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CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


The  GENDRON  MFG.  CO.,  Limited,  Toronto 


Reed 
Furniture 

upholstered  in  all  new  designs  and 
patterns  of  chintz  and  tapestry. 


Factory:  137  Duchess  Street 
Sample  Room  :    55  Bay  Street 


New  Goods 


now  on  display  at  our  central  saniple 
room,  which  will  be  open  until  about 
February  4th. 


Lines  comprise — 


Baby  Carriages 
Carriers 
Sulkies,  etc. 

in  the  latest  styles,  and  new  combina- 
tions of  colors. 


1    Our  travellers  are  in  attendance  | 


The  GENDRON  MFG.  CO.,  Limited,  Toronto 


January,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


STRATFORD  Mli  rURWflTURg 


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JANUARY  13th  to  25th 

I  ARE  THE  DATES  OF  THE  | 

STRATFORD 
I  FURNITURE  EXHIBITION  1 


When  thousands  of  square  feet  of  floor  space 
will  be  filled  with  the  latest  and  best  in  new 
spring  and  summer  patterns,  the  product  of  the 
skill  and  ingenuity  of  the  Stratford  manufac- 
turers who  have  prepared  for  this  Exhibition  an 
unusual  array  of  trade-compelling  lines  that 
every  dealer  must  see  if  he  wants  to  know 
what  is  best  for  his  coming  season's  stock. 

To  neglect  a  visit  to  the  Exhibition  in  January 
will  mean  a  serious  handicap  to  the  merchant 
who  wants  his  stock  to  present  the  latest  and 
most  attractive  showing  to  the  public. 


Stratford  Furniture  Manufacturers 


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CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


iSTRATrOMO 


FURNlTUItC 


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5052A— Buffet 


The  graceful  lines  of  this 
black  walnut 

William  and  Mary 

Diningroom  Suite 

cannot  fail  to  appeal  to 
all  buyers  who  appreciate 
something  really  exclusive. 


5057-Table 


5059A— Diner 


The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited 

Stratford,  Ontario 


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January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


FURNITURC 


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A  thorough  inspection  of 
our  entire  line,  into  which 
we  have,  this  year,  intro- 
duced many  new  and 
attractive  pieces,  will  very 
well  repay  you  for  a  trip 
to  Stratford. 


Dont  forget  the  date  of  our 
ANNUAL  EXHIBITION, 
January  13th  to  25th,  inclusive. 


5052— Buffet 


5059— Diner 


5054 — China  Cabinet 


The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited 

Stratford,  Ontario 


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6 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  January,  1919 


rURNITURE 


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Meet  us  at 


Stratford  Furniture  Exhibition 


January  13 — 25 


We  will  show  an  immense  display  of  Livingroom  Furniture 
which  will  be  of  interest  to  every  furniture  dealer. 

Many  new  designs  representing  the  latest  in  styles  and  coverings 
are  awaiting  your  inspection. 

For  many  obvious  reasons  our  display  will  be  the  most  interest- 
ing we  have  ever  had. 

PLAN  TO  COME  TO^DA  Y 

The  Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Limited 


STRATFORD 


SPECIALISTS  IN  DAVENPORT  BEDS 
AND  LIVINGROOM  FURNITURE 


ONTARIO 


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January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


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I  Come  to  Stratford  Exhibition  | 

AND  INSPECT  OUR 
NEWEST  DESIGNS 


You  will  find  this  occasion  a  profitable  and 
enjoyable  outing. 

Any  dealer  visiting  Stratford  with  open  eyes 
and  ears  is  bound  to  obtain  information  and 
ideas  from  both  manufacturers  and  the 
dealers  he  meets. 

We  will  exhibit  the  newest  designs  in  Living-Room 
Suites,  Kroehler  Kodavs,  Davenos,  and  Bed  Davenports. 

A  Hearty  Welcome  Awaits  You — Come. 

The  Kttd^t  Bed  Company,  Limited 


STRATFORD 


ONTARIO 


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CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


rURNITURB 


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679  B. -Top  21x50.  Mirror  12x42 
Height  56in. 


Quartered 
Oak  Suite 

Colonial  Design 

Get  this  new  suite  on  your 
floor  and  you'll  quickly 
find  that  in  design,  quality 
and  price,  it  is  just  what 
your  customers  have  been 
looking  for. 


IVrite  us  for  price  of  this 
suite  to-day.    It  will 
interest  you. 


422  — Top  15x39,  Height  59in. 


The  Stratford  Chair  Co. 

Limited 

Stratford    -  Ontario 


679A— Top  21x53.  Mirror  8x42 
Height  52in. 


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January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


9 


IHUffiilllWICiiMK 


PURNITURS 


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We  Will  Show  Many  New 
Designs  at  the 

STRATFORD 
FURNITURE 
EXHIBITION 


IN  addition  to  the  attractive  Dining  Room 
Suite  illustrated,  we  will  display  our 
entire  representation,  consisting  of  many 
new  designs  in  Diners,  Den,  Library  and 
Office  Chairs,  complete  Dining  Room  Suites, 
Dressers  and  Stands,  in  plain  and  quartered 
oak  and  quartered  gum. 

DON'T  FORGET 

COME  TO  STRATFORD 

January  13th  to  25th. 


No.  374— Top  44x44 


No.  1691-1 


No.  1691  5 


The  Stratford  Chair  Co. 

Limited 

Stratford    -  Ontario 


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10 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


STRjirrroitp 


FURNITURC 


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I  Come  to  Stratford  Furniture  Exhibition  1 


We  will  exhibit  upholstered  reed  chairs 
and  rockers,  leather  and  imitation  leather 
chairs  and  rockers  and  Old  Hickory 
furniture. 


1 


We  carry  the  most  select  stock  of 
tapestry,  chintz  and  denim  coverings  in 
Canada.    Come  and  see  for  yourself. 


IMPERIAL  RATTAN  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

STRATFORD,         -  ONTARIO 

IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIillMMIilllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 


Mr.  Furniture  Dealer: 

Are  you  getting  and  reading  The  Canadian 
Furniture  World  and  Undertaker  regularly? 
If  not,  send  $  1 .00  to  address  below,  and  the 
paper  will  come  to  you,  postpaid,  each  month. 


The  Commercial  Press,  Limited 

32  Colborne  St.,  Toronto 


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January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


13 


Fifth  Annual 

CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD 
BUYER'S  DIRECTORY 

Containing  the  Most  Extensive  and  Most  Conveniently  Arranged 
Buyer's  Guide  ever  compiled  for  Canadian  Furniture  Dealers 

and  Manufacturers. 


This  Directory  Number  has  not  been  hastily  compiled.  Every  furniture 
manufacturer  in  Canada  has  been  written  to  for  information,  and  months 
have  been  spent  in  making  the  Directory  complete.  If  the  Directory  is  in- 
complete in  any  way  it  is  the  fault  of  the  manufacturers  Avho  failed  to  supply 
information  in  answer  to  our  requests. 

£^  The  Directory  is  published  as  an  editorial  service  to  the  Furniture  Deailers 
^  of  Canaida.  Manufacturers  from  whom  the  Furniture  World  has  never  re- 
ceived a  dollar  for  advertising — and  some  from  whom  it  protoably  never  will — 
have  their  lines  listed,  as  well  as  other  manufacturers  who  are  more  progres- 
sive and  recognize  the  advertising  valne  to  be  obtained  in  the  pages  of  a 
trade  newspaper  for  which  subscribers  pay  real  money. 

JI|  Being  an  editorial  iservice  to  readers,  and  not  part  of  any  advertising  ])ro- 
-''  position,  the  names  of  advertisers  and  non-advertisers  are  given  in  the  same 
style  of  type.    The  Directory  is  intended  to  be  la  real  Directory. 

£n  Practically  every  furniture  retailer  in  Canada  will  receive  a  copy  of  the 
Directory  Number,  and  to  enable  him  to  more  conveniently  preserve  the 
Directory  for  reference  during  the  coimng  year,  each  copy  is  perforated  and 
corded  to  hanig  up  like  a  telephone  directory. 

^  Compare  this  Directory  Number  with  other  publications,  consider  the  broad 
policy  of  service  followed  by  the  Furniture  World,  and  the  reason  for  the 
rapid  gi'owth  of  this  paper  in  circulation  and  popularity  will  be  recognized. 
The  publishers  express  appreciation  for  the  liberal  support  given  the  Furni- 
ture World  'by  the  furniture  trade  in  Canada  during  the  past  eight  years,  and 
will  further  appreciate  isuggestions  as  to  how  next  year's  Directory  Number, 
and  the  Furndture  World  every  month,  can  be  made  of  greater  service  to  the 
trade. 


THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED 

TORONTO,  CAN. 


Pablithers 


32  COLBORNE  STREET 

Trade  Papers: 
Canadian  Furniture  World 
Canadian  Hardware  Journal 
The  Retail  Grocer  and  Provisioner 
The  Retail  Drueeist  of  Canada 
Motoring 


Technical  Papers: 

The  Canadian  Manufacturer 

The  Canadian  Builder 

The  Electrical  Dealer  and  Contractor 


14 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January.  1919 


Bedroom  Furniture 

BEDS— Brass  only 

Alaska  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limiibed, 

Monta-eal. 
Canadian  Mersejeau  Co,  Toronto. 
Stratford  Bed  Co.,  Stratford. 

BEDS — Brass  and  Iron 

Aiaska  Bedding  of  Moutreal  Limifted, 

Montreal. 
Canadian  Mersereau  Co.,  Toronto. 
Dominion  Brass  &  Iron  Bedstead  Co., 

Montreal. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Ma:ttress  Co., 

London. 

BEDS — Iron  only 

Aliaslia  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limited, 

Montreal. 
Reliable  Bedding  Co.,  Weston. 

BEDS — Davenports 

See  Davenports  (upholstered  furni- 
ture.) 

BEDS — Folding 

Alia.sika  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limited, 
MomtTeal. 

Antiseptic  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

Canadian  Mersereau  Co.,  Toronto. 

rajquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Kindel  Bed  Co.,  Stratford. 
D.  H.  Langlois  &  Co.,  St.  Johns,  Que. 
Li)ipert  Furniture   Co.,  Kitchener. 
Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 
Snyder  Bros.,  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

BEDS — Institution 

Alasika  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limiited, 

Mo'ntreal. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Mattress  Co., 
London. 

BEDS — Sofa 

Alasika  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limited, 
Montreal. 

FarquharS'on  Gifford  Go.  Ltd., 
Stratford. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Geo.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitebener. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Knpchtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 
Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co,  Wat- 
erloo. 

BEDS — Wooden 

.\ntl)f's  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Art  Fumiture  Co.  Ltd.,  Kitchener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

M.  F.  Beach  Co.,  Winchester. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Thorese.  Que. 

Eastern  Townships  Fum.  Mfg.  Co., 
Arthahaska,  Que. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Hopworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co..  Hespeler. 
HiVjner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 


.Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

George  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm  &  Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Markdale  I'urniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Middlesex  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 

Stratford. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltid., 

Owen  Sound. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover,  Ont. 
Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

BEDROOM  CHAIRS  AND  ROCKERS 

Also  see  Upholstered  Chairs. 

Anthes   Furniture   Co.,  Kitchener. 

Art  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Kitchen^er. 

Ball  Furniture  Co., -Hanover. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southamr>ton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley,  Ont. 

F.  E.  Coomibe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Fraserville  Chair  Co.,  Riviere  du 
Loup,  Quebec. 

Giddings,  Ltd.,  Granby,  Que. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Mc'Gill  Chairs  Limiited,  Cornwall. 
Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover,  Ont. 
Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Sehierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Speisz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 

BEDROOM  TABLES 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Durham  Furnitnrp  Co..  Durham. 
Eastern   Townships  Furn.  Mfg.  Co.. 

Arthabaska,  Que. 
Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co..  Hespeler. 
Hibner  Furniture  Co..  Kitchener,  Ont. 
.lacnues  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 


Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lueknow  Table  Co.,  Lucknow. 

D.  H.  Langlois  &  Co.,  St.  John 's,  Que. 

Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Haimilton. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
G.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Stratford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

Peiii)ler  Bros..  Hanover,  Ont. 

J  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 

BEDSIDE  TABLES 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 

Owen  Sound. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co..  Otterville,  Ont. 
Canada  Furniture  Mfgs.  Ltd., 

Woodstock. 

BED  SPRINGS 

Alaska  Bedding  of  Momtreal  I/im'iyte<l, 
MontTcal. 

Canadian  Feather  and  Mattress  Co., 
Toronto. 

Canadian  Mersereau  Co..  Toronto. 
Colleran  Spring  Bed  Co.,  Toronto. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois.  Que. 
Leggett  and  Piatt  Spring  Bed  Co., 
Windsor. 

Marshall  Sanitary  Mattress  Co.  Ltd., 
Toronto. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 

Ontario  Sprin-^  Bed  and  Mattress  Co., 
London. 

J.  C.  Sloane,  Owen  Sound. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 
du  Loup,  Quebec. 

James  Steel  &  Co.,  Guelph. 

The  Steel  Furnishing  Co.,  New  Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Whitworth  &  Restall,  Toronto. 

BOX  SPRINGS 

Alaska  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limite<l, 
Montreal. 

Canadian  Feather  and  Mattress  Co., 
Toronto. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co..  Cornwall. 
F.  W.  &  S.  Mason,  St.  Andrews,  N.B. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Mattress  Co., 
Loudon. 

Quality  Mattress  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Standard  Beddin"  Co..  Toronto. 

BOLSTER  ROLLS 

Alaska  Bedding  of  ^Montreal  Limited, 

]\Iontreal. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Jtliddlese.x  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 

Strathroy. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Mattress  Co., 

London. 

Quality  Mattress  Co.,  Waterloo. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


15 


CHIFFONIERS  (Odd  or  to  match  Dres- 
sers and  Stands) 

Anitthes  Fuiruitiure  Co.,  KitcheaieT. 

M.  r.  BeacJi  Co.  Ltd.,  Wiichester. 

Beaeh  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Oaniada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Durham. 

Eastern  Townships  Furn.  Mfg.  Co., 
Arthabaska,  Que. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 

Hepworth  Mfg.  Co.,  HepwoTth. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

.lacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesiley. 

Geio.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kin- 
cardine. 

Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdiale. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawia. 

Pejjpler  Bros.,  Hanover,  Ont. 

Spiesz  Furniture,  Ltd.,  Hanover. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Eiviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  NjS. 

COMFORTERS 

Ailiaska  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limited, 
Moditoeal. 

Canadian  Feather  and  Mattress  Co., 
Toronto. 

Toronto  Feather  and  Down  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

COSTUMERS 

Alasika  Bediding  of  Montreal  Limited, 
MiontxeaJ. 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southamipton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elom. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
Snyder  Bros.  U^hols/tering  Co.,  Wlat- 

erloo. 

Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wiindcr  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

COTS 

Canadian  Mersereau  Co.,  Toronto. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Ohesley. 
Munro  Wire  Works,  St.  Andrews,  N.S. 
.  Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Mattress  Co., 
London. 


Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
ii^arkhill  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Montreal, 

Winnipeg,  Vancouver. 
St.  Lawrence  J!'urniture  Co.,  Riviere 
du  Loup,  Quebec. 

CRADLES 

See  also  Iron  and  Brass  Bea». 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Go.  Ltd., 

Victoriavilile,  Que. 
Eastern  Townships  Furn.  Mfg.  Co., 

Arthabaska,  Que. 
Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Lea-Trimble  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 
Boxton  Mill  &  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo, Quebec. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 

CRIBS 

See  Bedis  (brass  and  iron). 
See  also  cradles. 

DRESSERS  (Only) 

Canada   Fm'niture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Oo.  Ltd.,  Meaford. 
Gibbard  Furniture  Oo.,  Napan.ee. 
Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Company, 

Kincardine. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover,  Ont. 

DRESSERS,  CHIFFONIERS,  CHE- 
VALS,  WASHSTANDS,  SOM- 
NOES,  DRESSING  TABLES, 
ETC. 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

■Aa't  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Kitcihener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

M.  F.  Beach  Co.  Ltd.,  Winchester. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Dominion  Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Eastern  Townships  Furn.  Mfg.  Co., 
Arthabaska,  Que. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 

Hepworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

Malcolm   &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

A.   Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Middlesex  Fuirniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Orillia  Furniture  Co.,  Orillia 
J.  Oiiver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 
Pejijiler  Bros.,  Hano\  er,  Ont. 
Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Victoriaville  Furniture  Co.,  Victoria- 

ville.  Que. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 


DRESSERS      AND  WASHSTANDS 
(Odd) 

M.  F.  Beach  Co.,  Winchester. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southamipton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Dominion    Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Eastern   Townships    Furniture  Mfg. 

Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que. 
Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 
Hepworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 
Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  Oliver  &  Son,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 
Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quetoec. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

DRESSING  TABLE  DESKS 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee,  Ont. 

Hesiieler  Furniture   Co.,  Hespeler. 

.Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furni'^ure  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 

HAMPERS 

Canada  Furniture  Mfrs.  Ltd., 
Wioodstock. 

IRON  BUNKS 

Alaiska  Bedding  Co.  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  IBedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  &  Mattress  Co., 
London. 

LADIES'   DRESSING  TABLES  (Odd 
or  to  match  Dressers  and  Stands) 

Anthes  Fua-niture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

M.  F.  Beach  Co.,  Winchester. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 

Eastern    Townships    Furniture  Mfg. 
Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Nai)anee. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros,  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

Malcolm    &   Souter    Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

.And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J  Oliver  &  Son,  Ltd.,  Ottawa 
Spiesz  Furniture  Co..  Hanover. 
Stratford  Chair  Co..  Stratford. 


16 


CANAblAX  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


MATTRESSES 

Ala&ka  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limited, 

Montreal. 
Antiseptic  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Bothwell  Mfg.  Co.,  Bothwell. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Featlier  and  Mattress  Co., 

Toronto. 

Edmonton    Tent   and   Mattress  Co., 

Edmonton. 
Empire  Bedding  &  Upholstering  Co., 

Toronto. 

Gold    Medal    Furniture    Mfg.  Co., 

Toronto. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ives  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Keystone  Bedding  Co.,  London,  Ont. 
Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
J.  B.  Larose,  Hull,  Que. 
Marshall  Sanitary  Mattress  Co.  Ltd., 

Toronto. 

F.  W.  &  S.  Mason,  St.  Andrews,  N.B. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Mattress  Co., 
London. 

Peterboro  Mattress  Co.,  Peterboro. 
Quality  Mattress  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Quebec  Mattress  Co.,  Quebec. 
Standard  Bedding  Co..  Toronto. 
Steel  Furnishing  Co.  Ltd., 

New  Glasgow,  N.S. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Whitworth  &  Restall,  Toronto. 

PILLOWS 

Alaska  Bedding  of  Montreal  Lim'ited, 
Montreal. 

Antiseptic  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Feather  and  Mattress  Co., 
Toronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

Tves  Modern  Bedstead  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

.J.  B.  Larose  .Jr.,  Hull,  Que. 

F.  W.  &  S.  Mason,  St.  Andrews,  N.B. 

Munro  Wire  Works,  Ltd.,  New  Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Ontario  Sjiring  Bed  and  Mattress 
Co.,  London. 

Quality  Mattress  Co.,  Waterloo. 

Resitmore  Mfg.  Co.,  Vancouver. 

Standard  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

Toronto  Feather  and  Down  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Whitworth  &  Restall,  Toronto. 

WARDROBES 

Ant'hes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

M.  F.  Beach  Co.,  Winchester. 

Bothwell  Mfg.  Co.,  Bothwell,  Ont. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St 
Therese,  Que. 

Eastern  Townshijis  Furniture  Mfg. 
Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que. 

Hepworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

.Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  ^Ifg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 
Pepyjier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 
du  Loup,  Que. 


Dining  Room  Furniture 


BUFFETS,  SIDEBOARDS,  EXTEN- 
SION TABLES,  SIDE  TABLES, 
CHINA  CABINETS,  DINERS. 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  itehener. 

Beaver  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southamipton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee, 

Hejiworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 

Hespeler  Furniture   Co.,  Hespeler. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Neustadt  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Neustadt. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 
BUFFETS  AND  SIDEBOARDS  (only) 

Also  see  Buffets,  etc. 

Canada  Furniture  Mianuf acturer  Ltd., 

Wiood  stock . 
Dominion    Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Eastern    Townships   Furniture  Mfg. 

Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que. 
Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 
Hespler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespler. 
Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
D.  H.  Langlois  &  Co.,  St.  John's,  Que. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Meaford. 
Megantic   Furniture    Co.,  Megantic, 

Que. 

Miididlesex  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Orillia  Furniture  Co.,  Orillia. 
Paquet  &  Godbout,    St.  Hvacinthe, 
Que. 

Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hanover. 
CHINA  CABINETS  (Only— Odd  or  to 
match  Sideboards  and  Buffets) 

Amtihes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchemer. 
Canada  Furniture  Mfrs.  Ltd., 

Wioodstoek. 
Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Dominion    Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Eastern    Townships    Furniture  Mfg 

Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que. 
Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee. 
Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
.Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover,  Ont. 
CURATES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  'Voodstock. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 


DINERS  (only) 

Also  see  Buffets,  etc. 
Hall  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 
F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Flora  Furniture  Co.,  Flora,  Ont. 
Elniira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Fraserville   Chair   Co.,   Riviere  du 

Loup,  Que. 
Giddings,  Ltd.,  Granby,  Que. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lipjiert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford. 
Meades  Upholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 
McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
-N'orth  American  Bent  Chair  Co.,  Owen 

Sou nd. 

Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Preston  Ohair  Co.,  Preston. 
Roxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 
Que. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Stanfold   Chair  Mfg.   Co.,  Stanfold. 
Quebec. 

Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

DINING  ROOM  TABLES  (not  adjust- 
able) 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Chesley  Furniture  Co.,  Chesley, 

manufacturers  of  "Twins." 
Dominion  Furniture  Co.,  St.  Therese, 

Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

EXTENSION  TABLES  (odd) 

Also  see  Buffets,  etc. 

Baird  Bros.,  Plattsville. 

Beaver  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Kitchener. 

Ohesley  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Chesley. 

Dominion    Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Eastern  Townships  Furniture  Co.,  Ar- 
thabaska, Que. 

Gibbard  FiirndtuTe  Co.,  Napanete. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Geo.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lucknow  Table  Co.,  Lucknow. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Meaford. 

National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

Orillia  Furniture  Co.,  Orillia. 

.J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 

Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Twin  Pedestal  Extension)  Tables. 


Parlor  and  Living  Room 


FOR  SPECIAL  LINES,  SUCIT  AS  PED- 
ESTALS, TELEPHONE  STANDS, 
ETC.,  SUITABLE  FOR  VARIOUS 
ROOMS,  SEE  NOVELTIES. 

CHESTERFIELDS 

See  upholstered  furniture. 
DAVENPORTS 
See  upholstered  furniture. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


17 


LIVING  ROOM  CHAIRS  AND 
ROCKERS 

Biaetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitciiener. 
Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  WoQidstack. 
Canaidian  Rattan  Chair  Co.  Lt'd., 

VTctoriavil'le,  Que. 
Chesley  Furniture  Go.  Ltd.,  C'hesley. 
F.  E.  Combe  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 

Kincardine. 
Elinrira  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Elmira. 
Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersol'l. 
The  FiarquharsoD-Gifford  Co.  Ltd., 

Stratford. 
The  Gold  Medal  Furniture  Co.  Ltid., 

Toronto. 
Kin  del  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Life  Long  Furn'iture  Co.,  Ingeirsoll. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
MrcGill  Chaiirs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
Meades  ITpiholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound,  Ont. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 

Owen  Sound. 
Wlmder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

MUSIC  CABINETS 

Beach  Furniture  Co,  Cornwall. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Gibbard  Furniture  Co.,  Napanee,  Ont. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co  ,  To- 
ronto. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kim-ar- 

dine. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Meaford  Mtg.  Co,  Meaford. 
Newbigging  Cabinet  Co.,  Hamilton. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Oo.  Ltd., 
River  du  Loup,  Que. 

PARLOR  OJIAIRS  av.i  ROCKERS 

See  reed  .-nd  upliold i.-?co  1  riiniiluro. 
PARLOR  SUITES 

See  uj'li  )lsi  ered  fui'nitare 
PARLOR  CABINETS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

PIANO  BENCHES 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 

PARLOR  TABLES 

Bactz  Bros.  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Furniture  Oo.  Ltd.,  Chesley. 

F.  Fj.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Dominion   Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 


Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

D  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Knecihtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Ca.,  Chesley. 

D.  H.  Langlois  &  Co.,  St.  John's,  Que. 

Geo.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Orillia  Furniture  Co.,  Orillia. 
T'eppler  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

PEDESTALS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwiall 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Furniture  Co.,  Chesley. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

IMalcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

McGill  Chaiirs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
Meades  'U'pholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Middlesex  FuTuiture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
.T.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 


Library  and  Den  Furniture 


BOOKCASES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canada  Office  and  School  Furniture 

Co..  Preston. 
Dominion    Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 
Kueohtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 


H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

G.  McLa.gan  Furniture  Co.,  Stratford. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 

North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

BOOK  STANDS 

(See  Magazine  Racks). 

BOOKCASES  (Sectional) 

Baetz  Bros  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Glcube-Wernicke  Co,.  Stratford. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture   Co.,  Hanover. 
George     McLagan     Furniture  Co., 

Stratford. 

CARD  AND  DEN  TABLES 

'Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

-  Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers. 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

•  Chesley  Furniture  Co.,  Chesley. 
Elmira  Furniture  Go.  Ltd.,  ElmiTa. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

•Hourd  &  Co.,  London. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

-  Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

•  H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
•G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Malculm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

•  Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 

ford. 

•  Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

•National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

Snyder  Bros.,  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

•  Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

■  Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

CELLARETTES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.  Woodstock. 
J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owe" 
Sound. 

Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 

CHAIRS  and  SETTEES 

See  upholstered  furniture. 
COUCHES 

See  upholstered  furniture. 
DAVENPORTS 

See  upholstered  furniture. 


18 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


DESKS,  LIBRARY 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Baird  Bros.,  Plattsville. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canada  OiBce  and  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Dominion  Furniture  Co.,  St.  Therese, 
Que. 

Elmira   Furniture   Co.   Ltd.,  Elmira. 
Glohe-Wernicke  Co.,  Stratford. 
Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co..  Hanover. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Meades  Ujiholstering  Co.,  Hamover. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kindar- 
dine. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
National  Table  Co..  Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Preston  Furniture  Co.,  I'reston. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

LIBRARY  TABLES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Baird  Bros.,  Plattsville. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
Berlin  Office  &  Fixture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canadia     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canada  Office  and  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Dominion    Furniture   Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Durham. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
The  Gold  Medal  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 
Toronto. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Beauharnois, 
Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.,  &  Co..  Chesley. 

G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 
And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Meades  Upholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 

John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Peyipler  Bros.,  Hanover. 

Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto 
Walker  <3s  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co..  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 


MAGAZINE  RACKS  AND  STANDS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Office  and  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

P.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 
Kdneardine. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
J  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
J.  C.  M;undell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

MORRIS  CHAIRS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufasturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St 
Therese,  Que. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Imperial  Eattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

Parlor   Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Pointe-iaux-Trembles,  Que. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo.- 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 

SMOKERS'  SETS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Stratford. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Meaford  Mfg  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Pointe-aux-Trembles,  Que. 

WRITING    TABLES    AND  SECRE- 
TARIES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 


Canada  Office  &  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston 

D  ominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Darham. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Hibner  Furnitiire  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat 

ford. 

North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Spiesz  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Stratford  Ohair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 


Hall  r  urniture 


CONSOLE  TABLES  AND  MIRRORS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Hesiieler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

And.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

North  American  Furniture  Co..  Owen 
Sound. 

Wunder  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
HALL  CHAIRS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

C.  P.  Gilinas  &  Frere,  Three  Rivers, 
Que. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
McGill  Chair  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Que. 

Stratford  Ohair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Wunder  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

HALL  CLOCKS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
HALL  SEATS  AND  MIRRORS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstoclc. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


19 


Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Ma.rl<dale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound,  Ont. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hano\er. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

HALL  TREES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co..  Hespeler. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lindsay   Library   &   Office  Fittings, 

Lindsay. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co..  Owen 

Sound. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

HALL  RACKS 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchensr. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Dominion  Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Dymond-Colonial  Co.,  Strathroy. 
T>.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kilgour   Bros.    &    Co.,  Beauharnois, 

Que. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

UMBRELLA  STANDS 

Canada  Furniture  'Manufiu-turors, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

UiiK  'a  Fur)iitu)f   (..)..  IMmira 

Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 

J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kneehtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 

National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Pejipler  Bros.,  Hanover. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 


Kitchen  and  Laundry 


BAKE  AND  IRONING  BOARDS 

H.  E.  Furniture  Co.,  Milverton. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

CHAIRS 

Ball  Furniture  Co.,  Limited,  The, 
Hanover. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 
Victoriaville,  Que. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Ltd.,  Chesley. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Dominion  Chair  Co.,  Limited,  Bass 
River,  N.S. 

Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Durham. 

Fraserville  Chair  Company,  Fraser- 
ville,  Que. 

C.  P.  Gilinas  &  Frere,  Three  Rivers, 
Que. 

Giddings,  Limited,  Granby,  Que. 
Harriston  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  Har- 
riston. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener: 
Kilgour    Bros.    &    Co.,  Beauharnois, 

Que. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Kneehtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
North    American     Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
Neustadt  Mfg.  Co.,  Neustadt. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 
Roxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 

Que. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Que. 

George  Valliere,  Quebec,  Que. 

CLOTHES  DRIERS 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

CLOTHES  WRINGERS 

.1.  H.  Connor  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
CUPBOARDS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Durham. 

Eastern  Townships  Furnituro  Mfg. 
Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que. 

H;  E.  Furniture  Co.,  Milverton. 

Harriston  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  Har- 
riston. 

Hejiworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 
Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 
Kneehtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 
du  Loup,  Que. 

CURTAIN  STRETCHERS 

Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

KITCHEN  CABINETS 

Canada     Furniture     Manuf  ..cturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Eastern    Townships    Furniture  Mfg. 

Co.,  Arthabaska,  Que 
Wm.  Gray,  Sons  &  Cam])bell, 

Chatham,  Out. 
lIiMii  &  Nott,  Brantford. 
Hourd  &  Co.,  London. 
H.  E.  Furniture  Co.,  Milverton. 
Kneehtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 


Kneehtel  Kitchen  Cabinet  Co.,  Han- 
over 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
.1.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

PORCELAIN  TABLES 

TI.  E.  Furniture  Co.,  Milverton. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

STEP-LADDER  CHAIRS 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

STOVES  AND  RANGES 

Beach  Foundry  Co.,  Ottawa. 
Burrow,  Stewart  &  Milne,  Hamilton. 
Clare  Bros.,  Preston. 
Gait  Stove  &  Furnace  Co.,  Gait. 
Enterprise  Foundry    Co.,  Sackvilli 
N.B. 

Findlay  Bros.,  Carleton  Pla^e. 
Gura(y  Foundry  Co.,  Toronto 
Hall-Zryd  Foundry  Co.,  Hespeler. 
Hamilton  Stove  .S:  ir._;itc:-  Co.,  Hamil- 
ton. 

MeClary  Mfg.  Co.,  London. 

Moffat  Stove  Co.,  Weston. 

D.  Moore  Co.,  Hamilton. 

Jas.  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

Jas.  Stewart  Mfg.  Co.,  Woodstock. 

TABLES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Wcodstcck. 
Gushing  Bros.,  Calgary. 
Eastern  Townships    Furnitur-3  Mfg. 

Co.,  Arthabasku,  Que.  ( 
Hepworth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hepworth. 
Kneehtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Beauharnois, 

Que. 

Kneehtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

D.  H.  Langlois  &  Co.,  St.  John's,  Que. 

Lucknow  Table  Co.,  Lueknow. 

G.  .T.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

ilu  Loup,  Que. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 
Weiler  Bros.,  Victoria,  B.C. 

TUB  STANDS 

J.  H.  Connor  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 

REFRIGERATORS 

Eureka  Refrigerator  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ham  &  Nott,  Branlford. 
John  Hillock  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Sanderson,  Harold,  Co.,  Paris. 
James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

WASHING  MACHINES 

J.  H.  Connor  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Cummer-Dovv'swcll,  Hamilton. 
Geo.  C.  Kaittins;  &  Son,  Gait. 
D.  Mn.xwell  &  Sons,  St.  Mary's. 

CLOTHES  WRINGERS 

Jas.  Steel©  Ltd.,  Guelph. 


Bathroom  Furniture 


BATHROOM  FITTINGS 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 


20 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


MEDICINE  CABINETS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Dominion  Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Tiierese,  Que. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
H.  E.  Furniture  Co.,  Milvorton. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
IMarlvdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Matthevrs  Bros.,  Toronto. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 

Philips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Eiviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
D.  L.  Shafer  Co.,  St.  Thomas. 

MIRRORS 

See  Novelties. 
STOOLS 

See  office  furniture. 


Verandah,  Lawn  and  Camp 


AWNINGS  AND  WINDOW  SHADES 

Geo.  H.  Hees  &  Sons  Co.,  Toronto. 
Fred  G.  Soper  Co.,  Toronto. 

BOAT  CHAIRS  (Revolving) 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

CAMP  STOOLS 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Roxtou  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 
CAMP  BEDS  AND  COTS 

(See  Iron  and  BraS'S  Beds). 

Colleran  Spring  Bed  Co.,  Ltd., 
Toronto. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

CHAIRS,  ROCKERS  AND  SETTEES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal 

F.  Bibby  &  Co.,  Dundas. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 

ville.  Que. 
Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 
Danville  Chair  Co.,  Danville,  Que. 
Fraserville    Chair    Co.,  Fraserville, 

Que. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
0.  P.  Gilinas  &  Frere,  Three  Rivers, 
Que. 

Imperial  Rattan- Co.,  Stratford. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Malcolm  Co.,  Limited,  Vancouver. 
J.  C.  Mundcll  &  Co.,  Flora. 
McGill  Chairs  Ltd.,  Cornwall. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 

Owen  Sound. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Roxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 

Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 


Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Quebec. 

COUCH  HAMMOCKS 

Ailasika  Bedding  of  Montreal  Limited, 

Montreal. 
Gait  Robe  Co.,  Gait. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

FOLDING  CHAIRS 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 

ville.  Que. 
Canadian  Steel    Specialty  Company, 

Grimsby. 
Chesley  Cliair  Co.,  Chesley. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Roxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 

Que. 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 
FOLDING  TABLES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 

ville.  Que. 
Hourd  &  Co.,  London. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
^McGiU  Cliiaiirs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
National  Table  Co..  Owen  Sound. 
.1.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Roxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 

Quebec. 

Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

HAMMOCKS 

Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  OtteTville. 
Gait  Robe  Co.,  Gait. 

LADDERS 

Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

LAWN  SEATS  AND  SWINGS 

.J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 

Canadian  Buffalo  Sled  Co.,  Preston. 

Canadian  Rattan   Chair  Co., 
Victoriaville,  Que. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co..  Elora. 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

.Tames  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

W.  F.  Vilas,  Cowansville,  Que. 

.lohn  Watson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ayr,  Ont. 

OLD  HICKORY  FURNITURE 

Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 

PARK  SEATS 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co..  Stratford. 
.Tames  Smart  Mfs.  Co.,  Brockville. 
John  Watson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ayr. 

REED  AND  RATTAN  FURNITURE 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 
ville, Que. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

J.  E.  Smith  &  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

SEAGRASS  FURNITURE 

W.  B.  Jennings  Co..  St.  Thomas. 
The  Malcolm  Co.,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

WILLOW  FURNITURE 

F.  Bibby  &  Co.,  Dundas. 
Brantford  Willow  Works,  Brantford. 
Im-perial  Rattan  Co..  Stratford. 
Malcolm  Co.,  Limited,  Vancouver. 


Office  Furniture 


BOARDROOM  TABLES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canada   Office   &   School  Furn.  Co., 
Preston. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furn.  Co.,  Kincardine. 
Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchenerv 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Table  Co.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 

BOOKCASES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Globe- Wernicke  Co.,  Stratford. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furn.  Co.,  Stratford. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

Snyder  Desk  &  Table  Oo.  Ltd.. 

Waterloo. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 
du  Loup,  Quebec. 

CHAIRS 

Ball  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Caniailian  Rattan  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 
Victoriaville,  Que. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

F.   E.   Coombe   Furniture   Co..  Kin- 
cardine. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialtj'  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Fraserville    Chair    Co.,    Riviere  du 
Loup,  Quebec. 

Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Krug  Bros  &  Co..  Chesley. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 

John  C.  Mundell  &  Co..  Elora. 

North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

Owen  Sound  Chair  Co..  Owen  Sound. 

Stanfold   Ohair  Mfg.   Co.,  Stanfold, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Chair  Co..  Stratford. 

Snvdev  Desk  &  Table  Oo.  Ltd., 

Wiaterloo. 
Woeller,  Boldue  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 

DESKS— FLAT  AND  30LL-TOP 

Baird  Bros.,  Plattsville. 
Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Dominion    Furniture    Mfg.    Co.,  St. 

Therese,  Que. 
Glotoe-Wernioke  Co.  Ltd.,  Stra.tfiord. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKEN 


21 


-  Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Beaubarnois,  Que. 
Knechtel  Turniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
A.   Malcolm  Furniture   Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Paquet   &   Godbout,   St.  Hyaeinthe, 
Que. 

Preston  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Stratiiroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 

Snyder  hesk  &  Taibl'e  'Oo.  Ltd., 
Waterloo. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Que. 
Steel  Equpiment  Co.,  Ottawa. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

DESKS— STANDING 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Woodstock. 
Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Globe-Wernicke  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 
Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Wiaterloo. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
A.  Malcolm  Turn.  Co.,  Kincardine. 
Snvder  Desk  &  Table  Oo.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 

FILING  CABINETS  AND  SUPPLIES 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Glob&-We.rnieke  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Steel  Equipment  Co..  Ottawa. 
Snvder  Desk  &  Table  Oo.  Ltd., 
Waterloo. 

OFFICE  TRUCKS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Snvder  Desk  &  Table  Oo.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 

SETTEES 

Berlin  Interior  Hardwood  Co., 

Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  R-attan  Cha'-  Co,  Victoria- 

ville.  Que. 
Canada  Office  &  School  Furniture  Co., 

Preston. 

F.  E.  Goombe  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 

Kincardine. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira 
Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
.L  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Taible  'Oo.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

STOOLS 

Ball  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 
Victoriavillc,  Que. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Danville  Chair  Co.,  Danville,  Que. 


Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Toronto. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
McGill  Ohaiirs  Limited,  Oornwall. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Neustadt  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Neustadt, 
Ont. 

North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Ta-ble  Oo.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 
Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford.  _ 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup.  Quebec. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

TABLES 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

Chesley  Furniture  Co.,  Chesley. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Glolbe-Wernicke  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

Interior  Hardwood   Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Cheslev. 

G.  .1.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

.1.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Preston  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Table  Oo.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 

Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

TYPEWRITER  DESKS 

Baird  Bros.,  Plattsville. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Globe-Wernicke  Co.,  Stratford. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Preston  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Table  'Oo.  Ltd., 
Waterloo. 

WARDROBES 

"anada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Globe-Wernicke  Co.,  Stratford. 
Ca  Jidda  Office  &  School  Furniture  Co., 

Preston. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Preston  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Table  Go.  Ltd., 
Waterloo. 

WASTE  BASKETS 

See  Novelties. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Globe-Wernicke  Co.,  Stratford. 


Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 

nechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Malcolm   &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
Preston  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 
Snyder  Desk  &  Table  Co.  Ltd., 

Waterloo. 


Church  and  School  Furniture 


ASSEMBLY,  HALL  AND  THEATRE 

Ai*t  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Canadian   Steel  Specialty  Company, 

Grimsby. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Dominion  Chair  Co.,  Bass  River,  N.S. 

Fraserville  Chair  Co.,  Fraserville. 

Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 

National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 

Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

Royal  Chair  Co.,  Quebec. 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold. 

James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

Valley  City  Seating  Co.,  Dundas. 

W.  F.  Vilas,  Cowansville,  Que. 

BLACKBOARDS 

Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

CHURCH,  SCHOOL  AND  LODGE 

Art  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 
Co.,  Preston. 

Canadian  Steel  Specialty  Company, 
Grimsby. 

Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 

James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

John  B.  Snider,  Waterloo. 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co..  Stratford. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 
du  Loup,  Quebec. 

Vnlley  City  Seating  Co.,  Dundas. 

W.  F.  Vilas,  Cowansville,  Que. 

Westport  School  Furniture  Co.,  West- 
port. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

LODGE  SETTEES,  PEDESTALS,  AL- 
TARS, ETC. 

Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Canada     Fiirnitare  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
McGill  Chair  Co.,  Cornwall. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

PRAYER  DESKS 

D.  H.  Lauglois  &  Co.,  St.  John's,  Que. 
TEACHER'S  DESKS  AND  CHAIRS 

Globe  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 


22 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


Upholstered  Furniture 


CHESTERFIELDS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ijtd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

De  Luxe  Upholstering  Co.,  Kitchener. 
EDis  Furniture  Oo.,  Ingersoll. 
Parquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Geo.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

D.  Hibner  I\irniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Jeffries  Furniture  Co.,  Welland. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Kindeil  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Life  Long  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 

Meades  Upholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 
Pointe-aux-Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

COUCHES 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Geo.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

Jeffries  Furniture  Co.,  Welland. 

Kindel  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

Kilgour  &  Bros.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener.  . 

Meiades  Upholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 

Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 

Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 

John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  T^lora. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Pointe-aux-Trembles,  Que. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wat- 
erloo. 

Steel  Furnishing  Co.,  New  Glasgow, 
N.S. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Boldue  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 

COUCH  FRAMES 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Meades  Upholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kindp.1  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Pointe  aux  Trembles,  Que. 

DAVENPORTS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock, 
r.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar^ 

dine. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elniira, 


Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Geo.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Jeffries  Furniture  Co.,  Welland. 
.  Kilgour  Davenport  Co.,  Toronto. 
Kindeil  Bed  !Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Ontario  Spring  Bed  &  Mattress  Co., 
London. 

Owen  Daveno  Bed  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Pointe  aux  Trembles,  Que. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

DAVENPORT  BEDS 

(See  also  Iron  and  Brass  Beds). 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Geo.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Kilgour  Davenport  Co.,  Toronto. 
Kindeil  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Steatford. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 
John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Owen  Daveno  Bed  Co.,  Hespeler. 
Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co., 

Waterloo. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

DAVENPORT  FRAMES 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd..  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine, 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Toronto. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kindeil  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co., 

Waterloo. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 

DEN  CHAIRS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Jeffries  Furniture  Co.,  Welland. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Meades  Upiholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 
M'CGill  Chaiirs  Limited,  Corn  wall. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 
Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 


North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

Owen  Daveno  Bed  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 
Pointe-aux-Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Wattrloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

DIVANS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Toronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 

Owen  Daveno  Bed  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 
Pointe-aux-Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

DIVANETTES 

Canada      Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Toronto. 

Geo.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kindeil  Bed  Co.  Ltd..  Stiratford. 

Kilgour  Davenport  Co.,  Toronto. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

Owen  Daveno  Bed  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Pointe  aux  Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

LIVING  ROOM  CHAIRS  AND  ROCK- 
ERS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 

Kincardine. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Farquharson-Gifford   Co.,  Stratford. 
The  Gold  Medal  Furniture  Co.  Ltd., 

Toronto. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Kinidel  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Life  Long  Funiiture  Oo.,  Ingersoll. 
Meades  Ujiholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 
McGill  CTiaiirs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 

Owen  Sound. 
Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 

Pointe-aux-Trembles.  Que. 
Wundier  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd., 

Kitchener. 

LIVING   ROOM    FURNITURE  AND 
SUITES 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


23 


Farquharson-GiflEord   Co.,  Stratford. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

The  Gold  Medal  FuTniture  Co.  Ltd., 
Toronto. 

Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

G.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
.Jeffries  Furniture  Cj.,  Welland. 
KindeA  Bed  Co.  Ltd.,  Stnatford. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincardine. 
]Meiade«  ITiphol storing  Co.,  Hanover. 
Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 
McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Oornwall. 
Miontreal  Upholsteriug  €o.,  Momtreal. 
John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd.,  Pointo  aux  Trembles,  Que. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg..  Co. 
Kitchener. 

LOUNGES 

Aliafsika  Beddinig  of  M'omtreal  Liimiited, 
Montreal. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Stratford. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Geo.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

JSIeades  U,pholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 

Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 

Owen  Daveno  Bed  Co.,  Hespeler. 

Parlor  Manufacturers  Ltd.,  Pointe- 
Ltd.,  Pointe-aux-Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

MORRIS  CHAIRS 

See  Library  and  Den  Furniture. 
PARLOR  FRAMES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Elora  Furniture  Co.,  Elora. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Meiades  Uipiholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Ltd..  Pointe  anx  Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 

PARLOR,  RECEPTION  AND  DRAW 
ING  ROOM  CHAIRS  AND  ROCK- 
ERS. 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 

ville,  Que. 


F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville. Que. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

Fraserville  Chair  Co.,  Riviere  du 
Loup,  Quebec. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Jeffries  Furniture  Co.,  Welland. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
The  Malcolm  Co.,  Vancouver,  B.C. 
Montreal  Upholstering  Co.,  Montreal. 
Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 

John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

McGill  Chair  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manuf acturers 
Ltd.,  Pointe  aux  Trembles,  Que. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Stanfold   Chair  Mfg.   Co.,  Stanfold, 

Quebec. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd., 
Kiitehieiier. 

I 

PARLOR  SUITES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Jeffries  Furniture  Co.,  Welland. 
Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lipjiert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
McGill  Chair  Co.,  Cornwiall. 
Meadeis  Upholstering  Co.,  Hanover. 
Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers 
Pointe  aux  Trembles,  Que. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

rlu  Loup.  Que. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 

RECLINING  CHAIRS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd. 

Woodstock. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Ijijipert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Parlor  Furniture  Manufacturers,  Ltd, 

Pointe  aux  Trembles,  Que. 


Reed  and  Rattan  Furniture 


LIVING  ROOM  SUITES  —  CHAIRS, 
ROCKERS,  SETTEES,  COUCHES, 
FOOTSTOOLS,  TABLES,  DESKS, 
BOOK  STANDS,  FLOWER 
STANDS,  TEA  TABLES,  TEA 
TRAYS,  WORK  BASKETS,  CUR- 
ATES, WASTE  BASKETS, 
CRADLES 

F.  Bibby  &  Co.,  Dundas. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Vietoria- 
ville.  Que. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

Giddings,  Ltd.,  Granby,  Que. 
.   Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 

W.  B.  Jennings  Co.,  St.  Thomas. 

Kilgour  Bros.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

Malcolm  Co.,  Limited,  Vancouver. 

J.  E.  Smith  &  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

WILLOW  AND  GRASS  FURNITURE 

Brantford  Willow  Works,  Brantford. 
Eglinton  Willow  Works,  Toronto. 
W.  B.  .Jennings,  St.  Thomas. 


Novelties  and  Sundry  Lines 


ARTS  &  CRAFTS  FURNITURE 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 

ASBESTOS  TABLE  COVERS 

Canadian  H.  W.  Johns-Manville  Co., 
Toronto. 

BABY  CARRIAGES,  GO-CARTS  AND 
SULKIES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Giddings  &  Co.,  Granby,  Que. 
J.  W.  Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois, 

Que. 

Lloyd  Mfg.  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Sidwav  Mercantile  Co.,  Toronto. 
J.  E.  Smith  &  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

BABY  GATES 

Rock  Island  Mfg.  Co.,  Rock  Island, 
Que. 

Stratford  Manufa.eturing  'Co.  Ltd., 
Stratford. 

BENT  WOOD  FURNITURE 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 

BREAKFAST  TABLES 

Antihes  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchemer. 
Biaetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitdhener. 
Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Geo.  MeLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
BI-TABLES    (Combination   taWe  and 

desk) 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 


24 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd..  Woodstock. 
Xational  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 

BUNGALOW  CHAIRS  AND  SUITES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Waterloo  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

CAMP  FURNITURE 

Imperial  Eattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

CANDLESTICKS 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

CANDLESTICKS—  (Brass) 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

CARPETS  AND  RUGS 

Brinton  Carpet  Co.,  Peterboro. 
Canadian  Carpet  Co.,  Milton. 
Canadian  Carpet  &  Comforter  Mfg. 

Co.,  Toronto. 
Cobourg  Carpet  and  Matting  Co., 

Cobourg. 

Dominion  Axminster  Co.,  Toronto. 
Guelph  Carpet  Mills  Co.,  fnielph. 
Toronto  Carpet  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Thomas  Bros.,  Toronto. 

CARS  AND  CYCLES  (For  chUdren) 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Canadian  K.  K.  Co.  Ltd.,  Flora,  Ont. 

CEDAR  BOXES 

H.  E.  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Milverton, 
Ont. 

Keenan  Bros.,  Owen  Sound. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Eloria. 
Port  Dover  Planing  Mills,  Port 

Dover,  Ont. 
D.  L.  Shafer  &  Co.,  St.  Thomas. 
Tickell,  Sons  &  Co.,  Belleville. 

CHAIRS  AND  ROCKERS 

Baetz  Bros.  &,  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Ball  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.  litd., 

Vietoriaville,  Que 
Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

F.  E.  Coombe.  Furn.  Co.,  Kincardine. 
Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Fraserville    Chair    Co.,    Riviere  du 
Loup,  Quebec. 

C.  P.  Gilinas  &  Frere,  Three  Rivers, 
Que. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Haehborn  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Kneohtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  Chesley. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture   Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Morlock  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
McGill  Chairs  Limiited,  Cornwall. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Boxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo. 

Que, 


Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
George  Valliere,  Quebec,  Que. 
Walker  &  Clegg,  Wingham. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

CHAIRS— Children '  s 

Ball  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Company  Ltd., 
Vietoriaville,  Que. 

Danville  Ohair  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Durham. 

Fraserville  Chair  Co.,  Riviere  du 
Loup,  Quebec. 

C.  P.  Gilinas  &  Frere,  Three  Rivers, 
Quebec. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
McGill  Chairs  Limiited,  Cornwall. 
Neustadt  Mfg.  Co.,  Neustadt. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.  Stratford. 

CHILDREN'S  HIGH  CHAIRS 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Eattan  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 

Vietoriaville,  Que. 
Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
Neustadt  Mfg.  Co,  Neustadt. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 
Sound. 

Eoxton  Mill  &  Ohair  Co..  Waterloo, 
Que. 

Stanfold  Chair  Mfg.  Co.,  Stanfold, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Chair  Co.,  Stratford. 

CLOCK  CASES 

Art  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Kitchener. 

COMMODE  CHAIRS  (for  adults  and 
children) 

Canadian  Eattan  Chair  Co., 

Vietoriaville,  Que. 
Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 
Canada  Furniture  Mfrs.  Ltd., 

Woodstock. 
Kneohtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
McGill  Chairs  Limiited,  Cornwall. 
North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound,  Ont. 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Neustadt  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Neustadt. 

CROKINOLE  BOARDS 

Canadian  Buffalo  Sled  Co.,  Preston. 

CUSHIONS  AND  FORMS  (Plain  and 
Fancy) . 

Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 


Toronto  Feather  &  Down  Co.,  Toronto. 
Whitworth  &  Restall,  Toronto. 

DESK  TRAYS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  OfBce  &  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Globe-Wernicke  Co.,  Stratford. 

DOLLS'  BEDS 

Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 

DRAPERIES     AND  UPHOLSTERY 
GOODS 

A.  B.  Caya,  Kitchener. 

Daly  &  Morin,  Montreal,  Que. 

The  Ellis  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersioll. 

DRAPERY  HARDWARE 

Daly  &  Mordn,  Montreal. 

FALL  LEAF  TABLES 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 

FERN  STANDS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Kneohtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
LI.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 

FLOWER  STANDS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitdhener. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
McGill  Chairs  Limiited,  Cornwall. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 

FOLDING  TABLES 

(See  also  Card  and  Den  Tables). 
Baetz  Bros.,  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 

Woodstock. 
Hourd  &  Co.,  London. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

FOOTSTOOLS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krus;  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

Schierholtz  Furniture  Co.,  New  Ham- 
burg. 

Snyder  Bros.  IJipholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 

FURNITURE  POLISH 

Domestic  Specialty  Co.,  Hamilton. 

Ronuk,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 
Cross  Products,  Toronto. 
NiOTthern  Varaish  Co.  Ltd., 

Owen  Sound. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


25 


GO-CARTS  AND  CHILDREN'S  SUL- 
KIES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
W.  B.  Jennings  Co.,  St.  Thomas. 
Sidway  Mercantile  Co.,  Toronto. 
Lloyd  Manufa«tuiring  Co.  Ltd., 

Kitc'lbener. 

HOSPITAL  COUCHES 

Imperial  Rattan  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

HOTEL  AND  RESTAURANT  TABLES 

Canada  Furniture  Maniufaicturers 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Kneoh'tel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Lucknow  Table  Co.,  Lueknow. 

ICE  CREAM  TABLES  AND  CHAIRS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian   Steel   Specialty  Company, 

Grimsby. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 
H.  Ki'ug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
Lyons  &  Marks,  Toronto. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
St.  Lawrence  Furniture  Co.,  Riviere 

du  Loup,  Quebec. 

INVALID  CHAIRS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock.  » 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Gendron  Wheel  Co.,  Toledo,  Ohio. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 

INVALID  TABLES 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd.. 

Woodstock. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
J.  Watson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ayr. 

INVALID  TRAYS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
M'cGili  Chairs  Ldimiteid,  Cornwall. 
Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co.,  Otterville. 

JARDINIERE  STANDS 

Baetz  Bros.  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Coinwall. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

Ch'esley  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Chesley. 

Dominion  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  St. 
Therese,  Que. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

H.  E.  Furniture  Co.,  Milverton. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kin- 
cardine. 

Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

MrcGill  Chaiirs  Liniiteid,  OoTnwall. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Otterville  Mfg.  Co..  Otterville. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

Strathroy  Furniture   Co.,  Strathroy. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 
Woeller  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Kitchener. 


itlNDERGARTEN  SETS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 
ville.  Que. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

Danville  Chair  &  Specialty  Co.,  Dan- 
ville, Que. 

Glolie  Furniture  Co.,  Waterloo. 

Durham  Furniture  Co.,  Durham. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa, 

Roxton  Mill  &  Chair  Co.,  Waterloo, 
Quebec. 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

LADIES'  DESKS 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  KitelhetneT. 

Baird  Bros.,  Plattsville. 

Beach  Furniture  Co.,  Cornwall. 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 

Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Crown  Furniture  Co.,  Preston. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

J.  Kreiner  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Markdale  Furniture  Co.,  Markdale. 
Geo.  McLagan  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Strathroy  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Windsor  Furniture  Co.,  Windsor,  N.S. 

LAMPS  (Reed  and  willow) 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 

Woodstock. 
Im'])erial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 

LAMPS,  Portables  and  Chandeliers 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Beauehamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers 

Ltd.,  Woodisto'ck. 
Hespeler  Furniture  Co.,  Hespeler. 
Timjierial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Lamb  Bros.  &  Greene,  Napanee.  Ind. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

LAMP  SHADES— (Silk) 

Biaetz  Bros.  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

MANTELS— Wood,  Tile,  Electric 

Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture  Co.  Ltd., 
Kitchener. 

MIRRORS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
G.  L.  Irish  &  Co..  Toronto. 
Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
Moaford  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Meaford,  Ont 
Philliips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

MOPS  (Polish  and  dry) 

Clements  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

MOULDINGS  &  PICTURE  FRAMES 

G.  L.  Irish,  Toronto. 
Matthews  Bros.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Phillij)is  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Reliance  Moulding  Co.,  Kingston. 

NOVELTY  CURTAINS 

Daly  &  Morin,  Montreal. 

ORIENTAL  MATS  AND  RUGS 

Malcolm  Co.,  Limited,  Vancouver. 


ORNAMENTAL  TABLE  LAMPS 

J.  Walter  &  Sons,  Kitchenier. 

ORNAMENTAL  CANDLE  STICKS 

J.  Walter  &  Son®,  Kiteheai'er. 

PATRIOTIC  CHAIRS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

PICTURES  &  FRAMING  SUPPLIES 

G.  L.  Irish  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
Phillips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto.' 

PIANO  LAMPS  (Reed  and  wUlow) 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd., 

Woodstock. 
J.  E.  Beauehamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
Laim'b  Bros.  &  Green,  Napanee,  Ind. 

PILLOW  SHAM  HOLDERS 

Tarbox  Bros.,  Toronto. 

PHONOGRAPHS 

Berliner  Gramophone  Co.  Ltd., 
Montreal. 

Brantford  Piano  Case  Co.  Ltd., 
Brantf  ord. 

Canadian  Symphonola  Co.  Ltd.,  Brock 
Ave.,  Toronto. 

Canadian  Phonograph  &  Sapphire 
Disc  Co.  Ltd.,  407  Builders'  Ex- 
change Bldg.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Columbia  Graphophone  Co.,  Toronto. 

Farquharson,  Gifford  Co.  Ltd., 
Stratford. 

Gerhard  Heintzman  Piano  Co., 
Sherbourne  St.,  Toronto. 

Henderson  &  Richardson,  Board  of 
Trade  Bldg.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

I.  Montagnes  &  Co.,  Ryrie  Bldg., 
Toronto. 

Musical  Merchandise  Sales  Co.,  Ex- 
celsior Life  Bldg.,  Toronto. 

Musical  Instruments  Ltd.,  247  Yonge 
St.,  Toronto. 

The  Nordheimer  Piano  &  Music  Co. 
Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Phonola  Co.  of  Oaaiada  Ltd., 
Kitchener. 

Pathe  Freres  Phonograph  Co.,  of 
Canada  Ltd.,  4-6-8  Clifford  St., 
Toronto . 

Playola  Phonograph  Co.  Ltd., 
468  King  St.,  Toronto. 

Regal  Phonograph  Co.,  145  Church 
St.,  Toronto. 

Star  Company  of  Canladia  Ltd., 
London. 

Torcan  Sales  Co.,  Bay  St.,  Toronto. 
Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture  Co. 
Ltd.,  Kitchener. 

Motors,  Tone  Arms,  Sound  Boxes, 
Needles  and  Phonograph  Parts 

'Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 
Otto   Heineman   Phonograph  Supply 

Co.  Ltd.,  Lumsden  Bldg.,  Toronto. 
Leonard  Markels,  New  York. 
Thomas  Mfg.  Co.,  Kent  Bldg., 

Toronto. 

Phonograph  Records 

Columbia  Phonograph  Co.,  Toronto. 
Berliner    Gramophone    Co.  Limited, 

Montreal . 
Edison  Phonograph  Co.  Toronto. 
Pathe  Freres   Phonograph   Co.,  of 

Canada  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Phonola  C'o.  of  Canada  Ltd., 

Kitchener. 


26 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January.  1919 


Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Star  Compiany  of  Canada  Ltd., 

London. 
Phonograph  Cabinets 
Newbigging  Cabinet  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 

SCREENS 

Geo.  H.  Hacihiborn  &  Co.,  Kitcihener. 
Stratford  IMfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford. 

SEWING  TABLES 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
F.  E.  Coombe  Fui-niture  Co.  Ltd., 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Flora. 
Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
North   American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 

SHIRT  WAIST  BOXES 

H  E.  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Milverton, 
Ont 

Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 
D.  L.  Shafer  &  Co.,  St.  Thomas. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 
Owen  Sound. 

SLIPPER  CASES 

!McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 

SLIP-ON  CHAIR  COVERS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Life  Long  Furndtiure  'Co.,  IngersoU. 

SHOE  SHINERS 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
SMOKING  CABINETS 

Bell  Furniture  Co.,  Southampton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furn.  Co.,  Kincardine. 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
A.   Malcolm  Furniture   Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Geo.   McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd., 

Stratford. 
Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 
John  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

SMOKING  SETS— (Brass) 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 
STATUARY 

G.  L.  Irish  &  Co.,  Toronto  (all  kinds). 
Li))|>prt  I'urniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

(Wood). 

TABLES— DAVENPORT  END 

Baetz  Bros.  &  Co.,  Kitchener. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
TABOURETTES 

Baetz  Bros.,  Kitchener. 
Elmira  Furniture  Co,.  Elmira. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 
G.  J.  Lippert  Table  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Li]i))ert  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kin- 
cardine. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Strat- 
ford. 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co.,  Meaford. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 
Peppier  Bros.,  Hanover. 
Strathrov  Furniture  Co.,  Strathroy. 
Woeller  Bolduc  &  Co.,  Waterloo. 
Wunder  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 

Kitchener. 


TEA  STANDS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 

TEA  TRAYS 

See  also  Reed  and  Rattan  Furniture. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

G.  L.  Irish,  Toronto. 

Jacques  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 
Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
McGill  Chairs  Liimited,  Cornwall. 
Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 

Stratford,  Ont. 
Phillips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Toronto  Furniture  Co.,  Toronto. 

TEA  TABLES 

(See  Card  and  Den  Tables). 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener, 
Malcolm    &    Souter    Furniture  Co., 

Hamilton. 

G.  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Stratford. 
Phillips  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Coimwall. 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &.  Co.,  Waterloo. 

TEA  WAGONS 

Baetz  Bros.,  Kitchener. 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

McGill  Oiairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 
TELEPHONE  STANDS 

Baetz  Bros.,  Kitchener. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

Canada  Furniture  Mfrs.  Ltd., 
Woodstock. 

Elmira  Furniture  Co.,  Elmira. 

D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Co., 
Stratford,  Ont. 

A.  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Kincar- 
dine. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 
McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Corniwiall. 
Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
National  Table  Co.,  Owen  Sound. 
North  American  Furniture  Co.,  Owen 

Sound. 

Wunder  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 
TRAYS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

G.  L.  Irish,  Toronto. 
Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co- 
Hamilton. 

McGill  Oliairs  Limited,  CornwiaJl. 
Phillips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

TOYS 

Victoriaville  Toy  Co.,  Victoriaville, 
Que. 

TOY  SETS 

Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 

Canadian  Rattan  Chair  Co.,  Victoria- 
ville, Que. 

Chesley  Chair  Co.,  Chesley. 

Kilgour  &  Bro.,  Beauharnois,  Que. 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.  Ltd., 
Owen  Sound. 


J.  Oliver  &  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Victoriaville  Furniture  Co.,  Victoria- 
ville, Que. 

UMBRELLA  STANDS 

(See  Hall  Furniture.) 
VACUUM  SWEEPERS  &  CLEANERS 

J.  H.  Connor  &■  Sons,  Ottawa. 
Clements  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Onward  Mfg.  Co.,  Kitchener. 

WAGONS  AND  SLEDS  (ChUdren's) 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Canadian  Buffalo  Sled  Co.,  Preston. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Sidway  Mercantile  Co.,  Toronto. 

WASTE  PAPER  BASKETS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Canadian  Office  &  School  Furn.  Co., 

Preston. 

Imperial  Rattan  Co.,  Stratford. 

Knechtel  Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Kitchener. 

Malcolm  &  Souter  Furniture  Co., 
Hamilton. 

McGill  Chairs  Limited,  Cornwall. 

J.  C.  Mundell  &  Co.,  Elora. 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co., 
Owen  Sound. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

WINDOW  SHADES 

Daly  &  Morin,  Montreal. 
Geo.  H.  Hees,  Son  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Paquet  &  Godbout,  St.  Hyaeinthe, 
Que. 

Stewart  Hartshone  Co.,  Toronto. 
WORK  BASKETS 

H.  E.  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  Milverton. 
Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 
Ltd.,  Woodstock. 


Factory  Supplies 


ALUMINUM  GOODS 

Spielman  Agencies,  Montreal. 
(Sheets,  screws,  nails,  wire,  etc.) 

ALUMINUM  CAULS 

British  Aluminum  Co.,  Toronto. 
Spielman  Agencies,  Montreal. 

ALUMINUM  TOPS  FOR  KITCHEN 
CABINETS 

British  Aluminum  Co.,  Toronto. 

ART  WOOD  STAINS 

Adams  &  Elting  Co.,  Chicago. 
Marietta  Paint  &  Color  Co.,  Marietta. 
Ohio. 

CHAIR  SEATS 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.  (fibre.) 

BED  FASTENERS 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Jas.  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

BRASS  TRIMMINGS 

Hahn  Brass  Co.,  New  Hamburg. 

National  Lock  Co., 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

CASTERS 

A.  B.  Oay.a,  Kitchener. 
John  Duer  &  Sons,  Baltimore,  Md. 
Foster  Merriman  Co.,  Meriden,  Conn. 
James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 
Universal  Caster  &  Foundry  Co.,  New 
York. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


21 


HOUSE  FURNISHING  FABRICS 

Gold  Medal  Turniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Richard  Haworth  Co.,  Limited,  Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Stonards,  Ltd.,  Paternoster  Bldgs., 
London.  E.G.,  England. 

Thomas  Brothers,  Toronto. 

CLAMPS 

Batavia  Clamp  Co.,  Batavia,  N.Y. 
James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Broekville. 

CLOTHES  WRINGER  SPRINGS 

J  as.  Steele  Ltd.,  Guelph. 
CURLED  HAIR 

Cudiahy  Curled  Hair  Co.,  Toronto. 
Delaney  &  Pettit,  Toronto. 
Griffin  Curled  Hair  Co.,  Toronto. 

DOWELS  AND  DOWEL  PINS 

Otiterx  ille  Mfg.  Co.,  Otter ville. 

DRY  KILNS 

Grand  Rapids  Dry  Kiln  Co.,  Grand 

Rapids,  Mi  oh. 
Morton  Dry  Kiln  Co.,  Chicago. 

EXCELSIOR— (For  packing) 

Delaney  &  Peittin,  Toronto. 
J.  B.  Larose,  Jr.,  Hull,  Que. 

FURNITURE  HARDWARE 

Hahn  Brass  Co.,  New  Hamburg. 
National  Hardware  Co.,  Orillia. 
James  Sm^art  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 
Stratford  Brass   Co.,  Stratford. 

FURNITURE  SHOES 

Onward  Mfg.  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

GLASS  AND  MIRRORS 

Berlin  Plate  Glass  &  Mirror  Co., 

Kitchener. 
Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Co.,  Toronto. 
Excelsior  Plate  Glass  Co.,  Toronto. 
Hobbs  Mfg.  Co.,  London. 
Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
Phillips  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 
Toronto  Plate  Glass  Co.,  Toronto. 

HAIR  SUBSTITUTES 

F.  W.  &  S.  Mason,  St.  Andrews,  N.B. 
FURNITURE  CARVINGS 

J.  Wialter  &  Sons,  Kitchener. 

DRAW  KNOBS 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

GLUE 

Berlin  Glue  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canada  Glue  Co.,  Brantford. 
Delaney  &  Pettit,  Toronto. 
Perkins  Glue  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Snap  Co.,  Montreal. 

HAT  WIRES  FOR  OPERA  CHAIRS 

Jas.  Steele  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

HELICAL  SPRINGS  FOR  WOVEN 
WIRE  BED  SPRINGS 

Jas.  Steele  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

HALL  RACK  HOOKS 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford, 
JAPANS  AND  DRIERS 

Noi'thprn  Varnish  Co.  Ltd., 
Owen  Sound. 

KITCHEN   CABiiJET  ACCESSORIES 

American  (!an  Co..  Hamilton. 
American  Nikoloid  Co.,  Peru,  Ind. 
Northern  Aluminum  Co.,  Toronto. 
Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Toronto. 
Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 
E.  T.  Wright  Co.,  Traniilton. 

LADDERS 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 


LEATHER  and  LEATHER 
SUBSTITUTES. 

British  Leather  Cloth  Mfg.  Co.,  Man- 
chester, Eng. 

Boullee  Eraser  Leather  Co., 
New  York  City. 

Clarke  &  Clarke  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Du  Pont  Fabrikoid  Co.,  Toronto. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Lackawanna  Leather  Co.,  Haeketts- 

town,  N.J. 
Marlatt  &  Armstrong,  Oakville. 
Peerless  Leather  Co.,  Kitchener. 
''Rexiue"  Toronto. 
Textileather  Co.,  New  York,  N.Y. 

OFFICE  STOOL  SCREWS 

.las.  Smart  Mfg.  Co..  Brockville. 
PAINTS  AND  ENAMELS 

S  i)ielimian  Agencies,  M'ont.real. 
PAINT  MILLS 

Jas  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 
PLATIIhG 

p.  L.  Robertson  Mfg.  Co.,  Milton. 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

PLATE  GLASS  FOR  DESK,  TABLE, 
DRESSER,  SIDEBOARD  TOPS 

(See  also  glass  and  mirrors.) 
Matthews  Bros.,  Toronto. 
Phillips  Mfg.  Co.,  Tor'onto. 

REVOLVING  AND  TILTING  CHAIR 
FIXTURES 

Jas.  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

RIVETS   (Iron,  Copper.  Brass,  Alum- 
inum) AND  SCR3WS  (Wood) 

P.  L.  Robertson  Mfg.  Co.,  Milton. 
Si)ielmaji  Agencies,  Montreal. 

(Aluminum.) 
British  Aluminum  'Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
SCHOOL  DESK  CASTINGS 

Jas.  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 
SANDPAPER 

Delaney  &  Pettit,  Toronto. 
SPRINGS 

Ailiaisika  Bedding  of  Mont  real  Limited, 

M'on'treal. 
Colleran  Spring  Bed  Co.,  Toronto. 
Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto. 
National  Spring  Co.,  Windsor. 
James  Steele  &  Co.,  Guelph. 
James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

Winnipeg,  Vancouver. 
Waterloo  Spring  Co.,  Waterloo. 

TABLE  SLIDES 

B.  Walter  &  Co.,  Wabash,  Ind. 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 
TABLE  LOCKS  (for  extension  tables) 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 
TRAY  HANDLES 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

Phillips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

TRUCKS 

James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 
J.  Watson  Mfg.  Co.,  Ayr. 
UPHOLSTERERS'  SUPPLIES 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  To- 
ronto. 

G.  H.  Hees  &  Son,  Toronto. 
Snyder  Bros.  Ujiholstering  Co.,  Wa- 
terloo. 

UPHOLSTERERS'  SPRINGS 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co., 
Toronto. 

National  S|)ring  &  Wire  Co.,  Windsor. 
Jas.  Steele  &  Co.,  Guelph. 
Waterloo  Spring  Co.,  Waterloo. 


VARNISHES 

Adams  &  Elting,  Chicago. 

Ault  &  Wiborg,  Toronto. 

Dougall  Varnish  Co.,  Montreal. 

Glidden  Varnish  Co.,  Toronto. 

International  Varnish  Co.,  Toronto. 

R.  C.  Jamieson  &  Co.,  Montreal. 

Northern  Varnisth  Oo.  Ltd., 
Owen  Sound. 

Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Montreal. 

Standard  Paint  &  Varnish  Co.,  Wind- 
sor. 

VARNISH  STAINS 

Northern  Varndsh  Oo.  Ltd., 
Owen  Sound. 

VENEERS 

Adams  &  Raymond  Veneer  Co.,  In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

J.  E.  Beauchamp  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
(Chair  seats.) 

VENEER  PRESSES 

Wm.  R.  Perrin,  Toronto. 

WASHERS 

P.  L.  Robertson  Mfg.  Co.,  Milton. 
James  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 

Stratford  Brass  Co.,  Stratford. 

WASHING  MACHINE  SPRINGS 

Jas  Steele  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

WIRE  NAILS 

P.  L.  Robertson  Mfg.  Co.,  Milton. 

WIRE  (Bright  or  annealed) 

P.  L.  Robertson  Mfg.  Co.,  Milton. 

WOODWORKERS'  VISES 

Jas.  Smart  Mfg.  Co.,  Brockville. 


Store  Equipment 


BANK,  OFFICE  &  STORE  FITTINGS 

Cameron  &  Campbell,  Toronto. 
Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 

CJo.,  Preston. 
Dominion  Office  &  Store  Fitting  Co., 

London. 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture  Co., 
Kircbener. 

CARPET  AND  RUG  RACKS 

Steel  Furnishing  Co.,  New  Glasgow, 
N.S. 

COUNTER  STOOLS 

Canada     Furniture  Manufacturers, 

Ltd.,  Woodstock. 
Neustadt  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Neustadt. 
North    American    Bent    Chair  Co., 

Owen  Sound. 

POLISHING  RAGS 

E.  Pullan  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

RUG  DISTIjA  X  RACKS 

John  H.  Best,  Galva,  111. 

Steel  Furnishing  Co.,  New  Glasgow, 

SHOW  CASES  &  SILENT  SALESMEN 

Interior  Hardwood  Co.,  Kitchener. 
Canadian  Office  &  School  Furniture 

Co.,  Preston. 
Kent-McClain  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture  Co., 

Kitchener. 

TABLE  DISPLAY  RACKS 

Strathroy  Furniture  '!o.,  Strathroy. 


28 


s'  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


THE 

HEART 

OF  YOUR  EXTENSION 
TABLE  IS  THE 

SLIDE 

YOUR  TABLE  IS 
CONDEMNED  IF  THE  SLIDE 
DOES  NOT  WORK 
PROPERLY 

WABASH  SLIDES 

INSURE 
SATISFIED  CUSTOMERS 


WABASH 
TABLE  SLIDE 


WABASH  SLIDES 


HELP  SELL  TABLES. 
ELIMINATE  SLIDE  TROUBLES 


WE  ARE 

SLIDE  SPECIALISTS 

Having  manufactured  SLIDES 
exclusively — for  30  years 

Many  Canadian  Table-makers  u»e 

WABASH  SLIDES- 
Because 
We  furnish  Better  SLIDES  at 
Lower  Cost. 

Made  by 

B.  WALTER  &  COMPANY 

Factory  St.      WABASH,  IND. 

Canadian  Repreaentative  : 
Mr.  Frank  A.  Smith,  Kitchener,  Ont. 


AGAVA  HAIR 

Ensures  Comfort.  Service  and 
Satisfaction  in  Mattress  Making 

LIGHT,  AIRY,  RESILIENT,  ODORLESS,  DUST- 
PROOF,  and  VERMIN-PROOF  is  the  nature  of  the 
filling  required  for  good  mattress  making. 

These  qualities,  summed  up,  can  be  expressed  in  two 
words,  namely:  AGAVA  HAIR. 

With  the  use  of  Agava  Hair  a  superior  mattress  that  demonstrates  real  economy  can  be 
produced  at  a  price  within  reach  of  all. 

The  Mattress  Filling  that    Comes  Back^' 

The  Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress  Co. 

Limited 

Toronto  Ottawa 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


29 


THE 


Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Co. 

LIMITED 

KINCARDINE  and  LISTOWEL 


Makers  of  ...  . 
The  Finest  General 
Line  of  High-Grade 

FURNITURE 

on  the  market .    .  . 

Announce  that  they  will  show 
a  comprehensive  display  of 

FURNITURE 

On  January  13th  to  24th,  1919 

on  third  floor  Craig  Building 

215  Victoria  Street,  Toronto 

You  are  cordially  invited  to  attend 


WE  wish  to  thank  our  friends  in  the  trade,  not  only  for  their 
liberal  patronage  during  the  year  which  has  just  closed,  but 
also  for  their  many  valuable  suggestions,  v  hich  we  have 
oftentimes  followed.  We  feel  that  much  of  the  success  we  have 
attained  during  the  past  year  has  been  due  to  the  advice  as  to  design 
and  business  policy,  which  we  have  received  from  our  customers. 
We  wish  you,  one  and  all,  A  Happy  and  Prosperous  Nevy  Year. 


30 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


All  Under  One  Roof 
January,  1919 


^lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|||||!|IIM 


/ 


An  opportunity  to  see  the  greatest  aggregation  of  MADE-IN-CANADA 
Farniture  to  be  found  between  Halifax  and  Victoria. 


DO  NOT  FAIL  TO  VISIT  OUR  GREAT 

MID-WINTER 

FURNITURE 
EXHIBITION 

to  be  held  at  our 

Toronto  Showrooms 

136-140  King  Street  East 

It  will  pay  you  to  call  and  see  our  new  lines 
before  placing  your  Spring  orders. 

BUY  CANADIAN  GOODS 

Keep  your  money  at  home.    Canada  needs  all 
the  business  she  can  get  during  the  re-construction 
period,  to  keep  her  returned  men  busy. 

Come  ana  see  what  we  have  to  offer. 


THE  ONLY  EXCLUSIVELY  PERMANENT  WHOLESALE 
FURNITURE  SHOW  ROOMS  IN  CANADA 


AN  ADA  ruRNiTURE  Manufacturers 

Limited 


WOODSTOCK,  ONT. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


31 


GOLD  MEDAL  LINE 


No.  791 


Gold  Medal  "A' 


We  wish  all  our  friends  and  customers 
a  Bright  and  Prosperous  New  Year 


January  Exhibit 


DURING  JANUARY  WE  WILL  SHOW  AT 
OUR  TORONTO  FACTORY  A  FULL  LINE  OF 


UPHOLSTERED  GOODS 

DAVENPORTS  AND  DIVANETTES 

HERCULES  SPRING  BEDS  AND  STEEL  COUCHES 
GOLD  MEDAL  FELT  MATTRESSES 

GOLD  MEDAL  PHONOGRAPHS 

Factory  and  Show  Room:  TORONTO 
Corner  Van  Horne  Street  and  Bartlett  Avenue 

Phone  Junction  840  or  842.     We  will  call  for  you. 

The  Gold  Medal  Furniture  Manufacturing  Co.  Limited 

TORONTO      MONTREAL      WINNIPEG  UXBRIDGE 


32 


CANADIAN  PUilNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAlCER  January.  1919 


VICTORY!    "Your  boys  and  ours  have  won 

When  you  realize  that  your  Framed  Pictures  are  sold  out  before  the  season  is 
over  you  will  resolve  to  stock  heavier  next  season  and  also  make  up  your  mind 
to  continue  using  Matthews'  "Take  me  home  look"  Nobby  Picture  Frames. 

MATTHEWS   BROS.,  LIMITED 

THE  BIG  CANADIAN  MOULDING  HOUSE 

1906  DUNDAS  STREET  WEST  TORONTO,  CANADA 


Utility  Boxes 

Covered  in  assorted  chint- 
zes; trimmed  with  rattan. 
Made  of  3/"  B.C.  Cedar. 


D.  L.  SHAFER  &  COMPANY 

ST.  THOMAS  ONTARIO 


Attractive 

Parlor  Suite 


This  suite  is  made  in  Solid  Mahogany, 
with  an  absence  of  fussy  ornamentation 
that  stamps  it  at  once  as  a  practical 
design  that  is  pleasing  and  artistic. 

Our  other  lines  are  characterized  by  the 
same  good  taste.  These  are  Chester- 
fields, Steel-Constructed  Couches, 
and  the  celebrated  Push  Button 
Reclining  Chair. 

We  extend  to  one  and  all 
best  wishes  for  a  prosperous 
1919. 

MORLOCK  BROS. 


HANOVER 


ONTARIO 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


33 


TWIN 


Begin  the  Year 
with 


THERE'S  A  REASON'* 


They  appeal  to  the  ladies  because  of  the 
convenience  in  handling  the  Tilt-Top 
Twin  Table. 

The  top  can  be  tilted  in  an  instant 
when  dusting,  and  it  can  be  easily 
moved  through  a  doorway  or  passage  on 
its  own  casters,  thus  eliminating  the 
necessity  of  lifting  sideways  or  taking 
the  table  apart. 

The  "TWIN"  pedestals  are  the  perfect 
pedestals,  closed  or  extended.  No 
danger  of  tipping  under  uneven  load. 

Demonstrate  these  special  features  to 
your  lady  customers.  They  will  not 
fail  to  see  the  point,  and  incidentally  you 
increase  your  sales. 


Chesley  Furniture  Co.,  Limited     -     Chesley,  Ontario 


I'l'lil'l'lll'lll'l'l'l'l^lil'l^l'l'l'lil'lllllllll'l'l'lllll'lllllllllllilllllllill^^   |i|!llllllllllllllllllllllll|- 


34 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


linillllllMIIIIIMnMIIIIIIMMMMIIIMMnil'IIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIi; 


Npm  f far. 


Boullee  Fraser  Leather  Mfg.  Co.^  Inc. 

232  Canal  Street,  NEW  YORK 


VIIIMIMIIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIMIMIIUMIIUIIMIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIMIMIMMMIIMinilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi- 


Upholstery  Springs 

Highest  quality  Upholitecy  Springs, 
made  from  the  finest  grade  High  Car- 
bon Steel  Wire,  oil  terapeted  after 
the  coiling  operation,  thus  insuring 
uniform  strength  and  "No  Set."  Re- 
member, the  quality  of  your  High- 
Grade  Upholstering  depends  entirely 
on  the  quality  of  the  springs  you  are 
using. 

HELICAL  SPRINGS 

for  spring  bed  and  mattress  fabrics. 
Get  the  habit  ;  buy  Ce.nadian  springs. 

James  Steele,  Limited 

Guelph,  Canada 


The  National  Table  Company,  Limited 
The  Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Limited 
The  North  American  Furniture  Co., 

Limited 

Owen  Sound  Ontario 

Manufacturers  of  Medium  and  High- 
Grade  Dining  Room,  Bedroom,  Hall, 
Living  Room  and  Library  Furniture. 

Catalogues  sent  on  application 


"Hygienic^'  Mattresses 


"Hygienic"  Mattresses  are  built 
on  "Hygienic"  principles,  and 
that  means  a  great  deal  with 
Standard  Bedding  Mattresses. 
Not  only  does  it  mean  a  thorough- 
ly sanitary  mattress  built  of  new 
and  clean  materials,  but  it  also 
means  a  mattress  that  will  give 
lasting  wear. 

You  can  recommend  an\)  "Hygienic" 
mattress  as  being  a  reliable  mattress. 


The  Standard  Bedding  Company 

Mattress  Specialists 

27-29  Davies  Ave.  Toronto,  Ontario 


January,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


35 


No.  660E  Bedroom  Suite 


Successful  merchandising  for  any  extended  period 
presupposes  a  thoroughly  faithful  line  of  merchan- 
dise of  known  value.  Such  a  line  is  our  bedroom 
furniture.  Knechtel  Bedroom  Furniture  will  help 
you  to  develop  and  maintain  a  most  satisfactory 
and  permanent  patronage.  Above  is  one  of  the 
suites  that  will  be  shown  in  our  new  catalogue 
now  in  press. 


THE  KNECHTEL  FURNITURE  CO. 

LIMITED 

HANOVER  ONTARIO 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  191!J 


IN  THE  1919  LINE 


No.  39205 — The  Maime  Ctost.  A  genuine  Chandler  pastel ;  in  4  inr-li  No.  60;iG-165  and  a])propri.ate  corner  ornaaneuts. 
Rich  burnished  antique  in  reddifih  tone.      Picture  size  20  x  :'0  inches. 


i 


1  '4  inch. 


2  inch. 


-  -J  1-  - 

(Cuts  about 


size)       3  ir.  ch,  4  inch. 

Xo.  60:!6— A  new  emboissed  gum  high  back  ma.de  in  four  widths,  in  proportion  as  shown  in  the  eiits  of  reduced  size. 
Made  in  finishes:  No.  480— Plain  antique  gold;  Finish  482— Antique  gold,  top  ormament  land  front  burnished;  Finish  165— 
Burnisheid  antique  gold,  centre  in  reddish  tone;  Finish  166 — French  gn-ey  amd  burnished. 

The  above  with  many  other  equially  good  niumibers  are  being  shown  in  ooir  travellers'  s.amples.  Be  sure  you  see 
their  line. 


Phillips  Manufacturing  Co.,  Limited 


258-326  Carlaw  Ave., 

TORONTO,  ONT. 


January,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


37 


KITCHENER-WATERLOO 

Furniture  Exhibition 


January  13  th  to  25th 


The  firms  listed  below  are  holding  their  Annual 
Furniture  Exhibition  in  January,  and  extend  a 
cordial  invitation  to  every  Canadian  furniture 
dealer  to  call  and  inspect  their  products.  Many 
new  and  interesting  designs  will  be  shown,  and 
dealers  should  be  greatly  benefited  by  attending. 

Anthes  Furniture  Co.  -  -  Anthes  Factory,  Kitchener 
Art  Furniture  Company,  Ltd.,  Factory  Showrooms,  Kitchener 
Baetz  Bros.  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd.,  Anthes  Factory,  Kitchener 
Beaver  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd.  -  Schreiter's  Furniture  Store 
Crown  Furniture  Company  -  -  Queen  St.  Auditorium 
Geo.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co.  -  -  Queen  St.  Auditorium 
D.  Hibner  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd.,  Factory  Showrooms,  Kitchener 
H.  Krug  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd.,  Factory  Showrooms,  Kitchener 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Ltd.  -  -  Queen  St.  Auditorium 
Quality  Mattress  Co.,  Ltd.,  Factory  Showrooms,  Waterloo 
Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co.     -     Factory  Showrooms,  Waterloo 

You  will  receive  a  cordial  reception. 


Do  not  forget  the  dates— JANUARY  13th  to  2Sth 


38 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January.  1919 


Krug  Factory  Showrooms 

KITCHENER 

Furniture  Exhibition 


January 
13th 
to 


January 

25th 
Inclusive 


ONE  MINUTE'S  WALK  FROM  STATION 


Most  Up-to-date  Line  in  Canada 


The  charm  of  fine  furniture  lies  in  the  enduring  character 
expressed  in  its  symmetrical  design,  carefully  chosen  mater- 
ials and  masterly  workmanship. 

H.  Krug  Furniture  sells  and  satisfies. 

All  the  patterns  in  our  line  will  be  on  exhibition  during 
January,  in  addition  to  several  new  designs  which  will 
please  your  customers  during  the  coming  season. 

THE  TRADE  CORDIALLY  INVITED  TO  INSPECT  OUR  LINE 


The  H.  Krug  Furniture  Company,  Limited 

Kitch  ener,  Ontario 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


39 


I,,,, I  „  I, II, II,  mil  I  II  1,11,11  Illllllllllll  Illlllilllllllll  I  Illllllllll  Illllllllillllllll  MUM  I  MMMHMMIMIIM  'MMI  I  I  MM  I  Ml  IMMMMMMMMM  MMMIMMMIMMi;^ 


JMMMMMIIMHMIIMMMMMMMMMMMIMIMIMMIIMMMMMIIIMMMMMMMMMMMIMIMIMMIMMMMIIMMIIIIMMMMMMIMIMIIIMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMIIMMMIMIMHMMMMMMMMMMHMMIIIMIIMIMIMM 


THE 
ANTHES 
FURNITURE 
COMPANY 


Annual  Furniture  Exhibition 

January  13th  to  25th 

Anthes  Furniture  Buildings 
KITCHENER 


THE 
BAETZ 
BROTHERS 
FURNITURE 
CO.,  Limited 


JIMMIMMMMMIMMMMMMMIMMMMMMMMMIHMIIMMMIMMI  MMMMMIIMIMIMIMMMMMMHIMMMMHMMIMMMIMMMIMMMMMMIIMMIIMMMMMMIMIMMMMIMMMIMMMMMMMMMI  MMMMMMMIMMMIMIMHMMMHMMIIMH  I  MIMMMIMIMIIr 


.^IMMMMIMIIIIillilMM 


 MMIMIMMMMMMMIMMMMMMMMMMHI  IMMMIMMMMMMUMMIMIMMMMMMM  M,IMIM|lil,llllll  II  II  IMMIMIMIMIIIIIIMMIMIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIMIMMIMIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIMIMIilllllllMIMIIIIMMIMII:; 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


lTppert  $0fioiiBmtiroon) 

FURNITURE  ®>     ^„^\i„i^  CANADA 

COMPANY  LIMITED      ^urniuiFE  i— 8 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


41 


MR.  DEALER-- 

Why  not  let  the  Lyraphone  play 
the  money  into  your  pocket  ? 

A  most  faithful  worker. 

Ever  at  your  service. 

Will  be  shown  at  the 

Kitchener  Furniture  Exhibition 

JANUARY  13th  to  25th 

at  the  Auditorium,  Queen  Street 


Satisfaction  and  Quality 

The  Lyraphone  Watchword 

These  are  the  merits  the  Lyraphone  are  sold 
on.  The  phonograph  that  is  unsurpassed  for 
tone  reproduction,  exquisiteness  of  design,  and 
perfection  of  scientific  making. 

RETAILING  AT  $48.50  TO  $450. 

Write  for  descriptive  circular  and  details,  so 
that  you  may  see  the  opportunities  the  Lyra- 
phone holds  for  you. 

Lippert  Furniture  Co.,  Limited 

KITCHENER,  ONTARIO 


42 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


janunry,  1919 


Come  to  Kitchener  Exhibition 

COUCHES 

and  Visit  Us 

PARLOR  SUITES 
CHESTERFIELDS 
DIVANETTES 
DAVENPORT  BEDS 
LIVING-ROOM  CHAIRS 

We  will  exhibit  our  complete  line  in  the 
Auditorium,  Queen  Street. 

An  inspection  of  our  1919  line  will  be 
of  great  help  to  you  in  choosing  a  good 
saleable  stock  for  the  coming  year. 

January  13th  to  25th 

GEO.  H.  HACHBORN  &  COMPANY 

KITCHENER         -         -  ONTARIO 

I 


Come  to  the 

KITCHENER  EXHIBITION 

January  13th  to  25th 

Dealers  throughout  Canada  should  attend 
this  Exhibition  and  see  the  wide  range  of 
patterns  offered. 

You,  Mr.  Dealer,  are  invited. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


Our  Warerooms 


You  are  cordially  invited  to  attend 
this  exhibition  of 
FINE  FURNITURE 

January  13th  to  25th 


Will  be  open  during  January  for  the 
inspection  of  buyers. 

We  will  show  a  range  of 


Diningroom  Suites 

Bedroom  Suites 

Parlor  Tables 

Library  Tables 

Bool^  Cases 

Parlor  Suites 

Hall  Racks,  Etc., 

in  the  newest  styles 
and  finishes. 


D.  Hib  ner  Furniture  Co..  Limited 

Kitchener  Ontario 


44 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


An  Invitation 


We  invite  you  to  call  and  inspect  our  display  at 
Schreiters'  Furniture  Store,  King  Street,  Kitchener, 
during  the  Kitchener  Furniture  Exhibition. 

We  are  showing  a  complete  line  of  high-class  Dining 
Room  Suites,  and  are  confident  that  you  will  be  favor- 
ably impressed  with  the  quality  and  workmanship 
which  are  outstanding  features  of  our  furniture. 

All  our  tables  are  equipped  with  the  well-known 
automatic  slide. 

Do  not  neglect  to  see  this  display  Tvhen  in  Kitchener. 

The  Beaver  Furniture  Company,  Limited 

KITCHENER      -  ONTARIO 


1 » 


Come  to 
Kitchener 

January  13th  to  25th 


In  keeping  with  a  high  standard  of  quality  our 
prices  are  very  altractive.  The  "Art"  trade 
mark  is  our  promise  to  you  and  your  customers 
of  exc^  Hence  in  design  and  workmanship  and 
carefully  selected  wood. 

Our  complete  line  will  be  on  exhibit  at  the 
Kitchener-Waterloo  Furniture  Exhibition,  and 
we  extend  a  cordial  invitation  to  you  to  pay 
us  a  visit. 

Don't  forget  the  dates 
JANUARY  13th  to  25th 

Art  Furniture  Company,  Limited 

KITCHENER,  ONTARIO 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


45 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii  iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiii^<MiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMi!iiiiiiiiiii;;iMi^ 

illiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiin)iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii;iiMiii<iiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin   iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


"QUALITY  FIRST" 


These  High-Grade  Mattresses 

are  just  wliat  you  want  for  your  better-class  trade.  Every  mattress 
is  labelled,  showing  retail  price  and  what  it  contains.  We  stand 
behind  these  values.  That  is  your  customers'  and  your  own  protection. 
Quality  .Mattresses  will  increase  your  sales  and  double  your  profits. 


Superior  Felt,  showing  French  roll  edge. 


Perfect  Box  Spring  and  Mattress. 


"Quality  Felt." 


"Kapok,"  showing  Imperial  edge.    Weight  32  lbs. 


Compare  Quality  Mattres- 
ses with  any  make  made 
f  and  you  must  admit  that  for 
rest  -  promoting  qualities 
and  profit  they  offer  to  the 
trade,  Quality  Mattresses 
stand  beyond  competition. 


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi  IIIIIK 

IVe  extend  a  cordial  invi- 
tation to  every  furniture 
dealer  in  Canada  to  visit 
our  showrooms  during  the 

Waterloo  Furniture 
Exhibition 

January  13  th  to  25  th. 

IIIIMIIMIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIII 


Quality 
Mattress  Co. 

Waterloo,  Ont. 


 ""  '  IIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIMIMIIIIMIMMIIIIIIII  II  IMI  IIMI  MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIII  Illl  Illllll  IMIIIIIIII  Mil  II  1  Ill  IIIMII  IIIIMIIIIMIII  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI 

 "  '  ""I  I""""  Illl  IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  I  II  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM  IIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIII  IIIIIIIMIIII  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI  Mill  IIIIMIMIIII  I. 


46 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


Chesterfields  and  Easy  Chairs 

The  Chesterfield  and  Easy  Chair  illustrated 
will  be  on  exhibition  at  our  January  Furniture 
Exhibition.  We  are  giving  our  customers  the 
opportunity  of  stocking  this  saleable  pattern 
at  an  advantageous  price  based  on  our  old  costs. 
Do  not  neglect  to  see  them. 


84  in.  long,  33  in.  deep,  33  in.  high 


35  in.  wide,  32  in.  deep 
32  in.  high. 


We  extend  a  cordial  in- 
vitation to  visit  our  display 
of  living  room  furniture  at 
our  permanent  Showrooms 
in  Waterloo.  You  will 
receive  a  hearty  reception. 


WOELLER,  BOLDUC  &  COMPANY  ^o™r.o° 

Furniture,  Upholstery  and  Phonograph 

Manufacturers 

ARE  YOU  IN  THE  MARKET 

for  Upholstery  Leather,  Tapestry,  plain  and  figured 
Velours,  Kapok,  Moss,  Cane,  Cabinet  Hardware, 
Locks,  Butts,  Screws,  Casters  and  Table  Slides  } 

Your  patronage  solicited.     Trade  enquiries 
will  be  given  every  attention. 


A.  B.  CAVA  28  King  Street  East  Kitchcner,  Ollt. 


PHONE  349w 


SUCCESSOR  TO  F.  A  SMITH 


January,  1^19 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


47 


Press  Advertising  Sold  Victory  Bonds 

BEFORE  the  war  bond  buyers  were  "marked  men."  In  number  they 
were  40,000  in  March,  1  9 1  7 — this  is  shown  by  the  number  of  pur- 
chasers of  the  Government  War  Loan  of  that  date.  But  in  the  autuH/U 
of  the  same  year  their  number  increased  twenty  times  —  to  820,000! 
This  was  the  number  purchasing  the  Victory  Loan,  1917.  Last  Month — 
November,  1918 — over  1,000,000  persons  purchased  the  Victory  Loan, 
1918! 

These  wonderful  results  were  accomplished  by  Press  Advertising. 

Before  the  war  one-half  of  one  per  cent,  of  our  people  bought  bonds.  Now  quite  twelve 
and  one-half  per  cent,  of  our  people  are  bond  buyers ! 


Before  the  stupendous  amount  of  $676, 
000,000  worth  of  bonds  could  be  sold  to 
our  Canadian  people  in  three  weeks  a  most 
thorough  and  exhaustive  campaign  of 
education  was  necessary,  and  this  campaign 
was  carried  through  by  advertising  in  the 
public  press.  The  power  of  the  printed 
word  never  had  a  more  convincing  demon- 
stration. 

By  means  of  printed  word,  through  the 
medium  of  advertisements  in  the  press  of 
our  country,  the  Canadian  people  were 
made  to  know  what  bonds  are,  the 
nature  of  their  security,  their  attractiveness 
as  an  investment,  and  why  the  Govern- 
ment had  to  sell  bonds. 

Every  point  and  feature  of  Victory  Bonds 
was  illustrated  and  described  before  and 
during  the  campaign — in  advertisements. 


No  argument  was  overlooked.  No  selling 
point  was  neglected. 

The  result  is  that  Canadians  to-day  are  a 
nation  of  bondholders. 

They  know  what  a  convenient,  safe  and 
profitable  form  of  investment  bonds  are. 
Instead  of  one  man  in  two  hundred  owning 
bonds,  now  one  Canadian  in  eight — men, 
women  and  children — owns  a  Government 
Security.  • 

This  complete  transformation  in  the  natio- 
nal mind  and  habits  was  brought  about 
by  advertising  in  the  press  of  the  nation. 
Press  advertising  has  justified  itself  as  the 
surest  and  speediest  method  by  which  a 
man's  reason  can  be  influenced  and  directed. 

The  Minister  of  Finance  acknowledges 
this.    His  own  words  are: 


"The  Wonderful  success  of  the  Loan  iDas  due  in  large  measure  to  their 
(the  press  of  Canada)  splendid  and  untiring  efforts  during  the  whole 
of  the  Campaign.  " 

Mr.  E.  R.  Wood,  Chairman  of  the  Dominion  Executive  Committee  having  oversight  of  the  campaign  to 
raise  Victory  Loan,  1 9  I  8,  said:  "...  The  press  publicity  campaign  .  .  .  will  ranl^  as  one  of 
the  most  remarf^able  and  efficient  publicity  campaigns  ever  undertaken  in  any  country;"  and  Mr.  J.  H. 
Gundy,  Vice-Chairman  of  the  same  committee  said :  "/  have  been  selling  bonds  for  a  long  time,  but  I  never 
found  it  so  easy  to  sell  them  as  at  this  time.  The  reason  is  the  splendid  work  ^he  press  has  done.  I  take 
off  my  hat  to  the  press  of  Canada." 

The  success  of  Victory  Loan,  1918,  and  the  knowledge  which  Canadians  now  possess  of 
bonds  are  a  straight  challenge  to  the  man  who  doubts  the  power  of  the  printed  word,  in 
the  form  of  advertisements,  to  sell  goods — and  this  applies  not  to  bonds  alone,  but  to  the 
goods  you  are  interested  in  selling. 


JlllllllUIMIIIIUIIIIIMIIIMIIinMIIIMJIMMMIIIIIMMIMIMIIIIIMMIMIMIIIIMIMIIIIMIMIinMNJHIIMIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMMIIMIMIMIIIIMIIII 


48 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  191 


9 


S 


ave 


20% 


We  are  moving  our  Statu- 
ary Department  Feb.  1st., 
and  we  make  this  extraor- 
dinary offer  to  save  movmg. 
We  have  good  selection  of 
models.  If  you  are  interested 
vv^e  w^ill  forward  our  cata- 
logue and  will  mark  statues 
we  can  ship.  This  offer  is 
only  good  for  January. 

Our  lines  of  Serving  Trays, 
Pictures,  Frames,  Mould- 
ings, etc.,  are  bigger  and 
better  than  ever.  Write 
for  our  catalogue,  you  can 
make  big  money  on  our 
lines.  If  you  haven't  got 
our  goods  you  are  losing 
money. 


G.  L.  IRISH 

499  Queen  Street  West 
TORONTO,  ONT. 


D.  O.  McKINNON 

GENERAL  MANAGER 


W.  B.  HART 

Advertising  manager 


Wm.  J.  BRYANS 
JAMES  O'MAGAN 

EDITORS 


Published  by  The  Commercial  Press,  Ltd.,  32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rate  |1.00  per  year  in  Canada,  Great  Britain  and  British  Colonies;  11.50  to  the  United  States, 


Vol.  9. 


TORONTO,  JANUARY,  1919 


No.  1, 


BRIGHT  OUTLOOK  FOR  FURNITURE  TRADE 

IMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMIIMMIIIIIIMIIIMMniKIIIIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIMMII^ 

Big  demand  for  furniture  should  develop  during  next  year  or  so  Extensive  building  being  planned — Men  returning 
from  overseas  w^ill  be  establishing  homes — Now  is  the  time  to  make  plans  for  strong  drive  for  furniture  business 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiniMIMIIIIMMIIMIIIMIIIinillllHILMIIIIIIIIIIMIIiniMIMIIIIMIMIMIIIIII^ 


THE  business  outlook  in  tihe  furniture  trade  is  a 
very  promising  one  indeed.  There  are  many 
reasons  why  there  should  be  an  increased  de- 
mand for  furnishings  now  tihat  tIhe  war  is  over.  For 
one  thing-,  many  people  have  been  ibackward  about  in- 
vesting money  in  furniture  Avlien  the  future  was  so 
uncertain,  hut  now  that  the  return  of  normal  condi- 
tions is  assured,  they  will  be  looking  to  the  future  Avith 
eonfideuee,  auid  furnishing  their  homes  accordingly. 


call  of  duty  and  Avill  have  to  be  re-establisihed.  All 
this  ii3  grist  to  the  furniture  dealer's  mill  and  he 
should  enter  the  new  era  with  aggressiveness  and 
vim,  laying  his  selling  plans  on  a  big  wide  scale. 

Time  to  Formulate  Plans 

Now  is  tIhe  time  to  make  your  pkns.  It  is  the  care- 
fully prepared  campaign  that  is  productive  of  the  best 
result®. 


Much  Buildino^— Many  New  Homes  CALGARY  FIRM  HAS  DEPARTMENT  ADVERTIS- 

The  great  amount  of  new  'building  that  is  being  ING  DISTRIBUTION  BOOK 

planned  will  also  prove  a  big  boon  to  the  furniture  In  order  to  keep  track,  of  the  totals  of  advertising 
trade  for  all  these  new  residences  and  office  buildings  and  the  amount  used  iby  each  department,  tlie  Neilson 
must  be  fumislhed,  and  the  big  program  along  this  line  Furniture  Company  Ltd.,  of  Caligary,  have  a  "depart- 
that  is  being  mapped  out  in  practically  every  centre  in  ment  ladvertising  distribution  book  "'in  loose  leaf  form. 
Canada,  is  bound  to  create  a  demand  for  furniture  and  After  the  bill  for  an  ad.  is  cheeked  and  passed,  each 
furnishings  that  will  prove  most  beneficial  to  the  trade.  ad.  is  measured  and  the  space  used  by  each  depart- 
Many  new  home's  will  be  establislied  througliout  the  ment  is  charged  to  it.  Once  a  month  each  account  is 
length  and  breadth  of  the  laud  during  the  next  year  or  toitaled  and  recapitulaition  made  on  a  sheet  assigned  to 
so.  Many  men  were  married  just  previous  to  going  it.  Twice  a  year  a  recapitulation  is  made  by  mediums, 
overseas  and  have  to  furniLsh  a  home  on  their  return,  whic'h  acts  as  a  double  check  on  the  totals. 
Many  couples  have  beoi  waitinig  until  the  end  of  the  The  plan  also  Ivccps  a  close  check  on  advertising  ex- 
war  before  taking  the  marriage  vows.  Many  homes  penditure  and  enables  tlie  firm  to  keep  well  within  the 
were  broken  up  when  the  head  of  the  family  heard  the  appropriation. 


50 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  191  & 


Practical  Suggestions  for  Getting  More  Trade 


GIVE  THE  FILING  CABINET  A  CHANCE 

Desks  and  chairs  are  not  the  only  staple  of  office 
furniture.  The  filing  cabinet  belongs.  Some  dis- 
plays still  seem  to  ignore  it.  The  prospect  imagines 
himself  sitting  in  the  chair  and  using  the  desk.  Cor- 
rect sales  strategy.  Let  him  also  get  the  idea  of  using 
a  concrete  example  of  modern  filing  science.  Pro- 
gress in  filing  systems  has  been  one  of  the  notable 
achievements  of  the  last  decade.  Make  the  filing 
cabinet  prominent  in  your  display.  It  connects  up, 
readily,  with  every  other  line  your  handle. 


HAVE  ESSAY  CONTEST 

The  Retail  Merchants'  Association  of  Eagle  Pass, 
Texas,  arranged  recently  for  a  school  children's  con- 
test in  the  writing  of  an  essay  on  "Why  We  Should 
Buy  at  Home."  All  children  of  Eagle  Pass,  whether 
they  be  attendants  of  the  public  or  private  schools, 
were  eligible  to  enter  the  contest. 

A  first  and  second  prize  will  be  offered  for  the  best 
essays,  and  the  essays  will  be  published  with  the  name 
of  the  winners.  A  committee  composed  of  persons 
not  residents  of  Eagle  Pass  will  be  named  to  judge  the 
contest,  and  every  boy  and  girl  in  the  city  will  be 
given  a  fair  chance  to  win  the  prize. 


INSTALLED  AUTOMATIC  DOOR  OPENER 

A  dealer  in  one  of  the  northern  towns  of  the  U.  S., 
according  to  an  exchange,  has  installed  an  automatic 
door  opener  which  has  been  found  greatly  helpful  in 
his  business.  Before  putting  it  in  he  reasoned  vdth 
himself  this  wise: 

Did  you  ever  stop  to  think  of  the  inconvenience  ex- 
perienced by  a  customer  loaded  with  bundles,  in  try- 
ing to  open  the  front  door  of  the  store  on  wintry  days? 
An  element  which  largely  contributes  to  a  store's  suc- 
cess is  store  service — the  attention  to  the  little  things 
which  make  trading  there  a  pleasure.  It  was  not  al- 
ways possible  to  get  to  the  door  in  time  to  open  it  for 
customers  entering  or  leaving,  so  hitting  on  this  auto- 
matic opener  proved  a  decided  improvement  in  store 
service.  The  electric  door  opener  is  operated  through 
push  buttons  in  different  parts  of  the  store  by  the 
clerk  who  waits  on  the  customer.  Such  an  opener  is 
not  expensive,  and  can  be  purchased  from  and  installed 
by  any  electrician,  or  if  there  is  no  electrician  in  town 
it  can  be  purchased  and  the  wiring  done  by  the  dealer 
himself.  The  approximate  cost  of  the  different  parts 
of  the  outfit  is  about  five  dollars. 


DO  YOU  USE  FOLLOW-UP  LETTERS? 

Practically  every  merchant  should  have  a  follow-up 
letter  system.  He  should  have  some  dignified  and  ac- 
curate method  of  ascertaining  if  the  various  purchases 
made  by  customers  at  his  store  have  met  their  require- 
ments. He  should  try  to  learn,  too,  why  this  or  that 
customer  who  formerly  traded  with  him  quite  regularly 
now  goes  elsewhere  for  his  goods. 


A  customer  who  has  visited  your  store  regularly  for 
years  or  some  months,  and  then  ceases  coming  should 
be  sent  a  dignified,  courteous  letter,  asking  why  he  or 
she  has  ceased  to  trade  with  you. 

If  possible,  the  dealer  should  obtain  the  name  of 
every  new  customer  who  comes  into  the  store.  This 
may  be  done  by  offering  to  have  the  package  he  or 
she  buys,  delivered.  In  this  way  both  the  name  and 
rhe  address  are  easily  gotten.  A  record  of  this 
r.hould  be  kept,  together  with  the  date  of  purchase. 

Your  clerks  should  be  instructed  to  watch  for  the 
second  appearance  of  that  customer  in  the  store.  If 
the  customer  does  not  come  again,  a  polite  formal  note 
should  be  mailed,  asking  if  the  article  purchased  did 
not  meet  the  requirements  of  the  purchaser  and  offer- 
ing to  adjust  the  matter  satisfactorily  if  anything  is 
wrong. 


WHAT  ABOUT  DEBT-PAYING  DAY? 

[f  one  day  in  the  year  were  debt-paying  day  there 
is  many  a  shattered  friendship  that  could  be  mended. 

We  have  a  mother's  day  and  backyard  day,  clean-up 
week  and  the  good  Lord  only  knows  what  other  days 
and  weeks  set  aside  to  certain  ideals.  None  of  them 
interfere  with  regular  business  for  they  are  none  of 
them  holidays.  Mayors  throughout  the  country  might 
well  consider  the  propriety  of  promulgating  a  debt- 
paying  day,  setting  it  far  enough  ahead  on  the  calendar 
to  enable  debtors  to  prepare  against  it. 

The  Chinese  square  their  accounts  on  the  first  day  of 
their  calendar  year,  and  surely  we  could  also  have  a 
similar  day  to  clear  off  our  accounts. 


ADVERTISING  THAT  WILL  NOT  PAY 

Half-hearted-once-in-a-while  advertising  won't  pay, 
exaggeration  won't  pay.  Misrepresentation  won't 
pay.  Red-flag-brass-band  methods  won't  pay.  Ad- 
vertising not  based  upon  true  worth  and  merit  will 
never  pay.  Advertising  is  a  man's  game,  and  must  be 
played  as  such.  Successful  advertising  retiuires  the 
highest  type  of  business  instinct,  energy,  judgment  and 
integrity.  More  than  that,  it  takes  patience  and  time 
to  let  the  work  of  constant  repetition  convince  and 
educate.  Most  men  who  do  business  on  a  broad  basis 
advertise  liberally,  intelligently,  forcefully,  regularly, 
because  they  have  learned  that  wide  publicity  of  true 
worth  and  merit  pays,  and  pays  big. 


UNIQUE  WORDING  OF  STREET  CAR  CARD 

A  street  car  ciaa-d  with  unique  wording  is  useid  in  the 
civic  street  cars  Iby  Nioden,  Hiailitt  &  Johnston  Ltd., 
furniture  dealers  of  West  Toronto.     It  reads: 
A  young  maiden  loves  a  man, 

Tihat  is  her  business; 
A  young  man  loves  a  maiden, 

That  is  his  business; 
The  younig  maiden  and  man  get  married, 

That  is  their  business; 
We  furnish  the  home, 

That  is  our  business. 


January,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  51 


ATTEND  THE  JANUARY  EXHIBITIONS 


Fruitful  sources  of  information  for  the  furniture  dealer. 


ARE  you  in  line  for  the  January  Exhibitions?    If  not  already  prepared,  get  busy  at  once.  It 
is  now  time  that  you  had'  announced  to  your  head  salesiman  that  he  isi  going  to  have  a 
chance  to  show  what  he  can  do  when  you  are  not  on  the  job — time  that  you  had  packed 
your  pyjamas  in  the  little  old  club  bag,  kissed  good-bye  to  wife  and  kiddies  and  started  out  to 
visit  the  best  furniture  exhibitions  that  have  been  staged  since  Kaiser  Bill  started  out  and  made 
an  "exhibition"  of  himself. 

There  is  no  doubt  that  the  January  furniture  ex'hibitions  from  January  ]  3  to  25  this  year  will 
be  tlie  best  that  have  been  seen  in  years.  That  uncertainty  as  to  the  future  that  has  clouded  the 
business  horizon  during  the  past  four  years  has  been  swept  away  by  the  collapse  of  Germany  and 
the  coming  of  peace.  Manufacturers  are  looking  forward  to  the  future  with  the  highest  degree 
of  confidence  and  this  year's  exhiljitions  have  been  planned  on  that  basis.  They  will  be  found 
truly  worthy  of  the  first  peace  year  and  a  pleasing  introduction  to  the  era  of  expansion  and 
prosperity  which  we  are  now  entering. 

It  is  hardly  necessary  to  point  out  to  the  aggressive  furniture  dealer  the  value  of  attending 
these  exhibitions.  They  are  most  fruitful  sources  of  information  for  the  dealer,  and  this  for 
many  reasons.  For  one  thing,  the  dealer  acquires  a  first-hand  knowledge  of  the  trend  of  styles 
and  designs,  which  is  something  that  will  save  and  make  money  for  him  as  he  will  be  better  able 
to  buy  the  goods  that  will  sell  freely  and  not  develop  into  stickers.  At  these  exhibitions  he  gets 
in  touteh  with  the  new  and  novel  lines  that  are  frequently  so  valuable  in  stimulating  public  in- 
terest and  in  buoying  up  sales  in  a  manner  that  would  not  otherwise  be  possible. 

Conversations  with  other  furniture  dealers  he  meets  at  the  exhibitions  will  also  prove  of 
great  value.  From  them  he  is  bound  to  glean  many  ideas  which  will  prove  of  value  in  increasing 
sales  and  enlarging  profits.  Where  two  or  more  dealers  are  gathered  together,  talk  naturally 
drifts  to  business  matters  and  the  interchange  of  experiences  and  opinions  is  bound  to  prove  of 
mutual  advantage. 

The  man  who  goes  to  the  exhibitions  with  h^'s  eyes  and  ears  open  is  bound  to  benefit — 'bound 
to  find  the  tim'C  and  money  spent  in  the  visit  a  profitable  investment.  So  put  your  head  sales- 
man in  charge  (the  responsibility  will  probably  inspire  him  in  a  way  that  will  cause  him  to 
boost  sales  better  than  if  you  were  on  hand)  ;  pack  your  club  bag  for  a  real  visit  of  inspection  and 
hike  it  to  the  January  exhibitions. 


Remember  the  dates — January  13  th  to  25  th 


52 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


TIME  FOR  THE  ANNUAL  STOCK  TAKING 

iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiMiiiiiimimiiii^ 

Every  dealer  should  take  stock  at  least  once  a  year — Suggestions  as  to  method  of  procedure  given  by  a  retailer. 

llllil!IIIIIIIIIIUIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!linillllllll^  :illlllllllllNIIIIIIIIIIII!llllllllllllllll[llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|i|lllllllllllll!i|»^ 


You  have  asked  me  to  tell  retail  dealers  why  they 
should  take  stock  and  how  to  do  it.  I  can 
hardly  see  any  reason  for  telling  a  dealer  why 
he  should  take  stock  and  make  out  a  financial  statement 
at  the  end  of  each  year,  because  if  he  is  a  real  business 
man  he  will  realize  not  only  the  need,  but  the  necessity 
of  doing  so. 

Necessity  to  Find  Standing  of  Business 

No  business  man  should  go  on  for  longer  than  a  year 
without  knowing  what  progress  he  is  making,  and  this 
cannot  be  ascertained  with  any  degree  of  accuracy 
without  taking  an  inventory  of  his  stock  as  well  as  his 
other  resources  and  liabilities.  The  amount  of  busi- 
ness done  during  the  year  is  not  an  accurate  gauge  of 
progress  because  big  sales  do  not  always  mean  satisfy- 
ing progress.  This  is  a  particular  in  which  many  re- 
tailers fool  themselves  badly  every  year.  For  instance, 
T  know  a  brother  dealer  who  has  not  taken  stock  for  a 
number  of  years.  When  I  took  him  to  task  for  not 
doing  so,  he  said,  "Oh!  I  am  getting  on  alright.  My 
sales  show  an  increase  every  year."  Yet,  I  would 
be  willing  to  bet  dollars  to  doughnuts  that  he  is  not 
making  half  as  much  money  as  he  thinks  he  is.  If  he 
were  he  would  be  able  to  look  after  his  liabilities  bet- 
ter. He  is  doing  the  business  but  he  is  not  making 
very  much  money.  If  he  would  make  out  a  financial 
statement  each  year,  it  would  show  him  clearly  that  he 
is  not  making  as  much  net  profit  as  he  should  on  the 
business  done,  and  he  would  then  get  busy  and  rectify 
the  leaks  that  are  at  present  eating  up  his  profits:  As 
long  as  he  neglects  such  a  yearly  statement,  however, 
he  will  never  realize  just  how  little  money  he  is  mak- 
ing. 

Insist  on  Accuracy 

Now  as  to  the  work  of  stock-taking.  I  would  first 
like  to  impress  on  dealers  the  need  for  absolute  accuracy 
in  taking  the  inventory.  Unless  this  point  is  insisted 
on,  the  result  will  not  be  a  proper  indication  of  actual 
worth  of  stock  and  the  purpose  of  taking  stock  is  de- 
feated. Do  not  leave  the  question  of  quantities  or 
prices  to  gues.swork.  Count  goods  and  make  certain 
that  prices  are  correct. 

It  is  better  to  underestimate  than  to  overestimate. 
A  man  can  always  afford  to  be  a  little  better  off  than 
he  figures,  but  it  is  dangerous  to  believe  that  he  is 
better  fixed  than  he  really  is.  It  is  like  going  on  a 
"spree."  It  feels  alright  at  the  time,  but  the 
"morning  after"  is  not  likely  to  be  so  pleasant. 

Hov^r  to  Go  About  It 

T  find  it  the  best  plan  for  those  engaged  in  the  work 
of  stock-taking  to  divide  themselves  into  twos.  One 
man  calls  off  the  stock  as  he  counts  it,  and  the  other  in- 
serts the  quantity,  description  and  cost  price,  if  it  is 
Icnown,  on  the  inventory  sheet.  A  little  system  will 
lessen  work.  For  instance,  goods  of  the  same  kind 
can  be  put  together  and  counted  in  one  sum,  or  space 
can  be  left  on  the  line  to  add  more  articles  of  a  similar 
nature  if  they  come  to  light  later.     This  saves  the 


work  of  writing  out  several  lines  for  the  same  article. 
Don't  jump  all  over  in  stock-taking.  Start  at  a  cer- 
tain place  and  cover  it  thoroughly.  Otherwise  you 
are  liable  to  miss  some  goods. 

Preventing-  Duplication 

If  stock-taking  is  to  extend  over  a  considerable 
business  period,  precautions  will  have  to  be  taken  so 
that  articles  listed  and  afterwards  sold  will  be  de- 
ducted from  the  total  stock  showing.  Clerks  who  are 
soiling  goods  may  make  a  note  of  checked  goods  sold  in 
a  book  for  the  purpose,  and  deduct  the  total  amount 
of  such  sales  from  the  total  stock.  Some  dealers 
leave  a  slip  on  each  line  of  goods  which  has  been  listed 
so  that  sales  may  be  noted  on  it.  It  is  not  necessary 
to  make  a  note  of  goods  sold  but  which  has  not  been 
listed,  as  they  will  appear  in  cash  on  hand  or  amount  on 
books  in  your  financial  statement. 

Once  the  goods  have  been  listed,  all  that  is  necessary 
is  to  make  extensions  and  add  up  totals  and  the  total 
amount  of  stock  on  hand  will  be  known.  Compare  it 
with  the  amount  of  stock  of  the  previous  year.  If 
there  has  been  any  large  increase,  look  into  the 
cause. 

Once  the  amount  of  your  stock  is  known,  you  are  in 
a  position  to  go  ahead  and  make  out  a  financial  state- 
ment that  will  show  the  exact  standing  of  your 
business. 


BE  SURE  GOODS  ARE  RIGHT 

The  first  great  problem  is  to  be  sure  the  goods  are 
right  and  that,  of  course,  is  a  buying  problem.  And 
to  that  old  saying  that  goods  well  bought  are  half  sold 
I  would  add  be  sure  of  the  quality  first. 

There  is  a  natural  curiosity  and  a  desire  to  know 
about  things,  even  things  of  every-day  use  and  you 
will  find  about  90  per  cent,  of  your  customers  are  in- 
terested in  information  about  the  goods  they  buy. 
They  want  to  know  how  they  are  made  and  where  they 
came  from. 

Every  interesting  idea  about  your  goods  that  you 
can  pass  to  a  customer  will  make  all  the  stronger  the 
hold  your  goods  will  have  on  that  customer  when  she 
buys.  And  it  is  not  difficult  to  get  people  to  absorb 
facts  about  your  goods  if  they  are  presented  in  the 
right  manner. 


Send  Us  Your  Xmas  Window 

A GOOD  many  clerks  have  photographs  taken  of 
their  Christmas  window  displays  to  retain 
as  souvenirs  of  their  special  Christmas  efforts 
aiid  as  a  source  of  suggestion  for  other  years.  To 
such  clerks,  we  extend  an  invitation  to  send  us  along 
copies  of  such  photographs  for  reproduction  in  our 
paper  that  other  clerks  may  see  what  they  are  doing 
and  benefit  from  their  work. 

