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: THE INTELLIGENCER 
» Founded in 1834 
Merged in 1930 with 


Second Class Mail 


. CP Rail Is ‘Lleeden 
To Moving Its Tracks — 








Picketing 
Spreads 


TORONTO (CP) — Picketing 
by truck drivers epread today 
as members of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters de 
fied pleas from thcir union offi- 
cers to remain at work while 
contract talks continue with the 
Ontario trucking industry. 

Pickets halted operations at 
Smith Transport Ltd, and Do- 
minion Freightways Co. Ltd. 
here and Scott Transport Lid. at 
Oakville, Overiand Express at 
Hamilton reported 15 pickets on 
duty outside its terminal. More 
» than 65 men walked out at Wal- 
ter Little ‘Transport and Star 
Transfer in Timmins today. 

The Teamsters’ last contract 
expired at midnight and a strike 
became legal today, 


Election? 
‘Who Knows 


OTTAWA (cP) -— Did 
Prime Minister Trudeau 
mean it? This exchange 
took place in the Commons 
Thursday night: . 

Clifford Downey (PC— 
Battle River): “When the 
prime minister came into 
the chamber this evening I 

- thought xe might have the 
good fortline to hear the an- 
nouncement of an election.” 

Mr, Trudeau: “Any 
time,” Fan 
End of exchange, 


THE WEATHER 


Synopsis: Temperatures In 
the 70s and 805 today are fore- 
cast for today and Saturday 
but a return to cooler weather 
4s expected -Sunday. Highs to- 
day near 73, Lows tonight 55 to 
bt Highs Satorday in the low 


TEMPERATURES 
Max. Min. 

Today _. 75 St 
Year Ago 3348 


Your daughter is growing 
up wher she starts dressing 
slower — and dialing faster. 










Deseronto briefly 


‘News Briefs 


NEW YORK (AP) — Dock workers from Maine 
to Texas went on strike today, facing the govern- 
ment with the first complete shutdown of every 
deepsea port in the continental United States. 
With the other ILA locals pledged to follow New 
York's tead, all 45,000 inembers at U.S. East and 
Gulf ports were out. West Coast ports have been 
on strike since July 1. when men:bers of the Long- 
shoremen’s and Warehousemen’s Union walked 
out. 





* * * 


CARACAS, Venczucla (Reuter) — Armed 
troops and police blocked all roads from Caracas 
today in a mammoth hunt for Dominican Consul 
Tnelma Frias de Rodriguez, kidnapped by guer- 
rillas Thursday and held for $1 million ransom. 


* « + 

TOKYO (Reuter) — Japan had a record sur- 
plus of $3.04 billion in its balance of payments for 
August. the finance ministry announced Friday. 
The revised August figure compared with a surplus 
of $496 million in July. The ministry said the sur- 
plus was duc to a drop in imports from the United 
States caused by a West Coast dock strike and a 
massive inflow of short-term moncy, 


* * * 

MONTREAL (CP) — More than 1,000 members 
of the Mentreal Policemen‘’s Brotherhood voiced 
unanimous approyal Thursday night for a new 
wage settlement that will put their salaries on a 
par with that of Toronto policemen. 


x * 

EDMONTON (CP) -- Fullscale research into the 
recycling of wastes is not a priority of the federal 
government, Environment Minister Jack Davis 
said Thursday. The government plans more re- 
search on recycling, but not now, he said in an 
interview following an address to the Western 
Canada water and sewage conference. 


Eat 


; Sunny Stop at Deseronto 


While Descronto Reeve" George Lyons 
talks to Pitmier Bill Davis and his wife 
Cathie, Tyendindga Chief Earl Hill shakes the 
PC Jesder's hehd. Mr. Davis stopped in 


Truckers’ & 


Thursday on a swing 


through the Quinte area. For story see first 
page, second section, 


Cut Bac 
Or Debt 


-Queen’s 


KINGSTON, Ont. (CP) 
Queen's University was told by 
its principal Thursday it will 
have to cut back sharply on ex- 
penditures this year and may 
even have to resort to borrow- 
ing money as a result of the 
provincial government's restric- 
tions on university grants. 


Dr. J. J. Deutsch said in a ~ 


report to the university senate 
that the institution's operating 
costs are rising at a much 
higher rate than the two-per- 
cent increase in grants which 
the government has decreed. 

The present grant to the uni- 
versity is $1,730 per student. 

Dr. Deutsch said that in the 
1970-71 academic year the value 
of a per-student operating grant 
was six per cent higher than in 
the previous “year. But the unl- 
versity’s budget showed a defi- 
cit of about $500,000. 

He said a university commit- 
tee studying the situation sug- 
gested Queen's should look at 
several alternatives, including 
borrowing money, reducing the 
number of faculty members or 
their salaries, 


% 


changes. = 


Community College Enrolment x 


“ Loyalist One of Three -to Exceed Target 


or curriculum, 


Staff 


4 Not Interested 
If $s Needed 


By ROY PEACOCK 


The Canadian Pacific Railway is something less 


- than enthusiastic about local proposals that their 


relocated. 


Belleville. 

J. F. Crate, superintendent 
of the Smiths Falls division of 
CP Rail, told the 35 people 
present his company was not 
opposed to progress but want- 
ed it put on the record that 
his company would agree to 
track relocation only if there 
was no loss in business, no 
loss of its competitive posi- 
tion 2nd no cost to CP Rail. 

Answering an earlier sug- 
gestion that CP trains might 
run over Canadian National 
Railways track, Mr. “Crate 
said he did not sce how this 
was possible if CP Rail was 
to _ US competitive 
positi 

But Mayor J. Russell Scott 
is still confident that some- 
thing can be worked out and 
a proposal that a feasibility 
and economic at CP 
Rail track relocation will be 
placed before city council. 

The proposal will be that 
the study be done either by 
consutants to be hired by 
the Quinte Area Planning 

. for preparation of the 


city’s official plan, or by a 
separate firm of consultants. 
It was agreed 


that the study should be the 
first step in any proposal for 
track relocation. 

the meeting were 
most members of city coun- 
cil, representatives from Sid- 
ney and Thurlow townships, 
officials from both railways 
and local and provincial 
planning experts. 

Mayor Scott told the meet- 

ing that Belleville was split in 
two by the Moira River and 
was divided north and south 
by two railwcys. 
} He said the CP tracks cut 
the res of the city off from 
the waterfrom which, he said, 
was the finest and most 
beautiful part of Belleville. 

The mayor said it was time 
to reassess the situation and 
suggested that a third rail 
might be provided on the CN 
tight of way for lease “or 
whatever" to CP rail. 


Ad 


SS 


as 


ad 
ad 


‘Any word on the latest 


single-line track across the south end of the city be 


This was stressed in no uncertain. terms at a 
Special meeting held at city hall last night to discuss 
the possibility of track relocation to north of 


even suggested the city should 


be compensated for its loss in 


George Van de Water, gen- 
eral manager for CN's Rideau 
Area at Belleville, said, how- 
ever, that his company had 
no present plans for a third 
track on its Toronto-Montreal 
system. 

Centralized traffic’ control 
would increase the traffic po- 
tential of th? present two 
tracks but he did not see how 
the system could handle an 
additional 22 trains run daily 

“by CP Rail, 

R. A. Shire, director of en- 
uncering for the rail trans- 
Port committee suggested 
that although track relocation 
was an engineering protiem. 


economics also entered the 


picture. 

He said a study was nec- 
e-sary to determine the cc- 
oromic advantages and dis- 
advantages. 

He said track relocation 
was becoming a Canada-wide 
problem and referred to a 
pilot study now being done 
in Winnipeg in connection 
with possible track removal 
taere and to determine the 
sort of legislation needed to 
provide finanical assistance to 
carry out a national program. 

No one was able to say de 
finitely whether a transpor- 
tation study was eligible ‘for 
subsidy from the senior gov- 
ernments, although the prac- 
tice has been to subcidize the 
cost urban renewal studies. 


_—— 


CPR 
(Continued on Page 2) 





a a 


Mette - rane 






























Sure-handed Saint 


Offensive end Stan Brooks of. the Quinte” 
Saints goes high in the air to intercept a pass, 
Brooks turned the reception into a 60-yard touch- 
down gallop,to help the Saints romp to a 52-6 win 
over Centennial. For story see page 11. 


Canada Steps Up 
Anti-bomb Stand 


UNITED NATIONS (CP) — 
Growing Canadian concern over 
the effects of the proposed big- 
gest-ever U.S, underground nu- 
clear test on Amchitka Island is 
expected to be one of the prime 
topics External Affairs Minister 
Mitchell Sharp will discuss with 
State Secretary William Rogers 

the two meet at the UN 
tod, 

Canada wants the test, sched- 
uled for later this month on the 
tiny island near the end of the 
Aleutian chain off Alaska, can- 
celled because of the dangers 
such a blast poses tofthe envi- 
ronment in an ca lake-prone 
area. 

Sharp strongly condemned un- 
derground nuclear testing by 
both Russia and the U.S. in a 
General Assembly specch 


Inside Your Intelligencer 


The Quinte area has probably seen the last of the 
Province’s major party leaders. A half-day tour by 
Premier William Davis yesterday covered a lot of 
territory. First page, second section. 

@ Vandals strike downtown area. Page 2. 
@ Trenton’s highrise is far from dead. Page 3. 








| Today’s Chuckle | 


By LENNY WILLIAMSON 
_ Staff Reporter 


Enrolment at Loyalist College 
is up 17 per cent over last year, 
its board of governors were in- 

formed last night. 

The number of students enrol- 
ed by Sept. 14 Was 615, although 
the total has climbed since 
then. The formula forecast, on 


which the college's budget is - 


based for this year, was for 601 
students this year. 

The board was told ecient 
{fs usually a slight decrease \j 


enrolment’ is taken for govern- 
ment grant purposes. College 
Officials are predicting the num- 
ber then will he about 611, 10 


* More than the formula forecast. 


Other colleges are in a less 
enviable position, Seventeen™of 
Ontario’s 20 com:nunity colleges 
have a lower enrolment than 
their formula forecast.- Only 
Lambton, Loyalist and Niagara 
have an increase in the actual 
numbers enrolled over their for- 
mula forecast. 

ose 17 colleges who based 
their budgets on a larger en- 


teen Be 1, the date the ~__/folment than actually material- 


tase” Sock be! @acouN ia asane 
cutbacks when the government 
gram, based on the Dec. 1 en- 


Forty students expected to re- 
turn for their second or third 
years. did not turn up, and 110 


view of the deteriorating labor 


same staff, as in fonner years. 





Wednesday, and he is expected 
to ask Rogers to use his influ- 
ence in having President Nixoa 
call off the test. 

The White House sald Thurs- 
day Nixon has not yet reached a 
decision on whether to allow the 
test involving a five-megaton 
bomb, equal to five million tons 
o TNT. There have been re- 
Ports that the-bomb already is 
implanted .300 feet_underground, 
awaiting the go-ahead. 

Press reports say sources 
close to the White House have 
indicated that Nixon-will delay 
the test—known as Cannikan— 
until late this month so that it 
will not conflict with the visit of 
Soviet ‘Premier Alexei Kosygin 
to Canada in mid-October. It 
had been scheduled for some- 
time this week or early next 
week, 


Greenpeace 
Gets Support 


VANCOUVER (CP) — The 
Canadian protest mission 
Greenpeace, cheered by a mes- 
sage of support from a U.S, 
Coast Guard cutter, hopes to 


move further along the Aleutian 

. Islands toward Amchitka Satur. 
day, 

The mission pl to cruise 

Just outside the thkce-mile terr- 

torial limit if the Dnited States 


goes ahead with plans to deto- 
nate’ a five-megaton » nuclear 
bomb on Amchitka, 


House May 
Debate Test 


OTTAWA (CP) — Govern 


. ment Hous Leader Allan 


MacEachen says he will offer to 


chitka Island. 





Zric Emerson 





















































1 
{| 
| 










"2 THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1971 


CPR Wants Gu 


(Continued From Page 1) 


Impaired 


Charges 


Stick in Court 


He 
ite 
rH 
ful 


t 
: 

| 
&¥ 





DIAMONDS 


“The Gift of Love” 


[e@ee002080080 







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Be as sure of your dia- 
aa 


zeae arp ot 
Tic un explain’ to you 


ct 


| 
| 


ocoVeccccce 


Coles Jewellers ¢ 


Belleville Plaza e 


oP a. es 


o0000@ 


him closely tailgating a car 
on Front Street near the Park 
Theatre. 

He was stopped on Dundas 
St. East, after taking up two 
Janes, and pleaded guilty to 
impaired driving. 

Together with a $100 fine. 
$4 court costs, his licence 
was suspended for three 
months. 


11. Rifles Stolen 


City police have disclosed 
that a total of 11 “high-pow- 
ered rifles were taken dur- 
ing the Sept. 28 raid on Grif- 
fin's Guns and Sports Shop at. 
180 North Front Street. 

As well as the rifles, 20 
boxes of 30.06 ammumition 
and a cook book, were re- 
moved from ‘the store. 

Total value of the stolen 
goods has been estimated at 
$1,300. 














































LOVE'S 


FRESH LEMON 
FOR 
YOUR HAIR s 


SHAMPOO & 
CREAM RINCE 


‘WITH PROTEIN 


SPECIAL 


$4.00 VALUE. 
NOW ONLY 


$3.00 


Prescription Pharmacy 
Open 7 Days a Week '- 962-455] 


FREE TAXI DELIVERY ON ORDERS OVER $2.00 








station. Aare NQ) * 
If both railways were to- 
gether the number of grade 


separations would be halved, 


be said. 

Allan Brass, planner with 
Procter, Redfern, Bousfield 
and Bacon, who did Belle- 
ville's urban renewal studies, 
complimented those respon- 
sible for bringing all groups 
together for discussions. This, 
be said, was good planning. 
* He agreed with Ald. Keegan 
that development in the city’s 
Foster Ward area was being 
hampered by the CP tracks 
but felt the meeting should be 
talking procedures rather than 
specifics. 

Reeve Bush said his town- 
ship would be interested in a 
transportation study and sug- 
gested it Be a joint effort on 
the part of municipalities con- 
cerned. 

He said his township now 
had 27 level railway crossings 
ami if they were all protected 
it would cost $30,000 annual- 
ly in crossing protection main- 
tenance. 

This brought a comment 
from Mr. Shire, who said that 
closing certain crossings would 
be one way to economize. 

Thurlow Reeve Horace 
Casey said his township had 
fewer level crossings than did 
Sidney. If there were more 
tracks further north there 
would be more crossings, he 
said. 

Ald. Robin Jeffrey asked if 
a transportation study could 
be done by the Quinte Plan- 
ning Board. 

Whether this could be done 
would depend on the scope of 
the problem, it was ‘stated. 
If the study was done as part 
of the official plan, it was [elt 
the cost would be cligible for 
subsidy. 

Bert Kenny, planner for the 
Quinte Planning Board, said 
it would have tu be determin- 
ed whether a complete trans- 
portation study was required. 

If So, land use would have 
to be studied and growth 
potential noted. 

Ald. Jean Smith wondered 
what would happen after a 
study was donc. 

Mr. Shire said this was a 
question that bothered him. 
He said that althougn the 
RTC gave approval on track 
relocation. it had no power to 
direct them, 

Neither was there any lezi- 
slation to bring in the three 
levels of government for allo- 
cation of project costs. 

“There is no one to say 
that costs will. be picked up 
in a certain way.” he said. 

Mr. Shire said this was one 
of the purposes of the cur 
rent study at Winnipeg. 

Although there were no def- 
inite answers on the problem 
of track relocation, the mect 
ing did sce headway ‘n an- 
other matter. 

Mr, Shire’s suggestion that 
closing certain level crossings 
was one way of reducing costs 
prompted a question from Ald. 
E. A. Orr, if railway property 
along the CP tracks in Fos 
ter Ward might be purchased 
by the city to provide an ac- 
cess :road and thus allow 
closing of at Icast onc of the 
crossings. 

Mr. Van de Water said CN 
owned property in that arca 
and he anticipated little pro 
biem in it being made avail- 
able. 






ie 


Here Today, Gone Tomorrow 


Charles Semark, 65, worked his last day at the AOCO plant in the city 
yesterday, after 49'2 years’ service with the company. Mr. Semark began 
with the company as a mail boy in 1922 and has the honor of being the first - 
male to be employed by the Belleville plant. Mr. Semark’s wife, Gwen, admin- 
istrates the Legion Ladies’ Auxiliary and Mr. Semark plans to join her in 


Legion duties. 







With one-third of the esti- 
mated budget for Loyalist 
College's new building spent, 
tenders have come in at 10 
per cent under the original 
estimates, : 

The board of governors at 
the college was informed-tec}, 
night that the total of the con- 
tracts now tendered for 

-, ameunts to substantially less 
than.expeeted. Each individu- 
al gender was-léss than esti- 
mated, except for the struc- 
tural steel, which was $27,300 
over estimate. 

ted cost of the new 
building is $3,482,297. 

Last night the board appro- 
ved, tenders for. several con- 
tracts. Cost of windows, pro- 

~ vided by Glaverbell Glass Ltd. 
Concord, is $82.246. The esti- 
“mate was $98,000. 

Roofing and sheet metal was 
awarded to Semple-Gooder 
and Co. Lid., Rexdale at a 
cost of $55,380. The estimate 
was $60,000, ‘ 

Tie damp roofing contract 
was awarded to Dean-Chand- 
ler Waterproofing Lid. for 
$2.00. : 

The steel deck and metal 
cladding contract went-to Ca- 
nadian Metal Rolling Mills for 
$79.£36, about $650 Iess than 
estimated. 

The college Has made an ef- 
fort_to involve local compa- 
nics’ in the construction, but 
has experienced difficulty. in 
getting them to bid. 

Only one company, Dalton 
Enginecring, bid on the back- 
fill contract. Six local firms 

* were asked to bid, but none 


Obituaries and Funerals 


CHARLES ROBERT SCOTT 

Former player with 1928 
Belleville Nationals basebail 
team and well known in local 
sporting circles, Charles Rob 
ert Scott, 15 Elinor Gardens 
died this morning ip. Belle- 
ville General Hospital follow 


ing a six-month illness. He 
was in his 63rd yvar. 
Bern at Renfrew he was 


the son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Dickie Scott and 
had lived in Renfrew and 
Mermtreal before coming to 
Belleville 41 years ago. 

A cne-time employee of the 
Canadian National Railways. 
since 1953 he had been gen 
eral chairman and secretary 
treasurer of the Brotherhood 
of Railway Signalmen. He 
was also chairman of the in 
ternational board of trustees 
for signalmen. 

Mr. Scoctt played third base 
for the 1928 Belleville Na 
tionals which that year won 
provircial +t $ 
also interested in hockey. 

He was a men... ats 
Columba Presbytenan 
Church. 

He s survived by his wife, 
the former Janct Mze Beall. 
a daughter, Miss Roberta 
Jane Scott of Belleville, a 
brother George of Renfrew. 
and two sisters, Mrs. Rebert 
(Catherine) Hannah of Cleve 
land, Tenn., and Mrs. Thomas 
(Jean) Egan of Poros 

The funcral will be held 
Monday from the John R. 
Bush Funeral Home with ser- 
vice in the chapel at 2.30 p.np. 
conducted by Rev. Dayid 
Murphy. Interment, >Belle- 


' #32 


vite Cemetery, 


Belleville Parks employee Brian Hannah this 
JInorning fweeps up charred remains of waste 
afire at 1 a.m. at the side entrance to 


t sel 
ee Vandals struck several piles of refuse, on 
Victoria Avenue, Bridge Strect and at City Hall. 


DONALD MERLE HOGLE 


Suffering a heart attack af 
ter completing his day’s work 
a: 1. driver for a local dry 
clearing firm,-Donald Merle 
Hog'c, 37 West Bridge Street. 
dee suddenly in Belleville 
i a Hosp*tal bn Thurs- 
dayevening. He was in his 
Sine year 

Bern at Wellman’s Corners, 
he as the son of Mrs. Molhe 
Bateman Hick and the late 
Wiliam Hogle end had lived 
in the city for the past 32 
years. 

He was a member of Christ 
Church and was a driver for 
Lioye’s Cleaners. 

A veteran of World War 
Ih he enhsted with the RCAF 
in NO and served in Eng 
Holland. 


Gerinany 


lane. France. and 





and 
honvrable discharge at King 
ston in 1955 

A bachelor, he js survived 
by two sisters, Mrs. George 
(Beatrice) Houlden of High 
River. Alberta and Mrs. Phil 
io (Bernice) Ray 3rd conces 
sion of Sidney. A trother 
Thomas E. Hogle predeceas 
ed him 

Tie funcral will be held 
Saturday [from the John R. 
Bush Funeral Home with ser 
vice in the chepcl at 1 p.m. 
conducted by Canon R. B. D. 
Wright. Interment, St. Thom- 
as Cemetery. &th concession 
Rawdon township. 


City Hall Victim of Vandals — 


After firemen extinguished the flames, It was up 
to city employees to clean up the mess, fnielding ° 
a number of victimized small trees, such as the 
one Jack Egget watches being loaded onto a Parks 


Board truck, 


received = an” 


RAYMOND LOUIS Genereaux, Kenneth Cooney, 


VANSLYKE Justin Vanslyke and James 
. Stirling Davidson. 

The funeral of Raymond — MRS. NORMAN BROWN 
Louis Vanslyke, RR 2 Stirling Stirling ; 
was held Wednesday after- A memorial service for Mrs. 
nocn at the Hogle Funeral Ada Florence Brown of Stir- 


Home, Stirling. 

Robert Jones of Pic- 
ton officiated at the inter 
ment in Stirling Cemetery. 
Bearers were Floyd Rankin, 
Douglas Vanslyke, Timothy 


ling was held Thursday at the 
Pinkston and Luscombe Fu- 
neral Home with Gev. Roy 
Taylor of Stirling officiating. 
Cremation will be today in 
Toronto, 


Sandbanks Tour 
This Weekend 


Rev 


‘1S Eleanor Gardeas 


« ° 
PICTON (Staff) — Sand- meet in the parking lot Inside 

barks Provincial Park will be the main park entrance then 

toured a6 By the ‘Nac walk to the dune areas. 






This field trip follows on 
the heels of an announcement 
by Prince Edward - Lennox 
Conservative candidate James 
results of Quarrying Taylor stating the Ontario 
d gevernment is planning to ac- 
quire the 73-year lease held 
by Lake Ontario Cement Ltd. 


Provincial Parks 
a conservation 
n an effort to illus- 








for quarrying at the Sand- 
banks. 
Ontario Cement Barry Young. Prince Ed 












ward - Lennox Liberal candi- 
date had carlier called for a 
public inquiry into the situa- 
tion. 

It has been reported that 
the department of mines and 
the Lake Ontdrio Cement 
Company Ltd.. are conducting 

int studies of alternate quar 
Ting sites near Cherry Val- 
ley. Midland and Kingston. 


ny Lid., the three poli- 
partics and the press 
been invi 









‘ the association. 

The field trip, planned for 
11 a.mm. Saturday, is open to 
utcrested persons Wishing 
r the park arca where 
quarryirg has been car- 
out by the cement com- 
pany. 

Those joining the tour will 


at pA Help Coming 


On. Trem Land 


SMITHS FALLS, Ont. (CP) — 
Public Works Minister James 
Auld said Thursday the provin- 
cial government is planning to 
start acquiring land to help pre- 
serve the Rideau-Trent-Severn 
river system. 

(The province earlier was criti 
cized for not having taken im 
mediate steps, as recommended 
in the report, to freeze land dc 
velopment along at least 10 
miles of the 425-mile long sy3- 
tem. ; 

Mr. Auld said implementasen 
of the report “is a long-rasse 
plan, but things that are: gcncr 
ally agreed upon—such as # 
quisition of certain, lands—coutd 


3 


year.” 








1 
Receiving Dates 


9 a.m. to 1 


* 
- 


Loyalist\ Tenders 
Under Estimates 


be started during the fiscal] § 


SPACE IS AVAILABLE IN BUILDING No. 
4 AT ENHIBITION PARK FOR CAMPER 
TRAILERS (only) AND SioBILE OUT- 
BOARD MOTOR BOATS. : 


submitted tenders. These 

companies will be contacted 

again, the date for opening 

tenders will be éxtended, and 

no decision will be made on 

we backfill contract until 
. 5. 





Lidster), 
proud 
Scott's little brother, Johan Cullen, 
born at the Belleville General Hos- 
pital" on Thursday, September 30, 
197i. Weight 8 Ibs, & ozs. 


KENNLDY ~~ Paul and Stephanie 
'nee Butler) are delighted to an- 
nounce the birth of their daughter 
Stephanie Elizabeth at Royal Col- 
umbie Hospital, New Westminster, 
B.C. on Friday, Sept. 24, 1971. 


DEATHS 


BROOKS, Litie May — At the 
Beveville General Hospital on Wed- 
nesday, September 29, 1971 in her 
Tath year, Beloved wife of Lorne W. 





Brooks, RR. 3 Stirling.  On- 
-| toro. Dear mother of Harry W, 
Brooks, Belleville. Lovingty ree 


membered by five grandchildren 
anc three great grandchildren and 
siser, of Mra. Irene Bray, Rochester, 


"irr Brooks is res at the 
Horle Funeral’ Home. 87 James St, 
Stirling. Services, Saturday, October 
2, at 1.30 p.m, 

Interment Cagmel Cemetery. 

530-2¢ 


CAIN — At Trenton Memorial Hos 
Plal on Wednerday. September 23, 
19Tl, Lepitia Cain (3 Sidney Street, 
Frankford), Widow of the late Eg- 
bert Cain, Beloved mother of Mary 
Laitue of Colborne, Margaret Lac 
Rue of Frankford. aged 1 years. | 

Friends are invited to call at the 
Weaver Funeral Home, Trenton. Re- 
quier mass will be offered itn St, 
Francis of Assissi Church, Frank- 
ford cn Saturday October 2 at 8 
am, 

interment St. Mary's Cemetery, 
Kingsion, 
COOK Mrs. Jessie Blanche — Of 
RR. 1 Carrying Place (Redners- 
Vilteh af the home of her daughter 
on Wednesday, Srptember 29. 1971, 
in her #2nd year. Dear daughter of 
th> late Mr. and Mrs, Charles 5her- 





riff, Leloved wife of the late Abner 
VarDusen and Altert Cook Dear 
mother of Ray VinDusen of Cal 
fornia Ralph of St. Cétharines; 
Mrs Thelma Allbon of Brantford, 
Ontario and Maisie (Mrs. Albert Em- 
Dury) of RR. 1 Carrying Place, Ak 
20 survived by 9 grandchildren. 

A family service will be held on 
Friaay. October 1 from the Thomp- 
son Chépel, 23 Everett St, Belle- 
ville. At the requost of the family, 
no visitations, Eildon LeRoy 
off citing. 

Interment Glenwood Cemetery, 
Picton, Ontario, 

Memorials to the Canadian Can- 
cer fociety of Heart Foucdation 
or other charitavie organizations 
would be appreciated. 7 

530-2 


“HOGLY. Densld Merle — Of 37 
West Bridge St. passed away sud- 
Belleville General Hos- 


Rev, 


deny at 


pital on Thursday evening. Septem- ,°” 
1971, in his S2nd year, Deas,” 


SD 
§ 
brother of Mrs. George (Beatri 


ber 
son of Mrs 
ance the late Wiilham Hogie. 


Molle Bateman 


Moulden. Migh’ River, Alberta, M. 
Philip ‘Bernice? Ray, 3rd Conces- 






BIRTHS ae 
RDA pee ine a 





sion, Sidney, Thomas E. Hogie, pre- “.-../ 


deceased 

Mr. Mogie is resting at the John 
R. Bush Funerat Home.’ £0 High- 
land Avenve, Dellzville, Funeral sere 
viees will be held in the chepel on 
Saturday .October°2 at 1 p.m, Cane 
on R DB. D, Wright officiating. 

Interment St. Thomas Cemetery, 
Sth Concession, Rawdon. 
SCOTY, Charles Robert (Bob) — Of 
at Belleville 
Generel Uorpital on Friday morn- 
ing. October -1, 1971, In his Gord 
sect, Deor son of the late Mr. and 
Mis. Robert Dickie Scott. Beloved 
husbend of Janet Mae Beall, Dear 


of Beeville. Dear brother of George 
ot Renfrew. Mrs. Kobert (Catherine) 
Mannah, Cleveland, Tenn. Mrs. 
Thomas J. Jean) Egan of Renfrew, 
Air, Scott is resting at the Joba 
R. Bush Funeral Home, 80 High- 
land Avenue, Betleville. Visitations 
from Saturday at } pm. Fuherat 
services will be held in the chapel 
on Monday, October 4 at 230 p.m. 
Rev. David Murphy officiating. 
Interment Belleville Cemetery. 
Yenations to ths Canadian Can- 
cer Society would be 
by the fanitly 





IN MEMORIAM 


RULINT — In loving memory of @ 
dear mother, daughter and sister, 
Mrs, Madeline Butpitt (nee Wood- 
cock) who passed away Oct. 1, 1947, 
Mere and more cach day we miss 
her, 
Frienda may thine the wound ts 
heated. 
But they little Know the sorrow, 
Live within our hearts ‘concealed. 
Sidty missed and always re 
membered by her son. Stanley, 
Mom Dad, brothers Thomas, Frank 
pnt Tillie 











| “CARDS OF THANKS 


| fhe family of the late Mra. Gore 
dot ‘Lamoine) Lavender, 03 Bridge 
|}St. W. Belleville. wishes ta ex 
}tend sincere thanks to the many 
francs relatives and neighbers for 
the acte of kindnest and expres 
siows of sympathy at the time of 
death of our beloved wife and mothe 
er 

Gordon, Jodi. Lvpn, Patsy, Tracey 
and David Lavender 


Coming Events 





















1 


Oct A191 every Sunday at 2 pm, 
| suex Turkey Villa, Roslin. 

H S20-O1-3-8-14-15-21-22-28-28 
| HELLEVILLE THEATRE — GUILD 
[will hold Rummage Sale, Saturday, 
Oci, 23 Rummage donations re 
quested, 9620065 or 962-5496. ona 









sPASSPORT. PHOTOS 


“wn: E. RILEY 


PHOTOGRAPHER 








Oct. 2nd & 16th 
2.00 Noon 


a? 


father of Miss Roberta Wane) Scott - 


appreciatedanes, 


a 


SHOOTING MATCHES STARTING” 





PTE were a 






















SAG A ee a ET BP SAT a aE TL a ER Ne ot TT 





® 
\ 


; ae : UU: 4 3 oS - | = on TO LAND 
Trenton Ss Highrise Is Not Dead Yet a THE 08 YOU WANT 


THE. INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, “17k g 


HOGLE FUNERAL HOME 






trying to satisfy ‘the On- f tion’ of an apartment’ ted over a limited period. Lap . wees looking fc ibs tery hen ton 
‘ are sal ‘ construction, an a being t- for a job. Bu’ are 
sera men learn. _{arie’ Municipal’ Board the building at the intersection" Town crews conducted traf- po batish raped pelt we doe don'ts that make STIRLING 395-2424 
N wast boscs for its ruling ‘no longer _ ‘This three-page service re- fic surveys on the streets sur- longer exist. Jstue of ‘The Reader's Digest LARGE ACCOMMODATIONS AND HARKING 
yesterday a systematic hold water.’ Planning board dispatched to the. rounding the Fraser bome- “Dyiring last night's Jooka at the problem of job 5; : 
developed be- members were quick to point . Town of ‘Trenton September stead from September 7 to the bend puter regen ae: in depth; with some 
here as part cut last night the OMB had 10‘ and indicates services in September 13, as they work- vice trom Frank Stecmene of | 2 epson J : : 
overthrow the not “rejected” but only ‘‘de- . the area are satisfactory. ed to: build the ‘new save ~~ Vi-0 trom Frank ee 235: preparit for the 
Municipal Board’s rut- ferred" the rezoning. It says “the existing street the - highrise case .These Stookmans’of |i tions ; ; 
mo ha lias hare AS to which the re eros f : oan 
cam: move Teasons * tributary appear S a 
protighrise ferral — get that planning adequate . . . the trunk sewer OMEN 00 
town board approval, lack of which — system is quite adequate.”* | W ARE PEOPLET' f ! 
meeting the OMB was—“concerned On water * service the re wtjae : ; 
Suburban mri pee port’ states, “‘the an ae: _ DOWN WITH DISCRIMINATION ! 
to deal with the apart- ene my quite sufficient for service NO MORE HIDING BEHIND A MERE MAN! 
lanning board maintained to the proposed building 5 2 
Disclosure came that the some caution at rsheabel Aue) cece ot water See Bay meena ing 
apart clining to ahve: tascam ational palletes building has an supporting the Belleville and District 
of the issue approval. of the rezoning independent pressure system. =U, United Appeal, we agree. Everyone who 
the TSPB change until reports on parks ‘This municipal _ service works in Belleville — male or female 
SP ous Tie oo ke learn. se tia saat bay coneal ; 2 — is expected to!give his or her fair 
matter quashed by the was - jan, may 
then et Aieak ed during the meeting, Jaunch- out one of the OMB's grounds ‘ rf share to support the thirteen agencies 
Municipal cor aeney So een Oe soni chiection. tie seecerel 55 ; who make up the appeal. 
Pome Snes 08 [one Ao ¥2 cxiy thee tens er tn Cet RoMnacnier unction hee BELLEVILLE SUBORDINATE If there are a man and a woman 
permit ‘the con. OMB had “deferred” the zon- await the other reports — one PLANNING ADVISORY COMMITTEE working in your family we expect two 
fact planning i& Switch that would. have on traffic, the other on parks City ha donations, not one — just to emphasize 
suiclent- slowed building of the unit — to be completed. They are >. City Hall, Council Chamber * that everyone means everyone — re- 
planning *ructure. dy being | prepared. ! gardless of sex, race or religion. 
On September 3, the Tor- The traffic study is far 
Boerd lest night reviewed the 0° atte t Ren ais a» tee Wednesday, October 6th, 1971 


7:30 p.m. 



























th rezon- 2nd Storrie was comission. by the town to ‘support. the 
ed to report to the town on apartment tower bid the last . FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSIDER- 

generally thought “the adequacy of sewer and time around. Residents in the ING BY-LAW NUMBER 9104, WHICH 
to be reopening Water system service, at the neighborhood of the highrise IS A BY-LAW TO REZONE A POR- If do it — it will get done! 
the issue, however, appeared intersection of Dundas Strect- site had argued that the traf TION OF THE BELLEVILLE MOTOR you do B 
last night to be one of the West and Catherine Streets, fic count prepared by the HOTELS (QUEENS MOTOR HOTEL) * . 
final actions in the getthings p— PROPERTY AT DUNDAS STREET . UNITED APPEAL OF BELLEVILLE 

ana OMB TORO PROPERTY BY THE BELLEVILLE ee 
gan swiftly, after the 
handed down its decision on NTO STOCK EXCHANGE GENERAL HOSPITAL AS AN EX- & DISTRICT 
the old Fraser estate site. (Omission of stocks usually quoted indicates no sales yesterday) TENDED CARE UNIT. : 224 John Street, Belleville 962-9531 

The job bas been four-fold: Comments of those persons affected will be welcomed. i ee 

Seck planning board appro- 
vals and comments (absent 
from the town's case before a 





j 


t 
a3 





dition of 

traffic in a bid to more fully ten te 

document and defend the Kerr Addison 635 

town’s pro-thighrise ‘stand. Brasesa ast Jockey Club 420 Ferg 
In its r the icipal Be Derek: 8 zane Ont. Cem, 225 Mattgmi’ 23% 

debra mumcipa BC Phone 0 x, Lotaws B34 McAdam Mining 49 

voiced at the Aug. 12 hear- 

ing had not been answered 

satisfactorily. The hearing 


BE 
1 
i 
s 
T 
uy 


y Central Det Ria 16% 
Domtar 10% Union Carbide 144%, CS Pete 605 












‘ Falcon 83 Union Gas 14) 
(Town council had approved } Felon a, Wilttreaw Sy Dynamic 123 
oe reming ange PN aa eee ee Puce Gea HE 
+" 
petted oerpbians: preted (Siac Ry - A a 
ty. 2 MINE: 
fully, A corps) of w Gui’ Canada 25° Spooner 122 
side protestors prompted in- | Harding Crot A 12 Atlanule Coast 48 W. Decalta 733 


Witnesses Wanted 


To the accident involving 1968 Triumph, 
Lic 71006A, at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, 
September 18th; 1971, at Bell Boulevard 
and North Front Street (entrance to 
Quinte Mall). 


PLEASE CALL 392-8650 


& SP NG 
f BEN NEDSS 
RAS, SAYS 


% 
we 
















MOUTHWAS SELTZER 
pe OUTHWASH ‘ 
TOOTH PASTE 6-0z. M.S.L. 95¢ Family Size. M.S.E. 1.29 


M.S.L. 2.98 


Only 1.50 


ee PRISTEEN — 
remanent 1.99]... ms" 1.09 
MSL, 2.39 bd 3.5-0z, MLS.L. 2.39 .. a 

















SUPER 
Krona Chrome THROAT TOs 
_ ° Blades LOZENGERS 

\ ps. MS.L. 896 pea eg tte Assorted Colors. 


Ade 2 Rolls 55¢ 
Phisohex-Medicated, Antibacterial 


SKIN CLEANSER ~< ; 1 37 















~~ 













Cec cscee =< es wet « : ae = : IW S \ 
Contac-C ZOnNONS STERADENT = - © 8. 
cold capsules | CARY, | Taaters Welcome to Heidelberg: 
20's M.S.L, 2.80 14-0z, MLS.L. 1.29 17's. MLS.L, 59¢ f 


_ Welcome to the taste of Heidelberg! So brigh® so malt, the choicest,high prime Hallértau hops from 
lively, so brimful of flavour it brings more enjoyment Bavaria...and pure spring water. » 
tayour drinking pleasure. Take your thirst to Heidelberg today. You'll 
Welcome to the quality of Heidelberg! : get a happy welcome that will never wear . 
Heidelberg is brewed from only the best CAI out because every glass of Heidelberg ~ 
ingredients . . . the finest golden barley SORES is as crisp and satisfying as your first. 






86-- At- 





KELLY’S DRUG STORE 


411 BRIDGE ST EAST : DIAL 962-5388 


— YOUR ““PARCOST” STORE ~ ; : : 
@ oat sWerkToonm Ui ie ee So much more to enjoy 





2. Use Your Chargex 














- A Look Around 


Some thoughts at random: 

There are areas of Belleville untouched 
by the progress of recent years. In some ways 
this is a good thing, for amid the' poverty and 
atmosphere of deterioration there are pockets 

' of comparative affluence and there are trim 
lawns and gardens and an overall character 
lacking in the more modern areas of the city. 

We are thinking of Hillcrest for example; 
here there are some interesting architectural 
contrasts, from well-kept bungalows to older 
stone structures, some given added character 
by a mantle of wy, on down to dwellings which 
might better be condemned and replaced by 
modern low-cost housing. : 

Foster ward too: has its own unique char- 
acter, a combination of the old and the fairly 
pew, and down by the harbor and waterfront 
homes and businesses there is the atmosphere 
of Europe, perhaps some little coastal com- 
munity in Holland, coi a or Germany. 

And there is the Avaterfront proper and 
you visualize it as it could be. There is the nu- 
cleus here of an extended park and pedestrian 
walk system. 

You wonder too stout housing needs — 
in both Hillcrest and Fester ward — and in- 
stead of what can only be considered as sub- 
standard you imagine again something in line 
with contemporary progress. : 

Low-cost. high-rise. apartments then in 
Hillcrest.and Foster ward? Or town houses? It 
is something to think about. 

se 2 

October is here, the year is in decline but 
autumn's fabled image remains and the best 
is yet to-be. 

Maybe it is our growing population, but 
Belleville seems to have more pretty girls than 
ever. 

And the minf Is still “in,” although you 
also see the occasional midi and peasant dress. 

And oh yes... there are those hot pants! 

Summer sporting activities may be tap- 
ering off, but they are still playing tennis at 
Zwick’s Island, in the cool of the evening, and 
well into the night under lights. 

Only a year or so ago that would have 
been unheard of. 

The Mall is flourishing. So too are the 
other suburban commercia! establishments. 

The downtown scene also looks healthy. 


You look at the new cars, some of them 
still fitting a description of them at a confer- 
ence in The Hague a few years ago: “the fan- 
tastic and insolent products of the United 
States (Canadian) car industry,” and you 
wonder why this year scme of the sportier jobs 
look as if they might reach 140 m.p.h., instead 
of say 120 m.p.h. and why thie should be when 
the speed mit is 70 mp.h. 





Who Needs Wallace? 


.- We have never been greatly impressed by 
Alabama governor George Wallace. He talks 
a lot but his arguments and views strike us as 
shallow arid exuding from the top of his head 


so to speak , 

Wallace probably has never met Prime 
Minister Trudeau but he evidently has delved 
into Mr. Trudeau's left-wing past to describe 
him, as he did in New York the other day, in 
the following terms. He had been talking about 
communism in Latin American and added: 
“We've got a cryptocommunist premier in 

just above us. He’s got a worse back- 
ground and record tha:: Cuban Premier Castro 
timself.” 


The word “crypto” means secret or hidden 
but we can see nothing-in Mr. Trudeau's ut- 
terances or policies in recent years to-give any 
credence to Wallace’s remarks. The Alabama 
governor {s out of touch in this regard, for Mr. 
Trudeau's left-wing sympathies are now a 
thing of the past, To say he is-worse than Cas- 
tro Is the sort of ludicrous remark we might 
expect of Governor Wallzce. 





Mr. Greene Ill 


Energy Minister Joe Greene's ilJness in 
Japan is another setback for a man who has 
already been sidelincd once or twice with 
similar heart problems. Mr. Greene has suf- 


fered a stroke and paralysis of one side. Pol-.. 
itical life is a gruelling thing and all the more 


so for one in as delicate’health as Mr. Greene. 
_ We wish him a speedy and complete. recovery 
and return to his duties if health permits. 





“vis said: “ 


=a 
el 


i 


ii 
i 


= 
z 
= 
a 
aa 








: Karsh Takes A Look ‘at the Greats ‘of Our Time 


they were about to go. “But for any of the tricks or pos- 


moon! Why are you so inter- 
se mundane 


Need to Clarify Issue 


‘you have just been to the < tures of eminence.” The great 
mankind 


scientist said: “If 
fails to find a harmonious sol- 


ution, then there will be dis- 


asked to what source we should 
look for hope. “To ourselves.” 
He spoke sadly yet serenely, 
reports Karstr, “a:man beyond 
hope or despair.”” 

What was Robert Frost's way 


half an hour I realized that I, 
not, he, was being interviewed. 
I could not resist a man who 


appeared to have no interest in 


an immense cunning in pene- 





pte 


NEIGHBOR , 
FOR SAVING MY 





. 
¢ 
i 
LY 

: 


| 


Candidates and the Separate Schools 


Editor, 
The Intelligencer. 
It is often difficult to find the 


-meat in an election issue be 


cause of the sauce poured on 
by candidates and such appears 
to be the case in the current 
one. While the question of sep- 
arate school support is not of- 
ficially part of the campaign, 
it remains a private issue with 
many voters. and due to this 
fact a bit of clarity might en- 
able voters to better assess both 
the parties and the candidates. 

On Sept. 21, speaking on the 
CJBQ open line program, in 
reply to a query on the separ- 


+ .we feel that 
there should be one standard 
schoo] to handle all races and 
religions in the province to cre- 
ate a continuity in curriculum 
and standards”. Earlier state 
ments credited ta him in the 
press indicated his fear that to 
tal support of the Catholic 
schools would “fragment the 
system". 

Mr, Davis openly supports the 
concept of French language 
schools and these schools in 


Brockvill 


Brockville Recorder and Times 
Can the city legally refuse to 
rezone property if it is not pre- 
pared to buy the property or 
offer the owner tax relief? 

City ceancil will be faced with 
this Question as well as others 
when councillors must decide 
whether or not to approve the 
recommendation of the planning 
board for a zone change for the 


old Ault milk plant in Walter 


street cast, An apartment de- 

veloper would hke to replace 

the old plant with a waterfront 
ecietpe building. 

ile k-won't be known until 

1 ieets how many mem 

of council oppose the re- 

it is a pretty good guess 

that a majority are aguinst it, 

for reasons that are not too 


Northern Ontario are separate 
(language) schools North 
Bay Ecole Secondaire Algen- 
quin, and, I belieye, also the 
Sudbury Macdonald - Cartier 
school. Sturgeon Falls students 
are demanding a French-speak- 
ing separate school. and their 
demands have been met with a 
promise of “investigation”. 
Another thing that troubles 
me... Mr. Davis’ plea for 
“continuity in curriculum and 
standard” — are these students 


educated in the French langu- 
age to be provided with all 
French colleges and universities 
in Ontario in an effort to pro 
vide such continuity? 

The Sturgeon Falls demon 
stration appears to be the re: 
sult of “fragmentation™ of the 
system. How does Mr. Davis 
justify his statement that sup- 
port of religious scparate 
schools would “fragment the 
system™ when at the same time 
he advocates the support of 


separale Janguage schools and 
fails to notice the fraymenta 
tion caused by suca schools, 
Whether one is a separate or 
public school supporter is of no 


consequence. . . tl questiun 
exists and all Ontari' idents . 


who pay taxes should demand 
that Mr. Davis clarify his stand 
or perhaps an answer could be 
forthcoming from one of the as- 
piring candidates. 

MARION ANDREWS 


Sturgeon Falls School .|ssue 


ate school issue, Premicr Da Ottawa Le Droit:.A royal 


commission, the classic_sub- 
terfuge of Canadian govern- 
ments is the agent to which 
Toronto will have recourse to 
solve once and for all the edu- 
cational annoyances of the 
type which have just aroused 
the French population of Stur- 


~geon Falls. This time, how- 


ever, it seems it is serious, 
Not only has the minister of 
education; Robert Welch.) an- 
nounced «the forniation” and 
terms of reference of the com. 


mission, to be headed by 
Thomas Symond. president of 
Trent University, but he has 
clearly said all sources of the 
fonflict should be eliminated. 
In other words, Toronto 
really wants to give justice to 
the fra boar 
In six months at the latest, 
March 16, the law should be 
modified.  Franco-Ontarians 
will not have to wait much 
longer to see if they are being 
From the decision of the 


e Waterfront Rezoning 


clear, There has been for jn- 
clance, a whisper he 
ar some beneficent citizen is 

ing to buy the property. and 
donate it to the city for park 
use. Who is this mysterious ci- 
tizen? No one seems to know: 
Apparently it is part of a ploy. 
Then there is another whisper- 
ing campaign that the Reynolds 
Coal company “may” want to 
donate" the old coal yard to the 
city for park purposes if the 
city doesn't rezone the prop- 
erty. This tis blackmail if not 
true and in the absence of any 
such announcement from the 
coal company should be writ- 
ten off as another part of the 
same. ploy, Then there's to be 
a petition, Of what worth is a 
petition without a personal in- 


lerview of all those who sign 
such things, many not aware of 
what they are signing. many 
not even city residents or tax- 


payers. -. 

Another interesting and dis- 
turbing factor in this contro- 
versy is the fact that there is 
now agitation for a further 
study by a group of consult- 
ants, This would be supplemen- 


lary to the parks and recreation 


study now before city council. 
This supplementary study 
would cost $15,000 on top of the 
$10,000 spent on the original 


. study. 





Brockville has been studied: 


and planned to the point where 
it is becoming a matter for,ci- 
tizens to wonder the need or the 
purpose of such studies, The 


minister, it follows that the 
Sturgeon school dispute is set- 
Ued in principle. As the fran- 
cophone majority desires! a 
separate secondary school for 
anglophones should be con- 
structed. Unfortunately the 
delay of six months will not 
make possible until Septem- 
ber, 1973, what should have 
been possible in September, 
1972, or even this year, had 
not the NipiSsing school board 
been so morbidly franco- 


phobe. 


Issue” 


waterfront has been zoned since 
1950. The zoning was’ :evised 
in 1964 to allow for mixed uses 
with some non-conforming uses 





said: 


kind and his joys and_ fears. 
Look at the picture, then read 
of the man, then look at the 
picture again and see more 
than we saw for the first tim 


It is a measure of the gre“ 


ness of the 
Karsh.» 


men — and 


GLEANINGS FROM OUR FILES OF BYGONE YEARS 


2 YEARS AGO 


been appointed assistant city 
editor of the Toronto Globe and 
Mail. f 

Lady golfers of the Bay of 
Quinte Gof and Country Club 
climaxed a high’g successful 
season with a field “ay and din> 
ner at the club, Presentation of 


nore Bateman, games captain, 
and Mrs. James Grant, assistant 
games captain. Expression of 
appreciation to members who 
assisted in the success of the 
season was voiced by Mrs, Doris 
Bradford. 


3% YEARS AGO 


October 1, IMI 
Roaring over a reeasured mile 
course in the Bay of Quinte off 
Point Anne, Lloyd Hicks. in his 
rew specd-boat, Miss Eugene, 


attained a speed of 4647 miles , 


per hour, slightly below’ the 
world’s record. 

The City of. Belleville will 
have a by-law covering the 
sounding of locomotive whistles 
within the Corporation, The 
City Solicitor was advised to 


Booklet Gives NDP 
Credibility Lacking in Past 


Frem The — Intelligencer's 
Queen's Park Bereau. 
By DON O'HEARN 


What may turn out to be the 
most effective piece of propa- 
ganda in this campaign is a 
booklet put out by the New 
Democratic Party. 

Booklet actually is a poor 
word to describe it. "Because 
this piece is a very slick 14 
pages in full-color magazine for- 
mat and highly professional in 
both production and writin. 

It is reported to have cost 
more than $50,000 to produce 
and around one million copics 
are to be distributed. 

This could be the best $50,000 
investment that any party 
makes in the campaign. 

For the piece is not only a 
slick production. it is also slick 
politically. 

It uses nationally known writ- 
ers and figures, Pierre Berton, 
June Callwood, Bruce Kidd, 
Bruno Gerussi, to express NDP 
beliefs and, in turn, their beliefs 
in the party. 

The assessments and opinions 
they express tend to be very 
simplistic, but their polishod 
writi makes them polished 
politics. ; 

What will probably make the 
piece a very good mvestment is 
that on its professionalism alone 
it should register effectively 
with the voting public. 

It gives a credibility to the 
NDP that the party critically 
needs. . 

The publication reflects qual- 
ity and stature and know hos, 
“big-time know-how, Particu 
larly big-time know how. 

And its paeans of praise will 
also do their bit. For they arc 
cleverly done. Most notaly. not 
overdone. And though, as men 
tioned. the content is simplistic 
this really is only vbvious to the 
person .who is informed or to 
anyone who makes a close, ana- 
lytical examination. The public 
won't sce through. 

It is a very good effort. : 

An incidental of this pivce is 
that it reflects the considerable 
improvement in the NDP clec- 
tion’ organization in this cam 

The same type of publication 
was attempted in 1967. But. even 


sen hetween the standardspin 
the two. It was high class ama- 


secure the bylaw enacted at Ni- 


a 


Looking Backward: 4 


agara Falls, Ont.. and prepare © 
one for this city in accordance 


with its clauses, 
_ #@ YEARS AGO 


October 1, 1331 
the Rev. W. Merrick and 


The board of the Reyal Aca- 
cemy of Music and the Royal || 
Hrs, 


College of Music of 
Majesty King George is 
has issued a performer's cert 
ficate to Clifford Empson Mc- 
Cormick as a solo performer on 
the basis of examinations held 
at Toronto. He is the son of W. 
Emest McCormick of this city, 
3@ YEARS AGO 


October 1, 1921 

A soccer team ‘was organized 
at a meeting at the YMCA 
with teams represented from 
Albert College, Ontario School 
for the Deaf, Grand Trunk Rail- 
way. Teplin Bakery, Belleville 
Tigers. Mth Battery, and Tiger 
Tire Co. Officers elected were: 
president Syd Taylor: vice-pre- 
sident Andy Knott; secretary F. 
Walsh, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McCorkin- 
dale, Waterloo, are visiting Mr. 
ind Mrs. H. A. Morgan, Cedar 
Street. 


teur as contrasted with com- 


plete pro... 


And this same contrast can be 
spotted throughout the NDP or- 
ganization. It is a much more 
efficient machine this time, 





TODAY 
IN 
HISTORY 


By THE CANADIAN PR 
Oct. 1, 1N1 ... 


T. E. Lawrence, Law. 
rence of Arabia, leading in- 
surgent Arab forces, for- 







mally occupied Damascus - 


curing the fighting against 
Turkey in the First World 
War 3 years ago today—in 
1918. Using Arab insurgent 
recruits, Lawrence, a Brit- 
ish Army officer, scored re 
markable successes in the 
desert fighting and was 
noted for his disruption of 
Turkish rail communica- 
tions. In 1922, believing 
Arab interests had been 
neglected after the peace, 
he renounced his rank of 
lieutenant-colonel and his 


1%5—A n unsuccessfu. 
Communist rising began in 
Indonesia, 

1960—Nigeria won 
pendence, 

1H7—A reign of austerity 
began in Britain as new 
public restrictions were en- 
forced. 

1940—Top-ranking Nazis 
were convicted as war 
criminals and sentenced, to 
death, including Hermann 
oering who later commit~ 
ted suicide. 

193—The Allied Sth Army 
captured Naples: 

1338—German troops oc 
cupied Czech Sudetenland. 
1936—The general council 

United Church of 


surname and joined the ai | 
force as a craftsman. 4 


inde- 


cs 
Caria 
nation of women. 

1I8H—A British Labor 
Party convention rejected a * 
sweeping socialization’ plan 
advocated by Sir Stafford 
Cripps. . 


" NOTICE TO READERS 


"Letters lo this newspuper should be as brief as possible and | 
preferably no more than 500 words, While for publication 
purposes a pseudonym may be used, letters must also bear the 
handwritten signature and address of the sender, Letters may be 


sobject to editing. 


f : 
‘ B 
K.. 

i] 








approved the ordi~~ | 
















OTTAWA (CP) — Jack Mc- 
Intosh (PC-Swift Current-Maple 
Creek) denied the required 
unanimous Commons consent 
Thursday for. a motion that 
would have had all MPs con- 
demn nuclear tests. 

However, later, Government 
House Leader Allan MacEachen 
said the government would 
place such. a motion on the 
order paper \Monday if an 
agreement could be reached ‘to 
limit the debaté to one speaker 
for each party. 

The motion was proposed by 
Eugune Whelan (L-Essex), who 
said President Richard, Nixon is 
expected to make a decision in 
the next few days on an under: 
ground nuclear test blast sched- 
uled for Amchitka in Alaska’s 
Aleutian Islands next month. 

It asked MPs to express theit 
unanimous and united opposi- 
tion to any nuclear testing aoy- 
where by any country. 

Speaker Lucien Lamoureux 
asked whether there was unant- 
mous consent and said, as 
shouts of “yes” arose. that 
there appeared to be unanimity. 
Mr. Mcintosh called out “no” 
and the motion was scrapped. , 

New Democrat Leader David 
Lewis later asked Prime Minis- 
ter Trudeau to have a govern- 
ment motion condemning such 
testing. In that way. it would 


Not require unanimous consent 
to come before the House. 

Mr. Trudeau replied that the 
government opposition to nu- 
clear testing already had been 


TO WIT: 





Notice is hereby 
for Sale for Arrears of 


my office, 


Treasurer's Sale of Land 
For Taxes 


CITY OF BELLEVILLE 


By virtue of a Warrant issued by Mayor of 
the Corporation of The City of Belleville under his 
jihand and the Seal of the said Corporation bear- 

ing the date of the twelfth day of July, 1971, the 
Sale Of Land in arreas of Taxes in the City of Belle- 
ville will be held ini the Council Chambers, City 
Hall, Belleville, Ontario, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock 
in the forenoon on Friday, the twelfth day of Nov- 
ember, 1971, unless the! Taxes and Costs are sooner 

id. 


Notice is hereby further given that the adjourn- 
ed Tax Sale, if necessary, cnall be held on Monday, 
the twenty-ninth day of November, 1971, at 10:00 
o'clock in the forenoon, whereat the Corporation 
of the City of Belleville shal! purchase any and all 
parcels of Land if the price offered is less than the 
arrears of Taxes and Costs accrued. 


iver. tnat the List of Lands 
Taxcs was published in the 
Ontario Gazette on the seventh day of August, 1971, 
and that copies of the aie list may be obtained at 





















Chief Leo Culhane, left, and Inspector Paul Stevenson cast an eye 
toward the Fire Department’s new billboard which heralds the beginning of 
Fire Prevention Week in Belleville Oct. 3-9, The billboard, located in the 
Recreation Centre parking lot, will be cn display throughout October and 
will be supplemented by a truck and bootn in the Quinte Mall. 


One Dissenter Scuttles 
Nuclear Test Motion 


expressed in the Commons. in 
the United Nations and else- 
where. 
Nor had the Liberal sidé cb-} 
jected to Mr. Whalen’s motion. 
The required unanimous con-} 
sent was also denied Wednesday | 
to a similar motion by David 
Anderson  (L-Esquimalt-Saan- | 
ich) and last weck to a mation | 
by the New Demotrats. 
In an adjournment debate; 
later. Heath Macquarrie PC.) 
Hillsborough said he was 
shecked and astounded that} 
Prime Minister Trudeau has aot 
made direct representations to! 
President Nixon about the Am-| 
chitka blast. | 
Canada should be relentless in| 
pushing for a complete test ban 
because cach one posed a grave 
risk and left the universal envi- 

















NEW BRRTH | 
CONTROL FREEDOM , 
FOR WOMEN | 


Today more and more women | 
see voluntary stenilization as 
| 





the ideal method of birth con- 
trol. For women who have com- 
pleted their families, this safe, 
simple and inexpensive opera- 
tion removes forever the fear 
of unwanted pregnancies. The | 
October issue of The Reader's 
Digest looks at this new method 
of birth control. Why hasn't 
voluntary sterilization been 
more common’? Are there harm- 
ful psychological side effects? 
Does it affect femininity? These 
and other questions are dealt 
with frankly and honestly. Get 

answers in the October issue 
of Reader’s Digest today. 

















































Frank J. Morrell 
, Treasurer. 








THE. INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER . 1, -1971 5: 


Political Interns Learn On. the Job 


che 





Plan Now fo Affend 
2 1971 


International Plowing Match 


for the 10 positions this year, 
compared Sih 100 Jan 7e8ke: 

i . If he wanted 
Bellomo, 24, Toronto: Wendy us to help on his campaign be 
Carter, 22, Vancouver; Marie} would probably have to pay us 
Cordeau, 21, Quebec; Kenneth | nimself.”” 
MacDonald, 24, Victoria: Jim] But it the election were held 
McDonald. 26, Toronto: ‘Kalhy late in the spring, be guessed 
S winton,20, Edmonton; Paul a Biers oral be et oe 
Thomas, 27, Winnipeg; Bruce | mons jobs until 
Thordarson, 2, Saskatoon; 
Yvon Turcotte, 21. Val d'Or, 


But nobody seems to know ex- 
actly what will happen to them 
if an election is called before 
their terms end July 1. 

Last year’s batch was so suc- 
cessful that one government 
MP, responsible for assigning 
the interns for the ‘year, said 
the government should be afraid 
of the whole program. 

“If I were a member of the 
cabinet," said John M. Reid 
(Kenora-Rainy River), “I'd be 
seared right out of my mind. 
















Immediate Ist and 2nd 


MORTGAGE 


include briefings from such par- 
liamentary personalities as for- 


LOANS : seine 
Beach Pollution Beaten || arranged anywhere Harewood Acres and 
OTTAWA (CP) — The Na-jshowed how water could be Frome Eensat cad Fue Neighboring Farms Near 


tional Research Council offers |pumped into the polluted beach 
this solution for beach pollution: }area from the clean centre 
Flush it. channel of the river. 

Flush it with a water-pumping 


Leag Terms - Lew Meathly 
— Payments — 


Nanticoke in Haldimand County 


hy 


If You Need Money 





and almost ruaranieed to ending 50 cubic fect of waters Tuesday, October 12 to 
your city’s summer swimming second, were installed just up- ji 
Wns Geacesne system, Meher oo raed Saturday, October 16 





This created 2 slow but uni- 
form current in the formerly 
stagnant water, flushed the 
beach area clean and prevented 


further build-up of pollutants. 





MORTGAGE 
FINANCING 


Thursday, was developed \in co- 
operation with the City of Ok- 
tawa engineering department. 
The water-pumping system is 
based on the premise that some 






WHY NOT 















rimming beaches become pol- SERVICES OF 
luted simply because the water PETERBOROUGH ENJOY YOUR 2 
the tee Oc ake and score || ang CARPENTRY Il] sr Pinel sree 
is sluggish or even stagnant. Belleville — 968-5781 THANKSGIVING DINNER 
Working with a scale model of 
the section of the Rideau River ahace a . a“ =f _ AT 





in the Mooney’s Bay beach area 
of Ottawa, NRC scientists 


ronment “‘a little more polluted, 
a litle more poisoned.”* 


ve JIM TAYLOR = 


MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 8 P.M. 
" AMELIASBURG TOWN HALL 


ENTERTAINMENT REFRESHMENTS 














LAKESHORE LODGE’S 


ANNUAL 


THANKSGIVING SMORGASBORD 


Hot Turkey with Vegetables and all the tri 
Cold Cute. Baked Scion, Salads. etc. A ulee place ¥ 
for a family party. ‘ 


SUNDAY OCTOBER 10 th 


5:00 P.M. TO 7:00 P.M, 


FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE RESERVATIONS ARE 
SUGGESTED 


PHONE 393-3461 
Children Under 10.- $2.00 


. 


$3.50 Per Person 


COME AND BRING YOUR NEIGHBOR 


. 


‘ 


THE HASTINGS COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION 


AND 


LOYAL!ST COLLEGE OF APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY 


~ 


Le present 


NIGHT SCHOOL ’71-’72 


BELLEVILLE COLLEGIATE MOIRA SECONDARY SCHOOL TRENTON HIGH FED ‘CENTRE HASTINGS. 


INSTITUTE — 962-9581 
Registration - Monday, October, Registration - Monday, October 4, SECONDARY SCHOOL 
Registration - Tuesday, October 5, 7:00 -.9:00 p.m. 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
es - 9:00 p.m. Classes begin Wednesday, October 6, Instruction In the followigg subjects will be Registration Night - Tuesday, 
Classes begin Thursday, October 7 7:00 p.m. given. at Trenton School during the October 5,7:00,- 9:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 1971-72 season, providing there is sufficient ‘ 


interest. 
HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT COURSES 
Grade 13 — Geography 


HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT COURSES 


All Grade 13 courses will be offered at Moira 
S.S. or B.C.1. Registrations will be accepted 


HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT. COURSES 


All Grade 13 coursgs will be offered at B.C.1. ADULT EDUCATION 


or Moira S.S. Registrations will be accepted at either school. Grade 13 — Mathematics in 
at either school. Grade 13 — English Grade 13— English Academic Subjects — Grades 9 to 13 
Grade 13 — English Grade 13 — History Grade 13 — Chemistry Bookkeeping (Accounting) © 


Grade 13 — History = ee | 
Grade 13 — Mathematics 
Grade 13 — Biology 
Grade 13 — Physics * 
Grade 13 — Chemistry 

2 Grade 13 — Geography 
Grade 11-12 — Mathematics 


Grade 13 — Mathematics 
Grade 13 — Biology 
Grade 13 — Physics 
Grade 13 — Chemistry 
Grage 13 — Geography 


Grade 13 — Physics 

Grade 13 — History 

Grade 11, 12, 13 — German 

Grade 11 — Drafting 

Grade 9, 10,11, 12 — Mathematics 


fe COURSES 


Auto Maintenance Small Engines 





= 12 Grade 11, 12, 13 —~ Italian 
Senior Typing and Office Practice apne 11-12 ateecreres Grades 7 Bieioes Mae Machine Shop 
_ Shorthand roar Type ma ° Woodworking Welding Electricity 
Elementary Typewriting lemen' Bookkeeping 
ry Type > INTEREST COURSES Snowmobile Maintenance 
INTEREST COURSES INTEREST COURSES ae Seed English br ffx 
: rthand Bookkee . 
Drawing and Painting (One night per week) Art (Drawing and Painting) Conversational French on Outdoor Education Physical Fitness Course 
ipyeetment: & pissoes (Gos ee per week) Auto Mechanics - Elementary Art Instructional Music Ceramics ‘ 
nversation: nc! 
Conversational French . Advanced Driver Education - Theory Sewing ao Sewing Pottery (Ceramics) 
English as a second language™ Welding Driver Education (Theory) Paintipg (Oil, Water Color, Acrylics) 
Auto Mechanics Geara. £01 er) basic automo- | General Woodworkin: Woodworking Welding 
tive mechanics) ee Drafting ~ Conversational French 
Pottery oon and those more ad- Sewing - Elementary and Advanced Electricity — Electronics ce ser 
vane! sritin; efresher 2 men: ie 
Advanced Sowing (continued instruction in Typewriting - R Building Construction aS se 
dressmaking) 4 >t Physical Fitness for Women : > Auto Mechanics Typewriting 
rears 


WELDING COURSES weeeceeee+ $18.00 ALL OTHER COURSES tanonceS le. 00 


(Fees payable at time of registration) 


. 
_ 


FEES: 


Farm Machinery + Deroostrfin 











| 










Members of the Quinte charge of the bird study. ‘Traverse Point in Prince Ed- Hedley Smith is working on 
Field Naturalists. club“ have Fis oun ditioreek apecica ek ward County, Presqu’ile Pro- the framework for the insect 
not been idle since their pro- birds are to be found through- yincial Park and O'Hara Milt census of the area and would 
ol ihecing inforcaation out the year in the circum- near Madoc provided facts be grateful for relevant ob- 
ject of gal scribed 30 mile radius of with pleasure. Members have At the October 
towards compiling a natural Belleville, 104 of these spe- been asked to watch especial members hope to 
history record of the Quinte cies being sighted during win’ ly for banded birds, and to make a start on collecting the 
area was announced this past ter months. report such sightings, with de- common names of wild flow- 
spring.“ Irwin Knight, who Informal outings during ‘the — tails, to the responsible com- ers indigenous to the area. 
with president, Terry Sprague. late ‘spring and summer to mittee members. The Quinte Field Naturalists 
{ have set themselves a prodig- 

- Study. Guild ‘Discusses Pollution thd posed knowlege eet 
to gather a sound base of in- 

A lively sap ed ay in ee: formation on the local natural 
nace ronaiga areas of opinion from the cratie "én Waar “eae. Fol the second half of 


a most stimu. ded the first meating of the : 
Bee te toneal the season. ee merits of these, newspapers, 00 September 27, a‘ the En- 
1971-72 season of the Women’: Several members of the ex-  Tadio, TV, and other medja. the “lal Lescol . 
eee eed, Using provoce. ecutive reviewed such maga- Miss Elson gave a list of pe oP ity a 
tive statements and questions zines as Mactean’s, Saturday periodicals available at the + Arse des el rnp 
from an article in September Night, Time, Chatelaine, New Public Library. T6 sum up, permine River", and in stun- 
Maciean’s magazine, the new Yorker and others, telling of she then asked the: members eine colcc: tie ove ed 
president, Miss Olive Elson, the various types of articles (a) where they’ got their in- : Sepic 

formation, (b) bow they im- the three week trip. by 12 in: 
@ _Pafted it to others: (c) what see Posey cisgarsioc 
Mr; Mrs Ross Lott contributed to their under: River. trom 'Yellowiife. In 
, focenation! vent paiey andes deat 
Wed for 50 Years breeding, the perm. Grae the, enna Joao 
» Mrs. 1970 in the N.W.T. 
. ss “Prayers of Life” by Michel 
Pleasant ‘ evening was and Charlesworth serv- visually exciting 
‘ o rabecacis od gens Sask Topher: Quoist asa devotional, read- stating @oestoansa erie 
goal ieee, Gin ing in the kitchen were Mrs. i8& prayers that pertained to ths dunaessie booting 
United Church, Belleville Gs Ninaker, Mra. Bill Various methods of commu- of tha hang vadds\ cocoa 
when ‘open house’ was held  xforeau, "Mrs. Lena Wright ations. tesed ‘along, this tnletty;and 
to mark the occasion of the - and Mrs. Berkley Stenson, ‘Mrs. G. E. Adams was bos- powerful river, notorious for 
Sth wedding anniversary & Mr. and Mrs. Lott (ace tess at her home for the meet- its areas of white water, and, 
Mr. and. Mrs. Ross Lott, Janey Charlesworth) were ing, and was assisted by Mrs. with superb photographic 
Ameliasburg RR 1. Mrs, married on September 29, H. G. Wylie and Mrs. L. N skill, showed the vastness and 
Lot dressed in plum heather 1921 at Frankford Angican Fortin in serving. refresh- grandeur of the far north. its 
tone dress was presented with Church by the late Rev. ments, great wealth of animal life, 
’ ‘a corsage of yellow sweet- Byers. Attendants at that During the business portion, its birds, shrubs and flowers, 
heart roses and Mr. Lott with time were the late Mr. and letters were read from the — Mr. Bayley was introduced 
a rose boutomniere.” f Mrs. Percy Charlesworth. Canadian Save The Children by Alma Wallis and thanked 
For the occasion, the hall The couple have two sons Fund, and Marylene Cohen of by Mr. H. Smith. 
was highlighted wth a lace Edwin Lot. 20 Green Marseilles, France. the girl 
covered tea table with gold Street, Belleville and Elvin eh eee oe 
underlay, centred with a of Rossmore. There are 10 Pamphlets from CANSA’ urck 
threetiered white and gold grandchildren. regarding Ks sponsorship plan, eecinhanrn wots 
anniversary cake Mr. Lott at one time farm: the summary of its annual FALL FAIR DAY 


ay : 
. 


THE: INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, . OCTOBER ‘1, 1971 


Naturalists Compile. History Record 








ist Quality... Heavy Weight — 
(11-12 oz) and a generous 60-62” wide 


CRIMPKNIT 






Extra 
all 
day and 


folh- tere] liaise.) 
Satur- 
Fleleh as 


decorated 
_ and flanked with golden tap- 


+; those. present, offered _ con- 


ers. The guest tables were 
most attractive with white 
cloths centred with bou- 
quets of yellow snapdragons. 

Pouring tea and colfce 
were Mrs. Lott’s two sisters, 
Mrs. Maude Baker and Mrs. 
Chris Ralph, both of Tor- 
onto: a sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Fred Charlesworth of Tren- 
ton; Mr. Lott's cousin, Mrs. 
Maurce Bell of Stirling and 
two nieces, Miss Joyce Bell 
of Belleville and Mrs. Bob 


in Prince Edward County 
and later worked at the Of- 
ficers* ess, Trenton CFB 


report, and its Christmas 
cards for 1971 were distribut- 






Our advertised 
Wednesday 
even more 
prise Buys 
ping 


features 

Listen for 
great ~“Sur- 
while shop- 





What modern seam- 
stress could resist this 


OCT. 27th special low price on 









ed by Mrs. R. Settle to each 
member of the Guild. 





BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 


Progressive, expanding company requires distributor to 
handle approved air purifying equipment in the anti pollution 
and health fields. 


Unlimited sales potential for residential, commercial, in- 
dustrial and institutional use, in an exclusive area. 


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training, manuals and advertising allowance supplied. 


NO FRANCHISE OR LICENSING FEES REQUIRED 


For confidential interview write or phone 
The Marketing Director 

















Churches Mark akianiGid 








RAWDON — Mount Plea: 
sant - Rawdon United Church 
Women entertained the com- 
munity and guests from 
Hoards United Church to a 
centennial social evening in 
honor of both churches on ob- 
serving 100 years since the 
churches were dedicated in 
1871. Over 100 people gather- 


SOCIAL and! 


PERSONAL 


ENGAGEMENT NOTICE 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward E. 
Follwell are pleased to an- 
»nounce the engagemennt of 
their daughter Mary! Beth, to 
Mr, Edward Douglas’ Parnell, 
gon of Mr. and Mrs. Doug- 
las E. Parnell, of London, On- 
tario. The marriage will take 
place on Saturday. October 30. 
1971, at 3 p.m., Christ Church 
Anglican, Belleville. 

os « *« * 

ENGAGEMENT NOTICE 

The engagement is an- 
nounced of Patricia Maurcen 
Carson of Ottawa, to John 
Andrew Marvin, son of Mr, 
and Mrs. A. Marvin of Roslin 
_ RR2. The wedding will take 
place - in. Trinity United 
Church, Roslin, un Saturday, 
October 9, 1971. 





savsesansnecennecn senvesenoness 


25th Wedding Anniversary 


gratulations and best wishes. , 


Mr. and Mrs. 2ewton De- 
mille were pleasantly sur- 
prised at to events recently 
to mark. the occasion of their 
25th wedding anniversary. 

A family get-together had 
been erranged at the home of 
their daughter Shirley Harri- 
sen and Mr. Harrison in 
Napanee when. they were 
greeted by their son Ron and 
his wife Marylyn of Ottawa, 
as well as both parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. DeMille and Mr. 
and Mrs. E. Cross. Others 
present were Mr. end Mrs. G. 
Berr, Mr. and Mrs. J. Clarke, 
Mr, and Mrs. D. Cross, Gary 
McLaughlin and Miss Brenda 
LaRue. 


The evening. was spent in 


playing cards efter which 
Jack Clarke, on behelf of 


ed in the church hall for this 
special event. 

Rev. W. C. Cox was chair 
man and throughout the pro- 
gram Mr, Harvey Couch and 
son Kenneth, and Donald 
Campbell furnished musical 
selections. Several vocal duets 
were rendered by Dennis and 
Dale Ray of Springbrook and 
Sandra and Lana LaChappelle, 
Stirling. 

Mrs. Clayton ‘Thompson of 
Hoards presented a devotional 
with scenic pictures on the 
theme “The Wonders of Our 
Father’s World.” Her assis- 
tants were Mrs. Harold Milne, 
Mrs. ‘Tom Thompson, Mrs. 
Gerald Heagle and Mrs. Ron 
Parr. A trio selection was 
given by Linda, Heather and 
Kenneth Hoard with Margaret 
Hoard as accompanist, Mrs. 
Percy MacMullen contributed 
a humorous reading. 

A group from Mount Plea- 
sant presented a short play 
“St. Peter at the Golden 
Gate.” Those taking part were 
Mrs. Jack Dunham, Mrs. Ken- 
neth Weaver, Mrs. Walter 
Wrightman, Mrs. W. C. Cox, 
Mrs. Milford Wrightman, Miss 
Bonnie Williams and Mrs. 
Garth Joslin, 

At the close a social hour 
was enjoyed with refresh- 
ments served. 

Rev. Gordon Whitehorne of 
Seymour expressed thanks on 
behalf of Hoards congregation 
for a most enjoyable evening. 


A’chime clock was presented 
by Ron Demille to his parents 
on behalf of the family and 
the couple received a number 
‘of other gifts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Mc- 
Mechan entertained a number 
of close friends of the couple 
at their home. Viny Pascoe 














4 Eva Road, Etobicoke, Ontario 
416-€22-6333 








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spoke briefly and Mrs. Jack 
McFarlane read an address. 
At this time the couple re- 
ceived a set: of TV tables, 
after which a buffet supper 
wus served. 
















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Successful Living | 


Rebellious. Girl 


have broken? fingernails all 
winter if they didn’t ‘use rub- 
ber gloves; insulated against 


By DORIS CLARK 
Dear Doris: My. friend's 
daughter (16) is one. of six 


When this daughter was 10 
her mother gave birth tothe 
sixth child, The daughter was 
staying with us and told us 
that she did not want to go 
back home. *'No one will even 
look at me,” she said, “They 
will only be looking at the 
new baby.” 

1 know for a fact that her 
mother is baby crazy and if 
the child grows up as an easy- 
to-raise child.-fine, but if as 
in this daughter's case. she 
needs the spoken knowlodge - 
that she is loved and warited,- 
and acts up when she is not 
wanted, well, maybe, she gets 
written off in the mother's 
mind, — Wanting To Help 

Dear Wanting: I suppose the 
thing is as plain as the nose 
on your face — to everybody 
but the mother. She thinks 
she can breed babies, take 
care of their physical wants, 
and let it go at that. 

I know more than one moth- 
er. or father, who will lavish 
attention on babies and young 
chiléren. Then when their 


SIDNEY SOUTH 


The September meeting of 
Sidney South WI was held at 

















tist Church hall. It is hoped 
that as many. as possible 


REMBRANDT 
: PRINTED PATTERN 


Ruffles Ring Romantic Neckline 


babes reach a certain age with Mrs. 
: : they no k find them in- jn charge. short course 
Soft, romantic ruffles ring the V neckline of this shapely eicaling aie: me it ey had “News eer as for Kit- 
éressiin. lightweight wool designed by Old Borden of Rem-  cnjcyed playing with dolls chens" will be held Decem- 


brandt: He made the ruffles of the same fabric. The Original 
of Printed Pattern A997 has braid accenting a high waistline 
cand framing the neckline and sleeves. Have your version all 
in one color, or combine two colors in knits, weol crepe, challis, 
blends. aa 3 

Printed Pattern A%7 isfevailable in New Misses’ Sizes 8, 
10, 12 14, 16, 16. Size 12 (bust 34) requires 2% yards 54-inch 
fabric. 

Send ONE DOLLAR for Printed Pattern A997 to THE 
INTELLIGENCER, 60 FRONT STREET VEST, TORONTO 1, 


but when they turncd into peo- 
ple with minds and ideas of 
their own, the older persons - 
were not equal to them. 
Perhaps if you can remain 
a staunch friend, inviting this 
girl to your home from time 
to time to share in your fa- 
mily fun, you can provide 


The meeting was turned 






















som the warmth which 
* “ONTARIO, Pattern ent. Please print plainly YOUR as ome rebel or sates Relot te Ata ep ‘take pe acai ee 
* NAME, ADDRESS with STYLE NUMBER and SIZE. eee bers to 13 jes in E . 79¢ ea. 69¢ ea. 

Ontario residents add 5 cents sales tax, Dear Doris: What do you as well as London. England 4 
FASHION FREDICTIONS — lengths, looks, drama {in recommend for fingernails? and the Netherlands. She des- 

COUTURE PATTERNS BOOK! Dresses, costumes., separates. Sometimes I have several split cribed her trip which lasted 

pantsuits. Includes — How To Fit Pants Professionally. S0c split or broken at the ends at 22 days and included over 30 

coupon — apply to any $1 pattern in Book. Send S0c. one. time. -- Tried Every- cites of the world. The beauty ; 
INSTANT FASHION BOOK! Leam to stretch, accessorize. thing. of her ‘trip was revealed in PET SHOP 


revitalize your wardrobe. Choose right lines to minimize Maws, 
avoid mistakes, 122 pages. hundreds of pictures. $1.00. 
INSTANT SEWING BOOK helps you to wear tomorrow what 
syou start sewing today. 500 illustrations. Only $1.00. 


e/ Kitchen Tested Recipes 


Ham and Cheese Omelet with 


By MARY MOORE 
REQUEST FROM: Mary: 
Please renew your.efferts to 
enclose 10 cents plus a stamp- 
ed self - addressed enve!ope 
with every request. Some of 
you obey the ruics. Others do 
not know them or forget. 
QUESTION: 1 beught a 
package of omelct seasoning 
mix for 19 cents but have 
never made an omclet. You 
are persuading me to use more 
eggs so I would like to know 
if you have used this preduct 
if it is good. Please give 
the details. — Nancy C 
ANSWER: Yes I have made 
tt and all of the‘dircctions are 
on the package but I will try 
to enlarge on them for it is 
an excellent product. I made 
a ham and cheese version 
but you can omit them if you 
wish. 
HAM AND CHEESE 
OMELET (serves 2) 
One 1's - oz. pkre. omelet 
Seasoning mix e 
42 cup cold water 
4 large eggs & 
¥% to 1/3 cup process cheese H the 
chopped small (cptional) sip 
4% cup chopped cooked ham 
(optional) 
- 2 thsps, butter 
Empty omelet seasoning 


ERIDAY 


we ; 

¢ Dinner Menus 

< Bahed Mackerel Supreme: 
Lemon Wedges; Creamed 
Potatocs; Crumbed Egs- 
plant (sce Thursday): Rel- 


Dear tried: Does “ever 
thing” include rubber gloves? which she showed, alt 
Detergents tend to soften the currency and many 
nails. Many women would of her trip. ¢ 
















Seasoning 


David, a year older than you 
and he is a good cook too. I 
am sending your Ietter to him 
in Edmonton. 


mix into a bowl. Stir in water 
until smooth. Beat in eggs for 
1 min, Stir in cheese ‘and ham = you want a special ree pe. I 
if used, Melt butter until bub-, have a grandson named 
bly and beginning to turn gold ~ == ————= _ 


in large 9 or 10° frying pan x 5 
Bus Service to Quinte Mall 


or electric frying pan. Pour 
in egg mixture, cover and re- 

Effective Monday, October 4, 1971, the Express Bus to Quinte 
Mall will operate as follows: 


duce heat to low ‘for about 
t Mon., Tues., Wed. — 1:20 p.m. - 6.15 p.m. 


10 to 15 min. or until set. If 
electric frying pan is used, 

Thurs., Fri. — 3:20 p.m. - 9:15 p.m. 
Saturday —9:50a.m.-6:15p.m. ~ 


set heat at WO deg. Fahr. 

Loosen edges with spatula. 

ercase omelette lightly at cen- 
Lv. Courthouse, Pinnacle St, — 10 to and 20 after hour 
Ly. North Front & College — 5 to and 25 after hour 

Ly Mall —S after and 25 to hour 


tre and fold over, Cut in hal- 
ves crosswise and serve on 

The regular Avondale - Parkdale buses will provide service to 
the Mall when the Express Bus is not operating. 


preheated plates, 
Regular Bus: 6:30 a.m. - 11:45 p.m, Ly. Pinnacle Stseet Court- 


David. Keep up the good work 
and let me know any time 






































2 
& 











LETTER: My name is Dav- 
house 20 after hour. 


id Wooley, and I am 12-years- 
old. Iam writing to tell you 

Extra Bus: 7:50 a.m. - 8:50 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Leave Court- 
house, Pinnacle Street. 


I make your Blceberry plus 
NOTE: Extra lus does not operate on Saturday. 


pic. It was easy to make and 
it turned out Great. The pic 

BELLEVILLE TRANSIT COMMISSION 
962-1925 


























was just deticious. Thank your 
for putting it in the paper. Sin- 
cerely yours, David™ Wooley. 
ANSWER: Thank you, 




















ish Tray: Radish Roses, Dill ce) 
> Spearr, Carrot Sticks; Plum four yeat uy aged 
Cohbler with Ice Cream: with a fu 


eight year old. 






~ 


‘the beaver oan é 


sift shop 
‘The Home of Canadian Arts 
and Cfalts, 
The Beaver Den 
Gift Shop 
For All Seasons 


| Open I Days A Week 

Location Hwy. 62 - 6 miles 

Rorth of 401 at Belleville 

‘962-7860 

«The Beaver Den Atmosphere 

Will bring you back again 
and again. 











15 gal. size 


oo 


niversary dinner, 
lady honored guest sit opposite 
the nails, with good effect. her husband on one side and 


~ Women’s Institutes 


children. If her mother slaps their hands in hot, ‘soapy ial 
her face, the girl slaps her pene is : 

‘ . She has ‘al- re is a cream or 
mates Oe ae siege mn ae 
Wh "be applied at night all around 


ae 


~ 


Dear Doris: For a 50th an- 


does © the 


A draw for a flight bag was 
won by Mrs.. G. Sills, who 
also presented a small token 
to Miss Roluf for ber talk. 

During lunch which was 
served by the hostess and her 
assistants, Mrs. J. Dickens, ~ 
Mrs. D. McComb and Mrs. 
Sills, the con’umers report 
was given by Mrs. F. Meens 
and contained 


some helpful 


hints. 


NEW STYLE FISH AQUARIUMS 
Complete with hood and reflector. . 


$19.95 | 10 gal. size .-... $17.50 
THIS WEEKEND ONLY 


COR, COLEMAN & 


4 , 


1 Everything in the 


TROPICAL FISH DEPT. 
NOW OPEN 


For Fall Business 


An experienced representative will be available every 
Saturday from 9 a.m, to 5 p.m. 

@ LARGER DISPLAY 
@ MORE VARIETIES OF TROPICAL FISH 

@ MORE FISH PRODUCTS FOR; YOUR NEEDS 





HARRIET — ACROSS FROM CAN. TIRE 
DIAL 968-9369 


Feels Unwanted © 
ie aierpred aarsiae 


ed envelope, and I will give 
~you the name of this com- 


he on the other side of table, 
but opposite his bride of 50 
years ago; or do they sit to- 
gether? — Josie 

Dear Josie: Fifty years ago 
they sat side by side at their 
wedding dinner holding hands 
surreptitiously under the table. 
Oh yes, they did. I have it on 
good authority! But their wed- 
ding guests had not yet 
thought up the picturesque 
twist of demanding that they 
rise and kiss each other upoh 
the insistent tapping of spoon 
on glass. = 

The couple fifty years mar- 
ried will still enjoy sitting side 
by side, bride on groom's 
right. And who knows?-Maybe 
they will sneak in a little hand - 
hold 

eee 

Every day Doris hears from 
reacers who report success 
after taking her advice on a 
human dilemma, Let her help 
you with yours, 


7 


v 


THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1,” 1971 






‘ 





bm >D a 2 »y 


POINTS” 
FOR 





-v = : 

{t’s natural for a small child to feel jealous of the 
litle newcomer. Scolding will not make him less so. 
Protect the new baby, of course, but let the older child ° 
admit to you that he doesn’t like her or want her, while 
you reassure him that he still has your affection. 














mnily { 
STORE-WIDE | 
SALE <<] 


by 


THRASHER’S PET SHOP 


every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 


THRASHER’S PET SHOP 





Surprise Your Wife This 
Christmas With Your Photograph 


: 214 William 
ad edd oe = Shido 


” Street 


TROPICAL FISH DEPT. 
NOW OPEN ° 


For Fall Business 


An experienced representative will hg. available 


@ LARGER DISPLAY 
@ MORE VARIETIES OF TROPICAL FISH 
@ MORE FISH PRODUCTS FOR YOUR NEEDS 


Available at 


Cor. Coleman & Harriet—across from Can. Tire 
DIAL 968-9369 


‘faic | 


Bs *@) Brite Sites. cee 





LAST DAY TOMORROW 


@ SAVE 15% ON FAMILY “AIRS 
EVERDAY LOW, LOW PRICES. 

@ SAVE 15% IN EVERY DEPARTMENT. 
CHILDREN’S, GIRLS’; MEN’S, BOYS’, 
LADIES’. : 


‘ 


Belleville Plaze — Open Thurs. & Fri. ’til 9 p.m, 





awniluy 


ae ear 





x 
Ay 
iore. | 
@ SAVE 15% ON ALL OUR FIRST } 
QUALITY MERCHANDISE : 
@ SAVE 15% ON YOUR ERLL & WINTER , 
SHOPPING 


@ SAVE 15% ON ALL HEALTH AND 
BEAUTY AIDS 


Brigies «@) Sree Sv CeSD 


Other Days Until 6 p.m, 





> = 













Saeco oe ere) 


AZo en Se 


FR RINE EPL ERI, BTS 









. § THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1971 





Ann Landers 
Ann Goofs Answer; 
Due to Copy Cut 


7 DEAR ANN LANDERS: Van otcd = ast t boo oar be 
big enough to admit it.I refer to your shamefully inadequate 
to the mother who signed herself “ “DL In, Tinols.": I 






“mnepe 
icidstal 
: 
Haste 
ti 
beerise 
Ce 
ig 
i 


and try it again. — MARION, IND. 


DEAR ‘MARION: You're right that I goofed, buf “the 
buck stops there. Every word that appears under my byline 
is written by me, and I'm responsible for it. 

The advice you question was, I agree, inadequate.\1 
have no defence but I do have an explanation. I sometimes 
must cut a letter in order to use it in the column. In this 
» instance, I cut the letter so drastically that some vital facts 
were deleted. In the orginal letter, the mother described 
the boy's accomplishments, He was creative, outgoing, re- 
lated well to members of both sexes, did beautifully in 
school and was headed for a promising career. He told his 
parents he was a homosexual and made it clear that he was 
perfectly content and did not want professional help. The 
mother, on ‘the other hand, was so grieved about his devia- 
tion that she was becoming bedridden. I told her not to 
press therapy on a boy who didn’t want it, but to get some 
therapy herself, so she could learn to accept him. 

x * + 
DEAR ANN LANDERS: Our youngest daughter went 
steady for (wo years with a smart alec punk who didn’t know 
enough to stand up when speaking to an adult, We never liked 
the boy and she knew it. To make a long story short, he got 
Neva pregnant and then tried to lie his way out of it, 

I could fill your whole page with stories about what we 
went through with our’ ter. To matters Neva 
really did care about that creepy kid. We had a terrible time 
convincing her that she should not keep the baby. It tore my 
heart out to watch that girl sit by the phone, waiting for a 
call. And then when the father had to drive her to the hospital 
to have the bavy I thought to myscli, what’s the matter with 
the laws in this country? How come the boy who got her that 
way is nowhere around? Is it fair that a 16-year-old girl, who 
was a virgin when she met the dirty dog, has to carry the 
burden alone while he runs off with his buddies to ballgames 
and dates other girls? 

Please, Ann Lanuers, do what you can to get a law passed 
saying the boy has to marry the girl when a pregnancy is in- 
volved. You would be performing a great service. — WICHITA 
HEARTACHE, 


> 


DEAR W.H.: A great service? For whom? Do you have 
any idea what the divorce rate in this country is among 
people who get marricd willingly? Why. wish a bum like 
that on your daughter? She is far better off without him. 
Good riddance. 









BONUS : 


ZENITH 74588 


283 MAIN ST., WELLINGTON 
TELEPHONE 399-3020 








* care of The Intelligencer, Pat- 


AVOID THE RUSH 


DURING THE FIRST COLD SNAP - 


CALL NOW : 
FOR TOTAL COMFORT SERVICE 


- 3 WAY PROTECTION 


1, YOU GET THE FINEST HEATING OILS 
2. YOU GET AUTOMATIC DELIVERY SERVICE 


3. YOU GET EXPERT EQUIPMENT SERVICE 


You can get a full line of equipment (furnaces, humidifiers, hot water 
tanks, ete.) “And we are prepared to do the installations.” 


GULF OIL CANADA LTD. 


BRIGHTON — WOOLER — FRANKFORD 


LLE and TRENTON 968-7113 


{HEY | 


Did Your Neighbor Pay Too Much ? 
DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOU!! 


1972 ADMIRAL COLOR TV's 







. Come in and see—Craig Platt or Hilliard Tremblay 


| 
WELLINGTON Tv | 


—TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU— | 


139 MAIN 8T., PICTON 
\, TELEPHONE 476-5722 


“The Little Stores With a le Prices” 












PRINTED PATTERN 














SATURDAY, OCT. 2nd 
IS THE LAST 
VALUE-PACKED DAY 
OF TARGET SALE! 






Fashion Foursome 


4 Fema Helos 


More for tess money — 
that’s the happy idea. when 
you rew this pattern! Includes 
long, short pants plus knick- 
ers to go the rounds with a 
zippy top! Easy, easy, easy! 

Printed Pattern 4750: New 
Girls’ Sizes 6, 8, 10, 12, 14. 
Size 10 top, pants 2% yds. 
4S-in. 

Seventy - five cents (75c) in 
coins (no stamps, please) for 
each pattern — add 15 cents 
for each pattern for first-class 
mailing and special handling. 
Ontario residents add 4 cents 
sales tax. Print plainly size, 
name, address, style number. 

Send‘ order to Anne Adams, 














tern Dept., 60 Front St. W., 
Toronto 1, Ontario. 






THE BUTTERFLY 
BOUTIQUE 


(Abeve O’Coaner’s Jewel Boz) 
OPEN # TO 3 DAILY 
FRI. TIL # (CLOSED WED.) 
Visit Us Seon, New Vali items 
Arriving Daily! 


, WATCH FOR 
THE 




























... They point the way 
to the many great 
"MYSTERY DAY’ 

- ° BARGAINS! 


; : | f ‘si 











—— 












































26" $979. 00 =o wit trae’ | Bring along your 4 : 
25” $495.00 WITH TRADE | 2] Walkers Option : : 
19” $395.00 = we tRave | Charge and cash in | 


on the store-wide 
savings. —=—> 










FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE WE ARE OPEN 
Mon., Tues., Wed. and Sat. — 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
Thurs. and Fri. — 9:30.a.m. to 9 p.m. 








Dial 968-5751 










Intelligencer : Advertising 


Pays Big ‘Dividends 








BELLEVILLE, ‘ONTARIO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1971 

















































Personal Touch Is Keynote of Quinte 


Prime Minister William Da- Lennox riding. There guests question about discoveries he ed throats, Mr. Davis and his The band was playing the 
vis ruast have felt like an au. “Te treated to coffee and, might have made so far dur. wife inched their way around «Davis campaign song and a 
thentic,’ old-time © politician light ~ snacks while the — ing the campaign. He fisted the warm parking lot, taking Sroup of young supporters 
Thursday as he used the per- Premier made 2 speech simi- the environment as number time to sign autographs on were loudly. spelling out the 
sonal’ approach to mect the lar to the ne he gave in one among his party's prior-s Canadian flags, sample the Prime Minister's name as Mr. 
« _.gitizens’ of Deseronto, Napa- Descronto. The party then ities for the next four years.. odd cone and even wish one Davis picked up the © micro- 
nee and Tweed. 5 piled back onto the campaign He also mentioned that ‘voter best wishes’ on his 8%h_ phone to make his final speech 

Seeking reelection in the  DbUSCS and set out for Tweed. singe “people {eel divorced _pirthday. of the afternoon. The theme 
Oct-21 provincial election, the During the ride. Dr. Davis from government,” his admin- Mr, Davis met with one dis- was familiar, invokirig the 
Conservative leader said  @nswered reporters’ questions istration would see. to it that - senting note when a man, who crowd to support local can- 
“there's much shaking hands 0" & variety of issues, He “ministers go to the people, said he had led a m,  didate Clarke Rollins and 
and signing autographs be. “tid his government was municipal heads, school heads.  quectioned him about the clo- pointing out the past record 
cause people still want it.” carefully investigating the citizens groups. There are hu- sing down of Tweed - Hunger- of Conservative governments. 

Certainly the crowds who Sandbanks question and dis- man limitations, of course. ford District High School and Then, with a’final grin and 
turned out to greet Mr. Davis cussion was underway with — but the situation can be im- the resultant’ busing out of wave, the premier and his 
and his wife Kathleen, scem- Public Works officials about proved.” students, Mr. Davis replied wife stepped on board the 
ed to be in agreement. More acquisition of the land. The reception in Tweed was that, he was well aware of — chartered bus and headed off 
than 300 people. most of them Environmental control and a mixture of youthful enthu- the problem but reiterated — for an evening engagement in 
youngsters Ict out uf public Pollution abatement were the siasm and elderly reserve, his decision, saying that ‘he Peterborough. 
school, welcomed the premier 
to Deseronto. PC advance man 


ec Picton Welcome Warm 


mobbed as he handed out pla- 


cards and flags to cheering By MARGARET HAYCOCK of them students. gathered esscry in an election cam: can takeover of Canadian in- 
Kids: A + PICTON (Staff) — Ontario on the lawn of the Armory — pairn, according to Premier dustries and commented the 
The visit to Descronto and premier William Davis stress. Mall Davis, who observed a cam- United States assumes control 
Napance was only the second. ed yesterday the government The Premier said he has paign cannot be conducted of a Canadian mine, for ex- 
by a provincial premier in his- has made senior citizens ex-. sce nothing in his campaign solely through press confer- ample, sells its resources and 
tory although Mr. Davis WAS emp from payment of medi- znd nothing in kis experience ence: and press releases. He profits. 
hare:pressed to come up with care premiums as of Janu- ‘0 contradict the wisdom of said he has been travelling Premier Davis replied that 
the name of the first dignitary. acy. to allow them to share luwcring the voting age to 18 {cr the past week and meet- the province is not closing 


George Lyons, Reeve of Des “out general economic years. ing persons province-wide to its doors: to American invest. 
eronto and Mr. Davis’ host. prey-th.” M:. Davis commented to- discover and discuss their ment because “we are still 
recalled that Howard Fergus- Mr. Davis, who made a dvy’s youth has “a very real” concerns. young economically and we 


on had paid a call te the com- 

munities in the late 1920s. 
Highlight of the visit was 

the meeting between Mr. and 


sixty-minute stopover at the contribution 10 make and “These kids ask some pretty. have to have our people work- 
Progressive Conservative urged students in the group good questions,” he told re-| ing. 
committee rooms and the to approach the election ob- porters as he spoke with 13- American operated indus- 












; ithgeh) Armory Mall, also endersed — jectively. year-old Warren McFaul, a tries provide large tax returns 
Mts. Davis and Chief Earl the government's decision to “They'll add a lot of en- grade nine student at Prince and salaries to prove takeover 
Hill of the Bay of Quinte Mo- jouer the voting age. thusiasm to the election.” he Edward Collegiate Institute. is not “a one way street.” 
hawk band. Dressed in full He spoke to a group of.ap- predicted. The youth had asked Mr. The Premier confirmed the 


costume. Chief Hill was ac- 
companied by a group of simi- 









































proximately 250 persons, many The personal touch is nec- Davis his opinion of Ameri- province retains complete con- 
trol over pollution from any 


Jim Taylor Supported ‘in Picton 


larly attired school. child el di. i ia: ; 
ts geil as former thie acon %900,000 Building Here ma eo ay 
A. Brant. 


Premier Davis and his wife 


Chief Hill spoke privately to be were greeted’ on arrival in 
vepennae ce CN Introduces New System ¥risu.2 
6: bility of provincial aid in the \" Ackerman, Prince Edward 
z jrebullding Net Tats eon A new phase of merchan- east as Gananoque. Picton cation of work. no one per- — — oe Cpe 
ff house. Mr. st. 1 , . $on was responsible ‘for the son. Prince Edward - Lennox 
ed he make a {ormal request dise shipping has been start- will be the southern bound service, customera could not Conservative candidate James 





to Queen's Park. > ed and the Canadian National ary of control and car res- utr * po Taylor and a large group of 
MORE t station in Belleville is finding  pomsibility will reach as far computer system in Montreal chcerirg onlookers. 

