to submit to the mem- 
rounds 
Wednesday 
of 
th e 1 bership. 
Professional 
Bowlers Assoria- 
The Association is asking a 
tion $75,000 Cougar Open. 
$6.5 million pension package. 
Eagan had six-game blocks of 
1.25/ and 1,363 for a 2,620 total. 
Teata Semiz, River Edge, N.J., 
was next at 2,600. 


Bergen— Trim contempo­ 
rary in textured fabric or 
vin yl. Six.sizes. 
Sale Priced From 


Angel 
Cordero 
led 
North 
American jockeys in 1968 with 
345 winners. 


Jets Raise Price 
For All Tickets 
NEW YURK ( Ap t —The New 
York Jets, Hie American Foot­ 
ball League s fust Super Bowl 
winner Wednesday raised their 
ticket prices 33 poi’ cent for next 
season 
The Jets raised regular re­ 
sen ed seats from $5 to $6.50 
and box seats from $6 to $8 
Notice of the increase became 
known when season-ticket hold­ 
ers received a letter signed by 
Philip lf. Iselin, president of the 
club, which said “ Regretfully, 
increased 
costs 
for 
all 
em­ 
ployes, labor, materia! and sup­ 
plies, which affects everybody, 
have necessitated an increase in 
the price of your Jets tickets at 
She* Stadium.” 


More Exhibitions 
Seen In Football 
NEW YORK (AP) — Pending 
a final decision on the shape of 
the merged pro football leagues 
in 1970 at the annual meetings 
in March, it is apparent that the 
trend 
is toward 
more 
inter­ 
league 
exhibition 
games 
for 
1969. 
Regular 
season 
inter­ 
league games are expected to 
start in 1970 
The Nan Diego Chargers re­ 
cently announced their pre-sea­ 
son schedule of five games, only 
one of which will lie played 
against another American Foot- > 
ball League team. The Chargers 
will play four National Football 
league teams, all at home. The 
NFL foes will be Baltimore, 
Aug. 2. New' Orleans, Aug. 9, 
Cleveland, Aug. 23 and Los An- j 
geies, Aug. 30. The lone AFL 
team will be Oakland, Aug. IG. 


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GORDON’S 


Est. 1924 — 474-5631 


Dayton 


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Ti) 
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,Vv‘0. ii), 
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m&< r-\ 
a - 
if< 
a* ' 
lv Pick McLain 


Pro Athlete 


Of The Year 


La Salle Wins Despite Suspension Coming 


ONE’S A CROWD HERE—A rookie catcher from Binghamton, 
N.Y., Thurman Munson has the Yankee training camp at 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., all to himself as the Yanks were open­ 
ing their advance camp with or without the players—em­ 
broiled in a pension rhubarb. Munson was drafted. 


Ashlarr College 
Takes Over Lead 
In Cage Rankings 


BURBANK, Calif. (AP) — De­ 
troit hurler Denny McLain was 
named pro athlete of 1968 in the 
second annual Academy of Pro­ 
fessional Sports Awards pro­ 
gram Wednesday night. 
McLain the American League 
winner, and winners in eight 
major sports were picked in a 
poll of leading sports writers 
and sportscasters conducted by 
an accounting firm. The results 
were announced at a National 
Broadcasting Co. network pro-! 
gram. 
These 
other 
winners 
were 
named: 
Boh Gibson, St. Louis. Nation- j 
a1 League, baseball. 
Billy Casper, golf. 
Bobby Hull, Chicago Black 
Hawks, hockey. 
Wesley 
Unseld, 
Baltimore 
Bullets, basketball. 
Earl Morral!, Baltimbre Colts, 
National Football League. 
Joe Namath, New York Jets, 
American Football League. 
Angel Cordero Jr., horse rac­ 
ing. 
The football Super Bowl play 
wasn’t 
considered 
by 
the 
judges. 
Singer Perry Como was host 
for tile program, seen at NBC’s 
Burbank studio by 700 persons. 


By HERSCHEL NISSEN SON 
Associated Press Sports Writer 
The Explorers of La Salle 
aren’t going to any post-season 
tournaments but they’ll probe- 


a 
championship 
auy- 
bly win 
way. 
By 
trouncing 
eighth-ranked 
Duquesne 
85-71 
Wednesday 
night, the fourth rated Explor­ 
ers staked a big claim for the 


Fa stern 
college 
basketball 
crown But they're under NCAA 
suspension so their season will 
end after games against Detroit 
on Friday and West Chester 
next Tuesday. 


the Tar Heels eonian I catch up 
until Charlie Scott put them 
ahead 57-56 more than five min­ 
utes into the second half. The 
teams then battled through six 
ties and as many lead changes 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 
Ashland (Ohio) College found 
a perfect way to celebrate its 
rise to No. I ranking among the 
nation’s Small college basket­ 
ball team. The Eagles accepted 
a bid to the NCAA Mideast Re-; 
global College Division Tourna- j 
ment 
Ashland, winch replaced L a-1 
mar Tech at the top of The As- J 
sociated 
Press’ 
weekly 
poll 
Wednesday, agreed to host the 
Mideast regional March 7-8. 
Joining Ashland in the tourna­ 
ment was Cheney (Pa.) State, 
No. 16, the team Ashland beat in 
the first round last year. 
Ashland, the top defensive 
team in the country with a 20-1 
record through last Saturday, 
received five first place votes 
and 289 points from a 21-man 
national panel. 
Lamar, 17-2, fell to fourth aft­ 
er losing to Trinity, Tex., 83-69. 
Fairmont, W.Va., 21-1, climbed 
from fourth to second with two 
top votes and 244 points. Ken­ 
tucky Wesleyan, which won the 
NCAA tournament last year, re­ 
mained third with 206 points. 
Trinity moved from sixth to 
fifth followed by Southwestern, 
La.; Stephen F. Austin, Howard 
Payne, South Dakota State and 
South Carolina State. 
Howard Payne rocketed from 
14th to eighth and South Caro­ 
lina State spning from 19th to 


SPORTS 
Hiohliohts 


iOth as the new teams in the 
Top Ten. They replaced Long 
Beach State, which fell from 
eighth to lith. and U. of Ne- 
vada-Las Vegas, which plum­ 
meted from 10th to 17th 
Tho top 20, with first-place 
votes, season records and total 
Joints: 
1. Ashland. Ohio 5 
20-1 
2. Fairmont, W.Va. 2 21-1 
3. Ky. Wesleyan 2 
4. Lamar Tech 2 
5. Trinity, Tex. 2 
6. Southwestern, La. 
7. Stephen F. Austin 
8. Howard Payne I 
9. South Dakota St. 
10. So. Caro. St. I 
11. Loiig Beach St. 
12 Alcorn A&M 2 
13. Indiana, Pa., St. 
14. Gammon, Pa. I 
15 SW Missouri St. I 
6. Cheyney State 
17. U. Nev-Las Veg. 
18. High Point I 
19. Wittenberg 
20. Mich. Lutheran 


18-4 
17-2 
17-4 
17-' 
21-3 
20-3 
17-3 
19-2 
19-3 
21-0 
19-0 
17-5 
17-4 
19-2 
17-5 
20-1 
15-3 
23-1 


289 
244 
206 
205 
202 


165 
158 
135 
94 
92 
90 
86 
78 
78 
61 
57 
54 
45 
29 
26 


PIN BRIEFS 


PRAIRIE LANES 


Coffee Time 
High 
individual, 
single 
— 
Elisabeth Reac lim amis. 222. High 
individual, 
series 
— 
Nellie 
Esposito and Margaret Carter, 
485 
High team, 
siimglo 
— Van 
Camp Hot Mix 811. High team, 
series — Van Camp Hot Mix, 
2,252. 


Top Shooters Listed 
Shooting top scores in the 
Pickaway 
Junior 
Rifle 
Club 
competition Tuesday were Tom 
Shea and Tony Betts, 46, prone 
position; 
Dezie 
Zwayer, 
41, 
sitting; Mark Gamer and Jack 
Tate, 42, kneeling; Tim Car­ 
penter and Rick Cong rove, 39, 
standing. 


DAYTONA 
BEACH, 
Fit. 
(AP) — David 
Pearson, the 
world’s fastest stock car driver, 
predicts race laps as good as 
the 180.029 miles an hour record 
he set Wednesday as the factory 
Ford and Dodge teams squared 
off in a pair of 125-milers this 
afternoon^ 
“ There should be some 190 
laps,” the 34-year-old Spartan­ 
burg, S.C., veteran and NAS 
CAR champion said. “When the 
fast ears start drafting, they’ll 
get faster.” 


KANSAS CITY (AP) - The 
loading defensive team in the 
nation, Ashland, Ohio, has ac­ 
cepted an invitation to play in 
the NCAA Mideast Regional Col­ 
lege Division Basketball Tour­ 
nament March 7-8. 


SHOP 


too 


r 
n 


OPEN 
tt TO 9 
MONDAY 
THRU 
SATURDAY 
IO TO 6 SUNDAY 


Make it 
BEAUTIFUL 
with 
WALLPAPER 


A* i smart homemaker, you know that com­ 
pliments come when your home emanates an 
air of comfort, coziness and relaxed living. 
You know, too, that WALLPAPER is one of 
tho easiest and quickest ways to aehiava that 
impression of livability. Bast of all, the many 
selections of design and color ean point up 
your individuality as a homemaker and really 
bring forth a glow of approval. Coma in to­ 
day and ravel in our wonderful wealth of 
now styles and selections. They're soap 'n' 
water washable, tool 
__________________ 


P R E -S P R IN G 
SALE 
All Wallpaper 


Sidewall Pattern 
IN STOCK 


DISCOUNT 


250 Patterns to Choose from 
25% 


WAROELL’S 
CARPET & RUGS 
12G0 N. Court - 474-2805 


Three other -Top Ten teams before Clark’s dramatic game- 
were in action and all had to "inner. 