Mail  with  a  brief  description  to  The  Editor,  32  Col- 
borne  St.,  Toronto. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


53 


HAVE  PROPER  CATALOGUE  FILING  SYSTEM 

nil,  I  I  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI  I  iiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiii'  I  II  I  Ill  1  Illlllllllllllllllllll  mill  I  I  nil  I  III!  miiim  i  '  >  "i""  "»  

Many  sales  lost  because  dealer  cannot  locate  desired  catalogue — Have  a  system  that  prepares  for  any  emergency 

111  I  I  II  niiiiniii  I  I!  iiiiiiiiiii  mil  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  I  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiii;miiiiiii;;:i::i;;;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiii  iii  i  iiiiiiii  


A CATALOGUE  file  is  so  extremely  useful  to  the 
merchant  that  the  little  trouble  involved  in 
preparing  one  and  keeping  it  in  good  shape,  is 
many  times  repaid.  Yet,  a  canvas  of  retail  merchants 
will  reveal  the  fact  that,  with  rare  exceptions,  no 
orderly  memorandum  of  manufacturers'  catalogues  or 
of  their  contents  is  kept.  The  handsomely  illustrated 
booklets,  prepared  at  so  much  expense  and  handed  out 
fo  hopefully,  lie  around  the  retail  merchant's  office  for 
a  time  and  soon  find  oblivion  in  the  wastepaper  basket, 
or  are  left  heaped  in  so  unsystematic  a  manner  that 
they  are  of  little  use. 

Catalogues  accumulate  so  rapidly,  and  price  changes 
are  of  such  frequent  occurrence, 'that  unless  there  is 
some  system  of  keeping  track  of  everything,  one  may 


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Cai'd  index  for  catalogue  file  described  in 
acocnipanying  article. 


well  despair  of  any  good  from  the  catalogues.  As  a 
matter  of  fact  the  average  merchant  gets  a  very  limited 
amount  of  benefit  from  them.  So,  when  a  customer 
comes  in  and  encjuires  for  a  dining  room  suite  in  the 
William  and  Mary  style,  in  American  black  walnut, 
and  at  a  certain  price,  he  can't  just  lay  his  hand  ou  the 
information  necessary  to  at  once  take  advantage  of  the 
prospective  sale.  An  up-to-date  merchant  is  pre- 
pared for  any  emergency.  He  should  be  prepared  for 
tliis.  He  should  have  infoi'mation  on  tap,  as  it  were, 
all  the  time,  so  as  to  be  ready  for  a  customer  when  he 
calls. 

To  do  this  it  is  necessary  to  have  a  cabinet  of 
drawers  in  which  to  keep  the  catalogues,  and,  in  addi- 
tion, a  sample  system  of  indexing  the  contents. 

Card  Index  for  Easy  Locating-  of  Desired  Catalog-ues 

The  card  system  of  indexing  is  the  handiest,  as  it 
allows  changes  and  additions  to  be  made  quickly  and 


easily.  The  cards  shoidd  be  about  4x6  inches  in  size. 
At  the  top  of  each  should  be  room  for  the  name  of  the 
article;  for  example,  "Diningroom  Suites"  would  be 
one  heading.  The  body  of  the  card  should  be  ruled 
across,  with  a  lengthwise  ruling  near  each  margin.  In 
the  middle  write  the  names  of  the  furniture  manu- 
facturers, whose  catalogues  you  have.  On  the  left 
margin  place  letters  indicative  of  the  grade  of  goods 
each  otfer  for  sale;  for  example,  the  letter  "M"  Avould 
mean  mediiim-priced,  the  letters  "H  G"  would  mean 
high-grade,  etc.  Within  the  right-hand  margin,  oppo- 
site a  manufacturer's  name  shoidd  be  placed  the  num- 
ber signifying  which  drawer  of  the  filing  cabinet  eon- 
tains  that  dealer's  catalogue.  The  cards  should  be 
filed  according  to  the  articles,  not  by  the  names  (ff  the 
furniture  makers. 

Have  Information  Readily  Securable 
Every  furniture  dealer  will  find  it  to  his  interest  to 
get  catalogues  from  every  manufacturer  whose  goods 
he  is  likely  to  need,  and  file  them.  Then  he  should 
subscribe  for  a  good  trade  paper  and  carefully  scan 
the  advertisements  it  carries,  for  infornuition  regard- 
ing changes  of  prices  and  new  things  Avhieh  come  out. 
This  material  should  then  be  noted  upon  the  catalogues 
and  kept  track  of.  A  merchant  may  not  know  every- 
thing ofi'hand,  but  he  should  know  where  to  get  the 
information  and  get  it  quick,  so  as  to  strike  when  the 
iron  is  hot. 

The  accompanying  diagram  Avill  be  found  useful  in 
illustrating  the  card  described  above. 


HOW  TO  MAKE  YOUR  WINDOW  ATTRACTIVE 
AT  NIGHT 

The  value  of  a  show  window  is  increased  greatly  at 
night  by  two  important  conditions: 

1.  The  mind  of  the  observer  is  freer  tit  night  than 
during  the  hustle  and  bustle  of  the  business  day,  and 
so  more  sensitive  to  impression. 

2.  The  drawing  power  of  the  display  is  greater  be- 
cause of  the  greater  contrast  between  the  bright  win- 
dow and  its  darker  environs. 

The  light  sources  should  be  at  the  top  and  front  of 
the  window  and  completely  concealed.  Lamps  shonlrl 
be  placed  so  that  the  light  cannot  enter  the  eye  direct 
from  the  luminous  centre.  The  pupil  of  the  eye  ad- 
justs itself  to  the  brightest  spot  in  the  range  of  vision, 
and  if  contracted  on  account  of  the  lamps  being  in 
sight,  the  goods  are  necessarily  less  visible  and  the 
selling  power  of  the  display  greatly  lessened. 

Don't  deceive  yourself  by  failing  to  realise  the  num- 
ber of  people  who  see  your  show  windoAv?  at  night. 
During  the  day  the  passer-by  may  not  have  time  to 
srive  your  windoAV  more  than  a  passing  p-lanee.  At 
night  only  the  bright  snots  are  points  of  interest  an^l 
he  has  more  time  and  will  study  you^'  disnlnv  eriticnlly. 
Merchants  say  that  they  have  watched  tliis  mnt^-er 
closely  and  have  freqnentlv  seen  men  and  women  who 
were  "window  shonping"  the  nicrlit  beFove.  in  the 
store  and  buying  the  next  dav.  Trv  it  yourself  anrl 
you  will  be  convinced  that  your  window  should  be 
Iproperly  illuminated  at  night. 


54 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


THE  SELLING  of  HOUSEHOLD  APPLIANCES 

'""">'  IIMIMIIIIIMIIMIII  IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIIIIMII  Ill  1111111  IIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIMI  IIMI  Ill  IIMIIMII  IIMIIIIIIIIIII  Illlllllllllll  IIIIIIIIIIMIIMII  lll'll  Illl  IIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

How  a  dealer  handles  this  line  in  his  store — Allowing  the  housekeeper  sell  herself. — Some  suggestions  of  value. 

" MIIMMIIIIIJMIIMIIIIMII  mil  IIMIIIIIIIIMIII|:M|i|IIMIMIIMIMIIIIIH  Illlllll  I  I  Illlllll  mill  Mlllllllllllll  I  Illllimillllllll  Iimilllllll  Ill  I  IIIIIMIIIII  IIIHMI  IIIIJII  tlllllllllllll  Ill 


A FURNITURE  dealer  not  a  thousand  miles  from 
Toronto,  some  little   time   since   told  how  he 
handled  the  specialties  in  his  housefurnishings 
department,  among  them,  vacuum  cleaners   and  re- 
frigerators. 

Selling  Vacuum  Cleaners 

On  the  former  he  said  something  like  this:  "Suction 
sweepers  are  an  article  you  have  to  let  the  housewife 
sell  to  herself  in  her  own  home.  Most  women  would 
rather  spend  twenty-five  dollars  for  a  hat  than  for  a 
sweeping  machine.  They  have  to  see  a  lot  of  bene- 
fits coming  to  them  before  they'll  invest  that  much  in 
any  utensil  for  housework.  And  they  are  more  or 
less  skeptical  of  any  demonstration  you  make  in  your 
store.  They  don't  have  to  deal  with  cork,  powder, 
and  so  on  at  home. 

"In  selling  a  machine  I  pick  out  one  that  Avill  really 
do  the  work,  is  durable,  simple  to  operate,  and  can  be 
trusted  to  perform  its  duty  in  the  hands  of  a  novice. 
My  plan  is  to  ask  the  housewife  to  let  me  do  her  weekly 
cleaning.  I  send  one  of  my  men  with  the  machine. 
He  shows  the  housewife  how  to  work  it  and  allows  her 
to  handle  it  herself.  Then  he  exhibits,  when  he  empties 
the  bag,  the  unseen  dirt  with  Avhich  she  has  been  liv- 
ing, and  calls  her  attention  to  the  short  time  it  has  re- 
quired to  clean  all  her  rugs  and  carpets  more  thor- 
oughly than  they  have  ever  heen  cleaned. 


"He  tells  her  how  this  method  saves  her  carpets  and 
rugs  and  guards  the  health  of  her  family — we've  sold 
a  lot  of  sweepers  in  homes  where  there  are  babies  be- 
cause we  have  convinced  the  mothers  that  their  babies 
ought  not  to  creep  on  floors  that  are  not  thoroughly 
cleaned  of  dust  by  the  suction  system.  Then  we  leave 
the  machine  with  the  housewife,  so  that  she  may  use 
it  herself  the  next  week.     She  usually  buys  it." 

Handling  Refrigerators 

It  is  pretty  much  the  same  with  refrigerators,  though 
the  purchase  of  a  refrigerator  represents  about  the 
largest  expenditure  the  average  family  makes  for  a 
household  utility,  and  the  sale  is  correspondingly  diffi- 
cult— especially  because  the  average  man  or  woman 
looks  on  any  box  that  will  hold  ice  as  a  refrigerator. 
This  dealer  made  up  his  mind  that  every  possible  buyer 
he  could  reach  would  have  to  be  educated  in  the  prin- 
ciples of  ice  refrigeration.  But  you  can't  force  this 
information  on  a  customer.  You  have  to  make  him 
want  it. 

The  minute  you  approach  a  man  or  a  Avoman  with  a 
suggestion  to  buy,  the  person  approached  is  on  guard 
against  that  particular  suggestion  and  prepares  to  re- 
sist it.  That's  human  nature.  So  this  dealer  evolved 
a  plan  to  work  up  to  the  refrigerator  by  way  of  some 
other  merchandise,  so  as  not  to  rouse  the  buyer's  an- 


Uepartmciit 


which 


one  firm  has  for  featuring  such  lines  as  vacuum  cleaners,   washing  machines. 
Note  the  carpet  to  demonstrate  what  the  vacuum  cleaners  will  do. 


etc. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


5S 


tagonism  to  his  refrigerator  suggestion  and  then  have 
to  overcome  that  antagonism. 

The  efficiency  idea  in  all  sorts  of  work  which  has  of 
late  been  attracting  public  attention,  has  been  used  by 
the  dealer  to  apply  to  housework.  So  he  started  a 
home-efficiency  department  and  coached  one  of  his  men 
as  an  efficiency  expert.  His  idea  was  to  announce  to 
the  housewife  that  his  efficiency  expert  would  make  a 
survey  of  her  home  and  suggest  ways  and  means  for 
making  the  work  of  her  household  help  more  efficient, 
calling  attention  to  the  fact  that  her  husband  adopted 
in  his  office  every  device  for  economizing  time  and 
labor,  while  most  housework  is  still  done  in  a  more  or 
less  primitive  way.  The  expert  would,  among  other 
things,  suggest  the  installation  of  a  sanitary  refrigera- 
tor wherever  one  was  lacking,  and  so  would  lead  up  to 
sales. 

Where  a  refrigerator  isn't  really  needed  we  suggest 
something  else,  a  fireless  cooker,  or  something  of  a 
relatively  high  cost.  This  scheme  has  sold  a  lot  of 
goods;  it  has  done  something  more — it  has  established 
our  reputation  as  a  progressive  store,  and  has  made  us 
known  to  those  who  did  not  know  us  before. 

"You'd  be  surprised, "  continued  this  dealer,  "at  the 
specialties  in  the  average  store  that  would  increase 
the  efficiency  of  the  houseworker — devices  about  which 
the  average  housewife  knows  nothing.  She  doesn't 
know  a'bout  them  because  so  few  of  these  specialties 
or  staples  are  advertised,  and  fewer  are  properly  ad- 
vertised. Incidentally  that's  one  reason  why  there  are 
so  few  good  retail  appliance  salesmen.  I've  noticed 
that  in  lines  which  are  well  advertised  the  manufac- 
turers, directly  and  through  the  consumer,  educate  the 
retailer  and  his  clerks  to  an  appreciation  of  the  ad- 
vertised goods  and  of  efficient  ways  to  sell  them.  That 
develops  a  lot  of  good  salesmanship  in  those  lines." 

While  the  summer  is  the  best  season  for  the  sale  of 
refrigerators,  they  are  needed  in  many  households  even 
during  the  cold  weather.    Goods  cannot  frequently  be 


placed  outside  and  if  left  inside  some  refrigeration  is 
necessary.  This  is  particularly  true  in  apartment 
houses,  where  residents  have  not  the  convenience  of  a 
cellar. 


RANDOM  SHOTS 

I  shot  an  arrow  into  the  air;  it  fell  in  the  distance,  I 
knew  not  Avhere,  till  a  neighbor  said  that  it  killed  his 
calf;  and  I  had  to  pay  him  six  and  a  half  ($6.50). 

I  bought  some  poison  to  slay  some  rats,  and  a  neigh- 
bor swore  it  killed  his  eats ;  and,  rather  than  argue 
across  the  fence,  I  paid  him  four  dollars  and  fifty  cents 
($4.50). 

One  night  I  set  sailing  a  toy  balloon,  and  hoped  it 
would  soar  till  it  reached  the  moon ;  but  the  candle  fell 
on  a  farmer's  straw,  and  he  said  I  must  settle  or  go  to 
law. 

And  that  is  the  way  with  the  random  shot ;  it  never 
hits  in  the  proper  spot ;  and  the  joke  you  spring,  that 
you  think  so  smart,  may  leave  a  wound  in  some  fel- 
low's heart.   

Send  in  bills  early  and  often.  That  is  the  way  to 
get  your  money  and  to  prevent  accounts  accumulating 
and  becoming  losses. 


SHAKING  HANDS 

SOME  salesimen  shake  hands  too  much.  In  order 
to  muke  handshafcing  iirofitaible,  learn  when  to 
do  it.  The  handshake  should  be  used  as  a  sign 
of  the  developmeiit  of  a  closer  interest  between  two 
people. 

Shaking  hands  at  the  right  time  will  promote  a 
better  feelling  between  customer  and  salesman.  Shak- 
ing hands  at  the  wrong  time  may  make  the  customer 
avoid  the  salesman  next  time.  Get  the  happy  medium 
between  the  college  freshman  wrench  and  the  life- 
less cemetery  flop.  Don't  stick  out  a  limp  paw  for 
the  other  fellow  to  wiggle  up  and  down.  Shake  hands 
(juickly,  firmly,  as  if  you  meant  it. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


The  Curse  of  the  Antique 


By  ARTHUR  GUITERMAN 
in  Harper's  Magazine 


MY  friends,   the   Van    Buzzens,  ht*ve  millions  to 
spare; 
They  live  to   the    northward    of  Washington 
square; 

Their  chastely    magnificent,  sumptuous  home 
(Or  rather,  their  mansion) — from  cellar  to  dome 

Is  filled  to  repletion 

With  things  that  are  Grecian 

And  early  Venetian 

(Or  seemingly  so). 

And  Late  Jacobean 

And  Middle  Pompeiian 

And  Aramathean — 

For  all  that  I  know. 


The  panels,  the  ceilings,  the  elegant  doors, 

Are  Louis — some  Louis — oh,  Seize  or  Quartorze; 


"Noir  here  is  an  object  exceedingly  choice." 

And  down  in  the  kitchen  the  skillets  and  pans 
Are  some  other  Louis — conceivably  Quinze 

While  tables  on  gate-legs 

(Those  movable  eight  legs) 

Or  highly  ornate  legs 
That  martyr  your  knees. 

And  chairs  upon  scroll-legs 

Or  neat  cabriole-legs 

(The  French  word  for  "bowlegs") 
Are  thicker  than  peas. 

Miranda  Van  Buzzen,  a  Priestess  apart, 
The  Heiress  of  All  of  the  Ages  of  Art, 
Is  proud  of  old  tapestries  hanging  in  shreds. 
Of  highboys  and  lowboys  and  canopied  beds, 

Of  caddies  and  kettles 

In  various  metals, 

Of  dressers  and  settles 

And  benches  and  thrones. 

Of  boxes  for  laces, 

Of  porcelain  vases, 

And  coffers  and  eases 
By  Inigo  .Jones. 

But  Abel  Van  Buzzen  is  sick  unto  death, 
He  lately  confided,  though  under  his  breath, 
Of  "all  this  nonsensical  'Period'  bluff — 
The  C'hippendale-Heppelvvhite-Sheraton  stuff!" 

"I'll  furnish  my  study 

As  snug  as  a  cuddy. 

With  no  fuddy-duddy 

Of  gimcracks!"  said  he; 

"And  nothing  that's  'Classic' 

Or  Upper  Jurassic 

Or  utter  jack-assic! — 
Plain  comfort  for  me!" 


He  went  to  a  dealer  in  Crotchets  and  Whims, 
Impressive  in  glasses  with  tortoise-shell  rims, 
And  told  him,  "I  want  a  Eesponsible  Chair; 
It  needn't  be  something  seductively  rare 

By  any  old  masters 

On  fluted  pilasters. 

But  Comfort  on  Casters — 
A  cushioned  retreat; 

And  I  want  a  table. 

Whatever  the  label,  . 

SufSciently  stable 

To  hold  up  my  feet!" 

The  Expert  replied  in  a  delicate  voice, 
"Now,  here  is  an  Object  exeeedingl.y  choice — 
A  chair  with  a,  wheel-back  and  single-curve  arms; 
The  spatulate  feet  are  the  least  of  its  charms. 

We  bought  it  from  Madam 

McAdam  of  Haddam — 

A  Genuine  Adam! — 
Oh,   don't  be  misled! 

The  marks  that  you  term  'holes' 

Are  Guaranteed  Worm-holes!" — 

"I  think  they  are  germ-holes!" 
Quoth  Abel,  and  fled. 

The  next  Oounoisseur  whom  he  happened  to  seek 
Was  strong  for  the  Gothic  with  touches  of  Greek, 
For  chairs  that  were  stiffer  than  pokers  and  starch 
And  built  like  cathedrals  with  pillar  and  arch. 

"Observe  the  acanthus, 

The  drooping  ailanthus. 

The  rich  polyanthus 
And  tendril  design 

With  nothing  aborted!" 

The  Person  exhorted. 

But  Abel  retorted, 

"Not  any  in  mine!" 

Another  remarkably  talented  man 
Was  all  for  the  colorful  mode  of  Queen  Anne — 
For  marquetry  tables  and  armchairs  with  wings; 
Another,  for  ormolu  Empire  things. 


"  With  chairs  you  can  prose  in  and  smoke  and  repose  in." 

Still  others  orated 

On  chairs  that  were  mated 

With  feet  that  were  plated 

Or  turned  like  a  cup 
And  legs  that  were  twisted; 
Wiile  many  insisted 
On  styles  that  existed 

When  Rome  was  a  pup. 

They  gabbled  of  Flemish,  Byzantine,  Grotesque, 
Hogarthian,  Tudor,  Baroque,  Arabesque, 

(Concluded  on  next  page.) 


niiTi.niiLiimiiimrr 


i.nnnjinmimiiiiij  iiimi:ti]iii '  f  1 1 1 1  m  ,-Tni  1 1 1 1 1  ]  i  n  lujiUjjjmninpiEJTiii 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


57 


VALUABLE  PRICING  TABLE  FOR  RETAILER 


A  table  which  shows  at  a  glance  how  the  selling  price  of  an  article  can  speedily  be  arrived  at  from  cost 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:ii:iiiiii:Niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


THE    Canadian    Fui'nitnre    World    has    had  a 
number  of  articles  during  the  past  couple  of 
years  on  the  question  of  pricing  goods,  and  has 
given  a  number  of  tables  from  time  to  time,  to  simplify 
the  problem  of  pricing  for  the  dealer. 

We  reproduce  here  another  table  that  promises  to  be 
of  great  service  in  this  connection.     It  was  devised  by 


PRICING  TABLE 


% 

Multiple 

% 

Multiple 

20 

1.25 

31 

1.45 

21 

1.267 

32 

1.471 

22 

1.283 

33 

1.493 

23 

1.299 

34 

L516 

24 

1.316 

35 

1.539 

25 

1.334 

36 

1.563 

26 

1.352 

37 

1,588 

27 

1.37 

38 

1.613 

28 

1.39 

39 

1.64 

29 

1.409 

40 

1.667 

30 

1.429 

41 

1.695 

%=Gross  profit  on  sales. 
Multip]cXeost=selling  price. 


E.  C.  Thulin,  and  appeared  in  one  of  our  exchanges. 
The  writer  has  made  a  close  study  of  figuring 
profits  and  pricing  in  recent  years,  and  believes  that 
this  is  one  of  the  simplest  tables  he  hacs  yet  seen. 


Explanation  of  Table 

The  table  is  not  difiicult  to  understand.  Suppose, 
for  instance,  you  desire  to  make  a  gross  profit  of  40  per 
cent,  on  the  selling  price  of  a  certain  article.  How 
shall  you  determine  what  this  will  amount  to  in  dol- 
lars and  cents?  You  cannot  multiply  forty  by  the  cost 
price  of  the  article,  because  the  percentage  of  profit 
isn't  figured  on  the  cost.  It  is  figured  on  the  selling 
volume. 

This  table  solves  the  problem.  It  shows  you  what 
price  you  ought  to  charge  to  secure  a  gross  profit  of 
any  desired  amount.  If  you  desire  to  make  a  40-per 
cent,  profit,  based  on  the  selling  price,  you  simply 
multiply  the  cost  price  by  1.667.  In  the  case  of  an 
article  costing  $1.00,  you  would  therefore  put  a  price 
on  it  of  $1.67. 

If  you  desire  a  gross  profit  of  30  per  cent.,  multiply 
the  cost  by  1.429.  If  you  desire  a  gross  profit  of  35 
per  cent.,  multiply  the  cost  price  by  1.539 — etc.,  etc. 


WATCH  YOUR  STEP 

Johnny  SnoAV  says  that  you  never  can  tell  when  your 
simplest  words  are  going  to  be  twisted  out  of  their 
meaning.  He  exemplifies  with  the  incident  of  an 
austere-looking  woman  who  Avalked  into  Eaton's  store 
Avhilo  he  and  his  Avife  were  looking  about,  and  said  to 
the  clerk : 

"I  should  like  to  purchase  a  mut¥." 

"What  fur?"  inquired  the  clerk. 

"To  keep  my  hands  warm,  you  idiot!"  exclaimed 
the  Avoman. 


gMiiiiiraii,jjii.['MU,U3nrn  rriiiiiiiTi'i'.i'iTiiinrtTiTiiTt'miTim 


TTTTTTHTinJi  LLi  I '  I  [  1 1 M  inTT  ji[min"riTTTi7TnTnii]jjjiiLUijijLi  jiiimrg^        jiuiiiiiLimK'^^'^*^ ■ 


(Continued  frojn  previous  pane.) 

Of  cedar  and  ebony  artfullj'  wrought. 
Of  Indian  teak,  and  mahoganj'  brought 

From  far  Orinoco 

And  carved  in  rococo. 

They  drove  him  quite  loco. 
Or  nearly  to  drink, 

With  talk  of  mo!?aic — 

Not  wholly  archaic, 

But  done  in  Passaic, 
New  Jersey,  I  think. 

Com])letely  bewildered  and  ready  to  drop. 
He  staggi^red  away  to  a  Furniture  Shop; 
And  what  should  he  see  in  that  wonderful  place 
But  tables  of  dignity,  substance  and  grace, 

And  arm-chairs,  by  gracious! 

Invitingly  spacious, 

Su|ierbly  capacious 

And,  Hea\'en  be  jiraised! 

Divinely  upholstered, 

Hecushioned  and  bolstered! 

His  buffeted  soul  stirred 
With  jo.y  as  he  gazed. 

"Magician  of  Furniture,"  Abel  exclaimed, 
"What   date  are  these  marvels,   and   how  are  they 
named  ? ' ' 


The  Artist  replied,  with  a  blush  on  his  cheek, 
"  They  .  haven 't  been  christened:  we  made   'em  last 
week. 

We  dare  not  assign  'em 
A  ])l'ace,  nor  define  'em, 
We  only  design  'em 
The  best  that  we  can." 
"Oh,  send  me  four  dozen, 
Mike  Angelo's  Cousin!" 
Cried  Abel  Van  Buzzen, 
"And  hurrv  the  \'an!" 


The  House  of  Van  Buzzen  is  splendidly  cold 
And  crammed  with  rare  treasures  that  ought  to  be 
sold; 

Its  satin  wood  sideboards  are  guiltless  of  dust; 
Its  stately  perfections  deserve  to  be  mussed. 

But  u|i  in  the  attic, 
A  place  deiiioeratic, 
Is  Abel's  ecstatic 

Eesort  of  the  blest. 
With  chairs  you  can  ))rose  in 
And  smoke  and  repose  in 
And  dreamily  doze  in, — 

Oasis  of  Rest. 


58 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


PRACTICAL  SUGGESTIONS  IN  AD.  WRITING 

By  J.  W.  CARLIN 


"J  0  make  sure  that  our  ad.  will  be  seen,  we  must 
I  "lay  it  out"  in  a  manner  that  will  attract  at- 
tention, and  begin  it  with  Avords  which  will 
compel  interest.  Then  let's  word  it  carefully,  and 
print  it  sensibly,  so  it  will  be  read — and  if  it  rings  true, 
it  will  be  believed. 

Some  advertisers  seem  to  think  that  all  they  have  to 
do  is  to  run  out  into  the  middle  of  the  road  and  shout 
"STOP!"  and  the  Avorld  Avill  halt  and  listen  to  them. 
You  see  ads.  headed  in  glaring  type  with  such  words  as 
"Stop!"  "Look!"  "Important,"  and  so  on.  But 
you've  seen  so  many  of  them  '  lat  you  USUALLY 
PASS  THEM  BY  without  both  '.-i  ig  to  see  what  they 
are  talking  about. 

Like  an  Electric  Sw.-un 

The  best  heading  is  one  which  actually  leads  the 
reader  into  the  subject  of  the  advertisement;  like  the 
electric  switch,  it  makes  a  connection  through  which 
your  current  of  selling-talk  will  flow  with  force  and 
effect.  S.  Roland  Hall,  in  his  recent  book  on  "How 
to  Write  an  Advertisement,"  says  that  when  a  farmer 
comes  to  town  and  wants'  to  advertise  a  mule  for  sale, 
he  goes  to  the  office  of  the  local  paper,  and  writes  an 
ad.  headed  like  this: 

GOOD  MULE  FOR  SALE 

Then  he  proceeds  to  tell  ahout  the  mule — his  age 
and  size,  Avhere  he  can  he  seen,  and,  perhaps,  the  nrico. 
NOW,  THAT  IS  A  GOOD  AD.,  because  the  man  who 
wants  to  buy  a  mule  will  surely  read  it  when  he  sees 
the  heading,  "Good  Mule  for  Sale."  But  some  other 
man,  who  thinks  he  must  ^be  "clever,"  even  at  the 
sacrifice  of  being  clear,  Avill  probably  start  off  the 
mule  ad.  with  a  line  like  this: 

HE  NEVER  KICKS 

Many  readers  who  might  buy  'a  mule  will  pass  his 
ad.  Avithout  reading  it,  because  they  won't  knoAv  it  is 
about  a  mule.  If  they  read  it,  they  will,  perhaps,  be 
suspicious,  fearing  that  a  man  Avho  will  state  positively 
that  a  mule  never  kicks,  might  also  misrepresent  in 
other  ways  about  the  mule. 

Don't  Be  Too  Clever 

Too  much  smartness,  either  in  wording  or  type, 
causes  lack  of  confidence.  People  may  read  your  ad. 
and  say,  "that  certainly  is  a  clever  advertisement!" 
— and  then  not  buy  from  you.  You  don't  care  if  they 
don't  even  realize  that  they  haA^e  read  your  ad.,  so 
long  as  they  buy  your  goods.  In  my  own  experience 
I  have  noticed  that  AA^henever  my  friends  come  to  me 
and  say  "that  was  a  fine  ad.  you  had  in  the  paper  to- 
day," that  ad.  hardly  ever  pulls  as  good  results  as 
some  other  ad,  upon  Avhieh  they  never  think  to  compli- 
ment me — because  in  it  they  see  only  the  merchandise, 
and  not  the  ad.  itself. 

Put  all  the  punch  you  can  into  your  headline ;  AA'hen 
you  throAv  that  sAvitch  to  start  the  live,  pulsating  cnv- 
vent  of  sales-talk,  throw  it  hard! 


This  Headline  an  Ad.  in  Itself 

For  instance:  "Don't  Envy  a  Good  Complexion; 
Use  Pompeiian  and  HAVE  One !"  That  line  is  an  ad.  in 
itself!  the  very  force  of  it  put  the  reader  in  a  frame 
of  mind  to  want  to  believe  Avhat  follows. 

Sometimes  it  may  be  worth  Avhile  to  be  "fancy"  in 
the  way  you  have  your  headings  set  up,  but  usually 
THE  PLAINER  YOU  MAKE  THEM  THE  BETTER, 
and  don't  ever  let  the  message  be  obscured  by  your 
desire  to  achieve  some  clever  or  fancy  effect  of  typo- 
graphy. 

' '  Better  Business  Bureau ' ' 

is  a  far  better  head  than 

BETTER 
USIN^SS 
UREAU 

In  the  first  case  you  are  not  conscious  of  the  type  or 
the  Avords,  but  only  of  the  sense.  In  the  second  cflse 
your  attention  is  distracted  from  the  name  to  the  fact 
that  the  ad.  writer  is  a  clever  contortionist  Avith  Avords. 
The  second  example  requires  some  effort  to  read ;  and 
\A'henever  you  make  a  thing  hard  to  read,  you  lessen 
the  number  of  people  Avho  Avill  read  it,  and  you  lessen 
the  tenacity  with  which  it  Avill  cling  in  their  memory. 

In  a  recent  issue  of  the  Inland  Printer  I  came  across 
this  example  of  typographical  gymnastics : 
A 

ADVERTISER 
A 

M  J.  G.  WILLIS,  Prop. 

S  Adams,  Mass. 

How  many  peoi^le  will  take  the  trouble  to  read  it? 
How  much  better  to  have  been  plain  and  straightfor- 
ward— like  this : 

ADAMS  ADVERTISER 
J.  G.  Willis,  Proprietor, 
Adams,  Mass. 

DON'T  EVER  POOL  YOURSELF  into  thinking  that 
people  are  going  to  Avork  out  a  rebus  to  find  out  Avho 
you  are  and  AVhat  you  sell.    They  won't  do  it. 


AD-AGES  OF  TO-DAY 

Every  good  ad.  has  a  silver  linimg. 
An  ad.  in  time  saves  nine. 
Advertise  not;  profit  not. 
All  is  not  advertising  that  is  printed. 
Ads.  of  a  feather  flock  together. 
Too  many  authors  spoil  the  ad. 
An  ad.  is  known  by  the  company  it  keeps. 
An  ad.  in  the  paper's  worth  two  in  the  mind. 
A  good  ad.  a  day  keeps  the  sheriff  away. 
Least  said,  easiest  mended — ^when'it  comes  to  super- 
lative claim's. 

Advertise,  and  the  world  advertises  with  you.  Stop 

and  you  sit  alone. 
It's  a  wise  merchant  that  knows  his  OAvin  ad. — ^where 

the  signature's  omitte-d. 


Canadian  Furniture  World 

TORONTO  JANUARY  1919  CANADA 


A  THRIFT  REQUEST 

To  Our  Subscribers: 

About  your  subscription  receipt: — Instead  of  send- 
ing you  a  receipt  for  your  renewal  subscription,  we 
ask  you  to  watch  the  expiry  date  on  your  next  copy. 
By  it  you  will  see  your  remittance  has  been  received — 
it  will  be  advanced  accordingly. 
Thanking  you,  we  are 

Gratefully  yours, 
THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED, 

32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 


January  There  are  good  trade  opiportiini- 

Furniture  ties  during  January  for  the  furni- 

Trade  ture  dealer  Who  is  prepared  to 

make  the  most  of  them,  in  spite  of 
the  seneral  idea  that  a  post-hoMday  quietness  is  in 
order  dui-ing  the  first  month  of  the  yeiar. 

It  is  a  time  when  people  are  indoors  a  good  deal  and 
naturally  an  appeal  for  better  home  furnishings  is 
more  likely  to  create  interest  than  at  any  other  time. 
Advertisements  booming  the  idea  of  better  homes  and 
furnishings  will  he  found  productive  of  best  results  at 
this  time. 

This  is  a  good  time  to  exhort  people  to  fill  in  the  odd 
pieces  of  fumitaire  they  need  and  which  they  have  been 
contemplating  the  purchase  of.  Such  sales  will  assist 
in  working  off  odd  pieces  of  furniture  in  stock  and 
clearing  the  floor  of  left-over  Christmas  goods. 

But  go  after  business  in  January  as  if  you  expected 
it.     To  expect  trade  (|uietness.  is  to  invite  it. 

•    •  • 

Handling  There    are    frequently  specials 

of  Specials  Avhich  the  furniture  dealer  can 

take  lip  to  advantage  and  which 
even  though  small  in  price  may  help  oiit  sales  totals 
considerably.  For  instance,  Campbell  &  Campbell,  of 
Brandon,  Man.,  took  up  the  sale  of  door  mats,  devot- 
ing an  advertisement  in  the  local  paper  exclusively  to 
them.  It  read,  "Cocoa  door  mats  are  indispensable 
at  this  season  of  the  year,  when  the  simw  is  melting 
rapidly,  and  soon  the  mud  and  silush  will  appear.  It 
will  pay  you  to  invest  in  an  outside  dooi-  mat — ^and 
keep  the  dirt  outside.  Your  house  will  be  kept  clean 
and  your  floor  coverings  preserved.  The  prices  are 
exeeedinglv  moderate  and  the  (juality  exceptionally 
high." 

Capitalizing  Many   furnit^^re   dealers  appear 

The  Telephone  rather  dubious  about  the  possibili- 

ties of  creating  direct  sales  by 
means  of  the  telephone.  There  is  no  doubt,  however, 
that  it  can  be  made  of  considerable  value  in  following 
up  prospeicts.  The  possibilities  along  this  line  were 
recently  referred  to  by  a  writer  in  an  exchange.  He 


pointed  out  that  the  'phone  undoubtedly  is  a  great 
time-saver  and  often  one  can  "break  through"  with 
its  assistance  Avhen  a  personal  call  would  prove  unsuc- 
cessful. Salesmen  on  the  retail  floor  are  learning  that 
they  not  only  can  save  a  lot  of  time  but  make  it  easy 
for  their  prospects  by  handin:g  to  customers  a  business 
card  bearing  the  store 's  telephone  number,  at  the  same 
time  explaining  that  whenever  it  is  inconvenient  to 
visit  the  store  their  orders  may  be  given  by  'phone  with 
the  assurance  that  conscientious  attention  will  be 
promptly  secured.  Care  should  be  exercised,  however, 
when  waiting  upon  the  customer  in  the  store,  to  the 
end  that  the  salesman  gets  permission  to  miake  a 
memorandum  in  his  sales  book.  In  most  cases  the 
salesman,  if  tactful,  can  get  the  customer's  name  and 
address,  with  a  notation  of  her  first  choice.  A  live 
man  on  the  floor  Avill  never  overlook  the  importance  of 
getting  the  sale  worked  up  to  the  point  of  decision.  If 
before  deciding  the  customer  must  refer  the  matter  to 
some  otlher  party  the  advantages  of  handing  out  store 
cards  is  apparent.  It  is  surprising  to  note  how  many 
sales  can  be  closed  over  the  telephone  when  this  method 
is  followed.  Making  it  easy  for  the  customer  to  order 
over  the  'phone  is  the  constant  endeavor  of  the  thor- 
ough salesman — a  service  appreciated  by  both  customer 
and  employer. 

Open  House  This  would  be  a  good  month  to 

to  Customers  conduct  an  open  house  to  custom- 

ers, inviting  them  to  visit  your 
store  and  inspect  your  stock  Avithout  any  obligation  to 
buy. 

A  good  many  of  the  people  in  your  community  may 
not  know  just  what  your  store  or  stock  is  like.  Get 
them  to  come  in  on  a  tour  of  in.spectiion. 

•    *  • 

Make  Husband  The  (|uestion  has  been  asked  and 
Consider  Wife  (|uite  justly  too,  "Why  shouldn't 
the  housewife  have  her  home 
e([uippeid  with  labor-saving  cquip'ment  as  much  as  the 
man  has  his  office  equipped  with  them?"  Life  recently 
referi-ed  to  this  in  a  semi-humorous  way  as  follows,  but 
it  has  been  rightly  said  that  many  a  true  word  is 
spoken  in  jest : 

"The  Home  and  the  Office — Why  not  make  our 
homes  as  attractive  as  our  offices? 

"The  modern  high-class  business  man  is  rapidly  de- 
veloping into  a  InxuT'ious  creature.  He  has  on  his 
office  walls  beautiful  j)ictures,  and  under  his  feet  soft 
and  costly  ruigs. 

"His  neutral  color  schemes  are  joyful  to  the  eye,  his 
furniture  is  the  highest  type  of  combined  beauty  and 
efficiency  and  hiis  lighting  system  is  the  last  word  in 
science. 


60 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  19l9 


"  Anything  he  wants  is  immediately  at  his  disposal, 
whether  it  be  i^olish  for  his  boots,  the  latest  periodical, 
a  book  of  reference  or  a  buffet  luncheon. 

"The  air  is  cooled  for  him  in  summer.  Messengers 
wait  upon  liim.     There  is  no  friction,  no  disputing. 

"He  presses  a  button  and  his  lightest  word  is  taken 
down  and  recorded.  At  the  luncheon  hour  he  has  a 
choice  of  the  most  highly  divertsified  companions. 

"Contrast  this  ideai  condition  with  that  of  the  place 
called  home,  filled  with  fossilized  furniture,  and  almost 
denuded  of  servants. 

"Let  not  the  home  be  destroyed.  Let  it  be  placed 
upon  an  equality  with  the  modern  office." 

One  furniture  firm  in  the  United  States  ran  this  as  an 
ad.  headed.  "Read  this  to  your  hurshand." 

*  *  * 

Don't  Fool  Don't  let  the  larger  sales  of  the 

Yourself  present  year  fool   you.  Larger 

sales  do  not  necessarily  mean 
larger)  profits.  One  dealer  told  the  writer  recently 
that  he  expects  his  sales  for  1918  to  be  larger  than  the 
totals  for  1913  and  1914  combined,  but  he  do??n't  ex- 
pect his  profits  for  the  year  to  be  any  larger  than  for 
1914  alone. 

Sales  figures  these  days  are  very  deceptive. 

Courtesy  to  The  travelling  salesman  is  entitled 

Travelers  to  more  courteouis  treatment  than 

he  receives  from  certain  mer- 
chants. The  number  of  retailei's  w^ho  treat  travelers 
in  a  boorish  manner  is  few,  but  there  are  certainly 
some  who  do  not  seem  to  have  the  first  idea  of  common 
decency. 

There  are  few  travelers  who  get  peeved  just  because 
a  merchant  does  not  buy  their  goods,  but  they  do  feel 
as  if  they  have  just  cause  for  eomplaint  when  they  are 
not  even  courteously  received. 

A  good  policy  for  the  merchant  for  his  treatment  of 
the  traveling  man  is,  "Do  unto  others  as  you  would 
they  should  do  with  you,"  if  your  positions  were  re- 
versed. 

#  *  * 

Figure  it  Out  Figure   out  yourself  just  what 

Yourself  the  loss  of  the  amount  of  a  cus- 

tomer's bill  means  to  you  and  the 
amount  of  work  you  have  to  do  to  make  good  the  loss. 
You  know  bad  debts  have  to  be  added  to  your  cost  of 
doing  buisiness. 

You  extend  credit  to  the  amount  of  ten  dollars  to  a 
customer.     He  does  not  pay  the  bill.     Figuring  that 


your  net  profit  on  sales  is  four  per  cent.,  do  you 
realize  that  you  have  to  sell  $250  worth  of  goods  to 
malce  good  the  loss?  There  is  a  lot  of  work  connected 
with  the  selling  of  $250  worth  of  goods.  It  would 
seem  especially  so  if  the  dealer  would  bear  in  mind  that 
he  was  doing  it  without  reward — merely  to  make  up  the 
loss  of  a  bill  that  some  unreliable  person  would  or 
could  not  pay. 

If  the  dealer  who  loses  $10  by  bad  ielhts  would  bear 
in  mind  in  selling  the  next  $250  worth  of  merchandise 
that  he  was  performing  the  work  for  nothing,  it  would 
probably  cure  him  of  the  habit  of  extending  credit 
recklessly. 

A  credit  business  in  many  instance-s  proves  a  big 
convenience  to  customers  and  generally  helps  the 
dealer  in  selling  more  goods,  but  it  should  be  con- 
ducted on  a  safe  and  sane  basis. 

#  #  * 

Giving  Out  Many  merchants  are  averse  to 

Financial  giving  a  statement  of  their  finan- 

Information  caal  standing  to  wholesalers  or 

credit  reporting  agencies.  Even 
some  men  with  good  strong  backing  are  inclined  along 
this  line.  They  argue  that  they  can  meet  their  bills 
and  that  their  financial  affairs  are  nobody  else's  busi- 
ness. 

They  should  bear  in  mind  that  all  wholesalers  or 
manufacturers  desire  is  an  assurance  of  their  reliability 
in  a  really  definite  way,  just  as  a  retailer  wishes  similar 
assurance  from  customers  he  is  extending  credit  to. 

It  is  an  advantage  to  a  dealer  to  be  reported  on  fav- 
orably by  a  ci'edit  reporting  agency  or  the  credit  de- 
partment of  a  wholesale  house.  It  makes  the  Avhole- 
saler  more  anxious  to  get  his  business  and  he  is  more 
likely  to  give  better  prices  and  terms  to  him. 

*  *  # 

Taking  of  A  good  many  retailers  add  a  good 

Discounts  deal  of  profit  during  the  year  by 

taking  advantage  of  discounts 
offered  for  cash.  Take  even  the  matter  of  a  1  per 
cent,  discount  in  10  days  in  lieu  of  30  days  net.  This 
practically  means  1  per  cent,  on  money  for  20  days.  If 
money  could  be  kept  working  at  this  rate  continuously 
throughout  the  year  it  would  mean  18  per  cent.,  cer- 
tainly not  a  dividend  to  be  passed  up  without  real 
necessity. 

Dealers  should  have  a  plan  for  keeping  track  of 
those  accounts  on  which  discounts  are  available.  They 
will  amount  to  a  considerable  sum  in  the  course  of  a 
year. 


GET  A  LINE  ON  YOUR  PROGRESS 

THE  man  who  keeps  grinding  away  without  ascertaining  at  regular  intervals  just  what 
progress  he  is  making,  is  certainly  a  poor  business  man.  There  is  no  sense  in  driving  on 
unless  you  are  sure  you  are  headed  in  the  right  direction,  and  the  only  way  to  make  cer- 
tain of  this  is  to  take  an  inventory  and  make  out  a  financial  statement  at  least  once  a  year.  It  is 
only  by  a  comparison  of  financial  standing  year  by  year  that  the  dealer  can  tell  accurately  what 
progress  is  being  made  in  dollars  and  cents.  Especially  in  these  times  when  sales  figures  are  far 
from  an  accurate  indicatioii  of  progress,  the  making  out  of  an  annual  financial  statement  is  neces- 
sary. 


efanuary,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


^1 


New  Year  Thoughts 

from  the  Editor's  Pen 


Wm.  J.  Aryans 


Happy  New  This  should  certainly  be  a  happy 

Year  New  Year  for  the  people  of  Can- 

ada. The  very  thought  that  we 
enter  a  new  year  with  the  world  at  peace  and  the 
slaughter  oi'  the  past  four  years  at  an  end,  cannot  h'jlp 
but  bring-  a  happy  feeling  to- the  great  majority.  There 
are  many  homes,  we  regret  to  say,  where  there  ir< 
uiourning  for  dear  ones  who  will  no  more  join  thi. 
family  group  in  Yuletide  festivities,  but  the  loss  •''f 
these  is  tempeied  by  the  knowledge  that  they  dind  in 
the-  cause  of  freedom  and  the  objects  for  which  thry 
foug'iht  are  near  to  accomplishment. 

The  success  of  the  cause  for  which  the  Allies  have 
been  struggling  for  the  past  four  and  a  half  years  is 
surely  reason  for  happiness.  Let  us  all  unite  in  that 
cheerful  thankfulness  which  we  should  feel  at  this 
time,  knowing  that  the  clouds  are  rolling  away  and 
the  sun  of  a  new  era  of  greater  things  is  breaking 
through. 

Our  wish  for  you  is  that  the  advent  of  the  New  Year 
may  find  joy  in  your  heart  and  happiness  in  your  home. 
May  the  year  upon  which  we  enter  be  one  of  success 
and  happiness  for  yoit  and  yours. 


The  Past  The  past  year  has  had  its  good  and 

Year  bad  features   in    so    far  as  the 

furniture  trade  is  concerned.  The 
dealer  has  had  his  diffieultieis  in  getting  and  selling  his 
gooids,  he  has  had  his  help  problem  to  solve,  and  he  has 
been  bound  round  with  many  rules  and  regulations  in 
conection  with  the  sale  of  his  goods. 

However,  it  has  been  a  fairly  prosperous  year  to  the 
majority  of  dealers.  High  wages  have  facilitated 
business  and  favorable  buying  of  advancing  goods  has 
helped  out  the  profits  of  many  dealers.  Collections 
have  also  been  generally  good. 


What  of  the  The  year  ahead  is  one  that  calls 

Year  to  Come?  for  careful  management  on  the 
part  of  the  retailer.  As  far  as 
business  is  concerned  there  is  no  great  need  of  worry. 
Of  course,  it  will  be  necessary  to  keep  on  the  aggressive 
in  order  to  maintain  sales,  but  the  bigger  problem  is 
the  maintaining  of  profits.  There  will  be  need  of 
earnest  work  to  clear  the  decks  of  goods  which  are 
likely  to  depreciate  in  value,  while  careful  buying  will 
be  essential  in  order  that  no  large  stocks  will  be  ac- 
cumulated of  goods  likely  to  be  reduced  in  price. 

There  will  be  special  need  of  watching  credits 
closely  in  view  of  the  fact  that  many  people  who  have 
been  earning  big  money  at  war  work  will  have  to  live 
on  smaller  wages  now. 


Help  Problem  One  thing  that  will  lessen  the 

Better  worry  of  the  retail  merchant  dur- 

ing the  coming  year  will  be  the 
improved  conditions  in  regard  to  help.  The  securing 
of  adequate  and  efficient  help  during  the  past  few  years 
has  certainly  been  a  big  problem  for  the  average  mer- 
chant. He  has  been  forced  to  take  on  much  work 
that  was  generally  looked  after  by  clerks  and  long 
hours  have  been  the  rule  in  order  to  keep  work  cleared 
up.  'Clerks  have  not  only  been  demanding  high  wages 
but  on  the  whole  have  been  less  efficient  than  ordin- 
arily. 


Don't  Forget 
Your  Inventory 


Every  merchant  should  make  it  a 
point  to  take  an  inventory  and 
make  out  a  financial  statement  at 
least  once  a  year.  In  no  other  way  can  he  tell  ac- 
curately how  he  is  progressing,  especially  during  re- 
cent years  "vvhen  sales  have  not  been  the  usual  indica- 
tions of  profits. 

The  first  of  the  year  is  a  good  time  to  take  stock,  as 
there  is  generally  a  temporary  quiet  spell  after  the 
holiday  rush  which  gives  more  time  for  this  Avork  than 
at  most  periods  of  the  year. 

The  merchant  who  does  not  make  out  an  annual 
statement  of  the  standing  of  his  business  is  guessing 
as  to  his  actual  progress  and  guesswork  has  no  place 
in  business  to-day. 


Watch  Credits 
Closely  Now 


rf  there  was  ever  a  time  when  the 
retailer  needed  to  watch  the  ex- 
tension of  credits  closely,  it  is  the 
present.  The  reason  for  this  is  quite  obvioits.  There 
have  been  a  large  number  of  people  earning  big  money 
at  munitions  and  other  war  w^ork  whose  incomes  will 
be  considerably  reduced  by  their  return  to  other  em- 
ployment. Many  of  them  have  got  into  the  habit  of 
spending  right  up  to  the  limit  of  their  enlarged  in- 
come of  the  past  few  years  and  will  find  it  difficult  to 
alter  their  habits.  The  result  is  that  there  will  be 
many  re(|uests  made  to  retailers  for  "time"  on  current 
bills.  Dealers  want  to  exercise  the  highest  degree  of 
judgment  in  the  matter  of  extending  credit.  When 
in  doubt,  it  is  the  best  policy  to  play  safe.  The  man 
who  is  not  able  to  clean  up  all  his  current  bills  from 
his  wages  one  week  is  le.ss  liable  to  be  able  to  do  so 
next  week. 

Make  an  investigation  of  the  reliability  of  each  apjili- 
eant  for  credit  before  selling  them  goods  on  this  basis. 
Set  a  definite  time  for  payment  of  accounts  and  if  eacli 
bill  is  not  settled  at  the  time  specified  cut  them  right 
otf. 


62 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDElElTAKfiR 


January,  1919 


Merchandising  Suggestions  from  Our  Exchanges 

Methods  and  ideas  in  furniture  retailing  as  seen  by  other  journals 


MERCHANT  EDITOR  PRINTS  PATRONS' 
SUGGESTIONS 

A NEBRASKA  dealer  in  a  city  of  aJboait  8.000  is 
thoroughly  demonstrating  the  value  of  the  store 
jiaper  as  an  advertising  medium.  His  publica- 
tion is  a  hriglit  little  af¥air,  the  editorial  pages  abound- 
ing with  good,  wholesome  logic,  interspersed  with 
sprightly  humor.  The  style  thronigliotit  is  such  as  to 
eommanid  a  careful  reading  of  each  issue. 

A  peculiar  feature  of  this  littile  piaiper — and  one 
wihich  adds  materially  to  its  local  interest,  is  that  the 
suggestions  ad^vaniced  do  not  represent  solely  the  ideas 
of  the  editor,  for  every  edition  contains  at  least  one 
contribution  from  an  outsider.  Of  special  interest 
was  a  recent  contest  conducted  through  the  pages  of 
thie  paper.  The  clhoice  of  any  $35  rug  in  the  rvtioro,  or 
a  $35  credit  on  a  higher  priced  rug  was  offered  to  the 
woman  Avho  could  contribute  the  best  short  article, 
telling  what  commodity  in  the  furnitiire  line  had 
proved  the  most  desiralble  addition  to  her  home  eriuip- 
ment.  describimg,  of  course,  the  particular  feature  of 
suc'h  article  whie'h  she  considered  specially  commend- 
able. 

Anyone  can  readily  understand  the  tremendous  ad- 
vertising value  of  such  contributions  from  consumers 
themselves,  and  it  goeis  without  saying  that  the  money 
expended  on  this  little  scheme  proved  a  worth-Avhile 
investment. — Grand  Rapids  Furniture  Record. 


KITCHEN  CABINET  SALES  PROFITABLE 

Concentrating  extra  attention  upon  the  sale  of 
kitchen  cabinets  at  the  present  time  is  good  business. 
No  woman  Can  do  her  Avork  in  the  kitchen  to  the  best 
advantage  or  can  hope  to  economize  on  foods  if  she  is 
not  proAdded  Avith  the  proper  appliances  any  more  than 
an  office  can  be  operated  efficiently  and  economically 
Avithout  filing  cabinets  and  the  like.  Dealers  should 
bear  these  facts  in  mind  and  have  their  salesmen  talk 
more  about  the  cabinet  itself  and  less  about  the  price  of 
it  if  their  desire  is  to  make  the  selling  of  kitchen  cab- 
inent-s  a  profitable  and  easy  task.  There  is  another 
point  in  pushing  the  sales  of  kitchen  calbinets  that  many 
dealers  have  overlooked  A^4ien  they  advanced  the  argu- 
ment that  there  wa.s  not  enough  profit  in  selling  kitchen 
cabinets  to  Avarrant  so  much  attention  being  centred  on 
this  end  of  the  business.  Say  that  a  merchant  spends 
considerable  money  and  time  featuring  furniture  lines 
that  have  a  large  margin  of  profit  on  the  individual 
article.  For  instance,  cost  $50,  selling  price  $100.  He 
thinks  this  a  Avonderful  sale  because  he  makes  $50. 

He  has  other  articles,  among  them  kitclien  cabinets, 
that  he  pays,  say,  $22.50  for  and  sells  for  $36.  These 
he  thinks  are  not  Avorth  featuring.  He  forgets  the 
fact  that  the  article  that  makes  him  a  $14  or  $15  profit 
is  in  many  instances  Avidely  advertised,  and  it  turns 
over  so  rapidly  that  he  can  sell  twelve  to  fifteen  of 
them  and  make  $225  gross  profit  while  he  is  selling  one 
of  the  articles  that  he  pays  $50  for  and  sells  for  $100. 
— Chicago  Furniture  Journal. 


MUST  INDUCE  CUSTOMERS  TO  BUY 

Some  retail  merchants — and  the  furniture  dealers  are 
on  the  list — seem  to  think  it  strange  that  so  much  of 
the  business  that  should  come  to  them,  goes  to  others, 
and  in  this  way  deprives  them  of  so  many  sales  for 
merchandise  that  is  or  should  be  found  in  their  stores. 
The  term  "sihould  be"  is  the  main  reason  in  many  cases 
Avliy  they  do  not  gain  these  lost  .sales.  There  is  a  sound 
reason  Avhy  these  are  turned  to  other  channels.  From 
past  experiences  their  customers  knoAv  that  often  it  is 
not  possible  to  get  what  is  wanted  in  these  stores,  and 
they  have  quite  naturally  gone  to  other  places  where 
there  was  a  certainty  of  obtaining  just  AA'hat  Avas 
wanted. 

If  we  want  to  make  our  business  groAv  Ave  must  haA-e 
a  reason  for  this  that  will  be  of  value.  We  cannot  hone 
or  even  look  for  the  larger  sales  Avlien  there  are  so  feiv 
inducements  offered  the  trade  in  the  stock  selection.  Go 
to  some  furniture  dealers  and  Avhat  do  Ave  find?  There 
is  a  small,  incomplete  and  limited  selection  of  furni- 
ture specials  and  houselhold  lines,  that  do  not  offer  the 
better  class  of  trade  anything  Avorth  Avhile  in  the  matter 
of  a  choice  selection.  The  lines  are  such  as  to  please 
some  people ;  the  kind  who  are  not  eager  for  either 
selection  or  for  the  class  of  mere'handise  they  buy.  Rut 
there  are  others,  the  discriminating  kind,  Avho  are  not 
satisfied  Avith  ordinary  styles,  and  who  are  i-ure  to  go 
Avhere  there  is  a  stock  that  is  both  modern  and  com- 
plete, AA^ere  the  stock  is  inviting  and  that  Avill  give  the 
customers  a  reason  for  seeking  such  stores. — The  Furni- 
ture Worker. 


THE  RETURN  PRIVILEGE  A  BIG  LEAK 

In  cutting  costs  of  doing  business,  department  stores 
are  turning  their  attention  toAvard  the  greatest  leak  in 
their  administration — the  return  privilege.  Great 
progress  has  been  made  in  Boston  all  along  this  line  by 
united  action  of  the  department  stores.  Returns  are 
encouraged  to  a  large  extent  by  the  prevalence  of  the 
charge  privilege,  women  findin'g  it  very  easy  to  return 
goods  after  they  baA'e  been  charged  and  ordered,  when 
it  is  simply  a  case  of  goods  being  credited  on  their  re- 
turn. The  furniture  department  is  a  sufferer  from 
the  return  privilege.  Cases  are  cited  Avhere  fine 
furnishings  have  been  ordered,  possibly  before  the  giv- 
inig  of  some  social  function,  AA-hen  they  are  afterAvard 
returned.  Several  months  ago  a  woman  bought  a 
hall  runner.  Recently  it  Avas  brou2:ht  back  to  the 
stoi'C  'badly  soiled  and  torn  at  one  end.  as  if  by  con- 
tact Avith  a  frequently  opened  door.  In  this  case  the 
customer  contended  that  the  merchandise  Avas  de- 
fective and  insisted  upon  a  ncAv  runner.  After  an 
hour's  argument  the  store  made  a  concession  and 
agreed  to  remove  the  torn  part  and  fix  the  runner  up 
in"  the  'best  possible  shape.  This  decision  Avas  strenu- 
ously objected  to  'by  the  customer,  Avho  insisted  that  a 
new  runner  was  '  due  her.— The  Furniture  Trade 
Review. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


63 


BELIEVE  IN  OCCASIONAL  SPECIAL  PRICE 

Big  western  furniture  house  finds  the  occasional  special  price  is  a  big  factor  in  attracting  other  trade — Sales  sheets 
show  advertised  articles  frequently  followed  by  big  sales — Arrangement  of  the  store  to  show  goods  to  advantage 

i;!i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiii!i::iiiiiiuiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiNiii!iiiiiiiiiiiii^iiN   iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


A  western  furniture  company  visited  by  the  writer 
are  quite  extensive  advertisers  in  the  local  papers,  and 
follow  the  practice  in  their  advertising  of  quoting  occa- 
sional special  prices,  and  find  that  it  is  a  valuable 
method  of  attracting  customers  to  the  store,  where  an 
opportunity  is  presented  of  selling  them  additional 
goods. 

"We  frequently  have  instances  illustrating  to  us  the 
part  that  special  prices  play  in  putting  us  in  touch 
with  customers  and  in  helping  business  generally," 
stated  the  general  manager  of  the  retail  depart- 
ment of  the  store  to  a  representative  of  the  Canadian 
Furniture  World.  "At  least,"  he  continued,  "the  fact 
that  an  advertised  article  is  first  on  a  big  list  of  goods 
would  seem  to  indicate  that  such  as  true.  Quite  often 
I  notice  that  a  $4  or  $5  article  that  has  been  adver- 
tised in  the  local  paper  is  first  on  a  sales  slip,  and  per- 
haps the  total  bill  may  run  up  to  $70  or  $80.  No  doubt 
they  would  have  bought  the  goods  anyway,  but  it  is  a 
question  whether  we  would  have  got  he  business." 

Work  Windows  and  Ads.  Together. 

The  display  windows  are  found  valuable  sales 
creators,  and  play  nearly  as  important  a  part  in  at- 
tracting customers  to  the  store  as  newspaper  adver- 
tising. "We  make  a  practice  of  working  the  windows 
and  newspaper  advertisiing  together,  "said  the  manager 
"and  find  this  plan  of  co-operation  productive  of 
the  best  results.  Not  infrequently  do  we  find  direct 
results  coming  in  from  each."  A  good  deal  of  atten- 
tion is  given  to  the  arrangement  of  windows,  and  some 
attractive  sales  producing  displays  are  turned  out. 

The  retail  store  of  this  iurniture  company  is  a 
large  one,  with  the  various  departments  well  arranged. 
The  basement  is  given  over  to  baby  carriages,  iron  and 
brass  beds,  springs  and  mattresses,  kitchen  furniture, 
cheap  chairs,  and  rockers. 

The  main  floor  is  used  for  the  display  of  lines  it  is 
desired  to  feature,  and  the  character  of  displays  is 
frequently  changed.  This  is  the  floor  that  customers 
see  when  they  enter  the  store,  and  thus  the  value  of 
having  varied  displays  that  will  attract  attention  and 
arouse  interest.  The  lines  that  are  generall3^  shown  on 
this  floor  are  library  and  den  furniture,  parlor  goods, 
music  cabinets,  ladies'  desks,  book  cases,  and  similar 
lines. 

Show  Furniture  Suites  of  Rooms. 

The  second  floor  is  used  for  the  display  of  dining 
room  furniture,  parlor  furniture,  and  tables.  A  fea- 
ture of  this  floor  is  that  one  side  is  devoted  to  sample 
furnished  rooms  showing  a  complete  suite  of  rooms 
furnished.  This  is  found  to  be  of  a  good  deal  of  ad- 
vantage in  making  sales.  Many  customers  do  not 
seem  able  to  size  up  the  requirements  for  a  room  or 
a  house,  and  this  method  of  display  assists  them 
materially.  It  also  tends  to  increase  sales,  for  people 
will  frefjuently  buy  additional  lines  when  they  see 
how  well  they  work  in  with  the  articles  they  had  de- 
cided on.   This  is  sbown  by  the  fact  that  one  man  who 


came  in  to  select  furnishings  for  a  house  looked  over 
the  arrangement  of  the  entire  five  rooms,  and  found 
they  appealed  to  him,  so  he  gave  an  order  for  the 
entire  five  to  be  duplicated  in  his  own  house.  If  he 
had  been  picking  out  the  goods  one  at  a  time,  it  is 
probable  that  he  would  not  have  purchased  near  as 
much. 

Carpets,  linoleum,  drapery  goods,  and  bedding  are 
shown  on  the  third  floor,  a  photograph  of  which  is  re- 
produced here.  It  will  be  noted  that  the  department 
is  artistically  laid  out.  Rugs  and  carpets  are  draped 
in  an  attractive  manner  in  the  foreground.  Along 
one  side  extends  shelving  for  carpets,  while  displays 
of  linoleum  extend  down  the  other,  with  the  drapery 
department  at  he  rear.  The  floor  is  large  and  well 
lighted,  and  allows  of  the  advantageous  display  of  the 
various  lines. 

On  the  fourth  floor  is  shown  office  furniture,  bed- 
i  oom  and  hall  furniture. 


THE  IMPORTANCE  OF  DESIGN  IN  FURNITURE 

If  the  design  of  a  piece  of  furniture  is  good,  that  is, 
if  it  appeals  to  the  buyer,  a  favorahle  first  impression 
is  made  and  the  sale  is  begun  in  the  mind  of  the  buyer. 
If  this  same  piece  of  furniture  is  comfortahle  a  much 
more  favorable  impression  is  registered  and  the 
sale  progresses.  If  in  addition  to  being  well  de- 
signed and  possessing  features  that  make  for  real  com- 
fort a  piece  of  furniture  offers  advantages  of  consider- 
able utility  (let  us  say  double  utility  as  in  the  case  of  a 
bed-davenport)  three  very  strong  reasons  for  ex- 
changing money  for  the  piece  of  furniture  have  been 
offered.  Now  if  this  piece  of  furniture  is  priced  so 
that  the  person  buying  considers  it  a  "good  buy,"  the 
appeal  of  economy  is  presented  and  another  strong 
impression  is  registered. 

And  the  sale  is  made. 

But,  supposing  that  the  first  favorable  impression 
had  not  been  registered?  Chances  are  that  the  sale 
would  not  have  been  made,  because  risistance  instead 
of  an  appeal  would  have  been  the  stronger.  But 
supposing  that  you  insisted  that  the  prospect  consider 
the  funiiture,  in  spite  of  the  poor  design  and  poor 
first  impression,  and  supposing  that  comfort,  utility 
and  the  economy  of  buying  it  were  as  strong  as  in  the 
first  case.  If  the  sale  could  finally  be  "put  over" 
would  it  be  a  really  satisfactory  purchase? 

Design  is  Avonderfnlly  important  in  furniture.  Be- 
cause that  first  favorable  impression  must  be  presei't 
or  there  is  too  much  resistance  to  make  a  profitable 
sale. 

That  is  not  saying  that  poorly  designed  furniture 
is  not  sold  in  abundance.  It  is,  and  will  continue  to 
be  sold.  But,  the  future  of  the  furniture  business, 
because  of  our  growing  intelligence,  because  of  our  in- 
creasing and  expanding  educational  facilities,  is  more 
or  less  tied  up  with  better  designs  than  Ave  have  here- 
tofore manufactured  and  sold. — The  Couehmaker. 


64  CANADTAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  January,  1919 

BUILDING  for  SUCCESS  in  the  RETAIL  BUSINESS 

IIIIIIIMII  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII  IIMIiniMIIMIIlIllll  mil  Illlllll  I  IIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMI  I  illll  Illllllll  Ill  MIIIIMIIIII  II  MIIIIIIMIIMIjniMII  Illlll  Ill  Ill  Ill:  IIIMIMIMMIIIIIII  I  Illlllllllllll 

Some  up-to-date  pointers  for  those  engaged  in  the  retail  furniture  business,  from  a  successful  sales  manager 

 iiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiii  1IIIIIIIIIIIN  I  iiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiniiN  mill  iiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  ii  iiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiii  iniiiiiiiiiini!!  uiiu  iiimii  n  |,:|||||||„|  nm,,  i,,,,,,,,,  ,„„,|„  ,  iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii  iiimiiiiiiMiiMinmiiiuiiiiiiiuiiiimiu.iiii 


SOME  time  ago  1  read  a  book  written  by  George 
Ade —  one  of  those  little,  short  books  of  his.  It 
was  the  description  of  two  men  in  a  business 
partnership.  One  of  the  men  was  an  optimist,  and 
the  other  a  pessimist;  one  handled  the  exchequer — 
the  things  coming  up  in  the  way  of  cash — and  the 
other  fellow  was  at  the  door  with  the  glad  hand  all 
the  time,  and  expressed  pleasure  and  good  fellowship 
when  anybody  came  in.  Together  they  had  amassed 
(|uite  a  nice  sum  of  money,  and  of  course  each  one 
took  it  upon  himself  to  be  the  cause  of  the  success  of 
the  partnership.  The  grouch  thought  his  good  busi- 
ness ability  was  the  cause  of  their  success,  and  the 
other  fellow  said,  "Grouch  is  always  back  there,  back 
of  the  counter,  and  he  isn't  a  part  of  the  issue — why, 
I  am  the  fellow  out  on  the  line  all  the  time — I  am  the 
fellow."  They  came  to  the  division  of  profits.  Each 
one  thought  that  he  should  get  the  major  part,  so 
they  decided  to  quit  partnership. 

Two  Types  Portrayed 

The  grouch  opened  a  store  and  every  time  a  sales- 
man would  come  in  to  sell  him  a  bill  of  goods  he  con- 
sidered it  an  insult  to  be  approached  in  this  manner. 
The  result  was  that  he  had  a  very  small,  limited  as- 
sortment of  goods  on  the  counter.  If  a  customer  came 
in  to  make  a  purchase  he  had  to  see  the  cash  before 
the  purchase  was  made.  He  was  taking  no  chances. 
He  ran  his  business  to  suit  himself,  and  if  the  public 
didn't  care  to  do  business  his  way,  no  business  was 
done.  He  spent  his  entire  time  at  his  desk,  gradually 
closed  up  in  his  shell,  lost  sight  of  all  outside  condi- 
tions, and  the  result  was  that  he  lost  hi.i  entire  busi- 
ness and  wound  up  in  the  bankruptcy  court. 

The  other  chap  was  the  hale  fellow,  well  met  type. 
All  the  salesmen  from  all  over  the  country  realized 
that  they  could  secure  an  order  any  time  they  called. 
His  shelves  were  jammed  with  all  kinds  of  goods.  He 
spent  his  time  going  around  to  the  country  fairs.  Any 
customer  could  get  credit,  the  sky  was  the  limit.  Of 
course,  the  result  was  just  the  same  in  his  case  as  in 
the  case  of  his  partner.  The  two  of  them  met  in  the 
bankruptcy  court. 

They  had  enough  wisdom  left  to  realize  that  each 
needed  the  other.  fSo  they  went  back  into  partner- 
ship again  and  handled  their  business  successfully. 

Study  Your  Own  Qualifications 

I  think  we  all  owe  George  Ade  a  vote  of  thanks  for 
that  article.  It  contains  the  fundamental  principle 
upon  which  you  gentlemen  will  have  to  run  your  busi- 
ness. It  is  not  sufficient  that  you  are  an  economist 
pure  and  simple  in  everything  that  you  do,  because  if 
you  are  only  looking  to  the  economies  in  your  busi- 
ness, it  will  soon  close  up  within  itself  and  die  of  dry 
rot. 

On  the  other  hand,  you  must  not  operate  your  busi- 
ness on  the  basis  of  hale  fellow,  well  met,  and  forget 
the  business  end.  The  operation  of  your  business  is 
just  exactly  the  same  in  principle  as  that  of  an  archi- 
tect who  designs  a  building.  If  he  is  the  right  archi- 
tect, he  will  see  that  the  steel  beam  is  strong  enough  to 
carry  the  load  and  not  too  heavy  for  its  duty.  In 


other  words,  the  building  will  be  strong,  but  it  will  be 
built  to  the  requirements  and  not  be  overdone.  Each 
one  of  you  should  study  your  own  qualifications.  If 
you  are  the  business  getter,  the  promoter  of  sales  in 
cars,  accessories,  shop,  etc.,  then  you  should  have  at 
your  right  hand  a  business  man  who  can  at  all  times 
check  up  and  tell  you  whether  or  not  your  business- 
getting  is  being  done  on  a  profitable  basis — a  man 
who  also  can  control  the  leakage. 

Let  me  give  you  this  picture :  Two  identical  build- 
ings can  be  side  by  side  in  the  same  town  and  on  the 
same  street.  They  can  both  do  the  same  volume  of 
business.  One  can  be  operated  at  a  profit,  with  satis- 
fied customers,  and  the  other  can  be  operated  at  a  loss, 
with  dissatisfied  customers.  Facilities  for  the  doing 
of  business  are  one  thing,  but  the  training  of  your  or- 
ganization is  a  job  which  is  never  completed,  and  un- 
less it  is  constantly  having  attention  from  the  manage- 
ment the  business  is  not  living  up  to  its  true  efficiency. 
See  that  in  your  business  the  two  elements  are  prop- 
erly cared  for — expansion  of  business  and  contraction 
of  expenses,  both  intelligently  handled. 

Learn  Principles  of  Business 

This  principle  is  perfectly  plain  to  me,  because  1 
have  been  over  the  road.  I  have  had  the  experience. 
It  is  unfortunate  that  human  nature  is  so  constituted 
that  we  do  not  thoroughly  realize  truths  until  they 
have  been  brought  home  to  us  by  actual  experience. 

When  I  was  a  boy  at  home  I  remember  distinctly 
that  my  father  laid  before  me  many  axioms  which  were 
common  sense  principles,  but  which  I  did  not  fully 
realize  until  I  had  gotten  out  in  the  world,  gotten  ex- 
perience and  been  knocked  around  a  little  bit.  Then 
these  truths  were  brought  home  to  me,  I  remembered, 
and  I  understood  what  he  had  in  mind  when  he  gave 
me  those  instructions.  I  remember  at  one  time  a  suc- 
cessful merchant  made  a  remark  to  me  which  I  then 
did  not  understand  but  which  excited  my  curiosity. 
He  said,  "If  I  had  your  years  and  you  had  my  experi- 
ence, large  results  would  be  obtained."  In  other 
words,  he  wanted  to  start  over  again  in  life  with  those 
principles  back  of  him  but  instilled  and  hammered 
home  by  experience.  The  wise  man,  however,  is  the 
man  who  examines  the  principles  of  business  and  tries 
to  grasp  and  learn  them  as  rapidly  as  possible.  If 
you  have  the  experience  back  of  you,  you  will  realize 
the  value  of  my  warning.  Watch  two  features  in 
your  business — expansion  of  sales  and  the  proper  con- 
trol of  expenditures. 

Chart  Your  Business 

Every  owner  or  manager  should  have  drawn  up  a 
chart  of  his  business.  Every  man  in  the  institution 
should  know  to  Avhom  he  is  supposed  to  report.  Each 
employee  should  know  what  his  duties  are  and  what 
the  company  expects  of  him.  Each  individual  should 
be  trained  to  assist  in  the  getting  of  business  and  to 
abhor  the  wilful  waste  of  money.  When  you  have 
done  this  in  your  organization  and  have  learned  how 
to  handle  your  men  properly,  then  you  have  established 
yourselves  as  managers. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNT^ERTAKER 


'  65 


LEADERSHIP 


By  J.  RUSSELL  PONTIFEX,  Ottawa. 


THE  glorious  ftuecess  of  Canada's  fighting  men  will 
fill  some  of  the  brightest  pages  in  Britain's 
history  of  the  world  war.  Under  Gen.  A.  Cur- 
rie  our  men  have  won  so-called  impregnable  positions 
and  proved  theinsel'ves  fighters  second  to  none. 

Here  lies  a  lesson  for  the  Canadian  merchant.  Our 
men,  taken  from  the  store,  the  office  and  the  faetor\^ 
had  to  face  a  nation  of  fighters  trained  to  fight  from 
childhood.  So  successful  were  their  efforts  that  the 
mighty  Hun  grew  afraid  of  the  men  from  Canada. 

This  result  was  achieved  by  leadership.  Just  what 
leadership  means  we  are  apt  to  forget  or  underestimate. 

The  men  in  the  trenches  are  useless  without  the 
artillery  to  support  them,  but  the  artillery  must  get 
ammunition,  the  men  must  be  fed,  the  wounded  at- 
tended to,  reliefs  be  made,  roads  repaired,  railways  laid 
and  reserves  be  arranged  for  in  case  of  attack. 

Every  man  must  have  a  place  and  every  place  its 
man. 

A  successful  leader  must  see  to  it  that  nothing  is 
overlooked.     He  must  know  that  every  man  is  trained 


in  and  understands  his  particular  job  while  he  himself 
must  be  able  to  make  quick  and  accurate  decisions  to 
meet  the  ever-changing  conditions. 

Mr.  Merchant,  are  you  a  leader  worthy  of  success? 
Can  you  ask  your  staff  to  follow  you  along  the  road  in 
the  full  knowledge  that  they  will  do  so  and  be  proud 
to  follow  where  you  lead?  Are  you  laying  plans  like  a 
general,  training  your  staff'  to  fill  their  positions  to  the 
very  best  possible  advantaige? 

Are  you,  as  a  buyer,  getting  full  values  for  your  cus- 
tomers, or  are  you  merely  placing  orders  without  any 
regard  for  the  price  or  quality? 

Are  you  grasping  the  latest  methods  to  attain  success 
or  are  you  satisfied  to  make  a  comfortable  living  and 
let  the  rest  go? 

Remember  that  the  world  has  no  use  for  the  general 
who  failiS  or  the  merchant  who  has  to  make  an  arrange- 
ment with  his  creditors.  Both  of  these  men  drop  out 
and  beicome  nobodies. 

For  Canada's  sake,  for  your  own  sake,  be  determined 
to  win.  Make  1919  a  banner  year.  Prospects  were 
never  brighter,  or  success  nearer  than  it  is  to-day. 

The  time  you  spend  making  plans  and  sowing  for  a 
future  that  shall  mean  a  record  harvest,  is  time  well 
spent.  '    '  i  'i! 

Your  country  needs  your  efforts.  Shall  she  call  in 
vain  ? 


Attractive  liall  and  dining  room,  interior  view 


(Cut  through  coiirtesu  of  Diipont  M(t{inzine) 


66 


CANADIAN  FURNlTUHE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  January,  1919 


For  the  Man  Behind  the  Counter 


A  Department 
of 

Salesmanship 


USE  ART  IN  SELLING  THE  CUSTOMER 
"SOMETHING  ELSE" 

To  sell  the  customer  something  in  addition  to  that 
for  which  he  came  into  the  store  to  huy  has  always 
been  considered  the  test  of  a  good  retail  salesman.  It 
is  called  "Rotating  the  Sale." 

The  following  editorial  from  Printers'  Ink  is  inter- 
esting in  considering  this  topic,  not  only  because  it 
suggests  the  use  of  art  in  this  matter  but  because  it 
shows  evident  anxiety  for  the  power  of  national  adver- 
tising in  creating  good  will  for  a  line  and  for  a  store : 

"In  any  discussion  on  retail  salesmanship  it  is 
usually  pointed  out  that  a  clerk  is  missing  an  oppor- 
tunity when  he  neglects  to  rotate  the  sale,  or,  in  other 
words,  when  he  does  not  try  to  sell  the  customer  more 
per  things  that  he  had  no  intention  of  purchasing  when 
he  went  into  the  store.  Whether  or  not  this  is  a  good 
policy  is  an  open  question.  There  are  at  least  two 
sides  to  it.  Much  has  been  said  in  favor  of  it.  It 
might  be  advisable  for  manufacturers  to  give  some 
consideration  to  the  other  side  of  the  argument. 

"Many  shrewd  retailers  go  so  far  as  not  to  allow 
their  clerks  to  rotate  sales.  Others  permit  it  only 
within  very  carefully  prescribed  limits.  These  retail 
merchants  claim  that  the  average  person  resents  be- 
ing led  on  to  buy  more  goods.  They  say  that  most 
clerks  are  not  capable  of  suggesting  additional  pur- 
chases without  giving  offense  and  that  many  customers 
are  lost  in  this  way.  These  retailers  contend  that 
many  buyers  are  easily  influenced  and  can  be  readily 
induced  to  buy  things  which  they  later  regret.  Other 
buyers  are  sensitive  and  must  be  handled  with  greater 
delicacy.  Unless  the  clerk  is  a  good  judge  of  human 
nature,  he  may  try  his  salesmanship  on  the  wrong  per- 
son and  thus  lose  a  patron  for  the  store. 

"It  is  a  growing  practice  in  many  good  stores  to  let 
the  customer  do  the  buying.  No  open  attempt  is 
made  to  'sell'  him.  It  is  the  business  of  the  estab- 
lishment to  cater  to  his  wants,  after  they  have  been 
created  by  the  advertising  of  the  manufacturer  plus 
the  advertising,  merchandising  and  displays  of  the 
store. 

"This  does  not  mean  that  the  clerk  is  being  made  an 
automaton  with  no  chance  to  exercise  his  selling  abil- 
ity. Quite  the  contrary,  the  new  methods  call  for  a 
higher  order  of  ability.  Rotating  the  sale  and  influenc- 
ing the  mind  of  the  customer  are  still  done,  but  so 
clevorlv  that  the  buyer  is  not  conscious  that  he  is  being 
'sold.'^ 

"Displays  are  arranged  so  as  to  help  the  clerk  sug- 
gest an  additional  sale.  When  a  person  buys  one, 
the  display  itself  suggests  other  articles  in  the  same 
line.  The  clerk  may  help  along  the  idea  by  putting 
his  hand  on  the  article  and  at  the  same  time  look  ques- 
tioningly  at  the  customer.  The  up-to-date  merchandiser 
is  a  veritable  genius  at  arranging  displays  in  this 
fashion,  so  that  the  clerk  can  use  his  selling  skill  with- 
out giving  offense. 

"The  well-trained  retail  salesman  leads  his  brief 
conversation  on  until  the  customer  actually  asks  for 
the  thing  the  clerk  wishes  to  sell  him.     Suddenly  the 


buyer  finds  himself  saying,  for  instance,  that  he  has 
trouble  making  his  tie  run  in  his  collar.  Whereupon 
the  clerk  shows  him  a  little  device  for  overcoming  this 
very  difficulty.  Price  only  fifteen  cents.  Many  mer- 
chants have  their  salespeople  suggest  just  one  other 
article  after  the  original  purchase  has  been  made.  The 
clerk  must  use  his  judgment  as  to  what  it  will  be.  It 
is  usually  suggested  by  the  conversation  of  the  cus- 
tomer. 

"So  it  seems  that  rotating  the  sale  is  anything  but  a 
questionable  practice,  if  it  is  done  tactfully  and  cour- 
teously, according  to  the  newer  methods.  Manufac- 
turers cannot  be  too  lavish  in  giving  this  sort  of  in- 
formation to  the  great  rank  and  file  of  the  retail  trade. 
It  is  selling  help  of  the  most  practical  sort." 


PITHY  POINTERS  FOR  THE  DEALER 

The  window  display  that  is  not  the  em^bodiment  of 
some  specific  idea  is  not  a  display  that  will  produce  a 
hundred  per  cent,  of  its  possibilities. 

The  more  you  practice  the  making  of  show  cards, 
the  better  you  will  become  at  the  work  and  the  more 
cards  you  will  have  and  use. 

Economy  in  store  management  is  a  fine  thing  when 
it  does  not  go  so  far  as  to  become  stinginess.  Learn 
where  the  line  should  be  drawn. 

A  carelessly  operated  store  will  have  small  profits 
whether  it  has  quick  returns  or  not. 

The  store  with  a  definite  policy  and  a  popiilar  policy 
is  a  store  that  will  be  popular  because  people  will 
know  what  to  expect  from  it. 

The  deader  must  be  guided  by  his  own  peculiar 
circumstances  in  his  effort  to  put  his  business  on  a 
cash  basis.  The  present  time  would  seem  an  excep- 
tionally favorable  one  for  this,  because  he  has  behind 
him  the  educational  work  being  done  along  these  lines 
by  every  other  sort  of  merchant  in  the  country. 

The  proper  time  to  take  a  stand  is  at  the  very  first. 
It  may  seem  harsh  to  refuse  accommodation,  but  then 
is  the  best  time  to  take  the  step.  And,  to  collect 
accounts  a  personal  call  at  the  home  is  the  best  method. 


MAKE  GOOD  WHILE  THE  BOSS  IS  AWAY 

A GOOD  many  clerks  regard  the  absence  of  the 
boss  from  the  store  as  an  opportunity  for  tak- 
ing it  easy.  This  is  altogether  a  wrong  at- 
titude and  one  that  is  only  adopted  by  the  listless  and 
unambitious.  One  who  is  inclined  this  way  is  not 
apt  to  ever  be  successful. 

The  clerk  who  takes  a  real  interest  in  the  business 
and  is  ambitious  to  demonstrate  his  own  worth,  puts 
forth  even  greater  effort  when  the  boss  is  away,  be  it 
for  only  a  few  hours  or  on  a  lengthier  absence.  It 
gives  him  an  opportunity  to  rely  on  his  own  initiative 
and  ability  and  to  really  develop  and  learn  to  assume 
responsibilities.  These  are  all  thinigs  that  make  him 
worth  more  as  a  clerk. 

Wten  the  boss  goes  away,  make  it  a  point  to  put 
forth  your  best  efforts  in  his  absence. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


67 


Sutherland  &  Son,  furniture  dealers  and  undertakers, 
of  Welland,  Ont.,  have  dis.solved,  G.  F.  Siitherland  con- 
tinuing. 

Work  is  to  start  shortly  for  furniture  building  on 
Louisa  St.,  Toronto,  for  T.'  Eaton  Co.  Ltd. 

A  contract  has  been  awarded  for  repairs  to  factory  of 
Alaska  Bedding  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,  costing  $8,500: 

The  Acker  Furniture  Co.,  236  Danforth  Ave.,  To- 
ronto, contemplate  the  erection  of  a  furniture  store 
next  spring. 

Capt.  Stanley  S.  Ball,  C.A.M.C.,  O.C.,  of  Whitby 
Military  Hospital,  and  youngest  son  of  R.  J.  Ball,  M.P., 


W.  A.  WRIGHT 
Prominent  furniture  dealer  of  Port  Arthur 
who  passed  away  last  monlh. 

of  the  Ball  Furniture  Company,  of  Hanover,  Ont.,  was 
married  on  Christmas  Day  to  Miss  Ida  M.  Oldham, 
B.A.,  of  Toronto. 

Robert  Nugent,  furniture  dealer  and  undertaker,  of 
Lindsay,  Ont.,  passed  away  early  in  December  in  his 
62nd  year.  He  was  born  in  Victoria  County  and  after 
some  years  on  the  road,  entered  business  in  his  home 
town. 

It  is  reported  in  the  local  press  that  the  T.  Eaton 
Company  have  secured  the  present  site  of  the  Adams 
Furniture  Company,  of  Toronto,  and  that  the  latter 
firm  will  erect  a  new  store  on  the  southeast  corner  of 
Yonge  and  Shuter  Sts.  Mr.  Charles  S.  Coryell  is 
president  and  general  manager  of  the  Adams  Company. 

The  Murray-Kay  Company,  of  Toronto,  have  opened 
a  furniture  section  at  their  store  on  King  St.  E.,  in  the 
premises  adjoining  their  old  store.  Gift  furniture 
was  shown  in  this  section  at  Xmas  time. 


JANUARY  EXHIBITIONS  FROM  JAN.  13  TO  25 

For  the  January  Exhibitions  from  January  13  to  25, 
manufacturers  have  prepared  bigger  and  better  ex- 
hibits, making  it  Avell  worth  while  for  retailers  to  visit 
them.  Many  new  lines  will  be  on  display  by  the 
various  manufacturers. 

The  Stratford  Exhibition 

Sti'atford  manufacturers  have  been  putting  forth 
every  effort  to  surpass  previous  showings.  Arrange- 
ments have  been  made  to  look  after  visiting  retailers  in 
the  same  hospitable  manner  as  other  years  both  in  re- 
gards to  aecomra-odation  and  entertainment.  The 
Stratford  Furniture  Manufacturers  have  enuipped  a 
Club  Room  which  is  open  at  all  times  to  visiting  furni- 
ture dealers  and  which  will  be  found  of  great  conveni- 
ence at  exhibition  time. 

Kitchener- Waterloo 

The  manufacturuers  of  Kitchener  and  Waterloo  are 
also  doing  their  best  to  make  this  year'vS  exhibition 
stand  out  in  point  of  interest.  They  are  operating  on 
the  same  plan  as  other  years,  most  firms  making  dis- 
plays of  their  products  in  their  own  factories;,  while  a 
number  of  Kitchener  firms  will  display  in  the  Audi- 
torium on  Queen  Street  South. 

Exhibitions  in  Toronto 

The  Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Limited,  are 
putting  on  a  special  display  as  usual  at  the  permanent 
show  rooms  on  King  St.  E.,  Toronto,  while  the  Gold 
Medal  Furniture  Company  have  a  splendid  showing 
of  both  their  furniture  lines  and  phonographs  at  their 
factory.  A  special  display  is  also  being  made  by  the 
Ideal  Bedding  Company  at  their  plant  on  Jefferson 
Ave.  The  Canadian  Mersereau  Company  Ltd..  of  Tia- 
ronto,  will  exhibit  their  line  of  brass  beds  in  their 
showrooms  at  81  Florence  St. 

Some  out-of-town  firms  will  also  show  in  Toronto. 
At  215  Victoria  St.  there  will  be  disnlays  by  the 
AndrcAv  Malcolm  Furniture  Co.  Ltd..  and  the  F.  E. 
Coiorabe  Furniture  Co.  Ltd..  of  Kincardine,  Ont.  At 
55  Bay  St..  there  will  bp  exhibits  by  the  North  Ameri- 
can Furniture  Co..  The  National  Tahle  Company,  and 
the  Owen  Sound  Chair  Comioany,  a.ll  of  OAven  Sound, 
PS  well  as  the  Renfrew  Refrigerator  Co.  Ltd..  of 
Renfrew. 


INGERSOLL  FIRM  CHANGES  NAME 

The  style  and  firm  name  of  J.  P.  Albrough  &  Co..  of 
Ingersoll,  Ont.,  has  been  changed  to  the  Life  Long 
Furniture  Co.  They  manufacture  high  grade  Chester- 
fie'lds  and  do  re-upholstering  for  the  trade. 


C.  B.  CHATFIELD 

Designer  of  Furniture 


GRAND 
RAPIDS 


Michigan,  U.S.A. 


'68 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


MANY  FURNITURE  MEN  ELECTED  TO  OFFICE 

Many  Ontario  men  connected  with  the  furniture 
trade  were  honored  by  election  to  municipal  office  this 
year,  indicating  the  high  place  Avhich  they  hold  in  the 
esteem  of  the  public  which  they  serve.  Among  those 
elected  Avere  the  following : 

Reeve — W.  H.  Manning,  Coldwater. 

Deputy  Reeve — J.  P.  Mc'Cammon,  Paris. 

Councillors — Wesley  Walker,  Goderieh ;  C.  P.  Turner, 
Milton ;  R.  A.  Currie,  Wingham ;  N.  L.  Brandon,  St. 
Marj^'s;  Frank  Lenahan.  Durham;  F.  J.  McArthur, 
Cobourg ;  H.  McKillop,  P>rampton ;  Chas.  Pufifer,  Nor- 
wood. 

Amonff  the  Manufacturers 

Kincardine — James  Malcolm  of  the  Andrew  Malcolm 
Furniture  Co.  Ltd..  was  re-elected  mayor  by  acclama- 
tion. F.  E.  Coombe,  of  the  F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture 
Company  was  re-elected  Reeve. 

Orillia— A.  J.  Taylor,  of  the  Orillia  Furniture  Co., 
was  elected  alderman. 

Owen  Sound — John  G.  Hay  of  the  North  American 
Bent  Chair  Company,  was  elected  deputy  reeve. 

Southampton — C  M.  Bell  was  elected  mayor  of  the 
town. 


GENDRON  LINES  ON  EXHIBITION 

The  Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  have  opened  for  the  Furni- 
ture Exhibition  season  a  saanple  and  display  room  at  55 
Bay  St.,  Toronto,  where  they  are  exhibiting  examples 
of  all  their  new  goods,  including  baiby  carriages,  car- 
riers and  sulkies,  in  their  latest  styles  and  color  com- 
binations. They  have  also  on  display  samples  of  reed 
furniture,  ujiholstered  in  all  the  newest  designs  and 
patterns  of  chintz  and  tapestry.  The  company's  On- 
tario travelling  representatives  are  in  charge  of  the  ex- 
hibit, which  will  be  continued  until  February  4. 


PERMANENT  EXHIBITION  ROOMS  IN  TORONTO 

Ai'rangements  for  permanent  exhi'bition  rooms  in 
the  Allan  Building,  55  Bay  St.,  Toronto,  have  been 
made  by  the  North  American  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  The 
Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.  Ltd..  and  the  National  Table 
Company,  of  Owen  Sound,  and  the  Renfrew  Re- 
frigerator Co.  Ltd..  of  Renfrew,  Ont.  The  iiixth  floor 
will  be  used  for  this  purpose. 


CHESLEY  MAN  DOUBLY  BEREAVED 

On  Sunday.  December  15,  Henry  Ankenmann,  of 
the-  firm  of  Krug  Bros.  &  Co.,  of  Chesiley,  Ont..  was 
doubly  bereaved,  both  his  wife  and  son  Raymond, 
dying  from  influenza-pneumonia  within  a  few  honrs 
of  each  other.  Mr.  Christian  Ankenmann,  manager 
of  the  Chesley  Chair  Company,  is  a  son  and  brother 
respective'ly  of  the  two  deceased  ones. 


NEWS  OF  THE  FURNITURE  TRADE 

The  Gre-it  Wc'St  Furniture  Store,  of  Regina.  Sasli., 
has  dissolved. 

The  People's  Furnishing  House  of  Montreal,  has  re- 
cently been  registered. 

IT.  W.  Cook,  proprietor  of  the  Riverview  House, 
Fordwick,  Ont.,  is  completing  a  deal  for  the  disposal 
of  this  hotel  to  a  concern  which  will  open  a  furniture 
store  in  the  premises. 


B.  WALTER  &  CO.,  REPRESENTED  BY  A.  B.  CAYA 

B.  Walter  &  Co.,  manufacturers  of  table  slides, 
Wabash,  Ind.,  are  represented  in  Canada  by  A.  B. 
Caya,  28  King  St.  E.,  Kitchener,  Ont.,  who  recently  suc- 
ceeded to  the  business  of  the  late  Frank  A.  Smith. 


HUMAN  FACTOR  IN  FURNITURE  BUSINESS 

(By  Col.  David  Carnegie). 

While  I  have  great  faith  in  the  possibilities  of  or- 
ganization, and  the  pi-ovision  of  suitable  machinery, 
to  secure  remmierative  trade  without  unrestricted 
competition  and  for  maintaining  efficient  production 
with  co-operative  competition,  I  also  recognize  that 
unless  the  attitude  of  the  employers  and  employees  is 
sincere  in  seeking  to  discover  a  community  of  interest 
in  which  each  will  find  a  fair  return  for  their  invest- 
ment of  capital  and  labor,  the  furniture  industry  or 
any  other  industry  will  not  have  that  prosperous  de- 
velopment for  which  we  all  hope. 

I  am  convinced  that  a  permanent  union  of  interests 
can  be  established,  where  representatives  of  the  em- 
ployees and  employers  meet  in  conference,  with  the 
endeavor  to  find  not  only  the  means  whereby  methods 
of  manufacture  may  be  improved,  but  where  the  con- 
ditions of  the  workers,  the  number  of  hours  they  work, 
and  the  rates  of  remuneration  they  obtain,  may  be 
freely  discussed  with  the  honest  desire  to  do  the  right 
thing  for  employers  and  employees.  Such  meetings, 
where  human  contact  is  established  between  masters 
and  men,  must  be  productive  of  permanent  good. 


NEWEST  DESIGNS 

We  are  preparing  a  supplement 
to  our  regular  catalogue  which 
will  contain  "  many  new  and 
up-to-the-minute  designs.  Our 
revised  price  list  will  also  be 
ready  for  distribution  shortly. 

We  aim  to  make  every  chair 
turned  out  by  our  factory  a  source 
of  pride  to  us  and  to  you.  That 
is  why  so  much  care  is  given  to 
finishing  and  other  details. 

THE 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co. 

LIMITED 

Owen  Sound       -  Ontario 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


69 


DEPOSITS  ON  GOODS 

Though  a  retailer  may  have  the  best 
of  intentions,  it  is  often  that  his  store 
makes  enemies  througih  a  misunder- 
standinig  on  the  part  of  customers  who 
make  a  deposit  in  connection  with  a 
request  to  have  goo'ds  held,  and  a  bul- 
letin from  the  National  Vigilance  Com- 
mittee of  the  Associated  Advertising 
Clubs  sugigest  tlhat  store  good-will  is 
often  destroyed  through  a  failure  to 
make  customers,  and  especially  women, 
understand  that  when  a  deposit  is 
made,  this  amounts  to  a  contract  on 
the  part  of  the  customer  to  take  the 
gooids. 

From  vari'ous  ciommunities  where 
th^re  are  local  vigilance  committees,  the 
National  Vigilance  Committee  has  had 
reports  of  trouble  arisinig  from  miisun- 
derstandings  of  this  character. 

"Oan  you  hold  this  for  me?"  the 
woman  asks. 

"Yes,  if  yo'u  will  make  a  deposit  of 

 , "  says  the  salesman,  naming  the 

amount  to  her. 

That  is  all  there  is  to  the  conversa- 
tion in  toio  many  instances.  The  sales- 
man presumes  that  she  knows  that 
wlien  she  makes  the  deposit,  she  enters 
into  a  eonftrac't  to  'buy,  but  that  is  often 
a  violent  presumption,  says  the  Vigil- 
ance Committee.  In  a  large  number 
of  instances,  women  return,  announce 
that  they  have  cfhanged  their  minds, 
and  ask  for  the  return  of  their  money. 

Many  such  cases  oome  to  the  atten- 
tion of  local  vigilance  committees,  for 
the  committees  advertise  that  they  are 
prepared  to  receive  complaints  from 
persons  who  feel  they  have  been  mis- 
treated. In  sueih  cities,  the  commit- 
tees, of  course,  take  the  part  of  the 
merchant,  but  even  wihere  the-e  is  a 
vigilance  committee  on  the  job,  some 
cmtomers  still  feel  that  an  exception 
might  be  made  in  their  case. 

The  vigilance  committee  suggests 
that  one  certain  way  to  insure  that  all 
ciistomers'  will  uuderstard  the  terms  of 
such  sales  would  be  to  print  a  sipecial 
receipt  for  payments  of  this  kind,  the 
receipt  to  set  forth  the  fact  that  un- 
less the  goods  are  taken  by  a  certain  date,  the  cash 
dep'osit  wiU  become  the  property  of  the  store. 


Greater  Publicity  for 


HE  advertising  that  Fabrikoid 
will  have  during  1919  is  a 
matter  of  interest  to  all  who 
make  or  deal  in  furniture. 

Through  newspaper  adver- 
tisements, street  cars,  display 
cards  and  other  practical 
sales  methods,  we  are  bringing  Fabrikoid  conspicuously  to 
the  public's  attention  this  year.  This  will  benefit  the 
furniture  manufacturer  by  creating  an  ever  -  increasing 
demand  for  Fabrikoid.  It  is  therefore  "up  to  you"  to 
see  that  your  stock  of  Fabrikoid  upholstered  furniture  is 
increased  to  take  care  of  this  demand.  We  believe  that 
1919  is  going  to  be  a  record -making  year  for  the  furni- 
ture trade.  We  believe  that  you  will  sell  more  furniture 
than  ever.  The  advertising  of  Fabrikoid  will  this  year 
establish  it  more  firmly  in  the  mind  of  the  public  as 
THE  MOST  SANITARY,  ECONOMICAL,  SAT- 
ISFACTORY upholstering  material. 

You  will  therefore  be  well  advised,  when  placing  orders  for  your 
stock,  to  specify  that  it  be  "Upholstered  in  Fabrikoid." 

THE  DU  PONT  FABRIKOID  CO. 

Factory  and  Sales  Of f ice :    NEW  TORONTO,  Ontario. 


SMITH'S  FALLS  DEALER  COMPLETES 
IMPROVEMENTS 

J.  J.  Marsh,  of  Smith's  Falls,  Out.,  has  just  com- 
pleted improvements  to  his  huildiug  which  will  greatly 
improve  his  furniture  store  and  nndertaking  establish- 
ment. He  lowered  and  rebuilt  the  foundation  and 
laid  a  hardwood  floor  in  the  furniture  section. 

The  adjoining  store  has  been  taken  in  and  is  being 
converted  into  a  funeral  cha,pel.  A  Delco  lighting 
system  has  been  installed. 


H.  E.  KITCHEN  CABINETS  WAREHOUSED 
IN  WINNIPEG 

In  order  to  give  better  service  to  their  "Western  cus- 
tomers, the  H.  E.  Furniture  Co.  Limited,  of  Milverton, 
Ont.,  will,  after  January  15,  warehouse  several  lines  of 
kitchen  cabinets  in  Winnipeg.  D.  McTntyre,  816 
Florence  Ave.,  "Winnipeg,  will  be  in  charge. 


High- Grade  CHESTERFIELDS 

Re-Upholstering-  to  the  Trade 
SPECIAL  ORDER  WORK 

Life  Long  Furoiture  Co.,  Ingersoll,  Ont. 


70 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


Talking  Machines  in  the 
Furniture  Store 


GET  AFTER  RECORD  BUSINESS  NOW 

THE  jjieseut  is  a  time  Aviieii  selling  effort  behind 
records  will  be  found  prodnctive  of  particular 
good  results.  Many  phouoigraphs'  liave  been 
given  as  Xmas  presents  and  usually  not  a  very  lai'ge 
selection  of  records  is  inclnded.  The  owner  of  the 
new  machine  will  want  more  recordls  and  it  is  the 
dealer  tlhat  sxiggests  the  matter  to  him  that  will  get  his 
business.  A  person  naturally  is  greatly  interested  in 
a  machine  when  they  get  it  first  and  accordingly  is  the 
best  ])Ossible  prospect  for  records. 

This  is  also  a  g'ood  season  for  general  business  in 
records.  People  spend  a  good  deal  of  their  time  in- 
doors and  if  they  have  a.  phonograph  tlhey  will  want 
some  new  selections  for  it.  Use  window  and  ad.  to 
boost  this  dep'artment  now. 


and  play  a  few  good  selections.  Anyway,  there  is 
generally  some  member  of  the  family  AVho  wishes  the 
miachine  to  be  retained  and  \v^o  hell'ps  you  in  makiag 
a  sale." 


MIRROR  FOR  SHOWING  MOTOR 

One  manufacturer  at  the  Oanadian  National  Exhi- 
bition last  fall  had  a  novel  method  of  showiuig  the 
operation  of  the  motor  out  of  a  phonograph  to  patrons. 
It  might  well  be  used  by  the  retailer  for  demonstra- 
tion purposes.  The  motor  was  mounted  on  a  frame- 
work with  a  mirror  visible  to  the  person  underneath. 
By  looking  into  the  mirror  the  operation  of  the  motor 
was  visible  to  virw. 


GOOD  RESULTS  FROM  COUNTRY  CANVAS 

In  a  talk  with  the  editor  of  The  Canadian  Furniture 
Journal,  "W.  S.  Carr,  of  Niagara  Falls,  Ont.,  who 
handles  musical  instniments,  stated  that  lie  gets  good 
results  from  personal  canvas  among  farmers  right  at 
their  own  home.  He  keeps  a  salesman  with  a  horse 
and  light  wagon  on  tlie  road  continuously.  Two  ma- 
chines can  easily  be  carried  and  a  trial  given  to  pros- 
pective customers  right  in  their  own  home®. 

"When  you  get  a  machine  right  in  the  customer's 
h.ome  and  allow  the  family  to  hear  a  few  good  appeal- 
ing selections,  you  have  made  an  appeal  that  is  a  sales 
creator.  When  a  person  has  not  had  a  machine  in 
their  home  previously,  they  regret  to  'have  it  go."  s;ays 
Mr.  Carr.  "It  is  quite  often  the  carse  that  people  who 
dlid  not  care  to  even  have  you  bring  the  uaachine  in, 
cannot  resist  wanting  to  buy  it  when  you  get  it  there 


NOVEL  WAY  TO  ATTRACT  PUBLIC 

A  dealer  in  talking  madhines  in  Toronto,  in  order  to 
advertise  his  store  and  catch  the  attention  of  those 
passing,  has  the  cellar  of  his  store  arranged  so  that  a 
malc'hine  can  be  placed  near  the  cellar  Avindow  facing 
the  street,  and  it  is  kept  in  operation  with  the  window 
open.     Naturally  it  sei-ves  to  interest  many  people. 


HANGING  THE  KAISER  WITH  A  PHONOGRAPH 

During  the  cele'bration  of  fhe  signing  of  the  armis- 
tice, a  Toronto  dealer  arranged  a  moving  feature  in 
his  window  showing  the  hanging  of  a  miniature  repre- 
sentation of  the  Kaiser.  A  rope  was  suspended  about 
his  neck  and  the  movement  of  pulling  him  contiimously 
up  to  the  cross  piece  was  performed  by  the  cord  being 
attached  to  lOne  side  of  a  moving  platform  of  a  talking 
machine.  It  alternately  tightened  the  cord  and  let  it 
loose. 


A  real  attractive  display  of  phonographs  that  will  offer  suggestions  to  the  dealer 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


m 


m 


El 


El 


51 


NOTHING  stands  still— and  the  Furniture  Trade  is 
no  exception ! 

ANY  house  that  feels  satisfied  with  whatever  it  HAS 
and  refuses  to  try  and  create  NEW  customers  is 
slipping  back ! 

A  buyer  CANNOT  hope  to  find  the  best  opportunity 
in  a  house  that  is  no  longer  putting  forth  its  very  best 
efforts  to  make  MORE  friends! 

If  YOU  want  to  make  MORE  friends  and  expand 
your  business  along  progressive  lines,  OPEN  A 
PHONOGRAPH  DEPARTMENT,  and  if  you 
believe  that  it  IS  more  important  to  have  the  customer 
satisfied  than  to  merely  have  a  record  on  your  books  of 
a  sale — be  SURE  to  write  us  for  our  latest  confidential 
Booklet,  "A  Word  With  You,"  for  it  gives  you  ALL 
the  particulars  of  the  FINES  F  phonograph  made,  the 

Pathephone 

"So  far  remote  from  the  commonplace  in 
Phonograph  making  that  it  offers  man})  extra- 
ordinary talking  points  and  service  jeatures  and 
places  it  in  your  customer's  hands  as  THE 
FINEST  PHONOGRAPH  MADE,  NOT 
IN  ANY  CLASS  EXCEPTING  ITS  OWN" 

Pathe  Freres  Phonograph  Sales  Co. 

4  6-8  CLIFFORD  ST.,  TORONTO 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Ontario — Pathe  Freres  Phonograph  Sales  Co.,  Toronto. 
Quebec — Pathe  Freres  Phonograjih  Sales  Co.,  Montreal. 
Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  British  Columbia — 

R.  J.  Wliitla  &  Co.,  Limited,  Winnipeg,  Ma-n. 
New  Brunswick,  Nova  Scotia  and  Prince  Edward  Island — 

H.  L.  Hewson  &  Son,  Limited,  Amherst,  N.S. 

AGENTS  WANTED  EVERYWHERE 


L^|LE1|LE1|LS1|L51|L51|L51|LS1|LS1|L51|LS1|L5~||L5"||LS 


•     •   •   '. .  Ml 


72 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


BIG  TRADE  FROM  RETURNING  SOLDIERS 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIInillinillMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMinnilllMlllllllllllirilMllinilllMH 

They  are  good  prospects  for  machines — Have  learned  to  appreciate  the  value  of  the  phonograph  while  at  the 
front — Will  be  interested  in  records  that  call  to  mind  their  fighting  days — How  to  go  after  this  business  best 


MANY  talking  machine  dealers  have  been  using- 
in  their  advertising  the   slogan,   "Keep  the 
Home  Fires  Burning — ^with  a  talking  machine 
by  the  fireside  to  play  the  tunes  that  your  'boy  loves  to 
hear  on  the  battlefront  across  the  sea."    This  was 
good  business,  and  it  helped  to  sell  some  machines. 

Now,  however,  that  the  boys  have  put  over  the  job 
laid  out  for  them  and  are  about  ready  to  return  to 
their  homes  in  America,  the  slogan  quoted  above  is 
out-of-date.  The  thing  for  the  talking  machine  dealer 
to  do  now  is  to  advertise  AT  the  soldier  bovs  instead 
of  ABOUT  THEM. 

The  Reasons  for  Trade  From  Them 

This  brings  us  down  to  the  main  point  of  this  article 
— that  the  talking  machine  business  is  going  to  be  xin- 
usually  good  from  noAv  on,  and  returning  iioldiers  are 
going  to  be  among  the  best  purch'asers.  This  is  true 
for  a  good  many  reasons. 

In  the  tinst  place,  it  is  generally  agreed  that  out  of 
the  melting  pot  of  our  army  organization  will  come  an 
army  of  civilian-idealists.  Men  ^who  were  poolroom 
loafers  on  one  extreme  and  men  who  were  soteiety- 
idlers  on  the  other  extreme  are  coming  'back  from 
Europe  with  a  new  conception  of  what  constitutes  a 
happy  existence.  They  are  goinig  to  want  to  get  to 
work  doing  something  useful.  They  will  get  married, 
build  homes  for  themselves,  and  they  will  want  to  stay 
in  these  homes.  This  is  not  a  mere  prophecy  by  one 
individual.  The  greatest  thinkers  and  students  of 
economy  in  the  country  say  thiat  such  a  condition  will 
prevail. 

Music  Essential  to  Home  Life 

With  the  desire  for  a  home  comes  the  desire  for  the 
things  that  make  home  life  really  worth  while.  Music 
is  one  of  them,  it  is  an  essential,  and  the  soldiers  have 
learned  to  appreciate  this  fact.  Many  of  them,  yes 
thousands  of  them,  listened  to  talking  machines  when 
in  from  the  front  line  for  a  rest,  and  learned  for  the 
first  time  how  cheering  good  music  can  be,  what  .'-i 
source  of  inspiration  it  is.  These  men  will  all  want  a 
talking  machine  in  their  homes,  and  if  the  dealer  ad- 
vertises to  them  in  the  right  way  selling  them  will  be 
an  easy  task.  Besides  the  unmarried  men  who  will  come 
back  and  take  wives  and  build  homes,  there  are 
thousands  of  others  who  will  be  talking  machine  pros- 
pects when  they  get  back  into  civilian  life.  These 
last  mentioned  are  the  soldiers  who  married  on  the  eve 
of  departure  for  the  front,  and  who  will  set  up  homes  of 
their  own  as  soon  «as  they  return.  They,  too,  will  have 
learned  that  a  home  is  not  complete  without  a  talking 
machine. 

Appealing  to  the  Rstumed  Men 

Naturally  soldiers  who  have  been  over  there  fighting 
for  their  country  will  feel  a  prid'e  in  their  achievement, 
and  will  be  interested  for  a  long  time  in  anything  that 
calls  to  mind  their  fight  on  the  other  side.  For  this 
reason  the  best  kind  of  advertising  to  get  the  business 
of  the  returned  soldiers  will  naturally  be  advertising 


that  refers  to  their  life  as  soldiers.  The  idea  here  is 
the  same  as  that  used  for  advertising  to  the  parents  of 
the  boys  while  the  war  was  on.  Everyone  is  familiar 
by  this  time  with  the  way  in  which  thousandis  of  ads. 
coupled  up  selling  goods  with  winning  the  war. 

The  thing  to  do  now  is  to  couple  up  the  peace  era 
with  renewed  activity  in  selling.  Headlines  like  this 
would  be  good  for  advertising  talking  machines  to 
soldiers:  "The  songs  you  heard  over  there  can  be  heard 
in  your  home  over  here,  on  the  Blank  talking  machine; 
start  your  home  right ;  put  music  there  the  first  thing" ; 
then  give  terms,  etc.  Or:  "You  remember  how  much 
fun  you  got  out  of  that  talking  machine  in  the  Y  hut  in 
France ;  come  to  us,  and  let  us  tell  you  how  you  can 
have  an  instrument  in  your  own  homes  on  easy  terms." 
Theise  two  suggestions  are  just  to  give  the  idea.  Any 
dealer  who  is  awake  can  frame  up  attractive  ads.  that 
will  get  the  attention  of  soldiers  starting  new  homes  as 
they  get  back  into  civilian  life. 

Publicity  Will  Pay 

Some  dealers  may  contend  that  not  enough  soldiers 
will  be  releasied  in  their  town  to  make  such  advertising 
pay.  Many  thiouisiands  of  soldiers  will  be  released  each 
month  from  now  on,  from  all  sections  of  the  countiy. 
Some  of  them  in  your  town  are  bound  to  respond  to 
the  kind  of  adyertisinig  mentioned.  Besides,  such  ad- 
vertisin,g  will  be  read  by  others  than  soldiers,  because 
it  will  appeal  to  the  popular  taste,  and  hence  it  will 
sell  machines  to  many  persons  not  iioldiers.  It's  good 
publicity. 

Such  adis.  as  those  mentioned  can  appear  over  a 
period  of  several  months  from  the  present  time  on. 
The  soldiers  will  not  all  be  back  for  at  least  a  year,  or 
two  years,  perhaps. 

Speaking  of  soldiers  being  good  purchasers,  there  is 
another  thing  in  this  connection  to  remember,  and  that 
is  that  s'oldier-civilians  will  be  good  "risks."  They 
have  learned  the  value  of  economy  and  have  been 
ta:ught  discipline  and  a  sense  of  duty  which  will  make 
them  desire  to  meet  their  obligations  oromptly. 

It  has  been  stated  that  the  soldiers  will  not  be  the 
only  ones  to  whom  the  kind  of  advertising  spoken  of 
will  appeal.  Another  class  that  Avill  read  these  ads. 
and  buy  talking  machines  is  the  Bond  holders.  Dur- 
ing the  Avar  it  was  patriotic  to  hold  on  to  bonds,  but 
noAv  that  the  Avar  is  won  many  people  who  haA^e  wanted 
things  like  talking  machines,  but  -AA^ho  never  could  save 
up  enough  to  buy  them,  may  be  inclined  to  dispose  of 
their  Bonds  and  purchase  things  for  their  pleasure  that 
they  have  long  Avanted.  A  different  "tAvist"  can  be 
given  to  advertising  to  cover  appeals  to  this  class. 

All  things  considered,  it  looks  as  if  the  dealer  in 
talking  machines  had  the  greatest  opportunity  evev  to 
"do  business"  for  the  next  year  or  so  Avith  so  many 
ncAv  homes  being  started.  If  he  is  alive,  advertises  in 
the  right  Avay,  and  gives  his  prospects  the  proper  at- 
tention, he  isimply  can't  help  getting  the  bu«iness.  It's 
here,  and  the  live  dealer  will  get  it. — By  Courtenay 
Harrison,  in  The  Talking  Machine  World. 


Januai-y,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


78 


Phonola 
Prospects 

are  the  Brightest 


Thinking  dealers  have  good  reason  to  part  company  with  those  who  bewail  looked- 
for  depression,  Canada's  foundations — agriculturally,  financially,  and  socially— were 
never  so  strong  as  they  are  now. 

We've  learned  to  finance  our  own  undertakings.  The  nations  of  the  world  are  our 
customers.  There's  room  for  millions  more  people  in  our  land — and  development 
work  for  them  to  do. 

Musically,  every  home  now  is  beginning  to  see  the  necessity  of  music.  The  re- 
turned soldiers,  in  settling  down,  will  create  thousands  of  new  homes,  and  they  all 
know  that  life  without  the  phonograph  is  impossible. 

PHONOLAS  and  PHONOLA  RECORDS  will  be  sold  on  a  bigger  scale  than 
ever.  Are  you  a  Phonola  dealer  ?  The  Hne  includes  a  design  for  every  taste  and 
a  price  for  every  purse. 

And  remember  PHONOLA  RECORDS.  Write  for  the  monthly  lists  of  new 
records.*  '  . 

The  Phonola  Co.  of  Canada,  Limited 

KITCHENER  CANADA 


74 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


MUSIC  A  NECESSITY 

By  H.  Addington  Bruce 


MOST  people  regard  music  as  one  of  the  luxuries 
of  life.  Actually  it  ought  to  he  regarded  as  a 
necessity. 

Some  sort  of  musical  instrument — 'piano,  organ, 
violin,  harp,  or  automatic  music-producer — ^should  he  in 
every  home.  And  it  should  be  used,  not  left  to  ac- 
cumulate dust. 

Get  music — good  moiisic — in  the  home,  and  life  Avill 
run  more  smoothly  and  pleasantly  for  every  member 
of  the  family.  It  will  run  more  pleiasiantly  because 
there  will  be  less  liability  to  strain  and  nervousness, 
greater  ease  of  adjustment  in  the  family  relations  and 
greater  individual  health  and  efficiency. 

Music,  that  is  to  say,  has  splendid  tranquilizing  and 
energy-'developing  effects. 

In  a  Boston  newspaper  the  other  day  there  appeared 
an  interesting  announcement. 

It  was  to  the  effeict  that  during  the  annual  examina- 
tions at  Harvard  University  there  would  be  a  brief 
organ  recital  at  Appleton  Chapel  every  morning  before 
the  day's  examinations  began.  Students  were  in- 
vited to  these  recitals. 

The  suggestion  was  made  that  by  attending  them 
they  could  more  easily  overcome  any  nervousness  they 
might  feel  regarding  the  examihiation  ordeal  and 
would  be  better  able  to  do  justice  to  themselves  in 
ansAvering  the  (jiiestions  put  to  them. 

There  is  plenty  of  precedent  in  medical  experience 
for  this  curioiis  use  of  music  as  an  aid  in  gaining  con- 
trol of  mind  and  nerves. 

Many  a  nervous  patient  has  been,  helped  back  to 
health  by  listening  to  music.  In  all  first-cHass  hospitals 
for  mental  disease,  music  is  regularly  uisied  as  a  quiet- 
ing, upbuilding  agent.  There  are  cases  in  which  it 
has  brought  about  remarkable  cures. 

A  physician,  traveling  in  Europe  with  a  friend 
afflicted  with  melancholia  and  showing  suicidal  tenden- 
cies, found  it  imjpossible  to  improve  his  friend's  condi- 
tion until  one  evening  they  Avent  to  hear  some  Strauss 
music  in  Vienna.  Then,  to  his  surprise  and  .satisfac- 
tion, the  physician  noticed  that  his  friend  displayed  a 
slight  revival  of  interest  in  life. 

"T  was  not  slow,"  he  relates,  "in  following  the  in- 
dication. We  became  assiduous  devotees  to  the  divine 
art  as  represented  by  the  waltz  king.  The  faint  dawn 
of  intellectual  life  brightened. 

"We  gradually  enlarged  our  scope,  and  included 
grand  opera  and  other  musical  entertainments.  From 
this  time  improvements  were  steady. 

"The  patient  would  sometimes  relapse  into  apathy. 
But  the  fits  of  gloom  became  less  frequent  and  of 
shorter  duration,  until  the  cure  by  music,  happily  be- 
gun in  Vienna,  was  complete,  and  he  returned  home 
sane  of  mind  and  sound  of  body." 

To  those  in  perfect  health,  as  to  those  nervously  or 
mentally  ill,  music  is  equally  helpful.  Its  greatest 
value  comes  from  the  pleasurable  emotion'al  states  it 
creates. 

No  other  art  appeals  so  strongly  to  the  emotions. 
The  man  who  has  learned  to  love  music  has  within  his 
reach  an  unfailing  source  of  joy. 

And  the  joy  which    music    brings    to  him  echoes 


through  his  whole  organism,  stimulating  all  the  physi- 
cal processes  within  him. 

The  food  he  eats  is  more  easily  digested,  his  lungs 
work  better,  the  quality  of  his  blood  is  improved. 

From  all  this  his  brain  benefits,  being  better  nour- 
ished. Consequently  he  finds  it  easier  to  reason,  to 
remember,  to  plan,  to  execute. 

You  say  you  are  not  fond  of  music?  Leani  to  be 
fond  of  it.  You  can  learn,  and  it  is  well  worth  the 
effort. 


TO  CAPITALIZE  THE  CAPABILITIES  OF 
THE  SALESMAN 

We  have  all  had  the  experience  of  seeing  the  man- 
ager of  a  store  hover  in  the  offing  as  a  salesman  was 
handling  a  customer,  and  indicate  by  ever\'  action 
that  he,  the  manager,  was  in  a  nervous  sweat  for  fear 
thaJt  the  sialesmani  might  not  be  able  to  handle  the  deal 
even  though  it  eonsisted  merely  of  taking  a  couple  of 
clean  collars  out  of  a  box  and  getting  the  thirty  or 
forty  cents  therefor.  We  have  also  seen  the  manager 
deliberately  butt  into  the  transaction  and  simply  kill 
the  pleasing  impression  that  was  being  made  by  the 
salesman.  Under  both  situations  is  is  not  hard  to 
imagine  just  what  the  salesman  is  thinking  and  how 
he  feels.  If  his  feelings  and  his  thoughts  Avere  pat 
into  execution,  the  manager  Avould  prohably  be  a 
pretty  sick  man. 

Managers  Who  Butt  In 

For  the  manager  to  butt  in  and  assist  the  salesman 
gives  the  iraipression  to  even  the  most  casual  customer 
that  the  salesman  is  not  competent  and  cannot  be  de- 
pended iipon,  probaibly  an  impression  just  opposite  to 
that  which  the  manager  seeks  to  ereaite.  The  time 
to  train  and  coach  salesmen  is  during  the  off-hours  and 
not  in  the  presence  of  customers.  On  this  important 
subject  "The  Voice  of  the  Victor"  for  October,  had 
the  f ollovv^iug  comments  to  make : 

"When  a  salesman  is  reallj^  successful  in  his  work 
he  is  so  by  virtue  of  his  own  personality  and  his  own 
methods.  Why  then  take  the  chance  of  spoiling  sales 
by  haviag  a  third  party  butt  into  the  game? 

Music  Lovers  Easily  Offended 

"Music  has  been  called  the  languaige  of  th«  emo- 
tions, and  while  it  has  been  called  a  variety  of  other 
tilings  that  definition  will  sxiffice  for  the  present.  In 


McLagan  Furniture  Co.  Limited. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


75 


any  case,  we  all  know  that  the  nra'sic-loving  public  is 
made  up  quite  largely  of  people  who  are  essentially 
sensitive — and  therefore  easily  ofJended. 

"It  stands  to  reason  that  if  the  salesman  has  been 
able  to  bring  the  customer  up  to  the  closing  point  he 
must  have  been  able  to  establish  some  sort  of  sympa- 
thetic understanding  and  consequently  it  would  seem 
that  to  introduce  the  credit  man  or  the  manager  at 
this  point  would  be  more  likely  to  result  in  a  discord 
rather  than  in  added  harmony. 