The Prime Minister then itself right in the middle of north as Peterborough and which could locate their car Mayor Ackerman welcomed 
spoke briefly to the crowd 4, operation, Bancroft. instantly, and communications Mr. and Mrs. Davis to Picton 
from ‘the main’ steps of the “It has long been a prob- “What we.are trying to dois broke down,” said Mr. Van  atd presented the couple with 
post office, promoting Hast- 1.7. that customers were in: to centralize all the customer de Water. a souvenir of local handicraft. 


ings. MP Clark Rollins who is convenienced by the’lack of ~~ services"so: that when a-cus- ~ "With the new system: these Quinte- Apple Blossom” q 
secking re-election fer the information available on the tomer has a problem, he problems are almost complete. Queen, Anna Lynn Walker 


fourth time, and emphasizing — jocation of a particular car in can make a toll-free phone ly eradicated.” be said. presented premier Davis with 
the Censervative party's Ge- 4 certain train due at Jeast call to the service centre in Another serious problem in 4 bushel of locally grown 
sire to “consult with people partially, to the middle men his area and find out exactly ~ the past was that a train car 4pples. * 


_The scene then shifted to in the business.” said George what is happening to his could be held at the station When Mr. Devil concluded. 
Nepanee where the greeting Van de Water, manager for freight.” said Mr. Van de until a ‘complex process of his brief remarks ‘at the -Ar- 


_ wes perhaps not as noisy but cy's Rideau arca. Water, rating and billing was‘com- mory Mall he moved through 
every bit as” enthusiastjc. In the past, agerts spread “Express services are al- picted. the crowd signing autographs, 
Mayor Lorne Smart presented across the CN line would ne- ready under a scheme such as “Now the customer can con- shaking hands and answering 
Mr. and Mrs. Davis with a — gotiate business with a cus- this and the carload service is ceivably receive his invoice questions. : 
wooden serving tray before tomer and then go through the next step to making the at the same time as his car- “Is it alright for me to do 
the town hall but the gilt complicated channels, relay- operation complete across the go." said Mr. Van de Water. this?" he asked as several 
caused some consternation for ing the needs of the custom- board.” he said. Spokesmen for the CN feel students sought his autograph 

‘ the honored couple. “Kathleen er These services will be ex- the “Servo Centre” will rce- on their excuse slips. 


thought it was going to be a With the new system. the tended to cover passenger duce most of the tieups in the The premier was stopped 
baby’s bassinet." Mr. Davis customer will talk directly to service and telecommunica- over-all service to the cus- briefly by a man who stated 
said, conunenting om the the service centre for the tions in the future. tomer. he was from Montreal and 
finely-wrapped gift, “Five's area, This same centre will “Through this change.” said An extension is being add- happened to be passing 
all J can handle, I think. be responsible for the location Mr. Van de Water. “at least ed to the existing express through Picton during the Da- 
We're not thinking of those of the car, its progress and nine area agents will be clos- building which wilt’ cost in vis stopover. He was eager 


things at the moment." They its invoicing. ing shop.” the neighborhood of $300,000, to {ell the premier he felt his 
have five children at home in One of 100-Such centres will Some facilities used in the with construction starting in policies were “excellent” and ‘ , 2 
Brampton. be located in the city. Others old operation will be used to the next month. repeated “bon chance” as he y rad 


The premier strolled along in the Rideau area are locat- complement the communica- Work should be completed shook hands with the visiting : ' 
Dundas Street, shaking hands ed at Ottawa, Brockville and tion setup of the new pro- by February and staff train- premier. iets 3 st 
and chatting with the locals, Peterborough. gram for car location. ing and relocation should be Shortly after 1 p.m. the IF | 4 
mostly older folk who had The centre in Belleville will “The number of problems’ completed by March when the Davis party boarded “the Bill ne c 
lined the sidewalks. The walk be “responsible for cars as in the old scheme were ridi- station is expected to go into Davis bus" and Jeft Picton j . * ° 
ended at the hezdquarters of far west as Oshawa and asfar culous to the extent of dupli- operation. enroute to Deseronto. With Clarke Rollins in Napanee 


ROR'3 


















i “i 
ae 
S 


: x OS ie 
Audience Greeted Premier in Deseronto : 


ea 


Youthful 


a 





n Street Li 











Jeet INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1971 
ee 


Fans’ 


WASHINGTON = (AP) 
Washington Senators, their 
| merry mourners turning a fu-’ 
neral into a fiasco, have 
bowed out of baseball with 
-one of the rarest feats in the 
team's history—a last inning 
Joss by forfeit. 

The Texas-bound team, a 
* fixture in the American 
~ League's basement for many 
of its Tl years, seemed heeded 










E 


01 60 .627-— 
Kansas City 8 76 52 16 
Chicago 7 83 488 2% 
California 7% % 469 235% 
Minnesota 4 86 463 26% 
Milwaukee 6 2 49 2 
Results 
New York 9 Washington 0 
California 3 Minnesota 2 
Chicago 2 Milwaukee 1 
National League 
East 
WL Pct. GBL 
Pittsburgh 97 65 509 — 
St, Louis 9 72 586 7 
Chicago 8 79 S12 14 
New York 83 79 S12 14 
Montreal 71 90 441 25% 
Philadelphia 67 95, 414 30 
West 
San Francisco 9 72 546 — 
LosAngeles 89 73 S49 1 
Atlanta & © 506 8 
Cincinnatl 72 83 488 11 
Houston 79 83 488 11 
San Diego 61 100 .379 28% 
@' Results Thursday 
Chicago § Montreal 3 
Pittsburgh 4 Philadelphia 3 
New York 6 St. Louis 1 
Atlanta 6 Cincinnati 2 
Los Angeles 2 Houston 1 


San Francisco 5 San Diego 1 


Fanning Pleased with Expo Performance 


MONTREAL (CP) — De- 
spite the fact Montreal Expos 
finished the 1971 season with 
7i wins, two less than las: 
year, general manager Jim 
Fanning was still satisfied 
with the progress of the third 
year club. 

“If we take a look at some 
of the individual perform- 
ances, there was a clear im- 
provement over last year. 

“Our best young players 
head into a double A ncxt 
year and some of them should 
make the jump to the major 


Fanning said he was partic- 
ularly pleased with the start- 


Staub Busiest 


MONTREAL (CP),— Right: 





Cost Senators Chance to Win Lost Washington Game 


for certain victory in.the capi- 
tal finale Thursday night. 
The Senators held not only a 
TS lead, but New York Yan- 
kees had no one on base and 
only a single out remaining. 
For the long-suffering Sena- 
tors’ fans, it was just too 


much, 

* By the hundreds they 
poured ote of the stands, 
sournngiene outlield, jam- 
ming the basepaths, "pulling 


OS Ce, eee 


up the bases and running ott 
. with the pitchers rubber; 

For the first time since 
1954. a major league baseball 
game ended in forfeit. 

“We won the game even 
though they took it away by 
the rules,"" said catcher. Paul 
Casanova. 

“J never expected anything 
like that, said pitching coach 
Sid Hudson, a Senator for 


more than two decades.: 


“What a way to end ‘a ball 
club, huh?” 

“Thot was just’ the fans’ 
way of exprscs’ng themselyes 
over what they thought was a 
wrong" deal," saRt” reserve 
Tom McCraw. “I'm not say- 
ing it was a good way, but. I 
guess they thought it was the 
only way." 

Almost 15,000 fans were on 
hand to sce the Senators, who 
lost 96 games with a team 





batting average of .230, slip 
into history alongside storied 
losers like the St. Louis 
Browns. The fans came not so 
much to: mourn as to heckle 
owner Robert Short, who engi- 
necred the transfer of the 
franchise to Dallas-Fort 
Worth. 

Short was not Seen at the 
stadium, but fans carried an 
effigy of him “through the 
stands. Signs ridiculing Shor. 





mere pore 


season 
clinched the American 


and Steve Renko. 

“McAnally, Renko and 
Stoneman have done a good 
job. Mike Marshall has 
proven to everyone that he is 
a capable relief man,” 

Stoneman was shooting for 
his 18th win in the season's 
finale Thursday at Jarry 
Park, but Jost the game 5-3 to 
Ferguson Jenkins and the Chi- 
cago Cubs, leaving his record 
at 17-16. 

Renko had a 15-14 mark and 
McAnally came back from 4 
disastrous “beginning to finish 
witharespectable ll-iz.- 
record. At one stage of the 
season, McAnally was 23, 

Marshall was the Expos’ 
premier relief artist, register 
ing ‘23 saves and posting a 58 
won-lost record with a 4.28 
eared run average. He ap- 
peared in 66 of Montreal's 
games and finished 52 of 
them. 

One. thing that Fanning 
hopes to be able to improve 
during the off-season is the 
left-handed pitching on the 
club. The Expos currently 
have one southpaw--})an 


McGinn—who was anything | 


but effective with the Expos 
this season. 


McGinn appeared in 28 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


American League 











three re beer Suntieed 








Winning Swing 


Chicago White Sox’ slugger Bill Melton 
swings away for his 33rd home’ run of the 


in Chicago Thursday. The homer 


league hone run title 


games for Montreal—six as a 
starter—and had an unim 
pressive 1-4 record with a 5.95 
ERA. 

Fanning said the Expos 
“need a left-hander who can 
get the left-handed hitters 
out.” 

There is anothers depart 
ment that Fanning would also 
like to improve and _ that's 
speed on the bases 

The Expos have a couple of 
good base-runners in their 
minor Icague chain including 









































@ SIMPSONS-SEARS 


QUINTE MALL 


McCullough 
Chain_Saw 


Demonstration 


for the Sox’ third baseman. Milwaukee catcher 
Darrel Pcrler waits for the pitch that never got 


there, 


Jim Chapman of Vancouver. 
B.C.. who played part of this 
sceson with Quebce Caravals 
of the Eastern League. 

But the Expes ciub man 
aged only 51 stolen bases this 
season as a team, which is 
unimpressive when sone indi 
vidual base runners get more 
than that in a season 

“We need a guy with the 
Lou Brock type of speed,” 
Fanning said. “We teed effen 
sive speed, the kindhat both 
ers a pitcher.” 


blossomed from virtually 
every corner of Kennedy Stad- 
jum. At least one of the signs 


was obscene. 

"Police removed that one, 
drawing a jecr that was al. 
most matched in sheer vol- 
ume by the cheers for popular 
slugger Frank Howard. 

Howard, who has not: been 
noticeably happy about the 

prospect of playing in Texas 
next season, gave the fans 


y 


FP Me nner ee ner wane 

















(AP Wirephoto) 


Heres the reason for buying a Ski Whiz NOW... 


something to remember him 
by with a soundly laced line- 
drive home run in the sixth— 
his 26th of the season. 

“We had ali the confidence 
in the world we would have 
gotlen the side out,” said out- 


grass, at the Scoreboard 
signs, even the dugout roof. 














“It was like opening day, 
except in reverse,” said 
Unser. “it’s one of the things  — 
I'll always remember." e 

The Senators’ forfeit was 
the first in major league base- 
ball since July 18, 1954, when 
delaying tactics by St. Louis 
manager Eddie Stanky led 
umpires to give Philadelphia 
Phillies a sweep of a a 
header with the Cardinals, 


September Slump Survived, © 
Giants Head for Champagne ™ 


By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 


San Francisco Giants, after 
building a huge early-season 
lead and nearly losing it in. 
dreadful September slump, put 
everything together on the final 
day of the season and clinched 
the National League's West Di- 
vision title with a 5-1 victory 
Thursday night over the Son 
Dicgo Padres. 

Charlie Fox, in his first sea- 
son as Giants’ manager, talked 
about it in a champagne filled 
dressing .room celebration that 
had been brewing for more than 
a week, ‘ 

“I feel wonderful.” he said. 
his uniform dripping with the 
bubbly ‘stuff the Giants had 
been carting around in the final 
hectic days of the frantic race. 

The Giants’ victory enabled 
them to finish one game ahead 
of the onrushing Los’ Angeles 
Dodgers, who completed their 
season with a 2-1 victory over 
Houston Astros. 

“Sure, I'm disappointed that 
we didn’t go all the way.”* said 
Dodgers’ manager Walt Alston 
in the quiet’ Dodgers’ dressing 
room, 

The Giants’ triumph also 
sends them into the. National 
League's best-of-five playoff 
against Pittsburgh, the East 
Champion, beginning Saturday 
in San Francisco. 

The Pirates ended their regu: 
Jar season with a 43 victory 
over Philadelphia Phillies. In 
other National League finales. 
New Yerk Mets defeated Stg 
Louis Cardainls 61° Atlanta 
Braves downed Cincinnati Reds 
62. and Chicago Cubs rimmed 
Montreal Expos 5-3. 

The Giants, leading the wild 
West since April 12th, took an 
8'zgame lead into the final 
month of the ‘season but their 
fate swoon. which saw them 
lose 16 to 23 games, shrank 


their lead over Los Angeles to 








one game going into the final 
day of the campaign. But even 
in the team’s worst stretch. Fox 
was certain the Giants could 
win it. 

“We had the confidence all 
along, “he said. “ “We knew we'd 
Ret straightened out.” 

Fox was right. The Giants 
won three of their last four 
games and hung on for their 
first title since 1962. 

Juan Marichal, the high-kick- 
ing right-hander and ace of the 
staff, made sure of it. He held 
the Padres to five hits, struck 
out five and had his usual pin- 


JUAN MARICHAL - 


point control, walking none, in 
winning his 18th game against 
11 losses, 


Only two days before. the 
kame, he had not been feeling 
well. “But I'm going to try."" he 
said, adding that he had no 
problems against the Padres. 

“When you've got support like 
T have on this club it makes you 
feel better and it makes you 
pitch better,"’ he said. 

Rookie Dave Kingman, filling 
in for injured Bebby* Bonds. 


provided “Marichal’s major of- 


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fensive support. The. 6-6, 210- 
pound right-handed slugger 
capped @ three-run fourth inning 
against Dave Roberts with a_ 
two-run homer. 

Tito Fuentes opened the in- 
ning with a single and scored on 
a double off the centre field 
fence by #-year-old. Willie 
Mays. The Giants added two 
runs in the ninth, but they wer: 
en't necessary as Marichal had 
the Padres well under control. 

The Dodgers, meanwhile, 
were concentrating on beating 
the Astros and watching the 
scoreboard. They had to win. 
and did. But there was nothin 
they could do to stop the Giants. 
_ Maury Wills, the Dodgers” 
Shortstop and captain, capsuled 
his team’s disappointment, say- 
ing: 

“On paper, we're a’ better 
team than the Giants. But 
they're a better team on the 
field. But to lose by a cape. oe 
well, that’s pretty togh‘ 

Don Sutton, 17-12, pitched bril- 
liantly for the Dodgers, thwart- 
ing the Astros on six hits and 
six strikeouts. “I couldn't afford 
to relax out there on the mound, 
even if the Giants were ahead,”” 
he said. “I still had some mca 
to get out.” 

Pittsburgh tuned up for the 
playoffs, beating the Phils with 


the help of Manny Sanguillen’s’ 


homer and Jackie Hernandez” 
two-run double, 

The Mets’ Tom Seaver won 
his 20th game and bettered his 


league strikeout record for ing ; 
harders, fanning 13 for a t 


N 


of 289, as New York topped S| 
Louis. Ken Singleton belted two 
homers for the Mets. 

Chicago's Ferguson Jenkins 
registered his 24th victory—tops 
in the leaguc—as th® Cubs de- 
feated Montreal on Ron Santo’s 
run-scoring single and Jim 
Hickman’'s two-run double in the 
ninth. 





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. 


Crush Centennial 52- 6) 





By ERIC EMERSON 
Sports Staff 
The idea might not have 
been quite what Leo Cahill 
had in mind when he started 
his notorious new offensive 
system with the Toronto Argo- 
nduts but the Quinte Saints 
showed yesterday that twin 
quarterbacks ~ really -can be 
wsed effectively. : 
Quinte's change from the 


employed simultancously. The 

system worked to perfection 

as tbe Saints~ trampled Cen- 
tennial 52-6 in a Bay of Quinte 

COSSA senior bout yesterday. 

Actually, only Rick Meagh- 
er saw action at the pivotal 
position of Quinte’s offence 
but Saints’ backup quarter - 
back Stan Brooks was getting 
more than his share of play 
— at offensive end. 

The second string signal 
caller proved to be a first- 
Ps rate receiving threat, hauling 

in scoring strikes of 40 and 60 
yards run from Meagher 
who shredded the Chargers’ 
pass defence. 

“Stan? What can you say 
about him, except that it 
must have been his tremen- 
dous basketball training that 
helped him catching a font- 
ball,’" grinned Quinte head 
coach Rick Locke. Brooks 
basketball mentor last sca- 
son, as he assessed the receiv- 
ers’ efforts, 

At first, it appeared as 
though Centennial would be 
the team to enjoy-air success 
as quarterback AGlenn Carle- 
ton connected for a spectacu- 
lar GO-yard pess - and - play 
with end Phil Easton. After 
their initial success the Char- 
gers scldom went te the air, 
however, sticking to a ground 
game that went nowhere 
against the tough Saint de- 
fence. “I was a bit surprised 
that they didn’t pass more af- 
ter they completed a couple 

- of early ones,” admitted 

Locke. : 

Increased pressure by the 
defensive line in the second. 
third and fourth Lpebesie 
one possible explanation” Tor 
Centennial’s failure to exploit 
the passing game. 

“\ While Centennial. was 
grounding to a halt, Meagher 
filled the air with footballs, 
as the Chargers proved fairly 
strong against the rush but 
were completely vulnerable to 
the air attack. 

Besides his pitches to 
Brooks, the Saint slinger 
threw a 50-yard touchdown 
pass to brother Terry Meagher 
on a Meaiticker and helped 

‘ sct up a 27-yard gallop by 

Paul McQuaid on a Statue of 
’ Liberty play. 

In addition to the touch- 
down tosses the Meagher 
brother act accounted for 
two two - point conversion 
passes with Brooks hauling 
in a third. 

McQuaid scored in the first 
period on a five-yard reverse 
and Bill Kirkham went 12 






























& 





ess racing ca 


* turnout. 


* 


RACE NO. 1 
N-W 4001971 AE-NW last 3 


Pioneer, Narra D. Murphy 
issold 











Molly Haw Lea, BR. Brown 


RACE NO. 2 
N-W 230-1931 AE N-W 238 


~Paitaurie, C. Storms 

Vietor Mal Direct,.C. Newton 
Mr. Chick, THA. 

Jimmy Belwyn, TBA, 

Prima Bb G, Filson 
Paul Reed, THA 

Lot Boy, A. Me-kiey 


RACE NO. 3 
N-W 400-1978 AK N-W last 
3B Starts 


Dozsle Dandy, B. Siecth 
Ren Way, C. Latchford 
Little Heather, TEA 
Sree. Northwood Grant. W. Demille 
. Donz Flyer. A. Merkicy 
Mighlawn Doug, TBA. 
Misty Comet, G. Stratton 


RACE NO, 6 
200 < 800 Claiming AK N-W 
last 3 Starts Quinella 


Dayton Freight. TBA 800 
Simm Sam. J. Hogan 800 
Reya XK. Abbey, J. Walsh, 800 
Old John, TBA 

Resin Bow, L. Zebedee 
Magic Joan, K. Weeks 
Smokey Valley, N. Edwards 


More Sport 
On Page 18 


@ President Evy Gowsell ex- 
plained that “we had two 


Starts © First Malf Dally Dowdle 


fast 6 starts tad Balt Dally Deable 





yards on an off-tackle for the 
other Quinte major. Punter 


Paul Hall booted a,pair of sin- 
gies and Carleton led a 
safety touch for remain- 


ing Quinte offensive points. 
Inside linebacker Ken Vos 
Capped an outstanding effort 
on the Saints’ defence when 
he sprinted 30-yards with a 
second quarter interception 





for a touchdown, Corner line- 
backer Terry Doran was the 
other stickout in a fine all- 


‘round defensive performance 


by the winners, 

The game had figured to 
be a much closer affair with 
both teams winning their Ica- 
gue openers. Quinte had 
blanked Centre Hastings 37-0 
while the Chargers had come 


‘Saints Make Two-Pivot System Work 


“through with a dramatic 7-1 The winners rallied in the’ 


last-minute win over the tough final period. with Peter Vos 
Trenton Tigers. providing some powerful in- 
@Quinte’s passing success side running and Murray Han- 
was evident in the junior nah adding the final counter 


game as well, helping them 
to an 18-6 win. Saint quarter- 
back David Bird flipped 23- 
yard scoring passes to David 


on a 15-yard off-tackle run. 
Defensive lineman Dave 
Ogden and Terry Reid along 
with safety Bob Moore were 


Drake and Terry Marek to the major factors in contain- 
vate tote Sa 


build a 12-0 lead at half time. 


‘Fancy Meeting You Here!’ y 


Centennial Secondary School halfback Jolin 
Bunner runs smack into the stonewall defence of 


the Quinte Saints as 


linebacker Terry Doran 


makes the tackle. Quinte turned the expected Bay 
of Quinte COSSA battle into a rout as the 


Fairway Problems Could Be. Worse 


By ERIC EMERSON 
Sports Staff 

There's no doubt that Belle- 
ville Fairways’ coach Murray 
Hunter is faced with a pro- 
blem, the rookie Junior B 
hockey coach can be excused 
if he does manage to smile 
through his tears. 

The problem? “We might 
have to wind up cutting some 


Quinte Raceway 
Runs Final Card 


The Quinte Agricultural So- more dates we could have 
ciety hopes to fold its harn- 
Saturday and been dropping off latcly be 
. noisily steal away. The group. 

- which conducts the Quinte 
Raceway harness cards will 
hold its final meet of the sca- 
son tomorrow night and of- 
ficials are hoping for a big 


operated, but the crowds have 


cause of the weather, so we 
thought it would be better to 
wind things up Saturday in- 


stead of maybe going in the ~ 


hole for next season.” 

The final mect will get 
under way at 7.45 p.m. at the 
Belleville Fairgrounds and 
will have a full 10-race card. 


* * 
RACE NO. & 
Tiet and Face N-W 
Dizzy Melen, E. Pennell 
Brown Kid, R. Brown 
Sunset Satly, D. Steacy 
Wades Rockey, ‘Nm. Wade 
Top Return, J .Hogan 
Oiga’> Girl, W. Demille 
Super Indian, L. Wemp 
RACE NO, © 
N-W 350-1931 AZ N-W 
2 Starts 
Briae Wann, J. Cochrane 
Doc Herbert. G. Walker 
Beilicx, K. Weeks 
3! K. King. S. Mulholland 
Beverley’s June, A. Vance 
Shelly Down, G. Irwin 
True Laird, G. Stratton 
RACE NO. 7 
N-W 1000-1971 Opt. 


700-1931 


230 fast 


Claiming 


1500 Mare under € allowed too ~ 


Eaacter 
Chico Hal, J -Hogan 
Tisy State Jan. J. Robbins 
Tye Venture, F. Jarrell 
Auios Susie, G. Walker 
Lady Violet Direct, J. Walsh 
Monaco, A. Vance 
Stardale Flashy, J. Jeffrey 
RACE NO. & 
N-W (00-1975 AR N-W lost 
3 Starts 
Angella Gratton, TBA 
Pixie Lobel, B. Gilpin 
Northwood Vaivet. EB. Weeks 
Coins Doyle, F. Jarrell 
2 Angur Wann. D. Butters 
Bry State Millie, A. Vance 
Trippers Poy. W. Desaltle 
RACE NO. 
Maidens AF N-W Suo-t0st 
Hey John, *E. Stanbury * 
Preston Heel, K. Weeks 
Lute Raindrop, G. Walker 
Charlie Cress, W. Demille 
Nigt! Rocket. L. Kellett 
Harsvill Shirley. J, f¥illiams 
Wm. Wade 
Wem 


Quidelly N-# * age-1sit 
Peter Magic. H. Wemp 
Gist. 3. lams / 


Prince Odser. 


Allgon Scott, B. Wemp 
R. U Dillon, BD. Sleeth 


of the guys who played on 
last year's team.” explained 
Hunter after w ng oa 
turnout of close to 30 junior- 
age candidates at the Memor- 





jal Arena last night. Some 
“Some players might not 
make it. this season, who 


could have made it almost 
‘any other year.” 

Hunter tempers his enthus- 
fasm with the knowledge that 
the Eastern Ontario Junior B 
league should be a well-bal- 
anced him, “Peterborough 
and Oshawa always scem to 
come up with power,” he ack- 
nowledg “but we could put 
up a goed 
place. Our main problem will 
be not to Iet down against 
teams like Gananoque and 
Picton, we don’t know what 
kind of clubs they"ll come up 
with.” The latter two entries 
in the league are Junior C 


cS, 





clubs that will compete with 


the Peterborough. - Oshawa. 
Kingston and Belleville 


teams.) 


One area which threatened 
to be a problein coald tum 
Strong 
“I don't 


out to be a Fairway 
point — netminding. 


fight for third 


defending champions bounced back from a 6-0 
deficit to hand the Chargers a 52-6 drubbing, It 
was the second league game for both teams after’ 
cach had won their league opener last week. 


The Fairways’ coach made 
eight cuts after the practice 
session and will continue to 
cut the size of the squad 


this weekend. He feels that 
theleam may be ready for a 
short scrimmage in tonight's 
6 p.m. workout. 


ooo 


| Sports Calendar 
See 


SENIOR A HOCKEY 
TONIGHT ~- Orillia Terriers ve 
Belleville Quintes at Trenton 
Community Gardens, 830 p.m 
) qQUINTE MOCKEY LEAGUE 
TONIGHT ~- Open practice for 


POWER SQUADRON 
MONDAY, OCT. 


~ 


MINOR HOCKEY 


Central Taxi; Memorial Arena, MONDAY - TONIGHT — Belle 
B43 Pm cinte wocxey vile Minor Hockey Association 
SUNDA eee eeaisa tie Player jreeietration, Recrestion 
Simca Teele RO ee » Pinnacle St, 9 am. - & 
QUINTE HOCKEY TONIGHT — Registration at 


SUNDAY — Open practice. for 
Reidy) Dairy at Relleville Memor- 
tal Arena, 3.30 p.m. 

COMMERCIAL SOFTBALL 

SATURDAY, OCT. 9 — Annual 
League banquet at Royal Canadian 
Leann, Pinnacle Street, 7 pm 

HARNESS RACING 

SATURDAY -- Weekly races et 
Exhibition Grounds» begin at 7.43 
Dim. 


Memorial Arena, 7 - 9 p.m. 
Memorial Arens. 9 a.m. - 13 p. 
HIGM SCHOOL FOOTBALL. 


Hestings. 


RCMP Huskies at South 
Field CFB Trenton. 2 p.m. 
JUNIOR B- ROCKET 
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL 
MONDAY Cosy Grill ve 
Wee's Flowers at Alemite, eR 


Belicy) 
Avena, 


BCI Soccer Squads 
Hold. Moira Scoreless 


om, 


“RB” 


know how good Arnie Istead 


Is, 
sharp tonight, 


tending position,” noted 
Belleville coach. Istead, 
year’s back-up 


ments, 


A total of 11 players who 
saw Junior B action last sca- 
son were on hand for the 
captain 
Tim Yohn, 
Brian O'Coin, Cliff Janitsch, 
Peter Ackerman, Dave Smith, 
Doug James, 
Paul Whattam, Dave Horwood 


workout = including 
eJchn Mulvihill, 


Bill Bunnett, 


and Rod Palmer. 


Also. signed with the Fair- 
ways is Mark Woodward, the 


lezding score tast season wil 


the now-defunct Trenton Gold- 
en Hawks. The speedy centre 
ceunted 12 goals: and 20 as- 


sists for Trenton. 


Hunter was also impressed 
with the first appearances of 
a. new- 


defenceman Jim Cain, 
comer to the Belleville are 
and centre Brian Cousins wh 


performed with the Blake Kerr 


Midgets last season, 


but Bob Harrison looked 
He could have 
the inside track on the goal- 
the 
last 
goalic was 
forced to miss the initial prac- 
tice because of job commit- 


BCI's senior soccer squad 
trounced the Trojans in a 
Bay of Quinte Cossa bout 
yesterday, but the junior Col- 
legians were held to a 0-0 tie 
by .their Moira counterparts. 

“—Chafies Nesterovski and 
Dave Van Vliet scored in the 
first hal€ for BCI, Van Vliet 
crashed into goalie Jim Wib- 
bericy on the play sending the 
Moira netminéer to hospital 
with a possible broken nose. 
BCI netminder Warren Rush- 


ians controlled the play. 


the second shutout in a 
for the Rushlow. 


juniors to a 0-0 deadlock. 


Minor Hockey Offers 
Two More Chances 


. « - And the sign Said 
minor hockey players had 
best apply,” might not make 
the hit parade, but the mes- 
sage should be clear to boys 
planning to participate in the 
a sport this winter. 

o Only 700 applications have 
béen received so far by the 
Belleville Minor. Hockey As- 


h 


* 
> 


1 p.m. 





. 4 — Fall gen- 
eral meeting and registration at 
Bay of Quinte Yecht Club, 8 p.m. 


SATURDAY — meateraen at 


TONIGHT — Trenton ve Centre 


NATIONAL DEFENCE FOOTBALL 
SUNDAY — Trenton Broncos vs 
Bide 


TONIGHT — Open practice for 
Fairways et Memorial 


low on the other hand, had 
an easy night as the Colleg- 


Van Vliet scored his sec- 
ond goal of the game in the 
final half, while Rick Hogge 


missed a fine opportunity to 
tp the count to 40. Twas 


BCI goalie Barry Hicks 
turned in an excellent per- 
formance to hold the Moira 


sociation, about half the num- 
ber expected. Those Who have 
not registered for minor hock- 
ey will have only two more 
* chances before theytare forc- 
ed to go on a waiting list. 
Registration will be" hel® 
tonight at the. Belleville Mem- 
orial Arena from 7 - 9 p.m. 
and Saturday from 9 a.m, to 































Fresh Trades 


LOW, LOW. 


~ WINTER PRICES 
0-Day 100% Warranty 





1971 OLDSMOBILE™ 


Delta 4 door Hardtop, spotless in Gulf green with dark~ 
green vinyl top and green brocade cloth interior. Equip- 
ped with automatic transmission, radio, power steering 
and brakes, Low masons by one careful owner. Lic. 


Perere errr rrr irri tiir seebecsescosenscessasesess 


$3995 
$2795 
$1695 


1970 CHEVROLET 


Belair 4-door sedan in dessert gold with Matching in- 
terior, _~ equipped Ane v3, hopper ne power 

brakes. economy car family car 
stencing and Lic. 90656A A 


Prrerrrerririirrirtirr ir 


1970 EPIC 


Deluxe 2 door in beautiful turquoise with blue interior, 
Big 84 horsepower engine coupled with 4 speed trans- 
mission and radio make this one a real goer. Lic 82002A . 


1969 CHEVROLET 


Convertible, all original in spring green with white top 
_ vinyl interior. This one we we sold new and bave 
ny seaeee 8 only 24 000 000 miles and the alance of a 


BELIZA, 0... cccvecesensceccevorenee 


factory warranty. Li 


1969 CAPRICE 


Ta yt an 
m: ac. iP. y PI ig 
windows. Words cannot d icine tks le of 


$2895 
$1995 
$2695 
$2195. 


$3099 
$1695 


Daily 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 
Satucday 9 a.m, to 1:00 p.m. 


1969 BELAIR 


4 door sedan in smart forest green’ with matching in- 
eatanl equipped with 327 engine, automatic, radio, 
Pete se steering and brakes. Just one previous owner. 


1969 BUICK 


The lovey LeSabre 4 door family sedan in soft sez foam 
green with matching interior completely set off by 
whitewall tires. Full equipment includes turbo-hydra- 
matic, power steering, power brakes and radio. Lic. 
9319K. FULL PRICE . asesee 





st eeeeeesereeareeroeeeees 


1969 METEOR 


Rideau $00 4 door sedan, spotless in deep diplomat blue 
with matching interior and white vinyl top. Equipped 
, th automatic, radio, and power steering.- Just one 
previous owner who kept it like new. Lic, S4845A. 
. FULL PRICE ........se0008 SPPPrererrrr irri tri ririrtit 


1969 OLDS. 98 


Smart Verdo reese with black’ vinyl top and soft 

green brocade cloth interior, full luxury car equipment 
and completely reconditioned. Just one reyious owner 
and priced to save you many dollars. Lic, 95028A. 


PRIC eprrerrreterttrrrertrerrrrirys 


1968 BUICK 


LeSabre 4 door ae in Pewter silver with black vinyl 
top, power equipped and completely reconditioned. Ec- 
pear eee priced ie the family man in mind. 

ic. . 


Prerevireritiriiiririririrtiiii a) 










OPEN 








SY Srudeau 
S| MOTORS LIMITED. 


ae 


—— 


THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1971 


ne 


ees No Vheboaes Needed 


Although appearing to be swamped by high waves, Henry Sprague 
is on his way to winning a race during first day’s action of the North 
American Finn sailing champtonships on Lake Ontario off Toronto 
Monday. (CP Wirephoto) 








Angote Nets Quick Pair 


Hawks’ First’ Win Canucks’ First Loss 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


Vancouver Canucks suffered 
their first defeat in cight Na- 
tional Hockey. League exhibition 
games Thursday night when 
they fell 54 to Chicago Black 
Hawks in Vancouver. 

It was the first victory for the 
Hawks in five starts. They have 
lost two and tied two. 

Toronto Maple Leafs and Min- 
nesota North Stars struggled to 
a 11 tle in Toronto, Buffalo 
Sabres whipped Pittsburgh Pen- 
guins 6-2-in North Bay, Ont.. 
and Philadelphia Flyers downed 
St. Louis Blues 3-1 in Philadel- 
phia. 


~The Hawks exploded for three 


goals in the third period to win. 
a lu Angottl netted the tying 
“and winning goals for Chicago. 


Pit Martin,, Jerry Korab and 


Chico Maki added a goal vach. 
Murray Hall provided twa 
goals for the Canucks, with 
Mike Corrigan and Wayne Maki 
contributing one each. 


Angotti’s goals came 3 sec 


onds apart. . 

Tony Esposito tended goal for 
the Hawks, while Dunc Wilson 
and George Gardner shared net 
duties for the Canucks. 


Rookie Richard Martin, a 71. 


goal scorer with Montreal Cana- 


NHL Rival League 
Better Than Expansion? 


EDMONTON (CP) .— World 
Hockey Association teams now 
being considered in 14 Canadian 
and United States cities will 
provide better hockey than the 
new division of the National 
Hockey’ League, W. D. (Bill) 
Hunter, general manager of Ed- 
monton Oil Kings, said Thurs- 
day. : 
He told the annual “tace-olt 
breakfast" of the Western Can- 


‘ada Hockey League club there 


will be plenty of hockey talent 
available for the new leaguc, 
planned to begin competition 
next s¢ason, 


“There are quite a few NHL . 


players who are dissatisfied 
with thelr opportunities and who 
would play in the WHA, and 
many players of major Icague 
calibre still are in the minors.” 

Hunter attended a WHA mect- 
ing in Los Angeles recently dur- 
ing which. WCHL representa- 
tives from Edmonton, Calgary 
and Winnipeg were offered 
WHA affiliation, 

He estimated the franchise 


fee at about $1 million com- 


pared with the estimated $5 mil- 
lion paid by recent NHL expan- 
sion teams. 






Princess Anne Could Set Precedent 


-- LONDON (Reuter) — Brit- 
ain’s latest equestrian star, 
Princess Anne, could become 
the first member of the Royal 
Family ever to take part in 

_ the Olympic Games. 

The 21-year-old daughter of 
Queen Elizabeth won the Eu- 
ropean three-day riding cham- 


* Petes Win 


Home Opener 


PETERBOROUGH (CP) 
Ron Lalonde scored two goals, 
‘one into an empty net, as_Peter- 
borough Petes defeated st. 
Catharines Black Hawks 64 
Thursday night in the openihg 

| game of the Ontario Hockey As- 
sociation Junior A series. 

Lalonde’s second goal came 
with just three seconds remain- 
ing in the game after Hawks 
removed their goaltender for an 
extra attacker. 

St. Catharines led 2-1 after the 
first period, but Petes held a 4:3 
lead at the end of the second. 

A crowd of 3,362 saw the 
Petes receive six of 11 penalties 
called by referee Tom Smith. 


Sport Briefs 


Ali Plans Astrodome Bout. 


NEW YORK (AP) — An im- 
portant fight was expected to be 
announced today for Muham- 
mad Ali, former world heavy- 
weight boxing champion. 

- Bob Arum. president of Top 
Rank, Inc., which helped stage 
the recent Ali-Jimmy Ellis fight 
in Houston's Astrodome, called 
a news conference Thursday for 
this morning. 

No details were disclosed, but 
it was learned that Ali would 
fight cither Jerry Quarry, 
George Foreman or Buster 
‘Mathes in mid-November in the 
Astrodome. 

° x e * : 
MONTREAL (CP) -— Tie 

Quebec Junior A Hockey 

League, which became a major 

force on the Canadian amateur 

hockey scene last season when 

Quebec Remparts won the 


Memorial Cup for the first time, 


pionships at Burghley, Eng- 
land, this month to give her a 
strong chance of selection in 
the British team of four for 
the Olympics at Munich in 
August next year. 

Riding an eight-year-old 
horse, Doublet—a present 
from her mother and sired by 
one of her father's Argentine 
po'o ponies—the princess took 
on the cream of Europe's en- 
durance riders. 


Her performance was all 


the more remarkable as she — 


had ridden, little in the pre- 
vious two months following a 
minor operation. 

It was only the second time 

she had competed in a major 
international event. and she 
was riding as an individual. 
not a member of the official 
British team. 
_In winning the European 
championships Sept. 5, Prin- 
cess Anne showed two of the 
most important qualities 
needed for top competition— 
complete calm and total con- 
centration despite the cheer- 
ing of the huge crowd every 
time she took a fence. 


begins its 1971-72 season tonight, championship this season. Laf- 
with six of the 10 teams swing-| leur counted better than two 


ing into action. 


Each club will play 62 games| !132-goal total. 


between now and next March 
a 


The Remparts will be secking] son of Northern Dancer-Flam- 
their third straight league title] ing Page, coasted to a half- 
after running away with the] length win in the sixth race at 
championship last year. 32] Woodbine racetrack Thursday, 
points better than’ second-place} but didn’t impress his trainer. 


Shawinigan Bruins, 


Other clubs involved in ages Watters, after Minsky 
order of finish last season are} edged out Amber Stone to pay 
Trois-Rivieres Ducs, Sherbrooke! $2.70 for the win. 
Beavers, Verdun Maple Leals.| as hard as he has to. He gets to 
Sorel] the lead and pulls himself up. 


St. Jerome Alouettes, 
Black Hawks, Drummondville 


Rangers, Laval Nationals and] 1:23 4.5, combining with Amber 


Cornwall Royals, 

Despite 
Guy Lafleur to Montreal Cana- 
diens of the National Hockey 
League, he Remparts are fa- 
vored to retain the league 













losing high-scoring} Rebound was third. 


SPECIAL PURCHASE! 


FOOTBALLS: 
1, Price 


British sports writers have 
practically selected the prin- 
cess already but she is.more 
reserved on her Olympic 
chances. 

She told interviewers after 
her triumph that she would 
not ride Doublet again this 





year, “and would have a bet- Cooper Quality Footballs 
ter idea of her style after Sale Priced From... 
trials. next April, 
Ashley $3.63 to $4.50 
Q its NOW AT... 
‘* | BOB'S SPORTS 
NHL 


AND REPAIRS 


46 SOUTH FRONT STREET (ON THE HARBOR) 
@USE YOUR CHARGEX @ LOTS OF FREE PARKING 


GUELPH (CP) -- Linesman 
George Ashicy of Guelph has 
resigned from the National 
Hockey League officiating staff 
and will join the Ontario Hockey 
Association staff as a referee 
and linesman. 

Ashley, 29. is the ‘secued| 
Guelph resident to Icave the 
NHL staff befcre the new sea- 
son. Referee Ken Bodendistel 
has announced he is also mov- 
ing to the OHA staff. 















AT 


BRIGHTON SPEEDWAY 


2 FINAL RACE MEETS OF THE 1971 SEASON 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 


STARTING AT 2:00 P.M. 


goals a game last season for a 





ND 
«+e * THANKSGIVING MONDAY, 
TORONTO (CP) — Minsky. porkel. 


STARTING/AT 2:00 P.M. 


Win $195.00 in the Pick the Winners Contest — 
your program for complete details and entry form. 


“I can’t figure him out,” said 


“He runs only 
ADMISSION 


AGelts - $2.00 Children uncer 12 - Free - if accompanied by an adult 


Minsky finished the mile in 
KOR MORE FUN IN ‘11 — IT'S THE COMPETITOR'S 


4) MILE DIRT OVAL 


~ 


Stone for an $8 exactor. Miss 


O.H.A. “SR. A” 
EXHIBITION GAME 
ORILLIA TERRIERS 


‘BELLEVILLE QUINTES 


* ‘TRENTON MEMORIAL ARENA 
FRIDAY, OCT. 1st — 8:30 p.m. — GEN. ADMISSION $1.00 





+ 


. EXHIBITION PARK 





STOCK CAR RACING - 


diens of the Ontario"Hockey As 
sociation Junior A series last 
season, sparked the Sabres with 
two goals. Both came in the 
first period and Buffalo went 
ahead 6-0 before the Penguins 
scored. 

Gil Perreault, Eddie Shack, 





LOU ANCOTTI 


Reg Fleming and Don Luce also 
scored for the Sabres. 

Greg Polis and Rene Robert 
counted for the Penguins. 

Brian Spencer's power play 
goal carly in the third pericd 
bailed the Leafs out before 
16,636 fans in Toronto. 

Jean-Paul Parise 


fave the 


North Stars a 1-0 Jead in’ the 
first period, _Seconds after left 











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see the GOOD GUY 


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Good service and low prices make 
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winger Denis Dupere had re- 
turned to the ice after serving a 
hooking penalty. 
Gump Worsley played the en- 
Sk game for the North Stars, 
s did Bernie Parent Ae the 
tate 


Barclay Plager opened them 


scoring for the Hlues carly in 
the first period and then they 
subsided. Larry Mickey tied the 
score in the second. Bill Lesuk 
put Flyers ahead with a slap 
shot in the third and Garry 
Dornhoefer added the clincher 
near the end of the game. 


ac BLEGGR AUDITORIUIA 


Friday, October Ist — Adults and Students - 


7:00 - 


- 10.00 p.m. 


‘Saturday, October 2nd — Children - 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. 


Sunday, October 3rd — Family - 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. 


Adults & Students — 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 


Admission (Including Skates) 


Adults and Students - 


Children - 50c — 


$1.00 — Couples - $1.50 — 
Spectators - 25c 


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OUR SINCERE 
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The Quinte Exhibition and Raceway ex- 
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ARENA COMMITTEE 


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Controversy over the bill has 
been building in intensity. since 
Otto Lang, minister responsible 
for the Canadian wheat board, 
introduced it in Parliament al- 
Tost a year ago. 

Now, its fate may be de- 


cided by the courts if four Sas- 


katchewan farmers are success- 
ful in a bid to start legal action, 

They seek a writ of manda- 
Tus against Finance Minister 


4 


; REGINA (CP) — The cloud Edgar Benson and their applica- 
surrounding the Prairie Grains tion, filed in Regina Wednesday, 
Income Stadilization Act has be- is to be heard Oct. 6. : 
come a thunderbead. Such a writ, if granted, would 


force the government to make 
Jong<ieferred payments to the 
wheat board under the Wheat 
Reserves Act, amounting to a 
sum which has been estimated 
as either. $62 or $90 million, 

The government has made no 
payments under the legislation 
since July, 1970, intending to re- 
place them with larger pay- 
ments under the new stabiliza- 
tion act. 


Prime Minister Trudeau has 
reserves act are made, or # the 
new legislation is much longer 
delayed by opposition parties in 
the House, the proposed bill will 
be withdrawn. 

The Liberal government has 
said farmers cannot have the 
best of both worlds—either they 
get the stabilization bill or they 
stay witth the reserves act. 

Mr. Trudeau put it succinctly 
in a television broadcast Thurs- 
day night: ; 

“Sorry, we're prepared to in- 
crease payments to the western 


Hellyer Convention Opens 


TORONTO (CP) — Paul Hell- 
yer takes his Action Canada 
movement into its first national 
convention today, hoping it will 
Jead to a realignment—or coali- 
tion—of some existing political 
parties and a new opposition to 
the federal Liberal government. 

Mr. Hellyer, a 1968 leadership 
candidate ‘for the Liberal party 
and a former federal transport 
minister, has made it clear on 
several occasions he would like 
to see a realignment of the ex- 
isting Progressive Conservative 
and Social Credit parties, along 
with Action Canada. 

For this reason, Mr. Hellyer 
goes into the three-day conven- 
tion determined to maintain Ac- 
tion Canada's status as a move- 
ment—as opposed to a separate 
political party—so that efforts 
can continue toward a realign- 
ment of existing political forces. 

Conservative and Social 


vited to Action Canada’s first 
convention. But the invitation_ 
was not extended to the Liber-- 
als or New Democrats, 

Since Mr. Hellyer broke away 
from the Liberal party and 
founded Action Canada last 
spring there has been no indica- 
tion of the movement's strength, 
But late today, in the keynote 
speech to this convention, the 
founding chairman will reveal 
the membership figures for the 
first time. The figures were se- 
cret information on the eve of 
th convention, and the only 
-clue from convention workers 

. was that they were “well up in 

And no one had any idea of 
how many delegates would be 
attending this first convention, 
since there was no pre-registra- 
tion system and the meetings 
were to be open to everyon. 

Th convention will feature a 


Credit observers have been in-J series of workshops on econom- 


Opposition Said ‘Vague’ 


OTTAWA (CP) — An opposi- 
tion attack on government eco- 
nomic policies in the Commons 
Thursday was dismissed by gov- 
ernment speakers as being 
vague and irresponsible, 

New Democrat Leader David 
Lewis opencd debate with a mo- 
tion calling for economic mea- 
sures that he admitted were not 
original, but needed action 
nonetheless. 

They included a large-scale 
winter works program in co-op- 
eration with the provinces: im- 
mediate reduction in taxes; gov: 
ernment actior’ to force down 
interest rates: large additional 
funds for housing: funds for 
anti-pollution measures; intro- 
duction of a program to redirect 
trade and free the Canadian 
economy from forcign control. 

The NDP leader then said 
Prime Minister Trudeau had 
juggled unemployment figures 
in a search for excuses for the 
current seasonally-adjusted job- 
less rate of 6.5 per cent. 








Hugh Faulkner (L—Peterbor- 
ough), parliamentary secretary 
to State Secretary Gerard Pelle- 
tier, called Mr, Lewis's motion 
opportunistic and irresponsible. 

He said Mr. Lewis had 
presented a broad sct of attrac- 
tive proposals. 

But. the NDP’ Jeader-had at- 
tached no cost figure to his 
“large-scale program” to pro- 
mote winter employment. 

He had called for a reduction 
of taxes when the government's 
tax change bill, currently at 
second reading in the Commons, 
would remove a million people 
from the tax roles and reduce 
taxes for 4,700,000 people, 

He had called for lower inter- 
est rates, but short-term inter- 
est rates were currently at their 
lowest level since the early 
190s.. 

H waned more money for 
waste treatment plants. But he 
did not say how much more 
than the $432 million the govern- 
ment has spent on such plants 
during the last 10 years. 


ics, taxation, social welfare, for-’ 
eign affairs, pollution, housing, 
agriculture, human rights and 
government structures. It will 
end late Sunday night with the 
election of a leader—Mr, Hell- 
yer’s victory is a foregone con- 
clusion—and deputy leader. 
Four candidates have entered 
the race for, deputy leader. They 
are: George Skelton, president 


of Skelton-Advertising Services 
in Calgary: Barry Blow, a 30- 


yearold Chilliwack, B.C. 
teacher; Marvin K. Wallace, a 
London, Ont., businessman; and 
Leon’ Pushong of Toronto, who 
ran unsuccessfully. for the Brit- 
ish Parliament in 1963, 

Action Canada members who 
do not attend the convention can 
vote through the regional offices 
of a trust company which has 
codes for identifying members. 
The results are expected to be 
known here cuetenaiet. 


Robert Andras, minister of 
state for urban affairs, concen- 
trated on Mr, Lewis's housing 


proposal. 

He said mortgage loans ap- 
proved under the National Hous- 
ing Act in the first eight months 
of 1971 exceeded the volume for 
any. previous full year. 

There was little doubt, the 
minister said, that at the end of 
the year Canada would be 
shown to have enjoyed record 
housing accomplishment. 

Mr. Lewis received strong op- 
position support for his motion. 

John Lundrigan (PC—Gan- 
der-Twillingate) agreed that 
Mr. Trudeau has distorted un- 
employment figures to give the 
impression the government is 
doing all right. * 

Government responses to op- 
position questions on the econ- 
omy during the last month had 
shown deceit, distortion, con- 
cealment, pretense, hypocrisy, 
insensitivity, pious fraud and 
deliberate deception. 










grain farmer from $60 million to 
$100 million, but we're not pre- 


_ Pared to increase it to $160 mil- 


lion. So you must make your 
choice.” 


oA number of western farm 


groups, faced with that choice, 
have come out in support of the 


Democratic parties in Parlia- 
ment have continued their oppo- 
sition, on grounds that the gov- - 
ernment is breaking the law by 
its failure to make the required ' 






a | ved. it ourselves—which 
SE ey eacen toned a paperhanger to 


come in and do it right.” 


_ Farmers Take Own Action; Sue Benson for 


“payments under’ the existing 
legislation. 

With the stalemate in the 
House continuing, the ultimate 
decision on fate of the new leg- 
islation may rest with the im- 


_ pending court action, 


The four farmers who filed 
the ‘William Surdia 
of Assiniboia, Clarence Lucas of 
Mazenod, Roy Ames and James 
Bradley, both of Milestone—did 
so with the support of the Sas- 


katchewan —_ attorney-general’s - 


department, 
* Aottorney-General Roy Roma- 


EE 





x 





ZEGCEEER 
GL 
% & 
5 iH ig 
saf ute; 
gavenbe 


* But Richard R. Squtham (PC * 


- 


THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, ist 1g 
Wheat Payment 


—Qu'Appelle-Moose . Mountain) 


sald the truth is that more than 


week, 





OTTAWA (CP) — Prime Min- 
ister Trudeau announced Thurs- 
day afternoon the appointment 
of 28 parliamentary secretaries 
but cut the number to 27 in the 
evening. sae 

The move made Ian Watson 
(L-Laprairie). the shortest-lived 
parliamentary secretary on 
record. He had the post as as- 
sistant to Revenue Minister 
Herb Gray for just six hours. 

Twenty-seven is still by far 
the largest number of such sec- 
retaries in Canadian history. 
Each of the Liberal MPs so ap- 
pointed gets $30,000 a year, 
$4,000 more than the pay and 
allowances for regular MPs. 
The largest previous number of 
parliamentary secretaries was 
16. . : 

Of the 151 Liberal MPs, 30 are 
in the cabinet, 27 are parlia- 
mentary secretaries, three hold 
positions in the House of Com- 
mons, 39 are chairmen or vice- 


chairmen of Commons commit- 
tees, and two hold Liberal party 
positions. 5 

This leaves only 50 Liberal 
back-benchers. i 

Secretaries re-appointed in- | 
cluded: 

Barnett J. Danson, 50, York 
North, to Mr. Trudeau; Gaston 
Isabelle, 50, - Hull, to External 
Affairs Minister Mitchell Sharp; 
James A. Jerome, 38, Sudbury, 
to Privy Council President Allan 
MacEachen; Judd Buchanan, 
42, London West, to Indian Af- 
fairs Minister Jean Chretien 
Hugh Faulkner, 38, Peterbor- 
ough; to State Secretary Gerard 


PATIO LIGHTS 


at 


You know you need a new car... 


. but howdo you make a choice? 


- Trudeau Names 27 “Secretaries 


Pelletier; New appointees in- 
cluded: 


John Roberts, 37, York-Sim- 
co€, to Regional Economic Ex- 
pansion Minister Jean Mar- 
chand; Jack Cullen, 44, Sarnia, 
to Defence Minister Donald 
Macdonald; Lloyd Francis, 51, 
Ottawa West, to Veterans Minis- 
ter Jean-Eudes Dube; D. R. © 
Tolmie, 47, Welland, to Con- 
sumer Affairs Minister Ron 
Basford; David Wheatherhead, 
43, Scarborough West, to Urban 
Affairs Minister Robert Andras; 
Steven Otto, 49, York East, to 
Supply Minister James Richarg- 


son, 

















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manage. 

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We want you to be satisfied with the car 
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another car or truck to you Jor 4 years from 


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@® cHRYSLER 


CANADA LTD. 


Ten years ago, buying a new car used to 
be mostly a matter of picking the colour. 

u can choose a car that is exactly 
what you need, what you want, what you can 











“Chrysler 



























now, when you come to trade again. 
Before you turn the page, take a look at 
the many different kinds of cars Ptymouth 
offers. Then, pay a visit to one of our dealers, 
and see ail our new cars on display at 
Expo ‘72". Take a demonstration 
drive, ask lots of questions, figure out what 
options of special equipment you might 
need. 


Then, you'll have the information you'll 
need to make a logical buying decision. 


_ Fury is a family car— big on pear 




















Gesign plus the silence of Tor- 
sion Quiet nde add up to great 
velue lor you. 


~ 





Mid-size Satellite ~ a little smaller 
for easier handling and parking 
Bround town. Performs well with 
standard engines. so it’s easier to 
own and run. Special hardiop 










Barracuda gives you all the fun 
and great handling of a sporty 
Car without the price 
tag. The 225 Six and 318 V8 are 
standard, with 3-speed stick or 
automatic. Barracuda — funto 








the new’72 


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1500 ce. engine all standard. 


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offers you a@ 2-year 
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| MA 'T2 THE REST WONT DO, "WERE TOUGHER 7 WAYS” 





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Regular $1,073— Sale Price 3 Regular $1,143—Sale Price 






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special cam—ail standard equip- 
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BY more like a car, Great for the 
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_ ure was 





"(14 THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1971 





————— 


Tee 











Lewis Promises No-Fault Auto Insurance Plan in 1972 


TORONTO. (CP) — Stephen 
‘Lewis, leader of the New Demo- 
cratic: Party, promised. Thurs- 
day to enact a no-fault public 
automobile insurance plan for 
Ontario in 1972 if his party as- 
sumes power after the Oct. 21 
provincial election. 

“This is a commitment the 
NDP: formally undertakes with 


three weeks remaining in: the - 


election campaign.” he told a 
lunch meeting of Toronto area 
candidates attended by Howard 
Pawley. Manitoba municipal af- 
fairs minister.” 


Nixon 
Reveals 
Costs 


LONDON, Ont. (CP) — The 
Literal party will spend be- 
tween $450,000 and “probably 
$750,000" over and above that 
spent by local riding associa- 
tions on the Ontario election 
campaign. party leader Robert 
Nixon said Thursday night. 

Mr. Nixon mentioned the fig-. 
ures on a local radio program 
and elaborated on them later in 
an interview. 

He agreed with a reporter's 
suggestion that the $750,000 fig- 
“a guesstimate.” He 
said he does not know the final 
figure because party fund rais- 
ers only started to solicit funds 
after the election was called. 

The New Democratic Party 

has said it will spend $628,000, 
but the Progressive Conserva- 
tives have not revealed their 
election spending. Published re- 
ports have estimated Tory 
Spending anywhere between $2 
million “and $6 million. 
” Mr. Nixon said his personal 
campaign in Brant will cost be- 
tween $5,000 and $7,500. of 
which he will pay about $2.500 
himself. 

The NDP's seven one-minute 
commrcials and a single 12- 
minute film cost $5.000. They 
were made by film-maker Alan 
King who said he donated his 
own time to the party. 

The Tories have also refused 
to divulge the cost of their ad- 
vertising. which intruded pn Mr. 
Nixon's eampaign Thursday. 


Davis Contends Liberal Opponent 


“We see it as a commitment 
to do something about the high 
cost of living.”’ Mr. Lewis said. 
The NDP plan would reduce 
premiums charged by Ontario's 
200 private carriers by 15 to 20 
per cent. Ontario’s new no-fault 
auto insurance program. intro- 
duced this year, covers enly 
personal injuries and death ben- 
efits. 

Mr. Lewis said the. NDP 
scheme would include no fault 
payment: of property damage 


_. Which would elithinate costly 


“delays in reaching accident set- 


tlements and help to’clear up a 
huge backlog of automobile liti- 
gation in the courts. : 

Mr. Pawley,.-invited to To- 
ronto by Mr. Lewis to explain 
Manitoba‘s no-fault plan, said 
the controversy over the plan in 
his province has died down to 
an “ideological dixcussion.”* 


Mr. Lewis said the Ontario 


NDP plan would be mandatory 
with policies sold with licence 
plates so that no Ontario driver 
would be on the road without 


Pca said surplus premium in- 


‘come under the plan would be 


reinvested a$ a means of reduc- 
ing fees, or increasing benefits. 
The plan also envisages a for- 
mula provide compensation 
to workers in the insurance in- 
dustry dislocated by the change. 
A transitional assistance board 
would be created to provide 
help in the form of loans or 
retraining. Many of those dislo- 
cated would be invited to accept 


premium income of private car- 
riers was more than $300 mil- 
lion in 1970. : 

Mr. Lewis said private insur- 
ance agencies would still be 
able to provide additional cover- 
age over the plan’s basic mini- 
mum. 

He charged the provincial 
government with. standing by 
while auto insurance premiums. 
which increased 83 per cent in 
the last 10 years, led the climb 
in the consumer price index. - 


tives reacted “unenthtisiastically 
to Mr. Lewis's proposal. 


Herb Baker, executive secre- “It's pretty difficult for bim tm. 
tary of the Ontario Insurance we statement.” sf 
Agents Association, said his F. Clifford Fraser, deputy re- ¥ 


group estimates that 10,000 em- 
ployees of insurance companies 


or about one-third of workers in_ 


the industry would be put out of 
work by the Lewis plan. * 


A spokesman for Liberty Mu" 


tual said Mr. Lewis did not say 
how motorists would be able to 
save 15 to 20 per cent on their 
policies. * 


“All the companies don"t 
charge the same rate,” be said. 


gional vice-president of State 
Farm Mutual Insurance; Co. 
said the plan would “phase oyt 
Car insurance package deals”, 
with the government going inte 
the car business itself. . 
A spokesman for Wawanessa 
Mutual Insurance Co. said the 
plan didn’t sound “very-practi- 


jobs under the plan. Surplus 








Automobile insurance execu- 


Great Deal to Look Into . 


Hydro Not Answerable: Nixon 


LONDON, Ont. (CP) 


needed to oversee the operation 
of Ontario Hydro, Liberal 
Leader Robert Nixon said 
Thursday, 

Campaigning for the Oct. 21 
Ontario election, Mr: Nixon told 
about 125 University of Western 
Ontario students that “there is 
a great deal to look into as far 


“as Hydro is concerned.” 


He said that there now is a 
government investigation into 
the operation of Hydro “and it 
is a very quict investigation in~ 
deed.” . 

He said the investigation by 
the government committee on 
productivity started after 
Health Minister A. B. R. Law 
rence complained that the inde- 
pendent commission which runs 
Hydro raised rates cight per 
cent without first consulting the 
cabine 

Mr.iNixon said that if he be 
came premier, be would retain 
the commission bit institute 
stricter government — controls 
over il. 

The department of the envi 
ronment “should have a great 
deal to say’ about. Hydro’s op 
eration. The Hydro commission 








— Tigh- responsible for 
ter‘ government controls are 


the role of government back- 
benchers,”" 

The Liberal leader also reiter- 
ated his pledge to reduce the 
size of the cabinet to 12 from 26 
because now “the lines of re 
sponsibility are unclear, out of 
focus or blurred.” 

He also said that if he formed 
a government, his ministers 
would not. be expected to be 
technocrats and experts. 

“My own view is that a doctor 
should net be minister of health 
and a teacher should not be 
minister of education.” 

He said that the government 
already has hired @,.000 civil 
servants who are experts. 

After leaving Ottawa, »where 
the Liberals hold one of the six 
urban seats, he flew to Brock- 
ville. another Conservative 
area. a 

The Liberals hold none of the 
four London arca seats and Mr. 
Nixon told the students “for 





¢ So 2 


) MONEY 
TALKS 


ist - qe or 3 3rd Migs. 


“downgrading 


many years this has been a 
Conservative stronghold and it 


_May continue so to be.”” 


At a stopover in Belleville. 
Mr. Nixon said on a radio show 


that Ontario farmers, more than . 


any other group, are dissatisfied 
with the Progressive Conserya- 
live government, 

The Liberal leader, a farmer 
himself, told a caller that 
present government policies on 
markcting controls do not go far 
enough to ensure proper retums 
for farmers. 












AUTOMOBILE SALES PERSON 


| WANTED 


7 
We have an opening“in our sales staff for 
@ person interested in a sales career with 
a large volume Chevrolet and Oldsmobile 
dealer. The applicant must like talking to 
people. be a self-starter and be interested 
n making more than ave: 
perience is not necessary, 
helpful. We will provide training, a dem- 
onstrator, salary and commission, plus the 
usual company benefits. 


cal.” 


He also'said the government 
should extend credit to farmers 
ina manner similar to the way 


the Ontario Development Corp. © 


makes loans to other industries. 
=i 


WINDSHIELD 
WIPER TROUBLE? 


szx 
Belleville Auto Electric 
Lid. 


4 Grier St. Baal 


income. Ex- 
ut would be 


would also come under the scru 


tiny .f a legislature standing 
comry$re, which would report 
\to'the house. 

The Liberal’ leader said he 


Ecology Battle 


Sable Island, a sandbar in the Atlantic 175 miles east of Halifax, 


direc 


BUSINESS 
LOANS 


62-7444 


7 = y dally ané 
weekends 


G. W. 


Terente Funds Now 
8G Vor This Area 


PRUE ™ 






Apply ‘in person 
DON WILLIAMS 


STIRLING MOTORS 






is in the middle of a world-wide ecology battle between dev yelopers and 
conservationists. Ecologists are worricu about possible damage to plant 
and animal life on the island due to oi! drilling. Sable Island ponies 
(boitom photo) still outnumber humans. 


also plans to make the private 
member more effective through 
freater use of legislature com 
mittees, and accused former 
premier John Robarts of being 








Sf} v 


United it Services 
™ rront’ ns Belleville 








STIRLING, ONT. 
Phone 962-8527 — 395-3352 

















Misleading Public ¢ on Schoo! Issue 


NAPANEE, Ont. (CP) — Pre- 
mier William Davis charged 
Thursday. night that Liberal 
Leader Robert Nixon is giving 
the public “factually incorrect” 
information about the issue of 
grants to separate schools. 

The premier noted that he 
had said at the outset of the 
campaign for the Oct. 21 provin- 
cial election that he did not 
want the question to become an 
election issue. 

“T find the government's posi- 
tion is not completely under- 
stood by everyone and it may, 
be necessary from time to time 
to clarify it.” Mr. Davis told a 
news conference aboard his 
campaign bus. 

Both Mr. Nixon and Stephen 
Lewis. leader of the New Demo- 
cratic Party, have rejected as 
unfair the premier’s recent de- 
cision not to extend government 
grants to Roman Catholic 
schools beyond the present cut- 
off point of Grade 10. Both 
would extend grants through 
Grade 13. z ° 

Mr. Davis said Mr. Nixon had 
indicated on more than one oc- 
casion “that it was under my 
administration as minister of 
education that Grades 9 and 10 
were acded to the separate 
school sysetm.”" 

“This is factually incorrect-- 
























he’s only 74 years out, dike it) schools. but whether they should The Liberal leeder was re 
was done in 1895." : be extended to private scheols ported as saying cr the gov- 

“And there's anot item The premier has «oid many ecrnment’s decisicn was an 
that perhaps will have to be ex- times that he does pot want to nounced last month. that the 





plained in greater detail.” Mr. 
Davis added. “And that i 
(Nixon's) suggestion, w 
deliberate or otherwise, that the 
&rant structure in 194 was al 
tered with special treatment for 
Grades 9 and 10. once again 
under my administration. 

“Once again this 
incorrect.” 

Mr. Davis noted that in.19H, 
while he ‘was education minis- 
ter, government grants to sepa- 
rate schools had been extended 
to Grade 10 from the old cut off 
point of Grade 8 

But Grades 1 through 10 had 
been part of the separate school 
system since 1895, while Grades 
11, 12 anti 13 were. and still are. 
part of the private system, he 
said. 

In extending grants in 1964 he 
had merely acted to give sepa 
rate schools a fair share of 
frant monies which they had 
been éntitled to under existing 
constitutional rights. 

He had not “added” Grades 9 
and 10 to the separate school 





is factually 





extend grants through Grade 13 
for two reasons 











#rent question would be a cam 


pugn issue 


First of all. if he met the de But Mr Nixon later denied 
mends of Roman Cy ic sepa having said this. and stressed 
rate school supporters in this that he agreed with the premicr 
regard, he would have to give) and Mr. Lewis that such an 





tching grants to other pri 
vate 
perochial schools or Upper Can 
ada College. This the province 
could not afford 

In addition, the premier has 
said that the extension of grants 
to private schools would lead to 
a fragmenting of the school <) < 


schools such as Jewish 





emo 






1 ques 
med to 


ton should not 
erfere with the 
issues of jobs and 





be a 
basic election 
the eccnomy 
Despite the attegues by all 
three party leaders to downplay 
the separate school question. it 
hes continued to pop up during 


the campaign - 
tem. when his go v ernment Mr. Nixon. particularly, has 
s integrated been asked about his party's 
educational system throughout- policy on scparate schools at al 


the province. 

The premier denied a sugges 
tion that he was making the 
“school questiGn a cam 





« time T made 

clear the pe v of the gi 

ment, I was.net go 

it an issue and Thy 

would not be an 
“Mr, Nixen in his nomination 

speech as T read his own press 








sysiom, nor was any “special. release which was issued from 

treatment” involved. he said. his effice - contained the 
The premier said the issue is phraseclogy where bh 

not ere cf whether grants suid it was an issue.” 


should be extended to separate 





mier added, 


most all bis campaign stops 
Premier Davis faced a dem- 
onstration by 600 Roman Catho- 
he high school students in Wel- 
land last Friday. On Wednes 
day. curing a swing through 
several Northern Ontario com- 
s. a busload of separate 
orters _tonsed wi s 









Let your heart choose 
the new car you want. — 


Let your head choose 





No matter how old you are or how 


you don’t. 


the best way to pay for it. 


&\ 
‘ have to put up your valued savings, ~ 
your ste ineaearicn ora chattel 
mortgage as collateral for 
We don’t think you should have to 
go through all that. So, with IAC, 


loan: 


By not borrowing your sources of 
borrowing power remain 
important. In fact, if later on you need 
a loan, we can arrange that for you, too. 

We include life insurance at no 
extra cost to you. On top of that, you 
can enjoy the peace of mind of our 
Payment Protector Plan. This means 
we'll continue to make yourcar 
payments for you if you have an 
accident or illness and can’t work. 

Think of this before you decide: 


open. That's 


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“STIRLING MOTORS 


STIRLING, ONT. 
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many cars you've bought, 


car is exciting 


, buying anew 
And alittle complicated. ce 


you decide to buy it through IAC. 
The IAC system makes it convenierit 
for you. You wrap up the whole deal 


right at the car dealership. 


With IAC, you give only your 
deposit as security. Your car stands on 
its own financial feet. But when you 
borrow the money, you es find you 


chances are the very man ete buy your 
new Car from is financing his entire 
inventory of cars through an IAC 
system. Doesn’t that mean it must be 
the most convenient, safest and most 
sensible way for you to buy? 

When you buy, pick whatever car 
your heart desires. But when you come 
to pay for it, use your head, ask your | , 
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THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1971; 
SSS 


aniWISHING.. 
“ ‘UF % = 8 8 
_" - = - that you could Sell your car, Rent an apartment, Find a home in 

-—* the country, Hire a housekeeper, etc. — IT'S EASY WHEN YOU — 





. For Fast-Action! Call 962-9171 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE. 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


LIBERAL 


Your friends will certainly tell 
you, that you were very broad 
minded when you invested your 
hard earned money into this 
quality built home by Gajdicar. 
Hollywood type ‘kitchen wi 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



























~*~ 









MAURICE HK. 


ROLLINS 


CONSTRUCTION LIMITED 


mA Gallery of Homes 


135 ACRES — Just south of Belleville on well travelled county 
read. About 1,000 ft. on each side of paved road #nd 1,000 ft. on 
’ pod ptr road. And, access to the Ray of Quinte. Ideal for 

S wERTUY, , planned cattle, or, you name it. ONLY $11,900.00 with terms. Call 
- Duplex - East Hill ied lt BEBE |Fooms, finished rec room with | Bob Brennan today at 968-4571. - 





REAL ESTATE LUMITE 
\ REALTOR . 





» Solid brick and well-locatedt on Quien Street — a lovely 3-bed-| with attached garage. Lower asking only S31 Sha hates ‘ 

prom home for: the owner anda nice Zbedronm sell-contained Vlevel bas 20° living, room.. sep: eR CONSERVATIVE Saela Soret fruity bom wah (replace rovioex Invi enielale 
¢ ood tenant. Call us now fo; S. ‘ Ww : : 7 : < ; ‘2 ‘ 
apartment with a fg ir iate Loe tay teow ry asieg 4 ment area. Format dining room, equipped kitchen, park-like Jot 







Are you conservative when it | !00° x 200° Call Edith Therrien.963 4571. 


° and last but pot least — 4 den. 
: There is 2-piece wasbroom YOU CAN TELL YOUR Hane torbeyia hometit = eae rege 
West Moira close by. Second floor has 4 bed- BESf FRIENDS __ | §gies time to buy: 2 home! —| EAST BELLEVILLE — Custom.bniit brick and stone bunzalow. 






ri ~,,| Large living room with fireplace, separate dining room, spacious 
ciate the value in this attractive A a ee 
avout this one and they'll loN@ vou for it. This is x rare oppor: | two bedroom bungalow, located | master bedroom. finished rec room. Nicely lundscaped and fenced 
tunity to buy thus spacious four bedroom home on Stantey Park br 2 quiet cul-de-sac. scensets lot. Cali Joe Lee 966-4571. 
Drive. Living room with fireplace. dining room, roomy kitchen |dining room, spacious living | neveL_OpMENT OPPORTUNITY — ¢0 ; 
= Lt ‘ : > : : > ,. } _ acre parcel with excel- 
with cating area, two bedrooms up with 4 pe. bath, two bed- thet inadecepias ae eyed lent 4 bedroom house — all conveniences, plus 2 commercial 


ag _. |rooms and bath. Master bed- 
© A good brick bungalow — 3 bedrooms — a nice little home with | room is 15° Jong. There is a full 


“lawn and garden — paved drive. length covered porch on the out- 
en ene a, side. Mortgage is at 844%. 
















} = as ats rooms down with 2 pe. bath, panelled family room with bar. |° . é evi 
, Move Right In Lert a walk out from laundry room, zttached garage. beautiful grounds | 98 only $13,900. pare, and actin house. E ber phe acreage, Cal E Don 
BS 5 4 i . ZAS “ae with mature trees - - - Below reproduction custs at £5.60v.00, 3 % + - esis . 3 
A nice 4bedroom brick home‘on the West Hil — (16 sears of LOCATIONS Immediate possession. NDP. MacDermaid ‘for details at 968-4571. 


age) — a well-kept family home with an extra 2 pc. bath and 


full bascment. Just a phone call and we have the particulars, COUNTRY DELIGHT — 3 bedroom bungalow featuring carpet 


throughout and small barn situated or « | acre lot. Handy to 
town. ASKING $17,000.00. Call Jim Bailey %84571, 


We are now opening up a lim- 
ited number of building sites in 
the Victoria Avenue area. As 


ss |No decorating problem here! 
RIVER FRONTAGE }When you move into this en- 

r 3 {chanting different home located 
Ciose ts down-town Eelievlle., five. bedrooms. 143 bathrooms. ‘on a lovely landscaped lot, and 












i they are few in number you 
: Duplex - Bleecker Ave. should act quickly. All services| {iyitig room with fireplace, builtin boox shelves in den. Modern | just _a step tothe East end ; 968-4571. ) 
a) i rty in Older East Hill area <- buy this home Sep ice: We jacladed kitchen with ealing area. dining room, finished family room, | shopping plaza. Three good size : ae 
and let the apartment carry most of the eapenses oer le ail financing for you. Select | detached garage on a lot 217 feet steep. Only $25.00.00. emcee nen fire- . 
= re our plan or one of your own. << : Leslie deren peas 
231 Front Street ‘ . jport and asking only $29,950. |, 
os ROOM TO MOVF AROUND F 
962-4528 WEST SIDE In this three bedroom brick bungalow on Palmer Road. 118 foot °968-5757 : ; 















REALTOR 
175 North Front Street — Open Until 9 pm. 


We have under construction a 


lot with mature inccs, living room with fireplace, spacious J E 
variety of models on Thorncliffe . 


kitchen with cating area, 3 spacious Yedreems, 1'2 bathrooms 
Drive, a new section of West| Breezeway and atiached double ear garage. Full large base- 
Park Village. Two of these are| nent, only $34.600.00. Early possession. 


* 
sen model appearing for the| scat haces McKinney 
LTD 


Open Evenings ‘Til 9 p.m. 


DOUG BOULTON & WM. OLIVER 
908-5896 


call? You can select all your 
own colors and finshes. 


reat EAT MTTCO re BARRY“FORCHUK sili 








139 FRONT ST. 


























962-9248 Member Of The Bellevitie 
im ROLL . REAL ESTATE LTD. 32 DUNDAS ST. EAST ope o-entnens 
“REALTOR" ‘ile. On : A LARGER FAMILY 
I pea «pk Frm Sa pera Spey eas 
CONSTRUCTION LIMITED | Trenton R? Division St. 302 aR FARM HUNTING? Savous,, Nepees rin thar commry whore 
Sales Office — 9685995 | ———_$_$_$__ > >.__———— 487 Dundas St, West Well you should see this | $133200 ‘mais. for comfortable 
a . E, Ss ae Victoria Ave. - | a 3 BEDROOM BELLEVILLE, Ontario | solid brick home on 117 | 2 natn Reis modernised Kiehens 
keland Gas — Nature's Wonderfeul RAND NEW BUNGALOW C ing ¢ -_, | Pareall ving room and dining 
oe, ‘Assihethe’ A'tee ‘easia. ‘Point mnet $3 EAST SIDE acres of rolling country-| room, “Auached sarsse. are lores 
HAIL y stete | ‘ | Dining Parga ‘living room, kit- | $2500. down. Well looked after oh e. The land rental ers very thing i Gp. tp singe, 
nal A ¢ |ehen, ful asement, (stone home. 3 bedrooms. Living room, |“1€ expenses, over 

B, 'MITEO* REALTO Bet own scr Hae house) {Dining room. Spacious kitchen. acres under cultivation, 38 ACRE FARM 
Oy | Point it Pagsia *tarce kitchen, | Coniact; J. GALLOS j4-picce bath. Full basement.’ Buy now, move later, SUI! with § bedenom farm home. Large 
CUSTOM BUILT HOMES, for less than $20,000. and | tiving and dining area plus} ORK sacar nneesaredl ea Scobel Jing area. Starting price | Kitehen, ¢-piece bain and forced air 
‘only $2,000 down. InveStigate the low taxes, large lots | gazezaneearey three bedrooms for only $9.00 | “Seinen seine $25,000. | litge tivang room. Good tars 

and only.5 minutes from’downtown. + araige deans | Evenings: | on! NEAR NORTH FRONT —— 
psutton fat : Lena Stewart — 968-4231 eiurons To 4 Sree <4 etek PANORAMIC. VIEW A GOOD BYE 
SS: inv ri 2) oe eR eee on the tENTON {Asking $20,000. Duplex rick a soe 4 ; 

YOUR OWN BOSS: An eee rin a home, * lovely Bay of Quinte. 160 feet 962-8649 f jhome. 2 bedroom apartments. of Abe: (Bay. “Of Ouinte- eae ee ee ere 
unit motel with living quarter, al! year around |on the Bay and 660 fect deep. Duplex — East Side ‘hive in one and the other to ity UNC Ee. evenusan onlieg eee 


carry mortgages. Toni Hollings- Beautifully treed slope, 8e@- | me modern Bichon, separate dining 
' cluded setting, 32. acres, | S04 Pull basrment_— and t's @ 

4 ~ good buy for you. Take a look. 
some workable, Full price} 


1 $12,000, « OFFICE: 068-6472 


Call for further details. 






income, chattels are included for $65,000. 


| MY le . _ 
é Good Revenue i. 962.9104 or 968-8315. 


Owner Will Elold Mortgage | EAST SIDE 














2 BEDROOM HOMES. ARE SCARCE, But we have $24,500.00 














n lucky encugh to find one with a low down pay- i i 247 V2 Frent Stree 68-5654 '$2.500 down, 2 storey home. 2 
ment and priced at only $14,900.00. Call today. Troipectate spostession of tales OF | self-contained apartments. Total — PRP onion Nees 
mT H . : “toe \—— _ rent. co. pro- SALT p ye > a ae 
For further details on these and other listings, contact | quiet neighborhood. Very de ce aay Sattar: oaeaeen oe OLD COUNTRY HOME |20nN LAZENEY Sea aan cane 





1 sh acai a bedroom ie fees by irieet sice-| [DAILY CROSSWORD .. cy % 4 rower] [22 |Solid barn on 73. acres in| Ab ROBES Ne ccs 
% 330 FRONT STREET. ly landscaped and tastefully ss PRINCE EDWARD Prince Edward County, A|GO20N Woops ~_ 962. 


Open Evenings "Til 9 p.m. decorated: | Separate. caine ACROSS «47 Animal hardier «——_Vesterday’s Puzzle Solved: | COUNTY typical handyman special, IMMEDIATE 


















































|room. Taxes under $500.00. Give 
* . A ; ” 49 Airport code | $32,500. 30 acres. 5 bedroom Open to offers, Sapam) . 
“Growth Through Service Since 1913 us a call to inspect. Pigahce Fa tiises [brick home. Divided into. 2 ous. POSSESSION 
lang» | apartments — one rented. Ex- gp * 4 BEDROOMS. 2 bathrooms la 
A WINTERIZED HOME | ggtneate cttny [cellent pronery for hobby farm:| | MAIRLBANK ARE. | chen. beapd ew 2 wore) bei 
er. Mabel Kleinsteu . Bove 2 
You would be proud to own. outdoor party $2 Slangy negative or 393-2164 (100 acres of vacant Jand!3 pxproos, back spit with 2 
For your year round living,| 10 Dear: italian 53 Cereal grass | - c with spring, a real retreat.) Patimome Large family room. 
an attractive well built winter-| 14 Ammonia $4 Small: Scot. | HAY BAY . 136,500. with 10'. down. special model home with: wear ¥ 
ized cotaRe 7 the heart of compound: 57 Recent pcs? Fully furnished and = ° . Exiras See ut, buy it and live a 
° op vacation Jand. Electrically heat- Comb. for lopment terized, 2 room cottage. Roy | +0 ky VE "lie Ld 
ar ae Sane S cd Fireplace. Good: fishing. | 15 Peis _ eee Jordan, ¥2-910 or 322-1790, (ON Duty: Rocky Van Vilet |3 ROOM BUNGALOW. Extra ‘taree 
swimming. duck hunting, ski- toni = . Nehen, Dg living room’ and din- 
ELLE’ z E riage ng boat $9 Having 487 DUNDAS ST. W. 962-9248 | ing room. Charmingly decorated, 
i ced deal g dooing. Siverus 2 call. 16 Danish ascended WESTGATE PLAZA E ‘ ie serena Rector 
POSSESSIO? measure of 61 Instruction to 1011971 . Open Evenings ‘Til 9 p.m. - 2 
962-3418 ines wageey BELLEVILLE WE ARE AVAILABLE ANYTIME 
Owner transferred and ‘moving 612° MORTGAGE 3 oe Hoa ee ; 38 sea Direct Toronto Line - 
111 Dundas St. East this weekend. This 3 bedroom | y > > ine of the words ondition o Silkworm : 34-293 ° 
TRENTON split level is uocated ina prime pet tee many oC tebe —- Leeward 64 Attracts ‘c Hip 39 — 99 364-3931 | son 
S244 East side area. rge kitchen. | schools and shopping. Large Islands 67 Preposition ody of 4] Newcomer to ; 
DESERONTO separate dining room, bright} ¢amily room. separate dining | 19 Employee of 68 Where the land society: : 
396-2437 living oP the poy? bath aoe room. Attached garage. Carries Congress * trains come in: 11 Franciscan Informal Real Estate Broker 
tise beautifully” adeeapel for only $148.00 a month. A real} 20 Part of ure 2 words mission in 43 Porteay FOLLWELL Y6S1100 
LOW INCOME FAMILY 7 | bargain today. Call us to in- body 70 Terrace: Abbr. Texas 46 Musical _ 80-2 
Y a ome. Call now for more de-| spect, 21 Astronaut TL Hall: Prefig 12 Belonging to composition Irv Wear Fe Sat OTT 
‘ map iagen ae hay A ne 23 Golfer's 72 Irregutarly aking 48 Change the = PRICE rt ae TO $34,500. 
jouse 000. Saaw , : problem marked 13 Continously: contour of SELL This b ig i ; 
Ear fa Spor mod courtay | TARO RE eFag | wes: athena USE Sates, | anor eae | Me ae nm in 
— Large 2 storey brick home lo Abbr. 74 — the Red 18 Did certain irst molars s ve living for sume. terse living js Jocated on Front St. in down- 
CRAMPED 'N CROWDED? | Cate 0 2 acres. Here is your SEES 2 Ancient 75 Equip witha art work 4 States of DIAL 968-64i1 Tear dune area bitchen very moo. jtown Belleville. It has a poten: 
sey siete noel a the growing saralt 27 Obtained ulent 22 Gang itation BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO pedigree itty meorketegs “mal Fey monthly income of $500. 
| Enjoy easy, living, open air, at} Fleaty of room for a pony lor 29 Radio- 24 Musical 55 ftiekel alloy Brokers ® MS ENE Seed bedrooms, | FOF further information please 
~)igais country home only 15 min-|the kids or to try out that new | . 4 frequency DORN key 56 Prefix used The Oldest Name In Real |i sods pace bath.” fail basetnea! | on 
north atest of Belleville on |S20wmobile next winter. Taxes Onn bands: Abbr. 27 Outdoor game with physics E in Bellevill with Grepace, In finished, ree: room. call — LARRY LAMBLE, c/o 
ej . a 4 " * . =s NY 21 rage, lacge ty land- Olauy eo 
ee hway No. 14. 4 bedroom tows Lge ac lar i mh 314 FRONT STREET 31 Snakelike fish 1 Door posts 28 Evangelist— $8 Opposite me tial teaped jot 60 x 376 tany trees aed VICTORIA & GREY 
pane some Tec room 42 x 24, lot immediate possession. OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL & PM | .33 Gold: Sp. 2 Roman god Roberts 60 Have dinner $19.900, — Bungalow — Park- retry tore an: Soro se ue Baprett; TRUST 
aol aoe 34 Conceming 3 Vintner's 30 Lake in the at home: dale area call we have the key. 68-4417 
—- > gets <3 letter: establishment: Armenian 2 words . : Soares Siew 
LOT ON CENTRE ST. your T ($19,900. — Two storey — family 
HAVE YOU SEEN? Bee ire as caus ; pI AIL ‘a <sile Rites ed . ie 4 home with double lot. COUNTRY LIVING -—— | 7" z 
ize 46° x 108° with city water, fe janer: Anat. inferi artiaily: $00. — Brick b = LES FR wry LOTS F 
Belleville’s sub-division of new | priced to sell at $3,200.00. 40 Cooking 5 Group of quality Prefix oe i Pari poeace 4 MILES FROM CITY ier OR SALE 
. homes where you have 18 houses ‘all: AL CARKNE ingredient documents oa 35 Sea: Part 65 Con—-: With How about this one year old brick pas 
* to choose from, most of them| Call: AL CARKNER F - | Qr a subject clitheledian. movement $24,000. — Bungalow — paved bungaiow. living room 13 ¥ 20. @in- | APPROVED building lot. 210° x 300 
ready.to move in for only $2,000 Copperfield" 6 In order to Ocean 66 Winter ground drive — garage — three bed-| paronma with double cupboards. 4 | errno Nott Of Belleville sotom 
4, down. 44 Used to be have 37 Cantaloupe cover eas farce ole pik Ls a SEEM. 
ice nd Is = REAL ESTATE 45 The Navy 7 Grain spikes . Skin: 2words 69 Thus $24,500. — Brick bungalow —}taundry room 13 x 23. finished ree HELP WANTED ' 
trees and annuals enhance . - bs : country setting. room 13 x 26 taxes $253.09. Owner 


}@nxious to stil make action desk 












































this 80 x 236 exquisite lot, with 
@ circular drive: The best is Weller’s Bay Lot Realtor “See a Charsaiag sand rts you could be lucky. Sp ART TI E 
“yet to be’seen inside this brick ellers Bay Lols IST KF me — choice East Hull loca- a fe a 
¢ low located on Avondale Y “ bila eta as a E I i e ora. 
Road. Retirement in style for $12,500. Evenings Call: SFOLLWELL) nteresting and remuyera- 
< Sandy Beach Se Full police lor $12,500. KAY? OM nGn? Ipc sce. 4090 tive. Completing insurance 
= Gea: y Z Z > Th reports in your area. 1-2 
ANOTHER COUNTRY Bes Shee PHIL RAY occas 968-4789 REALTOR Resin 
NOME Wooded Sherr egret OF NORA KINCAID... 968-9269 400 Front Street hours dally. 
oe s § _. GARDIFF TED SAUNDERS <. 962-1126] _- - Reply To 
3 bedrooms with dining room| Complete with roads, hydro and’, parooms, large livin LES LENNOX ..... 962180] PHONE 968-6795 ; 
x Pers 8 ig room, BOX A-10 
to match the living room. Brick | telephone from .. . e 
» #@ad angelstone built by one of dining room, 3-pe. bath. Full ED HAGERMAN ...._ 968-6411 LR RANGER 
4 e's better builders $1895. and up oe. pokey rescuer bet Ex = Set ode, SHIVATES RAL IE INTELLIGENCER 
3 5. Dow quiet ‘area-i Close to Church ‘and |. Fay 5 — PRIVATE — — ATE SALE — | 2” : * S303: 
RaNW AS $195. Down = a yes bs * vs 
eee cow | $0. MONTHLY |’ hunting. Call Sobftrl, Pat Hat Bane ee ee CXECUTIVE HOME — | 'RED an eae at cn | SALES REPRESENTATIVE 
NVESTMENT INCOME 30. MOD loran, home 962-5579, HHREEY HEREBY AEee _ *DROOM CLAY BRICK) required for a local Canadian 
Complete! ted. this 3 Highway 33. 4 miles south of ey 3 — — = ¢ Immediate Occupancy — 4 BU NGALOW Company. Applicants. should be 
Suite apartment reauires  ualy | Trenton to Carrying Place, turn 3 mae | | ea | Ree TL Excellent Location’ ~ [@n East End Crescent,|mature ard willing to accept 
$10,000, ‘down for s 15% return, right at County Road 26, follow TOP END OF +> =t+}st —- Family a =: aa Level [close to Y, schools plaza, ; supervision. Must be a resident 
000. % f a é FRY REI i . = 5: a . 
‘ é : 0 [REPRESENTATIVE ON SITE ’ HUMEWOOD “ iti “Hoe aaeae ey * fae wood ‘“llcher = and churches, Two com: for 5 ‘Give: Salary? plusyiex 
eee oat tee mee igs PEPER TEEE Hollywond Kitchen {plete baths. Completely fin- | Peses- Give resume to 
Signs On Property Full price $16,500. Taxes ap- eee ms ished laundry room, rec 2 bah SL a 
CALL S| atten er tacts eal mL fe tecdseheclcd can] 4 fe gatcreme [ote eed play ares Riel |e ec neers 
Or Phone ootingtateacina batge pepe os s Attached Garage landscaped. Fenced — yard,! RELIABLE person to come into my 
“ ag: Many Extras ved driv ie home ¢ to 5 days weekly, one week 
and a 3rd bedroom or dining sce ™t To Ai jate“It:..|Pake ve, . in three from 3 to 6 pm. vet-cota, 
-QUINTE SHORES room. This: is a clean, well TT be ==, erboreee Owner Moving REA INT) 
ae /\mainiained house. One you! Gane: 2BBe WRITE BOX A31 Reply To Box A-50 | LEAD. vocat required for ets 
‘ Toronto 922-93. would be proud ‘to own. Call - THE INTELLIGENCER The Intelligence: binhed band. Must be versatile and 
° : . j-21|Pat Halloran 968-7777, | Z a : pas] he Intelligencer ony Pay instrument, SHEE atten 6 


Y a 





















\Y8 THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, , OCTOBER Lim | ; = : : 2 
FOR SALE. [ -FOR SALE FOR SALE 


> ~ — 
—Orey Nylon Tug 10 x15, plus Before Cold Weather re t 


Movie! Camera Comes - - - : ; 
~Single Purple Bedepreed rt Drapes “Replace Those STARTING 


meer BG Carburetor : iinet Naan TUESD AY 


—Tent Heater —Car Radio PENNVERNON 
~Pumo Shotgun WINDOW GLASS ocr es 








~ HELP WANTED _ | HELP.WANTED ACCOMMODATION. WTD. TRAILERS FOR RENT ; 














TRUCK AND CAMPER 

FOR RENT WEEKLY 
OR WEEKENDS : 
Camper fully self-contained with 


stove, oven, refrigerator, toilet, 
and furnace. 


TRUCK & FARM SUPPLY 





























































































































































































































—Duncen Phyte Table Z . THE INTELLIENCER’ FG ( 
Good for someone NATIONAL LEASE —Child's Borg Coat size 6 @ Don't walt for zero weather . S. "6S ‘PLYMOUTH 2door hard — 
led in second 123 Church St. Belleville |—Brownte Uniform, size & to catch you mapceparedt —| + WANT top, V-8, automatic, r 
‘ Peer LA. or C.G.A. Cs —Gulde Unitorm size 1¢ Replace your broken window Be Lic, T6251A. i ..0s003.0.-, $695. 
Telephone for appointment CALL oezsias + [PIES OO cw Glass, We ’ AD. "66: PONTIAC -V'6, “automatics 
* MR. ZIEMAN can supply you promptly ¥ j 4-door sedan. Lic. 11612K $ 
Ideal Venders Division Of = FOR SALE AYTER 6 Pt. : BARGAIN 
Eddy Match Co. Ltd. =< : 
Deseronto, Ont. — 396-2316 . ‘ BEAR WEEK A EVELLE ‘ 
S23 66 CH 
owom teh ernie aeei| HUNTER'S SPECIAL FRONT END door hard top, VS, automatic 
HUSBAND AND WIFE ; YOUNG vere Sounle heya ALIGNMENT a 6 3 Lic, 95128A 2.2.2.2... $995. 
required 473-220 after @pm. | BEHAL|  SPECIAL oo eee eee ee avons * 
MANAGEMENT ‘pomTioN = £3 SPECIAL seevcrereteey: $8.95 “ptandard. Lies BORSA ie 
ee REAL ESTATE WANTED Most Popular Cars - 329 CHURCH ST. INSERTIONS OF A — SPECIAL — ~ 
INCOMES $900.00 © 9000.00 Fee Month/ PART-TIME CARETAKER —Beretta over & under and suto- WESTERN , 962-2584. ~~ QUICK ACTION "6S CORVAIR Monza with & 
prey, matic shotguns, cs... 30% OFF : 
DUTIES: To do a Jeb, at_mansge FOR CHURCH SOMEBODY WANTS : AUTO CENTRE S26-4t WORD-AD FOR speed transmission, radio, 2- 
ea devel: Nox seteng re} Please forward full details YOUR HOME. 4 SPECIAL 21.52. ssecenseee $129.50 | Belleville’ Plaza - — 962-8609 THE PRICE dr. hardtop. Lic. 720G2A. $695. 
Qualifications and Gs SuSE OPEN TONIGHT ‘TIL 9 P.M. OF ‘ 398-7922 
Two References To |G em mio ses fm them | fetes os Be Be me inser} WILLIAM BICFORD | nie 
THE INTELLIGENCER _ |@ acvectnng, that “Sitrects atton-|—caradion Centennial Ri yan BR Zeck bes i 3 bie Coe onl} 
4 526-St} en to .your home. SPECIAL’ ........ ALUMINIUM ——— 
STEWART'S INTERNATIONAL Saloemarship that enables us to and REPAIRS 
po. BOX 3 THE FOUR SEASONS | |“! snd clowe the Geet. atet eosin (Free Estimates) ; Word Ads, Caly : ! 
PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO. | HOTEL wil help ‘the buyer finance. W. MANN SIDING SALES SORRY No Commercial Ads ‘ilton S 
requires Tor assistance plesse call — TO MENTION %M LINTON PARE RD Or Semi-Displays 
A GARDENER GORDON Woops KELLY’S “962-6077 : RR. 2, Brighton BUY — RENT — SELL Car Centre 








CHARTERED = |Apply to: 


REAL ESTATE ybev-ft? |W. have aluminum installers in} IN THE CLASSIFIED 





128 Front St. — Belleville 


SPORT SHOP. 






