ARNIE ADDS MORE LOOT—Recipient of the Richardson 
▲ward for contributions to golf, Amie Palmer hangs on to 
hie trophy in New York as Bing Crosby, also honored with 
an award, has the “take” sign on. Palmer told newsmen 
that a second pro tour, a satellite tour, should be arranged 
because 
' 
in the game today. 


struggle to win. Third-ranked 
North 
Carolina 
squeaked 
by 
; Maryland 88-86 on Rusty Clark’s 
tap-in with two seconds left, 
i fifth-rated 
Davidson 
turned 
back Duke 88-80 in overtime and 
No. 7 St. John’s came from be* 


I hind in the final five minutes to 
beat Syracuse 71-63. 
La Salle used its speed to nul­ 
lify Duquesne’s towering front 
court of Barry and Carry Nel­ 
son and Gary Majors, all of 
whom stand 6-foot 9. And Ro 


I land 
Taylor 
disrupted 
the 
Dukes’ attack by hounding Bill 
Zopf. who directs it 
North Carolina s victory over 
upstart 
Maryland 
moved the 
Tar Heels back into undisputed 
possession of first place in the 


I Atlantic 
Coast 
Conference, 
breaking a tie with I2th-ranked 
South Carolina, which defeated 
Furman 63-53 in a non-league 
game. 
Maryland raced to a 28-8 lead 
during the first 13 minutes and 


Davidson had to make up five 
points in the final 1:25 to send 
its game with Duke into over­ 
time. 
A 20-foot jump shot by Dick 
DeVenzio, who scored 28 points, 
had given Duke an 8 0 -79 lead 
with seven seconds left in regu­ 
lation time But Mike Malov's 
fret' throw knotted the score and 
Davidson outscored the 
Blue 
Devils 8-0 in the overtime peri- tte fwlto'itodbkint. 


St. John's went on a 15-5 tear 
in the final five minutes to hold 
off stubborn Syracuse and the 
Orangemen’s fill center. Bill 
Smith, who had 24 points and 15 
rebounds. John Warren paced 
the Red men with 2p. 


Elsewhere. Cincinnati reeled 
off 22 straight points over an 
eight-minute stretch of the first 
half and smothered Dayton 96- 
60. Larry Lewis had 24 points 
and 21 rebounds to lead St. 
Francis of Pennsylvania to a 
77-66 triumph over Canisius. 
DePaul held fi ll Bob Lanier 
to 14 points and nipped St. Bon­ 
aventure 72-71 when Al Zetzehe 
sank two free throws with 16 
seconds left in overtime. 
Frank 
Lukacs 
and 
Ray 
Loucks keyed a late 14-3 surge 
that gave Miami of Ohio a 68-62 
victory over Western Michigan 
and clinched at least a share of 
the Mid-America Conference ti- 


Bob Wren Named 
ATHENS. Ohio (AP) — Ohio 
University baseball Coach Bob 
Wren has been named to the 
Executive 
Committee 
of 
the 
American Association of Col­ 
lege Baseball Coaches. 


APPLES 


$2.00 to $3.50 bushel 


WOODRUFF 
ORCHARDS 
Baker Rd., Stoutsville 


474-851)6 
dosed Sunday During Winter 
BmMZGoodrich 


No Money Down 
ON TIRES 
AND SERVICES 
■IC M I W 
S H 
! ] 


AU 
SIZES 


Good mileage at a low, low price! 
• Big Edge tread design! 
• High dollar value! 
2fcr *2 2 70 


DFG Customer-Minded Passenger Retread Tire Guarantee 


Any passenger retread tire, when used in a normal 
passenger car service, is guaranteed throughout the 


lite of the original tread against failure due to defective 
workmanship and materials, and against failure caused 
by road hazards, which in our opinion, render the tire 
unserviceable. 
This guaranteexloes not apply to retreads with repair­ 
able punctures, tires irregularly worn, tires damaged by 
running flat, fire, wrecks, collisions, chain cuts or ob 
stu d iou s on the automobile, nor does it apply to tues 


when used on vehicles other than a passenger automobile 
or a passenger automobile being used for commercial 
purposes. 


Any qualified retread which fails (kit to an adjustable 
condition and is prasantad to a B FG store, or authorised 
dealer, tor replacement, by its owner, shall be adjusted 
promptly and in the same manner as a new tire, according 
to tread wear and computed an currant axshania prise 
for the same site and type passenger tire retread. 


Motorola 


BIB’S BIGGEST- 
SELLING TIRE! 


• 4-PLY N Y LO N CORD 


• LO N G -W EAR IN G 
SUPER SYN RUBBER 


• BIG ED G E TR EA0 
•’i i ' m ail, tubeless. Size 7.00 x IU, plus 
si.ti I Federal Excise tux, with trade-in. 


PORTABLE COLOR TV 


• B rillian t co lo r o n 
U N F or V H F 
• A ttra c tiv e , s lim -boo 
cab ine t 
• La rg e 1 0 2 a q . rn. 
picture 
O N L Y 
S268.00 
w 
w 
N o m o n e y d o w n w ith 
$3.50 a week 
BFG's ‘‘ C h o s c e -C h a e g e '’ 


Pated as shown at B J Goodrich stoics, competitively priced at B.F.Goodneh dealers. 
GOODRICH 
HS Wall SI. - 474-75511 


Se e M IS S R A D I A L A G E present M o n d a y It Tu e sd a y N ig h t ^ 


at the M o v ie s , T h e N a m e o f the G a m e , 
T h e O u ts id e r, an d Ironsides on N B C T V . 
B l Goodrich j r 


Classifieds 


Piton* 474-3131 
Per word for 1 insertion 
7c 
(Minimum charge $1.001 
Per word for 3 insertions 
14c 
(Minimum IO words) 
Per word for 6 insertions 
21c 
(Minimum IO words* 
Per word for 24 insertions 
60c 
<4 week s t 
(Minimum IO words! 
ABOVE RATES BASED ON CON- 
SECUTIVE DAYS 
Classified word Ads will be accepted 
until 
4 
p.m. 
previous 
day for 
publication the following daw The 
publisher reserves the right to edit 
or reject any classified advertising 
copy. 
Error in Advertising 
should be reported immediately. The 
Circleville 
Herald 
will 
not 
be 
responsible for more than one in­ 
correct insertion. 


I. Card of Thanks 


We 
would 
like 
to thank 
Rev. 
Merrier 
and 
Defenbaugh 
Funeral 
Home for all their kindness and 
help given us in the death of our 
dear son. 
Howard Hill 
Also we 
would 
like 
to 
thank 
our 
m a n y 
friends 
and 
neighbors 
for 
their 
flowers food and thoughtfulness. It 
was greatly appreciated 
Mr and Mrs. Iliad Hill 


We wish to express our grateful 
appreciation to our many friends 
and neighbors for their expressions 
of sympathy during the trying hours 
after the death of our beloved 6on 
and 
brother, 
Sgt. 
Michael 
R. 
Spangler who gave his life in Viet 
Nam. January 13. 1969 in ‘he service 
of 
our 
country. 
Our 
special 
acknowledgement 
t o 
Reverend 
Donald Cummans, Military Honor 
Guard, persons who donated to the 
Memorial 
Fund. 
Logan 
Elm 
Faculty, Students and the Class of 
1965. Defenbaugh Funeral Home. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Spangler, 
Jerry and Charles 


4. Business Serries 


WATER 
Produce 
softeners 
Company. 
salt. 
Steele 


KES 
Septic 
tank 
and 
sewer 
cleaning service. Phone 474-4566. 


10. Automobiles for Solo 


1965 GTO 
4335. 
Tri-power, 4 speed 474- 


195R WILLY'S Universal Jeep, good 
condition, hew tires $500. 471-7973. 


ZENITH 
TV 
Sales 
and 
Service, j 
Keller TV Service In the Circleville, j 
Stoutsville, Tarlton area. 474-4649 


BICKERS 
Hauling 
Sendee. J E j 
Jefferson Avenue, Ashville. Phone 
983-2377, 983-3902. 
Well Drilling 


4 to 20 Inch Wells 
Also Water Line Ditching 
474-4742 
Call Jim Gobel 


For Any 
Ceiling Tile 
Needs 


Call 
CELLAR LUMBER 
474-6943 
766 S. Pickaway 


1963 CHRYSLER Newport. 4 door, 
excellent condition, power brakes, 
power steering, radio, heater 474- 
6592 
_______________________ __ 


1961 CHEVROLET, power steering 
and brakes, 283 engine. Call 474- 
4627 . 441 N. Pickaway. 


13. Apartments for Rent 


3 
ROOM 
furnished 
apartment, 
downtown area 474-3795. 


3 ROOM apt. Adults only partially 
furnished 27 Jefferson Ave., Ash­ 
ville. eau 983-2354. 


1968 
MUSTANG 
sunlight 
gold 
ic transmission, power steering, ra­ 
dio and heater, white sidewalls, un­ 
der 14,000 miles. Call 983 335o after 
5:30. 