"We  humans  are  not  built  aceordiuig  to  the  same 
specifications  by  a  long  shot.  A  credit  man  by  the 
very  nature  of  his  business  has  to  be  of  the  cold  type 
and  there's  something  of  the  hard-shell  crab  about 
managers — otherwise  instead  of  managing  their  busi- 
ness their  btisiness  would  soon  be  managing  them. 
Neither  of  them  will  usually  possess  the  infectious  en- 
thusiasm that  is  so  necessary  to  the  salesman.  Cir- 
cumstances comi^el  them  to  be  judicial  rather  than 
ardent — and  there  you  are ! 

"It  would  seem  then  that  the  way  to  capitalize  the 
capabilities  of  the  salesman  for  all  they  are  worth 
would  be  to  keep  the  credit  man  in  the  office — with 
the  door  shut. 

Cashing  in  on  Friendliness 

"The  salesman  is  already  on  friendly  terms  with  the 
customer  and  Avhen  it  comes  to  the  fjuestion  of  terms, 
references  and  so  on  there  is  a  reserve  fund  of  friend- 
liness on  both  sides  of  the  fence  siifficient  to  withstand 
many  jolts. 

"Plaving  progressed  that  far  we  may  be  pretty  sure 
that  the  salesman  is  much  less  likely  to  put  questions 
the  wrong  way,  and  when  it  comes  to  the  real  facts 
concerning  credit — well — ii:)eople  don't  pick  up  a  Vic- 
trola  and  walk  off  with  it,  and  the  salesman  will  have 
ample  opportunity  to  talk  things  over  himself  with  the 
credit  man  long  before  the  instrument  in  question  is 
actually  delivered  to  the  customer. 

"Selling  musical  instruments  to  music-loving  people 
is  not  at  all  the  same  thing  as  establishing  credit  at  a 
bank.  Do  you  suppose  it  would  add  anything  to  the 
audience's  enjoyment  of  an  opera  if  the  management 
put  the  box  office  on  the  stage? 

"Personally,  we  think  it  would  result  in  a  consider- 
able loss  of  appetite." 


HOW  ONE  DEALER  WINS  TRADE 

A  western  retailer  who  has  made  a  success  in  busi- 
ness, gives  the  following  advice  as  an  example  of  how 
a  live  man  succeeds.  "Be  your  own  chief  gunner 
and  your  clerk's  able  assistant,"  he  says,  "by  thorough 
training  as  you  have  been  advised  by  others  many 
times  before,  by  coming  in  personal  contact  with  all 
regular  customers ;  meet  them  with  the  glad  hand 
whenever  and  wherever  place  affords.  There  is 
nothing  that  reaches  that  spot  in  the  inner  man  like  a 
'welcome  handshake'  when  backed  by  your  person- 
ality. '  I  mean  it,'  a  hand  that  speaks,  that  tells  one 
you  want  him  to  be  your  friend  and  that  he  is  wel- 
come to  your  place  of  business  whether  he  makes  a 
purchase  or  not. 

"Make  more  personal  calls  amongst  your  country 
customers.  Take  a  few  hours  off  once  in  a  while  and 
drive  through  the  country  among  your  friends,  drive 
with  them  when  opportunity  affords,  and  I  believe  you 
will  see  your  visits  rewarded  with  an  increase  in  your 
business  from  that  quarter. 

"Make  friends  of  the  children.  Perhaps  you  think 
you  have  no  time  to  spend  with  them,  but  take  time, 
and  when  a  child  comes  into  your  store,  possibly  sent 
there  for  some  trifle,  see  that  the  boy  or  girl  gets 
prompt  and  careful  attention;  use  them  so  kindly  that 
they  will  want  to  come  back  again.  Make  a  child 
your  friend  and  you  have  made  a  standing  advertise- 
ment for  you  and  your  place.  Do  you  stop  to  con- 
sider that  by  kindness  to  her  children,  you  have 
reached  some  mother's  heart;  you  have  won  a  cus- 
tomer in  her,  and  through  her,  the  father?  Try  this 
experiment  and  see  th  eresults.  It  costs  you  nothing 
but  a  little  attention." 


GOOD  SHOWING  OF  McLAGAN  PHONOGRAPHS 

Visitors  to  the  Stratford  Exhibition  should  not  fail 
to  visit  the  excellent  display  of  phonographs  arranged 
by  the  Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Company  Limited. 
This  company  is  very  strong  on  attractive  period  de- 
signs for  they  have  been  designers  and  builders  of 
artistic  furniture  for  a  third  of  a  century  and  have  also 
developed  a  machine  of  outstanding  musical  ability 
equipped  with  a  universal  tone  arm  which  enables  it  to 
play  all  makes  of  records  without  additional  attach- 
ments. 


76 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLt)  ANt)  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January.  1019 


Maxwell  Sanitary  Steel  Vaults 


Our  Customers  axe  Assured  of  Superlative  Qyality  and  Prompt  Delivery. 

Maxwell  Vaults  are  Abundantly  Strong  for  AH  Burial  Purposes,  Yet 
Light  and  Easy  to  Handle. 

Superiority  Unquestioned  Design  and  Construction  Unequaled 

Carried  in  Stock  by  All  Leading  Jobbers 

Ask  for  Revised  Price  List 

Maxwell  Ambulance  Transfer  Case 


For  the  Handling,  Removal  and  Transportation  of  Bodies.    An  Indispensable 
Adjunct  to  the  Modern  and  Progressive  Undertaker. 

Recent  Changes  in  Design  and  Construction  have  Greatly  Improved  the  Appearance  and  Practice] 
Utility  of  this  Case,  and  Reduced  its  Weight,  Making  it  much  more  Convenient  to  Handle. 

Removable  Interior  Tray  Retains  All  Leakage  and  Discharge,  and  Greatly  Facilitates  the  Handling 
of  Bodies.     Handles  conveniently  placed  to  enable  two  persons  to  remove  without  difficulty. 
Inside  Dimeniions:  75  in.  long,  20  in.  wide,  13  in.  deep. 
Prices:  With  Tray  $38.00 ;  Without  Tray  $36.00 ;  Tray  Alone  $8.00 

Sold  by  the  Leading  Canadian  Jobbers. 

Manufactured  by 

MAXWELL  STEEL  VAULT  COMPANY,  ONEIDA,  N.Y. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


77 


Undertakers'  Department 

1 Problems  affecting  the  Undertaking  Profession  are  here  discussed  and  readers  are  invited  to  send  letters 
expressing  their  views  on  any  of  the  subjects  dealt  with — News  of  the  profession  throughout  Canada.  I 


SOME  INFLUENZA-PNEUMONIA  CASES 

IIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIMIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 

Appropriate  subject  for  present  day  discussion —  How  to  treat  these  cases —  Examples  of  recent  treatments — How 
difficulties  were  overcome — Profit  by  past  experience — Some  difficulties — Heart  strength  vs.  pulmonary  circulation 

IMIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIininilllMIIIIMIIIIinilll(lllllMIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIMMI:IIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIin 

By  PROF.  CHAS.  O.  DHONAU. 


I  have  had  two  eaises  that  T  want  to  ask  your  advice 
on  after  explaining  treatment  which  I  igave. 

First. — Lady,  thirty-five  years  of  aige ;  weight  about 
no  lbs.,  was  a  tuberculous  patient,  and  contracted  in- 
fluenza. The  patient  died  at  9  p.m.  on  November  1, 
1918.  I  was  called  to  embalm  the  body  at  5  p.m.  on 
November  2.  I  injected  half  gallon  of  fluid  containing 
2V2  per  cent,  of  formaldehyde  gas  and  followed  that 
with  half  gallon  of  fluid  containing  5  per  cent,  of 
formaldehyde  gas.  I  did  not  drain  blood  in  this  case. 
T  injected  two  pints  of  fluid  containing  30  per  cent,  of 
formaldehyde  in  the  thoracic  and  abdominal  cavities. 
Up  to  this  time  there  was  no  purging  from  the  mouth 
and  nose.  Within  thirty  minutes  after  T  had  com- 
pleted my  work  T  placed  the  body  in  a  common  road 
wagon  and  drove  fourteen  miles  over  very  rough  roadrs. 
On  arrival  at  my  place  of  business  I  found  that  some 
pursing  had  occurred  en  route.  I,  therefore,  aspir- 
ated all  contents  of  the  abdominal  and  thoracic  cavi- 
ties and  refilled  them  with  the  same  fluid  (containing 
30  per  cent,  of  formaldehyde  gas).  'Body  was  shipned 
and  reached  its  destination  in  good  condition. 

Noted  by  Prof.  Dhonau: 

The  material  which  purged  from  the  mouth  and  no  e 
in  this  case  wais  probably  the  bloody  and  white  froth 
which  is  formed  within  the  air  passages  of  the  lungs 
from  a  combination  of  blood  serum  from  the  pulmonaiy 
edema  or  dropsy  that  preceded  death  and  decomposi- 
tion gas  which  was  evolved  during  the  trip.  Un- 
doubtedly, the  cavity  injection-  given  did  not  reach 
the  air  passages  of  the  lungs.  It  is  also  evident  that 
the  lung  congestion  prevented  the  proper  circulati"n 
to  the  tissues  of  the  lungs  throug''h  the  bronchial 
arteries.  It  would  have  seemed  logical  to  have  drained 
the  blood  in  this  ease  because  to  have  done  so  would 
have  given  the  fluid  a  better  opportunity  to  have  cir- 
culated properly.  In  so  stating,  T  wish  to  point  out 
the  fact  that  one  of  the  necessary  processes  in  produ"- 
ing  the  frothy  purge  is  the  development  of  decomposi- 
tion gas.  With  a  better  circulation  to  the  lungs  this 
would  have  been  prevented  and  no  purge  would  have 
been  possible.  This  explanation  holds  good  O'dy  for 
this  case.  T  have  ceen  hundreds  of  these  influeny.  - 
pneunu)nia  cases  in  which  the  air  passages  were  fi'led 
with  thick  mucous  matter,  all  of  which  was  depositeil 
there  during  life.  It  is  only  natural  in  these  cases  th>\t 
fluid  injected  after  death  should  then  crowd  the  hiug 
air  spaces  and  drive  the  contained  matter  toward  the 


mouth  and  nose.  In  this  first  ease,  however,  it  appears 
from  the  evidence  that  no  pneumonia  was  present;  the 
purge  then  being  purely  the  result  of  the  mixing  of  de- 
composition gas  and  excess  moisture. 

Second — Man,  died  at  11  p.m.  on  November  13.  I 
prepared  the  body  by  injecting  the  axillary  artery  and 
draining  from  the  vein.  This  was  a  pneumonia  case. 
As  soon  as  I  had  injected  one  pint  of  fluid  the  body 
began  to  purge  and  a  large  amount  of  gas  formed.  I 
kept  on  injecting  sloAvly  and  used  the  trocar  in  abdomi- 
nal and  thoracic  cavities ;  drawing  one  gallon  of  fluid 
material  out  of  the  cavities.  I  then  packed  cotton  into 
the  throat,  and  when  I  had  injected  one  gallon  and  one 
quart  of  fluid  into  the  axillary  artery  I  had  wYiat 
seemed  to  be  good  preservation  and  no  more  gas  had 
formed;  so  I  injected  two  pints  of  fluid  containing  30 
per  cent,  of  formaldehyde  gas  into  the  abdominal  and 
thoracic  cavities.  There  was  no  purge  before  I  ship- 
ped the  body  and  I  do  not  think  there  was  any  trouble 
afterward,  but  would  appreciate  your  advice  regarding 
treatment  of  these  cases.  The  last  body  had  pneu- 
monia two  days  and  during  the  last  day  had  conges*^ion 
of  the  litomach.     The  weight  of  the  body  was  150  lbs. 

Note  by  Prof.  Dhonau  : 

The  purge  in  this  case  was  due  to  the  crowding  of 
the  air  passages  by  fluid  pressmre  on  the  bronchial  cir- 
culation of  the  lungs.  It  may  be  safely  said  that  the 
development  of  decomposition  gas  helped  to  produce 
the  same  result.      It  is  very  likely  that  no  further 


MOUNT  PLEASANT  CEMETERY.  TORONTO 

(A  Sonnet.) 

Pathetic  silence  falls  upon  this  field; 
The  impulse  is  to  whisper  as  we  tread 
The  sacred  precincts  of  the  faithful  dead. 

Or  tend  the  turf  where  loving  lips  are  sealed. 

Nor  can  this  cultured  verdancy,  revealed 
In  shrub  or  tree,  in  grass  or  flow'ry  bed, 
Whereby  we  decorate  a  human  dread, 

Bring  forth  the  balm  by  which  our  woe  is  healed. 

Oft  in  our  helplessness  we  seek  the  space 

Where  spectral  marbles  hold  sweet  names  to  view; 

There  fancy  slu'ines  the  unfoi'gotten  face 

'  And  founts  of  tender  feeling  rise  anew. 

Ah  !  whither  look  but  to  that  hope  which  says. 
The  story  of  the  other  Avorld  is  true? 


78 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


trouble  occurred  and  that  j^our  case  reached  its  desti- 
nation in  good  condition.  No  one  could  have  done 
more  than  you  in  the  case. 

Out  of  several  hundred  influenza-pneumonia  cases 
handled  in  our  laboratories  in  the  Cincinnati  General 
Hospital,  there  were  only -a  few  which  did  not.  present 
evidence  of  cyanosis.  Cyanosis  is  the  technical  name 
covering  the  condition  by  which  the  circulation 
through  the  lungs  is  retarded  in  life,  the  blood  backs  up 
into  the  venous  system  and  by  overfilling  the  larger 
veins  and  consequently  the  further  backing  up  into 
the  smaller  veins  and  finally  the  capillaries,  a  blue  or 
blue  black  discoloration  is  produced.  Probably  97 
per  cent,  of  all  the  cases  we  handled  during  the  epidemic 
were  discolored  to  begin  with.  Over  75  per  cent,  of 
them  purged  from  the  nose  and  mouth  either  before 
beginning  the  injection  or  during  the  injection. 

We  noticed  in  some  of  the  first  ones  which  came  to 
our  attention  that  the  arterial  distribution  could  only 
be  made  under  difficulty;  that  there  was  a  back  pres- 
sure. This  Ave  found  later  to  be  due  to  the  shut  oi¥ 
action  of  rigor  mortis,  not  only  at  the  joints,  but 
wherever  muscle  tissue  was  found.  The  rigor  in  these 
eases  was  unusually  severe.  We  had  some  trouble 
eliminating  discolorations    with    the    usual  drainage 


LATK  CARDINAL  FARLEY 
Lying-in-state  in  residence  at  New  York. 

(Courtesy  Champion  Chemical  Co.) 


method  so  we  went  back  to  the  right  ventricle  of  the 
heart  method  and  by  the  time  the  epidemic  had  spent 
its  force,  we  had  reduced  the  time  necessary  to  embalm 
these  bodies  to  one  hour,  in  which  time  we  would  re- 
move the  discolorations,  eliminate  the  contents  of  the 
hollow  organs,  etc.  The  speed  of  the  method  was  due 
to  the  use  of  two  pumps;  an  injector  on  the  arterial 
side,  and  an  aspirator  on  the  right  ventricle  side.  With 
an  injection  of  two  gallons  of  fluid  we  averaged  a  re- 
turn of  1%  gallons  from  the  venous  side  through  the 
heart. 

Peculiar  circumstance  at  death  in  these  cases  was 
the  ever  present  one  of  the  heart  beating  for  a  short 
time  after  the  lungs  could  not  be  penetrated  by  the 
pulmonary  blood.  This  showed  clearly  that  regard- 
less of  the  strength  of  the  heart,  the  ruling  factor  was 
the  condition  of  the  pulmonary  circulation  and  the  air 
passages. 

One  of  the  high  spots  encountered  during  the  epi- 
demic was  a  case  which  had  been  unclaimed  for  ten 
days.  On  the  eleventh  day  it  was  claimed  and  our 
embalming  service  received  orders  to  prepare  for  ship- 
ment to  California.  On  examination  the  body  was 
found  discolored  all  over,  incliuding  the  face.  The 
blood,  however,  was  prevented  from  coagulating  by 
the  system  of  cooling  we  use  which  holds  it  in  liquid 
condition  for  some  time.  The  blood  had  dried  out  to 
some  extent,  however,  and  the  ordinary  injection  and 
drainage  failed  to  move  it  from  the  face.  I  took  one 
of  the  well-known  capillary  washes  and  injected  this 
through  the  trocar  into  the  right  ventricle  of  the  heart 
and  some  of  it  passed  into  the  veins  of  the  face.  The 
immediate  result  was  that  the  face  became  darker  than 
ever  for  a  time,  bait  after  three  pints  of  the  solution 
had  been  injected  in  that  way.  the  current  was  re- 
versed and  the  liquid  drawn  out  again.  Accomoany- 
ing  this  with  a  vigorous  massage  we  Avere  able  to 
record  a  complete  restoration  of  the  color  to  normal. 
Several  students  witnessed  this  operation  and  were 
profoundly  impressed  with  the  result  of  the  method 
and  expressed  a  desire  to  try  it  aigain  on  a  similar  case. 


MILLIONS  DIE  IN  INDIA 

The  influenza  epidemic  in  India  shows  definite  signs 
of  ahatement.  Its  ravages  have  been  terrible.  In 
Bombay  city  there  were  15,000  deaths,  and  in  Delhi 
city,  in  a  population  of  200,000,  the  death-rate  at  one 
time  reached  800  daily.  In  the  rural  tracts  beyond  the 
reach  of  etfective  prophylactic  measures  the  loss  has 
been  tremendous.  A  recent  report  shows  that  in  the 
Punjab  it  followed  much  the  same  couree  as  in  places 
attracting  more  public  notice.  The  first  signs  appeared 
in  August.  In  September  it  persisted  in  a  mild  form, 
and  from  the  middle  of  October  until  November  8,  it 
was  acute.  It  is  estimated  that  the  number  of  deaths 
range  from  five  to  ten  per  cent,  of  the  population.  The 
death-roll  is  heaviest  amongst  young  adults  and  women. 

The  mimlber  of  deaths  in  the  Punjab  is  estimated  at 
250,000.  When  the  final  results  of  the  epidemic  are 
summed  up  it  will  probaMy  be  found  that  other  provin- 
ces have  suffered  on  approximately  the  same  scale.  No 
paa-t  of  the  countiy  seems  to  have  escaped,  although  the 
visitation  Avasi  lightest  in  Bengal,  and  even  the  dry  and 
bracing  Himalayan  tracts  are  reported  to  have  been 
severely  attacked. 

The  population  of  the  Punjab  and  the  Punjab  Native 
States'  is  aboxit  24,000,000,  and  of  the  Avhole  of  India, 
about  315,000,000.  If  the  infiuenza  death-rate  proves 
as  heavy  throughout  India  as  in  the  Punjab,  this  Avould 
give  a  total  death-roll  of  over  3,000,000. 


JaxLuaiy,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


79 


Mr.            \   What  constitutes  "SERVICE"? 
Funeral     \   Does  "SERVICE"  mean  anything  to  you  ? 
Director    I   If  so,  are  you  getting  "SERVICE"  ? 

EFFICIENCY  in  time  of  EMERGENCY 

Last  minute  statistics  state  that  Spanish  Influenza  was  six  times  deadlier  than 
war.  Little  we  realize  what  this  means,  or  how  funeral  supply  houses  were 
able  to  cope  with  the  epidemic. 

DOMINION  SERVICE 

accomplished  what  supposedly  was  the  impossible,  when  put  to  the  test,  and 
the  SERVICE  rendered  to  hundreds  of  customers  proved  marvelous, 

One  branch  states  that  for  five  weeks  they  shipped  nothing  but  express  orders, 
and  by  so  doing-  never  received  a  complaint  from  customers. 

Another  branch  shipped  in  one  month  nearly  seven  times  its  regular  output, 
the  men  working  night  and  day.  even  Sundays,  but  they  stayed  by  their  post 
heroically,  with  the  results  that  DOMINION  SERVICE  proved  what  we 
advertise,  EFFICIENCY. 

Still  another  branch  tripled  their  output,  but  unfortunately  was  hit  very  hard 
by  the  epidemic,  at  one  time  50  per  cent,  of  their  staflF  was  disorganized,  some 
deaths  occurring.  However,  the  efforts  of  the  men,  to  cope  with  the  amount  of 
emergency  orders,  more  than  showed  the  "systematized  good-will"  that  exists 
between 

Labor — Dominion  Service — -Funeral  Director 


The  enormous  amount  of  merchandise  carried  by  our  respective  branches  from 
coast  to  coast,  helped  us  to  facilitate  matters  at  the  very  start  of  the  epidemic, 
consequently  we  were  in  a  splendid  position  for  the  final  drive  "Over  the  top," 
when  mortality  was  claiming  a  terrible  toll.  In  the  past  our  stocks  have 
largely  been  responsible  for  the  splendid  results  obtained  by  funeral  directors, 
thro  the  horrible  disasters  of  "Northern  Ontario  fires,"  the  "Titanic,"  the 
' '  Empress  of  Ireland ' '  and  the  ' '  Halifax  disaster. ' ' 

We  are  now  devoting  every  energy,  to  build  up  our  depleted  stocks,  and  assure 
you  that  DOMINION  SERVICE  will  always  "go  over  the  top"  under  the  most 
extraordinary  conditions. 


ONCE 
USED 


ALWAYS 
USED 


80 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


No.  543,  Solid  Quarter-Cut  Oak 
No.  544,  Solid  Mahogany 


WORKMANSHIP— AN— ELEMENT— IN— SERVICE 

Back  of  all  success  in  manufacturing;  back  of  the  sales  campaign,  the  financing,  the 
purchasing,  etc.,  the  big  fundamental  remains,  the  quality  of  product  is  a  determining 
factor  in  the  future  of  any  business.  Dominion  Manufacturers,  Limited,  safely  claim 
the  right  of  patronage  of  the  Funeral  Directors,  on  the  point  of  workmanship  alone. 


''Original  Designs,  Superior  Worl^manship  and  Materials/' 


Dominion  Manufacturers,  Limited 

Head  Office :    1 09  Niagara  St.,  Toronto,  Canada. 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


81 


ELEMENTS  of  EMBALMING 

A  Review  Course  of  instruction  for  readers  of 
Canadian  Furniture  W orld  and  The  Undertaker 

By  Howard  S.  Eckels,  Ph.  G. 
ARTICLE  IV 


To  describe  an  artery  and  its  appearance  may  best 
be  done  by  contrasting  it  with  the  vein.  As  we  have 
before  described,  the  artery  is  composed  of  three 
coats.  The  outer  coat  is  the  vascular.  This  is  the 
one  Avhich  contains  the  blood  vessels  which  supply  the 
other  coats  of  the  artery  and  frequently  shows  very 
plainly  in  blood-poison  eases,  alcoholism  and  Bright 's 
disease — also  in  bodies  which  have  been  dead  for  a 
number  of  hours  before  being  embalmed.  These 
little  vessels  in  the  outer  coat  of  the  artery  frequently 
become  quite  prominent  tAvo  or  three  days  after  death 
has  taken  place,  coloring  the  artery  a  streaky  red. 

The  middle  coat  of  the  artery  is  the  muscular  or 
fibrous  and  much  thicker  than  the  other  coats  of  either 
artery  or  vein.  Hence  the  artery  usually  appears  two 
or  three  times  as  thick  as  the  vein,  as  well  as  more 
solid  and  firm,  so  that  when  the  artery  is  cut  and 
rolled  between  the  fingers,  the  thickness  of  the  walls 
causes  it  to  gap  and  stay  open. 

The  branches  from  the  artery  usually  are  small  and 
occur  at  right  angles  fi'om  the  artery.  They  remain 
and  occur  at  right  angles  from  the  artery.  They  re- 
main the  same  size  until  they  them'Selves  send  otf 
branches,  when,  like  the  artery  from  which  they 
branch,  they  are  reduced  in  size  in  proportion  to  the 
.■^izes  of  the  branches  they  send  otf. 

Artei-ies  have  no  valves,  and  therefore  admit  of  a 
circulation  of  fluid  in  either  direction.  The  walls  of 
the  arteries  being  thicker  than  the  veins,  the  blood  is 
not  so  tran.sparent  in  the  arteries  as  it  is  in  the  veins, 
henee  does  not  anoear  to  be  as  dark.  ^he  ^irteries 
thus  may  be  readily  distinguished  fi-om  the  veins  by 
these  tests. 

The  basilic  A'ein  usually  is  twice  as  large  in  circum- 
ference ais  the  artery.  Where  branches  occur,  they  fre- 
(luently  appear  when  stretched  over  the  instrument — 
the  bone  seoarator  should  be  used — to  be  as  large  as  the 
vein  from  Avhich  they  branch,  and  the  iunetion  of  them, 
therefore,  is  like  unto  forks  of  a  road.  When  an  in- 
cision is  made  in  the  veins,  the  walls  lay  flat  tojyether 
like  tAvo  pieces  of  wet  tissue  paper  and  do  not  form  a 
gap  a«  does  the  artery.  The  walls  of  a  vein  collapse 
Avhen  empty,  because  of  their  being  thin.  Avhile  the 
ai-tery  remains  cylindrical  even  though  empty,  because 
the  walls  of  the  artery  are  thick. 

In  or  near  the  arm-j)it  the  axillary  vein,  which  is 
very  much  larger  than  the  basilic  vein,  is  used  to 
enter  a  tube  known  as  the  vein  tube,  the  Y-shaped 
tubes  show7i  in  the  illustration. 

Here  the  axillary  vein,  which  is  two  inches  higher 
no  in  the  ai'ui,  is  used  in  preference  to  the  basilic  vein, 
Ix'causc  it  is  larger  and  very  much  neai-er  the  surface, 
especially  in  stout  persons.  It  is  also  more  easily 
(iistingnished  from  the  artery  and  easier  to  locate  than 
the  basilic  vein.  The  veiji  tube  is  entered  for  the  pur- 
pose of  opening  a  Avay  through  the  valves  and  passing 


on  beyond  where  they  exist  in  the  vein;  that  is,  to  a 
point  near  the  upper  end  of  the  breastbone. 

The  vein  at  this  point  is  known  as  the  innominate 
vein  and  immediately  empties  into  the  superior  vena 
cava,  through  Avhich  the  blood  flows  before  it  enters 
the  right  auricle  of  the  heart. 

The  injection  of  the  fluid  into  the  arteries  during  the 
draining  of  the  veins  aids  in  the  circulation  of  the 
blood  from  the  capillaries  into  the  veins,  Avhich  natur- 
ally floAvs  into  the  largest  veins  just  as  does  the  water 
from  the  ground  into  the  siprings.  The  embalmer  thus 
collects  a  considerably  larger  quantitA-  than  possibly 
could  be  contained  at  any  one  time  in  these  large  veins 
and  in  the  cavities  of  the  heart. 

No  one  artery  and  no  one  method  absolutely  fills 
every  need  of  the  emTbalmer,  nor  meets  every  con- 
tingency that  may  arise.  It  is  safe  to  say,  hoAvever, 
that  the  axillary  method  more  nearly  fills  all  needs  than 
any  other  single  one.  since  by  it,  Avith  the  use  of  the  im- 
proved in.struments,  the  embalming  fluid  is  delivered 
directly  into  the  arch  of  the  aorta,  the  beginning  of 
the  systemic  circulation.  The  blood  is  drained  by  Avay 
of  the  axillary  vein,  from  the  superior  A^ena  caA'a,  the 
great  venous  blood  reservoir  of  the  upoer  portion  of 
the  body.  This  method,  therefore,  ena'bles  the  em- 
balmer to  remove  the  blood  from  exactly  the  portions 
of  the  bodA^  where  it  Avould  otherAA-ise  interfere  with 
cosmetic  effects,  since  the  veins  leading  from  both  the 
face  and  the  hands  dump  their  contents  directly  into 
this  great  natural  receptacle. 

It  is  impossible,  effectively,  cleanly  and  naturally,  to 
di'ain  blood  from  the  u'oper  portion  of  the  bodv  by  any 
other  method,  since  the  jugular  requirfs  not  onh-  a 
A^ery  deep  and  difficult  incision,  but  is  ant  to  produce 
an  ugly  floAV  AA'hich  is  hard  to  control.  The  promiscu- 
ous use  of  the  trocar  has  been  abandoned  by  all  scien- 
tific men  long  ago. 

The  basilic  vein  cannot  give  the  effective  floAv  that 
the  axillary  does,  since  it  is  A'ery  much  smaller  and  be- 
cause the  A'alves  are  apt  to  interfere  and  prevent  com- 
plete sueee.ss.  Throngh  the  axillary.  hoAA'CA-er.  we  can 
insert  a  A'cni  tube  past  all  vaH^es  and  thns  secure  a 
direct  floAV  from  a  .source  AA-here  it  is  possible  for  the 
operator  to  absolutely  control  its  volume. 

Another  advantage  of  the  axillary  method,  and  a 
most  imiportant  one,  is  that  since  practicallv  all  em- 
balming fluids  contain  more  or  less  formaldehyde,  their 
hai'dening  eft'ect  is  apt  to  give  such  rigidity  that  it  is 
extremely  difficult  to  properly  pose  the  subject  in  the 
casket. 

In  some  of  the  bettei-  fluids  the  harshness  of  the  raAV 
formaldehyde  is  modified  either  bA'  transforming  it  into 
formocholoral  or  by  the  inclusion  in  their  composition 
of  chemicals  which  have  a  tendency  to  retard  its  hard- 
ening effects. 

The  tendency  of  almost  all  fluids,  hoAVCA'er.  is  to 
give  more  oi-  less  rigidity  to  the  particular  pai't  of  the 
body  into  Avhich  they  are  injected.  The  result  of  this 
is  that,  when  either  the  radial  or  the  brachial  arteries, 
for  instance,  are  used,  the  arm  in  Avhich  the  fluid  is  in- 
jected Avill  become  extremely  j-igid  before  the  fluid  has 
had  sufficient  time  in  which  to  penetrate  and  do  its 
Avork  in  other  ])ortions  of  the  body.  As  a  natural 
result,  it  is  impossible  for  the  funeral  director  to  pose 
the  hands  in  a  life-like  attitude  in  the  casket,  unless 
the  placing  is  done  in  advance. 

( To  be  continued.) 


82 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


PROMINENT  ONTARIO  FURNITURE  DEALER 
DEAD 

Robert  Nugent,  Lindsay,  Ont.,  and  one  of  Ontario's 
most  prominent  funeral  directors,  died  at  his  home  in 
that  town  on  December  5,  of  cancer  of  the  Sioniach. 
Mr.  Nugent  was  but  62  years  of  a<>e.  He  was  born  in 
Victoria  County,  and  at  an  early  age  entered  the  furni- 
ture business  as  an  apprentice  with  Johii  Anderson, 
from  whom,  too,  he  got  his  first  insight  int(^  the  em- 
balming and  funeral  directing  profession. 

Later.  Mr.  Nugent  travelled  Western  Ontario  and 
the  Western  States,  which  experience  enabled  him  to 
add  to  his  knowledge.  In  3885  he  returned  to  his 
home  town  and  became  a  partner  with  his  former  eia- 
ployer,  the  firm  trading  under  the  name  of  Anderson 
&  Nugent.  Later  the  name  was  changed  to  Anderson, 
Nugent  &  Co. 

Mr.  Nugent  was  in  the  profession  for  33  years  as  a 
principal.  One  of  his  first  acts  on  returning  to  Lindsay 


-    THE  LATE  ROBERT  NUGENT,  - 
Lindsay,  Ont. 

was  to  enter  the  Canadian  Embalmers  Association,  of 
which  he  has  since  been  a  member,  entering  that  or- 
ganization in  its  second  year.  His  election  as  president 
two  years  ago  was  entirely  the  unanimous  choice  of  the 
Association  for  a  popular  director,  and  his  handling  of 
the  office  was  eminently  satisfactory. 

The  funeral  on  Saturday,  December  7,  was  a  par- 
ticularly large  one,  showing  the  regard  in  which  Mr. 
Nugent  had  been  held  by  his  f  ellow  townsmen,  and  was 
under  Masonic  auspices.  Many  funeral  directors  from 
the  eountiy  roundabout  were  present. 

Among  others  noticed  were  A.  Comstock,  of  Peter- 
borough, who  with  his  spn  drove  their  auto  25  miles  to 
Lindsay,  to  be  present.  This  is  particularly  notice- 
a'ble  because  Mr.  Comstock  is  now  82  and  the  weather 
was  somewhat  severe.  M.  J.  Stoddart,  of  Woodville, 
was  also  there,  as  Avere  Fred.  Coles,  of  the  National 
Casket  Co.,  Toronto ;  Secretary  Fred.  W.  Matthews,  of 
the  ('.Yj.A..  Toronto,  and  N.  R.  Cobbledick,  Toronto. 


George  Worthington,  president  and  general  manager 
of  the  Ontario  Rubl)er  Co.,  Toronto,  and  well-known 
in  funeral  directing  circles,  died  last  month  a  victim 
of  influenza. 


STATISTICS  IN  ONTARIO  AND  QUEBEC 

Dr.  J.  A.  Beaudry,  Inspector-General  of  the  Superior 
Board  of  Health  for  Quebec  province,  is  authority  for 
the  statement  that  there  were  in  that  province  last 
year  530,704  cases  of  influenza  and  13.880  deaths,  about 
one  case  in  forty  ending  in  death. 

Diiring  the  last  three  months  of  1918  influenza  and 
pneumonia  took  a  toll  of  7,158  lives  in  Ontario.  In 
October  there  were  3,105  deaths;  November,  2.608; 
December,  1,568. 


CANADA'S  WAR  DEATH  TOTALS 

Canadian  total  casualties  during  the  war  were 
220,182,  of  Avhich  60,383  were  deaths.  The  deaths 
were  classed  as:  killed  in  action,  35,666;  died  of 
wounds,  12,420;  died  of  disease,  5,405;  presumed  dead, 
4,)S71 ;  deaths  in  Canada,  2,221. 


PROFESSIONAL  NOTES. 

N.  Chartrc^nd,  funeral  director,  of  Vallev-rfield.  Que., 
is  dead. 

G.  F.  Sutherland  succeeds  Sutherland  &  Sons,  funeral 
directors,  at  Welland,  Ont. 

Harry  McKillop  was  elected  a  councilman  in  the  re- 
cent civic  elections  at  Brampton. 

Charley  Puffer,  of  Norwich,  Avas  elected  as  member 
of  the  council  in  his  town  at  the  beginning    of  the  year. 

The  Central  Casket  Co.'s  annual  embalming  de  non- 
stration  took  place  at  that  eorapaiiyVs  Niagara  Si. 
headquarters  at  Buffalo  on  January  7  to  10. 

Will  Bartlett,  travelling  salesman  in  Eastern  Ont  ario, 
for  the  National  Casket  Co.,  Avho  with  his  family  was 
laid  up  with  "flu"  has  recovered  and  is  back  on  his 
territory. 

J.  J.  Mairsh,  of  Smith's  Falls,  Ont.,  has  made  exten- 
sive alterations  to  his  undertaking  .  parlors.  The 
premises  have  been  enlarged  and  the  Deleo  lighting 
system  installed. 

Williams  &  Son.  St.  Thomas,  Out.,  are  adding  a  neAV 
motor  hearse  to  their  equipment.  The  body  is  built 
on  a  Stndebaker  chassis.  Thi';  is  the  second  motor 
hearse  of  this  firm. 

L.  F.  Hogan,  formerly  Avith  the  late  W.  G.  Stoddart. 
at  CornAvall,  Ont..  has  opened  up  a  furniture  business 
and  undertaking  parlors  under  the  name  of  Hog-au  & 
Co.,  on  First  St.  E.,  Cornwall. 

J.  T.  George,  of  A.  W.  George  &  Son,  undertakers, 
at  Port  Hope,  Ont.,  AA'hile  shoA^eling  snow  recently  from 
the  roof  of  his  house,  missed  his  footing  and  fell  to  the 
ground,  fracturing  both  legs  just  above  the  ankles. 


GOOD  PLACE  FOR  FUNERALS 

A  Frenchman  Avas  Avaiting  at  a  railroad  station  in 
Ireland  Avhen  a  couple  of  natives  sat  doAvn  beside  him. 

"Sure,  Pat.  it's  doAvn  to  Kilmary  I've  be?n.  and  I'm 
on  me  way  back  to  Kilpatrick." 

"Ye  don't  say  so,''  said  the  other.  "It's  mesself 
that's  just  after  being  doAvn  to  Kilkenny,  and  T  stop 
here  a  hit  befoi'e  T  go  to  Kilmore." 

"What  assatssins!"  thought  the  Frenchman.  "Would 
that  I  Avere  safely  back  in  France!" 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


I 


83 


FIGURING  PROFITS  IN  FUNERAL  DIRECTING 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  linillinilllllHIIIIIIinillMllllllllllllllllllllllinilllllMIIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIinilllllllllllllllllMIIIIMIIIIMIMIIlin 

A  knotty  problem — "Overhead"  an  expense  that  varies  with  locality — What  is  the  profit? — Cut  out  guesswork — 
Salesmanship  a  factor — ^What  of  the  automobile  ? — Time  counts  in  the  making  of  money —  Figuring  on  daily  expenses 

IIIIIIIIIMIIIII  IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIII  IIIMIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIIinilllllllllMIIIIMNIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMinMIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIiniMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^   Ill  lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 


DURING  the  past  years  there  have  been  many 
articles  written  on  this  subject.  Just  how  to 
figure  profits  in  the  undertaldng  business  is  a 
problem,  and  it  might  be  that  it  is  a  knotty  problem 
at  that.  One  can  get  twisted  into  hundreds  of  mental 
knots  trying  to  read  and  figure  out  some  of  the  articles 
that  have  been  written.  It  is  hard  to  apply  any  set 
plan  or  rules  that  would  fit  all  cases.  There  are  so 
many  local  conditions  that  enter  into  the  subject.  What 
will  figure  out  to  be  a  profit  with  some  engaged  in  this 
profession,  will  mean  a  loss  to  others.  An  overhead 
expense  of  15  per  cent,  might  apply  very  well  in  some 
localities,  but  20  per  cent,  to  30  per  cent,  would  come 
nearer  hitting  the  mark  in  mo.st  places.  It  is  only 
within  the  last  few  years  that  we  have  heard  much 
about  this  "overhead  expense"  and  it  has  caused  the 
wise  ones  to  get  out  their  little  pads  and  pencils  and 
do  some  real  head  work. 

Many  do  not  know  what  profit  is.  Many  will  state 
that  it  is  the  difference  between  the  cost  and  the  sell- 
ing price.  This  statement  is  partly  wrong.  The 
difference  between  the  cost  price  of  an  article  and  the 
selling  price  is  known  as  gross  profit,  and  out  of  thiis 
gross  profit  must  come  the  expenses  and  after  the  ex- 
penses are  paid,  what  is  then  left  is  net  profit.  It  is 
the  net  profit  that  we  are  interested  in.  Far  too  few 
engaged  in  the  undertaking  businesii  understand  just 
how  to  figure  profit.  Some  Avill  add  a  certain  per 
cent,  above  the  cost  price  and  feel  satisfied  that  enough 
has  been  added  to  show  a  good  net  profit.  This  sys- 
tem is  hit  and  miss,  and  doesn't  give  those  who  deal 
with  you  equal  fairness.  Some  will  be  charged  too 
much,  while  others  will  not  be  charged  enough. 

A  great  deal  of  guess  work  is  done  by  the  undertak- 
ing profession  in  the  making  of  prices.  If  you  would 
go  into  the  store  of  some  other  line  of  business  to  make 
a  purchase  and  the  proprietor  would  quote  you  a  guess 
price,  you  would  feel  that  perhaps  you  were  getting 
stuck.  In  either  case,  about  the  first  thought  that 
would  come  to  your  mind  would  be  that  that  merchant 
was  a  poor  businesrs  man.  Unless  you  felt  that  you 
were  getting  a  bargain  each  time  you  entered  his  store 
it  is  doubtful  whether  you  would  care  to  trade  with 
such  a  merchant.  Progressive  merchants  of  this  day 
and  age  mark  their  goods  not  always  in  plain  figures, 
but  nevertheless  marked  so  that  they  know  juist  what 
profit  each  article  carries.  Successful  merchants  un- 
derstand this  and  know  that  each  article  sold  must 
show  its  jjroportionate  profit.  The  most  expensive 
thing  that  any  one  engaged  in  this  profession  can  do, 
irs  to  make  guess  prices.  The  most  profitable  thing 
to  do  at  all  times  is  to  knoAV. 

A  very  successful  merchant  will  always  figure  that 
the  most  costly  thing  he  handles  is  time — minutes, 
hours,  days,  weeks  and  months.  It  is  not  hard  to 
prove  this  asi^ertion.  Sup|)ose  that  yoni'  average  ex- 
pense is  20  per  cent,  of  the  sale.  Say  that  you  buy,  as 
an  illustration,  an  article  for  $50.00  and  you  put  your 


selling  price  at  just  double  the  cost,  which  will  make 
the  selling  price  .$100.00.  If  you  are  fortunate  to  sell 
this  article  the  first  year  you  will  make  $30.00  taking 
off  your  20  per  cent,  expense.  But  perhaps  you  are 
compelled  to  keep  the  article  several  years  'before  you 
finally  dispose  of  it.  Say  that  at  the  end  of  five  years 
it  is  sold,  and  you  take  your  paper  and  pencil  and 
figure  the  transaction  out  in  cold  figures.  Your  ex- 
penses have  been  20  per  cent,  for  each  one  of  the  five 
years,  or  100  per  cent,  for  the  full  five  years  period. 
Hence  you  can  readily  see  that  you  have  used  up  the 
entire  $100.00  you  received  and  you  are  out  the  $50.00 
the  cost  of  the  article — all  because  of  the  time  it  took 
to  turn  your  investment  into  money. 

Now,  to  show  that  time  counts  and  to  make  money 
fast,  and  this  is  the  creed  of  all  big  money-making 
merchants,  you  ishould  only  buy  such  articles  that  will 
turn  your  money  many  times  within  a  year.  To  fur- 
ther illustrate  this  point  let  us  suppose  that  you  had 
sold  the  article  in  question  in  less  time — a  very  short 
time — for  $70.00.  Your  expenses  are  still  20  per  cent, 
or  $14.00  and  your  profit  would  only  be  $6.00.  Here 
lies  the  point!    If  you  made  this  sort  of  transaction 


Examination 

-By- 

The  Board  of  Examiners 

—To  be  Held  at— 

Toronto,  Wednesday,  Feb.  5th,  1919 

The  Government  Boai^d  of  Examiners,  under 
the  Embalmers'  and  Undertakers'  Act,  will 
conduct  an  Examination  in  the  Anatomical 
Section  of  t'he  Toronto  Universit.y,  on  Wednes- 
day, February  5th,  1919,  commencing  at  9.30 
o'clock  in  the  moi-ning. 

Candidates  wishing  to  take  the  Examination 
for  qualification  and  Govei'nment  license  as 
embalmers  will  send  their  application  and  fee 
of  $20.00  to  the  Secretary  not  later  than 
February  1st,  1919.  Blank  forms  of  applica- 
tion can  be  had  on  application  to  the  Secretary. 

T.  E.  SIMPSON, 
Secretary-Treasurer, 
Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Out. 


84 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


ten  times  over  in  one  year's  time,  your  profit  would  be 
160.00.  It  is  easy  to  see  how  speeding  up  the  time  in- 
creases the  real  profit,  although  the  margin  is  very 
much  smaller. 

In  many  undertaking  establishments  it  is  not  hard 
to  find  some  articles  that  have  been  on  sale  for  a  num- 
ber of  years,  and  the  proprietor  would  be  willing  to  sell 
them  at  a  very  small  profit  and  in  some  cases  would 
stand  a  loss  to  move  the  article  in  question.  Having 
goods  on  your  floor  for  a  number  of  years  is  due  in  a 
great  degree  to  carelessness  and  poor  salesmanship.  It 
is  not  in  the  scope  of  this  article  to  explain  how  a  slow 


HONORED  IN  DEATH 

Funeral  of  Nurse  Hurlturt  leaving  the  Gardiner  Funeral  Home,  172 
Kennedy  St..  Winnipeg,  recently.  Six  associated  nurses  acted  as  pall- 
bearers, a  fitting  tribute  to  a  life  laid  down  in  service. 

Nurse  Huribnrt  was  on  the  staff  of  the  King  George  Municipal 
Hospital  and  volunteered  for  service  among  the  influenza  patients.  She 
contracted  the  malady  and  succumbed  after  a  heroic  fight  for  life. 

Preceding  the  casket  are  seen  Rev.  Dr.  Armstrong,  of  Ft.  Rouge 
Methodist  Church,  and  .\.  B.  Gardiner,  who  conducted  the  funeral. 


selling  casket  can  be  changed  and  find  ready  sale.  This 
is  salesmanship,  but  nevertheless  it  has  much  to  do 
with  the  net  profit.  Perhaps  you  have  never  figured 
that  the  longer  you  keep  a  certain  casket  in  stock  the 
cost  of  that  casket  is  daily  increasing.  It  is  far  better 
to  avoid  old  casket  stock  and  at  all  times  keep  your 
stock  right  up  to  the  minute  with  fresh  goods.  You 
are  then  able  to  obtain  better  prices,  and  turn  your 
money  faster. 

Your  expenses  for  rent,  salaries,  light,  heat  and 
water — formerly  your  barn,  now  your  garage  expense 
— and  all  other  expenses  that  are  necessary  with  a 


modern  undertaking  establishment  are  daily  expenses?. 
To  bear  out  the  above  argument  this  daily  expense 
should  be  placed  against  all  the  goods  on  hand  every 
day.  The  goods  that  are  of  slow  sale  should  stand 
the  greater  part  of  these  expenses,  particularly  the 
item  of  rent.  To  hold  goods  is  what  we  rent  our  build- 
ing for,  and  in  view  of  this  the  goods  that  move  slowly 
should  stand  the  greater  charge  for  expenses.  To- 
day the  overhead  expense  of  any  undertaking  estab- 
lishment is  much  more  than  it  was  just  a  few  years  ago. 
The  advent  of  the  automobile  has  added  an  additional 
expense  to  some,  and  to  others  it  has  lessened  the  ex- 
penses of  this  department.  In  some  localities  it  is 
necessary  to  have  both  the  horses  and  the  automobiles. 
No  doubt  this  is  an  increased  expense,  and  adds  to  the 
overhead.  The  automobile  has  proved  a  gain  for  some, 
and  a  loss  to  others. 


EARLY  FUNERALS  IN  WALES 

Shortage  in  coffins  due  to  the  exceptionally  large 
number  of  funerals  in  South  Wales  during  a  recent 
fortnight,  reminds  a  correspondent  that  up  to  the  com- 
mencement of  the  eighteenth  century  many  bodies  were 
interred  in  rural  Welsh  churchyards  without  coffins. 
They  were  placed  in  what  was  known  as  "cadach  dAvy- 
pen"  ('which  literally  means  cloth  with  two  ends),  re- 
sembling a  labourer's  wallet.  The  body  wa^  let  down 
into  the  grave  by  ropes  fastened  to  the  two  ends.  There 
Avere  some  old  people  living  in  a  Mid-Wales  village 
some  fifty  years  ago  who  recollected  such  burials,  and 
their  de.scription  is  recorded  in  one  of  the  Welsh  papers. 


ENTERS  BUSINESS  ON  OWN  ACCOUNT 

E.  E.  Sponenburg,  of  Windsor,  Out.,  has  purchased 
the  business  conducted  at  St.  Thomas.  Ont..  by  Kerr 
&  Co.  Mr.  Sponenburg  has  been  assistant  with  J. 
Chappin,  of  Windsor,  for  the  past  six  years ;  and  has 
had  experience  also  in  Detroit.    He  is  a  son  of  Geo. 


MR.  K.  E.  SPONENBURG 

Sponenburg,  undertaker  at  Melbourne.  Ont.  He  at- 
tended the  last  school  conducted  by  the  C.  E.  A.,  at 
Toronto,  successfully  passing  his  exams. 

Mir.  Sponenburg  took  possession  of  his  new  business 
on  Jan.  1,  and  intends  having  an  up-to-date  establish- 
ment and  motor  e((uipment.  He  will  build  a  morgiie 
and  chapel,  and  intends  carrying  a  good-sized  repre- 
.sentative  stock.  Mr.  Sponenburg  Avill  make  a  first- 
class  addition  to  the  modern  funeral  directors  of 
Ontario. 


CANICULA  TitSr 


That  velvety-flow  fluid  that  is  different; 
does  not  burn  or  shrivel  the  arteries, 
allowing  the  operator  to  inject  as  often 
as  he  likes  and  obtain  that  desired  eff'ect. 

CANICULA  CHEMICAL  COMPANY 

366  Bathurst  Street       -       TORONTO,  CANADA 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


85 


Something  Further  About  Necropsies 

Dr.  Robinson  of  the  Dept.  of  Pathology,  Toronto 
General  Hospital,  dwells  further  on 
post  moitem  cases. 


A  number  of  obstacles  are  met  witb  by  the  pathologist 
in  securing  permission  for  a  necropsy.  A  commission 
appointed  by  the  New  York  Academy  of  Medicine  in 
1912,  to  determine  Avhat  were  the  main  causes  of  these 
obstacles  found  five  factors  at  work.  First,  that  "due 
to  the  ignorance  on  the  part  of  the  public  of  the  im- 
portance of  necropsies  to  science  and  therefore  to  the 
welfare  of  the  people."  This  we  have  never  found  a 
very  serious  factor  for  most  intelligent  people  when 
the  case  is  put  clearly  before  them  will  not  hesitate  to 
give  permission,  iu  fact  sometimes  they  are  very 
anxious  to  know  Avhat  was  wrong,  and  insist  on  a 
complete  written  report  of  our  findings.  Secondly : 
"to  the  existing  inadequate  laws." 

Most  public  hospitals  in  Europe,  have  the  right  by 
law,  to  perform  a  post  mortem  examination  on  every 
patient  that  dies  in  their  institution.  A  number  of 
hospitals  will  not  receive  a  patient  unless  permission  is 
first  signed  for  a  post  mortem,  should  the  patient  die 
while  in  their  institution. 

T  don't  think  that  we  need  such  regulations  in  this 
country.  We  have  an  intelligent  class  of  people  to 
deal  with  and  we  would  rather  have  the  voluntary 
consent  of  the  next  of  kin. 

Third:  "to  the  activity  of  undertakers  and  certain 
funeral  societies." 


Fourth:  "to  the  inadequate  rules  of  hospitals  in  this 
respect."  And, 

P'ifth  :  "to  the  claims  of  the  department  of  anatomy." 

Now,  as  this  is  a  meeting  of  embalmers,  the  third 
factor  no  doubt  is  the  one  that  will  interest  you  most. 
Personally,  I  have  not  found  this  a  very  serious  obstacle 
because  most  of  the  members  of  your  profession  that  I 
have  had  dealings  with  have  never  interfered  in  any 
way  with  our  endeavor  to  secure  permission  for  post 
mortems.  in  fact  in  a  number  of  cases  we  have  been 
grateful  to  them  for  assistance.  Just  the  other  day  1 
performed  a  post  mortem,  in  Avhich  case  the  undertaker 
had  secured  the  signed  permission  on  his  own  initiative. 
We  all  appreciated  that  act  very  much  indeed,  for  we 
felt  that  he  was  also  interested  in  science  and  anxious 
to  help  lis  along  in  our  Avork. 

Mr.  H.  J.  Edwards,  president  of  the  Kings,  Queens 
and  Suffolk  County  Undertakers  Society  in  speaking 
to  the  Long  Island  Medical  Association  on  the  suibject 
of  post  mortems,  placed  before  them  some  of  the  ob- 
.iections  of  the  undertakers  to  post  mortems.  He  says 
that  manj'^  of  the  undertakers  do  not  know  for  Avhat 
reason  post  mortems  are  done,  and  thus  are  not 
interested  in  them.  I  hope  that  I  have  made  it  clear 
to  you  the  o-bjeet  of  our  post  mortem  work  at  the  hos- 
pital. He  makes  an  ob.jection,  that  of  severing  the 
large  arteries,  that  is  hard  to  get  away  from.  This 
could  be  overcome  to  a  large  extent  by  ligaturing  the 
vessels  before  sewing  up  the  body.  On  the  other  hard 
I  have  done  a  number  of  post  mortems  on  the  bodies 
after  they  were  embalmed,  and  have  been  able  to  make 
a  very  satisfactory  examination.  The  embalming  fluid 
is  an  excellent  preseTvative  and  fixative,  and  I  have 
made  beautiful  microscopical  sections    from  bodies 


ONE  GALLON  CONTAINER 


ARAN  A 


EMBALMING-FLUID 


Embodies  all  the  recent  advances  of  knowledge 
in  the  compounding  of  embalming  preparations. 

It  IS  a  combination  of  the  most  powerful  antiseptics 
and  preservatives  known  to  the  science  of  chem- 
istry. These  are  compounded  to  the  limits  of 
concentration,  and  it  is  impossible  to  produce  a 
stronger  or  more  active  preparation. 

No  rouge  or  other  coloring  is  required,  as  any 
effect  desired  can  be  produced  by  following 
directions.  An  order  will  convince  you  of  ils 
merits,  direct,  through  our  representatives,  or 
through  your  jobber. 


r.ARANAP.  LABORATORY 


PETERBOROUGH,  ONTARIO,  CANADA 


86 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


buried  for  some  daj's.  However,  it  would  not  be  an 
advisable  procedure  in  every  case,  as  the  embalming 
woi;ld  destroy  all  hope  of  getting  bacterial  cultures 
from  infectious  cases. 

He  also  mentions  the  disgraceful  condition  the  body 
is  left  in  sometimes  after  a  post  mortem  examination. 
Failure  to  sew  up  the  body,  improper  incision  of  ^\\e 
scalp  for  the  removal  of  the  brain  and  failure  to  prop- 
erly fix  the  skull  cap  in  place,  thl^s  showing  an  objec- 
tionable ridge  on  the  forehead.  There  is  no  excuse 
for  any  of  these  things.  After  the  post  mortem  the 
pathologist  should  see  that  all  the  organs  are  replaced 
Avith  a  little  sawdust  to  take  up  the  fluid  present  and 
the  body  carefulh-  and  securely  sewn  up. 

The  undue  length  of  time  elapsing  before  the  under- 
taker is  able  to  get  the  body  after  a  post  mortem  is  an- 
other objection  raised.  It  is  very  hard  sometimes  to 
avoid  delaying  a  little.  The  physician  in  charge  of 
the  ease  is  very  anxious  to  be  present  and  we  are 
anxious  to  post  it  for  an  hour  suitable  to  most  of  the 
students. 

Most  of  these  objections  should  be  easily  overcome 
and  I  am  sure  the  members  of  your  profession  will  bear 
with  us  a  little  in  the  others  for  the  sake  of  science  if 
nothing  else. 

Through  an  article  in  a  medical  journal  and  a  con- 
versation with  your  secretary,  Mr.  Matthew^s,  I  was 
led  to  inquire  into  the  system  of  co-operation  the  Cin- 
cinnati General  Hospital  had  with  the  undertakers  of 
Cincinnati.  I  received  a  very  nice  letter  from  Mr.. 
Dhonau,  the  president  of  the  Cincinnati  College  of  Em- 
balming, explaining  in  detail  the  system  they  have  in 
that  hospital.  The  pathologic  institute  was  up  against 
a  problem  very  much  like  ours.  After  discussing  the 
question  over  with  the  Em'balmers  Society,  a  commit- 
tee was  formed  to  draft  out  a  plan  whereby  there  might 


Will  Eckardt,  son  of  A.  J. 
H.  Eckardt,  was  home  for  a 
few  days  at  the  New  Year. 
His  photo  will  be  recognized 
by  those  in  the  profession  on 
whom  he  called  on  the  road 
between  Toronto  and  Mon- 
treal. Will  was  with  the 
Rurroughes  Adding  Machine 
Co.,  at  Detroit,  and  when 
the  U.  S.  entered  the  war  en- 
listed as  a  private.  He  was 
|)romoted  rapidly  and  at  the 
time  the  armistice  was  signed 
he  was  one  of  the  officers  in 
charge  of  supplies  at  Camp 
Cufster,  Michigan.  He  is 
.'till  on  military  duty  there 
h  dping  with  demobilization. 


be  a  better  understanding  and  a  closer  co-operation 
between  them. 

This  resulted  in  the  Pathologic  Institute  appointing 
Mr.  Dhonau  to  a  position  on  their  staff  to  supervise  the 
post  mortem  technic  and  to  have  supervision  of  the 
care  of  the  bodies,  particularly  -with  regard  to  their 
preparation  for  burial.  He  also  devoted  part  of  his 
time  to  the  working  out  of  new  and  better  methods  of 
preservation.  He  had  the  co-operation  of  60  out  of  64 
of  the  undertakers  of  that  city.  Being  Profe'-sor  of 
the  Embalming  College,  he  uses  the  bodies  at  the 
hospital  for  the  teaching  of  embalming.  After  the 
post  mortems,  his  students,  under  his  supervision,  em- 
balm the  bodies  and  turn  them  over  to  the  undertaker, 
charging  him  for  the  emhalming  just  enough  to  cover 
the  cost  of  materials.  In  that  way  the  undertakers 
have  none  of  the  bother  and  trouble  of  embalming,  the 
college  has  a  Avealth  of  material  for  teaching,  and  the 
Pathologic  Institute  has  a  marked  rise  in  their  per- 
centage of  autopsies.  The  students  of  the  Embalming 
College  attend  these  post  mortems  and  there  learn  some 
of  the  pathology  as  well  as  the  anatomy  of  the  human 
body. 

The  percentage  of  the  post  mortems  at  the  Cincinnati 
General  Hospital  following  the  introduction  of  this  sys- 
tem in  1915.  jumped  from  28  to  63  per  cent.  I  under- 
stand from  Prof.  Renaurd  that  they  have  had  a  similar 
systm  in  vogue  for  some  time  in  Bellevue  Hospital. 
New  York.  I  hope  that  some  day  we  may  have  some- 
thing similar  to  it  in  the  Toronto  General  Hospital. 

We  are  anxious  to  have  a  better  undei'standing  witli 
you  for  we  are  fjuite  conscious  of  the  position  the 
members  of  your  profession  hold  with  the  family,  when 
a  word  from  you  for  or  against  might  mean  so  much 
to  us.  You  can  help  or  hinder  us  a  great  deal,  so  I  am 
here  this  morning  to  plead  for  your  co-operation  and 
assistance.  We  are  anxious  to  secure  permission  for 
a  post-morten  on  every  ease  possible  that  dies  in  the 
hospital.  We  need  these  for  the  study  and  teaching 
of  medicine. 

Our  percentage  of  post  mortems  to  the  number,  of 
deaths  at  the  Toronto  General  Hospital  has  fallen  from 
52  per  cent,  in  1915,  to  36  per  cent,  in  1917.  At  the 
Mayo  Clinic  in  Rochester,  Minn.,  which  is  a  private  in- 
stitution, their  post-mortems  for  the  years  1910-1912 
were  81  per  cent.  The  Peter  Brent  Brigham  Hospital 
of  Boston,  for  1917,  had  50  per  cent.;  the  Cincinnati 
General  Hospital.  39  per  cent.,  and  the  Massachusetts 
General  Hospital,  31  per  cent.  Our  percentage  is 
pretty  high  compared  with  some  other  hospitals,  still 
we  want  to  do  better,  and  we  are  making  a  direct 
appeal  now  for  your  co-operation,  wherever  you  feel 
that  you  can  do  so,  in  securing  for  us  more  post 
mortem  examinations. 


"FLU"  DEATHS  IN  EGYPT 

It  is  officially  computed  that  41,000  persons  died  in 
Egypt,  outside  of  Cairo  and  Alexandria,  as  a  result  of 
the  recent  influenza  epidemic. 


GIVING  THE  NEWS  IN  ADVANCE 

The  country  editor  can  sometimes  do  better,  as  when 
one  of  them  published  the  item: 

"Our  esteemed  fellow  citizen,  Jim  Dcruglass,  will  go 
to  the  hospital  to-moryow  to  be  operated  upon  by  Dr. 
Jones  for  appendicitis.  He  will  leave  a  wife  and  two 
children." 


January,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


87 


ONTARIO 

Bobcaygeon — 
Byng,  G.  C. 

Bowmanville,  Ont. — 

Morris  &  Son,  L.  'Phone  10, 

Brantford — 

H.  S.  Peiree  &  Co., 
Funeral  Directors  and 
Eimbalmer. 

Both  phones  200. 

Burks  Falls — 

Hilliar,  Joseph.    Box  213. 

Coboconk — 

Greenley,  A. 
Dorchester,  Ont. — 

Logan,  R.  A.     'Phone  2107. 

Dungannon — 

Sproul,  William 

Dunnville — 

D.  P.  Fry.    'Phone  68. 

Elmira — 

Dreisinger,  Chris. 

HuntsviUe — 

Hilliar,  Joseph. 


Hamilton — 

Blachford  &  Sons, 

57  King  Street  West. 
Dodsworth,  A.  H. 

59  King  St.  W. 
Eobinson,  J.  H.  &  Co., 

19-21  John  St.  N. 
IngersoU — 
Mclntyres. 

F.  W.  Keeler  and  R.  A. 

Skinner,  props. 
Kemptville — 

McCaughey,  Geo.  A. 

Kingston — 

Corbett,  S.  S. 

Reid,  Jas.,  254  Princess  St. 

London — 

Ferguson's  Sons,  John 
174  to  180  King  St. 

Orillia — 

W.  A.  Stracha:!, 
Sucpessor  to 

H.  A.  Bingham. 

Phone  453. 
D.  Clark.    Tel.  159. 
Miindell,  J.  A.     Phone  126. 
150  Mississaga  St. 


Oshawa — 

Luke  Burial  Co. 

Schomberg — 

F.  Skinner. 

St.  Catharines — 

Grobb  Bros. 

144-146  St.  Paul  St. 

St.  Thomas — 

William,  P.  E.,  &  Sons,  519 
Talbot  St. 

Stirling — 

Ralph,   Jas.        Phone  lOii. 

Stratford — 

Greenwood  &  Vivian,  Ltd. 

88-92  Ontario  St. 
Whit  3  &  Co.,  80  Ontario  St. 
Down  &  Fleming, 

94  Ontario  St. 

Toronto — 

Geo.  J.  Chapman 
742  Broadview  Ave 
Phone  G.  3885 
Ambulance  service. 

Cobbledick,  N.  B.,  2068 
Queen  St.  East  and  1508 
Danforth  Ave.  Private 
Ambulance. 

J.  A.  Humphrey  &  Son, 
463  Church  St. 

Washington,   Fleury  Burial 

Co.,  685  Queen  St.  E. 
J.  C.  Van  Camp, 

30  Bloor  St.  W. 
Washington  &  Johnston. 

707  Queen  St.  E. 

Corner  of  Broadview 


Thedford — 

Woodhall,  J.  B. 
Wallaceburg — 

Cousins,  Burlington  &  Saini 
Welland— 

Patterson  &  Dart 

Sutherland,  G.  W. 
Woodstock — 

Mack,  Paul. 
Whitby— 

Nicholson  &  Seldon. 

QUEBEC 

Montreal — 

Tees  &  Co.,  912  St.  Catherine 
St.  W«st. 

NEW  BRUNSWICK 

Moncton — 

Tuttle  Bros.,  164  Lutz  St. 
St.  John— 

Fitzpatriek  Bros. 
100  Waterloo  St. 

MANITOBA 

Brandon — 

Campbell  &  Campbell. 
Dauphin — 

Farrell,  A.  F. 
Winnipeg — 

Clark-Leatherdale  Co.  Ltd. 
232  Kennedy  St. 

Thompson  Co.,  J.,  501  Main 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Moose  J  aw — 

Broadfoot  Bros. 
Saskatoon — 

Young,  A.  E. 


SOME  DAY  DIOXIN  WILL  BE  USED  BY  PRACTI- 
CALLY EVERY  GOOD  UNDERTAKER! 


These  are  Some  of  the  Reasons  why  WE  Recommend  DIOXIN 
and  why  YOU  Should  Use  It! 


It  is  interesting^  and  impressive  to  talk  with  the 
funeral  director  who  has  adopted  DIOXIN, 
the  Peroxide  of  Hydrogen  fluid. 

He  entertains  no  misgivings,  no  doubts,  no  un- 
certainties. 

He  KNOWS  that  he  has  the  Best  Fluid  in  the 
world  and  he  will  tell  you  WHY. 

And  we  firmly  believe  that  the  weight  of  his 
experience  soon  will  result  in  the  majority 
of  other  funeral  directors  using  DIOXIN. 

We  have  implicit  faith  in  the  working  of  that 
business  law  which  rewards  a  product  in  pro- 
portion to  its  deserts;  and  we  are  confident 
that  its  application  will  benefit  DIOXIN  Em- 
balming Fluid. 


We  believe  in  the  professional  world — whether 
it  be  caskets,  or  hardware  or  linings  or  em- 
balming fluids — a  sifting  process  goes  on  con- 
tinuously which  sends  the  unfit  to  the  bot- 
tom and  the  fittest  to  the  top. 

We  believe  that  an  inexorable  law  is  set  in  mo- 
tion by  an  exacting  professional  demand 
which  unerringly  will  hunt  out  DIOXIN  as 
the  best  fluid  just  as  it  has  hunted  out  the 
best  caskets  and  the  best  funeral  supplies. 

And  it  is  our  quiet  conviction  that  DIOXIN  IS 
the  best  fluid  made  in  America  to-day;  that 
the  sifting  process  is  under  way;  that  profes- 
sional sentiment  is  rapidly  turning  in  its 
favor;  and  that  it  is  only  a  question  of  time 
before  DIOXIN  will  be  used  by  every  funeral 
director  who  demands  the  best. 


Dioxin  Contains  More  Peroxide  than  Any  Other  Fluid  Made  ! 


H.  S.  ECKELS  &  COMPANY 


221  FERN  AVENUE 
TORONTO,  ONTARIO,  CANADA 


88 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


January,  1919 


Index  to  Advertisers 


A 

Alaska   Bedding   of   Montreal,    Ltd.  o.b.c 

Art  Furniture  Co   44 

B 

Baetz  Bros.  Furniture  Co.  Ltd   39 

Board  of  Examiners    83 

Beaver  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  The  ....  44 

Boullee,   Fraser  Leather  Co   34 

C 

Canada   Furniture  Mfrs   30 

Canadian  Feather  and  Mattress  Co.  28 

Canicula    Company,    Limited    84 

Caranac  Laboratory    85 

Caya,  A.  B   46 

Champion   Cheinical   Co  i.b.c. 

Chatfield,  C.  B   P7 

Chesley  Furniture  Co   33 

Colleran  Spring  Bed  Co   12 

Coombe,  F.  K  i  f.c. 

D 

Dominion  Manufacturers   79-80 

Dupont  Fabrilvoid  Co   69 

E 

Eckels,  H.  S.  &  Co   87 

Fgyptian  Chemical  Co   88 


I'iirtiuharson  Gifford  Co   6 

G 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co  i.i.e. 

Gold  Medal  Furniture  Co   31 

H 

HiK-hl.nrn  &  Co.,  Geo.  H   42 

Hihiii'i"   Furniture   Co   43 

Hnurd   &   Co   28 

I 

Irish,   G.   L   48 

Imperial  Rattan  Co   10 

K 

Kindel  Bed  Co   7 

Knetehel   Furniture   Co   35 

Krug  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  The  H.   .  .  38 

L 

Life  Long  Furniture  Co   69 

Lippert  Furniture   Co.   Ltd  40-41 

Malcolm  Furniture  Co.,  Andrew  ....  29 

Ti'attheAvs   Bros.    Ltd   32 

Maxwell  Mfg.  Co   76 


McLagan  Furniture  Co..  Geo   4-5 

Meaford  Mfg.  Co   12 

Morlook    Bros   34 

N 

N.  A.  Furniture  Co   34 

National  Table  Co.  Ltd   34 

North  .\meric;ni  Bent  Chair  Co.    ...  47 

O 

Owen  .Scund  Chair  Co   34 

P 

I'aihe  Freres  Co.  <  f  Canada   71 

Phillips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd   35 

Pollock  Mfg.  Co   73 

Q 

Quality  Mattress  Co.   Ltd   45 

S 

Shafer  &  Co.,  D.  1   32 

Steele  &  Co.,  .las   34 

Stratford  Chair  Co   8-9 

Stratford  Manufacturers   3-11 

W 

Walter  &  Co..  B   28 

Weeller,   Bold  t     Co   46 


The  Original 
Patented 
Concentrated 
Fluid 


Patented  Formula 
Strongest  and  Best 


Essential  Oil  Base,  com- 
bined with  Alcohol,  Glycer- 
ine, Oxidized  Formaldehyde 
and  Boron-Dioxide. 

Ask  others  for  their  Formula 


Special  Canadian  Agents 

National  Casket  Co. 

Toronto,  Ont. 
GLOBE  CASKET  CO. 
London,  Oct. 
SEMMENS  &  EVEL  CASKET  CO. 
Hamilton,  Ont. 
GIRARD  &  GODIN 
Three  Rivers,  Que. 
JAS.  S.  ELLIOTT  &  SON 
Prescott,  Ont. 
CHRISTIE  BROS. 
Amherst,  N.S. 


Larger  Bottles  filled  up  with  water 


Egyptian  Chemical  Co.  Boston,  u.s.a 


For  Sale 
Wanted 


TERMS  OF  INSERTION 

50  cents  per  insertion  up  to 
twenty-five  words.  Each  additional 
word  two  cents,  If  Box  is  required 
5  centsextra  to  cover  postage, etc. 
Cash  must  accompany  each  order 
— no  accounts  booked. 


FUENITURE  LINES  or  funeral  supplies  -wanted  on  commission, 
by  experienced  traveller.  Box  53,  Canadian  Furniture  World, 
32  Colborne  St.,  Toronto.  d-j 


SALESMAN  wiajited  in  Oanada  for  Undertakers'  Supply  House. 
Must  bave  good  coniieetion.  C.  C.  Stiles,  340  W.  85th  St.. 
care  Three  Arts  Chub,  New  York  City.  -j 


WANTED — Traveller  wants  good  line  of  furniture  on  eouimis- 
sion  basis  for  Montreial  only.  Experience  8  years,  speaks 
both  languages.  Good  appearance,  28  years  old.  Will  fur- 
nish references.  Address,  J.  A.  Pinette,  3376  St.  Hubert  St.. 
Montreal.  -j 


WANTED — TTndeitiaker 's  lassdstauit  for  Toronto.  Musit  be  good 
enibalnier.  Married  or  single.  Give  full  particuliars  in  first 
letter.      Bo.\  GG,  Canadi.an  Eurnittire  World.  -j 


FURNITURE  WORLD 

'WantAdV 

BRING  BIG  RESULTS 


nuary,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


Champion  Embalming  Fluid 

^^The  Leader  for  Generations^^ 


Being  mechanically  compounded  from  purest 
:hemicals,  Champion  can  be  counted  upon 
or  dependability  and  economy. 

/  a  better  embalming  fluid  than  Champion  could 
je  compounded,  Toe  would  compound  it. 


Highest  Possible  Quality 

Makes  Maximum 
Quantity 


daint  f  atrirk'a  (llatl{rilral 
\ttA  ettg 


38*7  Lexinoton  A-venxjb 

BHi  WBBM  SIR  AMS  SSNO  Stms* 
TBZ.BPHONB  0373  PUlZA 


October  5th  1918 


Mr.  M.J.  McCaffrey 
381  West  118th-  St., 
Hsw  York  City 

I  regret  very  much  that  you  were  out  of  town  and  unable  to  attend 
the  Solemn  Obsequlea  of  Hie  Eminence  Cardinal  Perley.  It  was  with 
out  doubt,  the  greatest  funeral  ever  held  in  this  country.  From  the 
time  hia  remains  were  brought  from  his  country  home  at  Mamaroneok 
H.Y.  to  St.  Patrick's  Cathedralnearly  one  million  people  passed  by 
hia  bier. 

You  can  ina.f^ine  the  responsibility  that  waa  placed  on  my  ahoulders 
when  the  church  authorities  adviaed  me  that  I  had  been  aelected  to 
take  full  charge  of  the  funeral.  Hero  was  a  case  where  a  mein's  rep- 
utation was  at  sta^e.  I  was  placed  in  a  position  of  either  raakinj; 
good,  or  going  down  in  the  history  of  the  undertaking  profession  as 
being  one  who  could  not  measure  up  to  hia  job,  when  put  to  the  test. 

Aa  to  the  general  arrangements  and  running  of  the  funeral,  the  enclosed 
clipping  from  the  Hew  York  Sun  tells  that  every  thing  ran  like  a  well 
oiled  piece  of  machinery,  there  was  not  one  little  incident  that  occur- 
red to  mar  the  prooeedinga . 

I  was  really  mors  concerned  about  how  the  body  would  keep,  than  about 
anything  else,  because  any  careful  man  can  handlethe  other  situations 
as  they  cone  up,  but  no  matter  how  careful  one  is  with  the  embalming, 
if  you  haven't  the  right  kind  of  fluid,  all  your  work  ia  for  naught. 
Having  had  some  very  important  funeral  work  in  ray  career,  I  have  always 
insisted  that,  only  the  very  bust  kind  of  embalming  fluid  be  used  in 
all  my  work,  and  tihon  I  was  called  to  do  the  most  important  work  that 
I  have  had  no  far,  I  had  no  fear  in  using  CHAMPION.  I  was  told  that 
the  remains  of  the  Cardinal  would  have  to  lie  in  state  for  one  week. 
Having  seen  some  bodies  that  were  put  to  this  test  and  failed,  I  felt 
absolutely  sure  that  in  this  case  CHAJ.IPION  FUIL.D  would  do  its  usual 
good  work  and  pull  me  through. 

V/all,  If  you  could  have  been  here  and  seen  the  body,  you  certainly 
would  have  been  proud  yourself.  There  was  not  one  spot,  even  the  size 
of  a  lead  pencil,  that  could  be  criticised.  There  was  none  of  that  usual 
hardening  and  cracking  of  the  lips.  The  skin  was  soft  and  velvety,  and 
the  features  were  calm  and  peaceful.  The  great  teat  was  the  wonderful 
death  mask  made  by  a  noted  aoulptor,  and  which  turned  out  moat  wonder- 
ful. 


luat  wish  to  say  in  closing  th*t  I  owe  a  debt  of  gratitude  to  CHA.'JPIOB 
id  I  trust  that  this  letter  wllT  pay  it  In  a  raeaeure. 


pay 

(ery  tru,ly  youre 


The  Champion  Chemical  Co.,  Springfield,  Ohio 

DR.  G.  W.  FERGUSON,  Canadian  Manager 

74  Leuty  Ave.,  Kew  Beach,  TORONTO 
Canadian  Manufacturing  Plant    -  WINDSOR 


The  ALASKA  "Newport"  % 

{Patent  Applied  For) 

COUCH-BED 

— gives  you  either  a  lounging 
couch  or  a  comfortable  full- 
sized  bed  at  a  moment's 
notice. 


This  unique  new  couch-bed  has  all  the 
good  points  of  the  sliding  couch  and 
the  Davenport,  plus  new  features  that 
make  it  a  ready  and  profitable  seller. 

The  illustrations  show  the  construc- 
tion and  operation  of  this  couch-bed. 
It  is  very  strongly  put  together,  rigid 
and  light  in  weight.  A  child  can 
make  the  change  from  couch  to  bed 
and  vice  versa. 


By  lifting  the  top  section,  you  disclose  the  second  section,  which 
holds  the  bedding  when  not  in  use — a  unique  feature. 


The  indestructible  link  fabric  spring  and 
the  folding  mattress  of  clean,  new 
materials  ensure  years  of  comfort  no 
matter  how  used. 


THE  "NEWPORT"  IS  A 
REAL  MONEY-MAKER  AT 
ANY  TIME  OF  THE  YEAR. 


ORDER  NOW—  direct  or 
through  our  representative 

NET  PRICE-$20.5? 


Then  you  turn  the  second  section  completely  over,  and  place  the 
legs  on  the  floor,  as  shown.     Then  drop  the  upright  section  and 
turn  over  the  folding  mattress. 


We  can  Bupply  you  with  folders 
and  electros  for  local  use.  Ask 
for  them. 


ALASKA  BEDDING 

OF  MONTREAL,  Limited 

Makers  of  Bedsteads  and  Bedding 
400  St.  Ambroise  St.  -  MONTREAL 


Ready  for  the  bed  clothes.      The  whole  operation  is  just  as 
quickly  and  as  easily  performed  as  it  looks;  and  you  can  put 
any  guest  on  this  bed  without  misgiving. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


THE  GENDRON  MFG.  COMPANY,  LIMITED 


A  new  design 

ENGLISH 
CARRIAGE 

A  wooden  body,  with 
reed  panel  and  hood, 
finished  in  combina- 
tion colors,  making  it 
a  most  beautiful  car- 
nage. 


THE  GENDRON  MFG.  CO.,  LIMITED,  TORONTO,  CAN. 


Announcement  to  the 
Furniture  Trade — 

While  the  building  and  plant  of  the  Ontario  Spring 
Bed  &  Mattress  Company,  Limited,  in  liquidation, 
may  be  offered  for  sale  by  the  assignee,  we,  the  present 
sole  lessees  of  the  building,  the  Ontario  Spring  Bed 
&  Mattress  Company,  London,  wish  all  our  cus- 
tomers and  friends  to  distinctly  understand  that  this  does 
not  affect  us  in  the  slightest,  and  we  will  continue  to 
manufacture  our  complete  line  of  iron  and  brass  beds, 
springs  and  mattresses,  in  the  city  of  London,  and  en- 
deavor to  give  the  very  best  service  as  heretofore. 


Our  section  of 

ENGLISH 
CARS 

is  most  complete.  The 
line  consists  of  new 
Reed  and  Wood  and 
Reed  Combination 
designs. 


THE  ONTARIO  SPRING  BED 
&  MATTRESS  COMPANY 

LONDON  ONTARIO 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  3 

S-TRAfrOIlP  IMM  PORNITURE. 

^nillHIIIIIIIHIinMIIIIMJIIMinlnlllMIIMMIIMIMIIIMIMIMIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMMIMIMIMIIIMIIMMIMIIM 


^'MIIII!IIIMIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMIi:illlllli:illMMIIMIIIMIMIMIII!IMIIIMI!IIIIIMIIIIIMiliniMIIMIMIi:iMIMIIIMM!MIIIIIMnMlliMIMIIIi:MII;IIIM 

I  MEDIUM  PRICED  | 

I  The  merchandising  possibilities  of  Stratford  | 

I  Chairs  are  recognized  by  many  of  the  leading  | 

I  furniture  dealers   throughout   the   country.  | 

I  Stratford  Chairs  exemplify  the  best  there  is  | 

I  in  design,  material,  and  manufacture,  at  the  | 

I  price  for  which  they  may  be  had.     The  i 

I  rockers  are  carefully  balanced  so  as  to  give  | 

I  the  maximum  of  comfort  and  that  restful,  | 

I  easy  swing  which  is  so  desirable  in  a  living-  I 

I  room  rocker.  | 

I  You  will  find  Stratford  Chairs  good  chairs  to  sell.  | 

5  THE  STRATFORD  CHAIR  CO.,  LIMITED  | 

I  STRATFORD     -     ONTARIO  1 

nllllll  Illllllllllllllll  lillllll  I  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIItllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIII  I  I  IMIIIIIIIIIIII^ 


VIMIMIIIIIIIII  I  lillllll  Illlll  Illllll  I  Illlllllll  Illlllllllllllllll  I  Illllllllllll  IIIIMIIIMII  nil  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMtMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIMIIIII  I  I  III!  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIII  Illllllllllll? 


4 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  February,  1919 


^nilllUIIMMIIIMIIIMnillMnMIJMMIMIIMIMIIMIMMIMIIMIIIIMIIMIIMIIIIIMIIillMIIMIIMIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIIItlllllllMIIIIIIIIIII^ 


5072A  Buffet 


Good  Design  is 
inherent  in  every 
McLAGAN  pro- 
duction. Built  to 
satisfy,  and  priced 
to  sell. 


Queen  Anne  Diningroom  Suite 

in  American  BlacJ^  Walnut 


507/  Ex.  Table 


2675  Diner 


The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited 

STRATFORD      :-:  ONTARIO 


^IIIMIIIIIlllMlinHIMIHIIilHIHnillllllllllllinHllimiMninrMIIIIIMIMIIMIIJnillllllMIMIIinMMIMIIIIIIIMMJMMIinillllHIIIIMIIIIIJIIIIIIMMMIJIIII^ 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


5 


!§■— — 


■iinimMW 


'i  >"<  I"""'"  IMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIMI  MIIIIIIMIMIMIMIMIMIIIIIIMrilllllllllllMIMIMnillllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM  Illll  IIIIIIIMII  Illllllllll  Mil  II  MIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIIIIIIIIII|||||M|||HIMIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  Mllll!: 


Our  business  is  based 
on  the  assumption  that 
the  trade  wants  goods 
of  real  character.  It 
is  this  subtle  quality 
that  has  ever  kept  our 
lines  right  in  the  front 
rank. 


5072  Buffet 


Note  the  quiet  dignified  lines  of  this  Queen  Anne  Suite 


2675A  Diner 


5074  China  Cabinet 


The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited 

STRATFORD      :-:  ONTARIO 


' I""""M1IMMI1II,IIIM11M1M1  IIIIIIIIIMIMMIIMMII  MIMINIIMMIMIMIIMMMMIMIlMMinNMllNIMIlIM  MIIMMIMIMIMMI  IMIMMIMI  ,  IMIMIM,  ,  „  HMMI  ,  1  1111,11,1  I„l„l„„,„l  ,  Illlllllil 


6 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  February,  1919 


slIHIInillllinJIMIiniMIMMIIMMMMIMMIMJIIIIIMirillMMIIMMIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIMIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIIMIIIIIMHIIMII^ 


Upholstered  Reed  Furniture 

Made  Complete  in  the  Imperial  Factories 


Imperial  Upholstered  Reed  Furniture,  and  all  Imperial 
Furniture,  is  made  up  complete,  frames  and  all,  in  our  own 
workshops.    That  is  one  reason  why  the 


Imperial 
Line'' 


comes  to  you  with  such  pro- 
nounced elegance  and  at  prices 
which  will  allow  you  a  liberal 
profit  on  the  turnover. 

Imperial  Rattan  Co. 

LIMITED 
Stratford      •:-  Ontario 


Latest  in  Folding  Beds 

''THE  CHESTERFIELD" 


It  combines  the  most  mod- 
ern features  found  in  any 
bed  or  Chesterfield.  It 
gives  the  customer  every 
service  of  a  bed  and  Ches- 
terfield, and  costs  only  the 
price  of  one. 

Write  for  price,  it  will 
interest  you. 


The  XEtttd^l  Bed  Company,  Limited 


STRATFORD,  ONTARIO 


silMniMIHIMIIIirillllMnMIMIIMIIMIIIIIinMjrMIMIMIIMinilllllMIIJIinNirMinilMllillMIIJMIIIMIIIIIMIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIMIiniMMIIIIIIIIINIII^ 


Fobniary,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


7 


WILL  HELP  TO  MAINTAIN 
A  PERMANENT  LEADERSHIP 


|\  yiEAFORD  Furniture  can  be  handled 
advantageously  by  any  furniture  dealer 
in  Canada. 

The  designs  are  such  as  appeal  to  the  average 
buyer,  they  are  neat,  homey  adaptions  that 
will  grace  the  home  of  any  middle  class 
family  and  become  a  source  of  permanent 
satisfaction  to  their  owners. 

Our  many  years  of  satisfactory  service  to  the 
retailer  is  our  best  evidence  of  a  carefully- 
manufactured  and  universally-satisfactory  pro- 
duct. If  you  wish  to  retain  or  obtain 
leadership  in  your  line,  Meaford  Furniture 
will  certainly  help  you  to  do  it. 


THE  MEAFORD  LINE 

Comprises  Most  Attractive 

Bed  Room  Suites,  Dining  Room  Suites, 
Odd  and  Matched  Den  and  Library 
Pieces,  Centre  Tables,  Jardenier  Stands, 
Medicine  Cabinets,  Music  Cabinets, 
Hall  Racks,  Seats  and  Mirrors. 


The  Meaford  Mfg.  Co. 

LIMITED 

MEAFORD      -  ONTARIO 


8 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


THE 

HEART 

OF  YOUR  EXTENSION 
TABLE  IS  THE 

SLIDE 

YOUR  TABLE  IS 
CONDEMNED  IF  THE  SLIDE 
DOES  NOT  WORK 
PROPERLY 

WABASH  SLIDES 

INSURE 
SATISFIED  CUSTOMERS 


WABASH  SLIDES  I 


HELP  SELL  TABLES. 
EUMINATE  SLIDE  TROUBLES 


WE  ARE 

SLIDE  SPECIALISTS 

Having  manufactured  SLIDES 
exclusively — for  30  year* 

Many  Canadian  Table-malccK  u>e 

WABASH  SLIDES- 
Because 
We  furnish  Better  SLIDES  at 
Lower  Cost. 

Made  by 

B.  WALTER  &  COMPANY 

Factory  St.      WABASH,  IND. 

Canadian  RepreMentative  : 
A.  BXaya.  28  King  St.  E.,  Kitchener, 
Ont.,  successor  to  Frank  A.  Smith 


FOLDING  TABLE ' 


proposition  to  buyers  in  gross  lots 
interesting.     Ask  us  about  it. 


is  a  constant  necessity. 

The  cessation  of  hostilities  has  led  to  the  resumption  of 
many  social  events  where  the  "Elite"  Folding  Table  can 
be  used  to  advantage. 

If  you  don't  already  stock  this  easy-selling,  profitable 
line,  write  to-day  for  prices  and  full  particulars. 

Sole  Licensees  and   DEPT.  W 
Manufaclurers  LONDON 


Hourd  &  Co.,  Limited 


Vr. 


P.. 

KAPOK 


IS  AGAIN  ON  THE  MARKET 

The  embargo  has  been  Hf  ted  and  we 
can  now  obtain  unlimited  quantities 
which  enables  us  to  resume  the  manu- 
facture of  our  celebrated  "  KAPOK  " 
mattress. 

We  can  now  fill  orders  promptly. 
Write  to-day  for  prices. 

The  Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress  Co. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO  OTTAWA 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


9 


Remember,  our  perman- 
ent showrooms  at  1  36- 
1 40  King  St.  E.,Toronto 
are  open  all  the  year 
around  and  afford  the 
dealer  with  a  prospective 
customer  every  opportu- 
nity to  make  a  sale. 

When  in  Toronto  make 
our  showrooms  your 
headquarters. 


Upholstered 

Reed  Arm  Chairs 


Illustrated  below  are  two  of  a  very 
large  variety  of  chairs  manufac- 
tured at  our  Walkerton  factory, 
which  is  exclusively  devoted  to 
the  manufacture  of  reed  goods. 

C.F.M.  Furniture  makes  it  possible  for 
you  to  offer  some  mighty  good  values, 
and  yield  a  good  turnover.  It  is  always 
w^ell  made,  well  finished,  and  inviting  in 
appearance. 


SEAFORTH  GENERAL  OFFICES  :   WOODSTOCK.  ONT.  WIARTON 

WHOLESALE  SHOWROOMS  :  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 


10 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


VICTORY!    "Your  boys  and  ours  have  won 

When  you  realize  that  your  Framed  Pictures  are  sold  out  before  the  season  is 
over  you  will  resolve  to  stock  heavier  next  season  and  also  make  up  your  mind 
to  continue  using  Matthews'  "Take  me  home  look"  Nobby  Picture  Frames. 

MATTHEWS   BROS.,  LIMITED 

THE  BIG  CANADIAN  MOULDING  HOUSE 

1906  DUNDAS  STREET  WEST  TORONTO,  CANADA 


A  CEDAR 

CHEST 

that  expresses 

an  ideal 

There  is  more  to  a  SHAFER  RED  CEDAR  CHEST  than  dignity  of  design 

and  beauty  of  finish.    Built  into  each  one  is  the  satisfaction  of  producing  a  fine 

piece  of  furniture — the  pride  of  creation.    Skilled  workmen  and  best  quality 

material  make  possible  the  execution  of  our  effort  to  build  only  chests  of  this 

character.    'Prices  and  illustTations  on  request. 

D.  L.  SHAFER  & 

COMPANY 

ST.  THOMAS  . 

ONTARIO 

NEW  CATALOGUE 
SUPPLEMENT 

A  supplement  to  our  regular 
catalogue  will  soon  be  ready 
for  mailing.  It  contains 
many  new  designs  that  will 
be  of  interest  to  every  dealer 
in  Canada. 


Write  for  our  revised  price  list 

THE 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co. 

LIMITED 

Owen  Sound  Ontario 


At  all  times  it  is  essential  for  the  salesman  to  know  his 
goods,  but  when  times  are  a  little  quiet  it  is  doubly  so, 
and  anyone  desirous  of  making  a  success  as  a  sales- 
man must  first  equip  himself  with  a  thorough 
knowledge  of  the  line  he  is  trying  to  sell. 

Here  is  the  book  which  you  need 
to  give  you  accurate,  concise, 
and  complete  furniture  information. 

THE  PRACTICAL  BOOK  OF 

PERIOD  FURNITURE 

By 

Harold  Donaldson  Eherlein 

and 

Abbot  McClure 

With  230  illustrations  that  illustrate 
RIGHT  FURNITURE 

A  special  feature  is  an  illustrative  chronological  key  for  the  iden- 
tification of  Period  Furniture.  Octavo.  Handsome  decorated 
cloth,  in  a  box — $6.00  net,  postage  extra. 

This  book  will  be  vyelcomed  by  all  those  who  wish  to  buy  Right 
Furniture  (Antique  or  Reproduced)  for  the  Household,  by  all 
dealers  in  the  same,  and  by  all  makers  of  Correct  Reproductions. 
Whether  you  are  a  Salesman,  Manufacturer,  Dealer,  Designer, 
or  Connoisseur,  you  should  buy  this  Handsome  Practical  Volume. 
PRICE  $6.10,  Postage  Paid 

CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD 

and  THE  UNDERTAKER 
32  COLBORNE  ST.,  TORONTO 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  11 


No.  389  Dining  Suite,  Queen  Anne  Pattern 
Plain  Oak,  Fumed  or  Golden  Finish 

Above  is  one  of  the  new  suites  that  is  shown  in  our  new 
catalog  to  be  mailed  shortly.  We  are  not  boasting  when 
we  say  Knechtel  Furniture  is  good — that  is  a  matter  of 
history  or  fact.  Neither  are  we  out  of  the  realm  of  fact 
when  we  say  there  is  an  established  market  for  this  class 
of  goods.  Then,  with  ordinary  merchandising  methods,  the 
retailer  can  dispose  of  what  he  buys  at  a  profit.  We 
honestly  believe  that  if  you  push  Knechtel  Furniture 
during  1919  your  profits  will  be  commensurate  with  your 
efforts,    it's  worth  the  trying  at  least. 

OUR  BIG  CATALOG  WILL  BE  READY 
ABOUT  MARCH  1ST. 


THE  KNECHTEL  FURNITURE  CO. 

LIMITED 

HANOVER  ONTARIO 


12 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


All  Patriotic 

FURNITURE  DEALERS 
Should  Sell  THRIFT  Stamps 


SELL  Thrift  Stamps,  not  because  there  is  any  immediate 
profit  for  you  in  such  sales,  but  because  the  Dominion 
of  Canada  needs  your  patriotic  co-operation  in  its  plans 
to  ensure  Prosperity. 

If  the  smaller  savings  of  the  people  can  be  made  available 
to  fiiiance  Government  expenditure,  then  the  larger  public 
ia vestments  will  be  free  for  industrial  securities,  thus 
promoting  general  Prosperity  in  which  every  storekeeper 
is  vitally  interested. 

Get  your  customers  to  take  a  Thrift  Stamp  in  place  of  25c 
change  whenever  you  possibly  can.  Display  your  sign. 
Explain  that  Thrift  Stamps  are  a  means  to  acquire  War- 
Savings  Stamps,  and  people  should  strive  to  fill  their 
Thrift  Cards  as  quickly  as  possible. 


Have  you  bought  your 


IB 


We  sell  them 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


13 


^IIIIMIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMII^ 


Diningroom  Suite  No.  60 


EEP  in  mind  the  practical  end 
of  your  business — values — and 
profits  —  and  remember  that  the 
VICTORIAVILLE  LINE  offers  you 
exceptional  opportunities  for  both. 

We  manufacture  a  stylish  line,  well- 
made,  in  various  period  and  modern 
designs,  handsomely  finished,  mod- 
erate in  price. 


I     THE  VICTORIAVILLE  FURNITURE  COMPANY  | 

H  LIMITED  m 

1  VICTORIAVILLE,  QUEBEC  | 

liiillllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll^ 


14 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


FROM  OUR  REGULAR  UNE 


No.  28,  Serving  Tray 
A  unique  shape, 
popular  with  the 
trade.  Mahogany  or 
walnut  finish.  Size 
6  X  20  inches. 


No.  32,  Serving  Tray — Mahogany  finish.  Assorted  fillings 
in  dainty  patterns.    Size  8  x  12  inches. 


No.  30,  Serving  Tray — One  of  our  popular  ovals.  Sizes  10  x  16  and  12  x  16 
inches. 


No.  39606 — His  Victoria  Cross — One  of  our  returned  boys  exhibits 
his  cross,  and  tells  how  it  was  won.  A  picture  with  a  story. 
Framed  in  embossed  brown  with  harmonizing  mat.  Glass  size 
13  X  171/2  inches. 

— No.  39229 — Rheims  Cathedral,  in  burnished  antique    high  back. 
Size  13  X  20  inches. 

No.  39228 — Same  design      Size  10  x  141/2  inches. 
Companion  picture — The  Rose  Window. 


Our  travellers  carry  the  above  pictures  in  their  samples.    Ask  to  see  them. 

PHILLIPS  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

258-326  Carlaw  Avenue         -         TORONTO,  ONT. 
Mouldings       Frames       Framed  Pictures       Trays  Mirrors 


D.  O.  MCKINNON 

GENERAL  MANAGER 

W.  B.  HART 

ADVERTISINO  MANAGER 


Wm.  J.  BRYANS 
JAMES  O'HAGAN 

EDITORS 


Published  by  The  Commercial  Press,  Ltd.,  32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rate  $1.00  per  year  in  Canada,  Great  Britain  and  British  Colonies ;  $1.50  to  the  United  .States, 


Vol.  9.  TORONTO,  FEBRUARY,  1919.  No.  2. 


BRIGHT  OUTLOOK  for  the  FURNITURE  TRADE 

IIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMMIIMIIIMIMIMIMIMIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIMIMIMIIMIIIIMIMMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIM 

Some  reasons  for  this  as  set  out  by  investigator  of  prospects — Big  demand  has  accumulated  during  past  four  years — 
Many  new  homes  to  be  opened — The  purchase  of  furniture  per  capita  is  very  small  in  Canada — Overseas  trade 

IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIillllllllllMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIlin  M  llllllll  llllllllllllllllllllll  lllllllllll  llllinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll  lllllllllll 


SOME  of  the  outstanding  reasons  why  the  outlook 
for  business  in  Canada  is  particularly  bright  at 
the  present  time,  especially  for  the  furniture 
trade,  were  outlined  by  S.  Roy  Weaver,  of  the  Investi- 
gation Department  of  The  Reconstruction  Association 
to  the  furniture  dealers  who  attended  the  Canadia)i 
Feather  and  Mattress  Company  banquet  at  Toronto,  on 
January  14. 

In  addition  to  the  general  business  activity  that  is 
expected  in  Canada  under  the  new  era,  of  prosperity 
ushered  in  by  the  advent  of  peace  and  a  resumption  of 
old-time  business  operations,  there  are  some  special 
reasons  why  there  should  be  a  big  demand  for  furniture 
in  the  period  we  are  now  entering. 

Per  Capita  Purchase  of  Furniture  Small 

For  one  thing  the  per  capita  purchase  of  furniture  is 
exceedingly  small — much  smaller  than  it  should  be  in 
a  prosperous  country  like  this — and  there  are  excellent 
opportunities  for  measuring  this  in  a  big  way.  The 
actual  annual  pui'chase  of  furniture  in  Canada  is  only 
$1.75  ])er  person.  If  you  deduct  from  this  a  moderate 
amount  spent  in  hotel  and  office  furniture,  you  will  find 
that  the  average  family  in  Canada  is  not  spending  more 
than  .$8  for  the  purchase  of  new  furniture  and  the  re- 
placement of  old  furniture  in  their  homes. 

This  amount  is  admittedly  small  and  it  should  be  pos- 
sible to  materially  increase  it.  The  increasing  of  the 
per  capita  pui'chase  of  furniture  is  an  avenue  for  in- 
creased sales  that  in  itself  gives  the  furniture  dealer 
great  opportunity  for  the  expansion  of  sales. 

Biff  Accumulated  Demand 

Another  significant  factor  is  that  while  prices  of 
furniture  in  'Canada  have  increased  since  the  outbreak 
of  war,  the  per  capita  purchase  is  .50  cents  less  than  in 
imO.  It  can  easily  be  said  that  during  the  four  years 
of  war  the  consumption  of  furniture  in  Canada  has 
been  one-quarter  to  one-half  below  normal.  This 
really  means  that  as  a  result  of  the  decreased  purchases 
of  furniture,  directly  and  indirectly  because  of  .the  war. 
there  has  been  dammed  up  during  the  past  four  years, 
a  demand  etpial  at  least  to  a  year's  production.  This 
accumulated  demand  will  be  felt  now,  especially  in 


view  of  the  fact  that  the  public  can  expect  no  lower 
prices  on  furniture. 

There  are  several  reasons  why  furniture  prices  can 
be  expected  to  remain  firm.  For  one  thing  furniture 
factories  at  the  present  time  are  not  making  a  large 
margin  of  profit  and  no  great  reduction  in  the  wages 
of  skilled  furniture  workers  is  looked  for.  Prices  of 
lumber  are  expected  to  remain  strong  for  some  little 
time,  as  there  is  a  general  shortage  at  present, 
and  the  demand  from  Europe  will  be  large  for  some 
time.  For  instance,  the  Timber  Controller  of  Great 
Britain  has  been  authorized  to  purchase  $40,000,000 
worth  of  timber  in  Canada. 

Overseas  Demand 

In  addition  to  this,  besides  the  accumulated  demand 
for  furniture  for  Canadian  homes  that  has  been  de- 
veloping during  the  past  four  years,  and  the  need  for 
furniture  for  the  many  new  homes  that  will  be  opened 
during  the  next  couple  of  years  because  of  the  cessa- 
tion of  hostilities  and  the  return  of  men  from  overseas, 
there  will  ^be  a  big  demand  from  European  sources  for 
the  products  of  Canadian  factories.  This  is  already 
(|uite  marked,  especially  for  lower  priced  goods,  and 
Canadian  furniture  manufacturers  are  making  arrange- 
ments to  send  a  I'epresentative  to  England  to  secure 
British  and  European  orders. 

Big  Buying  Period  Ahead 

This  all  means  firm  prices  for  furniture.  The  pur- 
chasing public  cannot  exi)ect  lower  prices  for  some  time 
to  come.  This  should  inspire  confidence  while  the 
reasons  set  out  above  should  convince  the  furniture  re- 
tailer that  the  period  ahead  is  indeed  one  of  great  op- 
portunity for  business  men  generally  and  himself  in 
particular. 

The  dealer  would  do  Avell  to  demonstrate  his  faith  in 
the  present  and  his  confidence  in  the  future  by  real  ag- 
grei-'sive  business  methods.  Such  a  spirit  will  inspire 
a  similar  feeling  in  othei's.  Optimism  is  contagious,  and 
when  every  one  is  oj)timistic  business  is  bound  to  be 
good.  Start  the  ti-ade  ball  i-olling  merrily  and  the 
cash  register  will  ring  in  the  same  way. 


16 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAEJJR 


February,  1919 


Suggestions  from  the  Methods  of  Other  Dealers 


A DEALER  iu  Renfrew,  Ont.,  advertised  in  the  local 
papers  that  he  would  sell  the  same  iron  bed  that 
a  mail  order  house  advertised  at  $6.10,  his  price 
delivered  and  set  up  being  $6.25.  He  stated  that 
farmers  who  called  for  the  bed  could  have  it  for  $6.15, 
and  they  got  it  the  same  day — no  writing,  postage,  un- 
certainty or  delay. 


WINNIPEG  FIRM  TRIES  FREE  FURNITURE  IDEA 

In  order  to  get  acquainted  Avith  more  buyers,  the 
Crescent  Home  Furnishers,  of  Winnipeg,  Man.,  tried 
out  the  "free  goods"  idea,  whereby  those  who  pur- 
chase their  goods  on  certain  days  during  the  month, 
receive  them  free.  In  some  other  lines  of  business 
where  purchases  during  any  one  day  are  comparatively 
small,  the  idea  has  been  tried  out  during  the  past  few 
years  but  this  is  the  first  time  it  has  been  attempted  by 
a  firm  dealing  in  goods  such  as  furniture  where  pur- 


GET 

Ym 


FURNirURE  FREE 


Never  Before  Has  FurnHurc  Been  Oflercd  to  You  fTwAA 
And  This  Probably  Will  be  the  Last  Time  Too  *  » 


t>cr  in  wbl'ti  tvoitim  «iU  be  gmn  nwny  TREE  kt  tba  Cmeeot 
Ton  ««a       a  kitchen  'tuir  or  iuntuh  yonr  «ntir«  home  PBEE. 
Thij  is  ■  cimpnign  to 'turlK*r  our  ari.iainLanre  *ilh  ytrn  Wp 


y  FBEZ.  Yoti  T. 


Dtc.  31ic 


Any  S  dajri  : 


d  day*.  Thoi 


iatiag  No»tml>*r  anil  UeMmber)  and      will  njumi  all  th""  moiiy  you  paid  u.i. 

ThU  means  yoa  keep  all  the  Furniture  you 
bought  and  it  doan't  cost  you  one  cent. 

So  oar  know.  <b*l  3  daji  tbt  FREE  'l»y>  art  n^mx  to  K  Bui  you.  bife 


si,  191 


Could  Any  thing  Possibly  Be  Fairer? 

Il'i  up  lo  you  to  Uki;  »dvanla(fe  of  Ihii  ev«[Hlul  opTXirdimty  Nn  -tIit 
itof*  .0  Cwada  bx  ("er  cominitttd  itwlf  to  luch  l  cosdy  ndverlijinK  dan. 


To  you  who  have  never  before  purekased-  at 
the  Crescent: 

Thj.  id'i  waa  orifinally  plann«d  f-r  the  htncfll  of  new  trlonda  and  cus- 


To  Our  Old  Customers 

This  it  your  opportunity  to  get  all  the  home 
■onjfortt  your  heart  desires. 


We  will  without  question  REFUND  all  your 
MONEY*    You  keep  the  Furniture  FREE. 


B-U-S-T  E-D  P  R  I  C  E  S 


i>  an  Advertuing  Campaign  which  from  all  rtandpointo,  never  before  wa. 
Equalled  in  Canada  and  Probably  Never  Agam  Will  Be. 

-r.'.4  "-^  .j.i.v«.d  ^,  Th.  Tr.buQ.  h.for.  Sov.m    I  q^i  ^  ooUhi  purcluje  OF  ft  SI.OOO  porthftfte  FEEE.  Wo  wurchirg* 

N™.(.r«^~ji^.u —<=>-■■'  I  ftU  loftMi  10  our  ADVIETISING  DEPABTMZNT. 

e'Date  on  Youi"  Invoice  Corre«pond«  to  one  of  the  3  Dates  in  the  Sealed  Envelope 
You  Keep  the  Furniture  and  Get  Your  Money  Back.  


179JanDatyne_Ave^ 

4  Doors  oil  Main  SIrecl 
4lli  noor  lo  Showroom 
PHONE,  MAIN  2400 


^gRinTURESfgRii' 


CASH  ONLY-NO  CREDIT 


Open  Saturday  till 
10  pjn. 
TidofT  Bonds  Takta  Fur  FmilUR 


chases  in  a  day  run  into  considerable  money,  especially 
in  i^roportion  to  the  number  of  customers. 

In  this  instance,  three  days  were  set  aside  during 
November  and  December,  and  a  sealed  envelope  con- 
taining the  dates  deposited  with  a  local  newspaper.  At 
the  end  of  the  time  those  having  a  sales  .slip  or  invoice 
corresponding  to  any  one  of  the  three  dates  had  their 
money  refunded. 

The  idea  was  extensively  advertised,  not  only  by 
their  circulars,  but  by  the  use  of  space  in  the  local 
paper.  On  the  two  days  previous  to  the  announce- 
ment, column  space  was  used  in  the  local  paper  in  an 
ad.  headed,  "Don't  Buy  any  More  Furnituse."  It  can- 
tinued,  '"During  November  and  December  we  are  go- 
ing to  give  it  away  free.  One  article  or  a  houseful 
won't  cost  you  a  cent.  Watch  for  our  ad.  Thursday, 
October  31.  Absolutely  the  biggest  and  costliest  cam- 
paign ever  attempted  in  Canada." 

A  CURIOSITY  WINDOW 

In  a  recent  sale  of  a  Toronto  dealer,  one  of  his 
windows  was  completely  enclosed  except  for  a  small 
opening.  On  either  side  of  the  opening  was  a  list  of 
the  goods  displayed  and  the  prices. 

People  eame  along  the  street,  stopped  at  the  window 
on  the  left,  studied  the  list  of  prices  and  the  goods 


Would  you  hazard  a  peep  if  it  saved  you  money ! 

displayed  there.  They  then  moved  over  to  the  other 
window,  read  the  list  and  studied  the  goods  shown. 

Occasionally  a  couple  of  young  people  came  along, 
and  in  a  spirit  of  bravado,  one  "peeked"  in.  The 
efi'ect  was  all  right,  hoAvever,  for  just  as  soon  as  two 
or  three  stopped  at  the  window,  a  line  of  people  looked 
in.  These  people  would  not  forget  the  things  they 
saw  nor  where  thev  saw  them. 


Space  used  in  local  paper  to  advertise  "Free  Furniture"  idea. 


Just  because  you  have  a  good  front  is  no  reason  why 
you  should  not  have  a  better  one  if  it  will  pay.  It  is 
little  trouble  to  find  out  from  the  store-front  makers 
whether  something  different  can  be  made  to  pay. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


17 


JANUARY  EXHIBITIONS  on  IMPROVED  SCALE 

,,,,„i  ,  iiiiiiiiiiiii{|||||iininiiiii|ii|rr|||||iin,i|t||||||iiiiiiiiimii>n!iiiin^   iiiiii  iiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiii  i  i  iiii  iiiiiiiiiiiipiiiiiiiiiiii  i  iii  iiiiiiiiii  ii:  ii  i  iii  iiiiiii  iiiii  mil  

General  improvement  in  exhibitions  at  all  Ontario  centres — A  larger  number  of  exhibits  and  more  extensive^ — 
Increased  number  of  buyers  and  big  business  done — What  the  exhibitors  in  the  various  centres  displayed 

,„|„,„|„l„  IIIIIMIMIhllllllillllMIIIIIIIIIMIIIMMI  I  I  IIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  I  UMI  HHMIII  llllll'lllllllllllllllilMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII  IIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|I|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMII  IIIIIII 


THE  January  Exhibitions  Avere  outstanding  this 
j'ear  in  many  respects.  There  was  a  general 
demonstration  of  confidence  and  faith  in  the 
business  situation  as  indicated  by  the  large  number  of 
firms  making  exhibits  and  the  quality  and  extensive- 
ness  of  displays.  The  number  of  visiting  retailers  arid 
buyers  was  unusually  large  and  the  list  was  very 
representative,  including  dealers  from  the  Maritime  to. 
Prairie  Provinces.  There  was  an  unusual  large  at- 
tendance from  the  province  of  Quebec,  while  the  num- 
ber from  Ontario  was  well  in  keeping  with  the  idea  of 
a  new  era  of  business  certainty  and  prosperity. 

Many  Visitors — Much  Buying 

Not  only  was  there  a  large  number  of  visitors,  but 
buying  was  on  a  scale  that  has  not  been  experienced  in 
some  years.  This  was  true  in  practically  all  the  cen- 
tres where  exhibitions  Avere  held  and  another  feature 
was  that  buying  Avas  pretty  Avell  divided,  practically 
all  the  exhibitors  expressing  satisfaction  in  this  regard. 

This  is  all  indicative  of  the  feeling  existing  in  the 
furnitiire  trade  that  a  period  of  business  prosperity  is 
ahead  for  those  engaged  in  the  house  furnishings  busi- 
ness, and  also  backs  up  the  contention  that  prices  on 
furniture  are  likely  to  remain  firm  for  some  time  to 
come.  For  this  reason,  buyers  Avere  not  backAvard  in 
making  purchases. 

Improvement  in  All  Centres 

As  usual,  exhibitions  of  any  extensiveness  Avere  con- 
fined to  the  four  centres — Stratford,  Kitchener,  "Water- 
loo and  Toronto.  And  again  this  year  there  Avas  no 
centralization  of  exhibits,  the  greater  portion  of  dis- 
plays in  all  these  centres  being  entirely  separate. 

Stratford  again  lived  up  to  the  reputation  it  has 
attained  in  other  years.  The  manufacturers  located 
in  that  centre  each  making  displays  in  their  factories 
and  tshoAvrooms  that  Avere  not  only  extensive  but  at- 
tractive to  the  eye.  The  accommodation  and  enter- 
tainment Avas  also  again  looked  after  in  the  same  pleas- 
ing manner. 

The  Kitchener  Exhibition  Avas  an  improvement  on 
recent  years,  the  spirit  of  optimism  prevailing  among 
the  furniture  manufacturers  of  that  centre.  There 
were  not  only  some  A'^ery  attractive  exhibits  but  many 
new  lines  Avere  on  display.  As  usual,  a  number  of 
firnits  made  exhibits  in  the  Auditorium  on  Queen  St., 
while  some  firms  .shoAved  their  goods  in  the  local  stores. 

The  twin  manufacturing  city — Waterloo — also  did 
well  in  the  matter  of  display  this  year,  the  number  and 
appearance  of  exhibits  being  on  a  par  with  other  years. 

In  Toronto,  there  Avas  a  greater  number  of  exhibits 
than  during  the  jiast  feAV  years.  In  addition  to  the 
Toronto  facloi'ies  putting  on  displays,  a  number  of 
outside  Ontario  firms  also  had  shoAvings  of  their  goods, 
Owen  Sound  firms  displaying  in  the  Allan  Building  on 
Bay  St.,  Avhere  they  have  established  permanent  sboAV- 
rooms,  and  Kincardine  firms  occupying  temporary  space 
in  the  Oraig  Building  on  Victoria  St. 


The  General  Trend 

Altogether,  it  can  easily  be  said  that  the  Ontario 
furniture  exhibitions  Avere  a  great  improvement  on 
those  of  the  past  fcAV  years,  due  to  a  large  extent,  to 
the  greater  feeling  of  confidence  among  both  manu- 
facturers and  retailers.  Satisfaction  is  expressed  by 
both  exhibitors  and  A'isitors. 

While  many  new  things  were  shoAvn  by  individual 
manufacturers,  there  Avas  no  decided  change  in  general 
trends.  In  designs.  Queen  Anne  still  seems  to  hold 
the  centre  of  the  stage  in  popularity,  but  there  is  an 
increasing  demand  for  all  period  styles.  A  call  for 
higher  ((uality  goods  is  more  noticeable. 

In  dining  room  furniture,  there  is  a  noticeable  tend- 
ency toAvards  solid  front  china  cabinets.  The  English 
brown  finish  is  more  to  the  front.  In  bedroom  furni- 
ture there  is  a  decided  trend  toAvards  boAV  foot  beds, 
vanity  dressers  and  ehiffonettes.  Exhibits  indicate  a 
larger  manufacture  and  demand  for  comfortable  liv- 
ing room  furniture.  Stuff-over  goods  are  much  in 
evidence  in  a  big  variety  of  coverings.  Tapestries  lead 
for  this  purpose  and  some  rich  samples  are  shown. 


TEATFOED 


The  Geo.  McLagan  Furniture  Company  Limited 

Better  than  ever  before  Avas  the  display  of  The  Geo. 
McLagan  Furniture  Co.  Ltd.,  at  their  factory  shoAV- 
rooms,  Stratford.  Diningroom  suites  Avere  arranged 
on  one  side  of  the  exhibit,  bedroom  suites  on  the  other 
and  their  immense  range  of  odd  pieces  were  neatly  dis- 
played in  the  centre  of  the  floor.  In  diningroom  furni- 
ture two  suites  in  solid  mahogany  Avere  outstanding, 
one  a  Louis  XVI  the  other  an  Adam  design.  These 
suites  are  also  made  in  black  Avalnut.  Period  designs 
occupied  a  large  part  of  the  diningroom  display  in- 
cluding attractive  reproductions  in  Louis  XV,  Queen 
Anne,  Louis  XVI,  Louis  XIV,  William  and  Mary, 
Chinese  Chippendale,  and  Arts  and  Crafts  in  mahogany, 
walnut  and  oak.  Oval,  square  and  round  tables  Avere 
shown. 

In  bedroom  furniture  many  ncAv  suites  Avere  shown 
in  period  designs.  Louis  XVI,  Louis  XV,  Queen  Anne, 
Heppehvhite,  Chippendale  and  Adam  periods  Avere  in 
evidence.  A  Louis  XV  suite  Avith  bow  foot  cane  iianel 
bed,  vanity  dresser,  chefifonette  and  handsome  dresser 
in  walnut  was  very  pleasing  to  the  eye.  Boav  foot 
beds,  vanity  dressers  and  ehiffonettes  are  features  of 
practically  a'll  the  newer  suites.  Adam  and  Chippen- 
dale suites  Avere  shoAvn  in  ivory  enamel  Avith  atti'active 
period  decorations. 

A  full  display  of  Gunn  sectional  bookcases  Avas  dis- 
played and  a  new  library  suite  in  walnut,  Queen  Anne 
period,  w'as  a  feature  of  the  exhibit. 


18 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  February,  1919 


Down  the  centre  of  the  exhibit  were  shown  period 
designs  in  chesterfield  tables,  livingroom  tables,  and 
parlor  tables,  davenport  end  tables,  card  tables,  sewing 
tables,  tea  tables  and  trays,  telephone  stands,  eellaret- 
tes,  record  cabinets,  pedestals  and  jardiniere  stands. 

A  large  room  on  the  second  floor  of  the  factory  was 
occupied  by  McLagan  phonographs.  Many  exclusive 
period  designs  were  exhibited  in  oak,  mahogany  and 
walnut.  Queen  Anne,  Louis  XVI,  Louis  XV,  William 
and  Mary,  Chippendale,  Adam  and  Gothic  designs  were 
in  evidence.  One  Cbippendale  design  with  record 
cabinets  on  each  side  created  a  great  deal  of  comment 
among  visiting  buyers.  The  library  table  model  is 
something  out  of  the  ordinary.  All  McLagan  phono- 
graphs are  equipped  with  automatic  stops,  tone  control, 
etc.,  and  pla.y  any  make  of  disc  record. 

Kindel  Bed  Company  Limited 

This  firm  had  their  display  in  one  of  the  down  town 
stores  in  Stratford  which  they  leased  for  the  occasion. 
They  have  greatly  expanded  in  the  living  room  line, 
showing  some  ve-ry  attractive  overstuffed  chesterfields 
and  easy  chairs.  Kroehler  Kodavs  and  Davenos  with 
neatly  upholstered  livingroom  chairs  to  match,  made 
up  a  large  part  of  their  exhibit.  Chesterfield  beds  are 
a  strong  line  with  the  Kindel  Bed  Company,  and  a  line 
that  should  take  well  with  the  retail  trade.  .  Some 
pieces  iipholstered  with  Marshall  cushions  were  par- 
ticularly comfortable  and  attractive. 

A  new  library  suite  consisting  of  kodav,  library  table, 
chair  and  rocker  which  this  company  are  shipping 
k.d.,  was  a  feature. 

Kodavs  in  period  designs  in  walnut  and  mahogany 
w^ere  in  evidence. 

Stratford  Manufactiiring'  Company  Limited 

A  striking  display  of  their  line  was  made  by  this  firm 
in  the  Farquharson-Giflford  Building.  Folding  screens 
are  a  new  line  Avith  this  company  and  some  very  at- 
traetive  ones  were  shoA\Ti.  Folding  kindergarten  sets, 
baby  SAvings,  for  indoors  and  out,  baby  Avalkers.  play- 
yards,  extension  porch  gates  are  all  new  lines  that 
should  find  a  ready  market  in  the  furniture  stores  of 
Canada. 


Their  usual  line  of  lawn,  camp  and  verandah  furni- 
ture, ironing  boards,  clothes  racks,  bread  boards,  dress- 
making tables,  kitchen  tables,  .step  ladder  .stools,  lad- 
ders, etc.,  occupied  prominent  places  in  their  exhibit. 

Imperial  Rattan  Company  Limited 

This  company  made  a  striking  di-splay  of  their  line  in 
their  shoAvrooms  at  the  factory.  In  reed  and  rattan 
several  suite's  were  shoAA'n  in  grey  enamel  and  ivory 
eiiamel.  Chesterfields,  settees,  chairs  and  rockers,  with  a 
sprinkling  of  floor  lamps  made  up  a  large  part  of  the 
exhibit.  "Old  Hickory"  verandah  and  laA\-n  pieces 
were  shown  in  sAvings,  chairs,  rockers,  settees,  ferneries, 
floAver  stands,  children's  sets,  etc.  This  line  has  proved 
a  very  popular  one  in  Canada.  Workmanship  and 
finish  are  particularly  noticeable. 

The  Stratford  Chair  Co.  Ltd. 

A  very  extensive  shoAving  of  their  large  ranse  of 
chairs  Avas  made  down  the  middle  of  their  shoAvroom_s 
w'ith  bedroom  lines  on  one  side  and  diningroom  on  the 
other.  The  display  of  chairs  embraced  all  designs  and 
finishes.  There  Avere  diners  of  all  vffi-ieties.  office 
chairs  and  stools,  rockers,  dressing  chairs,  and  arm 
chairs. 

Bedroom  suites  Avere  shoAvn  in  Avalnut  and  oak,  ivory 
and  Avhite  enamel,  gum,  finished  natural  and  fini'shed 
walnut.  Sevei-al  period  designs  Avere  shown  in  bed- 
room goods. 

Diningroom  suites  Avere  shown  in  fumed  and  golden 
oak  and  gum,  and  here  again  the  period  dc'signs  Avere 
very  much  to  the  fore. 

Altogether,  the  display  Avas  not  only  an  extensiA'e, 
but  an  attractive  one. 

Stratford  Bed  Company  Ltd. 

This  firm  shoAved  some  fine  examples  of  their  Avork- 
manship  in  the  shoAvrooms  of  the  Stratford  Chair  Co. 
There  Avere  several  neAv  designs  to  greet  the  Adsiting 
trade.     Various  finishes  Avei'e  shoAvn  as  usual. 

The  Farquharson-Giflford  Co.  Ltd. 

The  display  of  this  company  in  their  oavu  building 
was  one  that  appealed  to  the  eye  both  from  the  stand- 
point of  size  and  attraetiveness.     There  Avere  some  out- 


standing  patterns  in  coverings,  and  with  the  new  de- 
signs being  fihown,  the  display  was  certainly  one  worth 
visiting. 

In  livingroom  furniture,  chesterfields  and  easy 
chairs,  some  new  and  handsome  designs  were  shown, 
and  striking  examples  of  their  artistic  work  were 
demonstrated  in  a  suite  covered  in  purple  and  another 
in  black  and  gold. 

A  big  variety  of  designs  in  their  Nufold  Divanettes 
and  Pullman  beds  were  on  disjolay  with  chairs  and 
rockers  to  match,  making  some  very  attractive  and 
unique  suites. 

The  whole  display  of  this  company  was  greatly  im- 
proved by  the  lighting.  There  were  a  niimber  of 
floor  lamps  with  colored  silk  shades  Avhich  greatly  en- 
hanced the  appearance  of  the  goods  on  display. 