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































MR. PARKER the Ameliasburg area on the 
+68 GRAND OPENING . 2-229 
BANK REQUIRES | FOUR SEASONS HOTEL | arama noms] MS NORTH FRONT | Sctouen iat Grady [Set Cena? erre| The Intelligencer’s ee 
le w AN 
Beitevitlo ‘area, 109 “acres “or Detter HOMECRAFT SHOP — |before Br creators phos for DAT Gae Gia LOT MORE CARS ARRIVED 
CLERK \ ply, must bea reasonable, 1-416-291- Cannifton a free estimate aN an IAG COME SEE AND YOU'LL BUY 
EMPLOYMENT WANTED | e233 attee © S2*I3| oe pam Dedls eos cseceeeeses All Types Homemade Articles Or | 1906 Fairlane 500 convert 
PIST : FOR RENT —Suee Lamp, complete with For Perna ince Call 475-0521 Collect Z aan Lic. 141627, Gleaming red; 
TY . : z 
BOOKKEEPING- 3h Ineh Padded Mead Boord Rio Arie "W te seq [And Deal Directly With The SNOW VEHICLES p.s.. radio, sharp. 
Apply In Person '. ACCOUNTING ; . 2 Te als Gibran ees On Gonslenmment: Basia os : Contractor And Save . FULL PRICE ONLY. +» $990, 
BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA) Mt 7tm, So'sean expeninee in CARPETED HOME Camas iets, utene PER, The Salesman's Commission SEE THE- +). | MUSTANG hard top,: Lic. 
aes WORST part part time, 20 years expertence im alt]: CARPETED HOME = | cdtaverteky .0.2<:esssssteeses —Honkcme Bed,’ Springs and oan aiekes aARiTeS ; popes V-8, Urs p.b., radio, 
Belleville, Ontario Si feson Belo an Sone cy Absismers ood’ fe wre of “Country es a ots 1972 ARCTIC CATS FULL PRICE et 
. area. ’ eo -e | eee - by 
St4t] — REASONABLE ae oaly please. 39. LYNX — CHEETA] — PUMA| 1965 CYCLONE hard top, 
TELEPHONE 473-0500 WRITE BOX A-l One yout old. Telephone 962-0590 ]_Othee Books from ..-...-060++ Ze GRIFFIN'S PANTHER Lic. No. 983-892, V- tn, vay 
SALES TRAINEE 7 ——=| mH INTELLIGENCER Ta cae her Ie ee ee = TODAY automatic, ; Tadic. 
rf Wek : | 3 962-5996 GUNS and SPORTS 
OO Ot | phone 968-9000," | S00-3t ; UNS ar Ww : 
oe imairiusk etn petting ex= | R FING THREE BEDROOM HOME | RELVINATOR = refrigerator $30. aphen ———_—_ + 180 N, Front St., Belleville “ ‘Seectoa: Pram : 
Wat Br peomsted oak fe $16.50 Per Square And Up Gar Beat Offor,” POd-TOO. $20-3 FURNITURE BARN (Park Plaza) — 962-8888 SNOWMOBILE cLotuing | 28, OLDS Dynamic ve hes 
oa ‘take reaponsibility. Bathroom upstairs and ‘down, |rmic #5. cei> $15 high h chat? fi6. LOW OVERHEAD } s . “9. 
Sere tied See see |EAVESTROUGHING [Bah hatte dau: EREAE HS MEY GES tor mer eer ot Ge, | Fetune Ta Large sine of| DOUULE TRAILERS and | pb fad, coer pre | 
tion. Salary expernes. monthly Nabi OAK tiled floor and panelled walls, |36~ CONTINENTAL bed. very good Combination Bedroom Suites RELOADING EQUIPMENT lites = family ear or for * fook- i 
DON an a inode supplied, 62-7657 ay [Paved driveway, good garage, jconsiven 1 eerIé OFS) piacite Suites and. Htundreas of ‘and COMPONENTS — Now DE sroce ing for comfort and trouble | 
Toe scxndentist interview call 20 miles north of Belleville, FOR SALE Gaabie ees nadie In Eastern Ontario NO DOWN PAYMENT _free motoring, yet ; 
Se ene aas teldipet woman requires 473-2269 Madoc COME — SEE US Mon, to Fri. 9 A‘M. tog P.M.| Up To 96 Months To Pay FULL PRICE ONLY .. $990. 
92-3737 cg 5 GAY, OMY See OM BELLEVILLE, FURNITURE Saturday 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. You Know You 1965 BUICK Skylark, “Special” 
= - dd AUCTION BARN AgtB-everm-weL-NS coach, automatic, white walls, 
—_——_ I RURSE wit “ake [care of, sidesiy BRADLEY ‘ 2Na0 DUNDAS ST. aris Can Count On The Cat radio, economical to operate, 
AMBULANCE DISPATCH | Reply to Box A-47 The sotelllpences: CONSTRUCTION irc e —— rrig. ILD. Ronge Chestertictd share appearance 
= 1D. = ertic - 
OPERATOR — Part Time | cosposrssunroung. Tinereys Complete Plumbing 1 Model 209 Combine, 10-foot | and Chair —- Hocker — Bathtub FULL PRICE ONLY .." $790. 
Sats te 8 pert time reliet position ie weve = were. | Tile Bed and Trenching ANNEX wee cutnar ot tare, | Pak Samm? — Pine Fong othe Ml IN / ies PLYMOUTH Eury 1 2-door | 
yuccessful candidate will be | - ant laia a A - las an eater — atl Mirrors lan, Lic. N92959, auto- 
_ fetalred to work on ail 3 shift On Forde. hauling, 962-1988 260 COLEMAN > eit Wan ieee pI ag cr tel yee Aten matic. Low mileage. ; 
Bee whlch ike will be necewary | wena, rublny have worn truck, Jetatt cotanee. =3Furrowe International Pows 10°| Rutt Cours — Aluminum Door’ and | SPORTS AND MUSIC | FULL PRICE ...... $1 
to write and obtain a Restricted | 962-3062. S20-St Lise pada re Ou Stove on CENTRE 1966 CHEVELLE Wi , 
Hiadio Operator's Licence. anne 3 BEDROOM lower apartment, sep 19" COLOR TV —1 Tandem Disc, new. 4 ‘oe! * 5B CHE Station Wagoa 
‘Appointment’ may be made by | ODD JOBS — carpentry + painting. . oN RY Many Other Household Items at s Lic. 28831. Vv: .S., p.d. 
Teteghoning ‘Shas iacee tee room, situased Nigh: Slide Controls Fa ger "maise Aters | at CANNIFTON RD. ae ey en eae 
MRS. H. FRASER |way 30 44 mules from Beticvitis or] Latest Solid State Circuits ys sms EEE Ri Belleville pears , f 
a — raya EN UaAe Geter] ONLY $200.08 wi. | rear a ng te wpe mere APPLES ss choose FROM. eam 
968-5511 ace BABYSITTING 2 25" COLOR TV Rroeram Gerald“ doycet ineuranes MAC'S . HAND-PICKED SEE and $AVE Prices from $150. to $2,000. | 
- sencies mk 'Dargaen Price While They Last) * 
Main S Famous Make eS _ Apa °50 Per Bus Terms With Xo $ $ $ Down 
if : wit ted, 392-72: : aa $2.50 Per Bushel 
LAB TECHNICIAN — | REVARLE guter rat "atetienced | or doattess Ba Limited Supply SAND (Fill. crowed gravel and! Brine Your Own Containers SKI-DOO '72 Open Daily 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
individual ‘posses- ibe, parang References ti | P PARK DALE COMMUNITY. MALL ONLY $499.50 w.t. Phone 477- Tvl Thurlow. Apontt LEEMAN'S Service Is Ou 3 nes PHONE. 962.2222 
a chemical technologist’s aa (teeter eae sa phone WELL DRILLING, water witching. |, y . ee atten x S ue Dee ll oanse 
ena or having related ex- | home. Ree pea vinsge, waeases | oeb-aTes vw] 26" BLACK MATRIX Peron Mare Ml nag Se mais a bee het "71 MODELS STILIZ — |—Body portable jack 
experience required for Quality {. _______. S20 BARK DALE Comm: : PICTURE TUBE 2050, Gd- TUS pemeoieas 77E {eee — AVAILABLE —Custom Model T frame 
Assurance Laboratory in local WOULD mind or board child under | rent. Monday, thru Saturday. { Automatic fine tuning, WATER WELL Grilling for extimates |—!S-foot boat wath coveerd deck Good Selection Of —Custom traction bars 
oil inoeairy. Abi, 6 oom S companion for 4 sear old eich. ones and rates. PI sok ant Automatic Tint Control and reasonable rote Dial Sanse and tsdehietd | 23 Rp. motor, Used Machines —'39 Chev Sedan | 
with eae em a aefinite safe | ROOM TO RENT. CLOSE TO DOWN- Lo Wood ee abinet : SERIES Se tes aC aie ‘oe Se —2 Model T Coupe bodies q 
Good starting salary with ex- WANTED woot. Fophone serosa” Sabie Sento we. rONTIAG 2 Gee gs sch i | —izenure pamy ebot gun with ‘ib VERMILYEA —2 Front fenders, ‘27 T. Ford | 
ts. - - —_—- - nears ane ft. cedar strip beat, 40 hp. Evinrude end poly choke $0. 
cellent fringe benefi BASEMENT commercist property, 1-Yr. Parts and Labor end trailer, ea. 233 atten 5. becca 1 Neaineialk model 760 pump action “alias Grae vod Trees } 
Apply: BOX A-64 43) 9q feet. Don Alexander 962° ; 83-51 | 30-06, as new $109. OUTDOOR 4 
THE INTELLIGENCER —ALTERATIONS ts) Warranty ANTIQUE “GOLD braadioom 11" y2-0231 igs = Coupe hard top, 289, 
~~ ~ * - w, S17 Ww = — ————— yea - -1> TOM . i 
—REPAIRS PUBNIBHED ream West Mare FAMOUS MAKE ine SS setae NE ES Ez SALES AND SERVICE eS 562.2029 : 
—REMODELLING Se ets es 2 ORY BLACK AND WHITE by the side or guar: y CUSTOM Belleville and poet Only. bch 
. i ad » out wrep| Yj ° 1 ~ 
MAKEUP neat, aut (sseaaeseee| MARAE vs SPS) wa rota, | Ried ae” |——_—_—_ 
teres: ition available for S TAIL imoediotely. atin Specia ‘hile They Last! sa ae NSTALL: NS 962-4146 
the perso tho is interested an i aig FURNISHED gn $99.95 wit. © compte ae Guiting snd Blading = 18,000 Miles — Excellent 
eee and application of Located At heat and hydra, all conveniences, doure, ewnings, tron railing. Apoty BILL COVENEY “There's No MOBILE Condition — Radio — 2-Door 
. f si seccrpace emp fat 10 site: 30-3 yi INE No } uE 
7 ! Sak monthiy. oe22713 WEBCOR CAR STEREO | anys: cao hich chit, wether, 962-0865 Like The SNOWMOBILE” Bucket Seats 
oi PHOS SNGLAND TWO BEDROOM frame house on TAPE PLAYERS play’ pon, pink end white snowsuit, aaa ‘ After Five 
LONDON OF ENGLAND >) | Bay. Approximately”. ralire trons 8-Trhck So tis $ yearn bes tess S036 | << See 9 LESLIE DRIVE — 962-6488 
MODELLING ACADEMY OF Bellevile 2 Matching Speakers | srw galvanized “auting of rooting. |—Cedar Posts any size, 12¢ _~ MOTO-SKI jae Ost 
962-612 962-6542 MODERN ane _ bedr t Automatic Channel Change — | $230 per sheet, Phone 477-2500 inch in dismeices sal FOR 1972 at | 
pate ee eo Belleville Plaza Sisnso, ‘Avewaine Now 3, .| FROM $39.95 Complete | oo. core ty en ~—Cedar Corral Poles}12" and . 1966 CHRYSLER 300 
EARN EXTRA MONEY S2t-ev-m-w-f-tt | — eae | peaion72 afer 6 pm or Saturday} 16° length, 10¢ pd gunning ELLIOT l MOTORS Convertible, full power, bue- | 
Show Canada's finest line of Christ- pecan 2 minutes from | WEBCOR COMPONENTS | morons Soo] foot ‘ pig or pone. tilt. wheel, mid. ‘| 
Novel Ete. ae — Sicapclaanis Sa x . . CORES p> TS GRAVITY furnace Des z 66 FRONT ST. 
Be, Sater tae ad BACK HOE ONE” GROUND, few, “ae peiea| AM-FM - FM STEREO Sie. ‘ino bel Sa, “8 MADOC 473-4008 ” ‘2584 aha ures expallent, cocall Son. Corea 
prompt service: hn Solid State nase cemenaseaesrs yenings wy es oth Sadevemewe ltt | Ff 
JEAKDRON GREETING CARD \ RENTAL ww iSsaenn eniniE Obie 2 Acoustical Matched See ea, Raeeel toueeuton ix $28-& | i970 19 WP, Moto-Ski #e2-7908 after 
a Syne PD oe ROSS POUND a ned, Your-plece bath, oll Speakers dark mahoeany cabinet, penseee Ke aE 392-8049 82-01-23 
Py urnace, $100. month includes hydro. ‘Ss . iF Onl G bd O05 A : = eee. it , 70 SD Toranado. is see i 
Mamiiion, Ontario gia | RB. 6, BELLEVILLE ae Se Ee gael ae for tain, Aisa some pheqeanta Teiee We OEAN & ‘MeCAMON— Pinfrersia St TN MESSE |e, Sten new fie ma trek | 
= or male se Or! cle SAN & JMC a 
ANTED BY mere TWO BEDROOM farm Thane, 13| STEREO HEADPHONES | prose e000 ?"" su0-3t  ABATTOIR (38 SKEDGO TNT, Se itr. wiin | PEt efter, Ficlon CESS SUS 
, ithe bebe eed fer aerd od water, Avaiiabie ONLY $6.99 SCUNA equipment, $275 GMust sett | EEF & PORK YOR FREEZERS Lacey ot hd ge Power “equippen. 
DENTAL PRACTITIONER LIFE-LONG HORSEMAN {mmnedi Apply Mr. Clifford ak pes-5044 L\ 39231] “Custom Slaughtering. Cutting, 70, 40 RUrP “peenum, 60 “pales | ct 
REQUIRES PONY, FOR SON | memset esa iat Malas ela GREY PERSIAN lamb jacket, e120 19 | gig QV giRine, & Quien, Breese, | Fos sea me soot 
Fully qualifed hygienist full or TWO-BEDROOM  sportment, tt good condition, 63-9922. St ene my = ee spe a 
















part time — will be consider- 

ed on qualifications of appli- 

oot: Excellent salary and bene- 
its. 






































Must be 4 to 10 yearn. Not exceed: | refrigerator, broadiaom, catle TV, )™ ISONY comette recorder complete 
ing 14 hands, guaranceed sound and | heat, hydro, laundry facilities, parks j with pccemmries $30 9OT-1374. Glenn E eneorigagl ee am Dene om rabere me teed 
free of all vice. Wil pry ressonatic [tre Appty 398 Dufferin Avenue. S30-2¢ | —____ Jyas-ev- -atf |ometar, tachometer, cover Exceflen| 
price but must prove ae etove. —jart 2 Aduts only. o1- u sary ———————— - ree condition, >. _01- at | cg AUSTIN 30002 cala,o seew i 
SEWING MACHINE, floor polisher. | sOLIt, watnut coffee table, bas |q9 ALOURTTE GT 2? MP. +13 STIN tadio, snow 
98-4590, 


Phone Collect 653-2680 Days | ItRATED, one tadronm apartment. carpet sweeper. antique setice and 
7 $110. doll orth, Apply 2a? 4 | sine pad. All good, 962-3790. omeret and tack, fond condition $433. | 
653-1811 Evenings lars perma poly | chair, “2 Dodge Dart, 962-2223 after |S To.s |S ae Seek 883, | on 


onat Charles Street. Saturday or Sunday. 5. x! = ne 
i £30-3t COMPLETE PHILLIPS component 
TWO LANGE sim stores on Main 1 20-08 RIFLE oetuxe 7a )modet. | stereo “system, excetiont condition 
LOYALIST electronica students need | Street in Trenton, alta 2 offices, Cee eee ike. ‘newt 0a | 9671257. __ Ses 
5 jen renovated, 392-7852 | stm 590-3 | Queen St 830-3 | OAK buflet, stor windows, Cheap. 
—— 300 SAVAGE lever action with nas | See 
pane) Rete: eee GUNS." wopes, reloading “tool! = )Q YO. NEED HELP, 












WRITE BOX A-84 
THE INTELLIGENCER 
823-71 


~ CASHIER 







ANNEX 
260 COLEMAN ST. 
PHONE 968-6791 











| 1968 METEOR door eutomatic, tie, VB 
| Telephone 907-1339, Best offer 
cepted. ‘ 

71 TOYOTA 

$2500, 


BOATS AND MOTORS 


——— 













































rn 
would te greatly spore 
Bischoff, 











































































































DORI. | MODENN air conditioned 
~ ~~ OL-31 | Bpace. avatlable immediately. 3. Mee 3BAT nen seantite | bought, "traded, tred. minnows, Caev: tylinder motor. Asking 
\ poi laa at eae EE a 2 > “2 = 7 $150. tas safety check certificate. | 
> Apply TEN SPEED bicycle, OI. (eee wt versis7. Au} BEAT THE FROST ! yeINCH nea rns TV 7 atone Kelly's “Sad Neth “Front, ADVICE, REPAIRS, Call 960-0638. 820-36 
Os gas teak hears, rate TV) —Large Cukes ....,... $2. bu. day 0-7, 962-9348. fi Sa1ett ESTIMATES IN ‘2 DODGE Dart, automatic, slant $ 
MRS. BOUTET “830-4 !]_Green Tomatocs_..<? $3, bu. of far fod -otmrar 4g cs pee reac FIBREGLASS ? sod condition, $300, 963-2238 eficr 5. 
retura, will 00-0590 S50, | TUREE bedeoom | rewly dees | _p, condition. “61 Volkswagen . 5 ‘ali 
FOUR SEASONS HOTEL, | pay. Stier 35 ere ee ee Ee Nort, | cppets, red and must vel, BO 7074. Then Call Us. — We Specialize | 
—— fe required for math A student | A764. Soo4t} Breen. - DU. | sy HONE 130 best accordion with | 820-3 | In 
TUTOR required for math A student ar Stal cw. |—Potatoes -......... case in excellent condition $150, Fagenrerere sep theck-out ter nae t 
MODERN three bedroom bungalow, a 3 out coun Bos 
PART TIME $35. weekly. Phone 968- sate OS Cac ee East end. Availatie Oct. 15 or 300K : A Whalen's Music House, 193 Front St | in excellent condition, 963-2663. —Snowmobdile and 
7413 between 830 am. aod 10 am. Sar oi tes awe Tore $200 “monthty, 602-7137 or 967-1635 ‘ sae SS ean — ",_ S2e3t 
: $23-01-4 | 92-3350. 01-21 | atter 4 B30-3t | OWN ees eee see ee eee $2.50 by, | RIFLE 243 Sako with 24 x ® power | VACUUM CLEANER wardrobe, —Trailer Repairs. 
JANITOR YIRM has openings for good condition. | HAVE a lovely 3 bedroom housn |—Onions, Sweet Spanish, Nausch and Lomb scope, W8-4147. | dining room chairs, steel Dunk beds, GOOD TERMS and 
lume persond, ght  Janitoress 01-2: | Fast End of Deiieville. Avaitabie} No.1 $5. bu. — No, 2 $4. bu Punts S231, bulfet, floor polisher, drewer, dewks. | WORK QUICKLY DONE 
Patio. evenings between and 10 TV TOWER and cana, Phone 333- Oct. Ih. Rent $215. For further K oe +l >. plaice ‘oleport | Evadie sewing machine. oil _ beater. 
pm Monday to Friday, ye car, Pretete “and antenna, information pl ic ‘ é Brownian rug. pe, | Cleciric range ete, YOO” SPH) es PINE “INDUSTRIES 
‘Sez sat) > | Seceat ‘Victoria Grey HATFIELD'S 1-3 | NEW GREY winter coat Grey mink | 2¢SAUAN ES -DANET Us 


collar, chamois lined. size 12, Tole- 7 South Front St. oes “YOLXSWAGEN. $300, Can be 


$$$ * — KENMORE»: Goer, | ike new * $123. 
MATURE WOMAN to, help with eld. | Cersid Redner. 95-2005. apartmen Rednersville Road ERMORE ves Goren Steno phone after 6, 942-2202. Everett. 


erty SOS live in, 903-5997. 2 — 16" RIMS for 1963 Chevelle. — Drivate entrance and re ‘Adulte 
520-3 = 968-548: N oe _— MASSEY-FERGUSON four furrow 
ees Phone 962-3418 after 3. Seat only. Apply 7 Read St. front en 1 o1-3t FOP SOIL for sale, delivered, 0 plow. 10-inch bottoms, 3-point Bitch 







































WANTED co old \viollan, any endl: | here eee — nize, Oem ; 
Lion while giving paruculars and|STORAGE SPACE for boats end FRIGIDAIRE _ retcigers ‘custom nen dh ctatach Fm —— Sy PTC ES BAYCREST MARINA ber, ae Te 
8S] price expected to Box A-77 The In. tratlers. Avatlabie. in central Bast | trailor hitch for 1906 Chet. 2 wheel | TWO wringer washers. In exces Phone 965-4229. : rf 

WATTRESS _wan'ed. Night telligencer pore areca, Tolephone 062-2276, A trailor, flat top, suitable for snow- J. Bessonatty priced, 1 ele “ sheet cael S29-3 See the new 1972 * ‘os OLDS CUTLASS, 

Five Gays per week, Saturday and| ——~O Casn Gar umd furniture S202 | mbbLA hone wés-bia, 1-24 | Pho : nen: | Se ted . J GHRYSLER BOATS! Does ses este Ota | 

Bundsy off. Apply Pit Bunny Rest ad peal ete Ae eee ae —{ TUXEDO, size 37. shict, pertect con-|7! NORDIC SKI-DOO and trailce. w 1 

auzani, 222 Front Street. < 52 teal, Foster's Furnitu S; oes 723. EE dition, up to date shawl cotier. own- | Will sell o¢ trade-for boat or moter | _ 5 IT" Bows Rider now on diapey 1969 PONTIAC < GTO, two-door bard | 

REAL | ISTATE salon jes personnel. x ‘S22-te ROOM AND BOARD er te 3 4", $30, Evening Leen bes-ete2. Z : ce t | for a demonstration ride, Order we top. is $1300. Contact Gary 
$20-3t | save. 1971 prices, free storage and Ss 520-4 


WANTED. Clean fill. Ye mile” from $ ae i 
Rossener ss jeer nee eee YURNISHED bedroom with electric | broom, WEDDING ows size ITZ, train, | BEAUTIFUL “red, Macintosh applica |" Pavment & ean ‘BEAUMONT, V-8, console shift 
FES RO ST Drojector veil and shoes: 1744). M well. Bent | band = picked, *$250 per Dushel. Stgrace automatic, bucket seats, redic. ne®@® 

Of good used hockey —————— offer, 962-4007, Rollie,” Redan your own containers. Gord | Big rise. *Dhenorestviiie — 476-5357 safety certificate, 968-9468, 
for. boys ages 8 snd 1a | ROOM snd board ae reee. Student Fe ee eer aliens ines beanie Rednersville Road. S24-tf O1-26-59:1F15-16 Sy 
went Sashes Ciephone 960-4031. AP. oa ee 5, ee Tirad wicca | ONY gold salon jacket size 12, biue Z ‘0 GTO #0 | 
7 . 961-1000. and whitg | uajform ‘ize 12 and one| CHRYSLER MAKES IT. HAPPEN. | automatic. | 
pink uni: size 10, in good con- Captain Clearance ‘Prices brakes, thirty five five thousand. leg 
cked and indi |fiton Phone pezaee. SIEM] Ste at Cee ara” | never nacupA sare SU 

Ve Bees, — sale aonb wath 

eet ye) 2 BRENTWOOD electronic TO BARRACUDA convertible, 24.000 
See eee Ladd Seen“ aoa Leyoourds pros iS note pedal board. antes: alstomnabic 2 Tiebert nceneey 


\ f-—~ tnow = eee —naaeleetT enna 
TTING room in quiet home, . furrow . CAltivator, chetos demonstrator. Special $295.00, Whal- . boar FRA hee 

Adtenes privil Sul bu condition Cell Sirk. Ron i es Parry 393-070 oF 5 || 

ces Suitable for, bus; #0. x, as: | hotenale her a ke, ef? [en's Music House, 193 Front St. so0-3t 0-4 





> 






























' Me ¥ 


ce spas j ote ee THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1971. 7 


common et «a SPECIALIST Do It! 


TRACTOR DEMONSTRATION : 
@ HOME. @ FARM @ BUSINESS SERVICE 
Aven NASE 17 NES ee eee 


To Introduce from Poland the New Ursus Tractors 
AUUCUUNTANTS CARPENTRY 











ON THE FARM OF ALEX McCURDY 
Lot 2, Con. 2, Rawdon Township 
4 miles East of Stirling on Ridge Road or 












PONTIAC Laurentian sedan, PRESSURE SYSTEMS SEPTIC TANK SERVICE” 
‘V-8, automatic, power stecr- 


“ing, radio, Lic. $2470A. 



























JOHN D. LEWARS 





SALES AND SERVICE . 
Ws emia ‘Vie. 25785, or 1 mile West of No. 62 Highway on Ridge Road Cuartered Accountant meevteiins <= Fienses © Lavestroughing — Paiating Pump Sales, Service, Installation,| eee penta er 
= 217 Pinnacle Street Ree Rooms — Tile Floors and Rentals, Plastic Pipe end Fittings. 
ue Repairs To All Makee Of Construction and Sperting Events 


61 CHEVELLE Malibu, four 
Le \Station Wagon, 6 cylin- 


MON DAY, OCTOBER. 4th 













































automatic, power stccr- coapvelry Sey Customer ioucntre Gusranteed 
Locally owned. Lic. X46- 10:00 am. "til 4:00 p.m. 1 = As RR b= = Scrmrdey 0-18 03-8700 a 
Come See — Test Drive Seis [sic Me Oe 
‘e CHEV. Biscayne, 6 cyl., Ee . ——— . ¢ 
utomatic, four door sedan, Demonstrated through the facilities’ of the ‘ * ROOFING TYFING 
radio, Lic. 98144A. .... $1050 RT RET LANDSCAPING 
"66 CHEV. “four door ‘cord top, ch ceamneesaunrity o1-2t ALL WAY FENWOOD TYPING i 
~V-8, automatic. ee ane PEMA ESOP Ea PR rah soD.— 80D + BOD. BUILDING IMPROVERS SERVICE 
, Uc 89862A ...-.-....0. -| TRAILERS FOR SALE AUCTION SALE  Pembrok HIGHLAXD CON! KENTUCKY AND MERION BLUE STORY, Belleville Experience — Neatness 
68 CHEV. four door, 6 cylin- : SEARS | MERI UEE Sey RAVESTROUGHING Ertictent Quality Typing 


OR LAID, We del ever 400 yards. 


ALL TYPES OF ROOFING 
Special prices on large quantities 


SBTZELCO RESIDENTIAL 





- fer automatic, Power steer-) CLEARANCE PRICES 


if BISOBA. 2.2... eee $995. ON ‘71 MODELS COMPLETE HOME 


























































































































































































































































































































REMODELLING t-ses-2468 SIDING - 962-9912 5 
Only — Lionel Hard ames —— Sil-2n = Ott 
"6S RAMBLER Ambassador | "Siecrw’s, renulon price $2100, Reulavtin : ronT ROPE pace cee ahi 
- two door hard top, V-8, auto-| NOW ..5 00. $1795. LARRY, BODEN, B. COM. CA, Lappin lant 7. BAILEY AND Cv. TYPEWRITERS 
matic, power stecring, power | Woods hard to a used 3 weeks, UceoteN BODEN, FAE. ROOTES 
brakes. Lic. No. 87837A $795.| new $599. Now ...... $99. Aceredived Public Accountant GLASS OF ALL DESCRIPTION MAGNETIC SIGNS AU Types Of Roofing 
In stock 15 - te and bods ft. MERRY SODEN, BA. < SRERNOS ANE ouase 5 i $18 SQUARE AND UP THE JAMES TEXTS LOITED 
Trailers at luced Findlay oval: pump: Chartered Accountsat ‘artous Sizes Than wee Troughing and Siding - 
ricess : Box: : : Ol-te i Pries : 3D MAGNETIC Speseey fren piles Promat ané Etfislent Repelss Co 
= ROSSMORE TRAILER dere, é SSS nnn ALUMINUM: CAR Sane AD ork Cuaroteet Sd adlserk Tent Ae 
10 DUNDAS ST. W. SALES ARCHITECTS 96 Division Street ae — mouse, wea — icone | sci Al Maes 08 Maeinaee 
962-7363 or 9620881 Massassaga Road TRENTON STRAien stoxs Rubber Bumpe Sele, Service 
ma 968-8332 WATSON AND Ot-sm| For Guaranteed Quality end | SAIL AND CANVAS PRODUCTS 143.183 rroot St. — Phooe pee 5.73 
TRUCKS FOR RENT | 07 Swetee snd Weekes, - aiken masmic pimexsioxs | a Ee) 
WEEKLY, MONTHLY DEAD SAND! DISABLED ott] ew AND REPAIRS’ To: ara 
DALY, . Sreaiiec FARM STOCK WANTED Baila — Tents — Awnings TREE SERVICES 
LONG TERM SUN era ain LERS m9 TRONT STREET USE OUR FREE SERVICER shrpeuiins +—-2/ Boat) Covers, a TE Ey 
I<-UPS, VANS, STAKES : a ‘ Deed and Crippled Farm Animals MORTGAGES % Conversitte: “O'BRIEN TREE SERVICE 
: TRACTORS Vinyt sides, furnace, frig, ete. Pare Belevitia Oot. Picked Up s industrial Tema COMPLETE TREE CARB 
National Truck Leasing System | “usoy tne on On sale ery or cHAROS DOCEDIATE 18T AND IND Ture Ravardene sare" Seteere ated i pegs 
UCK AND FARM B&D DEADSTOR | MORTGAGE LOANS. Sallmakers & Marine Hardware . 5 Tree Removal 
Hes ° SANDY HOOK VARIETY BOOKKEEPING RR 2 Tweed MORTGAGE FINANCING 11 Water St, Dolieville, Ontario ‘ Power stenp. Rea Removed 
SUPPLY LTD. 476-2488 Picton 7 ter: 4 Picea Cotiecs PHONE 600-973 Ol re ree sures 
128 Church Street — Belleville $23-2¢-25-20-01-3 | fo Y caraeaes os 3] ———Fooxmezrma | Tove *7H3712 or Believe on-sat2 eae a Poe ane A&A FRANK O'BRIEN 
968-5537 quent seal al oh Pianae’ ; RR. 1, Belleville — 963-4330 
4 5i3-1m|CAMPER MADE FROM 1956 ORD : eties avavices ED BYLLEVILLE 908-5781 SERVICE STATIONS Ole 
— P. 800 VAN Took eT ete Toe 2s": oki EAVESTROUGHING MEMBERS OF ONT, MORTGAGE DS SS SS 
16 inside, sle@ps six. Watertank, | sow: quantity of electric wiring: ALL BUSINESS PHASES —— - ——— BROKERS ABSOCIATION |. yO TEBWwor: WATER SERVICES 
2 A-1 sua adiven. pe eullts sad “cushions ae TEES — REASONABLE ALL-WAY od TEXACO soled STATION <tc Ree 
USED CARS Phos plore to be tn at noon on 942-9003 BUILDING INPROVERS [RS av. a DOXTATOR'S 
HANK'S SUNOCO Not responsible for any injuries : Stim 962-8003 — BELLEVILLE PAINTING Coen: Every Night and Every emi WATER SERVICE 
Bloomfield Se ecctientt on Sey. 0t seh: ean i Te anger pine 
soos | Terme of tale — coy — RAY-FYLO Scemicrs Eavestroughing aah cri ane" se ibes Reasonable Rates 
393-3426 cai Paka pla feb pertik a Rivera add BUSES All Types Of Roofing (Triple “AD 9 Cass A Mechanics Oa Duty oes-c3t1 
Rope seh poetget at 2 PUONE s02-1038 —~— —— Bieeico Residential Sidin: DECORATORS Gasranieed cena, recipa Dativess 
; (Wl Be Held Inside In Case ERVICE TO TRENTON AN! weed 513-2 Family Trade Since 1889 aceesl - Ot-ira 
BUS SERVIC TON AND KL ; 
MOBILE HOMES selene pee Sette | grecrmcuans ee SERVICES a 
SUR TUNITIES AUCTION SALE ae =~ "Te, aa Bus 963-1814 : shareacds ps nas 
OPPO ae ae RICHARDSON ELECTRIC MALCOLM BROS LTD 2 
Mobile aia i bm New Installations Repairs and a 01-121 FLOOR AND WINDOW ee ‘ 
Private Sale— oF FINE ANTIQUES 333 Bm Friday only. * Steven, Depots UPHOLSTERY FURNITURE CAB DAVE ROME gr Anerne : 
aS SAT. SAS Aa TGA? tere Water Heater and At biatatodanss. at CLEANING and RUG CLEANING BELLEVILLE MILK 
OCT. 2 AT 1 P.M. BUSES LEAVE BUS TERMINAL Contract Butldings 
BUSINESS IN THE AT BRIGHTON AUCTION HALL. ND) Ee miles ¢ Ticeang Connc- Eee BRUSH and SPRAY PAINTING SERVICE TRANSPORT LTD, 
, es ENTERTAINMENT — [acta iti SIMS stool: vlctures | parumun BUS SERVICE. LTD ae CLEANING ind RESTORATION COMPLETE HOUSECLEANING —— Poe 
e m 7 leaf tables; Tiffany | ‘Treaton Ont. — Phone 302-3355 ‘ Sa-1m| All Trews of, Mome improvements 968-8226 of pes-2776 a 
ene insu Si chine: mantel ‘clocks, dec dle: a re Ot] WEDDING INVITATIONS 
/ Same owner*for past 14 years. FLOOR FINISHING ALL WORK Fully Guaranteed | ees 
y f = aa ae 3. McQ 
MAXFIELD ~ | avo mutes from Belleville SEAS “Woe ates enc BOATS peberrncerseen Phone J. MeGOINES SEPTIC TANK SERVICE union 
TRAILER SALES Taree Bedroom House Included | sa¢ iG hse aso Wiese Toor Finishing Spectaliste Meroe all tnvitetions ordered uring 
wi { Bell ie. PHONE 962-5751 BOATS 9a2-0437 — 340 Pinnacle Street Gonn’s sxPrio SEPTEMBER 
Sod s29086 — 392-8441 -—--— = 413-17 Inside Winter Storage Moors Sanded and Finished D. W. SWEENEY TANK PUMPING ectgihi pean CRENEENG 
WOULD YOU like a busines of your 7 oo 7 $200 PER root Tloors cleaned, waxed and pok Painting Contractor Largest Company With You Are Invited te Take Oul® 
don't need an office to TENDERS ished Window cleaning and wall The Newest Equipment Sample Books Home Oversight 
7." HANCOCK washing. Reatals of floor sand> INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR In The Quinte Aree Tree Bridal Gift Register 
LTD. ers, Edgers, Commercial Scrub- — FAEE ESTIMATIS — Also Renting Tollets For e Wi Order 
Mela furmuned — | obligation. bing and Polishing Machines. Construction and Sporting Events Piss AA 
prod ade A s 
Cone FS FULL PRICE - : z aa >, CARRYING PLACE | aeping Equipment & Vacuums meee im pes-44e4 eed ee 
PETS FO 
* NOTICE ° 
BEAUTIFUL Saint Bernerd puppirs. NOTICE THE BETTER HALF 
long-haired. Excelent markings sod ; PS By Bob Bames 
disposition. Bred for quality CKC ea = ————— -—- —— . KATHRYN 
E RELOCATABLE Momes Lid.. Mobile | registered. One female end 3 meies. Township of Sidney .|. BUS TO THE 
homet. Pyramid, Mariette. Open for Sih SES Wes gd” KUHLMAN MIRACLE 
q Zone, inspection. Across, trom Quinte ALE Chihushos pops for NOTICE HEALING SERVICE 
iv! 


Se ete 6 pany Monday 15 Tetepnone se? CORPORATION OF THE 
Feiday, cyeainet 700 to 400 Dl pEMALE Suman eat to weg. | CITY OF BELLEVILLE 

coab- | Beered_ sees, TENDER CALL 
MORTGAGES 


— 


RESPECTING ASSESSMENT APPEALS AT PEETSBUROH, FERN: 


r Bus leaving October 21, return- 
MUNICIPALITY OF THE TOWNSHIP OF SIDNEY he October 23. 


‘The asscssment roll may be inspected during business hours, Liat ine —: — 
at the municipal office located at RR 5, Bellevilic. . ripe ; ae 
Any complaint with respect to an assessment on the assess- or Reservations 



























































PERSONAL TRENT ment roll may Le brought to the Assessment Review Court Kingston H2-0737 
: INVESTMENTS LTD. pursuant lo Section 32 of the Assessment Act. R.S.0. 1970, ¢.32 as After 5:30 p.m. 
t - aoe . amended by section 10 of the Assessment Amendment Act. 1971. , 525-01-3-6-8 
F > WAY Ist and 2nd Notice of complaints must be made in writing cither by 
y TELL IT THE WAY IT IS. pia ac hs 
Someone (Cares \c= MORTGAGE alte otiee or: @ eigned. letter or on forms available x te Municipal Offices. MUSIC LESSONS 
Call TELECARE FUNDS essari!y accepted. For purposes of identification, please include your name and 
ecb y a D. MH. Wright, postal address, and the reason(s) for complaint. If possible, note NS Acadethy tee 
(formerly Lifeline) N. Front Street PURCHASING AGENT. also the assessment roll number. the street address. concession | ARDAN, -2vSion plane theory. Ace - Ss 
62-4111 180 N. nt e City ef Belleville ana lot numbers, and the municipality in which the property | cordion for sale. new, used, yw How does the slectric toaster work since J 
A Trained Counsellor Is On . 962-2133 under complaint is situated, Church Street, 968-7723. sie fixed it?" 
Duty 24 Hours A Day vu Apt-ev-w-th-f-satt? Any Notice of Complaint shall be mailed by ordinary mail 















‘ TENDERS 


If you are holding a mortgage 


















to the Regional Registrar named beluw, and, in addition, by 
registered mail to any other person whose assesinent is com- Cheese chang 
plained of, not later than the 31st day of October, 1971. Ex . 

































































































on someone*else’s property or * 
oe leita bean Pl a0 Acie Mr. Alfred Johnson, 
e um ci £3 Regional Registrar, i report 
gara will purchase and pay you ROOFING . Assessment Review Court, scape ribbed < . CANADB SERVE YOU? 
top price. Discuss it with one . P. 0. Box 208 cheese sold on the Belleville . 
INTRODUCTION SERVICE oie cabo available. oe pe ppaereaan Peterborough, Ontario. Exchange Wi Thursday Oct. 7th 
P.O. i, Burlingion, Ontario wie A signed: J. B. ftarder, Clerk, | day, Sept. 29. All cheese sold 3. 
Ca Municipality of the | FOB warchouse. Next ex: i 
“Gade FOR- SALE COMPANIES reat Tee | = ee TOWNSINP OF SIDNEY. | ooo to be held Wednesday one of our representatives 
\ 180 Front St. S. wara Hein complies, Picton, Ons - aay ; 
<r HOLSTEIN heifers, rising 3- Belleville — 962-4578 tari i = Pas Oe NOTICE NOTICE Oct. 6 at 11 a.m. MR. K. R. ELLIOTT 
(Pesre-old_ 968-12 an 16-01 ta may SESE a Se eC fe a ey Boxes Price will be at | 
LOST AND FOUND -JABRAMSKYS. 239 Princess, Street. |CORPORATION OF THE Specials | sd eae | 
Ontario. . HMovpitats or Charitable Institutions; COUNTY OF HASTING te je: n 
+E a a alae a : Bchoot desks, odd. chairs. cheetere 2 S} ist grade 833 73.8-75.7 BELLEVILLE 
‘ z s, ; & 6747.1 - : 
rs ; m ., Departement iteetirs ie, Senge ‘nex | TREASURER'S SALE OF arf Te In this district and throughout Canada many 
bn se —— Then Kets edd “tablex, pana’ X-ray ize . Colored large: persons and firms in practically all types of 
Devin ca, Nadas ssi D1 Ae CALL 546-3833 IN THE PROVINCE Or ONTARIO. | 15¢,8T8de er businesses including 
TAILORING Bales Extension 18 Z “| 2nd grade 3 6 
HORSES sat) Teles stine: ae reson « Aten tase tee ics sae Sere Cocetin s panalend 
} ee Seating and "pllerations, NOTICE ~ 400 King St East, tefan Deartn yy {the yun day of and iy me Se: Transportati Wholesale and 
F MUSTANG RIDING STABLES | “2 Front Street, oe-ece 521m * s4e-3008 June, i971, sale of lands in, arrears mony: “ tele te ee : 
lf Horse And Ponies For Rent SP ANN YREE PARKING - of taxes in the County c. Nastings | White: BHT 7 Retail Trades, as well as Manufacturing 
Sale Or Trade NOTICE OF AL For Quality Furniture Alweys the Cit ot Belleville. at The four Colored: 24,789 74 5 
Buggy and Trail Rides ORES SMAKING MEETING OF ONTARIO See Abramaky's Tint ati ot TE, Seinen fa the mornias White squares: 2 have obtained loans from the IDB to acquire 
at 


Babysitting Service HOMES FOR MENTALLY S20-21 | i971, unless the taxes and costs are| 1St grade 4910 73-749 land, buildings, and machinery, to increase 









pice RETARDED INFANTS, sooner paid. 2nd grade 700 678-682 working capital, to start a new business, and | 
R.R. 1, Thomasburg INCORPORATED. ~ NOTICE Ting nde tee” ae Tor atrens | 3rd grade 49 61 “for other purposes. If you consider that IDB 


{Turn East At Ivanhoe) "ANY dressmaking 5 
s TAKE NOTICE 
Ard-er-t-oat ing that aie Annual 








of ta oo been blished in the : 
Ontario Gazette on the sed day of | COlored squares: 


CONVENIENT Qatari, Gazette on the 3ed.day of | oo fae 2837 73.574 can be of service, you are invited to arrange an 












































Iz Said’ list may be had ot my office, 130° 67.67. appointment with the IDB Lapeiceere zd by 
HoRses, board box stalls, hey land AUCTION SALE FAST Deted at the Treasurer's Ottices} 2 Brode 8,526 : telephoning on the above date, | 
care monthly, Dog 5, this Sth day of Julyr 1971. Total squares | 
mm Tener, Bike ECONOMICAL CARL § BATEMAN. Average. price 1st grade (Belleville) 962-4531 =f 
BEF pores ee aS BEA Yo 3 ee 30 ame ot Deke treasaree and % score, or In advance by writing to 
Af ame" th convenient’ Inceton. “Sele (Ree hignway ee ee TAXI SERVICE County ‘or Tastings. White: D> 129,742 74.4 3 “f 
phone W. A. Jensen, 97-1023 any Sin allege : Give us @ ring at any hour J xP NEI 2-AR 13-20-57 1 | Colored: 99.420 73.9 a a 
Sy Phyte drop : ————————]| White stiltons: 
Been “Cunventeod ocatoc: "feie antave whatnot “twin Dede of ste eee — oe NOT RESPONSIBLE | Ist grade wiI8. 735-4. Ay 
ah el RT aan PE ea RESULTS. 4 COUR | ee 2nd 64.9 
Ubtsnce. Phone 300-2375. or Jong | es being machine chairs o rer teous taxi service anywhere ai ee aoe 5 a Total stittons 314 O INDUSTRIAL 
ae —— venue, awa (formerly price; grade 
bdr tn atc |r ie ot oS bd obtener supe ee pov pele * + DEVELOPMENT BANK 
responsible for ; 
fully  eaulbped. new ufen ‘watety pubAy pega ate debts contracted in my name on| White: “S158 74.1: KINGSTON eo 
MOTORCYCLES checked. twelve TAXI or after this date, September | Total weighted average: 191 PRINCESS STREET GSTON, ONTARIO 
Terma — Cash. by 130 FRONT. STREET 30, 1971 without my written sig-| while — 153,159 lbs. — 74.5¢; Telephone 549-1531 
BUNNETTS, Auction SERVICE 968-6464 — 968-6465 — 968 6466 ~ | Dature. colored — 124,209 : Ibs, — 


08 YAMATIA 120 ©, excelent con- 
dition, 962-4276 after 5. B23 


“~ 


520-8 Belleville, Ontario (Signed) Clare Reid: | 73.90, 





j 











— “INTELLIGENCER, 









Can Stay 


FRANKFORD — Curling 
— enthusiasts: in the Frankford 


and will be on a membership _ 





> FRIDAY: 


€04—Up with the Sun with Tom 


10.00—Join Jourard. 
10.30—-What Do You Think? with 
MIt Johnston. 


12.90—Luncheon Interlude. 
31230—Farm = Program with Pail 


Flagier, 
1.00--Town and Country Show with 
ing. 
230-.Matinee witn Most Pat Pat 
Yerson. 
2%S—To Trenton with Ted Snider. 
333—Peter Show. 
€30—Dery! Daniels Show, 
10.9%0—CBC News Package, 
a ‘Theatre 10.3. 
3$—Marold Tompkins Country 
Muzic Get Together. : 
SATURDAY 
€64—Up with the Sun with Tom 


eo Jourart. 
sere tel I ‘and Country Show with 


FRIDAY 
8.13—Morning Show. 
31.00—The Art Martie Show, 
3—Holiday ~ Par 
203—From the World's Great Mo 


403—Music, Music and Still More 


SATURDAY 


10.00—Holland Calling. 
11.90—Hawail Calle. 


' The schedule of Solunar 


"Periods, as printed below, has | - 


been taken from Mrs. Richard 
Alden Knight’s Solunar Tables. 
Plan your days so that you will 
be fishing in good territory or 
hunting in good cover during 
these times, if you wish to find 
the best sport that each day has 
to offer. 

The Major Periods are shown 
in boldface type. These begin at 
the times shown and last for an 
hour and a half cr two hours 
thereafter. The Minor Periods, 
thown in regular type, are of 
somewhat shorter du-ation. 

Use Eastern Daylight Saving 
Time. 

(October 2 - 10.) 

Dey Minor Majer Miner Majer 
AM, PM 
Saturday 3.00 9.35..3.30 10.00 
Sunday 3.45 10.20 4.15 10.45 
Mondsy — 4.30 11.10 5.00 11.40 
Tuesday 5.20 —— 5.55 12.10 
Wedres, 6.20 12.35 650 1.10 
Thursday 7.25 145 7.55 2.15 
Friday 8.30 245 855 3.20 
Saturday 9.35 3.50 10.00 4.25 
Sunday 10.40 4.55 11.05 5.30 


FLOOD OF OFFERS 


Ann-Margaret has had a flood 
of movie offers following the 
good reviews for her. perform- 
ence in Mike -Nichol’s latest 
film, Caroal Knowledge. 


Faun Cate ‘Zw 













* , 





coe: 


< 


. 
: moviewycuIDe 


in Watch carefully because everything happens — 
a fast, The chase: Thes desert, The shack. The 
roadblock. The end. = 


4 You never had a trp ik this before 
& me St -20 


at Home 


The membership chairman Ses ‘Pusat 
is Jack Madill with John .c0_Tomma Hunter (U1) aD 
Captor! as Latermry oxehovie: “the ‘Deady Hunt” 
Mrs. Marjorie Hewison sec- 
retary; Mrs. Carol Mawer 
treasurer and Gordon Elder 
games captain, 


Garden 
Gets Job 


TWEED — The Tweed Mi- 
nor Hockey Association isn't 
promising anyone a rose gar- 
den, but how about a Bob 
Garden? A veteran: with 25 
years of OMHA experience, 








¥ 











= 









«@ 
120th or or Consequences (@ 
row van pres @ ai) an 

About ay 

A Serre 
Partners (9) 
1 Bream of Jeannie (10 
G0O—D.A. 11 


iv 
Rowan send Martin (®@ (11 on \< : “Auntie Mame (11) 
eee Teddy Bears (4) u _ VIES: “fhe  Canterville 


Bendy Bunch 1D 

MOVIE: “Tell Them Willie 

Boy ts a) 

820—MOVIE: “River of Mystery” 
@ Merv Griffin (0 

OUare, US. Treasury (0 1 200—University of the Air (9) 


few, SATURDAY 


2.00—Kaleldomort (®@ at) a7 10.00— Performers an 
group at a meeting last week, [9 Bowing | " Minion, Imoeeibe a tm 

Other officials for the group Cade’s County 19) 
include Jack McNabb, vice- Hyena i 
president; Jack McMurray, 
second vice; Stan Walter, 
treasurer and Burt Vance, 
secretary. 

Registration fees ‘for this 
season will be $2 per player 
with a maximum charge of 
$5 per family. The minor 2 
hockey ran sated with a vu; be 8) ae Fee tegen 


meses” |S at the beautiful new Quinte Mall Cinemas 
atin eee tae | Sanaa SE Mtn BELLEVILLE’S EXCITING NEW DUAL THEATRE... 


raised in a walkathon. 630—News (4) 1 110 
7.00—It's Academ:: 4) 
Renny’ on ane Professor (13) 
a whole new world of movie-going pleasure! 
















| 






I 


COLOR by DELUXE 


~ ‘TODAY Show Tim 
and, 7.00- 215 
SATURDA beset 


































'¥ 347 FRONT ST. 968-6086 
ALSO AT. CENTRE, TRENTON 
















OE SXDeON Prana 


GEORGE HAMILTON « SUE LYON. 





12.05—MOVIE: ~Kisa of Evil”! 7) | 
i 11.15—Pro Football «@ (11) (12) 
(any a2) Movie “Black Sunday™ (10) 
ps and Your Family (@ Vik: “Gypsy” (13) 
Kane °() 1130—MOVIE “From the Terrace” 
420-MOVIE: “Joynny Dark" (4) 


Movi: rt Lope a 

























(Adult Entertainment) 





























+++the last of the daredevist ae 








RAWand VIOLENT! ¢, 
RUNG. RUM 





om lk. oe 8 







Repla: 
Saturday Night pets 
BELLEVILLE UTILrrizs 
Teams: Jets 5, Royal Canadians- Lawrence’ Welk ™ @ 
















y = Interview (6) 
B. ° 
wling Let's io The Whole Thing 
T= Dore in je atouse « aD 













On Tecation te 
Rollin® re gg River 3 
200—All in the sey. “o 7 an 
i. 
MOVIE: Goin Down the 


8 







































erry Sinciale So Brilliant, completely fresh. | A masterpiece. : 

eet ce Road” 16) «11. a2 5 - i word at. _ =p 
eh Rodgers 7 Getting Togncher 113 ma — Judith Crist, Nec — Andrew Sarris, Village Voice od wos cet.:-WASTE HIM! COLOR 
UNION CARBIDE. sem Good Lite a a ' Beautiful. Remarkable. opamsapaelnhs 
birds 2 Maney Gang’ France MOVIE: “Sweet, Sweet Rach- — Pauline Kael, The Nev r ~— Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek Sat. based 
c ane 
ne eer a Sane | Ear, me Superb. Brilliant work of art. B98 PRONE £125 9085779 1: otee Eatartaiament 
Belnt G27, 345, C. Hineman 612, | | Dick Van Dyke (0 7 tle, —Playboy Magazine Mang — New York Times 
Ladies’ High Scores: | N, Are YP J Rey 
Lucas 340. 236, 










Weren 322, 1. Clarke S31. 


Feature Times 


TUESDAY PbS MIXED | ar THE PARK — In Color — This 


TONIGHT & ee TuEe AY 






2ND GREAT HIT — IN COLOR 
The explosive story of a guy with a guitar...and GUTS! 
Be | 







THIRD ATTRACTION 
“COUNTRY MUSIC ON BROADWAY” 
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 7,00 P.M. - i BD 
ONE COMPLETE SHOWING AT 7.30 P.M. : 


BELLEVILLE "1" 





Ey, 
@#2%2  MRS-MILLER 


rer) 








WAPFON BEAT: EAL ORSTE NTR. het mw at Dang f oui Prodcton of "MeCADE 6 3S MILLET 

i Aso Yareng RENE ALDUFLUOND <sovrya by Fictet Annan aed Duan Morty + Prod.ced by Oni Foster 
wd inet Dower « Bates c o wCabe'ty komad Neuza + Deected by Robe Ameas 

UNIONS TLeOOCCLERe Tron Wener Bros, A Kinney Lotewre Service, 


- THIRD WEEK - 


Winner of 2 Academy Awards 
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR JOHN MILLS 
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY 















A FAMOUS PLAYERS THEATRE 


Pee RG SAL ERY icon hee 


mn 
* 







KEK KKK KKK KKK KK KKK HE HK HE 









Astory of love. Filmed by David Lean =~-© 


~ Ryan's Daughter ¢- 


ADULT CNTERTADaEE NT 


Scorer 
AT 7.45 ONLY 


TODAY 


7.00 - 9.10 












THE ROUND-UP CLUB i 


| CHECKER TAXI | 
I DIAL 968-6464 


OR 968-6466 
24-HOUR SERVICE FOR YOU AND 
© JOUR PERSONAL NEEDS 
@ QUICK — PROMPT — COURTEOUS 


LYLE VANCE AND THE 
























KINSMEN 


SOCIAL EVENING 
SATURDAY NIGHT 
TOBE'S COUNTY GARDENS 


(ROSSMORE) 
Sponsored by Kinsmen Club of Belleville Inc, 


_ DANCE TO 
“THE WESTERNAIRES” 


Country and Western 
Round & Square Dancing 
so - Receptions 

















WINNER 


“Tom Schrieder” 
F ri 

The winner of the 9'x12’ Shag Rug at the Grand Opening of Quinte Car Wash was Tom 

Schrieder of 28 Glendale Road. Pictured above are (from left to righ) Gary Honey, op- 

erator of Quinte Car Wash, Mr. Schrieder, and Doug Hayworth, owner of Belleville 

Broadloom, who drew the winning ticket. 
































PHONE: 


Early Bird Special 7:30 p 
Special Bal Ont 3 Games No, 1- $35. No, 2 - 50, 


Belleville Tweed Tweed Trenton. © 
Vern Hicks «Steve Fisher Shirley Cooney Ron Hutchison 
962-7818 478-6613 478-6226 392-5297 






~ 
il 4 
Congratulations to Mr. Schrieder and thanks to all of the people who dropped in on 
Saturday, September 25th and made our Grand Onening a great success, We hope you 
were pleased with the service you reccived and will come back again soon. 


QUINTE CAR WASH 


NORTH FRONT STREET AT QUINTE MALL 
@ JUST ANOTHER ONE OF OUR NEAT IDEAS @ 







The Wealth Games 














NAWSNTH 


Admission 25¢ Regular Games 15 for $1. 
* Prizes — Hundreds of dollars given away 
FREE TRANSPORTATION 
From Central Taxi Office e 










ORANGE HALL (315 CHURCH ST.) 
SAT.,.OCT. 2 Admission $1.25 


SPOT DANCE — DOOR PRIZE 




























\ —s 
\ EY REEL 
wus \ wi a 








“What a bad place to run out of gas but 
there-always seems to be one good 
soul around.” - , 


“He's very particular about his food.” 





© Cg Femme Ryan, bey 1 Vas me 





















THAR LI'LNOSES ~~ 
STARTED QUIVERIN 
WIF ECSTASY, 
WHEN THEY SEEN 
TH SMOG OVER 
ERIE, PA.S! 


-AN' GOBBLE ALL TH’ 
GLOP AS FAR, NORTH 
AS BANGOR,MAINE- 
AN'AS FAR SOUTH 
AS BALTIMORE // 




















AH 1S LEAVIN NUFF 
GOBBLEGLOPS IN NOO 
YAWK TO ~ BSUSH Sr = 
MULTIPLY © 



















Ht AND LOIS 





( 


rt A 
Si 


THIS ISNT FOR ME, BUT IVE 
&] €CT THis FREND WHO HAS A 


¥ 


= DIONT THINK & 
COULD REALLY 
MAKE IT ALL IN 


BEETLE BAILE 













YOU KNOW HOW HARD 
IVE TRIED! TELL ME 
HOW I'VE TRIED... 


PsYcdiATRic 


I'VE TRIED,AND TRIED AND 
weer $e TREO =| 


i 
SI'VE REALLY TRIED! 





). 


SMIDGENS ~~ 
















WELL, I DON'T THINK 
I. LOOK FORTY...PO YOU 


THINK I LOOK FORTY? 


YEP! TOMORROW I'LL 
BE FORTY YEARS OLD! 





To Your Good Health St 


Spots Not Harmfal 


_ White 


Dear Dr, Thosteson: I have 
a skin discase known as vitil- 
igu. In other words, I have 


white spots on my body,-Is ~ 


there anything I can do about 
it? Is & harmful? What caus- 
es it? — M. R. 

There probably {sn't much, 
if anything, you can do about 
it. Teisn’t harniful, The cause 


It has been’ observed that 
injury to the skin, such as s¢- . 
vere sunburn and blistering, 
can be followed by such white 
areas in the skin, but vitiligo 
(vite - EYE - go) has also 
occurred when there is no re- 
cord of any such damage to 
the skin, 

Pernicious anemia has been 
teported to be“more common 
in patients with vitiligo than 
others — but in other instan- 
ces there is no connection be- 
tween the two ailments. 

From such small scraps of 






Sydney J. Harris Says 
Newness in Auto 


Is Not A Virtue 


Just as everyone thinks he 
knows how to run a newspa- 
per, everyone thinks he knows 
how to build, sell and adver- 
tise a car — and the auto 
makers must be fed up to 
their fins with well-meaning 
and ignorant advice about 
their product. 

But, ff I may add one more 
shrill voice ‘to the chorus of 
unpaid. consultants, let me 


suggest that car makers’ 
constant emphasis on “new- 
ness” can be a self-destruc- 
tive slogan. 


Each model year, we are 
assailed with these strident 
claims of newness—new body, 
new comfort, new powcr, ncw 
styling, new performance..And 
eusually, in much smaller 


type, new prices, 


Now, rew is not a vir 
tue in tel yes it repre- 
sents a gen advance, it 
becomes mere novelty for 
which the customer is paying. 
There are signs the customer 
is beginning to awaken to *his 
fact. 

Moreover, these claims 
cheapen the past reputations 
of the cars. They tend to indi- 
cate that the car of a year or 
two or three years ago was 
really not much of a vehicle, 
and: that past claims of great- 
ness were luridly exaggerat- 
ed. This dos nothing to in- 
spire the confidence in buy- 
ers. 

Ironically enough, most 
of the men who make cars 
are solidly conservative in 
their political and social be 
licfs. They hold that whatever 
has been tested and found to 
be good in the past should aot 
be discarded simply for the 
sake of expensive experiment. 

But what they preach about 
government, they lamentably 
fail to practice in industry. 
they are to be consistent con- 
seryatives, they should point 
proudly to the worthiness and 
stability of the old elements 
in their cars. 

Newness for the sake of 
newnéss is a shallow, spend- 
thrift and radical attitude to- 
ward life. The genuine con- 
servative holds fast to what 


has been proved excellent In 
the past, and approaches inno- 





vations with caution and sus- 


the quite practical result that 
the intense and perptual 
competition for newness des- 
troys a good deal of wealth 
that is tied up in tools and 
dies: that it places a premium 
on gimmicks rathr than on 


truly new car comes along. 
the motorist is skeptical and 


cars. 


Rylstone 


RYLESTONE — George 
Reid sp2nt a few days recent- 
ly at Waterloo, where he 
visited friends at University 
of Waterloo. 


Mr. and Mrs. Rodney Beg- 
bie of North Bay, spent a few ° 
davs recently with her broth- 
cr,*Panl McKeown, his wife 
and Kelly..and visited other 
relatives and friends in the 
community. 


The family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Eracst Irwin, were guests of 
their parents, on Sunday, to 
celebrate Mrs. Irwin's birth- 
day. Present, were sons, El- 
wood and Claire, his wile and 
fainily, ail of Campbellford: 
and granddaughters Judy and 
Sue Wallace. of Peterborough. 


Mr. and Mrs. Gary Tor- 
rance and Tracey of Scarbor- 
ough, arc spending a few 
days with her parents, Mr, 
and Mrs. Donald Stewart, 
pnor to moving tc their new 
hone, at ‘trenton, 


Jeane Dixon’s Horoscope 
For October 2 >, 


Your birthday today: You 
have much service to render 
this year, mainly to yourself. 
You attract chores and resporsi- 
bilities whith offer great oppor- 
tunity for learning new-for-you 
lessons. Today’s natives com- 
bine aggressive personal initia- 
tive with some rather specific 
talent, often follow a specializ- 
ed career. 

ARIES (Mar. 21 — Apr. 19): 

Get right on the ball carly: and 
sell whatever you'd most like to 
move. Energy and curiosity run 
strotig~and productively today 
and tomorrow, 
_ TAURUS (Apr, 20 — May 20): 
There's always a sad story if 
you're ‘looking for one, some- 
timess when you're “hot. Thought 
about your own activities avoids 
a dead-end sityation later. 

GEMINI (May 21 — June 20): 
Facts and people you don't yet 
know are involved indirectly in 
almost any project you can-im- 
agine. Discretion in what you 
do pays off well. 

CANCER (June 21 — July 22): 
Attend social obligations, check 
up on relatives, make the 
rounds, lingering nowhere. By 
day’s end you'll have many 
separate threads of experi- 
ence to put together. 

LEO (July 23 — Aug..22): 
Up carly and in your brightest 
mood and fresh attire! Be quite 
visible, ask for what you want, 


but be ry of promising too 
much a trcoen 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 — Sept. 22): 
In a full and busy day, it’s har- 
der to get out of work than ta 
just pitch in and do what's to be 
done and get cleafed away, 

LIBRA (Sept 23 — Oct, 22): 
Delays mean nothing more 
than simple patience. Entertain 
and refresh your mind while you 
wait for routine programs to 
take shape 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23—Nov. 21): 


Whatever help you seck has» 


unplanned strings at! at 
the last minute, particula if 


significant share of the deal. 
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. % — 
Dee. 21): Mobilize your strength 
go ahead despite sounds and 
furious gestures. Do what's been 
scheduled and get done with it 
at the carlicst practical mo- 
Ment. _ ‘ 
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 — Jan, 
19); New information, unfami- 
liar faces still keep showing up 
to make it a lively Qyy and a 
long evening of dil! study. 
“AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 — Feb. 
18): Unexpected visitor, per- 
haps ‘distant relatives are nor- 
mal for today’s experience. Test 
your facts by cross-ref ¥ 
PISCES (Feb, 19 — Mar, 20): 


Count: your. blessings, pause aq 


moment for thanksgiving that 
there are so many, then return 
to attending the minor problem 


-your mate is invited in a q 






















THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, | 


Gastritis. 


Dear Dr. Thosteson: My 
husband had an operation for 


Power steering and brakes, 


Lic, 16674K. Clearance Price 


vinyl roof, immaculate 


miles. Balance of new car 
warranty. Lic, 90560A 


dises. A one owner car. 
warranty. Sharp. Lic. 91214J 


V8 engine, power equi 
whitewalls, wheel discs, fi 


1966 FORD 2-DOOR 


black top. 
Lic. S3015A 


A real sharp car. Lic. 88870A 


Fully 
ing. 
A real luxury car, Lic. 84281 
1966 RAMBLER 


Long wide box. 


T; 





positraction, deluxe interior and 
gold. Balance of new car warranty. 


exterior re 
sreenevssssessqusse SOOO. 


USED CARS 


DEMONSTRATORS 


1970 CAPRICE 4-DR. HARDTOP 
Chevrolet’s luxury car, power equipped, 
throughout 


OK guaranteed. Lic. 96625A .. 


1966 PLYMOUTH SATELITE 2-DR. HDTP. 


v3 , automatic transmission, bucket sé console, fin- 
is! Wilts wih red interiors > ert E 


R 


V-8 engine, automatic transmission, finished in blue. 495 
One owner. Lic, 74887A. Priced to clear ® 


AS IS 


1962 CHEVROLET, Lic. 17921K 
1962 CHEVROLET, Lic. 703454 


TRUCKS 
1967 CHEV, 14-TON PICK-UP 
Lge. MBI ie eevee 
1967 ECONOLINE VAN, As Is. Lic. ¥44603 595. 









2 


hemorrhoid 
may be the cause of his bleed- 
ing. 


“COUNTRY COUSINS’ ” 
OK GUARANTEED 3 


CARS 


1971 CAMARO 2-DOOR HARDTOP 


radio, whitewalls, wheel discs, 
package. 


1970 CHEVELLE MALIBU 2-DOOR HARDTOP 


V-8 engine, automatic transmission, power steering and brakes 
bucket seats, whitewalls, wheel discs. dy : 


A sharp car, Lic. 72004A-..... 


1970 CHEV. IMPALA CUSTOM COUPE 
Vinyl roof, power steering and brakes, radio, whitewalls, 19,000 


1970 CHEV. BISCAYNE 4-DR. SEDAN 

§ cylinder, automatic transmission, radio, finished 2295 
in gold, Balance of S year warranty. Lic. 90081A .. s 
1969 IMPALA 2-DOOR HARDTOP 


Ulnytroof, power steering and brakes, radio, whitewalls, wheel 
alance of 5 year 


1969 CHEV. IMPALA 4-DOOR SEDAN 

. automatic transmission, radio, 
hed in gold. 

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1966 OLDS, 2-DOOR HARDTOP 
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in black with matching interior. 


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; STIRLING, ONT. 
395-3352 — PHONE ‘“— 962-8527 
FASTERN ONTARIO'S LARGEST 

COUNTRY . 


CHEVROLET - OLDSMOBILE DEALER 


| 
| 








j THE INTELLIGENCER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 
sores he Sella 


Toronto Major Prize 


In Airline Scheduling 


“OTTAWA (CP) — Toronto is a 


major prize in coming air talks - 


between Canada and several 
European countries. 
Alitalia, Royal Dutch KLM, 
Lufthansa and Air France all 
want landing rights in Toronto. 
But. the federal government is 
demanding equal concessions in 
return. " . 

The Toronto issue is expected 
te crop up in a. new. round of* 
negotiations about 
lateral air agreements. 

Italy is first on the list with 
discussions slated to begin in 
early November. Air agrec- 
ments with West Germany, The 
Netherlands and France will be 
coming up for negotiation later 
this year. 

One nation—The Netherlands 
—has already cancelled a ‘bilat- 
eral air agreement with Canada 
because KLM, the Dutch air- 








renewing bi- * 


line, failed to get permission to 
land at Toronto, say govern- 


“ment sources, + 


West Germany has served no- 
tice that the bilateral agrce- 
ment with Canada will end next 
August. This came during a 
squabble between the two coun- © 
tries about landing rights at To- 
ronto and Frankfurt, 

_ Under the bilateral agree 
ment, one year's notice must be 
given by a party wishing to can- . 
cel the deal. > 

West Germany has refused to 

allow Air Canada to fly its new 


Boeing 747 jumbo jet into 
Frankfurt. In return; Canada 
has denied the West Germen 


The government informed 
West Germany in June that it 
ieee oe 

ing rights in Toronto in October 
if the German government with. 


Ei SIMPSONS-SEARS 


‘drew ‘its: notice of cancellation 
and allowed Air Canada to land 
in Frankfurt. 

The West German soem: 
ment replied that this proposal 
. was pot satisfactory so the fed- 
eral government removed Ger- 
many from its list of priorities 
for discussions. ; 

Though the air arreement 
with The Netherlands has been 
cancelled, Dutch ‘and Canadian 
airlines still fly between the two 
nations. 


Air transport authorities in 
the two nations have agreed tn 
allow KLM and CP. Air to land 
at Montreal and Amsterdam. 


But government sources say 
this of agreement can be 
ended any moment leaving 
the airlines in the cold. 


The only European airline 
now using Toronto is Britain's 
BOAC. This arrang:ment has 
been in force for several years. 





- Health Plan Se 
Insidious Trend 


“I fear that the public will 
suffer most,” he said. 

“I, as a physician, refuse to 
be told how to treat my patients 


- .by  politically-motivated, agen- 


cies that I believe are more 


Tax Reform 
Tax Study Wasted. Time . 


TORONTO “(Py y= 
study of Canada’s rion 


- measures concludes that the re- 


vision, which took about nine 


> years, was a waste of time and_ 


money. 
That's the basic finding of 


“ Dean Howard Ross of McGill 
University’s faculty of manage- 


ment in a study prepared for 
the Private Planning _Associa- 
tion of ‘Canada. and. just re- 
leased. 

He concludes “that she hoes 
great reform undertaking was 
an aberration afid that we were, 
in effect, doing all right before 
wé mixed up in it.” __, 

“I think: the operation should 
be classified as a ‘defeat’. oF 
do not believe we got enough in 
the process to balance the effort 
that was devoted to it and the 
disruption that ensued. 

Mr. Ross also says It was 
tragic that the whole debate got 
cast as a matter of equity ver- 
sus economic growth. This mis- 





understanding would have to be 
Cleared up before any future tix 
reform could be properly han- 
dled. 

The real point, \he says, is 
that the Canadian tax system. of 
the 19603 was'relatively good by 


international comparison and it - 


Was wothigg well enough not to 
warrant so vast an examination 
and so comprehensive an effort 


* _. to transform it. 


Mr. Ross does not downgrade 
the ideal of equify as an ulti- 
mate goal of tax reform, but 
says it can be acceptable only 
as a long-term aim. 

~ Even equity-trying to treat 
everyone the same—is difficult 
to define. 

He suggests three aims for 
the future: 

1. We must recognize some of 
the crucial things we did wrong, 
so that we may henceforth do 
them right. 

2. We must not just rave 
about how great equity is in a 


Study Says 


non: Fl 

» hon-orofit organization '/f 
in 1958 to undertake 
studies of Canadian =| 





tax system; we must also cons!- 

der how to go about 

it when imposin¥ taxes. ; 
3. We must have a sensible. | 

program to direct further work 

in pursuit of a betler system. 
The Private Planning Associa «| 

tion is a private, 





mainly in economic matters. | 


A. Y. Jackson 89. 


KLEINBURG, Ont. (CP) — | 
A. Y. Jackson, last surviving | 
member of the famed Group of 
Seven Canadian artists. cele” 
brates his 8h birthday here™ 
Sunday. * 

Mr. Jackson . lives at the 
McMichael Conservation Collec. 
tion of Art with the gallerics* 
directors, Signe and pee | 
McMichael. 





Personal Shopping Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 











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sorted colors and patterns, Sizes 
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Fabric Clearance 


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tons and cotton blends, ..”. $iyd. yd, 


STORE HOURS : 


MON., TUES., WED., SAT. 9:30 A.M. to 5:30, PM. 
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY 9:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M., 





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t 
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15 Bags. Reg. $3.99 ...... + 2.99) 
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‘TELESHOP FROM 8:45 AM. DAILY _ 
RETAIL AND CATALOGUE ORDERS 966-3211 


- ADMINISTRATION. AND SERVICE. . . 966-3661 













Ps ike 


~< 


we 





TAE INTELLIGcuw at 
~ Founded in 1834 
Merged in 1930 with 
The Ontario, founded 1870 


——_—— 






Two Belles for Ballet 








Debbie Graham of the local Ballet Guild, pairs with the city hall bel! in a 
novel method-of announcing the Oct. 19 visit of the National Ballet of Canada 
to Belleville. The performance will take place at Centennial School auditorium 


at 8.30 p.m. 


& Amchitka Opposition 


MPs . May Go to Nixon 


OTTAWA (CP) — An all- 
party delegation may go to 
Washington to urge President 
Nixon to cancel the Amchitka 
nuclear test, .. . 

The group’s intentions were 
announced Friday, a day after 
Government House Leader 
Allan MacEachen said the gov- 
ernment may introduce a mo- 
tion Monday asking the Com- 
mons to oppose the test, 
planned for the end of October. 

A news release said Mark 
Rose (NDP—Fraser Valley 
West) will approach Mr. Nixon 


on behalf of an all-party group. 
* ‘The release said Mr. Rose has 


asked the Canadian embassy in 
Washington to try to arrange a 
meeting with the U.S, president. 

Liberal and NDP members 
have tried three tithes in the 
Jast two weeks to have the Com- 
mons endorse condemnation of 
the proposed test, which would 
detonate the nuclear warhead 
designed for anti-missile wea- 
poory located near the Cana-, 
dian border, 

The first motion was denied 
by vobes appearing.to come 
from’ Liberal ranks, the second 





by Donald MacInnis (PC—Cape 
Breton-East. Richmond) and the 
third by Jack McIntosh (PC— 
Swift Current-Maple Creek). 


Thursday Mr. MacEachen 
said the government would in- 
troduce the motion itself on 
Monday if it could get agree- 
ment that debate would be lim- 
ited to one speaker from each 
party. . 

The five-megaton test is 





‘Yes, Mr. Trudeau! 
No, Mr. Trudeau! 
Yes, Mr. Trudeaut® 


4 
. 





Inside Your Intelligencer 


, Assaults on police and citizens has resulted in 
Police Chief Douglas Crosbie initiating two-man 
street patrols. For stoty see Page 2. 

@ Hospital board considering lottery. Page 2. 
@ Trailer park referred to province. Page 3. 
@ Provincial election roundup. Page 12, 

@ Grain debate cools off. Page 18. 








Election Roundup 
Ontario Leaders 






scheduled to be set off on Am- 
chitka, one of the Aleutian Is- 
lands of Alaska. 

The Canadian goveriiment has 
frequently protested the Am- 
chitka blast as a possible earth- 
quake cause and 2 nucicar-pol- 
lution hazard. 

There has been speculation 
that President Nixon might halt 
the blast but the unofficial word ~ 
from Washington is that he has 
merely delayed it until Premier 
Kosygin of the Soviet Union has 
completed a visit’ to Canada 
starting Oct. 18. 


Sharp Now 


Tries Russians 


By STEPHEN SCOTT 

UNITED NATIONS (CP) — 
External Affairs Minister 
Mitchell. Sharp, having deliv- 
ered a forceful protest\over the 
proposed United States ‘pucicar 
test, was to do much the same 
thing with the Soviet Union 
today, 

Sharp said Friday night he 
made a “forceful presentation" 
to U.S. State Secretary William 
Rogers over the planned US. 
nuclear test on Amchitka Island 
in the Aleutian chain of islands 
off Alaska, 

Today, Sharp meets Soviet, 
Foreign Minister Andrei Gro- 
myko and is expected to bring 
up, among other things, the re- 
Cent Soviet nuclear test, . 
fect apart, 





(CP) 
After a fighting speech by . 
Paul Hellver, Action Can- 
ada delegates today begin 
planking in a platform 
which, they hope, will 


unify some existing politi- 
cal parties and bring on a 
new opposition to the fed- 
eral Liberals. 

This és one of the prime tasks ~ 
of Action Canada, a political 
“movement” begun five months 
ago after Mr. Hellyer quit the 
Liberal government to organize 
this “vehicle of ideas" in pro- 
test against existing policies. 

In a broadside attack on his 
old party, he said Prime Minis- 
ter Trudeau and a “super- 
group” exercise near absolute 
power, that the government's 
tight-money fight against infla- 
tion was “‘the ultimate in bad 


judgment.” 


The speech by the former Lib- 
eral Seadership candidate and 
one-time cabinet. minister was 
the highlight of the convention's 
first day, and he clearly set a 
target of alignment with other 
political parties. 

Mr. Hellyer has made no se- 
cret of the fact he would like to 
see Action Canada bring in Con- 
servative and Social Credit 
members to form a new opposi- 
tion party. ; 

“Our purpose is not to divide 
but to unite,” he told his follow- 
ers Friday. “We do not wish to 
become another splinter party 
but we do want to participate in 
apolitical realignment that will 
Rive the Canadian people a 
clear, responsible and credible 
alternative to the present gov- 
emment.”” 


The Conservative and Social 
Credit parties were invited to 
send observers, an invitation 
that was not extended ‘o the 
Liberals or New Democrats. 

Action Canada now jias some 
4.800 members. 


THE WEATHER 


Synopsis: Unseasonably warm 
summer weather will continue 


. uninterrupted through the week- 


end across southern Ontario. 
The likelihood of showers in- 
creases on Sunday along with 
cloudy periods. 


TEMPERATURES 
Max. Min, 
Today 7% 8 Si 
Yoir~Ago 6 49 


Today’s Chuckle 


The happiest families are 
those in: which the children are 
properly spaced. About 10 


Iutellige 
' Paul Hellyer I 
Broadside At PM | 


-Joint ; 


- 


First of Bear-Pit Sessions at Loyalist 


of three Quinte riding candidates to engage 
in a bear-pit session with retraining students 
at Loyalist College, For his platform com- « 


Alan J. Deacon, a teacher at Quinte 
Secondary Schoel, New Democratic Party 
candidate for the provincial riding of Quinte 
in the Oct. 21 elections, last night was the first 


Benson, 
Pepin - 
At Odds 


OTTAWA (CP) — Senior cabi- 
net members are reported div- 
ided on framing a response to 
American demands for changes 
in the Canada-US. auto produ 
tion agreement. ‘ 


The main split is believed to 
be between Finance Minister E. 
J. Benson and Trade Minister 
Jean-Luc Pepin. So far. inform 
ants say. Mr. Benson seems to 
be ahead in his view that Can- 
ada must give up some ground 
in the American-imposed condi- 
tions for eliminating the US. 
surcharge on imports. 


The agreement streamlined 
€anadian factories into more 
production of fewer models, cut- 
ting costs and granting access 
to the US. market duty-free, at 
the manufacturers’ level. Ee 

The U.S, has been pushing for 
at least three years to have re- 
placement auto parts, a lucra- 
tive market, included in tne 
duty free agreement, 


“Ss 2 ea 





purer 


feel ar iS ees = 


ments, see page 2. 


Briefs 





LOS ANGELES (AP) — Anthany J. Russo Jr. 
agreed Friday to testify in the federal grand jury 
investigabon inte the Pentagon Papers case, and a 
judce ordered his release from jail where he, had 
been since Aug. i6 for refusing to talk. Russo, 34, 
worked at the Santa Monica-based Rand Corp, at 
the same time as did Daniel Ellsberg, indicated 
last June on charges of unauthorized possession of 
the then-sceret Pentagon Papers on the Vietnam 
War. 7 


* * © 

FREDERICTON (CP) — Wallace S. Bird, 
licutenant-governor of New Rrunswick for the last 
three years, died in hospital here carly today at 
the age of 53. Mr, Bird, appointed in 1968 during 
the term of former Liberal premier Louis J. Robi- 
chaud, was taker to hospital Wednesday with in- 
ternal bleeding. 


* * 

SAIGON (AP; — Betweenm50 and 100 Hue Uni- 
versity students burned election posters and hurl- 
ed firebombs at police in a three-hour anti-govern- 
ment demonstraticn today as political protests 
continued througnout the country on the eve of 
South Victnam’s one-man presidential election. 


* * 

TORONTO (CP) — Negotiators “ff empuing to 
avert a possible strike by'.7,000 southern Ontario 
truckers continued talking into the carly hours of 
today and planned to continue until an agreement 
was reached, a spokesman for the trucking. in- 
dustry said. The negotiations were “in the final 
stages,” said Don Leatherdale, a spokesman for 
the Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau, 

presenting 37 trucking companies, The unions 


Mr.‘ Pepin’s view is said to be (progressed despite scattered picketing Friday by 


that giving ground to the U.S. 
on autos will open the way for 
concessions elsewhere, 


members of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
Sers who defied pleas from their union officers to 
remain on the job while talks continued, 


‘Have Common Complaint-Ottawa 





Deader 
Suggests 
Gun Role — 


QUEBEC (CP) —- Michel 
Chartrand, head of the Montreal 
central council of the Confeder- 
ation of National Trade Unions, 
said Friday that when the day 
comes he can accomplish noth- 
ing more with his speeches “I 
too will go underground and 
work with a machine gun.” 

Mr. Chartrand was taking 
part in a debate at Laval Uni- 
versity on the kidnap crisis of 
last October, 

Asked what he thought might 
happen this October, Mr. Char- 
trand said “anything could hap- 
pen, the- same fools are in 
power,” 

Immediate. plans called - for 
demonstrations on Oct. 16 by 
various groups to mark the first 
anniversary. of the invocation of 
the War Measures Act, 

“We will sing, we will parade, 
we will laugh at the judges and 
ministers, we will have a good 
time ... right up to the time 


“they blidgeon us," Mr, Char 


trand’ said. 


































By CRATG ASPINALL 





‘With 140,000 unemployed. in 
the province jobs falling 
like nine-pins in the wake of the 


ure to seek the advice of the 
provinces. > 

Liberal Party Léader Robert 
Nixon made the same charge, 
saying that when Ottawa finally 
gets around to determining pol- 
icy, particularly in the field of 
foreign control of the economy, 


it will be “inadequate” because - 


Ontario had no say in it. 


Stephen Lewis, leader of the 
New Democratic Party, pucs it 


* this way: 
“Today, as our pathetic reac- . 


tion to President Nixon's t¢co- 
nomic measures illustrated, the 
threats to Canadian independ- 
ence have rarely been greater.” 


All three men have said they. 


would co-operate with’ Orawa 











on any steps i takes to 
strengthen the economy. But all 
express doubts about Ottawa's 
ability to come yp with the 
goods, : 


Premier Davis, in a Toronto 
speech Friday, said federal pro- 
posals on tax reform, tax-shar- 


ing, unemployment insurance * 


and social services will be “less 
than satisfactory” because they 
will be “handed down” from Ot- 
tawa rather than being devel- 
oped in. co-operation with the 
provinces, 

He called for new policise to 
ensure more processing of natu- 
ral resources in Canada; more 
spending on research and aevel- 


by foreign-owned firms; 








the channelling of savings into 
business investments: and ct 
Ploitation of the nation’s bar- 
Raining power when digkering 
with outsiders on the sale of 
resources, 


The Progressive Conservative 
premier previously had prom- 
ised a big winter works .pro- 
gram should the need arise and 
__ “some form of assistance” to 

” Ontario companies adversely af- 

fected by the US. economic 

measures, but not cligihle for 
federal aid, : 


Mr. Nixon said in a Toronto 


speech Tuesday that Ottawa has 
been “far too slow” in acting to 
protect Canada from the Ameri- 
can economic juggernaut, and 





complained that Ontario, ‘'the 
economic heartland of Canada,” 
docs not have’a major voice m 
determining policy. 

All three party leaders have 
spoken on the theme of Ontario 
as the keystone ‘of the national 
ecofiomy, providing 40 per cent 
of Canadian production, gener- 
ating 45 per cent of corporations, 
income and housing one-third of 
the total population. 


Mr. Nixon has proposed a $32 
million program to create jobs; 
4 review board to control for- 
eign investment; a policy by § 
which the province would be the 
“buyer of last resort’ where 
foreign takeovers appear immi- 


nent; processing of raw. materi- 





als in Ontario and encourage- 
ment of labor to strengthen its 
Canadian autonomy, 

But Mr. Nixon has added that 
he does not believe forcign- 
owned companies could be ‘ex: 
cluded from job-creating provin- 
cial programs. 

Mr. Lewis says: 

“My own view is quite sim- 
ple: Ontario must save Cana- 
dian economic independence." 


“He has said an NDP govern- 
ment in Qntario would stop giv- 
ing incentive grants to foreign- 
owned companies; limit the de- 


free of foreign ownership of in- * 


dustry? establish a board to re- 
view take-over plans by foreign 


companies; decrease .reliance_ 





on foreign capital by requist- 
tioning funds from financial in- 
stitutions and corporations; and 


‘demand that’ branch-plant lay- 


offs be justified economically. 
The NDP would stimulate pew,- 
enterprises through Crown cor: 
porations governing some re- 
source industries, and through a 
provincial development corpora- 
tion. Assistance in terms of 
money planning argi marketing 
would be made available to 
farmers and™ small business- 
men, - 
Both the Liberals and New 
Democrats have promised price 
review boards which would be 
given the power to cdhtrol price 
increases in some key indus- 
tries. 


















GRANT FUNERAL HOME 


68 North Front Street 
Dial 968-9119 





Witnesses Wanted 


To the accident involving 1968 Triumph, 
Lic .71006A, at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, 
September 18th, 1971, at Bell Boulevard 
and North Front Street (entrance to 


Quinte Mall). \ : 
392-8650 








PLEASE CALL 


DRUG STORES OPEN 
SUNDAY 


“BARTON'S PHARMACY 














JAELYS ORIG STORE 








McCOLL, TURNER & CO, 
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 
‘With offices in Peterborough and Belleville 
are pleased to announce 
the admission to partnership 
of 
DONALD J. JACKETT 
ROBERT E, C. WRIGHT 
WILLIAM A, WITHAM 














« PARTNERS 


-_~ JOHN A McCOLL, P.C.A. 
JAMES H. TURNER, B, Com., F.C.A. 

j JOHN A. NAIBH, C.A. 

] R. GRANT HARRISON, C.A, 
DONALD J. JACKETT, C.A. 
ROBERT E. C. WRIGHT, B.Com, CA. 

WILLIAM A. WITHAM, C.A, 


















SEPTEMBER 1971 














ANTIQUE FANS 
TWO GREAT LECTURE SERIES 


GERALD SEVENS 
EARLY CANADIAN PAINTING 


AN APPRECIATION OF EARLY CANADIAN PAINTINGS 
COVERING THE PERIOD UP TO AND INCLUDING THE 
GROUP OF SEVEN. 


TUESDAY NIGHTS 8:30 TO 10:30 COMMENCING OCT. 5 FOR 
10 WEEKS. 


EARLY CANADIAN ANTIQUES 


ANTIQUE ENTHUSIASTS WILL FIND THIS SERIES OF LEC- 
TURES A ANTON GUIDE TO MANY FORMS OF 




















REGISTER NOW BY MAIL OR IN PERSON WITH THE COL- 
LEGE, MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, PHONE 962-9501. LATE 
BECISTRATIONS ACCEPTED INCLUDING NIGHT OF FIRST 


ALL COURSES TO BE HELD IN LECTURE THEATRE, “B” 
BUILDING, LOYALIST COLLEGE. 


LOYALIST COLLEGE 
BOX 4200 
WALLBRIDGE ROAD, 
BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO 










9 





Prescription Pharmacy B 


a | 
Open 7 Days a Week - 962-4551 | 
Free Taxi Delivery On Orders Over $2.00 | 


55 pee 





bad a 


Spanish River near Espanola. 
He referred to the conviction 


BELLEV: 
will hold 
Oc: 





quested. 962-9003 or 962: 


bers 2 
wishing 
ted 


RELAX AND -ENJOY NEW FiLMS 
of general intere: 







welcome. No admission fee. 























“t 
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be 


F 
~ 

























Searching for Ancestors 


Mr. and Mrs. R. I. Milner of 570 Wolffdaie Avenue, Ottawa, are visiting 
the Belleville area in an attempt to truck down Mrs. Milner’s great grand- 
father E. P. Boselly, a cabinet maker and wood finisher who lived in Belleville 
during the late 1880s. As well as searching through graveyards such as this 
Small one on Stanley Street, the Milner’s have spent time searching files in 
the Dominion Archives in Ottawa, archives in Toronto and the Belleville 
Museum. 


Old Line Parties Fail 
The People Says Deacon 


In a speech before 125 ad- 
ults retraining students at 
Loyalist College Friday night, 
NDP candidate for Quinte, 
Alan J. Deacon, charged that 
both the Conservative * and 
Liberal partics could not ac- 
tively support the people be- 
cause they receive funds from 
big business interests. 

“That is why the NDP has 
deliberately sought the sup- 
port of the individual people 
and small businessman,” he 
said, “that is why neither the 
Tories or the Liberals can 
afford the time to care what 
happens to you and me.” 

Mr. Deacon, a teacher at 
Quinte Secondary School, cited 
the case of pollution in the 


and the subsequent “govern. 
mental delaying and blocking 
tactics." 

In the bearpit session be- 
fore the students, Mr. Deacon 
said the Conservative govern. 
ment’s stringent pollution laws 
were an excellent move, but 
they “do not enforce and at- 
tack big corporations that are 
polluting,” and at this po:nt 
he commented on what he re 
ferred toes a “cement plant” 
in the Belleville district as 
another example. 

Answering a question from 
the floor, he said his party 
would attempt to sce that the 
Ontario Water Resources 
Commission has a free hand 
to enforce laws. They are 
frequently thwarted at every 
tum by delays in decisions 
and failure to back them up.” 

“The government passes the 
buck from department to de- 
Partment;—there is no need 
for it to be a political issue,” 
he stated. 

One student termed Mr. 
Deacon's stand on foreign 
ownership “communism"™ after 
the NDP candidate said his 
party would attempt to “pre. 

ee ot oo ee, sound, but I weuld like to see 
and experts, invested in the» non-political distribution 
country.” board with each riding repre- 

“Communism. . Pot quite.” sented by equal diftribution.” 
he stated, explaining that of — Employment: © = 
all the Investments in Cana- embry macet Re SES 

dian business, only six per bates of corporate taxes, 
"cent is coming from outside brought in in 1970, amounting 
the country. However, 8 per to $175 million. This would 
cent of Canadian investment — stimulate the economy _and 
comes originally from foreign small business.’ In ‘reply to 


capital and removal of this 5 
investment would be disas- @ further question from the 
floor, Mr. Deacon said the 


trous. 

NDP is not interested in con- 
trolling business. “It doesn’t 
want lo become a small busi- 
nesman; it wants to help 


small business get onto its 
fect.” 


During his two hour session, 
the first in a series of three 
wherein Quinte riding candi- 
dates will appear before the 
Students, Mr. Deacon answer- 
ed questions on a variety of 
subjects. 

— Separate Schools: “The 
NDP policyyon this is to sup- 
Port separate schools thrqugh 
Grade 13, but structured fac- 
ilities would be shared by 
both. It is my personal belief 
that no country can effectively 
operate with a multiplicity of 
school systems: if we could 
Operate one system without 
hurting anyone, I'm all for 
| 

— Grade 13° “Grade 13 
should be climinated. We are 
the only province which main- 
tains Grade 13. As a high 
school teacher, I see many 
students who don't get en- 
ough work: they could or might 
want. 

-- Voting sysiems: “The 
clectore! system is basically 


of the company in the 1940s 


TLE THEATRE 
Rummage Sale, Sa 
Rummage donations re 
3496, 









TRENTON 
eneral meeting Monday. Oct ¢ & 
Yacht Club, All aéult mem- 
any new adult members 
te join this club are re. 
ta aoe Application 
le. 





at Public Lib. 
le St. Wednesday, Oc- 
900 pm. Everyone 


PICTURE FRAMING 


WM. E. RILEY 


FHOTOGRAPHIR LTD 


a Ae 968-5329 





eee 5 
~y “ 


“DESTINY IN- WORDS” 
But I say"unto you that every idle 
word that men shall speak; they 
shall give account of it in the day 

* ° of judgment. = 
For by thy words thou shalt be 


justified and by thy words thou 
‘shalt be condemmed, # 


Matthew 12: 36-37 











Increasing numbers of as- 
saults on city police Olficers 
has caused the Belleville 
Police Department tc double 
the night crews walking the 
downtown street beats. The 
two-men teams will patrol] 
during the dark hours. The~ 
force already has each cruis- 
er manned by two officers, 

Chief Crosbie revealed that 
over the past two weeks there 
have, been at least four in- 
stances wherein police offic- 







SERVICES: COMMUNION 9:45 - 10:45 
FAMILY BIBLE HOUR AND SUNDAY SCHOOL 
11:00-TO 12:00 


HASTINGS PARK. BIBLE CHAPEL 


CENTENNIAL HIGH SCHOOL; PALMER ROAD 
f the young church at belleville 








r 






By IAN ROBERTSON 
Staff Reporter 


proval, one-third of the cost 
for this construction must be 
met by the city. 


Hospital administrator Phil- 
ip Rickard Friday told the 
board the OHSC has not of- 
ficially, approved any name, 
but the closest they can come 
up with is Queen's Pavilion. 

Discussing the situation with 
fellow administrators, before 
October board of governors 
meeting, Mr. Rickard said the 
OHSC prefers to delete the 
Lodge part’ of the name. 

“They think it would give 
the impression of an old folks 
home,”” he commented. 





| , Broken Pane 


In an attempt to deter- | 

i] mine the cause of window |} 

| breakage at Belleville Gen- | 

i] eral Hospital, the board of 

| governors yesterday agreed | 

j to seck the help of the Na- ff 
tional Research Council, ff 
costs to be shared jointly 
by the hospital and the sup- 

I} plier. 

H} J. N. Brown, chairman 

j of the planning and prop- 

| crty Committee, told board | 

i] members that more than 

} $2.000 worth of windows 

H had broken during 1970. 

i] The cost of repairs has ff 

} been met by the supplier. 

|} Mr. Brown speculated 
that heat buildups between 

i the panes of glass and 

i drapes on windows, caus- 
ed the glass to crack The | 

4 contractor, however, ori- 

| sinally felt breakage was } 

H due to thinly cut glass. 

} Board chairman Mon. | 
signor J. P. Sullivan said 

i] the supplier w be re- 
quired to replace age 
at the end of the hospital's 

ij five-year repair contract. 


MRS. ALBERT COOK 


The funeral of Mrs. Jessie 
Blanche Cook of Rednersville 
took place Friday at 11 a.m. 
from Thompson Funeral 
Home, Belleville, to Glen- 
wood Cemetery, Picton. 

Rev. Eldon LeRoy presided 
in the chapel and at the 
graveside. 

Bearers were Paul Embury, 
Howard Allison, David Bry- 
ant, Norman Bury, Ralph 


Van_Dusen, Jr., and Darwin 
Van 


ers have been assaulted while 
making - routine arrests. 

“We are taking every step 
@ sce our men are provided 
With protection ard to see that 
laws are maintained on the 
strect,” he stated. 

The street incidents in 
which the assaults occurred. 


‘ingluded -drinking offences, 


Public. _ disturbance com- 
plaints and the assault on a 
citizen. 

During one fracas, Chicf 


However, with delay in ap. 


Obituaries~andl Funerals 


- 


“I don’t think the city of 
would want to 
to the public expense,” 
Joyce explained this morn. 
ing, “I don't think there's 
Fee, Banc parse: lor 


ance committee chairman 
Carl E. Batemah told ‘The In- 
telligencer, slightly more than 
$8,000 remains in _ hospital's 
capital fund, “Care of the pa- 
tient isn’t at jeopardy and as 
far as the elevator situation 
is concerned, there isn't any 
panic,” but Mr. Joyce said 
the city’s share could be rais- 
ed by holding a lottery, > 
“E wouldn't for a minute 
want ‘to take anything away 
fron: the Belleville Yardmen 


Board Looking for Name 


-Ment, board member Ald. Ben 

Corke said he wanted to clear 
up earlier reports that some 
members of Belleville city 
council were “opposed to the 
Queen's Motel thing.” 

He said objections were reg: 
istered because “we could 
envision certain problems." 

Ald. Corke said it was un- 
fair to say Mayor J. Russell 
Scott and two aldermen were 
opposed to the plan. He said 
Opposition arose because the 
“desire to rezone certain Pro- 
Perties would cause delays.” 

Board chairman Monsignor 


TV Rental Up 


Patients recovering in wards 
at Belleville General Hospital 
will be paying more for their 
rented television sets, obtain- 
¢d through the hospital and 
set up in rooms. 

Costs of renting a TV have 
been raised from $1.25 to 
$1.35 per day. 

A spokesman for the board 
of governors said yesterday, 
“this is the first increase 
since the hospital opened.”* 


Four Arrested 


Police this moming report 
the arrest-of four Belleviie 
youths in connection with the 
Sept. 22 theft of more taaa 
$2200 in televisions and 
stercos from Booth’s Ridio 
and Television sales on the 
market square. 

Charged. with break, enie> 
and,theft are John Edward 
Adams, 18. cf Sidney Stree, 
Amold Stone. 17. of Safe 
Boulevard, Simon Peter Mar 
tel, 17, of Pine Street asi 
Terry Donald Hannah. 18, of 
the Belvedere Hotel. 

The stolen goods have not 
been recovered. 


Omitted 


In the obituary of Charles 
Rotcrt Scott in Friday's In- 
telligencer, his membership 


“Th, the Royal Caradian Legion, 


Belleville and the Army, 
Navy and Air Force Veter- 
an’s Association was inad 
vertently omitted. 





Tre funeral service for 
Mrs Mary Ann Newton was 
held Friday. Oct. 1 in the 
cnacel of the John R. Bush 
Funcral Home at 2.30 p.m. 

Rev. Peter Tett conducted 
the service and interment 
was in Bellevilic cemetery. 

Bearers were members of 
Branch 9 of the. Royal Can- 
-alizn Legion Gcorge Dumin- 
ic. Harold Vaughan, George 
Calbury, Fred Smith. Tom 
Purdy and James Calnan. 


Assaults on. Officers 
Lead to Two-man Teams 


Crosbie reported a citizen 
used a police call box to call 
the. Campbell Strect station 
and advise officers one of the 
polit€men was in trouble. 

The latest in this scries %r 
incidents took place on down- 
town Front. Street “at 1.30 
a.m. Thursday. As a result, 
two youths have been arrest- 
ed and charged with common 
assault on police offictrs; the, 
second youth will also appear 
in provincial court charged 
with resisti 


SE ne i SSE SES ENT 


Hospital Board Asked 
To: Consider Lottery — 


s 


or the Greek church fund, T'm 


only interested in those dol- | 


lars that are going out of the 
Country and province.” | 
“We should do’ our fund- 


raising here instead of Ire- | 
land; it’s ridiculous to send _ 


it out of the country when we 
could help support . old folk 
and the sick,”* he said. g 
Mr. Joyce said he 
amazed to think no 
hospital has taken 

of the i govern- 
ment's approval for lotteries. 
“The i 


have | 


sweeps 
been the salvation of their 


Commission would give ap- 
Proval to such 2 project, Mr. 
Bateman _persnnally suggest- 
ed “5 don’t think there would 
be any objection.” 


Support of the auzxiliary P 
Pital wing plan for the motel. 

At’ Monday's council: meet- 
ine, Mayor Scott argued that 
the Quinte Planning Board | 
should hold 2 public hearing || 
before a rezoning bylaw was 
passed by council. 

However, council gave the 


give residents a chance to dis- 
cuss the situation and register | 
any complaints they might 
have. 


Standby 
Chiller | 
Proposed £ 


The Board of Governors of 
Belleville General Hospital will | 
seek permission from the On- | 

‘tario Hodpital Services Com- 
mission, tg instal a Standby 
chilling unit and an emer- | 
kency backup, to supplement 
the existing air conditioner | 
during hot weather. 

This request. made by 
Superintendent of building ser- | 
vices, W. F. Todd. was made | 
to the board Friday morning j/ 
by planning and Pooperty com- 
mittee chairman J. N. 
who stated’ * 
you can afford not to have 
it | 

One board member agreed, 
commenting he was 
that the hospital “would tice | 
to be evacuated” if the Koa 
compressor breaks down. 

“I may be making a moun- 
tain out of a molehill, but I 
agree we shouldn't take chan- 
ces.” he said. 

Quotations presented, rang-~ 
ed in cost from $22,000 to 
$13.000. 
rE 

BIRTHS | 
LOVETT — Rodwand Irene are | 


preud mnounce the birth of their 
first_child. a son. Jeffrey Charles, 
on September 38, 1971 at 


y. 
Berlevilie General Hospital. Weight | 
5 be. | 
MILL —~ Glenn and Shirley Hill are | 
Pleased to announce 


R. Brant. Special thanks to 
Noveia. 


ee 


CARDS OF THANKS 


~My sincere thaaks to Dr. 
Seott Dr. Mipwell, the nurses i 
staff en fifth level of Belleville | 


eral Hospital for their effictent | 
care also to my friends, neighbors 1 
and relatives for their cards and 


whats. 
Joseph Wickens, 


MEMORIAMS 
pRactr — 


3rd 1967. 
The blow was great, the shock se- 


vere. 

We little thought his death so near, 

Only those that nave lost can tell, 
rrow of paring without fare 


Sadly mised by wife 
art sens Kenneth. Archie, 
and their families. am 


well | 
Marion | 
Frederick 





GELstnorrEe — In loving memory 
of a Cear mot who passed away 
é 963. 


Ocw . 
Just » memory sad and true, 
Just the love and sweet devotion, 
Of one who thinks of you. 

ver remembered by son Bruce 
ind Caughter-in-law Gladys. 


MEMORIAL SERVICE __ 





- nn || 
ELLIS, gy tn loving memory,of a 
deer mo! '. Amanda 


pawel away "September 21, 
There are times of 















































eee Department has 


been making a concentrated est 


check on all area schools, pub- 


Fire Prevention (Week. 
Spotlights Hazard 


In the past week, the Belle- ber that fires in 1970 cost the Chief Culhane. "You can in- 


Canadian resident the Breat- 
Property less ever,” said 
Fire Chief Leo Culhane. 
Approximately $200 million 
damages were the result of 
Canadian fires Jast year, and 
~ this figure has been increas- 
ing each year, says a report 
{rom the National Fire Pre- 
“vention Bureau? \This does not 
includé the cost of forest fires. 
From the same report it is 
listed that 224 deaths resulted 
~from these fires, showing an 
increase of 45 from the pre- 
vious year, 
“Fire is a terrifying thing 
because of its finality,’ said 


Madoc Conservatives 


Elect New 


signation from the office, say- 
ing he is much too busy with 
other work to do justice to 

It was moved that all of 
fices be declared vacant and 
the floor was open for nom- 
inations. The new executive 
elected were: president, Kel- 
vin Kincaid: vice - president, 
Terry Pigden: secretary-treas- 
urer, Harry Brown; exccutive 
assistants, Ed Armstrong. Bob 


E Low Income Houses 


Executive 


Kirkwood, Frank Downey, 
Mary Goulah and Eugene Pig- 


The possibilities of forming 
a ladies’ Conservative organ- 
ization were discussed. It 
was suggested that the new 
executive hold a ladics night 
and get this set up. Mr. Rol- 
lins volunteered to attend the 
meeting and talk to the la- 
dies, in the event one is held. 

The president - elect, Kel 
Kincaid, took over the chair 
for the remainder of the meet- 
ing. He thanked his electors 
forthe confidence placed in 
hin in making him their new 
president, and congratulated 
the members of the executive 
on their newly, acquired posi- 
tions. He said the executive 
assistants are the hard work- 
ing members, who must be 
able to act. Mr. Kincaid stres- 
sed that it is very important 
to get the young people out 
and give them every oppor 
tunity to take part. 


© Termed ‘Buffer’ 


TRENTON (Staff) — The. 


Trenton Housing Authority has 
approved the site 0 Ontario 


Bia Sia ORL sire eo 2 
buffer zone. 


Lou Aziz. a member of plan 
ning board and the housing 
authority, told the Trenton 
and Suburban Planning Board 
Thursday the land parcel fs 
an ideal location for that type 
of housing complex because 
it. will be a buffer between an 
industrial belt and the west 
side residential areas. 


Spring Flood Damage 
Can Be Avoided Now 


For the wan; of a nall the 


by high water in low areas 
along the Moira each spring 
when the proper precautions 
taken in time could have pro- 
tected property. 

He points out that spring 
flooding conditions cannot be 


' predicted but after frost. 


snow, kee and water arrives 
it Is often too late to protect 
property. 

Mr. Duffy urges that pumps, 
docks. “driveways and build- 
ings be reinforced ,ahead of 
time so that they can better 
sare the effects of high 


Mackie: lawn furniture, 
and boats should be stored so 
that they will be above the 
flood level, Exposed electri- 
cal fixtures, pipes and drains 
should be sealed and secured. 

He goes on to advise resi- 
dents to think of the problems 
createdsby high water last 
year and consider now what 
could be done to prevent them, 
and if they do occur, how 
best to overcome them. 

And it doesn’t hurt to be a 
. Re neighbor to someone who 
might not be aware of pos- 
sible flood conditions along 
the river, 


“Advise new neighbors who 












-FUR 

and. 
FUR TRIMMED 
CLOTH COATS 










have moved into a potential 
flood area of the precautions 
that should be taken.” = 
says. 


* eral modern apertment build: 





sure a house, a car, furniture, 
just about anything but you 
can’t insure a life for com- 

Last year in the city there 
were 535 calls for assistance 
amounting to $336,000 worth 
of damages. 

“It’s nice to think that while 
the nation’s statistics for fires 
are climbing, Belleville’s fig: 
ures dropped by 73 calls from 
the previous year,” said the - 
chief. 

“Because fire prevention is 
being stressed this week, the 
fire department invites any- 
one to call the depa: for 
information and, ‘fein. an 
inspector will vi a home 
and check for fire hazards. 

“It might be interesting to 
note," said Reg Christopher, 
fire inspector, “that fires in 
the city last year cost cach of 
us $10." 

With the construction of sev- 


ings in progress across the 
city, the fire department has 
made numerous articles avail- 
able on the facts and myths 
of fires in such structures, 

“There is really no such 
thing as a fireproof building. 
but contractors do give prior- 
ity in choosing building ma- 
terials to those materials that 
are fire resistive.” 

In the case of structural 
steel, where steel will bend 
under severe heat, it is wrap- 
ped in a heat resistive ma- 
terial. 

Apartment buildings are 
reasonably safe because of 
the numerous safety factors 
built into them.” said the 
“chief, 

In the age of the highrisc. 
many fire fighting techniques 
aave become. obsolete. 

“Because of their existence. 
modifications had to be made 
to both fire regulation codes 
and fire fighting equipment.” 
said a spokesman for the fire 
department. 

“It would be nice if every 
one could be on the lookout 
for fire hazards all year round 
but at least for the weck of 
Oct. 3 to 9, the fire depart 
mem would appreciate that 
everyone check for fire dan 
Rers and report them to the 
department.” said Chicf Cul 
hane. 


——ee 25 


MONEY | | 


TALKS 
Ist - Pad oe 3rd Mery 
BUSINESS 

LOANS 


anne Funds Now 
baer Vor This Arca 


62-7444 


« aon onre day and 


G. GW. ‘PRUE 


Seen Services 
a1 Froat's St Belleville 












tribution. 
Please give generously! 































ATTENTION BUSINESSMEN ! 


One of these busy people, who are canvassers in the 
Commercial Division of the United Appeal, will be 
calling on you during the next week for your con- 


John Adams 
Ann Acton 
Keith Allison 
Paul Andrus 
Terry Barratt 
James Barton 
Marie Bell 
Charles Bristol 
Doug Clark 
David-Davey 
James Dufficy 
Bernice Farrell 
Catherine Farrell 
Grant Harrison 
Frank Heisz 
Jack Ireland 
Robin Jeffrey 
Ronald Keel 
Bryson Leslie 
Nell Lockyer 
Mac MacDonald 
Donald MacKinnon ™ 
George O'Brien; 

Roger Porter - 





























George Zegouras, 
Chairman 


THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER. a 19Tt 3 





Added Sentence 


For Parole Breach 


In_ provincial courh Thursday 
afternoon, an 18-year-old 
Belleville youth was ordered 
returned to the Ontario ‘Refor- 
matory in Gd to complete 
a one-year after 
breaking thé conditions of his 
« parole, and was sentenced to 
Serve aterm of one year, less 
a ‘day, alter being found guilty 
on a Charge of break and en- 
ter with intent to commit 


e 
served concurrent to the thrst 
sentence, 


David John Casselman, of 49 <=0% 


Dundas Street East, pleaded 
not guilty to the break and en-° 
ter charge and a third charge 


; Of supplying liquor to minors. 


The latter charge was not 
proceeded. with. 