See the New 1969 Models 
DODGE — CHRYSLER 
On Display at 
WES EDSTROM 
MOTORS 
150 East Main Street 


12. Trailers 


3 
ROOMS, 
furnished 
apartment, 
utilities pud, adults only. Also I 
sleeping room, men only 474-2282. 


4 ROOM apartment for rent, life 
baths. 
AshviUe 
474-6628 
after 
7 
p.m. 


DELUXE northend apt. 2 bedrooms, 
large living room, 
kitchen with 
disposal, birch cabinets am 
tiled bath, utility room, 
on one floor, available 
$89.50. 474-6556. 


licnen wun 
and dinette. 
I, patio, all 
e March I. 


14. Houses for Rent 


3 BEDROOMS, modern, call after 
6 p.m. 474-6877. 


5 ROOM modern home near Five 
Points 869-2855. 


3 BEDROOMS, partially furnished, 
Jefferson 
Addition 
$135. 
474-6365 
after 4 p.m. 


2. Speciol Notice 


BUYING nightcrawlers, $1.60 per 
quart Open all night Davis, 331 
Huston. 


3. Lost ond Found 


LOST: 
Black Labrador Retriever. 
Reward. 345 Brown S t Has red 
collar and chain. 


LOST 
cat in vicinity of Atwater Sc1 
Childrens pet. Reward. Call 


year old Siamese sealpoint 
' 
bool. 


4. Business Service 


rOR tbs bast in trash and rubbish 
hauling. Residential end Commer- 
cal — CaU Larry's Refust Hauler. 
474-6174. 


WELLER’S Lode and Key Shop. 
Keys 
duplicated. 
combinations 
changed Sales Service and Repair. 
165 E. High. 


HANING'S INC. 


Plumbing — Heating 
Roofing — Sheet Metal 
Pumps and Repair 
158 W. Main St. 
Call Dale Conkle 
Phone 474-4651 


FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, furnished 
trailer, caU 474-4782. 


FOR 
RENT: 
Mobile 
home. 
2 
bedroom. 12 foot wide. Shady Acres 
474-2594. 


3 CHOICE lots avaUable March I. 
Complete hook-up with patio and 
trees. Shady Acres 474-2594. 


6. Mala Help Wanted 


MAN to work on farm, 
general 
farming in beef cattle 474-3311. 


2 MEN to drive trash .ruck, at 
least 22 
years 
old. 
Chauffeur’s 
license. Larry’s. 901 CUnton Street. 


SAW Mill 
Manager 
must 
have 
su ccessfu l 
managed 
a similar 
operation. Must have a thorough 
knowledge of Ohio Species, log and 
lumber grades, timber and miU 
operations. 
timber 
and 
grade 
lumber markets. $7,800 to $9,000 
per year. Perry Wood Products 
2180 §. 3rd. Columbus, Ohio 614-444- 
7865. 


FOR SALE 1963 Elcar IO* x 55’, 
2 
bedroom, 
washer 
and 
dryer, 
$2,375.00. 983-2838. 


REAL nice 3 bedroom tfe twin single 
$110. per month, 474-3796. 


6 ROOM and bath. 
134 
Drive. Adults 474-4479. 
Nicholas 


7 ROOMS and bath, country, all 
modern. Hard surface road, 6 miles 
out, 474-5190. 


15. Sleeping Rooms 


ROOM and 
Motel 
by the week. 
1014 North Court, 
474-3467. 


17. Wanted to Rent 


WANTED land to lease or rent. 
CircleviUe 
and 
Ashville 
area. 
James Valentine Jr. 983-3670. 


18. Houses for Solo 


BY 
OWNER 
3 
bedroom, 
dining 
room, 
finished basement, 
corner 
lot. 474-2641. 
NORTHEND 


Nice 3 bedroom home with fam­ 
ily size living room and kitchen, 
bath and half, TV room, full 
basement with divided rec area; 
attached garage. Corner lot with 
very good financing and low in­ 
terest. 


MRS. JANE BARR, 474-4171 
LESLIE DEARTH, 642-5676 
MAX SPANGLER, 474-4589 
CHARLES R A D O F F , 474-4996 
RALPH ANKROM, 474-3312 
F V A N S 
A-—/ 
f ' M T N 


JOHN A. EVANS, Realtor 
121 E. Main St. — 474-4266 


20. Lots for Sale 


BEAUTIFUL 
wooded 
homesites. 
One to l>fe acres each. Seven miles 
south of Du Pont on Blackwater 
Rd. Just off Route 23. Red Bud 
Acres. Phone 642-5760. 


21. Real Estate - Trade 


CURTIS W. HIX 
R. E. Broker and Auctioneer 
— Salesmen — 
W. E. Clark - 474-4200 
Orren Stout — 474-2214 
Office 228V* N. Court St. 
Circleville. 0.-474-5190 


19. Forms for Sole 


List y >ur farms 
Ba riles. Realtor. 
with George C. 


FOR RENT three bedroom trailer, 
adults only, no pets, call Vic’s 
Pizza, 474-4886 after 5. 


BY 
OWNER, 
acre 
of 
ground, 
completely fenced with 48 x 8 ft. 
house trailer in 
good 
condition. 
Between Kingston and Lauielville 
in Whisler. $6,000. Ernest E. Kiger, 
Route I, Kingston, Ohio. Phone 655- 
2083. 


16. Misc. for Rent 


LARGE modern store room, ap- 
ixim ately 1200 sq. ft. Phone 474- 
(CaWhan’s) Reasonable. 


GARAGE for storage, 
after 5 p.m. 
call 474-4119 


18. Houses for Sole 


20. Lots for Sale 


2 ACRES wooded lot $3,230. terms. 
Write Box 637 c-o The Herald. 


Circleville Realty 


WILLIAM BRESLER, Realtor 
Off. 474-3795 
Res. 474-5722 
Robert Burton 474-3058 
Ted Huston 474-5503 
Carl Agin 474-4586 
152 West Main Street 


24. Misc. For Sole 


18 
The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
Circleville, Ohio 


24. Misc. for Sole 


LUCI’S Discount Shoe Store Save 
40-60 percent. 108 S. Court Street. 


HUMAN hair wigs. Your choice of 
style and color. Ready to wear. 
$39.00. 474-7954. 


GIBSON GSS IOO guitar amplifier, 
IOO 
watt with 4 speakers $300. Call 
474-3141. 


box 
BEDROOM 
suite, 
including 
springs and mattress, only $169.95. 
474-5577. 


24. Misc. For Sole 


1966 BSA 650, 4,000 miles, one owntr, 
474-3270. 


LOFTY pile, free from soil is the 
carpet cleaned with Blue Lustre. 
Rent electric shampooer $1. Boyer 
Hardware. 


THIS week’s 
special: 
Hollywood 
beds, complete, $59.95. 474-5577. 


SOFA, chairs, 
desk, table, 
cedar 
chest, bicycle, chest, play pen, 474- 
3697. 


CARPETS 
and 
life 
too 
can 
be 
beautiful if you use Blue Lustre. 
Rent electric shampooer $1. Jim’s 
Pay and Save. 


TIMOTHY hay $16 OO a ton call 474- 
6318. 


GOOD bank run gravel, 
Raleigh Spradlin 474-4127. 
fill dirt. 


FIREPLACE wood for sale. 229 E. 
High St. 474-4830. 


rn k'y 


W itll Cl 
k. J k 
W A N T A D P 


ELECTROLUX 
VACUUM CLEANER 


This late model cleaner has 
many attachments, runs like new 
and uses disposable bags. All 
equipped with massager, paint 
sprayer, and floor polisher. Un­ 
der I year guarantee. Available 
this week for just 6 payments of 
$5.80 each. Phone 474-3733. 


i6. Houses for Sole 


NEW LISTINGS 


CARY 
Blevins 
t m 
trimming, 
roofing, 
spouting 
and 
chimney 
w o r k . 
Free 
estimate, 
work 
guaranteed. 474-7863 or 474-2079. 


D E N V E R 
Gradates 
band 
In­ 
struments. 
Sales — 
Rentals — 
Repairs 202 N. Pickaway St Cir­ 
cleville. 
We service Instruments 
that we sell. Free tor duration of 
child's school yean- Lower rental 
rates, finest quality sendee. 


IKE'S 


Septic Tank and Sewer Cleaning 
Service. All Work Guaranteed 
To Dc sure, c a ll. . . 
474-4566 


Home 


7. Female Help Wonted 


6 WOMEN for full or part time 
work. Car necessary, interviewing 
in this area Feb. 28, Write Box 
639 oo The Herald. 


7A. Help Wanted Gen. 


New Listing — Almost new bedroom fully carpeted I story. 
Large kitchen with lots of dining space. Living room carpeted, 
storms and screens, attached garage, utility area. Located Logan 
Elm School District — $18,500.00. 


New Twiif Single — All built-in kitchens, 2 bedrooms each side, 
nice living area and breakfast nook. Washer and dryer hook-ups. 
Approximately Vi acre Logan Elm School District — $17,500.00. 


2 story older home with 5 acres. 2 bedrooms, den, living room 
and big kitchen. Country size bath. Completely remodeled. En­ 
closed back porch for utility area. Partial basement, garage anq 
barn. Fairfield County on the County Line road — $16,000.00. 


M i 
Wzm 
SPEAKMAN REALTY 


NEW LISTING — Located on large lot in north-end, center hall, 
large living room with w /b fireplace, tiled bath w/shower, 2 good 
size bedrooms, huge kitchen with dining area, full divided base­ 
ment, a 14x24 attached garage, home is in excellent condition 
throughout, priced at only $17,200 (conv). Shown by appointment, 
CALL 


JANE K. SPEAKMAN, Broker, 474-2896 


SUE SPIRES 474-2585 
RUSS PALM 474-5234 
D. H. WATT, Realtor 


APPLICATION now being taken for 
car hops, 
waitresses 
and 
dish­ 
washer at A & W Drive-In. Call 
in person 474-4217 


474-5294 


PART-TIME help to work afternoons 
and evening. Prefer high school 
boy. Call 474-3695 
NEW LISTING 


REGISTERED 
Nurses. 
licensed 
Practical Nurses, ii you have a 
day or two off a week and want 
to 
wark. 
contact 
Mrs. 
Kearns. 
Kearns Nursing Home. 174-3455. 