H.  E.  Furniture  Company 

The  H,  E.  Furniture  Company,  of  Milverton,  Ont., 
made  an  exhibit  of  their  kitchen  cabinets  and  tables  in 
conjunction  with  the  Kindel  Bed  Co.,  at  Stratford. 
Their  white  enamelled  cabinets  attracted  considerable 
attention  and  the  enamelled  metal  top  kitchen  table  is 
something  new.  The  H.  E.  Company  are  bringing  out 
a  new  line  of  cedar  chests,  and  samples  of  the  line 
were  on  display. 


ITCHEMER 


Baetz  Bros.,  Furniture  Co.  Ltd. — Anthes  Furniture 
Company 

One  of  the  most  striking  exhibits  at  the  Kitchener* 
Exhibition  was  that  of  the  Baetz  Bros.  Funiitui'e  Co. 
and  the  Antlies  Furniture  Co.  These  two  progressive 
firms  had  their  exhibits  together  on  the  second  floor  of 
the  Anthes  factory.  As  soon  as  you  entered  this  floor 
you  were  struck  with  the  beauty  of  the  array  of  high- 
grade  furniture. 

P>reakfast  room,  diningrooiii,  bedroom  and  living- 
room  suites  were  set  in  such  a  manner  as  to  attract  the 
attention  of  every  visitor,  while  reading  and  floor  lamps 
placed  so  as  to  give  the  best  light  possible  served  to. 


make  the  display  one  that  Mill  be  remembered  for  some 
time  by  those  fortunate  enough  to  see  it. 

At  one  end  of  the  exhibit  there  was  arranged  a  four- 
room  apartment  which  was  exceptionally  good.  The 
breakfast  room  was  daintily  furnished  with  a  grey  and 
blue  enamel  suite  consisting  of  a  novel  shaped  gate  leg, 
drop  leaf  breakfast  table,  with  four  chairs,  buffet  and 
serving  table.  The  diningroom  was  furnished  in 
Heppelwhite  design — buffet,  extension  table,  china 
cabinet  and  serving  table  with  flatware  cabinet  and 
compartment  for  silver  or  liquors.  The  livingroom 
was  particularly  good — furnished  in  Spanish  Renais- 
sance style  with  library  table,  gate-leg  table,  writing 
table,  secretary  and  bookcase  combined,  cabinet  for 
china  or  smoking  accessories.  All  these  pieces  were  in 
solid  walnut,  shaded  wax  finish.  In  this  room  there 
was  also  a  settee,  arm  chair  and  two  side  chairs  in  same 
style — Avalniit' — neatly  upholstered  with  covering  to 
blend  with  furniture  of  this  period.  The  bedroom  was 
furnished  in  Louis  XVI  period,  ivory  enamel  suite  with 
bow  foot  bed,  vanity  dresser,  chift'onette,  dresser,  secre- 
tary, chairs  and  fioor  lamp. 

One  breakfast  room  suite  in  quartered  oak,  English 
brown  finish  with  black  moulding  is  particularly  worthy 
of  mention.  Diningroom  suites  in  Italian  Renaissance, 
Louis  XVI,  Queen  Anne,  Heppelwhite,  and  Jacobean 
designs  in  English  brown  and  fumed  finishes  occupied  a 
prominent  place  in  the  display. 

Bedroom  suites  in  Chinese  Chippendale,  Louis  XVI 
and  Queen  Anne  were  in  evidence  in  walnut  and 
mahogany,  and'  one  in  grey  enamel. 

Louis  XVI  livingroom  suites  were  shown  in  both  c  ine 
with  upholstered  seats  and  loose  cushions,  and  in  all 
upholstered.  Two  French  Chippendale  suites  attracted 
your  attention,  and  several  new  designs  in  chesterfields 
and  easy  chairs  nuule  up  a  very  handsome  exhibit. 

H.  Krug-  Furniture  Co.  Limited 

This  firm  made  an  extensive  display  of  their  high- 
grade  line  of  furniture  at  theii'  factory  show  rooms. 
Hand-carved  designs  in  libi-ary  and  hall  tables  and 
chairs  were  in  evidence. 

Xew  designs  in  livingroom  furniture,  chesterfields 
and  easy  chairs  were  mostly  of  note.  Club  chester- 
fields are  a  large  line  with  this  company  and  pieces 
slu)wn  were  comfortable  and  luxurious.     Several  de- 


20 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTATOQR 


February,  1919 


signs  in  cane-back  chesterfields  with  upholstered 
cushions  were  shown. 

Library  tables,  secretaries,  chairs,  rockers,  gate-leg 
tables,  ferneries  and  pedestals,  served  to  make  this 
exhibit  a  very  handsome  one. 

Beaver  Furniture  Company  Limited 

This  company  had  their  display  at  Schreiter's  Furni- 
ture Store,  King  St.,  Kitchener.  Several  new  designs 
in  period  diningroom  furniture  were  .shown  in  oak  and 
walnut. 

Hespeler  Furniture  Company 

Hespeler  furniture  was  shown  in  Schreiter's  Furni- 
ture Store  on  King  St.,  Kitchener.  Several  new  period 
suites  were  in  evidence.  Queen  Anne  designs  in  both 
bedroom  and  diningroom  furniture  occupied  a  portion 
of  this  displa.v.  Chinese  chippendale  and  some  Louis 
suites  were  worthy  of  the  attention  of  the  discriminat- 
ing buyer. 

De  Luxe  Upholstering  Co. 

This  firm  made  a  display  of  their  upholstered  furni- 
ture in  Schreiter's  Furniture  Store,  King  St.,  Kitchener. 
Several  luxurious  livingroom  suites  were  on  display. 
Coverings  this  year  are  very  attractive. 

Crown  Furniture  Limited 

Crown  Furniture  Limited,  of  Preston,  occupied  their 
usual  space  in  the  auditorium,  Queen  St.,  Kitchener. 
Devoting  their  energies  to  bedroom  furniture  this  firm 
are  placing  many  attractive  suites  on  the  market.  Wal- 
nut, mahogan}',  figured  gum,  (inartered  oak,  and  ivory, 
and  white  enamel  suites  in  period  designs  made  up  their 
display.  A  Louis  XVI  suite  was  particularly  attractive. 
Lippert  Furniture  Co.  Limited 

This  company  occupied  a  large  portion  of  the  audi- 
torium in  Queen  St.,  Kitchener,  with  their  permanent 
display.  A  representative  showing  of  upholstered 
livingroom  furniture  in  period  designs  was  on  displa,y. 
A  richly  upholstered  cane  livingroom  suite  attracted 
much  attention. 

Many  period  designs  in  diningroom  suites  were 
shown  in  oak.  mahogany  and  walnut.  One  end  of  their 
display  was  devoted  to  the  Lyraphone  talking  machine 
which  this  firm  are  featuring  with  great  success.  Period 
designs  were  shown.  The  Lj^raphone  is  equipped  to 
play  any  make  of  disc  record. 

Geo.  H.  Hachborn  &  Co. 

A  displaj^  was  made  by  this  firm  at  their  permanent 
show  rooms  in  the  auditorium,  Qiaeen  St.,  Kitchener. 


An  extensive  line  of  upholstered  living  room  and  parlor 
furniture  was  shown  as  well  as  many  designs  in  couches. 
New  coverings  were  much  in  evidence. 

Chesterfield  suites  by  this  firm  are  built  upon  at- 
tractive and  comfortable  lines.  Upholstered  with 
Marshall  cushions  they  should  prove  ready  sellers  dur- 
ing tjie  coming  season. 

Folding  screens  occupied  a  part  of  this  display  and 
a  new  thing  in  a  ladies'  folding  work  basket  is  worthy 
of  note. 

Geo.  J.  Lippert  Table  Company 

This  firm  had  their  display  at  the  auditorium  in 
Queen  St.,  Kitchener,  with  that  of  the  Lippert  Furni- 
ture Company.  An  extensive  display  of  diningroom 
tables  in  period  designs  were  shown.  Library  tables, 
jardiniere  stands,  a(|uariuras  and  smoking  sets  oc- 
cupied a  prominent  place  in  the  display,  and  the  read- 
ing lamps  which  are  part  of  this  firm's  product  served 
to  make  this  exhibit  an  attractive  one. 

Art  Furniture  Co.  Limited 

This  company  made  a  display  of  their  bedroom  furni- 
ture at  26  King  St.  E..  Kitchener.  They  have  shown 
a  marked  improvement  in  their  line  during  the  past 
year.  Several  striking  period  designs  Avere  shown  in 
walnut,  mahogany  and  ivory.  One  suite  with  bed 
with  bow  foot  and  vanity  dresser  is  particularly  worthy 
of  note.  Library  tables  were  also  shown  extensively. 
Jacques  Furniture  Company 

At  their  factory  showrooms  this  firm  had  on  display 
several  period  designs  in  bedroom  suites  with  Queen 
Anne  predominating.  This  company  are  making  a 
special  feature  of  their  drawer  construction. 

D.  Hibner  &  Company 

This  firm  showed  their  line  at  their  factory  show- 
rooms. Many  period  designs  in  diningroom  suites 
were  shown  both  in  walnut  and  oak.  A  solid  mahogany 
inlaid  dining  room  suite  was  a  feature  in  connection 
with  this  end  of  their  display.  A  full  line  of  buffets 
and  tables  in  oak  are  a  part  of  their  product. 

Bedroom  suites  are  a  new  departure  with  the  D. 
Hibner  Company,  and  many  artistic  designs  in  oak. 
walnut  and  mahogany  were  shown. 

Hall  seats  and  mirrors,  reading,  library,  parlor 
and  chesterfield  tables  in  mahogany,  walnut  and  oak 
occupied  a  part  of  this  exhibit. 

Several  new  designs  in  neatly  upholstered  chester- 
fields and  livingroom  chairs  were  in  evidence.  Sec- 
tional book  cases  were  also  shown. 


No.  288— Chesterfield 
manufactured  by 
D.  Hibner  &  Co.. 
of  Kitchener,  with 
loose  cushion  spring 
seats. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


21 


Waterloo  Furniture  Company  Limited 

The  Waterloo  Fui'niture  Company  had  a  striking 
display  of  their  livinoroom  and  parlor  furniture  on  the 
third  floor  of  the  Edwards  and  Eitel  furniture  store. 
Chesterfields  and  chairs  with  cane  backs  and  sides  with 
richly  upholstered  seats  and  loose  cushions  were  par- 
ticularly worthy  of  note.  One  Queen  Anne  design  at- 
tracted considerable  attention.  Period  designs  in 
stufl'over  goods  were  very  good. 

Library  tables,  diners  and  den  furniture  in  oak,  wal- 
nut and  mahogany  occupied  one  end  of  the  display. 
This  firm  are  now  featuring  an  extensive  line  of 
popular-priced  diningrooni  and  bedroom  furniture  and 
devoted  a  part  of  their  display  to  this  line. 

The  walls  were  hung  with  many  new  samples  of  mo- 
hair velvets  which  will  be  one  of  the  best  selling 
features  of  the  Waterk)o  line  during  the  coming  season. 

Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Company 

Snyder  Bros,  had  a  very  snappy  display  this  year. 
They  have  remodelled  their  showrooms  into  a  series  of 
livingrooms  that  extend  completely  around  their  show. 
Each  room  was  furnished  with  a  Chesterfield  and  easy 
chairs,  library  table  and  floor  and  ta'ble  lamps.  Many 
new  designs  in  tapestries  and  velvets  were  in  evidence 
— also  some  new  designs  in  Chesterfields. 

In  the  centre  of  the  display  were  many  Chesterfields 
and  livingroom  chairs  lighted  in  a  striking  manner  with 
semi-indirect  ceiling  lamps  and  floor  lamps.  A  few 
designs  in  leather-covered  and  club  chairs  were  shoAvii. 

Snyder  Desk  and  Table  Co. 

This  firm  had  a  comprehensive  display  of  their  line  of 
flat  and  roll  top  desks,  typewriter  desks,  library  and 
office  tables,  chairs  and  stools  in  the  showrooms  of  the 
Snyder  Bros.  Upholstering  Co.  They  also  showed  a 
line  of  lawn  and  verandah  furniture  in  white  and  green 
that  is  worthy  of  comment. 


Woeller,  Bolduc  &  Co. 

This  firm  had  a  very  neat  display  of  their  chester- 
fields and  easy  chairs.  Several  new  designs  were  in 
evidence  and  some  new  coverings  are  deserving  of  men- 
tion. The  construction  of  Woeller  Bolduc  chester- 
fields and  chairs  is  particularly  good.  Livingroom 
suites  and  library  tables  were  the  predominating 
feature  of  this  exhibit. 

Quality  Mattress  Company 

The  Quality  Mattress  Company  of  Waterloo,  had  a 
splendid  display  of  their  many  high-grade  mattresses 
in  their  factory  showrooms.  This  firm  is  featuring  a 
high-grade  Kapok  mattress  that  should  appeal  to  the 
dealer.  Box  springs  and  pillows  were  also  shown. 
Quality  Mattresses  and  Box  Springs  were  also  on  dis- 
play at  the  Snyder  Bros.'  show  at  Waterloo,  and  the 
Crown  Furniture  ShoAV  at  the  Auditorium,  Kitchener? 


TOEOMTO 


Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ltd. 

This  firm  had  the  usual  extensive  showing  of  their 
goods  at  their  permanent  showrooms  at  136-140'  King 
St.  E.,  Toronto.  Displays  are  maintained  on  five 
floors  and  .'buyers  have  an  opportunity  of  inspecting 
the  furniture  lines  manufactured  in  their  various  fac- 
tories, under  one  roof. 

There  was  a  particularly  strong  showing  of  bedroom 
furniture,  the  entire  second  floor  being  devoted  to  this 
line.  Walnut  was  much  in  evidence  while  mahogany 
is  also  strong.  There  were  some  nice  showings  in- 
white  enamel  and  satin  walnut.  Queen  Anne  still  holds 
the  lead  in  popularity  with  William  and  Mary  and 
Louis  XVI  sharing  second  honors. 

Walnut  and  mahogany  also  predominated  in  the  din- 
ing room  suites  shown,  while  an  old  oak  suite  was  one 
of  the  outstanding  new  shoAvings.  Period  designs  in- 
cluded Queen  Anne,  William  and  Mary,  Adam,  Shera- 
ton and  Cromwellian.     Tables  are  running  more  to  the 


No.  3043 


No.  3039 


Two  attractive  reed  cliairs  by  Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers  Ijiniited. 


22 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


S([uare  design.  More  china  cabinets  with  closed  doors 
are  being  shown.  They  shoAv  a  big  range  of  .Windsor 
chairs  which  can  be  supplied  in  all  colors. 

On  one  floor  is  an  extensive  showing  of  desks,  library 
tables,  dinner  wagons,  sewing  tables,  smoking  stands, 
telephone  stands  and  kindred  lines.  In  these  goods, 
English  brown  is  superseding  the  red  finish  to  a  large 
extent.  The  console  table  in  combination  with  w^all 
mirror  is  a  new  feature.  Sectional  book  cases  are  also 
a  big  feature  with  this  firm. 

Oue  of  the  most  attractive  spaces  is  that  devoted  to 
reed  and  rattan  furniture  which  can  be  supplied  in 
any  color  and  with  trimmings  of  any  variety  of 
tapestry.  The  range  includes  chairs,  settees,  tables, 
sewing  tables,  smoking  tables,  dinner  wagons,  etc. 

The  Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Co,  Ltd. 

This  firm  which  has  factories  in  Kincardine  and 
Listowel,  had  an  attractive  showing  of  their  dining 
room  and  bedroom  furniture  at  215  Victoria  St.,  their 
display  occupying  the  entire  third  floor  of  the  building. 
Two  passageways  were  arranged  down  the  entire 
length  of  the  building  with  suites  ranging  along  both 
sides.  Each  individual  suite  was  grouped  in  room 
formation  with  a  setting  that  showed  goods  up  to  ad- 
vantage. Walnut,  which  this  firm  makes  a  special 
feature  of,  predominated,  while  there  were  a  few  suites 
in  oak.  Therp  were  also  some  attractive  showings  in 
den  and  livingroom  goods. 

In  bedroom  furniture.  Queen  Anne  was  well  to  the 
front,  one  suite  of  eight  pieces  being  particularly  out- 
standing. A  Chippendale  suite  on  displav  attracted 
much  attention,  while  some  attractive  suites  in  Avhite 
ivory  were  shown. 

F.  E.  Coombe  Furniture  Co. 

This  Kincardine  firm  had  quite  a  representative 
showing  of  their  living  room  and  novelty  lines  on  the 
second  floor  of  the  Craig  Building,  Victoria  St. 

Stuff-over  chairs  and  chesterfields  in  which  they 
specialize  were  shown  in  a  wide  range  of  designs  and 
coverings.  Tapestries  are  well  to  the  front,  while  real 
comfort  is  the  big  underlying  feature  of  all  these  goods. 

A  special  showing  was  made  of  dinner  w^agons  wnth 
a  number  of  worth-while  features,  while  their  library 
sets  and  individual  chairs  also  attracted  attention. 

Owen  Sound  Firms 

The  North  American  Furniture  Company,  The  Na- 
tional Table  Company,  and  The  Owen  Sound  Chair 
Company,  all  of  Owen  Sound,  had  a  combined  display 
of  their  goods  in  the  permanent  showrooms  which  they 
have  opened  on  the  sixth  floor  of  the  Allan  Building.  55 
Bay  St.,  Toronto. 

The  bedroom  and  dining  room  suites  of  the  North 
American  Furniture  Company  were  shown  in  a  variety 
of  designs  and  finishes,  while  quite  a  range  of  individ- 
ual pieces  such  as  pedestal  lamps,  smoking  sets,  maga- 
zine stands,  library  tables,  etc.,  were  shown. 

The  Owen  Sound  Chair  Company  manufacture  chairs 
of  most  every  variety  and  finish,  including  diners, 
livingroom  and  office.  Medium-priced  lines  were  prom- 
inent in  living  room  chairs.  The  National  Table  Com- 
pany manufacture  a  general  line  of  tables. 

The  Renfrew  Refrigerator  Company 

This  firm  also  had  a  showing  of  their  hou'-ehold 
refrigerators  in  association  with  the  above  firms  in  the 
Allan  Building  and  will  maintain  a  permanent  displaj' 
there  throughout  the  year. 


The  Ideal  Bedding  Co.  Ltd. 

This  company  had  a  good  .showing  of  their  goods  at 
their  plant  on  Jefferson  Ave.,  Toronto,  and  report  a 
large  number  of  buyers  who  bought  freely.  They 
are  shoM'ing  a  number  of  new  designs  of  beds  in  a 
variety  of  finishes.     The  ribbon  finish  is  very  popular. 

The  Canadian  Mersereau  Co.  Ltd. 

A  number  of  new  models  for  1919  were  shown  by 
The  Canadian  Mersereau  Co.  Ltd.,  at  their  factory  on 
Florence  St.,  Toronto,  during  the  month  of  January. 
Some  particularly  attractive  designs  were  shown.  The 
ribbon  finish  is  much  in  demand. 

The  Gendron  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd. 

The  Gendron  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  made  a  display  of  their 
productions  at  55  Bay  St.,  that  was  well  worthy  of 
visiting.  The  company  has  made  big  advances  in 
furniture  making,  and  their  old  ivory  finished  rattan 
suites  with  chintz  upholstering  were  very  fine.  The 
ebony  and  gold  combination  finishes  were  another 
striking  exhibit,  as,  too,  were  the  fumed.  A  splendid 
selection  of  chintz  coverings  .was  on  display.  While 
odd  in  some  designs,  they  were  rich  in  colors,  toning 
down  to  (|uiet  combinations.  All  the  examples  of 
furniture  displayed  showed  the  lines  were  strong  on 
color  finishes. 

Baby  carriages  occupied  the  centre  aisle  of  the  booth. 
Here,  too,  the  color  finishes  were  well  played  up.  Grey 
seems  to  be  the  predominating  tone,  and  some  nice 
samples  of  duo-tones  were  in  evidence — white  and  grey 
and  white  and  blue.  Some  of  the  carriages  shown 
were  both  the  company's  most  popular  wood  bodies  and 
their  rattan  bodies. 

Cradles,  children's  chairs  and  rockers,  verandah 
chairs  and  rockers,  and  invalid's  chairs  "were  also  shown 
in  this  section.  Some  decidedly  new  features  have  been 
added  to  the  invalid  chair  line,  making  the  chairs  so 
adjustable  in  every  part  that  to  the  onlooker  nothing 
has  been  left  undone  that  could  add  to  the  comfort  of 
those  for  whom  they  have  been  constructed. 

A  special  section  of  the  display  was  reserved  for  the 
children's  play  line — doll  carriages  of  all  sizes  in  wood 
and  reed  bodies,  imitating  closely  the  carriages  for  the 
real  babies ;  sulkies,  velocipedes,  automobiles,  rocking- 
horse  chairs,  baby  walkers,  kindergarten,  sets,  metal 
toy  carts  and  wheelbarrows,  etc.  A  striking  new  line 
of  velocipedes  shown  are  the  "Blue  Devils,"  colored  in 
light  French  blue  and  built  of  spring  steel.  The 
company  are  bringing  out,  also,  six  new  lines  of  auto- 
mobiles. These  will  be  ready  in  a  month's  time,  as 
will  also  'be  the  samples  of  their  next  season's  sleigh 
lines. 

Messrs.  Batema)i,  Roy  and  Chadwick  were  in  charge 
of  the  display. 

The  Gold  Medal  Line 

Following  their  usual  custom  the  Gold  Medal  Furni- 
ture Company  made  a  display  of  their  full  line  at  the 
Toronto  factory.  This  year,  in  addition  to  their  large 
line  of  upholstered  furniture,  divanettes  and  Herciiles 
springs,  they  showed  several  very  attractive  designs  in 
phonographs.  For  some  years  past  they  have  made 
the  cabinets  and  assembled  machines  for  several  large 
companies,  and  a  few  months  ago  decided  to  market 
their  own  finished  product — under  the  name  of  the 
Gold  Medal  Phonoe-raph.  Good  business  was  done  in 
this  line  and  would  have  been  much  larger  during  the 
C  Continued  on  page  J2 ) 


Canadian  Furniture  World 


TORONTO 


FEBRUARY  1919 


CANADA 


A  THRIFT  REQUEST 

To  Our  Subscribers: 

About  your  subscription  receipt: — Instead  of  send- 
ing you  a  receipt  for  your  renewal  subscription,  we 
ask  you  to  watch  the  expiry  date  on  your  next  copy. 
By  it  you  will  see  your  remittance  has  been  received — 
it  will  be  advanced  accordingly. 
Thanking  you,  we  are 

Gratefully  yours, 
THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED, 

32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 


ting  more  help  into  an  otherwise  quiet  month,  and  to 
stimulate  greater  interest  in  a  line  that  is  not  given 
the  attention  in  the  average  store  that  it  should  get. 
There  is  no  doubt  that  many  stores  could  materially 
increase  sales  of  bedding  if  they  Avould  put  some  real 
energy  behind  this  line,  as  the  Green  Furnishing  Com- 
pany did. 

The  success  of  their  luidertaking  is  indicated  by  the 
fact  that  over  fifteen  thousand  people  visited  the  store 
during  the  five  days.  A  full  account  of  this  unique 
exhibition  is  given  in  this  issue  and  is  Avorthy  of  tlie 
careful  perusal  of  eA'ery  reader. 


The  January  That  the  men  engaged  in  the  fur- 

Exhibitions  niture  trade  of  Canada  have  suc- 

ceeded in  chasing  the  bogeyman 
of  business  depression  which  many  people  were  in- 
clined to  believe  would  follow  in  the  wake  of  peace,  is 
indicated  by  the  success  of  the  January  Furniture  Ex- 
hibitions in  Ontario  this  year. 

The  furniture  manufacturers  of  Ontario  demon- 
strated their  faith  in  the  new  era  which  we  have  entered 
upon  by  displays  which  surpassed  those  of  the  previous 
few  years  in  number  and  extensiveness,  and  the  re- 
tailers of  the  Dominion  responded  in  a  pleasing  man- 
ner by  visiting  in  large  numbers  and  buying  on  an  ex- 
tensive scale. 

A  full  report  of  the  exhibitions  and  the  showings  of 
the  various  firms  will  be  found  in  this  issue.  Every 
dealer  would  do  well  to  read  it  thoroughly. 


Accumulated  In  addition  to  the  increased  de- 

Demand  mand  that  should  be  stimulated 

For  Furniture  for  furniture  during  the  next  year 

Or  two  by  reason  of  the  large  num- 
ber of  new  homes  that  will  be  opened  up  throughout 
the  length  and  breadth  of  the  land,  there  is  also  an- 
other factor  that  should  mean  much  to  furniture  sales. 
This  is  the  demand  that  has  accumulated  during  the 
past  four  years  by  reason  of  people  foregoing  the  pur- 
chase of  furniture  that  they  otherwise  would  have 
bought. 

One  investigator  estimates  that  the  amount  of  furni- 
ture that  would  have  been  bought  in  Canada  in  normal 
times  and  which  was  not  because  of  the  Avar,  is  equal 
to  a  full  year's  production  of  all  the  furniture  factories 
of  the  Dominion.  This  accumulated  demand  should 
begin  to  make  itself  felt  now  that  normal  peace  comli- 
tions  are  again  close  at  hand. 


Held  Better  Seldom  has  anything  of  itcs  nature 

Bedding  been  attempted  in  Canada  as  was 

Exhibition  carried  out  by  the  Green  Furnish- 

ing Company,  of  Hamilton,  Out., 
last  mouth  when  they  conducted  their  Better  Bedding 
Exhibition.     It  was  inaugurated  with  the  idea  of  put- 


Sizing  up  At  this  time  of  the  year  we  hear 

Yourself  a  good  deal  about  stock-taking  in 

business.  Why  shouldn't  a  man 
take  stock  of  himself  once  in  a  Avhile,  to  make  sure  that 
he  himself  is  progressing  in  just  the  manner  he  should? 

Ask  yourself  a  few  questions.  Are  you  being  as  ag- 
gressive in  going  after  business  as  you  might?  Are 
you  employing  all  the  energy  and  ability  you  possess 
or  have  you  possibilities  that  are  yet  undeveloped?  Are 
you  co-operating  Avith  those  around  you  in  a  way  to  ac- 
complish the  best  results?  Are  you  endeavoring  to 
learn  more  about  your  business?  Do  you  spend  your 
spare  time  in  a  demoralizing  Avay  or  in  a  manner  that 
reduces  your  buisiness  aggressiveness?  Do  yoia  get 
around  as  early  in  the  morning  as  you  should?  Do 
you  set  a  good  example  generallv  to  other  mem'bers  of 
the  staff? 

And  last,  but  not  least,  Avould  you  hire  yourself  at 
the  Avages  or  salary  you  are  drawing? 


Know  Where 
You  Are  Goins: 


When  you  start  out  to  go  any 
place  you  generally  make  sure 
that  you  are  going  in  the  right 
direction  before  you  start  Avalking.  Similar  common 
sense  should  be  exercised  by  the  man  in  business.  He 
should  make  certain  that  he  is  really  maldng  progress 
in  the  right  direction.  There  isn't  much  sense  in 
working  one's  head  ofiP  unless  it  is  getting  him  some 
place.  Too  many  merchants  go  on  Avorking  from  year 
to  year  Avithout  really  knoAving  Avhether  they  are  mak- 
ing any  money  or  not,  instead  of  finding  out  periodi- 
cally whether  they  are  making  money  or  hoAv  much. 

This  is  the  purpose  of  the  annual  inventory  and  finan- 
cial statement.  It  shoAvs  the  dealer  .just  Iioav  he 
fitands  as  compared  Avith  a  year  ago.  AA'hetlier  he  has 
really  made  money  and  to  Avhat  extent.  It  also  brings 
to  light  many  little  particulars  regarding  stock,  con- 
dition of  book  accounts  and  bills  payable  that  cannot 
help  but  prove  of  value  to  the  dealer  in  planning  for 
the  neAv  year  ahead. 

If  you  are  not  in  the  habit  of  taking  stock  annually 
and  making  out  a  yearly  financial  statement,  it  is  about 
time  that  you  got  the  habit.  You  Avill  find  that  it  will 
prove  a  mighty  valuable  habit.     Get  busy. 


24 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


Errors  in  A  correspondent  of  The  Toronto 

Freight  Charges  Globe  urges  an  efficient  audit  of 
railway  freight  bills,  alleging  that 
thousands  of  dollars  are  lost  annually  through  incor- 
rect freight  charges. 

There  is  certainly  need  of  checking  up  freight  bills. 
There  are  hvindreds  of  freight  schedules  and  of  classi- 
fications applying  to  them,  and  under  the  bes*:  of  cir- 
cumstances mistakes  are  liable  to  occur. 

The  extent  of  mistakes  is  shown  by  the  fact  that  a 
number  of  audit  companies  carry  on  a  profitable  busi- 
ness by  detecting  errors  and  securing  adjustments  on 
freight  bills  on  a  commission  basis. 

*  *  * 

Getting  a  Wife  An  Eastern  Canadian  paper  re- 

By  Mail  cently  used   a   cartoon  entitled 

"Getting  a  Wife  by  Mail."  One 
section  showed  a  man  in  a  seutimental  pose,  courting 
his  wife  from  afar  with  the  help  of  a  photograph.  The 
photojrraph  was  "easy  to  look  at"  and  he  could  hardly 
wait  for  the  day  when  he  would  meet  her.  But.  alas, 
what  a  rude  awakening,  when  that  day  did  arrive.  The 
original  failed  to  match  up  with  the  picture. 

And  this  is  the  frequent  experience  of  people  who 
buy  goods  from  mail  order  houses  by  pictures.  -When 
they  arrive  they  are  a  disappointment.  This  is  where 
the  local  dealer  has  the  edge  on  the  catalogue  house. 
He  can  shoAv  them  the  actual  goods — let  them  see,  feel 
or  smell  them. 

«    *  * 

The  Placing  Frequently,  little  things  count  for 

of  Signs  much.     For  instance,   take  the 

placing  of  signs.  The  average 
person  is  not  a  close  observer.  It  is  necessary  to  go 
more  than  half  way  to  meet  his  ordinary  range  of 
vision,  because  he  will  not  go  the  other  half  way. 

The  proprietor  of  a  big  chain  of  retail  stores  stated 
recently  that  they  had  raade  hundreds  of  experiments 
with  signs  in  their  stores,  and  find  that,  to  get  the 
best  results,  it  is  necessary  to  place  a  sign  directly  on 
the  level  of  the  average  customer's  eye  when  he  is 
seated. 

"As  near  as  we  can  ascertain,"  he  states,  "an  an- 
nouncement of  a  new  line  displayed  at  eye  level  is 
.iust  five  times  as  effective  as  one  which  is  two  or  three 
feet  higher  than  the  eyes.  An  observant  man  may 
look  up  and  see  the  sign  that  is  higher  up,  but  there 
are  comparatively  few  observant  men." 

*  *  * 

It  is  Profits  In  summing  up  the  pajst  year  and 

That  Count  planning  for  the  year  to  come, 

bear  in  mind  that  it  is  not  sales 
which  count,  but  actual  profits.  A  large  volume  of 
business  does  not  necessarily  meajn  that  you  have  made 
money.  Get  down  to  actual  profits  in  gauging  your 
progress. 

*  *  * 

Keep  After  The  dealer  wlTo  has  past  due  ac- 

CoUections  counts  on  his  books  should  get 

after  them  now.  Most  people  are 
pretty  well  "fixed"  financially  at  the  present,  but 
there  will  come  a  time  when  such  will  not  be  the  case. 
Clear  your  books  of  the  deadwood  now  and  build  up  a 
reserve  against  any  depression  the  future  may  hold. 


Dad's  Monthly  Letter  to  Jim  in 

the  Store        :        •        •       Edward  Dreier 


Jim,  did  you  ever  realize  the  power  of  a  pleasant 
smile?  It's  tremendous.  Smiles  change  the  lives  of 
people.  They  sink  into  a  nature  and  remain  there  for 
years.  Let  me  tell  you  a  little  story  of  a  woman  who 
smiled. 

This  woman  moved  into  a  little  Western  Ontario  town 
from  a  big  city  over  in  the  States.  She  didn't  know 
anyone.  But  this  woman  had  a  wonderful  personality 
and  it  wasn't  long  until  people  found  out  that  she  was 
in  the  town.  They  found  out  who  she  was  and  many 
of  them  spoke  to  her.  And  she  smiled  back  at  them. 
She  smiled  a  good  morning  or  a  good  night  at  the  baker 
boy  and  the  market  boy — and  she  smiled  a  "good  day" 
at  everyone  she  met.  Her  face  was  a.  veritable  ray 
of  sunshine  always. 

A  year  or  more  after,  this'  woman  passed  into  the 
Great  Beyond — it  all  happened  very  suddenly.  So  they 
took  her  back  to  the  city  from  where  she  came.  And. 
Jim,  the  night  they  took  that  woman  away,  her  entire 
street  was  lined  with  people.  There  were  truck 
drivers  and  coal  heavers  crying  as  if  their  hearts  would 
break.  Women  almost  went  hysterical.  The  local 
florist  said  that  never  in  the  history  of  that  town  had  so 
many  flowers  been  purchased  for  anyone. 

Just  one  year,  Jim — a  year  of  bright  smiles  made  for 
that  Avoman  more  friends  than  anyone  else  there  had. 
Take  this  lesson  to  yourself  in  your  work  there.  Have 
a  cheery  smile  for  everyone.  Smile  on  children — 
they'll  be  men  and  Avomen  soon.  Smile  on  the  old — for 
they  can  only  have  your  smiles  a  little  longer.  Smile, 
smile,  ahvays — just  a  good,  honest  and  sincere  smile 
right  out  from  the  bottom  of  your  heart. 

You'll  find.  Jim,  that  the  patrons  of  the  store  Avill 
look  to  you  for  that  smile.  Perhaps  a  smile  may  put 
courage  into  someone  who  has  had  business  reverses, 
who  can  tell.  Put  a  smile  into  your  work  from  morn- 
ing until  night  and  you  Avill  find  that  the  Avork  is  awful 
easy — and  you'll  find,  son,  that  your  Avork  Avill  be  bet- 
ter."    There's  a  lot  of  satisfaction  in  that,  isn't  there? 

Try  it  on  the  next  one  Avho  comes  in  the  door  after 
you  read  this  letter  and  keep  on  trying  it  on  every- 
one who  comes  into  contact  Avith  you.  Just  a  little, 
cheery  smile  for  a  good  morning  or  a  good  night — and 
a  heart  reflects  your  smile. 

Merrily. 

YOUR  DAD. 


IN  THE  VALLEY  OF  WHATSTHEUSE 

My  friend,  have  you  heard  of  the  town  of  Yawn, 

On  the  i)aiiks  of  the  River  Slow, 
Where  blooms  the  Waitawhile  flower  fair. 

Where  the  Sometimeorother  scents  the  air, 
And  the  soft  Goeasys  grow? 

Tt  lies  in  the  valley  of  AVhatstheuse, 

In  the  province  of  Letitslide, 
That  tired  feeling  is  a  native  there — 

It's  the  name  of  the  listless  Idon 'tears, 
Where  the  Putitoffs  abide. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


25 


Passing  Comment  on  Current  Topics 


Watch  Credits  The  present  is  a  time  that  calls 
Closely  for  the  exercise  of  special  care  in 

the  extension  of  credits  if  the 
dealer  would  avoid  loss.  There  is  a  well  grounded 
reason  for  this.  Many  people  who  have  been  drawing 
large  wages  at  munitions  and  other  war  work  will 
have  to  get  along  on  a  smaller  income.  Many  of  them 
have  been  living  right  up  to  their  enlarged  income  and 
will  find  it  difficult  to  make  ends  meet  at  the  reduced 
wages.  They  will  be  applying  for  credit  at  local 
stores  and  dealers  need  to  use  their  best  judgment  in 
handling  the  matter.  People  who  were  not  able  to  save 
money  when  engaged  in  munition  work  are  not  likely 
to  prove  very  reliable  parties  to  extend  credit  to  when 
employ ed  at  less  remunerative  work. 

•  *  « 

Ask  For  Don't  be  backward  in  demanding 

Credentials  credentials  from  those  who  ask 

you  to  extend  credit  to  them.  You 
can't  get  goods  from  a  wholesale  house  until  they  are 
assured  that  you  are  perfectly  reliafble  and  a  good 
risk.  Why  should  you  extend  credit  to  every  Tom, 
Dick  and  Harry  without  a  pretty  strong  assurance  that 
you  will  get  jDaid  for  your  goods? 

Assume  that  it  is  your  right  and  privilege  to  know 
the  patron's  probable  ability  to  pay.  Don't  be  back- 
ward in  asking  as  to  amount  of  money  they  earn,  when 
they  get  paid,  what  other  dealers  they  have  been  trad- 
ing with  and  whom  they  can  give  as  reference.  You 
are  entitled  to  this  information. 

•  •  • 

Set  Time  When  extending  credit  to  a  cus- 

For  Payment  tomer  set  a  time  for  the  payment 

of  the  account  and  give  the  cus- 
tomer to  understand  that  you  expect  pa.yment  promptly 
at  that  time.  The  date  of  payment  should  be  set  ac- 
cording to  the  periods  that  the  patron  receives  his 
wages. 

Get  after  accounts  .just  as  soon  as  they  are  due.  It 
is  a  .bad  business  policy  to  allow  customers  to  get  into 
the  habit  of  allowing  accounts  to  run  after  the  time 
set  for  payment  or  to  allow  a  balance  to  run  over.  With 
the  average  person  on  a  wage,  if  they  are  not  able  to 
clean  up  all  their  current  bills  one  pay-day,  they  are 
less  liable  to  be  able  to  care  for  them  the  next  pay- 
day. 

•  •  • 

Get  After  If  there  are  accounts  standing  on 

Collections  your  books  now  is  the  time  to  get 

after  them.  Money  is  more  free 
with  many  people  than  it  will  be  for  some  time  to  come, 
and  the  present  is  undoubtedly  the  time  to  get  them  to 
clean  up  what  they  OAve  you. 

You  should  be  building  up  a  bank  reserve  now  that 
will  allow  you  to  face  any  unforeseen  obstacles  of  the 
future  with  confidence.  You  are  probably  planning 
to  expand  your  business  just  as  soon  as  conditions  be- 


come favorahle.  The  present  is  the  time  to  prepare 
your  finances  by  gathering  in  all  over-due  accounts. 

There  is  also  another  side  of  the  question — you 
should  have  your  money  Avorking  for  you,  w'hieli  it 
isn't  when  it  is  standing  on  your  books.  Money  is 
worth  from  51/0  to  8  per  cent,  these  days  and  any  sur- 
plus you  have  should  be  earning  that  for  you. 

*  «  * 

Prospects  for  The  furniture  dealer  can  face  the 

Business  future  with  confide-nce,  for  the 

most  of  his  goods  are  very  staple 
lines.  The  amount  of  goods  purchased  through 
the  furniture  dealer  will  also  be  larger  as  the  men  re- 
turn from  Europe  and  join  the  general  puhlic  again. 

As  normal  times  return  again  there  will  also  be  a  re- 
vived demand  for  many  of  the  fancy  lines  of  goods 
which  have  disappeared  from  the  limelight  during  the 
past  couple  of  years. 

Altogether,  the  future,  both  immediate  and  more  far 
removed,  looks  bright  for  the  retail  furniture  dealer. 

•  «  * 

Planning  for  The  retailer  should  look  at  the 

the  Future  future  in  a  broad  way  and  make 

his  plans  with  the  anticipation  of 
a  long  period  of  opportunity  for  expansion.  We  are 
now  entering  upon  an  era  that  we  all  trust  Avill  be  one 
of  prosperity  for  the  Dominion  of  Canada  and  this 
prosperity  will  best  come  by  a  high  level  of  individual 
ambition  and  endeavor.  No  decided  boom  should  be 
looked  forward  to,  but  a  steady  legitimate,  well- 
founded  and  well-maintained  growth  that  will  spell 
general  prosperity  and  expansion. 

*  *  • 

The  Matter  It  oan  be  expected  that  service 

of  Service  mhII  again  become  prominent  as  a 

factor  in  business-getting  but  re- 
tailers should  not  be  too  hasty  in  inaugurating  costly 
service  that  Avill  eat  up  too  much  of  the  profits. 

Previous  to  the  war  some  dealers  were  going  a  little 
too  far  in  the  matter  of  service — especially  delivery 
service.  It  Avas  becoming  an  oppressing  burden  and  a 
Avrecker  of  profits. 

There  is  a  happy  medium  to  be  aimed  for,  that  gives 
an  appreciated  convenience  to  customers  but  does  no* 
proA''e  too  costly  to  the  dealer. 

•  *  • 

Profit  on  Some  dealers  are  averse  to  tak- 

Advancing*  Goods  ing  the  extra  profit  resulting  from 
prices  advancing  on  goods  pur- 
chased at  a  more  favorable  price  than  obtainable  at 
the  moment.  'Such  dealers  are  inclined  to  regard  it 
as  profiteering,  whereas  it  is  only  a  protection 
against  the  time  when  prices  Avill  begin  to  head  in 
the  opposite  direction  and  the  dealer  will  be  compelled 
to  take  his  losses  on  declining  goods. 


26 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


BEDDING  EXHIBITION  BY  HAMILTON  FIRM 


Green  Furnishing  Company  of  Hamilton,  Ont. ,  conduct  a  five-day  Better  Bedding  Exhibition  with  great 
success — Over  i  5,000  people  attend  the  event —  Many  features  to  attract  and  interest  the  public  were  eniplo}  ed 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiniiii^ 


ONE  of  the  biggest  events  of  its  kind  that  has  ever 
been  staged  by  a  retail  furniture  store,  was  the 
"Better  Bedding  Exhibition"  conducted  by  the 
Green  Furnishing  Company  of  Hamilton,  Ont.,  for  five 
days  during  January.  It  was  well-planned  and 
cleverly  carried  out,  and  altogether  a  huge  success,  at- 
tracting no  less  than  15,400  people  to  the  store  during 
the  five  days. 

Many  Features  to  Interest 

It  opened  on  Monday,  January  13,  and  continued  for 
five  days,  with  Hamilton's  best  orchestra  providing 
music,  refreshments  served  free  in  the  basement  in 
connection  with  the  cooking  demonstration,  and  a  free 
prize  drawing  through  which  the  count  was  kept  of 
the  number  of  persons  entering  the  store.  Every  ef- 
fort was  made  to  keep  things  running  strong  and  it 
can  easily  be  said  that  interest  never  lagged  for  a 
moment. 

Enlivened  Quiet  Month 

The  main  intent  of  the  Better 
Bedding  Exhibition  was  to  enliven 
an  otherwise  dull  month  and  make 
a  drive  on  a  line  that  is  capable  of 
great  possibilities  and  does  not 
receive  the  attention  in  the  aver- 
age store  that  its  importance  war- 
rants. 

The  complete  lines  of  fourteen 
manufacturers  of  bedding  were 
ordered  to  arrive  in  good  time  to 
permit  of  comprehensive  display. 
The  program  for  the  five  days  was 
as  follows : 

Daily— 

Lorna's  Orchestra  2.30  to  5  p.m. 
Free  prize  drawings,  4  p.m. 
Refreshments,    afternoons  and 
evenings. 

Monday,  January  13,  Opening-  Day 

All  Canadian  bedding  lines  con- 
veniently displayed  for  leisure  in- 
spection. 

Tuesday,  January  14,  "Alaska" 
Day 

Featuring  the  famous  "Oster- 
inoor"  mattress,  pillows  and 
kindred  lines. 

Wednesday,  January  15,  "Ideal" 
Day 

Featuring  the  Ideal  Bedding 
Company's  brass  and  iron  beds, 
mattresses,  springs,  pillows,  beds, 
couches,  etc. 


You  Are  Invited  To  Attend  The  First 
'^tter  BeddiDg"Exbibition  In  AiQerlca 

O  — A(  Greens 

ThU  I"  rhe  fir"l  "Brtter  Bpddinj;"  exhibition  Id  Amcr* 
v.n,    thr  foremost  Cniwduio  majiufactuirrs  will  display 

inosi  i^mfortaWe  and  saniCirv  sprjigs  Hvd  mattn«i*s. 
hero  ft>r  your  impri-twD. 

Exhibition  Will  Start  Next  Monday 

-luniriiT  >\cxi  M^.ndav,  a  (are*  [«n  of  our  bia  itore  wjl 
i.rKi\rii  .jvrTtmhioiis  bod'Uu^    Thi-  .■jhihni'm  wiTl  ^oo- 
ijLuc  on  Fn.tny     M.ni.hiy    (uiwnlni    -ity).  CumidMo 
«  Rfddin?  hncs  coDvemerrtly  dtsplaycd  fnr  leisure  uwpcc- 

.-..me  every  rUy-   f*p<*ri*l  fwlurcs  aB  Week:" 

Valuable  Prizes  Are  Given  Every  Day 


Thursday,  January  16,  "Sanitary"  Bedding  Day 

Exhibiting  prominently  bedding  lines  that  have 
special  sanitary  features. 

Friday,  January  17,  Bedtime  Comfort  Day 

Featuring  comfort-giving  mattresses,  pillows,  springs, 
box  springs,  etc. 

Baby's  comfort — this  day  is  also  set  aside  to  feature 
baby-beds  and  nursery  furnishings. 

Extensive  Advertising  of  Event 

The  success  of  the  event  is  due  to  a  large  extent  to 
the  advertising  done  in  connection  with  it.  The 
publicity  was  excellent  both  in  regard  to  quality  and 
([uantity.  Even  before  Christmas,  stickers  announc- 
ing the  dates  Avere  placed  on  all  local  mail.  The  first 
real  shot  was  fired  when  a  store  paper,  "The  Xews, " 
was  delivered  to  23,000  homes  in 
Hamilton,  and  3,000  more  to  the 
rural  section.  Great  confidence 
was  placed  in  this  medium  for  it 
had  proved  its  value  on  previous 
occasions.  On  the  Saturday 
previous,  the  three  local  papers 
carried  four  column  announce- 
ments, and  thereafter,  during  the 
course  of  the  exhibition,  ads.  ap- 
peared daily  in  the  two  publica- 
tions enjoying  the  largest  circula- 
tion. 


TufBdav  and 
irUrt..  win  h. 
:niM  The  foi- 

7  aJI 


Wednoaday.  'l.iriL 
pnios),  Hra*>  Ri> 

fl.!.  Friday,  pur  M 


irv  bI.<'>1u(cIv  fr«  of  rhsrge  [ 
pru«  hf  ft  flidinR  '-"u^h,  Tatue 
1.1  Uip  <iold  M*dftl  MaJMira-tunns 
(day.  Waldorf  Raj  Sfirinij*.  S30. 
■  F<i^.=  B.d.  f3T„V>:  Thund*,  (fiTa 
^17  .W;  Kopok  Mattrera.  S2.^.  Cod 
To.tiimiT.  *12:  Whil*  Metal  B«d. 
ir-hnll  VennralH  Pilloira.  Sl^i  Uyer 


Music  and 


;  aO.  t  od  Si.rmR.  (fI2,30. 

Refreshments 


Adjiu 


Provided 


The  Importance  of  Sleep  Comfort 


1  11  ApppnriDw-'' , 


1  hrmp  nlf*p, 


No  Celling  During  This  Ezhlbitlon 


Next  Tuesday  WiU  Be  "Alaska  Day" 

(.r-lrt'ina.       M..nif.-.il.       TVj<sdU,v.    TU.^  finn  ha--.  .»r- 


<^ME  NOT  ONCE.  BUT  MANY  TIMES 

TheGreenrumishing  & 

5I0ȣ  BEMAlNa  OfEN  EVERY  EVENING 

Corner  King  and  Catharine  Streets 


Initial  newspaper  advertisement  in  connection  with 
the  Exhibition.    It  was  followed  by  regular  space 
in  local  papers. 


Attendance  Greater  Than 
Expected 

The  week  prior  to  the  opening 
it  was  felt  that  one  thousand 
tickets  for  each  of  the  first  three 
days  and  fifteen  hundred  for  the 
Hst  two  would  suffice.  At  two 
"'"lock  on  Monday  a  hurried  re- 
order was  sent  in  to  the  printer — 
2,400  persons  entering  the  store  on 
that  "day;  2.500  on  Tuesday: 
3.200  oii  Wednesday;  3,700  on 
Thursday,  and  3.600  on  Friday. 
The  weather  Avas  fair  and  mild  all 
week  and  could  not  have  been 
better. 

Many  Channels  of  Advertising 
Used 

No  channel  Avas  lost  in  which  to 
advertise  the  exhibition — a  large 
canopy  istretched  from  the  front 
door  to  the  curb  so  that  anyone 
passin?  could  not  fail  to  see  that 
something  was  going  on  at 
Green's.      One     thousand  five 


Kobnciry,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


27 


Front  view  of  the  store  of  the  Green  Furnishing  Company  of  Hamilton,   Ont.,   during  their  Better  Bedding  Exhibition. 

canopy  stretched  from  curb  to  door,  the  big  sign  and  the  attractiveness  of  windows. 


Note  the 


hundred  letters  were  mailed  to  mothers  of  babies  up  to 
one  year  old,  together  with  an  enclosure  especially 
printed  for  the  occasion,  inviting  them  to  come  on  Fri- 
day, Mothers'  Day.  Letters  were  sent  to  all  hotels, 
institutions  and  the  Women's  'Canadian  Club. 

Contests  and  Moving  Pictures 

The  drawing  was  the  feature.  The  box  was  placed 
on  the  second  floor  of  the  annex  so  that  all  comers  had 
to  pas-s  the  entire  exhibits,  which  were  placarded  with 
tasteful  signs.  Much  interest  was  displayed  by  the 
A^isitors  in  the  big  display  of  things  bedding. 

Moving  pictures  were  arranged  to  be  shown  on  a  wall 
of  a  building  across  the  street  but  the  brightness  of  the 
moon  interfered  and  they  were  shown  inside.  A  r"el 
showing  the  process  of  cleaning  feathers  was  the 
feature. 

Photographs  were  taken  of  the  exhibits  and  display 
windows  and  it  is  the  intention  to  publish  a  printed 
piece  showing  the  various  exhibits  collectively  and  in- 
dividually. Some  of  these  photos  were  reproduced  in 
the  daily  papers. 

Manufacturers'  Literature  Used 

Literature  supj)lipd  by  the  various  manufacturers 
was  handed  out  daily  to  the  thousands  entering  the 
store.  A  special  man  opened  and  closed  the  door  for 
all  comers.  Animated  windows  arranged  for  Fnday 
showing  the  Kiddie-Koop  and  Marshall  Sanitary  Mat- 
tresses attracted  a  great  deal  of  attention.  Calendars 
were  given  out  to  the  number  of  8,000  the  first  day: 
thimbles  in  the  same  quantity  were  handed  to  all  ladies. 

People  were  much  interested  in  the  bedding,  but  at 
the  same  time  showed  a  desire  to  see  throughout  the 
store.  While  no  selling  or  solicitation  was  adverti'^ed 
the  store  did  averMge  business,  and  if  any  article  of 
bedding  was  T)urchased.  say  on  Tuesday,  the  buyer 
agreed  that  delivery  should  not  take  place  until  after 
the  exhibition.  Many  persons  attending  the  exhibi- 
tion made  their  choice  throughout  the  week  and  came 
on  Saturday  morning  to  purchase.     Generally  speak- 


ing the  mattresses  sold  were  of  good  quality  and  price. 
People  that  did  not  come  to  the  store  enquired  over  the 
telephone  prices  of  this  or  that. 

At  the  prize  drawing  at  four  o'clock  daily  short  ad- 
dresses were  given,  the  most  notable  of  which  took 
place  on  the  last  two  days.  Mr.  Smith,  the  manager 
of  the  Canada  Feather  and  Mattress  Co..  was  the 
speaker  and  held  the  interest  of  the  ladies  in  good 
manner. 

The  exhibition  was  followed  up  by  further  sales  at- 
tention to  beds  and  bedding.  A  big  ad.  was  run  in 
Friday's  paper  headed  "The  Better  Bedding  Exhibi- 
tion is  now  over — ^and  now  comes  the  Bedding  Sale." 

During  the  Exhibition  a  good  deal  of  editorial  at- 
tention Avas  given  to  it  by  the  local  papers  as  it  Avas 
really  a  "news"  event. 

The  idea  of  running  the  Better  Bedding  Exhibition 
was  originated  by  Kirke  H.  G-reen,  general  manager  of 
the  Green  Furnishing  Company,  who  was  ably  assisted 
i]i  carrying  out  the  scheme  on  such  a  'big  scale  and  with 
such  great  success  by  Will  J.  Nash,  buyer,  F'.  0.  Cnndill, 
sales  manager,  and  P.  W.  Read,  advertising  manager. 


No.  5878 

Free  Drawing  Ticket 

Deposit  this  half  in  drawing  box 

in  Bedding  Section, Second  Floor 


This  is  your  chunce  to  win  one  of 
Five  Big  Prizes 

1 —  Pair  Marshall  Pillows 

2—  Felt  Mattress 

3—  Standard  Mattress,  $20. 

4—  Adjusto  Mattress,  $22.50 

5 —  Coil  Spring,  $12.50 


No.  5878 

Free  Drawing  Ticket 

KEEP  THIS  HALF 

and  see  if  this  number  is  the 
same  as  drawn  and  published 
in  tomorrow's  newspaper  ad- 
vertisements entitling  the 
holder  to  One  of  the  Five  Prizes. 


You  will  see  winning  numbeis  in 
Green's  advertisement  tomorrow. 


Before  leaving  be  sure  to 
go  to  "Baby's"  Own  De- 
partment and  see  the  dis- 
play of  "Everything  for 
Baby." 


Sample  of  the  free  drawing  ticket  given  to  visitors, 
contest  each  day. 


TUwe  wfts  a  new 


28 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


Pebroary,  1919 


LETTERS  USED  TO  ADVERTISE  EXHIBITION 


Green  Furnishing  Company  of  Hamilton,  Ont.,  made  good  u?e  of  letters  to  a  selected  list  to  supplement  their 
regular  advertising  in  connection  with  their  Better  Bedding  Exhibition — The  letters  sent  out  to  selected  lists 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^  i{:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>i!!;i:!:ii»!!!!!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii<iiiiiiiiiiiiiii» 


NO  stone  was  left  unturned  by  the  Green  Furnish- 
ing Company,  of  Hamilton,  to  interest  the  public 
in  their  Better  Bedding  Exhibition.    One  way 
in  which  they  supplemented  their  regular  advertising 
was  by  the  use  of  letters  sent  to  mothers,  institutions, 
hotels  and  the  Women's  Canadian  Club. 


1.500  Letters  to  Mothers 

A  total  of  1,500  letters  were  mailed  to  mothers  of 
babies  up  to  one  year,  along  with  an  enclosure  printed 
especially  for  the  occasion.     The  letter  was  as  follows: 
Every  mother  thirsts  for  knowledge  and  new 
ideas  that  will  insure  her  "Baby's"  continued 
growth  to  healthy,  happy  childhood. 

One  way  to  surround  the  "Baby"  with  every- 
thing necessary  to  its  well  being  is  to  let  no  occa- 
sion pass  wherein  you  can  get  advanced  ideas  re- 
garding baby's  welfare. 

You  have  an  opportunity  now,  of  hearing  one 
accustomed  to  address  a  congress  o-f  mothers,  an 
authority  Avho  will  speak  to  the  mothers  of  Hamil- 
ton during  the  "Better  Bedding"  Exhibition  at 
Green's  this  Fl-iday,  January  17. 

Please  consider  this  letter  your  invitation  to  be 
present  on  that  day — Friday,  January  17.  Light 
refreshments  will  be  served. 
Along  with  this  was  sent  a  circular  inviting  mothers 
to  attend  on  Baby's  Day  and  advertising  baby  beds, 
cribs,  walkers,  carriages,  bassinettes,  cots,  cradles  and 
kiddie-koops. 

Institutions  and  Hotels 

The  letter  sent  to  the  heads  of  institutions  in  regard 
to  the  Exhibition  was  as  follows : 
Dear  Sir: 

When  the  time  comes 
that  you  must  make  a  de- 
cision on  such  an  im- 
portant matter  as  the  pur- 
chase of  bedding,  it  is 
rather  worrisome  to  be 
obliged  to  consult  people 
whose  opinions  often  are 
vague,  and  to  depend  upon 
the  measrre  information 
furnished  by  catalogues. 

That  is  why  we  believe 
+bp  "Better  Bedding"  Ex- 
liibition  will  prove  to  be 
of  interest  to  you.  in  your 
responsibility  of  sunervis- 
ing  the  nurchpsing  for  the 
hosnitals  of  Hamilton. 

All  bedding  factories 
within  reach  are  exhibit- 
ing at  our  store  for  five 

days,  beginning  Monday,  .^^^^.^^  ^.^^  b^^^^^  ^^^^.^^  Exhibition 

January  the  loth.      There  Green  Furnishing  Company,  of  Hamilton. 


will  be  no  selling — this  is  a  clean-cut  educational 
movement. 

Not  onl}^  do  we  lay  this  before  you  as  a  real  help 
to  one  interested  in  comfortable  sanitary  bedding, 
but  also  as  a  movement  well  worth  your  support. 
Yours  trulv. 
THE  GREEN  FURNISHING  COMPANY. 
By  PWR/BN. 

P.S. — Many  new  designs  of  institutional  beds 
on  display  during  exhibition. 


Letter  to  Women's  Canadian  Club 

A  somewhat  similar  letter  was  directed  to  the 
proprietors  of  hotels,  while  a  different  letter  was  sent  to 
the  women  of  the  Canadian  Cliab.  This  letter  was  as 
follows : 

Not  so  long  ago  the  old-fashioned  feather  tick 
was  in  vogue ;  the  spare  bedroom  was  considered 
incomplete  without  its  fluffj*  feather  bed. 

There  are  so  many  kinds  of  mattres.ses  and  bed 
springs  nowadays  that  one  really  finds  it  hard  to 
decide  which  is  the  best.  Surely  bedtime  is  im- 
portant when  nature  demands  a  third  of  one's  life 
for  sleep. 

That  is  why  we  believe  the  "Better  Bedding" 
Exhibition  will  be  doubly  interesting  to  you. 

Please  accept  this,  our  cordial  invitation  to  you, 
to  be  present  at  this  exhibition,  the  first  of  its  kind 
in  America. 

Yours  truly, 
THE  GREEN  FURNTSHIN-G  CO^MPAN^Y. 

PWR/RM.  By  Kirke  H.  Green. 

P.S. — Just  ask  yourself  these  questions:  Are  my 
beds,  springs,  and  mattresses  conducive  to  vigor- 
renewing  rest:  is  our  bedding  sanitarv"? 

With  this  letter  was  en- 
closed a  program  of  the 
exhibition  setting  out  the 
features  for  each  day.  It 
Avas  printed  on  heavy  card 
paper. 

This  is  a  method  of 
jiublicity  that  is  not  used 
to  the  extent  that  it  might 
be  by  the  average  dealer. 
Quite  often  a  letter  of  this 
kind  will  get  the  attention 
of  the  prospective  cus- 
tomer when  she  can  be 
reached  in  no  other  way. 
I\Iany  women  are  more  in- 
clined to  read  a  letter,  es- 
pecially if  it  is  nersonally 
addressed  to  them,  than 
any  other  kind  of  pub- 
licity. It  has  a  personal 
appeal  that  counts  for 
much. 


by  the 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


29 


STORE  PAPER  HELPS  IN  PUBLICITY  WORK 


MMMIIIMIMIMIMIIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIMMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIMIIMMIIIIMIMIIMMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIH 

Large  edition  of  "Store  News"  issued  to  give  publicity  to  Exhibition — Program  is  given  in  detail,  and  reading 

matter  used  to  stimulate  greater  interest  in  comfortable  and  sanitary  bedding —  Some  extracts  from  the  paper 

lllnMinUIIJinMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIJIIIIMIMMIHIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMMII^ 


THE  Green  Furnishing  Company,  of  Hamilton,  have 
used  a  store  paper  before  with  good  results  and 
accordingly  .made  good  use  of  this  means  of 
publicity  in  connection  witli  their  Better  Bedding 
Exhibition.  They  delivered  23,000  copies  in  Hamil- 
ton and  3,000  more  in  the  surrounding  district. 

What  it  Contained 

It  featured  the  program,  told  more  about  it  than 
could  be  detailed  in  their  newspaper  advertisements, 
listed  the  prizes  given  in  the  drawing  contests  and  set 
forth  special  reasons  why  readers  should  be  interested 
in  better  bedding.  It  contained  eight  pages  measur- 
ing 10'  by  12  inches  and  contained  advertisements  of 
those  firms  whose  goods  they  were  featiiring. 

The  paper  contained  some  good  reading  matter  that 
other  dealers  might  use  to  good  advantage  to  interest 
their  customers.     Some  of  the  headings  were : 

"First  Better  Bedding  Exhibition  in  America  Opens 
at  Green's  on  Monday  Next." 

"Boards  of  Health  Gladly  Approve." 

"Your  Soldier  Boy  Should  Return  to  a  Comfortable 
Bed." 

"Restful  Sleep  an  Essential." 
"The  Importance  of  Sleep  Comfort." 
"Bedding  Manufacturers  Use  Great  'Care." 
We  give  here  some  extracts  from  it : 

"The  Importance  of  Sleep  Comfort" 

"The  (juestion  of  sleep  comfort  has  always  taken  a 
prominent  place  among  the  problems  that  have  eon- 
fronted  the  human  race  for  solution.  This  is  only 
natural  when  practically  one-third  of  life  is  spent  in 
the  repose  necessary^  to  replenish  the  vital  forces  used 
up  daily  in  waking  hours. 

"For  the  human  body  may  be  aptly  likened  to  the 
storage  battery  in  a  modern  automobile.  Each  day  a 
great  store  of  energy  units  are  used  up,  which  must  be 
replenished  by  restful  sleep.  Anything,  therefore,  that 
interferes  in  the  slightest  degree  with  deep,  dreamless 
sleep  causes  a  total  or  partial  halt  in  the  process  of  re- 
charging the  vital  energies.  Such  interference,  if  con- 
tinued for  long,  must  result  in  depletion  of  nerve  force 
and  finally  in  general  physical  deterioration. 

"To  come  back  again  to  the  storage  battery  com- 
parison, the  vital  powers  of  the  'human  battery'  reach 
a  more  or  less  discharged  condition,  with  ultimate 
disastrous  results. 

"In  the  light  of  the  above  remarks,  therefore,  the  im- 
portance of  a  really  comfortable  bed  will  be  at  once 
realized.'  '  A  siagging  bedspring,  a  hard,  matted-down, 
lumpy  mattress — or  a  combination  of  the  two — makes 
deej),  restful  sleep  almost  impossible.  The  hours  spent 
in  vainly  wooing  sleep  on  such  a  bed  plus  the  fitful 
sleep  that  finally  comes,  leaves  anyone  unfit  to  solve 
the  daily  problems  of  life. 

"However,  it  is  not  enough  for  the  bed  outfit  to  be 
comfortable;  it  is  equally  important  that  the  materials 
used  ill  the  manufacture  of  the  mattress  and  pillows 


THE  NEWS 


Published  by  the  Green  Furnishing  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ontario 
CIRCULATION  26,000 


Editor:  P.  W.  Read,  Advertising  Manager 

FIRST  OF  THE  KIND 

Hiamiilton  is  to  see  tlie  first  "Better  Beddinig  Exhibi- 
tion" held  in  Aimerica.  In  propagaitinig  such  an  un- 
dertakinig  the  Green  Furnishing  Company  has  been 
piomplimenteid  froim  .all  sides  and  itlhere  is  no  doiiilbt  but 
thrat  other  centres  will  follow  the  lead  of  Hamilton's 
progresisive  establishment. 

There  is  greater  need  to-day  of  better  sanitation  in 
bedding  than  at  any  time  in  history.  Oongeisted 
housing  conditions  make  sanitation  necesisary  and  steps 
are  being  taken  to  make  sanitary  conditions  perfect. 

The  Gi-een  Furnishing  Oompany  is  hapipy  in  the 
th'O'Ught  that  through  its  instniimenitality  saich  a  broiad 
stap  in  the  upward  direction  is  under  wiay;  haippy  in' 
the  thouight  that  irresii)eetive  of  actual  profit  it  is  pro- 
motinig  the  idea  of  better  bediding  and  oflEeriug  to 
110,000  people  in  Hamilton  the  unequalled  opportunity 
to  judge  for  themselves  the  claims  of  manufacturers 
for  perfect  sanitation  in  all  things  bediding. 

No  less  than  14  Canadian  miauufactureTs  will  ex- 
hibit their  ciomiplete  lines.  Every  mannfaifturer  is 
enthusiastic  over  his  product  and  speakers,  in  15 
minute  talks  will. show  how  sanitation.,  plus  comfort,  is 
embodied. 

Thinking  persons  will  at  once  see  the  tremendous 
value  accruing  from  such  an  exhibition.  The  formial 
opening  of  Green 's  new  store  in  Novemiber  attracted 
thousands.  The  Better  Bedding  Exhibition  will  be 
a  still  bigger  attraction. 

All  public  bodies  are  asked  to  be  represented,  espe- 
cially those  applyinig  to  public  welfare  and  sanita+inai. 

Plenty  of  entertainment  is  provided,  ref lo-sh.ments 
will  be  served  and  the  best  possible  spirit  will  prevail. 
There  will  be  absolutely  no  soMcitation  on  the  part  of 
the  store  people. 

The  most  difficult  part  of  remembering  is  remember- 
ing to  rememllier — conscience  is  a  great  help.  Let 
]niblie-spiritediiess  be  the  prompter  in  this  case — 
"Better  Bedding  Exhibition"  commen^cing  January  13 
— ^at  Green's — corner  King  and  Catharine  Sts. 


BEDITORIALS 

How  did  you  sleep  last  night  Why  is  this  the  first 
question  you  ask  your  guest  in  the  morning? 

Did  you  ever  really  realize  that  bedtime  is  one-third 
of  your  life?   

Yes,  moderately  pTiced  bedding  may  be  "Better 
Bejdding. "    Come,  and  see  for  yourself. 

Make  up  your  mind  to  visit  the  "Better  Bedding 
Exhibition"  daily.     Bring  a  friend. 

What  does  a  comforta.ble  bed  mean  to  you? 

A  real  good  mattress  outweai-s  three  ordinary  ones — 
wh'ere  does  economy  come  in — tirst  or  last? 


In  times  of  depression  [ircpare  for  suoeess. 
times  of  success — jirepare  for  more. 


In 


30 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


should  be  new.  clean  and  sanitaiy  in  every  respect. 
Nothing  less  will  properly  safeguard  health.  Second- 
hand materials  such  as  rags,  "shoddy,"  old  mattresses, 
etc..  that  have  been  in  previous  use  on  or  about  the 
person,  should  be  strictly  prohibited  for  sanitary 
reasons. 

"The  Alaska  Bedding  Companies  have  always  lived 
up  to  this  self-imposed  rule.  Alaska  Guaranteed  Mat- 
tresses, from  the  least  to  the  most  expensive,  are  guar- 
anteed to  be  made  from  clean,  new,  sanitary  materials. 
They  will  give  many  years  of  restful,  healthful,  sleep 
comfort. 

"Alaska  all-feather  pillows  are  made  from  feathers 
that  go  through  the  same  washing  treatment  that  your 
laundry  receives,  emerging  clean,  sanitary,  light  and 
downy.  These  feathers  are  then  encased  in  feather- 
proof  ticking  of  attractive  appearance. 

"Every  Alaska  product  is  backed  by  the  guarantee 
of  the  largest  manufacturers  of  beds  and  bedding  in 
the  British  Empire,  and  the  second  largest  in  the 
world." 

"Restful  Sleep  an  Essential" 

"Sleep  is  the  body's  building-up  time.  Only  deep, 
sound  sleep  can  restore  the  energy  spent  on  daily  work. 

"You  can't  get  this  kind  of  sleep  in  a  wooden  bed 
that  creaks  and  groans  every  time  you  move  in  it.  nor 
in  a  rattling  swaying  metal  bed,  nor  on  a  sagging  bed- 
spring.  Therefore  buying  a  sleep  comfort  outfit  is  a 
transaction  requiring  proper  discrimination  with  an 
eye  to  future  irsefulness  as  Avell  as  present  looks." 

' '  Physical  Condition ' ' 

"There  is  not  anything  in  the  house  to  which  we 
should  attach  more  importance  than  bedding.  It  has 
not  only  to  do  in  a  very  large  measure  with  our  com- 
fort, but  more  especially  with  our  health.  Note  the 
physical  condition  after  a  night  spent  in  discomfort 
and  unrest,  emphasizing  the  need  of  a  comfortable 
place  on  which  to  lie." 


BABY'S  DAY 

From  Green's  "Store  News" 


Not  the  least  important  throughout  the  big  bedding 
exhibition  is  the  display  of  "everything  for  baby." 
All  the  big  manufacturers  showed  their  newest  cots, 
cribs  and  mattresses  for  baby.  Friday  afternoon  is 
set  aside  for  "Baby's  Day."  You  Avill  be  highly  in- 
terested and  every  mother  in  Hamilton  should  spend 
an  hour  or  two  at  the  ex^hibition. 

Until  recently  the  special  manufacture  of  furniture 
and  furnishings  for  the  child's  bedroom  has  been 
sorely  neglected ;  it  has  been  a  receiving  jjlace  for 
articles  that  were  "altogether  too  good  to  throw 
away."  Under  such  ruling  as  this  the  child's  room 
naturally  lost  any  characteristic  quality  of  its  own  on 
the  appearance  of  a  second  "Auction  shop." 

Realization  of  the  importance  of  environment  on  the 
plastic  mind  has  changed  the  order  of  things.  Now 
we  find  the  walls  decorated  in  keeping  with  the  childish 
ideals — Mother  Goose  borders  and  so  on — good  rugs 
covering  the  entire  floor — and  most  important  of  all 
— real,  comfortable  little  beds. 

Comfort  is  the  first  requisite  for  the  sleeping  room  of 
a  child.     Color  is  the  second,  and  all  bassinettes,  cribs 


and  cots  are  finished  in  snow-white  enamel.  Iron 
cribs,  with  sliding  .sides,  have  proved  to  be  a  boon 
from  the  standpoint  of  sanitation.  Comfortable 
springs,  restful  mattresses  and  Avarm  comforters  care 
for  the  child's  repose. 

Barssinettes,  plaj'  pens  and  special  furniture  are  now 
made  for  the  child's  bedroom,  and  with  various  color 
schemes,  specially  selected  curtainings  and  nigs  the 
child  of  to-day  is  well  cared  for. 

You  may  well  imagine  that  at  this  better  bedding 
exhibition  all  manufacturers  have  .striven  to  have  their 
new  goods  for  you  to  see  on  Baby's  Day. 


ODD  IDEAS  FROM  THE  OLDEN  DAYS 

Time  changes  all  things  and  it  has  great  effect  in 
changing  th*^  shading  of  words  or  phrases.  In  the 
olden  days  if  one  asked  for  a  bed  they  Avould  be  shov,-n 
only  a  mattress  and  there  was  much  greater  distinc- 
tion between  the  various  parts  that  to-day  Ave  sum 
under  one  head^ — a  bed. 

In  England,  before  the  Norman  Conquest  and  even 
in  the  period  immediately  folloAving,  bedsteads  Avere 
scarce— -reserved  for  the  master  of  the  house,  or  ladies, 
there  often  being  only  one  in  the  house;  AA-hile  the 
other  members  of  the  household  took  their  rest  on  mat- 
tresses of  straAv  laid  on  the  floor  or  on  tables,  chest's  or 
benches. 

The  beds  used  in  the  sixteenth  centiTry  Avere  made  of 
oak,  often  elaborately  carA-ed.  They  Avere  large  and 
cumbersome  and  therefore  difficult  of  transportation 
and  fcAv  of  them  have  reached  American  shores.  These 
beds  Avere  very  expensive  and  in  the  seA^enteenth  cen- 
tury the  eommonest  variety  brought  as  much  as  ■£8. 

The  materials  used  to  make  the  mattre^s^s  Avere 
sometimes  called  "flock  beds,"  being  made  of  chopped 
rags,  straAv  beds,  canvas  beds  filled  with  the  doAvn  of 
the  bullrush,  and  silk  grass  beds,  hair  beds,  and  later, 
chaff  beds,  shoAving  that  almost  any  soft  substance  Avas 
utilized  for  making  mattresses  Avhere  feathers  Avere  un- 
obtainable. 


AN  UNUSUAL  INVITATION 

Unusual  methods  Avill  sometimes  get  results  when 
ordinary  ones  Avould  not.  In  order  to  get  the  atten- 
tion of  customers  who  had  not  A'isited  the  store  for  some 
time,  one  dealer  sent  them  a  message  on  a  regular 
statment  form.  At  first  glance  it  looked  to  be  a  bill, 
but  it  read,  "To  one  call  you  OAve  at  our  store  where 
.  you  will  find  an  attractive  isplay  of  ncAV  goods." 

The  novelty  of  this  message  Avill  result  in  many  re- 
newals of  acquaintance. 


YOUR  SOLDIER  BOY  SHOULD  RETURN  TO 
A  COMFORTABLE  BED 

AFTER  strenuous  days  at  the  front,  and  nig-Ms 
sipent  under  canvas,  many  perhaps  in  djigouts, 
in  tihe  hard  bunks  of  barracks,  steaaner  and  rail- 
roaid  berths,  what  a  relief  for  the  tiired  soldier  boy  to 
tuniible  into  a  real  old-fashioned  bed. 

To  your  home,  perhaps,  a  hero  will  soon  retiirn. 
Are  ytm  prepared?  This  "Better  Bedding  Exhibition" 
is  a  splendid  opportunity  to  learn  about  real  bedtime 
comfort.  You  can  return  later  to  buA'  if  you  see 
thingis  that  please  you.— Green  Purnishing  Co.,  Hamil- 
ton. 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


31 


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I  KNOBS  of  NEWS 


3'J|l'lllll|[||i.'lllllillllllMllllh>:illllllllli;i::NllllllllhNiHlllilllllllll[.'lllllli:'lll|lllllllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIMI^ 


The  Harris  Furniture  Co.,  of  Toronto,  has  recently 
been  registered. 

F.  X.  Yali(|uette  &  Co.,  furniture  dealers,  of  Mon- 
treal, have  dissolved. 

J.  A.  Lesperance,  furniture  dealer,  of  Montreal,  has 
recently  been  registered. 

A.  L.  Oatman,  furniture  dealer  and  undertaker,  of 
Tillsonburg,  Ont.,  is  opening  a  branch  at  Springfield. 

The  McAllistei'  Self-Making  Bed  Company  of  Can- 
ada, Ltd..  with  head  office  in  Toronto,  has  been  in- 
corporated with  a  capital  stock  of  .$50,000. 

J.  G.  Henry,  of  Sudibury,  was  down  to  Toronto  to  see 
the  furniture  displays.  He  was  accompanied  by 
his  daugliter,  Mrs.  Newton,  of  Copper  Cliff. 

The  A^ictoriaville  Furniture  Company  Limited,  of 
Vietoriaville.  Que.,  haiS  been  incorporated  with  a  capital 
.stock  of  $99,000.  The  incorporators  are  P.  Tounguy, 
A.  Bourbeau,  and  J.  E.  Alain. 

The  shareholders  of-  the  Markdale  Furniture  Co., 
Markdale,  Ont.,  at  a  recent  meeting  agreed  to  accept  an 
offer  of  purchase  from  W.  G.  Lee,  who  contemplates 
the  maiuifacture  of  another  line. 

In  order  to  have  the  organization  under  one  roof, 
the  furnishings  department  of  the  Murray-Kay  Com- 
pany, of  Toronto,  is  being  moved  to  the  six-storey 
building  adjoining  the  Murray  store  on  King  St.  E. 

Brown,  Son  &  MePhee,  of  Parkhill,  Ont.,  have  bought 
out  the  furniture  business  of  W.  W.  Tait.  They  Avill 
conduct  their  undertaking  department  in  their  own 
stand,  and  furniture  department  in  the  Tait  store. 

Takito,  Ogawa  &  Co.,  New  York  and  Chicago,  and 
the  Tajimi  Co.,  New  York  and  Boston,  two  large  im- 
porters of  Japanese  goods  have  consolidated  under  the 
name  of  Taiyo  Trading  Co.,  Inc.  The  principal  offices 
will  be  at  101  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York,  and  325  Madison 
St.,  Chicago. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Weston,  46  Gormley  Ave.,  To- 
ronto, celebrated  their  Golden  Wedding  on  Februaiy  1. 
Mr.  Weston  came  to  Canada  from  England,  in  1867,  and 
.settled  in  Toronto.  He  became  associated  with  the 
Schomberg  Furniture  Company,  and  married  Miss 
Eh'anor  Schomberg,  in  1869. 

E.  C.  Tufts,  of  Tufts  &  Thompson,  furniture  dealers 
and  undertakers,  Madoe,  Ont.,  has  purchased  from  the 
Dale  Estate,  the  modern. brick  block  in  which  the  above 
firm  have  been  carrying  on  their  business  for  the  past 
few  years.  This  is  the  newest  and  most  up-to-date 
block  in  the  village,  being  centrally  located  on  Durham 
Street. 


FURNITURE  MANUFACTURERS  AFTER  EXPORT 
TRADE 

The  (Canadian  Furniture  Manufacturers  Association 
Iiavo  appointed  a  committee  consisting  of  J.  G.  Hay, 
J.  R.  Shaw  and  II.  B.  Smith,  to  select  a  man  to  represent 
the  Association  in  Knghuul  and  push  the  sale  of  Can- 
adian furniture  in  Europe.  It  is  the  intention  of  the 
Association  to  keep  in  close  touch  with  the  Canadian 
Trade  Coniiniission  in  London  and  send  theii-  ri'pre^en- 
tative  over  at  the  opportune  time. 


SEVENTH  ANNUAL  BANQUET  OF  CANADIAN 
FEATHER  AND  MATTRESS  CO. 

The  seventh  annual  banquet  of  the  Canadian  Feather 
and  Mattress  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Toronto,  held  in  Foresters' 
Hall,  22  College  St.,  Toronto,  on  January  14,  was  the 
usual  big  success.  Furniture  dealers  and  salesmen  to 
the  number  of  about  125  enjoyed  the  excellent  repast 
provided  by  the  company  as  well  as  the  musical 
features  and  orations  by  prominent  men  in  the  furni- 
ture trade  which  followed. 

When  the  inner  man  had  been  fully  satisfied  and 
those  present  had  "posed"  for  a  flashlight.  W.  H. 
Smith,  manager  of  the  company,  who  acted  as  master 
of  ceremonies,  extended  a  welcome,  followed  by  C.  W. 
Stephens,  secretary-treasurer  of  the  company.  Among 
those  who  delivered  short  addresses  were :  0.  P.  John- 
ston, of  Washington  and  Johnston;  Albert  Welch,  of 
A.  Welch  &  Son ;  Robert  Lowry,  of  the  Robt.  Simpson 
t'o. ;  Chas.  Montgomery,  of  the  Adams  Furniture  Co. ; 
W.  W.  Gumming,  of  the  National  Mattress,  Felt  and 
Batting  Co. ;  Robt.  Burroughes,  of  the  F.  C.  Burroughes 
Company;  Fred.  Armstrong,  of  the  T.  Eaton  Co.  Ltd.; 
Jas.  Acton,  of  the  Furniture  Journal;  and  Wm,  J. 
Bryans,  of  The  Canadian  Furniture  World. 

The  chief  speaker  of  the  evening  was  S.  Roy  Weaver, 
of  the  Investigation  Department  of  the  Reconstruction 
Association,  who  pointed  out  the  many  reasons  why 
Canadian  business  men,  especially  those  engaged  in  the 
furniture  industry,  should  be  looking  forward  to  great 
trade  prosperity  for  the  future.  A  fuller  report  of  his 
remarks  will  be  found  elsewhere  in  this  issue. 

Those  who  provided  the  entertainment  features  were 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sweet,  Mrs.  Stone,  Richard  Foster,  of  the 
T.  Eaton  Co.,  Master  Laurence  Muir,  and  Mrs.  Robt. 
Muir  who  presided  at  the  piano. 


SCHREITER'S  LIMITED  PURCHASE  PRESTON 
BUSINESS 

Schreiter's  Limited,  of  Kitchener,  Ont.,  have  pur- 
chased the  furniture  and  undertaking  business  of  the 
late  J.  Werlich,  of  Preston,  Ont.,  and  wall  conduct  it  as 
a  branch  under  the  management  of  T.  H.  Speers.  who 
Avas  formerly  with  the  R.  U.  Stone  Compiany  Ltd.,  of 
Toronto. 

This  store  has  been  in  operation  for  27  years.  It 
-was  established  by  the  late  Jacob  Werlich  who  con- 
ducted it  for  nine  yeai's  and  sold  to  Hall  and  Belt. 
After  the  death  of  Mr.  Belt,  the  business  was  repur- 
chased by  Mr.  Werlich,  who  later  removed  it  to  larger 
quarters. 


C.  B.  CHATFIELD 

Designer  of  Furniture 
GRAND 

RAPIDS         -         Michigan,  U.S.A. 


32 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


' '  RAH !  RAH ! "  HE  MEANT 

Eddie  Bagshaw  was  put  to  such  a  strain  in  looking 
after  the  business  that  came  his  way  at  Stratford  dur- 
ing the  January  Exhibition  that  he  was  forced  to  vary 
his  diet  considerably  in  order  to  secure  the  necessary 
vim  to  pursue  business  vigorously. 

Most  any  morning  Eddie  could  be  heard  whispering 
to  the  waiter  at  the  local  food  emporium  that  he 
would  take  his  eggs  "College  style."  Only  those  who 
watched  closely  found  out  what  this  addition  to  the 
hash-house  vocabulary  meant. 


HE  WASN'T  IT 

W.  H.  Smith,  of  the  Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress 
Company,  Toronto,  tells  the  story  of  a  foreigner  who 
asked  a  friend  what  a  polar  bear  was.  When  this 
was  explained  to  liim,  he  protested  that  it  couldn't  be 
right. 

"And  why  not?"  asked  the  friend. 
"Because  I'm  not  that,"  he  said. 
"Who  said  you  was?" 

"Well,  Ike  died  to-day  and  Mrs.  Ooldstein  asked  me 
if  I  would  be  polar  bear  at  the  funeral." 


BIG  BASEBALL  MATCH  SCHEDULED  FOR  JULY 

There  has  always  been  a  good  deal  of  competition 
■between  Montreal  and  Toronto  in  the  matter  of  sports 
and  it  is  natural  that  when  the  furniture  men  from 
these  two  districts  meet,  as  they  did  at  the  January 
Exhibitions,  that  there  should  'be  some  difference  of 
opinion  expressed  as  to  the  superiority  of  the  respective 
cities  in  the  matter  of  sport.  The  whole  question  is  to 
be  definitely  settled  by  a  sudden  death  baseball  game 
to  be  staged  in  Toronto  during  the  July  Exhibition 
between  furniture  men  from  the  Toronto  and  Montreal 
districts.  "Bill"  Pearson  is  the  promoter  of  the 
event. 


TORONTO  EXHIBITION 

(  Continued  from  page  22  ) 

Christmas  season  if  they  had  had  more  stock  ready.  The 
upholstered  chesterfields  and  easy  chairs  were  shown  in 
a  very  fine  range  of  tapestries,  and  one  particularly  at- 
tractive design  wa.s  fashioned  with  mahogany  base  in 
Queen  Anne  period,  upholstered  in  a  rich  blue  electra 
velour. 

Business  during  the  month  has  been  brisk  and  the  de- 
mand for  heavy  upholstered  pieces  remains  firm. 


PRODUCTION  OF  ONTARIO  SPRING  BED  AND 
MATTRESS  CO.  NOT  INTERFERED  WITH 

The  building  of  the  Ontario  Spring  Bed  and  Mattress 
Co.  Ltd.,  of  London,  Ont.,  is  being  offered  for  sale  by 
the  assignee,  'but  A.  E.  Miller,  the  manager  of  the  com- 
pany, states  that  any  change  that  may  be  made  in  re- 
gard to  the  building  will  not  interfere  at  all  witli  pro- 
duction, and  that  they  will  at  all  times  be  able  to  satisfy 
customers  with  anything  they  may  reciuire  in  the  way 
of  iron  or  brass  beds,  springs  and  mattresses. 


Many  dealers  know  not  the  preciousness  of  silence 
Anger  frequently  runs  away  with  their  judgment  and 
they  fail  to  keep  the  proper  brakes  on  their  tongue. 
Too  many  people  think  aloud  and  then  offer  the  excuse 
that  they  always  "say  what  they  think."  It  is  fre- 
quently a  good  thing  for  the  man  in  business  not  to 
say  what  he  thinks.  What  may  be  right  enough  to 
think  or  what  one  cannot  help  coming  to  his  mind,  may 
not  be  quite  the  thing  to  put  into  words.  Think  before 
you  speak. 


When  you  fail  to  make  a  sale,  ask  yourself  Avliy. 
You  can't  hope  to  sell  even^  time,  but  often  there  is 
a  reason  why.  You  should  be  able  to  sell  a  little  more 
each  month. 


A  model  diningroom 
that  will  help  the  gale 
of  furniture  and 
household  appliances. 


Pebruarj',  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


33 


THE  VALUE  OF  TRUTH 
IN  ADVERTISING 

A  woman  was  heard,  not  long  ago, 
to  read  an  advertisement  of  $5  hats 
for  ^2M.  and  to  express  a  wonder 
that  a  store  eoulld  sell  them  at  such 
a  low  fignre  and  still  make  a  profit, 
for  she  did  not  believe  the  store  pro- 
posed to  lose  money. 

"  Think  Avhat  a  profit  I  would  have 
paid  them  at  $5,"  she  said. 

That  isone  side  of  the  story,  says  a 
bulletin  from  the  National  Vigilance 
Committee  of  the  Associated  Adver- 
tising Clubs  of  the  World. 

The  other  side  is  that  a  great  many 
other  women  refuse  to  believe  that 
the  article  advertised  was  ever  worth 
the  higher  figure  named — or  $5,  as 
in  this  case. 

"Usual  value,"  or  "value"  or 
"worth"  are  destructive  advertis- 
ing expressions,  the  bulletin  from  the 
committee  declares.  They  dull  the 
appeal  of  advertising.  When  a  store 
does  have  a  real  sale  to  move  off  odds 
and  ends,  a  great  many  readers  of  its 
advertisement  are  in  the  same  atti- 
tude as  the  men  who  declined  to 
come  when  the  little  boy  in  the  old 
stors^  called,  "Wolf,  wolf!" 

It  is  being  proved,  the  committee 
says,  that  business  of  a  more  per- 
manent character  can  be  built  with- 
out such  statements. 


EFFICIENCY  -^'t^ ^°<"^^y \° "^!P^°i'V,7''! 

  Kobettson  bocket  Head  Wood 

Screw    assures   efficiency.  Used 
tV,ilca,forfrcc  ^^^^^^   ^„    jg^jj^g  furniture 

manufacturers,  etc. 


dtmontir  aiion 


P.  L.  Robertson  Manufacturing  Co.,  Limited 

MILTON  -  ONTARIO 


High-Grade  CHESTERFIELDS 

Re-Upholstering  to  the  Trade 
SPECIAL  ORDER  WORK 

Life  Long  Furniture  Co.,  IngersoII,  Ont. 


1919 


More  Publicity  for 

Craftsman  Quality 


Rt'i  U  S.  PAT  OFF 


During  1919  we  are  going  to  carry  on  an  advertising  cam- 
paign for  Craftsman  Quality  Fabrikoid  that  will  bring  an 
increased  volume  of  business  to  your  store. 


It  is  frankly  admitted  that  Fabri- 
koid is  infinitely  better  than 
"leather  splits"  for  any  uphol- 
stery work — and  our  advertising 
will  drive  this  point  home  this 
year  as  never  before. 


Get  behind  this  big  movement. 
See  that  your  stock  of  Fabrikoid- 
covered  furniture  is  complete,  in 
order  that  you  may  realize  on 
the  demand  that  this  publicity 
is  bound  to  bring  you. 


LET  US  HEAR  FROM  YOU 

Wc  have  plate  glass  signs,  and  various  booklets,  that  are 
yours  for  the  asking. 

DU  PONT  FABRIKOID  CO. 

Sales  Office  *    -      63  Bay  St.,  Toronto 


I  ijiiiilfmmnMIIIII 


ISO] 


NP  ?.& 


Upholstery  Springs 

Highest  quality  Upholstery  Springs, 
made  from  the  finest  grade  High  Car- 
bon Steel  Wire,  oil  tempered  after 
the  coihng  operation,  thus  insuring 
uniform  strength  and  "No  Set."  Re- 
member, the  quality  of  your  High- 
Grade  Upholstering  depends  entirely 
on  the  quality  of  the  springs  you  are 
using. 

HELICAL  SPRINGS 

for  spring  bed  and  mattress  fabrics. 
Get  the  habit  ;  buy  Canadian  springs. 

James  Steele,  Limited 

Guelph,  Canada 


The  National  Table  Company,  Limited 
The  Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Limited 
The  North  American  Furniture  Co., 

Limitad 

Owen  Sound  Ontario 

Manufacturers  of  Medium  and  High- 
Grade  Dining  Room,  Bedroom,  Hall, 
Living  Room  and  Library  Furniture. 

Catalogues  a«n(  on  application 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


Febniary,  1919 


(iLS)o(<L5>o(?J9o 


Talking  Machines  in  the 
Furniture  Store 


Satisfaction  Helps  Build 
Business 

From  Thomas  Phonoparts 


NO  me'asure  of  worthy  service  can  be  taken  out  of 
any  machine  that  does  not  have  that  full  meas- 
ure of  worth  built  into  it  by  the  manufacturer. 
With  infei-ior  parts  it  is  impossible  to  make  a  superior 
product.  No  matter  what  argument  may  be  advanced, 
the  man  who  intends  to  succeed  must  select  those  units 
that  are  the  most  efficient  and  reliable,  or  he  will  face 
dissatisfaction  with  his  product,  the  loss  of  business, 
and  finally — ruin. 

Quality  Essential 

This  is  true  not  only  of  this  industiy,  but  also  in  any 
other  manufacturing  enterprise;  every  year  hundreds 
commence  the  manufacture  of  some  article  of  con- 
venience or  necessity  and  the  process  of  elimination  be- 
gins at  once.  Thousands  have  started  to  make  auto- 
mobiles in  this  country,  and  yet  the  total  number  ha,s 
been  steadily  cut  down  until  the  business  is  "now  in  the 
hands  of  a  comparative  few.     The  same  is  true  of  sew- 


ing machines,  and  almost  any  other  article  in  common 
uise  that  you  may  name. 

Many  of  the  failures  have  happened  because  th'^; 
manufacturer  first  failed  to  recognize  that  the  <iuality 
of  the  goods  manufactured  was  not  e(|ual  to  the  <iuality 
put  into  competing  lines  by  othex  makers. 

Nowhere  will  this  process  of  elimination  be  more 
rapid  than  among  phonograph  builders.  Hundreds  of 
manufacturers  have  sprung  up ;  some  have  already 
failed;  others  are  struggling  to  keep  on  their  feet;  a 
few  are  going  forward  to  success,  and  those  who  are 
succeeding  are  invariably  those  who  are  giving  the 
customer  the  best  that  can  be  obtained. 

You  cannot  afford  to  use  inferior  goods:  you  must 
put  into  your  machines  motors,  tone  arms,  and  repro- 
ducers about  Avhich  there  can  be  no  question. 

The  cost  of  repairing — or  recalling  and  replacing  one 
defective  or  uiis'atisfactory  machine  that  will  not 
"stay  sold,"  will  eat  up  all  your  margin  of  profit  on 
the  sale  of  a  dozen  others — ^and  this  loss  may  be  small 
compared  to  the  .sum  you  will  lose  through  some  one 
of  your  large  buyers  becoming  irritated  and  su>spicious 
because  of  continued  complaints  from  his  customers. 
It  is  well  worth  your  while  to  investigate  by  a  personal 
visit  to  the  factories  making  the  equipment  offered  to 
you,  and  it  is  likely  to  prove  of  more  value  than  any 
other  equal  investment  of  your  time  and  money. 


Soundproof 
rtemonstrat'on 
booths  are  found 
valuable  aids  to 
S  lips  by  many 
dealers  in  phono- 
graph';.   Here  is  a 
u  ell-arranged  booth. 


'ebruary,  1919  CANADTAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  TMil  UNDERTAKER  — — 


SPIRIT  OF  CO-OPERATION  IS  NEEDED 

iiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii::iiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiin^   'iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiimiiii  i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiii. 

Dealers  should  adopt  every  new  idea  that  will  enable  them  to  meet  competition — Service  is.  the  foundation  stone 

aiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuin^   in  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 


THE  spirit  of  service,  or  «o-operation,  has  been  de- 
veloping steadily  in  all  branches  of  industry.  In 
fact,  every  day  we  are  realizing  how  much  one 
leans  upon  the  other.  The  war  in  Europe  has  de- 
monstrated most  vividly  how  Government  and  business 
must  work  hand  in  band,  each  aiding  the  other,  in 
order  to  secure  the  eolosisal  results  aimed  at  in  winning 
tihe  war. 

Fighting  methods  in  business  will  always  exist,  but 
they  will  be  along  fairer  lines,  for  a  reformation  is 
well  under  way,  and  the  spirit  underlying  this  move- 


M39 — Another  attractive  Mcljagan  pronograph  made  in  mahogany 
and  American  black  walnut. 

ment  is  far  stronger  than  many  people  imagine.  In 
every-day  business  we  find  that  the  merchant  and  the 
manufacturer  are  working  hand  in  hand  to  achieve  the 
desired  results. 

Service  is  Foundation  Stone 

"Service"  is  the  foundation  on  which  a  greater  and 
more  successful  business  structure  is  being  built.  The 
manufacturer  to-day  is  spending  thousands  of  dollars 
preparing  suitable  advertising  matter  in  the  form  of 
catalogues,  window  display  cards,  circulars,  in  fact, 
all  kinds  of  printed  matter  most  attractively  arranged, 
whereby  the  talking  machine  dealer 's  business  is 
helped,  and  his  path  toward  success  made  more  easy. 

It  would  seem  that  this  generous  ol¥er  of  co-opera- 
tion on  the  part  of  the  manufacturer  would  be  seized 
upon  with  avidity  by  talking  machine  dealers,  and 
eagerly  utilized.  Yet  we  hear  of  complaints  from 
manuufacturers  of  talking  machines  who  are  sending 
out  suitable  literary  matter  in  the  way  of  helps  and 
hints  to  the  trade,  that  t/heir  suggestions  are  not  ac- 
cepteid  or  utilized  as  they  should  be.  In  other  words, 
there  is  a  lack  of  that  co-operation  wihich  is  essential  to 
the  success  of  this  service  i)lan. 

This  attitude  is  somewhat  surprising,  for  the  closer 
the  intercourse  between  the  manufacturer  and  the 
dealer  the  better  for  all  concerned.  When  suggestions 
are  sent  out  by  manufacturers  which  do  not  appeal  to 
the  dealer  he  ought  to  make  it  a  point  to  write  and 
tell  why,  and  if  he  can  see  a  better  way  of  handling 
the  snb.iect  his  .sniggestions  will  certainly  be  received 
by  the  manufacturer  in  the  ])roper  spirit.      For  it 


takes  real  co-operation  on  the  part  of  both  manufac- 
turer and  dealer  to  put  any  suggestion  into  practice. 

It  takes  time  and  money  on  the  part  of  the  manufac- 
turer to  produce  ideas  which  are  distinctly  aimed  to 
aid  the  dealer  and  to  help  him  to  sell  his  goods.  It 
should  be  the  duty  of  the  dealer  handling  the  goods  of 
the  manufacturer  to  co-operate  enthusiastically  so  as  to 
put  these  ideas  into  use  xmless  they  are  faulty  or  can 
he  improved  upon. 

Make  Use  of  Manufacturers'  Helps 

Manufacturers  to-day  are  giving  i^erious  considera- 
tion to  any  and  every  pLan  that  will  tend  to  help  their 
own  and  their  dealers'  business.  Many  of  them  have 
opened  bureaus  for  this  purpose  under  the  manage- 
ment of  capable  men,  where  special  literature  is  pre- 
pared and  plans  outlined  to  help  dealers  promote  busi- 
ness in  their  locality.  This  is  a  most  commendable 
plan;  it  is  along  those  progressive  lines  that  help  to 
build  up  great  enterprises. 

But  all  these  efforts  are  a  waste  of  time  unless 
dealers  are  alive  to  the  necessity  for  action.  It  is 
certainly  disheartening  to  spend  time  and  money  in 
setting  forth  ways  and'  means  of  hellping  the  business 
of  a  dealer  when  he  treats  with  ajpparent  indifference 
the  various  sales  helps  sent  out  by  manufacturers. 

Conditions  at  present  render  it  imperative  for  the 
dealer  to  discard  all  old-fashioned,  antiquated  methods 


M27 — Plionograph  manufactured  by  the  Geo.  McLagan 
Furniture  Co.  Ltd. 

of  doing  businessi,  and  to  adopt  eveiy  new  idea  and 
method  which  will  help  him  to  meet  successfully  the 
keener  competition  which  has  developed  since  the  be- 
ginning of  the  war,  and  the  dealer  who  deliberately 
disregards  and  neglects  to  use  those  aids  \Vhich  the 
manufacturers  offer  him  is  certainly  not  conducting 
his  business  efficiently,  or  with  a  view  to  securing 
maximum  results  in  his  sales  and  profits  columns. — 
Talking  Machine  World, 


36 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


Pathephone  No.  45 
Price  $58 
In  Mahogany  and  Oak 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"Georgian" 

Price  $185 

In  Mahogany,  Walnut  and 
Fumed  Oak 


EVERY  PATHE  MODEL 

is  another  reason  why  you  should 
be  the  Pathe  Agent  in  your  locality 


NOTE — the  superior  artistic  appearance  of  the  Pathe 
designs— 

— the  marked  price  advantage — 

— the  many  exclusive  Pathe  features,  including 
the  Sapphire  Reproducing  Ball  instead  of 
steel  needles — 

— the  Pathe  advantage  of  playing  ALL  records— 

— the  striking,  comprehensive,  nation-wide  adver- 
tising campaign,  aimed  at  sending  purchasers 
into  the  dealers'  store. 


PATHE  FRERES  Phonograph  Sales  Co. 

4-6-8  Clifford  Street 
TORONTO 


ij 

'  f1  / 

Modem  Style  Pathephone 
No.  100 

Price  $115 

In  Mahogany  Walnut  and 
Fumed  Oak 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"William  and  Mary" 

Price  $235 

In  Mahogany,  Fumed  Oak 
and  Walnut 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"Jacobean" 

Price  $215 

In  Jacobean  Oak,  Mahogany 
and  Walnut 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


37 


The  BIG  Advantage  of  PATHE  RECORDS 

— Better  tone,  better  quality  and  everlasting  wear — 

— the  latest  popular  hits,  first  out  on  Pathe — 

— operatic  selections  by  the  world's  greatest  opera 
stars — 

— famous  bands  and  instrumental  selections — 

— a   complete   selection  of  "old  world  music" 
NEVER  out  on  other  records — 

— ALL  recorded  by  the  new,  superior  and  EX- 
CLUSIVE Pathe  method. 

Such  Records  will  make  your  store  the  Phonograph 
Music  centre  of  your  city  and  guarantee  you  the  profit 
and  prestige  that  such  a  reputation  positively  brings. 

There  may  be  an  opening  for  a  live  Pathe  agent  in 
YOUR  city.  Write  us  for  our  confidential  booklet, 
"A  Word  With  You"-it  tells  the  tale. 


PATHE  FRERES  Phonograph  Sales  Co. 

4-6-8  Clifford  Street 
TORONTO 


Pathephone  No.  72 
Price  $85 
In  Mahogany  and  Fumed  Oak 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"Sheraton" 

Price  $302.50 

Inlaid  Dull  Antique  Mahogany 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"Adam  Bros." 

Price  $145 

In  Mahogany,  Walnut  and 
Fumed  Oak 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"Louis  XVI" 
Price  $385.00 
In  Mahogany 


Period  Design  Pathephone 
"Queen  Anne  ' 
Price  $260 
In  Mahogany  and  Walnut 


38 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


PREDICTS  PROSPEROUS  PERIOD  FOR  THE 
PHONOGRAPH  TRADE 

"The  phonograph  is  about  to  enter  on  a  period  of  un- 
paralleled popularity  as  a  national  household  article, 
and  the  phonograph  industiy  is  about  to  enter  upon  a 
period  of  unparalleled  volume  of  sales,"  said  John 
Cromelin,  general  sales  manager  of  the  Otto  Heineman 
Phonograph  Siipply  Co.,  Inc.,  in  a  talk  recently. 

"Dui'ing  the  period  of  the  war  tlhe  demand  for  phono- 
graphs and  recordfs  Avas  enormously  in  excess  of  the 
ability  of  the  entire  industry  to  supply.  The  war 
brought  home  to  the  entire  world  the  iralportance  that 
wholesome  and  inspiring  songs  and  muisi'c  have  in  main- 
taining the  be.st  efficiency  of  civilian  and  soldier  alike, 
and  it  brought  home,  further,  the  fact  that  the  incom- 
parable vehicle  for  these  songs  and  music  iis  the  phono- 
graph. Every  jnanufacturer  was  oversold  far  in  ex- 
cess of  his  capacity.  The  recognition  of  the  import- 
ance of  the  phonograph  as  the  universal  entertainer 
and  morale  and  effieiency-builder  is  shown  not  (only  in 
the  tremendous  and  insatiaible  demands  that  come  from 
the  public,  but  also  in  the  treatment  of  this  industry 
by  the  Government.  The  restrictions  which  were  im- 
posed upon  the  phonograph  industry  were  reluctantly 
and  tardily  imposed  and  they  were  nothing  like  so 
severe  as  restrictions  on  many  other  industries. 

"Why  Avas  this?  Because  the  Giovernment  recog- 
nized the  great  value  of  the  pOionograph  in  keeping  the 
men  in  the  camps  and  the  men  and  the  woman  in  the 
factories  and  in  the  homes  content  and  efficient.  Because 
of  this  the  restrictions  on  the  phonograph  industry 
were  moderate  and  were  iunposed  at  such  a  late  period 
that  they  in  themselves  did  little  t'o  interfere  with  the 
production  of  plionograiphs  and  records.  There  was 
verj'  substantial  interference  with  production,  but  this 
came  from  the  shortage  of  material  and  labor,  due  to 
the  enormous  total  production  of  all  kinds  of  war  and 
pea<;e  supplies. 

"  The  laboring  classes  of  the  country  during  the  war 
period  made  money  at  a  rate  that  they  never  dreamed 
of,  and  the  first  thing  that  t'h'ey  turned  to  for  the  en- 
joyment of  their  new  .surplus  was  the  phonoigrtaph. 

"Now  We  are  entering  a  situation  \A*ere,  owing  to 
tJhe  enormous  tasks  to  be  performed  by  the  world,  the 
dem'and  for  labor  will  continue  for  an  indefinite  period 
to  be  nearly  if  not  fully  as  great,  as  it  h'as  been;  there- 
fore the  prosperity  of  the  working  classes  will  continue. 
This  means  that  the  purebasing  power  of  the  indi- 
vidual will  remain  high  and  the  demand  for  phono- 
graphs and  records  Avill  therefore  keep  \\\p  the  way  tbat 
it  has  done  in  1917  and  1918— but  with  this  big  differ- 
ence--that  now  peace  industries  have  come  to  have 
their  turn  in  getting  supplies  of  material  and  labor, 
the  phouoigraph  industry  Avill  be  able  to  make  deliveries 
of  the  (juantities  of  goods  the  public  want.  This,  tak- 
ing into  consideration  the  great  increase  in  demand, 
will  mean  an  enormous  volume  of  phonograph  and 
record  business  as  compared  with  any  figures  that  the 
industry  has  ever  experienced." 


FEATURES  OF  GOOD  SHOW  CARDS 

The  average  fui-niture  store  does  not  use  sufficient 
show  cards,  which  are  acknowledge  as  valu- 
able factors  in  the  selling  of  goods.  Aiid  it 
must  be  admitted,  as  pointed  out  by  The  Merchants 
Record,  that  the  average  .show  card  is  far  from  what 
it  should  be,  both  in  wording  and  appearance.  The 
commonest  fault  with  show  cards  is  that  they  are  let- 


tered in  a  style  that  makes  them  difficult  to  read.  This 
fault  arises  from  two  causes — the  arrangement  of  the 
wording  and  the  style  of  lettering.  It  is  an  almost 
universal  fault  with  the  beginner  at  card  writing,  who 
has  gained  some  degree  of  proficiency,  to  wish  to  show 
off  his  skill.  As  a  consequence,  he  is  not  satisfied  with 
plain  lettering,  but  must  introduce  all  of  the  curly- 
cues  he  is  capable  of  making.  Instead  of  making 
cards  to  be  read,  he  makes  them  to  please  the  eye. 
Nearly  every  card  writer  has  passed  through  this  stage 
and  most  of  those  who  have  succeeded  in  this  calling 
look  back  to  their  earlier  work  with  a  good  deal  of 
amusement.  They  can  remember  wonderful  examples 
of  fancy  lettering,  and  how  much  pride  they  took  in 
it  years  ago.  But  it  is  a  significant  fact  that  all  of 
these  old-timers  have  gotten  away  from  the  fanciful 
styles  in  favor  of  plain,  straight  letters  that  are  easy 
to  make  and  easy  to  read. 

That  is  the  first  consideration  in  show  card  lettering 
— that  it  be  easy  to  read.  And  the  easier  to  read  it 
is,  the  better  from  a  practical  point  of  view.  It  must 
be  remembered  that  the  show  card  is  an  advertise- 
ment. Its  purpose  is  to  sell  goods.  It  must  also  be 
remembered  that  the  average  show  card  gets  but  a 
passing  glance  from  the  woman  who  is  passing  the 
window.  If  a  phrase  on  the  card  catches  her  eye  and 
interests  her,  she  may  stop  to  read  the  rest,  but  if  it  is 
merely  an  obscure  blur  of  fancy  lettering  she  will  never 
give  it  a  second  thought. 

The  advertising  man  has  at  his  disposal  quite  as 
many  fancy  alphabets  as  the  card  writer.  Every 
printing  office  has  styles  of  "freak"  type  that  the  ad- 
man could  specify  for  his  advertisements  if  he  wanted 
to— but  he  doesn't.  He  sticks  to  the  plainest  type  he 
can  find,  because  plain  type  is  the  easiest  to  read.  So 
it  should  be  with  the  show  card  writer.  Stick  to 
the  plain  alphabets.  Make  your  cards  as  easy  to  read 
as  possible.  The  easier  they  are  to  read  the  more 
business  they  Avill  bring  to  the  store,  and  the  more 
your  services  will  be  worth  to  the  boss. 


WHO  SAID  THIS? 

Prof.  Renouard,  according  to  Tom  Simpson,  was 
giving  his  pupils  a  lesson  regarding  the  circulation  of 
the  blood,  during  the  recent  school  session,  and  among 
other  things  said:  "If  I  stand  on  my  head,  by  way  of 
illustration,  the  blood  rushes  to  my  head,  doesn't  it?" 
Nobody  contradicted  him.  "Now,"  he  continued, 
"when  I  stand  on  my  feet,  Avhy  doesn't  the  blood  rush 
to  my  feet?" 

"Because,"  answered  one  daring  youth,  "your  feet 
ain't  empty." 


FULFILLING  OF  PROMISES 

THERE  is  a  certain  shop  in  the  East  wihieh  has  won 
an  enviaihle  reputation  because  it  uses  the  most 
pimple  stateiTients  when  speaking  of  its  wares. 
Its  announeements  are  never  far  fetched.  Its  goods 
are  never  presented  in  Loid-face  type.  And  yet  it 
does  an  excellent  business.  It  has  many  friends  who 
have  traded  at  its  counters  for  years,  and  who  cannot 
be  wwn  away  from  it  under  any  pretext  wliatever.  Its 
merehandisie  is  not  of  the  most  expensive  character — 
on  the  contrary,  it  is  moderate  in  st.vle  and  in  price — 
bait  it  has  obtained  a  unique  position  and  does  a  much 
larger  volume  of  bu.<!inesa  than  do  many  more  preten- 
tious stores,  .just  becausie  of  its  "  person alit.v. "  It 
is  simple,  natural,  fraak,  and  not  stilted.  It  never 
miakes  a  promise  that  it  cannot  fulfill. — Decorative 
Fu  rnis'lier. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


89 


T 


HE  Phonola  is  not  "assembled."  It 
"built."     Every  detail  in  its 


IS 


construction  is  aimed  at  the  one  result 
—  to  make  a  strictly  high-grade  musical 
instrument.  That  is  what  gives  the 
Phonola  Line  individuality. 


The  Phonola  and  Phonola  Records 

The  Combination  for  1919 

Thinking  dealers  have  good  reason  to  part  company  with  those  who  bewail  looked-for  depres- 
sion. Canada's  foundations — agriculturally,  financially,  and  socially — were  never  so  strong  as 
they  are  now. 

We've  learned  to  finance  our  own  undertakings.    The  nations  of  the  world  are  our  customers. 
There's  room  for  millions  more  people  in  our  land — and  development  work  for  them  to  do. 

Musically,  every  home  now  is  beginning  to  see  the  necessity  of  music.  The  returned  soldiers, 
in  settling  down,  will  create  thousands  of  new  homes,  and  they  all  know  that  life  without  the 
phonograph  is  impossible. 

PHONOLAS  and  PHONOLA  RECORDS  will  be  sold  on  a  bigger  scale  than  ever.  Are 
you  a  Phonola  dealer?    The  line  includes  a  design  for  every  taste,  and  a  price  for  every  purse. 

And  remember  PHONOLA  RECORDS.     Write  for  the  monthly  lists  of  new  records. 

The  Phonola  Co.  of  Canada,  Limited 

KITCHENER  CANADA 


40 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


Maxwell  Sanitary  Steel  Vaults 


Our  Customers  are  Assured  of  Superlative  Quality  and  Prompt  Delivery. 

Maxvyreli  Vaults  are  Abundantly  Strong  for  All  Burial  Purposes,  Yet 
Light  and  Easy  to  Handle. 

Superiority  Unquestioned  Design  and  Construction  Unequaled 

Carried  in  by  All  Leading  Jobbers 

Ask  for  Revised  Price  List 

Maxwell  Ambulance  Transfer  Case 


For  the  Handling,  Removal  and  Transportation  of  Bodies.    An  Indispensable 
Adjunct  to  the  Modern  and  Progressive  Undertaker. 

Recent  Changes  in  Design  and  Construction  have  Greatly  Improved  the  Appearance  and  Practical 
Utility  of  this  Case,  and  Reduced  its  Weight,  Making  it  much  more  Convenient  to  Handle. 

Removable  Interior  Tray  Retains  All  Leakage  and  Discharge,  and  Greatly  Facilitates  the  Handling 
of  Bodies.     Handles  conveniently  placed  to  enable  two  persons  to  remove  without  difficulty. 
Intide  Dimensions:  73  in.  long,  20  in.  wide,  15  in.  deep. 
Prices:  With  Tray  $38.00;  Without  Tray  $36.00;  Tray  Alone  $8.00 

Sold  by  the  Leading  Canadian  Jobbers. 
Manufactured  by 

MAXWELL  STEEL  VAULT  COMPANY,  ONEIDA,  N.  Y. 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


41 


Undertakers'  Department 

I Problems  affecting  the  Undertaking  Profession  are  here  discussed  and  readers  are  incited  to  send  letters  ■■b^^^^^^^^^i^^ 
expressing  their  views  on  any  of  the  subjects  dealt  with — News  of  the  profession  throughout  Canada. 


FUNERAL    RITES    AND  CEREMONIES 

IIMMIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIMIMIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMMIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMlin 

World  -wide  customs  and  services — Embalming  practiced  by  Egyptians — Funeral  rites  from  old  times  and  old 
countries — Funeral  sacrifices —  Mohammedan  burial — Jewish,  Greek  and  Roman  customs  —  By  H.  C.  Wilmot 


EVERY  country  has  certain  ideas  as  to  hovi''  funeral 
rites  should  be  carried  out.  Funeral  rites  in 
every  country,  no  matter  how  civilized  or  un- 
civilized, have  for  their  base — if  you  will  go  back  far 
enough  in  history — religion.  All  funeral  and  burial 
ceremonies  are  based  upon  religious  rites  handed  from 
generation  to  generation.  We  all  know,  or  rather 
have  read  and  heard,  that  the  Egyptians  embalmed 
their  dead,  and,  having  no  record  that  any  other  set 
of  people  ever  did  the  same  thing,  we  are  compelled  to 
give  the  Egyptians  credit  for  being  the  tirst  race  that 
practiced  embalming.  In  many  old  religions — and 
the  same  is  true  with  old  countries — ^funeral  rites  are 
given  at  this  day  and  age  in  their  original  form.  It 
has  been  left  to  the  English-speaking  people  to  get 
away  from  old  ideas  and  keep  funeral  ceremonies  up 
with  all  other  modern  ideas.  But  in  all  counti'ies  and 
with  all  different  religious  ideas  the  funeral  ceremony 
has  but  one  meaning,  and  that  iis  the  final  tribute  we 
pay  to  our  departed — the  last  true  tribute  of  friend- 
ship and  love  paid  to  the  remains  of  the  dead.  The 
earliest  information  we  can  obtain  of  funeral  rites  tells 
us  that  they  also  had  funeral  sacrifices,  such  as  the 
slaying  of  men  or  animals  to  accompany  the  soul  of  tlie 
departed  to  the  world  of  spirits.  The  slaying  of  men 
as  a  sacrifice  was  to  give  assistance  to  the  departed,  if 
he  needed  same;  the  slaying  of  animals  was  to  furnish 
him  with  food.  We  smile  at  such  a  thing  this  day  and 
age,  but  it  is  told  that  it  was  a  very  widespread  cn«tom 
in  the  early  years  of  this  world's  history.  As  stated 
before,  every  country  and  every  religion  seemed  to  have 
its  own  funeral  customs,  but  T'believe  that  the  Moham- 
medans came  closer  to  our  present  idea  than  any  other 
set.  The  Mohammedans  believed  in  burying  their 
dead,  and  as  soon  after  death  as  was  within  reason,  the 
prophet  generally  stating  at  what  time  the  interment 
should  take  place.  The  Mohammedans  did  not  be- 
lieve in  signs  of  excessive  grief,  and  no.  tears  nor 
lamentations  were  allowed.  We  learn  that  wit-h  the 
Jews  the  next  of  kin  closed  the  eyes  of  the  denarte-l, 
and  then  the  body  was  washed  and  laid  for  a  time  in 
spices  or  annointed  with  spices,  swathed  in  linen 
bandages,  and  then  deposited  in  a  tomlb.  And  then 
we  read  that  in  the  religious  creed  of  the  Greeks  and 
Romans.  sepuHure  was  as  an  act  of  piety  to  the  de 
parted  ;  without  it  the  spirit  had  to  wander  one  hu'-dred 
years  on  the  banks  of  the  gloomy  Styx.     The  last 


breath  was  generally  caught  by  a  near  relative,  who 
opened  his  mouth  to  receive  it.  You  have  all  heard 
of  the  "wake"  or  "watching,"  and  it  is  still  celebrated 
in  some  parts,  although  I  believe  the  idea  of  making 
it  one  large  drunken  feast  has  passed.  T  well  remember 
as  a  small  boy  in  my  home  town  of  seeing  a  number 
of  pereons  entering  a  home  where  I  knew  some  one  had 
died.  T  asked  my  mother  what  it  all  meant,  and  she 
told  me  that  they  were  going  to  a  "wake."  My  youth- 
ful curiosity  and  the  youthful  curiosity  of  several  of 
my  playmates  led  us  to  find  a  hiding  place  near  the 
house  and  watch.  Up  to  the  time  we  were  called  home 
by  our  parents  they  had  rolled  two  empty  beer  kegs 
out  the  back  door,  and  as  I  recall  the  scene  it  was  get- 
ting pretty  boisterous.  This  is  something  I  could 
never  understand,  because  I  suppose  I  was  brought  up 
different,  and  never  did  learn  the  full  meaning  of  a 
"wake."  I  do  know  that  it  means  the  sitting  up  with 
the  dead,  and  that  there  is  generally  a  certain  amount 
of  festivit3^  but  T  have  never  been  able  to  figure  out 
just  what  meaning  it  had  for  the  departed.  As  an  un- 
dertaker working  for  the  family  I  never  question  any 
sort  of  ceremony  or  service  or  any  religious  or  com- 
munity ideas  they  might  have  in  mind.  I  am  paid  to 
fit  in  and  give  them  the  services  they  are  paying  for. 


L.  F.  Hogan,  Ltd.,    Cornwall,    Ont.,    has  been  in-- 
corporated  with  a  capital  of  $30,000  to  carry  on  a  fur- 
niture and  undertaking  business.     Gordon  J.  Parisian 
will  be  in  charge  of  the  funeral  directing. 


The  Toronto  city  relief  office  had  a  busy  year  in 
1918.  according  to  the  annual  report  of  'City  Relief 
Officer  Coyell.  During  the  year,  39  adults  and  118 
infants  were  buried  at  the  expense  of  the  city. 


CANADIAN  Furniture  World  and  The  Tlndertakev 
is  the  mouthi)ieec  of  all  the  funeral  directing 
associations  in  Canada — Maritime  Funeral 
Directors'  Association:  Caniadian  Embalniers'  Associa- 
tion; Western  Canada  Funeral  Directors'  Association; 
Saskatchewan  F.  D.  A.;  Alberta  F.  D.  A.;  and  British 
Columbia  F.  D.  A. 

If  you  are  a  member  of  any  of  these  associations 
you  should  fret  this  paper.  For  one  dollar  a  year  it 
is  yours.      Sit  down  and  send  in  your  ilolliir  now. 


42 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


THE  OPERATOR 

5  IV ritlenfor  Canadian  Furniture  World  and  The  Undertaker 

By  CHA3  O.  DHONAU.  Cincinnati 


IF  tJie  human  mind  is  the  seat  of  intelligence  and  will, 
the  mind  of  the  embalmer  can  be  made  the  subject 
of  a  searching'  inquiry  to  establish,  if  possi])le,  a 
basis  upon  which  intelligent  operators  may  be  selected. 
While  the  brain  is  the  seat  of  the  mind,  the  condition 
of  every  portion  of  the  body  has  something  to  do  with 
the  production  of  a  mind  that  will  come  up  to  all  re- 
quirements. Sometimes  the  distinction  between  active 
minds  and  slow,  dull  minds,  is  due  to  the  comparative 
health  of  all  or  parts  of  the  bodies  in  which  said  minds 
are  located.  At  other  times  a  distinction  is  found  be- 
tween minds  which  have  been  properly  developed  and 
those  which  have  been  neglected  by  their  owners. 

The  ideal  embalmer  should  have  a  mind  that  is  clear, 
broad  and  flexible  and  not  clouded,  narrow,  set  or  in- 
flexible. These  characteristics  enable  one  to  separate 
the  fully  competent  from  those  who  cannot  and  do  not 
demonstrate  complete  control  over  themselves  and  the 
bodies  in  their  care.  The  extent  to  which  mental  de- 
velopment has  been  carried  out  determines  the  extent 
of  the  viewpoint  from  which  the  embalmer  guides  him- 
self, his  methods  and  his  control  over  usual  and  iin- 
usual  circumstances  and  conditions. 

Only  a  person  who  develops  a  broad  mind  acquires 
a  broad  professional  viewpoint.  The  ability  of  a  per- 
son to  cope  with  and  overcome  unusual  conditions  is  in 
proportion  to  the  breadth  of  his  vision. 