George Angelatos, of 62 Dun 
das Street East, charged Cas- 
‘selman broke into his Min- 
















Book Fair Attracts Hundreds 


The competition for books was fast and furious at the tenth annual 
University Women's book fair at the armory mall in Picton Friday. Every 
beok became a bestseller as the donated texts were used to raise ‘money for 
Grade 13 students who are enrolling in university and for the Grade 12 ia 
with the highest standing, 


Province Will Be Asked 






~~ which he was found guilty ear- 


To Set:Up Trailer Park 


There are ro 
owned 


pparent cit 


for a 


6 suitable 









trailer park in Belloy to provide such a fac ? Alderman Donald Soutter 

the e:ty parks board will s reconunended tha ff said the provincial department | 

te the crevanee set « ¥ the Q i wild be asked af it has any | 

me s fac he redquested lans for a trailer camp with. | 
r mutry of areas n 25 miles of the city —- pre- 








developrin 
Flore 


| — 


ta Belles 





RIGHT NOW 








i 
ti 
| 


If the request is t 


down and the city s 









MMeerman Pobin Jefines 
ted that, areca 1 


ard to 


bead rest that, arta omen shi 
Poesy be tske make 
th tle milar request to the dey 








TAKE A MINUTE 


urned 














“What would be 
> asked. 












fer, ably along 


ARS BELLEVILLE 


RESTAURANT 

FREE DELIVERY 
7 231 FRONT STREET 
be 968-3056 


’ AND LOOK AT YOUR 
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 


DO TIHFY NEED: CHECKING & RETAGGING 


) RECHARGING 
REPAIRS 
HYDROSTATIC TESTING 


() DO YOU NEED ADDITIONAL EXTINGUISHERS 7??? 


| Yow TUAT YOU HAVE DONE THAT — 


} us 


K EVERYTHING HAS NOT CHECKED OUT OK 


PHONE OR WRITE 


23YW ALLBRIDGE CRESCENT, BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO 


(613) 968-5701 


EM MEDIAT ELY!! 































Roy Taylor 
Jack Trembley 
John Trud 
Ross White 
Murray Workman 


F [ xou ] DO IT, IT WILL GET DONE! 


UNITED APPEAL one BELLEVILLE 
& DIST 


224 John Street, Belleville 


eau 









bas 


962-9531 







TENTS 


Fre AGE, 


150 FRONT STREET 


THE TENANT'S 
PACKAGE POLICY 


“a0 “22. re veaR 











had you all these coverages in Belleville. 


. THEFT insurANCE AT YOUR PREMISES 
EXTRA EXPENSE INSURANCE 
THEFT INSURANCE AWAY FROM HOME 
PERSONAL LEGAL LIABILITY INSURANCE 
VOLUNTARY THIRD PARTY MEDICAL 

. VOLUNTARY THIRD PARTY PROPERTY DAM. | 


— PLUS MORE — 


(Not av vailable to mercantile risks) 


Lorne McDougall 


INSURANCE AGENCIES LTD. 
DIAL 968-5728 


“Representing the Empire Life insurance Co. for many typezpf life Insurance plans”, 


FIRE AND EXTENDED COVER! AGES ON CON- 


ec 


PIZZERIA AND 








the bene- 


| the bay front. 





i 
| 
{ 


' 
\! 
| 
| 
i 
} 


| FOLEY SUPPLY & MACHINE CO. (1970) LIMITED’, 








BELLEVILLE 











theft. An earlier charge for 
possession of a stolen auto, for 


~.ute Lunch restaurant on Dun- 
das Street, July 24, stole two 
cartons of Cigarettes and an 
lier. in September, netted him 
a six-month sentence, to be 


Bay of Quinte Agricultural Mutual 


Fire Insurance Company 
PICTON, ONTARIO zn 


FIRE IS SO FINAL 


Almost all fires are caused by somebody's negligence, 


Smoker's carelessness, mis-use of electricity, faulty 
|| Stoves and furnaces, children playing with matches, 


kitchen deep-fat flareups are among the leading 
causes of these fires. 


“LOCAL AGENTS: 


BURR INSURANCE AGENCY — 210 Front St., Belleville 
CRAIG WATSON INSURANCE AGENCY — Stirling 

FORD GAINFORTH INSURANCE p Cenc _- Frankford 
ROSS KETCHESON INSURANCE — Moir: 

GEORGE AIRHART INSURANCE AGENCY — Campbellford 


- 








A PROCLAMATION 


WHEREAS authoritative statistics compiled and published 
by the Dominion Fire Commissioner show that during t the past 
ten year, seven hundred and forty thousand fires in Canada 
have taken six thousand lives, seriously injured at least twenty- 
one thousand other persons and destroyed property valued at 
one billion six hundred million dollars: 





















AND WHEREAS such losses are still increasing year by 
year; 






















AND WHEREAS humanitarian and economic considerations 
imperatively demand that improved fire prevention measures 
be undertaken to prevent this economic waste and tragic loss of 
ie ip ong that the nation’s Prosperity may be maintained; 








AND WHEREAS it is desirable that the attention of the 
public be directed to the extent and underlying causes of the 
preventable loss-ef life and property by fire and to the best and 
most practicable means for its control and that a specific period 
of the year be set apart and properly designated for the dis- 
semination of such information; 


THEREFORE I DESIGNATE THE WEEK COM- 
MENCING SUNDAY, THE THIRD OF OCTOBER, 
AND ENDING ON SATURDAY, THE NINTH OF 
OCTOBER, IN THE PRESENT YEAR AS 


“FIRE PREVENTION WEEK’ 


























in the City of Belleville and do recommend that at 
some time during this week:- 






a 
(1) All citizens inspect their homes and all conditions likely to 
cause or promote the spread of fire be removed. 


(2) All merchants carry out a general clean up campaign of 
the business section and assist in this program to reduce 
the loss of life and property by fire. 


(3) All theatres, hotels and places of 
special emphasis on the removal of 
premises, 


(4) Hospitals and institutional buildings be in Bected and the 
necessary changes made to Protect the occupants in case 
of fire. 


(5) Firo dyjls and lectures on fire safety be given by teachers | 
and s(3if in co-operation with officials of the Belleville Fire 
Departmént in all schools an educational institutions to 
acquaint the occupants with the dangers of fire and the best 

nd most expeditious mode of exit in time of danger. 


(6) All citizens keep in mind the ever present threat of ies = 
take every possible means at their disposal to assist in 

reduction of fire and the loss of life by carrying out ire 
prevention throughout the year. 


Russell Scott, M.D.C.ML., 
MAYOR. 



















hazards from their 











patie assembly niece 





































Dated at the Mayor's Office, 
October 1, 1971. 












. 


SATURDAY; OCT. 2, 1971 


THE INTELLIGENCER . _. 
Intelligencer Established is3 — Ontario 1870 






4. THE INTELLIGENCER, 












Party Leaders’ ‘Wordsmiths’ : : : \ 


The Speech Writers: Phantoms of 


By RICHARD JACKSON 























H. Myles Morton: President and General Manager ; 
Subscription Rates: 5 : 
By carrier Sc weekly. © Se i guarantee i 
By mail in Canada $23.00 per year; 6 months $15.00; staff by phone or in the flesh. the whole show can and positive- positive and: dynamic This is not easy. There have 4 
_3 months $8.00; 1 month $3.00. The legman hustles ahead. ly will be beefed up into Some- action on both advance visits. to be some bad spots. Small a 
By mail in US.A. and other foreign countries, ene are getting on their marks . . . If he is a legman who has thing Really Big, or rejects ‘t, © If it does not come through. crowds sometimes, Rainy days 
‘ i year $26.00; one month $3.75. set... to go... his heart as well as ‘his head wiping the stop off the coming the legman can fix it,with a dampening ‘enthusiasm on su- 
eae Single copy rate 10c. ~ They are ail staffing or, as and legs for him, he hus- week’s campaign itinerery. phone call or a fast backtrack Permarket plazas. Sometimes, 
Back copy rate 20c each. the professionals in tbe busi- tles ahead twice. Then, the day before the by plane or car to the boss that in the metro areas especially, 
Authorized as Second Class Mail by the Post Office Dent, ness of hiring specialized per The first time, a week or leader flies, motorcades or rolls the local organization is not go- hostile demonstrations. 
Ottawa, Ont. Reg. No.~ 1714. : sonnel like to phrase it, “re- days in advance of the leader, in by train, the legman has a ing to, get to have’ the leader * But the leader cannot be seen 
Member: Canadian Dally Newspaper Association: Cana- cruiting’, = laying on the organization, the quick revisit to recheck and hold up their candidate's arm — or even be, allowed — to feel 
dian Press and The Audit Bureau of Circulation. Speech writers; rela- reception, the crowd, in fact, determine whether the show as in @ companionable signal of sorry for himself or uncertain ~ 
‘ tions experts, or, on the works at all the stops listed laid on is going to be good en: victory to come. ; of his success. Or up go the 
- some viewer A ee aes on the leader's itinerary which ough and if it is not can It be fated peat ben oases odds, ag 
. organizers sev brands is kept fluid from week to week. juiced overnight, or would Socatongantzation muff- -  Legmen, the 
Schools: Of Tomorrow and breeds; the whole cam Of course, he does not come it be better to skip the whole ai serengemnens: tthe big cir are quod forroos Sea That 
paign into city or town a stranger, thing. can- is about all the ene nor- i 
‘av Nobody can accuse Hastings county school By the time the campaign with nothing done in- prepara- On a day's campaign mm. celled out. : mal human being bask his | 
administrators of lack of foresight. The neeee are eee ot- tion for the leader's appear. opening with a breakfast rally, Excuses are oe: The cara batteries. ~ 7 
with such a plethore of ideas on our, pares sated ance. a: mid-morning rally, a: D000: she tt ere Somred penesas David Thomson, Prime: Mi 1 
trouble is that 1 hie cs as to the limit even ofhaving re- The local organization has time appearance, a midafter- stop had to be added. There ister Trudeau's seaseticcalyy 
how to handle school pop on ds, which sident bartenders to hustle been busy rounding up pledges noon pitch and the big evening was a spot of trouble with the successful legman in the las; 
might be termed uneven, trustees will be hard aboard and pour the refresh- of rally attendance and bash, the itinerary is kept Muid aircraft. Anything almost will election has been given his re- 
put to it to decide what is best. ments on the planes and yes, ing ovations for the glorious enough for bop.skip-and.jump- do. ward long since. ‘ 
i even, believe it, the busses. leader by the ever faithful. ing from stop to stop. : The energetic legman has to First, as man in charge of the 
As pointed out in recent days the word is rae pmoee reresher th ae Tentative arrangements have The leader's really only pin- be the =e froleee in motion, | PM's Western Political Desk, 
: — at least from been made for the hall, the high ned down tight on his evening moving time - between and more recently, 
that while elementary school population Is _ party leader's critical make- school auditorium or the super- rally, a must. the leader and his next week's viser, and pases are aniae 
shrinking the number of secondary school ee eee market plaza for the big day. Mired albrmass ets Posed a and nest day's stop. 
students requi accommodation is increas- speech writer, of the The legman looks it over, peovise, cutting his time absolute necessity he has Legmen that 
requiring wordsmithing team and the sizes it up against what he losses on poor shows and boos- to be an upbeat type. The eter. to fi onict oes 


‘ing dramatically and space will be required - 
for an additional 1,829 pupils by 1977. 

Administrator Eric Runacres envisages 
two new secondary schools, one at Stirling 
and one in East Belleville, but poses the prob- 
lem of a decade hence, when high school popu- 
lation starts to fall off? 

Alternatives run the gamut from bussing 
children from school to school as populations 
ahift, use by secondary schodl students of ele- 
mentary school accommodation as classrooms 
in the latter become vacant, work-study pro- 
grams which would have high school students 
out of school for periods to learn on the job in 


local ‘plants and businesses, home study by 
advanced students, to 2 12-month school year 





Looking Backward 


GLEANINGS FROM OUR FILES OF BYGONE YEARS 
20 YEARS AGO 


3 end other sports features of the 

broken into three or more semesters, and con- university. 48 YEARS AGO 
“ ” i and the Cham 

struction of “relocatable schools” similar to the ber of Commerce was the topic October 2, 1931 


first building put up at Loyalist College. There 
is also the possibility, in Mr. Runacres’ view, of 


; bushels of oats in Jess than nine 
putting up school buiidings that could be sold merce to the Rotary Club at hours on the farm of ex-W. 
‘eventually for conversion to factories or ap- their weekly luncheon, Mr. Da- of the county Gedrge Bailey 
artment buildings. : vis, who was born and educated Harold, Rawdon 


township, . 

was a bumper yield of oats. y 
Beileville market prices: eges 
25-26 cents per dozen; butter 27- 
28 cents per pound; chickens 75 


As we haye suggested, there is no lack of 
ideas. Bussing ‘however, as well as relocatable 
or temporary buildings destined for ultimate 


coms to $1 ir. 
use for other purposes, could sap whatever want 3@ YEARS AGO 7 ae Pas. 
pride and esprit de corps students may have . ‘ October 2, 1941 RS AGO 
in the schools they attend. It would increase Emblematic of their efforts October 2, 1921 j 


It’s Groovy! 


Well, the good old summertime has not left us 
completely. This Outlet scene is from a little while 


Form B won the Riggs’ Tro- 
phy in a basketball match play- « 
ed at the high school grounds 
against Form 2A. Score was 32 


too the sense of rootlessness and alienation 
some feel in the process of being shunted 
around and in the midst of large numbers of 


: in Toronto, for the alleviation 
degree of warmth, with the added bonus of of the suffering of their nation: 


autumn's giory. * (Picture by Ian Robertson) 


! al war refugees, the Chinese to 14, 
other young people. However ,that is not to back, but we are back to fine days again, and a fair Merchants Club of Belleville the barge “Dresdan” ran 
say that the ideas are not sound ones in the aground while proceeding out of 


context of the future and which of necessity 
may have to be adopted to meet the kind of ‘ 
needs the Hastings board visualizes. 


The young people of tomorrow are going 

sek to have to be more adaptable anyway and if 
they find themselves in a situation of more 
movement, in buses and in relocatable schools, : 
So be it. We would prefer however to sce as 
little bussing as possible and students in fixed 
establishments similar to those in use today. 
Stability should remain the goal of both popu- 
lation and school. If efter 1980 high school 
population does drop then maybe the year- 
round semester concept of education may 
be the answer, enabling permanent use to be 
made of the schools. It would‘require a greatly 
increased teaching staff — but then, that is 


Sxndbarhemaad That Actlicial Lake Scheme: 


expense of the rest of the com- 
munity. 

And, anyway, is there no bet- 
ter way we can spend $30 mil- 
lion in these times than to dig 
a big hole and fill it with water 
when natural water holes 
abound, almost on our door- ~* 
the political know have been steps? : 
able to make a killing at the WILLIAM C. HOCKLEY 


Opposition Prone to Gimtnicks 


. From The Intefligencer's 
Queen's Park Bureau 
By DON O'HEARN 


Editor, 
The Intelligencer. 

In these days of economic di- 
lemma, any proposal aimed at 
alleviating the: unemployment 
crisis is worthy of serious con- 
sideration, no matter how irrel- 
evant it may appear at first 
glance. 

Even so, the current sugges 
tion of spending $30 million dol- 
lars to create an artificial lake 
in North Hastings is incredible. 
In a province blessed with over 
200,000 natural lakes this pro- 
ject is comparable with truck- 
ing sand to the Sahara desert. 

In the light of the rape of the 


the arca proposed for the lake 
it is hard to foretell what future 
demands may be made by pr 
vate entreprencurs, Imagine 
spending $3 mullion to crezte 
an artificial lake and resort 
area Only to have some com 


desirable material for profit or 
any other reason, 

This whole project needs to be 
studied in detail and the value 
of the work generated weighed 
against the cost and practicality 
of the whole scheme. As the 
pany move in and remove the people of Ontario are going to 
sand from the beaches, tie wa- have to pay for it they must 
ter from the lake or any other = be asked by plebiscite if they 


want it and are prepared to pay 
for it. A full list of the names 
of the owners of the haf of 
the property that fs not govern- 


Mr, and \ 
mem owned must be published. Arie te as Caceme Aster aD 


Of this city have returned home | 
ifter a trip to Winnipeg and 
ther places in Westem Can- 
ada. 





This means it has to sell, and can Jook not too bad. 
hard sell. After all, why not? 
And in the drive to sell, some Doctors and lawyers do nm 


primarily meet extensive tech- 
nical requirements. 
But such requirements for 


IN 


another. problem. 





Wolf Legend 


It was a message in the Farley Mcwat 
tradition — the wolf, that is, contrary to long- 
held belief, is not such a bad critter after all; 
and he does not kill his own kind, in the way 
humans do. As for looking after their own, 
moreover, wolves are among the best parents 
of the animal kingdom. 


The CBC showed this little-known side 
of tt wolf, an animal which has its place in 
the scheme of things, its role in nature, in its 
program “Death of a Legend” the other day. 
Here we saw the wolf in his outdoor habitat, 
and particularly amid the winter snow where 
he is often at the mercy of.yapacious hunters 

~ in aircraft and now, more and more, riflemen 
on snowmobiles. 


Wolves where they have been known to 
menace farm stock cr protected game can 
expect the farmer's or hunter's wrath, but to 
hunt them down and Kill them for sport, as 
many are doing today by plane and snowmo- 
bile is not only crael but is harassing mem- 
bers of. the animal world which fulfill a valu- 
able role in the balance of nature. 


‘Indiscriminate hunting of the wolf is on a 
par with the same frenetic hounding of game 
in Africa, in many cases by poachers after the 
game for their coats and commercial value on 
the overseas fashion markets. “Death- of a 
Legend” had a message, as Farley Mowat's 
works on this subject do: It is that the big bad 
wolf of legend has a much less ominous image 
than may be supposed. 








Sandbanks by a private cement 
company, apparently with the 
permission and blessing of the 
provincial government, the 
taxpayer may be excused if he 
exhibits signs of headshakins. 

Many thousands of tax dol- 
lars were allocated to *he de 
velopment of the Sandbanks 
area. Now, at an amount quot 
ed as being $1 a truck Joad, 
some 80,000 tons of sand a year 
is being removed in the name of 
private enterprise. 

Already, Ilcading ecologists 
have pointed out that unless this 
practice is ceased immediately, 
irreparable damage will result, 
or, at best require very costly 
redevelopment to restore~ the 
ecological balance. 

The taxpayer paid for the or- 
iginal development of the banks, 
and I suggest is of peo- 
ple have enjoyed wandering 
amidst the beauty of the sand 
hills while listening to‘the gen- 
tle wash of the waters of Lake 
Ortario. I cannot recall the tax- 
payer ever being asked if he 
wished to sell off his investment 
to assist a private company to 
manufacture cement. 

If the government of Ontario 
heeds the growing concem and 
halts the removal of sand from 
the arca, who is going to foot the 
bill to replace and redevelop 
Lea Sree Will it be the 

Cement Company 
lations 

~paid for igi : 
wehouees 5 ae original. de 
I ixperience is any 
guide wer is obvious — 
the taxpayer. 


Not ‘knowing the Bcolégy of relaxed abortion laws. In Wash- 


‘TORONTO The opposition 
has a much harder job in an el- 
ection than the government. 

The government essentially 
haw testo pnd hold its vote. If 
it can do this, it will go back. + 


The opposition hes lo win new 
voles. 


extreme proposals can be put 
before the public. ‘ 
Liberal leader Robert Ni 
may have come up with one 
these with his proposal that 
teachers should be self-licencing 
and self governing, along the 
Lines of the incdical profession. 
On the surface this suggestion 


their own shows, so why not 
teachers? They also are spccial- 
ists and carry a degree of res- 
ponsibility as well as requiring 
icular education. 

But then, there are definite 
distinctions. 

A very important one is in 
standards. 


Doctors to be licensed must 
pad 


Toward Zero Population Growth 


~ Windsor Star 


According to a recently issued 
report by the Washington Con- > 
tre for Metropotitan studs he 
baby bocm has become a baby 
bust. The Centre peedicted that 
zero population growth new is 
a definite possibility for the U.S. 
in this century. Since Canadian 
hfe patterns generally mirror 
those in the USA, it is most 
Lkely that a similar develop 
ment is taking place in Cana- 
da, 

Such developments in popula- 
tion growth patlerns only re- 
inf:rce the argument that plan- 
ning for the future should not 
be based on past population 
growth patterns alone, but take 
into account the changing public 
attitudes towards childbearing. 
It makes ‘little scnoe, for ex- 
ample, to plan ahead for a city 
of several ‘millic#i people when 
the expected additional popu- 
lation will not be there. 

It is of further significance 
that the U.S. study did not take 
into account the increasing ab- 
orticn rate which resulted from 





ington alone, for example, ab 
ortions now run at the rate of 
2,000 per month. As abortion 
laws relax elsewhere — as they 
undoubtedly will in time — the 
prospect of zero ~ population 
Kruwth becoming a reulity may 


Evolution of 


F Ottawa 


On Labor Day,.a sense of 
humor helps a- trade union 
member. } 

Platitudes abound, as politi- 
cians and editorial writers 
praise labor's contribution to 
the nation; and sometimes 
mingle fatherly advice with the 
praise. The union man may 
Suspect that, next day, a few 
public well - wishers are again 
grumbling privately, “these 
damn unions . . .” 

Platitudes should be avoided 
and advice withheld for future 


tinent to public dialogue. 
In 1886, when the Trades 
Labor Congress of Canada. was 
formed as the first national la- 


J 


not be far away. It is also sig- 
nificam to note in this respect 
that .a British House of Com- 


preventing “unwanted” child- 


“ren from being born. 


the Unions 


bor body, it was not self-evi- 


ditions, 4 ; 

Labor as an entity, of course. 
is not made’ of -ohly of ‘union 
members. But well over 2 mil- 






teachers relatively minor. 
They do some pedagogical 
training. But pedagogy if it is a 
science at all, is a most inexact 
one. Routine examinations can 
show that the teacher applicant 
has absorbed whatever of this 
that is needed. And there is no 
way beyond this that a body’ of 


fellow teachers can tell whether. 


the applicant wil! be a bad 
or a good teacher. If for no 
Gther reason than that there is 
Do real standard of what is a 
good teacher, and given any 
ha dozen teachers you prob- 
ably will get a half dozen differ- 
ent answers as to what com- 
prises excellence in their call- 
ing 


A further important difference 
is that professional integrity is 
of yilal importance in both me- 
dicine and law. While it would 
be probably impossible to spe- 

- cify what constitutes integrity 
in teaching. 

Further, teachers all get their 
remeneration from public 
funds. As their employer, and 
being responsible for the quality 


of education, the state has a. 


very defjnite first person inter- 
est in their’standards, 

Ht would seem doubtful that 
Mr. Nixon would have thought 
this through. He and his advis- 
trs seem most likely in this case 
to have been dominantly at- 
tracted by’ the 80,000 teacher 
votes. s 

A rouble Is that rash election 


” one more continuing tension in 
~~ the community, 


Ontario. 
%  1946—Steelworkers 


| HISTORY | 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


Oct. 2, 1971... * 
Much of the far northern 
territory of Canada way, 
formed into the districts o h 
Mackenzie, Yukon c 
Franklin 76 years ago today 
—in 18%—and placed under 
control of the Regina gov- 
ernment. The Yukon be- 
came a territory in 1697, 
The remaining area was 
divided into the districts of 
Mackenzie, Keewatin ‘and 

Franklin in 1918. 

195S—The Canadian -Un- 
employment Act came into 
force. 

1950—The cost’ of index 
reached a record 170.7 in” 
Canada. 

1H9—The Soviet Union 
recognized the Chinese 
Communist government at 






Peking. 

1H8-Geee Drew was 
elected nal Jeader of | 
the Conserva # 


tive party, resigning two. | 
weeks later as premier of 


ac | 
cepted a I3cent hourly ~ | 
wage increase and returned 
to work after a strike which 
lasted 80 days. 

182—Lt. Col. Cecil Mer- | 
sTitt was awarded the Victo- — | 
ria Cross in the Dieppe hon- 
ors list. 

1899—An armed raider 
sank the British freighter | 
Clement off -the Brazilian | 











“= 


A let 
five fn 


Oe? 


Moslems, 


Me 


‘CHILDREN’S LETTERS 


De ar (Ir For ley, 
o f birds 
our yar o 


So dpi Vv-e EC AE Cfo l 


CoLAY, 


From inéxt 





Hindus 


Feel Pressure First 


M. Haroon Siddiqi, Bran> 

- don Sun city editor and for- 

8 mer Indian newspaper man, 
recently returned from a 
six-week visit to the sub- 
continent, Here he gives his 
views of India’s religious 
problems. 


By M. HAROON SIDDIQI 
Brandon Sun 


BRANDON, Mad. (CP) — 
Every time relations between 
India and Pakistan become 

strained—and that happens of- 
ten—the people who feel the 
tension and pressure more 
than any one else are the 60 
million Moslems of India and 
the 12 million Hindus of Paki 
stan. 

The present Bangla Desh 
crisis which has brought the 
two countries close to war is 
no exception. The atmosphere 
is volatile and conducive to 
communal riots, which if 
started could unleash violence 
“and killings. 

Still Hngering in the minds 
of the two miporitics are 
memories of the 18748 Hin- 
di-Moslem_ riots) when 
hundreds cf thousa were 
massacred after the partition 
of India into Moslem-dom!- 
nated Pakistan and Hindu- 
dominated India. An esti- 
mated 6.59-million Mosicms 
fled from India to Pakistan 
and 5.6-million Hindus from 
Pakistan to India. 

The mass migration did not 
leave Pakistan purely Moslem 
or India purely Hindu. By 1950 
there still remained as many 
as 45 million Moslems in India 
and about 18 million Hicdus in 
Pakistan. 

Living in the two countries 
created on sectarian lines has 
not been easy for the two mi- 
norities. Their loyalties con- 
stantly questioned, their reli- 
gious practices frowned on by 
the majority, they have had to 
live the life of second-class 
citizens facing discrimination 
fn Jobs and in their day-to-day 
lives. 

The Hindus of Pakistan 
have been concentrated in 
East Pakistan which, until 
a early this year, was consi- 
f dered a safer place for them 

than the western wing of the 

a country where they had to 
subjugate their freedom of 
speech, culture, language and 
thelr rejigious to 

* avoid the wrath of the eccen- 

tric religious fervor of Pun 
jabi Moslems. _ 2 

. Although East Pakistan 
Hindus found It easier to inte- 
ss grate with the majority be- 
cause their Bengali language 
and culture is no different 
than that of Bengali Moslems, 
they were victims of many 
riots and an estimated five 
million were forced “to -mi- 
grate, to, India between 1950 

and 197 
But the real crunch came 
ig when the West Pakistan Pun- 
; Jabidominated army~ began 
mars crushing the independence 
movement in East Pakistan in 
March and made Hindus the 
principal target of brutalities. 

Punjabi Moslems’ tradi- 
tional. hatred of the Hindus 
coupled with their desire to 
avenge Hindu support of the 
independence movement 
meant that a vast majority of 
the. reported 200,000 killed by 
the army and of the seven 
million refugees spilling into 
India were Hindus. 

Some observers believe that 
the) Pakistan army—which 
has so far unloaded half of the 
country’s minority pepulation 
onto India—is systematically 
driving Hindus out of its bor- 
ders. 

The problems of the Mos- 
lem minority {n India have 
been numerous. 
fn the civil service and the 

and their representa- 





< 


eir number - 


tion in provincial legislatures 
and federal parliament is not 


been cut down brutally in the 
many communal riots the 
pee nero epee a 


apts low-ranking Hindu of- 
ticials, especially officers, 
tend to side with the Hindus 
pik fost riots, and keep 

files on leading Mos- 
lems, often misconstruing nor- 
mal Moslem criticisms of cer- 
tain government policies af- 
fecting them. 

Far too often, Moslem lead- 
ers standing up to fight demo- 
cratically for their people's 
constitutional rights are 
branded “communal.” 

But Indian Moslems never 
have had to face anything 
even remotely resembling the 
Pakistan army's recent po- 

The important differncce 
between India and Pakistan, 
from the point of view of the 
minorities, is that Pakistan is 


an Islamic state committed in . 


effect to the domination and 
superiority of Moslems over 
the followers of other reli- 
gions, while India is a secular 
country with a constitution 
that provides equal ‘rights to 
people irrespective of religion, 
caste or creed. 

And happily for Indian Mos- 
lems, a majority of those in 
power since 1317 at the fed- 
eral and provincial levels. es- 
pecially in New Delhi, have 
been men and women dedi- 
cated to the principle of 
equality between all people. 

. This is in direct contrast to 
the situation in Pakistan 
where politicians keep whip- 
ping up anti-India campaigns 
to win cheap popular support. 

As the Ilustrated Weekly of 
India put it in a recent edi- 
tion: “Religicus hatred is his- 


tory’s legacy to both India - 


and Pakistan, but while India 
fought against it, Pakistan 
fanned it.” 

The Indian federal govern- 
ment has been alert to the 
dangers of communalism and 
has succeeded in dealing with 
it in as efficient a manner as 
is perhaps possible in an un- 
derdeveloped country of 1.23 
milliog square miles and 550 


* million people. 


Prime Minister Mrs. Gan- 
dhi’s overwhelming victory in 
the general elections early 
this year has given Moslems a 
new confidence and a sense of 
Telief, more so hecause she 
succeeded in routing out the 
Jan Sangh party, which has 
been known to have instigated 
many Hindu-Moslem riots. 

Despite the government's 
leadership in secularism, 
there are many in the country 
who, angered by what the 
Pakistan army did to Hindus 
of East Pakistan, would love 
to even the score by releasing 
their deep hostility on the 
Moslems of India. 


Christian Science 
~ Society ¢ 


(A branch of The Mother Church 
‘The First Church of Christ, 


beer be in Boston, 
jassachusetts) 


12 2 Poritr Avenue 
(Masonic Temple) 
Belleville 


SUNDAY SERVICE 
11:00 a.m. . , 
Subject: “UNREALITY” 
Sunday School - 11:00 a.m. 
(For pupils up to age 20) 
Testimonial Meeting 
at 8:00 p.m. - 4th W 
of each 






















P.M—PRACTICAL LESSONS FROM PSALM 119 

















The Anglican: Church of Canada 
‘ST. THOMAS’ CHURCH 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
TRINITY XVIL 


“8:00 2.m.—HOLY COMMUNION 


10:30 a.m.—CHORAL peter aires 
“Sunday School under the Church. Other{ 
Deparisheets will attend the firet part of the Church 


8:00 p.m.—ANGLICAN YOUTH MOVEMENT IN CHRIST 
CHURCH PARISH HALL. 2 atte 


lWEDNESDAY 
A.C.W. DEANERY MEETING IN ROSLIN. 
THERE WILL BE NO SERVICE OF COMMUNION IN_ 
ST. AGNES CHAPEL. 


| NEWCOMERS 10 THE CITY ARE INVITED TO MAKE 
ST. THOMAS' THEIR CHURCH HOME 


CHRIST CHURCH. 








9:45 a.m.—SUNDAY SCHOOL 





11:00 —FAMILY WORSHIP posthccoesapory 
7:00 p.m RALLY Neder bemeec rect 
. Rector 





The Salvation’ Army 


Asaistan: 
‘The Reverend J, R. Uttiey, 












188 VICTORIA AVE. AT CHATHAM STREET — BSc, ARCO. 
CAPT. & MRS. E.T GURNEY Organist and Master: 
DEPUTY BANDMASTER: A. AUSTIN .° ne : < - ae 
: EADER: G GRAINGER SUND ‘ocTo 
SONGSTER LEADER DAY. OCTOBE! : 


3:00 a.m.—HOLY COMMUNION 


10:30 a.m.—FAMILY EUCHARIST — Church School & Nursery 
(Senior Classes in Church this Sunday) 


7:00 p.m.—EVENSONG AND SERMON 
8:00 p.m.—ANGLICAN YOUTH MOVEMENT 


MIDWEEK SERVICE OF HOLY COMMUNION 
WEDNESDAY, 10:15 a.m. 


PARK DALE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 


$14 SIDNEY STREET 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd. 


A GROWING CHURCH IN A GROWING BAPTISMS BY APPOINTMENT 
COMMUNITY _ WE INVITE YOU TO MAKE CHRIST CHURCH 
We Heartily Welcome You YOUR PARISH CHURCH. 


SUNDAY SCHOOL—9:45 a.m. 


THE FAMILY HOUR WORSHIP SERVICE— 
11:00 a.m. 


THE YOUTH HOUR—6:00 p.m. 
THE EVENING SERVICE—7:30 p.m. 
AM.—THE OFFICES OF CHRIST 


ST. MARGARET'S ON THE HILL 


ORIOLE PARK AVENUE 
REV. J. A. DUNLOP, Rector 
Organist MR. WILLIAM 6B. J. McARTON 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
HARVEST THANKSGIVING 
8:30 a.m.—HOLY COMMUNION (Nursery) 
10:30 a.m.—HOLY COMMUNION 
10.30 a.m.—CHURCH SCHOOL—ALL GRADES 
VISITORS AND NEW MEMBERS WELCOME 


Pastor Penny preaching 


We are happy to announce the commencement of 
the Stockade Program for boys ages 8 to 11 years, 
each Monday evening at 7:00 o'clock. i 











The Presbyterian Church in Canada 
ST. ANDREW‘S CHURCH 


Church Sireet at Victoria Avenue 
Minister: REV. A. L. SUTHERLAND, B.A. 
Organist and Choir Director: MR. FRANK K. MARTIN 


9.45 a.m.—Church School—10 and over 
11.00 a.m.—Church School — 3-9 years 
11:00 a.m.—THE SACRAMENT OF THE LORD'S 

SUPPER 



























CALVARY TEMPLE 


PENTECOSTAL, ASSEMBLIES OF CANADA 
DUNDAS 4T GEORGE STREET 
BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO 
PASTOR+REV. C. K. BENN 

REV.1. LEACH 
CHOIR DIRECTOR: D. LEACH 
ORGANIST: D. OGBORNE 


10:00 a.m.—CHRISTIAN EDUCATION HOUR. At- 
tendance last week, 433. Adult Lesson: 
“A SURE COVENANT” 
MISSIONARY DAY. 


11:00 a.m.—COMMUNION SERVICE. Every Believer 
should obey Christ’s Command, “THIS 
DO IN REMEMBRANCE OF ME”. 


7:00 p.m.—MISSIONARY GOSPEL RALLY with 
Pastor Benn preaching on current mis- 
sionary Theme. Temple Choir and 
Special Singing. Welcome to Visitors. 


| en 8:00 p.m.—Mid-Week pelomeep 2 Bible 
Prayer. “CRUCIFIED WITH C 


7:00 p.m.—THE SACRAMENT OF THE LORD'S 
SUPPER 


ST. COLUMBA 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 


Corner Bridge Street and Farley Avenue 
Minister: REV. D. MURPHY, B.A., B.D., M.Th. 


9:30 a.m.—Junior, Intermediate and Senior Church School 

11:00 a.m.—Nursery, Kindergarten and Primary Church School 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 

11:00 am.—MORNING WORSHIP 


BETHEL a: 


eae ee 
0.15 a.m.—The Lord's Supper 5 ’ 

























11.00 a.m. 
Wednesday, 6:45 p.m.—Crusaders in Christian Edu- 
MR. GLENFORD cation Hall. 
MURPHY 8:00 p.m.—Christ’s Ambassadors Youth 
Lakefield . Thursday, October 7th, 8:00 p.m.—THE SINGING 
11.00 a.m.—Sunday Schoo! SHELLS of Wisconsin. This group Is 
Classes for All really diff t and receive wide ac- 
Agee pase claim. we 
7:00 p.m.—MR. GLENFORD MURPHY, Lakefield | | Saturday, 7:00, p.m.—Prayer Rally. 
Wednesday, 7.30 p.m.—Prayer and Bible Study ne “BUILD YOUR LIFE AND HOME WITH US 








ON THE OPEN BIBLE” 


~ CHRISTIAN REFORMED 


CHURCH The Wesleyan 
72 ORCHARD DRIVE ? 
4 Methodist Church 
ister: . B.A. B.D. 
Minister: REV. BE. GRITTER Everett and H 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd ~__" | | sinuter: REVEREND ELDON P. 
WORSHIP SERVICES ripe heme 
2 10:00 a.m. and 7:30-p.m. Organists: Mrs. Atleen Blakely 
Nursery Provide? 


YOU ARE WELCOME TO WORSHIP WITH US secrete 


i 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
9:45 a.m.—CHURCH SCHOOL FOR THE FAMILY 





Centennial Free Methodist Church 











ok Avaaaae Bl 11:00 a.m.—MORNING WORSHIP 
PASTOR — REV. LORNE C. BALL HEAR MR, HAL BOTHAM OF C.J.E.T. 
ORGANISE = MES EVELYN PEERY. 7:30 p.m.—COMMUNION SERVICE 
cee ere Ay Om Tuesday, 7:00 p.m.—CHRISTIAN CRUSADERS 
WORSHIY day, 8:00 p.m.—BIBLE STUDY AND PRAYER 
11:00 && 7:00 Feit Oi Po OUTH TINE ” 


Tuesday, 7.00 p.m.—PRAYER AND BIBLE STUDY 
Light and Life Hour, Sunday 9-92.30 a.m. CKLC, 1380 


ALL: ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 


WORSHIP WITH 


CHURCH OF CHRIST - 


MEETING AT ENGINEER'S HALL 
Comer of Pine & Chatham Bt. Belleville 


SUNDAY pare —- 10.00 a.m. 


STANDARD CHURCH 


PASTOR - REV. B. WOOD © MURMEY BT. 
vA SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
7 200 G ™m—SUNDAY SCHOOL 
a MORNING SERVICE 
m.—EVENING SERVICE 
i 209 p.m.—THURSDAY—PRAYER SERVICE 
A HEARTY INVITATION TO ALL 




















~ 















THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1911 § | 


he United Church” 
. of Canada 





Bridge Street United Church 


CORNER BRIDG# AND CHURCH STREETS 
: Rev Harry M Davis, BA, DD, Minister 
Robert Reid, Chotr Dtrester, &. Alec Gordon, Organist 
WORLD WIDE COMMUNION SUNDAY, 
OCTOBER 3rd 
ses CHURCK SCHOOL 
10:00 ati: i Senior Department * 
11:00 a.m.—Crib Room, Nursery, Kindergarten, Primary, Ju- 
nior Departments. ~ 
5 CHURCH WORSHIP. ‘ 
10:00_a.m.—HOLY COMMUNION IN THE CHAPEL 
11:00 a.m.—HOLY COMMUNION, IN THE CHURCH 
. Meditation: “DON'T WASTE YOUR HIGH 
HOURS” 
Dr. Andrew G. Finnie preaching 


ALL ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 
TABERNACLE UNITED CHURCH 


Muste Director: Mr, Clifford Templer, AT.CM, LMus. (McOit!) 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
11:00 a.m.—MORNING WORSHIP 
Sermon: “A NATION'S GREATNESS” 
11 Samuel 
CHURCH SCHOOL 
10:45 a. w= Junior: Senior and Intermediate Classes 
11:00 a.m.-Primary, Kindergarten and Nursery Classes 
~ ~Car Parking in Tabernacle's Large Parking Lot on Jobn St. 
bebind the Church. 
ALL ARE CORDIALLY INVITED 


HOLLOWAY ST. UNITED CHURCE 


CORNER DUNBAR AND HOLLOWAY STREETS | 
TRE FAMILY CHURCH 
REVEREND J. WILLIAM LAMB, BA, BD. Minister 
Organist: MR. D. HOARE — Chotr Director: MR. J. MACKAY 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 


9:45 a.m.—Junior and Intermediate Sunday School 
11:00 a.m.—Nursery, Kindergarten and Primary Dept. 


11:00 a.m—SACRAMENT OF LORD'S SUPPER 


NEWCOMERS WILL FIND A WARM WELCOME AT “a 
HOLLOWAY IN ‘THE HEART OF WEST BELLEVILLE 


EASTMINSTER UNITED CHURCH 


RERCHIMER AVENUE AT ichapreetelat 











Minister: REVEREND Bb, 
Orgauist and Chotr Director: as no. McOUGAN, ARC.T. 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
11:00 am.—HOLY COMMUNION 
_. CHURCH SCROOL 
9:30 a.m.—Senior and Yntermediate 
11:00 a.m.—Junior, Primary, Kindergarten and Nursery 


COLLEGE HILL UNITED.CHURCH 


SORTER PARE SENaes ee PORTE OF COLLEGE. 
& VESSEY, BA. B.D. Minister 
pigantes une Chase Essaes tae maeen nik oe 


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
MORNING WORSHIP 
9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. 
CHURCH SCHOOL 
9:30 a.m.—Senior, Intermediate and Junior Depts. 
11:00 a.m.—Primary, Kindergarten and Nursery Depts. 


Baptist Churches 


MEMBERS OF THE BAPTIST 
CONVENTION OF ONTARIO AND 
QUEBEC AND THE BAPTIST 
FEDERATION OF CANADA 

















eS Victoria Avenue 
Baptist Church 


Corner of Victoria Ave., 
and Pinnacle Street 


Pastor: Rev, J. Arthur 
_ Sheil, B.D., M.A. 
Organist and Choir Director: 
Mr. Wm. Connor, M.A. 
9. x a.m.—Chureh School 1.30 p.m.—Evening Service 
11.00 _—F, Worshi 8.00 p.m.—Wednesday — 
Nursery and J ny 3 i Bible Study 
Worshippers rhs 9.50 a.m. 
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
11:00 a.m.—‘WHAT KEPT THE PROPHETS 
GOING” 


7:30 p.m.—BIBLE STUDY 


im) 
’ 


rsh be 








Emmanuel 
» Reine a Prehehae 
Baptist Church Besieae aay 
68 Rollins Dr. byes rae ee 
Next to Y.M.C.A. MA eae 
Pastor: FR: eet 
Rev, Charles H. Savage £ J ie 
Organist: gs eee Se 
Miss Deborab Johnston fing . ee ie 
Choir Director: ae sS (Ag! 
Mrs. P, Weigand 





_ , SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3rd 
9:45 am—CHURCHSCHOOL ~..& 


11:00 a.m.— WORSHIP AND COMMUNION * 
WORLD WIDE FELLOWSHIP 


y (Nursery and Jr. Church Facilities) 


ee 
CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY 
ALLIANCE.CHURCH — 


W. Morra at Coleman Strees 
Rev. Stephen E. Tilley — Pastor 


MORNING *. EVENING 

WORSHIP SERVICE 

11:00 a.m. 7:30 p.m. 
SUNDAY SCHOOL MIDWEEK SERVICE 


9:50 am. TUESDAY, 8:00 p.m. 













SOCIAL and 
PERSONAL 





Local Nurse 
To Serve 


With CUSO 





A local young woman, 
Miss Linda Langabeer, daugh- 


to serve, with CUSO (Canadi- 
an University Services Over- 
seas), 

During, her school years, 
Miss Langabeer attefided St. 
Michael's Academy ‘and 
Quinte Secondary School, and 
late graduated from the Belle- 
ville General Hospital School 
of Nursing. For the past three 
years she has been on the op- 
exating room staff of the hos- 
pital. 

Her duti¢s in Alrica will in- 
clude tutoring and ward su- 
pervisory work in a teaching 
hospital operated by the Sis- 
ters of the Holy Family, Be- 
rekun, Brong Ahafo Region, 


Meagre in comparison to this 
country Miss Langabeer is 
looking forward to the chal- 
lenge of a two-year stint of 
duty in Africa. 


ST. ANDREW'S GUILD 


The September meeting of 
the Women’s Guild of St. An- 
drew’s Presbyterian Church 
was held in the parlor on 
Tuesday evening. “s 

Mrs. S, Fraser welcomed 
the group and opened the 
meeting with prayer. ~ 

The Sunshine Group was in 
charge of devotions with Mrs. 
A. Globe and-Mrs. R. King- 
ston’ taking part. * 

Mrs. R. Kempster gave the 
secretary's report and réid 


Michaud gave the 
treasurer's report. Mrs, Fra- 
ser thanked those who helped 
in the care group during the 
summer months, 

Mrs. M. Barlow expressed 
pleasure in meeting some 
young people from a United 
Presbyterian Church in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohid’These young 

_ people were on a working 
tour and spent a night at.the 
church, : ~ 
. The Women’s Missionary So- 
¢elety is oacking a bale and 

~ Mrs. V. Weir would be pleas- 
ed to pick up donations of 





| @ THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, ism 


A lo Se 






POINTS 
FOR 
PARENTS - 


~ MARY 
BRYSON 


\ 


44444 


your 


_ " CO ea mere 


‘thyod hire a babysitter for an evening, then change’ 
na; t may mean she has lost the chance to can 


‘a fee. 1f you must cancel out at the last minute, offer to 


reimburse her a reasonable amount, 
has tumed down other jobs for the same ours. 


ally if she 


Sales, Ad President 


Will Address Club & *== #220 


Mrs. Pauline Hill, first wo- 
man president of the 3,000 
member Canadien Advertis- 
ing and Sales Association will 
be the guest apeaker when the 
Beileville Women’s Sales and 


on's of Canada in Toronto and 


el a eee 


She joined Wekome Wagon 
Limited in Regina 1%3 as 
hostess; transferred to Win- 
nipeg as.area director of 
Western Canada for Welcome 
Wagon and in 1967 moved to 


managing director for Can- 
ada. In 1970, Mrs. Hill be- 
came executive vice-president 
of Welcome Wagon Lid., and 
elected to the Board of Direc- 
tors at that time. 

Mrs, Hill is married to Alex 
Hill, retired Inspector for De- 
tectives, Regina City Police 
Department and is- involved 
in numerous community en- 
deavors. 


Horticultural Meeting 


TWEED — Arrangements 
have been made by Tweed 
Horticultural Society to have 
as its guest speaker John 
Wuite — resources manager 
for Moira River Conservation 
Authority. on Tuesday, Oct- 
ober 12, to be held at the S. H. 
Connor School, Tweed, at 
8 p.m. 

The first meeting of the 
society for the coming season 


Women’s Institutes 


REDNERSVILLE WI 


Mrs. W. Green entertained 
the Rednersville Women's 
Institute for the September 


. 23 meeting. There was a good 


attendance in spite of the 
wind and rain. 


originated. Total 
$40,000, half of which has al- 
ready been raised. Nh was 
decided the branch will send 


$10.00 to the fund. 


Airs. H. Bonter extended 
thanks to those who had help- 
ed at Picton Fair, donating 
cookies, serving tea and 
cookies and detnonstrating a 
turkey casserole. She also 
thanked the hostess, Mrs. W. 
Green. 

Mrs. E. Onderdonk volun- 
teered to represent the Belle- 
ville branch at the Area Con- 
vention held in Belleville on 
October 21\and 22. Others may 
help with the report. During 
the apple picking and other 
harvests ‘t is difficult for 
many tv be sure of time to 
attend. 

Mrs. Gary Townsend gave 
an interesting talk on agricul- 
ture, beginning with a his- 
tory of its progress across 
Canada, It started in Quebec 
and Ontario in the 1500's. but 
the prairies were ‘much later. 
being settled. She also spoke 
of the Agricultural Rehabilia- 


was held recently, following 
the summer recess and was in 
charge of the president. Mrs, 
/Tarrté Wilson, The meeting 
opened in the usual way and 
the unfinished business was 
dealt with which included 
the appointment of Larry 
Wilson as bulletin editor, ~ 

Mrs. Jane Hughes won the 
flowering crab trce for obtain- 
ing the most new members 
during the summer months. 
This prize was offered by 
Larry Johnson, president of 
the Bellevilie orticultural 
Society. The raffle was won 
by Mrs. P. C. Barnett, a beau- 
tiful bouquet of cut flowers, 
and Mrs. George Griffin was 
the lucky winner of the door 
prize. 

Several other items of busi- 
ness were discussed and laid 
over until next meeting, in- 

. cluding the election of new 
ofticers. 


Surprise 
Party Given 
By Daughters 


TWEED — A surprise party 
was held recently at the home 
of Mr: and Mrs. Harry Ash 
ton, Durham Street, Madoc, 
to mark their 25h wedding 
anniversary, following a fa- 
mily dinner at the same 
home. 

The party had been arrang- 
ed by their daughters, Lynda 
(Mrs. Glenn West) of Ban 
croft, and Kathy, of Ottawa, 
with the assistance of their 
aunt, Miss Irene Snodden of 
Toronto and Mrs. Doug Pig- 
den, of Madoc. 

The table was decorated 
with a centrepiecé of red roses 
and white carnations, and sin 
Bie (roses with the names 
“Lynda” and “Kathy” on at- 
tached ribbons, as well as sil- 
ver candies and a three tict 
wedding cake. The cake was 
made and decorated by Mrs. 
Edward Galloway of Deloro. 

The bride and bridegroom 
of 2 years ago received many 
lovely gifts and congratula- 
tory messages. 

A total of 65 guests were 
present from Madoc, Foxboro; 
Belleville, Toronto, Mississau- 
ga and Sunderland, 





YOUR ANTIQUES 


by Jack Jamieson 


Jewellery Inexpensive: 


At Turn of Century 


At the turn of the century 
& was possible to buy a solid 
gold, 8" chainlink bracelet 
for $15.~The same bracelet in 
solid silver was $1.50, A 10 
carat gold ring set with gat- 
nets and pearis was $2. An 
engagement ring set with gar- 
nets,. pearls or turquoise was 
$1.25, The same ring set with 
diamonds, three large and 17 





Picture Credit: Messrs. 
Christie, Manson and Wood 


keeper rings were as cheap as 
35 cents each. 

A great deal of Victorian 
jewellery remains. It turns 
up with regularity at house 
auctions, In many oases a 
lot of items of jewellery are 
thrown away before the auc- 
tion begins because they are 
incomplete, one earnng, one 
cuff - link. or have a dam- 
aged pin. If silver they are 
probably black and tarnished 
and thrown away as worth: 
less. 

Silver mounted dresser sets 
were once in everyhdusehold. 
The mountings were usually 
over “French ivory"’ a type of 
celluloid that has probably 
long since yellowed and crack- 
ed or disappeared altogether. 
The silver mounts can be re- 
used on new combs, brushes. 
clothes-brushes, nail buffers. 
manicure sets or shoe horns 
and will last for another three 
generations. 

Gold collar studs and shirt 
studs dre often thrown out 
in the belief that they are 
brass. Not a few gold shirt 
studs are set with diamonds. 
Cuff buttons or cuff links in 
solid silver sold for 40 cents 
a pair in the 1890s. Set wnh 


Club Activities 
CROOKSTON ¢H CLUB 


On Monday. September 20. 
the third mecting of the 
Crookston 4H homemaking 
club was held at the home of 
Mrs. Donald Blackburn 

The discussion and demon- 
stration was on how to make 
a dresser scarf. Mrs. Black- 
burn and Mrs. Francis dem- 
onstrated the basic steps sin 
making a dresser scarf. For 
the next meeting, the mem- 
bers are to have the material 
there to start on their dres 
ser scarves. 4 

For group work. the girls 
made waste baskets, which 
they found quite difficult to 
cover. But finally they came 
up with a pattern, making it 
somewhat easier. 


LADIES' 
ELECTROLYSIS 


Avoid shaving, tweezing or use 
of depiletories, Have eyebrows 
styled and unwanted hair re- 
moved PERMANENTLY by elect- 
rolysie. Physicians recommend 
our work, Por free consultation 
and information call collect 


HARRISON SALON 
KINGSTON, ONT. 


542-5595 or 546-3935 


pearls they cost 45 cents and 
top quality they were 75 cents. 

Watch fob mounts on silk, 
(silk Alberts) or on woven 
hair, (hair Alberts) in solid 
blouse sets," also called Al- 
berts started at 90 cents. 

Hatpins and stickpins were 
popular and inexpensive start- 
ing at 10 cents. A mourning 
pin in solid gold set with 
péaris cost $1.50. Czarinas or 
silver buckles for young la- 
dies to wear°on a ribbon 
around the throat were 50 
cents. 

In addition to all the small 
dress items in gold and sil- 
ver and precivus jewels there 
were many more elaborate 
items. Among the more bi- 
zarre is the piece illustrated, 
a parure of tizers claws and 
gold made in 1872. 

A parure'was a matching 
set consisting of necklace, 
brooch, earrings and brace- 
let. This one was probably 
made in India and retailed 
for less than $25 new and 
would ne valued in terms of 
thousands now, 

At auctions the place to look 
for Victorian jewellery is in 
bedroom drawers, glove draw- 
ers, men’s collar boxes, sew- 
ing boxes (where all the czar- 
inas, Alberts, and belt buckles 
ended up alter the fabric 
wore out), and in the drawers 
of old sewing machines. 

Gold and silver if unmarked, 
can be tested by nitric acid. 
The acid must be undiluted. 
There should be no reaction 
if a drop is put on pure gold. 
With lesser> qualities of gold 
there will be a slight bubbly 
reaction. With brass, nitric 
acid fizzes avay merrily and 

Sxa large hole in a mat- 
tert seconds. Silver reacts 
much the same way as gold 
except that pure silver will 
form a grey deposit that turns 
black in the sunlight almost 
immediately. Nitric acid is ex 
tremely dangerous and this 
test is not intended for the 
amateur. Take your jewellery 
to your jeweller and Jet him 
do it. 





Two-ways Great! 


by fune fdams 


Most versatile! Wear one- 
pe. short jump by itself to 
play tennis or team it with 
skirt or body stocking. No 
waist scams — very easy to 
sew! 

Printed Pattern 1936:- New 
Misses’ Sizes 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 
18. Size 12 (bust HH) takes 
2%% yards 33-inch fabric. 

Seventy - five cents (75c) in 
coins (no stamps, please) for 
each pattern — add 15 cents 
for each pattern for  first- 
class mailing and special hand- 
ling. Ontario residents add 4 
cents sales tax. Print plainly 
size, name, address, style 
number. 

Send order to Anne Adams, 
care of The Intelligencer, Pat- 
tern Dept.. 6 Front St. W., 


Toronto 1, Ontario. 


Belleville Broadloom 









Second 


It shall be no trespassing 

If I come again = - - 

In the grey.disgulse of years 
Seeking ache of memory here. 


* 


happened. Yes, sir, he 
patience with children. 

“Whereas the big work- 
horse would stand, patiently, 
while any of us children strug: 
gled upon his broad back (I 
went right on going to 
aher side of the ground when 
I first attempted to get on 
him). But once on that vast 
expanse, he would turn his 
head around as if to see whe- 
ther or not his rider was pro- 
perl: seated and took’ not a 
single step until he was satis- 
fied. He seemed to love chil- 
dren, It was thus I learned 
that animals,: like people, 
have likes and dislikes: per- 
sonalities in their own right.” 

There was a pause, The 
road brought the car into 
view of another lovely farm- 
house. at the sight of which, 
our driver exclaimed: 

“Many a piece of fresh, hot 
rhubarb pie have I had in 
the kitchen of that. house as 


chum of the boy who lived 


there. We would follow his 
mother out to the creamery 
where huge pans of milk were 
kept cool. With a ladle, she 
would skim off some cream 


180 NORTH FRONT STREET 
FREE PARKING — FREE ESTIMATES 


Open Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat, to 5:30 


chments. Big Singer® features» 


pe 
make this a big Sale-a-Thon deafi P 


sy \V/ =) 








By Viva Richmond Graham 


THE ACHE OF MEMORY ~ 


. - * 
“I ‘remember as a youn, 

of our car, as we pass by Ontario lush-green farm- 
lands surrounding a small village; his birthplace 
and childhood home, “how horses fascinated me.” 
~_, “I used to go over to that farm yonder, where 
there were two horses. One,'a huge bay work-horse. 
the other, a lively, small, dark-brown, young colt, 
which had ways and means of letting his rider 

- know how he felt about him. If riding in the woods, 
many a time he'd make for the tree with the lowest 

* branches, under which he’d duck with the intent of - 
sweeping his rider off in one neat brush. Or if riding 
along a rail fence, he'd manage in some subtle. 
fashion to trot so close beside it that the ridee’s leg 
would be bruised and bleeding before he knew what 


Thurs. & Fri. t6 9 p.m. ™ 















































Glance 





—Robert Frost 
* i - 
gster,” recalls the driver ~~” 


was like that! He had no 


and pour K over the hot pie 


We = drive 


cream, fresh from the cream- 
ery...” 


DIAL 968-8574 





SINGER 


men’s clothing and winter 









































Trademark of the Singer Company ol Canada Limited , 





i 





clothing. A vote of thanks was sounded delicious, She men- rf Wool ester Plaid Sultings—Soft ; 
given to Mrs. J. Robertson — tioned quite a variety of busi- Soe aan oe resistant tad fabric that looks and tke a 
and her committee for a suc- nesses represented“ by her ANS) | tO) \\| wool. Sale Price $3.88 yd. it 
cessful antique sale and show. guests. Many of them return 45" Novelty ae feeg dcr gtleli a! for dracses. 
plane ate junderwey Aor, May sear er ee, gear Ful washable and crease resistant. Sale Price $1.68 yd. rn 
other | show. ‘next ‘This js a year-round ‘vaca: Cordless Electric Sclssors—A sewing ‘must at this low 
with Mrs. Robertson as con- «tion project and Mra. Craig Sale-a-Thon price. Battery operated, safe and easy, cuts even 
vener 1 seetee: ye ber feel none heavy coatings: Sale Price $1.98. 

Miss Frieda Matthews ex- also en. using ‘the snow- Alex, Adams gen Use the redit plen. Buy now. 
tended an invitation for every-- mobiles, horses, ponies, etc. |] Save during Sale-e-Thon. Singer easy 2 

to jon week- have for the of their oj 7 

Seat SAL a ead SC pete ee FIRE - AUTO - LIFE ___ wines A =GOLDEN TOUCH AND SEWe™ SEWING MACHINE, 
Columba Churches on Oct. 16 Mrs. Doxtator was a spe- 100 Fabulous machines and 1000 other prizes ie 
and 17. Speakers are Rev. cial guests at this meeting. 962-5326 to be won in the ‘Creative Woman Sweepstakes 
James Sutherland of Taiwan, She had recently moved from by Five Roses All Purpose Flour. >| 
Colin Wasocase, Indian Affairs the district and has . been * **Detade and entry forms at yout Singer dealers or at your tevourfte food store. | 
Branch, Ottawa and Miss Lois “missed. She was - presented: ‘ ; | 
Cooke of Tyndale House, with a gift of a lovely cup : 
Montreal. » and saucer. 
by members of the Sunshine social time that followed the 225 FRONT STREET : ” DIAL 962-0885 | 






“Ann Landers = 
| Young Girl Makes 
Decision on Braces 


DEAR ANN LANDERS: Two years ago we took Ellen to. 
the orthodontist to have her teeth 'straightened. It was an ex- 
pensive job but we were willing to put out the money. Ellen 
wanted a pretty smile more than anything in ‘ : 
the world. : : 

For tne last year we have heard nothing 4 Pait3 
“but gripes. Ellen hates her braces. They are 4 
ruining her social life. They~cut her mouth, | 
thcy burt. Last week my. husband told Ellen 








‘that if the braces were making ber that un. © 
happy she didn't have to wear thom more. 
The next day she had them rei . The 


orthodontist was very displeased. AIQU LANDERS 
1 believe my husband was wrong. He said it wasn't worth ~ 
the aggravation — that he wasn't going to put out that much 
money to listen to all that whining. His last words, were, “After 
all, it's her mouth.” What do you say? — HAYWARD HASSLE. 


DEAR SASS; I say it's too bad your husband let a 13- 
year-old girl make a decision as important as that one. He 
should have insisted that Ellen stay with the braces until 
her teeth were straight. In a few years she'll be sorry. And 
then she'll blame her father for letting her do such a stupid 
thing. 





x * 
* - DEAR ANN LANDERS: In May my husband's sister was 
married, His [clks gave her a wedding that cost at least $3,000. 
They also gave her the sccond family car which she had been 
driving. When Dan and I married they gave us a modest gift. , 
ard their heartiest congratulations. ; 

My sister-in-law is now pregnant and my in-laws are serd- 
ing them a nice cheque fcr “medical expenses.” This really 
burns me up, Dan and Y are having a hard time putting our- 
selves through school and his folks are not helping worth a 
_darn, Is st fair that parents go all out for a daughter and do 
nothing for a sun? I am very resentful and the resentment is 
turning to intense dislike. Your opinion is wanted. — LEFT 
GUT. 


* 


DEAR OUT: It is customary for the bride’s parents to 
pay for the wedding. From the sound of your letter it 
appears that you thought they should pay for thelr son's 
wedding. too, Sorry, but your wedding was your parents’ 
responsibility, : i 

About the gifts: I suspect reason you aren't getting 
much is because you came across to them the way you 
came across to me. Avaricious and unpleasant, 

x © * 

DEAR ANN LANDERS: When our son was nine years old 

he exhibited unusual musical talents so we bought him a becuti- 
‘ful piano. Our three older children were working at the time so 
naturally their board money went toward the payments, 

‘The piano-playing boy 1s grown now and although he did 
not maxe music his carcer he still plays the piano and enjoys 
it. He will be rearricd soon and the question has arisen as to 
what to do with the piano. He has not asked for it but we think 
we should offer it to him. The older children feel we should 
either kecp it or scll it and share the proceeds with them. 
(They do net need the money.) 

The question is, does the boy who used the piano so well 

& “have a mght to 12? We want to he fair? — TORONTO, ; 







DEAR T.: Leave the piano where it is. It's part of your 
horre and-stiould ren:ain so. When you son comes by to ree 
you Le can py your favorite numbers and bring back 
sone delightful memories of his youth. 










NOTICE 


McConnell’s 
Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 





11 DUNBAR STREET 
CHANGE IN TELEPHONE NUMBER 


966-1214 


JUST ARRIVED AT 


— MShher’s 


A FINE SELECTION OF 


KNITTING YARNS 


“SUCH AS... *ALTHEA 


2.98 | 



















t 
q 
t 
y 
4 













Two Large Ballp makes a 
Beautiful Sweater ...33... SPECIAL 


OTHER YARNS 










@ TRIALON @ PULLMAN 
@ RUG WOOL @ MOHAIR 
’ “@ AROSA @ ETC. ETC. 







‘% YARDS GOODS 
_ As to the ridiculous clalm “We will not be undersold” 
OUR CRIMPLENE 
SA TUINING veroics cS csscecscoctesapbosacesessncsacccasis 
POLYESTER KNITS 
WOOLLENS 



















Bridal Salon 


@ HEADPIECES 
@ RING BEARER CUSHIONS 
@ ETC. 









@ GOWNS 
@ VEILS 
@ FORMALS 








(Upstairs At Bixker’s) 


Ehher’s 


KNITTING AND SEWING 
191 FRONT ST. : DIAL 962-8861 







Fe a SS a a ee Se 


P 
—< 


Successful Living 


By DORIS CLARK 
What is it like to be o'd? ” 
One lady was overheard 


speaking of her. mother to a - 


neighbor: “If she would only , 
stay out of my kitchen!” Ap- 
parently there aro times when 


* the gap between old and young 
is just. intolerable: and: the - 


Kitchen Tested Reci 





Generation Co 


worst conflict seems to hap- 

Pen between the old and the 

not-so-young. . Mother and 

daughter don’t click as well 

as mother and granddaught- 
= 


er. 
But conflicts can lead to sol- 
utions and three generations 


cat: live happily under one- 


rool. This happens when each 
pes 


ged as reigning supreme in 
it, and ts turned to for appro- 
priate counselling. 


For the young one to make 
his way, he must first learn 


the old way — and then rebel. . 


There has to be 
rebel against. 


a pattern to 
there is none 


Large Quantity of -Hot Rolls 


By MARY MOORE 

QUESTION: I hope you can 
help me. I had a recipe for 
duns I clipped from the paper 
some time ago and have lost | 
it. It was for 150 buns and 
Sout all I can was 
they calied for 8 or 10 eggs 
and I think 1'3.I®s. shorten: 
ing. They had a nice texture 
and favor, — Mona D. 

ANSWER: That was 
years ago Mona. 
HOT ROLLS 

(Approximately 150) 


SATURDAY 
Dinner Menus 


Steamed Wicacrs; Mustard 
Bean Relish: Soft Mashed 
Potatoes: Vegetable Mar- 
row; Sliced Tomatne 
and Cucumber Vinaigrette; 
Chocolate Date Layer Cake; 
Coffee. 


10 





5 cups lukewarm water 

5 cups lukewarmmilk 

182 Ibs. (3 cvps) shortening 
3% cups sugar 

3 tbsps. salt 

2 cups (approximately 10) 


BES 
1 tsp. vanilla (optional) 
8% Ibs. bread flour 
Dissolve the yeast in 24% 


, cups of the listed lukewarm 


water (at 80 deg. fahr.) with 
‘a cup of the listed sugar. Let 
stand 10 or 12 min. Scald 
milk then cool to lukewarm. 
Cream shortening and add to 


it the remaining sugar and- 


salt and cream well. Add eggs 
gradually and beat well. Add 
vanilla if used. Add remain- 
ing water and scalded. milk. 
Add 5 Ibs. of flour and mix 
well. Add risen yeast liquid, 


(78 to 8 deg. Fahr.) free 
from druaghts, covered with 
a clean dry cloth. Allow to 


pressed lightly with the fin- 
ger.) Punch down dough and 
let rise again. Cut off pieces 
of dough approximately the 
size of golf balls, Shape until 


greased baking pans 2" apart. 
Cover with clean dry cloth and 
set in warm place to rise until 
doubled. Bake at 425 deg. 
Fahr. for 15 to 20 min. Re- 
move from oven and brush 
with melted butter, % desir- 
ed, 3 





NOTE: In the case of a resident without funds the Department of Social & Family Services 
will pay $11.00 per day towards their maintenance In a licensed Nursing Home. 


— 


West Lake Nursing and Convalescent Home 


ALL NEW MODERN, ON ONE FLOOR, NO STEPS OR STAIRS 
s 





Private, semi-private and ward accommodation is now available ia our spacious LICENSED 
home. Complete mcdern facilities are provided for your comfcrt and convenience, in a 
relaxed [riendly atmosphere, Special diets are catered for, professional clinical and nursing 


care are at your service. For 


further details please contact: 


West Lake Nursing and Convalescent Home 


PHONE 393 2124, WEST LAKE RD. PICTON, P.O. BOX 1449, PICTON 


Bal: Hi; FSeauty Sebe : 


EXPERIENCED LICENSED STAFF WILL GIVE YOU SERVICE 
AND STYLE OF YOUR CHOICE 






JUST RETURNED FROM ADVANCED STYLING INSTRUCTION WITH 


Whrld Champjon Siylist 


COLLIN LEWIS 


LONDON, ENGLAND 


MAY WE SUGGEST 


ae ae 


The 


a pean ha 


IN HAIR TRENDS 


Ly oness 

















een nn ge ee me nn ee ees etm eles an 


you can live longer if you de- 
velop some routines for keep- 


















MUSKRAT 


Fashionable . . . striking 
styles’. . . Rood wearing. 
See them now! 
A deposit will hold your choice 


Alley FIRS 


custom PuRRntgnt 


283 FRONT STREET 
CORNER VICTORIA AVE. 
BELLEVILLE 




































pap 
i 


Bek 

E38 
F 
a 





for one more week 


TERY. . ‘ 
‘ (Less chim Je a 


POWERFUL CONVENTIONAL 


“Our Success Depends 


“ACOUSTICON OF BELLEVILLE 


Under New Management 


Mr. Wesenberg has been appointed 
Your Acousticon Distributor 


@ SPECIALS e- 


Due to public response we will be continuing these specials 
Ending Oct. 9th, 1971 


NO HEARING AID OVER $249. 


WE HAVE-AIDS THAT WILL GIVE YOU UP TO 800 HOURS 
OF GOOD HEARING FROM AN ORDINARY NO. 675 BAT- 


EYEGLASS MODEL AND BEHIND THE EAR MODELS. 


500 HOURS FROM 2—Ne. 461 BATTERIES. - 
Yes, you cam save up to 3100. off the regular price of Aids f you 


OFFICE HOURS: Mon. thru. Fri. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
For Home Appointment or Service Just Phone 967-1585 


ACOUSTICON OF BELLEVIELE 


10 VICTORIA AVENUE ” 





dians_in 


likely. Seldom do we fail to 


. turn up a request, Readers? 


eee 


(Leaflets mentioned by Dor- 
is are available to readers for 










day to operate) 






AIDS (CORD TYPE) UP. TO 







On Your Satisfaction” 
























A NEW EFFECT IN FROSTING 


De Rag. 


268 DUNDAS 


The Pabblr 
Liber specials 


TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY 


$12.50 ........$9.95 
$15.00 2... $12.50 
3 $18.00 ...... $15.00 
Frosting Reg. $15.00: .3 '..$12:50 


WE BELIEVE THAT PERSONAL RECOMMENDATION IS OUR 
BEST ADVERTISEMENT, 


SI:.E: 





962-1519 


















Hamilton 
London 
Kitc Is 


Windsor 





employees. | 


and above current Ontario 





Orcalt Toronto 


To: Ontario Blue Cross 


(Individual EHC) 
24 Ferrand Drive 
Don Mills 402, Ontario 


Please send me detailed information and application form 
Cross Extended Health Care protection for individual pay-direct subscribers. 
Nwither | nor my wife/husband is employed in a@-company with 25 or more 


Blue Cross 


EXTENDED HEALTH CARE 


AVAILABLE NOW 
ALL ONTARIO RESIDENTS ELIGIBLE 


NO AGE LIMIT « NO MEDICAL EXAMINATION 


Blue Cross “EHC — EXTENDED HEALTH CARE — is designed to 
give increased protection against hospital-medical expenses by 
providing extra benefits not covered by basic-health insurance, such 
as Ontario Government OHSIP and Hospital Insurance. 


The Plan is normally available only to groups of 25 
or more persons, but enrolment is now open to in- 
dividual subscribers until November 22. 


Effective coverage starls December 1, 1971. 


BENEFITS include payment towards: 


© Prescription drugs, vaccines, Medical Association 
insulin rbot ag ruee bisa 
© Private nursing by anR.N. temporarily or travelling 
° ' outside Ontario, for medical 
; Sli 9 Cons . hospital services as legally allowed 
> inical psychology © Care in private hospital 
rege’ masseur © Physiotherapy, artificial limbs 
reaimen > and appliances, ambulance 
© Speech therapy service and diagnostic 
@ Payment ol medical fees over procedures — when not SS 


Deductible: Payment comprises 80% of total bill, 
subject to a $50.00 deductible per person or $150.00 
per family in any gi 
Nole — all benefits Subject to terms of Contract. 


12 month period. 


HOW TO ENROL: 


covered by government plans 











‘ 





(1) Persons now retired or not working in a company large enough 
to form a Blue Cross EHC Group may appl 
direct enrolment. 

(2) Persons working where there are 25 employees or more should 
ask their Personnel Officer about forming a company group for 
Blue Cross enrolment. 

(3) Call your locat Blue Cross representative for application forms, 
or mail the coupon at once, 


St. Catharines___ 682-6658 


y for individual pay- 


Peterborough__ 743-2140 
528-0281 Kingston 544-5778 
,432-6791  Ottawa__ 234-1062 
745-7379 Sudbury_____—_—_—6 75-5691 
252-1892 
Head Office 429-2661 (Area code 416) 
ISNA IESSELESE 


‘ 


\ ° 


{Please print) ~ 


















for the new Blue 
























































































@ THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER,?, 1 5 ‘ resi pied tar eh ast ap eg dome 
SR a 





SW & your [a 
-  .. eS, Sra 





Don't let it break yours! 


\ 





-ThIS , . . CAN CAUSE. THIS- 


Fire is not like the weather, Everybody talks about fire >. . but, every- 
body can also DO something. about it. During Fire Prevention Week, Octo- 
ber 3rd to 9th, The Fire Prevention Bureau of the Belleville Fire Depart- 
ment charges YOU to DO something about it! And there is a lot that you can 
do right in your own home. 


Education in fire prevention and the proper procedures to follow in the 
event of a fire, is an important step for both you and your children. Infor- 
mation is readily available from your local department. 


The best fire is the one that never started — so check out your home for 
hazards that invite trouble. Faulty wiring, improper use of electrical outlets, ‘ 
storage of unnecessary combustibles, lack of extinguishers ... all are playing 
with fire. Rid your home of these hazards. 


Fire prevention is most important, however it Is wise to prepare: for the 
event of a fire, in case it happens to you. Learn how to deal with small fires, 
post the Fire Department phone number near your telephone, plan escape 
routes from your home and carry ample insurance on your pemneings: 
Don’t just talk about Fire Prevention — Do something about it! 


DON'T LET FIRE BREAK YOUR HEART! 





THIS MESSAGE IS BROUGHT TO YOU ON THE 100th ANNIVERSARY 
OF THE GREAT CHICAGO FIRE AND FIRE PREVENTION WEEK 




















‘YOuR DEPARTMENT WORKING TO PROTECT YOU.... 


THE FIRE:PREVENTION BUREAU ee 
OF THE BELLEVILLE, FIRE DEPARTMENT 


CO-SPONSORED BY THE 





BELLEVILLE INSURANCE AGENTS’ ASSOCIATION. . : 


JACK H. ALLIN LIMITED BARRETT & BENNETT INSURANCE AGENCY GERALD JOYCE INSURANCE AGENCIES JAMIESON BONE*® CO. 
21 North Front Street P LTD. 3 LIMITED . 168 Front Street 
DON J. BARRE{T INSURANCE Rare 344 Front Street 314 Front Street - Ae MARSH INSURANCE LIMITED 
27 Campbell Street BURROWS & FROST INSURANCE AGENCY LORNE McDOUGALL INSURANCE, AGENCIES Nera 
BURR RoE nUCe, AGENCY 249% Front Street LIMITED FORD GAINFORTH GEN. INSURANCE 
210A Front Street C. D. cRosBy INSURANCE & REAL ESTATE et rab Ss Mee 3A Trent Street Nérth, Frgakford 
DAVISON & DAVISON ; ra LIMITED ALBERT VANREEWYK GENERAL INSURANCE FRANK DOWNEY, 

188 Front Street \ / 40 Bridge Street East : 409 Dundas Street West 21 St. Lawrence St. E., Madec 


































. 


Redskins Hope Defence Key to Winning War With. Cowboys 


“By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS gether the conference's mos! po- The Cowboys” defence | spar yards and two touchdowns and be: Atlanta Falcons at Detroit ©. in Monday night's game, Oak- against a herd of Colts still see- 
Washington Redskins and Dal- tent offence while the Redskins kled in’ their rout of Philadel- ran for a third. Lions, Chicago Bears at Los An- ~~ land Raiders at Cleveland thing over their loss last week 
las Cowboys meet Sunday to de- have thrown up its stingiest de- . phia Eagles last Sunday, com-- - The Redskins will be trying to - geles Rams, San’ Francisco Browns. Buffalo Bills are at’ eal 
cee terethenatrarh just fence .to remain undefeated ing up with a club-record seven win their first three games for “49ers at Philadelphia Eagles Minnesota Vikings, New ‘Orle- too, has the handicap 
acre See Ay Going tok the’ third game of the: 1. three by } ; i nd New York Giants at St. ams Saints at Houston\ Oilers oy catching a loser on the re- 
the ‘National Conference's East. season. interceptions. y Herb Ad: the first time Since 1947 but will 2nd. and Cincinnati Bengals at Green 
Division while New England Pa. Billy Kilmer has thus far been _derley. @ have to break a trend to do it. ‘Louis Cardinals. Bay Packers in inter-conference bound: The, Bills are winless 
triots and Buffalo Bills have the a more than satisfactory re- Craig Morton, who took over Dallas, defending division The American Conference ‘ and couldn't ee. Miami's. 
unfortunate luck of running into placement for injured Redskins at quarterback when Roger. champion, has beaten them six games have Baltimore Colts at Rookie quarterback Jim Plun: ground game last Sunday. 
angry teams in this weekend's quarterback Sonny Jurg=nsen- Staubach was jolied in dizei-  ‘talght times. If this game New. England. Patriots, San” ett couldn't move the Patriots Now they’ face one of the, iret 
Nationa! a ac- threw i t 5 A docsn't Eastern Diego Pittsburgh f powerful games v 
tion, ne weak ageinst Now Yok Giants, Pes. will start against Washing. rerio Sue; erp es consistently last week” against aaah wore 


< hieeee 


The Cowboys have™ put - to- 
two for touchdowns to Charlic 


Taylor. 


Advice Pon. Chinese Champ 


Diminutive 28-year-old Chinese table tennis 


hitting 23 of 32 passes, including 


perhaps their second meeting un 
Nov. 21 in Washington will. 
In other NFC ‘games, it will 


Steelers, New York Jets at 
ton. He finished with conple- 


tions on 15 of 22 passes for 184 


ball Conference and Saskatche- by Carl Crennel. 


of Edmonton Eskimos Wednes- 
Lions in Vancouver tonight. Lefebvre in his spot. 
“I just hope that the players 
are boiling mad efter ts * * 
monton game and play as if 
they are.” Etchesoay so4. 
win would move the Alouettes 
into second place alone in the 
Eastern Football Conference, 
Meanwhile, Winnipeg Blue 
Bombers will have their healthi- 
est lineup this year when they 





wan Roughriders-are looking for The Roughriders will be play- 
a chance to move closer to ing without Silas McKinnie, 
first-place Calgary Stampeders whose injured right knee hasn't 
in Canadian Football League ac- responded to treatment. But 


their 12-11 defeat at the hands without end Tom Pullen, who 
suffered a torn knee in Edmon- 
day night to take it out on the ton, but will have veteran Gar 


gary. 


cunning back Lawrence James, 
who at 6foot-2, 228 pounds will 
team with speedy Larry High- 
baugh, 5-foot-8, 165 pounds. 

‘Jim Young will move to 
flanker, while fullback Jim Ev- 
enson and quarterback Don 
Moorhead. will. round out the 


Lindsey can put it together 
against Hamilton in interlocking 
play Sunday afternoon in Cal- 


. Vikings will. be out to make up 


for their upset loss at the hands 
of Chicago Bears. 


| Futelligencer Sports: 


BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO, pe thiee OCTOBER 2, 1971 





Lions ‘Looking for Advancement 
Sam Looking for Improvement. 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS. cago Bears of the National 
* British Columbia Lions hope Football League. Either Craig 
io become the sole holders of McLeod or Paul Robson will fill 
third place in the Western Foot- the left linebacking spot vacated 


The .Lions are adding new The Stampeders Friday added 
Max Huber, an offensive, guard 
and tackle, to the list of those 
on five-day trial. Huber was re- 


leased by the Lions. 


tion tonight. they will have halfback Bob backfield. leased backup quarterback 
But Montreal coach San: Pearce going both ways against Calgary, suffering since the Wally Gabler. 

Etcheverry hopes the Aloucttes the Bombers. loss of quarterback Jerry Keel- The Montreg+B.C. game will 

will be angry enough about Montreal Alouettes will play ing. hope replacement Jim _be televised full CBC net- 


Sunday at 2 p.m. MST. 





The Tiger-Cats have signed 
running back Max Anderson, 2 
Buffalo Bills cut. To make room 
for Anderson, the Ticats re- 


work at-8 p.m. PDT Saturday. 
The full CTV networx will carry © 
the HamiltonCalgary game 


Chinese experts to Stephen Leacock Collegiate. 
in Toronto. Gloria's sister, Violetta, is the Cana" 
dian women’s champion. ; (CP Wirephoto) -; 


play host to Saskatchewan. 
Despite four new players in 
the Winnipeg camp. coach Jim 


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coach Lin Hsi-meng provides some tips to 
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Duncan Armstrong's effort 


* Dunc Helps Dunk Madoc Sis. 


of Bay of Quinte COSSA con 


Power Squadron. Charts 
Starting Course Monday 


The Bay of. Quinte Power 
Squadron has a course sct 


Wellesley 
Sidelined 


coach of Ottawa Rough Riders. 
admits that qparterback Paul 
“Brothers “was no Moses” when 
tried to'lead the British Col- 
Minbia Lions out of the football 
wilderness, 
But a desperate Gotta is gam 
ling that Brothers can help Ri- 


berth: in the Eastern Football 
Conference. Sunday they play 
Toronto Argonauts. 
Riders won only three of 10 
starts tn the EFC this year. 
With only four. games left, that 
puts them four points behinc 
Montreal Alouettes and Hamil- 
ton Tiger-Cats for the final play- 
aff spot. ~ 
Brothers was sigacd this week 
afier Riders cut Gary Wood. 
Although Toronto coach Leo 
Cahill has his club comfortably 
“in the EFC lead, he is con- 
cerned about the rate of inju- 


“rics. 

@:- casualties include: 
Swuartcrback Greg “Barton, out 
with a broken finger; running 
back Leon McQuay. torn liga- 

. Ments: Hneman Ed Harrington, 
on th 30-day injury list with a 
leg injury: lineman John 
Trainer, one for the scason. 

Riders have lost halfback 





Terry Wellesley for the balance 
of the year and Wayne Giar- 
dir~. who has played both ways, 
is a-doubtful starter. 

Giardino might see duty on 
Gefence. - 







“OTTAWA (CP) — Jack Gotta, 


ders in their bid for a. playoff « 


for Monday night — an initia- 
ion course. 

Boating enthusiasts wishing 
to learn water safety and 
nautical lore in general are 
welcome to join the club, 
which conducts courses from 
October to March. 


The nominal cost covers ma- 


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those who pass examination 
may be invited to become 
squadron members, 
Registration will take place 
8 p.m. Monday evening at the 
Bay_of Quinte Yacht Club. 


Bowling 


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Wemen's High Triple: Pat Dol- 
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Spavital said “we've had a gov 
week . . . and I believe you can 
tell a lot by the way a team 
practises.” 

New faces in tonight's lineup 
will be defensive tackle Rock 






leave the game. but Trenton In the junior contest Tren- 


Emie Belanger (left) and Ted Branton (right) ‘Assist Mr. J. E. Mitchell, 
Regional Sales Director of the Hausen: Relief and Compensation 
Fund, in drawing the lucky ticket. 


FIRST PRIZE: $7700. LUCKY TICKETS No. 00693 
WINNER: TED FRY, R.R. 2, Campbellford 
The Seller of the Ticket was M. Blake 
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* x’ ¢ - * count. ‘ Madoc 316. end Sid Beadley. cut from Chi- 
FOOTBALL STANDINGS * The speedy Trenton back 4 s 
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ier fielder was switched to half Quintes Left at. Arena By Truant Terriers etter ece ion 
Stix YER AM back from flanker for the sen . 3 r 
Picton 133 1a 2 ; sare The Belleville Quinte’s hope — parent!) unable to ice a team The Belleville club will be - 
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Siapenoiet H “3 om 6 20-yard touchdown run on the Orillia ‘Terriers were ap cancellation an exhibition @ncounter. TOWER REMOVAL 
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TORONTO (CP) — The lot of 
a utility forward in the National 
Hockey League is often a frus- 
strating succession of moves 
‘from one. club to “another and 
:veteran Donnie Marshall has 

chad his share‘of it. 
> The 39-year-old Verdun, Que., 
inative says he was satisfied 
:with his most recent mové to 
Toronto niaple Leafs but he still 
recalls the two low points of 
despair in his career with Mont- 
real Canadiens ad New York 
Rangers. 

“The first was in 1963 when 
Canadiens traded me away," 
Marshall said between workouts 
at Maple Leaf Gardens, ‘ 

“T just couldn't believe it was 


- : : ———————-—. 





‘Pie’ Earns Boston Tie 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


Dave Dapper, Vida Dour / 


Before AL Playoff Opener © 


BALTIMORE (AP) — Dave 
McNally—pleasant, poised and 
with the tdhfidence of a four- 
time 20-game winner—and Vida 
Blue—sullen, quict and appar- 
ently feeling the glare of his 
first. spotlight” season—are the 
pitching rivals today in the first 
game of the American League 
playoffs, 


“It's. daytoday enthusiasm, 
you have to keep up. The play- 
ers themselves have to do it. 
It's pride, every player wanting 
to be the best individual player 
everyday. If you.da that you're 
going to win ball games.” . 


The Athletics can’t match the 


Orioles in individual stars, but 
manager Dick Wiliams refuses 
to concede a thing to the de- 
fedding champions, not eyen ex- 
perience. 


“We've had some games that 
were very crucial and we met 
the challenge,” Williams sald of 


his club, which won 101 games 
and finished 16 games ahead of 
second-place “Kansas City Roy- 
als. ~ : 
_ Williams ‘said bis brash young 
team wasn't psyched by the fact 
~the Orioles had beaten the Ath- 
letics 74 in the regular-season 
series. He pointed out that the 
games were close, thtee of 
them decided in the ninth in- 
ning. | . 
“We're confident without 
being overconfident,’ Williams 
said. He dismissed the chance 


of a three-game Orioles’ sweep 
but liked Oakland’s chances of - 
doing it in three if they win the 
lirst.game today. . 
The Athletics, who haven’ 
won a-pennant since they wely 


Philadelphia Atfiletics in 1931, 


depend onthe pitching of Blue, 
2l-game winner Jim_ (Catfish) 
Hunter and 15-game_ winner 
Chuck Debson, Reggie Jackson, 
“whose 32 home runs tied him 
for second in the league, and 
Sal Bando, a 271 hitter with 94 
RBIs and 24 homers, supply the 
Athletics’ power, ‘ 


Injured Giant ‘Stars - 
Big Series Question -Marks 


SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — 
With one ‘mystery solved, there 
is sti more suspense in store 


rookie Dave Kingman might 
start in right ficld instead. 
McCovey, tortured by ar- 


pear to be on the other end of 
the spectrum—rested and re- 


















laxed after a comparatively 
thritic knees znd a torn carti- easy division victory. 

lage; not to mention a gashed Manager Danny Murtaugh 
hand, still can ruin pitchers. He has had time to te his 
. will start but won't be at full players, giving each critical. 
rest periods in preparation { ki 
the big series. Ever-dange! 
Roberto Clemente, heart ai 


The Boston Bruins’ forward line of centre Fred Stanfield and wingers Johnny Me- 
Kenzie and Johnny Bucy« appears ready for the 1971-72 National Hockey League season, 

The line, which piled up 106 goals in the 1970-71 campaign, accounted for all Boston 
scoring as Bruins and Montreal Canadiens tied 3-3 Friday night in an exhibition geme be- 
‘ore 14,995 fans at Boston. - 

In the only other exhibition contest, Cincinnati Swords of the American Hockey 
“eague, strengthened by Eddie Shack and GilPerreault ot the NHL's Buffalo Sabres, 


happening to me and, without 
stirring up unpleasant memo- 
ries after all this time, T'll just 
say I was hurt by ‘the way it 
was handled, too. 

“I was simply very upset to 
leave my home town and such a 













when San Francisco Giants 
meet Pittsburgh Pirates today 
in the opener of the National 
League playoffs. 

The Giants, who finally won 
the West Division title in a tin. , 
gling finish on the final day 





VIDA BLUE 


} fine situation for a hockey 





a 


player. I mean if this is the way 
you're going to make your liv- 
ing, Toronto and Montreal are 
the best cities to be in, eh? Or 
at least they certainly were 
then.”* —~ 

Montreal had won fise 
straight Stanley Cups up to 1560 
but then started losing in the 
semi-finals and Marshall was in 
one of the trades that followed. 

““Perhaps my attitude wasn't 
the best and. what with all the 
complications of moving, ad- 
justing and so on, my first sea- 
son with Rangers was casily the 
worst of my life.”* 

Marshall’s points total 
dropped to 23 in his first year 
with Rangers when he got 1! 
goals and 12 assists. 

“That led to the sccond low 
point I've experienced. Rangers 
did not include me on their list 
of protected players at the dralt 
meetings in 1964 and, what was 
even more humiliating. not one 
club was interested in picking 
me up for thejdraft price. That 
really hurt." x 

Alter several productive sea 
sons with the Rangers, Punch 
Imlach. Buffalo Sabres manag- 
er-coach, drafted Marshall from 
New York last year and this 
year left him unprotected, 
thinking no one else would want 
him. ~ 
The Leafs did want him-and 
coach Johnny McLellan has 
been happy with his work in 
training camp. 


Delvechio 
May Retire 


DETROIT (AP) — Red Wing 
captain® Alex Delvocchio has 
threatened to quit the team un- 
Jess he is shifted from substitute 
status, 

The 21-year National Hockey 
League yeteran, angered by his 
demotion from a full-time roll, 
said: “That's the only way I'll 
stay on the team.” 

“Coach Doug Barkley and gen- 
eral manager Ned Harkness, 
however, have something else in 
store for the veteran certre. 

“Alex is still advantageous for 
us.” said Barkley. “He can play 
any of the forward positions but 
he's 39 years old and just can’t 
keep up with a 78-game sched: 
ule." 2 

“I've always been a regular,” 

‘ said Delveochio, “and I want it 

to stay that way until the day I 
retire." 

“This is probably my last 
year anyway,” he added, 

“We'll use him as an extra 
man.” said Barkley, “and he'll 
work on the power play and 


\, penalty-killing team. 


e were going to do the 
same thing last year, but we 
needed him on the ice as much 
as he could play-* 

Delvecchio played in 7 
fames last season and scored 21 
goals and 31 assists for the sec~ 
ond-best record among the 
Wings, 


anked California Golden Seals of the NHL 6-0 at Peterborough, Ont. 


McKenzie, a 31-goal scorer last season, tallied twice and Bucyk, with 51 goals in 1970-71, 


got the other goal as Bruins forced Canadiens to come from behind three times. 
Guy Lafleur, Rejean Houle and Yvon Cournoyer scored for Canadiens. 


The Bruins, whose pre-season 


tosses to Montreal, were outshot 33-26 by 


Canadiens now are undefeated in 


Jonn: 


The teams mect again tonight in Boston. 


At Peterborougn. the Swords 
Rick Dudley scored twice. Cleland 
Rot single goals, 


Gabler 
Cut by 
Ti-Cats 


HAMILTON (CP) — Quarter- 
back Wally Gabler was released 
Friday by Hamilton Tiger-Cats 
of the Canadian Football 
League and his place on the im- 
port roster will be taken by 
(Mini) Max Anderson, former 
halfoack with Buffalo Bills o! 
the National Football League. 

Terms of Anderson's contra:, 
were not disclosed by Tiger-Ca: 
coach Al Dorow:-Anderson had 
been og_a five-day trial. 

Gabler, a former Toronto Ar 
gonaut who came to Hamilton 
last year from Winnipeg Bluc 
Bombers of the Western Confer 
ence, sparked Tiger-Cats to first 
place in the East with three 
wins and a tie in the last four 
games of the 1970 schedule. 

He took over direction of the 
team after first-string quarter. , 
back Joc Zuger suffered a bro 
ken right forearm in a game 
against Vancouver Lions. 

Gabler did not play in Hamil 
ton’s last two games this season 
but was prominent in two of the 
Tiger-Cats firt three victorics, 

His quarterback spot on the 
team will be taken by home- 
brew John Manel, who played 
briefly for the Tiger-Cats in 
1969, 


NHL Makes Loan 


WINDSOR, Ont. (CP) — The 
International Hockey League 
announced Friday that the Na- 
tional Hockey League has ap- 
Proved the loan of a maximum 
of four young players to each 
THL club in the 1971-72 season. 

“All International League 
teams have working agree- 
ments with National League 
clubs." IHL commissioner Bill 
Regan said, “and I hope that 
within the next three years that 
the number of professionals al- 
lowed to play for each IHL 
team will g6 as high as 10." 

The agreement allows only 
players under age 25 as of Dec. 
31. 1971, to go on Joan to the 
IHL. 

The cight-team IHL consists 
of Columbus, Dayton and Toledo 
in Ohio; Flint. Muskegon and 
Port Huron in Michigan; Fort 
Wayne, Ind,“ and Des Moines, 
Iowa, 

















GLEN LAWRENCE $1500. : 


INVITATIONAL PACE 












jf BIG ISLAND, DEMORESTVILLE 


record of two wins 


exhibition play with four wins and four ties, 


“We looked a little better and I'm not worried, not yet anyway.” Bruins coach Tom 
son said. “We still have a way to go. but there's time before we open the regular sea- 


led 1-0 after 20 minutes 

























Sport Brief. 

Either Baltimore Orioles or Oakland Ath 
Icucs will have the advantage of a home open 

tor the World Series starting Salurday, Oct. 

The second game of the Series also will be at’ 
the home of thy American Leagu> winner Oct. 
10. The following three zames, Oct. 12, 12 and 14, 
will be at either Pittsburgh or San Francisco, dc 
pending on whether the Pirates or the Giants 
win the National League title. If a sixth anc 


seventh game are necessary, they will be play 
ed Oct. 16 and 17 in Baltimore or Oakland. 


































»~ + # 

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. (AP) — World dri: 
ing champion Jackie Stewart, his second For 
mula 1 title already stashed away, enters to 
day's final qualifying round as the heavy favor 
ite to win the pole position for Sunday's 13th run 
ning of the Grand Prix of the United States. 
Stewart, driving a Tyrrell-Furd which he helped 
design, christercd the new 3.77-mile Watkins 
Glen course with a lap of one minute, 42.8 sec 
conds Friday to put his foot in the door for the 
top grid spot. His speed was figured at 118.21" 
miles an hour. : 


* * ® 
TOKYO (AP) — The fight between forme: 
world heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali, 
and Mac Foster scheduled for Nov, 29 has been 
. postponed until January, it was announced to. 
day. Yoshio Kou, the promoter, said the bout was 
Postponed because he could not cbtain govern 
ment approval tur dollar allocation. Ali is being 
guarantecd $500 000 and Foster $150,000, 
* * © oe 
TORONTO (CP) — Toronto Argonauts an 
nounced Friday that the team has nominated 
tight end Mel Profit and defensive safety Marv 
Luster for the Jeff Russel Memorial Trophy. The 
trophy is awarded every year to the. Eastern 
Foutball Conference player “possessing the high. 
est qualities of courage, fair play and sports. 
manship.” It went last year to Argo running back 
Bill Syinons. : 















> * » 

OTTAWA <CP) — The amateur sports ad- 
ministrative centre is asking for help to assemble 
a gullery of sports art to be included in its 
Sports Caravan project. The centre says it is 
looking for ‘sport paintings, sculpture, photo- 
graphs and cartoons for the display, which is 
to travel throughout the country. 






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and four defeats includes 7-4 and 2-1 
the defending Stanley Cup champions. The 


+ 
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The contrast was evident as 
McNally,’Baltimore Orioles’ 


left-hander, and Blue, sensa- 
tional young southpaw of Oak- 
land Athletics, fenced with re- 
porters Friday before rain- 
shortened workouts for the 
best-of-five series to determine 
an AL World Series representa- 
tive. 

McNally talked willingly 
about his injury-plagued season, 
expressed thankfulness for re- 
covery from a sore arm that 
cost him 38 days, or in the parl- 
ance of a pitcher, eight starting 
assignments. He finished 21-5 
with a 2.89 carncd-runaverage. 
winning eight of his last 10 
starts. 

Blue, Oakland's 24-game win- 
ner whose name has been ut- 
tered in the same breath with 
Sandy Koufax after one full sea- 
son in the majors, wasn't talk- 
ing—peried. 

Baltimore, 1970 American 
League winner and World Series 
victor over the National 
League's Cincinnati Reds, ruled 
a slight favorite over the West 
Division champion Athletics. 

The Orioles enter the playoffs 
with four 2-game winning 
pitchers— McNally, Jim Palmer, 
Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson— 
and a power hitting attack 
which includes ,Boog Powell. 
Frank Robinson and Brooks 
Robinson, each with 20 or more 
home runs and each. with better 
than 90 runs-batted-in. The Ori 
oles won the East Division by 12 
games over Detroit Tigers. 

Baltimore manager Earl 
Weaver dismissed the Orioles 
season-ending, I]-game winning 
streak. declaring: “There is ro 
such thing as momentum.” He 
recalled the 1969 World Series 
when Baltimore defeated New 
York Mets in the first game and 
then lost four straight. 

“If a guy is looking for mo- 
mentum, he won't find it,” 
Weaver said. 
















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Thursday, have other ~unan- 
swered problems as they open 
the best-of-five series with the 
East Division champions, 

But some’ questions remain: 
Wi Bobby Bonds play? Are 
Willie McCovey’s injuries a dis- 
abling factor? ~- 

There are even inore puzzles 

For instance, the pained hip of 

Charlie Fox. 
For instance, the paincd hip of 
pitching ace Juan Marichal. 
Fortunately for San Francisco, 
Marichal will have time to rest 
after hurling the division-winner 
over San Diego Padres Thurs- 
day night, ; 

The opening game assignment 
is in the hands of Gaylord 
Perry, a tall right-hander who 
thrives on hard work. He will 
face the Pirates’ Steve Blass. 

Bonds, who has been sidelined 
by a muscle pull in his rib cage, 
carries the biggest stick of the 
Giants’ fence-dreaking lumber. 
His status is questionable and 


Howe Gets Hair Removal 


TORONTO (CP( — Marty 
Howe got a haircut this week. 

It is a long-standing custom 
that rookies with Toronto 
Marlboros of the Ontario 
Hockey Junior A series re- 
ceive haircuts—rough _ hair- 
cuts. 

“For a week he came to 
practice carrying a hat, in 
-ase he had to wear it home." 
said team manager Tom 
Smythe. 

“We made it a little hard 
for him tonight. He started 
the game for us. That meant 
he was on the ice when they 
played the national anthem 
and he had to take his helmet 
off.” 

The game was an exhibition 
contest against Tulsa Oilers of 
the Central Hockey Leaguc. 
Tulsa won 64. 

The Howe family was in the 

























oa. ¥ 


@ SEAMANSHIP 










wedi 


> a 
GAYLORD PERRY 


throttle. 

Also in the Giants’ scheme is 
redoubtable Willie Mays, the 
youngest 40-year-old in baseball. 
An injured arm and the long 
season have taken their toll of 
the San Francisco veteran su- 
perstar, 

“Me? I'm tired.” he says. "I 
hope I'll be rested for the Pir- 
ates." 

The Pirates, meanwhile, ap- 







stands to see Marty play. He 
received two assists, but that 
wasn't what the family talked 
about, 

Of the haircut, his sister, 
Kathy said( “I just want to 
sce it. I can’t wait. to tease 
him.” 





soul of the team, and powerful 
Willie Stargell, the majors’ 
home run king, lend authority to 
the Pittsburgh attack. 

Pirates might need all 


help they can get against | | 


the Giants, a tough team for 
them to beat at Candlestick 
Park. They've managed to beat . 
San Francisco here only once in 
each of the last two seasons and 
both victories were authored by 
Blass. 

Does the situation upset Mur- 
taugh? Absolutely not, he says. 

“I never look back,” says 
Murtzugh. “I don’t let history 
bother me. You can't let things 
like that bother you in a playoff. 