9. Situations Wonted 


Specialties, Inc. 
823 E. Mate Street 
474-5044 
Glass Repair 
Auto Insurance 
M. B. Griest 
If your rates have gone ap yet 
may 
save 
important 
dollars 
b; 
calling . . . 
159 E Main 
Phons 474-6284 
NATIONWIDE INSURANCE OO 
Home Office, Cohanims. Ohio 
Colonel Jim Ford 
Auction Service — Real Estate 
Repreeeotteg 
E. R. Bennett 
Realty Co. 
Phone 4174-4561 


WILL care for I or 2 people 
my home. Mt. Sterling 869-2299 


WANTED. 2 rides to Columbus. One 
to 4th and Broad 474-6567; South 
Washington Ave. and Broad 474- 
7645. 8-5. 


IO. Automobile for Sale 


IBBS CHEVY, safety inspected $150. 
Pickup Camper 


Space-View IOV2 ft., 1966 model, 
all accessories including com­ 
pressor, intercom, TV antenna, 
top design, no sway, clean. 


MOUNTED ON 


1966 F-2S0 Fond Camper Special. ■ 
352 cu. in. engine, 4-speed, 20,000 
miles, 8 S 6 ply tires excellent, 
front 
spare mount, 
pull out 
bumper. See at 350 Piatt Avenue, 
Chillicothe, evenings or week­ 
ends. At CircleviUe Sat. 2/22 
A.M., 724 S. Court St 


Picturesque and charming one-floor plan with three bed­ 
rooms, on corner lot with trees and shrubs. Woodburning 
fireplace in living room; spacious kitchen and family 
room combination, with cabinets galore. Vanitory and 
new fixtures in bath; two-car attached garage. In choice 
north end area near hospital where there is very Utile 
turnover of homes. CaU for an appointment now. 
S. 
tBe.nne.tt, 


127' 2 E. Main St. 
474-4134 


I 
rn 


Two-story, four-bedroom house with bath and fuel oU fur­ 
nace. Situated on an acre of ground overlooking Route 
23, about six miles north of CircleviUe. CaU Jim Ford 
at 474-4581 for an appointment. . 
S. eft* ^Bennett, <z%ea£tox 


OFFICE 


EQUIPMENT 


Philco console color TV, 
$279.95, one week only. 
Call 
Firestone 


474-4938 


Double your 
mileage with 
Goodyear 
Polyglas tires 
MAC'S, 113 E. Main 


Mason Furniture Febru­ 
ary Sale now in progress. 
Save IO to 50 per cent. 


MASON FURNITURE 
121-125 N. Court St. 


Typewriters, 
Adding Machines, 
Desks, Chairs, Files 


Paul A. Johnson 
Office Equipment 


Kirk’s Furniture 


in 


New Holland 


Open Mon., Wed., Thurs. 
Evenings til 9 P.M. 


MUST SELL 


1968 Singer in beautiful walnut 
consolette, completely equipped 
to zig zag, make buttonholes, 
overcast, monogram, appUque 
and much more. Used just a few 
months, sews like new. AvaU­ 
able for just IO payments of $5.20 
each. Phone 474-3733. 


32. Public Sale 


PUBLIC SALE 


Having sold my farm, I wiU offer for public sale on the prem­ 
ises located East of Sugar Grove, O., five miles South of Lancas­ 
ter, O., East off Route 33, foUow the Horn MiU Road (County Road 
No. 63) for 3 mUes, turn on the Swartz MiU Road to first farm. 
Saturday Feb. 22, 1969 


Starting at 10:30 A.M. 
— LIVESTOCK - 
13 head purebred polled Hereford cows (5 to 8 years old), 3 with 
calves, others to freshen soon. One purebred Hereford bull, 6 years 
old. One Holstein cow and calf. Cattle are extra good. 
- MACHINERY - 
1963 T-950 Ford tri-axle truck, 18’ aluminum dump; 1958 M F. 
(65) tractor; 1953 Super M Farm all tractor; 1952 Ferguson (30); 
and a complete large line of good farming machinery and some 
small items. 
Owner: Chester Hertendehner 


TERMS — CASH 
Not Responsible For Accidents 
Auctioneers: MerriU Federer, Banty Smith 
Lunch 


127V2 E. Main Street 
474-2197 


f§l 
Z'" 
- 
WM 


rn 
rn 
rn 
i i 


SP 


WATT 


F.H.A. or G.I. small down payment. Especially nice 3 bedroom 
in North-end. Carpeted living room and haU. WeU maintained 
for inexpensive living. Nice fenced lot with 2 car garage and big 
breezeway. Close to Atwater school. 


b '.fa:'///, ', S', 


6. Moi# Help Wonted 


Open house Sunday 2:00 to 4:00 on No. 188 at our new aU elec­ 
tric home. Its fully carpeted, nice roomy closets, lift-out windows. 
Individual thermostats for room control. Big kitchen with large 
dining area buUt-in with cabinets galore. Sliding doors from dining 
area Attached garage, brick faced front, storms and screens. 
Vs acre, only $17,500.00. Small down payment. 


146 acres Fairfield County approximately 8 mUes from Circle­ 
ville. Tiled, good fences, slightly rolling, natural spring. $213.00 
acre. 


Immediate openings for electronic and mechanical 


technicians to work in Corporate Technical Center on 


exciting new development. Pleasant surroundings, 5 


W. D. Heiskell and Son 


NEW LISTING — THREE YEARS OLD. Carpeted living room. 
Nice kitchen with dining area. Three bedrooms and bath. FuU 
basement. Mound Street school district. Shown by appointment. 
NEW LISTING — JOHN STREET. Living room, kitchen, two 
I bedrooms and bath FuU basement. Fenced yard. Show you any- 
j time. 


NEW LISTING - WESTFALL SCHOOL DISTRICT — 235 acres. 
A farm that has had excellent care. Good level land mostly 
Brookston soil. Good drainage and fences. Six wells. Two modern 


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AUCTION 


1:00 O’Clock P.M. 
Wednesday February 26, 1969 


911 SOUTH PICKAWAY STREET, CIRCLEVILLE, OHIO 


THE PROPERTY BEING SOLD, RATHER THAN MOVE. I 
WILLIAM (BILL) LUTZ WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION, AT 
THE ABOVE ADDRESS AND TIME, THE FOLLOWING PROP­ 
ERTY AND MERCHANDISE — 
large meat case; 
;k; I metal top 
I large Coca-Cola cooler case (electric); I 
I large vegetable case; I large meat cutting bloc! 
table: I large frozen food case; I large ice cream case; 2 sections 
metal shelving; 2 National cash registers; I Toledo vegetable 
scale; I Toledo meat scale. 
“THE ABOVE ITEMS WERE 
STORE” . 
TAKEN FROM A GROCERY 


Morse portable electric sewing machine; Motorola 21” TV con­ 
sole; 2 electric ranges; gas ranges; 4 TV’s (as is); large mirror; 
toaster; electric irons; 2 refrigerators; power mower; 5 automatic 
washers; 2 electric dryers; hot water tank; sink; small pool 
table; old settee and three chairs; several electric fans; electric 
hotplate; gas hotplate; bathroom scales; clothes rack; rocking 
chair; bath tub; pitcher pump; tables; metal cabinet; old radio; 
old trunk; lot of chairs; TV stands; wicker rocker; library table; 
utility table; studio couch; mattress; 6x9 rug; 9x12 rug; day 
bed; lot of tires and wheels; old walnut wardrobe; Duncan Phyffe 
liable; table and 4 chairs; gas heaters; school seats and desks; 
ExceUent buy for small family — 3 rooms and bath down, I typewriter (long bar); oak office table with 6 drawers; oak office 
large room up. Living room paneled. Gas forced air furnace, par- chairs; new stove and furnace; pipe connections; desk; ’56 Chev- 
tial basement in A-l condition. Covered patio, large fenced lot r°let and Tudor Sedan; and many more items not listed, 
with lots of trees, l'/fe blocks from Jr. High or grade school. Under 
$8,000.00. 


New house under construction, located north on Old No 
23. 


“NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ACCIDENTS’ 
William (Bill) Lutz 


, 
, 
, 
* 
o 
1 
* 
1 
WOODED AREA — Looking for a home with trees around it? 
day 40 hour normal w o rk w eek . Salaried position plus Thf.n why not look at this one? There is a third acre with 
t ~ 
u 
ti 4. 
1 . 
,. 
, 
TREES. The view is beautiful overlooking TREES and a 
m a n y fringe b e n e fits. S end a p p lic a tio n and resum e STREAM This home is in excellent condition. The extra large 
living room has new carpet. Drapes stay, also woodburning fire­ 
place. Formal dining room. Three bedrooms and two full baths. 


163 acre farm with 5-year-old brick home. Dairy barn equipped I AUCTIONEER 
and older barn for storage. Hard surfaced road with good road 1------------------- 
frontage. $365.00 acre. 