The  three  essentials  necessary  in  the  development  of 
a  breadth  of  vision  consistent  with  our  definition  of  a 
competent  operator  are  as  follows: — 

1.  A  broad,  general,  theoretical  and  practical  educa 
tion. 

2.  A  brilliant  imagination. 

3.  The  power  of  analysis. 

1.  With  a  broad  education  in  the  arts  and  sciences  of 
anatomy,  physiology,  hygiene  and  sanitation,  cadaver 
chemistry,  chemistry  of  embalming,  and  embalming, 
founded  on  a  preliminary  education  sufificient  to  allow 
one  to  understand  the  principles  as  they  should  be  un- 
derstood, a  person  gradually  acquires  a  fund  of  infor- 
mation which  he  may  further  develop  to  his  own 
benefit  and  use  by : — 

2.  Developing  an  imagination.  An  imagination 
helps  one  to  understand  normal  conditions  as  well  as 
conditions  which  are  not  normal.  When  one  under- 
stands the  conditions  existing  in  a  case  he  is  enabled  to 
subject  such  conditions  to  a  further  analysis  before 
prescribing  a  treatment.  Therefore,  in  addition  to 
having  a  broad  education,  which  is  made  especially 
more  effective  by  the  development  of  a  brilliant 
imagination  in  connection  therewith,  the  last  link  in 
the  chain  of  essentials^ — the  power  of  analysis — must  be 
present  to  complete  the  chain. 

3.  The  power  of  analysis.  With  the  development  of 
the  power  of  analysis,  founded  on  a  broad  education 
and  a  brilliant  imagination,  comes  the  ability  to  de 
termine  the  degrees  of  resistance  of  the  body  to  the 
available  treatments  and  to  determine  the  kind  and 
strength  of  treatments  which  v^^ill  overcome  the  ex- 
pected resistance. 

Everyone  should  subject  themselves  to  self-analysis 


on  the  basis  of  essentials  1,  2  and  3.  -Many  would  find, 
that  while  they  are  broad  minded  along  business  lines, 
they  do  not  have  a  clear  understanding  of  what  they 
try  to  do  as  embalmers,  and  that  while  broad  in  one 
way,  they  are  narrow  and  set  in  another.  When  an 
embalmer  is  set  in  his  views,  when  his  plans  are  molded 
in  cast  iron,  when  he  cannot  think  straight  about  every 
phase  of  the  work  that  has  been  accepted  by  all  as  the 
work  of  a  profession,  he  is  at  the  mercy  of  such  condi- 
tions as  are  not  within  his  comprehension,  and,  there- 
fore, he  should  develop  essentials  1,  2  and  3,  if  he  is  to 
be  fully  and  truly  competent. 


FIVE  AMBULANCES  IN  ONE 

Buffalo  has  adopted  one  of  the  most  unusually  de- 
signed ambulances  known,  or  perhaps  it  would  be  cor- 
rect to  say  "some"  instead  of  "one,"  inasmuch  as  this 
ambulance  is  really  five  in  one.  It  consists  of  one 
well-made  body  and  five  separate  steel  linings. 

The  idea  originated  with  the  superintendent  of  one 
pf  the  Buffalo  hospitals,  and  the  reason  for  separate 
linings  is  to  prevent  contagion,  as  naturally  there  is 
scarcely  time  for  an  emergency  ambulance  to  be 
cleaned  and  fumigated  after  every  trip,  as  it  very  fre- 
'(|uently  happens  that  calls  come  in  so  rapidly  the  am- 
bulance after  delivering  one  patient  has  to  turn 
around  and  dash  away  for  another. 

Ambulances  are  also  costly  to  maintain,  with  a 
driver  for  each  and  extra  attendants.  But  this  Buf- 
falo hospital  superintendent  avoided  all  this  extra 
cost  by  his  simple  plan  of  making  one  ambulance  body 
to  which  steel  linings  can  be  fitted.  Of  course,  any 
number  of  linings  can  be  made  for  one  ambulance 
body,  but  in  this  instance  five  were  made. 

One  is  for  diphtheria,  another  for  .smallpox,  a  third 
for  scarlet  fever,  the  fourth  for  measles  and  the  fifth 
for  suspected  cases  and  general  emergency  and  in- 
juries. 

These  steel  linings  lare  made  with  voimding  corners 
and  rounding  angles,  so  they  may  be  easily  and  (jnickly 
scrubbed  out  and  fumigated.  A  sort  of  house  is  made 
for  them,  exactly  back  of  where  the  ambulance  stands. 
This  has  five  compartments,  each  one  labelled  "Diph- 
theria," "Smiallpox,"  "Measles,"  "General  Cases." 
When  the  call  comes  "Smallpox  case  at  No.  600  Blank 
Avenue,"  the  attendants  open  the  door  to  the  compart- 
iment  marked  "smallpox"  and  pull  out  the  lining:  it 
runs  on  rollers  and  slides  from  its  resting  place  into 
the  body  of  the  ambulance,  a  eouple  of  clamps  forward 
and  back  working  by  means  of  a  lever,  lock  the  lining 
in  position,  and  this  is  done  almost  before  the  driver 
has  had  time  to  get  into  his  seat. 

After  the  ambulance  returns  and  the  patient  has 
been  taken  to  the  isolation  ward,  this  lining  is  thor- 
oughly scrubbed  and  fumigated.  But  while  this  is 
going  on  another  call  may  come.  There  is  not  a 
moment's  delay.  The  ambulance  takes  another  lining, 
according  to  what  the  disease  is,  and  dashes  away, 
while  the  cleaning  of  the  first  lining  goes  on.  Even  if 
it  is  another  ease  of  smallpox  and  they  are  cleaning  the 
smallpox  lining,  any  of  the  others  may  be  taken  in 
isuch  an  emergency,  as  they  have  been  thoroughly 
cleansed  and  sterilized. 


Sulphur  fumigates;  it  is  not  a  disinfectant.  Its 
power  to  kill  bacteria  depends  upon  the  liberation  of 
fulphuric  acid,  which  must  come  in  direct  contact  with 
unprotected  surfaces,  to  be  effective. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


43 


ONCE 
USED 


ALWAYS 
USED 


Your  Business  Demands  Attractive  Hardware 


No.  573— Plate,  Size  9^"  x  5". 


*  No.  1206— Silver  Bar  No.  1207— Oak  Bar  No.  1208— Textile  Bar 

THE  ABOVE  DESIGN  MAKES  UP  INTO  A  SPLENDID  EXTENSION  HANDLE 


"  IV e  maJ^e  the  best  at  reasonable  prices.  " 


Dominion  Manufacturers,  Limited 

Head  Office:    109  Niagara  St.,  Toronto,  Canada. 


44 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


ALWAYS  ON 
THE  JOB 


National  Casket  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  Olobe  Casket  Co..  Limited 
London.  Ont. 

Girard  &  Godin.  Limited 
Three  Rivers,  Que. 


BRANCHES 

The  Semmens  &  Evel  Casket  Co., 
Hamilton,  Ont.  Limited 
Christie  Bros.  &  Co.,  Limited 
Amherst,  N.S. 
The  Semmens  &  Evel  Casket  Co., 
Winnipeg,  Man.  Limited 


NEVER  MISS 
A  TRAIN 


The  D.  W.  Thompson  Co.,  Limited 
Toronto,  Ont. 
Girard  &  Godin.  Limited 
Montreal,  Que. 
VancouTer  Casket  Co. 
Vancouver.  B.C. 


Highest  Grade  Funeral  Directors'  Supplies 


NUMBER  519  COUCH 


An  attractive  couch  casket,  covered  w^ith  Embossed  Plush.  On  display  at  our  showrooms. 

Your  inspection  is  invited. 

INVESTIGATE  and  BENEFIT  by  RESULTS. 

Perhaps  you  have  never  realized  what  an  important  factor  the  selection  of  HIGH-GRADE 
FUNERAL  SUPPLIES  are.  Maybe  you  are  too  much  absorbed  in  other  affairs  to  give  much 
time  and  thought  to  the  matter,  and  the  result  is  often  unpleasant.  Adopt  "Dominion  Service 
Products"  for  your  business  and  see  if  you  don't  find  an  improvement.  What  we  have  done  m  the 
past  we  hope  to  do  in  greater  measure  in  the  future. 

"  IVe  are  the  largest  manufacturers  oj  High-Grade  Caskets  and  Funeral  Accessories  in  Canada.  " 


Dominion  Manufacturers,  Limited 

Head  Office:    109  Niagara  St.,  Toronto,  Canada 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


45 


MORE  about  PROFITS  in  FUNERAL  DIRECTING 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

How  some  firms  figure  their  costs— Casket  should  not  bear  all  costs — Overhead  increasing  year  to  year — Some 
investments  too  large — Meet  your  business  face  to  face — Use  of  comparative  figures — Digging  into  one  s  business 

iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillliilin 


The  most  progressive  firms  have  a  system  of  mark- 
ing, whereby  each  casket  is  given  its  just  load.  They 
have  figured  it  out  just  as  near  as  it  is  possible  to 
figure  it  out — ^how  much  it  cost  them  to  do  business. 
To  this  cost  is  added  the  profit  they  feel  they  are  en- 
titled to.  The  style  of  the  casket  is  then  considered 
and  comparison  is  made  vi^ith  other  styles.  A  price  is 
arrived  at  and  this  price  is  marked  in  open  figures  or 
trade  figures  on  the  casket.  In  this  way  there  is  no 
hit  or  miss,  and  the  price  of  the  casket  is  maintained 
and  priced  to  all  alike. 

To  make  the  casket  'bear  the  entire  load  of  profit  is 
wrong.  Your  personal  services  should  be  charged  for. 
Each  thing  furnished  should  also  be  charged  for,  and 
charged  separately  so  that  when  a  statement  is  rend- 
ered it  is  easily  understood.  Emibalming,  hearse,  etc., 
all  in  the  price  of  the  casket  is  an  obsolete  idea  and  not 
used  by  real  progresisive  firms.  It  is  unfair  to  the 
patron,  as  well  as  the  undertaker  himself. 

Some  firms  will  use  the  system  of  entering  on  their  . 
day-book,  at  the  time  the  charge  is  made,  the  whole- 
sale cost  of  each  article  furnished  and  at  a  glance  they 
can  tell  the  profit  they  have  made  on  any  certain  case. 
This  is  a  haphazard  way  of  arriving  at  the  profit,  and 
of  course  does  not  show  the  true  profit.  The  overhead 
is  all  forgotten  and  just  the  gross  profit  is  shown. 

As  eacih  year  passes,  it  is  costing  us  all  more  to  do 
business.  We  must  necessarily  add  a  greater  profit. 
The  per  cent,  added  to  take  care  of  "overhead"  must 
be  increased.  What  was  proper  two  years  ago,  can 
not  be  right  and  just  to-day.  Everything  has  in- 
creased. Larger  salaries  are  paid.  Goods  are  cost- 
ing more.  Barn  and  garage  expenses  are  higher. 
Nearly  everything  necessary  and  needed  about  an  un- 
dertaking establishment  has  increased  in  cost  and  the 
end  of  this  continued  increase,  at  this  writing,  is  not  in 
sight.  If  you  are  not  careful  your  net  profit  will  fall 
short  at  the  end  of  the  year.  For  your  own  protec- 
tion you  must  adopt  a  definite  plan  in  adding  profit  to 
the  goods  you  sell,  and  give  up  guess  work.  Know 
what  you  are  doing. 

To  get  at  the  matter  in  a  business  way  figure  out 
your  total  amount  of  business  done  during  the  past 
twelve  months.  Add  up  the  expense  and  be  sure  to 
get  all  your  expenses.  When  you  have  the  footing  of 
these  columns  it  will  not  be  a  hard  task  to  find  out  just 
where  you  stand.  Don't  overlook  the  overhead  item, 
and  be  sure  to  add  a  percentage  that  will  cover  every- 
thing. With  the  total  showing  the  amount  of  busi- 
ness done  and  the  total  .showing  the  amount  of  ex- 
penses, you  should  be  able  to  figure  out  just  about 
what  your  overhead  expenses  has  been.  After  ob- 
taining the  amount  you  feel  Avill  take  care  of  the  over- 
head, you  are  now  ready  to  figure  and  add  your  profit. 
Now,  what  should  this  profit  be?  Take  the  total  gross 
business  done  during  the  twelve  months'  period  and 
deduct  the  total  amount  of  your  expenses,  multiply  the 
balance  you  have  left  with  the  overhead  per  cent.,  then 


subtract  the  total  of  your  expense  and  overhead  from 
the  gross  amount  of  business  done  and  you  will  see 
what  your  profit  has  been.  The  overhead  item  must 
take  care  of  the  wear  and  tear  and  depreciation  and 
all  other  items  not  taken  care  of  in  the  general  expense 
account.  You  have  now  found  the  amount  known  as 
net  profit.  Does  this  amount  give  you  enough  profit 
for  the  investment  and  the  amount  of  gross  business 
you  have  done. 

Many  men  engaged  in  this  profession  have  an  invest- 
ment too  large  for  the  business  they  do,  and  if  they 
would  figure  the  entire  proposition  as  it  should  be 
figured  they  would  be  losing  money.  We  also  have 
many  engaged  in  the  business  that  could  atford  to 
spend  much  in  the  improvement  of  their  place  and 
service,  and  still  make  a  greater  profit  on  the  business 
they  do.  After  you  have  found  the  net  profit,  make  a 
careful  comparison  of  all  figures  and  you  will  see  what 
end  of  the  horn  you  are  coming  out  of.  If  the  figures 
do  not  show  up  favorahly  then  some  end  of  the  busi- 
ness needs  doctoring.  Add  more  overhead,  for  it  is 
ten  chances  to  one  that  you  have  this  item  too  low. 
There  is  no  need  being  in  business  unless  yon  can  make 
a  fair  and  just  profit,  and  when  you  are  unable  to  do 
that  it  is  better  to  close  the  doors  and  call  in  the 
sheriff. 

To  attain  financial  success  in  the  undertaking  busi- 
ness you  must  know  what  you  are  doing  and  not  guess. 
This  is  the  big  secret  of  all  successful  businesses.  Sub- 
stitute the  certainty  of  facts  for  the  uncertainty  of 
giiesswork  in  your  lausiness  and  success  will  meet  you 
"face  to  face."  You  should  know,  and  not  guess,  what 
it  cost  to  do  business.  You  can  figure  this  out  for 
yourself  if  you  will  only  take  the  time  to  do  so. 

Each  locality,  as  has  heen  stated  before,  has  its  own 
peculiarities  and  it  is  hard  for  anyone  to  tell  exactly 
what  per  cent,  should  be  added  as  overhead.  You 
should  know  the  expense  and  profit  each  casket,  etc., 
should  bear. 

You  should  receive  a  just  compensation  for  every 
service  and  article  you  furnish.  If  you  adopt  such  a 
plan,  it  will  mean  added  profits  for  you  at  the  end  of 
the  year.  Know  what  each  article  costs.  Know  the 
per  cent,  that  must  he  added  if  you  want  the  article  to 
show  you  a  desired  profit.  This  all  can  be  done  and 
if  you  are  unahle  to  do  this  figuring,  it  will  pay  you  to 
hire  someone  that  does  know.  Most  all  undertaking 
firms  that  do  not  employ  a  bookkeeper  would  make 
money  if  they  did.  The  only  hope  anyone  can  have 
that  is  engaged  in  the  undertaking  business  is  to  have 
a  plan  for  figuring  profits  as  one  goes  alou'g  and  the 
making  of  those  profits  just  what  they  ought  to  be.  All 
very  successful  men  make  as  their  guide  to  their  groov- 
ing business  (and  all  businesses  should  be  growing,  and 
not  standing  still)  charts  of  their  experience,  boiled 
down  to  comparative  figures  of  cost,  selling  prices,  ex- 
penses and  profits.  To  find  out  these  very  essential 
facts  is  the  best  investment  any  undertaker  can  make. 


46 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


ELEMENTS  of  EMBALMING 

A  Review  Course  of  instruction  for  readers  of 
Canadian  Furniture  W orld  and  The  Undertaker 

By  Howard  S.  Eckels,  Ph.  G. 
ARTICLE  V 


The  axillary  method,  however,  possesses  a  very 
distinct  advantage.  By  it,  in  the  first  place,  the  fluid 
reaches  not  the  arm,  as  might  be  supposed,  but  is  in- 
jected through  a  flexible  tube  directly  into  the  arch  of 
the  aorta,  taking  the  course  thereafter  that  the  blood 
would  take  in  life,  and  Avith  the  same  relative  pressure. 
Indeed,  if  the  selection  of  the  arterial  tube  is  properly 
made  and  a  large  enough  one  is  used,  less  fluid  is  apt  to 
reach  the  side  in  which  it  is  injected  than  other  parts 
of  the  body,  particularly  so  unless  jiist  before  the 
operation  is  completed  and  while  the  fluid  is  still  flow- 
ing, the  tube  is  slowly  -withdrawn  so  that  the  fluid  may 
reach  the  smaller  branches  and  sub-branches  whicb 
have  been  closed  by  the  body  of  the  tube  during  the 
earlier  stages  of  the  operation. 

Even  when  a  rather  small  tube  is  used,  however,  and 
there  is  a  regurgitation  of  the  fluid  back  towards  the  in- 
cision and  a  consequent  hardening  of  the  neighboring 
tissues,  when  the  axillary  method  is  used  it  is  possible 
to  fold  the  arms  exactly  as  they  should  be  in  the  casket 
while  the  instruments  are  still  in  place  and  the  fluid 
still  is  being  injected.  The  shape  of  the  instruments 
permits  this.  They  may  project  either  above  or  lie 
below  the  arm  with  equally  good  results. 

The  fact  that  only  one  incision  is  necessary  and  this 
incision  in  the  most  obscure  part  of  the  body,  the  arm- 
pit, is  another  strong  point  in  favor  of  raising  the 
axillary,  rather  than  the  brachial,  carotid,  iliac  or 
femoral. 

Still  another  particularly  strong  point  in  favor  of 
the  axillary  method  is  the  fact  that  through  the  in- 
struments designed  for  its  application  the  fluid  may 
be  made  to  flow  into  the  body,  without  pumping,  by 
the  force  of  gravitation  alone.  This  enables  tbe 
operator  to  spend  all  of  his  time  in  gently  massaging 
tbe  face  and  hands  to  remove  any  discoloration  and  to 
secure  the  best  cosmetic  effect.  Particularly  if  a 
bland,  scientific  fluid  designed  for  use  with  the  instru- 
ments be  employed,  a  very  fine  cosmetic  effect  is 
practically  assured  for  two  reasons:  First,  that  the  em- 
balmer  is  enabled  to  give  his  entire  attention  to  mas- 
sage; and,  second,  because  the  drainage  is  so  thorough 
that  either  reflushing  or  a  putty  color  is  impossible. 

To  sum  it  all  up  in  a  paragraph,  every  advantage  is 
on  the  side  of  the  axillary  method — cleanliness  of 
operation,  thoroughness  of  drainage,  perfection  in  cos- 
metic effects  and  general  efficiency.  No  other  method 
yet  devised  presents  half  the  advantages  of  the  axillary 
in  ninety-nine  cases  out  of  a  hundred. 

For  the  odd  case  in  the  hundred,  be  it  a  jaundice, 
where  the  carotids  most  effectively  may  b"  used,  or  a 
posted  case,  where  other  arteries  in  addition  must  be 
used,  the  embalmer  would  proceed  according  to  es- 
tablished usage,  but  in  all  but  extraordinary  and  ex- 
tremely rare  cases  the  average  embalmer  will  find 
nothing  else  that  will  present  so  many  or  so  manifest 
advantages. 

To  me  and  to  thousands  of  others  who  have  used  tbe 
axillary  artery  for  injection  and  the  axillary  vein  for 


drainage,  it  would  seem  that  this  method  had  so  many 
advantages  that  they  w^ould  be  apparent  to  every  one. 

More  than  three-fourths  of  all  the  scientific  em- 
balmers  in  the  United  States  to-day  rely  almost  ex- 
clusively on  this  system. 

Naturally  some  of  those  who  learned  the  art  before 
the  invention  of  'the  axillary  tubes  still  cling  to  the 
old  way  of  injecting  fluid  through  the  brachial  artery 
and  draining  what  blood  they  do  drain  through  a  tro- 
car barbarously  thrust  into  the  heart — when  they  hit 
the  heart,  which  I  beg  to  assure  you  is  very  far  from 
invariable. 

I  certainly  have  no  fault  to  find  with  those  who  cling 
to  the  old  customs.  There  is  a  saying  as  old  as  history 
that  "You  can't  teach  an  old  dog  new  tricks." 

This  really  should  read,  "You  can't  teach  some  old 
dogs  some  new  tricks."  for  in  my  experience  I  have 
found  that  the  most  apt  pupils  were  some  Avho,  while 
old  in  years,  were  decidedly  young  and  progressive  in 
spirit.  Age  is  no  criterion.  The  progressive  man  is 
as  progressive  at  ninety  as  he  is  at  nineteen. 

But  T  was  talking  about  the  axillary  method.  I 
am  impelled  to  this  because  my  attention  has  recently 
been  called  to  addresses  delivered  before  two  State 
associations  by  two  supposedly  eminent  lecturers,  in 
which  the  axillary  method  Avas  scoffed  at  to  the  limit 
of  the  ability  of  the  speakers. 

To  say  that  I  Avas  surprised  is  putting  it  rather 
mildly. 

It  Avas  rather  to  be  expected,  as  I  have  said,  that  a 
fcAv  undei'takers  Avould  still  cling  to  the  old  methods, 
but  that  a  lecturer  and  Avould-be  teacher  should  try  to 
tell  an  intelligent  audience  that  the  axillary  tubes  were 
of  no  utility  and  were  exploited  only  because  the  in- 
ventor was  the  manufacturer  of  them  would  be  laugh- 
able if  it  Avere  not  pathetic. 

To  insure  preserA'ation  the  embalmer  must  inject  in 
normal  cases  about  one  quart  of  fluid  to  each  fiifty 
pounds  of  body  weight. 

Personally  I  think  that  he  Avould  better  inject  a 
little  more  of  a  properly  blended  fluid,  because  I  be- 
lieve that  better  effects  can  be  produced;  but  in  general 
practice,  the  average  embalmer  uses  aboiit  the  quantity 
T  have  mentioned. 

f  To  be  continued. ) 


,  SURPRISING  THE  UNDERTAKER 

Vernon  Green,  an  undertaker  at  Hermon,  N.  Y.,  was 
called  on  the  telephone  and  was  told  that  a  man  was 
dead  at  a  certain  place,  and  was  probably  another 
"flu"  AHctim.  He  said  he  Avas  so  busy  AA'ith  other 
calls  he  could  not  get  there  that  night,  but  left  instruc- 
tions that  the  body  be  placed  in  a  cold  room  with  the 
head  elevated,  and  he  would  be  there  to  do  the  embalm- 
ing the  first  thing  in  the  morning. 

When  he  reached  the  place  the  next  morning  he  went 
into  the  cold  room  prepared  to  do  his  work.  The  sup- 
posed corpse  raised  his  head  and  looked  at  Green  Avith 
as  much  displeasure  as  a  man  in  his  condition  could. 

"It  is  about  time  some  one  came,"  he  said.  "You 
are  the  first  person  to  come  near  me  since  last  night." 


Tbe  Anglican  Bishop  of  Jerusalem  is  responsible  for 
the  following:  "When  aOanadian  soldier  Avas  infonued 
that  the  Australians  had  reached  Bethlehem  on  last 
Christmas  eve,  he  replied,  like  a  flash.  'I'll  bet  the  shep- 
herds Avatched  their  flocks  that  night.'  " 


February,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  47 

^lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllll^ 


I  COUNT  LA  MARCH  | 

I      DIED  IN  CHICAGO.  JUNE  9TH.  1912.   SHIPPED  TO  FRANCE  JULY  3 1ST.  1913.  WHEN  THIS  PHOTO  WAS  TAKEN.  | 

I  EMBALMED  BY  W.  A.  DUFFEY.  CHICAGO.  | 

I  WITH  CANICULA  EMBALMING  FLUID  | 

I   CANICULA  CHEMICAL  COMPANY.  366  Bathurst  St.,  Toronto  I 

.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 


48 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


SOME  EARLY  HISTORY  OF  EMBALMING 

Embalming  was  practised  by  the  ancient  Assyrian!, 
Persians  and  Egyptians,  which,  latter  bronght  this  art 
to  high  perfection,  and  embalmed  not  only  human  be- 
ings, but  reptiles,  birds,  fishes,  insects,  and  other  sacred 
animals.  They  obtained  a  mummification  of  the  body 
by  removing  the  viscera  and  substituting  spices,  drugs 
(also  asphalt) ;  it  was  then  steeped  in  neutral  carbonate 
of  sodium,  after  which  it  was  bandaged  with  gummed 
linen  cloth.  It  being  considered  a  detestable  thing  to 
commit  violence  or  inflict  wounds  on  the  human  corpse, 
the  surgeon  appointed  to  this  task  was  generally  pur- 
sued with  stones  and  curses. 

The  aborigines  of  the  Canary  Islands  also  employed 
a  method  similar  to  that  of  the  Egyptians  by  removing 
the  viscera  and  padding  the  skin,  while  the  Peruvians 
and  Ethiopians  took  advantage  of  the  desiccating  at- 
mosphere using  additionally  salt  or  chalk  to  preserve 
their  dead.  In  all  cases  the  results  obtained  was  a 
mummy  permanently  preserved,  it  is  true,  but  which 
for  modern  uses  is  absolutely  impractical,  as  an  open 
exposition  with  life-like  appearance  is  desired. 

Modern  embalming  dates  from  the  eighteenth  cen- 
tury. Dr.  Pred.  Ruysch,  of  Amsterdam  (1665-1717), 
utilized  alcohol,  while  Wm.  Hunter  employed  essen- 
tial oils,  camphor,  saltpetre,  etc.,  final  desiccation  being 
effected  by  means  of  placing  roasted  gypsum  (chalk) 
in  the  coffin. 

J.  P.  Boudet  (1778-1849)  embalmed  with  tan  salt 
asphalt,  Peruvian  bark,  and  other  aromatics,  using  also 
corrosive  suWimates. 

Girolamo  Segato  obtained  splendid  results  by  petri- 
faction, but  died  in  1836,  taking  his  secret  with  him. 

The  Galvano  plastic  process  of  Vario  necessitated  in- 


CARANAC 
EMBALMING 
FLUID 


cision  and  vasculary  injection,  while  that  of  P.  Gorini, 
although  splendid  in  its  results,  was  not  practical. 

Prof.  Auguste  Renouard,  the  Nestor  of  American 
emhalming  instructors,  laid  the  way  for  the  present 
methods  of  embalming  through  his  earnest  endeavors 
dating  from  his  early  experiments  in  1867.  He 
achieved  greater  results  in  the  development  of  the 
work  of  the  profession  than  did  those  who  preceded 
him.  His  forty-five  years  of  service  devoted  ex- 
clusively to  the  education  of  embalmers  and  under- 
takers contributed  largely  to  the  present  higher 
standards  of  professionalism.  As  is  well-known,  his 
great  work  is  being  continued  by  his  son.  Dr.  Charles 
A.  Renouard,  whose  research  work  has  resulted  in  the 
discovery  and  adoption  of  numerous  practical  ideas 
now  used  by  almost  every  emibalmer. 


SERVING  THE  PUBLIC 

There  are  many  ways  in  which  the  undertaker  can 
gain  the  esteem  and  confidence  of  the  public,  but 
whatever  method  he  may  apply,  it  must  necessarily 
show  in  his  services  to  the  public,  says  The  Sunnyside. 
An  example  of  how  a  progressive  firm  in  th"  West 
takes  advantage  of  an  opportunity  to  serve  the  public 
is  shown  in  the  following  announcement  recently  sent 
out  by  a  firm  of  funeral  directors  in  Wyoming. 

"It  has  been  a  custom  of  old  for  all  persons  who  have 
dear  ones  interred  in  the  cemetery  to  visit  the  (paiel 
resort  on  Decoration  Day  in  each  year,  and  with  tender 
hands  and  loving  hearts  to  beautify  their  last  resting 
place,  by  placing  or  planting  flowers  on  their  graves. 

"Mount  Hope  Cemetery,  being  so  far  distant  from 
the  city  and  not  easy  of  access,  we  hereby  place  our 
automobiles  at  the  service  of  all  those  who  have  no 
conveyance  of  their  own  and  who  would  like  to  visit 
the  graves  of  their  loved  ones  on  this  day. 

"If  you  should  desire  to  make  use  of  the  above  offer, 
please  phone  us  your  address  and  time  you  would  wish 
our  auto  to  call — either  in  the  morning  or  afternoon — 
and  we  will  convey  you  both  to  and  from  the  cemetery 
without  any  outlay  on  your  part. 

"Trusting  that  this  offer  will  be  received  in  the  same 
spirit  in  which  it  is  made  and  to  receive  many  sum- 
mons for  this  purpose,  we  remain." 


GALT  FURNITURE  MAN  PROMINENT  IN 
CIVIC  AFFAIRS 

D.  Y.  Ray,  of  Allen  &  Ray,  furniture  dealers  and  un- 
dertakers of  Gait,  Ont..  who  was  again  elected  to  the 
Council  of  that  municipality,  was  chairman  of  the  com- 
mittee appointed  to  select  the  standing  committees  of 
the  year.  He  was  himself  elected  chairman  of  the 
Fire  and  Light  Committee  and  a  member  of  the 
Cemetery  Committee  and  the  Industrial  and  Publicity 
Committee. 


WANTED  TO  HELP 

A  little  hoy  at  school  saw  his  teacher  faint  and  fall. 
In  the  confusion  it  was  impossible  to  keep  so  many 
heads  cool,  and  the  little  ones  flocked  around  the  un- 
conscious lady  and  her  sympathetic  colleagues.  But 
this  small  boy  kept  both  his  color  and  his  coolness. 

Standing  on  a  bench  and  raising  his  hand,  he  ex- 
claimed:  "Please,  teacher,  can  I  run  and  fetch  father? 
He  makes  coffins." — Pittsburg  Chronicle-Telegraph. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


49 


Quality  the  Dominant  Feature 


Your  hearse  or  ambulance  will  be  a  credit  to  your 
profession  if  it  is  built  by  the  Hards,  Timpson 
Company.  Our  bodies  give  you  the  very  latest 
in  design,  and  the  expert  workmanship  employed 
ensures  long  and  satisfactory  service. 

We  build  hearse  bodies  to  any  style  you  may  wish 
and  guarantee  you  a  satisfactory  job. 

We  have  been  making  a  specialty  of  rebuild- 
ing horse-drawn  hearses.  Let  us  convert  your 
hearse  into  a  handsome  motor  turnout.  Prices 
are  extremely  reasonable. 

HARDS,  TIMPSON  &  COMPANY 

188  Strachan  Ave.,  Toronto 


50 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  February,  1919 


WEIRD  TURKISH  FUNERAL 

I3y  "TO  I  {( )NTO\  I A  X  ' 

UNLIKE  the  Greeks,  (who  carefully  exhume  the 
bones  of  their  dear  departed  after  exactly  three 
yeans,  and  place  them  in  a  carefully  labelled 
sack  in  places  for  the  purpose  provided)  the  Turks  be- 
lieve in  permanence  in  burial  matters.  It  fell  to  my 
lot  to  witness  a  Turkish  funeral  on  a  certain  occasion, 
and  it  turned  out  to  be  a  unique  proceeding. 

In  the  first  place,  the  grave  is  not  overly  deep  to  an 
occidental  mind  (they  also  reverse  our  customary 
idea  of  a  headstone — using  one  so  narrow  at  the  base, 
compared  with  the  top,  that  it  is  the  rule  rather  than 
the  exception  for  them  to  fall  in  a  short  time).  More- 
over, they  use  no  coffin. 

The  corpse,  bedecked  in  his  finest  array,  is  placed  in 
the  open  grave,  and  then  a  plank  (to  keep  his  features 
from  being  crushed  by  the  in-thrown  earth)  is  placed 
on  top  of  him,  from  head  to  heels.  And  now  comes 
the  amazing  part  of  the  ceremony. 

The  "hoadja"  (priest)  drops  down  on  this  plank, 
kneels,  places  his  head  (with  an  ear  to  the  plank)  above 
where  the  corpse's  head  lies,  and  then  raps  with  one 
hand,  beside  his  head,  sharply  on  the  board. 

After  allowing  due  time  for  the  summons  to  pene- 
trate, he  calls  out  (of  course,  in  Turkish)  "Are  you 
dead?"  This  is  repeated  three  times,  the  last  time 
with  the  addition  of,  "and  will  you  stay  dead?"  If 
the  corpse  has  a  proper  sense  of  dignity,  and  refuses  to 
answer,  the  priest  then  rises,  climbs  out,  and  tells  the 
mourners  that  all  is  well :  the  man  is  properly  dead, 
and  they  need  not  be  afraid  of  his  ghost  walking  o' 
nights. 

The  grave  is  then  filled  in  in  the  usual  manner  and 
the  bulbous-shaped  headstone  erected.  This  method 
should  be  useful  in  preventing  premature  burial — 
though  they  deny  that  there  has  been  any  trace  of  that 
idea  in  the  custom. 


STAND  BY  YOUR  TRADE  JOURNALS 

Stand  by  your  trade  journals  at  all  times,  and  es- 
pecially during  the  war  crisisi  which  affects  them,  in 
some  respects,  more  seriously  than  any  other  line  of 
business.  They  have  been,  and  still  are,  the  greatest 
benefit  for  the  money  you  spend  on  them,  that  you 
receive  in  your  profession.  Nothing  else  costs  you  so 
little  and  helps  you  so  greatly  in  a  thousand  ways. 
■  It  is  a  fact  that  you  need  your  trade  journal,  and  it 
needs  you.  Our  interests  are  mutual,  and  at  no  time 
has  this  been  so  strongly  eraphasdzed  as  during  the 
world  war.  Heavy  burdens  rest  upon  iis  all,  and  we 
are  trying  to  me^t  them  manfully,  answering  our 
country's  call,  in  whatever  form  it  comes  to  us.  Has 
it  a  right  to  expect  the  loyal  support  of  its  readers  and 
subscribers  in  return  1  Without  that  support  it  will  be 
unable  to  exist  and  continue  its  services  which  are 
needed  now  as  never  before  in  the  world's  history. 
Therefore,  we  ask  all  our  patrons  and  supporters  to 
remit  cheerfully,  when  they  receive  their  bills.  Remem- 
ber that  every  subscription  you  send  in  now  will  come 
back  to  you  many  times  in  increased  service  and  use- 
fulness on  our  part,  and  yours.  Our  interests  are 
mutual. — The  Casket. 


IS  IT  WISE? 

Texas  funeral  directors  set  the  style  in  the  matter  of 
skipping  a  convention  this  year  in  the  interest  of 
economy,  the  executive  committee  recommending  that 


each  member  pay  .$10  into  the  Red  Cross  fund.  If 
that  example  is  followed  in  other  states,  then  cer- 
tainly the  least  that  can  be  done  is  to  help  boost  the 
several  patriotic  organizations  in  a  financial  way.  But 
is  it  wise  to  pass  up  a  convention  in  any  state  ?  There 
are  few  state  associations  so  strong  that  they  can 
alford  to  lose  the  helpful  influence  each  annual  conven- 
tion brings. — American  Funeral  Director. 


A  NEW  CAVITY  FLTHD 

The  Champion  Chemical  Company's  latest  Canadian 
product  is  a  cavity  fluid  to  be  used  only  to  treat  the 
cavities  when  it  is  necessary  to  do  so.  The  solution  is 
of  a  special  strength,  composed  of  the  most  powerful 
chemicals  procurable  for  such  purposes.  Champion 
cavity  fluid  cannot  be  used  for  arterial  embalming,  but 
is  made  to  eliminate  and  to  prevent  gases  in  different 
cavities. 


PROFESSIONAL  NOTES 

The  London  Mausoleum  Co.,  Ltd.,  has  received  an 
Ontario  charter  to  erect,  etjaip  and  maintain  a  mauso- 
leum at  London,  Out.     The  capital  is  set  at  $15,000. 

L.  Weatherbie,  of  Winnipeg,  has  gone  to  Regitia  to 
take  over  the  management  of  the  Regina  Burial  Com- 
pany, Victoria  Avenue.  Mr.  Weatherbie  is  an  experi- 
enced embalmer,  and  for  a  number  of  years  has  been 
working  with  undertakers  in  Winnipeg. 

PVank  Reisinger,  a  funeral  director,  of  Dayton,  Ohio, 
gave  a  Christmas  tree  and  played  Santa  Claus  to  a 
thousand  children  in  the  garage  of  his  establi^-hment  at 
the  recent  festive  sea>son.  Mr.  Reisinger  has  been 
giving  this  function  annually  for  the  past  eight  years. 

Schreiter's  Ltd.,  Kitchener,  Ont.,  have  purchased  the 
late  Mr.  Werlich's  business  at  Preston  and  will  con- 
duct it  on  the  same  lines  as  their  own  big  business  at 
Kitchener.  T.  H.  Speers,  formerly  with  the  R.  U. 
Stone  Co.,  Toronto,  will  be  in  charge  of  the  Preston 
branch.     He  is  a  (pialified  embalmer. 

The  casket  manufacturers  of  the  United  States  were 
praised  by  the  War  Industries  Board  for  refraining 
from  profiteering  during  the  war  and  for  the  way  tliey 
(lid  their  duty,  the  casket  men's  war  service  committee 
being  said  to  be  the  best  prepared,  equipped  and 
handled  committee  that  co-operated  with  the  Board. 

The  Moncton  Undertaking  Co.,  have  oper.ed  busi- 
ness in  the  Samuel  Watters  building,  corner  of  St. 
George  and  Lewis  Sts.,  Moncton,  X.B.,  under  the  man- 
agement of  Wm.  J.  LeBlanc.  An  up-to-date  stock  of 
caskets,  coffins  and  funeral  supplies  will  be  kept  con- 
stantly on  hand,  and  up-to-date  service  day  and  right 
is  the  motto  of  the  new  company. 


Canadian  Furniture  World  and  The  Undertaker  is  the 
organ  of  all  the  Canadian  Funeral  Directors  Associa- 
tions— Canadian  Emhalmers'  Association;  Nova  Sco- 
tia Funeral  Directors'  Association;  Western  Canada 
Funeral  Directors'  Association;  Saskatchewan  Fu- 
neral Directors'  Association;  Alberta  Funeral  Direc- 
tors' Association;  B.  C.  Funeral  Directors'  Associa- 
tion. ' '  All  the  official  news  all  the  time, ' '  is  our 
motto. 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


51 


ONTARIO 

Bobcaygeon — 

Byng,  G.  C. 

Bowmanville,  Ont. — 

Morris  &  Son,  L.  'Phone  10, 

Brantford — 

H.  S.  Peirce  &  Co., 
Funeral  Directors  and 
Embalmer. 

Boih  phones  200. 

Burks  Falls — 

Hilliar,  Joseph.    Box  213. 

Ooboconk — 

Greenley,  A. 
Dorchester,  Ont. — 

Logan,  R.  A.     'Phone  2107. 

Dungannon — 

Sproul,  William 

Dunnville — 

D.  P.  Fry.    'Phone  68. 

Elmira — 

Dreisinger,  Chris. 

Huntsville — 

Hilliar,  Joseph. 


Hamilton — 

Blaehford  &  Sons, 
57  King  Street  West. 
Dodsworth,  A.  H. 
59  King  St.  W. 
Robinson,  J.  H.  &  Co., 
19-21  John  St.  N. 
Ingersoll — 
Mclntyres. 

F.  W.  Keeler  and  R.  A. 
Skinner,  props. 
Kemptville — 

McCaughey,  Geo.  A. 

Kingston — 

Corbett,  S.  S. 

Reid,  Jas.,  254  Princess  St. 

London — 

Ferguson's  Sons,  John 
174  to  180  King  St. 

Orillia-- 

W.  A.  Strachar, 
Suci'essor  to 

11.  A.  Bingham. 

Phone  453. 
D.  Clark.    Tel.  159. 
Mundell,  J.  A.     Phone  126. 
150  Mississaga  St. 


Oshawa — 

Luke  Burial  Co. 

Schomberg — 
F.  Skinner. 

St.  Catharines — 

Grobb  Bros. 

144-140  St.  Paul  St. 
St.  Thomas — 

William,  P.  R.,  &  Sons,  519 

Talbot  St. 

Stirling — 

Ralph,   Jas.        Phone  102. 

Stratford — 

Greenwood  &  Vivian,  Ltd. 

88-92  Ontario  St. 
White  &  Co.,  80  Ontario  St. 
Down  &  Fleming, 

94  Ontario  St. 

Toronto — 

Geo.  J.  Chapman 

742  Broadview  Ave 

Phone  G.  3885 

Amibulance  service. 
Cotobleddck,  N.  B. 

1508  Danforth  Ave.,  and 

2068  Queen  St.  E. 
Auto     equipment     for  all 

bnaiuclhes  of  .service. 
Phone  Beach  73. 
J.  A.  Humphrey  &  Son, 

463  Church  St. 
Washington,   Fleur^•  Burial 

Co.,  685  Queen  St.  F. 
J.  C.  Van  Camp, 

30  Bloor  St.  W. 
Washington  &  Johnston, 

707  Queen  St.  E. 

Corner  of  Broadview. 


Thedford — 

Woodhall,  J.  B. 
Wallaceburg — 

Cousins,  Burlington  &  Saint 
Welland— 

Patterson  &  Dart 

Sutherland,  G.  W. 
Woodstock — 

Mack,  Paul. 
Whitby— 

Nicholson  &  Seldon. 

QUEBEC 

Montreal — 

Tees  &  Co.,  912  St.  Catherine 
St.  West. 

NEW  BRUNSWICK 

Moncton — 

Tuttle  Bros.,  164  Lutz  St. 
St.  John — 

Fitzpatrick  Bros. 
100  Waterloo  St. 

MANITOBA 

Brandon — 

Campbell  &  Campbell. 
Dauphin — 

Farrell,  A.  F. 
Winnipeg — 

Clark-Leatherdale  Co.  Ltd. 
232  Kennedy  St. 

Thompson  Co.,  J.,  501  Main 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Moose  Jaw — 
Broadfoot  Bros. 

Saskatoon — 
Young,  A.  E. 


SOME  DAY  DIOXIN  WILL  BE  USED  BY  PRACTI- 
CALLY EVERY  GOOD  UNDERTAKER! 


These  are  Some  of  the  Reasons  why  WE  Recommend  DIOXIN 
and  why  YOU  Should  Use  It! 


It  is  interesting  and  impressive  to  talk  with  the 
funeral  director  who  has  adopted  DIOXIN, 
the  Peroxide  of  Hydrogen  fluid. 

He  entertains  no  misgivings,  no  doubts,  no  un- 
certainties. 

He  KNOWS  that  he  has  the  Best  Fluid  in  the 
world  and  he  will  tell  you  WHY. 

And  we  firmly  believe  that  the  weight  of  his 
experience  soon  will  result  in  the  majority 
of  other  funeral  directors  using  DIOXIN. 

We  have  implicit  faith  in  the  working  of  that 
business  law  which  rewards  a  product  in  pro- 
portion to  its  deserts;  and  we  are  confident 
that  its  application  will  benefit  DIOXIN  Em- 
balming Fluid. 


We  believe  in  the  professional  world — whether 
it  be  caskets,  or  hardware  or  linings  or  em- 
balming fluids — a  sifting  process  goes  on  con- 
tinuously which  sends  the  unfit  to  the  bot- 
tom and  the  fittest  to  the  top. 

We  believe  that  an  inexorable  law  is  set  in  mo- 
tion by  an  exacting  professional  demand 
which  unerringly  will  hunt  out  DIOXIN  as 
the  best  fluid  just  as  it  has  hunted  out  the 
best  caskets  and  the  best  funeral  supplies. 

And  it  is  our  quiet  conviction  that  DIOXIN  IS 
the  best  fluid  made  in  America  to-day;  that 
the  sifting  process  is  under  way ;  that  profes- 
sional sentiment  is  rapidly  turning  in  its 
favor;  and  that  it  is  only  a  question  of  time 
before  DIOXIN  will  be  used  by  every  funeral 
director  who  demands  the  best. 


Dioxin  Contains  More  Peroxide  than  Any  Other  Fluid  Made  ! 


H.  S.  ECKELS  &  COMPANY 


221  FERN  AVENUE 
TORONTO,  ONTARIO,  CANADA 


52 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


February,  1919 


Index  to  Advertisers 


A 

Alaska  Bedding  of  Montreal,   Ltd.  o.b.c. 
C 

Canada  I'urnitare  Mfrs   9 

Canadian  Feather  and  Mattress  Co.  8 

C'anicula  Company,  Limited   47 

Caianac  Laboratory   .■   -18 

Champion  Chemical  Co  i.b.c. 

Chatfield,   C.  B   31 

D 

Dominii'n   Manufacturers   43-4i 

Dupont  Fabrikoid  Co   33 

E 

Eckels,  H.  S.  &  Co   51 

Egyptian  Chemical  Co   52 

O 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co  i.f.c. 


H 

Hards  Timpson  Co   49 

Hourd  &  Co   8 

I 

Imperial  Rattan  Co   6 

K 

Kindel  Bed  Co   6 

Knetchel   Furniture   Co   11 

L 

Life  Long  Furniture  Co   33 

la 

Matthews  Bros.  Ltd   10 

Maxwell  Mfg.  Co   40 

McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Geo   4-5 

Meaford  Mfg.   Co   7 

N 

N.  A.  Furniture  Co   33 

National  Table  Co.  Ltd   33 


National  War  Savings  Committee   .  .  12 

North   American  Bent   Chair  Co.    .  .  10 

O 

Owen   .Sound  Chair  Co   33 

Ontario  Spring  Bed  Co  i.f.c. 

• 

P 

Pathe  Freres  Co.  of  Canada   36-37 

Phillips  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd   14 

Pollock  Mfg.  Co   39 

R 

Robertson  &  Co.,  P.    L   33 

S 

Shafer  &  Co.,  D.  L   10 

Steele  &  Co.,  .las   33 

Stratford   Chair   Co   3 

W 

Walter  &  Co.,  B   8 


The  Original 
Patented 
Concentrated 
Fluid 


Patented  Formula 
Strongest  and  Best 


Essential  Oil  Base,  com- 
bined with  Alcohol,  Glycer- 
ine, Oxidized  Formaldehyde 
and  Boron-Dioxide. 

Ask  otheri  for  their  Fonnnla 


Special  Canadian  Agents 

National  Casket  Co. 

Toronto,  Ont. 
GLOBE  CASKET  CO. 
London,  Ont. 
SEMMENS  &  EVEL  CASKET  CO. 
Hamilton,  Ont. 
GIRARD  &  GODIN 
Three  Riverl,  Que. 
JAS.  S.  ELLIOTT  &  SON 
Preicott,  Ont. 
CHRISTIE  BROS. 
Amher*),  N.S. 


Larger  Bottles  filled  up  with  water 


Egyptian  Chemical  Co.  Boston,  u.s.a 


For  Sale 
Wanted 


TERMS  OF  INSERTION 

50  cents  per  insertion  up  to 
twenty-five  words.  Each  additional 
word  two  cents,  If  Box  is  required 
5  cents  extra  to  cover  postage, etc. 
Cash  must  accompany  each  order 
—  no  accounts  booked. 


WANTED — On  a  eoimnnission  basis — a  general  line  of  furniture 
for  Toionto  aii^rl  Eastern  Omtario — ^by  reliable  travelling  sales- 
man. Apply  Box  68  Oamadian  Fiirndture  World,  32  Colborne 
St.,  Toronto. 


Send  your 

WANT  ADS 

to  the 
Canadian  Furniture 
World 


February,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


£:MIIIMIIIIIMMIIMIIMIIMIIIMIMIIMIMIIMIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMMIIIIMIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIMII!M 

I  CHAMPION  Embalming  Fluid  | 


The  Leader  for  Generations 


Made  of  purest  chemicals,  Champion 
can  be  depended  upon  for  economy,  and 
to  give  the  most  satisfactory  results  at 
all  times. 

Champion  has  great  preservative  povs^er, 
and  is  unequalled  for  producing  life-like 
cosmetic  effect. 


CHAMPION  Massage  Cream 


A  preparation  that  is  unsurpassed  as 
a  massage.  Constant  rubbing  of  the 
face,  hands  and  ears  will  greatly 
facilitate  the  arterial  injection. 

In  order  to  secure  the  beautiful  cos- 
metic effects,  so  much  coveted  by 
embalmers,  use  from  two  to  four  ozs. 
of  Champion  Massage  to  each  one- 
half  gallon  of  Fluid— the  results  will 
surprise  you. 


The  Champion  Chemical  Co.,  Springfield,  Ohio 


DR.  G.  W.  FERGUSON,  Canadian  Manager 

74  Leuty  Ave.,  Kew  Beach,  TORONTO 
Canadian  Manufacturing  Plant    -  WINDSOR 


U.S.A. 


lllllllllllllMIII  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIM 


I 'III  nil  I  mil  mil  I  Mil  iimmi  iimmmiimiimiii;  iii  imi  mi  mi  iiimiimmmmmmmmmmmmiimmmmM^^ 


No.  2051  Brass  Bed— $31.00  List  Price 

(F.O.B.  Montreal) 


These  New  Design 
ALASKA  Brass  Beds 
are  Sales  Stimulators 


The  well-made  and  designed 
brass  bed  will  always  retain  its 
popularity.  Nothing  can  take 
its  place  in  popular  favor. 


These  ALASKA  Brass  Beds,  illustrated,  combine  simple  dignity  of  design,  beauty 
of  finish,  attractiveness  in  appearance,  and  permanent  sturdiness  and  rigidity  of  con- 
struction with  reasonableness  in  price. 

You  can  afford  to  sell  them  at  a  figure  that  will  give  you  a  net  profit  on  each  sale. 
The  beds  themselves  are  so  prepossessing  that  increased  turnover  is  assured  with  a 
minimum  of  sales  effort. 


These  are  only  two  beds  from  the 
comprehensive  1919  ALASKA  Brass 
Bed  line.  There  are  many  other  beds 
in  the  line  of  equal  value.  Every  taste 
and  purse  can  be  suited. 


Ask  our  representative  to 
show  you  the  complete  new 
line  of  ALASKA  Brass . 
Bedsteads.    Some  of  them 
should  be  on  your  floor. 


No.  2153  Brass  Bed— $52.00  List  Price 

(F.O.B.  Montreal) 


ALASKA  BEDDING  l.mi™ 

400  St.  Ambroise  Street,  MONTREAL 
Canada  Has  No  Pure  Bedding  Laws-WE  HAVE! 


CANADIAN 

FURNITURE  WORLD 

and  The  UNDERTAKER 


MARCH,  1919 


Published  by  THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED,  32  COLBORNE  STREET,  TORONTO 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March.  1919 


THE  GENDRON  MFG.  COMPANY,  LIMITED 


':iiiiuiiiMiiiMiiii:iiiii::iiii''iii(liiiiii!niilliihiiiiiiiiiiiiiMI'ii!:iiiiiiiiiiilifliii.iiiiiitiiiiiiliiiiiliiih  _ 

I  Baby  Carriages 

and  Go- Carts  \ 

\    are  being  called  for  much  earlier  | 

i    than  in  previous  years.    The  de-  : 

mand  for  Children's  Vehicles  is  very  1 

great,  and  we  w^ould  advise  placing  j 

I    of  orders  as  early  as  possible.  | 

I          Travellers  now  on  the  road  i 

I     NEW  CALALOGUE  ready  ior  mailing  | 

 MllliiMlillllMII'lliiai  I  I   IIIIIIIIIIIIImIUIIIIIIIIIII  ailMIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIlilllllllllir'IMIIIiW 


THE  GENDRON  MFG.  CO.,  LIMITED,  TORONTO,  CAN. 


New  Attractive  CHESTERFIELD 


When  you  sell  MORLOCK 
Upholstered  Furniture 

you  have  done  more  than 
merely  make  a  sale.  Admir- 
ing friends  and  visitors  will 
be  told  it  was  bought  at  your 
store.  The  purchaser  uncon- 
sciously recommends  YOUR 
store  many  times. 


No.  542 


IVrite  us  for  prices  of 
Chesterfield  illustrated. 
It  will  increase  ^our 
Spring  trade. 


MORLOCK  BROS.,  Limited  -  Hanover,  Ont. 

Makers  of  Livingroom  Furniture,  Chesterfields, 
Parlor  Suites,  and  Steel- Constructed  Couches 


ililllH'l 


March,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  :{ 


FURNITURE  | 

KilllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIinillMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMiniMIMIIIIIIIIIMInlllilllllinillllllinilllllllMIIIIMIIIII^ 

IMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII  1  Illllllll 

MiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iMiiiiiiiiiiii':iiiii'iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

NUFOLD 

iiuniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMininiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  Illllllll 

DIVANETTE 

The  Most  Perfect  Folding  Bed  Manufactured 

Considering  the  exceptional  qualities  embodied  in 
its  construction  the  price  is  decide  dly  moderate. 

Make  the  "NUFOLD"  your  leader  this  Spring. 
Write  for  prices  now. 


The  Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Limited  '^ut^^^-il^T^i^  Stratford 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


FURNITURE 


MlliniMIIMIIMMMMIIIMIIIII!IIMMIIMIIIMIIUIIIIMIIIIIIMMIIIdMIIMIIMil|l|IIMlMIMIIMIIMIMIIMI!IMI!MIMIlMIIIIII4IIIIMIIIIIIII'r;ilMI^ 

M:MIIIIMI|l|IIIH;illllMIIIMI|IMIMIIMIIMIMIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII!IIIMI|IMIMIllMilMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIII!IIIIIIIMIIMIIMIIIIIIHIIIIin   !  IIIIIMnlllllllllllllltllllllllillllllllllllllirilMIIIIHllllli:!! 


5001  Buffet 


Reminiscent  of  Chippendale, 
is  this  elegant  suite  made  only 
in  selected  quarter-cut  oak. 

Particularly  pleasing  and  ex- 
tremely effective  in  Old 
English  finish. 

Order  without  delay  for 
Spring  selling. 


5007  China  Cabinet 


5008  S.  Table 


The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited,  Stratford,  Ont. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


rURNITURK 


IM!MIIMIIiniMllillli;1IM:::illlMIIIIMIIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIII|IIMIM;illllllllllMi;illllM.:i|MII!rilllllllllllMI!IIMIMI'illlM 

II  Mi  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMII  MIIIIIMIi;iinMIM::ilMIMIIiniilllllli:illllll'IIIIIIIMIMIiqi:illllMIMIIIIillli:ill!ll!IMIMI!IIMIi!MIIIIIIIIIIMlMMIIin 


The  splendid  proportions 
and  quiet  dignity  so  charac- 
teristic of  all  McLagan  pro- 
ductions, insure  for  them 
always,  a  ready  sale  with 
good  profits. 

Are  you  prepared  for  the 
rush  of  Spring  business  that 
is  bound  to  come? 


5000  Buffet 


5009  Diner 


5004  Extension  Table 


5009A  Diner 


The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited,  Stratford,  Ont. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


FURNITURE 


IlMIIIIIIIIIMiil>ltillllllllMinNI!llllllt)llll!llllll!nilillllll!'lr;illlllllli;illlllllMllllllllli 


llllllllMllHlillllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllll 


llllllllilllllllllllllMllflllllllilllllllllllllllI'Mllll  l|j|lllllllltlllllllllllllllllNlllllllltllllllllll!llltllfllIi;ilIllllliril!'illlllll.l!llir:ill!)llll< 


!i]|iililililiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiNiiiiiiiiH!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiHiiniljiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiHiH 


662B.— Buffet 
Height  56",  Top21"x52"  B.B.  Mirror  12"  x  41" 

Silver  Drawer  Lined 


DININGROOM 


This  line  will  catch  the  eye  of 
your  customer.  Its  beautiful 
lines  and  staunch  build  will 
commend  it  to  those  who  want 
style  as  well  as  quality;  and  it 
is  Stratford -made,  a  guarantee 
in  itself. 


35  j  A — Extension  Table 
44"  Quartered  Oak  Top  Plain  Oak  Base 

Extends  to  6  ani  8  feet 


1675-1  Diner 
Leather  Slip  Seat 


The  Stratford  Chair  Company,  Limited     -     Stratford,  Ontario 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


im  FURNITURE  i 

III  iiihiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiMii:iiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiii:ii>iiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiliiliiiii 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIillli:  inn 


iinininninininninniniiiMiinninMinininMiinninniiiii 


inninininniniiiinnininininiiiniM 


FURNITURE 


lliiillllilllllllliiiilll 


The  bulk  of  your  trade  want 
tasteful  Diningroom  Furniture, 
priced  to  suit  moderate  means. 
Let  us  place  a  Quartered  Oak 
Diningroom  Suite  on  your 
floor,  with  style  enough  to 
keep  it  in  the  A  class,  yet 
selling  at  a  reasonable  price. 


SI 


662A— Buffet 
Height  54",  Top  21 "  x  52"       B.B.  Mirror  10"  x  46" 
Silver  Drawer  Lined 


1675-5  Diner 
Leather  Slip  Seat 


405  China  Cabinet 
57"  High.    Top  16"  x  42" 


The  Stratford  Chair  Company,  Limited     -     Stratford,  Ontario 


8  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  March,  1919 

:i:;iiiii:hiiitiiii;jiiiiiiiHMMiii  iimimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii  i  iiiiiiiiiiimimiiimi  iiiiiiiiiiiiii|iiiini;riiiiiiiiiiiiii  iii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|iiiii|i>i!i,iiiiiiii  i!iniiiiiiiiiiMi:iiiiiiiiHiiMi  1111111111111:1111  i!:ii'ii!iiiiiiii!iiiiiiii-Miiii,iiiiiiiiiini!iiiiiiiiiiii>iMiiiiiiiiii 

IIMIIIMIilllllllllllllMIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinlllinillllllllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIn   llltlllllllllilllllliniMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIKIII  IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMINIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIII 


The  regular  routine  of  the  Spring  Housecleaning  and  Renovating 
Season  creates  an  Annual  Springtime  demand  for 

Sl©te\^rwelie  Sectional  Bookcases 


The  Spring  of  Nineteen-Nineteen  nill  experience,  in  addition  to  this, 
a  greatly  increased  demand  created  through  our  general  publicity 
campaign  to  educate  the  public  regarding  the  utility  and  superiority 
of  Globe- Wernicke  Sectional  Bookcases. 

The  best  Canadian  magazines  are  the  media  through  which  this 
educative  matter  is  being  placed  before  the  public. 

Globe- Wernicke  Dealers  are  bound  to  benefit  through  this  campaign, 
but  in  order  that  you  benefit  to  the  greatest  degree  we  would 
strongly  advise  ordering  immediately,  and  so  be  well  prepared 
when  the  call  comes. 


Stratford,  Ontario 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


9 


ISTRAfrOltDlU 

■Uoarlci 

iimmwiiiH 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMMIIMIMMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllllllllllMIM'IIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIHIinilininillllllMIMIIII^ 

llllllllllllllllllllllll  IIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinlllllllllllllllllll  !IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIillMIIIIMIIII!lll!llill!IIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIInilllllllllllMI!inillllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|!|llllllin 


Attractive  Values  in  Rattan  Furniture 


IMPERIAL  RATTAN  CO.,  LIMITED     STRATFORD,  ONT. 


Mr.  Furniture  Dealer: 

Are  you  getting  and  reading  The  Canadian 
Furniture  World  and  Undertaker  regularly? 
If  not,  send  $  1 .00  to  address  below,  and  the 
paper  will  come  to  you,  postpaid,  each  month. 


THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED      ::  TORONTO 


10  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  March.  1919 


■ 

■ 

1 

SOLID  PLAIN  OAK 

VICTORIAVILLE,  P.  Q.       February  26th,  1911* 

"Solid  Oak  Furniture" 

= 
= 

To  the  Trade  : — 

We  have  much  pleasure  announcing  to  the  trade  in  general, 

and   especially  to  our  old  customers,  that  we  have  installed  new 

machinery  and  secured  the  services  of 

a  most  competent  man,  Mr.  C.  J. 

Kelly,  of  Grand  Rapids,  Mich.,  to  take 

full  charge  of  the  manufacturing 

end  of  our  business,  and  will  now  manufacture     Solid  Plain  Oak 

Furniture"  in  addition  to  our  regular  line  of  "Surface  Oak  Furniture." 

—  -• 

: 

Being  the  only  factory  making  the  "  Solid  Plain  Oak 

-  - 

Furniture"  in  Eastern  Canada,  we  can  deliver  the  goods  at  a  most 

competitive  basis  of  freight  to  all  Eastern  points.    We  shall  issue  a 

"Supplementary  Catalogue"  showing 

these  ncAv  lines,  in  a  few  days, 

and  will  be  pleased  to  mail  you  a  copy  of  same  with  prices.  Thanking 

you  for  your  past  favors,  and  continuing  to  solicit  the  trade  in  general, 



We  are,  gentlemen. 

Yo 

urs  very  truly. 

THE  VICTORIAVILLE  FURNITURE  COMPANY 

LIMITED 

VICTORIAVILLE,  QUEBEC 

t 

■ 

March,  ]919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


11 


UTILITIES  IN  WHITE  ENAMEL  '%F?ilS&''' 


No.  100 — Bathroom  Cabinet.    White  Enamel.  Outside 
size  18  X  21  X  4  in  deep.    Fitted  plate  glass  shelves. 
12  X  18  Bevel  Mirror  in  door. 
No.  101 — Same  design,  one  inch  deeper.  . 


No.  1124 — White  Enamel  Framed  Mirror.  IV2  inch 
frame.  Fitted  plain  or  bevelled  mirror  plate.  Sizes 
7  X  9  to  16  X  20. 


No.  111372 — White  Enamel  Framed  Mirror.  Frame  is 
IVt  inch  wide,  Fitted  bevelled  mirror  plate,  Siies 
12  X  18  to  18  X  30. 

No.  1113  —  White  Enamel  Framed  Mirror.  Oval. 
Same  sizes  as  lllS'A. 


No.  1121 — Combination  Mirror.  Frame  in  white 
enamel.  Outside  size  14  x  26 'A  inches.  Has  plate 
glass  shelf  on  nickel  brackets,  and  towel  ring.  Mirror 
is  plain  plate,  9  x  14  inches.    A  handy  toilet  article. 


Our  White  Enamel  Framed  Mirrors  and  Cabinets 
are  carefully  wrapped  or  packed  in  suitable  con- 
tainers, ensuring  their  arrival  in  good  condition, 
and  cleanliness  while  carried  in  stock.  Mirror 
plates  in  all  bathroom  mirrors  finished  with 
guaranteed  copper  plated  back,  protecting  the 
silvering. 


The  above  are  taken  from  our  regular  lines.  Quotations  furnished  the  trade  for  our  full  line  of  Mirrors  and  Cabinets  on  request. 


PHILLIPS  MANUFACTURING  CO.,  Limited 


258-326  Carlaw  Ave. 
TORONTO,  ONT. 


Mirrors.  Mouldings,  Frames,  Framed  Pictures,  Trays,  Framers'  Sundries 


12 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


THE 

HEART 

OF  YOUR  EXTENSION 
TABLE  IS  THE 

SLIDE 

YOUR  TABLE  IS 
CONDEMNED  IF  THE  SLIDE 
DOES  NOT  WORK 
PROPERLY 

WABASH  SLIDES 

INSURE 
SATISFIED  CUSTOMERS 


WABASH  SLIDES  ( 


HELP  SELL  TABLES. 
ELIMINATE  SLIDE  TROUBLES 


WE  ARE 

SLIDE  SPECIALISTS 

Having  manufactured  SLIDES 
exclusively — for  30  years 

Many  Canadian  Table-maker»  u»e 

WABASH  SLIDES- 
Because 
We  furnish  Better  SLIDES  at 
Lower  Cost. 

Made  by 

B.  WALTER  &  COMPANY 

Factory  St.      WABASH,  IND. 

Canadian  Representative  : 
A.  B.Caya,  28  King  St.  E..  Kitchener, 
Ont.,  successor  to  Frank  A.  Smith 


We  can  fill  orders  for 

KAPOK 

MATTRESSES 


The  embargo  having  been  Hfted  we 
can  now  obtain  unlimited  quantities  of 
'*  KAPOK  "  which  is  used  exclusively 
in  the  manufacture  of  our  celebrated 
mattress. 

Write  for  new  prices. 

The  Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress  Co. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO  OTTAWA 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


13 


Baby  Carriages  of  Our  Make 

enjoy  favor  among  dealers  because  we  have  correctly 
estimated  public  demand  lor  baby  carriages  of 
highest  grade  in  their  price  class. 


^lllMinillMIMIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIMIMMIMIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMNIIIIII'IIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIMMIIMMIIIIMIIII^ 

I     Our  Walktrton  factory  is  exclusively  devoted  to  the  manufacture  | 

I    of  hahy  carriages  and  reed  goods.      We  advise  dealers  to  place  | 

j    their  orders  at  once.  CATALOG  MAILED  ON  REQUEST.  I 

?IIIIIIIMMIIIilllNIIIIIIIIIIIIMi||IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!IIMIIIMMIIIIIIIMMII:IIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIII^ 

PLACE  ORDERS  WITHOUT  DELAY 


Remember  that  Spring  is  near — and  so  is  the  demand  for  BABY  CARRIAGES 


MADE  BY 


I  ANADAfURNITUREiyiANUFACTURERS 

KITCHENER          W                       I  I    I  L.M.TED  GINGHAM 

WATERLOO  WALKERTON 

SEAFORTH                               GENERAL  OFFICES  :  WOODSTOCK.  ONT.  WIARTON 

WHOLESALE  SHOWROOMS  :  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 


14 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Sell- 

THRIFT  STAMPS 


I  'HE  dealer  who  encourages  his  customers  to 
*    take  their  change  in  Thrift  Stamps  is  giving 
valuable  aid  to  the  work  of  Reconstruction.  He 
is  helpmg  to  foster  Prosperity  by  making  small  sav- 
mgs  assist  in  financing  Governmental  expenditures. 

Then,  while  he  is  doing  that  much  for  the 
country,  let   him  do  something  for  himself — 


Buy 

War- Savings  Stamps 


"Hygienic"  Mattresses  are  Reliable 


They  have  the  honest 
construction  which  en- 
ables you  to  recommend 
them,  with  every  assur- 
ance that  they  will  give 
perfect  satisfaction. 

For  high-grade  mattres- 
ses at  a  reasonable  price 
you  can't  beat  the 
"HYGIENIC"  Line. 

LET  US  SEND  YOU 
OUR  PRICE  LIST 


The  Standard  Bedding  Company 


Mattress  Specialists 


27-29  Davies  Avenue 


Toronto,  Ontario 


March,  3919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


15 


'  •  »  •  »  ^*  •  < 


Meaford  Furniture 

Adds  Prestige  to  Your  Store 


PURNITURE  dealers  selling  the 
middle  class  trade  are  sure  to 
find  in  our  furniture  selling  possibili- 
ties that  are  unexcelled  and  rarely 
equalled. 

Correctly  and  attractively  de- 
signed, its  first  appeal  is  to  the  eye, 
it  looks  right,  it  looks  dignified — 
homey — as  though  it  would  help  to 
make  the  home  more  inviting. 

Not  only  is  Meaford  Furniture 
attractive,  it  is  so  thoroughly  well 
made  that  it  will  give  exceptional 
service — long  and  constant. 

In  choosmg  furniture  that  will  do 
the  greatest  good  over  a  term  of 
years,  you  can't  do  better  than  make 
"  Meaford  "  your  leading  line. 


The  Meaford  Mfg.  Co. 


LIMITED 


MEAFORD 


ONTARIO 


16 


CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


 =  GOLD  MEDAL  LINE   

Parlor  Bed-Room  Sets 

Divanette  or  Davenport  Styles  with  Chairs  to  Match 


Made  in  quarter-cut 
Oak,  fumed  or  golden. 
Extra  heavy  frames. 
Fitted  with  our  Wish- 
bone Link  Spring  and 
extra  heavy  Felt  Mat- 
tresses. 


No.  795  DIVANETTE 

See  Catalogue  for  other  designs 


The  Gold  Medal  Furniture  Mfg.  Co.,  Limited 

TORONTO         MONTREAL         WINNIPEG  UXBRIDGE 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


17 


No.  454  BEDROOM  SUITE,  ADAM  PATTERN 

When  genuine  quality  is  combined  with  artistic 
design  your  customers  are  sure  to  be  interested. 
KNECHTEL  bedroom  furniture  is  made  in  the 
popular  period  styles  at  remarkable  prices. 

Illustrated  is  our  number  454  bed  room  suite  m 
the  popular  "Adam  Pattern."  It  is  of  Walnut, 
Polished  or  Satin  Finish,  which  makes  it  doubly 
attractive  and  saleable. 


THE  KNECHTEL  FURNITURE  CO. 

LIMITED 

HANOVER  ONTARIO 


18 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


PHOTOGRAVURE 

After  the  famous  picture  by  J.  W.  L.  Forester, 
Canada's  foremost  j^ortrait  painter  of 

WILFRID  LAURIER 

Born  at  St.  Lin,  Quebec,  November  20,  1841 
Died  at  Ottawa,  February  17,  1919. 

This  picture  had  the  approval  of  Sir  Wilfrid  him- 
self and  i'ei)i-()diice.s  liis  fac-simile  signature. 


Portrait  of 

RIGHT-HON.  SIR  WILFRID  LAURIER,  K.C.M.G.,  P.O. 

Puhlis'hed  by  Matthews  Bros.,  Limited,  1906  Duuilas  St. 
West,  Toronto,  in  high-r-lass  Photogravure  from  the 
original  painting. 

Right  Honorable  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier,  P.C.,  G.C.M.G., 
I).C.L.,-LL.D.,  K.C.,  leader  of  the  Liberal  party  in  Canada 
sinee  1SS7.  Premier  of  Canada  for  15  years,  an  honorary 
member  of  the  Cobden  Club,  Grand  Officer  of  the  Legion 
of  Honor  of  Franc-e,  and  the  holder  of  honorary  degrees 
from  O.xford,  Cambridge,  Edinburgh,  Toronto,  and  Queen's 
Tni\'ersities,  was  born  on  November  20,  184],  in  the 
French-<,'anadian  parish  of  St.  Lin,  L 'Assom])tion  County, 
Q'jpbcc,  near  the  N'ew  Bruiiswiek  border. 

Plate,  size  15  x  18  inches.    Paper,  size  22  x  30  inches. 

Do  not  fail  to  have  one  or  two  of  these  handsome 
Photogravures  for  stock,  as  there  is  a  constant  demand 
for  these  handsome  Portraits  for  Public  Buildings,  Liberal 
Clubs  and  Associations. 

If  you  would  like  us  to  mail  you  a  dozen  or  half 
dozen  of  these  do  not  delay,  as  the  edition  is 
limited  and  you  will  lose  sales  by  not  having  them 
in  stock. 


Price  to  the  Trade,  60  cents  each 

MATTHEWS  BROS.,  LIMITED 

TELEPHONE  JUNCTION  3020 
1906  Dundas  Street  West       -  TORONTO 


Leading  Department  Store  in  one 
of  the  most  progressive  Ontario 
cities  has 

FLOOR  TO  RENT  FOR 

Furniture  Department 

Now  has  established  a  large  busi- 
ness in  Carpets,  Rugs,  and 
Draperies.  This  is  a  wonderful 
opportunity  for  a  progressive  and 
practical  furniture  man  with  neces- 
sary capital,  as  the  opening  is  most 
opportune,  the  opposition  being 
very  light.  Principals  only.  All 
inquiries  treated  in  confidence. 
For  further  particulars,  apply  in 
first  mstance  to 

BOX  41 

CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD 


32  COLBORNE  ST 


TORONTO 


A  CEDAR  CHEST 

that  expresses  an  ideal 

IIMIIIII>IIIIIIMI|lllllllll!lllllllllllllll'llllllllllini'lllllllll  IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 


There  is  more  to  a  SHAFER 
RED  CEDAR  CHEST  than 
dignity  of  design  and  beauty  of 
finish.  Built  into  each  one  is 
the  satisfaction  of  producing  a 
fine  piece  of  furniture  —  the 
pride  of  creation.  Skilled  work- 
men and  best  quality  material 
make  possible  the  execution  of 
our  effort  to  build  only  chests 
of  this  character.  Prices  and 
illusirations  on  request. 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iMiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiii,iiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

D.  L.  SHAFER  &  CO. 

ST.  THOMAS   -  ONTARIO 


March,  ]919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


TWIN 


The  "TWIN^^  Dealer  Has  What 
the  Customer  Wants. 


^  Chesley  dining  table  designs  would  answer  to 
the  term  "up-to-date, '  but  they  are  more  than  that. 

§  They  have  a  substantial  charm  in  addition 
that  bespeaks  thorough  quality. 

At  the  bottom  of  most  "TWIN"  dealers' 
satisfaction  with  the  line  lies  the  fact  that  TILT- 
TOP  'TWINS'' Jo  pi  ease  the  customer. 

^      Send  for  our  latest  prices,  they  will  interest  you. 


The  Chesley  Furniture  Company,  Limited 

CHESLEY,  ONTARIO 


20 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Furniture  Dealers  Should  Demand  the 

^^ARSHALL    LiSlbd    ^^^^^^      substitutes  and  Imitations 


TRADE 


MARK 


This  trade  mark  should  be  on 
every  Marshall  Cushion 


We  gladly  forward  labels  to  all  manufacturers 
whose  supply  is  running  short. 


Marshall  Cushions  are  becoming  so  well  and 
favorably  known  among  the  discriminating  section 
of  the  purchasing  public  that  when  they  purchase 
upholstered  furniture  they  want  to  be  assured  that 
they  are  getting  the  MARSHALL.  The  way  for 
the  dealer  to  convince  them  that  they  are  getting  the 
best — the  Marshall  Cushions — and  to  be  able  to 
assure  them  of  the  fact  with  fullest  confidence,  is  to 
demand  that  the  manufacturer  from  whom  he  buys 
attach  the  Marshall  label  to  the  goods.  All  manu- 
facturers are  furnished  with  labels  for  this  purpose 
so  that  the  dealer  may  be  fully  protected  against 
substitutes  and  imitations. 


Marshall  Ventilated  Mattress  Company,  Limited 

TORONTO         -  CANADA 

Successors  to  Marshall  Sanitary  Mattress  Company,  Limited 


-  ART  QUALITY  - 


IMIIIIilllllllllllllllllillllllilldlMllllllllllllMIMII 


iii:i;iii.iin![Mii|i:i!iiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiitii 


IIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  =^ 


-,mn\ 


When  genuine  quality  is  combined 
with  artistic  design  and  low  prices 
you  cannot  avoid  being  interested. 
j^rt  Bedroom  Furniture  is  made  in 
the  popular  period  styles  at  remark- 
able prices  it  is  finished  neat,  and 
is  inviting  in  appearance. 

Write  for  illuslraiions  and  prices  of 
our  newest  patterns 


lllllllllllllllllllinMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIMMIlllllMIIIIIIMIIIillllllllll'IMMIIIIhllllllMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMII 


IIIIIMIIMIMIIIIKrIIIMII 


Art  Furniture  Company 

Limited 

Kitchener       :-:  Ontario 


D.  O.  McKINNON 

GCNCRAL  MANAGER 


W.  B.  HART 

AOVERTISINS  MANAGER 


Wm.  J.  BRYANS 
JAMES  O'HAGAN 

EDITORS 


Published  by  The  Commercial  Press,  Ltd.,  32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rate  $1.00  per  year  in  Canada,  Great  Britain  and  British  Colonies;  $1.50  to  the  United  States, 


Vol.  9. 


TORONTO,  MARCH,  1919. 


No.  3. 


GETTING  READY  for  THE  SPRING  OPENING 

llli;ill|l||in  Illlllllllllllllll  ||||||||||||||||||:|l||||||||||llll!||IINIIIIIIIII!|i|llll!llllllllll!llllillllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIINIIIIII^   Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

Dealers  should  prepare  for  spring  sales  by  displaying  seasonable  lines — Other  trades  make  the  most  of  spring  season 
by  stimulating  sales — Housecleaning  time  good  for  selling  new  furniture  and  house  furnishings — Lay  out  a  plan 

 II  I  Ill  nil  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^   iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii»^^^^^^   iiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiinii  iiiiiiiiii  I  II 


M 


ABCH,  the  first  spring  month,  is  here,  and  with  it 
the  furniture  dealer  should  'be  prepared  for 
spring  business.  It  is  not  a  bit  too  soon  to 
start  right  after  and  push,  this  class  of  seasonable  furni- 
ture lines. 

Millinery  and  dry  goods  houses — many  of  them  at 
least — in  the  larger  centres  already  have  had  their 
spring  openings,  and  it  would  be  well  for  furniture 
dealers  in  all  sections,  large  and  small  centres,  to  get 
into  line  at  the  earliest  possible  moment. 

Housecleaning  time,  which  is  the  uppermost  thought 
in  the  good  housewife 's  mind  in  the  early  spring,  should 
suggest  household  neds — kitchenwares,  gas  and  electric 
stoves,  kitchen  cabinets,  new  carpets,  window  curtains, 
dishes  and  chinaware,  perhaps  a  new  bed  or  some  added 


piece  of  furniture  for  one  or  more  rooms  in  the  house ; 
a  baby  carriage,  too,  is  likely  to  be  a  need  in  many  a 
household. 

These  and  many  other  items  are  bound  to  suggest 
themselves  to  the  alert  dealer.  He  has  his  own  methods 
of  inviting  sales.  Those  that  have  been  tried  and 
proved  true  in  the  past  should  of  course  be  the  back- 
bone of  this  year's  efforts,  but  anything  new  that  is 
likely  to  be  of  advantage  to  the  dealer's  own  consti- 
tuency should  also  be  put  into  play. 

Methods  to  Inaug"urate 

Windows,  of  course,  are  always  in  order.  A  spring 
touch  to  even  the  most  prosaic  trim  will  liven  the  dis- 
play and  double  its  efficacy. 


Fli)W(T8,  spray.s  ami  foliage  give  a  touch  of  spring  to  the  most  prcsaic  window  trim.     It  added  much  to  the  wortli  of  this 

hedroom  furniture  display. 


22 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Interior  display  will  also  help.  Well  displayed 
goods  act  the  part  of  many  a  good  salesman's  introduc- 
tion to  his  goods. 

Demonstrations  are  a  good  thing.  They  sell  goods. 
It  Avas  thought  some  time  ago  that  demonstrations  were 
helpful  in  bringing  probable  or  prospective  buyers — 
especiallj'  women — into  the  store,  but  demonstrations 
have  proven  in  many  a. town  that  they  make  for  sales, 
and  where  properly  handled  and  looked  after  pay  for 
themselves. 

The  spring  opening  feature,  while  not  new,  is 
of  sufficient  importance  in  the  smaller  towns  to  make 
it  well  worth  Avhile  incorporating  into  the  store's  pro- 
gram.. It  acts  as  a  fillip  to  country  people,  and  is 
bound  to  attract  attention.  Country  folk  and  resi- 
dents of  the  smaller  towns  are  not  so  filled  up  with 
amusements  and  entertaining  features  as  are  city  .peo- 
ple, and  so  they  Avelcome  anything  that  is  likely  to 


Canadian  Furniture  World  about  a  year  ago  told  of 
the  Home  Furniture  Co.'s  "plan  and  how  that  concern 
made  it  well  worth  while  giving  attention  to  the  make- 
up of  the  monthly  circular. 

Some  .SO, 000  are  issued  every  month,  and  they  are 
distributed  throughout  the  east  end  of  Toronto.  •  It 
takes  two  reliable  men  three  weeks  to  distribute  these, 
leaving  one  in  every  house.  Window  displays  back  up 
the  special  ofiferings  made  in  the  monthly  circular. 

Featuring-  Spring  Lines 

And  what  about  housecleaning  features?  There  are 
numerous  articles  that  might  with  profit  to  the  furni- 
ture dealer  be  suggested  and  pushed  during  this  spring 
season.  There  are  two  big  furniture  concerns  in  To- 
ronto that  have  been  for  some  time  playing  up  kitchen 
cabinets,  and  because  they  have  gone  after  the  busi- 
ness strong  they  have  in  their  special  sales  of  these 


Tlie  kitclu'ii  in  the  window. 


Two  Toronto  furniture  stores  recently  conducted  special  kitchen  caliiuet  campaigns, 
efforts  were  highly  j  emuuerative  from  the  sales  standpoint. 


Their 


brighten  up  a  day  for  them,  even  though  it  liave  a  trade 
value  attached  to  it.  We  would  be  pleased  to  hear 
from  dealers  bearing  out  this  fact,  as  it  bears  out  the 
experience  of  those  Avith  Avhom  the  editor  has  spoken 
on  the  subject.  * 

Publicity  Has  Its  Place 

Advei'tising,  too,  has  its  place:  to  draAV  attention  to 
the  store's  goods;  its  special  sales;  its  new  lines,  its 
demonstrations;  its  services;  its  prices.  And  adver- 
tising has  a  value  that  lasts  many  months  after  the  ad- 
vertisement has  appeared.  All  of  us  have  had  or  heard 
of  such  experiences. 

Tiie  local  paper  is  reckoned  by  many  dealers  to  be 
the  most  effective  medium  for  adA^ertising.  This  is 
particularly  true  in  the  smaller  cities  and  towns. 
C'irculars,  too,  have  their  place.  In  fact  all  methods  of 
j)iiblicity  may  be  classed  as  advertising,  and  all  of  them 
have  some  particularly  good  features. 

The  Home  Furniture  Co.  of  Toronto,  have  tried  out 
a  bulletin  service,  and  are  so  i)leased  with  its  success 
that  they  issue  once  a  month  a  store  circular. 


goods  in  one  case  doubled  and  in  the  other  trebled 
the  number  of  kitchen  cabinets  sold  through  their 
stores. 

But  there  are  many  other  pieces  of  furniture  and 
articles  that  could  be  pushed  Avith  advantage  and 
profit  in  the  lines  of  kitcheuAvare.  carpets,  china,  cur- 
tains and  general  household  goods. 

Then  there  are  baby  carriages.  Last  March  there 
Avas  observed  a  "National  Baby  Week,"  AA'hich  caused 
furniture  store  windoAvs  all  over  the  continent  to  blos- 
som forth  in  all  kinds  of  baby  carriage  ecpiipment  in 
dainty  colors  and  curious  makes.  Many  Avonderful 
AvindoAvs  Avere  shoAA'u  in  the  large  cities,  and  representa- 
tives of  the  baby  carriage  manufacturers  state  that  the 
results  Avere  very  good.  If  the  manufacturers  Avere 
pleased  Avith  the  result  we  presume  the  dealers  who 
made  displays  and  sold  the  goods  Avere  equalh^  satis- 
fied. 

Here,  then,  are  some  methods  to  adopt  in  trying  out 
for  spring  business.  Make  your  start  right  uoav.  Lay 
out  your  plans  and  get  after  the  spring  business  right 
at  the  first  day  of  spring. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


23 


SUGGESTIONS  on  ARRANGEMENT  o/  DISPLAYS 

IMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillllllllllMIIIIIIIMIinilllllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 

Relative  value  of  interior  displays — Grouping  arrangements — Silent  salesmen  and  price  cards  help — Making  for 
quick  sales — Store  arrangement  a  science  that  should  be  studied — Good  window^s  bring  people  into  the  store 

Mllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll  IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillll^   IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

By  GEO.  F.  LEAPEK 


STORE    arrangement    is    a  science  in  itself.  A 
science  that  is  only  imperfectly  understood  by 
most  of  us.      The  arrangement  of  the  store  is 
often  the  factor  that  makes  or  breaks  its  success. 

Good  displays  in  the  window  are  responsible  in  a 
great  measure  for  bringing  people  into  the  store,  but 
once  these  people  get  in,  they  should  be  presented  an 
interior  capable  of  holding  their  attention,  and  capable 
of  making  these  people  enjoy  being  in  the  store. 

Window  Display  Ranks  First 

The  front  part  of  the  store  is  the  most  valuable  in 
all  ordinary  cases.  The  window  space  ranks  first  and 
highest.  The  department  nearest  tlje  entrance  comes 
second,  and  so  on  back.  This  is  true  largely  because 
it  is  so  difficult  to  get  customers  who  come  to  the  store 
to  circulate  far  beyond  the  entrance.  As  in  this 
present  day  of  hurry  the  customer  is  intent  on  secur- 
ing what  he  comes  after  in  the  shortest  possible  time. 
Therefore  the  goods  that  sell  themselves  must  be  lo- 
cated where  they  will  help  to  attract  attention  to  other 
goods. 

Goods  not  in  a  customer's  mind  must  be  located 
where  they  can  'he  seen.  The  merchandise  must  be 
arranged  in  groups  that  permit  of  making  the  sale  of 
more  than  one  article.  Goods  that  go  together  in 
actual  use  are  therefore  generally  grouped  together. 

The  profit  of  the  store  depends  upon  quick  sales  and 
large  volume;  therefore,  it  is  clear  that  everything 
should  be  done  to  handle  the  customer  efficiently,  and 
as  ({uickly  as  possible.  The  prospective  customer 
must  be  helped  by  the  arrangements  of  the  store  and 
by  displays  as  well  as  by  sales  people,  open  counters, 
easily-read  price  tickets,  printed  statements  about  the 
goods,  and  similar  devices  which  assist  in  this  direc- 
tion. 

Sales  people  need  to  show  the  goods  in  the  quickest 
possible  way,  and  to  be  prepared  to  tell  in  short,  clear- 
cut  sentences  the  things  the  customers  are  likely  to 
want  to  know  about  the  goods.  Above  all,  they  need 
deft  hands,  quick  eyes,  ready  minds,  and  unfailing  pa- 
tience and  good  will  for  every  customer. 

Goods  should  always  be  of  easy  access.  The  utiliz- 
ing of  the  stock  fixtures  by  the  salesman  is  to  get  the 
goods  in  the  hand  of  the  prospective  customer  within 
the  shortest  possible  time.  The  feel  of  the  stock  is  the 
greatest  factor  in  creating  a  desire  for  possession  in 
the  prospect.  When  a  salesman  must  waste  his  time 
opening  and  replacing  l)oxes,  the  desire  of  the  customer 
will  wane  accordingly. 

In  displaying  goods  inside  of  the  store  mixch  care 
.should  be  taken  to  place  goods  of  quality  before  the 
eyes  of  the  buying  public.  While  many  people  go  into 
a  store  with  tlie  intention  of  purchasing  an  inferior 
class  of  merchandise,  it  is  safe  to  say  that  if  they  see 
the  store  makes  it  a  point  to  make  a  showing  of  ex- 
pensive materials,  that  when  they  have  sufficient  funds 


or  when  the  desire  for  such  material  takes  hold  of 
them,  they  will  remember  where  they  saw  the  display 
of  such  merchandise  and  they  will  go  to  that  place  to 
make  their  purchases. 

Arrange  Displays  Effectively 

A  great  deal  of  attention  needs  to  be  given  in  ar- 
ranging the  store  display  so  as  to  make  it  most 
effective.  Goods  must  be  placed  where  they  Ccin  be 
seen.  The  principle  is  that  the  display  of  merchandise 
should  fall  largely  Avithin  the  average  line  of  vision. 
Experiments  need  be  performed  to  determine  just  what 
this  is,  but  it  may  be  safely  stated  that  most  people 
on  passing  through  a  store  notice  goods  only  when  they 
are  located  more  than  two  feet  and  less  than  seven 
feet  above  the  floor.  This  means  that  the  display 
must  be  planned  within  this  line  of  vision,  namely,  five 
feet  wide.  Displays  above  or  below  these  limits  seem 
either  to  remain  unnoticed  or  to  confuse  the  customer. 
As  a  rule,  whatever  is  done  above  or  below  these  limits 
must  'be  for  purely  decorative  purposes,  or  to  serve  as 
a  background  for  the  regular  goods  that  are  displayed 
within  the  line  of  vision.  Within  this  line  of  vision 
there  are  possibilities  of  great  art  in  arranging  the 
display  of  goods.     For  example : 

One  may  seek  to  get  the  colors  of  the  goods  into  an 
appealing  relationship. 

To  get  the  form  of  the  goods  in  harmonious  groups. 

To  get  an  effect  that  is  not  only  pleasing  to  the  eye. 
but  attractive  to  the  customer's  pocketbook. 

The  one  who  arranges  the  store's  display  has  the 
possibilities  of  exercising  talent  similar  to  that  of  a 
painter  or  sculptor,  but  his  combinations  must  differ 
from  the  painted  or  sculptured  group  in  this  respect, 
that  the  details  rather  than  the  ensemble  must  stand 
out  clearly  to  catch  the  customer's  attention.  The 
art  is  introduced  to  set  off  the  goods  effectively  so  that 
they  may  appeal  to  the  purchaser  and  be  sold.  Order, 
harmony  and  other  fundamental  principles  of  art  are 
essential  to  good  store  display,  but  art  must  be  for 
business  sake. 

Everything  beyond  the  direct  line  of  vision  in  a  store 
is  to  the  customer  what  the  frame  and  background  of 
a  painting  are  to  the  painter,  and  to  the  one  who  looks 
at  the  painting.  The  frame  or  background  needs  to 
be  in  keeping  with  the  central  object,  harmonious  yet 
suibdued,  not  attractive  in  itself,  tut  helping  to  make 
the  goods  displayed  as  attractive  as  their  true  natures 
will  permit. 


ONE  LITTLE  AD.  WON'T  DO  IT  ALL 

One  step  won't  take  you  very  far,  you've  got  to 
keep  on  walking.  One  word  don't  tell  folks  who  you 
are,  .you've  got  to  keep  on  talking.  One  inch  won't 
make  you  \-cry  tall,,  you've  got  to  keep  on  growing. 
One  little  ad.  won't  do  it  all,  you've  got  to  keep  them 
going. 


24 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


GETTING  GOOD  PHOTO  of  SHOW  WINDOW 


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Describing  method  used  by  a  dealer  in  an  Ontario  town — Some  necessary  precautions  to  insure  good  picture — 
Night  best  time  to  take  photo — Eliminate  reflections  and  avoid  sunlight  in  window  if  photo  taken  in  daytime 

IIIMMinilMIIJIIMIIIIMMMMIMIMIIIIIinillllllllMIIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIMIIMIIIIIMMIIMIIMIIMIIM 

By  C.  H«  BROOKS 


A GOOD  window,  the  kind  that  will  make  the 
people  stop  and  study  its  contents,  is  an  asset. 
To  preserve  the  original  is  impossible,  so  a 
faithful  reproduction  is  the  much  desired  object  of  its 
originator. 

Too  many  good  windows  are  poorly  portrayed  in 
the  photographs  taken,  so  to  get  a  good  picture,  a  few 
precautions  are  necessary,  as  it  is  a  fact  that  a  show 
window  is  one  of  the  most  difficult  things  to  photo- 
graph. 

The  Necessary  Precautions 

If  there  is  a  broad  street  before  your  window,  or  an 
open  space,  it  will  almost  be  impossible  to  take  a 
picture  by  day ;  for,  put  your  camera  where  you  will, 
it  is  always  darker  in  your  window  than  it  is  outside, 
and  the  opposite  condition  should  prevail.  But  it 
can  be  done  at  night.  See  that  your  lights,  while  flood- 
ing the  Avindow,  are  themselves  hidden  from  the  street. 
If  the  cara.-'ra  lias  a  good  lens  from  10  to  20  minutes'  ex- 
posure will  be  enough.  People  may  walk  betAveen 
the  camera  and  window  and  not  injure  the  picture, 
providing  they  do  not  stop. 

A  good  time  to  photograph  a  window,  is  early 
morning  on  a  clear  day ;  just  before  sunrise.  The 
light  is  strong  and  penetrating,  and  a  good  picture 
will  usually  result.  Remember  that  the  interior  of 
your  window  must  be  light.      If  your  Avindow  is 


darker  than  the  street  the  glass  acts  as  a  mirror,  re- 
flecting everything  on  the  opposite  side  of  the  street. 

A  method  often  adopted  Avith  good  results  is  as 
follows :  Make  a  cloth  screen  of  black  cambric  suffi- 
cient to  shut  ot¥  all  reflectors  AA^hen  raised  before  the 
window.  Fasten  the  two  upper  corners  to  poles,  and 
when  about  to  take  the  picture  have  tAvo  men  or  boys 
raise  the  screen  just  back  of  the  camera.  All  reflec 
tions  will  be  avoided,  and  a  clear  picture  will  result. 
Flashlight  pictures  will  not  avoid  reflections.  There 
is  a  popular  idea  that  the  camera  cannot  lie,  but  if  it 
cannot  it  is  still  capable  of  great  exaggeration. 

Avoid  Sunlight  on  Window 

Show  windows  should  never  be  photographed  Avhile 
the  sun  is  Shining  upon  them.  A  dull  day  or  early 
morning  light  Avill  give  better  results  than  a  bright  day 
or  when  the  sun  is  high.  Where  a  AvindoAV  is  illumin- 
ated by  electric  light,  the  evening  is  the  ideal  time  to 
photograph  it. 

If  the  lights  are  in  full  view,  precautions  should  be 
taken  to  eover  them,  for  if  a  long  exposure  is  made 
they  will  shoAV  up  in  the  picture  as  a  Avhite  blur.  The 
lights  can  easily  be  hidden  from  A^ew  by  the  arrange- 
ment of  the  goods  or  decorations. 

Take  a  photograph  of  your  AvindoAv  display  and 
send  it  along  to  the  editor,  32  Colborne  St.,  Toronto, 
together  with  some  particulars  about  the  results  it 
brought. 


GENDRON 

TORONTO 


CO.  Limited 
ONTARIO 


This  is  a  display  made 
by  the  Gendron  Mfg. 
Co.,  in  their  exhibi- 
tion hiill  at  55  Bay 
St.,  Toronto,  durinfr 
the  recent  furniture 
exliihition. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


25 


DEFINITE  IDEAS  on  DISPLAY  an  J  ADVERTISING 

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Change  in  display  of  value — Plan  window  displays — Backgrounds  a  factor — Color  schemes — Connect  window 
and  advertising  story — Demonstrations  have  their  place — Window  cards  and    price  tickets  give  an  idea 

i::iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>!ii::iiiiii:rN!i!i!ii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiim   iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  ii  iiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 


IN  a  previous  discussion  we  spoke  of  "change"  m 
display  as  frequently  of  value  for  its  own  sake. 
But  just  as  certain  principles  govern  change  in 
the  store  itself,  so  they  determine  the  kind  of  change 
demanded  in  that  concrete  section  of  the  store  known 
as  the  Window.  The  first  thing  an  intelligent  window- 
dresser  ought  to  think  of,  in  planning  his  scheme  of 
decoration,  is  the  shape  of  his  background.  Circle, 
square,  oval,  oblong?  If  the  background  is  natural,  if 
you  are  confronted  with  an  undefined  section  of  the 
backs  of  tables  or  showcases  interspersed  with  blank 
spaces  (as  is  the  actual  case  in  some  stores  of  the  older 
type),  create  your  background — precisely  as  the  ad. 
writer  creates  the  real  shape  of  his  advertisement 
within  the  oblong  of  the  space  allotted.  Create  it. 
Next  week,  or  next  day,  recreate  it.  Vary  it  as  much 
as  possible.  The  background  is  the  big  "silent"  fac- 
tor in  sales  appeal  through  the  window. 

Color  schemes  are  supposed  to  be  brilliant  emana- 
tions rather  than  logical  necessities.  Sometimes  that 
is  what  is  the  matter  Avith  them.  When  definite  ideas 
do  prevail,  we  usually  find  window  dressers  divided 
sharply  into  two  "schools  of  thought" — like  the  old 
fashioned  schools  of  medicine.  One  group  of  minds 
favors  synchrony — varying  shades  of  the  same  color, 
like  a  Whistler  study  in  gray  on  the  Thames.  The 
other  crowd  are  for  sharp  color-contrasts — like  a  Jap- 
anese water-color.  The  theory  seems  to  be — on  both 
sides — that  one  or  the  other  dogma  must  be  exclusively 
and  inescapably  right. 

Why  need  it  be?  There  is  absolutely  no  reason.  Use 
both  schemes — sometimes  one  month,  harmony ;  the 
next  contrast.  Or,  more  rarely,  use  a  background  of 
harmony  and  a  foreground  of  contrast.  Combine 
rather  than  exclude.  Call  this  "futurism"  in  win- 
dow decoration,  if  you  like.  It  has  succeeded.  And 
at  any  rate  the  principle  of  alternating  both  appeals 
has  solid  experience  behind  it. 

As  to  Window  Demonstrations 

Is  the  window  demonstration  worth  while?  It  has 
been  overdone,  no  doubt  of  that.  It  is  much  like  the 
freak  idea  in  some  advertising,  as  commonly  employed; 
curiosity  in  abundance  is  excited  hwt,  rarely,  the  desire 
to  buy.  Inside  the  store,  the  buyer  pays  more  heed  to 
a  demonstration — because  he  is  a  buyer — or,  at  least, 
a  prospect.  Out  on  the  sidewalk  he  is  generally  a 
whistling  boy  with  his  hands  in  his  pockets. 

Window  demonstrations  are  commonly  more  result- 
fu]  in  the  small  town,  where  people  have  more  time  to 
look.  But  they  may  not  by  any  means  be  ruled  out  or 
the  legitimate  methods  employable  for  merchandising 
a  new  or  even  a  standard  pi'oduct.  The  main  thing  is 
to  have  a  reason  for  a  particular  demonstration,  rather 
than  to  insist  on  demonstration  as  a  reason  for  itself. 
Constant,  weekly  demonstration  dulls  the  fine  edge  of 
curiosity.  Nobody  looks,  whoi  he  knows  that  the  free 
show  is  going  on  all  the  time.  Many  products — of  the 
best  salability — demonstrate  themselves.     Your  win- 


dow dresser — if  alert  and  receptive  of  new  ideas — is 
your  best  "demonstrator."  Vary  "still  life"  with  an 
occasional  sight  of  the  "wheels  going  'round" — but 
t-ecognize  the  limitations  of  the  plan.  Men  at  work 
are  rather  common  sights  in  a  city  street;  an  artistic 
and  forceful  window  display  is  a  rarity.  Which  is  the 
conclusioii  of  the  whole  matter. 

When  all  is  said,  the  fault  which  persists  is  the  fault 
of  clutter.  The  average  windoAv  in  the  retail  store 
of  1918  still  has  too  much  in  it — and  too  much  of  too 
much.  Absolutely  no  one  is  going  to  look  at  half  of 
it.  And  because  of  the  miscellaneous  aspect  of  it, 
many  people  will  never  look  at  it  at  all.  Take  some 
store  window  not  in  the  furniture  line,  and  you  will 
readily  see  the  idea.  The  average  retail  store  in  the 
small  town,  for  example.  It  is  a  salesman  shrieking 
too  many  kinds  of  instruments  in  too  many  different 
keys.  The  result  is  that  discord  which  is  not  emphasis 
but  dissipation  of  attentive  energy.  Look  back  at 
many  furniture  Avindows,  and  you  observe  precisely 
the  same  (lack  of)  principle.  The  plan  of  the  back- 
ground and  the  plan  of  the  color  scheme  are  not  a  whit 
more  essential  than  the  plan  of  choice  of  display-lines. 
Some  day  some  retail  merchants  Avill  Avake  up  to 
the  fact  that  what  they  leave  out  of  their  windoAvs  mav 
be  quire  as  important  as  what  they  put  in.  Attract 
the  buyer.    Don't  knock  him  doAvn. 

The  Advertisement 

_  "Dealer  advertising  is  primarily  a  local  proposi- 
tion." It  is  said  so  often  that  avc  forget  that 
we  mean  it  is  a  product  adapted  to  a  local  pro- 
position. Since  the  product  is  universally  the  same, 
some  ideas  which  succeed  in  the  large  city  will  make 
good  in  the  small  toAvn,  and  vice  versa.  Since  people 
are  about  the  same  in  the  aggregate  the  Avorld  over, 
and  their  demands  average  about  the  same,  the  com- 
mon argument,  "But  my  business  is  different,"  is 
weak.  It  is  not  a  question  of  an  individual  business, 
but  of  Avhat  the  trade  needs.  The  advertisemont 
Avhich  is  rightly  framed  hits  that  bull's  eye  or  it  fails, 
I'OAvever  admirably  shaped  to  the  supposedly  unchang- 
ing requirements  of  a  particular  tOAvn  or  business. 
"Nothing  succeeds  like  difference."  And  our  main 
reason  for  urging  the  dealer  to  use  liberally  the  ad- 
vertising matter  furnished  him  by  the  manufacturer 
is  that  it  is  different— and  hence,  often,  more  interest- 
ing to  the  reader  th^n  the  conventional  repetition  of 
nhrases  so  common  in  many  advertising  columns,  i'l 
many  different  plaeos,  and  many  different  bu"inesRe,s. 

Window  Cards  More  than  Price  Cards 

Window-cards  should  have  character.  That  is,  tliev 
should  be  more  than  price  tags  plus  a  fcAV  Avords.  11- 
lustration  is  one  good  method.  Original  and  fre- 
(juently  changed  type  of  printing  is  another.  Each 
-^nrd  should  be  distinctive — for  the  reason  that  each 
line  designated  is  distinctive.  Hand-printed  card,« 
f  Co7itinued  on  page  jo ) 


26        •  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  March,  1919 


Merchandising  Suggestions  from  Our  Exchanges 

Methods  and  ideas  in  furniture  retailing  as  seen  by  other  journals 


DON'T  JUDGE  CUSTOMERS  TOO  SLIGHTLY 

DON'T  permit  yourself  to  think  that  this  person 
or  that  person  Avil]  always  buy  cheap  mer- 
chandise just  because  they  have  not  as  yet 
bought  any  other  kind.  There  comes  a  time  in  every 
bu,yer's  existence,  if  he  isn't  cut  down  before  his  time, 
when  he  changes.  Every  human  being  in  the  world, 
who  isn't  absolutel.y  degenerate,  secretly  or  openly 
wants  and  hopes  for  things  better  than  he  now 
possesses.  The  man  who  sits  in  the  balcony  will  one  of 
these  days  come  down  into  the  orchestra.  The  man 
who  lived  passobly  well  on  a  second-rate  street  sud- 
denly decides  to  endure  it  no  longer  and  straightwa.v 
leases  a  nifty  place  on  the  boulevard.  The  man  Avho 
looks  like  an  American  Quarter  prospect,  like  as  not  is 
aspiring  to  genuine  quartered  oak  de  luxe.  Beeaus.\ 
when  people  really  want  something  they  generally  get 
it.  whether  it  be  fine  feathers  or  fine  furniture. 

People  are  climbing  up  in  the  Avorld.  This  is  a 
principle  as  sure  as  sunrise,  and  the  Avise  salesman  is 
continually  reaching  out  to  help  folks  make  up  their 
minds  to  buy  better  things.  And  these  are  laudable 
ambitions  for  both  buyers  and  sellers. — "Table  Talks,'' 
published  by  Mersman  Bros.-Brandts  Company. 


A  CARD  INDEX  OF  NE'W  CUSTOMERS 

Keep  on  friendly  terms  with  your  possible  customers. 
The  merchant  in  the  small  town  can  easily  make  a  card 
index  of  the  trade  in  his  territory.  Send  them  a  letter 
or  a  circular  occasionallJ^  Mail  them  reprints  of  your 
advertisements.  If  you  are  making  any  S])eeial  ofifers 
to  your  trade  be  sure  these  are  included.  If  they  eoine 
to  you  for  some  article  your  competitor  has  run  short 
of.  do  everything  you  can  to  accommodate  them. 

You  will  soon  find  your  trade  is  increasing.  These 
customers  Avill  appreciate  your  attention,  and  Avill  re- 
])ay  you  Avith  their  trade.  The  card  index  is  the 
simplest  Avay  of  keeping  track  of  them;  of  the  different 
mail  matter  you  have  sent ;  if  they  have  made  any  pur- 
chases in  your  store,  and  Avhether  it  is  profitable  for 
you  to  use  inail  advertising. — ^Southern  Furniture 
Journal. 


GRAPHIC  CHARTS  AND  SALES  CAMPAIGNS 

A  i)i'ogressive  eastern  dealer  has  found  the  keeping 
f)f  gi-aphic  charts,  accurately  depicting  the  condition  of 
his  stock,  of  immen.se  practical  value  not  only  as  a 
fzauge  to  jiropei-  buyii'-g.  but  as  a  material  aid  in  the 


intelligent  direction  of  selling  effort.  These  charts  are 
of  convenient  size,  being  about  16  by  12.  In  the  left- 
hand  margin  are  listed  the  various  commodities  com- 
prising his  stock.  The  sheet  is  ruled  off  in  small 
squares,  each  stiuare  according  to  the  scale  establi.sbed, 
representing  two  units.  These  sijuares  are  separated 
by  means  of  heavy  verical  lines  into  groups  of  five,  each 
group  thus  representing  ten  articles.  At  the  top  of 
the  chart,  starting  at  the  left-hand  side,  are  placed, 
within  the  scope  of  the  heavy  vertical  line,  tlie  figures 
"10,"  "20,"  "30,"  "40"  and  so  on  across  the  width  of 
the  sheet.  From  each  item  listed  in  the  margin,  then, 
a  heavy  line  is  draAvn  across  the  squares  to  the  point 
Avhieh  represents  the  ([uantity  on  hand.  For  instance, 
in  shoAving  a  (luantity  of  20  bed  springs,  the  line  is 
draAvn  across  ten  (*f  the  small  squares  and  terminates 
exactly  on  the  second  heavy  vertical  line.  These  lines. 
shoAving  stock  ((uantities,  are  made  Avith  a  soft  lead 
pencil  so  that  they  can  be  easily  altered  as  articles  are 
disposed  of  or  ncAv  ones  added. 

This  chart  system  Avas  inaugurated  at  the  time  of  the 
dealer's  last  iuA^entory,  and  he  states  that  it  retpiires 
comparatively  little  effoit  to  keep  it  up  to  date.  The 
exact  condition  of  the  stock  is  in  this  Avay  graphically 
flioAvn — those  lines  Avhich  need  replenishing  as  Avell  as 
those  on  Avhieh  the  stock  is  abnormally  large. 

In  sales  promotion  Avork  this  dealer  is  guided  very 
largely  by  these  charts.  When,  for  instance,  the  lines 
on  certain  commodities  assume  abnormal  lengths,  h? 
immediately  concentrates  his  efforts  in  a  vigorous  cam- 
paign to  reduce  same. 

This  is  a  very  simple  plan,  and  one  AA'hich  certainly 
offers  advantages  Avorthy  of  consideration. — F.  L 
i^dman.  in  (i.  R.  Furniture  Record. 


THE  COMING  OF  NEW  CONDITIONS 

The  country  has  made  a  pretty  good  start  in  the  in- 
dustrial race,  but  noAv  the  Avar  has  ended  it  is  going 
to  require  some  unusual  effort  to  maintain  its  lead,  says 
the  "Furniture  Index."  It  is  quite  certain  that  goods 
for  export  Avill  not  sell  themselves  Avithout  the  strong 
individual  or  collective  effort  behind.  To  success- 
fully enter  and  gain  profitable  trade  in  foreign  markets 
means  it  Avill  require  the  ability  to  overcome  t1  e 
strictest  competition  the  Avorld  has  yet  seen.  A  very 
eager  and  persistent  force  of  European  producei-s  will 
stand  ready  to  force  the  most  grueling  competition. 
And  vet  the  American  exporter  Avill  have  some  signal 
advantages  in  the  better  C(|uipment  of  his  factory,  the 
skill  of  his  Avorkmen,  the  ships  to  carry  his  goods,  aiul 
in  many  forms  the  better  resources  for  obtaining  his  ne- 
eessHi y  raw  material.  While  the  necessity  of  suitably 
l)laced.  perfectly  packed',  skilfully  drummed  and 
backed  by  appropriate  credits  and  banking  is  apparent, 
there  must  be  something  beyond  in  acciuiring  a 
familiarity  Avith  international  political  conditions  and 
the  latent  influences  that  to  a  considerable  extent 
directs  trade.  Success  in  isolation  is  no  longer  pos- 
sible. America  must  give  and  take  in  the. international 
markets  as  the  sole  basis  of  its  future  prosperity. 


Business  is  a  jcaJous  servant;  it  is  sensitive;  it  de- 
mands undivided  attention;  if  neglected,  its  disfavor 
IS  shown  in  reduced  profits;  it  will  boss  the  inefficient 
man — play  with  him — tangle  him — finish  him.  For  the 
constant,  consistent,  efficient  man,  for  the  man  who 
knows  all  the  ills  to  which  business  is  subject,  who 
governs  the  big  things  from  knowledge  of  the  little 
things— for  that  kind  of  a  man  it  works  overtime. 
Stretching  the  earning  capacity  of  every  dollar,  it 
grows,  expands,  earns,  knowing  only  one  limitation — 
the  measure  of  its  Boss. — E.  St.  Elmo  Lewis. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


27 


JUSTIFYING  THE  PRICE  YOU  ASK  for  GOODS 

IIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIMIMMIMIMIMIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIinillllllllNIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIlllll^ 

Dealer  should  find  out  for  himself  why  his  goods  are  worth  the  price  asked  for  them,  and  see  that  it  is  explained 
to  customers — An  experience — Difference  in  goods — An  interesting  article  from  "The  Decorative  Furnisher" 


iMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiii:ii:iiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 


IMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIMMIIMMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIirilMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMn 


EVEN  before  the  conditions  of  the  war  caused 
furnishing  goods  to  mount  sky-high,  many  a 
merchant  was  worried  by  this  expression:  "My, 
how  expensive  you  are!"  Some  merchants  gloried 
in  the  fact  that  their  goods  were  expensive  even  though 
there  was  no  logical  reason  why  they  should  be  ex- 
pensive. Other  merchants  frankly  worried  when  their 
customers  told  them  they  were  expensive,  and  con- 
sumed much  time  in  looking  around  for  cheaper  goods. 

If,  however,  a  merchant  runs  his  business  in  a  sensible 
conservative,  practical  way,  with  a  comparatively  low 
overhead,  and  his  goods  are  still  high,  there  must  be 
some  good  reason  for  it. 

It  is  up  to  the  merchant  to  find  what  this  reason  is, 
and  rectify  it.  if  it  is  of  such  a  character  that  it  can  be 
rectified,  or  take  advantage  of  it  as  a  selling  argument, 
if  it  is  a  legitimate  reason. 

Experience  of  One  Dealer 

Here  is  an  experience  that  is  apropos : 

A  high-class  merchant  in  a  flourishing  town  was  fre- 
quently told  by  his  customers  that  his  goods  Avere  too 
high.  So  far  as  he  could  find  out,  he  was  only  making 
a  reasonable  profit  on  his  goods,  and  his  busine.s-;  was 
runas  economically  as  any  similar  business  could  be 
run.     This  last  fact  he  was  quite  sure  of. 

But  the  statement,  coming  from  a  large  percentage 
of  his  customers,  worried  him.  He  knew  that  they  were 
not  all  wrong,  so  he  was  determined  to  find  out  what 
the  matter  was.  One  day  he  took  a  trip  to  a  nearby 
town  and  made  an  inspection  of  the  goods  of  other 
merchants  in  his  own  line.  In  about  an  hour — or 
even  less — he  easily  found  out  Avhy  his  prices  were 
high — and  he  was  glad  they  were  high.  When  he  re- 
turned to  his  own  store  he  called  his  selling  forr-e 
together  and  spoke  to  them  in  this  manner: 

"For  years  our  customers  have  all  told  us  that  our 
goods  ai'e  too  expensive.     The  statement  has  worried 


me.  I  do  not  think  our  goods  are  too  expensive  in 
comparison  with  their  value. 

"The  statement  worried  me  so  much  that  to-day  I 
was  determined  to  find  out  the  reason  for  it.  I  made 
a  trip  to  and  inspected  three  stores  which  sell  ap- 
proximately the  same  kind  of  goods  that  we  sell. 

"Before  the  first  inspection  was  complete,  I  under- 
stood why  we  have  been  called  expensive — and  I  am 
also  inclined  to  think  we  will  be  even  more  ex^Densive  in 
the  future. 

"We  are  called  expensive  because  we  actually  give 
more  value  in  our  goods  than  any  other  merchant  in 
our  town,  gives  in  the  very  same  kind  of  goods — and 
we  do  this  consistently. 

Difference  in  Goods 

"Superficially,  for  example,  every  chair  has  four 
legs,  a  seat,  and  a  back.  It  would  be  very  difficult  for 
a  designer  to  make  an  average  chair  without  these  six 
indispensable  items.  But  just  because  one  chair  has 
four  legs  and  a  seat  and  a  back  that  is  no  reason  why 
it  should  cost  the  same  as  some  other  chair  having  the 
exact  same  features. 

"But  the  average  customer  when  she  looks  at  a  chair 
looks  at  it  (juite  superficially.  She  sees  a  chair  in  our 
store  marked  $20.00  and  she  compares  it  Avith  an  ap- 
parently similar  chair  in  some  other  shop  that  is 
marked  only  $12.00. 

"What  is  the  difference?  Examine  our  chair.  It 
is  made  of  good  straight,  well  seasoned  wood.  The 
finish  is  perfect.  The  carving  is  sincere  and  Avell  done. 
It  is  finished  on  the  back  and  underneatli  just  as  care- 
fully as  it  is  finished  on  the  front.  The  design  is  Avell- 
balanced  and  artistic. 

"How  about  the  cheaper  chair?  The  Avood  is  not  as 
well  seasoned  nor  is  it  as  well  selected.  The  finish  ap- 
pears as  good  but  that  is  because  both  finishes  are  neAv. 

The  time  to  make  comparison  betAveen  finishes  is  after 


IIIIIIIIMIIIIillllllllllllMllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIII 


('llL•^st('r^ield  and  rocker  from  suite  No.  G02,  made  by  Morlock  Bros.,  Ltd.,   Hanover,  Onl. 


JIMIIIII  IMMIIinillllllllllllMMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIlnilMIIMIJIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIMIMinillllilllllllMlllllllllllilMIMIII 


1 


28  CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WOl 

they  liave  been  worn  for  a  few  months.  The  poor 
finish  will  then  show  decided  signs  of  wear.  The  good 
finish  will  actually  increase  in  merit.  Look  under 
neath  the  cheap  chair.  It  is  poorly  finished,  and  there 
are  many  rough  edges. 

"In  short,  the  real  difference  between  the  two  chairs 
— between  our  chair  and  the  cheaper  chair  with  which 
the  customer  mentally  compares  ours — is  a  difference 
of  ideals.  Our  ideals  are  higher  than  our  competi- 
tors. Our  ideals  are  so  high  that  nothing  short  of  a 
perfectly  finished  chair  pleases  us.  Our  competitor's 
ideals  are  perfectly  pleased  so  long  as  the  chair  has  four 
legs,  a  seat,  and  a  back. 

"If  you  will  examine  our  case  goods,  you  will  find 
the  backs  just  as  sightly  as  the  fronts.  Our  cabinets 
and  chests  have  dust-proof  partitions.  Our  mirror 
frames  are  backed  carefully  to  present  a  satisfying 
appearance — there  is  nothing  slip-shod  about  them  in 
any  way. 

"Remember  ideals  have  a  price  on  them. 
"High  ideals  come  high. 
"Low  ideals  come  low. 

"If  a  merchant  is  expensive,  don't  figure  that  he  is 
making  an  unjust  profit — or  charging  too  much  for  his 
wares.     Perhaps  his  ideals — like  our  ideals — are  high. 

"  Cheap  work  is  always  cheap  work,  no  matter  Avho 
sells  it  or  where  it  is  sold. 

"Honest  workmanship  can  never  be  bought  cheaply 
— although  it  is  the  most  inexpensive  in  the  end. 

"Tell  the  customers  who  come  to  our  shop  that  they 
can  depend  on  the  goods  we  sell.  We  are  not  ashamed 
of  them.  They  are  right  when  they  come  to  us,  and 
they  are  right  when  they  leave  us.  Point  out  the  hid- 
den virtues  of  our  merchandise.  .Explain  them  care- 
fully. Then  ask  the  customer  to  compare  our  goods 
with  goods  similar  in  all  respects  before  deciding 
whether  our  prices  are  unreasonably  high  or  not. 

"Here  is  another  point  worth  considering:  Good 
woods  do  not  necessarily  make  good  furniture.  A 
man  may  be  wearing  the  best  clothes  ever  worn  or 
tailored  and  still  not  look  stylish.  There  is  a  certain 
distinction  in  dress  which  we  call  taste.  And  there  is 
a  certain  way  of  building  furniture  Avhich  we  call  style. 
Our  furniture  is  built  to  be  artistic.  Perhaps  the 
mahogany  of  which  it  is  made  is  no  better  than  the 
mahogany  used  in  .cheaper  furniture.  Perhaps  the 
hardware  is  of  exactly  the  same  material  as  cheaper 
hardware.  But  the  fact  remains  that  the  complete 
price  is  as  harmonious  and  as  satisfying  as  it  can  be 
made.  It  possesses  style.  And  remember  that  style 
is  not  a  matter  of  chance.  It  is  something  studied  by 
the  designer.  To  get  a  design  that  is  artistic  and 
meritorious  costs  money.  All  this  adds  to  the  price 
of  good  merchandise." 

The  words  of  this  merchant  can  be  read  and  studied 
to  advantage  by  other  merchants  who  have  themselves 
been  called  expensive. 

It  should  also  be  remembered  that  price  is  not  the  big 
mainstay  of  modern  business. 

The  truism  is  always  before  us  that  we  never  get 
more  than  we  pay  for. 

Explain  all  this  to  your  clerks,  so  that  thej'  may  un- 
derstand why  you  are  expensive — and  why  you  glory 
in  the  fact. 


Brown.  Son  &  McPhee,  have  bought  out  W.  W. 
Tait's  furniture  business  at  Parkhill,  Ont.  They  will 
conduct  the  two  stores  as  usual  for  a  time  at  least,  and 
intend  toopen  an  up-to-date  funeral  chapel  in  the  near 
future. 


AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  March,  1919 


^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiih"iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii:ii'.i  I  iiiniii  iii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiMiii:'iiiiiiir:'iiifiiii 


KNOBS  of  NEWS 


J.  B.  Paquin,  furniture  dealer,  of  Montreal,  has 
registered  recently. 

The  Yale  Bedding  Company,  of  Montreal,  suffered 
fire  loss  in  February. 

A  demand  is  said  to  exist  in  the  Old  Country  for 
folding  chairs  and  tables. 

J.  E.  Wilder,  354  Bleury  St.,  Montreal,  is  erecting  a 
$125,000  furniture  building. 

Vaillaneourt  &  Lalonde,  furniture  dealers,  of  Mon- 
treal, have  recently  registered. 

Wm.  M.  Langton,  furniture  dealer,  Xanaimo,  B.C.. 
is  succeeded  by  W.  B.  Walker. 

The  Ontario  Furniture  Co..  230  Dimdas  St.  London, 
are  planning  to  remodel  building. 

The  Thrift  Broom  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto,  has  obtained  an 
Ontario  charter  with  a  capital  of  $40,000. 

J.  Lacroix  &  Son,  manufacturers  of  fui'niture. 
Ottawa,  Ont.,  sustained  fire  loss  recently. 

The  Robert  Simpson  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto,  announce  a 
scheme  of  profit-sharing  with  their  employees. 

The  Fireless  Cooker  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd..  Hull,  Que., 
has  been  incorporated  with  a  capital  of  $100,000. 

The  Montreal  Bed  Spring  Co.,  Montreal,  has  dissolved 
and  a  new  firm  has  been  formed  under  same  style. 

Adelard  Pare  has  been  registered  as  a  furniture 
dealer  at  Montreal,  as  also  have  Vaillaneourt  &  Lalonde. 

J.  H.  Curie,  secretary  of  the  Manitoba  R.  M.  A.,  was 
the  guest  of  the  Ft.  William  R.  M.  A.  at  a  banquet 
recently. 

J.  Lacroix  &  Son,  furniture  makers,  Ottawa,  Ont., 
sustained  a  fire  loss  recently.  Their  place  was  in- 
sured. 

F.  W.  Cottrell  has  been  appointed  representative  of 
the  White  Sewing  Machine  Co.  in  Manitoba  and  Sas- 
katchewan. 

The  Kiwanis  Club  of  Winnipeg  recently  conducted  a 
window  dressing  competition  open  to  all  merchants. 
Tlie  prizes  were  three,  two  and  one  Baby  bonds. 