“This playoff is really just a 
question of who gets hot. In 
short series, whoever gets hot is 
going to win,”* 


EXCESSIVE GAS 
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sparkling wines in a 
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A new Mercury, Pinto, Maverick, 
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ALLAN MONROE 


WELLS 


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: Stirling 


mal 
us the No. 1 Ford-M: Dealer 
tn the Quinte reson. b 














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“Time to Put My Foot} | 
Down, since you won't read 
the facts about consumer 
savings on 30 day revoly- 
ing charge accounts 
without Interest. 


trend is to HOME 
Maflware to get away 
from high charges on top | 
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THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1971: fj 


a a Sa ee. 
| Bowling Results | ‘et: Time_ 


AT THE PARK — In Color — Show- 
ing for the this evening 
















/ SATURDAY 


@ Baseball Film: “Toe Love Affair Continues” — a look at Les 





“Evel” Knetval,”» starring 
ONTARIO HYDRO MIXED Readryi Golddiggers 
Good Guys 12, Tormentors 10, 4317, ‘Anginiage 28 207. Bante and Sue Lyon. The tase = 
Fireballs 10. mes Maws 8. Hawk High “Average: Janet Duiven pee. Angel, Ren”. One complete 
ening 


es 8, 19. 
The schedule of Solunar “tS. Alley Sate 2 enced agri” Triple: Dorothy Mowers | Starting Sunday “We 4 
































Expos. — Channels 6, 11,12 — 4:00 p.m. ; High Scores: Naked”, also “Lady ” 
@ Baseball Play-olf: Pittsburgh Pirates vs. the western champs | Périods.: as printed below, has “Lit Tigh “Scores: b Lark High Singie: unle: Bevty Horton 257. | in Sexicotor. Love and lust on twe 
in the Natienal League play-offs opener, — Channels 7 and 8/ been taken from Mrs. Richard *? 2. ©. McGee 612 3s). ot aaa Maxine complete evening show 154. Re- 
— 4:00 p.m. (Time approximate.) Alden Knight's Solunar Tables. si, nang He Osho eS ery 221, Debble Henley 208. and over: Ne Sunday maatinets- 
‘ Rolla’ ® a1}. Go-Getters v 5 
~ WEATHER Bowling (@ phd ted ac0—All in the Femi ona) a9 Ete rome ene oe eee 
MOVIE: “Revenge of the Parteecs be fishing“in good territory or 
ae0—faeauty (a poy "| hunting in good cover during i x MOVIE GUIDE | 
FRIEND! Wresuing MOVIE: “Vou Ryan's Express” these times, if you wish to find Sports x : 
ge to pd ne ee Sa Se ini 






is eae Calendar’|* OPENS SUNDAY 


_The Major Periods are shown 






















* 



























$.00—Bugs Bunay “ a 
Wie, Wertd of spore | 930—Mary Tyler Sore a o in boldface type. These begin at Quinte nocKtY ‘An exquisite and Liman oe film!” 
Spa pa 1000 Siusioa Impossible (7) the times shown and last for an SUNDAY aS pm Jotith Gist, Now York 
ioooness = oc) x Persuaders (1D © © 9%) hour and a half cr two hours Sen QUEnEE HOCKEY 7 f 


lor 
thereafter. .The Minor Periods, Reids Dalry a “at s Reflevitle Memor- 
shown in regular type, are of re peeaaieed eee CORTRALE 
somewhat shorter dit-ation. SATURDAY, ocr. oi Annual 
Use Eastern Daylight Saving yearn corrode es bel ates 
HARNESS RACING 


“(October 2-10.) Exhibition Grounds begin at 7:45 






Mystery 
Lara pk Menten: 4) 
call 















Color Crossfire Antenna Stati anewanie vaine| Movie: wayaanon sa) [Dey Minar abe miner tler P™ woyecy sortants 
wary: - ath , xDAY — Gritl 
Winter can send chills through your color TV Rollinson toe River ® | Art of Laver re and “The arte Myer ites boped ween Flowers at Alemite, 630 
Saint ao 1.20—News fe v . .to 10. POWER SQUADRON 
toatl ie noone ee een Resny ade Profewae 1m]. MOVIE “Fhe Legian” th |Mond=y 430 ILI 500 1149 wonBA ct on rin gen 
” 


the 
On Location cy 





Tuesday 5.20 — 5551210 fy Tens, eae eaaten, 
Wedrnes. 6.20 12.35 6.50 1.10 eA SEOR ARS pETENcS SOOTBASS 
Thursday 7.25 145 755 215 near Huskies “at. South Side 
Friday 830 245 B55 3.20 Ft TR Orn NOCKEY 

Saturday 9.35 3.30 10.00 4.25 _ TONIGHT — Open practice for 


Sunday 10.40 4.55 11.05 5.30 mie ville razwere at Memorial 


Well, thenew Color Crossfire ee Channel Master 
is built to take it! It’s designed and engineered to 
stand and deliver exceptionally fine color and 
black and white reception on all channels, through 
the stormiest periods. No matter where you ink 
or what channels you watch, 


Now how’s that for a foul weather friend indeed! 
The Color Crossfire Antenna. 








SUNDAY 


@ Football: Toronte Argonauts vs. the Rongh Riders — in 
Ottawa. — Channel 9 — 2:00 p.m. 

@ Baseball Play-off — Second game In the National League 
play-olf matches the Pittsbergh Plrates vs. the Western 
champs. — Channel 8 — 4:00 p.m. - 

@ Football: Hamilton Tiger-Cats vs. the Siampeders in Calgary. 
— Channel $ — 3:00 p.m, 

206—Pre Football 9) 

News Conference 13) 

230—Green Thumb 113) 

200—Untamed World 113 





_ @ ON THE SAME PROGRAM @ 


“A MOTORCYCLE EPIC’ ~ 


. —Life Magazine 


“C.C, AND: COMPANY” Gz 


With JOE NAMATH and ANN MARGARET 


























11.40—MOVIE: “One Fine Day“ ®@ 
Under Attack 113) +12) 
o 












VIE: “Morgan” a3 
1.00—MOVIE: “Weekend with Fath- 

























































cartying Pince Re. RE Lee AO SOVIE: “ita Man Anwerss| suxpay : “Last Day 
‘Trenton, Oat. Phone ssa |] TEER Noi Sig BELLE ato 
Fi cmemeeh) - uets eee RADIO ran, ST FRONTST. eens 328: 8 
Phone 472-2746 Frankford, Ont. 
Circle TV Sales & Service Phone 398-7272 CJBO = 
Nourse Radio Electries Ltd. —— BELLEV 
sokina Senet Brat LIFE AT THE BOTTOM 
. Phone 968-6791 Pletoa, Ont. 
Cournyea Electric Phone 476-2240 Juvenile Jury (e sd AM - 800 HOW FAR CAN MAN G0 ? 
‘Tweed, Ont. Quinte Antenna Service Wild Kingdor DON’T MISS : 


1 arse of Teonaie no 


2.30—arorid of 
Jimmy Stewart ‘show © ap 
"az 


MOVIE: “To Sir, With Love~ 
‘oa mm Go 


Finkle Electric Ltd. R.R. 2, Belleville, Ont. 




















“WE ARE ALL NAKED” 
Ome Aso 
“LADY GODIVA RIDES” 





SATURDAY 


@04—Up with the Sua wita Tom 
Mookings. 










lod Squad (0 
800—Tilp Wilson +6) 113) 2) 
VBI a3) « 
820—Jimmy Stewart «) 
Shirley's World o 





Wrightman’s Home Heating 







































e R.R. 3, Suirting, Ont, oO eRe Drama Specist ait] 22%—Darvt Danien Show. 
x 2.03—J Talentecope. 
eS Sovim von peers Resten”| a0e—Anten Sit < Peet o IN SEXICOLOR 
a3) 18 03—What's New. LOVE AND LUST ON TWO 
peceaden County 1 10 SUNDAY CONTINENTS 














Ones (8 
Weekend '@) (12) aD 









11.00—Chureh Service from King STARTS SUNDAY SHOW TIME 7:00 
PS CHRYSLER WEEK 1200-Eichings tm Mack” and White LAST COMPLETE SHOW 8:50 
Chrysler owners, we salute you! 1.00—Sunday Matinee: 























It's your week at A & W. Drive into your nearest participating > Toronto et 
A & W, enjoy our delicious Fast and Fancy Family Fare and 


start collecting your set of 18 full color. . 


200—CFL. Football 
Ottawa. 








{10 
n ening?! Business (@ (11) 12} 3:0—Cross Country Check Up. 
11.30—Merv Griffin 14 7.30—Sunday and Friends, 
Johnny Caren (8) 9.03—Fun “N* Ga: 
10.00—CBC National News, 


10.10—Capital Report. 


Last Time This Eve, 
PARK Pry al ao ge 
One Eve. Show At 7.45 
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SUNDAY 


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ROYAL CANADIAN 
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BADM | NTON SAME ces eecnsssanannnnnnnnnnnonssnnnnnonenanennenennenne Ryans Daughter 7 THE ROUND-UP CLUB 
1971 - 72 SEASON BEGINS —_C*W BSS crececeeceeeereeeeeeeceerecerteetrrreecerteeeteeeseee NIGHTLY AT z: 45 ONLY Sar oor sate 
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CENTENNIAL SECONDARY SCHOOL Spot Prizes — Door Prizes 


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BELLEVILLE BADMINTON CLUB ee ee ee ee ee ee ; 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 

Economic issues were the 
thread which linked the major 
campaign statements of Ontar- 
fo’s three political party leaders 
Friday, even though the main 


subjects in two cases were pol- 
lution and a provincial natural 


gas system. - 


_12 THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1971 


and Jobs 





when he met members of Pollu- 
tion Probe in Toronto. One of 
his listeners charged’ he was 
being contradictory in promis- 
ing a program of industrial 
growth to create jobs, while 
also espousing the cause of en- 
vironmentalists: ° 
The main portion of New 
Democrat Stephen Lewis's 


Mr. Davis told 460. business- 
men that federal, proposals on 
tax reform, tax-sharing and so- 
cial services will be “less than 
satisfactory” because they were 


not developed in co-operation 
with the provinces. 


The premier said the Ontario * 


Advisory Committce on Confed- 


Common Thread During 


power when selling natural re- 
sources, 

Mr. Nixon told the Pollution 
Probe group growth is neces- 
sary to create jobs and a Lib- 
eral government would create a 
growth plan for ail of Ontario. 
He ,also said that the. moncy 
spent on Toronto's ill-fated Spa- 
dina Expressway should not be 








maintain environmental  integ- 
rity.” 

Mr. Lewis said an NDP gov- 
ernment would establish a 
Crown corporation and gas dis- 
tribution system similar to On- 
tario Hydro. Trunk lines would 
be owned and operated by the 


Campaign 


the Empire Club in Toronto to 
charge that the failure to de- \ 
velop a national economic pol- 
icy was due partly to wa's 
failure to seek advice from the 
provinces. 

Liberal Leader Robert Nixon 
became involved with the issue 


» dealt with the subject 


a federal moratorium 
sales 
known 


William Davis is “on a public 
relations kick’ and the ap- 
proach of New Democratic 
Party Leader Stephen Lewis is 
too far away from the middle of 
the road, Liberal Leader Robert 
Nixon said Friday night. 

. He made the comments on a 
radio show as listeners phoned 
in to get his views on the cam- 
paign for the Oct. 21 Ontario 
election. 

Mr. Nixon told a listener who 
said he was going to change his 
vote to Conservative from Lib- 
eral that there is plenty of room 
in this election for his party's 


Nixon 
Analyses. 


Davis, 





Lewis 


middle-of-the-road approach 
that wasn't there in the 1967 
election. . 


He urged the man not to 
change his vote “to save the 
province from the NDP.” . 

“Meanwhile Davis is on a 
public relations kick which 
means really that he is tailoring 
his position to what his experts 


Strategy 
7 





speech to a public meeting in 
Thunder Bay was devoted to his 
plan for a provincial natural 
gas system to provide gas to 
consumers at cost. But he also 


dian. exports of energy re- 
sources, saying there should be 


until Canada’s needs are 


HAMILTON (CP) — Premier 


of Cana- 


on such 


tell him the community wants 
to hear 

“Maybe he's doing~it very 
successfully, Certainly this is 
the approach that all of the ad- 
vertising is taking and he's tak- 
ing the advice from public rela- 
tions experts that . . . you know 
—the ones who clected Dalton 
Camp in the last federal elec- 
tion, the ones who elected Rob- 
ert Stanfield prime minister of 
Canada, the ones who elected Al 
Lawrence the leader of the Con- 
servative party—they all 
worked for losers. 

“They really had great cam- 
paigns but never had a success- 
ful one yet. Well... they did 
get Stanfield clected leader of 
the Federal Progressive Con- 
servalive party. 

“I feel that Bill Davis has 
made a committment to the PR 
{public relations) aphroach to 
politics. You remember he fired 
(his speech writer) Martin 
Goldfarb after he said ‘we're 








eration will be reorganized: to 
place more emphasis on cco- 
nomic problems, And he called 
for a new national policy that 
would ensure more processing 
of natural resources in Canada; 
“ compel foreign-owned compa- 
nics to do more research and 
development here; 
ings into business investment; 
and exploit Canada’s bargaining 
























wasted, and 


completed po: 
Dr. Donald 


channel] sav- to indicate “ 


going to sell Davis like we sell a 
can of tomatocs’.”  _. 

Mr. Nixon said that the NDP 
has strayed from the middle- 
line approach it had in the 1967 
election when Donald Mac- 
Donald, member in the last 
house for Toronto York South, 
was leader of the party. 

“He was trying to fulfil what 
you would call a responsible 
middle-of-the road role.” the 
Liberal leader said. “He 
thought that’s the only way for 
the NDP to win, and frankly I 
think he was and probably still 
is right." 

“Steve Lewis doesn’t take 
that approach although he is 
trying to shake the radical 
image that came with him when 
he came into the legislature. 

“He espoused some very radi- 
cal causes and the guy is a very 
bright man indeed—no doubt 
about that.” 

Mr. Nixon said that Mr. Lewis 
is talking about nationalization 
of industry, an issue which Mr. 











should be found at least for the 


sity of Toronto professor and a 
founder of Pollution Probe, said 
the group was “disappointed 
with these views" which scemed 


velopment through intensifica- 
tion of industry while hoping to 










province with municipalities sources outside the cotintry. 
purchasing gas from the sys- The slows down 
that some use tem. a bit over the we@hend. Premier 


Davis campaigns in the Toronto 
area today but has nothing on 
his Sunday schedule. Mr. Nixon 
will he weekend in his 
home ‘riding of Brant.* Mr. 
Lewis will continue his northem 
tour with visits to Nipigon, 
Schreiber and Marathon today ~ 


Gas distribution would be in- 
tegrated with Hydro “‘so that 
each of these-major sources of 
power will be available for the 
purpose for which it is best 
suited.” 

The NDP. Icader erate! 2 
the provincia] nor fed Rov- 
peatlabie ‘know Canada’s spe, and will be in his home riding in 
cific needs in relation to natural Toronto on Sunday. 


rtion, 
Chant, a Univer- 


exploitation of de- 


















| 
THESE 
ARE YOUR 
" PROGRESSIVE 
CONSERVATIVE - 
CANDIDATES 





MacDonald didn’t discuss four puses. The questions asked by 
years ago. students “‘are. pretty searching 

Mr. Nixon also said that vot-|and pretty helpful.” 
ers between.18 and 20 years of| He said young people add to 
age “will not do much for the|the election and: “we need a 
Conservatives” and the ballots {dash of idealism.” 
cast by this group—estimated at 
412,000—will be “split between 
the NDP and the Liberals." 

The voting age was lowered to 
18 from 21 at the last session of 
the Icgislature. 

Mr. Nixon said this was not 
the main reason he has been 
campaigning at university cam- 












WANTED 


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». TAILORING 
MR. ALI 


Located at BURKE'S 
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at 
























THE HASTINGS-PRINCE EDWARD TB & RD ASSOCIATION 
WISH TO ANNOUNCE A ae oy 


REGIONAL CONFERENCE ON AIR POLLUTION 
At Fellows High Schéol, Pembroke, Ont. 


SAT., NOV. 6th 1971 — 1.00 P.M. TO 4.00 P.M. 
























Che Intelligencer 


PRESENTS 


WANT-AD 
BARGAIN 





The Intelligencer’s 
WANT-AD STAFF 


special 
telligencer Want Ad. 


SAVE! 






































SAVE! 


INSERTIONS OF A 
QUICK ACTION WANT AD 
FOR THE PRICE OF 


COMMENCING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th. 
UP TO AND INCLUDING TUESDAY, OCT. 12th 


PHONE YOUR WORD-AD IN TODAY AND 
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS BARGAIN 


If you have something to sell — want to buy an article — rent a house or 
apartment — need help, etc., place a Low Cost Want Ad during this 
nt and find out for yourself the results you get from an In- 


SAVE! 


















Your Intelligencer Want Ad will run 6 times for the price of 3, and ap- 
plies to any word ad (not commercial) to start any time during >the 
week. commencing Tuesday, October 5th through Tuesday, October 12th. 
Want-Ads will be accepted up to 4 p.m. the day previous at this Bargain 
Rate. This applies only to word ads. NOT SEMI-DISPLAY ADS. 


BUY! SELL! RENT! HIRE! 











Beverley Lewis 
Ad-Visor 










IMMEDIATELY 








wes | THE WANT ADS 
. "ARRANGE , ; x ~ 
“amie” | | cmcommoy | Thy Yutolligeucer 


SORRY! NO 
COMMERCIAL ADS AND ASK FOR 


CLASSIFIED 











DIAL 962-9171 








WHICH SHALL BE CALLED “A.LR. DAY” 
—————— 


—listen to panelists gical aspects of air —find out what can be 


—Participate in discussion pollution. done 
—learn facts about:- legal, —sce displays —hear what others are do- 
legislative, ecological, —preview an air pollution ing 


medical, and technolo- film —raise questions 


“ALR. DAY” PHOTO CONTEST 


A Photo Contest is a part of this Conference — OPEN TO ALL AGES. Send your entries 
to the office at the address below — no later than October 22, 1971. 


YOU CAN WIN: $10.00 — FIRST PRIZE 
; $5.00 — SECOND PRIZE 
$3.00 — THIRD PRIZE 
Just take a photo (as many as you like) illustrating any aspect of 
don’t have to be an expert photographer to win because 
on content and not technical quality. The pholo winning first 


mitted in the Regional Contest and further prizes will be offe 
chosen on the day of the Conference: 


alr pollution. You 
will be judged primarily 

locally will be sub- 
on the first three photos 


: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
HASTINGS-PRINCE EDWARD TB & RD ASSOCIATION: 


~~ 311 BLEECKER AVE., BELLEVILLE 
PHONE: 962-2186 























PICK A PAIR 


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2nd TIRE 1, PRICE! 


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“DICK” ; 
POTTER 


QUINTE 
RIDING 














PHONE 968-3525 




















CLARKE T. 
ROLLINS 


HASTINGS 
RIDING 

























PHONE 332-1542 | 




















JAMES A. 
TAYLOR 


PRINCE EDWARD 
LENNOX* 
RIDING 


PHONE 476-2146 






















RUSSELL 
ROWE 


NORTHUMBERLAND 
RIDING 


PHONE 372-9403 















than wa 


Nobody's saying that words aren't important. 

Dialogue is, after all, pretty central to our notion 
of democracy. People talk to other people, and listen to 
other people talk about the changes that could or should 
happen to our society. 

But there’s something else that's pretty central to 
our notion of democracy, and that’s leadership. One 
person must act when all has been said. One person must 
speak for us. One person must listen, and very carefully, 
when there are difficult decisions to be made. 

Bill Davis is not new to the challenge of leadership. 
During his seven months as Premier, he has acted to 


stimulate our economy, to create opportunities for Gana-~] 


dians and for Canadian enterprise. He has acted on a 


Davis is domg things...for people, 


wide front to clean up our environment—air, land and 


water. He has acted to expand and up-grade a varicty . 


of government services, from day care centres to free 
medicare for those 65 and over. In all, more than 130 
pieces of legislation have been introduced, debated, and 
made law in those seven short months. 

In the course of the present election campaign, Bill 
Davis continues to listen and speak out, but his promises 


‘are fex€_Our economy can ill-afford the tax increases 


to which others have freely committed themselves. 

We may be sure that when action is called for, he 
will be both wise and decisive. 

In what he has already done is the true promise of 
what is to come from the leadership of Bill Davis. 


Inserted by the Ontaria Lic peeled Conservative Association, 


He listens, he understands, he acts. . x 


+ 


« 


On October 2ist,do something for Ontario...Support Bill Davis. : 


/ 





THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1971 B 

























IWISHING... 


> > that you could Sell your car, Rent an apartment, Find a home in 
FS aa ag ac OE a TS 








REAL SOMA FOR SALE 





REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 








a 
MAURICE H. 
+ CONSTRUCTION LimitgD 
HOUSE FOR RENT 













CE cee cre begmsont and '2 (== ene bedroort apart- 
ments. You'll always be sure of a substantial income from this 









18 NORTH FRONT STREET 
BELLEVILLE 


Dial 968-641! 











































M plex. BELLEVEIR ONTARIO H2-H18 
LOOK NO } MORE — You've found it! Great value in this 3 bed- Becker . Rena Ne i 
room, brick bungalow with large dining area, full divided base. ‘The Oldest Name In Real aes Ser ee 
caecttog beagle lw year oa: see gry and compare. Estate in Belleville Deseroalo 
rom - 
minutes te possessi 241-243 GEORGE STREET HAVE A HEART? 396-2137 


NOW IS THE OPPORTUNITY TIME to purchase your summer 
eatin fo Sil seats = cee wewara from $6,000.00 at 












Sce this income property close to schools and downtown. There 


are three one-bedroom apartments completely self-contained. NEW. HOMES 

















And need a bouse, with no steps? 














popular lakes in Hastings and Prince Edward Counties. NOW UNDER WAY!) |All with full bathrooms, kitchens, iving room, bedroom and Weibave 3 ere Mae sn |Thtee new homes on Robertson Lanz. One is a ‘bedroom, 
" entrances, The owner's quarters have 2 large bedrooms, living |151¢ bathrooms, Jovely broad. | 2Storey and the other two are bungalows, one with a garage. Low 
968-4571 A. number of houses in the| room, dining room, kitchen with breakfast area, 4-pc. bathroom, | loomed living room. Se short | down payments and large mortgages are available. These homes 
; psn voradirh mh debe ‘This | wall-to-wall carpet. forced air oil furnace. The lot is 8° x 122" | distsn-e north of the oye in 2 are ready for immediate Occupancy. 
CALL ANE OF CUS BAS BT ew phase of West Village | with trees, double garage and storage area. - - - Live in - - - Let |quie, village. Further details 


ues above vetendlg + str Riahor 
down paym: 2. 

already arranged at 84%. fa 
us show you this area. 








478-5280 | Dor. MacDermaid . Moe. rent pay for your home. Call soon for inspection and all details. | request. 


On Oriole Park Avenue. An immaculately clean 1'-storey, 3-bed- 
room home. Separate living and dining room, full basement, 
broadloom on stairs arid in hall. This home can be yours for 


ara Di 
EAST MOIRA STREET. ‘ 


A 1%4-storey, S-t<droom home. Spotlessly clean. Separate living 
sad Gabe oe. New oil furnace. Low taxes. An ideal family 












NEAR THE MALL 


NEW HOMES 
We have a number of new homes for sale with November A poet two bedroom aes 
possession. Split-levels and bungalows. some with garages. with a a pans 
8%4% N.H.A. mortgages. Call soon for further details. wre very roomy 


third bedroom. 
“CEC” GARRETT — 92-8041, home in good location. 


Exclusive Re tatives f Evenings Call — 
xCiUsI¥e presen ves for PHIL RAY .... 






















~~ fours ioc OCKS [m. = 


































REALTOR REALCARE LIMITED 
i Store: Exon Stevet = Open oes nme, Canada's Largest Home Relocation Service 
FOXBORO LELAND DRIVE 






A perfect location for a family home. near schools and play- 
. shopping centre and bus route. This is a large 3- 


Tnree-bedroom bungalow located in a Sub-Division with a 
split- Jevel of brick construction with an attached carport. Lovely 


park- 
like atmosphere. The It, 11C feet hy 200 feet, is right on the 
Moira River. If you want to get away from the City come and 






EAST-END SPLIT 





a 
BARRY“FORCHUK 










ert home, Askir, below residential area. 
soa iat Naataad ta te UIC, 1 REAL ESTATE LTD. - 
REALTOR 
Large kitchen with 
. EAST END je vee ‘ining BELLEVILLE ee pecan ; ; 
ta 3 . No salary require | Belleville Trenton bedroom bungalow on a large lot. Low taxes. Full basement. 

eee hic on feues Lage croecteay, eer Eeied ents for qualifying for 279 North Front St & Division St REALTOR Oil furnace. A low down payrment will do. Possession in 30 days 

room .formal dining room and family- size kitchen with loads of | 5#8* 68-64? Soa 962-9248 or less, Why pay rent when you can own this beauty? Call for 

cupboard space. May be seen by anpointment only. Call your = SS eS SS ees = zh details and viewing. 

“Joyce Man” now. 133 DUNDAS ST. EAST 

- BAVAICE H, uU Ni iT =) Belleville, Ont. 
wienente: ED TRUST scmaaduak wanes 
A ' NEAR PLAINFIELD %0. Double ‘house on '2-acre lot. 

* — rgetclireding site Hidde rnmivybahg epee gtnes 3 bedrooms. Living Bu grit 10 rooms in all. 4 buy for |Over 1100 ft. road front- 

heed tiag room and a den to satisty een Saceimination CONSTRUCTION Limirco | this price. Stewart Hoover. 962-9194 or 395-2412. age, Prince Edward, yen 

purchaser. This lovely home must be scen to be appreciated. Sales Office — 9688895 - |EAST SIDE — $19,00. Low taxes, 2storey brick home. Well |!#2d and woods, just 0 
































cared for. 3 bedrooms. Large living room, Separate dining room. | highway at Hiller. $7,000. 
Kitchen. Full basement. Kay Stafford 962-9104 or 392-4785. Must be sold! 


SOUTH SIDE BAY OF QUINTE — $20.90. 2-bedroom home. 

Living roots. Spores rar ed aerate igen seedy to| MURRAY FARM 

put a recreation room in, Well maintain jot, ordan 3 

392-1790 or 962.9108. 125 acres, paved road, all 
buildings good, 3 bedroom 

EAST SIDE — $24,500. Attractive brick bungalow only one yearihome with conveniences 

old. Large mortgage available. 3 bedrooms. Living room. Separ-| ang view, Land under cul- 


“\. WEST PARK VILLAGE 


Four-bedroom split-level on a quiet Crescent. This home features 
a finished rec room, 2% baths and a master bedroom with built- 
m furniture and sliding glass doors to the rear yard. Excellent 


me PHIL 
BUYING — SELLING 










































your mortgage payments with the rental 
income, Onl Only $24,900. 


WEST HILL: Good buy for the large family in an 

older home. Only $16,900. and featurin 

living room, separate dining room and pobre beds 

pres Lovely garden steps to school for the 
n. 


ale dining room. Well-planned kitchen. 4 piece bath. Basement. tivat! : 
BENNE This home is tastefully decorated. Frank Scobel 962-9104 or |'Vatton. - LtMiteob | 
962-7741. - 
EXECUTIVE TYPE | HAPPY HOURS await you as the new owner of this 4 
WEST SIDE — $15,900. 2 bedrooms, Large living room. Large t . 
REAL ESTATE sunny kitchen. Utility room. This home is sure to be appreciated. HOME rep ee oes emo elegy 
Realtor Toni Hollingsworth 962-9104 or 968-885. _ Tandem basement garage,| of the benefits. i i ree bot! pat 
86 BRIDGE ST. E. Office Open <s beautifully treed and land-| fireplaces, 
9 A.M. to 10 P.M, — MONDAY to SATURDAY lot, well built 3 bedroom . td 4 
962-5326 SEMI-DETACHED N w.—W sf VILLE |home which must be seen} INCOME MINDED? 3 units with 2 bedrooms in each. 
S14 Front Street Cc JSST DUNDAS St Wis W ES tGATE ELAN = /BELLENICLE!. lto be appreciated. Quiet peace brick triplex in good location. Live in one and ; 


Belleville $20,000.00 will purchase this pro- area near Trenton. 
: perty that is alread: —— 
Open Evenings Until 9:60 p.m. venue, 2 DAILY CROSSWORD... wu by R.A POWER] |ristings! ! Are you think- px 
968-9467) Vi Lindgren .......... 962: distance P ing of selling? This is the 
0 “itiog foo sa Ba ACROSS ba] —— of Yesterday's Puzzle solved: time of the year to give us 
bath. Ideal for an invest- singick Gh Peat aS ees {] a call to discuss the selling 
ent, ers 55 Foundry of your farm or extra land. 


BAY OF QUINTE On Duty: Ray Jensen 
WATER FRONTAGE 962-9248 









€ 





See po eee oye eee Oh, with a good 












































14 Island eerie: 2 words . ° view of Bay of Quinte, Buy now with only $500.00 
department of 63 Dumfound Open Evenings ‘Til 9 P.M.| down and build later. Approximately 1 acre priced to 
a Geese ‘c be Sllpoecy _ Direct ie sell at $3,500.00. 
se" “— Is 364-3931 
Generally: Born” For further details on these and other listings, contact 
WHEN THINKING 2 words 2 words salesinen listed al 
SEL oe UVES 1b Me, Gershnin 68 Formal BUILDING LOTS any one of the below 
: 17 Stems practices t — Lady 40 Toward the | care ocunpeem roor rrowracz| Chas. Cooke .... 968-7333 Janet Dignain . » 962-9995 
This investment property in chdice East Hill boasts one 2-bed-| . PHIL BENNETT REAL 18 Ali 69 9 —du Diadl THREE SEVENTY Harvey : - 
room and one 1-bearoom apartment. Gross income — $262.50 per ESTATE, 20 eaeiisiss 70 Nikola =: 10 Garlands : a Veloe | "Saar = FACHG SOUTR Carleton 3092-2898 Joyce Smith .... 392-1308, 
month. Solid brick, private drive and garage. Full basement- 22 Actress — Engineer who .11 Apply a 44 Pierre Thewe miles south of Bellevitie on Tom f jpson 962-7160 Roberta Smith 392-1497 
Lot 45 x 125. Excellent condition. Asking $22,500.00. CiNaase made AC trace of Tnaleec, he. |e ’ Manager, Marg. Cooke 968-7333 
23 Refuse of practical color to one. ‘Avsty MAY ALTE aver ‘S80 bath STREET 
pas molten metals 71 Perfum 12 “Goodhighh—"" 47 Trefiess ar 
WEST HILL — BUNGALOW moron a a be alles See. ron en Evenings Ti 9 pm. 
brick’bome with lots of living s Good sized living Missouri DON out ¢ Y “Growth Through Service Since 1913” 
Lars Pity helmet —3 Lenpsen = pe ral finshed rec. ee: rs woe 1” uae 48 eaax ting Weller 5 Bay Lots & 
4 ‘or children enced, Full basement. Your offer | ————— tate of armed = 1 Interstate beverage 50 Strait bet . $1,000 DO AND 
may do. Phone for appointment. seine, Siamece 2h an Enid tween Sandy Beach xj20 DOWN AND" | LOTS FOR SALE 
—_—_—_—— wi ommission: 23 Use a broom ante 
x about to fail Addr. 24 Ti 
WEST HILL — 1% STOREY 22 Rest eeabers 2a it Gh ca ge aah oid Wooded 
4-bedroom brick ~-2 baths — large kitchen —- = living room — Isagreement = Association: “27 Work: Prefix / US author , D 
‘8 le, 39 A Roosevelt Abbr, Complete with roads, hydro and SERVICES LTD. 
immediate occupancy. Estate sale. Make an of 42 Region of 3 Tine periods Hf pprosvaknee Far he wee from 53 968.3577 — 9627444 Or HELP WANTED 
. 231 Front Street brass 4 = 6 stiont $5 Entertainer $1895. and up 
A 962-4528 FA A ect Plate arte on Sc $195. Down PRIVATE SALE PART TIME 
a Open Evenings "Til 9 p.m. i Pesce ~ Fr ia oy molsture 61 Pan $30. esudvents OF HOUSE eins = remunera- 
° —b Astird 3 + form Highway 33, 4 es south of tive. Completing ins 
Joy Bowerman ......-. 962-1216 | Jack L. Diamond Semen) eines (5 Is capital is 62 Pronan Treen Wp Carrying Place, tura TO RENT OR reports in your area. I: 
Reiger) seeee pod John ratte bY sa reed 7 In proportion: 38 Hine a Recon ficht at Road 26, follow ‘FOR SALE hours daily. 
Acher ..... soo. 968-4418 | Doug A oollsh 2 words distinet fla ; ATIVE ON. STR Reply To . 
Harold Wilkinson ..... 968-524] Wea. Oliver .. baa - suffix WEEXEND Dial 962-0796 prea bs ply 
Jack Jeffrey .......... 962.5648 |D. J. Whalen < 4 Signs On Property = BOX A-10 
nmi ‘ Or Phone TRENTON THE INTELLIGENCER 
Duplex — East Side - : 
‘ SALES REPRESENTATIVE 
QUINTE SHORES _ Good Revenue Required. for a local Canadian 
Toronto 922-9388 Owner Will Hold Mortgage | Company Applicants should be 
& 01-2 968-5654 mane and « ig to accept 
= ° o1-st | SUPCrvision. Must be a resident 








900 — NEAT and CLEAN | 
bungalow, some 


‘ penses, Give resume to 
sorsuaiags included, Immediate 
possession. 


PRQPERTY FOR SALE BOX A-73 
MUNTING CAMP — 41 FT, BYgo THE INTELLIGENCER 


eS \for S years, Salaty plus ats 



















a ae — PRIVATE SALE — 
PRIVATE CUSTOM BUILT _ |call— LARRY LAMBLE, c/o | 












EXECUTIVE HOME 3 canoes CLAY BRICK VICTORI A & GREY UNITED 
Immediate Occupancy - NGALOW - TRUST SERVICES LTD. 
Excellent Location ones et a aortas 968-6437 Phone 968-3577 — 962-7444 | Den’ 
Family Room — Main Level |Close to schools, plaza, siete | Or Toronto 920-2113 ok a mr 
Beautiful Rec Room and churches. Two com- z — - ee Oe AS: Pinhead Teoed: Beast ber eevee “end 
wa be deer re baths. Completely fin- oe ns TERMS AVAILABLE BRAND NEW BONE W _ @ Everett Street Belleville Oe ate 
ant ed Jaundry room, rec} Duplex 82 2 apartments, each GALO sf —- 
3 Bedrooess room and play area, ni ely | Withy 3-pe. - bath and» separate Dining room, diving Ray $14,500 — FULLY MODERN | EXPERIENCED | car sales | person, 
Attached Garage e Z| enmeceed: Fenced y. fances, ‘Over $1800. annual chen ea, full " basement. (stove RETIREMENT HOME ing conditions, call 968-3441. 
any Extras — pay ve. " ’ UNITED Village of i 1 acre | EX> ‘CED waitress, full time. 
See It To Appreciate It Owner Moving ) REALTY Contact: J. GALLOS Near Village of Hastings. pentyl all ime. 
WRITE BOX A321 Reply To Box A-50° SERVICES LTD.- frontage oa Trent River.| prcnt st. . Belleville ‘O23 






Phone 968-3577 — 962.7444 
Or Toronto 920-2113 


395-3391 lot, 5 
Or Whitchead’s Restaurant Be celles eat terms. ee ene A BABYSITTER to come into my ”~’ 


THE INTELLIGENCER The Intelligencer | oan. 
: = 01-31 lor Toronto 920-2113. J2i8 between 6 sod 7 03-3 








HELP WANTED HELP WANTED 


“GREAT 
OPPORTUNITY 


One of, Canada’s largest Fund- 
Raising organizations requircs 
a mature, imaginative, com-} 
munity minded planner for 
Belleville and district. 
We are a fully owned and oper- 
ated Canadian company’ ser- 
vicing the financial needs of | FAnM wanted to rent in or around 
. Sports groups, nation-; Deny Led area, £108 pescres se utes 
al organizations in communities, | Fis must bes reasonable, 1-AlG-Z9t- 
towns, and citits across Canada, | 609 after ‘ SI3-13t | 
[we offer high potential earnings 


‘AST Cash ft carerer 
| a commission basis. nd" Pe cate 
Send us your personal resume 


|land, scrub bush = surface rights, 
abandoned farms and ARACEAE, 
tert, it, i location. price, 
in Cocascih Orville ‘Mociey. 
oe will be ack- 
caged and interviews ar- 


Orville Morley, Norval, Ont 
ereeces | renee at an early date. 


Jydewsu 
WRITE BOX A103 
_THE 


iON WTD. 





GENERAL ACCOUNTING 
. CLERK 
Preferably experienced in gen- 
eral accounting duties arily 


include preparation general 
journal entries account may: 


budget 
reports aud." bank gonclia: 


ACCOMMO 


FURNISHED apartment, one bed 
room. young responsibie couple, re- 
tently moved to city, Call 

tatier 122 pm S30-H 





Tent two in Bellevitie 
473-2229 after 6 p.m. S2e4t 





Faced oe bank 


oa opportunity for somcone 
presently cnrolied in. sccond 
year R.LA. or C.G.A. 


Telephone for appointment 
MR, ZIEMAN 
Ideal Venders Division Of 
Eddy Match Co. Lid. 

* Beseronto, Ont. — 396-2815 | 

















BABYSITTING 


DRY WA WALL = 
BOARDMEN 
AND TAPERS . 


To Work In Lindsay 
And Peterborough 
Experienced Only 


Call.-Collect 698-2891 


02-61 








; RELIABLE stadent will bobysit. East 
Hill area. Non-smoker. Expericaced 
with small babies. References, #62- 
1H. 


I'M EARNING 


MONEY 
MY CHILDREN’S COLLEGE 
EDUCATION. and 


FOR come 





1 must say I love getting out @nd 
tneeting people”, Those are the 
words of many Avon Representa- 
fives, It's an ideal opportunity to 
turn extra hours into extra cash 
You'll, also win prizes, meet peo- 
ple, have fun. No experience 
needed. Call: 963-3600 of write 
Mrs. 3. Stary, 279 King St W., 
Kingston, Ont. a 

Si-im 


C.L.U. REQUIRED FOR 
| PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION 
~ Some Travel Involved i 


Must Be Mature and 
Experienced 
* Phone 952-9889 Or Send 
Resume To 
P.O. BOX 158 BELLEV ILL E 


PART-TIME CARE 


FOR CHURCH 
Please forward full details 


FOR 


TEACHERS 
ACCOUNTING 


Loyalist College requires part- 
time teachers for evening clas- 
ses in accounting, R.1.A. or 
C.G.A. preferred. or equivalent 
extensive experience. Apply im- 





1,800 SQ. FT. 


oo 0080 


FURNISHED AND 
CARPETED HOME 





AKER 


! 


° 
i iting with r walificati {On East Hill for 6 months from 
media teiye fas writing Math ire: Qualifications and “| Nov. 1. Abstainers and adults 
sume to — Two References To ‘oaly please 
PERSONNEL OFFICE, | reLince nei WRITE BOX A1 
LOYALIST COLLEGH z 4  soost| THE INTELLIG ENCER 
BOX 4200 4 J EXPERIENCED ‘Cheese maker. obo! = 


a betper. with experience preferred. 
| Apply at Foxboro Cheese Factory, 
. | Corby vi Ne, O2-3t 


2-6 
| REAL ESTATE sates ~ personnel. = 


BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO | 





THREE BEDROOM HOME 





| Bathroom upstairs and down, 








felent commission bonus p pa a 
leads supplied downtown loca new o} urbace, fu Dascment, 
: CHARTERED Pie ate Ha Wison Real itiled floor and panciled walls. 





paved driveway, good garage, 
20 miles north of Beltevilic 





BANK REQUIRES 





EMPLOYMENT WANTED | 32209 Madoc 1 | 
CLERK - Sani ode.s.. 
BOOKKEEPING- = 
TYPIST BRADLEY 


ACCOUNTING 


CONSTRUCTION 


Complete Plumbing 
Tile Bed and Trenching 








Apply In Person ; 
BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA | éeiiver Trenton, Rerevitie. Breeht 


























4, | aces ‘ 
e 283 Front St. -- REASONARLE RATES 962-1983 
~~ a TELEPHOSE 473-0306 jan 
Belleville, Ontario s_ a Stee 
~ 


3 BEDROOM tower apartme 


AMBULANCE pisparcnt |= " bs 
OPERATOR — Part Time! May tacts Bo. 


| Reply to Bow A-t? The In 





‘This is a part time relief position 
and the succesful candidate will be 
required to work on ai! 3 shifte On 
the job traieing will be provided 
after which it will be neceserry 
to write and obtain a Restricted 
Radio Operator's Licence. 

Appointments may be made by | 


Tolephoning 
MRS. H. FRASER 
Personne! Dept 
BELLEVILLE GENERAL HOSPITAL 
968-5511 a | 
S32 


LAB TECHNICIAN 


Agsressive individual posses: | c 
sing a chemical technolosi 
cipioms or having related 


oh perience required for Quality | _ 
1 Searante Laboratory in local 
food industry. Ability to com- 


municate and relate effectively 
with others a definite assct. 
Good starting salary with ex- 
cellent daira benefits. 


BACK HOE 
ply: BON AG . 
THe ‘INTELLIGENCER, 3 RENTAL 

ree, ROSS POUND 


AMARELIP R. 6 . BELLEVILLE 


902-3783 
Interesting position av ailable for 
the person who is interested in 
the art and 
makeupr 


MATU Lone WOMAN, expenenced prim 


SUED tenevtow to May dst, 
elable aduits G€2-10Ts 


h 





WANTED 





i 


nzhO2 


aneliculen in LIFE-LONG HORSEMAN “epee 
REQUIRES PONY FOR SON | ummedioreiy 

‘ PHONE ‘\ inet prncanetas Eueroniced sound ond | FURNIS. 
LONDON OF ENGLAND | tree of alt vice. Wat Frosnnable | heat 


price but must prove as bbove 
oii oh ADEMY "i Phone Collect 653-2680 Days 
De ~~ 


€53-3811 Evenings 


— 


ED DACHE LO} t 
and bya 





— 


EARN EXTRA MONEY 
Show Canada's "finest line of Ch: 
mas Caras. Wraps, Novelties, 
Over 30 itent. For ~tree 


| LOYALIST cleetronics 
to | TV S rade ef: 
Any such donation 
Scored condition. would be 












- |ONE GROUND foo, hes 





new 

a catalogue, samples on approval and | elated. Poter Mischoli. room, furnshed or unfurnished, 962 

service: | i. Olas 7900 ol. n 
JEAKDRON GREETING CARD /STAKE truck 14) to 2's ton, fr MALI. 


two bedroom upstatrs apt 
contained Four-puece bath. olf 
furnace, $209 month includes hydr 





197 to "G fair condition. re seoesabiy 
1233 Pa "beivet prwec, will pay cash, 962-7293 


Mamitton, Ontario 


East, 








St-Im Ors ‘Ox, 8 miles north Uelevile 

RADY CIE TEN SPEED bicycie,, 966-6512. cs 
3 ¥ EDROOA apurtinent. stave, 
WANTED BY a nines . cuamadiontne rable TY, 


6) ct teas ona beat hydro, Yaundry facil 


itles, park- 


DENTAL PRACTITIONER | Thurs cent foe 












Apply 303 Ds ate, 
return will pay, 960-9520 mer Oe apt. 2. rt rey are Aol 
Fully qualifed hygienist full or = | NEATED, eae bedrooen 


2 & $110. doltars per month. 

“22 Charles Street, Saturday 

good | condit on. 
OL 


art time — will be consider: | 

on qualifications of appli- 

cant. Excellent salary and bene- 
fits. 


GIRLS aod boy's bike, “age 7 ands 


SEPers “trailer. 
| reasonable 962-C230 


TV TOWER and antenna. Phone = 
24O, Stirling. 


ADULT apple pickers, linmediste 
71 | Gerald Redner, 264-8003 Ol oat > Space, av Hy immed 


2 — 14° RIMS for 1963 Chevetle. — | Kinney Nealty Ltd., 
Phone 962-5118 after 5. S2*3t 4) peproos: 


WANTED -— Od viol nore “any cond: | P3id, $133 
ton, while giving culure and! 
price expected to Dox x Aa? Te In- 
telligencer 33-1 





iz*o, LARGE size stor 





WRITE_BOX A-84 


THE INTELLIGENCER Stopznn 












~ 





ehrat, hyd. cable 
monthly, 967-3081 
sD 


Ww 


CASHIER 





oe 
TUREE bedroom, house. rewly doce 
jorated in Picton. Available Nov 1. 


Apply 
























QUICK CASH for usd furniture 476354. S30-4t 
MRS. BOUTET Bed eae ees Puraiune, WELTEG, PODERN three bedroom, bunsiow, 

S22- aad 
"FOUR SEASONS HOTEL, | — mom fattee toe et oF EES 

as 3 Ol-3t 

= | ACCOMMODATION WTD,| Eat Yn tevrely 3. bedroom heen. 
. Sth. — ~ 
| THE FOUR SEASONS | ————__________ 10, ih, Ment, 3 ey aes 
HOTE SELLING YOUR HOME [fesony “em Grey Trust co 

requires WITH NO RESULTS? — |. 


NMODEAN 2 room heated apartment. 


ivale enirance and bath. Adults 


A GARDENER Would you consider renting to Pry 








POURS WORKING couple “wish to bridge Road» SS7-1878, 
bedroom hou: ————. 






_BABYSITTI NG 


WOULD mind or board child undcr 


3 companion for 4 year old girl 
wR 01-6 


DAY CARE for 1 or 2 children, area 
Township building on Walle 


TRADE SCHOOL 


‘ 


REAL ESTATE WANTED | ————2=———_————_- 


TRAIN TO BE A 
HEAVY EQUIPMENT 
OPERATOR 


yearn to operate Bulldozers, Drag- 

Cranes, Sorspers Loaders, 
ixrenchers ete. Study at home fol- 
lowed by resident training at our 
modern facility in Miam!, Florida, 
A high-paid carcer is open to am- 
btlour men. 


For further information and appli- 
jtion form send name, address 
phone no. to 


UNIVERSAL HEAVY 
CONSTRUCTION SCHOOLS 
Dept. No. 2723 


4195 Dundas Street West, 
Suite Jd 


Toronto 18. Ontario, Canada 
Or Phone _ 
(416) 333-6063 


RENT 


STORE FOR RENT 


FRONT STREET, BELLEVILLE 


AIR CONDITIONED 

SUITABLE FOR ANY BUSINESS 
REPLY TO BOX A-40 

THE INTELLIGENCER 


oO246912 13-16 


~ Hpuncusnen inwulated heated and! 


hy 1 and 2 bedroom cx rttaces 





HOUSF. five rooms and bath clase 


to horwpitsl and schools on 


| toutes, ve 0663. 


RCOM AND BOARD 


bus 
_O-3 = 








‘FURNISHED bectroom = with 
OGL EISS 


home 
ols 


1 board avattli§le in East 
alt Vive-day week. Mile student 
preferred Telephone 15-4031 

S20-e 


LARGE room. West Mul gentlemen, 
no parking. $40. monthly, 


PTIVCR ES. 


hooM a 
Malt 








TRAILERS FOR RENT 


TRUCK AND CAMPER 
| FOR RENT WEEKLY 









OR WEEKENDS 
Camper fully self-contWied with 
Move. oven, refrigerator, toilet, 
and i c 





TRUCK & FARM SUPPLY 
| NATIONAL LEASE 


123 Church St. Belleville 
90S 5507 
Sibim 
FOR SALE 


HUNTER'S SPECIAL 


wrtspal Conoes 








--Winchewer Model 96 
Cal WW or W spect! 
Neg. $119.59 SPECIAL mms 

90 NUMEROUS 

TO MENTION 


KELLY’S 
SPORT SHOP 


HS NORTH FRONT 
962-0565 





NOTICE 
NEW ADDRESS 
R. R. 1, Foxboro 


QUINTE ANTENNA and 
ALUMINUM SERVICE 
‘V Towers, Rotors and Croasfires 
Ere. Doom, Windows and 
Awnings — Choinlink Fencing 
SALES AND SERVICE 
Call Anytime 962-8509 
— FREE ESTIMATES — 
AolG@ev-ta-thett 








PIANO FOR 
One year oid 


SALE. apartment. eee. 





any 339-3 
UTILITY traner. Price $43. Tete 
phone 13-1600 $30-31 


ELVINATO refrigerator $30 VE. 
Z wringer Washing mechine. $232. 
Or beat offer, peh-T00t 


YUIG $25, erib $15. high chair Hen 
te. 6.69 


36" CONTINENTAL bed, very food 
condition $39. 962-1005. orn 
=— acide 








BEAT THE FROST ! 


—Large Cukés—~—... $2. bu. 
—Green Tomatoes - $8. bu. 
—Peppers, red and 
green © ae $3. bu. 
Potatoes $2.50 bu. 
—Tomatoes, pick your eT 
own $2.59 bu. | 


—Onions, Sweet Spanish. 
No.1 $5. bu. — No, #S4. bu. 


HATFIELD'S 


Rednersville Road 
9B SASL 
Ona 
FRIGIDAIRE _ refrigerator, custom 
traiee hitch for 1966 Chev. 2 wheel 


trailer, Mat top, suitable for snow- 
mobic. hone B65-9490. * Ol-2s 


TUXEDO, size 37. short, berlect con- 








$297 39 | 7 


Telepbone ¥6?-co | 


ssa uy 





FOR SALE FOR SALE 


celts 
STARTING 
TUESDAY 


OCT. 5th 
THE INTELLIENCER'S 


. WANT 





’ 


ALUMINIUM 
SIDING SALES 


R. R. 2, Brighton 
We have aluminum installers in 


WILLIAM BIGFORD | MAKE TRACKS WITH MOTO. SKE 


x 


‘ 
« 


TUE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1971 5 


\ SNOW VEHICLES 











SNOWMOBILES - 


Complete stock of New Moto Ski Snowmobiles in wide - 
range of H.P. ratings, starting at $499. and up (in 
carton prices available). 


ny USED UNITS 


the Ameliasburg arca on the| 1970 MOT, SKI M.S. 18 Wide Track model Electric 


week of October 4th. If you are 
thinking of doing your home 
before cold weather, phone for 
a free estimate © - 


_ 475-0521 Collegt 
And Deal Directly With The 
Contractor And Save 
The Salesman’s Commission 
20-YEAR GUARANTEE, a 


AD. 
BARGAIN 
WEEK 


6 


INSERTIONS OF A 


> 





quer sever | ne nour 
i “MARTINIZING. 
THE MOST in Rv CLEANING 
4 322 PINNACLE ST. 
: 962-4700 


Od-evem-th-s-tf 





Word Ads Only 


SORRY No Commercial Ads | TSS GD. BRacse — Chesterfield 


130d: Chair ae Recker. — Bathtub 
-Display. ‘Sink -- Sten Ladder — Lamps 
Or Semi-Displays | Rus Bampoosr — Ping bas Sel 
mh 7K op ‘an eater — Wall irrors 
BUY — RENT — SELL | tv" rowr Control — Eiectric Oven 
SOIT Broth —— Chair — 8 Stool 
IN THE CLASSIFIED © | coi “Goey —Rtumiaum Doors and 
Windows -— Hand Lawn Mower 

Ol Stove 


Many Other Household Items 
962-1326 After 5 


The Intelligencer’s 
DIAL 962-9171 


O1-3: 


APPLES 
MAC'S, HAND-PICKED 
(Bargain, Price While They_ Las‘) 
$2.50 Per Bushel 
Bring Your Own Containers 
LEEMAN’ 


O13: 











—Grey Nylon Rig 
underlay 

—Movie Camera 

ele Purple Nedepread A Drapes 


10 x 15) pilus 








—Noley 26 Carburetor 
| raw or Miteh 






—New Man's Winter Coat. Sif Its Mile a Red. ville Road 
—Tent Meater Car Nadio . Os-evrturtiv et 
—Pump Shotrun 
=Duncan Phyfe Table —Cedar Posts any size, 12¢ per 
}—Chitd's Borg Coat sire 6 inch in“diameter. 
—Drownle Uniforin, size & —Cedar Corral Poles, 12° and 
~—Gulde Uniform stse 16 16’ length, 10c per running 

. foot 

CALL 962.8185 

M 73-4008 
AITEN 6 Pt. 1ADOC 173-400 
320-3 Evenings 


Sm 


GRAND OPENING 





OCTOBER 1st (Friday) We Specialize in Freezer Orders 
HOMECRAFT SHOP DEAN & McCAMON 
Cannifton ABATTOIR * 
All Types Homemade Articles | gery a& PORK FOR FREEZERS 


Custom Siaughtering, Cutting, 


For Further Information Call | 
962-8382 


Wrapping & Quick Freeze 
Sides & Mama — Cured & Smoked 
RR @ BELLEVILLE - ae 

Giena McCamon am 
eve we str foul 









FURNITURE BARN 
LOW OVERHEAD 


nex Prices On New and Used 
Furniture 


STEREO, SOUND EQU 1PMENT 
lsexy To™EMD Tope 
Bast orhe 80, W 

= List 











Rtercé price $200 





Sultes 
Desks 
Mundreds 
tems 


| chepit Tents AVAILABLE 
COME -- SEE US 
BELLEVILLE FURNITURE 
and AUCTION BARN 


ot 





3S. DUNDAS ST. © 






3 Pows to" Beod 


1 Tendem Die, new 



























[U1 SKI-DOO TNT, 36 LP. with 
539-2 


Start, Special ....:ss.eleseccevevsessss $699. . 


1970 MOTO SKI ZEPHYR. Long track model, Good 
“condition. Special ........ 0.0... -ceceee $049, 


70 MOTO SKI CAPRI. Popular model. 


1507 MOTO SKI ZEPHYR. Only ............ $299, 
CLOTHING and ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE 


Conventional G.M.A.C. Terms 
After Sale Parts and Service 


ELLIOTT MOTORS 
70). LTD. 


366 Front St, North —— 


962-4584 









AUTO 
—_——————_—_____ 


INTRODUCTION 


72 SAGE 


1971 BUICK Electra two door’ 


SEE and $AVE 
* SKI-DOO~’72 


Service Is Our Business 
‘71 MODELS STILL 
AVAILABLE 
Good Selection Of 
Used Machines 


VERMILYEA 
OUTDOOR 


SALES AND SERVICE 


Belleville and District's Only. 
Authorized Dealer 


Located On Foxboro Hwy. 


paps extras. Lic. No. se18 96758A. 
SAVE NEARLY $1,000. ON 
THIS UNIT 


1971 PONTIAC Grand Ville four 


962-4146 door hard Aquarius Green 
S33! Metallic matching 
cloth interior, » high orm. 
° / ance engine, automatic trans- 
I-LJ00 72| see cer seems 
st ig wheel, remote 
- contra ares Many extras. 
cc. 94989. 
SALES SERVICE 
VE NEA 5 
ACCESSORIES SVE yen ane $900.) ON 


QUINTE SPORT 
CENTRE 


1971 PONTIAC Parisienne, four- 
door hard top, Aztec Gold with 
Gold vinyl roof, matching in- 
terior, fully equipped with all 
extras, including radio, clock, 


Lake St. — Picton rear seat speaker, rear 
“OPEN 1 DAYS A WEEK" dow defroster. Lic. 83518A, 
Sd-ev-s-m-t-s 








REDUCED FROM $5,050. 
TO $, 


| cover, %62-S005. 
70 449 RUPP © magnum, “430 miles 


~~ 
191 PONTIAC Catalina four 


with speedometer and boggies. Price| ‘door hard top, Aquarius Green 
MS EST S3+3t|} Metallic with cloth interior, 
. s fully equipped, 


many extras. Remote contro 

rear view mirror, white wall 

tires, side protective chrome. 

Lic, S3517A. 

ORIGINAL PRICE $4,768. 
SALE PRICE $3,395. 


VADER'S 


SANETHENAY ‘6S DATSUN 1600 1971 PONTIAC Laurentian, four. 
: 2. Madoc = =| ; . 
sos 25" ets U3, Station Wagon. 4-door, radio. — pr wepre tant bod 
we for sate Tere. axe Bicanie Guia eee is oe Finished in red. Lic. X74955. wer steering, power dise 
$6: ONE Mrownie uniform sur & 
. i 174 13, mattress and spring, 92. , Pra kes, automatic, radio, side 
hard to saxe imones® O86 ese protective chrome. Many ex- 
sropem ror Inaurance SOLID watnut | cotter table base tras. Lic. 96473A. 
enci at 4 2-532 mrt an pa AL gvod, ¥@-ar™ 
Agencies t . VE-S326. Ayasit'| nd p Gved 330-0 ‘ eke OVER $600. 
ae ane Se eye eae “sz| CAR SALES ecco 
Phone Thurtc Apsot 855. & ; 

















d teaorahie rate . Sotur- 
Oacst 965-9431 Foxbe Jaleuwt 
Mx+it pain of Gosdyear snow tires, 7.00 

© PONTIAC 2-duor hard top a) 13. Aa-new 90. after 6 
nt, Smet 


“ L ted 
picked. 
dour © 
Redner 


mh apples 
Duy hel 





4 
Bring 


ne Gor 
"| Roblir. ile Road. Siew 




















Artic 





| 


") MOTORLAND CHRYSLER |? 


ONF cold salon jacket size 12, blue | We are taking in a lot of 1-own- 





1971 FIRENZA S.L. four door 
sedan, Good Wood Green Met- 
allic with green vinyl ioterior, 
automatic transmission, white 
wall tires, deluxe wheel cov-- 
ers, low mileage. Lic. 9T04A. 

ORIGINAL PRICE $2720, 
SALE PRICE $2495, 


@ DATSUN @ 


SALES AND SERVICE 
Cor. N. Front and College Sts. 

. BELLEVILLE 

962-1449 962-1191 





Check With 

971 FIRENZA S.L. two-door 
coach, Honey Star Mist Metal- 
lic, with gold vinyl interior, 


Nest “Used Cats =| white wall ties, deluxe wheel 


,On Your 





[and white uniform size 12 and one! peed transmis- 
tl ands. arn fares 43 A cent jer low mileage trade-ins on our} Covers, four-s 
: gaivenized e.ding .Phione 062- saa. eerste 2 aedelne 2 sion. Lic. 95252A. x 
|} $220 per sheet, Phone @ Severe: Dayle Lew ORIGINAL $2430, 
‘Every z SALE 
leonsout rv, news MOTORCYCLES “Price Day", Se 
f wach deals 7) Noel a HIGHEST TRADE-IN 
Bn iafurmece” sa nine on 1 Nee eae se AVAILABLE 
ig epee tn Bagg bat eh G.M.A.C. FINANCING 
har nd picked an windls | MOBILE HOMES. AVAT 





we 


i" tere 4. al 
ons. Pine me 


” Ve grese. ducks and 

167-1060, 

ANTIOVE walnut bed and dresser, 

excellent condition; modem bas 
¢ motiress with legs 2 

618s orn 








« 






Mobile 
Homes 
MAXFIELD 





eS Fi 


TURIE-WAY 
stereo, 
paises ea Dine, 


rer 





* | TWENTY- FIVE White Rock puticts 
for sale. Alvo some phemants. Tr'e- 
phone 465-2109. SW-3t 

|scuna equipment, $273. Muat soil 

62-9944 $20-31 


GUEY PERSIAN lamb jacket, size 10 












| Soest concen (OE Sa. st EOE RAILER SALES 

1 39-08 RIFLE, det 

Pew, este and shells. Philm port | pj hi 2, West of Belleville 
able tolevision, Uke new $90. 151, AH y 

Queen St - , $33-3t $3036 — 392-8141 
200 SAVAGE. lever action with Wot Apsa-ss 


lame peep $80, #039450. 


I9-INCH RCA portable Tv 
Iktge rug. ¥ x 10, $49. 962-0091. 


S2i-6t 


7 
Sad 1971 SKYLINE — 60 X 12 
31 | 3 bedroom completely furnished — 
no down payment to gaalified buy- 
ers — $7.875 FULL PRICE, 
Delivered Within One Hundred 
Miles falf-Way Betwees 
Odessa and Kingston 
On Highway 2 
RK 


DPIECE pce setting _Coleport | 
china, @ x 6 broadioom rug. 2-pe. 
luxgage. maroon, 902-T0m. Ol-2t 
KENMORE gos dryer, like new $323. 
Northbrook 336-2309 ‘after 6. 


Ol-d: 
TOP-SOML for sale, delivered 92- ——$—$_— -—__ 


thes OF | pry TADLY Homes Ltd. Mobile 
TWO wringer washers. In excedlent | homes Pyrampl, Mariette, Open for 


condition. Reasonably priced, tele- Ayour inspdgticofn, Across from Quinte | 

Phone 963-3654. 01-01  rive-In ee qronaey ste, Batre 
0 0 m.) Mo: t 

31 NORDIC SKI-DOO and traiee. [pete if “pad 

Will sett or trade for boat or motor 

162-6402. O1-3t 


fet 





Call 392-0407. 








a. Pe options, new tires, must sell, 
Friday evenings 7.00 to 609 p.m. — | best offer, 


D1 | ey CHEVELI 






motoriand 
chrysler 


ELLIOTT 
MOTORS 


(70) LTD, 


366 FRONT ST. NORTH 
962-4584 


BELLEVILLE 


MOTORLAND CHRYSLER 
290 NORTH FRONT STREET 
962-3454 


"6S ENVOY 
18.000 Miles — Excellent 
Condition —* Radio — 2-Door 
Bucket Seats 
After Five 


DRIVE — 962-6488 
O1-2t 


Ov2t 


80-03 


VADER'S 


‘70 DATSUN 1600 


4-door, side trim package. Up 
to 35 miles gal. Finished in 
beige with dark brown interior. 
Lowner. Lic, 191MK. 


VADER’ S 


CAR SALES 
@ DATSUN @ 





9 LESLIE 


1966 CHRYSLER 300 


Convertible, full power, buc-! 

kets, consul, tilt wheel, mid- 

night blue metallic, white wall 

lires, excellent condition. Cert- 
ified : 

392-SH9 
‘S2-01-2 
) BARRACUDA Cuda 333 auloma- 


Picton 476-3915. iP haa 
LE convertible, W-8, 3 


~ 32 x @. full speed. automatic. Power uipped 
AS te. Apply 7 Read St. front ene dition, up to date thaw! collar, own- an WILLYS Jeep. without motoe | ac ry ed trig and. ty farmish |ypred 8 Condition, 9634839 after SALES AND SERVICE 
Apply to: : clean responsible family with | trance after 6 p.m. cand er ts 374, $30. Evening 962-055. 062.0549 CYT FS A deer ip Mey gs 5 S95t | CoN eas 
. MR. PARKER possible option to buy. Require “| WEDDING gown, size 1-12 train, “828-5 |.g7 TnIND four door Brougham | “CT + ELLEV thd 
FOUR SEASONS HOTEL. |3 bedrooms. References. 1 BEDROOM. clean, Douse: peiviicacs, | MASSHY-ANIIS Povo act, £2m"| vel and shoce (744), Must sell, Test tnterior 423 engine, Michelin tires, | ~ =BE ere 
ee ne ara OCR 2257 ferred. 965-9012. O21f| Plow, {urrow plow, cultivator, chains | Cfo: 962-4007. ost) 8 SNOW VEHICLES summee driver 24.000 miles, ee _+ 962 — > 962. 
, 2B-S357 pM AVAILABLE So Gees Gat sas condition $830. Call ogi. | OVEN READY Ecce retell and Se aes 
1TO:! pen: co $ -M. 7 atety. 7 t . BA Rost 47E- | —— TIN snow tires. BARRA convertible. 34.000 
Pmt ldots tis iron tHe AFTER 5.30 Sea Eoeceerriee room, TV cable. | MOVING Reset collide oie proiaed Eanes i ateges “Roo iot ae (Sao Yandaha sowmobiie, mi ausrot tote, ragior soe eensi- | miles. | automatic Ziebert,. excellent 
duties. evenings between 6 and 10 —_ i he Sacea’~ ‘aply. pb. bers Gual car’ speed- | tion, D6g-4550, _S20-& | con jon. nee going 
ona - pholstered chairs Samsonite | BUNK BEDS, G.f. Noor polisher, Re- ome’ tachometer, Parry 332-2181. 
pm. Monday to Fridoy: car prefer | TWO bedroom house in tekevil j7%o room ‘apartmen', suitable for | gage, teenagers ski clothen. 062-2007 | Elna, electric” broom, Kodak. 8 "mm | Ceadition: ‘sagaana’ over, Excelient | inca METEOR. 4-dooe automatic, V-B 2 T 
Hunt me af Pere The 'rerponsible couple, no smal | Fiature business woman. Central, | anytime. 02-31] Movie camera. projector lent ber, clephone 967-1339. Best offer ace | ————_ onde 
mere S22 ren. Reasonable rent, Dee, 1\052- 06-1064. iplicer and editor, 395-2104, Stirling. ‘70 ALOUVETTE GT 37 uP, Tere Be ed. S241 | 07 VOLKSWAGEN Bug. 1966 Trh 
Warrurss oe Night work, 4231. oRNISI ; 4+. ASSORTED kirt's clothing. size 10 to O1-2t ometer and tack, food condition $435 ——- umph Best. offer. 967-1198, 
Nive Coys¥rer wees. Saturday and COUPLE with’ one child require 2 pear a Lorene te - at: 968,008 O23: TUDENTS dor Jhd hao oe ideeeeina oe cosh Onn RONTIAG Sone Conta je ——— —-— 
Bundey git Apply Fit Hunny Ret bedroom apt, reasonable, OoHdms Lice, West MUL vadisel, -262 95" 2 ELECTRIC heaters, phone 960-| ines Wet Ise Te, Tecphone | 191! SKIDOO 25 Nb. aw INT os Eee 8s °Ford Sates, | "2 AUSTIN, « 00, 906-3068. 
aurany 223 Front Succ 826-08) Bz7-6! O21 . 12 09-3 | Dee TES Ta, Cote for HIB Telephone | coat between 4 ant Free Ont | Gente ot Btevensoa Pera ie IY sah piney ry 











ier 
i 


i 


Hi 
li 


f 
ir 













I 


TRAILERS FOR SALE 





i 


*68 CHEVY Il, Nova, four door 
V-8, automatic. Lic, 2578E. 


g 





fr 
a! 
i 


it 

be 

I 
ie 


iF) 
H 


a 
I 
i 
i 
i 


CHEVELLE ~ Malibu, four 
door Station Wagon, 6, cylin-/One Only 
der, automatic, power steer- 
Locally owned. 


i 
i 
E 


i 
htt 


il 





dl 


Scie $809 

ST CHEV. Biscayne, 6 cyl.,| , 20% 999. Now -.... : 
aul a! . four .door sedan, 
radio, Lic. S8144A, .... $1050. el Trailers at 


i 
5 


i 


"66 CHEV. four door, § cylin- 
_ der automatic, power steer-|. 






Hey 
i 


SANDY HOOK VARIETY 
476-2488 Picton 


5%3-2¢-35-90-01-2 
16-F7T. SHASTA, abeepe atx, ehectric 
brekes. Hitch Other extrea Good 

$1300, 473-0800. 


i 
; 


| 





to 









tt 
















BUSINESS 


Wilton’s OPPORTUNITIES 


i 





Cu Contre. — Private Sale— = of 
r Ventre BUSINESS IN THE f 
128 Front St. — Belleville 
pod ENTERTAINMENT 
FIELD. 


Same owner for past 14 years. 
Two miles from Belleville 
Taree Bedroom House Included 


PHONE 962-5751 


LOT MORE CARS ARRIVED 
COME SEE AND ao BUY 
196 Fairlane 500 convertible, 
Lie, 141627, Gleamizg red, V-8 


.3., Tadio, 5 
Fuin PRICE ONLY .. $990. 


19668 MUSTANG hard top, Lic. 
N58143, V-8, p.s., p.b., radio, |- 
Truly 

























SPARE TIME INCOME 





FULL PRICE ........ - 
1966 CYCLONE bard top, vinyl, er 
Lic, No, 983-892, V-8, consul, wetty can 
More 
terview 
REBAR Lp, 
TANK PUMPING FAST 
with y 
La petticoat ECONOMICAL 
In The Quinte Area 
Also Renting Totiets For 
ie | TAXI SERVICE 
oea-t444 Give us a ring at any hour 


of the day or night. Call 


' appearance. 
PRICE ONLY .. $790. 


1968 PLYMOUTH Fury II 2-door 
sedan, Lic. N92959, V-8, auto- 
matic. Low mileage. 
FULL PRICE ...... yEMALE Suuan cal 1b Sack 

ar peg ht ge Wagea neces —. O1-25 

ic. 2883) , p.s., p.d., | CHIN, male terrier puppics. 
radio, don't. miss ‘this one.) 22 Cas 


PLUS 15 OTHER CARS TO 












BOATS AND MOTORS 






































































Bot CHOOSE FROM. : 
4 
| Priston an @ fame. | aavenrsr wane TORONTO STOCK. EXCHANGE 
. the new 1973 
; 2 BUS TO THE KATHRYN (Omission of stocks usually quoted indicates no sales yesterday) 
} ; ti I aaa CHRYSLER BOATS ! TRACTOR DEMONSTRATION KUHLMAN MIRACLE S 
by PHONE 962-2222 IT Dow Rider now on duplar. Co HE ALING SERVICE Yesterday's Closing Prices Heathee sod Kor ‘and tate 
2 demonstration ride. Order your AT PITTSBURGH, PENN. p r “3 {| 
TRUCKS FOR RENT [20% 1773 Ctrrsier, bose now “ond To Introduce from Poland the New Ursus Tractors eae sigesi Pinesicaas Gate Sie ae Basle 45 parents Captain and Ms 
J. DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTEL [Pe sect twee | ON THE FARM OF ALEX McCURDY lng octsber 21 deat’ * eee RAD ig, «| A Cal Sone 
: LONG TERM eure ‘are $42, Includes 2 Nights Gas Trunk @ 3 to England on September ‘¥ 
PRE ees STAKES Lot 2, Con. 2, Rawdon Township r ging And Bus Fare Mwah arte reli Conwest Exp. 13 to live, where Capt. Simpson | 
wo oe Dial Atlantic Sugar 6% att Mickel a1 Cocpertials. 120 will be attend the C | 
+ National Truck Lea ton 42-0737 ‘ 
a sing System 4 miles East of Stirling on Ridge Road or pa pia: B Int. Prov. Pipe 21% field Institute of Technology. 







TRUCK AND FARM 
SUPPLY LTD. ar ae 1 mile West of No. 62 Highway on Ridge Road 


328 Church Street — Belleville moter and tealler, $000 FOR-706. MONDAY, OCTOBER 4th 


MORTGAGES 10:00 a.m. til 4:00 p.m. 


jt — 

=) eer Come See — Test Drive 
to us. We'll bandie them quick- Demonstrated through the facilities of the 
ly, efficiently and directly. Fast 






He will be studying for his 
Master's degree in acronauti- | 
cal engineering. They will be | 
living in Bedford for two 
years and plan to visit Europe | 
and the.British Isles during 
their vacations. 




































Sullivan 250 
Teck Corp. A 325 




























































































aprovais for the maximum in Ontario Farm Machinery Agency . Dom. % Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
2 ‘ mortgage fipancing, and consol- O1-m Perea ah aster Ate ay ons Moore, who have been work- 
sad idation 3 hel; x ‘ eodic y 
ben ateioTe OM refinance a present mortésée,| * TENDERS NOTICE Bemis iw ony ie NR eC Te | Erbe heeretbahidc! | 
make home improvements, ex: Se Ae! Ford Canada 88% Walkers GWosuK Dynamic 138 ranch “in. Cobourg. have eee 
oe pand a business. Group Life In- = NOT! ES 1c Ford US. 70 Westcoast 24% Mul City, 238 tuned to their } Ai RR 2 
hx ASSESSMENT APPEALS Se epee 20 MINES sone Tweed. . . 
of PERSONAL sense approach to money. Municipality of Grty, Trust 12% Allantie Coast 48 Wr Decalta 745 — 
P : Kinsmen president R 
THE “ 
Bush and his wife, Doris w 
TELL IT THE WAY IT Is.| NIAGARA COMPANIES A hosts for a Xinsmen * 
Someone Cares — Belleville — 962-4578 party on Friday, September 
per eaegeriaes LsLalas Keri ad* 2 24. Several Kinsmen and Kin- | 
(formerly Lifeline) BRUNSWICK THURSDAY 139, 273, 288, G. Spencer 61. | -ette couples enjoyed an even- | 
962-4111 TRENT CORPORATION OF THE AFIERNOON LADIES {EAauE S, Tradertchs e2s, 235, M. James ing of fun and fellowship. 


A Trained Counsellor Is On | INVESTMENTS LTD. It is hoped to have one of 





















LADIZS* BUSINESS LEAGUE 
rdworkers Rebels 7, 

































**. Duty 24 Hours A Day CITY OF BELLEVILLE ‘hase’ netiies oasetra’s miso 
Ste Ist and 2nd 2. Topcats 3. Hi “N" Low & | to encourage fellowship with | 
MORTGAGE the Kinsmen and Kinettes, | 

ne eo tein 

° orga yy . 

180 N. Front Street Net Earnings is Bush. 

962-2133 1° . - EE 2 eer | 

ADT-ev-w-th-faattt WINTER SAND p By THE CANADIAN PRESS | anmurspar vapise neacue Malt Penney 522, Val Tucker Oo. | Mr. Jack Fraser of, Ardoch, | 

keh Dodge py Geng S. Modes yiiriiyn Guay 478, Jim Begiey | is a patient in the Perth Mem- 














iT. 
o, Hustlers 7, Mit and Seles 7, 363 
_ . 
Singles: Larry Hedger 193, 
Triples and Singles: K While jynStewart 161, Matt Pentey 21} 
¥ 


- TAILORING orial Hospital, and Mr, Allen 


Flieler of Fernleigh {s a pa- | 












fv 


$209,322 profit, nine cents a 






























telling and alter : - thera’ tas, Rea | tient in the Kingston General 
MoRsES | Enea nas SP |share: 190, 4.02 os Undated xa Sebastes | 
WE not ine | ~A- J. Freiman Ltd, six Vielger 17¢ ats: Buty Bees 3. The 
MUSTANG RIDING STABLES ORESSMAKING ten. {months ended July 31: 1971,}- Di id ds : Relects 1; Lee Risers 2, Goodmane 
— . phl 1970, $66,199. viden Antennse Service 3: Ee reset yne, was 8&8 years old qq 
enster Lid, seven months | co tevenson | 


TENDERS July 31:" 1971, 44.200,000, || British Columbia Forest Prod- sr 1 The Toppers 3; Bardon Sup- 


4 cents a 
$1,196,000, 15 cents. 
Kotfler Stores Lid, six 











Saturday, September 11. 

Rose enjoys fairly pa | 
health. He is a former resi- 
dent of Deseronto, but is now 
living with his daughter - in - 
law, Mrs. Cora Rose. | 























TOWNSHIP OF FARADAY 
TENDER FOR TRUCK 









ne 
Cralgmont Mines Lid. 25. TORONTO (CP) » Suburban 
cents Oct, 29, record Oct. 15. Scarborough. the last holdout in 






Scintrex Ltd., six months 
ended July 31: 1971, $84,797 hss, 
10.9 cents a share; 1970, $230,007 


borough council that group 
Chemical homes handling wards of the 
and Wood Ltd., $1.70 pfd series Metro Children’s Aid Societies 














MR. TWEEDY 





They ar 


“Your parents don’t like me I know, 
buc we've got to stop meeting 
in these out-of-the-way places.” 


ARCHIE 


D Ree tere tere Sem, HFT Ftd age aor, 


x ~ 


r—\ 


HI AND LOIS 


MOUTHS IS 
WATERINAT 


HERE, AKE ONE OF THese 
A DY FoR 30 Ons, 
THEN REPORT BACK, 

TO Me. 


WHAT DO 


"THEY Do? 









HERE'S THE WORLD FAMOUS™ 


SWIMMER RUNNING TOWARD 
THE WATER... “ety 


Y'MEAN THISIS ALL You'Re 
GIVING ME FOR MY BIRTHDAY?, 
, ACRUMMY TWO- 


11S NOT THE 
MONEY, FANNY.» 
11'S THE 
THOUGHT: 


SMIDGENS 


LAND 








LL NEVER LET THOSE 
Ika @®@ GOBBLEGLOPS 
IN CHICAGO — AFTER 
WHAT THEY DID TO 
EW YORK //— 


By Ed Keed 





FOR ONE THING] THEY KEEP 
YOU OFF MY BACK FOR A 


MONTH. 


WELL,IM THINKING ABOUT 
‘ MONEY!! 4 a 


haps, ( 





* 
e 
3 
t 
j 
t 
i 


‘ 
* 


To Your Good Health 


Most Dermoid Cysts Benign — 


¢ 

Dear Dr. Thosteson: You 
wrote that “‘a dermoid cyst of 
the ovary is a malignant type"’ 
and should be removed. My 
wife had one removed 40 years 
ago. It obwjously was not ma- 
lignant. However, your state- 
ment that they are malignant 
is very disturbing to her, as 
two relatives. have developed 
malignancies. Could you pub- 
lish a qualification to the ef- 
fect that most dermoid cysts 
are not malignant? I am sure 
it would relieve many women 
who might be disturbed. — 
E. B.S. 

Gladly, and I truly regret 
any needless worry that may 
have been occasioned by what 
I wrote. Most dermoid cysts 
of the ovary are not malig- 
nant. 

As explained before, these 
curious cysts are made up of 
various kinds of tissue, in- 
cluding hair; bone, teeth, ctc. 
Most are benign and are re- 
moved for quite different rea- 
sons, 

It is true that some are ma- 
lignant, but not a great num- 
ber. I have seen various fig- 
ures quoted, the highest being 

“less than 5 per cent.” but I 

think that is much too high. 
One specialist in the field sets 
the figure at “Jess than one 
per cent,’ which I am sure 


\ 


will’ set at rest the minds of 
women who have had such 
cysts removed. 
eee 

Dear Dr. Thosteson: My hus- 
band found out six years ago 
that he was diabetic. The doc- 
tor told him to lose weight. 
He did, and he watches every 
bite -he takes, but he starts 
drinking on the weckend ‘arid 


ry s 


THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 197 7 


meal) before venturing an op- 
inon on how much he is hurt- 
ing himself. It has to be some. 
se ¢ x 

Dear Dr, Thosteson: My 
husband is 29 and gets severe 
leg cramps? gets them so 
bad “in the middle of the night _ 
that he rubs alcohol on his 
-legs, and cold towels, and 
tries to walk the cramps out. 


stops when he can't drink an-—~ Sometimes he lies“on the 


other ounce. He claims he is 
not an ic because he 
jpst “drinks. a little on week- 
ends”. Ww 

He was supposed to have his 
bivod checked every so often, 
but hasn't been back to the 
doctor since he. lost that 
weight six years ago. 

Is he cured? Will the gorge 
of beer hurt him? By “‘gorge’’ 
1 mean I have'to get some- 
one to take me to get him 
every weekend so I can drive 
him home. I go from 10 to 
125 miles. — Mrs. A. D. 

So let's label him a “week- 
end alcoholic’, There are 
such, 

No, his diabetes isn’t cured. 
It never will be. The question 
is whether he is keeping his 


blood sugar levels controlled, | 


and with all that beer, he pro- 
bably isn’t. 

I'd want a blood-sugar test 
(taken-two hours after- a 


floor and has to have help to 
get up because of the pain. 
He loses about an hour and 
a half of sleep when one oc- 
curs, and he gets them so of- 
ten that I'm scared. He won't 
"go to a doctor because he 
thinks there is nothing. they 
can do for him. "5 
He used to get. them before 
we were married but not like 
he does now. He is a butcher 
and works in the cold all day. 
Does that have anything to do 
with it? — N. D. ’ 
This doesn’t sound like the 
leg cramps that are so com- 
mon (and annoying) aera 


blood supply in the legs? A 
possibility. Something derang- 
ed in the spine? Also possible. 
» I rather suspect that there 
is effective treatment for 
whatever the cause may turn 


Jeane Dixon’s Horoscope 


For October 3 


Your birthday today: A year 
of coming to terms with other 
people, their needs and resour- 
ces and, with consistent effort 
on your part, much improve- 
ment in your own. Today's na- 
tives generally achieve what 
they go after and are willing to 
work hard to get it. 

ARIES (Mar. 21 — Apr. 19): 
Favorite hobbies and sports 
come to the fore, provide some 
high moments, Be attentive to 
the needs and progress of your 
community. 

TAURUS (Apr. 20 — May 20): 
Getting in a hurry solves no- 
thing, saves neither time nor 
energy. A truly tranquil mood 
brings you out on top in some- 
body's estimation. 

GEMINI (May 21 — June 20): 
The very easiest thing to co is 
get mixed into controversy be- 
tween other people over matters 
which needn't concern you. 

CANCER (June 21 — July 22): 
Home studies begun now are 
apt to produce sweeping in- 
sights, technica] advance. Main- 
tain your share of the neighbor- 
hood’s weekend customs. 

LEO (July 23.— Aug. 2%): 
It's all too easy to believe a wild 
promise. perhaps offer a ‘wild: 
er pledge in return. Managing 
your way through the day can 
be enjoyable, memorab'e. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 — Sept. 22): 
In a swirl of activity. you may 
have to take your breaks in 
short spells but do take every 
moment you can for rest, medi- 
tation, prayer. 


Sure enough, what yo hoped 
Sure enough, what you hoped 
off from what you wanted or is 
waiting your personal attention, 
Make changes and get busy to 
push things off dead contre. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23—Nov, 21): 
Be wary of external changes. 
There's too much subtle inner 
transformation going on for 
comfort. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov, 2 — 
Dec. 21): Your truce feelings em- 
erge now for all tg see. No 
harm done, particulaN;-if you 
match them with definite ac- 
tion,” 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 — Jan. 
19): Personal relations come to 
critical, poignant focus. Words 
the issue isn’t just mental but 
emotional rapport. 

QUARIUS (Jan, 20 — Feb. 
18): Join a couple at anything 
and find yourself promptly in 
the middle. Better work alone 
or in a sizable team where you 
can pass the good word quick- 
ly. 
PISCES (Feb, 19 — Mar. 20): 
Your participation is welcome 
as you give in good faith to fa- 
mily and neighborhood needs. 
takes home a symbolic crown. 
Credit is scattered: everybody 


For. Ocother 4 , 
Your birthday today: Fulfill- 
ment, retribution are the pheno- 
menarof the coming year. As 
you have sown, now you reap. 


The adjustments you achieve » 
tend to have a dramatic ov- Vy, © 


immediately noted by all who 
associate with you. Today's na- 
tives approach life with an op- 
timistic, progressive outlook, “a 
usually much interested in chil- 
dren. 

ARIES (Mar. 21 — Apr, 19): 
Your week gets off to a limping 
Start but picks up rapidly -by 
midday. Get set to do your best 
while the going is good. ° 

TAURUS (Anr, 20 — Milly 220) 
Career adyancement requires 


LIBRA (Sept, 23 — Oct. 22):° 


investment and self - improve- 
ment efforts, promises well in 
nearly all respects. 

GEMINI (May 21 — June 20): 
The appeal of new gadgets may 
cause sudden spending. Remem- 
ber you have several long-range 
benefits to work out. 

CANCER (June 21—July 22): 
A campaign to restore order is 
quite appropriate. You've let 
too many matters drift’ so long 
it's uphill to do anything at all 
about them. Some deals come 
to dramatic final settlement 
spontaneously. 

LEO (July 23 — Aug. 22): 
Obstacles, are present only to 
provide challange, and no more 
than you can cope with — it's 
up to you. Get pledges as you 
50. 

VIRGO (Aug. 23 — Sept. 22): 
You get from today no more 
and no Jess than you put into 
it. Be alive in spirit as well as 
body: find space and time for 
prayer. 

LIBRA (Sept. 23 — Oct. 22): 
Seek the peaceful path, staying 
close to familiar people and 














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bring back strong memorics. 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23—Noyv. 21): 
Confidants tum out to be press- 
agents. The need for consylta- 
tion and advice could be held in 
check for a couple of days. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov, 22 —— 
Dec. 21); No matter how alert 
you are, some pertinent infor- 
mation probably escapes your 
view. Your sensible behavior 
and conservative choices cover 
the gap. * 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 — Jan, 
19); Some ideas and schemes 
simply won't work. Get them 
out of your mind, clear the 
decks, go on with something 
that does promise results. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 — Feb, 
18): It’s time to resolve any 
long - standing disagreements. 
Where you feel a relationship 
would be aided by historic facts, 
offer them tactfully. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 — Mar, 20): 
Moderate your drive to allow 
for sharp edges. Avoid haste, 
but do retain your momentum— 
don’t settle queestions just to 
Ret peace. 


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out to be, but he’ ne¥er know 
. until he goes to the doctor. 
and finds out what’s wrong. 
proper footwear, and~exces- 
sive smoking all are possible 
ord say be'd be ‘smarter to. 
say 
§0 to the doctor now, instead 


of waiting for the trouble to 
get still worse. y - 


Weekly Livestock 
Review 





opened strong to higher and 
closed about steady with the - 
previous week, 

Slaughter cattle On 


date 1970, 338,981; this week last 
34.50, with sales to. 35.70; good 


Replacement cattle: Good 
stock steer calves 40-44; good 
light stockers and feeders 32-36; 
good heavy short-keep feeders 
31-35; common and medium 
stockers and ‘feeders 28-31, 

Calves 2,300: On offer this 
week 2,229; last week 2,014; to 
date 1971, 60,932; to, date 1970, 
71,490; this weck last year 
2,79; choice vealers 39-43 with 
top choice to $52.05; good 34-38; 
medium 27-33; common 24-26; 
boners 21-23. 

Hogs 9,500: On offer this week 
9,519; last weck 9,854; to date 
1971, 380,012; to date 1970, 
338,981; this week last year 
9,592; base price 26.25-28.20; 
heavy sows 17.05-17.55: stags 
and boarse?0.85-11.35, 

Sheep and lambs 2,150: On 
offer this week 2,138; last week 
2.305; to date 1971, 48,475; to 
date 1970, 42,580; this week last 
year 1,334; lamba 27-29, lights to 
31; common, medium and 
heavy 23-27; sheep 6-15. 





BELLEVILE 












OTTAWA (CP) — Steps were 
taken Friday to cool off the 
‘s great grain payments dispute 
and reimburse farmers hit by 
the 10-percent U.S. surcharge 
on dutiable imports. 

To further brighten the farm 
picture, Statistics Canada pre- 
dicted a record year for barley 
production—to 656.1 million 
bushels from 415.7 million in 
1970—and a 57-per-cent increase 
in the wheat~- yield over last 
year to 521.7 million bushels. 


18 THE INTELLIGENCER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1971 
a Ee 


_ Western Provinces Ask for Cooling’ Out Period on Grain Bill 


sible for the Canadian wheat 
board, met, then announced 
plans to seek a‘ week-long halt 
in debate, scheduled to resume 
in the Commons Monday. on a 
bill to stabilize income in the 
Prairie grains industry. 

The week would be used by 
farm leaders and governments 


,to re-consider the stabilization 


bill and end a Commons battle 
that has raged since early last 
month. 

Their announcement came 


mons the agricultural stabiliza- 
tion board and the agriculture 
products board would be design. 
ing aid programs for farmers 
hit by the U.S. surtax. 

Mr. Olson, while declining to 
put an amount on the assistance 
program, said the surcharge 


- could have damaged producers 


of non-processed agriculture 
products to the extend of $7.3 
million a year, based on 1970 
export figures. 

The government has a. bill, 


Prairie agriculture ministers 
and Otto Lang, minister respod~ | 
j X 


- shortly after Agriculture Minis- 
ter H. A. Olson told the Com- 


CTV. May Need Ottawa Aid 


OTTAWA (CP) — The federal 
government may wind up subsi- 
work, says John Reid, chairman 
of the: Commons broadcasting 
committee. 

Murray Chercover, president 


of CTV Television Network Ltd... 


says the principle of public as- 

sistance is valid but he would 
, prefer an indirect method. 

The two men were discussing 


in separate interviews the finan- 


cial difficulties of the network. 
Mr. Reid (L—Kenora-Rainy 
River) said that if the govern- 
ment believes a private televi- 
sion network is import to Can- 


ada, it will probably provide fin-. 


ancial support within five years. 
He said the CTV nctwork is 


apparently in financial trouble. . 


Cable television was cutting into, 
Canadian TV audiences and ad- 
vertising revenue was flowing to 
United States border stations. 

This was coupled with. pres- 
sure from the Canadian Radio- 
Television Commission to in- 
crease Canadian content in CTV 
programming and to extend the 
network to new arcas in Can- 
ada. 

Mr. Chercover said the gov- 
emment could provide micro- 
wave transmission facilities to 
carry television programs 
across the country. This would 
relieve the networks of a finan- 
cial burden. 

He said he has also proposed 
that the Canadian Film Devel- 


opment Corp. give financial aid 
to producers of television shows. 
The CFDC is a, federal agency 
whyetr provi funds for Cana- 
didn feature films. 

CTV ‘president told the 
CRTC in Toronto last week that 
Canadian programs attract less 
advertising revenue than U.S, 
shows. 


He said CTV loses about $1 
million replacing a U.S. one- 
hour show with a Canadian pro- 
gram over a broadcast season. 

He appealed to the CRTC to 
delay implementing the require- 
ment for 6 per cent Canadian 
content -on private television, 
scheduled to go.into effect Oct. 
1, 1972. 


Gastown Riot Proves Need 
For New Approach: Lawyer 


VANCOUVER (CP) — AN en- 
tirely new police approach to 
civil disobedience was recom- 
mended Friday as an inquiry 
into a riot in the city’s Gastown 
district Aug. 7 ended. 

Joe Wood, lawyer for the Brit- 
ish Columbia Civil Liberties As- 
sociation, blamed the confronta- 
tion on a lack of police judg- 
ment and training in dealing 
with an increasing number of 
demonstrations.’ 

He said the disturbance was 
the culmination of hostile moods 
building for some time between 
police and demonstrators. 

The riot in Vancouver's reju- 
venated skid-road district re- 
sultéd from a “smoke-in™ at 
which demonstrators had gath- 
ered to protest a crack-down by 


Guilt 

TORONTO’ (CP) — David 
Thurston, 20, charged with non- 
capital murder in the May 19 
death of Tracy Ann Brown, 2, 
was found guilty Friday of man- 
slaughter and remanded for 
sentencing to Oct, 29. 

Mr, Justice Donald Morand of 
the Ontario Supreme Court or- 
dered a pre-sentence report. 

The jury of 11 men and one 
woman deliberated for two 
hours and 27 minutes. Thurston, 
who had been living with the 
dead girl's mother, Jane Brown, 
20, showed no emotion when the 
verdict was read. 

. During the trial, Dr, Barry 
Shadling, staff surgeon at the 

* Hospital for Sick Children, testi- 
fied that the girl died of interna 
bleeding in the 2bdominal cav- 
ity from a wound inflicted by 
the heel of a shoe or boot. 

In a 45-minute charge to the 
jury. ‘Justice Morend reiterated 
_Crowsp counsel Frank: Arm- 
strong’s submission that Thur- 
ston deliberately stomped on 
Tracy Ann May 18, and that the 
act was sufficient to justify a 
verdict of non-capital murder. 

However, he also said that if 
the stomping “was done .. . to 
get at the mother,” to punish 
her for something, then “it 
would be manslaughter.”* 


Bonarlaw 


BONARLAW — Mr. and 
Mrs. Rob Cosby enjoyed a 
week's holiday with~ friends 
in Western Ontariby 





“Mrs. J. Brownson of Mar- 
mora is spending some time 
with Mr. and Mrs. Doug 
Brownson and family. 





Several attended Madoc fair 
from this vicinity. 





The WI met at the home of 
Mrs. Gerald . Burkitt. Con! 
stable Hawley of the Madoc 
OPP was the guest speaker. 





Miss Rose Marie Fraser is 
spending some time with her 
grandmother Mrs. William 
Neal. 

St. Mark's ACW catered 
for the wedding reception of 
,Mr. and Mrs. John. Hewitt. 


police on drug sales and use in 
the area. 

The inquiry, under B.C. Su- 
preme Court Justice T. A. 
Dehm. was called. following 
complaints of police brutality in 
dispersing the crowd, many of 
whom had not been participat- 
ing in the demonstration. 

Mr. Justice..Dohm said he 
hopes to complete his report by 
the end of next week and send it 
to Attorney-General Leslie P- 
trson. It was up to Mr. Peter- 
son to say when it would be 
released. 

Mr. Wood rejected the conten- 
tion of police union lawyer 
George Murray that thr riot had 
been prompted by a conspiracy 
among members of the Youth 
International Party. 

Mr. Murray said: ‘This affair 
was the’ result of a conspiracy 
between certain subversive cle- 
ments in this community who 
are bound and determined to 
overthrow all authority.” 












He suggested the smoke-in 
was organized to covér up the 
real purpose of the confronta- 
tion. 

“There isn't a tittle of evi- 
dence that this was an organ- 
ized conspiracy.”” Mr. Wood 
said. “The people who were 
there were 90 per cent observ- 
ers who had no intent what- 
soever to engage in any violen 
confrontation.” $ 

He said the crowd had been 
given the impression of tacit ap- 
proval by authorities. with uni- 
formed policemen standing 
around and streets closed off 
carlicr in the evening. when 
suddenly the order was given to 
clear the streets. 

He descmbed the following 
scene as “terror inducing” as a 
frontal assault was made on the 
crowd in the gonfined area. 
Flainclothes policemen “beating 
demonstrators and dragging 
them off samewhere added to 
the general riotous confusion.” 


SIMPSONS-SEARS 
Automotive Centre 


Quinte Mall, Belleville 


or 


passed by the Commons and 
now in the Senate, that would 


























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in. Ride in safety 
the job while you shop. 


Thursday &\Fri 
Automotive 





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2. Rebuild all cylinders 


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4. Repack all front wheel bearings 


5. Check wheel seals 
6. Top up brake fluid: 


7. Check all brake lines’ 
8. Check master cylinder 


9. Check stop light switch, wiring and bulbs 


10. Road test car 


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Hours: 8:45 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Daily 


9.95 


make $80 million available to 
industries hurt by the surtax. 
Assistance in agriculture 
would either go directly to 
farmers, through deficiency 
payments or purchases of prod- 
ucts by the government, or by 
indirect aid to distributors. 
Taken with these announce- 
ments, the Statistics Canada re- 
port rounded out a’ potentially 
rosy picture for Canadian farm- 
ers this fall. 
.Of the three. the payments 
issue remains the mé6st unpre- 
dictable, ae 


THE LITTLE WOMAN __. 


< 
Weald tights seeurert 


“I was.trying to remember... how man 
it been since I've had on an evening dress 


Exciting Music Box 
# Clock Radio 


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Loaded With Action 


Crank lift elevator, bell rings, stop signs raise and 
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The music plays ,then Hickory Dickory Dock 2h 
a picture story passes across the dial — the clock 
hands are moving, too: Here's a great way 
to teach the time as well — hands also turn’ 
manually. ‘ 
43—Toys 


It_ is complicated by contra- 
dictory statistical arguments 
submerged beneath the legal 
issue; 

The three provincial ministers 
—Samuel Uskiw of Manitoba, 
Jack Messer of Saskatchewan 
and Alberta’s Hugh Horner— 
asked for the suspension of de- 
bate to see if they could “build 
something better’= into the sta- 
bilization plan. : 

Mr. Uskiw said they felt “the 


could concentrate on a broader 
based system of aiding western 
Tarmers. 

The new'plan would pay all 
farmers a percentage of a $100 
million transitional payment to 
compensate for the suspension 
of the reserves act and’ other 
subsidy programs, and bolster 
low 1970 incomes. 

Then farmers would begin 
paying two per cent of their 
gross receipts for grain sales up 





ute twice’ the amount put in by 
the farmers. 
When the total gross receipts 


for the grains industry dropped 


below a five-year nmning aver- 
age, a payout would be made‘to 


“all, eligible farmers based on 


their receipts during the preced- 
ing. three years. 
Opposition members have 


criticized this plan on the basis 


that it would stabilize farm .in- 
comes at a starvation level, that 





legality of the issue" should be 
played down for a week in order ° 
that leaders and governments 





y years has 


‘|~ The Play Civics 


- 


to $15,000 a year-into a joint 
account with the government. 
_The government would contrib- 


Boards Don’t Hear 


TORONTO (CP) — Most hos- 
pital boards do not hear of ap- 
plicants for medical positions 
who have been turned down, a 
member of the Scarborough 
General Hospital's board of 


_ trustees said Friday. 


Carol Ruddell, a Scarborough 
alderman, told the committee of 
inquiry into hospital privileges 
in Ontario that the board gets 
its advice about privileges from 
the hospital's: medical advisory 
committee made up of estab- 
lished medical practitioners. 

“Do they not all have a poten- 
tial conilict of interest?" 

She said: “I would suggest 
that most boards only vote on 
the accepted, The denied—én- 
less they fuss=never come to 
the ‘attention of the board but 
die at the committee stage.” 

Dr. Elliott Siegel, a Toronto 
medical doctor who subse- 
quently became an oral (dental) 











surgeon, told the committce a 
board of appeal should be set up 
to consider hospital privileges. 

He urged that any reason for 
rejecting an applicant for a hos- 
pital ‘staff post be given in writ- 
ing and within a reasonable 
time. Some never .get an an- 
swer, he said. 

Dr. Siegel suggested that hos- 
pital boards be elected like 
school boards but with a few 
appointed medical men. He 
added a specific board for cach 
hospital would have to be 
‘elected by the community. 

Dr. Siegel said he had ex- 
pected the association of On- 
tario oral surgeons to present a 
brief to the committee and 
found it “interesting” the asso- 
ciation had changed its mind. 

“The oral surgeons fear they 
will lose what few privileges 
they have if they present a 
brief,” he said. 


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Fun while they learn 


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three pieces of playground equipment. Two trays hold 
a magnitized alphabet and numbers which adhere to 
the roof. Plus there's chalk and an eraser for the_- 


blackboard. . 


Teleshop 


payments 
made and certainly not in the 
immediate future. 


would seldom be 


Refusals 

He said plastic surgeons feel 
oral surgeons are a competition 
in areas such as jaw disfigure- 
ments and that in some hospe 
tals, oral’ surgeons are not al 
lowed to practise except in the 
outpatient department. 


~Many Canadian oral surgeons 
have gone to the United States 


“beeause that country gives them 


more professional courtesy, Dr. 
Siegel added. - ‘ 


Dr. Stanley Sober, an om 


thopedic surgeon, told the com-_. 


mittee that interns anc 
dents help the teaching staff 
the Victoria Hospital in London, 
Ont., but not the non-teaching 
Surgeons. f 
He said that once he was 
carrying out a complicated op- 
eration with only the help of a 
technician while two interns 
were assisting at a minor opera- 
tion in the next room, ey 





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The Ontario, founded 1870 





Founded in 1834 
Merged in 1930 with 


films, letters and notebooks. 


Lamorie defended Dewer, 
who «was encircled by other 


that he leave the yard, The 
Times says, But it added that 


q ,-..wo hours later the two convicts 





summoned from their 


3 
2 
8 
E 
E 
: 


E 
te 
fs 

5 
ze 
ee 
ot 
23 


| 


§ 


says. Earlier report’, 


1k? 
Fi 


king set up a security force to 
protect hostages, The Times 





Friends Back 





Lt 
Together 


eet 


Frank, the budgie, and Chief, both 413 years 
old, are back in the bosom of friendship after 
Frank took it on the wing this weekend. Absent for 
22 hours from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Campbell, 29 Glendale Road, Frank turned up two 
miles away. The free-flight budgie landed in the 
porch of Mr, and Mrs. Gary Parks, 159 Wellington 
Crescent, 15 minutes before the Campbell's son-in- 
law, Larry Caddick, decided to drop in for a visit 


only to find the lost pet, 


Pilot, Two Dead 


In Hijack 
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) 
— Three persons from Tennes- 
see, including an alleged air pir- 
ate and his wife, were shot to 
death today during the hijack of 

a posh private plane. 

The FBI said the hijacker ap- 
parently shot his wife and the 
pilot before committing suicide. 
Another passenger and the co- 
pilot survived. 

FBI agents on the scene when 
the plane landed at Jacksonville 
said they shot out both tires and 
one engine—prior to dodging a 
hail of bullets from inside the 
aircraft. 

The dead were Identified by 
the FBI as George Mallory 
Giffe and his wife: Susan, 25, 
and Brent Quinton Downs, 29. 
the~pitot 
Bobby Wayne Wallace, 32, the 
other passenger, was arrested 


Today’s Chuckle 


There's no fool like, an old 
fool. Ask any young [ool, 


rT 3 






Attempt 


and charged with air piracy, the 
FBI said. 

The co-pilot, Randall Crump. 
underwent questioning by FBI 
agents. 


Six Men Hijack 
Imported Liquor 


MONTREAL (CP) — A prov- 
ince-wide search is under way 
for six men who left a sccurity 
guard in critical condition and 
hijacked two 1740n containers 
of imported liquor from Mont- 
real harbor early Saturday 
night. 

A spokesman for National 
Harbors Board police said Sun- 
day the 0-year-old guard, found 


unconscious near the harbor's. 


cast-eng gate, was still in criti- 
cal condition although some- 
what improved. He was hit on 
the head with what police be- 
lieved was a hammer. 


The NHB. spokesman-eaid_the 


liquor was valued at a mini” 


mum of $100,000 but “it can go 
up.” : 


SS 


Money Back 


Pair Return 


SUMMERSIDE, P.EL (CP) — With 
most of the money from Prince Edward 
Island’s biggest theft back in the hands 
of the authorities, two young bank ac- 
countants wanted in the case gave them- 
selves up to police here today. 

Archibald MacLeod, 28, and William 
MacDonald, 29, sought by police ina 
three-week international manhunt, re- 
turned to Pnnce Edward Island from an 
undisclosed U.S. city during the weekend 
and surrendered to the police chief in this 
town of 10,000 at 9 a.m. today. 