OWNER CONSIGNOR 
CARL M. AGIN 


to Post Office Box 1616, Chillicothe, Ohio 45601 


W e a r e an equal opportunity employer 


1967 Vindale House Trailer custom made for owner. 804 aq. feet 
, , 
, 
, 
. . 
. 
. 
of living area. Carpeted and paneled. Coppertone refrigerator 
I- imshed rec room and study, basement and two and half car and range, disposal, in this lovely comfortable kitchen. Dining area 
f l u r u o o 
^ h n v r n 
h t r 
j n r u n n i m 
n n i 
. . . I A I - 
I 
a 
____ I 
/ _____ i i ___ _ 
a 
a. _ 1 
_ 
0 


»mmmM Wmmmm 


18. Houses for Sole 


with hutch and dinfng room 'furniture. 2 bedroom, space for 
washer and dryer. Permanently located on I acre with good well, 
water softener. Small building houses outdoor equipment. Shown 
by appointment. 


garage Shown by appointment. 


GARDEN CITY - MAINTENANCE FREE. Carpeted living 
room with fireplace. Beautiful carpet and paneling. Dining area. 
I Combination kitchen and family room, sliding doors onto patio. 
U U of storage. Two ear garage. Shown by appointment 
10 acres with nice year around retreat. 4 rooms and bath. En- 
SMAIX FARM. This is around 78 acres with frontage. The home cloAed P°rch . Knot‘y P">e ,kit,?hen,; completely furnished and all 
has living room, kitchen, two bedrooms and bath on first floor outdoor plowing equipment. Small buildings, shelter house and 
and one large room upstairs Let us show you this one by appoint- ouldoor fireplace, 
ment. 
_ 
, , 
Ranch home in Washington Twp. 8 rooms, 4 bedrooms, enclosed 
INVESTMENT PROPERTY — We have a duplex close to breezeway and attached garage on I Vi acres. Paneled thruout, 
town. First floor has carpeted living room and dining room. Two carpeted living room. $13,500.00. 
bedrooms, kitchen and hath. Upstairs has four rooms and bath. 
Basement, steam heat Show you anytime 
SU E SP IR E S 474-2585 
RUSS PALM 474-5234 


CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN 
TWO STORY. Living room, dining .ik’h 
i 
, 
HOWARD W EAVER 474-8536 
room. IV room, two bedrooms, bath. Basement New furnace, hot 
Lfcl&l 474-2673 
water heat Show you anytime Under $10,000 


CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN Older two story home. Carpeted liv­ 
ing room Duung room. Extra large kitchen with plenty of cabi­ 
nets 
New hath Two bedrooms Basement, patio, garage. New 
storms and screens Show you anytime. 


PUBLIC AUCTION 


ANTIQUES — ANTIQUES 
Saturday, March 


- ANTIQUES 
I, 1969 


11:00 A M. 


D. H. Watt, Realtor 


474-5294 


Priced in Middle Twenties 


Tree shaded corner lot — well located in Knollwood Village 


OHIO STREET — PRICE REDUCED — Thin home has living 22. But. Opportunities 
room, kitchen, two bedrooms and bath. Full basement. Gas fur- 
nace. Storms and screens Garage and fenced yard. Can be seen 
anytime. 


NEW HOLLAND — Slur 
— Story and half, Living room, dining room, 
hath Forced air furnace. Partial basement 
car garage. Shown by appointment. 
Three bedroom ranch, hath and hall fully carpeted living room 
two bedrooms and 
w/b fireplace, separate dining room, two tar attached garage 
New one and half c 
This home has built in kitchen and is in excellent .ondiUon M ove 
in and enjoy the coming of spring Shown ai your convenience 
VA/ 
P l 
1 1 ^ ’ 
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_ 
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c 
HATFIELD REALTY 
' 
He'Ske" ° nd S° n 


103 E. Main St., Circleville, Ohio 
Sales Asosciates: 
Marjorie Spalding 474 5204 
Dwight Grubb 474 4941 
Hubert Puckett 983-2594 


Realtors 
J23 South Court Street — 4744)137 
Residence 474-7144 
Sales Associates: 
Ruth McT adden 474 3995 
Larry McFadden 474 3995 
Charles Rose 986-3164 


BEAUTY SALON 
FOR SALE 


6 year old business with excellent patronage. 


Good selling price with financing available. 


Present personnel can stay with shop. Call 


Columbus collect 451-2114. 


Located in Williamsport, Ohio, on State Route 22, IO miles West 
of CircleviUe, 14 miles East of Washington C. II., 25 miles South 
of Columbus at the Williamsport Pavillion. Sale conducted indoors 
Beckwith pump organ; 1875 Pat. Square Grand Piano; roll 
top desk; 2 gateleg tables; brass hall tree; brass umbrella hold­ 
er: brass bed; marble top dresser; iron beds; 6-pc. living room 
8^ !c: *"eludes love seat; shaving stand; barrel back chair; 
odd tables & chairs; 4 phonographs ic records; Edison cylinder 
record recorder; copper lined wooden bath tub; old washer, 
copper L wood; coal range; sewing machine; refrigerator; 
water heater; 2 spinning wheels, I small, I large; piano rolls; 
coal hod; old camera supplies; pill boxes; buttons; pictures; 
kerosene lamps; lanterns; sugar bucket; wooden buckets; milk 
»nnii 
bl ani kettl,cs; h2rHC fiddle; 75 flat irons; 


nog; pia noons: fireplace sets; 1848 Pat. herb grinder- I room 
school bell; bullet mold; boot jack; sleigh- sleigh bells' burk 
board; sled drill; Model A horn; Claxton horn; brass tire nu nu 
nlH c a r Inola- nnrtuh n fnm o- 
o ut. » 
„ 
pum j 
OM car tool.; portable (orne, 2 hit 
miss engines- ox yoke: 
horse breaking plow; stake puller; gas pump; tee handle cfstm i 
pumps; butchering kettles; potato sorter; 38 caliber T o r John 
son pistol; muzzle loading shotgun; double barrel shotgun- and 
many other items too numerous to mention. 
’ 
AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: This offering represents an miki&nH 
MIsT t o b I I aLe " 6 4 authcnti,: " * * * » by Mr. Francis DONT 


Sale 


, 
TERMS: CASH DAY OF SALE 
Not Responsible for Accidents 
Lunch Will Be Served 
Owner: ROBERT FRANCIS 


Circleville, Ohio, Phone 474-6313 
Conducted by: J. ^ HEFFNER AUCTION SERVICE 
Ashville, Ohio, Phone 983-3000 


The Circleville Herald, Thur. Feb. 20, 1969 
19 
Circleville, Ohio 
Tiger 


Daily Television Schedule 


THURSDAY 


(C) Denotes Color 


4:00 - (4) Match Game - C; 
(6) Mike Douglas — C; (IO) 
Linkletter Show — C. 
4:25 — (4) News - C. 
4:30 — (4) Giliigan’s Island — 
C; (IO) Movie — “It Happens 
Every Thursday.” 
5:00 — (4) Perry Mason; (6) 
Mister Ed. 
5:25 - (6) McHale’s Navy. 
5:55 - (6) News - C. 
6:00 — (4) 
News, Weather, 
Sports - C; (8) Merv Griffin 
— C; (IO) News, Weather, 
Sports — C. 
6:30 - (4) News - Huntley, 
Brinkley — C; (IO) News — 
Cronkite —C. 
7:00 - (4) Truth or Con- 
sequences — C; (IO) News, 
Weather, Sports — C. 
7:30 — (4) Daniel Boone — C; 
(6) Flying Nun — C; (IO) The 


Judge — C. 
8:00 — (6) That Girl — C; (IO) 
Andy Griffith Special — C. 
8:80 — (4) Ironside — C; (6) 
Bewitched — C. 
9:00 — (6) What’s It AIi About 
World? - C; (IO) Movie — 
“All Fall Down”. 
9:30 — (4) Dragnet — C. 
10:00 — (4) Dean Martin — C; 
(6) Judd — C. 
11:00 — (4) News, Weather, 
Sports— C; (6) News — C. 
11:10 — (IO) News, Weather, 
Sports — C. 
11:80 — (4) Johnny Carson — 
C; (6) Joey Bishop — C. 
11:40 — (IO) Movie — “Queen 
Bee.” 
1:00 — (4) Big Picture 
Army 
-C . 
FRIDAY 


(C) Denotes Color 


4:00 
(4) Match Game — 
(6 ) 
Mike 
Douglas 


p r o g r e s s ) — C; 
(IO) I 
Linkletter Show — C. 
I 
4:25 — (4) News — C. 
4:30 — (4) Gilligan’s Island — 
C; (IO) Movie — “It Came 
From Beneath The Sea.” 
5:00 — (4) Perry Mason; (6) 
Mister Ed. 
5:25 — (6) McHale’s Navy. 
5:55 — (6) News — C. 
6:00 — 
(4) News, Weather, 
Sports — C; (6) Merv Griffin 
— C; (IO) News, Weather, 
Sports — C. 
6:80 — (4) News — Huntley, 
Brinkley — C; (IO) News — 
Cronkite — C. 
7:00 r- 
(4) Truth 
or Con­ 
sequences — C; (IO) News, 
Weather, Sports. 
7:30 — (4) High Chaparral — 
C; (6) Tom Jones — C; (IO) 


Wild Wild West — C. 
8:30 — (4) Name of the Game; 
(6) Generation Gap — C; (IO) 
Gomer Pyle — C. 
9:00 — (8) Movie — “Gidget 
Goes Hawaiian” — C; (IO) 
Movie — “Seven Brides for 
Seven Brothers” — C. 
10:00 — (4) Star Trek -* C. 
11:00 — (4) News, Weather, 
Sports — C; (6) News — C; 
11:10 — (IO) News, Weather, 
Sports — C. 
11:30 — (4) Johnny Carson —I 
C; (6) Joey Bishop —- C; (IO) 
Movies — “Atragon” — C and 
“Voyage to A Prehistoric 
Planet” — C. 
1:00 — (4) Moyie — “Port of 
Hell”; (6) Local News — C. 
2:30 — (4) News and Weather 
— C. 


|tto MOT ALLOWED! 
-to u s e s c is s o r s ; 


by Bud Blok* 


Sup 
we 


? 