Hogan  &  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Cornwall,  Ont.,  have  been  in- 
corporated with  a  capital  stock  of  $30,000  to  carry  on 
the  business  of  furniture  dealers  and  undertakers. 

Travellers  into  Stratford  will  be  more  numerous 
from  now  on,  that  city  having  lifted  the  ban  on  danc- 
ing imposed  at  the  height  of  the  "flu"  epidemic. 

The  Mitchell  Vacuum  Cleaner  Co.  Ltd..  Montreal, 
has  been  incorporated  with  a  capital  of  $50,000  to  make 
and  sell  vacuum  cleaners,  washing  machines,  sewing 
machines,  floor  scrubbers,  etc. 

Canadians  visiting  Grand  Rapids,  Mich.,  to  look  over 
aiiy  of  the  furniture  exhibitions  will  be  interested  to 
know  that  Canadian  Furniture  World  is  filed  in  the 
newspaper  room  of  the  Ryerson  Public  Library. 

L.  B.  Beale,  British  Columbia's  Lumber  Commis- 
sioner at  London.  Eng.,  has  been  appointed  British 
Trade  Commissioner  for  Western  Canada,  his  territory 
reaching  from  Winnipeg  to  the  Coast,  with  headquart- 
ers at  Winnipeg. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


29 


CASHING  IN  ON  YOUR  PERSONALITY 


niiiiiiiii  II  iiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiii  II  I  iiii:i  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiuiii:'ililll  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiilllllliiiiilliiil  II  nil  iiiliiiiilllllii  iiiiiiiliiil  iiiiiiiililliilllliiiillliiiiillliiiiiiilliiiillliiiiiiiiii  illliiilliillilllllllillllllllllllillllillliiiilliilliiililiiliiiliiiii  liiliiiii 


By  GORDON  C.  KEITH 


PERSONALITY  is  a  mighty  important  factor  in  the 
building  up  of  a  business.  Of  course,  a  busi- 
ness may  be  built  up  without  the  injection  of 
very  much  personality  into  it  upon  the  part  of  the 
proprietor,  as  the  substantial  establishments  of  many 
unfriendly,  crabby,  speak-to-me-at-danger-of-your-life 
dealers  go  to  prove.  But  there  is  no  doubt  that  a 
business  may  be  more  easily  developed  by  the  employ- 
ment of  that  something  called  personality — that  at- 
mosphere which  the  individual  creates  within  and 
around  himself. 

Personal  Touch  is  Powerful  Factor 

It  is  this  very  weapon  that  so  many  small  dealers  are 
finding  of  such  great  value  in  combating  such  ad- 
vantages as  the  big  stores  may  possess.  There  is  no 
doubt  that  the  personal  touch  is  a  powerful  factor  in 
attracting  trade  to  the  small  store.  The  public  like  to 
know  the  man  they  are  dealing  with  and  when  he  takes 
a  kindly  interest  in  them  the  bond  that  ties  them  to 
the  store  is  materially  increased. 

Has  Made  Good  Progress 

To  prove  my  point  I  will  refer  to  one  particular 
dealer  of  my  acquaintance  who  is  employing  this  trade- 
attracting  factor  called  personality  in  a  very  effective 
way  in  the  increasing  of  sales  and  building  up  of  trade. 
That  it  is  proving  of  value  is  demonstrated  by  the  pro- 
gress of  this  particular  dealer.  Coming  from  a 
country  town  (where  friendship  and  personality  as  a 
characteristic  of  business  men  seems  most  pronounced) 
this  dealer  started  in  business  just  about  a  year  ago  in 
quite  a  small  way.  Since  then  his  stock  and  business 
have  both  expanded  in  a  remarkable  manner,  and  he 
has  moved  into  larger  and  better  quarters. 

And  in  my  opinion,  personality  is  responsible  in  no 
small  degree  for  his  progress.  He  is  a  good  friend  to 
all — courteous  and  friendly  to  everyone  who  visits  his 
store — on  quite  an  intimate  basis  with  those  he  sees 
anyways  frequently — always  solicitous  as  to  their  wel- 
fare and  appreciative  of  their  personal  interests.  It 
comes  naturally  to  him  to  be  so,  but  he  appreciates  the 
fact  that  it  has  a  considerable  business  value.  In 
fact,  he  has  admitted  to  the  writer  that  his  ability  to 
make  friends  of  customers  is  worth  more  to  him  as  a 
trade  attractor  than  any  amount  of  advertising  he 
could  do. 

A  young  fellow  entered  the  store  and  was  at  once 
greeted  with,  "Say,  I've  the  dandiest  box  of  chocolates 
for  that  girl  of  yours."  He  employs  this  "free  and 
easy,  bright  and  breezy"  attitude  to  all  those  whom  he 
feels  can  be  approached  in  this  manner,  and  finds  that 
it  means  mueh  business  for  him. 

Some  dealers  may  object  that  it  savors  too  much  of 
"jollying,"  hut  this  dealei-  feels  that  it  is  better  to  be 
somewhat  inclined  in  that  direction  and  make  the  cus- 
tomer feel  at  home,  than  to  be  overly  precise  and  formal 
and  make  customers  feel  chilly  even  though  it  may  be 
(luite  a  warm  day  outside.  Anyway,  he  finds  that  a 
free  and  easy  manner  of  conversation  both  in  the  store 
and  over  the  'phone  coaxes  trade  out  of  customers  in 
a  most  wonderful  way. 


Attitude  Towards  Serious-Minded 


Of  course,  he  appreciates  the  fact  that  there  are 
some  more  serious-minded  people  who  cannot  be 
handled  in  this  open-handed  Avay,  but  he  finds  it  an 
easy  matter  to  recognize  such  customers  on  sight,  and 
make  it  a  point  to  serve  them  in  a  manner  in  keeping 
with  their  own  attitude,  not  neglecting,  however,  any 
opportunity  to  "break  the  ice,"  and  get  on  a  more 
friendly  and  less  formal  footing  with  them. 

He  also  demonstrates  his  personal  interest  in  cus- 
tomers not  only  by  remembering  some  of  their  own  in- 
terests mentioned  to  him  and  making  enquiries  regard- 
ing them,  but  also  by  making  every  endeavor  to  serve 
them  in  a  satisfactory  manner. 

For  instance,  he  will  get  goods  which  he  may  not 
have  in  stock,  for  customers,  thus  saving  them  the 
bother  of  going  or  sending  elsewhere. 

This,  naturally,  is  appreciated.  Of  course,  he  has 
another  purpose  besides  pleasing  the  customer  in  doing 
this.  It  keeps  the  customer  from  going  elsewhere  for 
goods,  which  might  be  the  opening  wedge  for  another 
dealer  to  get  in  on  their  trade. 

Yes,  personal  service  and  personality  have  proved, 
and  are  proving,  of  immense  value  to  the  dealer,  both 
directly  and  indirectly.  But  personality  is  something 
on  which  he  has  no  monopoly.  Every  dealer  has  the 
opportunity  of  using  it  to  advantage  in  his  business. 
He  will  find  it  of  great  value,  especially  in  combatting 
the  big  stores  and  mail  order  houses,  where  lack  of 
personality  in  dealings  is  a  big  handicap. 


The  Empire  Phonograph  Co.  has  been  I'egistered  at 
Toronto. 

The  Okeh  Phonograph  Co.  has  been  registered  at 
Montreal. 


No.  i).5tu,  Louis  XVI  bull'ot  in  walnut,  from  line  made  by  Canada 
Furniture  Manufacturers,  Ltd. 


30 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKES 


March,  19VJ 


News  of  and  for 
Canadian  Furniture  Dealers 


BELIEVE  IN  ADVERTISING  AND  EARLY  CLOSING 

The  "Home's  Store  Ne^ys'■  bulletin  which  for  the 
past  six  years  has  been  issued  monthly  by  the  Home 
Furniture  Carpet  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto,  will  for  the  future 
be  issued  semi-monthlJ^  In  the  company's  announce- 
ment re  this  the  following  is  published : 

"For  the  past  six  years  we  have  been  circulating  a 
monthly  bulletin  (as  an  advertising  medium)  to  ac- 
quaint the  citizens  of  Toronto  with  the  many  money- 
saving  opportunities  tolae  had  at  this  store.  We  have 
done  this  simply  because  we  believe  in  the  power  of 
advertising — advertising  has  dethroned  kings  and  has 
raised  millions  of  men  to  form  an  army  to  defend  the 
cause  of  right — and  we  firmly  believe  our  circular  ad- 
vertising in  the  past  has  been  appreciated  by  thousands 
of  Toronto's  east-end  citizens.  We  are  proud  of  the 
results  attained  and  in  order  to  improve  our  system  and 
give  additional  service  to  the  public,  we  have  decided 
to  enlarge  upon  the  past  and  instead  of  making  one 
issue  monthly,  Ave  will  issue  two  bulletins  each  month. 
The  results  of  the  past  fully  justify  our  new  el¥orts  and 
we  trust  will  be  beneficial  to  our  many  customers  and 
friends." 

The  Home  Company  have  also  adopted  a  commend- 
able custom  in  closing  their  store  at  noon  on  Wednes- 
days throughout  the  year,  to  allow  their  employees 
having  a  little  more  leisure  time.  The  store  hours  at 
present  are  from  8.30  to  9  week  days  and  to  10  on 
Saturdays. 


AGAIN  ENTERS  BUSINESS  FIELD 

J.  A.  Wright  has  returned  to  Regina,  Sask.,  after  aii 
absence  of  one  year  in  the  east,  and  it  is  his  intention 
to  start  up  in  business  again  on  his  own  account.  His 
plans  have  not  sufficiently  matured  to  enable  him  to 
make  a  public  announcement ;  but  he  intends  to  remain 
in  Regina.  and  Mrs.  Wright  is  returning  from  the 
east  to  .join  her  husband  there  next  week. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wright  are  both  well  known  in  Regina, 
having  been  residents  of  that  city  since-  early  days. 
For  many  years  Mr.  Wright  with  his  brother,  Bx-Ald. 
A.  D.  Wright,  conducted  a  large  furniture  store  and 
undertaking  parlors  on  South  Railway  St..  and  Avhen  he 
closed  out  this  business  became  manager  of  the  Regina 
Cold  Storage  Company. 


A  MERCHANDISING  COURSE 

The  University  of  Manitoba  during  the  latter  part  of 
February  conducted  its  second  business  congress,  at 
which  it  gave  a  short  course  in  merchandising.  The 
speakers  and  teachers  were:  James  W.  Pisk,  lecturer 
and  writer  on  merchandising  topics;  author  of  "Re- 
tail Selling,"  Harper  &  Brothers,  New  York;  director 
of  the  selling  service  of  a  niunber  of  the  leading  retail 
stores  of  the  United  States;  a  practical  business  ex- 
pert. Andrew  H.  Melville,  Ph.B.,  State  Federal  Food 
Administrator  of  Wisconsin,  a  retail  merchant,  a 
banker,  an  organizer,  associate  professor  of  business  ad- 
ministration and  district  superintendent  of  the  exten- 
sion division  of  the  University  of  Wisconsin. 

Other  speakers  were :  W.  B,  Moore,  managing  secre- 


tary of  the  Winnipeg  Board  of  Trade ;  James  A.  Mac- 
lean, LL.D.,  President  of  the  University  of  Manitoba  ; 
F.  Pratt  Kuhn,  manager  of  the  Winnipeg  branch,  A. 
McKim  Ltd. ;  Miss  M.  H.  Haliday,  supervisor  of  House- 
hold Arts,  Winnipeg  School  Board;  C.  H.  Prest,  mer- 
chant andauditor.  now  with  Copeland-Chatterson 
Ijimited;  Geo.  N.  Jackson,  Chairman  Advisory  Commit- 
tee on  Commercial  Education;  Edwin  Loftus.  K.C.. 
lecturer  on  commercial  law  in  evening  business  course; 
F.  C.  Middleton,  community  secretary  of  the  Social 
Service  Council  of  Manitoba. 


GALT  FURNITURE  FIRM'S  PURCHASE 

Allen  &  Ray,  the  North  Water  St.  furniture  dealers 
at  Calt,  Ont.,  have  purchased  the  building  they  now 
occupy  from  Capt.  Thomas  R.  Jarvis.  of  Toronto. 
This  valuable  piece  of  property  has  a  frontage  of  40 
feet  and  a  depth  of  112  feet.  Tt  sold  in  the  neighbor- 
hood of  $20,000,  which  is  at  the  rate  approximately  of 
$500  a  foot.  The  present  block  does  not  go  the  full 
depth  of  the  property  and  there  is  plenty  of  room  for 
extensions,  but  Mr.  Allen  stated  that  the  firm  did  not 
contemplate  making  any  other  changes  at  present. 


PRIZES  FOR  SUGGESTIONS 

The  National  Cash  Registei-  Co.  during  the  last  six 
months  of  1918  held  a  ''Suggestion  Contest"  for  their 
employees  whereby  the  employees  sent  in  hints 
through  which  the  company  might  save  time  or  money 
in  the  making  of  their  machines  or  facilitate  the -out- 
put. At  the  meeting  of  the  award  committee  last 
month  it  Avas  found  that  there  Avere  496  Avinners.  the 
prizes  running  from  one  to  $100  cash.  Here  is  a  sug- 
gestion that  furniture  dealers  might  adojit.  Is  there 
not  some  little  leaks  that  might  be  stooped  or  some 
methods  that  might  be  adopted  to  facilitate  business 
about  the  store?     Ask  the  employees. 


NAVY  LEAGUE  OF  CANADA 

The  NaA'y  League  of  Canada  is  sending  out  a  series  of 
leaflets  on  the  Avork  of  the  League.  The  first  of  the 
series  is  on  the  "Policy  of  the  League."  by  Aemilius 
Jarvis,  president  of  the  Ontario  division.  The  others 
are  "What  Canada  Oavcs  to  the  British  Navy."  by  Sir 
Chas.  Hibbert  Tupper;  "Heroic  War  Wo)-k  of  ]\Ier- 
chant  Marine.''  by  Sir  Robt.  A.  Falconer;  "British 
Navy  and  World  Freedom,"  by  Hon.  Benj.  Russell: 
"British  Navy  in  History."  by  J.  Castell  Hopkins. 


' '  ONE  DOLLAR  DOWN ' ' 

Visitor— "What  lovely  furniture!" 

eTohnuy — "Yes,  I  think  the  man  Ave  bought  it  from  is 
sorry  noAV  he  sold  it:  anyAvay,  he's  ahvays  calling." — 
Tit-Bits. 

DEFINITE  IDEAS  ON  DISPLAY 

f  Continued  from  page  2^  ) 

still  are  preferred  in  many  Avindows.  But  the  Avide 
variety  of  type  possibilities  is  proA'ing  more  and  more 
popular.  The  card  is  an  adA'ertisement  in  miniature. 
The  best  cards  ever  designed  Avere  themselves  adver- 
tisements for  the  line.  Not  many  Avords,  biit  an 
IDEA.  WindoA'^'  cards  are  to  advertisements  as  ear- 
toons  are  to  painting :  much  in  little.  There  is  no 
more  real  and  fertile  field  for  originality  in  modern 
advertising. 


Canadian  Furniture  World 

TORONTO  MARCH  1919  CANADA 


A  THRIFT  REQUEST 

To  Ovir  Subscribers: 

About  your  subscription  receipt: — Instead  of  send- 
ing you  a  receipt  for  your  renewal  subscription,  we 
ask  you  to  watch  the  expiry  date  on  your  next  copy. 
By  it  you  will  see  your  remittance  has  been  received — 
it  will  be  advanced  accordingly. 

Thanking  you,  we  are 

Gratefully  yours, 
THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED, 

32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 


Check  Freight  It  is  a  good  business  practice  to 

Bills  Promptly         see  that  you  are  not  over-charged. 

One  place  in  which  the  retailer 
should  make  sure  of  this  is  in  connection  with  freight 
bills.  Not  a  few  merchants  save  a  good  deal  by  the 
habit  of  checking  all  freight  bills  to  see  that  weights, 
rates  and  extensions  are  correct. 

It  is  a  good  policy  to  check  freight  bills  promptly  so 
that  if  there  are  any  mistakes  that  a  claim  may  be 
entered  while  the  matter  is  fresh.  It  is  an  easy  matter 
to  check  extensions  and  the  matter  of  weights  and  rates 
.should  also  be  gone  into.  The  matter  of  weights  can 
be  checked  by  comparison  with  bill  of  lading  while  it 
is  well  to  occasionally  run  shipments  over  the  scales  to 
verify  weights.  The  dealer  should  also  be  acquainted 
with  the  class  to  which  the  principal  lines  of  goods  he 
receives  belongs  to  and  the  known  freight  rates  on 
such  goods  from  the  point  he  generally  receives  such 
goods  from.  The  mis-cla.ssing  of  goods  is  frequently 
responsible  for  overcharges  and  any  leaks  through  this 
avenue  should  be  carefully  guarded  against. 

*  #  * 

Figure  Your  Because  some  furniture  dealer  in 

Own  Costs  your  community  says  that  his  cost 

of  doing  business  is  a  certain  per- 
centage is  no  reason  why  you  .should  take  that  figure 
as  the  basis  on  which  you  work.  The  cost  of  doing 
business  varies  to  a  considerable  extent  even  in  the 
same  community  and  you  should  figure  out  your  own 
expenses. 

*  *  * 

The  Pleasure  "T  don't  want  anyone  around  the 

of  Your  Work  place  who  does  not  take  ple  isure 

in  his  work,"  was  the  statement 
made  to  the  Avriter  recently  by  the  manager  of  a  lai'ge 
business  establishment.  "The  man  who  does  not  en- 
joy his  work  does  not  put  his  whole  heart  into  it  in 
the  manner  that  he  should  and  if  he  does  not  put  his 
heart  into  his  work  he  does  not  attain  the  best  results 
either  for  himself  or  us." 

All  of  which  is  immensely  true.     The  man  who  aj)- 


proaehes  his  work  as  something  disagreeable  to  be  done 
in  order  that  he  may  exist  is  not  likely  to  advance  very 
far  in  it.  It  will  be  better  if  he  would  give  it  up  and 
take  up  some  line  of  endeavor  in  Avhich  he  will  really 
take  an  interest. 

I  remember  a  conversation  which  I  had  some  time 
ago  with  a  man  who  takes  real  pleasure  in  his  Avork. 
He  said:  "There  mustn't  be  much  joy  in  life  for  the 
man  who  doesn't  enjoy  his  work — who  doesn't  get 
real  pleasure  out  of  the  accomplishment  of  things  con- 
nected with  it — who  doesn't  love  to  plan  for  its  ex- 
pansion and  get  real  satisfaction  out  of  seeing  it  grow 
and  prosper." 

The  same  thing  holds  true  of  both  proprietor  and 
employee.  Both  must  take  pleasure  in  their  work  in 
order  to  attain  real  success  in  it. 

*    *  « 

Get  the  Profit  It  is  safe  to  say  that  there  are 

Problem  Right  scores  of  retailers  who  are  certain 
in  their  own  minds  that  they  are 
figuring  their  profits  correctly — are  so  sure  of  the  fact 
that  no  amount  of  advice  or  argument  would  induce 
them  to  sit  down  with  ano-ther  person  and  figure  out 
whether  their  method  is  really  correct  or  not — and  yet 
they  are  wrong  and  losing  monev  everA-  day  as  a  re- 
sult. 

A  man  Avho  Avas  formerly  in  the  retail  business  and 
Avho  got  out  of  it  because  he  eouldn 't  make  any  money 
in  it,  admitted  recently  that  he  AA'as  one  of  such  men. 
He  isn't  a  brainless  person  by  any  means  as  he  is  mak- 
ing a  success  of  his  present  endeavor,  but  he  Avas  just 
so  sure  that  he  Avas  correct  that  he  never  even  thought 
of  sitting  down  to  reason  the  matter  out.  He  was 
Avrong,  however,  and  he  paid  the  penalty. 

T  Avill  explain  the  point  upon  Avhieh  this  dealer  went 
Avrong.  Briefly,  he  AA^as  figuring  his  profits  on  cost 
price  and  his  expenses  on  selling  price,  Avhich  is  some- 
AA^hat  akin  to  trying  to  figure  out  the  cost  of  a  shipment 
of  potatoes  AA'hen  you  only  know  the  price  of  beans. 

To  be  more  explicit,  this  dealer  figured  his  cost  of 
doing  business  at  19  per  cent.  He  Avanted  to  mako  4 
per  cent,  gross  profit  and  he  thought  he  would  get  it 
by  adding  23  per  cent,  to  the  cost  price.  Let  us  see 
just  hoAV  this  Avould  Avork  out.  Suppose  that  the  cost 
price  of  goods  sold  during  the  year  amounted  to 
.$20,000.  If  he  figured  his  profits  on  cost  price,  23  per 
cent,  added  Avould  give  him  a  profit  of  $4,600,  and  a 
selling  price  of  $24,600.  His  expenses  amounted  to 
19  per  cent,  but  remember,  19  per  cent,  of  sales,  upon 
which  cost  of  doing  business  is  invariably  figured. 
Mow.  19  per  cent,  of  the  selling  price  of  $24,600  would 
be  $4,674,  Avhile  his  gross  profit  would  only  be  $4,600, 
giving  him  a  net  loss  of  $74  for  the  year. 

Yet,  this  dealer  believed  he  Avas  figuring  his  profits 
correctly.  It  Avill  pay  every  merchant  to  sit  down  and 
make  a  little  study  of  his  method  of  figuring  profits. 


32 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


Marcli.  1919 


Some  Principles  of  Salesmanship 

jz::;^r:r=:;z^=:^^=  By  A.  L.  Habekotte  z^^^^=^^^^^^=- 

In  these  modern  days,  salesmanship  has  justly  been 
classed  as  a  profession,  and  has  been  developed  along 
scientific  lines,  until  it  ranks  equally  as  high  as  law, 
medicine  and  kindred  sciences,  and  requires  equally  as 
much  study,  thought  and  training  as  is  required  in  ob- 
taining success  in  any  of  the  above. 

In  later  years  there  have  been  developed  scientific 
sales  schools  and  clubs.  To-day  most  of  the  larger 
manufacturing  and  commercial  concerns  throughout 
the  country  have  their  own  sales  schools  to  increase 
the  efficieney  of  their  sales  force.  Some  of  the  big 
railroad  companies  are  now  educating  their  employees 
from  the  ground  up — fitting  them  for  positions  of 
responsibility  and  larger  remuneration. 

Selling  goods  is  essentially  a  process  of  the  mind  be- 
tween buj^er  and  seller.  Psychology,  as  one  writer 
puts  it,  is  "The  Science  of  the  Mind."  Every  sale 
combines  the  elements  of  mind  over  mind  and  unless 
there  is  a  willingness  of  the  buyer  to  purchase  and  the 
ivillingness  of  the  seller  to  sell  there  can  be  no  sale. 

Let  us  consider  first  some  of  the  qualifications  neces- 
sary for  the  successful  salesman  to  possess  and,  second, 
some  of  the  various  characteristics  of  the  purchaser. 

No  salesman  can  ever  expect  consideration  at  the 
hands  of  his  customer  and  command  his  respect  unless 
he  possesses  self-respect. 

Every  self-respecting  man  has  a  certain  amount  of 
dignity.  This  does  not  mean  he  should  be  independent 
or  egotistical.  A  self-respecting  salesman  has  the 
courage  and  determination  and  faith  in  himself  so  that 
he  can  look  every  man  in  the  face,  and  be  a  true  man 
in  every  sense  of  the  word.  The  salesman  should 
always  bear  in  mind  that  he  is  not  asking  any  special 
favors  from  his  customers  when  he  tries  to  sell  him  his 
goods  but,  on  the  other  hand,  should  try  to  convince 
his  prospect  that  he  is  there  to  render  him  service  by 
selling  him  the  product  that  in  turn  will  prove  profit- 
able to  all  concerned. 

Banish  every  sense  of  Fear,  for  the  salesman  that  is 
conscious  of  any  thought  of  littleness  will  never  suc- 
ceed. If  your  goods  are  right  no  apology  is  necessary 
when  you  trj''  to  sell  them. 

Cheerfulness,  Politeness  and  Enthusiasm  go  hand  in 
hand.  "As  a  man  thinketh,  so  is  he."  This  is  as 
true  from  a  salesmanship  standpoint  as  it  is  from  a 
moral  or  spiritual  standpoint.  The  man  who  can 
smile  and  does  smile,  the  man  who  is  cheerful  even  in 
the  face  of  disappointment,  is  always  in  greater  de- 
mand than  the  grouch  or  pessimist  who  is  always  look- 
ing on  the  dark  side  of  things.  Kickers  and  knockers 
have  no  place  in  the  business  world.  Many  a  sale 
would  otherwise  be  lost  if  it  were  not  for  the  fact  that 
the  buyer  was  impressed  by  the  pleasant,  good-natured 
attitude  of  the  salesman.  Some  authorities  claim 
that  these  qualities  are  of  as  much  importance  as  a 
knowledge  of  the  goods.  Showing  the  interest  in  the 
welfare  of  your  prospect,  and  working  into  his  con- 
fidence and  good-will,  will  always  bring  its  reward. 

If  your  prospect  is  inclined  to  argue  and  show  his 
resentment,  agree  with  him  for  the  time  being,  and  if 
you  are  tactful  enough,  you  will  soon  have  him  agree- 
ing with  you.  A  little  study  of  human  nature  will 
convince  you  of  this  fact.     A  man's  character  is  often 


expressed  by  the  clothes  he  wears,  the  manner  of  his 
walk,  the  expression  in  his  eyes.  A  judge  of  human 
nature  will  read  a  man's  character  in  his  face. 

It  is  essential  that  the  salesman  be  neat  in  his  dress. 
This  does  not  mean  to  be  a  fashion  plate  or  to  wear 
gaudy  clothes,  which  detracts  attention  from  the  real 
man. 

It  is  said  of  the  president  and  salesmanger  of  one  of 
the  greatest  concerns  on  the  continent,  that  in  a  meet- 
ing of  his  sales  force,  numbering  into  the  hundreds,  he 
addressed  a  dozen  or  more  of  his  men,  and  warned  them 
that  unless  they  had  their  clothes  pressed  and  wore  a 
subdued  color  of  a  necktie,  that  their  resignations 
would  be  accepted. 

Soap  and  water  are  cheap,  and  there  is  no  excuse  for 
a  salesman  to  neglect  their  use.  Keep  your  collar  and 
shirt  clean.  Keep  the  body  well  bathed ;  a  clean  shave 
each  day ;  hair  brushed  neatly  and  trimmed ;  teeth  and 
nails  should  always  be  kept  clean.  Pay  strict  atten- 
tion to  your  health.  The  salesman  who  is  careless  in 
all  these  matters  will  be  careless  of  his  business. 

The  use  of  cigarettes  and  liquor  should  be  shunned. 
The  smell  of  tobacco  or  liquor  on  the  breath  has  lost 
many  an  order  from  a  good  customer  and  in  some  cases 
the  buyer  has  quit  dealing  with  the  house  altogether. 

Experience  has  proven  that  it  is  not  necessary  to  in- 
dulge in  these  habits  or  to  entertain  your  customer  in 
this  manner  in  order  to  get  his  business. 

Hope,  Determination,  Stick-to-it-iveness  are  just  as 
important  for  the  salesman  to  cultivate  as  any  other 
qualifications.  The  man  with  the  desire  to  be  success- 
ful will  reach  his  goal  sooner  than  the  man  who  never 
hopes  to  attain  the  first  place  in  his  profession.  It  is 
true  some  men  have  their  wish-bones  where  their  back- 
bones ought  to  be,  but  the  man  with  the  definite  aim 
and  purpose  in  life,  the  man  who  is  not  a  drifter,  the 
man  who  aims  at  the  bull's-eye,  is  bound  to  win  the 
prize  of  the  high  calling  of  successful  salesmanship. 
Think  success  and  you  will  be  successful.  The  sales- 
man who  possesses  the  bulldog  spirit,  the  salesman  who 
say-R  "I  will"  and  "I  can"  is  the  man  who  will  not 
yield  to  opposition,  no  matter  from  what  source  it 
comes — never  let  go  and  when  you  are  sure  you  are 
I'ight — go  ahead. 

This  spirit  will  develop  confidence  in  yourself  and 
nothing  can  stop  you.  Persistence  in  the  right  direc- 
tion if  not  overdone  will  in  most  cases  land  the  order 
that  you  are  so  eager  and  anxious  to  secure. 


WOMEN  SHOPPERS  AND  LAW  OF  AVERAGE 

Statistics  go  to  show  that  the  average  woman  makes 
an  actual  purchase  in  the  third  store  which  she  visits. 
In  the  first  she  gains  certain  information;  then,  desir- 
ing to  get  the  full  value  of  her  money,  she  goes  else- 
where and  finds  that  the  prices  are  perhaps  two  or 
three  per  cent,  lower.  This  establishes  an  element  of 
doubt  as  to  the  honesty  of  purchase  in  the  first  in- 
stance, and  she  goes  to  a  third  store,  where  the  higher 
of  the  two  prices  is  quoted,  and  then,  being  too  tired 
to  return  to  the  first  store,  she  makes  her  purchase  on 
the  spot. 

Of  course,  this  works  oi;t  all  right  in  the  end  be- 
cause in  some  later  instances,  the  third  store  becomes 
the  first  and  the  first  the  third,  and  so  by  the  law  of 
averages,  it  adjusts  itself  automatically,  but  it  cer- 
tainly makes  a  lot  of  work  for  the  woman  herself  and 
the — well,  we  presume  the  clerical  force  should  not  be 
taken  into  consideration — at  least  that  is  what  some 
people  think. — The  Torch. 


Mareli,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


33 


PROPER  ACCOUNTING  BUILDS  for  SUCCESS 

,,„  |,|,||||;||||||,|||  lll|IIIINI[||||n|>!l|||||l|||ll!||IIIIITmilllim^^^^   Illlllllllllllllllll  I  IIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIII  Ill  I  I  Ill  II  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  II  I  I  II  Illlimillll  Illllllllllllllilll  II  nil  II 

Relation  between  records  and  results— Some  suggestions  of  great  help  to  the  retail  furniture  dealer— Does  your 
salary  figure  in  overhead  ?— Proper  bookkeeping  system  the  main  thing  in  your  business— Influence  the  customer 

IllmUmiU  nilUUMI  l  IMIMI  IIMIIIIIIIIU  MIN  l  MIIMIMIMMI  l  IMIMIIMIII  IMIMIMMIMIMNIH  IMIMIMMIMIMI  I  IMIMIMIMI  ,  IIMMI  I  Ml  IMIMIMIIIII  nil  IIIIIIIMIMII  MIMIMMh 

By  LYMAN  WHITING 


UPON  investigation  many  stores  are  proven  to  be 
run  at  a  loss,  because  the  bookkeeping  systems 
employed  are  inadequate  and  collection  methods 
are  faulty. 

Harvard  University's  Bureau  of  Research  gives  some 
very  interesting  and  profitable  points,  showing  how 
merchants  usually  make  mistakes.  Many  mistakes 
are  made  not  because  of  unwillingness  to  learn,  but 
rather  to  unreliable  sources  of  information  or  lack  of 
experience.  No  one  wants  to  lose — it  is  simply  be- 
cause they  are  not  equipped  to  win. 

If  you  want  to  succeed  as  a  retailer  you  must  have  a 
thorough  and  practical  knowledge  of  operating  costs. 
This  is  particularly  true  at  a  time  like  this  when  costs 
are  continually  changing,  and  the  war  has  rendered 
successful  retailing  even  more  difficult  than  in  the 
normal  times  of  a  few  years  ago. 

The  figures  of  those  who  have  made  exhaustive  re- 
searches show  that  many  a  store  is  running  at  a  loss, 
and  yet  strange  to  say,  the  proprietor  does  not  know 
it.  All  that  they  do  know  is  that  they  are  able  to  get 
a  living,  but  no  one  wants  to  simply  mark  time — we 
are  all  anxious  to  move  forward. 

Some  retailers  do  not  realize  that  if  they  would  in- 
vest the  money  which  they  have  tied  up  in  stock,  in 
some  other  way  and  would  go  to  work  as  a  clerk  for 
someone  else  at  $25.00  a  week,  they  would  be  making 
money,  and  the  reason  for  this  is  that  no  accurate 
records  hold  the  facts  up  to  them  for  inspection  and 
correction. 

How  About  Your  Salary? 

There  is  one  expense  that  many  retailers  fail  to  in- 
clude— their  own  salary.  One's  salary  should 
represent  the  amount  paid  the  manager  or  proprietor 
and  should  be  equal  to  what  the  retailer  would  be 
willing  to  pay  anyone  else  for  doing  the  same  kind  of 
work,  or  the  salary  which  he  would  expect  to  receive 
if  he  were  employed  elsewhere.  If  you  figure  that  for 
a  business  the  size  of  yours,  a  man  should  be  getting 
at  least  $2,000  a  year,  then  you  should  charge  your 
business  with  this  $2,000. 

One  retailer  I  have  in  mind  made  the  statement  that 
it  did  not  cost  him  anything  to  do  business.  Owning 
his  own  building,  he  had  no  rent  to  pay,  and  as  his 
wife  was  a  great  help  in  the  store  he  claimed  he  had 
no  selling  expense,  and  his  deliveries  cost  him  nothing 
because  he  had  a  horse  and  wagon  of  his  own,  which 
his  son  used  for  the  firm's  benefit. 

Now  this  is  not  an  exceptional  view,  for  there  are 
many  retailers  who  do  not  charge  their  business  with 
either  rent,  wages,  deliveries,  or  selling  expenses,  be- 
cause their  families  are  on  the  job. 

With  too  many,  bookkeeping  comes  last.  Often- 
times one  is  tired  after  a  busy  day  and  tries  to  find  out 
from  an  inaccurate  spindle  file  and  cheek  book  stubs, 
where  he  stands.  Perhaps  he  knows  little  about  book- 
keeping; his  accounts  fail  to  balance,  and  he  goes  on 
with  "Oh  well,  I'll  fix  that  all  up  to-morrow,"  but  to- 
morrow finds  the  hours  just  as  crowded  as  yesterday. 


Bookkeeping  is  neglected  again  while  he  waits  on 
trade,  sweeps,  keeps  the  store  in  order,  etc. 

There  is  another  type,  however,  who  are  alive  to  the 
importance  of  proper  bookkeeping,  realizing  the  ne- 
cessity of  straightening  out  their  business  before  they 
can  hope  to  make  the  straight  road  to  profits.  Every 
retailer  should  know  exactly  where  he  stands;  he 
should  keep  some  sort  of  a  systematic  and  accurate 
record  of  his  receipts  and  expenditures,  balancing  his 
accounts  at  the  end  of  each  month.  You  may  have 
to  face  an  unpleasant  truth,  but  keep  track  of  all  your 
expenses,  stop  the  leaks,  install  efficient  methods  in 
every  line,  and  your  balance  will  be  very  encouraging 
on  the  right  side.  You  will  find  what  you  started  out 
to  create- — a  profit. 

Many  most  excellent  systems  are  being  used  by  in- 
dividual stores — ^methods  which  show  the  store  keeper 
facts  about  their  business — what  their  delivery  ex- 
penses are — what  should  be  charged  up  to  rent,  service, 
insurance,  interest  on  money  invested,  etc. 

Influence  the  Customer 

Do  not  be  too  strongly  influenced  by  the  customer 
who  comes  in  to  make  occasional  demand  for  an 
article  that  you  have  proven  is  a  poor  seller.  Try  and 
influence  him  in  the  direction  of  those  which  sell 
readily,  for  it  never  pays  to  put  in  a  stock  for  one  man, 
for  in  taking  care  of  this  particular  man  would  mean 
the  carrying  of  otherwise  dead  stock,  which  sooner  or 
later  must  result  in  the  old  and  poor  practice  of  cut 
prices,  if  you  want  to  get  rid  of  it. 

Keep  your  stock  down  and  your  turn-overs  frequent. 
You  want  to  sell  everything  out  before  your  jobber's 
bills  are  due.  In  this  way,  too,  your  stock  is  always 
kept  new  and  fresh,  you  need  less  stock  room  and  your 
men  behind  the  counter  are  far  more  familiar  with  each 
article  that  you  carry  because  there  are  fewer  items  to 
memorize  and  upon  which  to  develop  selling  talk, 
therefore,  sales  are  made  more  readily  and  all  this 
cannot  be  accomplished  without  proper  records. 

In  order  to  discover  what  your  stock  turn-over  has 
been,  say  in  comparison  to  what  it  will  become  if  this 
simple  system  of  stock  records  is  maintained,  you  can 
determine  it  by  taking  your  inventory  for  the  last  year 
or  two.  For  instance,  should  your  inventory  for  the 
past  six  months  show  stock  on  hand  $6,000,  and  for 
the  previous  six  months  the  inventory  showed  $4,000 
in  stock  on  hand,  your  average  inventory  is  therefore 
$5,000.  Then  following  this,  if  the  cost  of  the  mer- 
cliandise  sold  for  the  year,  cost,  not  selling,  price,  is 
$50,000,  you  turn  over  your  stock  ten  times. 

You  will  note  that  the  cost  of  goods  for  figuring 
stock  turnover  is  used  because,  of  course,  you  figure 
inventory  at  cost,  and  should  you  have  occasion  to  sell 
out  what  you  have  bought,  you  have  turned  over  your 
stock  regardless  of  the  price  at  which  it  was  sold. 

Keep  careful  accounts,  keep  everlastingly  at  it, 
know  your  business  from  the  inside  out,  and  from  the 
outside  in,  and  you  will  be  more  than  satisfied  with 
results. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


FINDING  PERCENTAGE  OF  DELIVERY  COST 

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A  valuable  table  which  shows  the  dealer  at  a  glance  just  what  percentage  of  his  sales  his  delivery  costs. — 
Getting  back  to  the  service  feature—  How  an  American  firm  figured  out  their  profits  on  average  gross  business 

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NOW  that  the  war  is  over,  there  will  be  a  gradual 
return  to  the  s-ervice  feature  which  was  so 
prominent  in  all  lines  of  retail  business  previous 
to  the  outbreak  of  hostilities.  Dealers  need  to  pro- 
ceed with  extreme  caution  in  expanding  this  feature, 
especially  in  connection  with  delivery  service,  as  the 
cost  can  easily  be  run  up  to  such  a  figure  as  to  he  a 
burden  on  the  whole  business  and  possibly  turn  it  into 
an  unprofitable  feature. 

Know  Your  Cost  of  Delivery 

Tt  is  desirable  that  the  dealer  know  exactly  Avhat  it 
is  costing  him  to  deliver  goods,  not  only  in  so  far  as 
the  total  cost  is  concerned,  but  as  to  the  percentage 
that  this  portion  of  cost  of  doing  business  runs  into. 
One  of  the  most  convenient  tahles  that  we  have  seen  for 
ascertaining  this,  is  contained  in  "Profit  Pointers," 
published  by  the  Star  Egg  Carrier  &  Tray  Manufac- 
turing Co.,  of  Rochester.     We  reproduce  it  herewith. 

The  table  shows  at  a  glance  what  "per  eent"  a 
merchant's  delivery  service  is  costing  him,  based  on 
the  volume  of  business  he  does. 

All  these  figures  are  intended  to  represent  an  aver- 
age Aveek's  business — not  monthly  or  yearly — not  the 
busiest,  not  the  dullest  week. 

The  following  items  of  cost  must  be  included  in  the 
"delivery  costs"  for  the  week. 

Wages  of  drivers  and  their  assistants ;  hay  and  feed 
— horseshoeing;  gasoline,  auto  license,  tires;  oil  and 
grease;  repairs  and  depreciation  of  delivery  equip- 
ment; rent  of  stable,  or  garage,  whether  owned  or 
leased;  express,  parcel  postage;  Merchants  Union  de- 
livery charges. 

Directions  for  Finding  Cost 

Directions:  Find  the  amount  in  the  left  column  of 


heavy  black  figures  which  represents  the  average 
weekly  delivery  cost — then  run  an  imaginary  straight 
line  to  the  right  until  you  are  immediately  under  the 
heavy  black  figures  which  represent  the  average  weekly 
business.  The  figures  in  the  square  at  the  intersec- 
tion of  these  two  imaginary  lines  tell  you  what  per 
cent,  of  the  business  is  being  spent  for  delivery  service. 

Example :  'Say  the  business  runs  $600  an  average 
week  and  the  delivery  cost  for  the  same  period  is 
$20.00.  Run  your  finger  down  the  column  under  the 
heavy  black  figure  "600.00"  until  you  are  directl\ 
opposite  "20.00"  in  the  heavy  black  figure  column  at 
the  left  of  the  page,  the  figures  in  the  square  at  the  in- 
tersection show  that  the  delivery  costs  are  3  1/3  per 
cent,  of  the  business  done.  Tn  some  eases  the  "per 
cents"  are  not  to  the  exact,  smallest  fraction,  but  they 
are  accurate  enough  in  each  instance  for  the  purpose 
designed. 


CENSOR  YOUR  LETTERS 

Every  letter  that  leaves  your  store  should  be  a  sen- 
sible letter.  It  should  not  be  Avritten  simply  because 
"a  letter"  must  be  written.  It  should  develop  its 
reasons  logically  and  show  why  it  is  to  the  advantage 
of  a  customer  to  consider  the  proposition  you  present. 

Of  course  good  letters  are  hard  to  write.  If  they 
weren't,  there  would  be  fcAver  of  the  poor  kind. 

Make  the  censorship  on  all  your  letters  severe.  Don 't 
lift  it  under  any  consideration.  A  well  composed, 
neatly  written  letter  is  sometimes  as  successful  as  a 
personal  solicitation. 

The  uncensored  business  letter  does  as  much  harm 
to  a  store  as  the  uncensored  private  letter  does  to  a 
nation.  Appoint  a  censor  in  your  organization  to-day 
— and  start  him  "on  the  job"  immediately. 


AVERAGE  GROSS  AMOUNT  OF  BUSINESS  PER  WEEK 


$200 

$300 

$400 

$500 

$600 

$700 

$800 

$1000 

$1200 

$1500 

$1800 

$2000 

$3000 

$4000 

$5000 

$  5.00 

11/4% 

1% 

Vsof  1% 

y,  ol  1% 

^8  of  1% 

'/2  of  1% 

y„  of  1% 

H  ol  1% 

Ksof  1% 

of  1% 

%  ol  1% 

H  ol  1% 

Mooll% 

'Aoi  1% 

10.00 

5% 

3h% 

21/2% 

2% 

1^/3% 

iy7% 

1"4% 

1% 

'Aoi  1% 

h  of  1% 

y^of  1% 

h  ol  1% 

h  of  1% 

'/4  ol  1% 

15.00 

7K2% 

5% 

3M% 

3% 

2!/2% 

2'/,% 

VA% 

1K2% 

1% 

Ve  of  1% 

H  ol  1% 

Moll% 

H  Ol  1% 

XuOl  1% 

20.00 

10% 

6?.5% 

5% 

4% 

3^3% 

2%% 

2yi% 

27o 

1%% 

1H% 

1/9% 

1% 

%  ol  1% 

H  Ol  1% 

'A  ol  1%, 

25.00 

12^2% 

8H% 

6H% 

5% 

4'/6% 

3'/,% 

'  2J/2% 

2/,;% 

1%% 

iy,s% 

iM% 

%ol  1%, 

H  Ol  1% 

)/2oll% 

30.00 

15% 

10% 

73^% 

6% 

5% 

4'/,% 

3M% 

3% 

2^2% 

2% 

1%% 

1^2% 

1% 

34  ol  1% 

'A  ol  1% 

35.00 

17^2% 

11%% 

8H% 

7% 

55/6% 

5% 

m% 

3^2% 

2%% 

1"/b% 

1M% 

l'/6% 

%  ol  1% 

'Ao  ol  1% 

40.00 

20% 

13M% 

10% 

8% 

6%% 

5y,% 

5% 

4% 

3%% 

2%% 

2%% 

2% 

1%% 

1% 

%  ol  1% 

45.00 

22H% 

15% 

11M% 

9% 

■6y,% 

55/8% 

4^2% 

3H% 

3% 

2'/2% 

2M% 

1^2% 

m% 

'/o  ol  1% 

50.00 

25% 

1G%% 

12'/2% 

10% 

8^3% 

7'/,% 

6}4% 

5% 

4K6% 

3H% 

2'/,%, 

2J/2% 

1%% 

1% 

.  55.00 

27!4% 

18H%. 

13?4% 

11% 

9^0% 

7%% 

6K% 

5^2% 

4y,-% 

3%% 

3)/8% 

2^4% 

iy6% 

m% 

60.00 

 65.00 

70.00 

30% 

20% 

15% 

12% 

10% 

8*A% 

m% 

6% 

5% 

4% 

3H% 

3% 

2% 

l'/2% 

1^% 

32K% 

21?<i% 

16H% 

,  13% 

ioy.%, . 

9V,% 

6!/2% 

5>1,% 

4%% 

8'y',8% 

3H% 

2y*% 

15/.% 

iy,o% 

35% 

23'-^%, 

171^2% 

14% 

11%% 

10% 

7% 

5%% 

4%% 

3y,% 

3H% 

2%% 

iM% 

iy>% 

75.00 

3V/2% 

25% 

18'4% 

15% 

12J^% 

ioy,% 

7^2% 

6K% 

5% 

4'/.% 

3H% 

2H% 

1%% 

VA% 

80.00 

40% 

26'A% 

20% 

16% 

13M% 

11'/,%, 

mo 

8% 

'6%% 

5%% 

4y,% 

4%. 

2%% 

2% 

m% 

85.00 
90.00 

i?M% 

2m% 

17% 

14}^% 

12'/,% 

10J^% 

8^2% 

5%% 

4-y.e% 

i'4% 

2%% 

2)/8% 

459i. 

22'/2% 

18% 

15% 

12%% 

97c 

7!/2% 

6% 

5% 

4;/2% 

3% 

2M% 

1%% 

95.00 

471^2%, 

31%% 

23M% 

19% 

15%% 

i3y,% 

11%% 

9!/2% 

7'y;,% 

6H% 

5y,8% 

45<i% 

33^% 

23/8% 

l'/o% 

100.00 

S0'7o 

331/3% 

25% 
3Ui% 

20% 
25% 

16%% 

14'/,% 

12^2% 

10%, 

8H% 

6%% 

5%% 

5% 

3%% 

2H% 

2% 

125.00 

62^-2% 

41%% 

20%% 

17/,%, 

155/8% 

i2)/2% 

ioy„% 

8%% 

6'M.% 

6K% 

4/.% 

3^8% 

2^% 

150.00 

75% 

50% 

371/2% 

30% 

25% 

2iy,% 

1834% 

15% 

12H% 

10% 

8M% 

VA% 

5% 

3M% 

3% 

March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


35 


SCHEMES  FOR  COLLECTNG  THE  MONEY 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^   I  Ill  Mil  I  Illllillllllll  Mil  IIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIII  mill  I  II 

Suggestions  for  extending  credit,  obtaining  ratings  and  for  letters — Value  of  time  limit — Management  troubles — 
Difficulty  with  credits  and  collections — Losses  and  poor  accounts — Record  the   credits — Value   of  letters 

'.IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI^  lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

By  FRANK  FARRINGTON 


JN  hundreds  of  calls  upon  retail  dealers  throughout 
the  country,  my  question,  "What  one  thing  ahout 
the  management  of  your  business  causes  you  more 
trouble  than  anything  else?"  has  been  almost  uniformly 
met  with  the  reply,  "Credits;  collecting  what  folks 
owe  us." 

Practically  all  merchants  who  have  trouble  with 
the  credit  side  of  their  business  find  its  source  in  the 
difficulty  they  have  in  getting  the  money  people  owe 
thwn.  It  is  necessary  to  see  that  the  "poor  pay" 
people  do  not  get  in  too  deep,  that  they  pay  up 
promptly,  too.  There  is  no  profit  in  any  sale  until  the 
money  is  in  the  cash  register. 

Losses  and  Poor  Accounts 

It  is  all  right  to  seek  relief  from  losses  on  poor  ac- 
counts by  doing  a  cash  business,  but  there  will  always 
be  people  who  cannot  pay  spot  cash  and  are  willing 
to  pay  something  extra  for  the  privilege  of 
taking  more  or  less  time  on  the  account.  Without 
doubt  people  will  buy  more  freely  for  credit  and  the 
ideal  way  to  make  the  business  big  and  successful  is 
not  the  spot  cash  way.  Rather  it  is  through  the  use 
of  a  limited  credit  with  prompt  collections. 

The  smaller  a  bill,  the  easier  it  is  paid.  As  some- 
body has  put  it,  "A  short  horse  is  soon  curried."  When 
a  bill  gets  to  where  it  is  out  of  proportion  to  the  cus- 
tomer's pay  check,  then  it  begins  to  drag,  and  the 
dragging  bill  does  not  wear  itself  out  in  the  drag- 
ging, though  it  may  wear  out  the  dealer's  patience. 

Value  of  Time  Limit 

By  fixing  an  absolute  time  limit  on  all  accounts,  de- 
clining to  allow  anyone  to  continue  to  buy  on  credit 
when  the  bill  has  not  been  taken  care  of  within  that 
limit,  say,  30  or  60  days,  nobody  can  get  in  debt  to  you 
for  more  than  the  purchases  of  that  period.  This 
short-term  credit  plan  is  the  best  way  of  handling  the 
credit  business.  It  reveals  people  before  their  ac- 
counts get  too  large,  and  those  to  whom  longer  credit 
may  desirably  be  extended  can  be  taken  care  of  by 
having  them  clean  up  the  old  account  by  giving  a  note 
or  a  due  bill,  with  or  without  interest. 

The  big  thing  is  to  get  everybody  to  come  around 
at  least  once  a  month  and  agree  about  the  account 
and  its  immediate  or  its  future  payment.  When 
you  get  in  touch  with  a  credit  customer  once  a  month 
and  discuss  with  him  the  account  he  is  running,  your 
chance  of  loss  is  reduced. 

When  a  man  starts  an  account  it  is  up  to  the  dealer 
to  know  his  financial  standing  and  something  about 
his  income,  also  his  past  reputation  for  paying  prompt- 
ly. This  is  where  a  credit  bureau  established  by  some 
such  local  organization  as  the  chamber  of  commerce  is 
good. 

Record  of  Credits 

Such  a  credit  bureau  keeps  a  record  of  those  who 
ask  for  credit.     The  members  can  get  this  informa- 


tion at  any  time  and  each  member  may  keep  a  card 
index  with  a  card  for  each  customer,  going  to  head- 
quarters for  information  with  which  to  start  a  card 
about  any  new  applicant,  and  passing  on  to  head- 
quarters any  new  information  coming  to  hand  or  de- 
veloping in  experience  with  the  family. 

These  credit  bureaus  may  also  act  as  collection 
agencies,  and  since  they  represent  most  of  the  stores 
in  town,  for  a  man  to  refuse  to  honor  his  account  with 
one  member  may  result  in  credit  being  refused  him  by 
all  the  members.  In  fact,  the  threat  of  turning  the 
account  over  to  the  credit  bureau  will  rarely  fail  to 
bring  in  the  delinquent  debtor  to  take  up  the  question 
of  payment  in  some  manner. 

One  such  organization  sends  out  notices  to  all  the 
people  in  town  when  starting  its  credit  bureau,  and 
these  notices  are  letters  stating  that  such  a  central 
soutce  of  information  about  credit  ratings  is  being 
established  and  it  is  requested  that  the  recipient  make 
a  statement  to  the  bureau  of  his  reasons  for  claiming  he 
is  entitled  to  credit.  This  gives  the  bureau  a  standing 
with  the  public  at  once  and  makes  it  apparent  that  it 
wants  to  play  fair  with  everybody. 

The  First  Letter 

The  first  letter  this  association  sends  to  the  man 
whose  account  is  placed  with  it  for  collection,  is  very 
friendly,  and  takes  the  position  that  there  is  some  mis- 
understanding, and  asks  him  to  go  and  see  his  creditor 
and  get  the  matter  adjusted.  Further  notes  are  more 
pointed  and  the  final  notice  states  that  in  so  many 
days  the  organization's  attorney  will  take  action. 

But  not  every  community  has  a  credit  bureau  and 
some  men  prefer  to  work  independently,  anyway.  For 
such,  personal  calls  and  personal  letters  are  the  best 
collecting  mediums.  It  is  the  personal  touch  that 
saves  the  account.  If  you  can  go  and  see  a  man  and 
each  time  get  either  a  little  payment  or  a  promise  of 
payment  on  a  certain  date,  and  if  you  go  to  see  him 
on  that  date,  this  method  will  produce  results. 


C.  B.  CHATFIELD 

Designer  of  Furniture 
GRAND 

RAPIDS  -        Michigan,  U.S.A. 


86 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Among  The  Manufacturers 


TO  HELP  SETTLE  EXPORT  DISPUTES 

The  seuioi-  British  Trade  Commissioner  in  Canada 
and  Newfoundland  (G.  T.  Milne,  367  Beaver  Hall 
Square,  Montreal),  has  been  notified  by  the  Imperial 
Department  of  Overseas  Trade  in  London,  that  he  is 
empowered  to  appoint  an  expert  to  examine  and  report 
upon  consignments  of  goods  from  the  United  Kingdom, 
in  respect  of  which  a  dispute  has  arisen,  and  to  certify 
the  signature  of  such  experts  as  authentic.  The 
Commissioner  will,  however,  only  intervene  when  re- 
(juested  to  do  so  by  both  parties  to  the  dispute. 

The  kind  of  disputes  in  which  the  Commissioner  may 
intervene  are  those  regarding  goods  which  are  alleged 
to  be  not  up ,  to  sample,  or  which  have  arrived  in  a 
damaged  condition  owing  to  faulty  packing.  The 
Commissioner  is  not  authorized  to  deal  with  claims 
under  insurance  policies  for  goods  damaged  during  the 
voyage.  As  the  official  trade  representative  in  Canada 
and  Newfoundland  of  the  Indian  Government,  the  Com- 
missioner is  also  authorized  to  act  in  regard  to  dis- 
putes relative  to  shipments  from  India.  The  remunera- 
tion of  experts  appointed  by  the  Commissioner  is  a  mat- 
ter for  the  parties  to  the  dispute.  No  fee  will  be 
charged  for  his  services. 

The  British  Trade  Commissioner  at  Toronto,  F.  W. 
Field.  257  Confederation  Life  Bldg.,  is  empowered  to 
act  in  disputes  arising  out  of  shipments  to  Toronto  and 
to  other  centres  in  Ontario. 


NEW  MAKERS  OF  BABY  FURNITURE  LINES 

The  Gem  Crib  and  Cradle  Co.  of  Canada  is  a  new 
concern  now  located  at  Kitchener,  Out.,  making  a  line 
of  wheel  bassinets,  cradles  and  haby  Avalkers,  a  line 
which  should  appeal  to  the  Canadian  furniture  dealer. 
F.  C.  Brandt,  well-known  to  the  trade  from  his  handling 
of  similar  lines  is  manager  of  this  new  company. 


COST  ACCOUNTING  DEPARTMENT  INITIATED 

The  Furniture  Manufacturers'  Association  have  in- 
stalled a  cost  accounting  department  with  J.  E.  Fer- 
guson, of  Woodstock,  Ont.,  in  charge.  Mr.  Ferguson 
has  had  many  years  of  practical  experience  in  this  line 
of  woi'k,  having  been  associated  with  several  of  the 
large  furniture  manufacturers.  Latterly  he  has  been 
in  full  charge  of  the  cost  accounting  department  of 
the  Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers,  Ltd.,  at  Wood- 
stock and  other  branches. 


FURNITURE  MANUFACTURERS  USERS  OF  ROPE 

In  a  recent  issue  of  "The  Columbian  Crew,"  pub- 
lished by  The  Columbian  Rope  Co.,  is  an  illustrated 
article  on  the  uses  L.  &  J.  G.  Stickley,  Inc.,  makers  of 
fine  mission  furniture,  at  Fayetteville,  N.Y.,  put  rope  to 
in  covering  and  tieing  up  their  product  before  shipping 
to  market. 


NOW  MAKING  SOLID  OAK  FURNITURE 

The  Victoriaville  Furniture  Co..  Ijtd.,  Victoriaville, 
Que.,  announce  they  are  now  making  solid  plain  oak 
furniture  in  addition  to  their  regular  line  of  surface  oak 
furniture.  The  company  have  installed  new  machin- 
ery in  their  factory  to  take  care  of  this  line  and  have 


secured  the  services  of  C.  J.  Kelly,  of  Grand  Rapids. 
Mich.,  to  take  full  charge  of  the  manufacturing  end  of 
their  business. 

Victoriaville  is  said  to  be  the  only  factory  in  Eastern 
Canada  making  solid  plain  oak  furniture  and  so  are  in 
a  splendid  position  to  deliver  goods  at  a  low  freight 
rate  to  trade  in  their  territory.  The  company  are  to 
issue  at  an  early  date  a  supplementary  catalogue 
covering  their  new  line  of  furniture. 


MARSHALL  COMPANY  EXPANDING 

The  Marshall  Sanitary  Mattress  Co.  have  greatly  en- 
larged their  Toronto  manufacturing  plant.  The  com- 
pany now  occupies  five  floors  of  their  building  at  10 
West  Market  St.  They  are  also  now  making  their  own 
felt  and  have  installed  special  machinery  to  make  this 
adjunct  to  their  business. 


NEW  WOODENWARE  CATALOGUE 

The  Stratford  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd.,  Stratford.  Ont..  have 
issued  under  date  of  February,  a  new  supplement  ap- 
plying to  their  catalogue  No.  5  and  replacing  the  sup- 
plement of  November  15  last.  The  supplement  is  a 
16-page  booklet,  devoted  to  ironing  boards,  meat  and 
bake  boards,  clothes  bars,  tub  stands,  step  ladder 
stools,  curtain  stretchers,  safety  gates,  camp  cots,  fold- 
ing chairs,  kindergarten  sets  and  their  other  standard 
lines.  In  new  goods  are  mentioned  baby  phonographs, 
suspended  verandah  swings,  children's  swings,  plaj' 
.vards,  baby  walkers,  and  baby  swings. 


OLD  FURNITURE  DEALER  RETIRES 

In  a  recent  issue  of  his  local  paper  David  Hogg  has  a 
card  of  thanks  to  the  public  on  the  occasion  of  his  relin- 
quishing his  share  of  the  business  of  Hogg  &  Thomp- 
son, of  Perth,  Ont.,  to  his  successor,  Alex.  Blair,  of 
Westport.  In  thus  making  his  farcAvell  bow  in  a  busi- 
ness capacity  to  his  patrons,  Mr.  Hogg  does  so  with  a 
chain  record  of  fifty-five  years  as  a  furniture  dealer  and 
undertaker,  and  drops  out  of  business  activities  after 
having  been  for  some  time  the  very  oldest  head  of  any 
concern  in  the  town  or  country  in  any  line. 

In  1836  his  father,  the  late  David  Hogg,  started  the 
furniture  business  in  Perth  in  the  stand  still  occupied 
by  his  successor,  and  the  son  took  over  the  business, 
and  afterwards  added  a  modern  undertaking  equip- 
ment, including  two  handsome  and  expensive  hearses. 
In  the  earlier  days  most  of  the  furniture  sold  and  kept 
in  stock  Avas  made  on  the  spot,  and  long  ago  a  large 
three-storey  stone  factory  was  erected  in  the  rear  of  the 
showroom,  but  this  was  burned  many  years  since,  and 
for  long  after  the  ruined  walls  were  left  standing,  to 
be  removed  laterly  by  some  enterprising  mason. 

Mr.  Hogg  was  married  in  1868  to  Miss  Marj'  Cox. 
whose  death  took  place  within  a  short  time,  and  to  them 
were  born  four  children — William,  in  the  Merchants 
Bank,  in  the  Maritime  Provinces;  Mrs.  (Dr.)  Fowler. 
Perth,  Mrs.  Frank  Hicks,  and  Mrs.  Bailey,  both  of 
Toronto.  Mr.  Hogg  himself  has  attained  the  grand- 
father-age of  78  years,  but  he  is  yet  young  in  spirit,  and 
has  abundance  of  vitality  with  the  capacity  of  making 
the  most  of  it.  In  1900  he  took  in  as  a  partner.  Mr. 
Geo.  Thompson,  a  practical  man  who  learned  the  trade 
with  him ;  and  in  going  out  he  thus  leaves  to  the  public 
a  gentleman  very  competent,  with  his  new  partner, 
to  render  effective  service  to  this  community  in  a  very 
essential  work  which  appeals  to  all  of  us  in  time,  short 
or  distant. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


37 


PICKING  OUT  A  LOCATION  FOR  A  STORE 


MIIIINlllllllllilllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIrlllllllllllllMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIII  IIIIIIIIMMIIIIIMMIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIMIMIMMIMIIIHillliMIMNIMIMIIIIMIMMIMIIIIIIIIIinillllllllMIIIIMIMI^ 

A  matter  that  calls  for  careful  thought  and  study — Some  points  to  be  considered — Overcoming  the  handicap  of  a 
poor  location — Don't  make  haphazard  selection — Get  near  the  crowds — Get  on   right  side    of  the  street 

ll'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH^ 

By  A  STAFF  EDITOR. 


THE  selection  of  a  location  for  a  store  is  an  im- 
portant matter  and  calls  for  a  good  deal  of 
thought  and  study.  It  generally  means  much 
to  the  dealer's  future.  It  may  make  or  mar  his 
success.  A  bad  location,  if  it  does  not  altogether 
bring  about  failure  of  the  venture,  at  least  makes  it 
more  difiScult  for  the  merchant  to  progress  than  if  he 
■were  more  favorably  situated. 

Too  many  dealers  pick  out  a  location  in  a  hap- 
hazard manner.  A  store  in  their  neighborhood  is 
vacant  or  their  wife's  aunt  or  some  other  relative  has 
a  store  to  rent.  Many  dealers  in  contemplating  the 
opening  of  a  store  are  influenced  more  by  its  con- 
venience to  their  residence  or  the  district  they  have 
been  residing  in  than  by  the  prospects  of  a  worth- 
while trade  founded  on  thorough  investigation  and 
consideration. 

It  is  often  a  difficult  matter  to  judge  the  suitability 
of  a  location  with  accuracy.  Opinions  as  to  the  value 
of  a  prospective  site  are  liable  to  differ  and  sometimes 
promising  sites  do  not  come  up  to  expectations.  There 
are  certain  features  however,  that  are  pretty  good 
guides  in  sizing  up  a  location.  For  one  thing  it  is 
desirable  to  get  in  the  path  of  traffic,  although  the 
character  of  traffic  has  an  important  bearing  on  the 
matter.  For  instance,  if  you  were  near  a  factory 
•there  might  be  a  lot  of  people  pass  your  store,  but 
when  they  do  so  they  are  generally  in  a  rush  and  not 
as  likely  purchasers  as  if  they  were  of  a  leisure  class, 
bent  on  mere  exercise  or  on  shopping  excursions. 
In  Shopping  Centre  With  no  Direct  Competition 
Some  dealers  in  picking  out  a  location  are  inclined 
to  get  away  by  themselves  where  there  are  no  other 
stores.  This  is  a  mistake.  It  is  well  to  get  in  a  lo- 
cation where  people  really  go  shopping,  although  it  is 
preferable  that  the  other  stores  be  in  a  different  line 
of  business.  The  ideal  situation  is  to  be  the  one 
dealer  in  your  line  in  a  collection  of  stores  that  can 
supply  the  complete  needs  of  the  people  of  the  com- 
munity. Accordingly,  no  matter  what  a  customer 
may  desire  she  will  be  brought  to  your  neighborhood 
and  if  she  requires  anything  in  your  line  you  are 
likely  to  get  the  trade. 

In  the  city,  a  location  near  a  corner  where  people 
take  the  street  ear  is  advantageous  and  the  larger  the 
section  from  which  people  come  to  take  the  ear  there 
the  better.  Many  city  people  purchase  their  require- 
ments on  the  way  to  and  from  the  street  car. 
Some  Good  Locations 
A  moving  picture  house  is  a  good  neig'hbor  for  a 
business  while  the  proximity  of  a  public  market  is 
also  a  help.  In  the  smaller  town  a  store  near  the 
post  office  and  bank  are  generally  the  most  desirable, 
and  if  it  is  in  the  path  of  traffic  to  the  railway  sta- 
tion so  much  the  better. 

A  store  facing,  flanked  or  backed  by  an  extensive 
unbuilt  section  should  be  avoided,  unless  it  has 
prospects  of  being  built  up  in  the  near  future.  A 
dealer  recently  opened  an  expensively  fitted  shop  in 
one  of  our  cities  facing  a  large  walled-in  estate  that 


has  no  prospects  of  being  subdivided  into  building 
lots.  The  writer  believes  that  he  made  a  big  mis- 
take as  this  unbuilt  section  reduces  the  number  of 
prospective  customers  by  a  couple  of  hundred,  at 
least. 

These  are  all  matters  that  should  be  given  careful 
consideration  in  selecting  a  location.  It  is  too  im- 
portant a  matter  to  decide  without  proper  thought  and 
study. 

"When  a  dealer  finds  out  that  the  location  he  has 
picked  is  not  a  good  one,  or  not  all  to  be  desired,  he 
should  give  earnest  thought  as  to  whether  it  is  best  to 
endeavor  to  overcome  the  handicap  or  to  move  to  some 
other  location  where  business  will  come  easier.  The 
store  in  even  a  poor  location  can  sometimes  be  made 
so  attractive  to  the  public  in  various  ways  as  to  make 
it  successful  in  spite  of  this  handicap.  One  village 
dealer  found  his  store  was  avoided  by  farmers  be- 
cause of  his  closeness  to  a  railway  yard — the  puffing 
of  the  engines  frightening  the  farmers'  horses.  This 
difficulty  was  greatly  overcome  by  the  erection  of 
sheds  behind  his  store  Avhere  farmers  could  tie  their 
horses  while  shopping  at  the  store.  The  more  exten- 
sive use  of  motor  cars  by  the  farmers  also  helped  the 
situation  in  time,  so  that  this  dealer  now  h.'w  a  most 
extensive  farm  trade. 

On  the  Wrong'  Side  of  Street 

A  Welland,  Ont.,  dealer  who  has  found  himself  on 
the  wrong  side  of  the  street  has  been  endeavoring  to 
overcome  this  drawback  by  extensive  advertising 
coupled  with  attractive  prices.  In  a  recent  ad.  he 
said:  "Last  Saturday,  to  our  certain  knowledge  by 
cash  register  count,  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and 
seventy-six  (1,876)  people  crossed  East  Main  St.  for 
no  other  reason  than  to  trade  at  Wolfe's.  Why  do  all 
these  people  want  to  trade  at  Wolfe's?  There  is  no 
sentiment  in  the  matter.  They  came  across  simply 
because  this  live,  up-to-date  store  hands  out  the  goods, 
and  the  service,  that  they  like,  at  prices  that  admit  of 
no  profiteering.  If  you  are  not  now  a  customer  at 
Wolfe's,  it  is  a  sure  thing  that  it  will  be  to  your  ad- 
vantage to  become  one." 


EFFICIENCY  doorway  to  net  profits.  The 

  Robertson  Socket  Head  Wood 

Screw  assures  efficiency.  Used 
by  nearly  all  leading  furniture 
manufacturers,  etc. 


IV  rile  us  for  free 
demomlration 


P.  L.  Robertson  Manufacturing  Co.,  Limited 


MILTON  -  ONTARIO 


High-Grade  CHESTERFIELDS 

Re-Upholstering  to  the  Trade 
SPECIAL  ORDER  WORK 

Life  Long  Furniture  Co.,  Ingersoll,  Ont. 


38 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


CONCILIATING  FURNITURE  MANUFACTURERS 
AND  EMPLOYEES 

An  industrial  eonciliatiou  board,  formed  under  the 
Industrial  Disputes  Investigation  Act  of  1907,  has  been 
sitting:  recently  at  Stratford,  Hanover,  Kitchener,  and 
Montreal  to  inquire  into  the  difficulties  said  to  exist 
beweeu  manufacturers  and  employees.  The  members 
of  the  Board  are  Judge  D.  McGibbon,  Brampton,  chair- 
man;  Joseph  Orr,  Stratford,  representing  the  manu- 
facturers; and  J.  F.  Marsh,  Niagara  Falls,  represent- 
ing the  employees.  The  Board  has  obtained  a  com- 
plete list  of  the  employees  throughout  Canada,  sub- 
divided into  departments,  with  the  amount  of  the 
weekly  or  hourlj^  wages  paid. 

The  meetings  at  all  the  four  centres  were  largely  at- 
tended, and  Judge  McGibbon  paid  a  high  tribute  to 
the  spirit  which  has  animated  those  who  attended  the 
meetings,  both  representatives  of  the  manufacturers 
and  the  Avorkmen  and  he  complimented  the  furniture 
men  on  their  delimination  to  do  what  is  right  and  fair. 

The  Stratford  sitting  was  held  in  the  city  hall,  and 
at  it  were  furniture  men  from  Stratford,  "Woodstock, 
Milverton,  Hanover,  Chesley,  Toronto,  Hamilton, 
Kitchener,  "Waterloo,  and  other  places.  As  a  result  of 
the  conference  a  resolution  was  passed  by  the  furui- 
tiire  men,  both  manufacturers  and  employees,  which 
tended  to  a  setlement  of  the  issues  before  the  board. 
The  contents  of  the  resolution  will  be  taken  into  con- 
sideration by  the  board  in  making  its  award.  It  is 
thought  that  the  Conciliation  Board  will  issue  its  re- 
jiort  some  time  this  month. 

The  furniture  workers  of  Stratford  are  asking  for 
fifty  cents  an  hour  and  a  nine-hour  day.  J.  F.  Marsh, 
representing  the  workers,  informed  the  manufacturers 
that  it  was  in  their  interest  that  their  workingmen 
.should  be  contented,  and  this  could  be  secured  only  hy 
paying  a  living  Avage. 

The  Ontario  delegates  at  the  Montreal  conference 
were:  ]\Iessrs.  D.  Hibner,  Kitchener;  H.  M.  Snvder. 
Waterloo;  J.  R.  Shaw,  Woodstock;  D.  Wright.  Strat- 
ford; D.  Mason,  Stratford,  and  R.  A.  McGillvary, 
Preston. 


Shorter  work  hours  are  a  prominent  feature  in  the 
labor  program  throughout  the  world.  A  few  days  ago 
we  were  informed  that  the  main  proposals  of  the 
British  draft,  adopted  by  the  International  Legislative 
Commission  sitting  at  Paris,  included  in  the  interna- 
tional charter  of  labor  a  clause  that  a  Saturday  half 
holiday  be  compulsory  in  all  countries  of  the  world. 


CARE  OF  CATALOGUES 

One  of  the  best  helps  one  can  have  in  his  business  is 
a  well-stocked  library  of  good  catalogues,  and  the  study 
of  these  by  him  and  his  sales  force  is  time  profitably 
spent.  The  Northern  Furniture  tells  dealers  what 
ought  not  he  done  with  catalogues  in  the  following 
words. 

"Some  people  cling  to  the  idea  that  the  trade  cata- 
logue is  a  form  of  advertisement.  If  they  are  not  in 
the  mood  for  buying  when  it  arrives,  it  is  often  cast 
aside  and  perhaps  destroyed. 

"A  catalogue  is  simply  a  classified  and  illustrated 
list  of  goods  offered  for  sale,  and  takes  the  place  of  a 
personal  inspection  of  those  goods  by  persons  at  a 
di.stance.  As  such  it  ought  to  be  preserved  for  use 
when  needed.  , 

"Dealers  make  a  serious  mistake  when  they  allow 
catalogues  to  be  clipped  or  torn.  When  you  want  a 
catalogue  at  all  you  want  it  badly.  If  a  customer  seeks 
something  you  don't  happen  to  have  in  stock,  the  best 
thing  to  do  is  show  him  a  picture  and  description  of 
it  and  take  his  order.  If  you  can't  find  the  catalogue, 
or  discover  that  the  picture  or  page  is  torn  out,  you  Avill 
lose  the  sale.  But  the  manufacturer  gets  the  order 
anyhoAV  through  some  other  dealer  who  has  kept  his 
catalogues  in  shape  without  mutilation  of  the  leaves,  so 
that  the  customer  Avould  know  what  he  was  ordering. 

"There  is  enough  descriptive  matter  and  numbers  on 
most  catalogues  to  identify  the  goods  at  the  factory."' 


Judge:  "The  police  say  that  you  and  your  wife  had 
some  Avords. " 

Prisoner:  "I  had  some,  but  didn't  get  a  chance  to 
use  them." — Puck. 


Reception  hnll.  floor  of  which  might 
be  vastly  improved  through  \ise  of 
more  rujfs  (Photo  courtesy  DuPont 
Magazine) 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


39 


SOME  POINTERS  for  the  FURNITURE  DEALER 

rMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIMIIMIMIIIIMIMnilMIMIIMMIMIMIIIIIMMIMIMIMIIMIIIIIIMIIMIIMIIMIMIIIIMIMMIIMIIIMIMIMIIIIMIMMIMIIMMIM^   IIIIIIIIMINIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII 

Need  of  being  properly  protected — Fulfil  obligations  to  co-insurance  contract — Value  of  stock  sheets  in  proving  claim 

llllllllllllll  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMII  Mlllllllllllllllllllllllllll  Illlllllllll  Illllllrillllll  Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllll  llllliMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  Illlllllllllllll  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIIIIMIM  Illlllllll 


THE  stock  aud  fixtures  in  the  furniture  store  to- 
day, are  much  higher  in  value  than  before  war 
broke  out.  Increased  values  are  responsible. 
Most  dealers  are  alive  to  this  fact.  At  least,  they 
are  aware  of  it.  Few  of  them,  'however,  have  been 
so  practical  as  to  protect  this  increase  by  covering  it 
with  fire  insurance.  If  a  furniture  dealer  adds  a  storey 
to  "his  store  building,  or  makes  other  alterations  of  a 
nature  which  involve  additional  investment,  he  is 
pretty  sure  to  place  additional  insurance  upon  the 
completed  building.  But,  when  the  value  of  the 
original  building  or  the  stock  it  shelters  appreciate  in 
value,  it  is  somehow  different. 

Many  Dealers  Not  Sufficiently  Insured 

But,  then,  few  dealers  insure  even  ordinarily  to 
the  extent  which  their  stocks  warrant.  The  discrep- 
ancy is,  in  consequence,  even  more  marked.  It  is  not 
that  the  furniture  stores  are  immune  from  damage  by 
fire.  Personal  interviews  by  the  editor  with  a  number 
of  furniture  dealers  relative  to  this  subject  of  fire  in- 
surance, has  revealed  the  astonishing  fact  that  a  large 
proportion  of  them  have  had  experience  more  or  less 
serious  of  loss  by  fire.  The  average  investment  is  so 
large  that  it  would  seem  the  part  of  wisdom  for  dealers 
to  give  insurance  more  of  their  attention. 

An  agent  frequently  offers  the  suggestion  that  a  man 
should  take  advantaige  of  the  cheap  rates  obtainable 
under  a  co-insurance  contract.  As  this  contract 
affords  a  considerable  saving  upon  the  annual  premium 
many  men  are  glad  to  take  advantage  of  it.  At  the 
time  the  insurance  is  being  placed  the  under.standing 
as  to  the  basis  of  the  contract  may  be  perfectly  clear 
to  the  proprietor  of  the  store  or  goods,  and  yet,  he'll 
forget  or  neglect  to  fulfil  his  obligations.  If  he  does 
this  and  if  he  is  so  unfortunate  as  to  suffer  damage  by 
fire  he  may  have  a  disappointing  experience  in  store 
for  him  when  he  asks  for  a  settlement  from  the  insur- 
ance company. 

Fulfil  Co-insurance  Contract 

Briefly,  co-insurance  requires  of  the  insured  that  he 
'insure  to  the  extent  of  80  per  cent,  or  more  of  the  value 
of  his  property — goods,  fixtures  or  real  estate,  which- 
ever is  involved — and  keep  the  amount  always  80  per 
cent  or  over.  This  means  that  if  he  adds  to  his  stock 
or  fixtures  or  buildings  so  as  to  increase  their  value,  or 
if  they  increase  in  value  through  market  conditions,  he 
must  from  time  to  time  add  to  the  insurance  which  he 
carries.  For  example,  if  he  adds  improvements  to  his 
store  to  the  extent  of  $2,000,  he  must  add  $1,600  to  his 
insurance ;  and  if  his  stock  or  fixtures  have  grown  in 
value,  either  by  additions  thereto  or  as  the  result  of  an 
increase  of  prices,  to  the  extent  of  $2,000,  he  must  add 
$1,600  to  bis  insurance. 

Wlien  the  insured  suffers  damage  by  fire  and  has 
kept  up  his  proportion  of  insurance  he  is  entitled  to 
compensation  up  to  the  amount  of  his  insurance.  But 


if  he  has  not  maintained  insurance  to  tbe  extent  of  80 
per  cent,  of  his  values  he  can  collect  only  pro-rata,  in 
the  proportion  which  the  insurance  he  actually  carries 
bears  to  the  insurance  he  ought  to  have  carried  ac- 
cording to  his  agreement  with  the  insurance  company. 

Inventory  Sheets  Valuable  in  Proving  Claim 

Stock  taking  is  such  a  bore  to  many  merchants  that 
they  put  off  taking  an  inventory  of  their  goods.  Some- 
times a  couple  of  years  will  pass  without  any  checking 
up  of  the  contents  of  a  store.  For  the  purpose  of  es- 
tablishing values  in  case  of  fire  it  is  quite  necessary  to 
have  stock  sheets  to  which  to  refer.  It  is  well  to  look 
to  this  at  least  once  a  year.  Better,  it  is  well  in  times 
of  fluctuations  in  prices  such  as  Ave  have  been  ex- 
periencing to  take  stock  half  yearly. 

It  frequently  happens  that  during  the  term  of  a 
policy  some  action  is  taken  by  the  insured  which  in- 
creases the  fire  hazard.  Some  alteration  may  be 
made  to  the  building,  a  garage  might  be  erected  in  con- 
nection with  it,  or  some  appliance  introduced  which 
affects  the  security  of  the  building  or  the  contents. 
The  same  thing  might  happen  with  respect  to  an  ad- 
joining building.  For  example,  the  store  next  door 
might  be  leased  for  a  cleaning  and  pressing  business. 
In  either  case  the  insurance  company  concerned  should 
be  promptly  notified.  Unless  so  notified  the  insurance 
company  can  plead  non-liability  in  case  of  fire;  at 
least  it  will  probably  contest  any  claim  and  seek  a 
compromise. 

The  ordinary  policy  alloAvs  a  total  of  fifteen  days 
during  the  year  for  alterations.  If  improvements  are 
contemplated  it  is  well  to  bring  the  matter  up  for  dis- 
cussion at  the  time  the  insurance  is  being  placed.  Under 
such  circumstances  it  is  customary  to  have  incorporated 
in  the  policy,  permission  for  alterations  totalling  fifteen 
days  at  one  time. 

When  additional  insurance  is  carried  in  other  than 
the  one  company,  notification  of  this  should  be  given  to 
eacli,  and  the  wording  of  the  description  of  the  prop- 
erty should  be  the  same  in  each  policy. 


BILL  PARSON  BROUGHT  IN  THIS 

If  you  think  this  is  a  mild  winter,  ask  a  big  Toronto 
furniture  drummer  who  recently  went  to  bed  early  in 
order  to  get  up  to  catch  one  of  those  morning  trains 
out  of  Owen  Sound.  He  had  just  got  nicely  to  sleep 
when  there  was  a  knock  at  his  door.  "Four  o'clock," 
said  th(>  voice  without.  He  dozed  ofl'  again,  (iime  a 
second  knock,  "Four-fifteen,  the  bus  leaves  in  five 
minutes."  "Hold  that  bus,"  he  yelled  as  he  scrambled 
into  his  clothes.  When  he  rushed  downstairs  the  bus 
was  evidently  gone,  so  he  contiiuicd  his  flight  to  the 
station.  It  was  dark.  He  looked  at  his  watch.  It 
was  eleven  o'clock.  Also  it  was  below  zero.  Now 
he's  sweai'ing  he'll  get  even  with  the  fellows  who  put 
up  the  job. 


40 


» 

CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


MAKE  SIDWAY  CARRIAGES  IN  CANADA 

The  Sidway  Mercantile  Co.  is  called  an  "infant  in- 
dustry" in  the  sense  that  they  make  carriages  for  the 
Canadian  baby.  It  was  in  1905,  the  time  when  fold- 
ing carriages  first  made  their  appearance,  that  the  Sid- 
way  Mercantile  Co.  Avas  founded  in  Elkhart,  Ind.,  with 
12.000  square  feet  of  floor  space  and  25  employees.  In 
this  year  of  peace,  1919,  their  factories  cover  250,000 
feet  and  provide  employment  for  between  500  and  600 
people.  During  this  period  their  sales  have  increased 
from  .fifty  thousand  to  over  two  million  dollars  a  year, 
of  which,  four  hundred  thoxisand  is  paid  in  wages. 
This  faetoiy's  output  does  not  consist  entirely  of  fold- 
ing carriages.  The  Sidway  line  also  embraces  reed 
and  wood  bodies. 

Five  years  ago  the  Sidway  Go.  made  their  entry  into 
Canada  by  acquiring  the  plant  of  the  Goderich  Wheel 
Rigs  at  Goderich,  Ont.  This  plant  was  operated  for 
a  short  time  but  the  company  found  that  until  Cana- 
dian trade  was  further  developed  it  would  be  more 
economical  to  ship  the  manufactured  product  into 
Canada  and  Avarehouse  it.  Distribution  was  made  from 
Goderich  until  two  years  ago,  Avhen  the  Company  i-e- 
moved  their  office  to  Toronto.  During  the  last  few 
years  the  Canadian  business  of  the  Company  has  de- 
veloped very  rapidly,  and  it  has  now  been  decided  to 
manufacture  a  large  portion  of  the  product  in  Canada, 
and  with  this  in  view  the  Company  has  acquired  the 
building  on  Dufferin  St.,  Toronto,  until  recently  oc- 
cupied by  the  Dupont  Fabrikoid  Co.  It  is  expected 
that  this  month  the  plant  will  be  in  full  operation. 

For  the  present  the  company  will  confine  their  manu- 
facture in  Canada  to  reed  carriages,  which  is  their 
largest  item  of  sales.  Other  lines  will  be  manufac- 
tured as  soon  as  conditions  warrant.  This  inaugura- 
tion and  expansion  of  the  Canadian  plant  makes  for 
better  service  and  better  deliveries.  It  also  puts  the 
company  in  intimate  touch  with  Canadian  mai-kets  and 


requirements,  and  freedom  from  expense  and  delay 
resulting  from  the  Customs  regulations. 

The  expansion  of  their  Canadian  plant  Anil  not  in- 
volve any  change  in  management  or  personnel.  C.  A. 
Coryell  will  still  cover  Ontario ;  J.  J.  Xeander,  G.  Ul- 
rieh  and  A.  St.  Hilaire,  Quebec ;  and  A.  E.  Sanders  the 
east  and  west  provinces. 


NEW  TORONTO  FURNITURE  STORE 

The  Sterling  Furniture  Store  is  a  new  Toronto  con- 
cern opening  this  month  at  291-295  Yonge  St.,  the  old 
Bedell  location.  It  is  said  L.  Yolles,  the  Queen  St.  W. 
furniture  dealer,  is  behind  the  proposition. 


GUELPH  STOVE  CO.  SOLD 

Negotiations  which  have  been  in  progress  for  some 
time  for  the  purchase  of  the  Guelph  Stove  Company, 
Ltd.,  at  Guelph,  Ont.,  by  a  Toronto  concern,  have  been 
completed,  and  the  plant  has  been  turned  over.  The 
plant  is  a  large  one.  It  is  understood  that  there  will 
be  a  big  extension  to  the  plant  in  the  near  futur''. 
Owing  to  the  fact  that  the  purchase  of  the  plant  and 
property  also  included  all  the  patent  rights  owned  by 
the  company,  it  will  eontimie  to  be  known  as  the 
Guelph  Stove  Company,  Ltd. 


WHAT  ADVERTISING  HAS  TO  DO 

Advertising  has  a  great  many  things  to  do.  It  has 
to  create  confidence ;  it  has  to  shoAv  the  goods  to  those 
who  do  not  come  to  the  store ;  it  has  to  build  up  busi- 
ness and  good-will.  But  its  primary  function  and 
one  which  justifies  its  cost  to  the  greatest  degree  is 
that  of  bringing  people  into  contact  Avith  the  business, 
it  being  assumed  that  anyone  who  comes  into  contact 
with  that  business  once  is  going  to  be  so  pleased  that 
instead  of  making  a  sale  we  are  going  to  make  a  cus- 
tomer.— James  W.  Fisk,  advertising  manager  for  the 
John  Wanamaker  Stores. 


United  States  plant  of  Sidway  Mercantile  Co.  at  Elkhart,  Indiana. 


Mardh,  1919 


CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


41 


SYSTEM  IN  THE  STORE 

"Work  in  altogether  too  many  stores  is  not  guided 
by  rules  and  regulations  sxit¥ieiently  definite 
to  secure  the  best  resTilts.  There  is  a  great 
lack  of  system  and  etfieiency  'because  employees 
are  not  properly  acquainted  with  just  what  is 
expected  of  them — or  at  least  their  duties  are  not 
clearly  and  strongly  enough  impressed  on  them. 

Value  of  Written  Rules 

Many  stores  have  adopted  a  code  of  rules  for  the 
guidance  of  employees  which  at  once  serve  to  instruct 
them  as  to  their  conduct  and  duties  and  also  acquaint 
them  with  the  general  business  policy  of  the  firm. 
Verbal  instructions  in  this  regard  may  be  all  right  in 
their  way,  but  they  are  not  kept  continuously  before 
employees  in  the  same  way  as  written  rules.  Also, 
when  the  latter  are  used,  employees  have  not  the  excuse 
when  the  rules  are  hroken  or  violatcv^,  that  they  didn 't 
know  they  were  supposed  to  do  so-and-so,  or  that  such- 
and-such  a  policy  was  followed  by  the  store.  They 
are  supposed  to  read,  remember  and  continually  keep 
acquainted  with  them. 

Convenient  Chart  of  One  Firm 

This  was  the  idea  that  one  Canadian  chain  of  stores 
had  in  mind  in  preparing  a  chart  for  each  of  their 
stores,  indicating  not  only  the  duties  of  employers  and 
the  policy  of  the  company,  but  showing  those  in  charge 
of  various  branches  of  the  firm's  work  to  whom  different 
matters  should  be  referred.  A  blue-print  chart  with 
this  matter  arranged  in  a  systematic  manner  was  pre- 
pared for  each  store,  and  is  kept  in  a  convenient  place 
where  it  may  easily  be  referred  to,  and  where  it  can 
frequently  be  read  so  as  to  serve  as  a  constant  guide  as 
well  as  an  inspiration  to  employees. 


MUNITIONS  BOARD  SELLS  FURNITURE 

The  Imperial  Munitions  Board  (Aviation  Depart- 
ment) held  at  Toronto  during  the  first  week  of  Matvh 
an  auction  sale  of  the  Royal  Air  Force  equipment,  ap- 
proximating 145  carloads  of  goods,  much  of  it  fiTrni- 
ture.  Among  this  latter  were  one  buffet,  68  book 
racks,  41  arm  chairs,  1  leather  couch,  2  bedroom  chairs, 
300  chiffoniers,  500  common  chairs,  250  roimd  back 
chairs,  300  harroom  chairs,  4  wicker  arm  chairs,  90 
canvas  folding  chairs,  100  small  common  chairs,  50 
chests  of  drawers,  golden  oak  finish ;  10  settees,  leather; 
200  tables,  36  x  24:  7  card  tables  and  'chaii'S  to  match ; 
58  tables,  28  x  20 :  200  writing  tables ;  14  tables,  30  x 
30;  12  wall  mirrors,  46  door  mats,  150  rag  mats,  20 
round  tables,  6  half-round  tables,  6  umbrella  stands,  50 
wardrobes. 

In  tapestry-covered  furniture  were  85  easy  chairs,  30 
chesterfields,  9  carpet  sijuares,  1  roll  cocoa  matting,  80 
rolls  linoleum.  100  rolls  oilcloth.  Besides  there  were  a 
number  of  office  desks,  chairs  and  other  business  furni- 
ture items. 

2,500  beds,  black  enamelled;  350  beds,  white  en- 
amelled: 1,000  beds,  wooden;  1,500  coal  oil  heaters,  ancl 
100  coal  heaters  were  also  offered. 

Asked  as  to  the  effect  such  a  sale  might  have  on  the 
local  furniture  trade,  a  ])rominont  Toronto  furiiitni'o  ]•(>- 
tailer  said  that  so  far  as  the  beds  were  concerned  thei'(> 
would  be  practically  no  harm  done.  The  beds  offered 
for  sale  were  made  to  special  order  for  the  Govern- 
ment, were  only  three  feet  wide,  while  the  call  on  the 
furniture  trade  was  almost  entirely  for  four  feet  wide 
beds.  In  the  dealer's  own  store  calls  for  three-feet 
wide  heds  would  not  average  more  than  one  a  week. 


As  to  the  other  furniture  lines — chiffoniers,  chairs, 
etc. — the  eff'ect  was  problematical.  He  did  not  think 
any  hurtful  effect  would  result.  Much  of  the  stuff 
Avould  be  bid  on  by  contractors,  public  institutions, 
boarding  houses  and  second-hand  dealers.  Some  of 
these  are  customers  of  retail  furniture  stores,  it  is 
true,  but  the  retail  furniture  dealer  is  more  a  purveyor 
to  the  home  owner  and  housekeeper,  who  want  dis- 
tinctive and  individual  furniture  items. 


SHOW  WINDOW  BACKGROUNDS 

The  American  Architect  has  printed  the  following  as 
to  the  amount  of  light  given  by  different  colored  show 
window  backgrounds : 

Dark  blue  reflects  per  cent,  of  the  light  falling 
upon  it. 

Dark  green,  about  10  per  cent. 

Pale  red,  a  little  more  than  6  per  cent. 

Dark  yellow,  20  per  cent. 

Pale  blue,  30  per  cent. 

Pale  yellow,  40  per  cent. 

Pale  green,  46y2  per  cent. 

Pale  orange,  nearly  55  per  cent. 

And  pale  white,  70  per  cent. 

A  window  finished  in  light  oak  can  be  lighted  with 
must  less  wastage  than  a  window  finished  in  dark 
mahogany;  likewise,  a  window  in  which  white  goods 
are  displayed  can  be  lighted  much  more  economically 
than  a  window  for  a  display  of  dark  clothing,  furniture 
or  hardware,  such  as  stoves,  tools  and  goods  of  a  like 
nature. 


A  CANDLE-BURNING  GUESSING  CONTEST 

To  stimulate  interest  in  his  store,  a  dealer  recently 
conducted  a  candle-burning  contest,  awarding  a  five- 
dollar  gold  piece  to  the  person  making  the  nearest 
guess  as  to  how  long  the  candle  in  his  window  would 
burn.  Every  guess  was  free — all  that  the  customer 
had  to  do  was  to  enter  the  store  and  register.  The 
contest  was  well  advertised  in  the  local  paper. 

Another  dealer  who  used  this  scheme  gave  guesses 
only  to  those  people  making  purchases. 


DO  IT  NOW. 

If  yon  havo  hard  work  to  do, 

Do  it  now. 
To-day  tlic  skies  are  clear  and  blue, 
To-Inorro^v  clouds  may  come  in  view. 
Yeslordaj'  is  not  for  you; 

Do  it  now. 

If  you  ba\e  a  soug  to  sing, 

Sing  it  MOW. 
Let  tlie  notes  of  glMdness  ring 
Clear  as  song  of  bird  in  spring. 
Let  every  day  some  music  bring. 

Sing  it  now. 

If  you  liave  kind  words  to  say, 

Say  lliein  now. 
To-morrow  may  not  come  your  way, 
Do  a  kindness  while  you  niay. 
Loved  ones  will  not  .nlways  stay; 

Say  them  now. 

If  you  have  a  smile  to  show. 

Show  it  now. 
JMake  hearts  happy,  roses  grow. 
Let  the  friends  around  you  know 
The  love  you  have  before  they  go; 

Show  it  now. 


42 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Talking  Machines  in  the 

Furniture  Store 

DEVELOPING  A  RETAIL  TALKING  MACHINE 
BUSINESS  ALONG  PRACTICAL  LINES 

DEALERS  who  fail  to  realize  the  importance  of 
conihating  competition  with  practical  plans  and 
clever  ideas  often  wonder  why  others  make  a 
success  that  is  worth  while,  and  they  only  eke  out  a  fair 
living.  "What  they  lack  in  their  ideas  of  salesmanship 
are  practical  suggestions  to  the  trade.  They  fail  to 
arouse  that  keen  interest  that  is  the  best  possible  argu- 
ment for  making  sales  to  customers  who  come  again. 

A  study  of  the  successful  dealers  in  talking  machines 
and  records  j^roves  that  the  men  or  concerns  who  have 
made  a  striking  advance  have  done  so  from  the  very ' 
fact  that  they  proved  themselves  to  be  men  with  ideas 
that  were  of  value.  Competition  is  a  vital  factor  to- 
day in  the  talking  machine  industry.  This  single  item 
has  done  more  to  develop  the  sale  of  these  machines — 
the  records  follow  as  a  natural  consef(uence — than 
many  of  the  after-effects  and  the  plans  that  have  been 
laid  for  the  betterment  of  business.  The  dealer  who 
does  not  fully  value  this  part  of  his  industry  is  over- 
looking a  very  significant  element.  It  is  doubtful,  in 
fact,  if  he  ever  makes  good. 

In  coping  with  this  mattei-  of  competition  what  can 
the  dealer  do  to  offset  it?  What  can  he  plan  in  the 
method  of  his  sales  or  in  the  display  of  his  stock  or  in 
the  publicity  ideas  that  he  evolves,  that  will  prove  that 
he  is  a  live  man?  Theories  are  of  little  value  in  a  case 
of  this  kind.  What  is  demanded  now  are  facts.  He 
must  adhere  to  helps  that  will  induce  the  public  to 
seek  him,  and  this  can  only  be  done  in  a  profitable  way 
by  making  his  place  of  business  a  magnet.  The  people 
are  not  coming  to  him  from  sentiment  altogether.  But 
this,  too.  will  prove  a  help  when  rightly  distributed. 

Practical  helps  are  made  up  of  displays,  both  in  the 
windows  and  in  the  sales  section.  Care  in  arranging 
the  stock.  Rapidity  with  which  the  machines  can  be 
shown  and  a  careful  kiiowledge  in  the  placing  of  the 
records.  There  must  be  a  reason  why  the  trade  will 
seek  you  when  other  concerns  are  not  overlooking  the 
need  for  giving  the  trade  all  that  that  service  implies. 
Poor  displays  are  not  going  to  help  you.  Lack  of  some 
pi-actical  sales  system  in  giving  your  customers  Avhat 
they  want  (|uickly  is  not  going  to  encourage  them  to 
buy  now  or  to  come  back  later.  They  are  after  that 
<iuality  of  .service  that  is  the  ready-to-see  brand. 

Xow  what  is  your  live  competitor  doing  to  increase 
his  sales?  What  has  been  the  reason  for  his  success? 
Go  to  his  stoi-e  and  ascertain.  How?  Will  you  ask 
him  to  explain  this  to  you?  No.  Tf  you  did  he  would 
refuse  you.  You  must  find  out  for  yourself.  This  is 
sometimes  an  easy  matter  and  at  others  it  is  a  difficult 
one.  But  you  can  ascertain  some  things  by  pains- 
taking observation.  However,  as  imitation  is  a  very 
had  rpiality  of  flattery,  yon  will  doubtless  refuse  to  play 
the  second  part  in  this  sales  game. 


Then  you  will  be  compelled  to  modify  his  plans  and 
to  improve  upon  them  if  you  can,  and  therein  lies  the 
secret  that  Avill  be  your  most  logical  argument  for  bet- 
ter sales.  The  best  way  to  prove  that  you  are  a  capable 
man  is  to  take  a  careful  inspection  of  yourself.  Begin 
with  your  individual  self.  Co  over  your  own  ideas  of 
salesmanship,  of  display,  of  stock  and  of  customer  re- 
ception. Then  make  a  note  of  the  value  of  your  em- 
ployees. What  percentage  of  them  are  making  good? 
Have  you  watched  their  sales  plans  and  have  you  noted 
the  reason  as  to  why  sales  were  often  lacking? 

Perhaps  they  have  been  lacking  on  account  of  their 
inability  to  make  good.  They  were  ignorant  of  the 
first  qualifications  of  salesmanship.  They  did  not  know 
how  to  receive  a  ciistomer  intelligently.  This  is  not 
to  be  wondered  at.  There  are  a  great  many  inferior 
salespeople.  Cheap  help,  while  not  always  a  draw- 
back, is  likely  to  be  an  asset  to  your  competitor.  He 
might  become  aware  of  this,  for  people  are  going  to 
comment  at  times,  you  know,  of  things  that  do  not 
directly  concern  them. 

It  may  be  that  your  stock  is  lacking  in  the  number 
and  character  of  the  machines  offered  or  in  the  records 
shown.  This  is  sure  to  create  unfavoi*able  comment, 
and  when  the  public  becomes  aAvare  that  you  are  a 
failure  in  this  way  they  are  not  going  to  give  you  very 
much  consideration.  In  buyhig  records,  particularly, 
they  want  to  have  the  pleasure  of  making  a  selection 
from  a  number  of  pieces.  They  want  to  be  given  a 
practical  demonstration  of  your  ability  to  show  them 
that  you  have  the  stock  to  meet  their  Avhims. 

You  may  think  that  this  is  a  foolish  idea.  It  is,  if  we 
look  at  in  one  M-ay.  But  we  must  look  at  it  in  a  broad 
way  and  cater  to  the  ])ublie's  Avhims.  The  same  rule 
applies  to  the  editor  of  a  magazine.  He  must  give  his 
readers  something  that  will  please  them  regardless  of 
what  his  personal  opinion  might  be.  The  practical 
dealer  is  a  man  who  caters  to  the  public  taste.  He 
forgets  his  own  ideas  and  tastes.  He  is  seeking  to  sell 
the  public,  and  he  stands  ready  to  combat  competition 
with  this  striking  argument. 

The  live  dealer  values  this  to  the  limit.  He  does  not 
l)ermit  his  tastes  to  interfere  with  the  public's  and  he 
pleases  them  by  this  large  idea.  It  is  a  practical  one. 
He  serves  them  with  that  care  that  is  an  insurance  that 
they  can  get  what  is  wanted.  They  may  be  selfish,  and 
'Ihey  may  be  exacting  and  they  may  prove  to  be  annoy- 
ing at  times.  The  dealer  Avho  is  keen  to  these  notions 
oA'erlooks  them.  The  important  part  that  he  sees  is  in 
making  the  customer  a  satisfied  one.  He  will  pass  up 
his  own  ideas  when  he  finds  that  they  are  incompatible 
with  the  customer's. 

What  is  competition  doing  for  you  that  you  cannot 
make  capital  of?  What  is  that  live  dealer  over  the 
way  doing  now  that  makes  his  trade  so  good?  Well, 
he  does  advertise.  Yes,  and  he  backs  no  his  publicity 
statements  with  facts.     Otherwise  his  advertising  is  a 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


43 


'  1^  HE  Phonola  is  not  "assembled."  It 
is  "built."  Every  detail  in  its 
construction  is  aimed  at  the  one  result 
— to  make  a  strictly  high-grade  musical 
instrument.  That  is  what  gives  the 
Phonola  Line  individuality. 


The  Phonola  and  Phonola  Records 

The  Combination  for  1919 


Thinking  dealers  have  good  reason  to  part  company  with  those  who  bewail  looked-for  depres- 
sion. Canada's  foundations — agriculturally,  financially,  and  socially — were  never  so  strong  as 
they  are  now. 

We'  ve  learned  to  finance  our  own  undertakings.  The  nations  of  the  world  are  our  customers. 
There's  room  for  millions  more  people  in  our  land — and  development  work  for  them  to  do. 

Musically,  every  home  now  is  beginning  to  see  the  necessity  of  music.  The  returned  soldiers, 
in  settling  down,  will  create  thousands  of  new  homes,  and  they  all  know  that  life  without  the 
phonograph  is  impossible. 

PHONOLAS  and  PHONOLA  RECORDS  will  be  sold  on  a  bigger  scale  than  ever.  Are 
you  a  Phonola  dealer?    The  line  mcludes  a  design  for  every  taste,  and  a  price  for  every  purse. 

And  remember  PHONOLA  RECORDS.     Write  for  the  monthly  lists  of  new  records. 

The  Phonola  Co.  of  Canada^  Limited 

KITCHENER  CANADA 


44 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


deception  and  the  public  is  not  going  to  he  deceived  for 
very  long.  But  he  makes  good  because  he  proves  that 
he  "^is  a  practical  dealer.  That  is  the  sum  total  of 
what  this  means. 

His  window  displays  are  attractive.  They  prove 
that  he  is  fully  alive  to  the  needs  of  the  public.  They 
are  in  touch  with  anything  that  is  the  order  of  the  day. 
It  might  be  a  national  celebration  or  it  might  be  a  local 
affair.  It  might  be  an  opera  celebrity  or  a  musical 
artist  who  is  to  give  a  recital  in  his  city.  He  makes 
this  one  feature  a  practical  help  to  the  customers.  If 


there  is  a  popular  song  or  a  hit  in  the  musical  world  he 
places  these  records  in  the  forefront.  It  proves  to  the 
public  that  he  is  a  man  who  is  in  touch  with  the  world, 
and  that  it  is  to  their  interest  to  deal  with  a  man  of  this 
type.  I  ;■ 

How  are  you  a  practical  dealer?  Are  your  ideag 
based  on  a  foundation  that  does  inspii-e  the  public  with 
the  belief  that  you  are  a  capable  dealer?  If  your  com- 
petition is  keen  well  and  good,  you  have  a  stronger 
reason  then  to  work  all  the  harder  that  your  store  will 
become  the  trade  mecca  of  your  locality. 


Handling  An  Undecided  Customer 


Some  excellent  and  timely  advice  to  the  salesman  on 
the  handling  of  the  undecided  customer  is  offered  in 
a  recent  issue  of  "The  Voice  of  the  Victor."  Just  now 
salesmanship  is  of  such  great  value  that  the  advice  is 
well  worth  studying  Avith  profit. 

In  the  good  old  days,  when  you  and  a  lot  of  other  fel- 
lows went  swimming,  you  will  remember  the  fellow 
who  stood  shivering  on  the  bank  until  some  one  shoved 
him  in.  He  wanted  that  swim  as  badly  as  the  rest 
of  you,  but  couldn't  decide  to  take  the  first  plunge. 
And  that's  the  way  he  goes  through  life;  never  acting 
on  his  OAvn  initiative — even  when  buying  a  Victrola— 
but  always  waiting  for  some  one  else  to  make  the  deci- 
sion for  him. 

Physiognomists — those  scientists  who  classify  differ- 
ent types  by  their  features — tell  us  that  this  sort  of 
person  bears  the  earmarks  of  the  indecisive  type.  Close 
scrutiny,  they  claim,  will  generally  show  him  to  have 
flat  brows  and  a  long,  narrow  and  weak  chin.  His 
head  is  apt  to  be  very  narrow  above  and  behind  the 
ears  and  rather  square  in  back,  and  their  observations 
show  that  such  people  are  generally  dark  complexioned 
and  have  small  snub  noses. 

Maybe,  maybe  not,  but  if  an  approaching  customer 
bears  some  of  these  marks  and,  when  confronted  by 
you,  looks' up  in  a  timid  apprenhensive  sort  of  way  and 
says:  "I'm  just  looking" — it's  safe  to  assume  that  he 
lacks  initiative.  Arrived  at  this  conclusion  it's  up  to 
you  to  make  him  decide  then  and  there.  For,  left  to 
decide  for  themselves,  such  people  will  generally  leave 
you  at  the  end  of  an  hour  with  a  smile  and  an  "I'll 
come  again." 

Big  things  always  stagger  this  type  of  individual,  so 
avoid  the  momentous  question  of  buying  the  article, 
and  don't  mention  the  price  of  it.  If  you  are  trying  to 
sell  him  a  Victrola,  sidetrack  the  main  issue  and  in- 
terest him  in  records.  Find  out,  if  possible,  his  busi- 
ness— where  he  lives,  what  his  favorite  pastime  is  and 
whether  or  not  he  has  children.  Then  select  the  type 
Victrola  you  think  he  can  afford  and  sell  the  instrument 
to  him  piece  by  piece.  Show  him  such  things  as  the 
automatic  stop,'  the  flexible  tone  arm,  the  record  filing 
system,  and  even  tell  him  the  best  needle  to  use  Avith 
each  record  you  play  for  him.  Be  sure  to  lay  aside  all 
the  records  he  professes  a  liking  for. 

Paint  a  picture  of  the  Victrola  in  the  home,  dwell- 
ing on  the  enjoyment  it  will  bring  to  his  family  and  his 
friends.  For  the  indecisive  man  is  an  idealist.  There- 
fore, he  is  more  liable  to  decide  to  buy  a  Victrola  if  he 
believes  that  he  is  doing  some  one  else  a  service  than  he 
is  if  you  merely  tell  him  of  the  pleasure  he  will  derive 


from  his  purchase.  In  a  casual  sort  of  way  ascertain 
on  what  terms  he  would  like  to  buy  and  hoAv  soon  he 
would  like  the  Victrola  delivered  if  he  should  buy  it. 
Then  give  him  the  final  shove. 

Hand  him  your  pen  and  show  him  where  to  sign  the 
contract — which  you  have  already  filled  out  as  far  as 
possible. 

Tactfully,  but  forcefully,  make  him  realize  that  he  is 
not  buying  a  Victrola  for  his  own  entertainment  as 
much  as  he  is  for  the  entertainment  and  education  of 
his  family  and  their  friends.  Show  him  that  he  is 
taking  advantage  of  your  position  if  he  doesn't  buy 
after  alloAving  you  to  spend  so  much  of  your  time 
demonstrating  the  Victrola  and  playing  records  for 
him.  Make  it  plain  to  him  that  it  was  only  natural 
for  you  to  conchide  that  he  intended  to  buy  and  that 
therefore  you  have  drawn  up  a  contract  Avhich  is  readj' 
for  his  signature. 

If  he  is  the  indecisive  person  you  thought  him  he  Avill 
sign,  for  he  wants  to  badly  enough,  only,  like  the  rest 
of  his  kind,  can't  decide  to  do  so.  And  your  con- 
science needn't  trouble  you,  for  yoi;  Avill  really  have 
done  the  poor  fellow  an  inestimable  favor.  He  Avanted 
that  Victrola  just  as  badly  as  the  reluctant  sAvimmer 
Avanted  the  sAvim,  but  needed  a  good  strong  shove. 


PHONOGRAPH  AS  EDUCATOR 

The  greatest  factors  that  exist  at  the  present  time  in 
the  spreading  of  music  and  the  inducement  of  a  love 
for  it,  are  the  music  reproducing  machines  of  all  kinds. 
What  these  have  done  to  promote  general  musical 
knowledge  cannot  be  over-estimated.  W1\a%  you 
meet  people  who,  a  fcAv  years  ago,  Avould  not  ha\'e 
knoAvn  the  name  of  one  great  musical  composition. "who 
now  are  familiar  not  only  Avith  the  composers,  but  Avith 
their  foremost  interpreters  and  the  ways  in  Avhich 
these  interpretations  have  been  conceived.  These 
people  know  every  note  of  Avorks  they  hadn't  even 
heard  a  few  years  ago.  It  is  not  enough  for  a  compo- 
sition to  be  great  to  help  the  world,  apparently;  it 
must  be  known  to  be  great.  With  a  man  it  is  a  differ- 
ent matter.  Do  your  work  well,  and  you  AAdll  be 
judged  by  it.  There  are  always  those  Avho  can  judge 
if  one's  work  is  good ;  let  them  judge. 


NEW  PRICES  ON  PHONOLAS 

The  Phonola  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  manufacturers  of 
"Fhonola"  talking  machines  and  records,  have  issued 
a  ncAV  price  list  on  their  "Phonolas"  shoAving  a  little 
advance  on  their  former  prices.  The  new  prices, 
which  include  the  Avar  tax  are  as  foUoAvs : 

Phonola  "G,"  $25  ;  Phonola  "€,"  $39  ;  Phonola  "B." 
mahogany,  $61;  oak.  $61;  Phonola  "A,"  $80;  "Duch- 
ess," $95;  "Duke,"  $118;  "Grand  Duke,"  .*US : 
"Princess,"  $180;  "Prince,"  $225;  Organola,  $340. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


45 


ACCOUNTING  WITH  MODERN  MACHINERY 


IIIMIMIMIIMIIMIIIIIMIIIIMIIMIIIMIIIIIIMMIMIMIMIIIIIMIMIIIIMinillllllMIIIIIMMIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIII^ 

By  its  use  the  evils  attending  the  credit  system  can  be  eliminated — Minimum  of  labor — Prevent  account  running 

I  Mini  iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiMiiiiiii:iiiiiiniiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiMi;iiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii^ 


By  W.  L. 

LACK  of  efficient  machin-   
ery    and    absence  of 
adequate    system  are 
the  evils  M^hich  bring  the 
credit  system  in  the  retail 
trade  into  bad  repute. 

When  a  manufacturer  dis- 
covers inefficiency  in  his 
machinery  or  defects  in  his 

business  methods  he  endeavors  to  secure  more  efficient 
machinery  or  to  correct  his  business  methods  as  the 
case  may  be.  He  doesn't  come  to  the  conclusion  that 
because  of  the  defects  he  has  discovered  machinery 
should  be  discarded  and  that  system  should  be  throvpn 
to  the  winds.  Knowing  that  this  would  be  the  height 
of  folly  he  concentrates  his  mind  upon  the  considera- 
tion of  ways  and  means  that  will  correct  the  evils  he 
has  discovered. 

Being  a  distributer  and  not  a  producer,  the  retailer 
does  not  use  machinery  in  the  same  sense  as  a  manu- 
facturer does.  But  he  uses  machinery  just  the  same. 
If  he  doesn't  his  store  is  not  efficiently  equipped.  And 
where  there  is  inefficiency  of  equipment  there  must  ne- 
cessarily be  inefficiency  of  service. 

As  ninety-five  per  cent,  of  the  retail  business  of  the 
country  is  conducted  under  the  credit  system  it  natur- 
ally follows  that  the  machinery  and  the  methods  em- 
ploj-ed  in  carrying  it  on  should  be  of  the  most  efficient 
character  possible.  If  in  both  respects  efficiency  is 
not  employed  trouble  is  bound  to  follow. 

Ample  Supply  of  Efficient  Machinery 

As  far  as  machinery  for  looking  after  the  credit  sys- 
tem is  concerned,  there  is  an  ample  supply.  All  the 
retailer  has  to  do  is  to  pay  his  money  and  take  his 
choice.  If  his  business  is  of  such  a  character  that  he 
deems  it  necessary  to  install  the  complex  double  entry 
system,  all  he  has  to  do  is  purchase  the  necessary  books 
and  employ  a  bookkeeper  competent  to  look  after  them. 
If  all  that  he  wants  is  efficiency  without  complexity  that 
is  also  at  his  command.  As  it  is  the  latter  system  which 
the  average  retailer  wants,  and  should  want,  it  is  that 
in  which  he  is  most  interested. 

As  a  matter  of  fact  some  of  the  machinery  which  is 
available  for  the  keeping  a  record  of  credit  sales  is  so 
characterized  by  both  efficiency  and  simplicity  that  it 
is  fully  competent  to  supply  the  requirements  of  any 
retail  business,  whether  it  be  large  or  small  and  at  a 
cost,  both  in  the  original  outlay  and  in  maintenance, 
which  is  little  short  of  remarkable  for  the  service 
rendered. 

What  Modern  Machinery  Accomplishes 

The  first  requisite  in  any  system  of  bookkeeping  is 
of  course  the  preservation  of  a  record  of  the  sales 
which  have  been  made  on  the  credit  basis.  This  sys- 
tem must  be  thorough  and  in  accordance  with  the  re- 
quirements of  the  business.  Because  of  the  complex 
character  of  the  old  systems  in  the  years  gone  by  many 
a  retail  store,  particularly  the  smaller  kinf",  was  with- 
out effective  bookkeeping  methods. 

Even  to-day,  in  spite  of  the  extraordinary  develop- 


With  modern  accounting  systems  it  is 
an  easy  matter  for  the  retailer  to  conduct 
a  safe  and  successful  credit  business. 


EDMONDS 

ments  which  have  taken 
place  in  regard  to  bookkeep- 
ing methods,  we  occasionally 
hear  of  instances,  even  in 
large  stores,  where  the  sys- 
tem employed  is  totally  in- 
adequate for  the  require- 
ments of  the  business.  As 
bookkeeping  is  now  made 
compulsory  by  law  we  occasionally  hear  of  cases  before 
the  courts  where  no  books  of  any  kind  are  kept. 

But  while  the  first  essential  of  bookkeeping  is  the 
preservation  of  records,  the  most  up-to-date  systems 
specially  designed  for  the  retail  trade  provide  for  even 
more  than  this.  One  thing  which  at  least  some  of 
them  do  in  addition  to  preserving  records  is  to  provide 
the  facilities  for  invoicing.  And  what  is  more,  auto- 
matically providing  the  invoices. 

The  latter  provision  is  of  almost  untold  value,  par- 
ticularly where  the  retailer's  facilities  for  looking  after 
his  accounts  are  limited.  And  the  saving  of  labor  en- 
tailed is  not  the  only  consideration.  For  being  auto- 
matic these  modern  systems  of  accounting  enable  the 
retailer  to  ascertain  when  each  and  every  credit  sale 
is  made  the  exact  amount  that  the  customer  owes  him. 
The  advantage  of  this  is  obvious,  for  he  does  not  have 
to  turn  up  his  books,  possibly  at  a  time  when  he  can 
ill-afford  to  spare  the  time  to  do  so,  in  order  to  ascertain 
how  the  account  stands,  as  the  record  is  provided  with 
each  sale.  Furthermore  it  enables  him  to  judge  when 
to  apply  the  brakes  to  a  customer  whose  account  is  run- 
ning to  dangerous  proportions.  And  last,  but  not 
least,  it  facilitates  the  collection  of  accounts. 

In  a  word  the  great  advantage  of  these  modern  sys- 
tems of  bookkeeping  for  the  retail  store  is  of  a  two-fold 
nature.  In  the  first  place  it  provides  at  a  minimum 
of  labor  the  most  effective  of  accounting  machinery.  In 
Ihe  second  place  it  prevents  an  account  running,  with- 
out the  retailer  being  aware  of  the  fact,  to  an  undue 
length.  And  in  the  third  place  it  facilitates  the  collec- 
tion of  accounts. 


MAKE  SELLERS  CABINETS  IN  CANADA 

Alex.  H.  Davidson  and  Jacob  Beclitel.  of  Southamp- 
ton, Out.,  are  promoting  a  by-law  to  take  over  the  chair 
factory  plant  of  the  Boll  Fui-niture  Co.  at  Southamp- 
ton, and  will  manufactui'e  under  the  name  of  the  Sellers 
Kitchen  Cabinet  Co.  of  Canada,  making  the  line  of 
kitchen  cabinets  of  the  U.  S.  firm  of  the  same  name. 
The  Bell  Furniture  Co.  are  heavily  interested  in  the  un- 
dertaking and  will  control  the  selling  end  of  the  busi- 
ness. 


Mr.  Lindsay,  of  the  Burroughes  Furniture  Co.,  To- 
ronto, met  with  a  nasty  accident  which  laid  him  up  for 
a  few  days  recently.  While  running  for  a  street  ear 
his  foot  snapped  and  he  was  compelled  to  go  to  the 
Western  Hospital.  No  bones  Avere  bi'oken.  Mr, 
Lindsay  is  an  old-time  ruiuiei',  but  he  has  learned  that 
it  is  not  Aviso  to  try  to  do  too  many  stunts  oiitside  the 
race  track. 


1 

46  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  March,  191U 


Maxwell  Sanitary  Steel  Vaults 


Our  Customers  are  Assured  of  Superlative  Qyality  and  Prompt  Delivery. 

Maxwell  Vaults  are  Abundantly  Strong  for  All  Burial  Purposes,  Yet 
Light  and  Easy  to  Handle. 

Superiority  Unquestioned  Design  and  Construction  Unequaled 

Carried  in  Stock  f>y  All  Leading  Jobbers 

Asfi  for  Revised  Price  List 

Maxwell  Ambulance  Transfer  Case 


Recent  Changes  in  Design  and  Construction  have  Greatly  Improved  the  Appearance  and  Practic;  1 
Utility  of  this  Case,  and  Reduced  its  Weight,  Making  it  much  more  Convenient  to  Handle. 

Removable  Interior  Tray  Retains  All  Leakage  and  Discharge,  and  Greatly  Facilitates  the  Handling 
of  Bodies.     Handles  conveniently  placed  to  enable  two  persons  to  remove  without  difficulty. 
Iniide  Dimentions:  73  in.  long,  20  in.  wide,  15  in.  deep. 
Price*:  With  Tray  $38.00;  Without  Tray  $36.00;  Tray  Alone  $8.00 

Sold  by  the  Leading  Canadian  Jobbers. 

Manufactured  by 


MAXWELL  STEEL  VAULT  COMPANY,  ONEIDA,  N.Y. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


47 


Undertakers'  Department 

Problems  affecting  the  Undertaking  Profession  are  here  discussed  and  readers  are  incited  to  send  letters  t^^^^^^^^^^^^amm^ 

expressing  their  views  on  any  of  the  subjects  dealt  with — News  of  the  profession  throughout  Canada. 


FUNERAL   OF  SIR  WILFRID  LAURIER 

lllllllllllllll  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIMIIIIMIIIIII'Mlllllli:i|llll!ll!MllliniMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIIIM 

How  funeral  arrangements  were  handled— The  lying-in-state  and  the  procession — Services  at  the  church  and 
cemetery  —  A  Toronto  funeral  director  lends  his  help  —  The  casket  and  vault  —  Floral  tributes  —  Late  Notes 

IIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIinilllllllllllMlllinillllllllllllllllllliniMIMIIIIIIIMI  IMIIIIIIIMIMInlllllllllllllllllll^ 

By  STAFF  CORRESPONDENT 

SIR  WILFRID  LAURIER  is  dead,  Avas  the  message 
flashed  all  over  the  world  on  Feb.  17,  and  in  his 
passing  Canada  lost  one  of  her  greatest  men.  Not 
only  the  capital  city,  but  the  whole  nation  mourned. 

The  news  of  his  taking  off  is  now,  of  course,  not  en- 
tirely news.  The  daily  papers  of  the  whole  Dominion 
have  had  pictures  and  descriptions  of  life,  his  death 
and  his  funeral  and  on  this  score  there  is  very  little  to 
add. 

It  is  the  funeral  side,  however,  that  interests  the 
funeral  directors.  Gauthier  &  Co.,  had  charge  of  the 
funeral,  the  brothers  Edmoud  and  Henri  giving  their 
personal  attention.  The  Cauthier  firm  were  the  family 
undertakers,  and  through  marriage  are  said  to  be  re- 
lated to  the  Laurier  family. 


The  body  was  laid  out  in  a  bronze  metallic  casket 
supplied  hj  the  Montreal  warehouse  of  Dominion 
Manufacturers,  Ltd.  The  embalming  was  done  by  the 
Gauthier  firm,  the  remains,  after  the  week's  lying-in- 
state, being  well  preserved.  The  lighting  of  the 
chamber  at  Parliament  House,  where  the  body  was 
laid  out,  was  for  the  first  few  days  very  bad,  but  the 
last  day  or  two,  after  alterations,  showed  improve- 
ment. 