They were immediately’ arraigned on charges 
of theft of more than $0. Bail was set at $10,000 
each, and the case was adjourncd for one week. 

More than $114,000 was missing from the bank 
Sept. 9 after authorities discovered the theft. be- 
lieved to have taken place the previous evening. 

The lawyer for MacLeod and MacDonald said 
the money was returned by courier last week and 
according to information he had received most of 
the missing money was recovered. 

The lawyer, Charlies McQuaid of Charlottetown, 
said he was contacted by the two men from some- 
where in the US. last week. He declined to say 
exactly where, 


News Briefs 





BELGRADE (AP — President Tito of Yugo- 
slavia will visit the United States later this month 
ard Canada early in November, it was announced 
officially Saturday, Witn his wife, Jovanka, the 
79-year-old Yugoslav leader first will return the 
official visit paid by President Richard Nixon and 
his wife to Yugoslavia a ycar ago. It will be the 
third visit of Marshal Tito to the United States. 

- *« * 

NIAGARA FALLS, Ont. (CP) — The French- 
Canadian Association of Ontario has opened a 
$100,000 fund to finance a campaign, known_as 
Operation Anti-Assimilation, to win full rights for 
French education in the province. 

: * + * 

TORONTO (CP) — Revaluation of the Jap- 
erese yen has forced pnce increases of up to $251 
for Toyota cars. Canadian Motor Industries, distri- 
butor of the Japanese cars in Canada, said price 
increases on the Corvila line, the lowest priced, 
vary between $100 and $180 while prices of the 
more expensive models will go up by $201 to $251. 


sq-scninns uit ies mam asus aicaamaaaats 

| Inside The Intelligencer | 
The controversy over removal of i 

sand from the Sandbanks Provincial i 

Park area received a thorough airing 

over the weekend. Page 2. 

@ Pollution abatement system in- 
spected. Page 3. 

@ New ballot makes voting easier. 
Page 5. 


Creentiretntntteetn teterttiett tert 





Fairs Are for Kids 


Well, not always! The Tweed Fair 
attracted youngsters by the hundreds 


on Saturday but also a number of 
adults. One of the oldest visitors was 
Mrs. Alice Reavie, 91, of Flinton, 
shown with Clarke Rollins. A sunny 
day brought out one of the ‘best 
crowds in years, ; 








masked young man in from of 
a village church who blind- 
folded him. He was then taken 
by car and shown the famous 
painting by Johafines Ver- 


identified himself as Thyl 
from the north Belgian prov- 


be given to the Caritas char 
ityorganization for use 


sterdam’s Rijksmuseum and 
the Palace of Fine Arts in 


* Brussels finance a world-wide 


campaign against hunger. 

The painting was stolen 
from the Palace of Fine Arts 
Sept. 2A. 

Synopsis: Daytime temper- 
atures should still climb above 
normal for this time of year 
bat at night the readings will 
drop‘ considerably lower than 
for the last few nights. Tuesday 


mostly sunny, Lows tonight 45 
to 50. Highs Tuesday 65 to 70. 








Police Too Keen © 


Dismal 





Record 


Of Convictions 


MONTREAL (CP) — 


Quebec jutise tines 


Jerome Choquette says that while the War Measures 
Act was useful during last year’s kidnap crisis he 
would not ask that it be invoked again. 

“It was entirely necessary to have some legisla- 
tion,” he said in an interview on the eve of the first 
anniversary of the kidnapping last Oct. 5 of James 
Jasper Cross, British trade commissioner in Montreal. 
“But whether that legislation was good is debatable. 


“If we had to have the same 
situation again, I don't think 
that I would favor exactly that 
solution." 

The War Measures Act, in- 
voked by the federal govern- 
ment a year ago Oct, 16 at the 
request of the Montreal and 


Quebec governments, gave poti 


lice widespread powers of 
search without warrant and of 
arrest. It was attacked for cur- 
tailing civil rights, 

In his interview with The Ga- 
gested that police went too far 
in applying the powers of the 
act. 


In retrospect, Mr. Choquette 
said he is not overly disturbed 


the Front de Liberation du 
Quebec crisis caused by the kid- 
napping of Mr. Cross and Pierre 
Laporte, and the strangulation 
murder of the latter a day after 
the War Measures Act came 
into force. 

Mr. Cross was released by his 
abductors Dec. 3 in a govern- 
ment deal that permitted the 
kidnappers to be flown to Cuba 
the following day. 

“We judged by the evidence 


Bodies of° 


we had at the time,” the minis- 


overt act. That's the conclusion 
T've drawn as to my own future 
conduct in the charging proo- 
ess." : 


2 Girls 


Found in Gravel Pit 


PICKERING, Ont. (CP) 
Police said today that two teen- 
aged girls whose bodies were 
found Sunday in an abandoned 
gravel-pit ravine near here, 
were strangied to death. 

Kathleen Potter, 13, and Lee 


Snipers, Troops 


In Battle 


* BELFAST (AP) — British 
troops fought a two-hour gun 
battle with snipers and bomb- 
throwing guerrillas during a 
pre-dawn riot in Belfast today, 
the army saif- ; 

Troops eve they hit two 
gunmen during the battle in the 
Roman Catholic Mount Pottin- 
ger area of east Belfast, an 
army spokesman said. “One 
gunman was scen_ being 
dragged away screaming,” he 
said. : 


z 
a 
[ 


both girls, still 
fully clothed, lay behind a small 
clump of bushes in the pit, The 
older girl bad a cut on her head, 
they said. 
The bodies were found by two 
men who were walking across 
the pit to watch young motor. 
cyclists trailriding. “ 
lived in nearby Toronto at a 
“group home” with other chil- 











2 THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 





Parks Association Calls for Halt to Sandbanks Development 


By MARGARET HAYLOCK 
Staff Reporter 


ATHOL — Further develop- 
meat of Sandbanks Provincial 
Park should be withheld until 
the government forwards a 
provisional master plan for 
the park and public hearings 
are conducted to examine all 
points of view: 

Gavin Henderson, executive 
director of the National and 
Provincial Parks Association 
of Canada emphasized this as 


his association's stand during- 


a Saturday morning field trip 
at the Sandbanks, 

The field’ trip, organized to 
show the public the effects ‘of 
quarrying operations at the 
Sandbanks by the Lake On- 
tario Cement Company Ld., 
attracted approximately 65 hi- 


Ontario “residents as a “mag- 
nificent recreational area “but 


tional park status, We are not 
npeening that Sandbanks be- 
a national park; we are 


this area and manage it first 
and foremost to preserve and 
perpetuate its ecological integ- 


rity over as large an area as 


press report that the associa- 
tion he represents was tryihg 
to make “‘a political thing’ of 
the issue. 


He stressed the National and _ 


Minister Outlines 


Sandbanks History 


PICTON (Sta) — Rene 
Brunelle, Minister of the On- 
tario Department of Lands 
and Forests has announced 
the government will do “‘ev- 
exything in its power” to find 
an alternate source of sand. 
bse dy for the Lake Ontario ° 
Cement Company Ltd., at the 
same time safeguarding jobs 
created by this industry. 
In a press release issucd 
Saturday concerning quarry- 
ing by the cement company 
at the Sandbanks, Mr. Bru- 
nelle said some mis- 
takenly believe sand is being 
excavated from the park it- 
self, 
Commercial mining in any 
form is prohibited in all of On- 
tario's provincial parks and 
none is being conducted, he . 
said. 
The Lake Ontario Cement 
Company Ltd. is quarrying 
sand from a 15.6 - acre site ad- 
jacent to the Sandbanks Pro- 
vinelal Park under a 75-year, 


“The therefore has 
@ legal right te this sand. The 
sand is vital to its operations 


and therefore essential for the 
preservation of jobs for some 
250 employees,” said Mr, Bru- 
nelle. 

The press release issued 
during Saturday's field trip to 
Sandbanks Park stated the 
dunes have been formed by 
‘wave action washing up gla- 
cial sands and winds blowing 
them into dunes. Beaches were 
established first and later, the 
dunes, when sand-laden winds 
were checked by obstacles 
such as pioneering vegetation. 

Mr. Brunelle described the 
history of the Sandbanks from 
approximately 100 years ago 





St. Thomas Church 


FALL FAIR DAY 


Oct. 27th 




















= 

















diagnose Infection. 

















bu 


rF 





PINKSTON arid LUSCOMBE 


FUNERAL DIRECTORS 


"60 VICTORIA AVENUE 
DIAL 968-5735 


Diabetics Must 
Careful With Their Teeth 


Any focus of Infection is harmful, but espe- 
clally so for a diabetic. Higher blood sugar levels 
lessen resistance to Infection. Still a diabetic can, 
like anyone else, develop deep root abcesses, or 
pyorrhea, both of which are infections. And, you 
don’t have to have a toothache to have a root In- 
fection, or Joose teeth before your oun can 


Have dental checkups at regular ietiavats and 
be sure and tell your dentist, if you are 2 diabetic, 
so he can take extra precautions If an extraction Is 
needed, He can’t tell by looking at you. 


GEEN’S- 


PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 


276 FRONT STREET - BELLEVILLE 


PHONE 962-4551 


FOR DELIVERY © 


~to the present day, recalling 


recollections of a brick fac- 
tory and a hotel now buricd 
beneath the shifting sands. 
The dunes at that time were 
reported to be advancing at 
the rate of 40 feet a ycar. 
In 1921 the Sandbanks for- 
estry station was established 


Pand an extensive program of 


reforestation was begun. Re 
forestation continued in the 
ensuing years and the sands 
were successfully planted and 
restabilized. 


In the 1950s the department 
of lands and forests discover- 
ed the confusion concerning 
the boundary between proper- 
tics owned by the Lake On- 
tario Cement Company—Lid. 
and the Crown. 

The cement company did 
‘hot wish to redirect its oper- 
ations to the land it owned 
originally because of organic 
matter introduced in the sand 
by reforestation. - 

The department of lands 
and forests did not want to 
surrender the land because it 
would destroy the stabilized 
dvnes. 

An exchange of Jand was 
effected and the cement com- 
pany was given a 75-year 
Icase. At its expiry the land 
would revert to the Crown 

and would become part of the 
Sandbanks Park. 

Mr. Brunelle concluded. 
“The department of lands and 
forests is carefully supervis- 
ing the excavating operations. 
particularly for the safety of 
park visitors and the location 
of sand excavation. In the 
past, some people have mis- 
taken the safety fence for a 
boundary fence and have 
wrongfully thought that the 
company was operating in the 
park. It never has and will 
not in the future. The depart- 
ment of lands and forests is 
also encouraging the com- 
pany to make the operation as 
unobtrusive as possible and 
they are co-operating to the 
best of their ability.” 


AT CHURCH ST. 














































Provincial Parks Association 
of Canada is politically neu- 
tral concerning party politics 
but noted many of its aims 
at both the national and pro- 
vinelal levels hinge on politi- 
cal decisions by the govern- 


By pease I mean that what 
governments do in support of 
conservation, or what they 
leave undone, is always, you 
might say, a political decis- ° 
jon. It is soiconts the bus- 


iness of Segesioalions like ours 
to make “‘a political thing" of 
every important environmental 
issue so that the politicians 
get the message that people 
in growing numbers are con- 
cerned about nee things and 





ST 
. a 2 
SS 


are no longer willing to put 
up with the desecration of our 
environment for the sake of 
short - term political econ- 
”* he asserted. 


Conservationists, “Candidates Survey ‘ Sandbanks ~ 


Job Loss Conéerns Candidates 


ATHOL (Staff) Can- 
didates secking the Prince 
Edward - Lennox riding in the 
October 21 election spoke 
briefly at Sandbanks park Sat- 
urday morning concerning 
quarrying now carried out 
there by the Lake Ontario 
Cement Company Ltd. 

James Taylor, Progressive 
Conservative candidate expres- 
sed pleasure at secing the 
more than 65 hikers who join- 
ed the three - hour field trip 
and said he interpreted their 
presence as an endorsement 
of his stand to support cessa- 
tion of quarry operations. 

Mr. Taylor outlined the his- 
tory of negotiations between 
the cement company and the 
Crown which terminated in a 
lease which became a matter 
of public record. “‘When I be- 
came involved I could see the 
injection of commercial oper- 
ations into a park situation 
and it is not a compatible in- 
terest.” said the Conservative 
candidate. 

He referred to the noise 
mace daily by cement com- 
pany trucks drawing sand 
from the park near a cottage 
area. 

Mr. Taylor stressed the jobs 
of Lake Ontario Cement Com- 
pany workers are important 
and added it is important 
these men not lose their live- 
lihoods. 

Negotiations between the 
province and the cement com- 
pany should not be an attempt 


to polarize opposites. An effort 
should be made to work with 
industry. 

Mr. Taylor said all negotia- 
tions for sale of the cement 
company’s. lease to the pro- 
vince should be “amicable” 
but again observed ne- 
cessarily expropriation pout 
expropriation if 

He said be felt there was “a 
keen desire’ on the part of 
the provincial government to 
acquire the Sandbanks prop- 
erty leased to the company 
and added that he used the 
word “advisedly™. 

“I feel we have begun the 
solution to ‘the problem that 
confronts us. Now it is just 
a question of completing the 
transaction, I think” conclud- 
ed Mr. Taylor. 

Barry Young. Liberal can 
didate for the riding stressed 
he feels continued quarrying 
at the Sandbanks should be 
supported if no alternate 
source of sand can be found. 

He said pone cf his prime 
reasons for introducing the is 
sue was the appearance of 
letters in a Toronto newspu- 
per written by concerncd tour- 
ists. They were alarmed about 
the disappearance of the 
dunes. 

Mr. Young said no Ietters 
have appeared regarding the 
preservation of jobs. The Lib- 
cral candidate’ said he thinks 
industry and ecology should 
work together and cniticized 
the term “job blackmail” us- 


Cyclist. Killed’ 


MILFORD (Staff) — A 
Prince Edward County boy 
dicd Saturday morning when 
he rode his bicycle from a 
driveway into the path of an 
oncoming car near Cherry 
Valley. os 

Dead {s 12-year-old Ricky 





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STORE MANAGER 


Interesting and rewarding 
work in Canada’s leading toy 
chain, TOY WORLD LIMIT- 
ED, Quinte Mall. Phone for ap- 
pointment Wednesday, 
6th — 962-2352. Please bring 


Dainard, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Dainard, Milford. 
Driver of the car that collid- 
ed with the child was Merton 
Bentley, 43, of Milford. 


County coroner Dr. C. R. 


~ Richmond pronounced the boy 


ead at the accident scene 
shortly after 10:30 a.m. Satur- 
day. 


He is survived by his par- . 


ents, three brothers, Roger, 
Bobby and Frederick, and two 
sisters Roberta and Juanita. 
Funeral services were held 
at 2 p.m. today from St. Phil- 
lip’s Anglican Church, Milford 
with Rev. Kent Gardiner offi- 
ciating. Interment was in 
Cherry: Valley Cemetery. 











Oct. 






copy of background particu- 
lars. Otherwise forward to 


Head Office, 860 Belfast Road, 






Mobile Route No. 1, Ottawa, 







ed in Mr. Henderson's re- 
marks. 

Mr. Young asserted if Mid- 
land is chosen as an alter- 
nate souce of sand supply, the 
Lake Ontario Cement. plant 
near Picton “‘in all likelihood 
will close”. 

He repeated his earlier pro- 
posal that the entire province 
should bear the cost of a 
transfer of quarrying opera- 
tions. Ps fe 

If no alternate site can be 
found, then the cement com- 
pany should be allowed to re- 
tum to quarrying its original 
16 acres at the Sandbanks. 
An area back of the cuncs 
was suggested as a possible 
second site if it could be quar 
ried without causing a sand 
sweep. 

Mr Young said the Lake 
Ontario Cement#Company Ltd 
could be faced with costs 


from one-quarter to one-half 
million dollars for the revamp- 
ing of its sand source. 

He urged a forgivable loan 
to offset this cost and ‘said 
he is “very concerned” that 
by putting one extreme 
against another the situation 
might get out of hand. 

Mr. Young said the history 
of negotiations between the 
Crown and “the company Indi- 
cates the government placed 
the cémpany in its present 
position and not vice versa. 

Bryan Beazer. New Demo- 
cratic Party candidate for 
Prince Edward - Lennax said 
he is “very grateful” the Con- 
servative government has seen 
{it to take action. 

He observed this action 
scemed “strange” to him after 
all the efforts made in this 
direction by former NDP can- 
didate John Narnecy. 


Obituaries 


MRS. EGBERT CAIN 
Frankford 


A retired dressmaker, Mrs. 
Letitia Catherine Cain, 5 Sid- 
ney Street, Frankford, dicd 
Wednesday. Sept. 29, in Tren- 
ton Memorial Hospital. She 
was in her 82nd year. 

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Marten of Ottawa, she 
had resided in Frankford for 
35 years after moving there 
from the Kingston areca. 

She was predeceased by 
her husband, Egbert, and her 
only son, Edward. Two daugh- 
ters survive: Miss Mary L2- 
Rue of Colborne and Miss 
Margarct LaRue s Frank- 
ford. \— 

The funcral was held Satur- 
day from Weaver Funcral 
Home, Trenton, to St. Fran- 
cis of Assisi Catholic Church, 
Frankford. The 9 a.m. ser- 
vice was officiated by Father 
J, McGarvey. Interment was 
in St. Mary's Cemetery, King- 
ston. 

Bearers were Bert Carter, 


Fred Gardner, C. Steirman 
and T. Wheeler. 


Councillor Wants 
Mayor on Board 


TRENTON (Staff) — Coun- 
cillor Pete Aziz has served 
notice he will introduce a res- 
lution -at tonight's council 
meeting that may shuffle 
Trenton’s representation on 
Quinte Planning Board, 

The councillor said two 
weeks ago the town would be 
better served .if it was re- 
presented by “the power and 
influence’ of Mayor Duncan 
McDonald. However, for the~ 
mayor to serve someone must 
step down. 

Mr. Aziz has said one in- 
dividual representing Trenton 
“should take the hint and re- 
sign” to allow the mayor to 
assume a position on’ the 
Quinte Planning Board, > 


DONALD MERLE HOGLE 


The funeral of Donald 
Merle Hogle was held Satur- 
day afternoon from the John 
R. Bush Funeral Home where 
service in the chapel was 
conducted by Canon R. B. D. 
Wright. Interment was in St. 
Thomas’ Cemetery, 8h con- 
cession .Rawdon township. 

Bearers were Ray, 
Carman Dafoe, Jerald Bur- 
kitt, Harry McAdam, Harper 
Bateman and Cal Hogle. 


Views on Peace 
To Be Published 


The Lester B. Pearson 
Peace Park is sponsoring a 
volume which will encom- 
pass a varicty cf views on 
peace in the world. 

The anthology of peace, nev- 
er before attempted. is to be 
made up of 500 to 1,500 word 

, articles submitted by political 
and religious leaders as well 
.as Say persons. 

The’ Peace Park committee 
~ alsd. tres a 34-inch glossy 
print ph and a bricf 
outline of cach contributor's 
background’to accompany the 
article, \ 

The completed volume will 
be distributed at cost and will 
be made available to the pub- 
lic at the park as well as in li- 
braries and book stores, It is 
hoped that such an anthology 
will become an important 
source of reference and that a 
al contribution to peace will 
be made. 


ROWE - TOURS 


Boston & Cape Cod & 

L Lake Placid Tour 
THANKSGIVING WEEKEND 
“ “OMober 8-11 


For information, please phone ot 
write ° 


ROWE TRAVEL AGENCY 
Port Hope 883-2327 or 312-3279 











ecological importance of the 
dunes when the mixup over 


park boundaries was discover- > an 


ed more than 10 years ago 
but, presumably, for reasons 
of political expediency hand- 
ed the cement company a 75- 
year lease for quarrying at 
the Sandbanks. _ 

In .Ontario a government 
policy reverseh,now can be 
observed on issues such as 
commercial logging in provin- 
cial parks, the uncontrolled 
quarrying of sand arid gravel 
on the Niagara escarpment, 
and the loss of prime recrea- 
tional areas along the escarp- 
ment and Great Lakes shore- 
line owing to rising public op- 
position. 

“To the extent, therefore, 
that we are trying to influence 
government policy in a certain 
direction as-a result of this 
field trip, I would agree that 
we are “trying to’make a po- 
litical thing’’ of it."* commen: 
ted Mr. Henderson. 

The National and Provincial 
Parks Association realizes 
the need for safeguarding the 
Jobs of workers at the Lake 
Ontario Cement Company Ltd. 
against any threat it may 
have to halt operations if it 
Cannot gct access to the raw 
materials it needs, 

Jobs must take precedence 
if no alternate source of;sard 
economically available to the 
company can be found. 

“We sincerely hope, haw- 
ever, that the people of On- 
tario are not going to 
blackmailed over the job 
question on this issue as 
they were on Quetico. I don’t 
imagine, however, that - the 
government would have ente>- 
ed into negotiations with te 
company if it were not cer- 
tain that adequate alt 
sources of sand were a\ 
able.” said Mr. Henderson. 

Dr. Peter Peach, a m 
of the geology departm: 
Brock University exp 
the dunes’ formation ard em 
phasized their uniqueness in 
this province after- Mr. Hen- 


Quarrying - 
Speeded Up 
-Resident 


ATHOL (Staff) — Quarry 
ing operations by the Lake 
Ontario Cement . Compans 
Lid. at the Sandbanks have 
escalated markedly in the past 


be 























year according to a nearby | anc 


resident. 

Mrs, Jean Barrett 
Lake. said dur: a questior 
period on Saturday's ficld tr: 
to the Sandb: tr 












are now remov ’ 
rapidly as possible, 
She observed the com; 
seems to have quarried m: 
sand in the 5 year than it 
has site its lease was grant- 


cd by the Crown. 












OWRC Approves 


Waste Treatment 


A. $40.000 waste treatment | 





project is under constructs 
at Proctor.Lewyt Lid. ef Pic- 
ton following approval by the 
Ontario Water Resources 
Commissicn. 





a SCANTLEBURY, 














































derson’s remarks. 

Dr. Peach noted the thous- 
of years taken for. the 
dues to fqrm_should be con-. - 
trasted with the time it wild 
take to destroy them, 


Mineral Lectures 
Set for Kingston: 


Leo Bernier, Ontario 
ter of Mines and Northen’ 
Affairs, has announced that” 
the department will hold min- 
eral exploration classes in. 
Kingston from October 18 to 
2. 

The classes will be conduc- 
ted by E. B. Freeman, gcolo- 
Bical lecturer of the depart- 
ment of Mines and Northern 
* Affairs. 

Subjects to be covered fn 
tic course include e¢lement- 
ary geology, rock’and miner- 
al identification, _ prospecting 
methods, claim staking and as- 
sessment, work regulations 
rmation sources. Min- 
ilms will be shown and 







and other printed information 
also will be available. 

Classes will be conducted in 
the’ evenings from 7 to 10 in 
Kingston Collegiate and 


cational School Auditor! 

Frontenac Street, Kingston. 
The course is open ta all who 
wish to attend, Ail lectures are 
e and there is no 













- “Tarr ry 


¢ Gapgbter, Laurie 
urtay, October 2, 
telletilie General Hospital. 
10. ora. A sister for 
thinks to Dr, Bates 
and nursing staff. 


REGTAN Paul and Judy inte 
are pleased to announce the 
Paul Aaron Jr. 
1971 at Belle- 
tol  Weiebt @ 
t- grandchild for 
Mr end Mrs. G, Little and 10th 
grandchild for Mr. and Mra, I. Rute 
taa 





DEATHS 


SCOTT, Charles Rodert (Bed) — OF 
15 Eveanor Ga’ at Belleville 
} General Mospital Frilay morn- § 
tne October 1, 1, in bis rd § 






2r, Dear son of the 


par be appreciaicd 








: ord 


Charies Jack 

























s 
Dear son of Mr, 
aruon of RR. 7, 





t Union Cemetery 


CARDS OF THANKS 


C 
Bush 


Betty Langvan, 





Kart ant 


| IN MEMORIAM 





The approved facilities will | 7: 


treat metal plating and finish 
ing wastewaters and will in 
elud ion-exchange — ¢quip 
megs, batch treatment equip 
ment for ph adjustment 
metals precipitation, and a 
filter to remove precipitated 
solids. 

The system will work on a 
batch type treatment basis 
and should ensure a -cons! 
tently high quality efflu 



















rasa 





i N 
m6 PAI 
i) 

ty aa Presented b 








~*~ 


AT THE 





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Mountain and Sea’ 


1} 


EXHIBITION AND SALE OF 100 
OLD MASTERS’ STYLE 


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of DISTINCTION 
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Quinte Nail 

The best variety shown in the 


High Value Originals. Much Less Than the | 


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Still- Lives, Full variety of Spanish subjects, ete. 


ALL PRICES REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE 


10-DAYS ONLY 


. _ Free Home Approve! —~ Free Decoroting Advae 





















pod ever nave, 
ubered by . son-ine 


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Belleville Area 
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A million dollars worth of 

pollution abatement  cquip- 
ment is going into the site of 
Domtar's Trenton plant and 
a representative of the govern- 
ment responsible for it all 
» took a personal Jook at the op- 
ration Friday. 
Dr. R. T. Potter, MPP tor 
Quinte riding and minister 
without portfolio in the On-— 
tario government. toured the 
Trenton paper mill and heard 
about.Domtar's pollution con- 
trol measures from manager 
S. S. Hessian. 

“We screamed so loudly 
about Domtar's pollution - of 
the Trent and the Bay of 
Quinte, it’s time we saw the 
other side of the story — what 
they're doing about it," said 
Dr. Potter of his taur of the 
plant. 

The company is now digging 
* out a holding lagoon across 

the road from its plant where 
f effluent from the paper mak- 
ji ing process will be held. 

i -« o, When it is finished, Dom- 
ar's investment in pollution 

Berne will be $1 million. 
Eventually, by 1973, aerators 
will be installed to treat the 
effluent before it goes into the 
river, raising the company’s 
expenditure to a total of $1.7 
million, + 


The paper mill, one of 







. SOCIAL EVENING, EVERY 
. Elks’ Hall, 108 Nenee 
Street. 8 p.m. sharp. Good p: 


Special cover all prizes. Karis: 
sion 23e. NisSev-m-tf 








“ RELAX AND ENJOY NEW FILMS 
* of general interes? -_ Public ed 
ednesday, 
00 p.m. Everyone 
jon fee. 
O23 


CITIZENS ¢ CLUB UB NO. 94 
creation Centre 














United ity. Services 
a Front’ a lie tell Belleville 





Plant now, 
--Pluck later. 












a ha —e seeds 


$1 Station St. 968-55 
Open daily except Sat. p.m. 





















. ie e e - 
Wanna Shine Mister? 
Members of the Keyette Club from Belleville Collegiate Institute spent 
most of Saturday shining shoes on Front St. Unlike the boys’ Key Club 


which is financially sponsored by the students’ council, the young ladies 
had to rely on their own ingenuity to r aise funds to support their budget. 


Pollution Abatement 
Is Inspected by MPP 


Trenton’s oldest industries, 
manufactures the paper that 
forms the middle, corrugated 
layer, of a corrugated card- 
board box. 

It uses hardwood logs for 
the purpose, 140 cords of them 
a day. The timber goes 
through aa chipping mill and 
is then processed through di- 
gesters where it is mixed with 
chemical cooking liquor and 
heat processed for 15 miffutes, 

This procedure softens the 
chips and dissolves from &ahe 
wood some of the lignin, the 
material that bonds the cellu- 
lose together to form a tree. 

The black liquor pressed 
from the chips after this op- 
eration is sold to neighboring 
townships for road binder. 

But in the process the cell- 
ulose fibres are impregnated 
with sulphur compounds. Some 
of this sulphur, some lignin 
and wood fibres form the ef- 
fluent from the mill that is 
pumped into the Trent River. 

In producing 15) tons of 
paper’ a day, the company 
employs 140 people and has 
an annual payroll of more 
than $1.5 million. It pays 
$51.000 a year to the town of 
Trenton in taxes and $283,- 
0 a year for hydro, one- 
third of the annual total sold 
by Trenton PUC. 

In an effort to meet Ontario 





~S 
the most 
comfortable 


Fresh (reese severing 
sucoess from Pars to 
Los Angeles, Wathatoes® the 
tevolutionary mew hegh- 
fashion Cavual shoes, ate gow. 
lntreduced to Canada by 
Clarks®,,. famous for 
ther Dectt Boots * 
Fabvlowdy comfortable 
ard daringly smart — 
Wallatoes® wie 
ina walk with 
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shoes ever built... 


Men’s sand. or 
brown suede $27.00 
Brown or white 
leather .... $30.09 




























Water Resources Commission 
requirements, the company 
is now constructing a giant 
lagoon, where the effluent 
from the mill will be pumped 
and held. It will be released 
from the holding lagoon in a 
regulated flow, geared to the 
river's capacity to carry it. 

Now in operation at the plant 
is a pilot project in pollution 
abatement: a tank in which 
the effluent is acrated and an- 
other small lagoon where the 
aerated effluent is stored for 
regulated release. By aerating 
the effluent, it will be dis- 
charged into the river with the 
same oxygen content as the 
water in the river, Dr. Potter 
was told. 

“Our effluent contains 50 
solid parts (sulphinated lignin 
and fibres) per million.” 
Hessian told Dr. Potter. “The 
concentartion is high, but the 
flow is well below OWRC re- 


uirements."* 

By 1973, the company hopes 
to have all the bugs worked 
out in the operation of the 
pilot. project and will con 
struct effluent treatment facil- 
ities for all the plant's waste. 

The ptlot project will deter- 
mine, among other things, the 
proper size of the eventual 
permanent effluent treatment 
system, 


Mr. + 






. 


THE -INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1972: 3 


Thirteen Agencies S 
Benefit from Appeal 


aren ressients| are bvoat Ce of the slogan “'If you don't do 
























cates sty icarmacete ie Sadat Ib il get done’ Are, Water Colors, 
ly can b you do It, It will get done" mm, 

wt ing ce eee OMENS | Authough residents of Tren “It is a Mile mare positive Art ol Enos 
esking. “Why” should: 1. give ton and some surrounding and’ more appeal - Print Making 
to the United Appeal? bed aa areas are not canvassed to ing,” said a spokesman’ for Geology Relating to Mineral Prospecting 
I do give to the appeal, where contribute in their own areas, the campaign. Geology Relating to Gem Stone Deposits. 
do my dollars go?” “if they work in the city they Each of the 13 agencies, Advanced Dress Design 
‘Throughout the inonth of will be asked to make a con- under the administration of - Creative Cooking - = 
October, the United Commun. ‘*ution.”: sald Mr. Cooper: the United Community Ser- se tered 
ity ' Services will’ be "man, “They work bere and re- vices,” in basic terms, sub- ° ective Pu ig 
Be tne ahead te adi apes ceive' the same benefits as mits a projected defict for the Snowmobile Maintenance and Operation 
soring 13 agencies in Belle. <#Y Teskdents, and as we coming year. Advanced Auto Mechanics. 
ville that would not be bere have Perey, said, cone rele acosag? either phe Women-Understand Your Automobile 
without benefits communi ree of charge or simply 
without the contributions trom Bellevillebased organi: not charge enough to cover , Music Appreciation 
Included zations," expenses (a3 in the case of Further details regarding registration ures | 
elie Femi YMCA, Mi. Mr and payment of tuition fees will be advertised in | 
nor Sports” Association, Bell the very near future. Watch for this information. 
Soeniang 
for Retarded 


dian Arthritis end Rheuma- 


Meetings 
This Week 


Public and civic meet- 
ings this week (Oct. 4 - 
Oct. 7) of which The Intel- 
ligencer has received 
notice are: 

MONDAY 






LOYALIST ( COLLEGE 



























League of Canada, St. John 
Ambulance, United Commun- 
ity Services and the Victorian 
Order of Nurses. 

"It would be extremely dif- 
ficult not to benefit, in one 
way or another, with at least 


Velva Moisture Film’ 


“Several of the agencies pro- 
vide services for the city that 
seldom reach the ears of the 


cies such as. the Victorian 
Order of Nurses and the Cen- 
tral Volunteer Bureau are al- 
ways ready to help anyone in 
the community.” 

There have been changes 
made in the campaign this 
year that organizers feel will, 
“make for a more. effective 
campaign.” 

Rather than canvassing 
door - to - door, all contri- 
butions will be solicited at an 
individual's place of business. 

“A more efficient cam- 
paign can be conducted in this 
way for several reasons,"’ said 
Mr. Cooperman. “It would 
take a great number of vol- 
unteers to completely cover 
the city, house to house, 
whereas, at the office or plan 


Liberals Open 


Committee Rooms 


With only 16. days left to 
campaign before the Oct. 21 
provincial election. the Quinte 
riding Liberals opened their 
committee room at 27 Camp- 
bell Street, Belleville, today. 

Quinte riding Liberal candi- 
date Gerald Weaver visited 
the campaign offices and the 
staff maintaining it following 
open line program What Do 
You Think. 

















at Shire Hall, 7.30 p.m. 
Trerton — Town coun- 
cil in municpal offices, 
7.30 p.m. 
WEDNESDAY 
Public Hearing to dis- 
cuss the future of Queen's 
Motel as a convalescent, 
extended care unit of 
Belleville General Hos- 
pital, 7.30 p.m. at council 
chambers, city hall. 


THURSDAY 

Belleville Public Utlities 
Commission, 930 a.m. 
uilities offices, From 
Street! 

Quinte Planning Board, 
8 p.m. at Sidney Township 
Municpal Offices. Wall- 
bridge - Loyalist Road. 





































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Office: 962-3418 Res: 962-4054 
186 NORTH FRONT ST. 
PARK PLAZA 


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LTD, 


334 Pimnacie St. 962-3331 
— FREE PARKING — 








Velva Moisture Film 5.00,10.00,15.00 


KELLY'S DRUG STORE 


411 BRIDGE ST. EAST — 962-5388 








s - 
Belleville Broadloom 
180 NORTH FRONT STREET DIAL 968-8574 

FREE PARKING — FREE ESTIMATES 
Open Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat. to 5:30 ~ Thurs, & Fri. to 9 p.m. 















Try on a pair! 


are here! 












Wallabees... . 

most comfortable 

<ratenanaiy shoes 
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with special in-built features_, 













Women’s sand or 
brown suede $27.00 
Brown or white: 
leather .... $30.00 





LESLIE'S © 


SHOE STORE LIMITED 
255 FRONT ST. . “* "BELLEVILLE 


Where the right fit means more 
than just the right size. 








| 
| 
| 





4 THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY,” OCT. 4, 1971 
_—_—___—_—_— 
THE INTELLIGENCER 
Intelligencer Established 1834 — Ontarto 1870 

Dally by 


BA 45 Bridge St. East . ic 


By mail in Canada $28.00 per year; 6 months $15.00; 

_ 3 months $8.00; 1 month $3.00. : 

By mail in U.S.A. and other forelgn countries, one 
year $36.00; ‘one month $3.75. 

Single copy rate 10c. 

Back copy rate 20c each. 


Authorized as Second Class Mail by the Post Oifice Deot., 


Ottawa, Ont. Reg. No. 1714. ~ : 
Member: Canadian Daily Newspaper Association; Cana- 
dian ‘Press and The Audit Buredu of Circulation. 





Work Anyone? 


. “Welfare kills incentive,” as Ontario Lib- 
“"™ eral leader Robert Nixon so righty said during 
his visit to Belleville last week. 


Moreover, you can recognize how the wel- 
fare system has extended into virlually every 
corner of our social fabric when you look at 
the summer make-work programs for youth, 
to name -one, not to mention the fact that 
some people find it easler and more profitable 
to live off welfare than to go out and get a 
job. j 

But perhaps noone has put 1t more vivid- 
ly, this parasitic something-for-nothing men- 
tality, than the writer cf a Ictter on this page 
today. In it you can see how the virtue of 
work, for one’s own and family betterment, is 
lost on many people todzy. And not just among 
those of the younger generation who scorn 
both: capitalism and the rat-race lifestyle 
which keeps our economy going, but those, as 
we have said, who also take/advantage of the 
state's beneficence which in turn comes out 
of the pockets of their fcllow man. 


Yet, the economic health of the nation 
must be maintained, by those who still deem 
it necessary to develop their own capabilities 
to the utmost. We cannot do without the pro- 
fessional man or thé worker who takes pride 
in his company and its products. 


Maybe it is a rat-race, as they say, and it 
is disturbing that the mental and physical 
strain can be so high. But a man does not want 
to be a vegetable either, or a parasite; maybe 
some do, but they are the losers of this world. 


‘A-hotel chain is currently running a ser- 
les of advertisements whith is eloquent of 
this fast-paced North American lifestyle. One 
shows a businessman re‘axing at a’bar, in an- 
other he is ordering dinner. “After business 
in Peterborough, Ottawa, Barrie and Brant- 
ford .. . we'll take care of the rest,” says the 
first ad; in the second the cities mentioned are 
London, Kitchener, Thunder Bay and Kenora. 
But not all in one day, we would hope, for even 
by air that would really be a rat-race. 


In any event, without our businessmen, 
the executives who travel from nlace to place 
within Canada and overseas, and without our 
professional men, things would grind to a 
halt. Without their contribution we would 
have a depression the like of which we have 

_ never known. Similarly, without the work 
force in general, and their efforts, we could 
not go on either. 








Success Story 


You are an immigrant from Yugoslavia 
and work for a bakery in Hamilton. You have 
been here four years but decide to go and visit 
your mother in the homeland. You do 60, 
boarding a ship in Montreal and disembark- 
ing in France from whence you drive your 
1971 Ford across Europe to Yugoslavia. Your 
wife and two small daughters\meanwhile have 
flown from Canada to join you 


Well, all that is interesting enough in it- 

self. A real success story one would say: in- 

+ deed it sounds just that for anyone to have 

come to Canada from Eastern Europe (where 

there are even“fewer trees with money grow- 

ing on them than there are here), and be able 

to return four years later with ones wife and 
two kids and a late-model car to hoot. 


“Rénko Vukosavljevic, 30, is the handsome 
hero of this story but the rest of the tale has 
unhappy overtones. While driving to Lenin- 
grad to board the Alexander Pushkin for the 
return trip .Vukosavijevic was involved in an 
auteaccident in which a Soviet citizen was 
killed. The day he had set off for home his 
wife and children flew back to Canada and “all 
of a sudden,” said Mrs. Vukosavijevic, we didn't 
hear from him and didn’t know what had hap- 
pened.” < ¥ 

Then came word from Intourist, the offic- 
fal Russian tourist agency, that Ranko was 
being held in Russia pecause of the accident 
near Kiev. Finally, Mrs. Vukosavljevic received 
a postcard from her husband saying he was 
with the ship In London ,en route home, but 
he made no mention of the accident, or that 
he had been held by police, or whether he still 
had hiscar. — ' 


A brother meanwhile had also been in- 
quiring about him. As for Mrs, Vukosavijevic, 
“we just want him home,” she said. “Susy 
and Joyce miss him and his employer had been 
phoning to ask if he 13 coming back to work.” 

{We think this is a travel story with:a dif- 
ference. We are also intrigued by Mr. Vukos- 
avijevic’s evident affluence. How do you save 
that kind of money working for.a bakery? 








Farmer’s Lament 





APY ELE 


o 


Work—Where Does It Get You Today? 


Editor, 
The Intelligencer. 

I moved here 21 years ago 
with a wile, a baby boy, and a 
crippled back, no money and 


so today my credit is good. In 
those first few years I was 


Now I'm getting old, I'm over 
60 and I have to take i easicr, 
so.I just operate my farm and 
in my spare time I milk 20 cows 
twice a day, and care for 20 
steers. 

But now I don’t seem to be 
working for me, wherever I look 
there are’ unemployed looking 
for benefits, and those on wel- 
fare looking for benefits, I try 
to hire these people to help me 
with the hay, but until my hay 
grows with a gold plating. I 
cannot compete with the in- 
come they receive for doing no- 
thing, 

Ali alone, in a morass of hay. 
with the sun beaming down, 1 
straighten my crippled back, 
and picture these unfortunate 
people with nothing to do, saun- 
tering into the beverage rooms 
for a nice cool drink, but bless 
their hearts, they keep the 
brewery people working, so that 
they in tum mn buy my milk 
and beef, 

Yes, I have Jearned to count 
my many blessings, I have one 
leg a little shorter than the 
other, but then the other’ is a 
little longer to make up for it, 
and as the day gets hotter, 
and the bales heavier, I can sit 
on a bale and think of Ottawa's 
travelling students, one wants 
the price of a meal, another 
complains that the bus he was 
in today for his sightseeing trip 
was not air conditioned, and the 
poor lad finished the day fa- 
tigued, and just had to have the 
price of a “reefer” or a “fix.” 

Not so many years ago, when 
we were younger, how thank- 
ful we were to lie dawn in our 
uniforms, in the mud or snow 
of the ditches of Europe and 
snatch an hour's sleep but these 
young men complain that the 
mattresses in their hostels are 
not by Seally. We would lie flat 
on our bellies in the snow, dod- 
ging bullets, and try to eat two 
or three hardtack biscuits for 
breakfast, but these young men 
complain that the coffee is not 
hot enough, I can't hire these 
able-bodied young men cither, 
because our grand educational 
system has led them to believe 
that work is the most vulgar 
four letter word in our vocab- 
ulary. 

Working or not, these people 
have to be fed, so I wipe the 
sweat out of my eyes, and go 
at the hay again, but, the, breeze 
has dropped now, and the sun 
is scorching and soon I have to 
pause again, and I think of-the 
hundreds in Ottawa and Queens 
Park who are sitting in air-con: 
ditioned offices, doing no- 
thing, but because they won't 
admit jt, my handout to them is 
known as a salary, instead of a 
benfit. The only people I can 
hire in ever-increasing numbers 
at ever increasing salaries with 
less per capita output are 
politicians, civil ‘servants, and 
school boards, and although I'm 
paying NTR none of them 
seems ve my interests in 
mind. y. ‘ 


Now with 03 


and OHSIP 
and: several otHer sips, and that 
final for education, 


alas, my"COp no longer runneth 
over, The clever people at top 


fens! 


cannot seem to sce that they 
are putting me against the wall, 
that before I drop dead in the 
harness, I too will have to stop 
being a producer and become 
@ parasitic recipient. 

And so my farm lies like a 
sleeping giant, at a moment's 
notice, with Mother Nature I 
can command it to produce 
larger crops than ever, but, 
alas, I'm getting old and a lit 


To Pay Other 
Mothers More 


The Ottawa Journal 


The old orthodoxy was that 
welfare programs such as fam- 
ily allowances should be univer 
sal. Selectivity was an admin. 
istrative nightmare, it was said 
The income tax man would 
catch up with those for whom 
the monthly family allowance 
cheqiles of $6. $* and $10 for 
each child could not really be 
justified. 

Now a new enlightenment 
has set in and bureaucratic 
wisdom has changed. Selectiy 
ity becomes a good word. 
“More efficient use of the dol 
Jar by channelling more mon 
ey into the hands of lower and 
middle income families.” os 
Health and Welfare’ Minister 
Munro’s information men put 
it, with the same omniscience 
as their predecessors preten 
ded to in arguing for -univer 
sality. 

Certainly it was time to re 
form the family allowance pro 
gram which started in 1915 and 
has been only tinkered with 
since. The consumer ice in 
dex has risen by more than 
100 per cent and whatever ef 
fectiveness family allowances 
had as an income supplement 
has been eroded. 

Most Canadians will support 
the principle in the bill now be 
fore the Commons that family 
allowances be on a sliding scale 
based upon the income of re 
cipients. It is fair that the bil! 
does not repeat the mistake of 
last year’s white paper on in 
come security which had pro 
Posed that family allowances 
be cut whtnever income was, 
above $10,000, no matter how 
many children in a family. A 
household where there are five 
or six children and an income 
of $10,000 is more deserving of 
family allowances than one 
with one or two children and 
an-income of $9,000. 

The Government realizes that 
the country can't afford to raise 


le cross-eyed too, which may 
be due to my age, but I rather 
Chink it’s from taking in money 
with one hand and handing it 
to Mr, Benson with the other, 

So, I will have to part with 
my litte bit of heaven, and 

qMother Nature in her trickery 
' will soon revert it te wilder 
ne‘s, a great loss to our eco- 
nomy, but a woncerful recrea 
tion spot for all the unfortu 
nates, with nothing to do, 

With all the proceeds from 
my farm and all its trappings. 
(again exclusive of Mr. Ben- 
son's share) my wife and I will 
take an extended world. tour, 
mindful only to keep enough 
or our retum fares to Can- 
@uda, “God's Coyntry’” where 
“we will live in the lap of luxu- 
rious case, on welfare, until we 
are old enough for the pension. 

Maybe then, when the sun is 
beaming down, hot and dry, I 
tov will have time to saunter in 
for a nice cool drink, but it 
wouldn't be because I have no- 
thing to do, for I can't live long 
enough to figure out how there 
can be nothing to do in a young 
country like Canada which has 
the greatest potemial in the 
world, but I will die with 
satisfaction of knowing “that at 


tcast four of my past and pres-. 


ent employees namely Mr, Ben. 


son, Mr, Trudeau, Mr.. Robarts 
and Mr, Davis have honored me 
by thinking that I have an un- 
limited supply of dollars to 
hand out to my fellow men. 

My last wish would be that 
every working man and wo 
man in Canada would stop 
working tomorrow, and look for 
benefits, then we would have to- 
morrow what we are going to 
have in the very near future: 
complete chaos, and” perhaps. 
tomorrow someone would start 
cong something about it in, 
stead of putting i off till after 
the next clection. 

When they put me six feet un- 
der I think Ill start kicking all 
my dirt off, just for something 
to do. ‘ac 

When 1 was 22, Queens Park 
said, “If you have nothing to do, 
take a shovel and go up West 
of North Bay, and work on the 
Trans-Canada, for five dollars a 
month and your board, other- 
wise, we can't help you” so I 
went west of North Bay, 

R. CHILCOTT, 
Tweed 

PS./' I he's worth your vote, 
he Ul cut welfare by 8 per 
cent, in other words, help those 
in need, and he will cut educa- 
tion costs by 50 percent, this is 
what we can afford. — RC. 


Looking Backward 


GLEANINGS FROM OUR FILES OF BYGONE YEARS 


20 YEARS AGO 

October 4, 1951 
With the absence of any cri 
minal cases on the docket the 
trachtional white gloves were 
presented to Mr. Justice Me: 
Lennan at the opening session 
of Supreme Court at the Has 
tings County courtroom, The 
Belleville court is Mr, Justice 
McLennan’s first appearance 
as a Supreme Court judge since 

his recent appointment. 
Following the court session, 
a reception was held by mem 
bers of the Jozal bar associa: 
tion for® Judge MeLennan and 
Mrs, McLennan. The reception, 
held at the officers’ mess gt 


time. They are leaving here to 
reside in Toronto. Presentations 
were made by Mrs, MacKen- 
non on behalf of the choir, C.N. 
Reid, chairman of the church 
music committee and by V. P. 
Hunt, organist and choir mas- 
30 YEARS AGO 


ter, 
October 4, 1921 %, 

Hundreds of Shriners wearing * 
their conyentional Fez caps 
visited this city. H. Freeman 
Ketcheson was named as the 
local Potentate ‘Aid for 1921. 
Over “100 candidates became 
members of the Shrine. The 
Rameses Shrine of Toronte ar- 
rived by special train, headed 


the Armories, was attended &y_+py their famed Rameses Band. 


most of the lawyers and their 
wives and by courthouse offi- 
cials, Convencr for the recep- 
tion was E. G. Porter. Mrs. J. 
C. Anderson poured tea, assist- 
ed by Mrs, R. Cass, Mrs. Por- 
ter, Mrs. R. Graham and Mrs. 
Kenneth Ross. 


3% YEARS AGO 


October 4, 1H1 
Enrolment for night classes 


family allowances for everyone,» ®t BCIVS is now as great as 


Much is made -of takind“bats~ 
bonuses away from well - to - 
do familjes in order to increase 
the benefits payable’ to low in 
come families. 

But that is not the whole 
story. The new plan is going to 
cost about $150 million more in 
its first ‘year than the old uni- 
versal system. In‘ all, the coun- 
try will be paying out some 
$800 million in family allow- 
ances during the first year of 
the new scheme's operation? 

That is redistribution of in- 
come on a Iarge scale. But 
doubling family allowance 
cheques represents only a little 
levelling of. the valley between 
rich and poor. The real chal- 
lenge is. to provide greater op- 
portunities -for mbre Canadians 
to prosper in their own land. 
The very necd for larger fam- 
ily allowances and the growth 
of the unemployment rolls show 
how far that challenge is from 
being met, - p 


can be accommodated at the 
school by holding the custom 
ary two classes per- week. 

Mr. and Mrs, L. P, Lake. of 
Sidney St., have received a 
cablegtam from their son, Bom- 
badier Frank Lake, advising of 
hjs safe arrival in England, 

Mrs. F. G. Kennedy of Foster 
Ave. has received-a cablegram 
from her son, Bdr.' Bob Ken- 
nedy announcing his safe arri- 
val in England. 

LAC Dick George and Miss 
Alice Ross of Ottawa and Mr. 
and Mrs. W. George of Toronto 
spent the weekend with Mr. and 
Mrs, E. George of Burnham St. 


40 YEARS AGO 


October 4, 1931 

After practice, the members 
of the choir in Bridge Street 
Church “held a farewell party 
in the new parlors’ of the 
church for Mr. and Mrs. Cari 
Carson who have been valued 
members of the choir for some 


At the Presto Music Club's 
annual meeting S. Anglin was 
clected president; and - James 
Booth was elected. secretary: 
treasurer. 





Political Ss ra 


_ Handshaking: How It - 
Is Done in the 70s _ 


Queen’s Park _ 
By DON O'HEARN 

In the 603 handshaking be low key, something 
came a nigh political art. tween a hello and 
Originally started by Leslie course, the NDP 
Frost, who turned old-time polit-. A 
Sapient ramon ens Af you.Beppen. tobe 
by having long ‘receiving ses- eee loing for 
sions__before and after -the — points, as you watch li 
speeches, laying on of hands de- football, You might 
veloped into an essential part of nother “Wintermeyer.” 
electioneering. ~ In 1983 John 

; as leading the 
In the current campaign it is giving it the BIG effo 
thriving. And if you watch for it J of course, ga 
you might note this; thing the big effort but 
The basic technique is to grip, - was too much of a 
ite, ip and not get stuck. {oF politics, and particularly for 


The point is to- appear warm 
and interested but keep them 
moving, moving. 

A slight salutation is called 
for, and almost always this is 
“bow are you?” But while say- 
ing this you are already unslip- 
ping the palm and offering it to 
the next in line. 

If you do get stuck you give a 
clap on .the back and. say 
“Great,” “Wonderful, “Too 
bad," {Get in touch with me,” 
“You don't say" or whatever 
else may be appropriate—and. 
quick, : , 

The Conservatives are using 
the technique most in the cam- 
paign. 

But the Liberals seem to be 
best with it. 

Leader Bob Nixon's smile ap- 


line moving. seg : 
He was great on the hello. He 
really sepa Mle “How 
Are You?” tt sepa- 
rate words: HOW! ... ARE! © 
... YOU!!! But he was always 






thi e | 

presumably listening to Alm. © 

first. foe 
This night in Oshawa he got. 


really stuck. This elderly gentle- 
man started: “‘Oh Mr, Winter- 
meyer, I hope you can help me, 
I hope you can help me.” 

Mr. Wintermeyer, really not 
listening, beamed and nodded, 


everything was good cheer—'- 


while looking out the comer of 
his eye at the line. 


“[ have just got out of the | | 


hospital,” the man 
“My wife died while I was in 
there. I have just lost my pen- 


pears to register just that litle <ion. my daughter's house has 


bit extra. Perhaps his mouth is 
wider. He also uses a pretty. 
well-continuous smile. 

Premicr Davis is coming 
across with a fairly good “how 
are you?” But with his smile he 
tends to use an on and off tech- 
nique and doesn't peak to the 
Nixon candlepower. 

New Democratic Party leader 
Stephen Lewis comes across 


‘burned down and now I have to 
take tests for cancer, and the 
medical bills... .” 

There was a pouse Jor breath, 
the Liberal leader caught the 
break and he came on with his 
regular second line. Clapping 
the man on the back he said: 
“GOOD! FOR, 
your: 

+ Fortunately the man's 
ailments included deafness. 3 
moved on gratefully. 


Apartments Close To 
Downtown Area Means 


Boost For A 


City’s Core 


Peterborough Examiner 


Cocditional approval by the 
planning board of the construc- 
tion of three highrise apart: 
ment buildings within blocks 
of the downtown business sec- 
tion of Peterborough should be 
applauded, 

Apartments close to down- 
town can benefit any city, its 
people and its business com- 
munity. 

Peterborough citizens have 
jong been watching with quict 
desperation the stagnation — if 
not deterioration of the 
city’s downtown section. 

Many suggestions have been 
made to stop the trend, rang- 
ing from beautification schemes 
to tax concessions, But none 
of the suggestions pointed out 


‘that what downtown needs to 


keep it ie is people. Where 
there's pedple there is business, 
and- where there's business 
there's no stagnation or deter- 
joration. 

It's people that bring in peo 
ple. People create business and 
business forms the foundation 
of progress. 


Today in History . 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


Oct. 4, 1971... 

The first fashioned 
by human minds and hands 
entered space ‘M-years ago 


“ today—in 197—with the 


successful launching of the 
first earth satellite by the 
Soviet Union. Throughout 
the world Russia gained 
"prestige and the plaudits of 
scientists as Sputnik I 
whirled round the earth at 
speeds of 18,000 miles an 
hour, More than 500 miles 
high. Radio audiences lis- 
tened entranced to the pul- 
sating beeps sent out by 2 
radio inside the ‘185ipound, - 
25-inch thick artifical moon." ’ 
1%3—Hurricane Flora 
killed 5,000 “in ‘Maiti and 
1,000 in Cuba. 
1958—B ritish Overseas 
«, Airways Corporation inau- 
gurated transa tlantic jet 


airliner passenger service. 
194—A UN commiss:on 
reported 23,000 prisoners of 
war were still detained in 
Communist countrics, 
190-—The Hitler- Mussolini 
conference was held at the 
Brenner Pass, 
1938—Premier - Duplessis 
of Quebee declared in an 
election* campaign that a 
vote for him woukd be a 
“vole for autonomy against 
conscription."* \ 


1935—Prime i Minister 
Baldwin"declared Britain 
will not act alone in the 
Ethiopian dispute. : 


‘Fifteen years ago, downtown | 
Toronto was beginning to show : 


It isn’t accidental that the 
downtown sections of so many 
North-American cities have be 
come like ghost tawns, People 
moved to the suburbs and did 
not come back downtown to 


shop. bee | 
“It's easier to go to the g 
est plaza. “A i 


On the other hand, some 
cities were fortunate or wise 
enough not only to preserve but 
to enrich their downtown areas 
by encouraging the construc- 
tion of apartment buildings. 

Toronto is a good example. 


the signs of going theway of 


other large North American - 


cities. 

Then they began to build 
apartments buildings. They are 
beautiful, modern, 
offer many advantages like un- 
derground parking, sports fac- 
ilities and greenery in place of 
shabby, old houses. They li 
ally transformed the appel 


_ ance of the city. They greatly 


contributed to the fact that 
what used to be called Hog- 
town has become a modern, in- 
ternationally - recognized met- 
ropolis. 

But those downtown apart- 
ment buildings did more, than 
just change the appearance of 
the city: They offered living 
accommodation to thousands 
and thousands of people. 

Today. downtown Toronto's 
thoroughfares are full of people 
~—and stores, department stores, — 
restaurants, theatres and many 
other attractions, all doing a 
thriving business. 

*What Peterborough's down 
town needsyis the same thy 


—people. A’Soon as there? | 


more apartment buildings, (i 
will be more people and mare 
business = . and we will> 
have an entirely different city 
entre. sae 

It's time for a change. 


NOTICE TO READERS | 


Letters to thls newspaper should be as brief as possible and 


preferably oo more than. 500 


words, While for publication 


purposes a pseudonym may be used, letters must also bear the 
handwritten signature and address of the sender. Letters may be 


subject to editing. 








clean and” © 


| 


5 


preeicoesanaines 












=. 





Tt will be a big weekend for 
two groups of members this 


* coming Thanksgiving when the 


Hasty-P. Regimental Associa- 
tion holds its annual’ reunion 
in Peterborough and the 32nd 
Battery Association will hold 
theirs. in Pembroke. It is 
hoped they have as fine weath- 
er as this past weekend. 
“The entertainment chair- 
man. Jack Fitzgerald, has ar- 
ranged a special treat for 
those lovers of the wild mu- 
sic of the “ladies from bell”. 
as the Fritzes called them. At 
next Friday's social evening 
the Duke of Edinburgh Unit 
Pipe. Band will play a few 
choice selections and Wally 
Sawyer will again be at the 
piano with his song and dance 
music. 

Chairman of the sick com- 
mittee, Howard Calnan, had 
sad news for the members 
last Friday when he had. to 
report ‘the passing of a very 
well known and popular. mem- 
ber, Bob Scott. He had been 
in poor health for some time. 
President John Browning andy 
all members join in extending 
sincere sympathy to his be- 
reaved family. He will be 
missed by all. The hospital 
list grows longer also with the 
following comrades in the 
Belleville General Hospital: C. 


Night Classes 
At Madoc Oct. 5 


Registration for night clas- 
ses at Centre Hastings Scc- 
ondary School in Madoc will 
be held Tuesday, Oct. 5, at 
7 p.m. 

Among the variety of cours- 
es cffered arz bookkeeping, 
drafting, sewing, physical fit- 
ness, art, electricity, ceramics, 
welding. small engines and 
upholstering. 


Station Wagon 


Immobilized 


TWEED (Special) — There 
fs nothing more immobile than 
an automobile wit! Rhobt a dis- 
tributor and radiator. 

That was learned o¥er the 
weekend by Don Woods, 
Tweed furnace oil distributor 
who uses a McGowan Strect 
property to park his vehicles. 

Mr. Woods returned to his 
parking lot this morning to 
find that both the radiator and 
distributor had been taken 
from his 1966 model station 
wagon. . 

Two other break-ins were 
Teported at Tweed over the 
weekend. 

The Rashotte Lumber Com- 
pany on Metcalfe Street and 
the Ontario Hydro garage on 
James Street were entered 
but nothing was reported tak- 
en. 





money!. 


$50 to $5000 


ANAF News 





NOTICE 


McConnell’s 
Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 
ll DUNBAR STREET 
CHANGE IN TELEPHONE NUMBER 


966-1214 


Superior Finance’ 
makes it easy for 
you to borrow 


give youa better deal 
because we're more flexible. 


Superior Finance 


We'll lend you the money you need —no red tope 
BELLEVILLE - 22734 Front Street - 962-9163, 
Doily to 5:30 p.m. Thursday to 8:00 p.m. 
her evenings by appointment 
46 Superior Offices to serve you 





Marriot, room 525; T. Adams, 
316; A. Tuck, room 601; K. 
Hollands, room 701; J. Clarke, 
room 407; C. Kellar. room 716 
and W. Shepherd still in inten- 
sive care. Cde, Bob Mills is” 
in Douglas 236, Kingston Gen- 
eral Hospital. The chairman 
or. his committee have visited 
all of them. 

First vice - president W, J. 
Ford represented the presi- 
dent at the Provincial mect- 
ing held in Unit 227, London 
this-pgst weekend. “The presi- 
dent was funable td attend 
through previous commit- 
ments. A report on anything 
pertinent to the members will 
be made next week. 


Gounterfert 
U. S. Bills 
Circulating 


The counterfeit and forgery 
section of the provincial po- 
lice anti - rackets branch, has 
warned a new series of coun- 
terfeit American currency is 
being passed throughout On- 
tario. 

Unlike the Tocoaee:! series 
circulated in July of this year, 
the current $10 bills are of 
much improved quality and 
are more deceptive. 

The serial numbers are: 
B 417009 B, of front plate 
B36, and B 617668 B and 
B 71947665 B of back plate 67. 

The.gld July series bore the 
seen humbers, A 30593255 - 

162 A, B 95468355 - 
A 91238850 A. and A Ise 
239 B. 

The public is advised that if 
they should suspect they have 
received a counterfeit note, 
they should not return it to 
the passer, even if he or she 
offers to exchange it for a 
genuine note and delay the 
passer on any excuse, if pos- 
sible. 

Police should be alerted 
immediately and a good men 
tal description of the passer 
and the licence number of his 
car, should be obtained. 

Anyone receiving a counter: 
feit note is warned that if it 
is passed by them in an at- 
tempt to get rid of it. the 
sentence for knowingly pass- 
ing a counterfeit note is up 
to 14 years in prison. 


Two Charged 


At 6:30 a.m. Saturday city 
police stopped two young men 
in the vicinity of North Front 
Street ard Moira Street. In 






ing case containing a’ P- 
33 automatic pistol, a box of | 
ammunition and two clips. 
Charged with vagrancy and 
carrying a weapon offensive | 
to the public are Randolph 


Heggarty. 17. of 61 Donald | 


Street. and John Strand, 17, 
of 76 St. Charles Street. 













Superior can now 





ir possession was a leather If 


New Ballot Makes Voting Easier 


Returning Officer for Quinte Riding Gerald Joyce, right, and special 
pou enumerator Charles Smith, sort out the government's supply of special 
watermarked ballot paper and samples of the all new, white on. black, 
printed ballets. The new ballots are designed to eliminate as many spoiled 
votes as possible. In 1967, of the more than 21,000 ballots cast in Quinte 


riding, only 89 were spoiled. 


Truck Climbs 
Clerk’s Porch 


TWEED (Special) — Fore- 
ed to swerve when another ve- 
hicle emerged from a. side 
street, a half-ton truck driven 
by a 16-yearold Tweed youth 
damaged the front’ steps of a 
Bridge Street home and snap- 
ped off a telephone pole be- 
fore it could be brought to a 


Syeses 
| 








LUCKY THIRTEEN 


IF YOU DO YOUR BIT the thirteen agencies 
who combine in the Belleville and District United 
Appeal ure going to be lucky. They are going to 
receive enough money to carry on. 

IF THEY ARE VERY LUCKY they may even 
get enough money to give better service or carry out 
much neeced improvements. 

BUT THIS WILL DEPEND ON YOU, 

THE THIRTEEN AGENCIES don’t trouble you 
thirteen times by having thirteen campaigns. They 
only have one. And this is it. 

GIVE THEM A FAIR SHARE. But remember, 
cach dollar you give has to be split thirteen ways 
--- that's only seven cents apiece. 

DON ‘T LET THEM ap as UNLUCKY THIR- 
TEEN. ; 

Give gen¢rously - - - at work ’- - - tnis year. 


Tweed Police Chief Bill Car- 
toll said the truck driven by 
Clark McDonald, was west- 
bound when it went out of 
control and slammed into the 
front steps at the home of 
village clerk Garrett Morton. 

The truck then struck the | 
telephone pole and veered 120 | 
feet down Metcalfe Street. 

The driver. his sister 
Heather, and Peggy Palma- 
teer, both passengers in the | 
trek, all escaped injury. 


If you do it — it will get done! 


UNITED APPEAL OF BELLEVILLE 
BD pegecly hogaic phaser’ & DISTRICT 


rene me porch ysand tele: || 224 John Street, Belleville 


THE HASTINGS COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION. ° 













Air Pollution Gennnae BUYING. OR SELLING 


Planned for November 


An air pollution seminar will 
be held Nov. 6 with represen- 
tatives from most eastern On- 
tario municipalities to meet in 
Pembroke and hear a pro- 
gram of factual information 
concerning 


the atmosphere Prince Edward TB 
and how to keep it clean. Association, said that 
The conference, sponsored information is being sent to 


by the Eastern Ontario Region municipal, school and other 

i organizations. Interested citi- 
zens are asked to contact the 
Socal office at 311 Bleecker 
Ave., Belleville. or telephone 


962-2186. 


YIELD AN 7, 19% 
AVERAGE # @M (+) 


TORONTO DOMINION 


the bank where people make the difference 


AND 


LOYALIST COLLEGE OF APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY 


~ present 


BELLEVILLE COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTE — 962-9581 


MOIRA SECONDARY SCHOOL, 


Registration - Tuesday, ba 5, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
7.200 - 9:00 p.m. Classes hegin Wednesday, October 6, 
Classes begin Thursday, October 7 - 7:00 p.m. 
7:00 p.m. 


HIGH SCHOOL €REDIT COURSES 


All Grade 13 courses will be offered at Moira 
S.S. or B.C.1. Registrations will be accepted 
at either school. 


HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT COURSES 


All Grade 13 courses will be offered at B.C.1. 
or Moira S.S. Registrations will be accepted 


at either school. Grade 13 — English 
oe B— pe Grade 13 — History 
rade 13 — History 13 — i 
Gegiets = Maibeesaticn Grave 13 — Mathematics 


Grade 13 — Biology 
Grade 13 — Physics 
Grade 13 — Chemistry 
Grade 13 — Geography 
Grade 11-12% Mathematics 


Grade 13 — Biology 
»Grade 13 — Physics 
~ Grade 13 — Chemistry 
Grade 13 — Geography 
Grade 11-12 — Mathematics 





Senior Office Practi hine Sho, 
rth ee ang Aigo Grade 9 — Business Machines LE P * 
= ~ Hae, edt ae Welding Electricity 
Elementary Typewriting Elergentary Bookkeeping STEREST URS : : : 
= te co ES Snowmobile Maintenance 
INTEREST COURSES INTEREST COURSES . Basie = Drafting. x 
Drawing and Painting (One night per week) * Art (Drawing and Painting) _. amped ta tha becere mre Se eis < pie 
* Investment & Finance (One night t per week) Auto Mechanics - Elementary Art Instructional Musle Ceramics est 
couversationat Erenche, Ee ‘Advanced Driver Education - Theory > Sewing Pottery (Ceramics) 
English as a second language Welding : “Driver Education (Theory) a: SAS A eee : 
Auto oe Gears ‘some basic automo- Genin Woodworking Wood worki Welding Painting Seed Color, Acrylics) 
Mor t i Conv tional French 
Pottery lloe rite poseey and those more ad- Sewing - Elementary and Advanced Piss tne 3 ere c 
Advanced Sewing (continued instruction in Typewriting - Refresher z Building Construction “Thstrumental Music 
dressmaking) Physical Fitness for Women \Auto Mechanics * Typewriting 
ce 


FEES: 


Registration - Monday, October 4, t Ie 


WELDING COURSES ........... $18.00 


- NIGHT SCHOOL °71-’72_ - 





TRENTON HIGH SCHOOL A 


Registration - Monday, October 4, 
7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 


Instruction in the following subjects will be 
given at Trenton High School during the 
1971-72 season, heey there is sufficient 
interest. 


HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT COURSES 
Grade 13 — Geography 
Grade 13 — Mathematics 
Grade 13 — English 


Grade 13 — Chemistry 
Grade 13 ~ Physics 


Grad — History 
Grade \J, 12-13 — German 
Grade 11 — Drafting 


Grade 9, 10, 11, 12 —- Mathematics 
Grade 11, 12, 13 — Italian 


(fees payable at time of registration) 





y s 
THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1911 5 ~ 


FOR GUARANTEED 


RCA & G.E. SERVICE 


On TV and APPLIANCES 
PHONE 962-3401 


IRELAND'S 


GO AHEAD! ~ 
BUY 
CANADA SAVINGS 
BONDS 


WHEN HELD 
TO MATURITY 








CENTRE HASTINGS 
SECONDARY SCHOOL 


Registration Night - Tuesday, 
October 5, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m, 


ADULT EDUCATION 


Academic Subjects — Grades 9 to 13 
Bookkeeping (Accounting) 


INTEREST COURSES 
Auto Maintenance Small Engines 


ALL OTHER COURSES sere seintens $10.00 | 




















ESTATE 








in 




















§ THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 


graduated from this school, 


services is urgent, not- on Saturday. 

because of the vast Mr. Rickard whose address 
of money that are being _ dealt with the need to evalu- 
on them, but theques- ate performance in any field 
arises as to whether and the difficultics of evalu- 
are really :meeting the ating it in the social services 


where there is no profit crit- 
‘erion as in industry, stressed 
that in’ health care what is 
important i$ -the quality of 
care. He commennted that 
while no successful method 
has been devised be measure, 


She Struck Gold! 


Miss Mary Packard smiles happily after 
receiving her Gold Medal from Dr. Kenneth 


Douglas at the first annual graduation exercises 
of the Edith Cavell Regional School of Nursing. 
Miss Packard also delivered the waledictory 


address. ~~ 


Top: Awards . Presented 
At Graduation . Exercises 


At the first annual gradu- sented to Miss Mary Pack- 
ation exercises of the Edith = ard. 
Neale Herb pasa of Silver medal, also awarded 


by the fo 













Secondary School on rday 
afternoon the following special 
awards were presented: 
amedal awarecd by the Bo. 
of director’ of the school, pre- 


PRINTED PATTER™ 







iss Kathryn Sto 
ict] nursing 
d by the Bourd 
3s. Prince Edward 
Memorisl Hospital, 

nt ed to Miss Linda Mil- 
hursiat award 
Board of Dirce- 
Nord Memorial 
etented to Mrs. 
irds: and psy- 
Zz aw ard from 

















‘] ‘Winniteed Ben- 
Brown, Paula 
Semen: Judy 


sara Downes y, 













ie Kidd. Carat Maan, ‘Co. 
‘Finne Marlatt, Sandra Mills, 
“Susan” Pascoe, Marlene Pur 
vey, Barbara Ray, Naney 
Reynolds. Barbara Shoniker, 
Brenda Smith, Cheryl Sulli- 
van and Edith Treverton. 



















SIZES 104-204 


Fall Flattery 


bane Helen 


So crisp, clean cut, this 
step.in maxes every day sccm 
bright and bcautiful even if 
it's not. Have it with same or 
contrast binding. a 

Pnnted Pattern 4530: New 
Half Sizes 10%, 32%, 144, 
16'4, 18'4, 20'S. Size 1442 (bust 
37) takes 3% yards 39 inch. 

Seventy - five cents (75e) in 
coins (no stamps, please) for 
each pattern — add 15 cents 
for cach pattern for first-class 
-mailing and special handling. 
Ontario residents add 4 cents 
gales tax. Print plainly size, 
name, address, style number. 

Send order to Anne Adams, 
care of The Intelligencer, Pat- 

tern Dept.. 60 Front St. W., 
= Toronto.1, Ontario. -— 














AN APPRECIATION OF EAR 
COVERING THE se intel uP 
GROUP OF SEVE 


10 WEEKS. 
EARLY CANADI 


CANADIAN ANTIQUES. 










REGISTER NOW BY MAIL OR 
LEGE, MONDAY THROUGH FR! 
REGISTRATIONS ACCEPTED 


BUILDING, LOYALIST COLLEG 














BOX 4200 





BELLEVILLE, 








ANTIQUE FANS - 
TWO GREAT LECTURE SERIES 


B 
GERALD STEVENS — 
-EARLY CANADIAN PAINTING 
TUFSDAY saeites 's: 30 TO 10:30 COMMENCING OCT, 5 FOR 
ALSO 
ANTIQUE ENTHUSIASTS WILL FIND THIS SERIES OF LEC- 


TURES A FASCINATING GUIDE TO MANY FORMS OF 


Monday Nights 8:30 - 10:30 commencing Oct. 4 for 10 weeks. 


FIRST AND SECOND LECTURES. 
ALL COURSES TO BE HELD Death le THEATRE, “B” 


LOYALIST COLLEGE 
_WALLBRIDGE ROAD, 


_. Hospital Administrator Speaks 


this, he was confident that 
this will be achieved shortly. 

He remarked that standards 
and penalties for failing to 
meet these standards have 
been in vogue since the earl- 
jest times, though the ap 
proach was somewhat nega- 
tive. For example, he said 


up by King Hammurabi of 
Babylonia, a doctor was to be 
paid for various’ services but 
his hands would be cut olf 
if bé killed the patient or 
destroyed his eyesight. 

He said that “when we 
have succeeded in scientifical- 
ly measuring the quality of 
patient care it will be moni- 
tored daily by the nurse.”* He 
expressed the opinion that in 
hospitals there is a need only 
for nurses and super-nurses 
and that the traditional hier- 
archy of assistant head nurse, 
bead nurse and supervisor is 
archaic, He pointed out that 
often the best bed-side nurses 
are promoted into administra- 
tive roles where their talents- 
are not fully used. He said 
that'in hospitals of the future 
it will be the duty of the 
super-nurse to make a daily 
record of the quality of pa- 
tient care, 

Referring to the students’ 
desire for evaluation. Mr. 
Rickard advised them to pre- 
serve this desire, because they 
were entering a profession 
which for the first time this 
century has become compcti- 
tive. He suggested two cri- 
teria for self-evaluation, name- 
ly knowledge and compassion, 


Card Party 
Opens Year's 
Activities 


The Regent of Argyll Chap 
ter IODE Mrs. H. Kokesh 
welcomed members and 
friends to an enjoyable even 
ing of bridge and cuchre in 
the officers’ mess, Belleville 
Armorics. 

In bridge. the high ladics’ 
and men’s score prizes were 
won by Mrs. Rea Clarke and 
Charles Smith. The hidden 


score prizes were won by 
Mrs. Jean Macdonald. and 
Tom Colden. 

In cuchre. the high ladics* 


and men’s score prizes were 
won by Mrs. F. Carufel and 
Angus Duffy. The hidden score 
prizes were won by Mrs. Ann 
Yearwood and George Spratt. 
The winners of the door 
prizes, which were drawn by 
the honorary Regent 9 Mrs. 
Jack Cousins, were Mrs. Neil 
Smith and Mrs. D. Staughton. 
Sandwiches and small cakes 
were served by Mrs. Brian 
Milroy and her committee. 


AT HOME 


Mr. and Mrs. Earl F. Mit- 
chell, RR 2, Stirling extend a 
warm welcome to relatives, 
friends and neighbors to join 
them on the occasion of their 
25th wedding anniversary at 
their home on Sunday. Oct. 
10 from 2-4 and 8 - 8-10 p.m. 













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at First Graduation: of ‘Edith Cavell Nursing : School 


He pointed out that new . 
knowledge will continue to 
burst upon us to such an ex- 
tent that all professions will 
require recertification every 
five years, 

Defining compassion as the 
transmission of concern com- 
bined with a desire to alle- 
viate the cause of the con- 
cern, he said that it is a 
characteristic of the best nur- 
ses. 

He concluded by advising 
them to be aware of. their 
weaknesses and try to. im- 
prove and also to be equally 
aware of their strengths, 

Later the valedictory -ad- 
dress was given by Miss Mary 
Packard. She reminded her 
fellow-graduates that what was 

ree years ago a dream, had 

Ww a reality, and 

hat they must accept the re- 
sponsibilities that go with the 
privileges of being a nurse, 

She pointed out that being 
the first has never been easy 
because one is constantly call- 
ed upon to prove oneself. She 
said that being the first stu- 
dents of the Edith Cavell Re- 
gional School of Nursing had 
drawn the class closer togeth- 
er. She concluded by thanking 
their teachers, families, and 
friends for their help and 
Ruidance. 

At the end of the gradua- 
tion exercises, Miss Pamela 
Gonu, another graduate, an- 
nounced the dedication of the 
school’s first year book to 
Mrs. M. Flindall, principal. 

In the evening a ‘reception 
was held in the Trent Room 
at the Four Seasons Hotel for 
the graduating class and their 
friends, followed. by a dinner 
and dance in the Park Room. 


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Successful Living 


Good Manners Always Show Thoughtfulness 


By DORIS CLARK 

Manners!- Thzy -mean -so 
mach when. it comes to keep- 
ing our human relationships 
wall oiled. 

Thave.a letter from a Sister, 
resident’ of a convent, asking 
fora) resource to. give the 
ce in how to sit, 
e tho voice 








one. person 


ing: before ba: 





carnival-like 














cx aot tn 
aie ; 
Kitchen Tested: R&ci 
KA a 
i Vict y 
By MARY MOORE 
of b : 
hihty. 8 
oy 
pre s so ft 
tciaake' ane. ¢ 
but dst 
c r]I 
s sare 
t vi) >In 
£ ef cr ¢ Stover 














) 
pene 
| ji | 
bear. 
} 
| 
Be 
Basa 
pes! 
| : 
| 
} 
{ 
{ 
ie 
} 
i 4 
be | 
gel : 
© MO 
eet © 
~ | 
ee Nov 
este pic 
' rent 
faitt 
fost of 
era re 
Be fi the 
Biel fie 
Le SY el 
| oe ee ti 
i Fal 
ee 


Unbeliev. 


atmosphere of iny father's 


death and funeral. 
There was no drunkenness, 
but L was looking forward to'a 


peaceful reunion with the . 


members of my, immediate fa- 
mily and their children, But 
the married sons and daught- 
ers and fiances began arriv- 
ing. ready to be fed upon 
their arrival. I had no worry 
about the food supply as some 
of them brought‘a lot of food 
with thedn, but whtn we are 
exhausted from the care of 


my father and rushing up to | 


the hospital to sce him and 
then, trying to get up to the 
funeral parlor during visiting 
hours, it is almost beyond hu- 
man endurance! 
I only hope, for the sake of 
others, that people will realize 
this is no time for cousins und 
boy friends to have a big, 
happy reunion, A lot of them 
would say this is a rare oc- 
casion to see each other but 
what. difference does that 
make? I've got lots of rela- 
tives I've never seen and if 
I must sce them this is cer- 
tainly no time to do so. 
Perhaps some day it: may 


pes 








Samples Shepherd's Pie 


roast beef you can and fel- 
low recipe below just as it is. 
SHEPHERD'S PIE 

(Serves 4 or 5) 
I'@p diced carrots 
1Jeup Spanish onion chop- 
ped 








large egg beaten 
milk (preferably 







canned peas drain- 
< na!) 

93 mineed or ground 
of beef (packed) 














sak — divided 
». pepper 
leftover gravy (see 
belew) 
1 tep. Worcestershire sauce 
b! sup 
Cee ¢ potatoes first in 





cr until terder. 


mn and mash potatoes 
and measure. Season them 


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JUST 


be a standing joke that atten- 
dance at weddings and funer- 
als is to be by invitation only! 
The homage and respect paid 
to my father was far out- 
weighed, and sort of pushed 
aside, by all of us in this car- 
nivallike atmosphere. 

Thank you for listening, Do- 
ris! Other people must have 
had this problem and I think 
the more it is discussed the 
sooncr all thes: secondary 
relatives will realize that they 
are only adding distress to the 
occasion; and that in time it 
will be a ‘case of ‘this just isn't 
done’ ard the family can then 
enjoy the peace and quict and 
dignity of a family death. — 
Distressed 

Déar Distressed: I ily 
agree that the occasfon of a 
death and funeral is. Pet car- 
nival rhaterial — muct as it 
may take on some of the fea- 
tures of a family reunion. 

Probably the relatives 
thought they were being all- 
provident ir bringing sup- 
plics of food. They could hard- 
ly have conceived the depth of 
your fatigue when they per- 
mitted the assembly ~ to 


with 1 tsp. of the salt and beat 
in the egg and milk until per- 
fectly smooth, Maureen used 
her hand electric becter, 

To the cooked drained car- 
rots and onion add the peas 
(if used), meat, remaining ‘2 
tsp. salt, pepper, gravy, Wor- 

tershire sauce and catsup. 
: Ifyou do not have 
enough gravy make it up to 
1 cup by adding hot water. If 
you do not have-any gravy 
use 2 tsps. Bovril in 1 cup 
hot water.) 

Butter sides and bottom of 
2.qt. casserole and spoon in 
alternating Jayers of the 
mashed potato and meat mix- 
tures starting and finishing 
with potato. Peak up lop at- 
tractively wth fork tines and 
cctively with fork tines and 





< the carrots and ? sprinkle lightly with paprika 


(er grated cheese if desired) 

Bake at #00 deg. Fahr. 3 
min. until thorougaly heated 
througa and tinged with gold. 

















> See 


assume the proportions of a 
convention. 

Perhaps your letter will re 
mind others who fage a-sim- 
ilar family sorrow to shew 
consideration to the all-but- 
collapsing nearest and dear- 
est; as well as stressing the 
unseemliness of abandened 
gaicty! 

- ee 

Dear Doris: I am in love 
with this guy I went with for 
seven months until we broke 
up. I tried to forget him and 
go out with other guys but it 
doesn't help. We are both 20 
years old. 

Now I am going out with 
the guy I love but I want to 





know if he Joves me. What 
should I do? Picase don't tell 
me to forget him and go out 
with other’ guys. I can't, — 
How Do I know He Loves 
Me? 

Dear How: Don'teask. Wait 
until he tells you. But I'd say 
the fact that you are back to- 
gether again is a good-sign, 
wouldn't you? Send’ 20 cents 
and a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope for a copy of my 
leaflet What Is Love? 

eee 

Deris receives 10,000 letters 
a year, from readers, ‘Please 
remember to supply stamp 
for your reply. 


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§ THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 ~~ 
SS ee ere 


Lyon — Turner 


Holy Rosary Church, was 


| + the setting for the September 





| Che Intelligenrer 

















18 wedding of Margaret Fran- 
ces Turner, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Houghton Turner 
and of David Rockwell Lyon, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Lyon, Father Warren Sullivan 
conducted the ceremony while 
Tibor Csaszar provided organ 
Tusic for the occasion. : 
, Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride wore a floor 


length empire style gown of” 


silk crepe with small appli- 
ques of crocheted daisies. Jt 


featured long puffed sleeves, ~ 


a small stand-up collar. and 
a chapel length train. Her 
bouquet was a ‘cascade of 
white daisies and red roses 
laced with green feather fern. 

The matron of honor Mrs. 
Douglas Tall, the bride's sis- 


* ter wore a formal ‘empire 


style gown of printed rose 
cotton overlaid with chiffon. 
She wore a matching floral 
bead piece and carricd a 


“For the wedding trip to New 


Upon return the couple will 


reside at 19 Elmer Street, 
Belleville. 


MR. AND MRS. DAVID LYON 


Policewomen. Not Really Rare 


EDMONTON (CP) — Po- 
licewomen may be something 
of a novelty to the public, but 
they aren't really rare, says 
Sgt. Eileen Finlayson of* the 
Edmonton police department. 

Fifteen years ago, when she 
Joined the force, there were 
three women; tcday there are 
17. When she joined the 
women did little investigative 
work, acting mostly as well- 
trained social workers. 

Now, they do park patrol 
with male officers, work as 
narcotics squad members, in- 
vestigate frauds and work in 


several other areas along with : 


the men. 

Sgt. Finlayson was the first 
woman sergeant on Edmon- 
ton’s force, taking the exam 
six years. ago when it was 
first open to women. She now 
also has passed her staff ser- 
geant exam and is waiting on 
the promotion list. 

She looks after all assign. 
ments for women on the 
force, although they work di- 
rectly under the head of the 
detail they are assigned to, 
and she also is in charge of 
the matrons at thé city jail. 

Women hoping to enter the 


PRESENTS 


|| WANT-AD 


| BARGAIN 


WEEK 


The Intelligerrcer’s 
WANT-AD STAFF 


Saree 





> Nina MacMurchy 
Ad-Visor 


SORRY! NO. 
COMMERCIAL ADS 


COMMENCING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5th. 
UP TO AND INCLUDING TUESDAY, OCT. 12th. 


PHONE YOUR WORD-AD IN TODAY AND 
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS BARGAIN 


If you have something to sell — want to buy an article — rent a house or 
apartment — need help, etc., place a Low Cost Want Ad during this 
special etent and find out for yourself the results you get from an In- 


SAVE! SAVE! 


INSERTIONS OF A 
QUICK ACTION WANT AD 
FOR THE PRICE OF 


telligencer-Want Ad. 


SAVE! 





Your Intelligencer Want Ad will run 6 times for the price of 3, and ap- 
plies to any word ad (not commercial) to start any time during the: }, 
week commencing Tuesday, October 5th through Tuesday, October 12th-q 
Want-Ads will be accepted up to.4 p.m. the day previous at this Bargain 
Rate. This applies only to word ads. NOT SEMI-DISPLAY ADS. 


BUY! SELL! RENT! HIRE! | , 


~ 


IMMEDIATELY 
YOUR AD 
BRINGS 
RESULTS 

CALL US TO 
ARRANGE 

CANCELLATION 












force must have several basic 
characteristics. - 

“They must like working 
with, and for, the public. [ 
can’t stress strongly enough 
how much they must enjoy 
and be able to work with pco- 
ple. 

“I also think that a girl 
should have a balanced na- 
ture, with a good sense of 
humor. The police force is no 
place for a moody, tempera- 
mental, spoiled brat.” 

Being a policewoman also 
means having to submit to, 
and almost enjoy, discipline, 
she said. 








Your new mink... persian 


fekley FNS 





~ 


THROUGH 


THE WANT ADS 


The Intelligencer 
DIAL 962-9171 






thru 





» 


Farmers’ Wives Scarce. . 





fs » BONN (Reuter) — West on the land will have scarcely POINTS 
German farmers have a prob- a chance: of Soding jeutabie ryt 
Jem which strikes at their "riage antiack pe eaaT NG 5 
pene hey are tndng 8 tse FOR . . 
increasingly difficut to get villages. 
ia peat 

Country girls, it seems, are Fious regions’ have Jaunched ‘2 

more attracted to the cities, & campaign aimed at polish PARENTS 
and there is a dearth of ‘city ing up the negative image of s a 
girls prepared to settle for an the farmer's wife which is © BY ai 7) : 

lite. still stubbornly held by many us MARY A f Z 

The situation is particularly in the cities. a BRS -f om dB 
serious in. regions offering Ripelletelre tearm flare af aS or te el 
pesadie oot ben trendy with - * Ifa child’s:behavior goes over the Emi 

Sila the ssolbamatern aisle ot tarsasar pone to’ make coén- ment may be needed to help him remember’ next 

Baden - Wuerttemberg, an life more attractive to time. However, be sure he always knows why he is 

alarmed farmers’ association hes while familiarizing them being: punishers Even a rebellious teen-ager will be ~ 

has estimated that in the near. -with what it entails for wo —&fatelul for your control — if he feels you are being fair., 

future some 10,000 young men men. wy - 





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more Orioles talked about her- 


oes while the bitterly disap- 
pointed Oakland Athletics 
talked about an umpire after 
the defending champion Orioles 
beat the . Athletics 5-3 in the 
opener of their best-of-five 
American League playoff ser- 
ies. » - 
The teams go at it again 
today in the second game of the 
set with right hander Jim (Cat- 
fish) Hunter hoping to succeed 
where ace Vida Blue failed and 


Ietics before the series switches 


@ gain an even break for Whe Ath- 


ee 


@ centre, scoring Frank Robinson, 


to the West Coast Tuesday. 
Left-hander Mike Cuellar, one 
of four Baltimore pitchers who 
won at least 20 games this sea- 
son, pitches for the Orioles. 
Despite the key opening-game 
victory, Baltimore manager 
Earl Weaver wouldn't even talk 
about the possibility of the Ori- 


oles. sweeping the AL playotts / 


for the third straight year. 
“We have one and they don’t 
have any,” Weaver said when 
asked if he anticipated a sweep. 
“We'll be at the bell park today 
«to play just that game. So will 


they. ‘It doesn’t help to think | 


about a sweep one way or the. 
her." 


Weaver preferred to talk 
about the clutch. performance of 


his players, who rallied for four . 


runs in the seventh inning off 
Blue, the Athletics sensational 
24-game winner. 

“We battled Blue,” said 
Weaver. “We kept our bat on 


. 


the ball. We conditioned our * 


. aelves to stay.away from the 


pitch up and around the shoul. ” 


ders. We figured, eventually he 
would slow down and the ball 
would stop jumping.” 

The ball stopped jumping for 
Blue in the seventh inning as 
Frank Robinson led off with a 
waik. After Boog Powell struck 
out, Brooks Robinson singled 
Frank to second. Blue appeared 
to have worked out of the jam 
when he got hot-hitting Andy 
Etchebarren to fly out as Frank 
Robinson took third. 

Then came the first of Weav- 
er’s heroes. Light-hitting Mark 
Belanger ripped a single to 


Brooks taking second. 

“That was the key to the in- 
ning.” noted Oakland manager 
Dick Williams, ‘‘That put them 
behind only 3-2." 

Now, Weaver turned to the 
bench that helped him win the 
AL East Division title by 12 
games, sending up pinch hitter 
Curt Motton. 

Motton slashed a 31 pitch 
from Blue into the keft field cor- 
ner for a double, scoring Brooks 
Robinson and tying the score 
33. 7 

At this point the Athletics got 
hot onde <the collar. They 
thought plate umpire Hank Soar 
made some dubious calls and 
that,Motton should have been @ 
strikeout victim. 

“He (Soar) called what he 
saw to the best of his ability, J 
guess," commented Blue after 
the game. “Everybody makes 
mistakes. I'm not saying he 
m: stakes, but the umpir- 
ing wasn't the best.” 

Williams was even more spet- 
cific. . 

“We thought he missed two 

“strikes,” he said, fee our oe 
rogatixe to think that way. 
Se cot calling them. There 
were some debatable pitches.” 

Alter Motton’s game - tying 
hit, pitcher Jim Palmer ran for 
Morton. Paul Blair, 0-for-11 
against Blue this scason, then 
doubled down the left field line, 
scoring Belanger and Palmer 
for a 5-3 lead. 

Dave McNally got the victory 
for Baltimore with two innings 


e@- relief help from Eddie Wait. 


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Trio Tries in Vain 


The Pirates’ Gene Clines (15), Roberto Clemente and Jackie 
Hernandez converge on a blooper off the bat of the Giants’ Dave 
Kingman in short ¢éntre in the first inning of Sunday's National 
League play-off game in San Francisco. Clemente fielded the ball. The 


single filled the bases but the next two men were out, retiring the 


side.. 


WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. (AP) 
— Francois Cevert won his first 
Grand Pix race Sunday, riding 
home far in front of ald pro Jo 
Siffert before more than 100.000 
at Watkins Glen. 

But the 27-year-old son of a 
French jeweler let it be known 
immediately that the United 


Playoff 


Linescores 


SUNDAY 
American League 
Oakland 620 100 000-3 9 0 
Baltimore 000 100 40x—S 71 
Blue (0-1) Fingers (8) and 
Duncan: McNally (1-0) Watt (8) 
ard Etchebarren. 
Baltimore leads best-of-five 
playoff 1-0 
National League 
Pittsburgh 010 210 401—9 156 
San Fran 110 000 002—4 90 
Ellis (10) Miller (6) Giusti 
(9) and Sanguillen: Cumberland 
(01). Barr (4) McMahon 
(5)nCarrithers (7) Bryant (7) 
Hamilton (9) and Dietz. HRs: 
‘Pgh—Robertson 3 (3) Clines 
(1); SF—Mays (1). 
SATURDAY 
National League 
Pittsburgh 002 000 200-4 90 
San Fran O01 040 O0x—5 72 
Blass, (0-1) Moose’ (6) Giusti 
(8) and Sanguillen; Perry (1-0) 
and Dictz. HRs: SF—Fuentes 
(1) McCovey (1). 


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States Grand Prix was about 
the fourth choice on his list of 
places where he wanted to 
break into the winner's circle. 


“I'd. much rather have won 
the French, German or Mona- 
can Grand Prix,” said Cevert. 


“But the U.S. Grand Prix... 
well. it’s the most money paid 
en the Formula | circuit and 
that is good. very good “ 


Cevert, who joined world 
champion Jackie Stewart’s Ty- 
rell,Ford team only last year, 
collected $,000 from the 
$267,000 purse. 


The Frenchman's first For- 
mula I victory actually was an 
easy one. He started the race in 
fifth place ameng 29 starters, 
but by the end’ of half a dozen 
laps around the Glen's new 
3.377-mile circuit. he was push- 
ing Stewart for the lead. 

Stewart. who already had 
clinched his second world driv- 
ing title with six triumphs in 10 
starts. suddenly slowed as the 
leaders made their Mth trip 
around, and Cevert bolted 
ahead—never to be overtaken, 


FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 


: Robertson Fin ds Range 
_ After Six Long 


SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — 
Sunday was the day of the rab- 
bit ball for Pittsburgh Pirates. 


The Pirates tormented San - 


Francisco Giants with 15 hits, 
including Bob Robertson's three 
home runs. to secure a 9-4 vic- 
tory.and deadlock the National 
League playoffs at one game 
apiece. 

The Giants won the playoff 
opener Saturday 5-4. 

The best-of-five series contin- 
ues Tuesday with game No. 3 in 
Pittsburgh. . 

“That guy on first base (Rob- 
ertson) was nasty,”" said Charlie 
Fox. San Francisco manager 
Danny Murtaugh. 

The brawny slugger hadn't 
reached’ the fences in six weeks. 
Alter hitting a double in the sec- 
ond inning, he went to work 
with circuit shots in the fourth, 
seventh and ninth. ~ 

“Six weeks without a homer 
is too lorg for a man with his 
power,” said Murtaugh. 

Robertson, himself, was just 
happy to be playing—let atone 
turn out to be the hitting hero. 
He once sat out a season with a 
kidney ailment. 

While Robertson turned m the 
power. reliever Bob Miller 


+ helped to turn off the Giants 
+ with four ingings of lofty work. 


His performance was aimost 
Jost in Robertson's herculean 
performance. 

The right-hander had sorhe 
tough work to do when starter 
Dock Ellis, the Pirates’ 19 game 
winner, got_im hot water in the 
sixth inning. The first two bat- 
ters reached base, one hi’ by a 


« pitch and the other with a base 


(AP Wirephoto) fy 


it. and Miller came in to pro 


tect a 4-2 lead. 


Miller got pinch-hitter Frank Speier led off with a single and- 
* Duffy to-bunt foul for a third 


Weeks. 


But in the Giant fifth, Chris 


after a sacrifice and an infield 


strike, but slipped deeper ito” out Fuentes lofted a shot.over 


quicksand when he walked Ken 
Henderson to Joad the - bases. 
Then he struck out Tito Fuentes 
and got out of the jam when 
Willie Mays lined to Roberto 
Clemente in right. 

Miller served up three 
straight hits to open the ninth, 
including Willie May's two-run 
homer, before Dave Giusti 
came in to get the side out. 

Along with the home runs by 
Robertson and -Mays, Gene 
Clines also belted one ir: the 
fifth to give the Pirates and 
Giants a total of seven for the 
two-game set at Candlestick 
Park. 

The Pirates’ victory was the 
first ever in a-playoff and only 
third here in the last 14 games. 

In Saturday's game. Fuentes 
and Willie McCovey slugged a 
pair of two-run homers in a sud- 
den explosion of San Francisco 
power that carried the Giants to 
victory. 

Gaylord Perry, who pitched a 
nire-hitter for the Giants. fell 
behind early when a misjudged 
fly ball and an error by Mc- 
Covey helped the Pirates to a 
pair of runs in the third inning. 
San Francisco got one back in 
its half of the inning on a double 
by Ken Henderson but Pirate 
starter Steve Blass was in con- 
tro! until the fifth. 

Blass. who averaged only five 
strikeouts a game durifg the 
regular seascn, struck out nine 
Giants over the first four in 
nings,” setting a NL playoff 
record 


the right-ficld wall to put San 
Francisco ahead, Fuentes, who 
had struck out his first two 
times up, homered only four 
times during the regular season. 

Blass, shaken by the blow, 
walked Mays on four pitches to 
bring up McCovey, 
loaded a shot that tore into the 
upper deck in right field. 


who un-- 


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Toronto 12 Ottawa 3 


Result Sunday ~- 
London 28 St. Catharines 6 
Result Saturday 
Bramalea 11 Ottawa 10 
Games Saturday 
London at Bramalea 
St. Catharines at Michigan 
Ontario Universities AA 
West Division 


Windsor 
Western 


one Pune gan 
cookoow2 Poo 
855 
i 
we 
nv 


i 
Russo 


a 
McMaster 17 Western 16 
Queen’s 22 Carleton 0 
Laurentian 24 York 21 
‘Waterloo 15 Guelph 1 
Ottawa’2] Toronto 0 
Windsor 21 Lutheran 18 
‘Games Friday 
McMaster at Waterloo 
Carleton at Toronto 
Games Saturday 
Windsor at Western 
Ottawa at Lutheran 
Guelph at Laurentian 
Queen's at York 


A Pt 

0 178 122 12 

Lakeshore 3.6 0 189272 6 
Oakville 27 :0111 260 4 
Peterborough 1 8 0 60 267 2 

: West Division 
Burlington 8 1 038 86 16 
Hamilton 7°1 1270 5615 
Brantford 6 3 0 214 119 12 
Sarnia 2 6 1103 292 § 
Results Satarday 


Sarnia }6 Oakville 7 

Brantford 41 Peterborough 3 
Games Friday 

Peterborough at Lakeshore 

Hamilton at Burlington 

Scarborough at Oakville 
National League 

American Conference 
Eastern Division 
WLT FA Pet 


Baltimore 2:1 0 58 17 .687 
Miami 111 49 38 500 
New Eng 120N 68.33 
NY Jets 120 24 49 333 
Buffalo 03.0 SI 97 .000 
Central Division 
Cleveland 20 0 45 131.000 
Pittsburgh 2.1 0 S57 44 .657 
Cincinnati 120 6 55 33 
Houston 021 29 6 0 
Western Division 
Kansas 210 30 40 667 
Oakland 110 4 20 500 
San Diego 120 33 69 39 
Denver 0 21 26 & .000 
National Conference 
Eastern Division 
Washington 3 0 0 74 361.000 
Dallas 2 1 0107 GY .667 
NY Giants 2 1 0 66 9 -.667 
St. Louis 120 S$ 55° .333 
Phila 03 0 24110 000 
Central Division 
Chicago 2:10 40 49 667 
Detroit 2 1 0 88 61 .667 
Green Bay 2 1 0 94 72 667 
Minnesota 2 1 0 52 33 .667 
Western Division 
San Fran 2 1 0 86 43 .667 
Atlanta 111 78 78 .500 
L Angeles 111 57 47.500 
New Orleans 1 1 1 57 71 500 


Results Sunday 
Baltimore 23 New England 3 
New York Jets 14 Miami 10 
San Francisco 31 Philadelphia 3 
Pittsburgh 21 San Diego 17, 
Minnesota 19 Buffalo 0 
Green Bay 20 Cincinnati 17 
Washington 20 Dallas 16 
Houston 13 New Orleans 13 
Detroit 41 Atlanta 38 
New York Giants 21 St. Louis 20 
Kansas City 16 Denver 3 
Las Angeles 17 Chicago 3 

Game Today 
Oakland at Cleveland 





Jet Interceptor 





Defensive back Tim Anderson of Toronto 
Argonuuts shoots high in the air to intercept 
a pass from Paul Brothers Sunday in helping 
his team to a 12-3 victory over Ottawa Rough 
Riders. Brethers got into the game just long 


enough to throw two Interceptions and an 
incompietion in three tries. Rider flanker Billy 
Cooper (23) was the intended receiver on this 
one. Argo defensive back Chip Barratt backs up , 
anderson. (CP Photo) 


_ Western 


ing teams able to score just 
in three games. 


Calgary Stampeders clinched 
a playoff spot by _trouncing 
Hamilton Tiger-Cats 17-1 Sun- 
day in an interlocking game. 


The win over the Eastern 
Conference team left Calgary 
“six points up on Saskatchewan 
-Roughriders, who were 
thumped 35-2 by Winnipeg Bluz 
Bombers Saturday night. 

British Columbia Lions main- 
tained their third-place tie with 

Winnipeg at 11 points each, one 
back of Saskatchewan, by, dis- 
pensing with Montreal Alouettcs 
23-0 in another interlocking 
game. 


In Calgary, the Stampeder de- 
fence gave up a measly 117 
yatds to Hamilton while hauling 
down quarterback Joe Zuger a 
half-dozen times as he searched 


i 
i 


"(in vain for an open receiver. 


The TigerCat ground game 
accounted for an insignificant 52 
yards, including a 27-yard ram- 


Ticdis Trounced 





Argos Only Win One Place 


OTTAWA (CP) — Ottawa 
Rough Riders beat Toronto Ar- 
gonauts everywhere but on the 
scoreboard Sunday, losing 12-3 
before 21,868 disappointed East- 
ern Football Conference fans. 