"s 


c 


220 


Plash Gordon 
Don Barry 


C; 
(in 
32. Public Solo 


Charlie Huggins 
Has Magic Touch 


By Ed De GRAW 
Dover Hmes-Reporter 
Sports Editor 
NEW PHILADELPHIA, Ohio 
(AP)—-King Midas and Merlin of 
King Arthur’s day were said to 
have possessed the magic touch 
and people flocked to touch their 
cape. 
Today basketball fans of Tus­ 
carawas and Harrison County 
are wondering if Coadt Charles 
Huggins does not have a magical 
quality. 
Two years ago, Huggins was 
coach of the undefeated Stras­ 
burg team which won the state 
Class A basketball crown. 
Last year, while the elder 
Huggins was still at Strasburg, 
his oldest son Bob was an 
eighth grader flashed with a 30- 
et Indian Valley North, a few 
miles south of Strasburg in Tus­ 
carawas County, 
in 
another 
school district. 
There was much controversy 
and pressure applied as to where 
Bob would play bis high school 
ball. The 6-foot - 2 youngster 
with very adept moves for an 
eighth grader finish with a 30- 
plus scoring average. 
The problem was solved for 
Huggins when he accepted a 
position at Conotton Valley High 
as head football, and basketball 
coach and athletic director. 
Ile quickly admits he inherit­ 
ed a football squad with a host 
of lettermen. With Bob starting 
at end and then switching to 


COMMON PLEAS COVET 
PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE 
AU Interested parties are hereby 
notified that the following Executors 
and Administrators have filed their 
accounts in the Common Pleas Court 
Probate 
Division 
of 
Pickaway 
County, Ohio: 
No. 
ISMS 
ZeUa 
Armstrong, 
Executrix jot the estate of Harry 
K. Armstrong, deceased. First and 
final aeoeunt 
__ 
No. SHM Leona M. Parrott, Ad­ 
ministratrix of th# estate of Rem 
T. Parrott daoeaasd. First end final 
aeoeunt. 
No. SIMI Clarabella 
Timmons, 
Administratrix of tho astate of Dell* 
A. Adkins, deceased. First, final end 
distributive account. 
And that Beld Inventories win bs 
for bearing and eettlemmrt before 
the Court en Monday March 3rd, 
ism. et • o'clock A.M. Exception 
to said accounts, lf any. must bs 
filed herein on or before February 
35, USS. 
Witness my hand end toe Beal 
Cf 
said 
Common 
Plea* 
Court 
Probate Division this 37th day of 
January, IMP. 
Guy O. Cline, Judge 
Common Pleas Court 
Probate Division 
Jan. 80; reb. 0, It, SO 


quarterback for experience in 
the runaway games, Conotton 
Valley won the Harrison League 
title with two losses in IO games 
coming in non-league tussles. 
Huggins said It would take him 
some time, to build a winner in 
basketball. He inherited two 
lettermen, including one starter. 
Conotton Valley had Utile win­ 
ning basketball tradition with 
the last winning team coming 
eight years ago. 
But it apparently took Hugg­ 
ins only two games to build a 
winner. 
Conotton Valley lost its opener 
to Garaway, a team rated in the 
top IO of The Associated Press 
poll all season, and dropped its 
second to Hiland, a former state 
champion with a winning record 
this season. 
After that it was a1! Huggins 
literally and figuratively. Conot­ 
ton Valley started on a 15 game 
winning streak and freshman 
Bob Huggins started moving. 
Freshman cagers arc suppos­ 
ed to be erratic, one good game 
and one bad game. 
Huggins had his “bad night1 
against Hopedale when he( only 
sank three field goals. But he 
went to the folk. line and hit 17 
of 17 during the course of the 
game and finished with 23 
points. He had 360 points going 
into the final game. 
Father and son never discuss 
basketball at home unless a 
simple question is asked at the 
dinner table, and Charley is very 
careful to treat all of his play­ 
ers alike. 


A U C T I O N 
Friday Feb. 21 — 7 P.M. 
Dennis Auction House 
SOUTH BLOOMFIELD, OHIO 
TV stereo combination; gas ranges; refrigerator; 
green modem sofa; miscellaneous chairs; new men's, 
ladies’, children’s play, work and dress shoes; new 
toys and ceramics; Keystone movie outfit, complete; 
old and antique glass; electric water pump; lawn 
mowers, plus many miscellaneous items. Open at 6 
p. rn. 


Kildare 


PUBLIC 


Ken Bold 


AND ONCE THE WORD GETS }. 
AROUND THE INDUSTRY" THAT 
YOU’RE AVAILABLE-I'LL SEE 
THAT IT DOES, PERSONALLY— 
WHY/ YOU’LL BE ABLE TO 
WRITE YOUR OWN TICKET/ 


Blondie 
by Chic Young 


COMMON FLEA! COURT 
PROBATE DIVMION NOTICE 
All interested parties ere hereby 
notified that tbs following Executors 
and Administrators have filed their 
inventories end apprideementeln the 
Common 
Pleas 
Court 
Probate 
Division of Pickaway County, Ohio; 
No. 23271 
John 
William 
Ford, 
Executor of the estate of Estella 
M. Ford, deceased. 
No. 23333 Ruth M. Crist. Executrix 
of the estate of Em mitt L. Crist, 
deceased. 
No. 23272 Gerald Ayers, Executor 
of the estate of Alma E. Alderman, 
deceased. 
And that said inventories will be 
ftjr hearing and settlement before 
this Court on Monday, March 3, 
1909, at 9 o'clock A.M. Exceptions 
to said Inventories, if any, must 
be 
filed 
herein 
on 
or 
before 
February 27, 19®). 
Witness nay hand and seal of said 
Common 
Pleas 
Court 
Probate 
Division this 18th day of February 
1900. 
_ . 
Guy G. Cline, Judge 
Common Pleas Court 
Probate Division 
Fob. 20, 27 


24. Mite. for Solo 


SEASONED 
firewood, 
yourself 332,2853. 
haul 
It 


MODEEN 9 piece U i i 
f> piece bedroom,■ 
■ Originally $750. Sell 


living room set, 
used 6 months 
for $430. Call 


v - J : ■ 
■ rl* a 
best 


for cleaning carpets. Rent electric! 
shampooer SI. G. C. Murphy. 
■ 


DIAMONDS 
are 
a 
friend—ii i f I'l'n TiT’Y 


NEW 
fashion 
colors 
are 
Sue’s 
delight. She keeps her carpet colors 
bright — with Blue Lustre! Kent 
electric shampooer 
$1. 
Bingman 
Drugs. 


26. Wanted to Buy 


WANTED to buy from owner 
home in Ridgewood or Garden Ctty, 
Write box (138C c o of The Herald. 


COURT 
I NOTICE 
rn 
COMMON PLEASO iliM M llB 
m PROBATE DIVMIOl— 
I 
■All Interested parties ere hereby! 
notified that the following Executors I 
end Administrators have filed their I 
Inventories end appraisements in th e | 
Common 
Pleas 
Court 
Probate * 
Division of Pickaway County, Ohio: I 
No. 23314 Wanda Stapleton. Ad* | 
ministratrlx of the estate of Floyd I 
Williams. Sr., deceased. 
I 
■No. 
31434 
Katherine 
S m i t h , I 
Executrix of toe estate of Hayes . 
Smith, deceased. 
I 
No. 33331 Charles D. 
Ramsey, I 
Administrator of the estate of Mary I 
Elizabeth Ramsey, deceased. 
I 
No. 
23241 Roy H. Hurter, Jr., I 
Administrator 
of 
toe 
estate 
of I 
[Harold D. Welker, deceased. 
I 
■No. 23307 Grace J. Donaldson. I 
[Administratrix 
of toe 
estate 
of I 
Dewey 
Donaldson 
a>k>a 
George! 
Dewey Donaldson, deceased. 
I 
| And that said Inventories will be 
{for hearing and settlement before 
this court on Monday February 17.1 
11909 at 0:00 A.M., Exceptions ton 
scald inventories, lf any, .nust be Iii*I 
led herein on or before February ll, I 
lim 
I 
■W itness my hand and toe seal I 
gof 
said 
Common 
Pleas 
Court! 
|Probate Division this 4to day of| 
[February, 1009. 
| 


I 
Guy G. Cline. Judge 
I 


I 
Common Pleas Court 
| 


I 
Probate Division 
| 
iFeb. 6, 13, 20, 27 
I 


Saturday, Feb. 22, 12:30 P.M. 