The  Lying-in-State 

The  death  occurred  on  Monday  and  the  funeral  on 
Saturday.  In  the  interval  the  body  was  laid  out  at 
Sir  Wilfrid's  home  and  for  the  last  three  days  in  the 
temporary  House  of  Commons  Chamber  in  Victoria 


48 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Museum.  R.  U.  Stone,  of  Toronto,  had  gone  down  to 
Ottawa  on  Thursday  and  offered  his  services  to  the 
Gauthier  firm,  and  for  them  he  changed  and  re-arranged 
the  lighting  in  the  Assembly  Chamber  and  marshalled 
the  thousands  of  people  who  came  to  view  the  body. 
So  great  was  the  crowd  that  a  continual  procession  of 
people  passed  the  bier  at  the  rate  of  about  40  a  minute 
without  a  hitch.  Something  like  50,000  people  viewed 
the  remains. 

The  funeral  cortege  on  Saturday  morning  was  per- 
haps the  most  impressive  seen  in  'Canada  in  many  a 
day.  Following  the  hearse,  drawn  by  four  horses,  were 
representatives  of  royalty,  judges,  veterans.  Cabinet- 
ministers,  senators,  members  of  Parliament,  labor  men, 
farmers,  and  thousands  of  the  common  people. 

R.  U.  Stone  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  honorary 
pallbearers,  who  walked  beside  the  hearse  the  whole 
distance  to  the  church  and  cemetei-y.  These  pall- 
bearers were  Sir  Thomas  White,  Si-r  James  Lougheed, 
Sir  Wm.  Mulock,  Sir  Allen  Aylesworth,  Sir  Lomer 
Gouin,  Hon.  Sydney  Fisher,  Hon.  Rodolphe  Lemieux, 
Hon.  Chas.  Murphy,  Hon.  Jacques  Bureau,  Hon.  Frank 
Oliver,  Senator  Belcourt,  Senator  Dandurand,  Senator 
Edward,  Senator  David,  J.-  A.  Robb,  M.P.,  and  Mayor 
Lavigeur,  of  Quebec. 

A  Nation  Mourns 

There  was  a  solemnity  throughout  the  Avhole  city, 
there  were  the  tolling  of  church  bells,  and  the  streets 
were  lined  with  thousands  of  people.  A  platoon  of 
Dominion  Police  headed  the  procession,  then  followed 
seven  large  sleighs  loaded  Avith  floAvers,  laurels  and 
evergreens.  The  hearse  came  next,  then  mourners, 
cabinet  ministers,  heads  of  churches,  speaker  and 
members  of  Senate,  His  Excellency  the  Governor- 
General  and  Maj.  Gen.  Gwatkin,  representing  the  Duke 
of  Connaught;  speaker  and  members  of  the  Commons, 
representatives  of  municipalities,  returned  soldiers  and 
personal  friends. 

Three  Lieut-Governors  Avere  present — ^Sir  Chas. 
Fitzpatrick.  Quebec;  Sir  Richard  Lake,  SaskatcheAvan 
Hon.  Wm.  Pugsley,  NeAV  BrunsAvick ;  and  special  trains 
from  Toronto,  Montreal.  Brockville  and  Quebec.  Dur- 
ing the  fiineral  all  business  Avas  supended  in  OttaAva, 
and  many  business  houses  in  Montreal,  Toronto  and 
other  centres  suspended  Avork  for  a  fcAv  minutes.  The 
C.  P.  R.  stopped  all  trains  on  their  system  for  a  minute. 

The  funeral  proceeded  to  the  Basilica,  where  High 
Mass  and  the  funeral  services  Avere  chanted.  The 
Apostolic  Delegate  to  Canada,  Mgr.  Pietro  dr  Maria,. 


AA'as  celebrant,  and  he  Avas  assisted  by  Canons  Cam- 
peau  and  Plantin,  Revs.  F.  Maynard  and  Martin,  Mgr. 
J.  0.  Routhier  represented  the  Archbishop  of  OttaAva. 

In  the  church  the  casket  Avas  laid  on  an  elevated  bier 
in  the  centre  of  the  church,  surmounted  hy  a  canopy 
and  surrounded  by  hundreds  of  candles.  The  church 
Avas  draped  in  black  edged  Avith  gold.  Four  young  men 
attendants  in  full  dress,  stood  at  each  corner  of  the 
bier;  and  a  choir  of  75  voices  chanted  the  service. 
The  Last  Tributes 

The  funeral  orations  Avere  delivered  by  Archbishops 
Mathieu,  of  Regina  (in  French),  and  Father  Burke, 
C.  S.  P.,  Toronto  (in  English),  both  of  AA'hom  delivered 
impressive  sermons. 

The  procession  to  Notre  Dame  Cemetery,  in  the  out- 
skirts of  Ottawa,  Avas  resumed.  Lady  Laurier  going  the 
entire  Avay.  The  casket  was  enclosed  in  a  MaxAvell 
steel  vault.  Father  Lajeune.  Sir  Wilfrid 's  pastor,  offi- 
ciated at  the  grave. 

Not  many  outside  funeral  directors  Avere  noticed  at 
the  funeral.  T.  E.  Simpson,  M.P.,  of  the  Soo.  Avas 
there,  as  also  was  J.  J.  Marsh,  of  Smith's  Falls. 

The  driver  of  the  funeral  car  Avas  an  old  man  70 
years  of  age,  the  same  man  who  in  1896,  Avhen  Sir 
Wilfrid  Laurier  came  into  power  at  OttaAva.  drove  the 
carriage  in  VAdiich  Sir  Wilfrid  was  driven  in  a  some- 
AA^hat  triumphal  procession. 

The  floAvers  Avere  both  numerous  and  beautiful,  whole 
carloads  of  floral  tributes  being  brought  up  from  NeAv 
York  and  Boston.  Souvenir  hunters,  howcA-er,  got  in 
their  Avork,  and  many  of  the  floAvers  were  carried  off 
from  the  cemetery  folloAA^ng  the  funeral. 

The  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce.  AA'ith  com- 
mendable enterprise  had  moA^ng  pictures  taken  of  the 
funeral,  and  Avithin  48  hours  these  pictures  Avere  A'ieAved 
by  thousands  in  OttaAva.  Montreal,  and  Toronto. 

THE  BRIDGE  BUILDER 

An  old  man  going  a  lonely  way, 
Caime  in  the  evening,  dark  and  gray, 
To  a  chasm  A^ast  and  deep  and  Avide. 

The  old  man  crossed  in  the  twilight  dim, 
The  sullen  stream  had  no  fear  for  him. 
But  lie  turned  Avhen  safe  on  the  other  side 
And 'built  a  hridge  to  span  the  tide. 

Said  a  felloAv  pilgrim  standing  near, 
"You  are  Avasting  your  time  in  building  here. 
Your  life  will  end  Avith  the  close  of  the  day. 
You  never  again  Avill  pass  this  way. 

You've  ero'Sised  the  chasm  deep  and  Avide, 
Why  build  you  this  bridge  to  stem  the  tide?" 

The  builder  lifted  his  old  gray  head, 
And  turning  to  his  friend  he  said, 
"There  follow  after  me  to-day. 
Three  youths  Avhose  Footsteps  pass  this  Avay. 

This  chasm  Avhieh  Avas  as  naught  to  me. 

To  those  good  youths  may  a  pitfall  be. 

They  may  not  be  able  the  tide  to  stem. 

Good  friend,  I  have  builded  this  bi'idge  for  them." 


Paramount  Phonograph  &  Record  Co.  of  Canada, 
Ltd.,  has  been  incorporated.  Capital,  $300,000 ;  head 
office,  Montreal. 


CANICULA  ™™r 


That  velvety-flow  fluid  that  is  different; 
does  not  burn  or  shrivel  the  arteries, 
allowing  the  operator  to  inject  as  often 
as  he  likes  and  obtain  that  desired  eff"ect. 

CANICULA  CHEMICAL  COMPANY 

366  Bathurst  Street       -       TORONTO,  CANADA 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


49 


FUNERAL    RITES    AND  CEREMONIES 


 „ii,  mil,  miiiimimi  i  i  i'  mii  Miim  mmmiiimiimiii  iMiiimmiiiiimmii  mmmiiii  i  :  i  iiiiimmii  mii  i  mi  ii  i  iiiii 

Continuing  the  subject  of  funeral  arrangement$— Details  of  procedure  at  the  home— Give  the  best  that  is  in  you 
—Consult  the  family's  wishes— After  the  foundation  work  busy  yourself  on  the  outfit — Selling  them  the  casket 

 iimm„i,  iiimmmi  i  ii  iimi  iiimii  iiii  iMimm  iiiiNiiiiiii  iiii  iiiiiiii  mmmiiimi  i  Miiimmmiiii  i  iiiiiiiiiiiiiimi  iiiiiiimmiiii  ii  iimiiiiiii  i  ii  iiii 

By  H.  C.  WILMOT. 


THE  soul  has  departed,  "and  we  as  undertakers  are 
called  in  to  take  charge  of  the  remains  of  tlie 
departed,  and  to  take  charge  of  the  last  tribute 
of  respect  the  living  can  show  the  dead;  namely,  the 
funeral  service.  In  doing  this,  we  know,  if  we  be- 
lieve, that  we  are  simply  holding  services  over  the 
framework  in  which  lived  the  departed,  and  it  is  up 
to  you,  whatever  the  religious  belief  of  the  family  may 
be,  to  render  this  service  as  near  what  they  Avish  as  it 
is  possible  for  you  to  do.  You  should  talk  everything 
over  with  at  least  one  member  of  the  family,  and  it  is 
well  if  the  family  allows  just  one  to  confer  with  the 
undertaker.  One  member  of  the  family,  or  a  close 
friend  of  the  family,  is  sufficient,  and  it  is  better  than 
having  too  many  to  take  orders  from. 

After  the  embalming  work  is  done  the  body  should 
be  placed  in  a  side  room  or  in  the  front  parlor.  The 
idea  is  to  lay  the  body  in  a  room  that  will  not  be  used 
much  by  the  living,  and  yet  handy  and  accessible  for 
friends  who  will  call  to  extend  their  sympathy.  I 
generally  look  the  house  over  and  select  my  place  and 
then  ask  permission  of  the  family  to  use  same,  which 
is  never  refused.  Right  here  starts  proper  funeral 
conducting  and  arrangements.  The  foundation  Avork 
is  done.  The  body  has  been  prepared.  How  about 
your  outfit?  What  have  you  got  or  what  are  you  using 
to  lay  the  body  out  on?  This  is  the  start.  Are  you 
going  to  fall  down  before  you  really  get  started?  Per- 
mit me  to  refer  to  the  beautiful  couches  I  use  for  this 
work.  I  have  used  couches  for  fifteen  years,  and  to-day 
they  are  not  making  them  fine  enough  or  dainty  enough 
to  suit  me.  T  never  can  see  a  beautiful  throw,  pilloAv 
or  face  veil  that  I  don't  want  to  buy  it.  If  I  told  you 
the  amount  of  money  I  have  invested  in  just  this  sort 
of  paraphernalia  you  would  perhaps  wonder  at  my 
statement.  ,  I  aim  to  get  started  right,  and  herein  lies 
the  point.  If  the  couches  and  covers  you  use  are  of 
the  very  best  it  is  a  good  start  towards  selling  them 
something  for  the  funeral  very  much  in  keeping.  Good 
taste  should  be  shown  in  the  selection  of  the  proper 
coverings  in  keeping  with  other  details  of  the  room 
in  which  the  body  is  laid  out.  I  always  carry  a 
separate  grip  that  contains  nothing  but  such  outfits.  I 
look  the  room  over;  I  note  the  color  of  the  window 
shades,  the  color  and  style  of  the  lace  curtains  or 
draperies,  and  the  well  paper— in  fact,  in  one  glance 
over  the  room  my  mind  is  made  up  as  to  what  will  go 
well  and  not  clash  with  the  colors  the  room  might  con- 
tain. Have  everything  in  keeping,  so  that  a  person 
on  entering  will  note  the  refinement  and  taste  of  the 
whole  sitting.  This  is  the  first  impression.  It  is  the 
first  impression  the  family  gets  of  your  ability.  The 
day  of  any  old  style  board  and  sheets  has  passed,  and 
if  you  possess  such  an  outfit  it  would  make  you  money 
to  take  the  whole  bunch  out  behind  your  place  of  busi- 
ness aiul  touch  a  kindly  match  to  them  and  bid  them 
good-bye.  Such  outfits  will  lose  you  more  money  than 
any  other  anticiuated  outfit  you  might  have  around  your 


place.  As  long  as  you  have  them  you  will  use  them. 
Take  my  suggestion  and  touch  the  match. 

After  having  the  body  properly  laid  out,  you  sho^^ld 
invite  some  member  of  the  family  or  the  one  party  that 
is  looking  after  the  family's  interest  to  come  into  the 
room  and  see  if  everything  is  satisfactory.  You  can 
then  tell  immediately  from  his  expression  whether  he 
is  pleased  or  not.  It  is  now  the  proper  time  to  obtain 
the  obituary  notice.  The  obituary  notice  is  necessary 
for  the  proper  making  out  of  the  burial  permit  and  also 
for  the  use  of  the  newspapers.  By  allowing  the  news- 
papers a  copy  from  your  record  it  keeps  them  from 
calling  the  family  over  the  phone,  which  is  very  annoy- 
ing. I  have  a  printed  blank  form  which  asks  all 
questions,  and  at  most  places  I  hand  it  to  some  mem- 
ber of  the  family  before  starting  my  first  work,  and 
by  the  time  I  have  completed  the  laying  out  they  have 
the  blank  filled  out.  Permit  me  at  this  time  to  say 
that  I  have  printed  forms  for  all  details  pertaining  to 
the  business.  First  we  have  the  telephone  pad,  as 
most  calls  come  over  the  phone.  This  pad  we  have 
named  the  "call  order,"  and  on  it  is  a  place  for  name, 
address,  time  to  call,  name  and  address  of  party  calling 
and  a  place  for  remarks.  A  duplicate  is  made,  and 
the  duplicate  is  given  to  the  embalmer  when  he  departs 
and  the  original  is  kept  on  file  in  the  office.  I  know 
of  one  large  firm  that  uses  only  one  blank  form  for  the 
entire  record  of  the  entire  service.  On  this  blank  is  a 
place  for  the  call  order,  obituary  notice,  record  of  pur- 
chase, and  a  credit  side  for  payments.  This  fonn  is 
then  attached  to  a  medium  weight  cardboard  and  twice 
folded,  forming  a  neat  fold  for  a  filing  cabinet.  The 
name  and  number  are  put  on  the  upper  edge  and  it  is 
then  filed  under  the  proper  index.  When  the  account 
is  paid  it  is  filed  in  a  transfer  case.  Much  could  be 
said  of  this  arrangement,  as  it  keeps  all  records  to- 
gether and  does  away  with  large  ledgers,  etc.,  simplifies 
matters,  and  if  you  are  compelled  to  do  your  own  record 
keeping  or  book  work  it  makes  the  work  comparatively 
easy.  I  expect  some  day  to  put  the  system  in,  as  I  am 
a  strong  advocate  of  simplified  record  keeping  and  book 
work  in  the  office. 


Fine  new  auto  hearse  which  A.  L.  Oatman,  funeral  director  at  Tillson- 
burg,   Ont.,  recently  added  to  his  equipment. 


50 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


Marcli,  1919 


ELEMENTS  of  EMBALMING 

A  Review  Course  of  instruction  for  readers  of 
Canadian  Furniture  W orld  and  The  Undertaker 

By  Howard  S.  Eckels,  Ph.  G. 
ARTICLE  VI 


THE  AXILLARY  METHOD 

THE  first  question  to  be  decided  is :  Into  Avhat  artery 
shall  the  fluid  be  injected?  We  have  our  choice 
of  several,  and  on  some  bodies  it  is  necessary  for 
us  to  take  up  more  than  one.  On  ninety-five  cases  out 
of  a  hundred,  however,  one  artery  will  suffice,  if  the  in- 
jection be  carried  on  carefully  and  continued  until 
signs  of  embalming  are  eveiywhere  apparent. 
What  artery  then  shall  we  select? 
In  the  earlier  days  of  embalming,  when  preserva- 
tion only  Avas  aimed  at,  the  femoi-als  and  the  iliacs  Avere 
frequently  used. 

It  soon  became  evident,  however,  that  by  the  use  of 
these  arteries  preservation  Avas  no  more  thorough  than 
AA'ith  some  others,  and  also  that  cosmetic  effect  AA^as 
pretty  nearly  an  absolute  impossibility. 

There  Avas  a  further  objection  that  on  the  bodies  of 
AA-omen  and  children  an  unnecessary  and  offensive  ex- 
posure was  inevitable. 

The  choice  of  arteries  then  shifted  and  the  radial 
Avas,  for  a  short  time,  quite  commonly  used. 

Common  sense  soon  demonstrated,  however,  that  to 
inject  fluid  into  the  radial  artery,  one  of  the  smallest  of 
the  maintrunk  arteries  in  the  body,  Avas  to  inject  your 
embalming  medium  through  the  small  end  of  the 
funnel. 

It  was  only  natural,  therefore,  that  the  embalmer 
soon  began  to  follow  the  course  of  this  trunk  artery  up- 
AA^ard  and  raise  it  higher  in  the  arm  and  nearer  the 
heart.  The  brachial  artery  held  its  SAvay  longer  per- 
haps than  did  any  other  until  the  axillary  Avas  used. 

After  the  carotids  had  been  tested  and  the  objections 
to  their  universal  use  carefully  considered,  the  axillarj' 
Avas  selected  by  a  A^ery  great  proportion  of  the  really 
progressive  directors  of  the  country. 

The  reasons  for  this  Avere  many,  but  among  them 
may  be  cited  the  following  facts: 

1.  That  the  incision  need  be  only  a  small  one,  since 
both  vein  and  artery  lie  very  near  the  surface  in  the 
axillary  space  (the  arm-jiit). 

2.  That  at  no  point  of  the  body  does  a  large  trunk 
artery  come  so  near  the  surface  as  here. 

3.  That  the  incision  is  more  easily  concealed  from 
the  inspection  of  the  curious  than  at  any  other  point  in 
the  body. 

4.  That  by  the  use  of  the  flexible  artery  tube,  it  is 
easy  for  the  embalmer  to  inject  fluid  directly  in  the 
arch  of  the  aorta. 

5.  That  injecting  fluid  dir'cetly  into  tlie  arch  of  the 
aorta  starts  the  fluid  in  its  course  through  the  arterial 
system  at  the  same  point  at  Avhich  Nature  begins  the 
circulation  of  tlie  blood  and  that,  therefore,  it  reaches 
all  of  the  trunk  arteries,  their  branches  and  sub- 
branches,  AAnth  the  same  relatiA'e  pressure  Avhich 
Nature  gives  to  the  blood  in  life. 

6.  That  by  using  the  axillary  artery,  we  are,  there- 
fore, approaching  as  closely  as  ])ossible  to  Nature's 
OAvn  method. 


7.  That  through  this  same  incision  the  axillary  vein 
may  be  picked  up  and  by  means  of  the  G.-E.  Axillarj^ 
drainage  tube  blood  may  be  drained  directly  from  the 
superior  vena  cava,  the  main  blood  reservoir  in  the  up- 
per portion  of  the  body  and  the  one  into  Avhich  drain 
all  of  the  veins  from  those  portions  of  the  body  Avhich 
it  is  desirable  to  beautify  for  funeral  purposes. 

8.  That  by  the  use  of  these  tubes  the  drainage  of 
the  blood  is  absolutely  controllable  at  the  will  of  the 
operator,  who  can  start  or  stop  the  drainage  at  any 
instant  he  Avishes  Avithout  the  AvithdraAA-al  of  the  tubes. 

9.  That  by  haA^ng  the  drainage  of  the  blood 
absolutely  at  his  control,  reflushing  can  be  absolutely 
prevented. 

10.  That  by  AAithdrawing  blood  from  the  superior 
vena  cava,  it  is  possible  to  drain  more  blood  from  the 
points  Avhere  it  is  most  objectionable  to  cosmetic  effect 
than  is  possible  by  any  other  method. 

There  are  a  hundred  other  reasons  why  ythe  avillary 
method  should  commend  itself  to  every  lecturer  and 
teacher  of  emhalming,  but  I  shall  not  go  into  them  at 
this  time. 

Rather,  I  Avould  like  to  discuss  the  general  subject 
of  blood  drainage  and  its  advisability,  a  proposition 
which  was  denied  by  one  of  the  lecturers  to  whom  I 
referred  earlier. 

It  must  be  apparent  that  tAvo  bodies  cannot  occupy 
the  same  space  at  the  same  time. 

If,  therefore,  Ave  are  to  inject  from  a  gallon  to  a  gal- 
lon and  a  half  of  embalming  fluid  into  the  average 
body,  it  should  be  very  apparent  that  it  is  desirable  for 
us  to  withdraAv  at  least  as  nearly  the  same  quantity  of 
blood  as  possible,  if  only  to  make  room  for  the  fluid. 

This,  hov\^ever,  is  not  the  only  reason  for  blood  drain- 
age. It  is  tnie  that  to  inject  a  gallon  of  fluid  into 
many  bodies  Avithout  draAving  blood  Avould  be  to  give 
a  pufi^ed  and  SAVollen  appearance,  Avhich  Avould  be  alike 
displeasing  to  the  family  and  to  the  conscientious  un- 
dertaker. 

There  is,  hoAvever,  a  still  greater  reason  and  one  far 
more  vital  to  good  embalming.  This  is  that  all  em- 
balming fluids  are  more  or  less  astringent  in  their  ac- 
tion and  that  raAV  foimialdehyde  fluids  in  particular 
have  the  peculiar  faculty  of  pasting,  as  it  were,  the  red 
corpuscles  of  the  blood  against  the  Avails  of  the  smnller 
arterial  branches  and  of  sealing  up  the  blood  corpuscles 
in  the  capillaries.  The  chemical  action  of  these  fluids 
upon  the  corpuscles  also  a.ssists  the  natural  tendency  of 
the  corpuscles  to  become  darker  in  color.  The  result 
is,  as  this  pigment  is  Ansible  through  the  skin,  it  gradu- 
ally turns  from  a  reddish  color  to  a  very  dark  tint 
where  it  is  present  in  large  quantities  and  shoAvs  a  putty 
color  through  the  skin  cA'erywhere  else. 

f  To  be  continued. ) 


PROF.  STONE  FOR  SASKATCHEWAN 
CONVENTION 

At  an  executive  of  the  SaskatcheAvan  Funernl 
Directors  Association  held  at  Moose  JaAV  on  Feb.  17. 
it  Avas  decided  to  invite  Prof.  R.  U.  Stone,  of  Toronto,  to 
conduct  this  year's  demonstration  and  lecture  course. 
The  dates  of  the  annual  convention  Avere  not  fixed  de- 
finitely, as  there  Avas  a  feeling  that  the  conventions  in 
the  West  should  run  consecutiA^ely  to  alloAv  of  members 
attending  other  conventions.  The  dates  Avill  be  fixed 
after  Manitoba  has  selected  her  dates.  The  convention 
however,  will  be  held  at  Moose  JaAV  sometime  during 
the  summer. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


51 


EXCEPTIONALLY 
ATTRACTIVE 


MEDIUM 
PRICED 


National  Casket  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  Globe  Casket  Co.,  Limited 
London,  Ont. 

Girard  &  Godin,  Limited 
Three  Rivers,  Que. 


BRANCHES 

The  Semmens  &  Eve!  Casket  Co., 
Hamilton,  Ont.  Limited 
Christie  Bros.  &  Co..  Limited 
Amherst,  N.S. 
The  Semmens  &.  Evel  Casket  Co., 
Winnipeg,  Man.  Limited 


The  D.  W.  Thompson  Co.,  Limited 
Toronto,  Ont. 
Girard  &  Godin,  Limited 
Montreal,  Que. 
Vancouver  Casket  Co. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 


Popular  Priced  Caskets  Made  of  Solid  Hardwood  Throughout 


No.  559— Plain  Oak 


No.  562 — Quarter  Cut  Oak.  Made  with  Panel  Shrines  if  requested. 


Exceptionally  Attractive 
K  Panel 
Used  on  Any  Design  Casket 


No.  507K — Solid  Oak.   No.  508K — Quarter  Cut  Oak.   No.  509K — Birch  Mahogany.   These  numbers  are  also  made  without  Panel  Shrines. 


Our  Oak  '^nJ  Mahogany  Caskets  Cannot  be  Surpassed,  " 


Dominion  Manufacturers,  Limited  109  N 


Head  Office: 
iagara  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 


52 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March.  191!) 


Burial 


Robes 


An  important  feature  is  that 
"DOMINION  SERVICE"  ROBES 
are  adjustable  to  any  size  figure. 


No  Funeral  Director  can  afford 
to  have  his  work  discredited  by 
an  appearance  of  inelegance. 


S 
E 
R 
V 
I 

C 
E 

I 

N 

D 
E 
S 
I 

G 
N 

S 


No.  303- Marceline  Silk 


S 
E 
R 

V 

I 

c 

E 
I 

N 

Q 

U 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 


Our  line  is  complete  and  our  organization  is  at  your  service. 


Dominion  Manufacturers,  Limited  109  N 


Head  Office: 
agara  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 


.M;ii'-h.  IDl!) 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


BURIAL  OF  CANADIAN  SOLDIER  DEAD 

A  recently  published  despatch  from  Fred.  James, 
official  correspondent  with  the  Canadian  Corps  Over- 
seas, to  the  efPeet  that  Canadian  soldiers  who  have  died 
in  Germany  would  he  buried  in  a  special  cemetery  at 
Bonn,  has  been  made  the  subject  of  encjuirj^  by  the 
Director  of  Public  Information  at  Ottawa. 

Tn  reply  to  a  cable,  the  overseas  authorities  point  out 
that  the  article  was  not  intended  to  indicate  that  bodi'^s 
of  Canadian  soldiers  buried  in  Germany  would  remnin 
there  nerinaiiently.  but  simply  to  illustrate  the  care 
taken  by  the  army  of  Canadian  dead  in  enemy  territory. 
The  permanent  interment  of  the  bodies  of  prisoners  of 
war  wwho  died  in  Germany  is  a  (juestion  which  affects 
all  the  allies,  and  is  a  natter  down  for  discussion  at  the 
Peace  Conference. 

Tt  has  been  announced  recently  that  the  bodies  of 
Canadians  who  laid  down  their  lives  in  the  service  of 
their  country  on  the  Western  front  Avill  be  reverently 
collected  and  be  buried  tojrether  in  cemeteries  specially 
set  aside  by  the  French  and  Belofinn  Governments. 


DESCENDENT  OF  EARLY  SETTLER 

A  recent  issue  of  the  Journal  of  the  'Canadian  P>ank- 
ers'  Association  and  also  of  the  Toronto  Board  of 
Trade  News  contained  an  autobiography  of  the  late  H. 
M.  P.  Eckardt,  written  by  Victor  Ross.'  Mr.  Eckardt 
was  an  authoritative  Avriter  on  banking  and  financial 
topics.  He  was  a  descendent  of  the  Eckardt  familv 
who  founded  and  settled  the  country  about  Union ville 
Ojit..  in  which  town  he  was  born.  He  was  a  cousin 
of  A.  J.  H.  Eckardt,  Avho  conducted  the  National 
Casket  Co.,  at  Toronto. 

Another  member  of  the  Eckardt  family  who  ws 
brought  into  prominence  recently  is  Miss  Andrea  }J. 
Fenwick,  of  Toronto,  who  last  month  was  married  to 
Edgar  P.  Luckenback,  of  New  York.  The  marriage 
took  place  at  the  Ritz-Carlton,  New  York,  the  grooui's 
wedding  gift  being  a  magnificent  pearl  neckhice  valued 
at  over  a  hiuidred  thousand  dollars. 


MEMORIALS  FOR  SOLDIER  DEAD 

In  a  statement  on  the  work  of  the  Imperial  War  Com- 
mission by  Rudyard  Kipling,  aiinouneement  is  made 
that  memorials  to  commemorate  the  part  borne  by 
various  army  divisions  or  regiments  in  the  campaigns 
and  battles,  as,  for  instance,  by  the  Canadians  at 
Ypres.  the  South  Africans  in  the  Deville  Wood,  the 
Australians  at  Amiens,  and  the  Bi'itish  at  the  breaking 
of  the  Hind'-nburg  line,  will  be  considered  by  repre- 
sentatives of  the  Military  Committee. 

It  has  been  I'eeommended  that  in  each  cemetery 
there  should  be  erected  a  "cross  of  sacrifice"  and  an 
altar  of  stone  in  remembrance  of  the  dead,  and  that 
the  headstones  of  graves  should  he  of  uniform  shane 
and  size.  On  these  would  be  chiseled  the  name  of  the 
dead  and  his  i-egiment,  and  also  a  cross  or  other  reli- 
gious symbol  of  the  dead  man's  faith. 

It  has  also  been  recommend^^d  that  a  Moh  a  ni  me ( I  a  ii 
and  Hindu  temple  should  be  erected  as  a  remembrance 
of  the  sacrifice  made  by  the  [Mohammedans  and  the 
TTindns  in  the  war. 


NEW  MOTOR  HEARSE  AT  GALT 

An  auto  hearse  ui>-to-date  in  eveiy  ri'Si)ect.  has  been 
purchased  by  Allen  and  Ray,  funeral  directors  and 
fiu'iiiture  dealers.  Water  St.  N..  Gait,  Ont.,  which  will 
jn'ove  to  be  a  good  actpiisition  to  their  business.  The 


hearse  is  mounted  on  a  Studebaker  chassis  with  a  six- 
cylinder  motor.  The  body  was  built  by  A.  B.  Greer 
and  Son,  London,  and  is  of  the  finest  construction. 
Messrs.  Allen  and  Ray  have  shown  great  enterprise 
since  starting  the  business  five  years  ago.  They  realize 
that  a  motor  hearse  is  essential  to  the  business  of  a 
modern  uiulertaker. 


DEATH  OF  PROMINENT  FUNERAL  DIRECTOR 

Richard  Tees,  of  Tees  &  Co.,  Montreal,  is  dead.  For 
over  a  quarter  of  a  century  he  was  one  of  the  most 
prominent  funeral  directors  in  Montreal.  He  passed 
away  at  his  home,  912  St.  Catherines  St.,  on  February 
28.  He  was  62  years  of  age,  and  was  born  in  Montreal. 
He  is  survived  by  two  daughters,  Mrs.  C.  B.  James  and 
Mi.ss  Myrtle  Tees,  both  of  Montreal. 


ENGLISH  F.  D.  IN  BRITISH  NAVY 

James  Heap.  R..N.V.R.,  of  Heap  Bros.,  manufactiirers 
of  funeral  goods  and  supplies  at  Burnley,  England, 
left  Halifax  for  home  about  a  month  ago  aboard  the 
Olympic,  after  completing  his  naval  service  in  Canada. 
Heap  Bros,  are  a  well-known  British  firm  and  James 
was  doing  his  "bit"  for  the  Navy  on  this  side  of  the 
Atlantic. 


CARANAC 

EMBALMING  FLUID 


Those  that  use  this  fluid  do  not  believe 
there  is  a  better  one. 

Our  increase  in  business  each  year 
testifies  as  to  its  merits. 

It  produces  the  best  results  every  time. 

LET  YOUR  NEXT  ORDER  BE 
CARANAC 

WE  SHIP  PROMPTLY 


Caranac  Laboratory 

Peterborough      -      Ontario     -  Canada 


EMPLOYMENT  WANTED  BY  RETURNED  MEN 

Canadian  Furniture  World  and  The  Undertaker  will 
jiublish  free  of  charge  to  returned  men  any  applifji- 
tiou  thoy  may  make  for  employment  in  the  fmiiitint' 
or  und('itakin<>-  fields.  Please  word  apjilii-ations  ;is 
briefly  as  possible,  and  give  name  and  nutnljer  so  that 
mail  may  be  forwarded. 


54 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  TUF.  UXUERTAKEh 


March,  1919 


Professional  Notes 


Frank  Wilcox.  Waterford,  Ont.,  is  adding  a  new 
motor  hearse. 

The  Montreal  Marble  &  Granite  Works  have  been 
registered  at  Montreal. 

J.  C.  Lock.  Ridgetown,  Ont.,  has  a  new  motor  hearse 
built  on  a  former  Ford  tniek. 

Hogan  &  Co.  Ltd.,  Cornwall,  Ont.,  have  been  in- 
corporated with  a  capital  of  $30,000. 

E.  T.  Meadows,  Woodstock,  Ont.,  has  purchased  a 
new  motor  hearse.     It  is  built  on  a  Reo  chassis. 

R.  U.  Stone,  Toronto,  has  been  appointed  Canadian 
Commissioner  for  the  American  Purple  Cross  organiza- 
tion. 

Henry  Smart,  formerly  embalmer  for  Jos.  Taylor, 
Tillsonburg,  Ont.,  has  bought  the  Wilson  &  Co.  business 
at  Norwich. 

W.  R.  Williams  &  Son,  St.  Thomas,  Ont.,  are  adding 
a  new  motor  hearse.  The  body  is  erected  on  a  Stude- 
baker  chassis. 

W.  H.  Henderson,  better  known,  as  our  friend 
the  "Deacon,''  is  slowly  recovering  from  an  operation 
on  his  leg.     He  is  recuperating  at  his  home  in  Ottawa. 

There  is  a  move  on  to  resurrect  the  Alberta  Associa- 
tion and  to  put  more  life  in  the  British  Columbia  body. 
It  is  honed  that  both  these  bodies  will  hold  conventions 
this  year. 

Geo.  Dreisinger,  of  Elmii'a,  and  Roy  Hosea,  formerly 
with  Kitchener  Fumiti;re  Co.,  have  purchased  the  un- 
dertaking and  furniture  business  of  the  late  Geo. 
Greufzner,  at  Hanover,  Ont. 

Will  Eckardt.  son  of  a  A.  J.  H.  Eckardt.  Toronto, 
having  received  his  discharge  from  the  LT.  S.  army, 
spent  a  few  days  at  his  home  before  going  to  New  York, 
where  he  is  entering  the  financial  field. 

Walter  H.  Hutchinson,  formerly  of  Peterborough, 
has  joined  the  .staff  of  the  Fred.  W.  Matthews  Co.,  at 
Toi'onto.  Walter  is  an  expert  embalmer,  a  dignified 
funeral  director,  and  a  winner  on  prize  contests.  He 
Avon  the  church  ti'uck  a  couple  of  years  ago  if  we 
remem])er  correctly. 


AXIOMS  FOR  EMBALMERS 

Inoi-ganic  substances  are  not  subject  to  the  action  of 
bacteria,  which  cause  putrefaction  and  fermentation. 

The  coloring  matter  of  the  body  is  located  in  the 
scarf,  epidermis,  or  outer  layer,  of  the  skin. 

Physiology  is  the  science  which  treats  of  the  phe- 
nomena of  the  normal  living  tissue. 


FOR  SALE — Half  interest  in  one  of  the  best  and  most  complete 
House  -Furnishings  business  in  the  Province  of  Saskatchewan. 
Unrlertaking  in  connection.  Eeason  for  selling,  ill  health. 
Address  Box  ;58  Canadian  Furniture  World,  ''>2  Colborne  St., 
Toronto. 


WANTED — Position  as  embalmer  and  funeral  director.  Years 
of  experience;  both  licenses;  married;  best  references.  Noth- 
ing but  permanent  jiosition  considered.  Also  furniture  ex- 
jjerience. 


The  root  of  any  organ  is  a  point  at  which  the  arteries 
enter  and  the  veins  leave. 

The  amoeba  is  the  smalles!:  animal  organism.  It  is 
the  primitive  element  of  life. 

Long  hairs  showing  out  of  the  nostrils  and  ears  are 
signs  of  approaching  age. 

After  death  the  myosin  or  muscle  juice  coagulates, 
and  this  is  rigor  mortis. 

Bacteria  only  act  upon  organic  substances. 

Cold  air  is  not  necessarily  pure  air. 

FUNERAL  RULES  IN  THE  WEST  INDIES 

U.  S.  Consul  J.  A.  Howelis  at  Turks  Island.  West 
Indies,  in  response  to  a  recjuest  sent  by  Sunnyside  re- 
garding the  conduct  of  funerals  in  the  West  Indies 
wrote  doAvn  these  as  the  rules  applying: 

1.  How  soon  affei'  death  are  bodies  buried? 

If  death  occurs  before  sunrise,  burial  at  4  p.m.  same 
day,  in  ordinary  cases:  paupers  are  buried  day  of 
death  if  it  occurs  before  noon. 

2.  Who  prepares  such  bodies  for  burial? 
Ordinarily  the  nurse  or  a  neighbor.     If  it  is  an  in- 
digent, some  one  by  order  of  police. 

8.  Are  they  prepared  in  any  way? 

4.  Is  embalming  practised? 

No  preparation  of  bodies,  nor  is  there  embalming  in 
any  form  practised. 

5.  Is  undertaking  a  recognized  calling  or  profession? 

6.  See  beloAv. 

No,  nor  is  there  any  law  relating  to  embalming. 

7.  What  kind  of  coffin  or  casket  is  used? 
Mahogany,  white   or   yellow   pine.      Old    form — 

coffin-shaped. 

8.  Who  makes  them ?   Highest  and  lowest  price? 

A  carpenter  iuakes  the  cotfin,  his  bill  includes  coffin, 
grave  digging,  tolling  bell,  securing  bearers:  for  pauper- 
he  is  allowed  £1  16s.  or  $9.  For  one  able  to  pay.  £2 
($10)  to  £2  12s.  (or  !f;13,  for  pine  coffin;  for  mahogany 
coffin,  including  all  of  the  above  attendance.  £5  ($25). 

9.  Are  there  any  coffin  or  casket  factories,  as  in  the 
United  States? 

No.  The  carpenter  is  notified  of  the  expected  death 
and  often  begins  to  make  the  coffin  before  the  death 
has  taken  place.  The  climate  is  such  that  the  burial 
must  take  place  at  once. 

10.  What  is  the  cost  of  a  funeral,  highest,  average 
and  loAvest? 

See  reply  to  eighth  (|uestion. 

11.  What  religious  service  in  connection  Avith  the 
dead? 

Much  the  same  as  in  the  United  States,  except  that 
the  body  is  ahvays  take-ii  to  the  church,  no  service  at 
the  house  of  any  kind. 

12.  What  difference  l  etAveen  funerals  at  your  po.sr 
and  in  the  Uni<:ed  States? 

Replies  to  this  (juestion  included  in  above  ansAvers. 

13.  Are  coffins  or  funeral  furnishings  of  any  kind 
imported? 

No  coffins  or  caskets    are    imported:    nothing  but 
handles  imported. 

14.  If  so  from  Avhat  source? 

Imported  from  the  Uniljed  States  and  England. 

There  are  no  regular  undertakers  and  the  carpenters 
who  make  the  coffins  act  as  undertakers  so  far  as  they 
can. 


March,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


55 


ONTARIO 

£obcaygeon — 
Byng,  G.  C. 

Bowmanville,  Ont. — 

Morris  &  Son,  L.  'Phone  10. 

Brantford — 

H.  8.  Peiree  &  Co., 
Funeral  Directors  and 
Embalmer. 

Both  phones  200. 

Burks  Falls — 

Hilliar,  Joseph.    Box  213. 

Ooboconk — 

Greenley,  A. 
Dorchester,  Ont. — 

Logan,  E.  A.     'Phone  2107. 

Dungannon — 

Sproul,  William 

Dunnville — 

D.  P.  Fry.    'Phone  68. 

Elmira — 

Dreisinger,  Chris. 

Huntsville — 
Hilliar,  Joseph. 


Hamilton — 

Blachford  &  Sons, 
57  King  Street  West. 
Dodsworth,  A.  H. 
59  King  St.  W. 
Robinson,  J.  H.  &  Co., 
19-21  John  St.  N. 
Ingersoll — 
Mclntyres. 

F.  W.  Keeler  and  R.  A. 
Skinner,  ;]rops. 
Kemptville — 

McCaughey,  Geo.  A. 

Kingston — 

Corbett,  S.  S. 

Reid,  Jas.,  254  Princess  St. 

London — 

Ferguson 's  Sons,  John 
174  to  ISO  King  St. 

Orillia — 

W.  A.  Strachar, 
Suci'essor  to 

H.  A.  Bingham. 

Phone  453. 
D.  Clark.    Tel.  159. 
Mundell,  J.  A.     Phone,  126. 
150  Mississaga  St. 


Oshawa — 

Luke  Uurial  Co. 

Schomberg — 
F.  Skinner. 

St.  Catharines — 

Grobb  Bros. 

144-146  St.  Paul  St. 
St.  Thomas — 

William,  P.  R.,  &  Sons,  519 

Talbot  St. 

Stirling — 
Ralph,   Jas.        Phone  lOli. 

Stratford — 

Greenwood  &  Vivian,  Ltd. 

88-92  Ontario  St. 
White  &  Co.;  80  Ontario  St. 
Down  &  Fleming, 

94  Ontario  St. 

Toronto — 

Geo.  J.  Chapman 

742  Broadview  Ave 

Phone  G.  3885 

Ambulance  service. 
Cobbledick,  N.  B. 

1508  Danforth  Ave.,  and 

2068  Queen  St.  E. 
Auto     equipment     for  all 

biia.nelhes  of  .service. 
Phone  Beach  73. 
J.  A.  Humphrey  &  Son, 

463  Church  St. 

Washington,   Flenrv  Burial 

Co.,  685  Queen  St.  E. 
J.  C.  Van  Gamp, 

30  Bloor  St.  W. 
Washington  &  Johnston, 

707  Queen  St.  E. 

Corner  of  Broadview. 


Thedford — 

Woodhall,  J.  B. 
Wallaceburg — 

Cousins,  Burlington  &  Saini, 
Welland— 

Patterson  &  Dart 

Sutherland,  G.  W. 
Woodstock — 

Mack,  Paul. 
Whitby— 

Nicholson  &  Seldon. 

QUEBEC 

Montreal — 

Tees  &  Co.,  912  St.  Catherine 
St.  West. 

NEW  BRUNSWICK 

Moncton — 

Tuttle  Bros.,  164  Lutz  St. 
St.  John— 

Fitzpatrick  Bros. 
100  Waterloo  St. 

MANITOBA 

Brandon — 

Camjibell  &  Campbell. 
Dauphin — 

Farrell,  A.  F. 
Winnipeg — 

Clark-Leatherdale  Co.  Ltd. 
232  Kennedy  St. 

Thompson  Co.,  J.,  501  Main 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Moose  Jaw — 

Broadfoot  Bros. 
Saskatoon — 

Young,  A.  E. 


SOME  DAY  DIOXIN  WILL  BE  USED  BY  PRACTI- 
CALLY  EVERY  GOOD  UNDERTAKER! 

These  are  Some  of  the  Reasons  why  WE  Recommend  DIOXIN 
and  why  YOU  Should  Use  It! 


It  is  interesting  and  impressive  to  talk  with  the 
funeral  director  who  has  adopted  DIOXIN, 
the  Peroxide  of  Hydrogen  fluid. 

He  entertains  no  misgivings,  no  doubts,  no  un- 
certainties. 

He  KNOWS  that  he  has  the  Best  Fluid  in  the 
world  and  he  will  tell  you  WHY. 

And  we  firmly  believe  that  the  weight  of  his 
experience  soon  will  result  in  the  majority 
of  other  funeral  directors  using  DIOXIN. 

We  have  implicit  faith  in  the  working  of  that 
business  law  which  rewards  a  product  in  pro- 
portion to  its  deserts;  and  we  are  confident 
that  its  application  will  benefit  DIOXIN  Em- 
balming Fluid. 


We  believe  in  the  professional  world — whether 
it  be  caskets,  or  hardware  or  linings  or  em- 
balming fluids — a  sifting  process  goes  on  con- 
tinuously which  sends  the  unfit  to  the  bot- 
tom and  the  fittest  to  the  top. 

We  believe  that  an  inexorable  law  is  set  in  mo- 
tion by  an  exacting  professional  demand 
which  unerringly  will  hunt  out  DIOXIN  as 
the  best  fluid  just  as  it  has  hunted  out  the 
best  caskets  and  the  best  funeral  supplies. 

And  it  is  our  quiet  conviction  that  DIOXIN  IS 
the  best  fluid  made  in  America  to-day;  that 
the  sifting  process  is  under  way ;  that  profes- 
sional sentiment  is  rapidly  turning  in  its 
favor;  and  that  it  is  only  a  question  of  time 
before  DIOXIN  will  be  used  by  every  funeral 
director  who  demands  the  best. 


Dioxin  Contains  More  Peroxide  than  Any  Other  Fluid  Made  ! 


H.  S.  ECKELS  &  COMPANY 


221  FERN  AVENUE 
TORONTO,  ONTARIO,  CANADA 


56 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


March,  1919 


Index  to  Advertisers 


A 

Alaska  Bedding  of  Montreal,   Ltd.  o.b.c 

Art  Furniture  Co   20 

C 

Canada  Furniture  Mf>-c    13 

Canadian   Feather  and   Mattress  Co.  12 

Canicnla    Company.    Ijiniited    48 

Caranac  Laboratory    .53 

Chamiiion  Chemical  Co  i.b.. 

Chattield.  C.  B   35 

Chesler  Furniture  Co   19 

Crompton   &  Co.,  E.  B   18 

D 

DomiinoM    Manufacturers   oln'i 

E 

Kckels.  H.  S.  &  Co   55 

Egyptia"    Chemical    Co   .56 

F 

Farquh.irson.   Giffind  Co   23 


»  Q 

Gendron  Mfjr.  Co  i.f.c. 

Glel-e-Weriiicl-e  Co   8 

Grold  Med  111  Furniture  Co   16 

H 

Hourd  &  Co   12 

1 

Imperia!  Rattan  C(,   9 

E 

Kindel  Bed  Co   9 

Knetchel   Furniture   Co   17 

L 

Lit  yd  Mtg.  Co   11 

Life  Lcins'  Furniture  Co   3i 

M 

Matthews  Bros.  Ltd   18 

,\raN"-e'!  Mfg.  Co   16 

McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Geo   4-5 

Me.-ford  Mtg.  Cc   15 

?.rais;u;i  Pari  ary  Bedding  Co   2(1 

Morlrcl;    Bros  i.f.c. 


K 

N.  -V.  Furniture  Co   5G 

National  Table  Co.  Ltd   .56 

Natieiial  War  Savings  Committee   .  .  14 

O 

Owen  Sound  Chair  Co   56 

P 

Pollock  Mfg.  Co   4.3 

R 

Robertson  &  Co..  P.  1   37 

S 

ShatVr  &  Co.,  D.  L   18 

Standard  Bedding  Co   14 

Steele  &  Co.,  -Tas   56 

Stratford  Chair  Co   6-7 

V 

Victoriiville  Furniture  Co   10 

W 

V/nlter  &  Co.,  B   12 


The  Original 
Patented 
Concentrated 
Fluid 


Patented  Formula 
Strongest  and  Best 


Essential  Oil  Base,  com- 
bined with  Alcohol,  Glycer- 
ine, Oxidized  Formaldehyde 
and  Boron-Dioxide. 

Ask  otheri  for  their  Formula 


Special  Canadian  Agents 

National  Casket  Co. 

Toronto,  Ont. 
GLOBE  CASKET  CO. 
London,  Ont. 
SEMMENS&  EVEL  CASKET  CO. 
Hamilton,  Ont. 
GIRARD  &  GODIN 
Three  Rivers,  Que. 
JAS.  S.  ELLIOTT  &  SON 
Prescott,  Ont. 
CHRISTIE  BROS. 
Amherst,  N.S. 


Larger  Bottles  filled  up  with  water 


Egyptian  Chemical  Co.  Boston,  u.s.a 


NO  25 


Upholstery  Springs 

Highest  quality  Upholstery  Springs, 
made  from  the  finest  grade  High  Car- 
bon Steel  Wire,  oil  tempered  after 
the  coiling  operation,  thus  insuring 
uniform  strength  and  "No  Set."  Re- 
member, the  quality  of  your  High- 
Grade  Upholstering  depends  entirely 
on  the  quality  of  the  springs  you  are 
using. 

HELICAL  SPRINGS 

for  spring  bed  and  mattress  fabrics. 
Get  the  habit  ;  buy  Ce.nadian  springs. 

James  Steele,  Limited 

Guelph,  Canada 


The  National  Table  Company,  Limited 
The  Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Limited 
The  North  American   Furniture  Co., 


Limited 


Owen  Sound 


Ontario 


Manufacturers  of  Medium  and  High- 
Grade  Dining  Room,  Bedroom,  Hall, 
Living  Room  and  Library  Furniture. 

Catalogues  sent  on  application 


March,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


CHAMPION  Embalming  Huid 

The  Leader  for  Generations^^ 

Made  of  purest  chemicals,  Champion 
can  be  depended  upon  for  economy,  and 
to  give  the  most  satisfactory  results  at 
all  times. 

Champion  has  great  preservative  power, 
and  is  unequalled  for  producing  life-like 
cosmetic  effect. 


CHAMPION  Massage  Cream 


A  preparation  that  is  unsurpassed  as 
a  massage.  Constant  rubbing  of  the 
face,  hands  and  ears  will  greatly 
facilitate  the  arterial  injection. 

In  order  to  secure  the  beautiful  cos- 
metic effects,  so  much  coveted  by 
embalmers,  use  from  two  to  four  ozs. 
of  Champion  Massage  to  each  one- 
half  gallon  of  Fluid— the  results  will 
surprise  you. 


"Champion  Concentrated  Fluid  and  Champion  Massage  Cream 
are  made  in  our  Canadian  plant  from  Canadian  chemicals." 


j  The  Champion  Chemical  Co.,  Springfield,  Ohio  I 

DR.  G.  W.  FERGUSON,  Canadian  Manager 

i  74  Leuty  Ave.,  Kew  Beach,  TORONTO  | 

I  Canadian  Manufacturing  Plant    -    WINDSOR  1 


No.  2051  Brass  Bed— $31.00  List  Price 

(F.O.B.  Montreal) 


These  New  Design 
ALASKA  Brass  Beds 
are  Sales  Stimulators 


The  well-made  and  designed 
brass  bed  will  always  retain  its 
popularity.  Nothing  can  take 
its  place  in  popular  favor. 


These  ALASKA  Brass  Beds,  illustrated,  combine  simple  dignity  of  design,  beauty 
of  finish,  attractiveness  in  appearance,  and  permanent  sturdiness  and  rigidity  of  con- 
struction with  reasonableness  in  price. 

You  can  afford  to  sell  them  at  a  figure  that  will  give  you  a  net  profit  on  each  sale. 
The  beds  themselves  are  so  prepossessing  that  mcreased  turnover  is  assured  with  a 
minimum  of  sales  effort. 


These  are  only  two  beds  from  the 
comprehensive  1919  ALASKA  Brass 
Bed  line.  There  are  many  other  beds 
in  the  line  of  equal  value.  Every  taste 
and  purse  can  be  suited. 


Ask  our  representative  to 
show  you  the  complete  new 
line  of  ALASKA  Brass 
Bedsteads.  Some  of  them 
should  be  on  your  floor. 


No.  2153  Brass  Bed— $52.00  List  Price 

(F.O.B.  Montreal) 


ALASKA  BEDDING  limited 

jjjj^^^  400  St.  Ambroise  Street,  MONTREAL 

Canada  Has  No  Pure  Bedding  Laws^WE  HAVE! 


CANADIAN 

FURNITURE  WORLD 

and  The  UNDERTAKER 


APRIL,  1919 


Published  by  THE  COMMERCIAL  PRESS,  LIMITED,  32  COLBORNE  STREET,  TORONTO 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


THE  GENDRON  MFG.  COMPANY,  LIMITED 


We  have  a  very 
large  range  of 

SIDEWALK 
SULKIES 

Baby  Carriers 
and  Carriages 

to  choose  from. 


Order  early  to  ensure  prompt 
delivery. 


THE  GENDRON  MFG.  CO.,  LIMITED,  TORONTO,  CAN. 


INSIST  on  the  Celebrated  "MARSHALL" 


Showing  the  construction  of  "Marshall  ' 
Sanitary  Cushions 


WHEN  buying  upholstered  furniture,  dealers 
that  order  and  pay  for  Marshall  Cushions 
should  insist  on  the  label  being  attached  to  the 
bottom  of  the  cushion.  Goods  that  do  not  bear 
our  label  are  often  substitutes.  ALL  Marshall 
Cushions  are  upholstered  with  a  special  sanitary 
felt,  manufactured  in  our  own  factory. 

Marshall  Cushions  are  backed  by 
our  unqualified  guarantee. 


Marshall  Ventilated  Mattress  Company,  Limited 


TORONTO 


CANADA 


Successors  to  Marshall  Sanitary  Mattress  Co.,  Limited 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


3 


iniiiiiriiiiii 


■iiiiiiiiiiii 


Kroehler  Kodav  Suite  No.  428 


Kindel  advertising  will  play  a  very  important  part  in  boosting  your  sales 
when  you  feature  the  KROEHLER  KODAV  in  your  store.  Advertise- 
ments are  appearing  in  the  leading  magazines  throughout  the  country. 

By  demonstrating  the  many  advantages  of  the  KROEHLER  KODAV- 
you  will  make  many  sales  and  have  satisfied  customers. 

This  is  only  one  of  our  several  suites.  Write  us  for  complete  illustrations 
and  prices. 


THE  WinMX  BED  CO.,  LIMITED  :  STRATFORD,  ONT. 


lilllllllllllliilllilllllllllllllllli! 


iiiillili 


4  CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  April.  1919. 


The  dignified  quaintness,  so 
distinctive  of  Queen  Anne 
furniture,  is  very  charmingly 
in  evidence  in  this  excellent 
suite  of  American  BLACK 

WALNUT. 


The  quiet  dignity  combined 
with  faithfulness  in  interpre- 
tation and  the  period  it  repre- 
sents makes  this  suite  appeal 
most  irresistibly  to  all  lovers 
of  period  designs. 


2681— Side  Table 


lllllliil 

The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited  -  Stratford,  Ont. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


5 


STRATPO  It  D 


Combined  with  dignity  and 
distinctiveness  of  design,  you 
are  assured  of  ALWAYS 
receiving  in  McL  agan  pro- 
ductions goods  of  perfect 
construction  and  finish. 

If  not  already  handling  our 
line,  write  us  to-day  for  cata- 
logue and  price  list. 


6615 — Extension  Table 


2682— Diner 


2682— Arm  Diner 


Hiilil 

The  George  McLagan  Furniture  Co.,  Limited  -  Stratford,  Ont. 


6 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


FURtilTURB 


illillilllllllliillllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 


'Olobc^V^rwiekc  Sectional 
Bookcases  are  so  inexpensive 
that  there  is  no  one  who  can 
read  but  can  afford  them.  " 


"  This  is  the 

8  loW       r  t)  t  ckc 

Period" 


Stcl>e\\^rmelic  Bookcases 
At  Housecleaning  Time 


The  Spring  housecleaning  season  is  here,  and  good 
housewives  throughout  the  length  and  breadth  of  the 
land  are  taking  up  the  annual  task  of  renovating  and 
rearranging  the  home. 

Many  books  have  been  purchased  during  the  winter 
months,  and  the  housewife,  gathering  these  together, 
wonders  where  she  will  place  them. 

Naturally  she  thinks  of  the  31oVc^^\\^rt)iek(2  Sectional 
Bookcase  that  has  been  advertised  in  all  the  leading 
womens'  papers,  and  decides  that  she  will  go  and  see 
one  at  her  local  dealer's. 

Are  you  going  to  be  ready  when  she  calls  ?  Will 
you  have  a  display  set  up  so  that  the  whole  range  of 
styles,  with  their  many  appealing  features,  will  be  pre- 
sented to  advantage  ? 

Go  through  your  stock  to  day,  and  make  sure  that 
you  have  enough  t5lobc^\\^rwiekc  Sectional  Bookcases 
on  hand  to  carry  you  through  the  housecleaning  period. 


''Costs  no  more  than  the  ordinary  kind'* 


MAKERS  OF  SECTIONAL  B00t> 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


FURNITURE 


Stel>eM^rme](c  National 
Publicity  Campaign 


Covers  the  country  like  a  huge  blanket — it 
reaches  hamlet,  village,  town,  and  city;  the  ranch 
on  the  prairie,  the  residence  on  the  boulevard.  It 
is  humanized  advertising— the  type  that  stirs  up 
interest.  Women  are  attracted  by  its  home  atmos- 
phere— men  by  its  practical  presentation  of  the 
StoVe^^\^rnickc  idea.  It  inspires  the  confidence 
and  faith  of  its  millions  of  readers. 

Link  this  advertising  up  with  your  store.  Get 
our  window  display  cards.  Use  our  "electro" 
service  in  your  home  newspaper.  Take  advantage 
of  the  co-operation  we  offer  to  our  agencies. 
Identify  your  store  as  the  local  headquarters  of  the 
01oVc^\^ri)ickc  Bookcases,  and  increase  the  selling 
strength  of  our  ads  for  you. 

Push  ^lol)e^\^r»ick«  with  all  your  strength, 
because  the  sale  of  one  unit  is  the  nucleus  of  many 
other  sales  to  come. 


*'You  can  work  a  SloV>C^\^ri>tckc  Bookcase  into 
nearly  every  one  of  your  window  displays." 


"She  f/eart 
of  (he  Home " 


"  We  are  the  originators  of 
the  Sectional  idea  as  applied 
to  Bookcases  and  Filing 
Cabinets." 


Our  National  Advertising  has 
a  wide  circulation  in  your 
locality.  " 


\ 

Id 

1 

SES  AND  FILING  CABINETS  EXCLUSIVELY 


STRATFORD,  ONTARIO 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


FURNITUM 


1635-5— Diner 


The  Popular  Line 

of  Big  Values 


IIMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 


Distinctiveness  of  design,  rich- 
ness, and  finish,  thoughtfully 
matched  coverings,  construction 
that  guarantees  uncommon  ser- 
vice— these  are  the  things  that 
make  STRATFORD  Chairs 
so  desirable  for  you  to  handle. 

Are  you  prepared  for  the  rush 
of  Spring  business  P 

Better  stock  up  at  once,  for  a 
GOOD  thing  don't  last  long. 
Good  Furniture  is  bound  to 
be  in  demand  from  now  on, 
and  prospective  buyers  will 
look  to  you  for  suggestions  and 
help  to  furnish  their  home. 

Here's  an  opportunity  to  help 
your  customers,  and  build  up 
your  trade. 


1635-5 — Arm  Chair 


IIIIIIIIIIIHII 


The  STRATFORD  CHAIR  CO.,  Limited 


Stratford,  Ont. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  "I 


FURNITUflK 


Quality  and  Style 

Makes  Them  Move 


IIIIIIII'MIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIKMIIHIIII 


Our  Dining  Room  Furniture  will 
help  solve  the  big  problems  of  the 
furniture  retailer;  that  of  meeting  the 
present-day  competition,  and  at  the 
same  time  building  the  good-will 
which  will  carry  you  through  future 
years. 

Stratford  Furniture  makes  it  possible 
for  you  to  offer  good  values  and  yet 
make  a  neat  profit.  It  is  always 
well  made,  and  has  been  giving  sat- 
isfaction for  so  many  years  that  you 
take  no  chance  when  you  show  it  to 
the  most  careful  buyer  among  your 
patronage. 


No.  404 — China  Cabinet 


No.  351 — Extension  Table 


No.  656-A— Buffet 


■llllll 

The  STRATFORD  CHAIR  CO.,  Limited    :-:    Stratford,  Ont. 


10 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


rURNITURE 


1111 


The  Most  Profitable  of  Summer  Furniture 

IMPERIAL 


nmMm 

wmmmm 


In  Name  and  Character 

These  lines  are  particularly  sea- 
sonable in  selling  power,  though 
their  sphere  of  usefulness  covers 
the  entire  year.  Imperial  Rattan 
Furniture  moves  quickly  NOW 
because  its  value  to  the  user  is 
almost  doubled  during  the  sum- 
mer months. 


■ 


!IIII!!1J 


IMPERIAL  RATTAN  CO.,  LIMITED    STRATFORD,  ONT. 


Ontario 


Stratford  Summer  Furniture 

ALWAYS  PLEASES 

Your  customers  will  soon  be  wanting  this  class  of  goods.  It 
is  most  satisfactory  in  every  way  and  will  last  under  excep- 
tional usage.  Our  line  of  Folding  Tables  and  all  kinds  of 
Folding  Chairs  and  Lawn  Swings  are  the  best  of  quality. 

If  you  have  not  received  a  copy  of  our  supplement  to  catalog 
5,  Feb.  1919,  write  for  it  at  once. 


I  III'  


No.  22 


No.  15 


The  STRATFORD  MFG.  CO.,  Limited    STRATFORD,  ONT, 


April,  191!). 


CANADIAN  FUKNlTUliE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


11 


iniHiniMi 


NEW  DESIGNS 

Upholstered  Living  Room  Furniture 


:^NIIIiillliillllliiliii!niiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiii!ii:ii;t[ii:iiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiii!iiiiiii^ 


I  No.  821  I 

nlllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllMhllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiinilMIMIIlin 


We  don't  hesitate  to  enthuse  about  our  NEW  LIVING  ROOM 
FURNITURE.  Much  time  and  thought  have  been  given  to  the 
designs,  and  they  are  exceptionally  attractive  and  saleable. 

Our  travellers  are  now  making  their  regular  calls,  and  will  have  these 
new  designs  and  patterns  with  them.  We  urge  dealers  to  place  their 
orders  early  and  reap  the  share  of  profit  which  is  to  be  made  by 
selHng  F-G  Living  Room  Furniture  and  Davenport  Beds. 


Illllllllllllllllllllilliillllllllllllllillllillll!^ 

The  Farquharson-Gifford  Co.,  Limited  'VntL%V,\trF':;:iifui^^  Stratford 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiip 


12 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  19TJ. 


CoUeran's  Celebrated  Woven  Wire  Bed  Springs 

Colleran  Springs  are  made  of  the  most  rigid  construction.  Colleran's  improved  rope  edge  never 
sags,  and  this  is  one  of  the  features  which  sells  the  springs.  Our  rope  edge  is  not  only  elegant 
in  appearance  but  adds  materially  to  the  supporting  power  of  the  fabric,  and  produces  a  firm 
elastic  spring  edge.  Colleran  Springs  are  constructed  on  "Life-Time  Service  Principles."  Our 
guarantee  covers  every  phase  of  satisfaction  to  the  user. 


No.  91 — Lock  Weave  Steel  Frame 


COLLERAN'S  No.  10 
STEEL  DIVAN 

is  made  with  the  COLLERAN  improved 
ROPE  EDGE,  and  is  the  strongest  divan 
made.  The  legs  fold  under  by  a  simple 
twist  of  the  hand  when  not  in  use. 


Catalogue  and  Price  List 
on  request 


COLLERAN  SPRING  BED  COMPANY,  Limited 

TORONTO      -      -  ONTARIO 


April,  1919.  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  13 

pllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllll^ 


^  ^IIHMIIIIMIMIMMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIMIMIMIIIJIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIMIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^  ^ 

I  ]  Chippendale  Suite  in  American  Walnut  \  | 

j  I                 'T'HE  suite  here  illustrated,  true  to  the  period  it  represenis,  j  | 

I  I                     will  prove  particularly  pleasing  to  the  discriminating  buyer.  |  j 

I  I                 The  absolute  dependability  of  our  productions,  combined  |  | 

I  1                 with  their  attractiveness,  place  them  in  a  class  with  the  most  |  | 

I  I                 desirable.    Superior  quality  in  workmanship  and  materials  |  | 

I  I                 are  outstanding  features  of  this  comprehensive  line.  |  | 

II  //  will  profit  you  to  study  the  merits  |  j 
I  I                                         of  Malcolm  furniture  |  | 

j  1  The  Andrew  Malcolm  Furniture  Company,  Limited  |  | 

I  I                                 KINCARDINE      :-:      ONTARIO  1  | 

^  nlllllllllMM  Illllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll  IIIMIIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMII  IIIMIIIIMIIII  Illll  IIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII  Illllllllllllllllllllllll^  M 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllJ 


14 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


No.  6060 


No.  6061 


They  will  enable  you  to  make 
a  profitable  connection  and  give 
such  a  high  degree  of  satisfac- 
tion as  to  insure  a  permanency 
of  the  patronage. 

Write  us  at  once 
for  prices 


C.  F.  M. 

Lib  rary  Tables 

— in  quarfered  oak 

C.  F.  M.  library  tables  enjoy  a 
distinctive  reputation  for  features 
in  design  and  construction  not 
combined  in  any  other  line.  This 
quality  construction  makes  them 
good  sellers. 


8Cr:''  f  inieP  mNo.  6062 


No.  6063 


FACTORIES  : 

WOODSTOCK 
KITCHENER 
WATERLOO 
SEAFORTH 


MADE  BY 


Panada  Pjrniture^anufacturers 


L,  I M  I  T  E  D 


GENERAL  OFFICES  :    WOODSTOCK,  ONT. 
WHOLESALE  SHOWROOMS  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 


FACTORIES  : 

WINGHAM 

WALKERTON 

WIARTON 


April.  1919.  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


llilllillllllillllllllllillllllll 


Building  for  the  Future 

Every  time  you  sell  a  piece  of  MEAFORD 
furniture  you  add  something  definite  to  your 
goodwill  account.  It  will  pull  for  you  con- 
sistently and  continuously,  because  it  is  built 
to  give  perfect  satisfaction.  This  is  mighty 
important  to  the  dealer  who  wants  to  turn 
over  a  nice  steady  paying  business  to  his  boy 
twenty  years  from  now.  Let  us  help  you 
in  this  matter. 

Illustrations  and  prices  of  newest  lines  and 
designs  on  request. 


The  Meaford  Mfg.  Co. 

LIMITED 

MEAFORD  ONTARIO 


16 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April  1919 


SALE  OF 

urplus  Military  and 
Naval  Stores 

Dry  Goods,  Camp  Supplies,  Food 
Hardware,  Scrap   Metal,  Junk 

Cloth  ;  new  and  second-hand  clothing,  equipment,  hardware,  tents,  blankets, 
camp  supplies,  etc.  :  :  Flour,  jam,  canned  evaporated  milk,  tea,  coffee, 
etc.    :  :    Condemned  clothing,  junk,  old  brass,  metals,  leather,  rubber,  etc. 


SALES  WILL  BE  MADE  BY  SEALED  TENDER 

Persons  desiring  to  tender  are  requested  to  communicate  with  The  Secretary  of  The  War 
Purchasing  Commission,  Booth  Building,  Ottawa,  stating  the  items  in  which  they  are  inter- 
ested, whether  new  or  second-hand  or  both. 

Arrangements  will  be  made  to  have  samples  on  exhibition  at  places  throughout  Canada ;  specifi- 
cations, full  details,  and  tender  forms  will  be  mailed  when  ready  to  those  who  have  registered  as 
suggested  above. 

If  Interested  Please  Apply  Now 
Institutions  May  Make  Direct  Purchase  Without  Tender 

Dominion,  Provincial,  and  Municipal  departments,  hospitals,  charitable,  phil- 
anthropic, and  similar  institutions  which  are  conducted  for  the  benefit  of  the 
public  and  not  for  profit  may  purchase  goodswithout  tender  at  prices  established 
by  the  War  Purchasing  Commission. 


All  communications  should  be  addressed  to  the  Secretary,  War  Purchasing  Commission, 
Booth  Building,  Ottawa,  who  will  be  glad  to  supply  lists  and  further  details  to  the  se  interested. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


17 


KAPOK 

"The  Queen  of  Bedding  Material  ' 


"  KAPOK  "  Mattresses  can  be  easily 
turned  by  a  woman  when  required,  as 
they  are  surprisingly  light  in  weight. 

We  can  now  obtain  "KAPOK"  in 
unlimited  quantities  and  make  prompt 
delivery  of  our  well-known  mattresses. 

New  prices  on  request. 

The  Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress  Co. 

LIMITED 

TORONTO  OTTAWA 


FURNITURE  THAT  BUILDS  BUSINESS 


No.  556 — Arm  Chair 


A  reputation  for  handling  only 
reliable  merchandise  is  one  of 
the  principal  assets  of  a  dealer 
to  any  line.  The  furniture 
dealer  who  stocks 

**Woeller  Bolduc" 

Livingroom  and 
Parlor  Furniture 

has  taken  a  long  step  towards 
making  the  future  of  his  busi- 
ness secure. 


No.  556-  Rocker 


Two  of  our  r\ewest  pieces  are  illustrated  hereroith.  These  are  made 
of  IValnut  or  Mahogany  mth  silk  tapestry.     WRITE  FOR  PRICE. 


WOELLER,  BOLDUC  &  COMPANY 


Makers  of  Livingroom 
and  Parlor  Furniture 


WATERLOO 


ONTARIO 


18 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


THE 

HEART 

OF  YOUR  EXTENSION 
TABLE  IS  THE 

SLIDE 

YOUR  TABLE  IS 
CONDEMNED  IF  THE  SLIDE 
DOES  NOT  WORK 
PROPERLY 

WABASH  SLIDES 

INSURE 
SATISFIED  CUSTOMERS 


1  ^-jtBgHl 

THE 

WABASH 

TABLE  SLIDE 

 ;                       [    -^^  .... 

MANUFACTURED  ■■ 
BY  Z 

B.WALTERa<CO. 

WABASH 

IND. 

WABASH  SLIDES 


HELP  SELL  TABLES. 
ELIMINATE  SLIDE  TROUBLES 


WE  ARE 

SLIDE  SPECIALISTS 

Having  manufactured  SLIDES 
excluaively — for  30  year* 

Many  Canadian  Table-makeit  uie 

WABASH  SLIDES- 
Because 
We  furnish  Better  SLIDES  at 
Lower  Cost. 

Made  by 

B.  WALTER  &  COMPANY 

Factory  St.      WABASH,  IND. 

Canadian  RepreMentative  : 
A.  B.Caya,  28  King  St.  E.,  Kitchener, 
Ont.,  successor  to  Frank  A.  Smith 


MAKE  A  NOTE  NOW  IS 


Investigate  the  new  ONTARIO  Iron  Beds  before 
placing  your  Spring  orders. 

We  have  equipped  an  up-to-date  plant  to  manufacture 
this  line,  and  have  secured  expert  workmen  having 
long  experience  in  producing  a  superior  article. 


S^djusfo 


=8 


ADJUSTO  IS  GUARANTEED  AND  SOLD  BY  DEALERS  EVERYWHERE. 
MANUFACTURED    SOLELY  BY 

THE  ONTARIO  SPRING  BED  b  MATTRESS  CO. 

LONDON  •  •  •  •  CANADA 


Successful  business  for  the  year 
depends  on  the  class  of  goods 
you  stock  in  your  store. 

You  can't  go  wrong  if  you 
give  ONTARIO  Iron  Beds 
and  the  ADJUSTO  MAT- 
TRESS a  trial. 

The  Ontario  Spring  Bed 
&  Mattress  Company 

London  Ontario 


April,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


North  American  Bent  Chairs  are 
notable  and  distinctive  in  design — ex- 
ceptionally fine  construction,  embodying 
many  points  of  merit,  at  prices  which 
enable  the  dealer  to  meet  the  demands 
of  his  trade. 

In  the  reconstruction  period  competition 
will  be  keen,  but  business  and  profits  will  go 
to  the  efficient  store  as  surely  as  iron  to  magnet. 
Put  the  North  American  Line  on  your  floor, 
it  will  help  create  sales  and  turn  cash  into  your 
pockets. 

In  every  point — construction,  durability,  and 
appearance — they  are  equal,  if  not  superior  to, 
imported  products. 

Write  us  at  once  for  prices  arid  illustrations  of 
our  newest  designs 

THE 

North  American  Bent  Chair  Co. 

LIMITED 

Owen  Sound        -        -  Ontario 


20 


CANADIAN  PUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


I!|liilli:||{||<!!illii!!i||||||!!l!lil!i!ll!!ll^^ 


We  are  especially  equipped  lo  handle 
high-grade  Furniture  Half-Tones  from 
photographs,  or  pen  ink  drawings 
from  blue  prints,  suitable  for  newspaper 
advertising. 


We  are  also  in  a  position  to  turn  out 
first-class   commercial  photographs. 


WRITE  US  FOR  PRICES,  ETC. 


LEGG  BROTHERS,  LIMITED 

10- 12  St.  Patrick  Street 
Phone  Adel.  928-929  Toronto 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


21 


•■■fi':  Have  you  bought  your 


d: 


We  sell  ihem 


This  Sign  of  a  Patriotic  Service 
is  Seen  in  Many  Stores 

IS  IT   IN  YOURS? 

Become  an  authorized  agent  of  the  Depariment  of  Finance  for  the 
extension  of  the  War-Savings  Stamp  movement. 

While  you  do  not  make 'an  immediate  profit  on  the  sale  of  Thrift 
Stamps,  your  volume  of  business  depends  on  the  prosperity  of  your 
community,  and  the  far-sighted  store-keeper  gladly  helps  the  movement. 

The  money  raised  by  the  sale  of  War-Savings  Stamps  and  Thrift 
Stamps  is  used  by  the  Dominion  of  Canada  to  provide  credits  to 
other  nations,  who  are  thereby  enabled  to  purchase  food  and  Canadian 
manufactured  products. 

This  leads  to  steady  mdustry,  and  this,  again,  with  the  exercise  of 
Thrift,  provides  further  funds  for  Investment — a  continuous  process 
leading  to  Prosperity. 

Make  the  selling  of  Thrift  Stamps  a  real,  whole-hearted,  patriotic 
service,  of  value  to  your  customers,  to  your  country,  and  to  yourself. 

Explain  the  matter  to  your  helpers  and  secure  their  eager  co-operation. 
Have  them  look  over  the  Thrift  Stamp,  reahze  it  is  the  same  as  a 
quarter  in  giving  change,  make  them  familiar  with  the  Thrift  Card,  so 
that  your  helpers  can  explain  to  the  customers  how  1 6  Thrift  Stamps 
on  a  Thrift  Card  represent  $4.00  on  the  purchase  of  a  War-Savings 
Stamp,  which  will  be  redeemed  by  the  Dominion  of  Canada  Jan.  1  st, 
1924,  for  $5.00. 


BUY 


22 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKEN 


April,  1919. 


No.  376 — Dining  Room  Suite 


Made  m 
Red  Gum,  Satin  Walnut  Finish 


No.  376— BUFFET 
Top  22x56  P.  B.  Mirror  8x52 


A  most  attractive  Dining  Room  Suite  fashioned 
after  the  Period  of  Queen  Anne.  Constructed 
and  finished  up  to  the  recognized  standard  of 
Knechtel  Productions. 

This  suite  bids  fair  to  be  one  of  the  biggest 
sellers  of  the  Spring  Season  because  it  dis- 
plays a  marked  degree  of  attractiveness  and 
represents  value  which  ensures  exceptional 
salability. 

Place  your  order  now  for  this  one  so  you  will  be 
sure  to  have  it  for  your  Spring  business. 


Our  No.  SO  Catalogue  Contains  Many  Other  Attractive  Suites 

THE  KNECHTEL  FURNITURE  CO 

LIMITED 

HANOVER  ONTARIO 


,  1919 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


New  Line  of  Wooden  Chairs 

MIMIM^IMMnMIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIMIMIMIMIMMIMIIMIMMIIIMMIMIIIIIIIIMMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIMIIIIMIIIIMIIIII^ 

NOW  READY  FOR  DELIVERY 

llllllMIMIIIIMIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIMIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIIillMllllMlMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIbl'IIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMIMMIIIIIIMIII^ 


i;illlllMIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMM!MIIIIIIIIIIIIII  llllilllllMIIIIMIilllllllli;illlMlillllllllllllllSlliMI!MI^ 

I    Your  sales  depend  so  much  on  the  preparations  | 

I    you  make  to  develop  them,  and  you  should  en-  j 

1    courage  your  Spring  trade  in  the  strongest  way  | 

I    by  stocking  up  at  once,  and  push  our  new  line  of  | 

I    dependable  wooden  chairs.  i 

I  Complete  illustrations  and  prices  on  request  | 

f;illMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIIK|i|IIMIIIIIMMIIIIIIII|r:ilMMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII 


CANADIAN  RATTAN  CHAIR  CO.,  LIMITED 

VICTORIAVILLE.  QUEBEC 


24 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


UIHIMIMMMIininirNIMniniMlltlMMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMMIIIUIMIIIIIIIII!|l|llllll:iMIIMIIMIMnilllllllllllllMIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIMIMIIillllMI^ 


CEDAR  CHESTS 

are  especially  popular  at  this  season 


When  winter  clothing  is  being  stored  away  good  cedar  chests  are  exceptionally 
saleable.  And  by  virtue  of  their  quaHty  SHAFER  RED  CEDAR  CHESTS 
are  very  well  favored.    Prices  and  illustrations  on  request. 


D.  L.  SHAFER  &  COMPANY 


ST.  THOMAS 


ONTARIO 


nMM!nilinil:llMMIilMMMMnil!lllllllliMIMIMIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIl;lllllMlinilllllllMIIIIIIIMl|IMIMIilllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIMIMIIIH 


BALL  CHAIRS 


Dealers  say  they 
like  to  buy  the  "Ball 
Line"  because  they 
can  make  a  com- 
plete selection  from 
an  enormous  assort- 
ment. And  inas- 
much as  the  wo.  k 
manship  is  most 
skilled,  the  complet 
ed  chair  is  a  work 
of  high  ch  jiracter. 


IV rite  for 
new  illustrations 
and  price  list. 


No.  99 


BALL  FURNITURE  CO.,  LIMITED 

HANOVER,  ONT. 


The  National  Table  Company,  Limited 
The  Owen  Sound  Chair  Co.,  Limited 
The  North  American  Furniture  Co., 

Limited 

Owen  Sound  Ontario 

Manufacturers  of  Medium  and  High- 
Grade  Dining  Room,  Bedroom,  Hall, 
Living  Room  and  Library  Furniture. 

Catalogues  sent  on  application 


NQ  26 


Upholstery  Springs 

Highest  quality  Upholstery  Springs, 
made  from  the  finest  grade  High  Car- 
bon Steel  Wire,  oil  tempered  after 
the  coiling  operation,  thus  insuring 
uniform  strength  and  "No  Set."  Re- 
member, the  quality  of  your  High- 
Grade  Upholstering  depends  entirely 
on  the  quality  of  the  springs  you  are 
using. 

HELICAL  SPRINGS 

for  spring  bed  and  mattress  fabrics. 
Get  the  habit  ;  buy  Canadian  springs. 

James  Steele,  Limited 

Guelph,  Canada 


The  Canadian  Furniture  World  contains  numerous  business 
creating  ideas  for  furniture  dealers,  yet  the  subscription  price  for 
twelve  months  is  only  $  1 .00.  Every  furniture  dealer  and  manu- 
facturer in  Canada  should  be  a  subscriber. 


April.  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


25 


Announcing  the  FELTOL  Campaign 

During  the  months  of  March,  April  and  May  we  are  iutroduc- 
ing  an  extensive  advertising  campaign  on  Feltol.  The  best 
newspapers  and  farm  papers  throughout  Canada  are  being  used 
on  a  large  scale.  Thousands  of  people,  who  have  never  heard 
of  Feltol  before  will  be  told  of  its  many  advantages. 

This  campaign  has  been  undertaken  to  help  dealers  sell  more 

FELTOL 

FLOOR  COVERING 

Feltol  is  not  linoleum  or  floor  oilcloth,  but — it  is  the  best  felt 
base  floor-covering  made — at  least,  the  equal  of  the  best  im- 
ported, yet  much  lower  in  price. 

In  order  to  take  advantage  of  this  campaign,  you  should  carry  a 
good  stock  of  Feltol. 

Pattern  book  <^^d  quality  sample  on  request. 
MADE  IN  CANADA  BY 

The  Dominion  Oilcloth  Co.,  Limited 

MONTREAL,  P.Q. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


"THE  beautiful  Lloyd  "LOOM-WOVEN" 
baby  carriages  will  now  be  shipped  directly 
from  the  big  Lloyd  factory  at  MENOMINEE, 
MICHIGAN — now  offering  you  factory  service 
with  prompt  shipment  guaranteed.  Our  increased 
capacity  gives  us  the  largest  baby  carriage  capacity 
in  the  world  to  take  care  of  you — now  giving  you 
the  advantage  of  the  STATES  PRlCES-all 
styles  and  finishes  which  we  were  unable  to  carry 
al  Kitchener. 

Look  to  the  LLOYD-LOOM  LINE  for  your  baby 
carriages.  Other  carriages  made  by  hand  are  not  com- 
petitive to  them — the  fine  material — accuracy  and  evermess 
of  the  weave — no  comparison. 

States  Prices.  Send  your  orders  to  Menominee,  Michigan. 
KITCHENER  WAREHOUSE  DISCONTINUED 

The  LLOYD  Manufacturing  Company 

Menominee,  Michigan 


D.  O.  MCKINNON 

GENERAL  MANAGER 


Wm.  J.  BRYANS 


Published  by  The  Commercial  Press,  Ltd.,  32  Colborne  Street,  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rate  $1.00  per  year  in  Canada,  Great  Britain  and  British  Colonies ;  fl.oO  to  the  United  States, 

Vol.  9.  TORONTO,  APRIL,  1919.  No.  4. 


PUT  BEDDING  ON  THE  MAP  BY  EXHIBITION 

lllllllllllllliniHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIiillllllllllllllllMllilMlllllinillllllllMlllllllllllllinil^ 

Better  bedding  exhibition  put  on  for  a  week  by  Peterborough,  Ont.  firm,  as  beginning  of  an  enlarged  bedding 
department — How  the    exhibition    was    advertised    and    conducted — Orchestral   music    and    voting  contest 

MMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIMIIMMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIII^   Illlll  IIIIIIM  III  IIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIMIIHIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIlin 

By  Wra.  J.  BRYANS. 


THE  sale  of  beds  and  bedding  in  the  average  store 
is  not  what  it  might  be  nor  what  it  should  be. 
The  matter  of  sleeping  accommodation  and 
equipment  is  a  mighty  important  one  in  view  of  the 
fact  that  the  average  person  spends  about  one-third 
of  his  or  her  life  in  hed.  In  fact,  the  bed  is  probal)l.v 
used  more  than  any  other  single  article  of  furniture  in 
the  home. 

In  spite  of  this  fact  beds  and  bedding  are  handled  in 
a  rather  desultory  manner  in  a  great  manv  stores. 
There  are  scores  of  establishments  where  this  line  is 
stocked,  but  in  which  no  real  effort  is  made  to  direct 
any  great  attention  to  it  nor  stimulate  the  intei'est  of 
the  purchasing  public  in  the  matter  of  better  bedding 
or  sleep  comfort  and  convenience. 

Endeavor  to  Cash  in  on  Bedding  Possibilities 

This  was  exactly  the  situation  in  the  store  of  the  J. 
C.  Turnbull  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Peterborough,  Ont.,  previous 


to  the  recent  big  Better  Bedding  Exhibition  which 
they  used  to  put  this  department  on  the  sales  map. 
The  store  handled  a  certain  amoimt  of  bedding,  hwl 
sales  were  far  from  being  the  size  that  the  importance 
of  this  line  warranted.  This  fact  was  recognized  by 
the  management  while  it  was  realized  that  there  were 
great  possibilities  in  the  sale  of  bedding  if  it  was  only 
put  before  the  j^ublic  in  the  proper  manner.  It  was 
decided  to  make  a  genuine  effort  to  imj^ress  upon  cus 
tomers  that  bedding  was  an  important  department 
with  this  store  and  also  to  educate  them  to  the  value  of 
better  bedding. 

"Better  Bedding  Exhibition" 
A  Better  Bedding  Exhibition  was  decided  on  and 
planned  on  a  big,  broad  scale  that  would  really  create 
interest  and  attract  attention.  The  fifth  floor  of  the 
store  which  at  Xmas  time  is  used  for  a  toy  department 
was  given  over  entirely  to  an  extensive  display  of  a 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


29 


big  range  of  beds  and  bedding.  The  fact  was  im- 
pressed on  the  public  in  their  advertising  that  it  was 
purely  an  exhibition  and  that  there  would  be  no  soli- 
citation or  endeavor  to  make  sales.  The  idea  was  to 
get  people  into  the  store  that  they  might  become  ac- 
i|uainted  with  the  department  and  impressed  with  the 
need  of  better  and  more  sanitary  bedding.  As  a 
further  inducement  for  people  to  visit  the  event  an 
orchestra  played  during  the  afternoon.  The  windows 
were  made  good  use  of  too,  to  attract  the  attention  of 
the  passing  public  to  the  event. 

Orchestra  and  Voting  Contest 
Another  drawing  card  was  a  voting  contest  for  each 
day  in  the  week.  Each  person  visiting  the  Exhibition 
was  given  a  coupon  on  which  to  place  their  estimate  of 
the  number  of  people  who  would  visit  the  store  that 
day.  These  were  deposited  in  a  ballot  box  at  the  en- 
trance to  the  department.  The  manufacturers  whose 
goods  were  being  featured  contributed  prizes  for  these 
events  each  day.  These  prizes  were  exhibited  in  the 
window  and  the  name  of  winners  listed  in  the  loe;)l 
papers.  A  good  deal  of  interest  was  taken  in  these 
contests. 

8,000  Copies  of  Store  Paper  Mailed 

In  planning  the  exhibition  it  was  recognized  that  its 
success  depended  on  the  number  of  people  who  visited 
it  and  that  it  must  be  extensively  advertised  in  order 
to  get  the  people  into  the  store.  The  opening  gun 
fired  was  in  the  shape  of  a  store  paper  entitled  ''The 
News"  of  the  Better  Bedding  Exhibition  at 
TurnbuH's.  This  paper,  containing  eight  pages  lOy^ 
by  14  inches,  set  forth  the  program  and  particixlars  of 
the  exhibition,  articles  to  stimulate  greater  interest 
in  better  bedding,  lists  of  the  prizes,  advertisements  of 
the  various  lines  on  display  and  editorial  comment  on 
the  event. 

A  total  of  8,000  copies  of  this  paper  were  distributed 
to  the  homes  in  the  city  and  surrounding  country. 
They  were  all  mailed,  as  people  Avould  be  more  likely 
to  give  attention  to  mail  matter  than  if  thrown  in  at 
the  door. 

Steady  Publicity  Throughout  the  Week 

This  store  paper  publicity  was  followed  up  by  ad- 
vertising in  the  local  weekly  and  daily  papers.  The 
weekly  papers  were  used  to  get  the  attention  of  peoi:)le 
in  the  surrounding  district,  while  the  daily  made  a 
special  appeal  to  city  patrons.  The  exhibition  was 
held  during  the  entire  week  of  March  10  to  15,  and  on 
the  previous  Friday  a  big  announcement  of  the  event 
in  the  local  papers.  Only  small  space  is  usually  used 
for  advertising  on  Saturday  and  this  was  used  for 
a  talk  calculated  to  arouse  interest  in  better  bedding. 
Each  day  during  the  exhibition  space  was  used  to  an- 
nounce the  special  days  with  the  program,  give  the 
prizes  offered  in  the  guessing  contest  for  the  next  day 
and  the  winners  of  the  previous  day.  Tlie  fact  whs 
emphasized  that  the  exhibition  was  not  confined  to 
high-priced  bedding  alone,  but  to  show  that  sanitation 
is  for  the  lower  priced  articles  as  well.  The  local 
papers  assisted  by  articles  in  their  news  columns. 

Manufacturers  Lent  Assistance 

The  manufacturei's  whose  goods  were  featured  lent 
valua])le  assistance  in  malving  the  event  a  success.  On 
each  of  the  days  representatives  from  some  of  the 
firms  were  on  hand  to  give  information  on  the  goods  on 
display  and  the  consti'uction  of  tlie  various  lines.  On 
Prida.v,  which  was  "Sanitary  Bedding  Day,"  W.  H. 
Smith,  of  the  Canadian  Feather  &  Mattress  Co.,  aiid 


chairman  of  the  Social  Service  Commission  of  the  City 
of  Toronto,  gave  a  short  talk  on  sanitary  bedding. 
Representatives  of  the  Alaska  Bedding  Co.  were  on 
hand  on  Wednesda.v  and  Thursday,  and  of  the  Ideal 
Bedding  Company  on  Monday  and  Tuesday. 

Good  use  was  made  of  the  advertising  matter  sup- 
plied by  manufacturers,  the  name  of  the  Turnbull  Com- 
pan.v  being  printed  on  all  matter  of  this  kind  given  to 
customers.     Blotters  were  also  distributed. 

Special  Day  for  Baby 

One  of  the  big  features  of  the  exhibition  was  Baby's 
Day  on  Saturday,  when  lines  of  beds  and  bedding  for 
infants  and  children  were  given  special  attention.  A 
special  section  of  the  floor  was  given  over  to  all  lines 
for  children  and  special  prizes  were  given.  It  is 
recognized  that  parents  are  ahvays  interested  in  pro- 
viding for  the  comfort  of  their  children,  but  a  good 
many  stores  do  not  give  the  attention  to  appropriate 
articles  for  baby  as  they  might.  The  Turnbull  Com- 
pany believe  that  a  concentrated  displa.y  of  all  lines 
for  "Bab.v"  is  the  best  plan.  When  a  mother  comes 
in  to  lool\  at  one  article  she  is  likely  to  see  and  become 
interested  in  some  other  item  for  her  child. 

No  Solicitation — Followed  by  Sale 

In  spite  of  the  fact  that  there  was  no  solicitation  of 
business  sales  in  this  department  were  (juite  satisfac- 
tory during  the  event.  Other  departments  of  the 
store  benefited  to  a  considerable  extent  on  account 
of  the  large  number  of  people  brought  into  the  store. 
In  the  store  paper  sent  out,  an  ad.  was  used  inviting 
the  public  to  visit  the  home  furnishings  department 
while  attending  the  exhibition.  Some  lines  of  interest 
in  that  department  were  featured. 

Having  stimulated  interest  in  bedding  by  the  exhi- 
bition the  company  proceeded  to  cash  in  on  it  by  a  sale 
of  beds  and  bedding  during  the  following  week. 

Enlarged  Bedding  Department 

The  exhibition  was  the  beginning  of  a  large  bedding 
department,  the  roomy  fifth  floor  being  given  over  en 
tirely  to  this  line,  giving  one  of  the  largest  displays  of 
beds  and  bedding  in  the  province.  The  management 
believe  that  the  possible  sales  well-warrant  this  atten- 
tion to  the  litie. 

The  success  of  the  event  is  largely  due  to  the 
energetic  efforts  of  H.  E.  Hodgin.s,  partner  and  manager 
of  the  firm,  and  Geo.  F.  Lowe,  manager  of  the  house- 
furnishing  department. 

On  the  Saturday  pi-evious  to  the  exhibition  the  fol- 
lowing talk  on  better  bedding  was  used  in  their  ad- 
vertising space  in  the  local  paper: 

"It  is  a  long  way  from  the  bedding  of  even  a  few 


TURNBULL'S  BETTER  BEDDING  EXHIBITION 

MARCH  10th  to  15th 


VOTING  COUPON 

BABVS  DAY.  SATURDAY.  .MARCH  1 5th 


I  estimate  the  number  of  people  who  visit  the  "Better 
Bedding"  Exhibition  on  Sat.,  March  15  th,  will  be  

Name  

Address  


FnriM  cf  liiillot  iiscil  in  vntiii;;'  (•(iiilcst. 


30 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


years  ago  to  that  used  in  the  modern  bedroom  to-day. 

"Within  the  memory  of  the  writer,  straw-ticking 
was  one  of  the  staple  everyday  sellers  in  a  dry  goods 
store,  and  the  straw-filled  tick  had  its  place  in  many 
homes. 

"The  old-fashioned  feather  tick  had  always  the  place 
of  honor  in  the  spare  room,  Avhich  was  considered  in- 
complete without  its  fluffy  feather  bed. 


"ASK  YOURSPJLF  THESE  QUESTIONS: 
"Are  my  bed-springs  and  mattresses  conducive  to 
vigor  renewing  rest?   Are  they  everything  they  .should 
be  on  which  to  spend  one-third  of  my  time? 

"Whether  you  think  they  are  or  not,  accept  this 
•advertisement  as  a  cordial  invitation  to  you  to  be 
present  at  this  Exhibition,  any  or  every  day  next 
week. 


blllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIM|IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII;!!lll:l!llllll'llllllllllllll 


IIIIPIIIII;illjlllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII|i|llllllillllllljllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIt!i 


A  Unique  Event  at  Turnbuirs 

THE  WEEK  BEGINNING  MONDAY,  MARCH  1 0th 

The  Fifth  Floor  Given  Over  to  a  "  Better  Bedding 
Exhibition,  '  One  of  the  First  of  its  Kind  in  Canada 


The  outstanding  event  of  our  mprcluindising  program  for 
March  will  be  the  "Better  Bedding  Exliibition. ' '  which  will 
open  on  our  Piftli  Floor  on  Monday,  March  10th,  at  2. .30  p.m. 

This  is  not  exactly  a  selling  event,  but  really  what  the  name 
implies,  an  EXHIBITION  OF  BEDDING,  and  to  which  the 
leading  Canadian  manufacturers  contribute  their  best  and  most 
desirable  lines. 

The  ob.iect  of  the  Exhibition  is  to  allow  the  people  of 
Peterbero  and  its  suir(ninding  country,  to  become  acquainted 
with  modern  bedding  in  all  of  its  phases.  The  manufacturers 
have  forwarded  large  consignments  of  Beds,  Springs,  Mat- 
tresses. Pillows,  etc..  which  will  be  arranged  on  the  fifth  floor 
for  convenient  and  easy  inspection. 

Representatives  from  the  factories  will  be  on  hand  to  ex- 
plain the  yood  ])oints  of  their  respective  lines. 

Eacli  day  there  will  be  a  prominent  window  display  as  well, 
but  the  best  place  to  see  the  Bedding  will  undoubtedly  be  on 
the  large,  roomy  fifth  floor. 


More  and  more  people  are  demanding  definite  assurance  from 
llir  n^aiiufacturers  that  their  Bedding  is  clean,  pure  and  sani- 
tary. One  reason  that  manufacturers  co-operate  in  this 
Exhibition,  is  that  they  may  demonstrate  direct  tc  the  public, 
the  absolute  p\irity  and  the  cleanliness  of  their  product  to-day. 

We  wish  to  emphasize  the  fact  that  it  is  an  "Exhibition,  ' 
not  a  selling  campaign,  and  that  you  are  cordially  invited  to 
visit  it  any  day  and  every  day  of  next  week.  You  will  find 
everybody  ready  to  give  you  all  the  information  you  desire, 
but  you  will  not  be  asked  to  make  a  purchase. 

This  Exhibition  provides  an  opportunity  that  should  not  be 
missed  to  get  an  insight  into  the  manufacture  of  modern 
Bedding,  that  cannot  be  had  in  any  other  way. 

.V  visit  to  the  Exhibition  will  be  as  good  as  a  visit  to  the 
factory,  and  can  be  made  without  any  expense  and  much  less 
inconvenience.  There  will  be  Mattresses,  Beds  and  Bedding 
in  the  various  stages  of  manufacture,  from  the  raw  material  to 
the  finished  article. 


A  New  and  Exclusive  Bedding 
Department 

With  the  "Better  Bedding  Exhibition,''  we  will  open  what 
will  be  one  of  the  largest  exclusive  Bedding  Departments  in 
Ontario,  or  in  Canada  for  that  matter,  in  the  roomy  fifth  floor 
of  our  big  store.  The  entire  floor,  with  the  exception  of  the 
stock  room,  will  I)e  used  for  the  display  and  sale  of  Bedding 
of  all  kinds.  The  Department  is  unique,  for  very  few  stores, 
even  in  the  larger  centres,  carry  a  department  confined  to 
Bedding  alone,  as  a  rule,  it  being  combined  with  other  lines. 

In  devoting  this  much  floor  space  to  the  sale  of  Bedding,  we 
are  following  the  example  of  the  larger  American  stores, 
which  all  the  time  are  giving  a  more  prominent  place  to 
Bedding  in  all  its  branches. 


Entertainment  Provided 

We  have  provided  for  your  entertainment,  while  visiting  the 
Exhibition  with  a  first-class  orchestra  of  five  pieces,  from  the 
Local  Federation  of  Musicians  of  Peterboro,  which  will  render 
a  select  program  each  afternoon  from  2.30  to  5  o'clock.  This 
music,  in  itself,  will  make  a  visit  to  the  Exhibition  worth 
your  while. 

The  program  for  each  afternoon  will  be  announced  in  the 
piip  'rs  the  preceding  day. 

FREE  PRIZES 

One  prominent  feature  of  the  Exhibition  is  that  a  large 
number  of  prizes  have  been  donated  and  are  to  be  given  away 
the  various  days  in  which  the  Exhibition  is  in  progress. 

The.se  range  from  the  Babies'  Mattress  up  to  the  beautiful 
Brass  Bed,  which  is  donated  by  one  of  the  leading  manufac- 
turers of  Canada. 

The  method  of  awarding  these  prizes  will  be  announced  on 
Monday  and  at  the  Exhibition. 


nillllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllMII  I  Mil  I  IIIIMII  IIIIIIIMIIIII  MINI  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIII  I  IIIIIMII  Illlll  I  IIIIIMIIIIIIIIII'IIIMIIMIMIMM^ 

.Vdvertising  space  in  the  local  papers  was  freely  used  to  draw  attention   to  the  exhibition.      The  above  is  part  of  a  half  page  taken  by  the  firm. 


"To-day  there  are  so  many  kinds  of  mattresses  and 
bed-sj)ring.s  that  one  really  finds  it  hard  to  decide  which 
is  best.  Manufacturers  vie  with  each  other  in  provid- 
ing those  that  are  conducive  to  restful,  invigorating 
sleep.  They  are  to  be  congratulated  on  their  efforts 
ill  this  direction,  when  we  remember  that  nature  de- 
mands one-third  of  one's  life  to  be  spent  in  sleep. 

"Because  they  believe  in  "better  bedding"  and  are 
striving  to  better  sleeping  conditions,  manufacturers 
are  co-operating  with  us  in  celebrating  the  opening  of 
our  new  Bedding  Department  on  the  fifth  floor,  with  a 
'Better  BeddiTig'  Exhibition,  which  commences  Mon- 
day. March  10,  at  2.30  p.m. 


"There  will  be  first-class  music  by  an  orchestra  from 
the  Local  Federation  of  Musicians,  led  by  Prof.  Glid- 
don,  and  prizes  have  been  donated  which  Avill  be  given 
away  during  the  Exhibition." 

Representing  the  Exhibitors 

Messrs.  Theis  and  Trenwith  represented  the  Ideal 
Bedding  Co.  on  Monday  and  Tuesday;  Messrs.  Tooke 
and  Arrowsmith,  Alaska  Bedding,  on  Wednesday  and 
Thursday:  and  W.  H.  Smith,  Canadian  Feather  &  INFat- 
tress  Co.,  on  Friday.  Other  exhibitoi-s  were  the  Peer- 
loss  Divanette  Co.,  Toronto,  and  Peterborough  Mattress 
Co. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


31 


Plinto  of  window  like  this  is  well  wortli  while.     The  disjilay  shows  the  trim  was  well-planned,  and  the  idea  behind  it  was 
to  connect  up  the  suggestion  conveyed  to  the  onlooker  with  the  selling  of  the  goods. 


SELLING  WASHING  MACHINES  for  HOME  USE 

'IMIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMMIMIMIi:!IIIMi:illllMIMIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMiMMMMi:il>illi;|;MIMIIIMIIIM 

Good  time  for  dealers  to  boost  household  labor-saving  devices — Why  family  clothes  should  be  washed  at  home — 
Arguments  that  dealers  might  use — Spring  housecleaning  time  a  good  season  to  push  sales — Healthy  and  economical 

lllllllll  nil  inilllllllllllllMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIilllllllirillll  llllllllllllMMIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMinillinilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMIMIMIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIMIMMIIIIMIMI^ 


There  is  an  association  of  makers  of  washing  ma- 
chines in  the  United  States,  and  recently  that  organiza- 
tion has  been  busy  in  sending  out  literature  to  in- 
terested parties,  placing  before  them  the  advantages  of 
the  washing  machine  in  doing  the  heavy  work  in  the 
home.  Some  of  this  literature  contains  helps  that 
might  very  well  be  used  by  Canadian  furniture  dealers 
to  interest  home  owners  and  housewives  in  their  own 
communities.  Here  is  one  of  the  latest  circulars  issued 
by  the  Association  on  the  value  and  utility  of  the  wash- 
ing machine  for  household  use  : 

The  cheape.st,  most  economical  and  most  sanitary 
way  to  solve  the  problem  of  "clean  clothes"  is  to  have 
the  family  wa.shing  done  in  the  home  and  by  machine. 
This  statement  applies  to  families  living  either  in  city 
or  farm  homes.  The  shortage  and  scarcity  of  good 
househiold  servants  or  ' '  domestics, ' '  and  ithe  'high 
wages  they  are  demanding,  has  made  the  housewife's 
task  of  keeping  the  family  clothes  clean  her  most  diffi- 
cult one.  The  washing  machine  for  household  use 
points  the  way — the  cheapest,  the  most  economical  and 
the  most  sanitary — to  keep  family  clothes  clean  in 
homes  where  servants  are  employed  and  in  homes 
where  there  are  no  servants,  either  because  they  cannot 
be  secured  or  becai;se  they  cannot  be  afforded. 

Health  and  Welfare  of  Community 

The  health  of  the  family  and  the  health  and  the  wel- 
fare of  the  community  in  which  the  family  live.^  are 
fundamental  reasons  why  the  washing  should  be  done 
in  the  homo.  The  washing  machine  for  household  use, 
because  of  its  labor  and  time-saving  features,  makes 
it  possible  for  every  family  washing  to  be  done  in  the 
home  and,  at  the  same  time,  it  protects  the  health  of 
both  the  family  and  of  the  community.  The  prices 
and  methods  of  payment  for  washing  machines  are  so 
reasoiuible  that  one  can  be  i)urchased  by  any  house- 
wife wlio  has  been  in  the  habit  of  sending  the  family 
washing  away  from  the  home  and  paying  the  veiy 
high  rates  for  family  washing  when  the  work  is  done 
away  from  the  home.    For  the  housewife  who  has  al- 


ways done  or  had  the  family  washing  done  at  home,  the 
washing  machine  is  indispensable  because  it  does  the 
work  (juickly  and  cheaply  and,  if  a  servant  is  employed, 
it  helps  to  keep  the  servant  satisfied  with  her  position. 

A  report  issued  by  the  New  York  City  Department  of 
Health  states  that,  as  a  rule,  clothing  washed  at  home 
receives  a  good  deal  of  care  and  attention  and  that  the 
danger  from  infected  linen — washed  and  ironed  in  the 
home — is  negligible.  This  is  a  most  important  point  in 
favor  of  having  the  Avashing  done  in  the  home,  espe- 
cially at  this  time,  when  epidemics  of  influenza  and  in- 
fantile paralysis  are  so  prevalent  in  both  rural  and 
urban  communities.  When  clothes  are  washed  and 
ironed  in  the  home  of  the  family  wearing  them,  they 
are  not  washed  in  the  water  with  clothes  from  other 
families;  they  do  not  come  in  contact  with  either  dirty 
or  clean  clothes  from  other  families;  and  the  washing 
can  be  supervised  so  that  no  diseased  person  will  be 
permitted  to  do  the  Avork:  and  so  that  proper  applica- 
tion of  disinfectants,  soap,  water  and  heat  can  be  made 
to  destroy  all  vermin  and  pathogenic  organisms.  When 
the  washing  is  done  at  home,  the  houscAvife  can  select  a 
clean  place — free  from  vermin — in  Avhich  both  the 
washing  and  ironing  can  be  done.  When  the  washing 
is  done  in  the  home,  every  precaution  can  and  has  been 
taken  to  protect  the  health  of  the  family  and  of  the 
community  in  which  it  lives. 

Cheap  and  Economical 

The  washing  should  be  done  in  the  home  because  that 
is  the  cheapest  and  most  economical  way.  At  home, 
the  housewife  can  supervise  the  work.  She  can  see 
to  it  that  daiiity  clothes  and  delicate  laces  are  not 
washed  with  colored  clothes  and  thus  discolored  and 
mined.  She  knows  what  soaps  and  what  disinfectants 
arc  placed  in  the  water  and  she  can  make  a  selection  of 
soap  and  disinfectants  which  will  not  eat  or  ruin  the 
clothes  being  washed.  This  saving  of  wear  and  tear 
on  the  clothes  will  soon  save  the  price  of  a  washing 
machine. 

An  excellent  argument  in  favor  of  having  the  wash- 


32 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


iug  done  in  the  home  is  the  fact  that  when  clothes  are 
washed  at  home  under  the  supervision  of  the  house- 
wife— and  that  is  all  that  is  necessary  when  a  washing 
machine  is  used — the  housewife  knows  exactly  in  what 
condition  the  clothes  will  be  when  the  washing  is  com- 
pleted. She  knows  when  the  washing  will  be  done 
and  she  knows  that  it  will  be  home  ready  for  ironing 
when  she  wants  to  start  the  ironing  machine  or  when 
slie  may  want  a  particular  piece  of  clothes. 

The  life  of  clothes  washed  at  home  by  machine  is 
much  longer  than  the  life  of  clothes  washed  away  from 
the  home. 

Rates  for  doing  the  family  washing  away  from  the 
home  are  too  high  when  compared  to  the  final  cost  of 
doing  the  Avashing  at  home  by  machine  where  the 
clothes — without  much  work — can  be  given  the  care 
and  attention  they  deserve  at  present  high  prices  for 
all  kinds  of  clothing.  Washing  and  ironing  machines 
take  practically  all  of  the  work  out  of  the  task  of  wash- 
ing clothes.  They  enable  every  housewife  to  have 
clothes  washed  and  ironed  at  home  under  her  supervi- 
sion. They  point  to  the  cheapest,  the  best,  the  most 
sanitary  and  the  most  economical  way  of  solving  the 
problem  of  clean  clothes. 

Washing  machines  for  household  use  driven  by  hand, 
water,  gasoline  engine  or  electric  power,  can  be  pur- 
chased for  cash  or  on  long  time  terms  from  hardware 
dealers,  implement  dealers,  furniture  stores,  depart- 
ment stores,  public  utility  corporations,  electric  shops 
and  similar  specialty  shops  for  from  $20.00  up,  depend- 
ing upon  the  type  and  materials  from  which  the  ma- 
chine is  built.  Any  dealer  will  gladly  show  how  a 
machine  can  be  purchased  and  used  and  be  paid  for 
as  the  purchaser  saves  money  from  its  use. 


STANDARD  BEDDING  ERECTING  NEW  PLANT 

The  Standard  Bedding  Co.  Ltd.,  Toronto,  is  erecting 
a  new  three-storey  solid  brick,  mill  construction  factory 
on  its  present  premises,  27-29  Danes  Ave.  The  build- 
ing when  completed  will  be  25  feet  front  by  114  feet. 
A  new  feature  in  regard  to  the  heating  of  the  building 
will  be  that  oil  will  be  used. 

The  company  is  going  extensively  into  the  manufac- 
ture of  kapok  mattresses  and  for  the  i)urpose  of  treat- 
ing this  commodity  special  machinery  will  be  employed 
to  lighten  up  the  kapok.  The  process  and  the  ma- 
chinery which  will  be  installed  is  said  to  be  the  first 
of  its  kind  used  in  Canada.  The  company  intend  to 
manufacture  mattresses  exclusively,  as  heretofore.  Mr. 
James  Burrell  is  proprietor. 


OPPOSES  MANITOBA'S  BUSINESS  TAX 

S.  W.  Melsted,  manager  of  J.  A.  Hanfield's  furniture 
store,  Winnipeg,  appeared  before  the  Manitoba  Pro- 
vincial Tax  Commission  on  behalf  of  the  R.  M.  A.  He 
submitted  arguments  against  the  present  business  tax 
based  upon  rental  values.  Comparisons  were  made, 
showing  that  retailers  were  paying  an  unjust  share  of 
the  levy:  The  figures  condemned  the  system.  He 
said  that  the  taxes  slionld  be  i-aised  from  two  sources, 
viz. :  a  tax  on  real  property  assessed  uniformly  accord- 
ing to  value,  supplemented  by  a  tax  on  the  incomes  of 
individiials,  firms,  or  corporations  assessed  progres- 
sively according  to  ability  to  pay  with  reasonable  ex- 
emptions for  individuals  based  upon  the  normal  cost 
of  living. 


'ji-MiiI)  (jf  priiiinncnt  items  from  the  Stratford  Mfg.  Co.'s  line,  Stratford,  Ont. 


April,  J  919.  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  33 

DISPLAYING  FLOOR  COVERINGS  IN  WINDOW 


nillMMMIMIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIMIMIIIIMIMIMIMMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMlMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIMMIMIIMIIIMIMIIIII^ 

Carpets,  rugs  and  oilcloths  make  effective  displays— Make  trim  attractive  and  practical — Give  this  line  environment — 
Colors  and  design  lend  charm — Give  newness  and  freshness  to  displays — Change  frequently — Exemplify  ideas 


l!il|[iniiiliiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiii!iiii:iiiiiiiiii.iif:''jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiiiii[!iMiiiM 


CONTRARY  to  the  arguments  of  many  small  mer- 
chants, carpets,  rugs  and  floor  oil-cloths  can  be 
displayed  very  effectively.  They  are  bulky  in 
character,  that  is  true,  but  that  is  no  reason  why  they 
cannot  be  assembled  in  a  Avindow  in  an  attractive  and 
practical  way.  The  Carpet  and  Rug  World  explains 
how  to  do  it.  Naturally  this  class  of  goods  do  not  show 
their  intrinsic  vahie  and  beauty  when  displayed  merely 
as  so  much  merchandise.  Hardly  anything  does,  un- 
less it  is  an  entity  in  itself.  Carpets  and  oilcloths  are 
not  entities,  they  are  only  intended  to  be  part  of  some 
furnishing  scheme,  and  until  they  are  used  in  such  a 
scheme  their  beauties  are  not  apparent. 

When  floor  coverings  arc  shown  in  a  suitable  en- 
vironment, i7i  connection  with  meritorious  furnishings, 
they  lend  themselves  excellently  to  the  purpose  of  dis- 
play. They  have  color,  they  have  design,  and  they 
have  interest.  Their  color,  be,  it  bright  or  sombre  or 
in-between,  can  be  blended  in  many  different  ways  in  a 
window  and  made  inspiring  and  attractive.  And 
certainly  an  inspiring  window  draws  attention.  And 
an  attractive -window  possesses  the  characteristics  of 
"silent  salesmanship"  in  a  most  marked  degree. 

Design  is  interesting  because  it  is  universal.  Nearly 
everything  has  some  kind  of  design  or  pattern.  Nature 
is  the  greatest  designer  of  us  all.  Man  is  a  second  rate 
designer.  In  everything  we  execute  and  produce  we 
use  design,  good,  bad  or  indifferent  And  a  flooi- 
covering,  therefore,  being  largely  design  itself,  exerts  a 
strong  appeal  on  us. 

Undoubtedly  the  strongest  selling  characteristic  of 
floor  coverings  in  a  Avindow  display  is  Avhat  we  may 
call  their  intimacy.  Rugs  and  oil  cloths  are  insepar- 
ably linked  with  home.  When  one  sees  a  floor  cover- 
ing one  instinctively  thinks  of  their  ultimate  use,  and 
conjures  up  their  charms  and  delights.  This  feeling  is 
associated  with  rugs  and  oil  cloths,  and  the  greater 
an  observer's  interest  in  his  home,  the  greater  will  be 
Ihe  observer's  interest  in  a  display  of  floor  coverings. 
This  may  seem  an  unimportant  selling  factor,  but  the 
intimate  character  of  a  rug  or  oil  cloth  for  the  floor, 
and  the  sentiment  attached  to  it  is  great  and  important. 

In  all  varieties  of  window  displays,  newness  and 
freshness  are  essential.  The  best  display  ever  fab- 
ricated would  be  a  failure  if  it  were  kept  in  a  window- 
day  after  day  for  the  long  period  of  a  .vear.  Better  te  i 
floor  displays  during  a  month  than  only  one  good  one 
rll  month  long.  This  is  an  excellent  rule  to  work 
I'-ider.  Change  vonr  window  disnlays  often.  Change 
1he  goods  themselve-i.  ;ind  ch'i'i;''o  the  idea  which  they 
rre  sui)posed  to  exemplify.  For  example,  have  an  en- 
tire blue  scheme  this  week.  Make  it  a  living  room. 
Fverything  in  blue,  everything  in  keeping.  Every- 
thing built  u[)  so  as  to  bring  out  the  prominence  of  the 
line  shown.  Even  the  week  following  execute  and 
fabricate  a  bi-own  scheme.  Not  a  complete  room  thir'; 
time,  only  a  small  grouping.  Use  a  few  draperies  and 
a  piece  or  tAvo  of  fui-niture  with  the  display.     One  line 


at  a  time  is  enough.  One  good  floor  covering  Avith 
suitable  furnishings.  Multiplicity  is  confusing.  It 
distracts  and  divides  the  atteiition.  Then  the  folloAV 
ing  week  perhaps  change  the  display  to  a  bedroom. 

It  is  sometimes  necessary  to  quote  prices  in  Avindow 
displays.  If  this  must  be  done,  better  do  it,  not  by 
the  yard,  but  hy  the  entire  scheme.  That  is,  work  out 
the  approximate  cost  of  coA'ering  a  room  of  a  certain 
dimension  and  give  that  price.  It  seems  much  less  to 
say,  "Your  living  room  covered  for  $20,"  than  it  does 
to  say,  "this  floor  covering  $2  a  yard." 

In  shoAving  floor  coverings  in  a  AvindaAV  it  is  not  ne- 
cessary to  execute  an  entire  room  scheme.  Sometimes 
a  small  grouping,  or  a  side  Avail  treatment  is  quite 
sufficient  to  bring  out  the  distinctive  beauties.  For 
example,  the  covering  can  be  used  in  conjunction  with 
a  Windsor  chaii',  or  a  Colonial  scAving  table,  or  placed 
in  front  of  a  background  fashioned  from  Colonial  scenic 
papers.  The  idea  is  to  create  an  atmosphere.  The 
oil  cloth  alone  means  nothing,  it  is  so  much  merchandise 
and  nothing  more.  But  in  a  proper  environment  it 
adds  to  its  OAvn  merits  some  of  the  charm  of  the  sur- 
rounding furnishings. 

If  the  average  furniture  dealer  Avould  only  stop  a 
minute  and  do  a  little  serious  thinking,  he  Avould  easily 
hit  upon  many  Avays  in  Avhich  carpets,  rugs  and  oil 
cloths  can  be  displayed  in  his  AvindoAv  in  an  interesting 
manner.  A  sensible  reason  for  AvindoAV  displays  is  that 
salesmen  at  the  present  time  are  very  scarce.  Labor 
is  at  a  premium.  You  Avant  to  sell  your  floor  cover- 
ings cheaply  and  as  conveniently  as  you  can,  and  .A^our 
desire  to  conserve  labor  and  do  Avith  a  diminished  sell- 
ing force  can  be  realized— at  least  partially — through 
good  displays  in  your  Avindows. 

If  a  dealer  is  Avilling  to  give  a  little  thought  and  at- 
tention to  his  AvindoAvs  there  is  no  reason  whatever  Avh.v 
his  displays  should  not  bring  in  a  desirable  amount  of 
profit.  No  windoAvs,  however,  Avill  be  Avorth  anything 
unless  they  are  Avatched — and  Ave    might    also  say 

pampered.   

PROCESS  WINDOW  ATTRACTION 

The  Robert  Simpson  Co.  recentl.v  presented  a  win- 
dow display  of  Made-in-Canada  oilcloths.  But  the  at- 
ti'active  feature  about  the  exhibit,  and  the  one  that 
drcAv  attention,  was  that  shoAvn  in  the  foreground  of 
the  AvindoAv  Avhere  the  various  ingredients  that  e  'tor 
into  the  product  Avere  set  out — cork  in  many  si'es 
shellac,  etc.,  all  from  the  raAv  nr.it^rial  to  the  fi'i'-b"'! 
pi'oduct.  The  Dominion  Oilclo+ii  Co,  Montreal,  sup- 
plied the  exhibits.  

ADVERTISING  SHOULD  BE  INTIMATE 

Unfortunatel.v.  a  gi'cat  deal  of  advertising  is  i)rinte  l 
which  is  neithci-  intimate  nor  enthusiastic,  bu*^  is  stiff 
and  repellant  to  the  last  degree.  If  advertising  is 
printed  salesnianshij),  there  is  much  advei'tising  Avhi;'h 
is  deaf,  dund)  and  blind,  as  far  as  its  selling  ability  is 
concerned. 


34 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Improving  P.E.I.  Furniture  Store 

II.  A.  Coinptoii  &  Son,  furniture  dealers  and  under- 
takers, at  Sumnierside,  P.E.I.,  are  carrying  out  a  num- 
ber of  extensive  improvements  in  their  Central  St. 
store.  An  additiojial  store.v  is  also  being  added  to 
the  building  Avhich  Avill  be  used  as  a  public  hall.  The 
local  paper  recalls  the  fact  that  Mr.  Compton  was  the 
first  merchant  in  Summerside  to  import  and  put  into 
]ilace  a  plate  glass  Avindow.  He  also  is  a  public- 
spirited  citizen,  having  been  largely  instrumental  in 
getting  water  and  sewerage  systems  in  the  town. 


SELLING  BABY  CARRIAGES  IN  DISGUISE 

Here  is  a  i>hoto  of  a  couple  of  traA'elling  salesmeu 
taken  in  Lethbridge,  Alta.,  recently.  In  Alberta  a 
Provincial  law  was  made  requiring  every  person  to 
wear  a  mask  during  the  "Flu"  epidemic,  and  a  fine  was 
imposed  on  any  person  seen  on  the  street  or  in  any 
store  or  public  building  without  a  mask.  There  were 
a  great  many  amusing  sights  during  this  time,  to  see 


ill  tlie  big  stores  every  salesman  and  saleslady  wearing 
a  mask  and  waiting  on  the  public  who  were  likewise 
disguised,  the  most  amusing  was  the  black  porters  on 
the  sleeping  cars.  Thiidt  this  over  and  then  draw  your 
own  conclusion. 

The  photo  shows  a  street  scene,  the  man  with  the 
photo  ease  in  his  hand  is  A.  p].  Sanders,  representing 
the  Sidway  Mercantile  Co.,  Toronto,  and  the  other 
gentleman  is  Max  Bethune,  representing  The  Walter 
Biton  Co.,  waterproofs,  Toronto.  You  will  notice  that 
they  are  keeping  their  heads  or  faces  a  considerable 
distance  apart,  this  was  a  stipulation  in  the  law  that 
was  made  at  that  time.  Mr.  Sanders  tells  us  that  dur- 
in  the  epidemic  he  was  in  Alberta  during  the  worst 
time  where  many  were  dying  daily  and  he  was  glad  of 
the  protection  the  mask  gave  him,  as  he  escaped  the 
tei-riblc  disease. 


LECTURES  ON  HOUSE  FURNISHINGS 

To  draw  attention  to  "a  month  of  special  attrac- 
tions in  household  equipment  and  decoration,"  and  to 
introdiice  a  formal  display  of  furniture  and  house 
furnishings,  the  T.  Eaton  Co.,  Toronto,  engaged  Prof. 
Frank  Alvak  Parsons,  of  the  New  York  School  of  Fine 
and  Applied  Art.  for  a  week  of  lectui'e.s,  during  the 
first  Aveek  of  April.  The  professor's  talks  were  given 
under  these  headings:  Household  Decoration,  Past, 
Present ;  The  Relation  of  Dress  to  Art  and  to  Interior 
Decoration.  Demonstration  b.v  Manneijuins;  The  Uses 
and  Abuses  of  Decoration  ;  ("olor  Schemes,  Their  Choice 
and  Their  Applications;  The  Effects  of  Color  on 
Temperament  and  on  Health ;  The  Art  of  Selecting  and 
Using  Hangings  and  Floor  'Coverings;  Historic  Furni- 
ture and  Its  Modern  Uses;  The  Essential  Facts  in  Every 
Good  Room;  Art  Education  in  Its  Relation  to  INIodern 
Industrial  and  Social  Life. 