The trouble was the Riders 
ran all but four of their plays 
from outside the Toronto 40- 
yard line and never appeared to 
threaten at any time during the 
game. 

This left both coaches dis. 
gruntled, the players grim and 
silent and the fans displeased. 

“We were lucky to win, we 
were so inept,” Toronto coach 
Leo Cahill said while coach 
Jack Gotta of Ottawa com- 
plained: 

“Our throwers aren't throw: 
ing and our catchers aren't 
catching.” 

The players dotted their 
dressing room benches like 
mute lumps—hands and heads 
hanging—and the fans showed 
their general feelings by a ser- 
ies of boos for Ottawa quarter- 
back Rick Cassata in the second 
half. 

Cassata had been spared this 


Satchel Paige Reveals Secret: He's 65 


KANSAS CITY (AP) — 
Satchel Paige's secret is out: 
He's 65 years old. 


dinner in his honor that he 
was born July 7, 1906. 





"A DIVISION OF THE COOOTEAR 
4 MOIRA ST. W. 


Satch had the proof—verifi- 
cation of his birth from the 
Mobile County health depart- 
ment. 

The birth record had 
Paige's name: “Leroy Page” 
without the “i.” 

That means Paige. who 


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played baseball 42 years, was 


League 


until last weck when Ottawa put _ 


Gary Wood on waivers and 
brought in former B.C. Lion 
Paul Brothers. 

Cassata threw one intercep- 
tion and Brothers two in the 
brief time he was allowed to 
lead what attack Ottawa had. 

Two Ottawa points c2me on 4 
fine defensive move by lineman 
Wayne Smith when de neiled 
Toronto quarterback Joe Theis- 
mann in his own end zone for a 
safety touch in the first quarter. 
Marcel De Lecuw punted 13 
yards for a single. 

only real* attack the 
A showed ended in a 23- 
yard touchdown pass to Mike 
Eben in the first quarter. Their 
other points came from Ivan 
MacMillan with a convert and a 
Byard field goal and from 
Zenon Andrusyshyn with two 
Punt singles. 

Beyond that it was mostly 
solid. sometimes brilliant. de- 
fensive football. 

The Riders had 18 first downs 
to nine for the Argos and a net 
offence of 271 yards compared 
with 200 for Toronto. 


The one really bright spot for 
Toronto, perhaps of the game, 
was Theismanit who completed 
12 of 18 passes for 118 yards and 


ran 12 times for 62 yards. = 


But here too the Riders were 
on top with Cassata and Broth- 
ers good on !2 of 30 pass at- 
tempts for 161 yards. 

Brothers tricd three passes, 
completed none and had two in- 
tercented. 

On the ground the Riders net- 
ted 119 yards to 110 for the Ar 
fonauts, Dennis Duncen out- 
rushing Theismann with 77 
yards on 18 carries. 

This all led Cahill to observe 
that Theisthann “definitely was 
the difference for us today.” 

“I don’t want to take it away 
from theit“defence. but we were 
lucky to win’ he said. “We had 
absolutely no — consistency— 
that’s all there is about it.” 

The Argonauts, who lead the 
conference with nine wins in 11 
ames, meet the Aloucttes in 
Montreal Oct. 10. The Riders, 
who have only. three wins in 11 
fames are at home to British 
Columbia Oct. 9. 





pennant-winning 


42 years cld when Bill Veeck 

him to the major 
leagues for the first time, to 
pitch for Cleveland Indians in 
1948. 


Paige won six and lost one 


drive. Later, he was in the 
majors with the old St. Lous 
Browris in 1961-53 and with 
Kansas City Athletics in 1965, 
at age 59. Most of his carcer 
was spent in the Negro 


in Cleveland’s 188 American 





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ble by Bod Anderson. 


The - Stampeder offence. in 
front of 23,616 fans, piled up a 
net gain of 429 yards. 


Quarterback Jim Lindsey, fill- 
ing in for injured veteran Jerry 
Keeling, split the gains between 
tushing and passing but went to 
the air for two touchdowns. He 
Fit Rudy Linterman, who suf- 
fered a knee injury later in the 
game, from seven yards out, 
then put the ball into the hands 
of Herm Harrison for the other 
six points. 

Larry Robinson converted 
both and scored on one of three 
field goal attempts. 


Hamilton's point came on a 
41-yard punt by Zuger. 


In Vancouver. the B.C. de- 
fenders kept a close guard on 
Montreal receivers and picked 
off five passes, two of which the 
offence turned into touchdowns. 

Wayne Matherne intercepted 
three times ard one of his 
catches set up rookie quarter- 
back Don Moorhead for a four- 
yard scoring fun in the final 
quarter. * 

Moorhead, who went all the 
way before 25,138 fans, passed 
to Larry Highbaugh and Jim 


Visitors 


Feel Unwelcome 


™ By THE CANADIAN PRESS j 


Young for two of the other six- 
pointers, 
Fullback Jim Evenson, who ¢ 









carried for 103 yards Saturday \<v) 


to become the first Canadian 
Football League player this sea- 
son with more than 1,000 yards 
rushing, bulled his-way for the 
other touchdown. 

Evenson, with 1.011 yards in 
11 games; traded blows with 
former team-mate Bill Whisler 
and both were ejected from the 
Ramee. > 

Ken Phillips completed the 
B.C. scoring with two converts 
and a single while Ted Gereia ~ 
Got another single. 

In Winnipeg, the Blue Bomber 
defence broke a pattern of in- 
consistent play to go with an- 
oher solid offensive showing by 
the club. 

The victory, in front of 20,717, 
fans, snapped a’ five-game Sas- 
katchewan winning streak. 

Winnipeg coach Jim Spavital 
said “the over-all performance 
was the best we've had all sea-@ 
son, But Saskatchewan wasn’ 
playing up to their capabilities, 
mentally.”* 

Quarterback Don Jonas threw 
four touchdown passes, two 
cach to Jim Thorpe and Paul 
Williams, Co 

His 23 passes for a total of 360 





yards set single-season club ‘a 


records. of 207 completions and 
3.437_yards passing. 

Previous marks were held by 
Jack Jacobs who in 1951 threw 
204 times for 3.248 yards. 

Running back Mack Herron 
g% the other Winnipeg touch- 
down on a one-yard plunge. 

Jonas converted all. six-point- 
ers to push his season points-to- 
tal to 100. 

Saskatchewan scored on wide 
field goal attempts, one in each 
of the first two quarters. 


Roughriders’ fullback George 


Reed fumbled three times ard 
lost each as he carried the bulk 
of the Roughriders ground 
game. ¢ 
Winnipeg piled up 23 first 
downs to 13 by Saskatchewan 
and had a net cffence of 478 
yards compared with 204 yards. 








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: 
e”: BI Goldsworthy scored both ee 


Passes 
Test 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


champions lost 53 to the Bruins 
at Boston Saturday and 2-1 to 
the Flyers at Philadelphia Sun. 
day, ending an eight-game un- 
defeated exhibition string. 

In other Saturday contests, 
the Canucks walloped Los Ange- 
Jes Kings 84 at Vancouver, the 
Rangers nipped Detroit 3-1 at 
_New York, Buffalo Sabres and 
“Pi Penguins played to 
22 tle at St. Catharines, Ont., 
Minnesota North Stars and Chi- 
cago Black Hawks also dead- 
locked at 2-2 in Minneapolis and 

Flyers defeated 


the American Hockey League - 


Bears 4-2 at Hershey, Pa. 
In other Sunday games, To- 
ronto blanked the Hawks 2-0 at 


* Chicago, the Red Wings dumped 


California Golden Seals 5-2 at 


Port Huron, Mich., and Buffalo* 


edged the AHL's Swords 54 at 
Cincinnati. \ 

At St. Louis Saturday, Garry 
Unger, one of Detroit's players 
traded away after Abel was re- 
placed by Ned Harkness, scored 
a third-period power-play goal 
that broke a 1-1 tie. 

Gary Sabourin and Frank St. 
Marseille got the other St. Louis 
goals while Darryl Sittler 
scored for Toronto, 

John McKenzie, with three 
goals, led the Bruins Saturday 
as they posted their first win 
against the Canadiens in pre- 
season play this year. Cana- 
diens won two of the previous 
outings and tied the third. 

Reg Leach and Garry Peters 
got Boston's other goals while 
Jacques Lemaire, Claude La- 
rose and rookie Guy Lefleur re- 
plied for Montreal. 

Dale Tallon scored two goals 
for Vancouver and assisted on 
three others as the Canucks 
walked over the Kings, Mike 
Corrigan, Danny Johnson, Bob 
Schmaut, Wayne Maki, Ted 
Taylor and Dennis Kearms got 
the others. 

Pete Stemkowski, Bobby 
Rousseau and Ab DeMarco 
scored in successive periods at 
Detroit while Mickey Redmond 
tallied thé lone Detroit goal. 

Dick Duff “scored with less 
than three minutes left to earn 
Buffalo the tie in St. Catharines. 
Ed Shack notched the other 
Sabre goal. Ken Schinkel and 
rae Pronovast “answered for 


North Star goals Saturday, in- 

cluding the tying marker. Den- 

nisi hanya and Stan Mikita got 
riod goals for Chicago. 

Serge Bernier, Pierre Plant 

and Bob Clark exploded with 

third-period goals at Hershey 


. Saturday as the Flyers snapped 


e@ 
















tie. 

Morrison got the other 
Philadelphia goal and Gil Gil- 
bert scored twice for the Bears. 

In Philadelphia” Sunday, 
Clarke scored the winner for the 
Flyers when he beat Montreal 
goaltender Ken Dryden on a’ 
break away early in the third 
period. Lemaire’s goal stood up 
for two periods for Montreal 
until Bill Lesuk’s power-play 
goal with the final period just 23 
seconds old. 

Toronto goaltender Bernie 
Parent kicked out 28 shots and 
Denis Dupere and Paul Hender- 
son scored as the Leafs blanked 
the Hawks at Chicago. 

Goals in the final period at 
Port Huron by Alex Delvecchio, 
Marcel Dionne, Brian Conacher, 
Red Berenson and Redmond 
lifted the Red Wings to victory 
Sunday. Tom Williams and 
Gary Croteau put the Seals 
ahead 2-0 in the first period. 

Dick Duff was the hero for 
Buffalo again Sunday when he 
tied the score Jate in the final 
period at Cincinnati, 


‘al, 













In Trouble with the Law 


Hefty Kingston Aces’ newcomer John Law 


attempts to administer 


Excedrin headache number 4 to Belle ville’s Ralph Plane after the Quinte 
The defending Stanley Cup. captain sent Law’s helmet flying ina goalmouth scramble during Saturday 


night’s 4-2 Senior A exhibition win by Kingston. 


Linesmen broke up the 


minor skirmish before any punches could be landed. It was the first test 


- 


Pvunder game conditions for the Belleville seniors this season. 


Harness Swan Songs Happy. 


Drivers Joe Hogan and vester to a victory In the 
Jerry Walsh made their 1971 first race and added Eyre 
win with Simm Sam in t 
Quite” Raceway swan 'S00gs ind, while Walsh's wins 
happy ones as each reined @ came with Victor Hal Direct 
pair of winners in the final jin the second race and Lady 
card of the season. i Violet Direct in the seventh. 
Hogan guided Brent Har- Two pacers set lifetime 
* 


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BELLEVILLE HARNESS RACING RACE NO. 7 
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ar Ben. A. Vance 2.30, 2.10. Chico Mat. J. 


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Victor Hal" Directs “S. Wateh S00, Ree ee ere ae ane eae 


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Alliscn Scott, B. Wemp 850, 340, 
20. 


RACK NO. 4 
Quinelia No's, 2-3 paid 36.60 
os Sam, J. togen’ 630, 3.00. 


Hoya X Abbey, J, Walsh 280, 2.40. 
L Zebedee 270. 


Resir 

Time arty Alto - Old John, 
Smorey Valley, Dayton Freight, 
Magic Joan. 


Peter Magic. H. Wemp 270, 230. 
Lindy Lou. D. Irwin 270. 

Time 211.1. Ale> - K B Dillon, 
Bud Gist, Swak, 


Zune Indian, L. Wemp 380, 2.90, 


Brown Kid. R. Brown 3.10. 2.70. 
Dizzy Helen. BE. Pennell 250. 
Time 2182 Albeo - Olea Girt, 
Top Return, Wades Rocky. 
RACE NO, € 
Shelly Dawn, G, Irwin 640, 450, 


3.40. 
M XK King. 3. puihetand er 29. 
Bnan Wann, J. Cochr: 
Time 2113. Also « Delton. 7 True 
irc, Doe Herbert. 


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the price is right! 44.77 


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On Pages 14, 16 




























marks with Shelly Dawn tur- 
ing in a 2:11.3 in the sixth 
race and Bay State Millie a 
2:13 in the eighth. 


A crowd of 893 spectators chance. We'll just try and 


wagered a total amount of 
$24,384. 





CANADIAN /Z 





Older Faces Prominent 
In New-look Quintes’ Loss 


KINGSTON — The 500 or so 


» hockey fans scattered through- 


out Kingston's Memorial Cen- 


ected by a new Quinte coach. 
However, it was the old faces 
playing the most prominent 
roles in the same old bitter 
Kingston - Belleville rivalry,as 
the Aces skated off with a 
4-2 exhibition victory. 
Kingston's familiar forward 
combination of John Mercer, 
“Charlie Convery and Rod Gra- 
hant were chief architects of 


the Aces’ victory, counting. 


three of the four tallics in- 
crore 8) Deir by eeroer 
the final frame to ensure the 


goal-scoring ability seemed to 
ensure his grip as Least Popu- 
lar Player in the Limestone 
City. 

The game was a chippy af- 
fair, certainly not unusual for 
a Belleville - Kingston encoun- 
ter, with the Quintes drawing 
12 of the game's 20 penalties. 

Belleville coach Gene Poir- 
fer, like his Kingston counter- 
part Tom Thuriby, used a 
number of line and defensive 
combinations and didn't ap- 
pear particularly ups about 
dropping the exhibition deci- 
sion. “I thought we played 
pretty well for our first 
game," noted the Belleville 
coach. “There were some guys 
who didn't belong out there. 
but the only way to find out 
is to give everybody a 


hit. on the right combina- 
tion.” 


Vi 


Except for two unusual 
Kingston goals the score could 
have. been deadlocked at 2-2. 
Meehan Bonnar had given the 
visitors a , 1-0 “first - period 
lead, snapping a 10-footer past, 
Kingston goalie Bill Minnes. 
Some sharp goaltending by 
Steve Rexé and inaccurate 
shooting by Aces’ forwards 
kept Kingston off the s¢ore- 
sheet until Convery’s low shot 
from the right wing boards 
deflected off a skate and past 
the Belleville goalie. _ 

The eventual winning mark- 
er by Mercer in the third 
period also bounced off a 
skate as Ren Jury attempted 
to cover the short side of the 
net. - 

Plane pulled Belleville to 
within one goal at the 7:09 
mark of the third period, rap- 
ping a rebound past Jim Park 
to make it a 3-2 contest, but 
Mercer added a power play 


Broncos Lose 


TRENTON — The defence 
kicked up its heels, but the 
offence was a dead horse as 
Trenton Broncos dropped a 
140 decision-to RCMP in a 
National Defence Football Lea- 
gue contest ‘Sunday. 

The loss leaves CFB Tren- 
ton with a record of 2-3-1 for 
third spot in the fourteam 
loop, Despite a strong effort 
by the Bronco defence, Tren- 
ton was unable to handle the 
Mounties asa sputtering of- 
fence thwarted their scoring 
a(fempts. 


BIG ISLAND, DEMORESTVILLE 


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ma < 


THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER: 4, 1971 J} 























































goal with Jess than two min- 
utes remaining iff the game 
to ensure the Kingston win. - 

Poirier was pleased with 
the work of goalies Steve Rexe 
and Rop Jury,;“whe tended for 
30-minutes each, with each al- 
lowing two Kingston goals. 

Defensively he singled out 
“newcomers Dan Creighton 
and- Pete Stoutenburg along 
with veterans Greg Marchen 
and Lionel Botly as having 
played well, Among the most 
effective forwards were hust- 
ling centre Paul Perras and 
veteran Dave Jones, 


Jones, . McConnell, 
Broadfeot. Perras, Chittick, John- 
ston. Plane, Self, Bonnar, 
eon sc mant - Minnes, Park:; 
Lollar, Heid, 
Trarity. ord Rant 1 Law; aa 
waras - Con: Grahai 
Coilins, Kennedy, Culligan, Carty, 
Driscoll, Truesdale, Darling, Lid 
deil, Benhem. 


VIRST FERIOD 


REGULAR AND KINGS 


thold) 10.00: Convery (hold) 11, Ss: 
Ford (rough) 12.27; Jones (rough) 
12.27; Creighton thigh stick) 13.37; 

Johnston trough) 29.13. ‘ 

SKCOND rexiop™ 
Kingston + Convery, (Reid, 
Giatam) 3.43, 

3 Ciagstoa = Fall (Carty, Dare 
ling) €.02, 

Penalties: » Collins (slash) 25m: 
Bonrar thigh atick) 250; lane 
feiipr 345; reken ftrip) 8.55; 
Creighton thigh stick) 1040; Gre 
ham thigh stick) 10.40; Convery 
thigh stick) 12.28. 

THIRD PERIOD 

4. Kingston + Mercer 





funassist- 


edi C1 

S. Belleville - Plane (Stouten- 

bore, eM ngtiee 7.08. 

ingston + Mercer (Convery, 

Gratemed 18.10. 
nalties - Hroadfoot (fight 

snes Convery ‘fight) 10.00: Mare 

chen ‘elip! 1637: Carty trough) 

19.13" Bonnar ‘rough 19.12 





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Four Attenti 


OTTAWA (CP) — All levels of 
government should co-operate 
to finance a string of national 
bureaus to tell Canadians ‘of 
their rights in government pro- 
grams, says the Science Council 
of Canada. : 

The information network 
could act as an advocate to en- 
sure the citizen gets his rights. 
At the same time, it could feed 
back to the governments ingica- 
tions of how adequate are their 
programs. 


on Areas 


Breakdown in 


-* 
\ 


i]2 THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, i971 





council report to the federal 
government as one way to beat 
citizen alienation, scen. as a 
growing threat to democratic 
participation in decisions. 
Although the network sounds 
like an expansion of the Infor- 
mation Canada. program. the 
council makes plain its model is 
the British Citizens’ Advice Bur 
eaux. 
» Breakdown in citizen-govern- 
ment .communication is one of 
four crucial areas identified as 
needing immediate attention in 


building future cities, 

The proposals stem from an 
urban development study by a 
committce headed by Dr. Pierre 
Dansereau, University of Mont- 
real urban expert and the coun- 
cil’s only social scientist, 

Urban transport. housing and 
waste and recycling were three 


dustry as_a means to speed up 
or slow down the economy.) 

Removal of this and other im- 
pediments would enable the in- 
dustry to get on with providing 
more homes and experimenting 
with new techniques of con- 
struction and new kinds of 
dwellings, 


ment. 
Urban transport should be im- 
proved before the automobile 


demonstration projects. 
One such could be computer- 








Citizen-Government Liason Said Major Crisis 


on.its commuter trains which 
{eed into and out of Toronto 
from Pickering to the east and 
Hamilton to the west, 

Cities lack the funds*to find 
solutions ‘to* urban transporta- 
tion problems, FO™$100 million, 


mental 


25,000 tons of solid waste aday 
and industry and 


commercial 
establishments five to 10 times 


that much. Equal amounts of 
wet sewage sludge are pro- 
duced, 






*& 


Delegates Enthusiastic. |: 


About Hellyer’s System 


TORONTO (CP) — Members 
of the fledging Action Canada 
movement are heading back 
homie today, apparently all 
keyed up to work for the new 
Canadian society which their 
leader, Paul Hellyer, outlined in 
ringing tones Sunday night. 

But whether Action Canada 
will become the hopedtor 
bridge to unite some existing 
political forces in Canada re- 
mains to be seen. While Con- 
servatives and Social. Credit 
representatives attended parts 
of th three-day Action Canada 
convention, there was no indica- 
tion they would work toward 

~ immediate unity. 

There was cbvious ¢n{fusi- 
asm Sunday night as nearfy 300 
delegates heard Mr, Hellyer de- 
scribe a proposed nev™economic 
system, with full employment, 
stable prices and without 


* strikes, Old political divisions. 


in terms of “right” and “left” 
- would be redundant. 


Mr. Hellyer described himself 


Labor 
Split 
Over 
Market 


BRIGHTON, England (AP) — 
The Opposition. Labor party be- 
gins today its 70th annual con- 
vention, torn and troubled by 

disputes oyer Britain's pro- 
jected entry into the European 
Common Market . 

The official Jeadership under 
former prime minister Harold 
Wilson is seeking conference cr- 
dorsement of its decision to op- 

* pose British entry on grounds 
that Prime Minister Edward 
Heath's Conservative govern- 
ment has negotiated a bad bar- 
gain. 

Labor leaders argue that join- 
ing Europe will undermine Brit- 
ish living standards. They want 
the party's six million members 
to back a demand for submit- 
ting the issue to the test of a 
general election. 


But the party's deputy leader. 
Roy Jenkins, with a group of 
former cabinet ministers, has 
mounted a direct challenge to 
this policy. \ 

Jenkins argued at a conven- 
tion-eve rally Sunday night that 
British hopes of an elfective 
world role rest on joining an 
enlarged Common Market. He} 
called for»a Labor party alli- 
ance withssocialist parties on 
the continent to give West Eu | 
rope a left-wing leadership. 

The convention seems certain 


FS support Wilson and those op- 


posing market entry. But up to 
40 of Labor's 289 members cf 
Parliament are expected to 
” rebel against the party and vote 
to join the market. Heath's Cos- 
servative party, with 328 seats, 


* SP also is divided over joining Eu. 


rope, but the government is ex- 
pected to win by a margin of 
from 20 ta 40 when the Common 
Market vote is taken Oct. 28, 


Under British party practice, 
an MP risks his political Tuture 
if he votes against his own col- 
leagues on a vital issue: Jenkins 
nevertheless has vowed to do 
just that, even though it could 

_cost him his post as deputy 
leader, 


Besides the divisions within 
the leadership, Laborites 
seemed confused over what to 
offer the British people as an 
alternative to the Common Mar- 
ket—or whether there is any al- 
ternative. 


Some delegates are urging the 
party to commit itself to the aid 
of a Socialist United States of 
Europe," meaning a” sort of 
common market embracing 
East and West Europe. Others 
are sgying the party should face 
the fact thet Heath's terms for 
entry are not bad after all, 


as being ‘very pleased” with 
this founding convention. It had. 
he said, exceeded expectations, 

Action Canada was born last 
May 25 after Mr, Hellyer, a 
one-time Liberal Jeadership can- 
didate and a long-time cabinet 
minister, quit the party to form 
the movement of “ordinary Ca- 
nadians.”” 

This first convention was 
called for a broad discussion on 
general policies, for the ourpose 
of approving the “economic 
package” of policics outlined by 
Mr. Hellyer and for attracting 
interest by existing parties. 

The ‘package’ was approved 
unanimously by 210 voting dele- 
gates attending the final ple- 
nary session. Another 846 mem- 
bers telephoned their approval 
through the local offices of .a 
national trust company. Oply 
five phoned in disapprovals 

There were no disapprovals 
for Mr. Hellyer’s leadership. 


THE BETTER HALF 





"We'll fight this malady to your lost 
penny, Parker.” 


vad 


v/ 














Chrysler 


At right 


“Torsion-Quict Ride” and 


Unibody Construction 


smooth, safe, and quict. 


The strength surrounds you. 


Dimensions Four-Door 






Wheelbase 


Engine application by model 


P Special 

‘clara Spe 

Polara Custom 5 
Monaco and Monaco Brougham — 


Electronic Ignition System 


- SHIH respect et ; y ay r deep dish or styled road wheels 
An optional electronic ignition systemis (j cigar lighter, instrument pancl [ ation Wagons) —_([] air conditioning—front—dual P. h i 
: . eae ~ 5 a tional » 
available on V8 engines. System climi- (7) concealed headlamps—Monacos (J trim style combination—bench— ~ + ¢ (sation wagons) ol automatic speed cand pecen nia pees A > 
nates need for-breaker poifits and con- 7} gasoline vapors-evaporative control cloth and vinyl and all vinyl- control [) brakes—power disc front, a 
denser. Less to replace atfune up time. system with charcoal canister {J Unibody construction [_} ventless. drum rear (7) bumper guards—front 


Spark plugs last } 
exhaust emissions, 


Count on a full-size car with a 122” wheelbase. Count on ‘Torsion-Quict’ ride 
for smooth quiet driving pleasure. Count on a classically re-sculptured exterior 
styling and interior elegance, both brand new for ’72 

Count on Dodge Monaco and Polara for performance with optional 
engines all the way up to the 440 c.i.d. See Dodge Monaco and Polara at 


Unibody construction combines body 
and frame in a single, all-welded unit. 


Sedan & Hardtop 


ep! Helps reduce 


other areas in which the council Government also should as- controlled small buses to- give toward. experimental» programs Yet 42 per cent of the popula 
suggested. a varicty of urgent sume ownership over substan- home service .to passengers and demonstration projects. tion is not even served by pri- ? 
_steps. tial amounts of city-centre Jand within a community or to rapids Highest possible: priority mary treatment facitities. ‘ 
On housing, the council said and of land where the city will — _ transit stations. should be given to studying Again financing corrective i 
governments should stop {id grow. This would end harmful Ontario's GO Transit last waste recycling and disposal, ei- steps was beyond the ability of | 
ling with the construction in- land speculation and smooth spring started such a dial-a-bus ther by government environ- municipalities, J 





¢ 


- Forget the car once in a while. 













The 210 delegates at the conven- 
tion were supported by 82 
members at heme, ~ 

And George Skelton, a Cal- 
gary advertising executive, eas- 
ily wen the contest for deputy 
leader with 131 convention votes 
and 593'by telephone. Runner-up 
Marvin Wallace of London, 
Ont.. polled 69 at the convention 
and 231 by telephone. 

Although ro radical resolu- 
tions were adopted. there were 
many heated discussions during 
the three days as various philo- 
sophical viewpoints clashed. 
The microphones s¢emed to be 
dominated by vocal reactionary 
voices which, convention offi- 
cials said, overshadowed the 
moderate majority in attend 
ance. 


‘Arrive happier, 
take the train. =e | 


CN ‘Traveliving’ comfort. 
Relax. 

* Choice of meats, 

variety of accommodations 
: On most trains. 
CN’s Red, White & Biue 
fare pconomy. Family, Youth 
and Group discounts. 

And new reduced rates 

for travellers 65 or over. 
Think about it. Now, 

Not in your next traffic jam. 





Generally. delegates 
in *defercirg 


free-enterprise system. 


were 
the 
Many 






Sample CN fares and services 


Montreal-To 


caild for an end to social wel 
fare as it exists. 


By Bob Barnes 





DAVISON AND DAVISON 


188 FRONT ST. “CANADIAN: NATIONAL AUTHORIZED AGENTS” 


DIAL 962-3404 





“YOUR CANADIAN NATIONAL CITY TICKET OFFICE” 


ROLUF’S TRAVEL CENTRE | 


227 FRONT ST. “CERTIFIED TRAVEL CONSULTANTS” ~ DIAL 962-9201 











SIVES | 


on. * 


i 





coun 


Standard Safety Features 
(C) backup lamps with increased 
,candlepower [(} brakes, self-adjusting 
_ Cl energy-absorbing front seat backs 
{_} fuel tage impact protection 
hazard ing system—includes 
stop lamp override (J head restraints, 
front () hood release, inside, increases 
engine security (J instrument panel 
padded with variable intensity 
instruments and recessed controls 
(_] key-left-in ignition warging buzzer 
(_} locking steering wheel (F) safety-rim 
wheels (7) seat belts—three-point lap 
Nulder belt system [1] seat belts, lap, 
Sdution—two, outboard front 
front centre front seat (cars 
3 for threc)—three, rear 
ion wagon) 


19 Modcls from Monaco 
Brougham to Polara Special. 


ASEY LE EDS 


































Pere eres 


Expo ’72 at your Dodge dealers now. 


: Monaco Brougham 4-dr. Hardtop. 











‘Two-Door 
Hardtop 






Bt (wagons, 
p PEM aKt with - 
preo tape, AM/FM multiplex 
int/ FM multiplex with cassette 
Metered tape {7} power scats, windows, 
door locks and inside deck lid release 
- stckring wheel—tilt column with 
tim blowhorn (7 vinyl roof (except 
station wagons, std. on Monaco 
Brougham) (j wheel covers—deluxe 





230 @ 4400 
regular 








190 & 4400 
regular regular 





Op. 
Opt. 
Opt. 
Opt. 





Standard Equipment Optional Equipment 


() heater/defroster (1) horns, dual 
(j hub caps (1] litter container 
C power tailgate window lift (station 


side window glass (j windshield wipers - and rear [) clock electric (J defogger— 
—concealed—2-speed electric rear window (n.a. wagons) [_] glass 
O) windshield washer, electric _ tnted—windshield or all windows 


Dodae ets ae 

























fepeaes eo \ _ \ THE ENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 ]3 


eS ¥ 3 = * 








For Fast Action! Call 962-9171 : 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


(WISHING... 


your ear, Rent an apartment, Find a home. in. 
the country, Hire a housekeeper, etc. — ITS EASY WHEN YOU — 











REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE| REAL ESTATS FOR SALE 





HELP WANTED 










































; GENERAL ACCOUNTING 
~~ PHIL Cun 
== Z Preferably experienced in gen- 
BENNETT T iis eet ect 
180 N. FRONT ST. Joursal’ mettiesy accouds saat 
. sis, moathly budget comparison 
res of Ta rovécty i priced at $15.0 ould | CONSTRUCTION LimrTED BELLEVILLE__, REAL’ ESTATE =. |retorts "ands book recencatesll 
make remore ee HOUSE FOR RENT 40 Bridge St. E. — Belleville, Ont. tions. 
Don MacDermaid 968-4571. DIAL 968-6411 962-3418 Realtor Good opportunity hae 









_. REALTOR 
THE OLDEST NAME IN REAL ESTATE 
IN BELLEVILLE 


— Close to schools, | until we build you a new beme 

. Ree rien aplicierel & of your choice. Possession ,of 

— living room with broadioom, dining area, custom finished rec |D¢w home can 
Peg ee electric heating. Nicely landscaped lot. Call Joe Lee . 


UNDER $20,000.00 spheres to all amenities, this well-kept home 


year RIA. oc C.G.A. 
Telephone for appointment 
MR. ZIEMAN 
Ideal Venders Division Of 
Eddy Match Co. Lid. 
Deseronto, Ont. — 396-2316 

2 520-51 


36 BRIDGE ST. E. 


PICTON — OR, LARGE 
SPACIOUS HOME 


111 Dundas St. Zast 
TRENTON ° 






















side. We handle all mortgage 
arrangements. Plans available 
to suit all tastes. 


tomorrow. Let us present your olfer. Call Cee Ruttan 968-4571. NOW UNDPR WAY! =f ¥ 
THEY RE GOING — A quick transfer leaves this 3-bedroom home ; F y . 
for a new owner. Spacious living. enhanced by a fireplace, loads | Thomelitfe Sea: . : 2 WE os oh ped grounds. For DRY WALL 
of popes full basement and 2-car garage. Call Jim Bailey : BOARDMEN 
5 the basis of wealth. On 
“| Bead Taylor 962 9418 oc 962 S817 3 AND TAPERS 
you area. Ea 


BEAUTIFUL BAY SHORE — Complete. swell constructed, F 
spacious cottage or hame. Truly an ideal package, price reduced 3 : é oe 

—., ¢ - ¥ To Work In Lindsay 
details call George Crawford 968°4571. STILL UNDER $2,000. : Loni 9 ™ phooe Ablarde And Peterborough 
A building costs the value in our 




























to $19,900.00 and purchaser cornple‘e to ‘his own liking. Vendor 

will carry mortgage with as Jow as $3,000.00 down. For more 

TAKE TIME — To drive out and inspect this nicely treed lot on DOWN phased : 

the sth of Thurlow. 100° x 262°. Asking $7,500.00, Call Edythe | pespite the ever increesing| fame : : ic Experienced Only 






























houses qualify them for dining - room, living 
968-4571 resulting $4,000. down will buy this lovely three-bedroom brick bungalow. : mm 25" x Call Collect 698-2891 
! Ovner will hold mortgage for the balance. Convenient country with 08-er 
location. Low taxes. Large lot—100 x 300. Call fur full particulars. 
7 EVENINGS CALL = 
Bowes slacks [r0. sr ____| TEACHERS 
CUSTOM. BUILT 
REALTOR 3 BEDROOM cLaY Brick, ACCOUNTING 


175 North Front Street — Open Until 9 p.m. 

























Owner Moving PERSONNEL OFFICE 


Reply To Box A-50 LOYALIST COLLEGE 
The Intelligencer BOX 4200 


— BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO 
coe 


Low taxes. Asking $20,300 — 
terms. 


3 paved drive. 
TRIPLEX. Almost new brick mang West Park 

Village. Electrically,heated. Two three-bedroom apart- 

ments and one on room, fully leased. Less than 
$7,500, downpayment. to two mortgages and still see 
some return on your investment! 











china cabinet. There are 3 large CONSTRUCTION LimiTeo 

















landscaped. Fenced yard,|sume to — 
koa TEO es TOR 





























‘These miles eouth of Beilevitie on Sing a chemical 


way. Deep soil aed/ diploma or having senstetied 
Quality 


TWO 

bedrooms and Sales Office — 968-5595 — BUILDING LOTS z 
bathrooms, one ensuite. At low sae porous YOU CAN'T TELL! Until you inspect this home, what one munpnen root rrowracr| LAB TECHNICIAN 
er ae is La a ree Lakelend Ges — Nature's Wondertuat |@ gem it really is. Sunny kitchen with separate break- 962-3 A| 8 per "Facina souTH | Aggressive individual 
tacodsy room.) Hot water heat- Avetiedle In Our Momes fast room. Main floor family room where the children 


ing. : 


osw}can play safely. Three bedrooms. Beautiful garden. 


Near hospital. Asking only $19,000. 












Diemty of Ls 
we experience required for 
Apply RAY ALYEA 

Assurance Labpratory in local | 

ON PROPERTY — 4.3.31! f00d industry. Ability to com: 

r municate and relate effectively 

: with others a definite asset. 

HELP WANTED Good starting salary with ex- 
cellent fringe benefits. 


CENTRAL EAST HILL 


On a beantiful deep treed kt 
we have s three bedroomed 
home in immaculate condition. 
Fireplace in the living room. 
Separate dining room, 13° 3" x 
12° and a kitchen full of cup- 
boards. There is a full basement 
new furnace and new roof, call 
for an appointment to see this 
litle gem. 





3 ESCENT 
ae gl . WEST HILL — If space is what you want, this is it! 


O.J. 
Lovely 3 bedroom bungalow Loree Older brick home in A-1 condition. New furnace, new 
with attached garage. - room. Just needs a large family. Only $16,900. 


TAXI! TAXI! Well established taxi business. Terrific 
volume of business with high net income. Up to date 
cabs and op eee Surprisingly low downpayment 
required. Cal] Chas. Cooke. 


For further details on these and other listings contact: 
JANET DIGNAM 962-9154. 


Open Evenings “218 pont PARROTT DRIVE 





















Apply: BOX Ast 
boards and cushioa vinyl floor. 4 ACRES He INTELLIGENCER 
Moira River frontage — pane 
North of Corbyville. — 


$12,500.00. 





ACT FAST ! 


Are you looking for a solid fu- 
ture? Are you a seif-starter, 
aod hard work- 
Then join the Dominion 




















I'M EARNING MONEY FOR 
MY CHILDREN’S COLLEGE 
EDUCATION, and 


I must say I love getting out and 














FOR RENT 


lovember 15th, 1971 to May 
y “turn. 






600 FOOT FRONTAGE 
ON DOUBLE HWY. 


East of Belleville — form- 
erly Hall's Canteen — 2 
bedroom home 3-pc. bath. 
double garage. Now only 
$21,000.00. . 









Nora Kincaid .......... 968-9269 | Ted Saunders ........- 
Kay Tummon .. «-. 968-4090) Les Lennox ........... 
Phil Ray... «+. 96847891 Ed Hagerman ......... 
7 N 
: I) eet ae lus Yo', acho pce: |e feces rene 
A.E.LEPAGE ll] (SESE ane cate comptes tne [00-, mectered. oe enue 
i. LE —— ished laundry” room, rec irae experience. Apply in 
AVONDALE ROAD room and play area, nicely | ™ m 4 re 
a ii : 





























“Growth Through Service Since 1913” 


[DAILY CROSSWORD... +. rower] 


ACROSS 49 Sault — Marie Saturday’s Puzzle Solved: 
canals 
1 Reporter's $0 Small child 
question = $1 City in 
4 Mitchell— Nevada 
Canadian 52 items of 
Statesman furniture 
9 de bananes $4 The “E” of 
14 Operated » “Q.€.0." 
15 Lubricator 58 River barrier 
1b Outcast 60 Capture 
17 Beginning 61 Being utilized: 
19 Due 2 words 
20 Burns bitter 62 Alla -—-: 






3 turn extra hours into extra cash, 

Cathedral ceilings, nelled , . prizes, 
walls, stone fireplace ood full }00 the job training, with group tiv atti cepeieae 
length windows overlooking | insurance benefits and | needed. Call: 908-3000 oF write: 
beautiful and. full Jeogth win-|Act now and find out how you| Mra M. Stary, 378 King St W. 
ean join the Dominion Automo-| Kingstoa, Ont ; 
bile Association team. For a St-Im 

ential interview wrile to- 
level finished with family room,|day. Mr. A. H. Kirkey, Domin- REAL ESTATE 
study or 4th bedroom and pow-!jon Automobile Association. 201 
der room. This is a winner and} King 
Priced at under $30,000. 


WEST HILL — VACANT 


H 4 bedroom home -—— full 
Dot inspect this modern 3 bed-/basement. Call now. We 


| have the key. 






























962-5326 


314 FRONT STREET 
OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 P.M 


Ey © 





¥ te 
. Bright hen. 144 BURNHAM ST. 


rec 5 
Just $24,500, Cail 962-7070. 2 bedroom home — brick 
— which needs repairs. 
Roger But golng for only $9,500. 
with $1,600.00 down. 





4 BEDROOMS, 


2 STOREY 





54-20-04¢-18-N1-16-28 





HUSBAND AND WIFE __ 





















































In Madoc, % acre MONEY MAKER 21 Caused to Musical required For 
em conser dicecti 
" . x ection . 
Duplex — Bleecker Ave.| 22 Sen of Jacob 64 Science of 8 Verb form 37 Butler separa er iit Cn 
— s Call us for all the particu-| 23 Row of seats sound 9 impede the substitute: 
clean lars. 24 Certain bills: 66 Made public mation of inf@emal 900. 
=o Informal 67 Very much 10 Something 40 Ex with 
100 acre farm, near Pictoa. 3 + 231 Front Street. 26 River of to the point given for violénce 968-5757 
bdrm. modern home, family 962- 4528 Germany 68 Negative word = worthy 42 Dormant 
Toom and fireplace. 29 Miscellaneous 69 Démi — behavior 45 Mars JE Some Travel Involved 
"Til 9 p.m. collection Smal! cup 11 Outer layer of 48 Baker's units 
with | Open, Wvenings:°Tl 9 p 31 Sooner than —-70 Organic the skin 53 Conclude : ‘. woe Mature and 
Call: 32 Mild oath compound , 12 Males prematurely xperienced 
HAROLD WILKINSON | 33 Earliee than 71 Filthy place 13 Unit of energy 55 Wrecks CNINNE 
968-5234 36 Farm building 18 Roving 56 Scarf bape rai bod ea Resume To | 
38 Actress DOWN 24 Considerably 57 Easily FRETERRO. 01 P.O. BOX 188 BELLEVILLE 
— Fatow fewer: 2 words irritated LTD. — - Se ESOS A ORM, 
39 Everything 1 Part of the S — 59 inhabitant EXE RRIENCED } choans't sasionnsy alae 
371 FRONT ST. Counted: arm oss the of Media ALTO | 
op HEIST or 962-7444 2 words ~ 2Asian capital order from 61 Tributary of ne Fernie ore | 
Direct Toronto ,Line 920-2113 Al Narratiog Alp response Quebec the Eide ‘ euteul : commlaslonss besa aerecaes 
‘ 43 Contend _Aoa signal: 28 Male animals 62 Basedatter’s $34,600. 
4@ Require ~~ 2 words 30 Gas necessity tes, 119 Yorkvime Are. Toronto 
4b Stoos 4 Bribes 33 Taste = 63 Inlet Fe eR TT - 


47 Somewhat 5 Suite 34 Martini 
tound in shape 





a esscre AN ESTABLISHED DEPARTMENT STORE IN. THE CITY OF, | 
town Belleville. It has a en ex 
tal” monthly income. ot” 0 THUNDER BAY NEEDS A 
FARM DAY AT THE eee Sa eee eee SALES PERSON 
ACTION DESK bal St SS call — LARRY LAMBLE, c/o 
tos VICTORIA & GREY 


TRUST 
963-6417 









FOR ITS MEN’S WEAR DEPARTMENT | 
MUST HAVE NEAT APPEARANCE, GRADE 12, EXPERIENCE | 
IN RETAIL CLOTHING SALES 
* FIVE DAY 3732 HOUR WEEX ‘ 
* TOP EARNINGS FOR EXPERIENCED PERSON * 
*PENDLY HELPFUL CO-WORKERS 
* FRINGE BENEFITS INCUUDE: 
3 . Life-insurance 
. Sick-pay benciits (after 1 year) 
. Company pension 
. Excellent discount on purchases 


BIT OF THE COUNTRY 


You. must see this lovely old 
brick home and here are 7 bed- 
rooms, 4-pc. bath and large liv- 
ing room, and superb kitchen 
dining room. Aluminum storms 
end screens. Large basement 
with coe oil parnaces good wat- 
et supply. ig garage with 
stable at the back. Low taxes 
and can be purchased for only 
$22,500.00. 







“Cee” Garrett — 962-8041 


a SARRY-FORCHUKE 


REAL ESTATE LTD. 
Realtor 


Belleville 279 North Froat, St. 
968-6433 


Si6-t¢ 


. 


















3 BEDROOM 
RAND NEW BUNGALOW 


‘|Dining room, Uving room, kit- 
nes basement, (stone 


‘Contact: J. GALLOS 
395-3391 
Or Whitehead’s Restaurant 
4 




















»® 
~ 








at 











ip 


Treoton 82 Division Street 4 < 01-31 
392-9228 


NORTH EAST 


























a ae 
















Lot and home mec renovating, TRENTON — Spach i 9 Statutory Bolidays 
Bae re . Ry Duplex — East Side OF HOUSE . Two or three weeks paid vacation 
Cc : KESSLER aah a 0 TO RENT OR . Opportunity to purchase equity 
962- 8 69 5 Owner Will Hold Mortgage ee FOR SALE GONTACE. < ! 





968-5654 : J ; 
| Dial 962-0796 | YOUR LOCAL CANADA MANPOWER CENTRE 


ae 





| PHONE’ 968-6795 








“HELP WANTED » 








: 
eee 


Ht 





: 


| 





i 


ge 




















WOMAN, experienced pric- 
eiectrical ‘o nemams 


Wine asd oo ght bowerer 
Wiwia and do light 





stt | 


| THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, asm 





FOR RENT 


STORE FOR RENT. 


@ FRONT STREET, BELLEVILLE 





@ 1,800 SQ. FT. 


@ REPLY TO BOX A-40 incre! ae Net. Belp ne Because of low overhead and no salesmen to pay, these Sima ore tebe 
advice service uch lower than most cars, ve been checked 
THE INTELLIGENCER essinasie | freely avallable trom Pechanical fitness and carry a guarantee with them. Most have i 





STORE i 
12'X50" 
Ideal Location 
West End. Suitable -For 


Store Or Office. 
Plenty Of Free Parking 


CALL 392-8575 
Sad-ev-w-tf 


THREE BEDROOM HOME 


Bathroom upstairs and down, 
new oil furnace, full basement, 
tiled floor and panelled walls, 
paved driveway, good: garage, 
20 miles north of ‘Belleville. , 








~ tee cae = 473-2269 Madoc one 
CUSTOM Plowing. tars eet eae 
— carpentry - painting. 
Soe eres root bedrooms. Dart \ BRADLEY 
atom ered eeoran pera e CONSTRUCTION 
SS SLATE REISE A Sane ev? Complete Plumbing 
WANTED Tile Bed and Trenching 
= 962-1988 
—ALTERATIONB Joln-tt 
—REPAIRS 
—REMODELLING Fag eS, Soe ye 
By MR. ALI ONE BEDROOM near hospital nd 
Tue Tanton [emcee 
Located At ogg peg 
Bl IRKE’S way Te inliee ‘from ‘Delievilie ot 
school bus te the door, 
-— a i tenants pays own heat 
end hydro, Call Marmora 472-3500 or 
OF Bellevile |e ited pe 
962-6543” foes reemeptiogs ‘and information, 
Belleville Plaza hone ET oe ee errmtt 





condition would be greaty spore 
ciated, Peter Bischoff, 67-12 | 





FURNISHED bungilow to May Jat 


1972 Reliable adults, 9€3-1079. 
» O22 


Two LARGE size STORES ON 
Main Street tn Trenton, also 3 of- 
fices. recently renovated. 372-7252 
oe 372-76. S3-Im 


] ONZ BEDROOM furnished apartment | 


OFS heat, hydro eupptied. perking #100. 


























. Avatable tmmedcistely. 








HMOCKKY equipment. good condition | 73¢7_ pines 
for 3 baya, ege 10, 962-6719. ——————————— 
OF) PARK DALE COMMUNITY HALL 
~~} for rent. Monday thru Saturday 
Gog Gippers tn good con- tor and rates. Phone 
dition, Phooe 29120 after ae 96s-8743 sale-S 
= ————— “I PARK DALE Community Halt for 
STAKE truck 14, to 25 tom from }rent. Monday thru Saturday for re- 
2957 to “2 fair condition, ressonsbly | servations and rates. Phone 93-2743. 
prices, will pay cash. 962-7233. Jaleo 
t oox 
SPEED bicycle, 968-6313. 
tet O1-% ROOM AND BOARD _ 
———— 
TV TOWER and antenna. Phone 235 | ———- — ee 
al ——~ | FURNISHED becom with home 
Ww. — old violins, eny condi- | Drivileses, 966-3154. Ot-3t 
me capected ee ean, ee Wee ores Cana ty 
jou} TRAILERS FOR RENT 
QUICK CASH for used 2 
nces tools, etc. We buy "CI > 
24 Sor Poses rurstare, ez | TRUCK AND CAMPER 
sate 





ACCOMMODATION 
WANTED 





REAL ESTATE WANTED 


" SOMEBODY WANTS 
YOUR HOME... 


We cen betp you find them We} 
otter: =. 
















GORDON WOODS 
REAL ESTATE 


3-471 : 
82-01-4468 


YARM wented to rent in or sround 
Belleville area. 100 acres or better 
with house, good bam, weter sup- 
ply. must on reasonsbie, 3-416-251- 
009 after 6. *h Sx-121 




















BABYSITTING 


SS Ose a 
3S. competion for 4 year old get. 
ee2-sozz. 01-61 


DAY CARE for 1 oF 2 children, orca 
Township building on Wall- 


WILL babysit 
home. West Park 


your children in my 
Vitege. 909-0006. 
‘ sio-u 


FOR REMIT 









conditioned 
available immediately, J. 
Tass Realty Ltd, $ 968-5737. +5737. Agas- 


peid, $135. monthiy, oe7-1063. 















THREE bedroom bows, newly dec- 
erated in Picton, Available Nov 1. 
CEA. = Sot 


- 


EHAVE § loveiz 9 bedroom be 
Beeville. 


MODERN 3 room | 3 room bested apart 


y. ADpy 7 Read 8 front 
only. om 
trance her 6 pm. a Sate 

























FOR RENT WEEKLY 
OR WEEKENDS 


Camper fully self-contained with ; 


stove, oven, refrigerator, toilet, 


ta Debevite. and furnace. 
Denk wee TRUCK & FARM SUPPLY 


NATIONAL LEASE 
128 Church St. Belleville 


K3-5R7 
Sidim 


FOR SALE 


@ AIR CONDITIONED 
. @ SUITABLE FOR ANY BUSINESS * 








. 


/ 


LLOYD COONEY 


Between Frankford and Stirling 
Compacts to Luxury Models 
COMPARE PRICES AND THEN SEE THESE CARS 

"= $200. TO $300. LOWER 














-OPPORTUNITIES 
“BUSINESS 

















FOR SALE 








DIFFICULTY? 


DO SOMETHING ABOUT 
IT NOW. 


radio, white wall tires. Most can .be arranged with no money 


down if desired. 
PHONE STIRLING 395-3777 


HITCHONS 


340 FRONT STREET 


IT’S 
STARTING 


BOATS AND MOTORS 


































962-5349 Jyter-m-tf 
TUESDAY 3|r ees ; KINGS Do Yo 
S : NEED HELP, 
ee VADER S : : ADVICE, REPAIRS, 
OCT. 5th €OPIES : SERVICE CENTRE ESTIMATES IN 
THE INTEBLIENCER’S | —MADE WHILE YOU WAIT '68 CHEVY Tl Nova [76 Trent St, S. — Frankford FIBREGLASS ? 


uments — Birth Certificates 


Reproduction Service 
Blue Prints — Etc. 


398-7922 


4dr. 1 owner. Radio 
aa in’ Diplo YOUR FRIENDLY GULF 
DEALER 


Finished in Diplomat Blue. 6 
cylinder. Lic, 3386E. 


VADER‘SS 


CAR SALES 
@ DATSUN @ 


SALES .AND SERVICE 


ae) Call Us. — We Specialize 
—Boat 

-—Saowmobile and 
—Trailer Repairs. 


GOOD TERMS and 
WORK QUICKLY DONE 


MARINE INDUSTRIES 


WANT 
AD. 
BARGAIN 
WEEK 
6 


INSERTIONS OF A 







‘6S PLYMOUTH 2-door hard 
top, V-8, automatic, 
Lic. T6251A 


"6 PONTIAC V°8, ere 
4door sedan. Lic, 11612K $855. 


stationery 


ie | 
215 FRONT ST. 
Belleville, Ont 


CHEVELLE Malibu two- 
door hard rd top V-8, ee 


Otevmet 











BEAR College Sts.| Lic. 95128A ........-. 
WORDADL FOR 4 rininaeen OS BELLEVILLE e poh Falcon, 6, cylinder, 
WORD-S : : Y ‘alcoa, 6 ¢: h 
one Seen ALIGNMENT 962-1449 — 962-1491 standard. Lic. SHA39A. . 
oF $8.95 — SPECIAL — TRAILERS FOR SALE 
, AIR Mi with 4 : 
Most Popular Cars Check wee iol tremacalasion, radio. 2-} CLEARANCE PRICES 
4 WESTERN MOTORLAND CHRYSLER] dr. hardtop. Lic. 72002A. $695. earyecntatlt tgs 
: AUTO CENTRE jon Your Next Used Car. — 398-7922 One Only — Lionel Hard .top, 
Word Ads Only Belleville Plaza — 962-8609| We are taking in a lot of 1-own- 


Sleeps 7, xepulas, peice $2140. 
NOW - $1795. 
Woods hai 

new $599. 
In stock 1S - 18 and 17% ft. 


Frankford's Only Coin 


OPEN TONIGHT TIL 9 P.M. 
er low mileage trade-ins on our ed Car Wash 


JyiS-ev-m-t-t |'72 models, 


“CRIFFIN'S 


SORRY No Commercial Ads 
Or Semi-Displays 


BUY — RENT — SELL 





ol 











“Every Day Is Low 








: ATS SRI CIE , Price: Day" TRUCKS FOR RENT | Travel Trailers at reduced 
IN THE CLASSIFIED GUNS and SPORTS At DAILY, WEEKLY, MONTHLY| Prices. 
ina ' P k —T LONG TERM MORE 
The Intelligencer’s 180, N. Front St. Belleville PICK-UPS, VANS, . STAKES SALES 
DIAL 962-9171 Featuring The Largest Stock Of TRACTORS Massassaga Road 
5 IES 
—- —| GUNS — AMMUNITION motor National Truck Leasing System | | seassii2 
SINGER* RELOADING EQUIPMENT chrysler TRUCK AND FARM 


and COMPONENTS 
In Eastern Ontario 


Mon. to Fri. 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 


Saturday 9 AM. to 4 PM 
Agld-evmwit-N3 | 6) 


SINGER® 


SALE - A - THON 


SUPPLY LTD. 
128 Church Street — Belleville 





SALE - A- THON 
SPECIALS 
Clearance Of All 
Trade-In Sewing Machines |. 


SINGER of CANADA 








TAILORING ~ 
































MOTORLAND CHRYSLER 
NORTH FRONT STREET 


/VADERS E& 


SPURRELL'S complete men’s and 
ladies remodelling and alterations, 
2 Front Street, 908-2000. S$22-Im 





DRESSMAKING 


225 FRONT ST. — 962-0885 SPECIALS 
ALL TYPES of dresunaking. eufte 
The Only Singer Centr " . = : 
Wii = sitie, ee Singer Famous Slant-o- 70 DATSUN 1600 SNOW MACHINES ond’ canisin “Siternations, POR: A00T 
les 
Ors matic Sewing Machine — 













2-dr., California Yellow. 1 own- 
1 ONLY $179.95 ed Lic. BS307A, 


SINGER a! CANADA) \/ ADER’S 


LOST AND FOUND 


LOST — PINTO horse from 6:h Con- 
scoun, Thurlow, Lot 8 and ®, Phone 
oc-087%. oss 


j—Singer sewing machine ttreadie: 45. 
~AnUque wail tre 
—Showveses (2) $20. and 
—Propame fas stoves (2 
= Siéeboard cid: 

| Moree busty (good) 


Ski-Doo’ 72 


= roter [25 Froat SALES SERVICE LOST — Vaiushie key, Wedowday 
[=Be Ror Rares” pees ee CAR SALES ACCESSORIES Box Ave The Toteulgencers O53 





—Otfice chatr 

—fandard Sue Coke cooler 
—Sfex coffee maker 
—Hamiken Beach moke shake 








One HOUR 


“maRTiniZing. 


@ DATSUN@ | QUINTE SPORT “MUSIC LESSONS 























ae Ata SALES and SERVICE 
~Gacand deep fryer crereas ARDEN'S Accordion Academ: lew 
See Cock seen JHE MOST IN ORY.CLEANING § Cor. N. Froat and College Sts. : CENTRE geno im ecoedion, plase theory. Zs 
Se eon 322 PINNACLE ST. BELLEVILLE — a SENS sitet peers siew 
Sreee fae 962-1700 962-1449 — 962-1491 cn gga 
- mich body . = — fhe “OPEX 1 DAYS A_WEEK™ 
—Modet A Coupe body ¥ = _O2-ev fm th-o-tf Phe EO 
[Stra carae ne 30 png — ED Runge =< Camenaa| THE GOOD GUYS es PERSONAL 
—One tn Tire and” fled Vand, Shetr Racks —_ Berntoe 1963 FORD BOMBARDIER SKI-DOO a ae 
re a Ri adder - oa P30) z 7. 
472.9620 613 | Ru Shampooer —Fing Pong Tabse ad eas PERE AT THE WAY IP 18. 
ue = 
— PE TV" Rowe Control — Bectne Oven | Local automobile, light blue, Someone Cares — 









QUINTE MARINE 


Hwy. 2, 1 Mile E. of Deseronto 
OPEN MON. TO SAT. — ® to 320 
EVENINGS (Except Set)) — 1 to 9 


DIAL 396-2539 
(me tol charge) 
S2-ev-m-t-tf 


jiroter — Chairs — Step Stool 
ne a Cases — Aluminum Doors end 
Hand Lawn Mower 


original interior, set off with 
top quality ‘gleaming chrome. 
| Equipped with cconomical 6 
cylinder engine. Easy to oper- 
_o1-3: ate automatic transmission, ra- 
'dio. We would be only to happy 


o ‘to supply the owner's name. 
~couar Posts any size, 12c Pet yThis ideal automobile may be 


Indoor - Outdoor 


CARPET 


3.88 Sq, Yd. 


Call TELECARE 


(formerly Lifeline) 
924111 


A Trained Counsellor Is On 
Duty 24 Hours A Day 


On Aton Store 
Many Other Household lems 
902-1306 After 8 








a 




























inch in diameter. x ‘ 
" idriven at your convenience, SEX 
HUNTER S SPECIAL BELLEVILLE = Chdars Corral oles 12" and | picase phone 967-1300. “There's No MOBILE i ne * 
—127t. Sportipal Conore 4, fot "e PRICE $695.00 Like The SNOWMOBILE" | 3% ssn nen ted 
£ * 

Mer Serum Cwm «| © BROADLOOM MADOC 473-4008 , See ais Bopetiwane 19 explana ¥ 18 
Complete with eee pacdtes and 180 North Froot St Evenings WELLS pd leery joree PG meat welcome’. Write. 30 
—Deretta over & under and auto- | Park Plaza r save F | po, MERODUCTION SEAVICE 

pnatle, shots, + 208. OFF ; |25" ADMIRAL COLOR television. 7 FORD-MERCURY i3t | 
Ruger 46 Stag. \feg. $112.59, OPEN: |ranthe old, 66a-oozk Ona oie IOTT MOTORS 
aeaaen $120.50 | Bos. + the - Wed - Set te 330 SALES — STIRLING ——— 


—Modet $6 Mausers s mm, 





TO MINTION 















y' and Friday to 900 pm | OAK Duftet, storm windows. Cheep. 












































Rea. $4495 SPECIAL s3793|  yRee xpsTIMATES — Oce-7706. : aE es Open Monday. To Friday 366 FRONT ST. NOTICE 4 
Savage 22 & WD Gauge 3” mae- ‘+ REX PARKING | GUNS. scopes, reinading tole > a3 962-4584 : 

num over & under, Reg. *in30 Oem Ll at gr rc apa y ‘TU 9 p.m. Saturday ‘til S p.m. Y B2-ev-m-w-ftt a 
—Comedian Centennial Res. my Opn 99, Monday to Friday. Setur- PHONE 967-1300 ivi GKIDOO 26 wp, 90 TNT. 96 | NOTICE RESPECTING 

3130.00, SPECIAL $120.0 FURNITURE BARN day 8-7. be2-chxe Jatetf | —____- ———————-—« | 1081 Jetween 4 ani 7. OH 3SPSSMENT APPEALS 
—Wincherer Model 94 Carbines. | Low OVERIIZAD PAIR of Gondyear store vere. F009 oS —— | ASSESSME) a 

, Si iy 5 Tie — . ie 

oe rtrd hale lcwnrey mis pion, Prices Qn New and teed || 32 gr nth a otter e VADER’ S ___ MOBILE —_—— Municipality of 

OTHER SPECIALS TOO NUMEKOUS | CEmbinallon Bedroom Suites | Le AUTIFUL red Macintosh apples Anicliasburg, 


KELLY’S 
SPORT SHOP 


345 NORTH FRONT 
962-0565 


SINGER* 
SALE - A - THON 
SPECIALS 
Clearance Of All 
sxisting 1971 Sewing 
Machines 


SEWING BENCHES 


‘sx0-e: | Marked and Scratched From! 
— To Clear |aevtine. 


$16.95 to $19.95 
AT ONLY $5.00 


225 Front St. — 962-0885 
_ The Only Singer Centre 


yithin SO Miles 
SINGER OF CANADA 


GRAND OPENING 
OCTOBER Ist (Friday) 
HOMBECRAFT SHOP 
Cannifton 
All Types Homemade Articles 
For Further Information Call 


OL.et yan 


Soot 


SINGER of CANADA 


‘t! Only At 225 Front St. Belleville froin. S20 32. four-tiered weil finger 








Dushet 
your own containers. Gord 
Rednersvilte Road 


ONE. gold salon jacket size 12. blue 
and white uniform size 12 and one 
pink uniform sire 10, in good con.) 
dition Phone 962-3669. Sis 


4 WATER WELL dritiing for estimates 

__SI-IM | and reasonable rates. Dial Manse 
Donaldsan 963-9431 Foxbora, 

Myttt 


ANTIQUE walnut ted and dresser. 
excellent condition: modern box 
epnng and mattress with lege 392- 
3375 or 3e2-6144. O2-3t 


300 SAVAGE lever action with Wile 
| liams peep $20. 969-9459. S2a-6: 


KENMORE pes dryer, lke pew $135 
Northbrook 336-299 after 6 


hand - picked, $250 per 
ring 
Robiir. 


| Dinette Suites and HMundrede of 









The amessment be in- 
epected during business hours, 3! 
municipal offices located at 


rol may 


Other Items. 
CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE 
COME — SEZ Us 
blah tre FURNITURE 
an 


S26 





‘68 CHEVELLE Malibu 
2«loor hard top! V-8, automatic, 


radio, w-w and wheel discs, 
Lic, 19183, 


VADER'S 


_7CAR SALES 
@ DATSUN @ 


SALES AND SERVICE 
| Cor. N. Front and College Sts. 


Mobile .. 


Homes 
MAXFIELD 


TRAILER SALES * 


Highway 2, West of Belleville 
Res, 292,088 — 392-8441 






AUCTION BARN 
$00 DUNDAS ST. Xx. 










10-foot 















—1 Allis-Chalmere 362 Baler. 


1 414 International Diesel 
Tractor With Loader. 


—3-Furrow International Pows 10° 
bottoms. 

—1 Tendem Duc, new, 

JAMES HENRY 

R. R, 2, Madoc 















Nowces of complaint must be; 
writing either by letter | 





Purposre of = identificator. t 
include your name and postal | 
and the reason is) for com- 
















bers, and the municipality tn which 
the ‘property under complaint te} 
Ohusted 















TWO "eringsr washers. In exceticat BELDEVILLE 
hou: ay hes, s a ensone Priced, tele. 
ho'stered ure eelling cheap. S| Soe $6e- S634. O1-e 962-149 — 962-1491 



















Kaae. teenagers ski clothes. 962-2032] NORDIC SKI-DOO and_ Trailer. 
07-31 will sell or trade for boat or motor 


O1-3t 
without inotor, 
O1-3t 


size - 1-12 train, 
oat. Best 
Ol-3t 






TOWNSEND'S is 
TOWING SERVICE 
24-Hour Towing 
O.M.L. 
968-5376 
é O+1: 







is comph 
than the Sist day of Ovtober, igit. 





ASSORTED girl's clothing. size 10 to 
14, 963-4003 O2-3t 


REMINGTON CHAIN saws. two year |OO28060, 0 
Sarrenty, ene and up. One mile | WEDDING gown. 

on Mwy, 2 Open evenings | veil and shore (7'4). Must 
\ana weekends.) SiGevm-th-ett | offer, DE2-4007. 


ROUGER carbine 44 magnum, semi- | OVEN READY reese, retad and 
ulomatic rifle with case and shelts. wholesale, B.A. Btirk, Roslin 472. 
Portect condition. Les then 10 rounds | S210 


Ai ES 
iF ent oa aceoye 3 ie CARRIAGE white. tive trim 
FULL-LENGTH wedding gown. with | $20. Call after 3, 908-5216. eae 


44 WILLYS Jeep, 


































HORSES 
BOARD and cere for 
able convenient: locatidn. Teie- | 


options, new tires, must sell, 


Lip length. phat 
0510 afiee edo eats Picton 476-3013, S17-tf 






oa 
=) OF 








AUCTION SALE 





| DUO-Titersa heater wi with thermostat 
| pipes, 200 gal. tank $50. ee 
t 











Wednesday, Oct. 6 at one o'clock 
et Bunnett's, No, 2 Highway, 2 miles 
west of Dellevile. 






MOTORCYCLES 


© Aponte 50 TRIUMPH Bonnevitie $1000. Ex- 
cebent 


‘ST VOLKSWAGEN Dug. 1904 Trt 
t condition, 963-2432 betwene umph 


Best offer, 967-1196, 


Dr, Belleville, 962. | ti HONDA. 350 
ay Diri-tf ltion, after 5, call 902-9005. 


fa 
| 
E 


i 


if 
t 


i 
i 


| Cy Motel 7%; 
} Peos: Cola 2 


+ 


i 
af 
i 


ll 


nh 
Ne 
Hite 


ire 


Hn 


| 


bike; sled. 


libs 


Hh 


it 


i 


I : 
: i 


i 









j 
{ 


i 


Lined 
3 2 trailer 


bearings complete wi 





St. Louis 


Pounding 
Pins 


5 PINS BIG ‘7’ 





Les St. Louis 260 
Leo Labelle 250 
Bill Salter 249 
Bill Lott 246 
Russ Jones 245 
Le Lucciola 244 
J-m Begley 240 
QUINTE CLASSIC 4 
Black's Meat Market 7%5. La- 


beile Electric 6's, Ellis Printi 
3. Lethes Ski Den 3, Crystal Hoe 
te; th. secDeuesii Insurance 


Le St Louis'115?7, Bill Lott 1008, 
Clause Bandy 1046. Art Butler 
193. Jim Nicholls 1630. Bilt Sai- 
ter 1013. Jack Ca:man 1013, 
Pointer 1003, Leo Labelle 1001, 





C.O.F. SAT. NIGRT MIXED 
Shirley Foley 214 213% Allan 
Lott 207, 27¢, Linds Bunnett 367, 
Allan Macpherson 210, Fred Lee 
2. Terry Carmichael 230, Jennie 
Trorn 208, 223, Geraldine Fobert 
230, Mark Storms Jr. 223, Py 
Newell 237, 306, Lee Tripp 
353, Bill Bourette 203. Betty New: 
ell 214, Russ Ruttan 208, 224, 211, 
Paul Herdy 304, Marg Ruttan 213, 
214. 33a, Cathy Moore o 2m, 208, 
Maxine Soules 217, Agnes 
Loveless 210, Joon Betseh 23, 
Dominic Lentini 213. 

Term Points: Losere 2 Jets 4 
Crippere 5S. Beginners Luck 8, 
None Such 2, Hot Shots 2 





= 

C.O.F. SAT. NIGHT MIXED 

Russ Rutten MOS. Peal Hardy 
248. Marg Rettan DM. Dv, 20, Ar 
neid Cornish 202. Fred Lee 234, 
Terry + Carmichacl 232. Jennie 
Thorn 233. 300, Mark Storms Jr, 
21s, 203. 208. Cathy Coore 213, 
21¥, Charles Thorm 222. Bill Bour. 
e Poa, 221, Bernard Foley 388. 
212. ANlan Lott 203, 366, 203, Linda 
Bunnett 219. 

Team Points: Losers 7, Jets ¥, 
Cnrippers 7. 








MAJOR “(7 B PINS 
Tobes Pirzaburgers 7%. Farrell 
Motors 0 Spada Tile 0. Laveia 
E’ectric 7%, See'ey’s 
S:ewart Signs Py 


Itigh Scores: Rob Silis 836, Al 


Rogers 833. 


George Hammett Ts4, 
Jack Canning 783, Gary Cracknell 
mam 








FRIDAY MORNING LADIES’ 


Team Scores: Leftovers 6 Es 
cotesors 2: Lucky Six 6 Ding-a- 


Mieh Triples: 
Jeanne Maticr 647, Doreen Lucas 
633. Lenore Hil'ier S82, Esther 


} Cartitopber 371. 


Wigh Singles: Doreen Lucas 267, 
Jeane Matier 208 Elaine Cars 
cadden 240, Tle 
2, Lenore Hiller a 
BuUNswickK BELLEVILLE BOWL 
BOWLERO'S MIXED LEAGUE 
10-9IN 

Team Points: Hastings Driving 
School 3, Road Runners 3; Cab- 
oxes 2 Quinte Car Wash 2: The 
Gasers 3. Rippers 1; Quints 2, 
Smitty’s Gang 2; Four Aces 4, 
Mits and Misses ¢; Heat 


Ling @32 «239, 211), Ron * Swatak 
366 1/200), Bruce Cuay 520 (179), 

Ladies" Marilyna Guay 533 (213), 
Pat Swatuk 573 (183), Grace rose 
516 (222). 


int and Air Con3. 3. 
High Triples and 


BELLEVILLE BOWL 
Lipas er iyer 





BAUNSWIC! 
WEDNESDA 


0, Do Littles 4: 
Helicats 3; The 


ard Enis 


a hin 


Ta 


hey 
476, 271, Judi Perey 
Kathy Lambert 464, 167, 


RENEKAM BOWING LEAGUE 





Noward 238, 222, _ 


~ 


“™ 
































| 
} 
| 
| 
















| VANCOUVER (CP) — The 
Greenpeace protest mission, 
forced to backtrack 200 miles to 


Most Active Stocks 
TORONTO 


An 1109 am. report from 


Imp. Oil 25,509, 30%, up 14 
Pembina Pipe B 20,100, 634, 
down % ° x 
CPR New 15,470, 13%, up % 
Alta. Gas Tr. Rt 9,017, 1.20, 
no change 3 
MacMillan Bloedel 4,195, 2353, 
ho change 

MINES 
Louvicourt 21,500, .10, up .02 
Utd. Sisco 17,380, 3.05, up 05 
~\. Pure'Silver 6,000, 2.19, up .04 
(@ Cons. Red Poplar 6,000, .125, 
down .005 


Chemalloy 5,300, 1.93, up .08 
7 OILS 

Dynamic 29.652, 1.26, no 

change 


Mill City 11,384, 2.43, up .05 
Permo Gas Oil 4,993, .61, up 


01 
Spooner Oil 4,300. 1.47, up 
6 
Lochiel 3,750, 1.30, no change 


Thieu Wins 
Lone Race 


SAIGON (AP)' — President 
Nguyen Van Thicu won re-elec- 
tion by a far greater margin 
per cent “vote of 


etnamese ciection officials an- 
nounced today 

But even as the final vote 
tally was reported, opposition 
politicians charged that the 
election was rigged.\ An clection 
official in Saigon said he was 
ordered to replace anti-Thicu 
ballots with votes for the presi- 
dent, 

The national election centre 
claimed Thieu—the only candi- 
date—won $1.5 per cent of the 
votes cast, with 5.5 per cent of 
the votes against him. They 
were unable to account for the 
remaining three per cent of the 
votes cast. 

“Now, for the moment, we 
can't say where they are."’ said 
government spokesman Vu 
Khanh, *‘Maybe later." 


| -.. Change Needed 


LONDON, Ont. (CP) — Fed- 
eral Labor Minister Bryce 
Mackasey said Saturday labor 
must accept technological 
changes to kecp Canada com- 
petitive in world markets. 

Mr. Mackasye, speaking at a 
luncheon before attending the 
opening of the Canadian Labor 
Congress union industrics ex- 
hibition, said management must 
ce-operate with labor so there is 
a minimum of inconvenience. 

“It is imperative that technol- 
ogical change be accepted and 
indeed encouraged, and the ef- 
fects of those changes must be 
anticipated as advanced tech- 
nology can result in new jobs,” 
he said® 


.. Women Ynite 


TORONTO (CP) — About 180 
‘women decided Saturday to set 
up a_ coalition of women's 
groupa_aoross the province to 
press the federal government to 
pass legislation permitting abor- 
tion on request. 
The “delegates included uni- 
versity professors, high-school 
, . trade-union 
w social workers and scc- 
retaries, : 
The group, which has not 
named the new Organization, 
also agreed to ask women’s or- 
ganizations across Canada to 
exert pressure on their Iccal 
members of Parliament to try 
to get the law changed, 


Sharp Is Hest 


, OTTAWA (CP) — A tour of 
f North American military instal- 
Ei ‘Jations by the military commit- 
~~ tee of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization ended here Satur- 
day. 

Under the chairmanship of 
Gen. Johannes Steinhoff of West 
Germany, the committce has 
visited a number of American 
bases and the Colorado head- 
quarters of the North American 
Air Defence Command. 

Gen. Frederick Sharp, Cana- 
dian chief of staff, was host at 
the Ottawa meeting which dis- 
cussed mutual ‘force reductions 
fn Europe and a NATO inte- 

grated communications system. 


2 

































‘Greenpeace 800 Miles Away 










ting to Sand Point from Akutan, jplans to cruise three miles off 

battling high winds. and heavy|the shore of Amchitka in the 

seas all the way. At one stage, |hope that the presence of the 

the Cormack put into a cove for|Canadians so close to the blast 

shelter. site will keep the Americans 
The U.S. Atomic Energy Com-|{rom conducting the test. 

: plans to detonate aj The Greenpeace crew called 
five-megaton nuclear bomb]on Prime Minister Trudeau Sun- 
6.200 feet underground on Am-|day to “take the first plane to 
chitka, and is awaiting an offi-|Washington” and make a per- 
cial go-ahead from President|sonal protest against the 








@ HOME 


AUCUUUNTANTS 





JOHN D. LEWARS 
Chartered Accountent 
"£17 Pinnacle Street 














j 


Sucs dropped sharply lower, 
while prices in all other sectors 
of the Toronto stock market 
moved higher in moderate mid- 
morning trading today. 

The industrial index was up 
-76 to 171.58, base metals .09 to 
79.21 and western oils 1.93 to 


Volume by 11 a.m. was 426,00 
shares, compared with 536,000 
at the same time Friday. 

Advances outnumbered  de- 
clines 107 to 71, with 117 issues 
unchanged. 

Strongest sectors were bever- 
ages, industrial mining, oil re- 


TORONTO 


TORONTO (CP) — Prices 
were steady ona demand for a 
supply of slaughter steers and 
heifers lacking top quality at 
the Ontario public stockyards 
today. 

Cow trade was dull at barely 
stegdy prices, veal calf prices 
were steady and hogs higher. 
There were no carly sales on 
sheep and lambs due to a spe- 
cial afternoon sale at3p.m. . 

Slaughter cattle 996: Choice 
steers 33.50-34.50 with sales to 
34.90; good 22-3; medium 29- 


Nixon, The Greenpeace mission Iplanned Amchitka blast. 


TORONTO STOCKS 


TORONTO (CP) — Gold is-Ifining and trust and loans. 









Belleville, Ontarte 


Olt 





Eleven of the industrial index’s 
17 sub-groups moved higher. 

Banking, general manufactur- 
ing and pipeline issues drifted 
fractionally lower. 

r was up ‘y $liu; 
Rothmans 13 to $1%, Canadian 
Homestead .% to $10%. Opem- 
iska 15 cents to $8.25 and Moore 
%§ to $354. 

Inco rose % to $32, Walker- 
Gooderham 3a to $36%«. Numac 
% to $12%, Imperial Cil 2s to 
$30%, CP Ltd. 4 to $13% and 
Bow Valley % to $29's. 

- Tara dropped 4s to $1248, Asa- 


~ 





BODEN & CO. 
33 Campbell St. 
Bellevive 
968-3405 
LARRY SODEN, B. COM, CA, 
Licensed Trustee In Ban! 
KEN SODEX, F.AE 
Public 
KERRY SODEN, BA. 
Chartered Accountent 








mera 3= to $174, Hudson Bay BOOKKEEPING Me 

Mining % to $20!2 and Central- 

Del Rio % to $16%, BOOKKEEPING 
SERVICES 


LIVESTOCK 


ALL BUSINESS PHASES 








26: good cows 23:24; medium TEES — REASONABLE 
22.23; canners and cutters 16- 962-9083 
21.50; good heavy bologna bulls 531m 
26-27; common and medium 20- 
3.50. 
Replacement cattle 300: Good aloes 
light stockers and {ceders 32-36; 
good ‘heavy short-keep fecders | 503 SERVICE To TRENTON AND 


31-35; good stock steer calves 
40-H; common and medium 
stockers and feeders 28-31. 
Calves 481: .Choice vealers 
3943 with top choice at 45.10; 
good 34-38; medium 27-33; com- 
mon 24-26; boners 21-23. 
Hogs 1,021: Base price 27.40-| sanmun BUS SERVICE LTD. 
Trenton, Ont, Phone 333-3653 


31.50; common 24-28.50; choice 28.15, currently at Toronto 
heifers 31-32; good 29.50-30.50; /28.15; stags and boars 1075; 
medium 26.50-29; common 24-| good heavy sows 17.70. 





o1-u 









Oshawa Generals of the On- 
tario Hockey Association Junior 
A series thought they had « 
good thing when they made Bill 
Lochead their No. 1 pick in last 
summer's draft of midget play- 
ers. 
Now. with the schedule just 
two games old, they must be 
more certain than ever, 

Lochead scored three goals 
Saturday to pace the Generals 
to a 7-2 victory over Ottawa 67s. 
Then, Sunday, the Generals 
moved into Ottawa and whipped 








the 67s 9-5 with Lochead scoring‘ 


another goal. That gave him 
four in two games, one-quarter 
of the Oshawa output. 

In other weekend games, Pe- 
terborough Petes whipped Ham- 
ilton Red Wings 6-1 and London 
Knights downed St. Catharines 
Black Hawks 5-2. 

Lochead wasn't the only 
player with a four-goal week- 
end. Team-mate Rick Middleton 
totched a pair in Oshawa Satur- 
day night and two more Sunday 
in Ottawa. 

Walt Johnson, Don Seiling and 
Bob Ferguson also had two each 
Sunday. Ottawa goals in that 
Rame were scored by Ron Rob- 
bette, Derek Smith, Jim Cowell, 
Dave Lee and Blake Dunlop. 

In Oshawa Saturday, the 
oher Generals goals were 
scored by Frank Davis and 


Oshawa 





Like Lochead 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


Hockey Standings ~ 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 





BOATS 
eee 
BOATS 
Inside Winter Storage 
$200 PER FOOT 
T. 4. HANCOCK 


x 

F 
LTb. 

CARRYING PLACE 


Stim 


Generals 


Seve West. Wayne Merrick 
scored both Ottawa goals on 











power plays. CARPENTRY 
A St. Catharines melee in the = 
closing seconds spoiled an! ¢ CUSTOM BUILDER 


Homes — Cottages — Garages 
Renovations 

Ficore, Callings and Walls Tied 
ting, Electrical Wiring 


otherwise cleanly played game. 
St. Catharines forward Glen 


Apecialiste In Coloriok Siding 
EIGRLARD CONSTRUCTION 


3: 
Myts-ts 


sen drew a major penalty. On 
the next play, Mike Bloom 
charged into Lenssen, crashing 
him into the crossbar and the 
fight was on. 

It eventually involved every 
player on the ice, plus Black 
Hawk defenceman Dan 
O'Donohue, who Icft the penalty 
box to join in. He drew a double 
major and a game misconduct} Three Ontario Universities 
for his enthusiasm. Athletic Association football 


ee Soe aces eae poe games went down to the wire 


Raynak and Colin Wood scored Saturday while it was no contest 
for London. Jeff Jacques and| from the opening kickoff in the 
Bloom replied for S. Cathar-| other three. 
ines. McMaster Marauders necded 
In Hamilton, Peterborough] a field goal on the final play of 
scored their second consecutive] their game at Hamilton to nip 
win, giving them a share of the] University of Western Ontario 
early league lead with Oshawa.| Mustangs 17-16; University of 
Ron Lalonde, Skip Foster.| Windsor Lancers used a touch- 
Dan Gloor, Tom Thomson, Rick | down pass with less than three 
Chinnick and Jim Jones scored} minutes remaining to edge Wa- 
for Peterborough. Rookie Willic|terloo Lutheran University 
Wing got Hamilton’s goal. Golden Hatks 21-18 and Lauren, 
The league is idle tonight, but| tian University Voyageurs 
Tuesday, Kitchener is at Hamil-| scored a touchdown on the 
ton, Niagara Falls at London] third-last play of the game to 
and Toronto at St. Catharines. | shade York University Yeomen 
24-21, 
In other contests, University 
of Ottawa GeeGees blanked 
University of Toronto Blués 21- 
0, Queen’s University Golden 
Gaels shut out Caricton Univer- 





Ontario Junior Northern Ontario Junior sity Ravens 220 and University 
WLT FAP WLT FAP of Waterloo Warriors dumped 
P’borough 200 12 5 4 i University of Guelph Gryphons 
Oikawa 200% 7 4 S. Ste. Marie 200 13 1 4 15-1. 
Kitchener 10.0 8 2 2{chelmsford 10 0 7 4 2}_ Ottawa's fifth victory in five 
N. Falls 100 5 9 2{Sudbury 010 4 7 Ojstarts left the Gce-Gees on top 
Lencon 100 5 2 2!North Bay 0 2.0 1 13 0] of the Northen Division with 10 
Ottawa = 12:0 12 «17-2 Result Sunday points, Ector yt! than ages 
Toronto 000 00 0 ; tian, ‘ York, winicss 5 
Montreal 01 020.'s oF Sault Ste. Marie 7 North Bay starts, occupies thé northern 
i 2 > cellar. 
Scam, 203.0 7 16 | «came Tharnday Queen's, witht four wins and 
“Result Saturday Sudbury at North Bay one loss for eight points, leads 
“Oshawa 7 Ottawa 2 Games Friday the Blues by two points in the 
Results Sucday North Bay at Sudbury Capital Divisioo. Carleton's vod 
Peterborcugh 6 Hamilton 1 St. Thomas at Sault Ste. eae crag two points 9 
Oshawa 9 Ottawa 5 Marie ’ hird Toronto. — : 
London 5 St. Catharines 2 With its -victory. McMaster 
9 Tuesd: moved two points ahcad of Lu- 
— a: Quebec Jr. An. the in the Central Division. 
Kitchener at Hamilton WLT FAP ot ¥i5 ‘teas in five arta! 
Niagara Falls 2t Lordon terse e108 OTST 28 | Cee ete as Woes 
Toronto at St. Catharines Windsor's win and Western's 
ato Quebec 10 0 5 3 2}toss left the teams tied forst 
2 Drum'ville 10.0 5S 4 2) place in the West Division, each 
Southera Ontario Junior Verdun 110, 10 10 2| with six points, two more than 
WLT-F A Pj Cornwall 110 9 5 2° Waterioo. 
Welland 2.0 1 13 10 S/T.Rivieres 1 1 0 9 10 2] At Hamilton, the Mustangs 
Chatham 2.0 0 10 7 4]Shawinigan 1.1.0 8 7 2) rallicd from a 14-9 halftime defi- 
Guelph 110 16 9 2 Sorel 0 10 4 5 9] cit, only to sce Ken Bauz boot a 
St. Thomas 1 1 0 11 11 2|Laval 020 4 12 0 2 yard ficld goal on the final 
Brantford 001 3 31 play to ¢rase the comeback. He 
Sarnia 000 0 0 _Q Shawinigen 6 Trois-Rivieres 3} was wide on his first try but 
Detrcit 0 2.0°6 9 0\Verdun was given a second chance 
Windsor 020 6 16 90 when Western was called for an 
Results Sunday St-Jerome 13 Sherbrooke 7 | offside. 
Welland 5 Windsor 3 Quebec 5 Cornwall 3 Bauz also converted touch- 
Chatham 4 Detrcit 2 Game Today downs by Ralph Corvino on a 


St. Thomas 6 Guelph 5 








— — eee See 


4l-yard interception and Andy 







-. @ FAR 





“~ 


THE INTELLIG 


, 















/ 





Let a SPECIALIST Do It! 


@ BUSINESS SERVICE: 





CARPENTRY LANDSCAPING ROOFING me TYPING ba 
CUSTOM CARPENTRY WORK soD — soD — s0D ALL wae FEXWOOD TYPIRO 
Remodelling — Cottages KENTUCKY AND MERION BLUE BUILDING IMPRO SERVICR 
nee Ree oy, Kiicheos | GRASS MIXTURE — DELIVERED wate ee Experience — Neatnes 
‘Terazzo Bathrooms OR LAID, 3c del. over 400 yards. EZAVESTROUGHING * Efficient Quality Typing 
te, D. MYERS AND SON. Special prices on large quantities . ALL ‘TYPES OF ROOFING Al Work Beld Im Confidence 
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471-2084 eeeh Sone oes 4 > » store : 002-0012 
3 Olet Slim Olt 
—$—— * ———— 
COMPLETE HOME RS tv. BAILEY AND Cu. TYPEWRITERS 
REMODELLING MAGNETIC SIGNS ROOTS 








DEAD AND DISABLED 
FARM STOCK WANTED 


Ol4t)” USE OUR FREE SERVICER 


9es-S217 


Phone Collect 
Tweed 678-2713 of Believille ont 








BUILDING IMPROVERS 
oe2-0002 — DELLEVILE | 

+RAY-FLO Seamless Eavestroughing 
All Types Of Rooting 


Silico Residential Siding 
» ) BM-3m 





ELECTRICIANS 
RICHARDSON ELECTRIC 
New Installations Repeirs end 

Rewiring 
Stoves. Dryers 

Water Meater and Air 

Conditioning Connections 

— FREZ ESTIMATES — 


065-4353 
S22-Im 





MAUND'S SERV*CE 
Tioor Finishing Specialists 
92-0437 340 Pinnacle Street 


Tioors Sanded and Finished 
Tioers cleaned, waxed and pol 
ished. Window cleaning and wal 





HANDYMAN 
HANDYMAN 
Roofing and Repatre 
Zavestroughing — Painting 


Serving Trenton And 
Surrounding Arca 
2 Experienced Men 
M MIKEL @ 392-7308 
5-im 





Paul Knill was Western's big 
man, booting three ficld goals 
and converting a Terry ‘Haney 
touchdown. 

The Lancers had to come 
from behind three times at 
Windsor before taking their can-| 
test, 

Andy Paricht’s eight-yard 
pass to Jim Wakeman with two 
minutes and 15 seconds remain- 
ing gave the Lancers the win at 
Windsor. Mike Urban caught a 
Parichi pass and scored on a 
play that covered 7 yards while 
Don Hollerhead returned a punt 
68 yards to score Windsor’s 
other touchdown, Wakeman 
kicked two converts and Dennis 
Hannon one to round oat the 
Lancers’ scoring. 

Wally Parker scored ween 
down and kicked two conterts 
and a 31-yard field goal for Wa- 
terloo, Tom Passmore got the 
other touchdown and added a 
single point. 

At Sudbury, the Voyageurs 
won their first contest this sea- 
son when Peter Kotyk grabbed 
a Gary Mcleod pass and 
romped 86 yards for a touch-! 
down with less than three min-| 
utes left. | 

Tim Worton and Jim Nordin 
turned interceptions into touch- 
downs for Laurentian and Doug 
Radwick, who booted three con- 
verts, kicked a 26-yard fickd 
goal. The other Voyageur point 
came when York was charged 
with: rough play after Lauren- 
tian intercepted a Yeoman pass 
in the Laurentian end zone. 

Steve Ince —with two touch- 
downs, Dave Hamilton with one, 
and John Reed with three con- 
verts got York's points. | 

Party St. George returned a 
Blues punt 95 yards early in the 
second quarter to begin the 
Gee-Gees scoring at Oltawa be- 
fore a crowd of 3,000. Michel 
Gratton added the other Gee- 
Gee touchdown in the final 
quarter and Dave Gibbs booted! 
a pair of field goals, a single! 
and two converts. 

At Kingston, the Ravens only 
penetrated the Gacls’ 30-yard 
line once—in the final minute of 
play. Fullback Dave Hadden 
scored the first of his two touctr 
downs on a 95-yard, first. 
quarter jaunt, Doug Cozac with 











All Work Cuarnteed 
nous TREE TES 
COTTAGE 908-8233 — 963-547 AQ Makes Of Mochines 
vor GIBALER, SIGNS Olt ror 
tion > Rubber Stamps 2¢-Hr. Service 
PLASTIC DIMENSION: SAIL AND aystsa 
Ana Eh ht CANVAS PRODUCTS | 143 155 root st. — Phooe 906-6773 
Otte | ihe! 
is Rats 2 Awninge TREE SERVICES 
_ ey i — — Awnings 
Tarva: _ Covers 
MORTGAGES Boat Convertibie Tope 
‘Lawn ; O'BRIEN TREE SERVICE 
Special Industrial Items COMPLETE TREE CARB 
ul im 
DINMEDIATE 1ST AND IND rdent Canvas Screens Pruaing — Voeding As Tranmplantiog 
MORTGAGE LOANS esitmake he ee renee ! 
MORTGAGE FINANCING 11 Water St. Bollevilie, Ontario Power Stump Removes 
SERVICES OF PETERHOROUGH ee oe, O1-tt| ver Free Benen 
179 "A" Pinnacle St —- “ FRANK ORIEN 
BELLEVILLE 06-5721 Belleville — 9a2-<130 
MOMERS OF ONT. MORTGAGE SERVICE STATIONS: bare de ie Olt 
BRO ASSOCIATION - = = — 
oes 10 TEBwoRTHS of aes 
WATER SERVICES 
TEXACO SERVICE STATION 
PAINTING 400 W. Dundas — 963-4102. DOXTATORS 
Open Every Night and Every Sunday 
ae. Lubrication — Gas OW Diceel WATER SERVICE 
AAA panes nes rea Pipes” bie 
my ‘xace Un orey Beeson | Rates 
(Triple SAD 3 Class A Mechenics Oo Duty 
DECORATORS Workmanship oe3-coTt 
Tomity Trade Since 1883 . oe Prompt Delivery 
Industrial Painting O11 
Int Ext. Momes ed 
mE BROS. SERVICES 
Bus, 962-1216 
os, 963-0006 1,000 GALLONS CITY WATER 




















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Ot-12t Delivered ta Sanitary Staisless 
YLOOR AND WINDOW Stee! Tanker 
UPHOLSTERY FURNITURE DA ROBLIN. Anytime 
Contract Maintenance ef Buildings on VE 


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963-9700 
Ol-tf 


and Tom Taylor with a touch-| at Toronto. 
down each plus a safety touch} Windsor travels. to Westen 


accounted for Kingston's othcer| Saturday, Ottawa to Lutheran, | 


points, Guelph to Laurentian and 
Steve Boghossian picked up| Queen's to York, 


nine of Waterloo's points at ai Gucbee Assoctatlin, Bich 
, Kicki ‘ n Qu Association, Bish- 
a a = goal, cp’s thrashed Loyola 41-7 and 
ive singles and a convert. Rick) chorprooke defeated College 
Wiedenhoeft returned a punt 30) Militaire Royal. 40:20 to take 
yards for the Warrio enty| command of the Blue and White 
touchdown. "e Divisions respectively with two 
Don Westlame’s 63-yard ‘S4-| victories in as many starts. 
gle in the second quarter was| Montreal handed Royal Mili- 
Guclph’s only point. tary College its second straight 
Waterloo plays host to Me-| defeat 11-8, McGill whipped Sir. 


_ Sheffield Finally 


LONDON (CP) — Manchester} Shrewbury’s Alf Wood neted 
United, back at {ts best and four first-half goals and added 
bursting with determination, be-| another after the interval to 
came the first team to beat] bring his total to M from 12 
Sheffield United when’ it topped | league games, 
the newly-promoted Shefficld] In Scotland, Aberdeen 
side 2.0 Saturday. saeree as the new First Divi- 

A typically flamboyant goal] sion leader with a 20 win over 
by ines "Best, six minutes} Dunfirmline. Hibernian, second 
from the end, put Manchester; 0" goal average, tied 1-1 at 
ahead. The Northern Ireland| Motherwell. 
wizard took possession of. the Glasgow Celtic lost its place 
ball nearly the halfway. line and} at the top and its unbeaten 
beat a crowd of defenders to] record.when it lost 10 at home 
score with a bfilliant shot off] to St. Johnstone. 
the far post. Allan Gowling Glasgow Rangers were beaten 
added another goal to seal vic-}21 away to Hearts for their 
tory before a home crowd of 
54,000, 

Sheffield United still leads the 
English First Division with 18 
points, one ahead of the Man.'Nor’east Lynx golf team de- 
chester squad. “ feated Southern Sunsports : 10-2 

Derby County is-third with 16} in match play competition to 
points. It is the only unbeaten) mark the debut of the Interna- 








team in the division, but has! 





tional Professional Golf League 


Belleville, Ontario 





Queen’s Wallops Carleton Ravens 22-0 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS | Roy on a onc-yard pass. 


Willams 30:14, 

Trois-Rivieres downed Que 
Montreal 23-7. _ 

In the Bluenose Conference, 
Mount Allison won its first f>2t- 
ball game in seven years, ¢> 
feating Dalhosie 17-8, while St 
Francis Xavier edged Now 
Brunswick 26-23, and St. Mzry's 
walloped Prince Edward Island 
42-12. 

Unbeaten Alberta won its 
fourth. game 21-18 over Saskat- 
chewan to stay on top of the 
Western Association, two points 
ahead of. Manitoba, which de- 
Leated Calgary 33-2. 


Loses 


fourth defeat in five league 
matches. 

Celtic and Rangers were both 
rocked by 32nd-minute goals. 

John Connolly raced on to @ 
Jim Pearson pass to score what 
proved to be the winner for St. 
Johnstene over Celtic. 

Tommy Murray shocked 
Rangers with a tremendous shot 
which put Hearts ahead. Jimmy 
Brown lobbed home Hearts” sec- 
ond’ goal five minutes from the 
end before Willie Johnstone net- 
ted a consolation goal for 
Rangers. 


and 


* 


Pro Golf League Tees Off 


MONTREAL (CP) —. The; Chi Chi Rodriguez beat Chuck 


3 and 2. 


| Tommy Bolt finished one > 
‘over Lionel Hebert for the S.1s- 


ports’ only win. 


In the ‘Tquijpme, scored on a, 


been tied six times. Derby | sunday. . best-ball basis.» Bob Goa!by 
downed Newcastle United 1:0] The North'east Lynx team,| tamed up with George Knud- 
Satu to stay one point son of Toronto to defeat Bob 


ahead “of Manchester City, 2.0 
winner over West Bromwich Al- 


representing New York and the 
New England States, took three 
of four singles matches as well 


Toski and Ken (Hawk) Harrel- 
, the one-time major Icague 





MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 JS 


bion.- as the only foursome. ~ player, 3 and 2. Bar| 
Norwich’ City’s Iead in the| The Sunsports, playing out of] In pro-amateur competition “| 
Second Divisionwas. reduced ‘to| Florida and representing the | Saturday, Goalby:shot a sizzling 


two points when it was held to a 
score] draw” at home by 
Queen's Park Raggers. . 

An_ outstanding performance 


theastern United States, won 
other singles match. 

Two points were accorded 

cach singles victory and -fcur 


in the Third Division came from| points went to the winner of the 
Shrewsbury Town, which de-! single foursome match. 


65 to establish a course record 
for the par-72 Montreal munici- 
pal golf course. 

‘Bolt and Hill shot 67s while 
Knudson fired a 63. 

In team play, honors went to 


feated Blackbum Rovers 7-1] In the Lynx victories, ce and Montreal amatcurs 

after Rovers’ goalkeeper Roger Fleckman defeated Ed Furgol | Victor Crete, Charies Duran- | 
Jones was injured in a collision and Mike Hill topped Charles‘ ceau and Andre Corriveau, who“) 
before any’ scoring occurred. | Owens, each by 5 and 4, while| registered a best-ball total of 5S. “| 


= 












]§ THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 





MOND/2Y 


@ Pro Football: Oakland Raiders vs. Cleveland Browns at 
Cleveland? — Channel 13 — 9:00 p.m. 

@ Man Alive: Religious issues facing modern society. — Two 
Irish families — one Roman Catholic, one Protestant, debate 


the aspects of Ireland’s problems. — 


10:30 p.m. 
€00—News (© @ OM AD an 
Green’ « 


Dateline QL 

Johnny Cash (1D 
17.00—News (4) 

To Tell the Truth 

Doris Day 9) 

Truth or Consequences 

Gilligan's Island aD 

Marcus Welby 

Family Affair (1) 
730—Truth or Consequences (@) 

Dragnet 


ao 


oo 
Medical Center 
1 Dream of Jeannie (10) 
Irish Rovers (6 (11) a2) 
MOVIE: “Breakout™ (1) 
800—Laugh-In (3) 
Partridge Family (©) (1) 0D 
Gunsmoke + (7) (10) 
&830—Cannon «© 111) 02 
Nichols @) 
+ @fO—MOVIE: “Speedway” () 


Channels 6, 11, 12 — 


Here's Luty (4) (10) 
Pro Footbal! an 

$3—-Troat Page Challenge (©) (11) 
C 


Doris Day (© M 10 
Pig and Whistle @) 
10.90—Nature of Things 6) (11) 1D 
My Sons () 7% ao 
* Ironside (9) 
1033—Arnie (®) ™ 10) 
Man Alive @ G1) a7 
11.00—News (4 6) (7) 1B) (30) (11) 
ay as 
12.20—V! 
News (11) a2 
11.30—Johnny Carson ~ 
* Merv Griffin (@) (7 (10) 
2140—MOVIE: “Sabre Jet" (12) 
11.65—MOVIE: “Terror jn the Haun- 
ted Houve™ (11) 
ae Ove: “flame Over India” 
“ 
1200—-MOVIE: “The Wanton Coun- 
texs™ 
News (13) 
123.30—MOVIE, “Istanbul Express” 
an 


az 
114--MOVIE; “Jamaica Run” (@ 


\ 


TUESDAY 


@ Telescope: Profile: 


“Great Canadian Comic ‘ Books.” A 


nostalgic look at Canada's comic book heroes of the 1940's. 
—Channels 6, 11, 12 — 9:30 p.m. . 


€00—News (09 M 1) 10 an 
G Acres (6) 


reen 
Dick Van Dyke (9) 
Andy Griffith (1) 
630—News @ (13 (13) 
Weekday (6) 
sWorld Beat (9) 
Dateline (11) 
Ironside (12) 
7.00—News (4) 
North Country Sporteman (7) 
To Tell The Truth (8) 
Courtship of Eddies Father 


Ironside (11) 
Gilligan's Island (12) 
Med Squad a 

« ‘ 
Chicago Teddy Nears (9) 
Glen Campbell ™ (10) 
Good Life 16 12) 


£00—Political Ta.x (6) (21) 2) 
Glen Campbell (4) 


730— 


MOVIE: “The Last Child” (13) 
Hawall Five-O (7) (0) 
Sarge () 
9.00—Odd Couple 19) 
Hawaii 5-O (0 


Cannon M (10) 
10.00—Tuesday Night (@) Gtr 13 
Cannon (4) 


1140—MOVIE: “The Comedy Man™ 
ey) 


11,45-—-MOVIE; “Ghost Diver* (11) 
11.30—MOVIE: “3.10 to Yuma" (6) 
1200—MOVIE; “Istanbul Express‘ 


eu 
Roy MOVIE: “The Lawless Breed” 
« 


Sports Calendar 


COMMERCIAL SOFTBALL 
SATURDAY, OCT. 8 — Annual 
League banquet at Royal Canadian 
Legion, Pinnacle Street, 7 p.m. 
WOMEN'S SOFTBALL 
TONIGHT — 


Cosy Grill ve 
Weese’s Flowers :t-yAlemite, 630 
Pm. ’ 
FOWER SQUADRON 


TONIGHT -— Fa genera! meet- 
ing and registraion at Bay of 
Quinte Yacht Clu>, & pm, 

JUNIOR B HOCKEY 

TONIGHT — Open practice for 
Belleville Fairways at Memorial 
Arena. 6-3 p.m. 

FRIDAY — Belleville Fairways 
vs Kingston Froitenaca at King- 
ton 

NIGH BKCHOOL FOOTHALL 

TONIGHT — Napanee vs Bay- 


aide. 
TUESDAY — Picton va Quinte. 
WEDNESDAY — Centre Hast- 





x \ 
Redskins Turn NFL Tables 
On Favored Cowboys 
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | chise to Dallas-Fort Worth for A Cincinnati gamble that 


next scason. “We had to make 
the folks back home proud of 


edge the Bengals. - With. the 
Packers leading 20-17, the Ben- 
gals had fourth down and two at 
the Green Bay seven. 