Located on the Bulen-Piercc Road, I mile North of Duvall, 6 
miles North of Ashville, 12 miles Southeast of Columbus. 2 miles 
East of State Route 23, IV* miles South of Lockbourne ai what is 
known aa the Grace Blake farm. 
Having decided to discontinue farming, the following items will 
be offered for sale at public auction. 
, 
— TRACTORS — 
Oliver Super 88 diesel, wide front, good rubber; Oliver 77 gas, 
R.C.; Case Model DC, R.C. 
— FARM EQUIPMENT — 
New Holland Hayliner baler, PTO; Case Model 425 mounted 
corn picker; Case stock chopper; Case 13-7 grain drill; 2 Case 
manure spreaders: Oliver r mower; Case 2-row corn planter; 
New Idea rake; Oliver 3-14 hydraulic plow; Case 3-14 plow; Oliver 
L 
2-14 plow; Oliver disc; Case disc; cultimulcher; Palsgrove af Kip Kirby 
elevator; Palsgrove conveyer: Ottawa hydraulic loader; spring 
tooth harrow; Oliver 2-row cultivators; John Deere 8-row spray­ 
er; John Deere PTO bammermill, Model 14-A; 2 ladder wagons 
with grain aides; I wagon with grain bed: PTO grass seeder; 
electric grass seeder; 3 cattle hay bunks; 2 hog feeders; hog wat­ 
erers; DeLaval 2 unit milker, complete. 
— HAY & STRAW- 
1200 bales of hay and 1200 bales of straw, wire tied 
Be on time, very few small items. 
Terms: Cash Day of Sale 
Not Responsible for Accidents 
PRESTON LAMBERT: Owner 


Sale Conducted by: 
JOHN R. HEFFNER 
Auction Service 


Ashville, Ohio — Phone 983-3009 


y o u WAIT 
OUT HERE- 
I'LL GO IN 
ANO 
ASK HIM 


MR. DITHERS, T H E R E S 
A RUMOR GOING AROUND 
THE OFFICE THAT 
EVERV80DV'S 
GOING 
TO GET 
A RA ISE 


Prontico ft Dickenson 


CHARLIE, TAKE IT 
EASY/ NOT SO 
RAST/ 


Donold Duck 
Wolf Disney 


t i 


TEENAGE DANCE 
FRIDAY NIGHT 


Featuring 
THE GRAPES 
it 


PLUS <4LOVE’S CREATION” 
With WHOK Johnny Garber, M.C. 
8 Until ll 
4-H Grange Building 
ADMISSION ONLY $1.25 


SIA' 
" M i I 
ALL YOU t 
IS LET M E 


• • y ..... v 
ft? 


■ s o u n d s 
FAlG?.\OU'S?.E 


I JU ST ONE OF 


I SCRO O G E'S 
■s c h e m e s t o 
GET AS MUCH 
AS POSSIBLE 
■ F O R HIO 
y 
■ M ONEY. 
J 


i H E 'S TAKING Wk 
■ a LIFETIM E ■ 
S U B S C R IP T IO N * 
TO A MAGAZINE/ 
r 
t 
la 


Beetle Boiley 


When you came to the Ponderosa 
bring the family 


CHAR-BROILED 
SIRLOIN STEAK DINNER 


27. Bata 


POODLE AKC, 2 month*. Cham 
patgn female, shot*, poodle trim* 
rued, free 
Veterinary visit, ex- 
ifjlient with children Rio*. 474*8341 


with: Oven-baked Idaho 
Potato, crisp, cold Garden- 
fresh Green Salad with 
cholee of four dressings, 
hot, hsarth-bakod Buttered 
Roll. All for only................. 


mirn 
■a* 
PONDEROSA STEAK BOOSE 


© K in , f M . c n , * / • « « . . '«**. « » *• '»'•••* 1 
by Moot Walker 


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SOME LITTLE 
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SATINS TMS 
LEAVES, ANO AN 
OLD BIROS 
NEST ANO" 


Etta Kett 
by Paul Robinson 


ONE O'CLOCK. 
A N D ETTA'S 
A FINE HOU® TO B O N G 
A GIRL IN FROM A DATE H 
HE'S GOING RIGHT g 


OUT ON HIS J 
V t EA®/' j y 
V 


L l 


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GREAT SOUTHERN 
SHOPPING CEMER 


■Open I 
ll A.M. 
837 S. Hamilton Rd. 
■ 
WHITEHALL ■ 


W H I N Y O U ( O M I 
FO TMF 
POMI JE P O ' , A B R I NC. I H E 
F A M I L Y 
WF 
W A N T E V L H Y U N F 
I O E N J O Y STF A K 


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A LITTLE WORKOUT. 
V 


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PARTNER WHO'LL GO A FEW 
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WITH ME ? 


o 


men 
W 


(CO 


SURE 
THING, 
MR. 
ABERNATHY 


by Jones Br Ridgeway 


Cireiex lilt Herald. Thur 
Circlei-ilie. Ohio 
Feb. 20. 1000 


Sertoma Presents 
i 


SERVICE TO MANKIND — Mrs. Charles Kirkpatrick accepts 
the Cirele\ille Sertoma Club's “ Service to Mankind” award from 
Robert Scranton, president, during the annual awards banquet 
Wednesday. 


Hickle Calls Off Offshore 
Oil And Gas Lease Bidding 


Slain Pilot's Last Letter 
Outlines Grimness Of War 


WASHINGTON (AP) —* Secre­ 
tary of the Interior Walter J. 
Hickel, in his third action of the 
week aimed at preventing an­ 
other “ Santa Barbara tragedy,” 
today called off the sale of off­ 
shore oil and gas leases. 


cleanup and damage costs from 
any offshore-well pollution and 
proposed new and tighter regu­ 
lations for drilling in the Santa 
Barbara channel. 
Oil and gas leases along tile 
Gulf of Mexico coastline already 
The sale of 27 Gulfcoast tracts j have brought the Interior De 


JEANNE MEREDITH 


(Continued I r u m P a g e I ) 
art” in our community. 
A dream come true for Tommy 


m- 
Otiier 
accomplishments 
elude work on a panel to set 
up 
a 
comprehensive 
health 
is tile Well-Child Clinic. She now planning program to make this 
serves on its executive board, 
and she helped develop this 
Clinic with Dr, Swope and Dr. 
Moore. 
Tile 
Circleville 
La 
Sertoma 
Club 
works 
with 
Tommy in the Well-Child Clinic, 
\ bleb has been part of the 
club's sponsorship for tile past 
pro years. 


a master community. 
Twice yearly, Tommy has the 
Pediatric Otological Diagnostic 
Clinic for loss of hearing, and 
patients with nose and throat 
problems. 
She 
brings 
people 
and 


Mrs. 
Jeanne Meredith has 
been appointed a caseworker iii 
P i c k a w a y County Welfare 
Department, according to an 
announcement by Pauline E. 
Roese, director. She assumed 
her duties February 17. 
Mrs. 
Meredith 
graduated! 
from Circleville High School inj 
1963 and received a bachelor's 
rn 
professional degree from Capital University 
doctors 
from I in pre-social services, majoring I 


that could have brought the gov 
ernment millions of dollars, was 
scheduled for next Tuesday and 
was the only such sale of feder­ 
al offshore leases imminent. 
Hickel said the sale would be 
postponed “ until we are positive 
we have regulations which will 
prevent pollution such as the 
Santa Barbara tragedy.” 
He referred to the 11-day leak I 
of a Union Oil Co. well which 
spread an 800-square-mile slick \ 
across the Santa Barbara chan­ 
nel off California before it was i 
plugged Feb. 8. 
Earlier this week, Hickel is­ 
sued 
regulations 
holding 
oil 
companies 
responsible 
for 


partment close to $200 million in 
bonus bids. 
Sixteen tracts were leased 
Nov. 19, 1968 for a total of $150 
million in bonuses, followed by 
another 20 tracts for $44 million 
Jan. 14. 
Preliminary steps have been 
taken toward the possible leas­ 
ing late this yeay of areas off 


IRS Agent 
Not Drunk? 


.Ail 


More Welfare 


Protests Set 


CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP) — 
Welfare 
Demonstrators 
a r e 
planning another trip to Colum­ 
bus next month for legislative 
hearings on welfare appropria­ 
tions. 
Bruce Thomas, spokesman for 
the Welfare Rights Organization, 
said Hie demonstrators will use 
“ any means necessary” to show 
their disapproval of “ yet an- 
of welfare prob- 


Alaska, but that sale has not yet 
l>een definitely scheduled. 
Announcing the latest move, 
Hickel said, “ We have post­ 
poned the Gulf Coast sale as an­ 
other step in the exhaustive re­ 
view being conducted into all 
aspects of federal offshore drill­ 
ing and production. 
* 
“ Consequently, any bids re­ 
ceived for the Louisiana tracts 
will be returned to the sender 
unopened.” 
“ In announcing this postpone­ 
ment,” he added, “ I again de­ 
clare that monetary considera­ 
tions must not be allowed to ob­ 
struct consideration of what is 
best to protect the environment 
in which we live.” 