GOVERNMENT  FURNITURE  AUCTION 

About  $40,000  was  the  net  result  of  the  auction  sale 
of  the  et¥ects  of  the  R.  A.  F.,  mostly  furniture,  which 
was  held  last  month  at  the  factory  of  Canadian  Aero- 
planes, Limited,  at  Toronto,  Charles  M.  Henderson, 
auctioneer,  who  conducted  the  sale  in  person,  declared 
that  it  Avas  the  largest  croAvd  he  had  ever  Avitnessed  at 
an  event  of  this  nature,  nearly  6,000  persons  having  at- 
tended the  sale  daily,  the  one  exception,  perhaps,  being 
on  the  occasion  of  the  sale  when  the  13th  Hussars  left 
Canada  in  1867.  The  supplies  left  over  after  the  Rainy 
River  rebellion  in  1870  Avere  also  sold  by  Mr.  Hender- 
son. 


EARNING  POWER  OF  SMALL  SAVINGS 

If  a  person  through  the  use  of  Tln-ift  and  War  Sav- 
ings Stamps  saves  25  cents  a  day  and  allows  this  nionev 
to  accumulate  for  10  years  then,  on  the  1st  of  January, 
1929,  that  person  Avill  be  able  to  draAv  out  $1,152.62. 

If  this  person  continues  to  saA'^e  in  this  manner  for  20 
years  then  in  1939  he  or  she  may  draAv  $2,953.30. 

If  the  process  were  continued  for  30  years  then  on 
January  1,  1949.  $5,766.68  "could  be  AvithdraA\-n. 

For  a  good  return  over  a  long  period  it  is  diflficult  for 
the  average  person  to  get  anything  better  than  an  in- 
vestment in  War  Savings  Samps. 


A  FAMILY  PROVIDER 

"Is  your  husband  much  of  a  provider,  IMilandy?" 

"He  jes'  ain't  nothin'  else,  ma'am.  He  gAvine  to  git 
some  furniture  providin'  he  gits  de  money;  he  gAvine 
to  git  de  money  providin'  he  go  to  Avork;  he  go  to  Avork 
j)ro\'idin'  de  job  suits  him.  I  never  see  such  a  proA'idir. ' 
man  in  all  mah  days." 


BETTER  HOMES 

What  has  become  of  the  "Better  Homes"  movement 
that  Ave  heard  of  just  at  the  commencement  of  Avar? 
Isn't  it  about  time  Ave  started  it  ancAv,  or  if  asleep  that 
Ave  Avoke  it  up?  What's  the  ansAver,  Canadian  furniture 
manufacturers  and  dealers? 


Canadians  will  Avelcome  a  smaller  cent  especially  if 
the  coin  is  given  great'^r  purchasing  capacity. — ^Guelph 
Herald. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


35 


TELLING  THE  TRUTH  IN  OUR  ADVERTISING 

iii;iiililllllllllllllllllllllil|i||ilMlllillllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllilllllllllillll!lll!llllllllllllllllllllllU^  <i  mill  I  iiiiiiiiii  iiMiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii  nil  mil 

Adopting  a  standard — Truthful  advertising  pays — Exercise  caution  in  use  of  comparative  prices —  Illustrations 
should  depict  the  goods  described — Instituting  a  code — Use  "bargain"  only  when  bargain  is  offered — Shun  pet  phrases 

illllllllllliilllliilllllliiiiliiNiiillliNllillillliiiiiliililiiiiiilillllllllllllllllilliliiliiinillllllllllllllll^ 


BBC' A  USE  of  the  constant  temptation  tliat  confronts 
employees  of  retail  stores  to  think  of  the  immedi- 
ate sale,  regardless  of  the  influence  which  ex- 
aggerations in  advertising  may  have  upon  future  re- 
lationships with  the  customer,  many  retailers  have 
adopted  standards  for  the  guidance  of  all  employees, 
says  a  bulletin  issued  by  the  Associated  Advertising 
C'lubs  of  the  World.  It  goes  without  saying,  declares 
the  bulletin,  that  truthful  advertising  is  the  only  kind 


Good  Taste 

Q^OOD  taste  in  liome  furnishings  does  not  ne- 
cessarily iinply  that  they  must  be  expensive, 
althougli  some  people  appear  to  feel  that  this 
is  true.  Careful  selection  has  vastly  more  to  do 
with  the  tasty  furnishing  of  the  homr  tliiiii  the 
lavish  use  of  money.  We  are  in  a  tiositii'ii  to' 
furnish  our  customers  with  that  which  is  ',h:' 
most  appropriate  for  their  needs,  whether  it  he 
the  best  of  period  selections  at  prices  which  are 
commensurate  with  the  materials  and  labor  in- 
volved, or  that  which  is  produced  to  sell  fcr  less 
money. 

If  you  desire  to  put  any  problems  in  correct 
furnishing  and  tasty  arrangement  up  to  us  we 
shall  gladly  give  you  the  benefit  of  our  experi- 
ence and  our  imbiased  judgment  as  to  what  we 
believe  will  give  you  the  greatest  degree  of 
permanent  satisfaction. 

The  Great  Western  Furniture  Co. 

(Limited) 

On  Twenty-first  Street  between  Second  and  Third  Avenues, 
SASKATOON,  SASK. 


that  pays  in  the  long  run,  and  it  is  upon  this  thought 
that  stores  have  taken  every  precaution  against  untruth 
in  their  advertising.  For  example,  a  certain  store  in 
Milwaukee  has  adopted  what  it  calls  its  "Code  of 
Truth,"'  the  provisions  of  which  are  interesting. 

"All  sizes"  may  be  used  only  when  a  complete  stock 
of  all  sizes  is  actually  on  hand. 

The  Avord.  "Rargaiii,"  may  be  used  when  goods  are 
actually  priced  below  regular,  and  its  proper  use  is 
encouraged. 

"Best"  is  prohibited,  the  store  holding  that  through 
misuse  it  has  lost  its  meaning  in  a  store  advertisement. 

"Entire  Stock'"  is  permitted  only  when  the  sale 
described  literally  includes  everything  of  the  kind  in 
the  store,  and  nothing  may  be  hidden  or  held  out  in 
such  sales. 

The  store  permits  comparative  price  advertising  but 
cautions  great  care. 

Comi)etitors  may  be  rofei-red  to,  but  always  in  a 
complimentary  manner. 

"At  Cost"  and  "Below  Cost"  must  not  be  used  even 
when  true,  because  the  public  looks  upon  such  state- 
ments with  suspicion. 

All  illustrations  must  be  exactly  descriptive  of  the 


goods  advertised  unless  it  is  plain  that  the  cut  does  not 
pretend  to  illustrate  any  particular  item. 

"Damaged"  must  always  be  used  in  connection  with 
the  cause  of  the  damage. 

"Former  Price"  must  refer  to  the  price  of  an  article 
before  a  permanent  reduction  was  made  and  in  most 
instances,  the  store's  bulletin  on  the  subject  suggests, 
this  means  merchandise  not  quite  up  to  date. 

The  store  urges  its  people  never  to  hesitate  to  say 
that  an  article  was  carried  over  from  the  previous 
season,  when  it  is  true.  Great  care  must  be  used  in 
employing  such  expressions  as  "Fortunate  Purchase," 
"'Sample  Lot,"  "Manufacturers'  Overstock"  and  other 
similar  phrases.  They  cannot  be  used  unless  literally 
true.  A  59  cent  article  marked  33  cents,  the  bulletin 
suggests,  is  not  half-price  and  the  heading  "Half- 
Price"  may  not  appear  above  it.  Great  care  must  be 
used  in  employing  such  expressions  as  "Half-Price," 
"One-Third  Off"  and  similar  phrases. 

The  bulletin  virges  that  the  customers  be  warned  that 
the  quantity  is  limited  or  that  a  certain  price  is  avail- 

■  llllillllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllNlllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllNIIIIINI^  B 


I     "  My  Lady's  Boudoir  " 

I  Solid  Mahogany 

I  Bedroom  Suite. 


DESIGNED  IN  THE  ADAM  PERIOD 


.\  distinct  compliment  to  Brandon — and  to  the  = 

home  that  may  soon  possess  it.  g 

There  is  nothing  that  cements  home  happiness  more  g 

surely  and  securely  than  a  righteous  ijride  in  home.  g 

A  .Tune  bride — cv  any  other  bride — who  starts  life  1 

with   her  dream   home  a   reality,    is   sure   of  complete  g 

contentment  long  after  she  gets  to  know  her  husband.  1 

SKE  "MY  LADY'S  BOUDOIR"  IN  OUR  WINDOW —  i 

IT'S  ONE  OF  THE  DREAMS  OP  THE  BRIDE-TO-BE  i 

COME  TRUE.  I 

The  suite  is  of  solid  mahogany  in  tlie  .\dam  Period  = 

design,    with    solid    mahogany    Bed,    a    wicker-topped  1 

Pn'Ticli,    a   dainty   Table,    a    wicker-ljacked   Rocker   and  1 

Chair,   a  wonderful  Chefferobe  and  the  most  beautiful  g 

Vanity  Dresser  you  ever  laid  eyes  upon — Complete,  the  i 

suite  is  the  best  ever  displayed  in  Brandon.  i 

Campbell  &  Campbell  I 

Complete  Home  Furnishers.  | 


■illlll>ltlllNNIIIINill!llli:i:i!llllllllllllll|l|llllliniNIIIIII|l|llllllli|llll[llll!llllllllll!lllilNII^  ■ 

able  "while  the  ((uantity  lasts""  in  every  case  where 
there  seems  to  be  a  chance  that  one  day's  sale  will  ex- 
haust the  supply. 

Because  the  trnth-in-advertisiiig  movement  is  sub- 
sci'ibed  to  and  backed  by  advertisers  and  advertising 
modium.s  alike,  it  is  often  possible  to  obtain  results 


86 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


even  in  cases  where  it  might  be  hard  to  prove  a  viola- 
tion of  a  triath-in-advertising  law. 

A  ease  in  point  is  that  of  a  Detroit  advertiser  whose 
statements  as  to  values,  Avhich  might  have  been  diffi- 
cult to  prove  untrue  in  court,  were  nevertheless  ex- 
ceedingly doubtful,  and  certainly  were  not  of  a  char- 
acter to  inspire  public  confidence  in  advertising.  The 
local  committee  took  the  matter  up  with  the  ncAvs- 
paper  in  which  the  announcement  of  the  merchant  had 
appeared,  suggesting  that  the  paper  should  be  as  care- 
ful in  protecting  its  readers  as  it  would  be  in  i^rotect- 
ing  itself  against  the  possible  poor  credit  of  an  ad- 
vertiser— that  the  fact  an  advertiser  has  the  money 
with  which  to  pay  for  space  is  a  comparatively  small 
consideration.  The  manager  of  the  newspaper  agreed 
to  examine  future  advertisements  submitted  by  the 
store.  Tavo  days  later,  the  store  sent  another  large  ad- 
vertisement to  this  newspai:)er.  According  to  previous 
instructions,  this  "copy"  was  submitted  to  the  general 
manager  of  the  paper.  He  declined  to  publish  it,  sug- 
gesting numerous  changes.  These  changes  were  later 
made  and  the  advertisement  was  published.  Since 
then,  this  advertiser  had  learned  that  it  takes  more 
than  money  to  buy  advertising  space  in  that  com- 
munity— that  he  must  show  that  his  advertisements  are 
fair  to  the  reader. 

STANDARDS  OF  PRACTICE 

There  are  some  interesting  thoughts  for  business  men 
in  "standards  of  practice"  which  have  been  adopted 
by  various  advertising  oiganizations  and  business 
houses.  These  standards  are  worth  reading.  The 
Advertising  Club  of  Los  Angeles.  re(|uires  every  mem- 
ber of  the  Club  to  subscribe  to  these  rules  when  he 
joins : 

"We  pledge  ourselves  to  remember  that  advertisijig 
is  and  should  be,  first  of  all,  an  exponent  of  the  scpiare 
ileal,  and  that  it  is  only  when  business  men  put  the  in- 
terest of  the  buying  public  first  that  they  take  the  best 
advantage  of  their  o])portunities. 

"We  will  not,  at  any  time,  knowingly  do  anything 
which  will  injuriously  affect  advertising,  nor  will  we 
carelessly  speak  ill  of  any  advertising  medium. 

"We  will  work  together  to  the  end  of  making  all  ad- 
vertising more  truthful,  knowing  it  will  then  be  moi'e 
effective  ami  of  greater  benefit  to  the  buying  public. 

"We  will  exercise  care,  individually,  at  all  times,  to 
.'".ee  that  every  advertisement  with  which  we  have  any- 


thing to  do  shall  measure  up  to  the  plain,  simple  truth. 
We  stand  firmly  for  constructive  advertising  and  con- 
demn, without  reserve,  all  forms  of  destructive  arlver- 
tising. 

"To  each  other  Ave  pledge  patient  service  toward  the 
upbuilding  of  advertising  in  this  community. 

"To  all  business  men  of  this  community  we  pledge 
co-operation  toward  the  advancement  of  the  com- 
munity's business  along  sane  and  proper  lines. 

"To  the  public  whom  we  as  a  Club  serve  primarily, 
we  pledge  our  best  efforts  to  make  advertising  the 
servant  of  the  people  in  the  truest  sense." 

WHY  CUSTOMERS  DON'T  COME  BACK 

There  are  few  businesses  which  do  not  rely  on  the  re- 
peat customer  or  on  the  good-will  of  the  customer  for 
their  growth  and  prosperity. 

Even  if  you  are  selling  suspen.sion  bridges  or  reil 
estate,  there  is  a  strong  probability  that  if  your  first 
sale  is  satisfactory  to  the  buyer  you  may  be  able  to 
secure  other  business  from  the  same  source. 

For  the  owner  of  a  retail  store  to  give  the  utmost 
satisfaction  to  every  customer  is  vital,  of  cour.se.  Many 
merchants  know  that  they  are  losing  old  customers 
and  arc  unsuccessful  in  holding  the  trade  which  they 
should  have,  but  are  in  ignorance  as  to  the  reason  why. 

An  illuminating  report  was  made  by  Homer  J.  Buck- 
ley, of  Chicago,  in  an  address  before  the  Associated  Ad- 
vertising Clubs.  He  made  an  investigation  to  learn 
why  peoi)le  who  had  bought  goods  of  a  certain  concern 
had  discontinued  their  patronage. 


The  causes  Avere : 

Indifference  of  salesmen    47 

Attempt  at  substitution   24 

Errors    18 

Tricky  methods   17 

SloAv  delivery    16 

Over-insistence  of  salesmeji    16 

Insolence  of  employees    16 

Unnecessary  dela.vs  in  service   13 

Tactless  ])usiness  policies   11 

Bad  store  arrangement    9 

Refusal  to  exchange  purchase   6 

Poor  (iuality  of  goods    1 


What  concerns  the  clerks,  the  salespeople,  and  all 
merchants,  is  hoAV  to  cell,  and  sell  Avith  satisfaction. 


l,>oes  a  (loliveiy  service  pay'     Here  is  one  answer.     The  recognized  advaiilage    of    motor    cars  for  delivery  jiuriJoses  is  demonstrated  by  this 

battery  of  cars  used  by  the  Robert  Simpson  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Toronto. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


37 


SALESMANSHIP  —  HUNDRED  POINT  MEN  " 

illlllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIMIIM  MIIMIMIMIMIMMIIIIIMMIIMIMMIMIIMMIMIIIIIMMIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMIIMIMMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIMIIMIIIII^ 

Foundation  of  salesmanship  is  truth — Salesmen  should  know  underlying  principles — Selling  requires  thought — 
Requisites  for  success — Salesmen  made  not  born — Laws  to  be  obeyed —Salesmen  continually  sowing  seeds  to  ripen 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMinillMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIII.MIIMIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIII 

By  GEO.  A.  SIMPSON,  Hamilton 


The  subject  of  "Salesmanship"  is  one  that  has  been 
discussed  from  all  angles.  We  have  heard  a  hundred 
different  views  from  a  hundred  ditferent  people,  and  I 
am  free  to  admit  that  but  very  few  of  them  analyze  the 
subject  to  the  point  of  rendering  a  service  to  the  sales- 
man who  hears  the  discourse.  In  other  Avords — they 
deal  Avith  the  subject  in  the  abstract  rather  than  in  the 
concrete.  In  my  judgment,  what  a  salesman  ought  to 
know  and  understand  should  relate  to  the  underlying 
principles  pertaining  to  salesmanship,  that  is,  he  should 
be  familiar  with  the  principles  which  would  enable  him 
to  take  care  of  all  the  preliminaries  necessary  to  bring- 
ing the  transaction  up  to  the  point  of  getting  the  name 
on  the  dotted  line.  The  question  of  selling  is  one  that 
requires  a  great  deal  of  thought  and  for  any  man  to 
become  proficient  in  this  science  it  is  as  necessary  for 
him  to  study  all  the  elements  that  enter  into  his  suc- 
cess as  it  is  for  a  surgeon,  doctor  or  lawyer,  or  any 
other  professional  man,  to  make  a  study  of  his  profes- 
sion before  he  becomes  recognized. 

We  have  heard  that  salesmen  are  born,  and  "a  born 
salesman"  is  a  common  expression.  In  my  judgment, 
this  is  wrong,  and  I  maintain  that  any  young  man,  en- 
dowed with  common-sense  fair  personality,  good  health 
and  the  love  of  work  fairly  pronounced,  can,  with  the 
right  amount  of  study,  become  a  successful  salesman. 
The  truth,  as  always,  lies  between  the  two  extremes. 
There  is  no  salesman  so  born  to  his  duties  that  he  can 
dispense  with  a  knowledge  of  the  goods  he  sells,  or  so 
independent  of  experience  that  practice  teaches  him 
nothing  he  did  not  know.  You  should  know  what  you 
want  to  do.  then  hold  the  thought  firmly  and  do  every 
day  what  should  be  done  and  every  sunset  will  see  you 
that  much  nearer  to  the  goal.  Now  the  (juestion  is — 
What  should  he  study  and  how  can  he  prepare  himself? 

There  are  certain  laws  that  must  be  obeyed  and  cer- 
tain conditions  that  must  be  respected.  These  condi- 
tions, principles  and  laws  do  not  pertain  to  the  impos- 
sible or  the  mysterious,  neither  are  they  beyond  the 
reach  of  the  man  who  is  sincere  and  who  is  determined 
to  succeed ;  but  they  must  be  taken  into  account  and 
i-ockoncd  with  before  we  can  lay  claim  to  being  success- 
ful salesmen. 

f  maintain  that  the  real  salesman  is  the  man  who  is 
continually  sowing  seeds  that  will  ripen  into  profits  on 
future  sale.s: — the  man  who  is  building  up,  through  bis 
nersonaiity,  honesty  and  fair  dealing,  a  following  who 
l)plipve  in  him  and  respect  him — one  who  is  forging  a 
ch-iin  of  satisfied  customers  over  the  entire  territory  ho 
covers,  and  thereby  creating  an  influence  that  not  only 
menus  other  sales,  but  more  links  in  his  chain.  Such  a 
man  is  an  asset  to  the  interests  he  represents  arul  his 
services  will  always  be  in  demand. 

Salesmanship  is  that  power  resulting  from  a  combiu  '- 
tioii  of  certain  qualities  and  faculties,  mental,  spirii^ual 
and  iihysical.  which  enables  him  who  possesses  it  to  suc- 
cessfully influence  a  high  average  of  those  he  inter- 
view.s  to  i)ur('has(',  at  a  profit,  mark  you,  that  which  he 
has  to  sell. 


I  will  touch  briefly  on  some  of  the  essential  qualifica- 
tions that  are,  in  my  judgment,  necessary  for  the  sales- 
man to  understand.    Take  for  instance, 

The  Science  of  Thoug-ht 

Thought  is  not,  as  is  often  supposed,  a  mere  indefinite 
abstraction,  or  something  of  a  like  nature.  It  is  on  the 
contrary,  a  vital  force,  the  most  vital  and  irresistible 
force  there  is  in  the  universe. 

In  our  laboratory  experiments  we  are  demonstrating 
the  great  fact  that  thoughts  are  forces.  They  have 
form,  and  quality,  and  substance,  and  power,  and, 
furthermore,  we  are  finding  out  that  there  is  what  we 
call  "science  of  thought."  Through  the  operation  of 
our  thought  forces  we  have  creative  power.  The 
spoken  word  is  nothing  more  nor  less  than  the  outward 
expression  of  the  workings  of  these  interior  forces.  The 
spoken  word  is,  in  a  sense,,  the  means  whereby  the 
thought  forces  are  focussed  and  directed  along  any 
particular  line.  This  is  concentration  of  thought,  and 
there  is  no  question  in  my  mind  that  if  we  concentrate 
and  then  apply  the  expression  of  that  thought  in  well- 
spoken  words  we  will  accomplish  our  purpose.  Neither 
is  there  any  question  in  my  mind  that  if  a  salesman 
goes  after  his  prospects  with  a  determination  to  get  the 
order,  and  then  concentrates  his  thought  on  his  prospect 
and  the  ends  he  wishes  to  accomplish,  he  will,  if  he  ex- 
presses himself  right,  land  the  order. 

Thoughts  are  forces:  "Like  builds  like,  and  like  at- 
tracts like."  If  we  govern  our  thinking,  we  determine 
Our  life. 

The  law  of  attraction  between  mental  and  material 
things  is  wonderfully  exact  in  its  workings.  People 
ruled  by  the  mood  of  gloom  attract  to  them  gloomy 
things.  People  always  discouraged  and  despondent 
do  not  succeed  in  anything,  unless  it  is  in  making  other 
people  unhappy.     They  live  only  by  burdening  others. 

The  hopeful,  confident  and  cheerful  attract  the  ele- 
ments of  success,  and  they  become  a  power  and  an  in- 
fluence for  good  in  any  community.  In  a  salesman  a 
disposition  of  this  kind  is  invaluable. 

This  may  be  new  sales  gospel,  but  it  has  been  proven 
to  the  satisfaction  of  all  real  students  of  business  that 
the  most  sucessful  man  is  he  who  is  sure  of  himself.  He 
who  is  optimistic  and  cheerful  impresses  the  world  Avith 
the  fact  that  he  is  supremely  confident  always;  and 
the  world  of  business  has  every  confidence  in  the  man 
who  has  confidence  in  himself.  If  our  outlook  is 
optimistic  and  our  confidence  strong,  it  naturally  fol- 
lows that  we  inject  enthusiasm  and  clear  judgment 
into  our  work,  and  therefore  Ave  have  a  tremendous 
advantage  over  those  who  are  inclined  to  be  pessimis- 
tic and  nervously  fearful  that  their  judgment  may  be 
Avrong,  or  those  who  lack  confidence  that  comes  with  a 
right  condition  of  mind,  which  counts  so  much  for  suc- 
cess in  a  salesman's  career.  In  our  mental  lives  we  can 
either  keep  hold  of  the  rudder  and  steer  the  course  to 
success,  or  we  can  fail  to  do  this  and  dri^t  on  to  the 
rocks  of  failure. 


38 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Stratford  Furniture  Employers  and 
Employees  Agree 

The  Board  of  Conciliation  constituted  to  deal  with 
the  Industrial  Disputes  Investigation  Act,  so  far  as  it 
applies  to  the  differences  between  the  Furniture  Manu- 
facturers Association  of  Stratford  and  their  employees, 
has  presented  its  report. 

The  Board,  consisting  of  Judge  D.  McGibbon,  chair- 
man ;  J.  F.  Marsh,  representing  the  employees,  and 
Joseph  Orr,  representing  the  employers,  held  meetings 
at  Toronto,  on  Januai-y  18 ;  Stratford,  January  20,  and 
February  3  and  4;  Hanover,  February  18;  Kitchener, 
February  20 ;  and  Montreal,  February  25  and  26,  when 
evidence  from  both  employers  and  employees  was  pre- 
sented. 

The  matters  discussed  were  hours  of  labor,  overtime, 
wages,  strikes,  and  slack  periods.  The  Northern 
Ontario  manufacturers  made  a  suggestion  of  a  maxi- 
mum working  week  of  54  or  55  hours,  with  a  weekly 
wage  based  on  the  present  scale  for  59  or  60  hours, 
providing  all  Canadian  furniture  manufacturers  adopt 
the  suggestion,  and  that  time  and  a  half  'be  paid  for 
overtime  work  when  the  entire  factory  is  operating 
under  power,  but  not  otherwise. 

The  meeting  at  Kitchener  likewise  adopted  the  Han- 
over suggestion.  Because  opinion  was  not  unanimous 
at  Montreal  no  resolution  was  presented,  but  the  fac- 
tory schedules  were  filled.  Two  further  meetings 
were  held  at  Stratford,  and  after  discussion  the  Board 
was  able  to  bring  the  negotiations  to  a  successful  issue. 

In  the  negotiations  it  was  shown  that  a  wide  differ- 
ence existed  between  the  rate  of  wages  in  the  various 
centres,  Stratford  paying  about  the  highest  in  the  in- 
dustry. The  new  schedule  works  out  for  a  nine-hour 
day,  except  on  Saturdays  during  June,  July  and 
August,  when  the  plants  will  close  at  12  noon;  overtime 
to  be  paid  as  time  and  a  half;  and  wages  to  be  based  on 
a  present  59-hour  week  for  54  hours'  work. 

In  their  conclusion  the  Board  feel  that  it  is  likely  the 
Stratford  agreement  will  become  general  throughout 
the  entire  industry  by  May  1st,  and  that  it  will  affect 


Diner  99A — r'rom   the   line    of   the  Ball 
Furniture  Co.,  Hanover. 


about  11,000  employees.  The  Board  also  recommended 
to  the  Minister  of  Labor  the  institution  of  an  Indus- 
trial Council  such  as  the  Whitely  Council  in  Great 
Britain,  whereby  the  furniture  manufacturers  associa- 
tions of  Canada  and  the  labor  unions  representing  em- 
ploj-ees  could  discu.ss,  and  if  possible,  settle  all  disputes 
between  employers  and  employees. 

EMPLOYERS  AND  EMPLOYEES  SIGN 
AGREEMENT 

An  agreement  has  been  made  between  The  Globe- 
Wernicke  Co.  Ltd.,  of  Stratford,  and  their  employees, 
the  local  unions  of  Carpenters  and  Joiners,  and 
Painters  and  Decorators,  effective  from  February  1st, 
and  from  year  to  year  making  the  hours  of  labor  nine 
hours  daily  except  on  Saturdays  during  June,  July 
and  August,  when  work  shall  cease  at  noon.  Overtime 
will  be  paid  as  time  and  one-half. 

Wages  are  to  be  paid  on  a  basis  so  that  employees 
will  receive  for  54  hours  work,  an  amount  equal  to  that 
which  was  being  paid  for  59  hours.  In  case  of  dis- 
agreement there  shall  be  no  cessation  of  work  until 
the  highest  representative  of  both  parties  have  failed 
to  come  to  an  understanding. 

During  slack  periods  preference  shall  be  given  to 
reduction  of  hours  of  work,  rather  than  a  reduction  in 
workmen  who  may  be  looked  upon  as  members  of  the 
permanent  staff. 


INCREASE  BELL  FURNITURE  OUTPUT 

The  Bell  Furniture  Co.  are  installing  new  machinery 
in  tlieir  plant  at  Southampton,  Ont.,  which  will  allow 
of  a  greatly  increased  output.  One  of  the  new  ma- 
chines is  the  very  latest  in  the  line  of  a  sander. 


SELLERS  KITCHEN  CABINET  BY-LAW  PASSED 

The  Sellers  Kitchen  Cabinet  Co.  by-law  was  passed 
by  the  Southampton,  Ont.,  ratepayers,  with  only  eight 
dissenting  votes.  The  plant  will  be  running  in  less 
than  tAvo  months,  the  Bell  Comp'^ny's  chair  factory  hav- 
ing been  taken  over  for  this  puroose.  as  mentioned  in 
the  last  issue  of  Furniture  World. 


NEW  YORK  AS  FURNITURE  CENTRE 

The  Merchants  Association  of  New  York  has  issued  a 
vei'y  comprehensive  booklet  of  ne-^rly  70  pages  dealing 
with  the  furniture  industry  as  it  affects  New  York  City 
and  as  it  compares  with  other  centres  in  the  United 
States.  In  the  foreword,  Alfred  L.  Smith,  manager  of 
the  Industrial  Bureau  of  the  Association,  notes  the  re- 
adiustment  period  we  are  passing  throiish.  and  Avith 
this  in  view  the  report  covers  present  conditions  and 
the  trend  of  new  development. 

The  booklet  report  is  divided  into  six  chanters  deal- 
ing with  New  York  as  a  manufacturing  centre:  as  a 
market ;  as  a  source  of  wood  sunnly ;  on  manufacturing 
costs;  wages  and  labor;  possibilities  of  the  export 
trade.  Readers  of  Canadian  Furniture  World  mav 
obtain  a  copy  of  the  booklet  on  re(iuest  to  the  Associa- 
tion offices. 


HOME  OF  CIRCASSIAN  WALNUT 

Circassia,  where  Circassian  walnut  comes  from  or  as 
it  is  better  known,  Georgia ,  has  been  declared  a  re- 
pul)lic.  This  new  republic  occupies  that  mountain- 
ous tract  of  country  lying  between  the  Black  and  Cas- 
pian seas.  The  Caucasus  mountains,  the  cradle  of 
the  human  race,  separating  Asia  from  Europe,  stretch 
across  Georgia. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


39 


ACCOUNTING  SYSTEMS  an  J  CREDIT  BUSINESS 


illlMIMIIIIIIIHMllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIMIMIMIMIMIMIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIinilllMIMMIIMIIIIMIIIMIIIIMMIIMMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIII^   IIIIIIIIIIMIIIMMIIIIIilllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMl 

Lack  of  machinery  brings  credits  into  disrepute — Correcting  the  evils — What  modern  systems  accomplish — Pre- 
serving the  records — Make  for  efficiency  and  simplicity — Supply  requirements  for  retail  business — Good  service  given 

IIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMII  IMIMIIIIIIIMIMIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIinillMMIIIIIIIIIIill.lMIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIM^   IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIII 


By  W.  L 

LACK  of  efficient  maeliin-  
ery    and    absence  of 
adequate    system  are 
the  evils  which  bring  the 
credit  system  in  the  retail 
trade  into  bad  repiite. 

"When  a  manufacturer  dis- 
covers inefficiency  in  his 
machinery  or  defects  in  his 

business  methods  he  endeavors  to  secure  more  efficient 
machinery  or  to  correct  his  business  methods  as  the 
case  may  be.  He  doesn't  come  to' the  conclusion  that 
because  of  the  defects  he  has  discovered  machinery 
should  be  discarded  and  that  system  should  be  throvpn 
to  the  winds.  Knovping  that  this  would  be  the  height 
of  folly  he  concentrates  his  mind  upon  the  considera- 
tion of  ways  and  means  that  will  correct  the  evils  he 
has  discovered. 

Being  a  distributer  and  not  a  producer,  the  retailer 
does  not  use  machinery  in  the  same  sense  as  a  manu- 
facturer does.  But  he  uses  machinery  just  the  same. 
If  he  doesn't  his  store  is  not  efficiently  equipped.  And 
where  there  is  inefficiency  of  equipment  there  must  ne- 
cessarily be  inefficiency  of  service. 

As  ninety-five  per  cent,  of  the  retail  business  of  the 
country  is  conducted  under  the  credit  .system  it  natur- 
ally follows  that  the  machinery  and  the  methods  em- 
ployed in  carrying  it  on  should  be  of  the  most  efficient 
character  possible.  If  in  both  respects  efficiency  is 
not  employed  trouble  is  bound  to  follow. 

As  far  as  machinery  for  looking  after  the  credit  sys- 
tem is  concerned,  there  is  an  ample  supply.  All  the 
retailer  has  to  do  is  to  pay  his  money  and  take  his 
choice.  If  his  business  is  of  such  a  character  that  he 
deems  it  necessary  to  install  the  complex  double  entry 
system,  all  he  has  to  do  is  purchase  the  necessary  books 
and  employ  a  bookkeeper  competent  to  look  after  them. 
If  all  that  he  wants  is  efficiency  without  complexity  that 
is  also  at  his  command.  As  it  is  the  latter  system  which 
the  average  retailer  wants,  and  should  want,  it  is  that 
in  which  he  is  most  interested. 

As  a  matter  of  fact  some  of  the  machinery  which  is 
available  for  the  keeping  a  record  of  credit  sales  is  so 
characterized  by  both  efficiency  and  simplicity  that  it 
is  fully  competent  to  supply  the  requirements  of  any 
retail  business,  whether  it  be  large  or  small  and  at  a 
cost,  both  in  the  original  outlay  and  in  maintenance, 
which  is  little  short  of  remarkable  for  the  service 
rendered. 

The  first  reqiiisite  in  any  system  of  bookkeeping  is 
of  course  the  preservation  of  a  record  of  the  sales 
which  have  been  made  on  the  credit  basis.  This  sys- 
tem must  be  thorough  and  in  accordance  with  the  re- 
quirements of  the  business.  Because  of  the  complex 
character  of  the  old  systems  in  the  years  gone  by  many 
a  retail  store,  particularly  the  smaller  kinc'',  was  with- 
out effective  bookkeeping  methods. 

Even  to-day,  in  spite  of  the  extraordinary  develop- 


With  modern  accounting  systems  it  is 
an  easy  matter  for  the  retailer  to  conduct 
a  safe  and  successful  credit  business. 


EDMONDS 

  ments    which    have  taken 

place  in  regard  to  bookkeep- 
ing methods,  we  occasionally 
hear  of  Instances,  even  in 
large  stores,  where  the  sys- 
tem employed  is  totally  in- 
adequate for  the  require- 
ments of  the  business.  As 
bookkeeping  is  now  made 
compulsory  by  law  we  occasionally  hear  of  cases  before 
the  courts  where  no  books  of  any  kind  are  kept. 

But  while  the  first  essential  of  bookkeeping  is  the 
preservation  of  records,  the  most  up-to-date  systems 
specially  designed  for  the  retail  trade  provide  for  even 
more  than  this.  One  thing  which  at  least  some  of 
them  do  in  addition  to  preserving  records  is  to  provide 
the  facilities  for  invoicing.  And  what  is  more,  auto- 
matically providing  the  invoices. 

The  latter  provision  is  of  almost  untold  value,  par- 
ticularly where  the  retailer's  facilities  for  looking  after 
his  accounts  are  limited.  And  the  saving  of  labor  en- 
tailed is  not  the  only  consideration.  For  being  auto- 
matic these  modern  systems  of  accounting  enable  the 
retailer  to  ascertain  when  each  and  every  credit  sale 
is  made  the  exact  amount  that  the  customer  owes  him. 
The  advantage  of  this  is  obvious,  for  he  does  not  have 
to  turn  up  his  books,  possibly  at  a  time  when  he  can 
ill-afiPord  to  spare  the  time  to  do  so,  in  order  to  ascertain 
how  the  account  stands,  as  the  record  is  provided  with 
each  sale.  Furthermore  it  enables  him  to  judge  when 
to  apply  the  brakes  to  a  customer  whose  account  is  run- 
ning to  dangerous  proportions.  And  last,  but  not 
least,  it  facilitates  the  collection  of  accounts. 

Tn  a  word  the  great  advantage  of  these  modern  sys- 
tems of  bookkeeping  for  the  retail  store  is  of  a  two-fold 
nature.  In  the  first  place  it  provides  at  a  minimum 
of  labor  the  most  efPective  of  accounting  machinery.  In 
the  second  place  it  prevents  an  account  running,  with- 
out the  retailer  being  aware  of  the  fact,  to  an  undue 
length.  And  in  the  third  place  it  facilitates  the  collec- 
tion of  accounts. 


BILL  PEARSON  BROUGHT  IN  THIS 

If  you  think  this  is  a  mild  winter,  ask  a  big  Toronto 
furniture  drummer  who  recently  went  to  bed  early  in 
order  to  get  up  to  catch  one  of  those  morning  trains 
out  of  Owen  Sound.  He  had  just  got  nicely  to  sleep 
when  there  was  a  knock  at  his  door.  "Four  o'clock," 
said  the  voice  without.  He  dozed  off  again.  Came  a 
second  knock,  "Four-fifteen,  the  bus  leaves  in  five 
minutes."  "Hold  that  bus,"  he  yelled  as  he  scrambled 
into  his  clothes.  When  he  rushed  downstair's  the  bus 
Avas  evidently  gone,  so  he  continued  his  flight  to  the 
station.  It  was  dark.  He  looked  at  his  watch.  It 
was  eleven  o'clock.  Also  it  was  below  zero.  Now 
he's  swearing  he'll  get  even  with  the  fellows  who  put 
up  the  job. 


40 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Some  Don'ts  for  Clerks 

Gioen  to  employee!  by  Regina  Trading  Co., 
of  Regina 

READ  these  few  suggestions  over  carefully  and 
profit  by  them.    They  will  give  you  an  idea  of 
some  things  to  be  avoided  in  service  to  cus- 
tomers. 

Don't  fail  to  be  on  time  in  the  morning. 

Don't  delay  your  stock  work;  do  it  now. 

Don't  lay  your  salesbook  on  the  counter  to  be  cov- 
ered up  with  merchandise. 

Don't  assemble  in  groups  and  gossip,  be  on  the  look- 
out for  customers. 

Don't  talk  in  a  loud  voice,  the  ordinary  tone  is  better 
and  indicates  culture  and  self-control. 

Don't  fail  to  rise  if  seated,  and  to  greet  your  cus- 
tomer pleasantly. 

Don't  say,  "Lady,  are  you  waited  on?" 

Don't  fail  to  say,  "Madame,  have  you  had  atten- 
tion?" "May  I  be  of  service  to  you?"  "Are  you  re- 
ceiving attention?"  or  "May  I  interest  you  in  this?" 
(Some  article  or  line  of  merchandise  that  is  on  dis- 
play.) 

Don't  discuss  personal  or  house  matters  in  the 
presence  of  your  customers. 

Don't  fail  to  give  your  customer  your  undivided  at- 
tention. 

Don't  address  your  fellow  workers  by  their  given 
names  in  the  presence  of  customers ;  always  use  the 
prefix  Mr.  or  Miss. 

Don't  fail  to  impress  your  customers  with  the  fact 
that  there  are  other  departments  and  other  goods  on 
sale  besides  your  own. 

Don't  use  terms  of  endearment  when  addressing 
customers. 

Don't  make  mistakes,  it  costs  much  to  correct  them 
and  indicates  inefficiency. 

Don't  make  promises  to  customers  that  you  cannot 
fulfil. 

Don't  use  gum,  tobacco  or  liquor  during  working 
hours. 

Don't  fail  to  give  considerate  attention  to  the  small 
buyer  as  well  as  to  the  large  one, 


Don't  worry  if  customers  are  exacting.  Do  your 
best  and  overlook  their  actions. 

Don't  fail  to  make  your  checks  our  correctly  in 
every  particular. 

Don't  be  afraid  to  use  someone  else's  good  ideas.  The 
world  would  never  have  advanced  if  it  had  not  done 
the  same  thing. 


FURNITURE  OUTLOOK  GOOD 

The  furniture  market  is  (piite  promising.  Price 
changes  are  not  looked  for  by  manufacturers,  at  least 
not  as  far  as  declines  in  quotations  are  concerned.  The 
argument  in  the  trade  is  that  prices  were  not  advancpd 
to  the  extent  that  the  higher  price  of  materials  and 
wages  would  have  warranted  during  the  war.  There 
has  been  a  slight  reduction  in  prices  for  soiye  of  the 
materials  diiring  the  last  four  months,  but  tliese  ha^e 
been  comparatively  small.  Materials  are  more  readily 
procurable.  The  demand  for  the  bettor  class  of  furni- 
lure  is  stated  to  bo  good.  Downward  price  revisions 
are  some  distance  in  the  future,  and  they  are  not  ex- 
pected to  be  drastic  when  they  do  occur. — Toronto 
Globe. 


WHY  FURNITURE  IS  COSTING  MORE 

The  National  Association  of  Chair  Manufacturers 
has  given  out  a  comparison  of  costs  as  between  the 
years  1913  and  1918.    Here  is  the  result: 

Increase  last  year  in  cost  of  material,  43  per  cent. 

Increase  last  year  in  labor,  82  per  cent. 

Increase  last  year  in  overhead,  87  per  cent. 

Increase  last  year  in  output  value  62  per  cent. 

There  was  a  decrease  in  the  number  of  chairs  pro- 
duced last  year  of  35  per  cent,  as  compared  with  1913. 


ABOUT  COLLECTIONS 

An  old  adage  says  "short  accounts  make  best 
friends."  How  true  this  is,  everyone  in  business  knows, 
as  the  older  an  account  gets,  the  harder  it  is  to  collect. 
The  tendency  in  business  everywhere,  is  steadily  to- 
wards a  purely  cash  basis  or  shortening  of  credits. — 
Enterprise  News. 


Bed  No.  276—7.75. 
Made  by  the 
Ontario  Spring   Bed  Co.,  Ltd., 
London,  Ont. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


41 


AMERICAN  OPINION  o/FURNITURE  OUTLOOK 

iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiiiliiliiiiiiiiiii!iiiliiiiiiMiiiililiiiliiiimi  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  i':iiiiiiiiiiii>iiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

Adolph  Karpen  of  S.  Karpen  &  Bros.,  Chicago  and  New  York,  tells  of  conditions  that  prevail  across  the  border — 
Prospects  most  promising — Value  of  discipline  and  visits  abroad — Has  taught  appreciation  of  comforts  of  home 

1lllllllllllll>lllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!INIIIIIM!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIItllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllNIIIIIII^  IIIIMI  Ill  I  I  Illllllllllllllll  Ill  Illlllllllllllllll  Illlllllllllllllll  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMII  IIMIMIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIMMIMIMIIIIMIIIIMMMIIIIIIIIIII 


PERHAPS  never  before  in  the  history  of  the  furni- 
ture trade  have  the  conditions  been  so  auspicious 
and  the  outlook  so  promising  as  at  the  present 
time.  In  many  ways  conditions  are  similar  to  the  re- 
construction period  after  the  Civil  War,  with  the  ex- 
ception that  this  country  has  not  been  devastated, 
homes  have  not  been  destroyed  in  the  manner  of  actual 
warfare  and  what  suffering  has  been  undergone,  aside 
from  the  loss  of  men  and  material  wealth,  has  been 
more  in  the  nature  of  deprivation  of  the  things  to 
which  we  were  accustomed  before  the  great  conflict 
than  in  the  actual  destruction  of  homes  aiul  household 
goods  as  suffered  on  the  European  continent. 

Business  of  all  kinds  not  catering  to  the  needs  of 
the  Government  or  the  furnishing  of  war  supplies  has 
been  penalized.  Raw  materials,  steel,  iron,  wood  fab- 
rics, glue  and  a  number  of  other  essentials  entering  into 
the '  manufacture  of  furniture  have  been  limited  to 
a  certain  output,  and  only  those  concerns  which  by 
foresight  or  the  ability  to  purchase  large  (juantities 
before  the  war  have  not  suffered  from  limitation.  Tlie 
natural  result  has  been  a  limitation  of  the  output  of 
furniture.  The  withdrawal  of  hundreds  of  salesmen 
from  the  road,  the  entrance  of  thousands  of  others  in 
the  national  service,  including  important  employees, 
has  had  a  tendency  to  slow  down  the  manufacture  of 
furniture,  and  conseciuently  has  reacted  on  the  business 
of  the  retailer  and  jobber.  The  condition  of  trade  so 
far  as  the  manufacture  of  furniture  is  concerned  has 
been  a  passive  one  and  take-it-or-leave-it  attitude,  the 
policy  of  supplying  regular  customers  and  old  buyers 
with  little  effort  to  extend  business  to  new  fields. 

With  the  rise  in  prices  on  nearly  every  article  enter- 
ing into  the  making  of  furniture  came  the  natural  in- 
crease iti  prices  from  the  manufacturer  to  the  retailer, 
who  in  turn  passed  this  increase  on  to  his  customers. 
Never  before  has  it  been  demonstrated  that  furniture 
is  a  necessity  to  better  effect  than  this  war  has  done, 
as  purchases  continued,  though  naturally  in  a  lessened 
volume,  up  to  the  close  of  the  conflict,  and  left  dealers 
with  but  skeletons  of  stock  on  hand  in  many  localities. 
It  is  useless  to  conjecture  the  millions  of  dollars  lost 
through  the  war  to  the  dealer  and  manufacturer.  How- 
ever, it  cannot  be  really  said  that  this  business  has 
been  lost  as  the  need  for  the  furniture  still  remains, 
and  it  is  this  gradually  interrupted  current  of  buying, 
stopped  at  the  beginning  of  the  war  and  continued  in 
diminislu'd  volume  up  to  the  present  time,  that  will 
again  take  its  course — has,  in  fact,  taken  it — and  will 
make  the  years  1919  and  1920  according  to  all  condi- 
tions the  most  pi'osperoiis  the  furnilnre  ti-ade  has  e\er 
witnessed. 

The  drastic  effect  of  enlistment  and  mobilization, 
which  called  several  millions  of  young  men  away  from 
theii'  homes  aiul  in  a  way  wrecked  their  domestic  plans 
for  the  future,  had  an  iitiniediate  effect  on  the  business 
of  the  retailer,  and  purchases  made  just  prioi'  to  the 
war  were  in  man.v  cases  cancelled,  the  installment  men 
feeling  particularly  this  phase  of  war  conditions.  The 


newspapers  of  New  York  and  Chicago  contained  hun- 
dreds of  classified  advertisement  of  families  selling 
household  goods  because  of  the  war,  taking  more 
limited  quarters  because  of  the  enlistment  of  the  sons 
or  the  husband. 

Now  all  this  is  reversed,  and  the  j'oung  man  who 
went  away  on  our  entrance  into  actual  hostilities  or 
about  that  time,  is  looking  forward  more  intensely 
than  ever  before  to  the  day  of  homecoming,  and  has 
learned  to  apy)reciate  the  comforts  of  a  good  home  in 
a  way  that  no  other  experience  could  have  taught  him. 
The  wet  trench  has  been  exchanged  for  the  downy  bed ; 
the  camp  stool  or  ledge  of  rock  for  the  evening  chair  or 
comfortable  rocker.  Home  has  taken  up  a  new  mean- 
ing to  the  men  who  went  abroad  or  entered  camp  in  this 
country. 

But  the  war  has  accomplished  more.  It  has  taught 
him  the  essentials  of  citizenship.  And  more  important 
than  anything,  the  young  soldier  has  been  taught  the 
value  of  discipline.  Incidentally  it  has  taught  the 
.young  men,  in  a  manner  they  could  never  otherwise 
have  learned,  the  value  of  good  home  furnishings  and 
good  furniture.  The  soldier  and  the  sailor  have  lost 
the  provincialism  of  the  past ;  they  have  become  men  of 
the  world;  they  have  been  billeted  and  entertained  at 
the  best  homes ;  the.y  have  been  in  the  best  hotels  of  this 
country  and  abroad.  They  have  read  the  newspapers 
of  the  great  cities,  and  have  seen  the  windows  of  the 
great  stores  of  large  cities  with  their  wonderful  sug- 
gestions and  up-to-date  styles.  They  have  learned 
to  distinguish  the  good  from  the  cheap,  the  ill-designed, 
the  shoddy  from  the  artistic  and  the  fine. 

The  young  officer,  who  Avas  once  a  salesman  or  em- 
ployee in  some  humble  capacity — accustomed  to  the 
sordid  surroundings  of  the  small  town  and  its  drab  at- 
mosphere of  mediocrity,  but  later  (juartered  in  a  Frencli 
chateau  or  in  one  of  the  fairyland  cities  of  the  Rhine — 
who  has  seen  the  styles  of  Louis  XIV,  XV  and  XVT,  the 
Gobelin  tapestries  and  Sevres  ware,  will  find  it  hard  to 
reconcile  himself  again  to  the  crude  style  of  furnishing 
in  his  home  city.  Ho  will  want  at  least  some  improve- 
ment— the  germ  has  begun  to  work. 


FROM  FURNITURE  FASHION  CENTRES 

Intei'ior  decoi-ators  in  New  York  are  said  to  be 
swamped  with  work. 

Painted  furniture  is  having  unusual  vogue  across 
the  border,  artists  of  ability  are  turning  theii-  effoi'ts 
toward  creating  furniture  of  this  sort. 

Mr.  .Tarrett,  of  the  North  American  Bent  Chair  Co.. 
Owen  Sound,  who  was  at  the  front  with  the  Canadians, 
managed  while  there  to  see  something  of  the  furniture 
situation  in  France  and  Belgium.  He  believes  that 
there  is  a  field  for  f'anadian  furniture  in  France  for 
several  years,  and  in  convei-sation  with  a  Paris  furni- 
lurc  man  found  this  opinion  was  also  held  by  him. 


42 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiii; 


IIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII 


iiiiiiMiiiiiii:i!iiii'iiie 


KNOBS  of  NEWS 


IMIIIIIIIIMIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI 


Tlie  town  of  Delisle,  Sask.,  was  burned  last  month. 

Doekerill  Bros.,  Halifax,  N.S.,  are  enlarging  their  up- 
holstering factory. 

Morris  Michnik  intends  to  erect  a  $20,000  mattress 
factor}"  at  Hamilton. 

Jas.  Lacroix'  furniture  workrooms  at  Ottawa,  were 
burned  recently.     Loss  $5,000,  partly  insured. 

The  Anti(|ue  Furniture  Makers  have  been  in- 
corjiorated  at  Winnipeg.  Raehael  Provisor  is  head  of 
the  company. 

Alex.  Barrie's  furniture  store  at  Midland,  was  some- 
what damaged  by  smoke  from  a  fire  in  a  nearby  busi- 
ness block  recently. 

The  Montreal  Stulf-over  Fiirniture  Co.,  and  the 
Colonial  Store  and  Office  Furniture  Co.,  Montreal,  have 
been  registered. 

The  Kay  furniture  stock  at  Toronto,  is  being  moved 
into  the  Murray-Kay  store,  so  that  all  departments  will 
be  under  the  one  roof. 

Goodfellow  &  Blair,  furniture  dealers,  Westport, 
Ont.,  have  dissolved  partnership.  D.  L.  GoodfelloAV  is 
continuing  the  business. 

Geo.  H.  Hees  &  Son,  Ltd.,  makers  of  Avindow  shades 
sustained  a  fire  loss  in  their  factory  at  Quebec  city  re- 
cently.   The  factory  was  insured. 

Harry  Sargent's  furniture  store  at  Midland,  Ont., 
together  with  its  contents,  was  destroyed  by  fire  on 
March  22.     The  premises  were  insured. 

G.  E.  McCulloiigh,  advertising  and  sales  manager  for 
the  Ideal  Bedding  Co.,  Toronto,  has  resigned  to  be- 
come manager  of  the  Canadian  Advertising  Agency, 
Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Norman  Robson,  an  employee  of  the  National  Table 
Co.,  Owen  Soiand,  Out.,  died  from  the  eflfects  of  an  acci- 
dental discharge  of  a  revolver  in  the  hands  of  a  com- 
panion about  a  month  ago. 

Potters,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man.,  has  obtained  a  provin- 
cial charter  with  a  capital  of  $200,000  to  take  over 
Edgar  R:  Potter's  wholesale  furniture  business.  Mr. 
Potter  will  retain  chief  interest  in  the  new  company. 

The  Grimsby  Steel  Furjiiture  Co.  Ltd.,  has  been  in- 
corporated with  a  capital  of  $60,000,  to  make,  import 


and  deal  in  steel  furniture,  folding  chairs,  opera  chairs 
and  steel  specialties  of  all  kinds.  Head  office,  Grimsb}', 
Ont. 


NEW  FACE  ON  SALES  STAFF 

We  present  to  our  readers  a  photo  of  ]\Ir.  F.  W. 
Jarrett,  a  new  addition  to  the  travelling  sales  staff  of 
the  North  Ameincan  Bent  Chair  Co.,  Owen  Sound.  Mr. 
Jarrett  is  a  former  employee  of  the  Bent  Chair  Co.,  hav- 
ing been  a  member  of  the  office  staff  for  five  years  be- 
fore enlisting  for  overseas  service  in  the  147th  Bal- 


talion,  in  1017.  He  was  through  many  of  the  important 
engagements  of  the  past  two  years,  including 
Passehendaele,  where  he  was  slightly  shell-shocked. 

He  returned  recently  to  Canada  with  tlie  4th  C.  M.  R. 
and  his  old  employers  were  glad  to  be  able  to  oft'er  him 
a  better  post  than  he  had  before  going  overseas.  He 
is  taking  J.  M.  Adam's  territory  and  will  cover  practi- 
cally all  of  Ontario,  Mr.  Adam  has  linked  up  his  in- 
terests with  the  Renfrew  Refrigerator  Co. 


Chair    and    rocker,    from    a  suite 
made  by   Woeller,   Bolduc   &  Co., 
Waterloo,  Ont. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


43 


THE  PULLING  POWER  OF  POPULARITY 

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An  interesting  study  of  the  part  played  by  popularity  in  promoting  trade  for  the  retail  merchant  in  the  furniture  line 


POPULARITY  plays  an  important  part  in  pulling 
trade  for  the  average  retail  dealer.  It  is  a 
factor  that  the  retail  merchant — especially  the 
smaller  dealer— cannot  afford  to  overlook.  It  goes 
v»  ithout  saying,  says  an  American  exchange  in  the 
course  of  an  interesting  article  on  this  subject,  that  the 
dealer  who  is  popular  will  win  a  great  deal  more  profit- 
able trade  to  himself  than  the  one  who  is  either  a 
grouch  or  colorless  as  far  as  the  like  or  dislike  of  the 
community  go. 

The  matter  of  being  popular  is  not  one  of  luck  or 
happenso  by  any  manner  of  means,  for  one  has  not  to 
travel  far  to  discover  that  some  of  the  most  popular 
dealers  are  plain  of  features,  blunt  of  manner,  and 
many  of  them  not  conspicuous  for  business  slirewdness 
Just  wherein  then  does  popularity  lie,  and  can  a 
knowledge  of  the  underlying  principles  of  popularity 
be  acquired  like  a  course  in  typewriting  or  penman- 
ship? Yes  and  no.  The  secrets  of  popularity  are  not 
mysterious  at  all  and  they  can  be  learned  by  the  man 
who  is  anxious  to  learn. 

The  "know  it  all"  who  thinks  that  he  is  the  sura  of 
all  wisdom  or  that  he  does  not  put  much  stock  in  the 
other  fellow's  advice,  will  pro'ba;bly  not  benefit  much, 
for  he  will  not  try  to  benefit. 

LET  it  be  recorded  right  here  that  the  retail  busi- 
ness is  peculiar  to  itself,  in  that  it  eaters  re- 
peatedly and  endlessly  to  housewives  who  either 
become  loyal  and  devoted  customers,  or  who  are  un- 
consciously watching  for  some  excuse  to  go  elsewhere. 

The  business  man  in  the  furnitiare  line  who  can  read 
the  following  advice  and  feel  that  he  needs  none  of  it, 
is  a  rara  avis  and  it  is  dollars  to  doughnuts  that  if  each 
reader  can  get  one  principal  point  to  put  into  opera- 
tion, that  it  will  mean  a  surprising  increase  in  cash  in 
bank  at  the  end  of  the  year. 


THE  dealer  who  is  popular  is  the  one  who  does 
more  than  stock  his  store,  insert  an  occasional 
advertisement  in  the  newspaper,  and  wait  on 
people  who  come  in  with  their  requirements  all  ready 
to  voice.  Anyone  can  do  that.  Popularity  depends, 
however,  upon  a  real  knowledge  and  appreciation  of 
human  nature. 

To  begin  with,  our  popular  merchant  must  be  pub- 
lie-spirited,  remembering  always  that  the  man  who 
plays  ball  must  toss  occasionally  as  well  as  catch.  This 
does  not  mean  that  he  is  to  be  an  easy  mark  for  every 
solicitor,  for  it  is  easy  enough  to  set  aside  a  percentage 
appropriation  for  puWic  promotion  work,  and  if  you 
think  that  you  are  being  held  up  without  rhyme  or 
reason,  to  say  that,  much  as  you  regret  it,  your  ap- 
l)ropriation  for  contributions  to  work  of  that  kind 
does  not  permit  a  subscription,  which  is  a  much  more 
tactful  way  than  to  say.  "I  don't  believe  in  your  old 
scheme.  There's  nothing  in  it  for  me."  Just  the 
same,  the  popular  merchant  must  take  part  with 
both  personal  influence  and  financial  help  in  those 
things  Avhich  stand  for  community  welfare  in  the 
locality  in  wliich  he  is  situated. 


THE  next  step  in  popularity  is  to  be  genuinely  in- 
terested in  individual  customers  who  come  to 
you  in  person  ot  who  telephone  their  orders,  or 
whose  orders  are  taken  by  solicitors  for  the  store. 

When  a  customer  comes  to  the  store  in  person,  the 
wise  business  man  does  not  eye  her  critically  as  much 
as  to  say,  "I  wonder  where  you  escaped  from  last,"  and 
if  asked  for  credit  uses  reasonable  tact,  fi'aying  per- 
haps in  substance,  "We  shall  be  very  happy  to  have 
your  patronage  and  are  sure  that  you  will  be  satisfied 
with  our  service.  It  is  a  rule  of  the  firm,  which  of 
course  you  understand  is  a  business  necessity,  that  each 
charge  customer  give  a  couple  of  references  which  we 
can  look  up.  This  is  quite  as  much  for  the  protection 
of  the  customer  as  for  ourselves,  because  if  we  are  un- 
fortunate enough  to  give  credit  to  a  number  of  people 
who  are  not  financially  responsible,  it  means  a  heavy 
loss,  which  in  the  end  we  have  to  charge  up  in  the  price 
of  our  goods.     I  am  sure  you  understand." 

One  merchant  who  couldn't  understand  the  reason 
that  he  was  not  popular,  prejudiced  many  by  his 
senseless  attitude  in  meeting  requests  for  charge  ac- 
counts. He  always  treated  the  applicants  as  though 
Ihey  were  begging  the  goods  for  nothing,  and  never 
seem.ed  to  get  it  through  his  head  that  it  was  quite  as 
much  to  his  interest  to  gain  customers  as  for  the  cus- 
tomer to  find  a  supply  man. 


THE  next  step  in  popularity  is  absolute  fairness 
and  integrity.  The  business  man  who  shows 
an  unwillingness  to  take  undue  advantage  will 
gradually  win  an  enviable  reputation.  Be  fair.  Make 
adjustments  cordially.  Remember  it  is  quite  possible 
that  your  deliveryman  left  a  parcel  at  the  wrong  place, 
or  that  the  order  Avas  not  properly  filled,  or  that  there 
was  an  error  somewhere.  Look  the  matter  up  in 
justice  to  yourself,  but  give  the  customer  the  benefit 
of  the  doubt.  It  pays.  Then,  too,  a  grudging  ad- 
justment cancels  all  the  advertising  and  good-will 
benefit  of  the  transaction. 

Never  misrepresent  or  permit  employees  to  mis- 
represent a  single  item  in  your  advertisements  or  store 
representations.  Insist  that  everyone  tells  the  truth 
because  it  is  the  only  sensible  thing  to  do  and  the  only 
sound  business  policy  to  follow.  In  the  end  this  will 
establish  confidence  in  you  and  your  service,  and  con- 
fidence is  the  very  basis  of  worthwhile  popularity. 

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I  THE  STICKER  | 

I  It's  easy  to  cry  that  you're  beaten,  and  die,  | 

I  It's  easy  to  crawfish  and  crawl,  | 

I  But  to  fig'ht  and  to  fight  when  hoipe's  out  of  sight;  | 

1  Wlhy,  that's  the  best  game  of  them  all.  | 

1  And  though  you  come  out  of  each  gruelling  bout,  i 

I  .\11  broken  and  beaten  and  scarred —  | 

I  Just  have  one  more  try.    It's  dead  easy  to  die,  | 

I  It's  keeping  on  living  that's  hard.  f 

I  — Robert  W.  Service.  | 

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44 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Prices  of  Stoves 

(From  Manufacturers'  Standpoint) 
Is  there  any  likelihood  of  a  reduction,  and  are 
dealers  justified  in  holding  off  purchasing  in  expecta- 
tion of  lower  prices?  These  questions  are  frequently 
asked,  and  we  think  it  well  to  outline  the  position  at 
present,  and  our  opinion  based  on  same. 

In  the  first  place  the  manufacturers  of  stoves  have 


Illustrating  a  properly  and  securely  tied  load  of  furniture  through  the 
use  of  rope. — Cut   courtesy  of  Oolnmbia  Rope  Co. 

been  extremely  conservative  in  making  advances,  and 
these  increases  were  only  put  into  effect  when  it  became 
absolutely  necessary  and  were  never  sufficient  to  cover 
ihe  increased  cost  of  production. 

Every  dealer,  who  handles  gods  made  of  steel  or 
iron,  knows  that  in  practically  every  line  of  goods 
manufactured  from  these  materials  the  advances  were 
very  much  greater,  in  fact  in  some  eases  double  those 
made  in  the  stove  line. 

Plain  black  steel  sheets,  which  before  the  war  could 
be  laid  down  at  $42.00  per  ton,  now  cost,  even  at  the 
slightly  reduced  figiire  recently  put  into  effect,  $10.5.00 
per  ton,  or  tAvo  and  a  half  times  as  much  as  before. 
Polished  sheets  in  the  same  proportion. 

The  same  conditions  apply  in  the  pig  iron  market. 
As  for  other  materials,  such  as  asbestos,  bolts,  rivets, 
platers'  supplies,  etc.,  there  have  been  no  reductions 
whatever,  and  none  are  likely.  Labor  which  in  the 
manufacture  of  the  modern  stove  is  much  the  largest 
item,  there  is  no  possibility  of  any  reduction  in.  In- 
stead, since  the  first  of  the  year,  molders'  wages  have 
been  advanced. 

In  addition  to  these  direct  costs,  the  overhead  ex- 
penses, including  salaries,  traveling  expenses,  freights 
and  all  those  items  that  go  into  the  expense  account  are 
steadily  advancing  with  no  likelihood  of  any  relief  for 
a  long  time. 

In  view  of  these  facts,  evei'vone  can  .iudge  for  him- 
self as  to  the  future  course  of  prices.  In  our  opinion 
there  can  be  only  one  conclusion — that  there  is  no  like- 
lihood of  any  reduction  until  more  favorable  conditions 
are  brought  about  both  in  materials  and  wages. — 
Enterprise  Foundry  News. 


TURNING  CURRENT  EVENTS  INTO  CLEVER  COPY 

The  merchant  with  an  ability  for  copy  writing  will 
do  well  to  take  advantage  of  the  happenings  of  note  in 
his  town  and  especially  that  which  directly  concerns  hi.s 
store. 

To  illustrate :  A  runaw^ay  horse  dashes  through  the 
window  of  a  merchant 's  store.  Next  morning  the  mer- 
chant's  advertisement  was  headed: 

"We  don't  blame  the  horse  for  wanting  to  go 

through  that  window  after  he  had  seen  the  nice 

display  of  bedroom  suites,  he  thought  he  had 

never  seen  anything  so  fine  before  and  therefore 

he  went  through  the  glass  to  get  them,  etc." 

Another  merchant's  store  was  visited  by  robbers. 
The  next  day  he  had  in  his  window  a  display  of  articles 
similar  to  those  taken,  placarded  as  follows: 

"This  is  the  kind  of  hall  tree  the  thieve;  were 

after.     They  got  it." 

On  another  article : 

"Then  they  saw  these  fine  i-ugs  aiul  took  one  for 

good  measure.    Those  boys  knew  good  goods." 

With  a  little  thought  on  your  part  you  can  find 
hundreds  of  instances  that  you  can  turn  into  human 
interest  copy. — Southern  Furniture  Journal. 


COST  FINDING 

From  the  experience  of  cost-finding,  we  believe  we 
may  argue  for: 

1.  Standardized  accounting  systems,  suited  to  the 
various  industries. 

2.  Cost  and  profit  accounting  for  individual  products. 

3.  Reasonable  standardization  of  products  and  elimi- 
nation of  excessive  costs  due  to  unnecessary  multipli- 
cation of  styles  and  types. 

4.  Compilation  and  issue  of  current,  basic  trade  in- 
formation. 

5.  Conferences  between  industries  and  Government 
for  the  exchange  of  proper  and  useful  views  and  in- 
formation.— William  B.  Colver,  Chairman  Federal 
Trade  Commission. 


At  night,  says  a  successful  furniture  merchant, 
store  my  mind,  and  by  day  T  mind  my  store ! 


I 


IT'S  ALL  IN  THE  STATE  OF  MIND. 

If  you  think  you  are  beaten,  you  are, 

If  you  think  that  3'ou  dare  not,  you  don't, 
If  you'd  like  to  win,  but  think  you  can't 

It 's  almost  a  ' '  einch  ' '  you  won 't. 
If  you  think  you  '11  lose,  you 've  lost, 

For  out  in  the  world  you  find 
Success  begins  with  a  fellow 's  will, 

It's  all  in  the  state  of  mind. 

Full  many  a  race  is  lost 

Ere  even  a  step  is  run, 
And  miany  a  coward  fails 

Ere  even  his  work's  begun, 
Think  big,  and  your  deeds  will  grow. 

Think  small,  and  you'll  fall  behind. 
Think  that  you  can,  and  you  will. 

It's  all  in  the  state  of  mind. 

If  you  think  you're  outclassed,  j'ou  are, 

You've  got  to  think  high  to  rise. 
You've  got  to  be  sure  of  yourself  before 

You  can  ever  win  a  i)rize. 
Life 's  battles  don 't  always  go 

To  the  stronger  or  faster  man. 
But  soon  or  late  the  man  who  wins 

Is  the  fellow  who  thinks  he  can. 

— Author  Unknown. 


April,  1919  CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER  45 


•••••••• •,,1^ 

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•••••• 

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The 

Biggest 
Proposition 

in  the 

Talking  Machine 
Field 

the 


Pathe  Freres  Phonograph 

Sales  Company 

4-6-8  CLIFFORD  STREET 
TORONTO 


46 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Talking  Machines  in  the 
Furniture  Store 


ATTRACTING  AND  HOLDING  CUSTOMERS 


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Location  an  asset  for  the  dealer  handling  talking  machines  and  records — Pubhcity,  equipment,  stock  and  service 
are  requisites — Essential  factors  making  for  success — Don't  forget  overhead — W.  Webb,  in  Talking  Machine  World 


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WHERE  is  your  store  located?  Do  you  value  it 
at  its  true  Avorth,  aud  what  are  you  doing  to 
make  it  appeal?  There  is  an  art  in  attracting 
eustomei's  to  your  place  of  business,  and  this  is  O  'e  of 
the  vital  matters  that  every  dealer  should  keep  well  in 
mind.  Your  location  is  only  of  nominal  value  to  yoa 
if  the  store  itself  does  not  attract.  Can  you  not  cite 
some  instances  where  the  fault  in  this  respect  is  glar- 
ing? Can  you  not  look  about  you  and  see  wherein  the 
error  is  being  made  that  cuts  down  the  profits  on  sales, 
and  that  actually  curtails  sales  to  a  great  degree?  Stop 
and  think  just  a  moment,  then. 

Ask  yourself  this  ([uestion,  "Is  my  store  properl.y 
.located  for  the  sale  of  talking  machines  and  records? 
If  so.  does  it  attract  so  that  the  sales  are  as  largp  as  they 
can  be  made  "  You  are  the  only  judge  i:i  this  way, 
and  if  your  opinion  is  at  fault  where  will  you  turn  for 
a  better  judge?  You  know  what  your  annual  sa'es 
amount  to;  you  understand  what  your  overhead  is  and 
what  your  possibilities  are.  Ts  your  nearest  competitor 
— not  in  distance,  but  in  the  amount  of  influence  he 
has  on  the  public —  hurting  you?  If  so,  why?  Thei-e 
is  the  big  (piestion  mark,  and  .you  are  the  man  who 
must  answer  it. 

Now.  the  sale  of  talking  machines  and  records  is  not 
so  complicate'd  a  matter  that  the  public  cannot  be  in- 
'hiced  to  seek  the  store  where  there  is  a  reason  for  so 
doing.  The  customers  are  more  eager  to  get  service, 
stock  selection,  price,  and  to  enter  an  inviting  stor? 
than  they  care  very  much  about  the  location.  The 
latter,  of  course,  is  a  vital  matter.  The  out-of-the  way 
street  with  its  limited  number  of  pedestrians,  or  its 
fewer  autos,  is  not  likely  to  be  found  a  desirable  sec- 
tion for  man.y  lines  of  merchandise  ret?.i^ed.  There  i<, 
liowever.  the  more  active  thoroughfare  Avith  its  at- 
tractive shops  and  larger  number  of  passersby,  and  i"s 
life  and  hum  of  trade  that  offers  a  stronger  location 
for  your  place  of  business.  But  even  this  is  not  going 
to  force  the. public  to  seek  you. 

The  upstairs  shop  can  be  made  more  attractive  than 
the  floor  facing  the  street  if  the  dealer  is  not  fully  alive 
to  the  public's  keen  interest  in  the  properly  conducted 
store.  The  power  to  appeal,  the  art  to  make  the  public 
seek  you.  the  interest-arousing  windows,  the  magnet 
that  simply  forces  the  public  to  enter,  Avhat  and  Avhere 
are  these  to  be  found  and  what  is  the  real  secret  that 
makes  this  a  realization?  "We  see  it  demonstrated  in 
iiian.v  eases.  Why  do  Ave,  for  instance,  go  to  a  cer- 
tain store? 

Well.  Ave  Avill  sa.v,  there  are  often  many  reasons.  The 
store  that  does  appeal,  however,  and  that  makes  us 
ff-el  that  there  is  a  double  welcome  has  a  great  deal  to 


do  Avith  it  at  times.  We  go  many  times  because  the 
imdtation  is  so  strong  that  it  is  hard  to  resist.  Thes^^ 
stores  are  not  always  in  the  very  heart  of  the  city.  No, 
sometimes  they  are  located  on  a  street  that  is  not  noted 
for  the  number  of  people  Avho  pass  a  given  point  in 
every  twent.A--four  hours.  But  the  store  has  made  it- 
self known,  and  Ave  simply  go  there  with  confidence  and 
assurance  of  a  right  ro.yal  Avelcome,  and  Avith  the  know  1- 
e  Ige  that  there  will  be  nothing  to  cause  us  any  serious 
disappointment. 

But  how  did  the  store  of  this  kind  gain  its  reputa- 
tion? Well,  the  instances  vary  Avith  the  indiv'dnal 
cases,  and  the  success  did  not  come  oA^ernight.  It  was 
often  gradual.  It  came  from  several  reasons,  hoAvever, 
that  involved  th(^  ir.eans  for  building  a  foundation  that 
Avas  based  on  servii c  stock  selection,  and  attraction. 

Publicity  had  something  to  do  Avith  this  larger  suc- 
cess. This  is  a  help,  but  it  must  be  looked  unon  as  ■^ 
means  only  to  a'l  end,  and  if  it  iS  not  conducted  'n  the 
right  manner  it  may  just  as  Avell  be  left  abng.  By 
publicitA'  in  this  connection  Ave  mean  not  simply  neAvs- 
paper  advertising,  poster  announcements,  circular  let- 
ters and  kindred  methods,  but  s'-ore  pub'icitv,  as  Ave 
noted  above,  that  Avill  attr;^ct.  Then  there  is  the  other 
and  the  more  practical  kind.  This  is  v?ry  closely 
allied  Avith  service,  for  the  pleased  customer  becomes 
.your  adA^ance  agent  for  larger  sales. 

Yes,  there  is  the  kind  of  stor?  publieitA-  that  the 
dealer  should  place  a  A^ery  high  value  on — the  type  of 
advertising  that  keeps  his  store  in  the  public  mind. 
Avhich  prompt  and  regular  cust-omers  Avill  not  forget.  If 
he  can  give  them  a  cause  for  seeking  him  he  has  the 
best  possible  asset  in  the  matter  of  Hrger  sales.  Where 
shall  Ave  go  for  a  talking  machine?  Who  has  the  best 
selection  of  records,  the  kind  that  includes  the  lates" 
as  Avell  as  the  best?  This  is  Avhat  the  buA-ers  Avant  t'» 
knoAV.  and  if  yon  can  take  care  of  these  needs  the  public 
is  going  to  seek  you,  even  though  you  are  not  located  in 
a  big.  high-priced  heart-of-the-eity  store,  Avhere  eroAvds 
eontinuall.v  pass  your  door. 

NoAV,  take  a  personal  stock  of  .A-ou^self  and  see  if 
you  can  fulfil  these  I'equireme'its ;  see  if  you  are  doing 
so  noAV.  If  you  are  not,  the  big,  heart-of-the-city  sto'  e 
might  become  to  you  a  rather  heaA'.y  burden,  because 
the  expense  of  upkeeo  and  the  not  over  large  sales  will 
soon  make  the  overhead  so  topheavy  as  to  cut  in'^o 
your  pjofits  in  a  Ava.y  that  Avill  hurt.  You  Avant  to 
give  service.  Do  .vou  understand  AAdiat  the  meaning  of 
this  ver.A^  significant  term  really  means? 

If  you  do  and  are  Avilling  to  make  it  a  feature  of  your 
location  there  will  not  be  any  logical  reason  for  your 
sales  not  being  good.     Your  location  is  going  to  help 


April. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


47 


you  only  if  the  otlier  factors  are  at  work  to  make  suc- 
cess a  practical  idea.  The  fact  that  you  are  located  in 
a  down-town  section ;  have  a  big'  store  and  plenty  of 
sliow  without  anything  to  really  back  this  up  is  not 
enough  to  insure  your  larger  snecess.  That  is  why 
some  of  the  dealers  with  the  smaller  stores  wherein  the 
attractions  are  Avorth  while  do  make  good. 

Take  into  consideration  your  overhead.  This  is  a 
mighty  big  pi'oflt  devourer.  Tt  fairly  eats  the  profits 
with  the  appetite  of  a  giant.  The  smaller,  atti'active 
store  that  has  the  merchandise  and  the  store  that  gives 
the  real  service  can  count  on  a  nice  business  and  the 
profits  are  real,  too,  not  the  imaginary  kind.  Keep 
that  thought  in  mind  at  all  times.  Keep  the  <|uestions 
of  decreased  overhead  with  its  many  entangling  alli- 
ances well  in  the  foremost  part  of  your  head.  Then 
you  can  sit  back  and  smile  and  take  your  profits  and 
make  your  sales  and  keep  your  good  customers  wh'le 
the  man  who  tries  to  outdo  you  with  the  big  show  is 
losing  his  hard  cash. 

The  value  of  your  location  is  only  part  of  the  game 
you  are  playing.  There  ai-e  other  matters  that  de- 
mand youi-  attention.  Tf  you  are  going  to  keep  these 
in  mind  and  are  really  in  dead  earnest  about  making 
them  a  part  of  your  line  of  action  you  can  be  assured 
that  the  outcome  will  be  all  that  you  can  hope  for,  and 
that  is  success  in  its  real  meaning. 


Canadian  Possibilities 

in  Phonograph  Making 


THE  manufacture  of  phonographs  in  Canada  is  a 
branch  of  industry  that  has  possibilities  of  con- 
siderable growth  in  the  next  few  years.  Pro- 
duction is  increasing  steadily,  and  the  output  is  con- 
siderably larger  now  than  it  was  twelve  months  ago. 
Manufacturers  who  have  alreadv  entered  this  field 


could  sell  greatly  in  excess  of  their  production.  While 
the  percentage  of  Canadian-made  phonographs  sold  in 
relation  to  the  entire  number  disposed  of  in  the 
Dominion  is  quite  small,  there  are  indications  that  the 
I^roportion  of  Canadian  phonograph  cabinets  to  im- 
ported m'achines  will  grow  materially  during  the  period 
of  readjustment  of  the  industry.  The  prediction  was 
made  recently  that  the  phonograph  industry  will  un- 
dergo expansion  commensurate  with  that  of  the  auto- 
mobile. Canada  may  hope  to  manufacture  fifty  per 
cent,  of  the  machines  sold  in  the  Dominion,  according 
to  one  maker.  Imports  of  musical  instruments  for  the 
twelve  months  ending  January,  1919,  were  valued  at 
•t;^, 180, 826,  while  for  the  twelve  months  ending 
January,  1918,  imports  under  this  category  were  given 
a  valuation  of  $.3,i625,774.  By  far  the  larger  per- 
centage of  the  above  periods,  and  especially  for  the 
year  ending  January,  1919,  were  from  the  United 
States,  and  phonographs  constituted  a  very  large  part 
of  the  imports. 

A  Threefold  Industry 

The  construction  of  phonographs  has  been  divided 
into  three  major  parts.  The  motoi-  is  made  in  one 
plant  specially  fitted  for  this  end  of  the  work.  The 
tone  arm  and  sound  box  is  made  in  another  factory. 
Numerous  other  parts  in  which  metal  is  used,  include 
knobs,  cranking  device,  levers,  etc.  As  the  industry 
exists  at  present  in  Canada  the  parts  named  above  are 
imported  from  different  sources,  and  the  cabinets  are 
made  in  the  Dominion  and  the  finished  product  is 
turned  out.  There  are  about  twelve  firms  engaged  in 
the  manufacture  of  phonograph  cabinets  in  Canada. 
For  the  most  part  the  Canadian  manufacturers  are 
furniture  makers,  who  have  included  the  making  of 
t-abinets  in  their  industry. 

There  are  indications  that  Canada  will  soon  be  less 
dependent  on  foreign  sources  of  supply  for  some  of 
the  parts  now^  imported  than  she  is  at  present.  This 
is  one  of  the  developments  that  will  mean  much  to  the 
Canadian  industry.     For  1919  the  output  of  cabinets 


Twd     pluinogruphs    in     solid  inn 

liogaiiy,     from     the    line    of  The 

Ge'Tge  Mcljagan  Furniture  Co. 
Ltd.,  Stratford,  Out. 


48 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


will  be  much  larger  than  previously.  The  McLagau 
Furniture  Company,  of  Stratford,  which  entered  upon 
the  manufacture  of  phonographs  twelve  months  ago, 
will  increase  its  output  for  this  year  to  api^roximately 
6.000  instruments,  and  it  is  felt  that  the  prospects  of 
the  max'ket  are  such  that  a  greatly  increased  production 
would  tind  a  ready  market  in  Canada. 


What  Canadian  Manufacturers  Are  Doing 

W.  H.  Bantield  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  makers  of 
munitions  throughout  the  war  period,  are  turning  their 
plant  into  one  for  the  making  of  phonograph  motors, 
tone  arms,  reproducers  and  accessories,  none  of  Avhich 
have  previously  been  manufactured  in  Canada.  This 
venture  was  decided  upon  over  one  year  ago.  The 
ending  of  hostilities  in  November  meant  the  cessation 
of  munition  business  rather  sooner  than  had  been  anti- 
cipated. This  meant  that  readjustment  plans  had  to 
be  speeded  up.  An  entire  plant  in  the  United  States 
devoted  to  the  manufacture  of  phonograph  motors  and 
accessories  has  been  purchased  and  moved  to  Toronto. 
Production  has  alreadj^  been  entered  upon.  While  it 
is  expected  to  find  a  market  in  Canada  for  a  large  per- 
centage of  the  motors  produced  this  year  there  will  be 
a  fair  proportion  shipped  to  other  markets.  The  for- 
eign fields  will  be  developed,  and  are  likely  to  take  by 
far  the  greater  part  of  the  output.  The  markets  that 
are  considered  to  be  the  most  attractive  are  China, 
Japan,  India,  South  America,  New  Zealand,  Australia, 
South  Africa,  Norway  and  Sweden  and  Southeas*-ern 
Europe.  Business  is  understood  to  have  materialized 
already  with  some  of  the  above  countries.  The  Orient 
is  looked  upon  as  a  tield  of  tremendous  extent  for  these 
products.  There  have  also  been  orders  from  Australia 
for  delivery  as  soon  as  possible. 

In  connection  Avith  domestic  trade,  motors  will  be 
supplied  to  makers  of  Canadian  phonographs.  Pro- 
duction during  1919  is  expected  to  run  into  several 
thousands.  Export  of  phonograph  motors,  etc.,  to 
Europe  is  expected  to  be  of  considerable  magnitude  as 
soon  as  conditions  there  are  more  settled.  Incpiiries 
have  come  from  Norway  and  Sweden,  and  these  fields 
are  believed-  to  be  capable  of  large  possibilities  for 
Canada. 

Motors  of  seven  types  are  being  made.  The  foregin 
end  of  the  business  will  eventually  become  by  far  the 
larger  part  of  the  industry  when  the  overseas  markets 
can  be  intensively  developed. 


Another  Concern  to  Make  Motors 

The  reconstruction  plans  of  the  Russell  Motor  Car 
Co.,  have  been  brou.ght  to  completion,  at  least  in  part. 
At  the  King  St.,  Toronto,  plant,  the  manufacture  of 
gramophone  motors  will  be  entered  upon.  This  is  an 
important  line  of  manufacture  which  has  not  previously 
been  established  in  Canada..  Preliminary  work  ha? 
alreadj'  been  finished  in  connection  with  these  motors., 
and  after  successful  tests  were  made  recently,  the  com- 
pany is  already  entering  on  (juantity  production,  which, 
it  is  expected,  will  be  at  the  rate  of  1.000  a  month.  This 
industry  will  supply  an  important  part  for  Canadian- 
made  gramophones,  and  the  market  is  capable  of  great 
extension. 

Still  Another  Maker 

The  International  Machine  &  Mfg.  Co.  Ltd..  Ill 
Adelaide  St.  W.,  Toronto,  makei-s  of  munitions  during 
the  war,  are  turning  their  plant  into  a  factory  for  the 
production  of  phonograph  m.otors. 

New  Patheaphone  Company  for  West 

A.  S.  Binns,  of  R.  J.  Whitla  &  Co.  Ltd..  Winnipeg, 
has  been  elected  president  of  a  new  company,  to  be 
known  as  the  Patheaphone  Distributing  Company. 
Limited.  This  new  concern.  Avhich  promises  to  play 
an  important  part  in  the  phone  Avorld  of  Canada, 
opened  in  the  John  Deere  Plow  Company's  building 
on  Princess  St.,  Winnipeg,  on  April  1.  0\'er  10.000 
feet  of  floor  sjjace  has  been  secured  as  a  start,  and  this 
will  be  stocked  from  floor  to  ceiling  with  the  new  ma- 
chines and  records,  together  with  accessories.  C.  B. 
Moore,  who  is  an  expert  in  the  business,  has  been  se- 
cured as  manager,  and  a  big  launching  campaign  is 
under  way. 


TALKING  MACHINE  NOTES 

The  Otto  Heineniann  Phonograph  Supply  Co.  has  pur- 
chased a  controlling  interest  in  the  Garford  Mfg.  Co., 
Elyria,  Ohio,  makers  under  contract  of  the  Heinemann 
motor. 

The  Paramount  Phonograiih  &  Record  Co.  of  Canada. 
Ltd.,  has  been  registered  at  IMontreal. 

Lirola  Phonographs,  have  been  registered  at  ^lon- 
treal. 

Alex.  L.  Bell,  musical  instrument  dealer  at  Dunnvillo. 
Ont.,  died  suddenly  at  the  end  of  a  concert  given  in 
his  toAvn.  recently.  He  leaves  a  AvidoAv  and  three  small 
children. 


Thp  !;lipve  pliotograph  shows  the  loading  of  the  first  shipment  of  fi  ve  cars  of  Pathephanes  to  the  new  Pathe  jobbers  for  the  AVest,  Pathe 
Distributors.  Limited,  of  AVinnipeg.  This  firm  is  now  established  in  new  quarters  in  the  .Tohn  Deere  Building,  in  AVinnipeg,  and  are  read.v  to 
give  perfect  Pathe  service  in  the  AVestern  Provinces.  Mr.  C.  B.  Moore,  the  mar.as^er,  is  enthusiastic  about  the  facilities  which  have  been  placed 
at  his  disposal  for  handling  the  business  in  the  West  and  the  large  stoclis  which  have  been  accumulated  to  enable  him  to  fill  all  dealer's 
orders  promptly, 


April,  3919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


49 


The  PHONOLA  is  Advertised 
from  Coast  to  Coast 

The  advertisement  reproduced  below  is  a  sample  (in  reduced  form)  of  the  strong,  pulling 
series  of  ads  running  in  the  big  Canadian  daily  and  weekly  newspapers  from  coast  to  coast, 
and  in  such  widely  circulated  magazines  as  Canadian  Home  Journal  and  Everywoman's 
World, 

51  such  papers  have  been  carrying  information  about  THE  PHONOLA  and  PHON- 
OLA RECORDS  to  millions  of  people. 

There  is  a  consequent  jump  in  Phonola  sales.    Get  in  on  this  by  becoming  a  Phonola 
Dealer. 


The  Phonola  Co.  of  Canada,  Limited 

KITCHENER  CANADA 


50 


'  '^HCANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


PATHE  WAREHOUSE  AT  MONTREAL 

Owiug  to  their  constantly  increasing  business,  Patlie 
Freres  Phonograph.  Co.  of  Canada,  Limited,  have  found 
it  necessary  to  open  a  Avholesale  branch  in  Montreal. 
They  have  secured  exoeijtionally  fine  quarters  in  the 
Jaeger  Building — right  opposite  Goodwin's  Limited — 
on  St.  Catlierine  St.    This  is.  perhaps,  the  finest  block 


I'atiic  Cit.'s  new  Montreal  warehouse. 


in  Montreal  and  the  Pathe  Company  feel  sure  they  will 
obtain  a  gi-eat  deal  of  valuable  advertising  owing  to 
this  exceptionally  favorable  location. 

Large  stocks  of  machines  and  records  will  always  be 
carried  in  Montreal  and  a  competent  stafip  will  be 
ready  to  give  perfect  Pathe  service  to  the  trade  in  the 
Province  of  Quebec.  Mr.  Robert  Rice,  brother  of 
Lieut.  Gitz-Rice,  has  been  secured  as  manager.  Wi+h 
Mr.  Rice's  long  experience  in  musical  circles  in  Qnebec, 
he  should  have  no  difficulty  in  very  largely  increasing 
the  already  big  list  of  Pathe  dealers  in  that  territory. 

Mr.  R.  W.  Burgess,  who  has  had  charge  of  the  sales 
office  in  iVlontreal  during  the  past  year,  has  been 
promoted  to  an  important  position  in  connection  with 
sales  at  the  head  office  in  Toronto.  The  new  branch 
will  open  for  business  on  May  1.  and  an  invitation  is 


tendered  all  dealers — Pathe  and  otherwise — to  call  and 
inspect  the  new  premises  and  view  the  complete  Pathe 
line,  which  will  be  on  exhibit  in  their  attractive  show 
rooms. 


WHAT  ABOUT  WEEKLY  HALF  HOLIDAY? 

Grocers,  butchers  and  dry  goods  men  in  Ijoth  large 
and  small  centres  have  pretty  generally  adopted  the 
idea  of  a  weekly  half  holiday  during  the  summer 
months  and  in  some  places  it  is  observed  during  the 
entire  year.  The  T.  Eaton  Company  of  Toronto  have 
inaugurated  a  weekly  half  holiday  on  Saturday  after- 
noon all-the-year  round  and  the  closing  of  the  store  all 
day  Saturday  during  July  and  August. 

This  shows  the  general  trend  of  the  times.  What 
about  the  fui  niture  trade  ?  In  tlie  real  small  centres  the 
furniture  dealer  generally  closes  on  Wednesday  aftci-- 
noon  with  the  other  merchants.  This  is  a  plan  that 
might  well  be  adopted  by  furniture  men  in  other  centres 
as  well  as  in  self-contained  areas  in  our  cities.  Wherever 
possible,  each  individual  store  should  work  out  a 
schedule  to  give  each  members  of  the  staff  a  half  day 
off  weekly,  especially  during  the  summer  months. 


MANUFACTURERS  WANT  INDUSTRIAL  COUNCIL 

Furniture  manufacturers  of  Ontario  at  a  meeting 
held  recently  at  Toronto,  petitioned  the  Dominion  Gov- 
ernment to  give  them  an  Industrial  Council  along  the 
lines  of  the  Whitley  report.  A  resolution  with  this 
request  was  unanimously  passed  and  sent  to  the  i\Iin- 
ister  of  Labor. 


MANUFACTURERS  ADOPTING  BOARD'S  PLAN 

The  Canada  Furniture  Manufacturers,  Woodstock, 
Out.,  put  into  effect  on  April  1,  a  new  arrangement 
whei'eby  the  employees  receive  an  increase  in  wages,  a 
nine-hour  day,  overtime,  and  Saturday  half  holiday 
(luring  the  summer  months.  This  is  in  accordance 
with  the  findings  of  the  Conciliation  Board. 


FACTORIES  SHOULD  HAVE  CUSPIDORS 

Philip  Ring,  Lispeetor  of  Factories,  Halifax,  N.S.. 
says,  regarding  spitting  in  factories  and  cuspidors: 

"The  pernicious  habit  of  spitting,  which  is  prolific 
of  so  much  harm,  is  altogether  too  common  in  our 
factories.  In  workshops  it  is  said  to  attain  its  highest 
efficiency  as  a  destroyer  of  public  health.  Employers 
should  be  compelled  to  provide  sanitary  cuspidors  in 
factories.  The  efforts  of  'health  authorities  are  making 
a  noticeable  improvement  in  this  respect." 


The  National  Phonograph  Co.,  of  St.  Hyaeinthe, 
Que.,  has  been  registered. 

S.1:ewart  Phonograph  /Corporation,  Ltd.,  Toronto, 
with  a  capital  of  $40,000  has  been  granted  an  Ontario 
charter. 

A  fire  broke  out  in  the  furniture  store  of  Antoine 
Fiset  &  Co.,  St.  Joseph  St.,  Quebec  Cit.v,  on  April  8,  and 
damaged  store  and  stock. 

The  Pathe  Freres  agents  throughout  Canada  are 
playing  up  the  records  of  artists  who  have  recently 
l)een  singing  in  various  jiai-ts  of  the  countiy. 

R.  Green,  formerly  assistant  manager  of  the  Otto 
Ileinemann  Phonograph  Supply  Co.,  Toronto,  has  been 
appointed  manager  of  the  recently-opened  branch  of 
that  company  at  Ran  Francisco. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


51 


MOVING   PICTURES  PROMOTE  SALES 

MIIIIMIIIIMII  Illl'lllllllllllllllllllllll  lllllllllllllllllll>:ill|iMII.IIIIIIIIIIIIII!lllll  IIIIIMIIIIIIIMIHIIIIIIIIMIIIII'.IIIIIIIMIII!IIIMI!IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIMIIIi:iMIIIIMIIMIMIIIMMIMIM^   IIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIII  Ill 

Intended  chiefly  for  manufacturers — Retailers  may  adopt  ideas  to  help  advertise  their  stores  and  increase  sales 

||lllllli:illlMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMII  IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIill  hllllMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIinillllMIIIIIIMIIIlMIMIIIIIIIIhlllllllllllllllllllliniNIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIM   Ill  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIINII IIIIMIIIIIII 

By  HARRY  LEVEY,  Universal  Film  Mfg.  Co. 


ASK  the  first  ten  of  your  business  acquaintances 
that  you  meet  what  they  know  about  industrial 
motion  pictures  and  they  will  give  you  a  blank 
stare.  Your  own  information  may  be  equally  limited, 
because  the  development  of  the  industrial  motion  pic- 
ture has  been  so  rapid  in  the  past  two  years  that  many 
otherwise  well-informed  business  men  have  failed  to 
keep  in  touch  with  its  growth. 

We  have  gone  beyond  arguing  that  motion  pictures 
are  great  teachers.  It  is  too  obvious  for  repetition. 
But  it  is  worth  while  to  notice  the  new  recognition  of 
this  fact.  A  most  effective  example  is  the  efficient 
and  growing  film  work  of  the  United  States  Govern- 
ment, and  during  the  war,  at  least,  of  our  own  Canadian 
Government.  The  motion  picture  screen  bulks  large 
on  the  horizon  for  all  lines  of  business,  and  1919  will, 
I  believe,  also  witness  its  extensive  use  at  home  and 
abroad  in  tlie  furniture  trade,  which,  of  course,  is  the 
only  angle  that  the  readers  of  ('nnadian  Furniture 
World,  are  directly  interested  in. 

Let  us  first  consider  what  motion  pictures  can  do  for 
Ihe  furniture  trafle.      They  will: 

Establish  your  house,  name  or  trade  mark. 
Create  confidence  in  your  products. 
Create  a  desire  to  know  about  them;  ask  for  them; 
possess  them  or  enjoy  them. 

Prove  any  claim  you  make  for  them. 
Oppose   substitutes;   influence   dealers — round  out 
your  sales  campaign. 

Therefore,  motion  pictures  will  be  used  to  popularize 
furniture  prodncls.  and  particularly  is  this  so  in  re- 
gard to  the  export  trade.  Shortage  in  normal  industry 
during  the  war  will  have  to  be  made  up.  Where  up- 
keep has  been  neglected  there  must  be  rehabilitation ; 
where  there  has  been  destruction  there  must  be  recon- 
struction. No  matter  how  well  the  salesman  handling 
hardware  may  understand  his  product  and  his  firm's 
policies,  he  can  probably  talk  foreign  languages  only 
in  a  mediocre  fashion,  and  too  often  he  cannot  get  the 
foreign  buj^er's  viewpoint  at  all.  For  this  reason  mo- 
tion pictures  can  do  wonders  in  spreading  Canadian 
goods  over  the  face  of  mother  earth.  In  a  suitcase  pro- 
jector a  line  of  hardware  may  be  "carried"  in  one 
hand  to  the  earth's  distant  places,  and  be  usually 
demonstrated  before  the  eyes  of  the  buyers  in  the  one 
universal  "language"  that  all  the  world  can  under- 
stand convincingly  and  interestingly. 

The  results  achieved  by  this  sales  method  are  well 
known.  The  films  are  so  convincing  and  tell  the  sales 
story  so  well  that  the  prospects  become  buyers.  In 
countries  where  illiteracy  is  rife  and  where  the  popula- 
tion is  skeptical  of  the  foreigner,  the  motion  picture  in- 
spires confidence,  as  the  visual  message  is  more  be- 
lievable than  the  spoken. 

Scarcely  any  article  produced  in  this  country  fails  to 
offer  some  opportunity  for  visualization.  It  is  merely 
A  matter  of  knowing  the  proper  appeal  to  a  particular 
race,  their  buying  characteristics,  their  needs  and  their 
business  methods. 


This  brings  us  to  the  second  phase  of  the  use  of  mo- 
tion pictures  for  popularizing  hardware,  namely,  how 
the  screen  may  best  be  utilized  at  home.  There  are 
several  ways.  One  by  showing  pictures  of  your 
product  before  national  associations;  to  buyers  in  each 
city  by  showing  the  films  on  the  walls  of  their  offices; 
and  by  showing  the  films  direct  to  the  public. 

1  would  ask  furnituie  men  what  is  the  difference 
between  advertising  power  belting  and  drop  forgings 
direct  to  the  public  at  five  thousand  dollars  per  page  m 
a  Philadelphia  weekly  of  popular  and  non-technical  na- 
tional circulation,  as  is  at  present  being  done,  and  in 
advei'tisiiig  furniture  direct  to  the  public  on  the 
screen?  There  is  much  food  for  thought  in  this  com- 
parison.    To  do  one  is  as  logical  as  to  do  the  other. 

Until  recently  the  cinema  was  regarded  as  all  right 
for  "the  other  fellow's  line,"  but  not  applicable  to  the 
lur'niture  trade.  Fev/  understand  the  scope  of  the 
screen  and  its  ability  to  visualize  any  kind  of  human 
activity.  Herein  lies  its  greatest  power,  its  versa- 
tility. If  we  look  on  advertising  for  what  it  really  is, 
as  merely  a  short  cut  to  prestige  and  public  confidence, 
we  are  obliged  to  regard  motion  pictures  as  an  im- 
portant element  in  advertising,  second  only  to  the  trade 
journal,  which  is  of  necessity  of  primary  utility.  It 
is  a  dignified  and  straight  path  into  the  minds  of  the 
people  who  see  it.  It  is  a  straight  path  to  a  rich 
market. 


MR.  HARRY  LEVEY 


52 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Maxwell  Sanitary  Steel  Vaults 


Our  Customers  are  Assured  of  Superlative  Qyality  and  Prompt  Delivery. 

Maxwell  Vaults  are  Abundantly  Strong  for  All  Burial  Purposes,  Yet 
Light  and  Easy  to  Handle. 

Superiority  Unquestioned  Design  and  Construction  Unequaled 

Carried  in  Stock  Leading  Jobbers 

Ask  for  Revised  Price  List 

Maxwell  Ambulance  Transfer  Case 


For  the  Handling,  Removal  and  Transportation  of  Bodies.    An  Indispensable 
Adjunct  to  the  Modern  and  Progressive  Undertaker. 

Recent  Changes  in  Design  and  Construction  have  Greatly  Improved  the  Appearance  and  Practical 
Utility  of  this  Case,  and  Reduced  its  Weight,  Making  it  much  more  Convenient  to  Handle. 

Removable  Interior  Tray  Retains  All  Leakage  and  Discharge,  and  Greatly  Facilitates  the  Handling 
of  Bodies.     Handles  conveniently  placed  to  enable  two  persons  to  remove  without  difficulty. 

Iniide  Dimensions:  73  in.  long,  20  in.  wide,  15  in.  deep. 
Prices:  With  Tray  $38.00;  Without  Tray  $36.00;  Tray  Alone  $8.00 

Sold  by  the  Leading  Canadian  Jobbers. 

Manufactiired  by 

MAXWELL  STEEL  VAULT  COMPANY,  ONEIDA,  N.  Y. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FUENITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


53 


Undertakers'  Department 

Problems  affecting  the  Undertal^ing  Profession  are  here  discussed  and  readers  are  invited  to  send  letters  ^^mmi^^^^mi^^^^^^ 

expressing  their  oiews  on  any  of  the  subjects  dealt  with — News  of  the  profession  throughout  Canada. 


FIRST    SHOT   FOR   1919  CONVENTION 

iiMiiiiMiiiiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiniiiiniiiiiiMiii:iiii!iiiiiHiir:iiiii'i:iii;iiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

Executive  committee  takes  up  conuention  program^ — School  and  convention  meetings  as  usual — Prof.  Reronard  to 
lecture  and  demonstrate  again  this  year — Matters  affecting  the  profession  discussed — The  President's  coat  "stolen" 


THE  first  <;u)i  has  been  fired  for  the  -S6th  Annual 
Convention  of  the  Canadian  Embalmers  Associa- 
tion, which  will,  as  usual  be  held  at  Toronto 
University  during  Toronto  Exhibition  time,  the  dates 
and  program  details  to  be  later  announced. 

The  C.  E.  A.  Executive  met  on  Tuesday,  March  18,  in 
the  Secretary's  office,  665  Spadina  Ave.,  Toronto. 
There  were  present  all  the  members  of  the  committee — 
President  Norman  L.  Brandon,  St.  Mary's;  Vice-presi- 
dents, F.  F.  Norris,  Bowmanville,  and  T.  H.  McKillop, 
Brampton;  Treasurer  A.  R.  Coltart,  Chatham:  Secre- 
tary Fred.  W.  Matthews,  Toronto;  and  James  O'Hagaii, 
editor  Canadian  Furniture  World  and  The  Undertaker. 

With  the  president  in  the  chair,  and  the  acceptance  of 
the  former  meeting's  minutes,  the  discussion  turned  to 
the  coming  Convention  matters.  The  first  matter 
settled  was  that  this  year  the  Association's  Convention 
School  should  be  continued,  to  be  held  during  the  week 
preceding  the  Convention,  and  that  the  fees  should 
remain  unchanged. 

Secretary  Matthews  stated  he  had  received  offers  to 
come  to  Toronto,  from  Professors  Clras.  A.  Renouard, 
Albert  Worsham,  Chas.  C).  Dhonau,  Lena  R.  Simmons, 
C.  A.  Ganong,  Horace  Moll,  H.  S.  Eckels.  E.  D.  Rob- 
bins,  and  T.  B.  Barnes.  After  the  letters  had  been  read 
and  discussed  the  committee  decided  to  engage  Chas. 
A.  Renouard,  of  New  York,  again  for  this  year  at  a 
slightly  increased  honorarium. 

Treasui-er  Coltart  reported  a  bank  Ijalrince  of  neai'ly 
$900  to  the  Association's  credit. 

The  Convention  progi'am  was  next  taken  up  anil  tlie 
committee  referred  the  nuitter  to  Secretary  Matthews 
and  James  O'llagan  to  attend  to  and  report  at  a  future 
meeting. 

The  amusement  side  was  discussed,  and  a  inimber 
of  suggestions  made  to  the  program  committee  to  look 
into  to  see  if  it  was  worth  while  adopting.  It  was  felt 
by  all,  lio\vev(>r,  that  the  past  recent  Convention  pro 
grams  wei'e  about  as  well  suited  to  conditions  that  i' 
might  not  be  warranted  to  make  too  radical  a  chaivge, 
except  in  tli(>  matter  of  methods. 

A  general  discussion  took  place  on  fhe  av  lys  and 
means  of  im[)roving  matters  in  the  Association  and 
profession.    So  fai-  as  the  (Convention  was  concerned 


it  was  decided  to  ask  members  of  the  Association  in 
certain  disti'iets  to  interest  their  fellows  in  making  the 
1919  Convention  the  greatest  ever. 

Now,  altogether — -Boost  for  the  1919  Convention. 


WHO  TOOK  PRESIDENT'S  COAT? 

After  the  business  session  of  the  Executive,  Secretary 
Fred.  W.  Matthews  invited  the  members  to  a  light 
luncheon  at  the  Simcoe  (Club,  of  which  he  is  a  member, 
before  the  out-of-town  men  left  for  their  homes.  At 
its  conclusion  President  Brandon  was  minus  his  over- 
coat, and  voiced  his  eom])laint  accordingly,  saying  he 
was  very  suspicious  about  leaving  his  overcoat  where 
he  could  not  keep  his  e.ve  on  it  anyway.  So  it  Avas  ui) 
to  Secretary  MatthcAvs  to  produce. 

There  Avas  only  one  coat  left  hanging  in  the  coat 
I'oom,  and  as  it  ansAvered  the  general  description, 
though  not  the  richness,  of  the  President's  coat,  Mr. 
MatthcAvs  Avith  trepidation  began  a  soracAvhat  guarded 
search  through  the  pockets. 

From  the  contents  the  coat  belonged  either  to  Prof. 
Lena  Simmons,  of  Syracuse,  or  the  Avorthy  treasurer  of 
the  C.  E.  A.  As  ]io  person  had  seen  Prof.  Simmons 
that  day,  President  Brandon  was  advised  to  beat  it 
to  the  station  to  try  and  head  of¥  the  treasurer  befoi'e 
the  Chatham  train  moved  out.  This  advice  was  fol- 
loAved  and,  taking  the  left-over  overcoat,  Mr.  Brandnn 
made  the  linion  Station  on  the  run  in  four  and  one-half 
minutes.  He  Avould  hav(>  beaten  even  that  record  hail 
not  the  policeman  at  Kinjj  and  Yonge  Sts.,  suspecting  a 
doubtful  character,  held  him  up  Avith  the  remark: 
"Training  for  a  race"?"  The  President  shouted  over 
his  shoulder.  "No  racing  foi-  a  train." 

P]ventua]]y  the  treasurer  Avas  headed  off  before  he 
got  aAvay,  and  Avithout  the  assistance  of  tlie  police  th(> 
president  recovered  his  coat. 


Are  you  an  association  officer?  If  so,  remember  that 
you  were  elected  not  for  a  day.  but  for  an  entire  year. 
Association  officers  not  infrequently  look  upon  their 
election  as  a  mark  of  recognition  and  forget  the  re- 
sponsibilities which  go  Avith  the  po.sition.  An  officer 
Avho  is  active  only  during  the  meeting  or  for  a  fcAv  days 
prior  is  like  the  church  member  who  saves  his  religion 
for  Sunday,  forgetting  it  for  the  remainder  of  the  week. 


54 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  1919. 


Furniture  World  and  Undertaker 
Letter  Box 


Ml-.  J.  P.  0.  Langlois.  of  St.  Johns,  Que.,  writes:—"! 
read  with  particular  attention  your  article  relating  to 
tlie  funeral  of  the  late  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurior,  which  ap- 
peared in  .your  March  issue.  I  notice  this  special 
plirase :  'Not  many  outside  funeral  directors  were 
noticed  at  the  funeral.' 

Really  your  correspondent  is  not  acquainted  with  the 
trade,  and  much  less  with  the  funeral  directors,  as  T  can 
name  yon  the  followinjj'  who  attended:  Messrs.  Geo. 
Vandelae.  sr..  and  Geo.  Vandelac,  jr.,  of  Montreal ;  Mr. 
Lepi)ie,  and  Mr.  Moisan,  of  Quebec  'City.  These  gentle- 
men T  had  the  pleasure  to  meet  there,  and  consecpiently 
am  absolutely  sure  were  present,  and  I  understand  that 
some  funeral  directors  from  Carleton  Place,  Almonte 
and  Brockville,  and  several  other  places  were  also 
present,  but  T  had  not  the  pleasure  to  meet  these  gentle 
men. 

T  met  the  above  named  gentlemen,  and  together,  we 
went  and  had  a  good  look  at  the  remains,  lying-in-state, 
and  were  there  for  the  funeral,  and  observed  every- 
thing. 

The  writer  also  criticized  the  conduct  of  the  funeral 
and  mentioned  the  fact  that  he  was  surprised  to  see 
Mr.  Stone,  of  Toronto,  there. 

Ed.  note. — We  are  glad  to  stand  corrected  on  our  re- 
port of  this  funeral.  The  phrase  complained  of  was 
not  intended  to  hurt  the  susceptibilities  of  any  person, 
and  we  are  pleased  to  know  that  so  many  outside 
funeral  directors  were  present.  The  funeral  itself 
was  in  charge  of  Gautliier  &  Co.,  and  according  to  the 
information  we  have  been  able  to  obtain  through  in- 
dependent sources,  and  also  after  viewing  the  motion 
pictures  of  the  eA'^ent  it  seemed  to  be  well  conducted. 
Mr.  Stone's  visit  to  Ottawa  was  first  to  pay  respect  to 
a  great  statesman,  and  secondly  to  observe  a  large  state 
funeral.  Incidentally  his  services  were  accepted  in 
llie  spirit  in  which  they  Avere  offered. 


WITH  AN  EMBALMER  AT  THE  FRONT 

Private  E.  J.  Devine,  a  licensed  embalmer  with  the 
American  forces,  in  a  letter  to  "Siinnyside,"  tells  of 
his  experiences  at  the  fro'it.  Among  other  things  he 
has  this  to  tell : 

"The  following  day  T  reported  at  the  front,  and  was 
assigned  to  take  charge  of  the  American  section  at  the 
Lyssenthf)ek  Military  'Cemetery,  where  17,000  English 
soldiei's.  1.400  French,  75  Americans,  and  one  woman. 
Miss  Spindler.  a  nurse  Avho  was  killed  in  1916  by  a 
bomb  sent  over  from  the  German  lines,  were  buried. 
One  hundred  and  fifty  German  prisoners,  who  had 
died  on  the  way  to  the  allied  lines,  are  also  buried  there. 
Tbe  English  soldiers  lie  buried  two  in  a  grave  and  the 
American  one  in  a  grave.  As  far  as  T  have  been  able 
to  learn  no  boxes  were  used  in  any  of  the  burials  here. 
In  cemeteries  in  Belgium  our  brave  heroes  are  buried 
in  individual  graves,  a  foot  apart.  Their  bodies  are 
wrapped  in  canvas.  Avith  a  disc  tied  to  each  body,  and  a 
duplicate  disc  tacked  on  the  crosses  marking  each 
grave. 

"Within  H  radius  of  five  miles  from  this  point  there 
are  four  American  cemeteries — Abele,  Dirty  Bucket, 
Ilagle  Dump,  and  Lyssenthoek.  in  Belgium — with  one 
finbalmer  .stationed  at  each.     Had  facilities  been  pro- 


vided, most  of  the  bodies  lying  in  these  four  cemeteries 
could  have  been  embalmed,  as  there  was  ample  time  ^o 
do  the  work. 

"On  August  10,  Jerry  sent  over  a  dozen  shells  into 
the  cemetery  at  Lyssenthoek.  About  'iO  dead  bodies 
were  unearthed  and  sent  fl.ving  into  space.  Fortunately 
1  was  resting  in  a  dugout  when  this  happened,  but  the 
next  day  Jerry  got  me  on  the  shin  with  shrapnel,  which 
also  bruised  my  face  somewhat.  The  air  was  filled 
with  poison  gas  throughout  the  day,  as  attacks  were 
frecpient." 


WHEN  FUNERAL  REACHES  CEMETERY 

All  American  funeral  director  recently  discussing  the 
(|uestion  of  funerals  had  this  to  say  of  the  arrival  of  the 
cortege  at  the  cemetery:  "Upon  the  arrival  of  the 
flowers  at  the  cemetery  the  assistants  arrange  them  in 
a  pleasing  manner.  I  always  use  a  tent,  boards  and 
carpet — if  weather  is  bad,  remove  all  dirt — lowering 
device  and  chairs.  When  the  funeral  cortege  arrives 
at  the  cemetery  automobile  No.  1  drives  up,  leaving 
the  hearse  and  pallbearers  to  the  rear.  One  of  iny 
assistants  unloads  the  ears  and  sends  the  family  and 
friends  over  to  the  tent,  where  they  are  seated  in  proper 
place  either  by  my  assistant  or  myself.  Having  my  en- 
tire loading  list  before  the  funeral,  it  is  an  easy  mafer 
to  have  chairs  for  all.  After  family  and  frieiids  are 
seated  the  pallbearers'  automobile  drives  up  ami  is  un- 
loaded, and  then  the  heai-se.  T  walk  ahead  Avith  th» 
minister  to  the  grave  and  with  the  assistant  see  that  th" 
casket  is  placed  on  the  loAvering  device  properlv.  T  then 
lower  the  casket  until  the  top  of  casket  is  about  even 
Avith  the  ground.  The  minister  then  starts  his  service. 
At  the  end  of  the  service — that  is,  after  the  benediction 
has  been  said — the  family  is  again  nlaced  in  their  auto- 
mobiles. After  everyone  is  away  the  casket  is  loAverpd 
into  the  srrave  by  the  sexton.  Sometimes  th's  is  varipd 
a  little  if  the  grave  is  lined  nicely.  Such  times  T  loAver 
the  casket  after  the  benediction.  As  the  family  leaA'PS 
I  ask  them  to  step  forAvard  and  look  into  the  grave.  Tliis 
T  find  pleases  most  familie.'^.  Tf  the  singers  go  to  the 
cemetery  T  try  to  limit>^'heir  singing  to  one  song,  and 
have  them  sing  as  I  loAver  the  body.  T  genially  sug- 
gest to  the  singers  the  song  I  Avant  sunsr.  as  T  have  also 
suggested  to  many  ministers  to  get  aAvay  from  the 
I'egular  committal  service  and  in  its  stead  read  some 
nice  poem  fitting  for  the  occasion.  If  it  is  a  lodge 
funeral  and  one  or  several  lodges  attend.  I  ahvays  have 
niA'  outside  assistant  line  them  no  and  haA'e  the  casket 
pass  throua'h  their  lines  before  being  loaded  into  the 
hearse.  This  Ave  do  at  the  house  and  also  at  the 
cemetery." 


MILLIONAIRE  SELECTED  OWN  COFFIN 

Wellington  R.  Burt,  a  Avealthy  SaginaAv.  Mich.. 
))ioneer,  aa'Iio  died  recently,  selected  his  eofifiii  fAvo 
months  before  he  passed  aAvay.  He  needed  an  extra 
long  coffin,  as  he  Avas  knoAvn  as  the  "Lone  Pine  of 
Michigan." 


LOCATING  THE  LIVER 

During  the  recent  exams,  conducted  by  the  Ontario 
Board  of  Examiners,  according  to  Secretary  Simpson, 
one  of  the  candidates  Avas  asked:  "In  Avhat  nart  of  the 
body  is  the  liver?"  And  he  Avas  a  good  deal  surprised 
when  the  candidate  replied : 

"South  of  the  lungs." 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FUKNTTURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


55 


SERVICE 
IN 

DESIGNS 


National  Casket  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  Globe  Casket  Co.,  Limited 
London,  Ont. 

Girard  &  Godin,  Limited 
Three  Rivers,  Que. 


BRANCHES 

The  Semmens  &  Evel  Casket  Co.. 

Hamilton,  Ont.  Limited 
Christie  Bros.  &  Co.,  Limited 
Amherst,  N.S. 
The  Semmens  &  Evel  Casket  Co., 
Winnipeg,  Man.  Limited 


SERVICE 
IN 

QUALITY 


The  D.  W.  Thompson  Co.,  Limited 
Toronto,  Ont. 
Girard  &  Godin,  Limited 
Montreal,  Que. 
Vancouver  Casket  Co. 
Vancouver,  B.C. 


SERVICE!  SERVICE!  SERVICE! 

The  one  dominating  note  that  runs  all  throug-h  the  making  of  DOMINION  MANU- 
FACTURERS, LIMITED,  PRODUCTS  is  "SERVICE."  We  advertise  to  emphasize 
to  you  the  facilities  we  have  at  our  disposal  for  "SERVICE,"  which  enables  us  to 
produce  superior  designs,  secure  the  best  materials  and  give  a  high  class  finish  to  our 
product.  Our  "SERVICE"  is  not  a  mere  advertisement,  for  it  marks  a  standard  set 
for  the  buyers  who  select  the  choice  of  materials  used  in  our  products — for  the  men 
in  the  machine  room — for  the  men  in  the  finishing  room — for  the  expert  shippers — 
for  the  travelling  salesmen — for  the  office  help,  even,  who  do  the  clerical  work  and 
invoicing. 

All  are  mindful  of  "DOMINION  SERVICE"— it  is  a  source  of  gratification  to  all, 
employee  and  employer  alike. 

ONE  OF  OUR  SERVICE  FEATURES 

The  accompanying  cuts  show  the  exact  size  and  design  of  steel  braces  used  in 
the  manufacture  of  all  best  grade  casket  handles. 

Important : — Use  the  best — there  is  nothing  too  good  for  you. 


SERVICE  that  is  dependable  HARDWARE  that  is  dependable 


Our  Motto: — The  best  goods  at  fair  prices'' 


Dominion  Manufacturers^  Limited  109  Niagara  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 


CANADIAN  FCRNITUIiE  WOULD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


April,  ]9i:). 


BEST 
QUALITY 


NEAT 
DESIGNS 


VARIETY  AN  ELEMENT  in  SERVICE 


No.  601  H.P.  Upholstered  in  silk,  and  trimmed  complete. 


YOUR  CHOICE  IN  SPARTAN  DESIGNS  AND  SHADES 


No.  600  H.P.      Upholstered  in  silk,  and  trimmed  complete. 


SPARTAN-GOLD,  SILVER,  COPPER,  or  BRONZE 

"  Quality,  Stijle,  and  Finish — Guaranteed  " 
Dominion  Manufacturers^  Limited  109  Niagara  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 


April,  1919. 


CANADIAN  FURNITURE  WORLD  AND  THE  UNDERTAKER 


57 


Dr.  Wm.  Carpenter's  Axioms 
for  the  Embalmer 


THE  I'liyphatics  begin  at  every  capillary.  They 
pick  up  the  elements  that  are  absorbed  by  the 
blood,  carry  them  back  through  a  chain  of  glands 
and  finally  empty  them  into  the  blood.  If  in  these 
small  crannies  there  are  jnithogenic  bacteria,  it  gathers 
them  np  and  distributes  them  to  the  glands  through 
which  the  lymphatic  fluid  passes.  If  they  be  tuber- 
cular or  of  a  pus-forming  quality,  they  will  form  ab- 
cesses  throughout  the  lymphatic  system. 


Yon  -will  profit  financially  as  mucli  from  a  cremation 
funeral  as  from  an  earth  funeral,  providing  you  do  not 
suggest  to  the  family  that  it  is  useless  to  spend  so  much 
money  for  a  casket  when  it  is  to  be  burned.  Besides 
this,  you  will  have  done  the  living  a  favor  by  com- 
pletely removing  the  possibility  of  contaminating  the 
soil  with  a  putrid  mass. 

The  term  venous  stasis  in  the  living  means  that  there 
is  some  obstruction  to  the  i-eturning  flow  of  blood 
after  it  passes  from  the  capillaries  into  the  veins.  It 
causes  swelling  and  a  bluish  discoloration.  The  same 
condition,  when  the  blood  remains  in  the  arteries  and 
does  not  pass  through  the  capillaries,  is  termed  con- 
gestion. 


No  matter  Avhat  the  circumstances  be.  keep  your 
shoes  clean  and  polished.  Ten  cents  worth  of  polish 
Avill  shine  them  25  times.  If  you  are  neat  with  your 
shoes  you  will  be  neat  with  the  rest  of  your  clothing. 
Everybody  appreciates  a  neat,  clean-appeai'ing  man. 

Anaerobic  bactei'ia  are  tliose  which  ai'e  active  only 
when  inch)sed  in  air-tight  containers.  They  cause  de- 
composition of  the  body  when  it  is  not  properly  em- 
balmed, and  when  it  is  encased  in  an  air-tight  casket 
or  a  hermetically  scaled  A^ault. 


The  skin,  according  to  the  amount  of  surface,  eli- 
minates almost  as  much  carbonic  acid  as  the  same 
amount  of  surface  of  the  air  cells  in  the  lungs.  In 
addition  to  this  it  also  throws  otT  a  substance  similar 
to  that  of  the  kidneys. 

The  fascia  is  connective  tissue.  It  is  found  just  be- 
neath the  skin  in  two  layers,  tlic  superficial  and  deen. 
The  superficial  has  suspended  in  its  meshes  a  lar,o'e 
amount  of  fat.  The  deep  acts  as  a  binder  for  the 
muscles. 


Vaseline  is  n.)t  a  good  agent  to  use  during  the  em- 
balming process,  but  it  is  recommended  when  the  body 
is  to  be  long  exposed  to  the  air.  It  is  a  necessity, 
when  the  body  is  placed  in  a  vault,  to  prevent  mold- 
formatioTi. 


Glycerine  bi'ought  to  a  temperatui-e  of  125  degrees 
\\  ill  in  a  few  moments  remove  all  sorts  of  infective  mat- 
ter from  yoiir  instruments,  ineluding  your  rubber  noz- 
zh's  atui  trocars,  witliout  danger  of  their  being  ruined. 


Sa))rophytic  bacteria  »vv  not  all  bad.  If  it  were  not 
for  tlim  \\<'  i'f)n1(l  not  liave  \v'>II  flavoi'cd  cheese,  the 


butter  would  not  have  a  fine  aroma,  and  the  bread 
would  not  rise. 


Putty  skin  is  produced  by  the  use  of  too  strong 
fluids,  driving  out  all  of  the  coloring  that  the  blood 
Avould  produce  and  leaving  the  skin  of  a  natural  or 
normal  color. 


Cyanosis  is  a  term  used  to  explain  a  blue  or  almost 
purple  color  of  the  skin,  where  the  blood  is  not  aerated 
or  is  not  passing  through  the  pulmonary  circulation. 


If  you  sweetheart  or  your  dearest  fi'iend  should  die, 
would  you  care  to  go  into  the  saloon  or  a  billiard  hall 
to  find  the  embalmer  to  take  care  of  your  loved  one? 


The  price  of  absorbent  cotton  is  so  little  more  and  its 
etficieney  is  so  much  greater  that  it  should  always  be 
used  in  the  preparation  of  dead  bodies. 


The  skin  of  the  dead  body  prevents  it  from  drying, 
aids  in  producing  good  cosmetic  efi^ects,  and  keeps 
germs  from  passing  in  or  out  of  the  body. 


External  applications  have  little  effect  upon  the  skin 
in  preventing  skin-slip.  It  is  better  to  inject  the 
formaldehyde  into  the  tissues  direct. 


If  you  have  no  love