Columbus to help supervise this i in sociology, 
program. 
She comes to tile local agency 
w i t h 
casework 
experience, 
KROM Tommy s association 
Miss Benzenberg is a 17-year- 
with 
tile 
Child 
Conservation old senior at Circleville High 
League, the Pre-Natal Clinic I School. 
has become a reality, in which; 
- 
* * * 
she has served on its executive! SHE 
is 
president 
ot 
the 
board for the past ten years. Student Council, and has servedI 
p 
Tommy 
has 
also 
been 
an as vice president, corresponding 
executive board member of the. secretary and projects chair-; 
FC and Health Association. 
i man of the Service Over Self 
Mrs. Kirkpatrick is a charter (SOS) Club, 
member of the Child Study Club 
N a n c y 
has 
served 
as 
aud 
the 
Pickaway 
County president of the school band and 
Nurses Association, She is a 
a majorette and head drum j 
past member of 
the Heart j mayoress. 
.Association 
and 
the 
Cancer 
She was 
the 
junior class 
Society’, and she 
is also a < representative of 
member 
of 
the 
Methodist i Merit society and a 
the National Honor Society. 
She had the lead In the Junior r , 
. 
I 
Class play and was student J TO I c i i O p O S Q I 
director and choreographer of 
the Senior Class Play. 
She has also participated in 
tile volleyball intramurals. 
She is a member of the 
Trinity Lutheran Church and 


COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) 
Internal Revenue Service agent | other study 
charged with intoxication told a lems.” 
federal court jury Wednesday 
that he was not drunk when ar- 
having formerly been employed; rested July 26. 
in 
Lorain 
County 
with 
the! 
James M. Kowalski, testifying 
Welfare Department where she! bi his own defense, said he was 
with Aid to! “ tired and disgusted” when lie 
Dependent Children cases. 
and two other federal agents 
H e r husband, 
Lawrence j were arrested outside a South 
Meredith 
III 
is 
currently j Side tavern. 
stationed in Okinawa with the 
The other agents, Guy I. Weth- 
------------------ 
U.S. Security Agency. 
erell of the IRS and Justice De-1 $ C o n g r e ssm e n 
Mrs. Meredith and son 
are; partment attorney Edward T. - 
b t . 
living with her parents, Mr. and* Joyce, are scheduled for trial. ieT u o y ro n 
I rip 


Welfare has been studied suf­ 
ficiently to show the needs, and 
state money should be used to 
raise grants instead of being 
wasted on another study, said 
Mrs. Helen Williams, Cleveland, 
an Ohio representative of the 
National Welfare Rights Organ­ 
ization. 


WICHITA, Kau. (AP) — “War 
is all the horrible things a hu­ 
man being can do to another hu­ 
man being because lie has not 
learned to love . . . ” 
These were the words of Air 
Force Maj. Victor Coiasuonno in 
fourth grade class at Church of 
the Magdalen Catholic School 
here, of which his son, Kenneth, 
is a member. 
Major Coiasuonno, 
a pilot, 
was killed in action last week in 
Vietnam where he had been as­ 
signed 
since 
June. 
Services 
were 
held 
here 
Wednesday. 
While in Vietnam he had written 
regularly to the school where 
his three sans, Kenneth, Bobby 
and Stephen, and daughter Pat­ 
ty attend. Coiasuonno was sta 
turned at McConnell Air Force 
Base here before going to Viet­ 
nam. 
Some of the fourth grade boys 
had written at Christmas time 
and had asked, “ What war is” 
His answer, read to the entire 
school after his death: 
“ ITI tell you what war is not,” 
the major wrote. “ It is not a 
glamorous, daredevil existence 
where the ‘good guys’ always 
win. 
“ It is not a fearless fighter pi­ 
lot jumping into his airplane to 
shoot down the enemy. 
“ It is not a game which you 
play (and which I played as a 
child), where you go home to a 
good supper and a 
after it is over. 
“ War is fought by real human 
beings, not Hollywood stars— 


men like your daddy and per­ 
haps older brothers. 
“ We ad face a moment of 
truth when v\e must overcome 
our fear : and do what must be 
done, no matter how difficult. 
“ War is a time of tears when 
we must overcome cur sorrow 
for our fellow comrades and do 
what must be done, no matter 
how difficult. 
“ War is the curse of mankind 
because he will not listen to 
God’s will. War is the agony of 
mankind because he will not 
love his neighbor.” 
If man learns to love, the ma­ 
jor concluded his letter, “ There 
would be co wars, for man does 
not hurt what he loves. 
‘ Perhaps your generation can 
a J complish this—it seems that 
mine has failed. 
“ Do not allow adults to teach 
you to hate—for no reason and 
against no man.” 


Growth Rate Is 
'Terrifying' 
NEW DELHI (AP) — The 
implications of India’s rate of 
growth are “ terrifying,” Family 
Planning Minister Satyanaraya- 
nan Sinha told a meeting here. 
He said India is increasing 
each 
year 
by 
the t o t a l 
population of The Netherlands 
and even now “ we do not have 
enough resources for even the 
warm bed j existing population, whose per 
capita income is one-third of Cie 
international poverty lino ct 
$240.” 


Mrs. Henry Bartholomew 
Pontius Lane. 


Church, W’SCS and Circle 3. 


Study Proposal 


For Replacing 


C&O Bridge 


the English _ 
, 
_ 
member of 5 (|X DG UDDOSGS 
* * 


CINCINNATI (AP) 
The 


WASHINGTON (AP) - Sen. 
William B. Saxbe, R - Ohio, 
voiced opposition Wednesday to 
a bill before the Ohio Legisla- 
_______ 
_ 
ture which would shift some of 
has been president and projects; 
state attorney,genf ral s 
chairman of the Luther League 


on j in U.S. District Court next week. 
The cases blossomed into a 
controversy after the agents ac­ 
cused police of harassment in an 


f IRS investigation of income tax 
returns of some city and police 
officials. 
Prosecution 
witnesses 
testified 
that 
Kowalski 
drunk at the time officers ar 
rested him. 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Six 
congressmen from rural areas 
were to leave here tonight for 
Dayton, Ohio, to get a first hand 
look at problems of an urban 
area. 
Rep. Charles Wr. Whalen, R- 
liave Ohio, who will host the visitors, 
was j said the trip is being underwrit­ 
ten by the Ford Foundation. The 
group returns here Saturday. 


BAD BUDGET NEWS—Budget 
Director Robert P. Mayo ap­ 
pears thoughtful before the 
Senate-House E c o n o m i c 
Committee in Washington, 
where he said the Nixon ad­ 
ministration will be unable 
to make “dramatic” cuts in 
federal spending this year 
and may be hard pressed to 


balance the budget. 


The Seal of the United States 
shows the American eagle with 
oustretcbed wings and talons 
arui a striped shield upon its 
breast. 


Kentucky Highway Department She is a member of the choir 
is considering a proposal to, and a bible school teacher. 
build two adjacent bridges, with 
• • • 
tv.’p lanes each, to replace the | 
NANCY has taken surveys 
superstructure 
of 
the 
C&O and helped on various fund 
bridge. 
driver in the community. She 
J. R. Harbison, a program was a Brownie and a Girl Scout, 
management engineer with the j a member of the Youth Canteen I Saxbe said he wouldn’t like to 
department, disclosed his idea I Council 
and 
a Red C r o s s ; see the office downgraded be-1 
Wednesday in a meeting of the Vohinteen at Berger Hospital. 
cause he had something to do 
Ohio - Kentucky Progress Com- \ 
Miss 
Benzenberg 
has 
also I with building up the office as 
inittee. He said the department been an alternate to Buckeye! an advisory and enforcement 


enforcement powers to a new 
agency, the Department of Ur-: 
ban Affairs. 
Saxbe 
said 
the 
legislation j 
would reduce the attorney gen-1 
eral's office to little more than I 
a solicitor’s office. 
A former attorney general, 


is studying it. 
Hie bridge has been closed to 
pedestrian and vehicular traffic 
because of deteriorating con- 


Girls 
State 
and 
has 
been ; agency. 
awarded outstanding majorette* 
;--- —------ 
awards. 
Bomb Rips Doors 
The speaker for the banquet j 
CLEVELAND, Ohio (AP; — 
struction, but the piers for the was the Mayor of Crooksville,; \ bomb shattered window’s and 
span between here and Coving- Ohio, James Brown. Mr. Dave damaged garage doors at the 
ton, Ky., across the Ohio River Se a l o e k introduced Mayor i internation a1 Union of Operat­ 
i v e been judged structurally Brown, whose topic for the lug Engineers building Wedges- 
>ound. Harbison suggests that evening was “ The Humorous I day night. No one was injured. 
the new superstructure be built Side of Politics.” Mayor Brown 
' 
------------ 
on the existing piers. 
related to tile group a few of 
Columbus sailed through the 
It would cost about $0.5 mil- his comical experiences that he | Sargasso Sea and 
Bermuda 
ion to complete the project , has 
faced 
through 
thirteen Triangle 
on his 
discovery 
chich could be finished by 1971 years in the 
Marine Corps and v o y a g e 
to San 
Salvador 
providing there are no financing his political 
life as mayor of ( W a t l i n g ) Island in the 
problems, Harbison said. 
the “ Pottery’ Center of Ohio.” 
Bahamas in 1492. 


PALM'S SALES INC. 


459 E. Main St. 
Salvage & Surplus Foods 
Dial 474-3428 


Unclassified 
POTATOES 


50-Lb. Bag 
$1.19 


Charniin 
TOILET 
TISSUE 
4 *£ 29c 


N iagara 
SPRAY 
I 
STARCH 
; 
22-Oz. Can 
49c 


CRYSTAL 
SAI! 


(to r W ater Softener) 
100-Lb. Bag 
$1.19 


Ja c k Sprat 
CUT GREEN 
BEANS 


1103 Size 
2 
25c 
(C ase of 24 — $2.50) 


Swift’s 
LIMA 
BEANS 
With Ham 
24-Oz. C an 
46c 


We Have a 
V ariety of 
EASTER 


CANDIES 


At Low — Lou 
P rices 


Stokely 
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CORN 


502 Can 
5 - 99c 


Colonial 
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2<i-Oz. Box 


6c 


No Limit 


Moving To Our 
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475 E. Main St. j 


Various Kinds 
DOG FOOD 
Sc u n 


(Case of 48 — $2.40) 
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Nescafe 
INSTANT 
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I0-Oz. J a r 
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Harden Chevrolets 
VALUE SHOWDOWN 


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324 W. Main St. 
474*3141 


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