Bengal coach Paul Brown de- 
cided to go for the first down or 


“The future is now,” said 
George Allen after being named! ys." 
head coach and general man-| Charley Harraway's 57-yard 
ager of Washington Redskins|touchdown run in the first 
last January—and he wasn’t Quarter, Bill Kilmer's 50-yard 
kidding |TD pass to Roy Jeffersoa in the 
u 6 fl the | second quarter and second-half] tying ficld goal. But the Pack- 
Hs A te ke || field koals of 25 and 32 yards by ers" stopped rookie quarterback 
; im, Soh Aang twee: ;Curt Knight accounted for the; Ken Anderson at the line of 
Pecrne. ate Prasagins Rebheai Washington scoring. scrimage. 
ees aShS*| The victory put the Redskins | Pittsburgh turned a San Diego 


start since 1943. : : : 
For the first time in 28 years,!iMt2 sole possession of first}fumble and a pass “interception 


they have won their first three 
regular-season games, their lat- 
est triumph a 20-16 upset over | 
Dallas Cowboys Sunday in the 
Cotton Bowl. 

“This should make up for the 
Senators’ coming to Texas," 
said the smiling Allen, referring 











the National Footbal Confer-|three Charger threats in. the 
ence and left them as the only jclosing minutes to nip the 
unbeaten club in the NFC. Chargers. John Fuqua scored 
Cleveland Browns, the lonc| twice for the Steelers. 
undefeated team in the Ameri.| Charley Durkee, released ear- 
can Football Conference, puts| lier this scason by Houston, got 
its 2-0 record on the line tonight |Tevenge by kicking a 27-yard 
against Oakland Raiders in a/ficld goal with nine seconds left, 


the touchdown rather than al” 


Marcus Welby, M.D. (13) 
Persuaders 


to the recently-announced shift 
1030—Doctor in the House (10) 


of Washington's baseball fran- 


RADIO 


CJBQ — sieve 


ings vs BCI. 
THURSDAY — Moira vs Centen- 


Sounding Board (7) nal 
2200—News (4) 16) M &) OH OO FRIDAY — Trenton va Nap- 
an ay an anee. 


BASKETBALL 

THURSDAY Organizational 
eieeting for interested basketball 
ofticis: at Quinte Secondary 
School, 7.30 p.m. 


HIGHEST — 


) 

™ ao 
MOVIE: “The Roman Spring 
of Mrs. Stone” (13) 








EE 


televised game. 
In Sunday's other NFL 
games: f 
Detroit Lions held off Atlanta 


whipped New England Patriots 
233, Minnesota Vikings over 
powered Buffalo Bills 199, Los 
Angeles Rams downed Chicago 
Bears 17.3. San Francises."! 


oS 











with Dick Lovering 












ego Chargers 21-17 and New Or 





Falcons 41-38, Baltimore Colts! 





giving New Orlcans.its tie with 
the Oilers. 

Mark Moseley, who had lifted 
Houston into a 13-10 lead with a 
Hiyard ficd. goal with 59 sce: 
onds ren missed a 60. 


yarder with?four seconds to go. 


Deseronto 


battered Philadelphia Eagles | 
: 31-3 and Kansas Cuy Cu-cts B 
' AM - 800 trimmed Denver Broncos 16.3. an tams 
Both New York teams won. 
The Giants nipped St. Louis Best 
FOR YOUR MONDAY Cardinals 21.20 and the Jets 
° asi ZOelwUR Oe aks Sth Tom | Cowned Miami Dolphins 1410. Li 
USED SNOWMOBILE Hookings. |Green Bay Packers topped Cin | Deseronto Centennials show: 
Ighos thats pes. Yow Think? with cinnati Bengals 20-17, Pitts-| ¢d they had the best Bay of 
120—Luncheon Jaterlude. | burgh Steelers defeated San Di | 
ONA H 1.00—Town and Country Show | 





place in the Eastern Division of | into touchdowns and ped 





: 20—Ted and Lee and Company . Saints a . to capture the district: minor 
| 320—Drive Nome’ Show with Priet Icans Saints and Houston Oilers | patti rac 
2 S - DOO . Thompson. | AS struggled to a 13-13 tie. a? ii a : ; 
$30-Dary! Daniels Show roit defensive back Mike | | ote Soi Saas: Semoun 
7.3%0—Trenton Town Council "oe 59 een ay an strincout pitch 
CONVENIENT TERMS 10‘b--National | News snd. rive| Seer. Who scored on a 52 yard 1% , 
* : Nights a Week. fumble return, described the }, 798 shiek for the win 
apy ean ieee Sheree Shows Counvy | Lions Falcons game as a “free: | ete re Walking a single 
Music Get Together, for all.” Wide receiver Ken Bur | AG Be raig Empey, Bruee 
STIRLING MACHINE SHOP ben be Wy nterp ents Forename 








€0+—Up with the Sun with Tom 
Hook: 6 


10.°0-What Do You Think? 
Mult Johnston. 
12%0—Launcheon Interlude. 
1.00—Town and Country Show with 
Dick Lovering | 
230 ~-Ted and Lee and Company. | 
32—Drive Home Show with Peter | 
6%—Six O'Clock Report. 
€30—Daryl Dantes Show, 
1000-—-National News and 
Nights a Weck. 
10.0 Fiwood Clover Show. 
32.10—Marold = Tompkins 
Music Get Together. 


LTD. 






with 





STIRLING PHONE 395-3538 






rive 


LADIES ! 


LEARN THE ANCIENT ART OF 


Country 


130 yards, scored two touche 
downs for the Lions. 

Greg Landry tossed two scor 
ing passes for the Falcons. 

Earl Morrall and Johnny Uni 
tas combined for 19 pass com 
pletions in 24 attempts, veteran 
Tom Matte and rookie Don Not 
tingham ‘cach ran for a touch 
down and Jim O'Bricn kicked 
field goals of 41. 42 and 0 yards 
in Baltimore's victory over New 


worked for Vaders yielding 
three walks and recording six 
strikeouts between them. 
Kemp had a triple and two 
doubles for the winners with 
Wager getting a double and 
y and Dennison and Lay 
SéMd adding doubles. Farley 
Vader rapped a double and 
single for the losers while 
Dave Andrews added a triple. 


West Best 






Kingston 
‘Big 
Kingston 
Winner 


KINGSTON — It was a big 
day in Kingston for Kingston 
Sunday harness driver Gord 


Kingston that is. 

The Marysville competitor 
guided two ‘horses to- wins, 
including the featured tenth 
race at Kingston's Frontenac 
Downs Sunday. He drove 
Frosty Linda to a 2:07.2 per- 
formance in the feature for 
her sccond straight win and 
added another victory with 
Hornar, the first win ever in 
Canada for the Romanian 
born trotter. 


A crowd of 2,149 were on 
hand for the ten-card race, 
wagering a total of $44,836. 


FRONTENAC DOWNS 
FIRST 2.09 3-5 
Quinetia Neo's, 4-5 paid $6.36 
Marton Maud {C. Storms) 5.30, 
2.90, 2.60. 
Spricg Thaw (C, Barkley) 2.0, 


3.1, 
Spencer's Pride C (A. Besnyi) 
2.99. 


Also Started: Zorro Grattan, 
Magic Joan. Francesa R Stone, 
Mountain Rebel, ‘ 

SECOND 210 6-5 
Branch Scotty Oak (J. Sizer) 3.50, 
310 250. 


40. 
Lusty Dorothy (BR. Wemp) 4.60. 
Aho - Little Bonnie Dundee, 
Greek Warrior, Rick's Satan Boy, 
Nifty’ Rebel, Cindy's Lad 
THIRD 2th 3-3 
Frisco Goldie (B. Silecthi 5300, 
20. 220. 
Daffy’s Lass (O. Coville} 3299. 2.20, 
Spencer Heir (tS, Miller) 430 
Aho - Scotch Minnie, Princess 
G, Stormy Will, Rhythm Rick, 
FOURTH B13) 3-3 
Quinelta Nos. 4-7 pald $16.00 
Killick (B, Corcoran) 7.70. 24, 


270. 
Choctetta (E. Muller) 790, 320. 
McPride *H. Wemp) 3.10. 


virtue tte 63 
Mr. Chick (EK. Weeks! 2460. 11.90, 


410. 

Meghland Traux *G, Byers) 3.10, 

30. 

Prima Rea J. Huntback) 64. 
flea Started Rodney Ann, 
Moorfiash Fire, Ledy Top Deck, 

D J Ben. Scratch - Gold Putney. 

SIXTH 2:10 3-3 


Dan Brewer ‘A. McDonald) 

430, 410 

Moss Brockville «R. Stoner 356, 

20 

Mandy Randy iC. Taker) 330 
Also «+ Olly Bolly Gables, 

Town Volo, J G 

Miner Grattan 


Tay 
Ditton, Tupper, 
Vv 
REV HM 208 3-5 
Quinella No's. 3-6 paid $5.60 
Prima Mindy «S. Looth 870, 289, 
3.00, 
Cnrin, Zone I Wemp) 220, 230, 
Kerb Ron Betsy (1. Farr) 3.20. 
Abo + Cavalerde Smitty, Bell 
Carey, Magic Tom Lee. 
RIGHTH 209 3-3 
Glory Patch 10. Covilles 5.90. 16, 
7” 
Molly's Scamp 
740 
Nepean Township «BB. Hunt) 250. 
Aiso + Chanda C. Wee Scotch, Two 
Mountains Dear. 
NINTH Te 2-3 
‘G. Kingston 1090, 400, 





‘DB. Corcoran: 330, 


NMegnar 
316) 
A.ue Den (B Wemp) 260, 2.30. 
Juniper George (Robinson 356. 
Aho + Lady onnaught, Lady 
TNath™Lucky Bess Forever Magic. 
TENT 3 






3 1S 
-6 paid $21.30. 
370. 


Bracter Neo's. 
Frosty Lynda 'G. Kingston: 
20, 2.20. 

Mary Bing J. Cochrane) 450, 330. 
Justa Gay Lass .O Coviller 450 


Abo - Locust Don, Yankee Jed. 
Stewart's Tartan. Ace's Choice, 
Teac Judge 


Attendance 2.109 
Mutuel Handle $4431 U 


Theatre 
Feature Times 


AT TUE PARK — ta Color — Now 
showing and restricted to persons 
1s years of age and over “We Al 
All Naked.” Also showing in sert- 
color “Lady Godiva Rides", Show 
time 7.00, last complete evening 
show 8:20. 


§ y England. 
YOGA (HATHA) FM - 97.1 m/c Minnesota, Vikings dumped 
- . Buffalo quarterback Dennis ° 
i Shaw for seven losses totalling if 
with its “magic slow and relaxing movements”. 59 yards, giving the i nm ooccer Dri 
Yoga has a program to sult everyone's needs. MONDAY area Evie 0: Bills only Ay 


. 

*®.15—CBC Program + This Country 
in the Morning. 

1200—Luncheon Interlude. 

203—School Broadcast. 

220—The Max Ferguson Show. 

4.03--Local Music. 

B00—As It Happrns. 

B.90—Music As You Like It 


TUESDAY 


TWO CLASSES: Tuesdays - 4.00 - 5.00 p.m. and 7.00 - 8.00 p.m. 
Sparting October Sth 


PLACE: Y.M.C.A. 


INSTRUCTOR: Mrs.. 
A student of Yoga - 5 years 
An instructor of Yoga In the Quinte area - 2 years. 


, 


ter Kewley 


9.15—This Country fn the Morning. 
12.00—Luncheon Intertude. 
203—School Bros cast. 

403—Local Music. 

800—As It Happens. 

959—Music As You Like It. 


FOR MORE INFORMATION CALA, 962-9245 









> P 2 starter Jack Concannon, com | Stewart got the equalizer at 
; TUESD AY SPECI A L Siete “ five of 23 passes he | Six aries of the second half 
; yards and had- three inter-| with a long drive from 30 yards 
~ cepted against the Rams* fired- | out. Arnett scored the winner at 
Beh e 9 up defence, , . 16 minut¢s from a goalmouth 
en uc rie 12 eH San Francisco, in handing | scrambly and Becker completed 
® winless Philadelphia its third | thesCoring at 40 minutes with a 
lopsided loss. rolled up 510 tota) | hard drive from the right wing. 
j 5 yards, including 308 ‘in the air. 
dae ONLY John Brodie fired three touch- 
¢ «| down passes-for the ‘Mers, two Nis 
to Ted Kwalick. i 
> Jan Stenerud booted three i } 
: field* goals for Kansas City il 
5 against Denver end saron Hl ~ * 
3 Pieces Kentucky id Chicken bread ts ones «|| SOCIAL EVENING 
* touchdown on a 68-yard pass in- i 
French Fries Cole Slaw terception tl EVERY TUESDAY 
5 _ ran Tarkenton scored one | ll! c 
Fresh Grecian Bread touchdown and passéd for an. ! TY 
: * other, while rookie Rocky: TOBE s COUNTY GARDENS 
Thompson streaked’ 93 yards |S! , 
Reg 135 only 99% witha kickoff return for an.! a Sponsored by. Kinsmen Cth of Belleville, Ine. 
e e ' other TD, sparking the.Giants', & Early Bird Special 7:30 
A : : tad “ 330 p.m. 5 
; hens! tie Louis. iv Special Bl Out antes, No. 1 - $35. No. 2- $50 
lets recoverc: Share The Wea! ames ~ 
s: FROM 11 A.M. TO 12 MIDNIGHT that bounced off Miami safety: {ff L& 
. man Dick Anderson with Cys i Admission 25c - Regular Games 15 for $1.00 
minutes left to beat the Dolphins H Free Transportation from Central Taxi 
Following the recovery, the ovis - 
97 STATION STREET — BELLEVILLE Kd 
went 37 yards, with George Snowballs No, 1 - 55 nos. $375. — No. 2 - 52 nos. $100. 
186 FRONT STREET — TRENTON Nock scoring from the two for - 
- : backfired with two minutes re- 20 FREE TURKEYS given away on regular games. 
% maining enabled Green Bay to = KINSMEN 
his second touchdown, . = 








cight net yards in the air. Dave 
Osborn sparked the Minnesota 
offence, rushing 19 times for 9% 
yards, catching five passes for 
65 yards and scoring once. 

Los Angeles’ Victorysover Chi 
cago was its first in three 
games under new coach Tommy 
Prothro and ended the Cinder 


VANCOUVER (CP) -- Van 


Windsor Maple Leafs 3-1 Sunday 


couver Eintracht defeated! gaint AT BAYSIDE 


to capture the Canadian soccer 
championship and the Challenge 
Cup. 

Peter Arnett sparked the Ein- 
tracht attack with two goals, 


ella heroics of quarterback Kent| with Ady Bocken the other 


Nix. 


| marksman. Neil Stewart scored 


Nix, after replacing injured} the Maple Leafs’ only goal. 


~ 
= 





JOHN FORSYTHE 


“THE HAPPY 
ENDING’ . 


PLUS 


“The Christine 
Jorgensen .Story”’ 


Restricted to Persons 
18 or over. 




















#KINSMEN SPECIAL #3 





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1971 - 72 SEASON BEGINS 


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, AT 8.00 P.M. 


CENTENNIAL SECONDARY SCHOOL 
\NEW MEMBERS WELCOME — INSTRUCTION AVAILABLE 
BELLEVILLE BADMINTON CLUB 




















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$80 Hong Kong bargain suit will cost 
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ALL THE GLOPON THE ——- 
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To Your Good Health 


_ Muscle Strain Brings B 


‘habitually “favor” certain mus- 


By G.C. THOSTESON MD 


"Fhen perhaps ‘several months 
later with no warning it hap- 
pens again. My trouble always 
comes in the same place, just 
below the waist line. Why 
should this be and what treat- 
ment do you recommend?— 
K.EN, 

If you ever studied an ana- 
tomical chart of the muscles of 


criss-crossed, and at angles, 
with one set of muscles bal- 
anced against another, so that 
movement, though it scems 
simple to us, is really a matter 
of tightening one set of muscles 


while relaxing another. 

Back pain usually is the result 
of muscle strain. While there 
are many causes of back pain, 
about 80 per cent are muscular. 

When we're young and lim- 
ber, and all our muscles are in 
use quite frequently (you've 
seen the outlandish contortiors 


of strain on a muscle before it 
goes into spasm.” 

When we're older, we fall into 
patterns of movementy and 
some muscles don’t get much 
use. Put a strain on such a mus- 
cle, and it doesn’t take much to 
make it rebel, tighten up and 
give us a backache. 

Add to that the changes that 
come as we grow older. Some 
degree of arthritis. or thinning 
of the discs in the spine, or, a 
curvature or other faulty align- 
ment of the spine can put extra 
strain on a muscle, or make us 


You and The Law 


‘Two Land Registration 


Systems 


There are two basic sys- 
tems of land registration in Ca- 
nada — the registry system 
and the Torrens system. 

Under the registry system, 
there is no one document’ giv- 
ing a clear, up-to-date picture 
of the state of ownership. 
Deeds, mortgages, etc., deal- 
ing with any particular piece 
of land are registered in the 
land titles office or registry of- 
fice, and a notation of the reg 
istration is made in a book 
generally referred to as the 
“Abstract Book". 

To determine who owns any 
particular piece of land under 
this system and what is regis- 
tered against it, one must go 
through all entries in the ab- 
stract book dealing with that 
piece of land right back to 
the original grant from the 
Crown. 

Under the Torrens system, 
which is not in effect in some 
parts of Canada, the situation 
is much simpler and clearer. 
When land under the Torrens 
system is sold. a government- 
guaranteed Torrens Title. 
commonly referred to as a 
certificate of title, is issued in 
duplicate, in the name of the 
purchaser giving his descrip- 
tion, the description of the 

land and a list of all encum- 
brances such as mortgages. 
easements, ctéN> registered 
against the land. 

The certificate of title su- 
percedes any previous Certifi- 
cate of title. which must be 
surrendered to the land titles 
office when the property is 
sold, and so the current certifi- 
cate of title is the only docu- 
ment that needs to be looked 
at to determine the stae of 
ownership. 

Anctheer safeguard in this 
system is that when the land 


Used in 


is subject to a mortgage, the 
land tides office will not re- 
lease the owner's copy of the 
certificate of title to him. The 
resuk is that there is never 
More than one certificate of 
title in duplicate in exitence 
at any one time, and the own- 
er cannot attempt an illegal 
use of his copy when the Jand 
is mortgaged. 

All Canadian land was orig- 
inally under the registry sys- 
tem. The Torrens method was 
introduced in most parts of 
Canada at a later date. Since 
its introduction more and 
more land is continually being 
brought under the operation of 
he Torrens system through 
application by the owners. Al- 
though still in the distant fu 
ture, the time will probably 


‘ 


cles until an unusual movement 
or position causes spasm. 


and often overlooked is a short- 
ening of one Jeg. A half inch can 
throw the back out of kilter with 


~ that kids get into) it takes a lot——ceftain bending motions. But a 


heel lift can correct it. 

A strain while dust-mopping 
can be because twisting of the 
back exerts a particular type of 
strain, just as bending forward 
and reaching (as when making 
a-bed) is a greater strain than 
just bending. In picking up 
things, squatting and using the 
leg muscles causes less strain 
than bending ‘at the waist. 
Tricks like that can prevent a 
lot of recurrent hack troubles. 

For an acutely stretched mus- 
cle, rest is important—I don’t 
mean bed rest, but avoidance of 


‘Canada 


come when all Canadian land 
is under this more efficient 
system, 

Because of the guarantce 
features of a Torrens title, 
many, if not all, large money- 
lending institutions will refuse 
to grant a mortgage loan on 
land that does not have a Tor- 
rens title in those areas where 
effect. 

This is of particular signifi- 
cance to farmers purchasing, 
land with the assitance of the 
Farm Credit Corporation. If 
the land being purchased does 
now have a Torrens title, the 
corporation will still approve 
the loan, but only on the con- 
dition that this title is obtain- 
ed prior to registration of 
the mortgage. 

That's the law! 


Sydney J. Harris Says 


Long Hair Merely Symbol 


So you don’t care for “‘hip- 
pies"? Well, that’s your pri- 
vilege. You don’t like kids who 
mock the Establishment and 
thumb their dirty noses at the 
old-fashioned, all - American 
virtues, O.K. then. 

In that case, you must like 
boys who play baseball, and 
take it seriously. Even more, 
boys who play on teams spon- 
sored by the American Legion. 
How much more home-grown, 
old-fashioned, and all-Ameri- 
can can you get? 

But wait a minute. Some- 
thing’s wrong here. The pic- 
ture’s out of focus. At least in 
Orlando, Florida, where a 14- 
man teen-age baseball. squad 
voted to forfeit its remaining 
games in an American Legion 


tournament rather than cut the 
hair and shave the beards 
frem cight.of its members. 

The tournament director, in- 
specting the players as they 
stood at attention for pre- 
game ceremonies, refused to 
let the Orlando team play in 
the second round until eight 
of,the players got haircuts or 
sideburn trims. The boys—all 
high school seniors — tumed 
him down, and were support- 
ed by their coach, who pointed 
out disgustedly that the tourna- 
ment director himself “has a 
big moustache under his 
How stupid can the Estab- 
lishment get? The current [c:- 
ish for long hair is a sign of 
“belonging” to modem youth. 
a symbol of being “with it,” 


Jeane Dixon’st Horoscope 


For October 5 


Your birthday today: Current 
expectations should be high. 
Critical testing of your abilities 
and the reality of your plans 
comes quickly so that the first 
three ‘months are fyll of inci- 
dents, make-or-break’ opportuni- 
ties. Then your year)scttles to 
steady upward development, 
Today's natives understand the 
need for persistent hard work, 
prefer to organize so that their 


, Share is largely the _ thinking 


ard planning. 

ARIES (Mar. 21 — Apr. 19): 
Impulse moves everybody this 
morning, including some who 
aren't due to stir, Keep track 
of what's happening; do as lit- 
tle as your situation allows un- 
til you get the whole picture. 

TAURUS (Apr. 20 — May 20): 
Morning action runs into cross- 
currents, needless duplication 
if you let it. Afternoon clarity 
puts you at special advantage 
for a fresh start. 

GEMINI (May 21.— June 20): 
Pause and look about you ra- 
ther than depend on the skills 
and alertness of others. Work 
as nearly alone as your situ- 
ation “allows; be ready for de- 
lays, interruptions, 

CANCER (June 21 — July 22): 
Clearance -activity should be 
your main concern. Get rid of 
useless belongings, equipment 
serving no purpose; abandon 

- failing ventures. 

LEO (July 23 — Aug, 22): 

Long-term plans, are not yct 


feasible — more groundwork 
needs to be done. Declutter 
your scheduk. ‘ 


VIRGO (Aug. 23 — Sept. 22): 
Just staying abreast of yurrent 
developments 
your end:of the stick will be cn- 

* ough to manage; 


and cdérrying - 


LIBRA (Sept. 23 — Oct. 22): 
What may seem to be interven: 
tion turns out to be novel sort 
of help/ There's more to any 
Situation than you imagine. 

SCORPIO (Oct, 23—Nov, 21): 
Setback is or should be a rare 
exception from which you learn 
a great deal and rebound with 
even stronger motivation and 
morale. 

SAGITTARIUS (Nov, 22 — 
Dec. 21): Concentrate on the 
reasons why things are as they 
are and’ what you plan to do 
that will make them better. 






e@ RUGS 





























CAPRICORN (Dee. 22 — Jan. 
19): See the moment of rela- 
tive austerity in perspective 
Realize that better times and 
higher achievements are 
ebtned by hard work: and thrift 
now, Change is on the way. 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 — Feb. 
18): Reason and system enjoy 
a field day. For once everything 
secms to work smoothly. 

PISCES (Feb. 19 — Mar. 20): 
Review your position and make 
an added touch to improve or 
defend it. Everybody else is 
watching to see how you thrive. 





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SERVICEMASTER OF BELLEVILLE 


















EILEEN 


MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1972 


- THE INTELLIGENCER, 17 


; 


ack Pain 


further strain. Some support - 
(girdle or corset) helps. So may 
a bed board between mattress 
and spring, to prevent sagging. 
Heat (hot packs, infrared © 
lamp, etc.) can help relax a 
muscle. Sometimes ice packs 


’ relieve pain. Aspirin is enough ~ 


for most strains; in severe ones, 
muscle relaxants or stronger 
pain relievers may be needed, 

There are many types of exer- 
cises for back muscles, because 
there are so many rouscles and 
so many possible movements. 
Just careful bending and twist- 
ing exercises are good. Or lying 
on your back and raising the 
legs; or lying face down and 
raising the head. The purpose is 
to use (and strengthen) muscles 
not used in most daily activi- 
ties. 1 

Continuing pain, or constantly 
recurrent pain, may indicate 
something more than muscle 
spasm, of course, in which case 
a detailed examination is ia 
order, 


Dear Dr. Thosteson: I am dia- 
betic. Is there any possibility of 
transmitting diabetes through 
sexual contact?—J.B. - 

None whatsoever. 


Funeral Today 


FREDERICTON (CP) — Gov- 
ernment offices and schools 
were to close across New 
Brunswick at noon today in trib- 
ute to Lt.-Gov. Wallace S. Bird 
who died early Saturday, two 
days after he underwent emer- 
gency surgery for an esopha- 
geal hemorrhage. He was 53. 

Mr. Bird, youngest lieuten- 
ant-governor in Canada when he 
was appointed in 1968, was to be 
buried this afternoon following 
funeral services at Christ 
Church Cathedral. 


and nothing more. Hair long 
ago ceased having any political 
or social or sexual significance 
on the youth scene; even the 
squarest of squares are wear- 
ing their tresses far longer 
than they did a half - dozen 
years ago. 

This example, trivial as it 
is, nevertheless has import- 
ance in indicating how Estab- 
lishments invariably drive peo- 
ple into the camp of the “‘en- 
emy" by pushing their own 
conformity to a dangerous and 
idiotic excess, 

Boys who play baseball for 
the American Legion belong 
in the same category as apple 
pie and milk: they are about 
as threatening to the stabil- 
ity of the nation as a plastic 
water-pistol. Yet, by demand- 
ing that these resy-cheeked 
athletes trim their hair to 
some arbitrary length. the 
guardians of our national 
manners and- morals simply 
disenchant such lads and drive 
them into common company 
with other dissidents. 

By invoking such senseless 
rulings, the adult powers prove 
to the apolitical youths that 
the activists have a real point 
in opposing the dead weight of 
the Establishment. More con- 
verts to a faith are recruited 
by the blind stubbornness of 
authority than by the siren 
song of revolutionaries — a 
lesson Czars never learn ‘un- 
til they are deposed. 


3 ; 

















967-1672 











‘YB THE INTELLIGENCER, MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1971 





a Lewis Maintain CE... 
As Campaign Slows Up 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS — * 


The. campaign for the Oct. 21 
+ Ontario election slowed down to 
a crawl over the weekend for 
two of the major party Jeaders,. 
but New Democrat Stephen 
Lewis made two policy state- 
ments. 3 
Premier William Davis made 4 
a hand-shaking tour of Toronto- 
area ridings Saturday but took 


Club Destroyed 


TORONTO (CP) — Fire raced 
through the multi-million-dollar 
Tam O'Shanter golf, curling and 
skating ‘club here Sunday, re- 
ducing it to smoke and rubble. 


About 1,000 persons, mostly 
children, Were at the club when 
the fire broke out, but there 
were ho reports of injuries. | 

Cause of the fire was not de- 
termined and there were no offi- 
cial estimates of damage. 


James Craig. music operator 
of figure skaters, Said most of 
the crowd was at the club for 
skating and dancing tests.“ - 

Later, thousands of people 
crowded on to the golf course to 
watch the fire despite warnings 
of possible ammonia-gas explo- 
sions from the artificial ice 
equipment on the rink. 


Rogers’ Wants Two-China Policy 


UNITED NATIONS (CP) — 
State Secretary William Rogers 
delivers the main United States 
‘policy speech today and in it he 
will call for seating Peking in 
the United Nations while stak- 
ing his own prestige on retain- 
ing a seat for Taiwan. 

Despite the considerable 
power of the U.S. in the world 
organization, many diplomats 
believe the “two-China’’ pro 
posal will fail. Canada has said 
it cannot support such a policy. 

In addition to this plea on the 
Chinese question, Rogers is cx- 
pected to urge an interim Mid- 
dle East™peace accord and re 
opening of the Suez canal..He is 
expected tolemphasize there 14 
no other alternative to the long: 





son. 











. 


the day off Sunday, while Lib- 
eral leader Robert Nixon spent 
the weekend In his home riding, 
mainly in private meetings with 
his staff, 

Discussion of issues was left 
largely to Mr. Lewis, who began 
Saturday with a statement in 
Schreiber promising a review 
board with power to require in- 
dustry to justify the disparitics 
in the cost of goods between 
southern and Northern Ontario. 
' He said the board would not 
seck to impose cost parity be- 
tween the. two regions becmuse 
transportation costs would al- 
ways make goods more expen- 
sive in the north. However, ‘a 
more equitable balance would 
be achieved: 

On Sunday, Mr. Lewis told a 
news conference at his Toronto 
home that an NDP government 
would establish a rent review 
board to protect the rights of 
tenants. 

The NDP also would establish 
a standard form of lease which 
would cover items such as ad- 
vance payment of rent, repairs. 
notice of rent increases and 
evictions, 

Mr. Lewis said he would re- 
vise the Landlord and Tenant 


It_ will be the first time in 
many years the secretary of 
state himself has delivered the 
annual policy statement. Tradi- 
tionally, the U.S. permanent 
representative, who has cabinct 
rank, has made it. 

Rogers's decision to speak: 
reinforced the impression in 
diplomatic circles that the U.S. 
is fighting an uphill battle for 
its “two-China.” or “dual repre 
sentation.”’ policy. Jt is assumed 
that he wanted to place his per 
sonal prestige behind the at- 
tempt to save UN membership 
for Taiwan, 


Although U.S. 9ificials have 
tried to convince other dele- 
gates that Peking would be flex 
ible and not spurn an invitation 
to enter the UN if Taiwan re- 


s Pace. 





/ 


Act to provide for collective 
bargaining between landlords 
and tenants on rent and other 
matters, and would give tenants 


representation on the board of. 


directors of Ontario Housing 
Corporation. : 

“Adequate penalties would 
be provided to enforce the legis- 
lation. 

Liberal leader Nixon had his 
second consecutive weekend 
away from the hustings. His 


last appearance before the: 


weekend was on an” open-line 
radio showin- Hamilton. 

Mr. Ni charged the .gov- 
ernment was on a “public rela- 
tions kick": and that the NDP 
approach is too far away {rom 
the middle of the road—which 
the Liberals have staked out as 
the most appealing to voters. 

Mr. Nixon said former NDP 
leader Donald MacDonald had 
taken a middleof-the-read ap: 
proach and that ‘frankly I think 
he was and probably still is 
right * 

The main item on the cam- 
paign agenda today is a mect- 
ing of the three party Icaders 
for the taping of a television 
debate to be broadcast at 
10 p.m. 


mained, the widespread view is 
that China’s entry demands that 
Taiwan be excluded. 

The representation debate 1s 
expected to begin about Oct. 19. 
Nearly 100 speakers already 
have been listed. officials said. 

The U.S. generally is the sec 
ond speaker in the annual cc 
bate on world affairs, which 
opened a week ago. However 
Rogers was unable to take the 
customary” place this year be 


cause he accompanied Presi 


dent Nixon to Alaska to meet 
Emperor Hirohito and Empress 
Noagako of Japan. 

At the UN Saturday, External 
Affairs Minister Mitchell Sharp 
held a private meeting with So 
viet Foreign Minister Andrei 


Gromyko and expressed Can- 


NOTICE TO 
ALL VOTERS 


ONTARIO 


(a) NOT BEING QUALIFIED TO VOTE, VOTES; OR 
(b) BEING QUALIFIED TO’ VOTE, VOTES MORE THAN ONCE; OR 
(c) VOTES IN AN ELECTORAL DISTRICT OR POLLING SUB- 
DIVISION OTHER THAN THE ONE IN WHICH HE IS ENTITLED 
TO VOTE BY THIS ACT. 


RE: PROXY VOTING 


THERE ARE FOUR SEPARATE AND DISTINCT CLASSES OF VOTERS WHO MAY VOTE BY 
PROXY AT THE PENDING PROVINCIAL ELECTION, 
1, Members of the Canadian Forces who are absent from their ordinary 

residence and unable to vote in person. _* 

2. Persons employed in the Business of Transportation by Railway, alr, 
water or motor vehicle, who will be absent from their ordinary resi- 
dence and unable to vote in person, e.g. Airplane Pilots, Railway Men, 
Mariners, Long Distance Bus Drivers or Truck Drivers, 

. Persons who will be absent from their regular res’ 
vote at the Advance Poll or Polling Day by reason of attending an = 
Educational institution. : 

4. Persons certified as being physically unable to attend the Poll in per- 


THE PROCEDURE IS SIMPLE. A PROXY APPOINTMENT FORM MAY BE OBTAINED 
FROM ANY RETURNING OFFICER, COMPLETED BY THE PERSON APPOINTING THE 
PROXY AND MAILED TO THE PROXY VOTER. THE PROXY VOTER WILL HAVE IT 
CERTIFIED BY THE RETURNING OFFICER IN THE ELECTORAL DISTRICT WHERE HE 
AND THE PERSON APPOINTING HIM ARE BOTH ON THE LISTS,OF VOTERS. ON. POLL- 
ING DAY THE VOTING PROXY WILL PRESENT THE CERTIFIED PROXY APPOINTMENT 
FORM TO THE DEPUTY RETURNING OFFICER. . 


SECTION 133 OF THE ELECTION ACT PROVIDES— ~< 
“133. EVERY PERSON WHO, AT AN ELECTION, 


IS GIILTY OF A CORRUPT PRACTICE AND IS LIABLE TO A FINE OF NOT MORE THAN $1,000, OR 
TO IMPRISONMENT FOR A TERM OF NOT MORE THAN SIX MONTHS OR TO ‘BOTH.” 


iderice Al unable to 


RODERICK LEWIS, Q-C. 


CHIEF ELECTION OFFICER 
PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 


— 





“He's not lying when he says he works 


Rope Breaks - So 


LITTLE WOMAN . 


directly un- 
der the president of the company. He works on the 
ninth floor and the president is on the tenth.” 


Does Arm 


WOODSTOCK, Ont. (CP) — A-ciant tug-of-war held 


to launch this city’s 1971 


United Appeal campaign 


came to an abrupt end today when the rope snapped 
and the campaign chairman broke his arm. 


A total of 600 men ~~ 300 on 


each end of a 1,200- 


* foot-long rope — took part in the tug-of-war, which was 


billed as the largest in the world. 


But the Winch rope snapped after only a few 
muvutes bringing the event to an cod. 

Campaign chairman Wes Magill, who was at the 
front of one of the teams, suffered a fractured arm 


when the rope broke. 








ada‘s displeasure with the re 
cenuly-conducted Soviet nuclear 
test in the Arctic. one of the 
biggest underground blasts 
recorded. 


Sharp protested Friday to the 
U.S. against a planned under} 
ground test possibly this month 
on Amchitka Island. { 


Gromyko replied that it would | 
be difficult to stop nuclear tests} 
without an agree) t armong all | 
nuclear powers. 

It was the first meeting be 
tween the Canadiaa and Soviet 
foreign affairs chicfs since 
Prime Minister Trudeau visited 
the Soviet Union in May and 
signed a protocol providing for 
increasing contacts between Ca- 
nadian and Sovict authorities. 
















<7 



























Premier Dunks Girl ; 


"=== At Markham Fall Fair 


TORONTO (CP) — Premier 
William Davis visited big-city 
shopping plazas and a country 
fair Saturday on a hand-shaking 
tour of Toronto and area ridings 
ip his campaign for the Oct. 21 
election, 

A 10-hour campaign day -took 
him from northwestem, Metro- 
politan Toronto, where a few 
sparks flew over. the local issue 
of the defunct Spadina Express- 
way, to Markham, where he 
dunked a l4-year-old girl in a_ 
barrel of water at a midway 
booth, | 

The premier and: his wife 
Kathleen spent most of the day 
grasping hands and signing au- 
tographs as they strolicd 
through crowds of Saturday 

at four plazas on 
Metro's northern fringe. 

At Ajax, 20 miles cast of To- 
ronto, he delivered the only for- 
mal specch of the day, repeat- 
ing his contention that this is no 
time for promises entailing un- 
necessary tax increases or 
higher government spending. 

He reiterated his statement 
that the central issue is one of 
leadership in the face of “the 
tough decisions that this prov- 
ince will face in the 1970s.""~ 


The relaxed day, before a day 


off the campaign trai] Sunday, 


ended with a five dnimste visit to 
a high “awh deter here, 

Mr, Davis yaned te fun of 
the fall fair at Usrklam, 2 
miles north, here, riding a 
ferris wheel, buying ickets on a 
steer and a $100 Watery, as 
well as trying his skill at sev- 
eral games of chance, 

—~A barker talked fim into 
trying to throw a baseball 
through a small hole, in hopes 


of dunking’ mini-dressed Sharon * 


Denning of Markham, in the 
rain barrel, Mr, Davis missed 


* several tries, 


But he crawled over a bar-' 
rier, announced it was time for 
“direct government action” and 
hit the trip-Jever.with his hand, 
sending the teenager off her 
perch and down cut of sight in 
the barrel. 


The premier started back to 
the barrier but his wife ordered 
that he “go help that girl,’ and 
Mr. Davis assisted the dripping 
Miss Denning out. She said later 
she would vote for him if she 
were old enough. 


Some minor protest incidents 
interrupted the day. » 

At Yorkdale shopping centre, 
withip sight of the end-of-pave- 
ment on the Spadina Express- 
way, about 30 young people 
chanting “we «went Spadina™ 


tried to, drown out an, equal 


number of 
porters shouting for the 
micr, aye 


Spadina this year after an 


lay of $60 million, stopping a 
on the highway that was Hage 


reach into the downtown area. >" 
Wayne Novak, 22, a political 


science student at York Univer- | 


sity, protested reduced student * 
awards and other factors which 
he said were curbing Canadian 
graduate studies but not hurting 


Americans studying here. Mr. 
Davis said Canadian graduate 
students weré getting an equita- 


~ble share. 


At another plaza, a middle- 
aged Hungarian immigrant 
pressed the premier to say why 
Ontario ‘couldn't have separate 
schools’. when they existed in 
other provinces, An aide to Mr. 
Davis led the man way. 

The government has desided 
not to extend aid to separate 
schools past the current level of 
Grade 10. 


At Markham, a booth operg-_— 
tor at the fair told the prem’j 


that the decision on. separ: 
schools would bring the Cdn 
servatives his vote for the first 
time. 

Mr. Davis flies to Ottawa 


today. 





18 Hour Bra 


Now get day-long comfort, natural lift and © 


flattering lincs — all in one beautiful’ support bra. 


a—Made with Spanette*, the exclusive Playtex stretch fabric with tn 
exact combination of strength and softness for truly comfortable sup- 
port. The attractive nylon lace sclf-adjustable cups are suspended in a 
unique frame of sheer lightweight clastic for the ultimate in freedom of 
movement and castomized fit. The adjustable stretch straps won't twist, 
curl or lose their Stretch. Available in White’ Séecs: A: 


C: 32-42 

b.—Longline version. With 

B: 34-40; C: 34-42 ......... Veacadia ase culncieee tamteaimaarers ote 
‘ 2 


SIMPSONS-SEARS LTD. 
QUINTE MAIL, BELLEVILLE 
FREE PARKING FOR 1800 CARS 





STORE HOURS 


all the features as above in White. Sizes 


*10.50 


,D:34-42 .... 11.50 
—Foundations 


34-36; B: 32-40; 
D:34-42 ... 98.50 


Administration & Service 966-3661 


— SIMPSONS-SEARS| 








young Davis sup- 


#750 | 


* | TELESHOP FROM 8.45 a.m. Daily 


Mon., Tues., Wed., Sat. 9.30 {0 5.30 | Retail, Catalogue Orders 966-3211 
Thursday & Friday 9.30 to 9 p.m. 


















































“th 











THE ONTARIO INTELLIGENCER, Monday, October 4th; 1971 


icc 





WY | NEW! COLORED SKATES | 
») } 


\ SPECIAL 


cunawaet FOLDING CHAIR World’s best sellers - used-by Timex! So 


Exceptional value! Gleaming, chrome-plated | strong and flexible you can tie them in a 
tubular steel frame - black leatherette cover on | knot! Goldtone or chrome finish. Men's 
comfortably-padded seat. Folds compactly for | fully adjustable. Gift packed. “Topps” be 
storage. Fine for home or office. Don’t miss this | for value! 


ww cA | Py 
buy"! BLACK NYLON STRAPS. For oll watches... 99 


~ HOCKEY SKATES 
SCREWDRIVER SPECIAL! Fine-quality,  pro-style. skates ruggedly 


constructed of full grain leather in red-and- 

Handyman’s bonanza ! Stock up on slot or Phillips | blue colour. Fully lined and padded. Tenc 

styles! Plated blades; hi-impact plastic handles; | guard; heavy-duty moulded toe. Safety tube 
grooved rubber grips in assorted colours. 4” to 8” | guard and heel tip. Nickel plated blades of, 

SX ‘long; 1/8" to 1/4” ends. Made in U.S.A. plus other deatures! Rush the whole team i 


_ for this top-score value! 
YOUR 
CHOICE ¢ 





“PEE-WEE CURV" 
HOCKEY STICK 


Stickhandle your way to Western for this 
hae ‘leading buy! 2-pce. hardwood with 
d blade - left of right. 36” to 45” long. 


Protection, Comfort and Economy! 


SNOWMOBILE HELMET 


“Snowmo-special” for safety on the SPECIAL LOW PRICE 


trail! Has all the most-wanted features. 
including sturdy, fibreglass shell with . 
foam insulation; zip-on ear flaps; flip-up 


face shield and adjustable chin piece. ; 

White with assorted stripes. Medium ond 

large sizes. 

BOY'S SNOWMOBILE HELMET. Similor to above in boy's size. . 2. wee. 5.99 








>: 


SS 
i 


T lity models with plenty of flexibil- 
hy cod protection for ina test Top- 
grain cowhide palm, thumb. and finger 
gussets, cuffs and back pad rolls 
covered matching expo vinyls. 
“Armourflex’ thumb; foam-- pi 
cuff, Stitched with nylon through-"* 
Out. 13" long. Top-score value ! \ 


wider caps; 
$s. Laced front 


ade: 


a) eid: 
NEW! HOCKEY GOAL NET 


Professional, N.H.L, size and style! Folds for 
portability. Made for many seasons .of play 
with 1” tubular steel frame and durable nylon 
net in blue. Twin hoop back. Size 59x43x24", 


orm ay a 
f- 
——— 


“ALL STAR” 
FEATURE 


a 


Ses See ht 
wea: oh ang LSS 


C.NEWIC 


D. ELBOW PADS: Preshoped vinyl; felt padding. Rub- 
bertex elbow cap; poly core ..... INT. 3.66 pr. - 


E. ANKLE GUARDS: Fibre & foom; fit over skates, 
BOYS': 2.79 pr.; MEN'S: 2.99 pr. 


“Otto &M aa 
Jelinek” Figure Skates 


“Starlets” - designed 
stars! Feature new, 
uppers and nylon Tricot foam lining with double 
nylon stitching throughout. 1-piece, moulded 
soles; famous Mitchell & King blades.. 


MISSES’ 


(11% 


Sizes 10 to 2 Incl. 


HOCKEY HELMETS: 


Officially recommended! Moulded ree 


heim plastic with foam lining. 
Ventilated sides and top. Jr. and sr. 
models - 4-way adjustable to fit all 
head sizes. White only. 


SPONGE PUCK 


Black, regulation size. 
Safe, indoors or out. 


Sid 


abel s WE Aoi Sint 
OURED SHIN PADS. Black poly knee 7 
white wool felt; yellow vented shin section, 17” long. 


4.44 pr. 


SR. 4.66 pr. 


‘JR.GOAL STICK 


F. MOUTH BUARD: Hi-impact th 
rubber trim. Adjustoble Srope, t A 


SENIOR HOCKEY STICK 
Stroight-blade - varnished, with 499 


glass-wrapped tip. Left or right, 
Sor 6, 


“JR. PRO" CURV MODEL 
Laminated 47 to 48” handle. 249 


Spiece curved blade. Left 

right, 5 or 6. 

PRO CURV” STICK 

53” to 54” hondle. toh oe the 37? 
4,5,6,7. 

40” ash handle; locquered blade. 1 77 
HOCKEY STICK 

TAPE Black %"x 4 yds. 


ni ay 


lene; foam 
tion holes. 
1.39 


G. GOALIE MASK: Snug fitting, Mode of 
piastic - ribbed for stengine Web head “hen 


adjustoble. Opaque skin colour ....e00s 7.98 


strength, 


Say 


HOCKEY KIT BAG 


points offitrain. All-eround web 
carrying ‘strops; Hea 

th zipper. Ring for 
ting tle-on straps. Blue . 13x24”, 


long 


the renowned skating 
vy-duty, Dura-Hyde 


WOMEN’S 


122? 
pr. 


i 
Sizes 3 to 10 incl. ben 


FEATURE 


399 


canvos = reinforced at 


, full 
ing; “D” 


PLASTIC BLADE 


pas broken frend stick blade, 
eee tight or 


88: 


ft. Heat to 








SPORTMAN'S | 
SPORTMAN'S |. SNOW BOOTS 
; Specially-designed for  snow- 


A favourite with hunters, mobilists - great for all outdoors! 
skiers and snowmobilists! Rubber tread soles; nylon uppers 
Smart, split leather with vinyl with zipper and buckle. Full felt 
gussets and piping. Red cord inner boot with zipper. Built for 
; sling. Double-opening cap. long wear, comfort and warmth! 


48-oz, i a 
FEATURE! Boy 


LOWPRICE) 


ALL-PURPOSE 


LANTERN 


Ideal for hunting and boating! 
Unbreakbble, unsinkable plas- 
tic case. Top hand-grip; pro- 
tected thumb pad 
With 6-volt battery, 
“BURGESS” 
FEATURE 


DRILL 


® Drills oll materials, fast, accurately 
© Capacity: steel 14"; hardwood 
@ 2250 RPM; 1/7 h.p.; 1.9 amps. 

® Bronze tone with brown handle 


| Se 19022 ey Low PRiCe 


3/8” PORTABLE DRILL q 258 ASSORTED WRENCHES 


Double reduction gears. 2,1 
000 Open end, box end and combination wrenches in 
amps. | RPM. all the most-needed sizes, from %" to 7/8” » lengths 
from 4%" to 9%". Heavy-duty, creer seegee hey 


7" PORTABLE SAW poetbaer ik ay pamela tthe! Pathe 


® Cutting depth: 90° 2-3/8"; 45° 1-7/8" 
©@ Easy bevel and depth adjustments 

© With 7%4"-combination blade 

©@ Rugged 1 HP, 9 amp. 4300 RPM motor 


ONE-HAND JIG SAW 
© Makes all-shape cuts In wood, metal, 


ie 
© Capacity: 1” in hardwood; 1% In soft 
© 1/7 HP; 2.4 amps. 5/8” stroke; 3000 SPM 


rubber x Chrome vonodivm steel. 1/16" 
FINISHING SANBER Soeeertecheeee bese nion dic oon 2 © ee ORL TE. lrone vnetinn sed 18 
@ One-hand operation 


B. SANDING DISC ASSORTMENT. Fine medium, coore. 
@ Flush sands on 3 sides Aluminum oxide, 6", S-pock G. 7K° BISSTOM CIRCULAR SAW BLADES, Combination, 
© Ovor 25 sq. ins. orbital action . crows cv roker tooth eeeceess 3.69 on. 


© 2.2 amps; 4000 OPM; 1/6HP 39 2 oa for Ki" & 2/8" dell Poste 


@ 1 3°95 D.COARSE WIRE CUP BRUSH’. ..¢.... 1.49 Bececccces 1.89 
ns ES BLACK & DECKER JIG SAW BLADES; Assorted types. 3. 28-HOLE BRILL BIT BOLDER Golvoniaed steel. 1/14" to 
8338 Witiyeta seer ose een ee Bue 








rx 72”, with framing strips 


5) CAULKING GUN: 


Seol out drafts the easy way! GREY, 


Cortridge-type with smooth, > Be 
ratchet action. Easy loading. ¢ f 
2x8" borrel. Economical 


but efficient I: 


CAULKING CARTRIDGES 


Fit above gun. “Bulldog” -- black, 39 
Grey or white. by 


1” FURNACE FILTERS 


Fibreglass - treated to ONLY 


kill bacteria, ensure fresh . 

air in the home. Save on 

heating. 10 x 20”, 15 x € 
20", 16 x 20”, 20 x 20”, oa. 
16x 25". t 


HUMIDIFIER PLATES 


- Fibreglass construction - 


for replacement in most 
plaie-type furnace humi- ¢ 
difiers. 5 plates per pack. pkg. 


STORM WINDOW KIT 


Save fuel costs - keep 
home warmer! Transpa- 


L FEATURE 
rent plastic sheeting, 36 : 


19 
WEATHERSTRIPPING 

Medoon ups rimnset site Ge 
129 
29: 
99: 
99: 


OUTDOOR THERMOMETER 
79: 


COCO FLOOR MAT 
For front or rear 
door. Tough, shick 
fibers, Shake fe 
cleaning. Cocoa *<ol- 
our. 


and. nails. Wind and 
waterproof, For all wind- 
ows, inside or out. 


DELUXE ALUMINUMAVINYL DOOR SET 
Aluminium back + tubulor vinyl strip. 
Fits doors up to 3’ x 7, 


PUABLE PLASTIC SEALER - Peels off 
in strips - press into crotks for perma- 
nent seal, 


EXTERIOR WEATHERPROOFING TAPE 
Waterproof, sticks to any smooth sur- 
face. he" x 75' long. 


ALUMINUM/VINYL THRESHOLO STRIP 
Aluminum back - vinyl edge seals door 
ot floor level. 3’ long. Screws.” 


Fostens to window frame. 6” 
fubular glass cose - rustproof 
bracket, 5° magnifying spirit 
tube registers. —60° to 120°. 


16" x27" 


2"? 


JUST SAY 
“CHARGE-IT” 


SEE YOUR 
WESTERN DEALER 


Gift! . 
ENGLISH IRONSTONE SET 


Finewhite dinnerware in attractive pattern 
in blue, green, yellow or brown. Fired at very 
high temperature for body strength. Deter- 
gent and dishwasher-proof. 4 each of cups, 
saucers, bread-and-butter plates, soup/cereal 
bowls, 10” dinner plates. 


16-PCE. GLASSWARE 


All the most-needed sizes in one budget-priced 
“buy”! Popular shapes with attractive, handcut 
pattern, Made in Canada. 4 each ‘of dessert 
glasses, 4-oz.,juice glasses, 8-oz. tumblers, 11-oz. 
tumblers. 


2 toto ahtoee 


“TORCAN" | 
BASEBOARD HEATER 


Perfect for fall! Thermostat-controlled, 1000-watt heat. Safety, 
Wp-over switch. CSA opproved. Portable. Baked enamel. finish. 


44" Lx7" Hx 4" W. A “best buy”! 


oe 


- 
- 


ya ees 


FAN HEATER 


Instant-heating, nichrome wire element- 
1500 watts. Attached ‘cord. Baked 
enamel finish. Fon circulates heat, 


“TORCAN™ 1 249 


FAN HEATER/COOLER 
Blows hot or cold! Thermostat-controll- 
ed heat selection. 1500 watts. “Child- 


peoet grille. Baked enamel. Rubber 
‘ect, 


~ “TORCAN™ 1 528 





Rugged, all-steel mats. with traction- FEATURE 
ized surfaces to get you “un-stuck” 

quickly! Simply place under rear 33 
wheels. No winter driver should be 

without them. pair 


Rey. 2.29 WINTER/SUMMER 


RALLY CUSHION 


Unique reversible style! One side covered 
with warm, Orlon pile + the other with 
ventilated, open-weave fabric with racing 
stripe! Coil | innerspring construction. 
Assorted colours. Approx. 18 x 37”. A fine 
value at this low price! ‘ 





INNER CAR 
PRE-HEATER 


Step into a warm ‘car this 


8-Ft. BOOSTER CABLES wit fontced tal 


provides instont’ comfort and ¥ 


¢ frost-f indows, 830-watt 
Top value! Two 8-ft. cables of 6-gauge alumi- Cabadiaiceeat Matt with 


num wire. 200 amp. copper-clad clips. Vinyl “woodgrain” ponel. CSA 
hand grips. Save on towing expenses! opproved. Thermostat con- 
12-1. 6-ga. coppercables.......... 5.98 set trolled. Plugs. into house 


ome FEATURE 


SNOW BRUSH, eee en 

‘on-forced warm oir clear 

SCRAPER & SQUEEGEE windows quickly, inside or 

outside. Hi-impact _ plastic 

The oll-round tool to clear your windows! Thick, | case. 10-ff. attached cord 

nylon-bristle brush with 6” squeegee on top. Plastic] plugs into lighter, With 

scroper on other end. 24” long. Hardwood handle. | window scraper. Exceptional 
value! 


FEATURE 233 
LOW PRICE ' 


BATTERY 
CHARGER: 


\Keep your battery fully 
horged!- Plug into house yf 
tlet. - “Torcan” charges ( (Y 


“TORCAN” 
3x5%x8"D 


“CAR PLUG-IN 
DEFROSTER GUN 


“gvernight. Overload protector 
built-in. CSA approved. 


: : 4 

4 ° bd AF 

FROST SHIELDS | TIRECHAINS | THERMOMETER | 42,04 49° 

} For frost-free windows. Easy, strop-on instolla- Stylish * block case’ 2-amp. 
Easy to install. * Full tion. Fit all cors. Carry “hinged to magnetic 


range of sizes. A must a set. for emergency bose - sticks on dash. 
for safety! traction! 0-140° colored mork- 


ae JUST SAY 


LOW-PRICED! "TOP VALUE! FEATURE “CHARGE-IT” 
29 39» «43s SEE YOUR 
E WESTERN DEALER 

















{Ss 


‘SMOOTH, QUIET-RUNNING 


-| TRACTION 


si “OLYMPIC” SUPER TRACTION 

a on WIDE TRACK 
FOE 2 GREAT TIRES TO CHOOSE FROM: 

BELTED FIBERGLASS 


Our best snow tire for Canadian driving. Gives greater traction j 
and braking power for surer control. 





V 2 fibreglass bells _ WV greater stability and weor 
V 2-ply Polyester cord body V modern, wide-tread design 
V distinctive dual whitewalls VY quiet and smooth-running 


4-PLY POLYESTER . 


Ideal for city and highway. Combines maximum traction, 
quietness and smoother ride under all conditions 


v 4-ply Polyester cord body V first-line tread compounds 
V. stops morning tire thump v wider, deeper tread 
V slimline whitewalls V surer stop-and-go power 









WESTERN'S LOW PRICES. 


BELTED FIBERGLASS 4-PLY POLYESTER 
Deal Whitewalls Slimline Whitewalls 
_ SSS 



















G78/14 (825/14) 


G78/15 (825/ 5) 


(78/15 (900/15) 


5 P>—— ““Olympic™ tires ‘are made by @ leading nadian manufacturer to exceed all 
government safety standards. f 


Se 
=. GUARANTEE 


“Olympic” tires installed on passenger cars ar 








yt) 


I 


NEON 


e 
gvoranteed during their original tread life to be 
free from defects in workmanship and materials 
ond to withstand normal rood hazards without 


limit as to time or mileage. 







\ 


OCCU OINS 


( 


i 


oS 
a 
> | 


FNC QC OOS 












FOR SURE-FOOTED “GO”! 3 


“OLYMPIC” 
TRIPLE 
TRACTION. 


4-PLY NYLON 
SNOW TIRES 


Built to grip their way through snow, mud, slush 
or slick! Made especially for Western by a 
leading Canadian company featuring 4-ply 
nylon cord body and first-line tread compounds. 
-Modern,. quiet-running, deep tread design for 
the utmost reliability. Exceed all, government 
safety ‘specifications. Our most popglar tire for 
high-speed expressway and stop-and-go city 
driving. Install your set today. You can’t go 
wrong with “Triple Traction”. 


FULLY GUARANTEED! 





BUY AN EXTRA WHEEL 


* With an extra wheel you can keep ~ FROM 
your winter tires permanently mount- 
ed. 


- you'll save money on tire chonges 
twice a year 
- prevent bead damage to your fires 





° P . ORIGINAL 
- be able to install your own -winter + ) EQUIPMENT 
tires - QUALITY . . 





HUSKY, DEEP-BITING TREAD” 


TROUBLE! 
















Just say: 


“CHARGE-IT” 


GET YOUR CAR READY 
FOR WINTER NOW! 

“YOUR AUTOMOTIVE HEADQUARTERS” 
WELCOMES “CHARGEX” SHOPPERS 








"WESTERN" 
GAS-LINE 
ANTI-FREEZE 


For quick, sure starts in 
cold weather! Pour into gas 
tank. with each refill - pre-- 
vents frozen gas-line, car- 
buretor and fuel pump. 
Cuts out stalling, sputter 
and hard: starting. Carry 
a few cans in your trunk 
and be prepared! 


WIPER BLADES Cras 
“Arctic” with ice-repel- |’ ENGINE HEATERS 
lant hood. Mode for | For all.cars, Block, oil 
Canadian winters, dipstick, hang-up, 
water pump and tank 


FROM 


60 


PREMIUM" ANTI-FREEZE 


A top-quality product formulated es- 
pecially for Western! Ethylene-glycol 
base, 5 rust inhibitors and metal con- 
ditioner-to keep your cooling system in 
top shape. Refill your radiator today! 


THERMOSTATS 


Power-pill type; for 
winter. 180 & 192° . 
For most cars. 


WATER PUMPS 


Rebuilt by experts. As- 
sembly complete with 
gaskets. Guaranteed. 


98 


up, exchange 


WINDSHIELD 
WASHER 
ANTI-FREEZE 


* 
“Western” - pre-mixed, ready-to- 
use. Will not smear windshield. In 
reusable, plastic container. Choice 


of 2 temperature types: CARBURETORS 


Rebuilt to precise stan- 
dards. Guaranteed, For 


most cars. 


up, exchange 


ALTERNATORS 


-35° ond Chrysler products, 


Rebuilt, Guaranteed. 


For most G.M., Ford * 


RADIATOR CAPS 


Safety-designed. Main- 
fain correct pressure, 
For most cars, 


STARTERS 


Exactingly rebuilt. Gua- 
ranteed. For most mo- 
dels, 


, 


REGULATORS 


For olternator systems, 
Chrysler, G.M. & Ford. 
Rebuilt Guaranteed. 


49 


up, exchange 


TUN€-UP KITS-& PARTS 


CAR MAKE ANO TEAS. PARTIAL 
AIST OMY. WE CAN Surry 
FOU MOST VEMCLES 


F, “A-0-K" STARTING SPRAY 
€y Starts engine fast. Saves battery. 


29 ‘ G. “WESTERN” WATER PUMP LUBE 
1 lubricates, inhibits rust. 15-oz, 


Acadion, Camaro 
Chevrolet, Chevelle 
Chevy Il, Pontioc 
1963-70, 6 cyl. most 
1939-70, 8 cyl. most 


A. RADIATOR SEALER - 7 oz. 
Seals leaks permanently, 


99: 
79: 
89: 


5, BUMPER GUARD SPRAY - 6 ez. 
rome and trim protector. 2, Plymouth & Voliont 
1960-70, 6 cyl. most 


C. RADIATOR FLUSH - 15 oz. 1960-70, 8 evi. most 


Flushes out rust in minutes, 
~ 





J. WINOSHIELD SPRAY DE-ICER 
Melts ice on windows. 14-02. 


K. "VOX" WINDSHIELD DE-ICER 
l6 oz, . 


Aim, spray, drive away | 6-Or, 


E. 14 oz. LOCK DE-ICER ere 
Defreezes, prevents freezing, 2 Be 


D. INSTANT TRACTION TIRE SPRAY 1 39 
. p. 


H. AEROSOL IGNITION SPRAY 
79: Waterproofs ignition system, 
B-oz. 


Ford, Foirlone, Fokkon 
Mustang, Montego, Torino 
Meteor, Comet 

1960-70, 6 cyl. most 
1960-70, 8 cyt. most 


79: 





ORIGINAL | “BEAT THE FREEZE”’ 


EQUIPMENT 
QUALITY! 
WESTERN 


“REGULAR-DUTY" 
BATTERY ~ 


The leader in the low-priced field - made es- 
pecially for Western by a famous battery 
manufacturer! Ruggedly-built, with many 
of the features found in higher-priced 
batteries sold elsewhere. 54 amp. hour 
capacity; 53 plates. Excellent value for the 
economy-minded motorist I 


GUARANTEED 
24 MONTHS 


eee. 


WESTERN “PREMIUM” 


WITH TOP-QUALITY 
WESTERN PRODUCTS! 


WESTERN 
LOW PRICE 


rey 


WESTERN “SUPER DUTY” 


An investment in trouble-free, all-season 





Canada’s" greatest power package - 
features 78 plates with 85 amp. hour 
rating - thanks to new Polypropylene 
contoiner. Provides up to 20 times greater 
strength than rubber. Allows more plates 
per cell and greater acid volume. Exceeds 
all battery container tests. 


7 


GUARANTEED 5 YEARS 49 
1-YEAR FREE 
REPLACEMENT ize 


BATTERY CABLES. 


Heavy-duty construction. for better 
performance. New-car quality, 


se Qe vw 


~ 


TERMINAL CLEANER 


Wire brush assembly to clean bottery 
posts and cable ends. Plastic cose, 


“Only 
— 


Outperforms original. equipment almost 
50% providing reliable starts at all times. 
Packed with “power-plus” to operate extra 
accessories even under extreme weather 
conditions. Changeover to “Super-Duty” 
for top “go-power” all winter long! 


48 MONTH 
GUARANTEE 
12 MONTH 


» REPLACEMENT 


readings of charge, 


98: 


BATTERY HYDROMETER 


Cell tester - gives accurate, full range 


Top value! 9 8: 


driving! Should this battery fail within 6 
months (not -merely discharge) we will 
replace it FREE. Should it fail within 30 
months, we will replace it on a pro-rata 
basis. You poy only for the time used. 


* 
CHEVROLET, PONTIAC 


DODGE, PLYMOUTH 
FORD, METEOR 
RAMBLER... 


BATTERY FILLER 


spill filling. 


ur 69 





Heavy-duty bulb; plastic stem. For non- 











JUST SAY 


“CHARGE IT” 


SEE YOUR 
WESTERN DEALER 


WANT TO OPEN YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS ? WE HAVE 


. chised associate-dealer{ 


COP e eee esreseeresesers 


alee seeee 


THE KEY 


y 
Become a Weptern fron- 


Bea part of a 125-store 
successful organization. 
Thot success story fs 
spreod across S prov. 
inces! No experience is 
Necessary... we train 

in olf phoses of the ioe 
panding automotive field. 
Your investment con be as 
low os $15,000. For 
details, complete ond 
mail coupon at left today. 


7 


/ 
/ 


WESTERN 


MUFFLERS — 


DONT TAKE CHANCES WITH A LEAKY EXHAUST! 





. SHOP WESTERN FOR THE BEST MUFFLER “BUYS” 


\ 


IN TOWN! 


TANDARD 
The ideal muffler for the budget-conscious driver - 
id! Heavy-gauge, steel outer shell with roll 
a Lifetime guarantee against blowouts and 
$s. : 


uts you dollars 
1 blowout-proof 
manvfacturer’s 


PREMIUM 


Quality you can depend on! Top-of-the-line muffler with double steel 
shell and heavy, zine coatings inside and out for longer life. Lifetime 
gvarantee against blowouts and manufacturer's defects. 


“THRUSH” - tHE sounp oF power 
“Computed performance” means laboratory tested and engineered 


\ = assuring more power, faster acceleration, better gas mileage and 


greater engine economy! Install a “Thrush” on your car for the 


deep-throated, mellow sound of power! 


‘ 





Partial list onty. We can supply for most vehicles. 


PECIAL! 


%, “STANDARD SERVICE” 


~ 
CHEV./PONTIAC ‘54-64 
CHEV./PONTIAC 6-cyl-'65-68 


Cee 


Reg. 4.98* 











SHOCK ABSORBERS 


*Safer Steering *Smoother Riding *Save Tire Wear 


PREMIUM 


Ruggedly built for top pertormance even under 
~ severe driving conditions. Hardened, high- 
. quality steel rod and body. All-weather fluid 

won't weaken with temperature changes. Supe- 

rior to new-car quality. 


HEAVY DUTY 


Engineered especially for vehicles that carry 
heavy loads, tow trailers or are subject to ex- 
treme driving conditions - including station 
wagons and other vehicles with heavy suspen- 
sion systems, 


New shocks from Western pay for themselves 
by preventing costly repairs. 


" SHOCK SPRINGS 


Install In minutes over’ present shock absorbers. 
Increase load capacity, stabilize tuming, cushion the 
tide. Fit most cars, Available for front or rear. 


59 


FROM 
pair 


COIL SPRING LIFTERS™ 


Give a “lift” to sagging front or 
rear coil springs, Aluminum, rub- 
ber, adjustable or rubber-ring 
types. Fit most cars. 


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Ontario Legal Aid 


Said Passive 


And Too Costly 


OTTAWA (CP) — Legal aid 
for the poor in Ontario costs 
$261.13 a case compared with 
$51 for a more effective system 
in the United States, a federal 
study says. 

The study for the National 
Council of Welfare rejects judi- 
care systems such as Ontario's 


‘as passive and costly and says 


they can’t be justified when 
compared with the storefront 
Jawyer program in the U.S. 
“The Ontario plan would be 
pressed to point to a list of 
achievements which have done 
anything to substantially alter 


dhe- position of their poor 


esents,”” the study says. ‘ 
r*Lack of any outreach policy. 
Yess accessibility and little ef- 
fort to educate the client com- 
munity create a situation in 
which important problems are 
Jess likely to be brought for- 


Storefront 


The conference rejected the 
“traditional indifferent legal aid 
system™ and recommended ag: 
gressive poverty law and neign- 
borhood law offices. 

The Taman report says at 


‘least two provinces—Nova Sco- 


tia and Manitoba—appear on 
the verge of adopting the ncigh- 
borhood Iegal services concept. 
It criticized the three-year-old 
Ontario system for leaning 
heavily toward litigation with 
most No preventive work. 


kami was limited to criminal or 


Myorca.cases and rarely helped 
‘with many daily problems of 
the poor, such as: 
Rented premises that don't 
—? 


ward.” 

Larry Taman, law clerk of 
Mr, Justice Bora Laskin of the 
Supreme Court of Canada, was 
commissioned by the council to 
Study “legal services for the 
poor,” 

The council, not to be con- 
fused with the older Canadian 
council on Social Development. 
was created a year ago by Wel- 
fare Minister John Munro, 

It is intended to give a boots- 
trap view of welfare policy and 
procedures and its membership 
includes a number of welfare 
recipients. 

The bootstrap view. expressed 
at the Poor People’s Conference 
here in January, says: : 

“Legal aid in Canada is a sys- 
tem by the legal professional 
for the legal professional with 
total indifference to the client— 
the poor.” 


Concept 


meet heat housing standards; 
welfare benefits given on terms 
that aren't in the law: vague el- 
igibility standards for public 
housing: confusing regulations 
on workmen's compensation 
and unemployment insurance; 
vulnerability to unscrupulous fl- 
Nance contracts. 

Furthermore the Ontario plan 
was costly because judicare 
lawyers “are remunerated at 
nearly the rate to which the 
profession has become accus- 
tomed.” 

“These rates are kept high by 
law association tariff schedules 
which lawyers in private prac- 
tice are rot permitted to 
breach.” the report says. 


Overhead Too Costly 


“As well, the (Ontario) plan's 
overhead of approximately 25 
per cent, a large part of which 
is spent determining eligibility 
and reviewing billings, is in ad- 
dition to the normal 45 per cent 
involved in running the lawyers” 
own offices.” 

Also, there was no poverty 
Jaw section of the Canadian Bar 
Association to keep lawyers 
abreast of the ficld, as there is 
on corporation or tax Jaw. This 


ncant costly duplication of ef- 


rt. 

Divorce costs were so high 
that the attomey-general's com- 
mittee on legal aid in Nova Sco- 
tia has recommended salaried 
lawyers be retained. 

Law was meaningless unless 
a person had access to it. Yet a 
Halifax study had found only 32 
per cent of those interviewed 
felt they could afford a lawyer. 
Ontario legal aid offices 


tended to be in the business 
areas, raising not only physical 
but also psychological barriers 
against the poor. 

The provincially-financed On- 
tario system is administered by 
the Law Society of Upper Can- 
ada with a legal aid advisory 
committee reporting to the -at- 
torney-general. 

A fulltime director is aided 
by 46 area directors. only one 
working fulltime. The area 
director hears applications for 
aid and decides whether a legal 
problem exists. Then a welfare 
olficer assesses eligibility. 

The area director then de- 
cides whether to issue a certifi- 
cate. The successful applicant 
may choose a lawyer from a 
panel, but the lawyer doesn’t 
have to take the case. 

The lawyer is paid 75 per cent 
of an established fee schedule, 
plus his expenses. 


Discretion Questioned 


In practice, the report says, 
this gives the area director con- 
siderable discretion. Some re- 
strictions have been placed on 
certificates pranted for di- 
Vorees. even where the appli- 
seant qualifies financially.» 

plan drew 84,091 pegple to 

Rea offices in the ycar ending 
‘March 30, 1970. of whom 61.6 
per cent made formal applica- 
tions. 

The average cost of a case 
was $194.12. 

But the 19 per cent law soci- 
ety administrative overhead. 
Taised the figure to $217.73 and 
the cost, of the eligibility test-- 
administeragghy the department 
of social and family services— 
brought the cost to $2561.13. 

If spending on civil _cases— 


mostly ‘Bivorce—alone was con- 
sidered, the average cost was 
$228.03. 

Tne US. Neighborhood Legal 
Services Programme cost $51 a 
case. and the report says: 

“There is no evidence to sug- 
gest that service ... is of a 
lesser quality than that under 
judicare. 

“Indeed, existing evidence 
would seem to point in the op- 
posite direction.” 

The report concluded that the 
most effective answer to the 
many problems inherent in the 
Ontario plan was decentraliza- 
tion and “the use of full-time 
lawsers who will accept 38 part 
of their work ... the task of 
reaching beyond those  bar- 
riers.” 


Reconciliation Within Decade 


_ Economics Before 


y OTTAWA (CP) — Canada has 
told other nations that in the 
debate over economic growth 
versus environmental quality, 
economic growth is essential. 

This is a key point of the pre. 
liminary Canadian position sub- 
mitted tothe United Nations cn- 
vironmental conference to be 
held nakt June at Stockholm. 

So long as jobs are needed for 
one or two members of a fam- 
fly. “economic growth is neces- 
Bary,” says the position paper 


» 





‘ 


er 


‘Leee the air-fare. 
has started, 


OTTAWA (CP) — Hopse for a 
week-long truce in the Com- 
mons grains-payments dispute 
were shattered Monday as New 
Democrats and a handful of 
Conservatives lunged into de 
bate against the government's 
grain-income stabilization bill. 

The three Prairie agriculture 
ministers Friday asked that de- 
bate on the bill be adjourned a 
week while they and other farin 
leaders attempted to make it 
more acceptable to critics. 

But the government aga'n put 
the matter up for Commors 
consideration because, said Otto 
Lang. minister responsible for 
the Canadian wheat buard. the 
Conservatives refused to agree 


_fo the ceasefire request. 


Conservative House Leader 
Gerald Baldwin (Pezce Rives) 
said he would have supported 
the postponement hatl.the gov 
ernment agreed (o significant 
amendments to its bil’. 

The bill would set up a joint 
fund into which the government 
would contribute twice the 
amount put in by farmers each 
year, 

The plan would replace two 
main subsidy programs now ia 
effect: The Temporary Wheat 
Reserves Act, under which the 
government pays the storage 
costs for surplus wheat, and 
deal whereby the government 
makes up any deficits in wheat 
board payouts. 

Mr. Lang said last week he 
would withdraw the bill if the 
opposition continued a senes of 
Procedural attacks stalling its 
passage. He reiterated his inten 
tion Monday. 

Later, Conservative Leader 
Robert Stanfield issued a «tat> 
ment saying his party will aban 
don attempts to balk the bill by 
procedural manoeuvres. 

But Jack Horner (PC—Crow- 
foot). long opposed to the legis- 
lation, predicted in an interview 
that the bill would die any way 
under the weight of 14 amend- 
ments already on the agenda. 
Four of the amendments have 
been put forward by the Con. 
servalives. 


THE WEATHER 


Synopsis: Showers are ex- 
pected to more across the lower 
lakes tonight. The push of 
colder air from Hodson Bay is 
forecast to continue Into Wed- 
nesdav and drop the readings 
another five to 10 degrees. This 


would then” give about normal, 


temperatures for this time of 
Sear. 


TEMPERATURES 
Mas. Min, 
Today o 3S 
Year Ago shu 


| Today's Chuckle | 


“Stick to your washing, iron- 
ing. scrubbing and coéking.” a 
husband-exhorted his wife, “No 
wife of mine is going to work.” 


Beavers, Firemen and Shoppers 


The Fire-Prevention Week booth at the Quinte Mall attracts 
passing shoppers. Members of the Fire Department distribute 
jeaflets on fire prevention and talk to visitors on any household 


probleins. 


. 


Davis Asks 
Early Date 


TORONTO (CP) — Premier 
William Davis said Monday 


night he has sent a telegram to 


Prime” Minister Trudeau sug 
gesting tha. a planned federal 
provincial conference on the 
egonomy be held carlier than 
the scheduled dates of Dec. 64. 

Mr, Davis said he had sug 
gested that the conference “be 
moved ahead any time. well 
any time after the 28th (of Octo- 
ber) preferably, because we 
think it is urgent and we're sug 
gesting in that communication 
that the emphasis be_on-job sit- 
. uations and on the economy.” 

Ontario has a general election 
Oct, 21. 


U. S. Seta 





. 


Subtle a 
‘May Have Started — 


tions: 


government replies to a 


Government ministers also 
denied they are considering 
yielding to U.S. requests for re- 
vision of the 1965 Canada-US. 
auto pact and 1963 cefcnce-pur- 


chasing agreement in order to 
win relief from the extra duty. 


Trudeau Agrees 


To Discuss Jobs 


OTTAWA (CP) — Prime Min- 
ister Trudeau promised Monday 
to consider making representa- 
tions to Soviet Premier Alexci 
Kosygin on behalf of Jews in 
the Sovict Union. 

Andrew Brewin (NDP—Toron- 
toGreenwood) said that so far 
this year 30,000 Soviet Jews 
have requested exit visas but 
only 7,000 have received them. 

The Soviet premier is sched- 
uled to begin a one-week Cana- 
dian visit Oxt. 18. 


PCs Capture 
N.B. Riding 


RICHIBUCTO, N.B. (CP) — 
The Progressive Conservative 
party, in a provincial byelection 
upset. Monday captured the 
Kent seat held for nearly 19 
years by Louis J, Robichaud, 
former Liberal premier of New 
Brunswick 

Shattering a voting tradition 
that had kept the predominantly 
Acadian riding Liberal since 
1917, Conservative Omer Leger, 
a year-old St. Anthony insur- 
ance agent. upset Liberal Omer 
Cormier. 48. a Ste. Marie 
farmer, by a majority of 2.018 
votes. 


BRIGHTON. England (CP) — 
Former prime minister Harold 
Wilson vowed today fight 
Britain's projected che into 
the European Common Market 
on present terms every inch of 
the way. He demanded total 
backing of all iabor MPs in that 
fight. 

"We have no room for passen- 
gers or faint hearts,” he told 
checring delegates at the par- 


News Briefs 


UNITED NATIONS (CP) -- The United States 
indicated Mooday it is willine to make a contribu. 
tion to help the UN out offits financic! difficulties. 
although ut madc it clear tee difficulty was caused 
by others, State Secretary ‘William Rogers said in 
a speech to the General Assembly that if other 
countrics make “adequate contributions,” the US. 
wilt add its zssistance. That left the Soviet Union 
as the only big power that has net promised to help 
thd UN out of a wtuation that Secretary-General 
U Thant savs has the organization near bank- 
rupicy. . 








Inside Your 


* * * 


LONDON (CP) — Emperor Hirohito of Japan 
received a royal welcome today as he began a 
three-day state visit to Rritain that has aroused 
a mixture of curiosity and bitter memorics of thd 
Second World War, Princess Margaret greeted the 
emperor and Empress Nagako aboard their 
special Japan airlines DCS at Gatwick Airport, 26 
miles south of London. 


wrecking the. mteriors 
Pages 2 and 3. 


aeenevevnesnssanersesesseveefenserreeeeen 


: 


7 





While education board members were agon- 
izing over future building plans, vandals were 


@ The city’s traffic committee has narrowed the 
number of pussible methods of overcoming the 
downtown traffic problem. Page 2. j. 





which may be revised. before 
next June's mecting. 

At the same time, the Cana- 
dian paper says apparent con- 
flict between growth and envi- 
ronmental quality can and must 
be resolved, adding that *‘such 
reconciliation . . . is probable in 
the Canada of the next few dec- 
ades.” 

The Canadian position. made 
public Monday. clashed sharply 
sith views of the Science Coun- 
cil of Canada in a report to the 


rere rer to 


government which also was dis- 
tributed Monday. 
Dr. Pierre Dansereau, who 


headed a Science Council com, 


mittee whose recommendaticns 
were the basis for the report, 
told a news conference he does 
not believe economic growth as 
now defined can be reconciled 
with improving environmental 
quayty. 

lie said the Science Council 


Vit “all sorts of reservations” 


about economic growth as the 
primary goal in Canada. 

Dr. O. M. Solandt. ‘Science 
Council chairman, said that ini 
tially the Council had accepted 
“rather uncritically" the cco- 


nomic growth goals sct out by 


the Economic Council of Can 
ada. 

Since that time. a major 
change had occurred in the 
council's views on the subject. 
This had been reflected in var 
ious reports offering advice to 
the government, 


Ina letter attached to the 
urban development report. Dr. 
Dansereau, a University} of 
Montreal professor, attacks the 
concept of economic growth as 
failing to take adequate accou:%t 
of undesirable. by products of 
consumption such as waste and 
pollution. 

He argues that. design. re 
shaping and development of the 
urban ‘environment cannot be 
achieved within the social and 


economic system as it now ex- 
ists. 

However, at the UN confer. 
ence, Canada has indicated"that 
its position may be that, with an 
aroused public opinion and 
other factors. economic growth 
and a better environment can 


‘be achieved over a period of 
time. 


NS the Canadian position-paper 


3ays the benefits of growth can 
finance efforts to enhance the 
environment. In addition, Can- 








PM ‘Too Busy? 
| For Talks Now 


OTTAWA (CP) — Commons exchanges Monday 
aroused suspicions that the cavinct has decided to use 
Canada’s energy resources as a bargaining counter in 
its campaign for, relief from United States trade restric- 


The suspicion among MPs were fuelled by cautious 


scries of questions on how 


Canada could obtain exemption from the 10-per-cent 
supplementary duty the U.S. has placed on imports 
and other measures of economic protectionism. 


Prime Minister Trudeau said 
the government has toid the 
United States it now is too busy 
with other economic matters to 
continue US.-requested discus- 
sions on cnergy issues. 

The talks on trade in ofl ad- 
Jeurned last spring with a view 
to resumption in the fall. The 
U.S. government recently asked 
when they could begin again. 

“We have indicated tothe 
United States that at this partic- 
ular point we are preoccupied 
with other matters, particularly 
economic matters, and that we 
are not in a position at the mo- 
ment to sit down with United 
States officials and continue 
these talks," Mr. Trudeau told 
Conservative Leader Robert 
Stanfield. 

Andrew Brewin” (NDP—To- 
ronto Greenwood) asked if the 
refusa] is “a subtle form of re 
taliation in respect of recent 
US. economic policies.” 

Mr. Trudeau said, “No. 

“You mean it is not subtle?” 
interjected New Democrat chief 
David Lewis. 

The questions followed pub- 
lished reports that senior cabi- 
ret ministers have disagreed on 
whether to make auto-pact con~ 
cessions in an attempt to obtain 


removal of the U.S, import 
charges. 
Mr. Trudeau, however, said 


Monday a report on cabinet dis- 
sension was entirely false. 

Under the auto pact, Canada 
is guaranteed a certain share— 
too large a share say U.S. offi. 
cials—of production and em- 
ployment in the North American 

SUBTLE 
Sce Page 14 


Wilson Vows Fight 


ty's annual_conyention: “There 
is rot one Labor member of 


Parliament who could have 
been clected by his own ef- 
forts.”"* 


Wilson was plainly warning 
Deputy Leader Roy Jenkins and 
a band of followers who have 
signalled their intention of vot- 
ing with Prime Minister Heath's 
Conservative government when 
Parliament makes its choice oa 
the issue Oct. 28. 


Intelligencer 


of four public schools. 


resesevenseeeenvecngronssnesamind 


Be.Ottawa’s Position at UN. 


» ada has only just started to a 


ness research and technology to. 
this task. 

The paper.catalogues enviroa- 
mental meaggres taken in the 
last few years, from a mw 
water act to agreements with 
the United States to fight Great 
Lakes ‘pollution. 

It expresses support for mul- 
ti-nation attempts to take action 
against pollution of the seas, 
over-fishing or other factors be- 
yond the control of any one na- 
tion, 











. 





2. THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5s, 1971 





Vandals Hit 


Four Schools 


By IAN ROBERTSON 
Staff Reporter 

Four area public schools 
were heavily ransacked dur- 
ing an overnight series of 
break-ins. in which desks and 
filing cabinets were _ rifled, 
quantities of cash were re- 


@ moved and as one school prin- 


cipal put it, “they did a lot 
of stupid things." 

Bayside Public School, the 
most heavily hit, was. enter- 
ed after vandals broke a win- 
dow in a rear door and un- 
latched the crash bar. As 
principal Arno Hall opened 
the main office door this 
moming, he had to apply 
pressure in order to clear the 
piles of filing cabinet papers 
from in front of the door. 

Microphones. electrical 
cords, piles of office records 
and an assortment of school 
eq were strewn 
across the office floor to such 
@n extent, that only one or 
two small areas of tile were 
Jeft clear. 

“They really did a good 
§od of it,’ Mr. Hall told re- 


porters, 

OPP Constable Thomas 
Hume, a member of one of 
two teams investigating the 


Safety Violation 
Fines Levied 


Judge T. Y¥. Wills Monday 
afternoon assessed Rollins 
Lumber Ltd. of Foxboro, a 
total of $305 fines and court 
costs after it was found guilty 
of charges of failing to en- 
sure that construction ‘hard 
hats were worn and failure to 
ensure that cord-connected 
electrical power tools were 
properly grounded. 

The charges were laid 
under the Construction Safety 
Act following a routine in- 
vestigation at a home addi- 
tion construction site on High- 
way 2 in Sidney Township 
July 7. 

Judge Wills asked W. R. 
Owens, “construction safety 
olficer wth the Ontario De- 
partment of Labor to advise 
him on scales of finess-When 
informed that a lesser scale 
of $100 was usually levied) in 
the case of the electrical 
grounding charge, Judge 
Wills suggested this might be 
because of the lesser danger 
than the lack of hardhats. 


CARPENTRY 


CONTRACTORS 
Renorations, Repairs, Additions, 


Rec, Room, Bathroom, etc. 

Rare eg ARRANGED 
LitTY SARA} 

rL. YO 


ME 


Wedding Photosraphs 


WM. E. RILEY 








break-ins, estimates cash loss 
from school insurance  en- 
velopes collected from pupils 
at between $25 and $30. Dam- 
age to.the door has been plac- 
ed at $50. 

Denton Meiklejohn, principal 
at CanniftonCorbyville Pub- 
lic: School, described what 
he found this morning; - 

“They had en in a\low- 
ec door, sma the glass 
and forced the bar down; 
there was a little bit of cash 
taken, But I won't know how 
much until I check, 

“They ransacked the office 
pretty well and got into the 
file cabinets; however, there 
was nothing taken there,” he 
told The Intelligencer in a 
telephone conversation this 
morning. 

“They did a lot of stupid 
things, like placing an aquar- . 
jum on the floor, The two 
squirrels in the aquarium ¢s- 
caped. but we got them 
back.”* 

Mr. Meiklejohn said a sep- 
arate classroom was broken 

. but damage was minor, 
All money taken was contain- 
ed in insurance envelopes. . 

At Centenary Public School, 
principal Robert Butcher 
thinks entry was gained 
through a window in the of- 
fice, but this has not been 
proved. 

Mr. Rutcher described the 
situation at his school as one 
of ‘just_a general mess. 
There wasp bit of glue and 
paste spfead around: this 
schocl is small so they don't 
have such a Lig area to work 
m. 

The fourth school entered, 
Harmony Public School near 
Foxtoro, was, in the words of 
principal John Emerson 
“poally tured upside down.” 

A stone used to break open 
a door window was sull lying 
on the floor when staff ar- 
rived this morning. A gaping 
hole was mute testimony to 
the damage which lay beyond 
it. 

“Nothing wag actually 
taken, but file cabinets and- 
office file’ were ransicked. 

“I think they were looking 


for insurance money.” said 
Mr. Emerson, “out we've 
been taking ours to the 


bank.” 

Dazwage estimates for the 
window and office dcor have 
been placed at between $40 
and $50. 

All principals expressed the 
hope that this series of break- 
ins could he cleared up in a 
manner similar to the more 
schools in Prince Edward 
County. 

Two Belleville youths were 
convicted Sept. 24 of malic- 
ious damage and breaking 
and entering at Kente and 
Massassaga public schools in 
July. The youths received one 
year and three months, re- 
spectively, in reformatory, 


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serious damage inflicted on™ 





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ree ’ Town Garbage’ Service 


To Get Trial Period 


Skeptical New Arrival 


Canada Manpower’s James Stavely (1ight) yesterday brought the last 
of Ontario's quota of Tibetan refugees to Belleville, swelling the local 
Tibetan community by four to a total of .18. Newest arrivals are Gonam 
Sanang: (left) his wife and 20-month-old son. who took a wary eye of Mr. 
Stavely. Standing at right is Sangey Samang, who arrived with his brother's 
family from New Delhi. Belleville received the first and last Tibetans to be 
brought here from Indian refugee camps. 


Two Alternatives Selected 


Traffic Committee Zeroes in on Problems 


By ROY PEACOCK 


Stall Reporter 

Site alternatives for propos- 
¢d new structures and road 
ways to alleviate the city's 
northsouth traffic problems at 
the upper bridge and on Can- 
niften Road have been reduc 
ed to two by the city traffic 
committee. 

Earlier. consulting engineers 
Totten. Sims, Hubicki Associ- 
ates Ltd.. in a north-south 
corridor study report had pro- 
posed six different choices — 
three each for the two prob- 
lem areas. 

The report was presented 
to city council at its regular 
mecting last week and was re- 
ferred to the traffic commit- 
tee for consideration. 

The report suggested cither 
one or two new bridges over 
the Moira River at the north 
end of Pinnacle and Church 
Streets and two locations for 
either a subway or overpass 
across the CN double tracks to 
replace the present level 
crossing on Cannifton Road. 

Yesterday the traffic com- 
mittee favored construction of 
only one bridge at the end of 
Pinnacle Street to relieve traf- 
fic gongestion in the upper 
bridge arca. 

And it all but ruled out con 
struction of cither an over 
pass or subway over the CN 
tracks at the present Cannif- 
ton Road crossing. 






Instead the committee opt- 
ed for a grade separation lo- 
cation cast of the present 
crossing, the proposed routc 
to cross the CNRA park and 
link up with Emily Street. 

The proposed grade separa- 
tion location and roadway sys 
tem favored by the commit 
tee is one of the three alter- 


Parking Fine 


System Changed 


TRENTON (Staff) — A new 
Overnight parking bylaw came 
into effect here last night and 
it brings a substantial change 
in the method of pumshing 
those who leave their vehicles 
along the roadways dunng 
snow removal hours, 

Last year the procedure fol- 
Jowed here was for police of- 
ficers to record the names of 
violators and send them court 
summonses through the mail 

Although no change was 
made Monday to provisions to 
check roadway parking. the 
summons procedure has been 
rejected 

Summonses will be repiac 
ed this winter by parking Uck 
cts that will be Ieft on tae 
car. Fines of $5 for a first ¢ 
fence and $15 for repetifdhs 
may be paid by placing the 
fine in one of the collection 
boxes located around town. 


a 


Natives given by the consult 
ants 

Committee members felt 
that the present Cannifton 
Road crossing was too close 
to CN railway river bridge 
to iid a subway. while 
ramps for an overpass would 
destroy many of the proper- 
ties both north and south of 
the railway. 

If a subway was to be built 
at the Cannifton Road cross 
ing. a temporary railway 
bridge would be needed over 
the river to allow diversion 
of rail traffic while construc 
ion was 1n progress. 


Consultant George Totten es- 


timated such a bridge would 
cost at least $400.000 
However, priority is expec 
ted to be given the Upper 
Bridge traffic problem but 


committee members are still 


not decided on the route traf- 
fic should take north of the 
proposed new hridge. 

The consulting engineers 
prooosed the route should be 
along Cameron Strect with 
the roadway to join North 
Frott Street at about Strach 
an Street 

Seme traffic — commuttce 
members wondered, however. 
if the new Pinnacle = street 
bridge could rot be angled 
toward the intersection of 
North Front and Moura Street. 
This. it was felt. might re 


‘ 


Wall-to-Wall Ransacking 


aN sere Public School princlpal Arno Hall this morning joined OPP 


Cor 


simijarly struck, 


le/Lyle Bowes in surveying the scattered remnants of his office, left 
in wis ondition by overnight vandals, Thice other area schools were 


TRENTON (Staff), — Tren- 
ton Sanitation Ltd. will be 
awarded a five - year contract 
for the collection of garbage 
in the town but not before a 
set of preliminary problems 


is ironed out with the firm. 


Council had been prepared 
last night to give final ap- 
proval to the $39,990 yearly 


~ contract but delayed’ giving 


third reading to the covering 


‘bylaw on the recommendation . 


of Councillor Pete Aziz. 

Mr. Aziz suggested holding 
off on‘acceptance.of the con- 
tract to allow “a few days 
trial of the new service.” 

Councillors brought to the 
floor during Monday's regu- 
lar meeting a series of com- 
plaints against the new ser- 
vice’ that began last Friday. 

According to George Greer, 
all garbage is not being col- 
lected along Sidney Street. 

Councillor Stan Ketcheson 
reported a Dufferin Avenue 
business has been asked to 


Ruddy Donates. 
Sign Spaces — 


This year's fire prevention 
week campaign is receiving 
aid from the firm of E. L. 
Ruddy Ltd. which has ‘donat- 
ed space for billboard adver- 
tising. 

The signs at the recreation 
centre and at the corner of 
Dundas and Coleman warm 
passersby of the dangers of 
fire, 


sult in less property acquisi- 
ticn being required. 

In the end, committee mem- 
bers decided to look closely 
into both possibilities and 
directed the firm of consul- 


pay $14 a month for one gar- 
bage pickup, $17.50 if it wants 
two. 

“Some businesses cannot af- 
ford this ., . I think:it is a 
pretty heavy charge,” he said. 

Councillor Ted Parker inter- 
jected that he did not think 
Trenton Sanitation was asking 
businesses jo pay additional 
fees for garbage collection and 
suggested the $14 a month 
proposition comes from an- 
other company offering sup- 
plemental service. 

Another problem with the 
new garbage service is that 
many businesses in the down- 
town area assumed collections 
would continue on Mondays 
as in the past but this will 


not be the case. Trenton San- - 


itation will collect in the core 
area Tuesdays. 

Refuse [rom businesses was 
placed on the street to be 
carted away yesterday morn-. 
ing but stayed along the road- 
ways through Monday for re- 
moval today. 

It is expected council will 
approve the new contract 
within 10 days but first the 
problems will be settled. 

Council had “received two 
bids for the garbage contract 
when tenders clésed last week 
— one from the former. oper- 
ator. Ross Wilman, and one 
from Trenton Sanitation. Ac- 
cording to committee of the 
whole minutes, “Mr. Wil- 
man’s. tender was unsigned, 
did not have a bid deposit, 
or a performance bond as re- 
quired.” 


tants to prepzre conceptual 
plars for both alternatives. 
follewing which a © decision 
would be made. 

Enzircers said a concentual 
plzn for the alternate routes 


Hasty Pees Win 
Shooting Trophies 


CAMP BORDEN (Staff) — 
Belleville’s Hastings - Prince 
Edward Regiment scored top 
targets in the annual Ontario 
Rifle Association, Service Rifle 
Matches held bere over the 
weekend 

“We expected to pick up 
one or two team trophies, but 
to walk away with six was 
astounding,” team Captain J. 
B. Milroy of Belleville, said 
following announcement of the 
six individual and one over- 
all team win. 

“We'll have to go back next 
year and try to keep it.” he 
added. 

The Hasty Pees took hon- 
ors in six separate matches, 
incliding: 

Amiens Match, sharp- 
shooter class. won by CWO 
Howard Adamson of Belleville. 

— Dieppe Match, * sharp- 
shooter class, won by Sgt. G. 
T. Douglas of Peterborough. 

— Dunkirk Match, expert 
class, won by Capt. J. B. 
Milroy of Belleville. 

— Ambheim Match, master 
class, won by WO L. W. Dine- 
sen of Peterborough and in 
the sharpshooter class, Sgt. 
G. T. Douglas of Peterborough 
paced first. 


t 
Funerals 


MRS, LORNE W. BROOKS 
Stirling 

The funeral of the former 

Lillie May Jarvis of Stirling 

was held Saturday afternoon 

at the Hogle Funeral Home. 


4 
£99939 Stirling. 


Rev. J. S. A. Spearmani, 
with assistance from Miss 
Nancy White officiated. In 
terment was in Carmel - Raw- 


, don Cemetery. 


Bearers were Archie Bail- 
cy, William Murray, Ray Hag: 
erman, Alex Glover. Gerald 
Pycar and Albert Hagerman. 


-CHARLES RUSERT “BOB” 
scott 

The Tuneral of Charles Rob- 
ert “Bob™ Scott was held 
Monday afternoon from the 
Jotn R. Bush Funeral Home 
where service in the chapel 
was conductedby Rev. David 
Murphy of St. Columba Pres- 
byterian Church. Interment 
was in Belleville Cemetery, 

Honorary bearers were 
Tom Bates, Earl Cassellman. 
Chuck Chamberlain, Norm 
Cotten, Norm Hickson, Bruce 


Reynolds, Harold «Stockdale . 


and Emmett Dubois. 

Active bearers were Greg 
Culhane, Tom Egan, Russ 
Kingston, Jack Peoples, Har- 
old Reid and Elmer, Urch. 


» 


— Sgt. Douglas also came 
out tops in the Cooper Match, 
sharpshooter class. 

The regimental team shot a 
top score of 820 of a possible 
1,280 to win the Cole Team 
Match, originated 15 years 
ago by the Essex and Kent 
Scottish Regiment. 

A total of 3410 service rifle- 
men took part in the weekend 
shoot. which was favored by 
sunny skies and warm tem- 
peratures. 

This is the second year the 
Hasty Pecs have attended 
the ORA and Department of 
National Defence matches -at 
Camp Borden. In 1970, the lo- 
cal riflemen took home two 
individual match trophies. 

The two - foot Cole Team 
Match trophy will be on dis- 
play at the Belleville Arm- 
ories for. the first six months, 
after which it will be given 

lace of honor at the Peter: 
t igh headquarters of the 
Hastings Prince Edward 
Regiment. 


Recreation 


Is Studfed 


The old physical education 
classes in high schools are 
getting a new look with the 
institution of recreational 
leadership courses. 

The objective is to give sel- 
ected students at about the 
grade’ 12 level an opportunity 
to study the organization and 
administration of recreational 
facilities in their communities. 


One such class is now under 
way at BCI. under the direc- 
tion of teacher Brian Mac- 
Kenzie. Fifteen students are 
involved in exploring the re- 
creation outlets in Belleville 
and district and in sampling 
all sports and athletic oppor- 
tunities available. 


Last week, for instance, the 
group was guests of the Belle- 
ville Lawn Bowling Club and 
were instructed by John Avery 
and other members in the 
fundamentals of lawn bowling. 

Other activities being inves. 
tigated include winter sports, 
golf, canoe tripping, gliding. 
horseback riding and gymnas- 
tics. u 


The students will organize 
athletic events and work with 
children at Quevn Victoria 

1 to learn the adminis- 
trative and instructional end 
of community reereaticn, 


— 





Wilman had told council 
previously he was quitting 
garbage service to the town 
but did, at least, enter a pro- 
posal to continue his collec- 
tion operation after he 
said he wanted to end 
service here. 


Tape ce 
Tapes Stolen 


TRENTON (Staff) 
Thieves broke into a locked 
car on a municipal parking 
lot here overnight and made 
off with a stereo tape player 
and 10 tape cartridges. 

The car, owned by Robert 
Baylis of RR3, Roseneath, 
had been parked in the Front 
Street municipal lot and po- 
lice say. a side vent window 
had been forced open to gain 
jaccess to the $150 worth of 
contents. 


Store Robbed 


Belleville Detachment, On- 
tario Provincial Police, cD 


. 


reported a break-in at tt 
cay Monday monring. 

Entry was gained by fore 
ing a rear window, Approxi- 
mately $175 in cash was stol- 
en, together with a Cooey .22 
calibre repeating rifle, valued 
at $40. and 1,000 rounds of 
mushroom shells, valued at 
20. 

OPP Constable Richard Le 
wis is conducting the investi- 
gation. 


could be ready fn from four 
to six weeks. 

Also it directed preparation 
for alternate conceptual plans 
for a subway and overpass 
across the CN double tra 
to réplace the present Canr 
ton Road level crossing. _ 

Hopes are that the neces- 
sary highways department 
approvals could be obtained 
bs next June with a tender 
cail te be made later next 
year. 

Police Chief Douglas T: 
Crosbie favored the one 
‘bridge concept and also rec- 
commends it be angled to 
allow joinint up with North 
Front Street just north of 
Mcira Street. 

This, he said, would keep 
traffic in its normal alignment 
and the prescnt upper bridge 
ceuld be maintained for one 
way southbound traffic. 

Church Street, the Chief 
felt, should be a threc-lane, 
one-way northbound a: 

Referring to the Canni 
Road problem area, the Chief 
concurred with the engineers* 
report that the grade crossing 
facility must be maintained 
during sctual construction. 


BIRTHS 


—————< 
FOUND — Graydoa and Na t 
La‘chford) are proud to announes 
the arrival of a sen, Robert Gray- 
dor. on Sifmday, October 3, 1971 af 
Beveville General Hospital Special 
thank« to Dr. Martt and Dr. dan 
derville. 


IN MEMORIAM 





Mary V Du ho Cade ppeceeny 
‘an Dusen w awa. 
October Sth, 1967. ” of 
If 1 had all the world to give, 

Vd give it, yes andl more, 


‘ 


sgh Sahel HARA pi RR SRT Rl i RONNIE N LE HSER ARNT ee ee aay, 


r) 
PEARL AE CAAA NO 


To hear ber voice and see her smile, ~ 


And greet her at my door, 
Nut alt I can do, dear mother, 
ls 40 and tend your grave. 
And leave behind tokens of love, 


dx pena ie 


painsiomecn ed 








To the best mother God ever mada, 4 


1 ithe to think when life is 
Wherever heaven may be, 

‘That the'll be staring at 1 . 
Up there to welcome me. 


--Srdly missed and lovi 
membered by daughters Joyce, 
ine ard grandchildren. 


‘aul 





JOUNSTON — In loving memory 
of a dear aunt and uncle Anna 
and Wesley Johnston who died as 
# result of a car oceident four yeare 
ago. Cetober 4th, 1967. 


Away in the beaut'ful hille of God, 3 


By the valley of seat to fair, 

Sometime, someday, we know not 

when, 

We'll meet you both up there, 
~~Always remembered and sadly 

mised, Frank ant Helen O'Brien 

and family. 

SINE, Nellie irene -— In loving 

memory of a Gear mother and 

gtandmother who passed away Oc 

tober Sth, 1969, 

God looked aroun! Mis garden, 

And found an empty place. * 

Me koked down on the earth, 

And sew your tired face. 

Me put His arms sround you, 

And lifted you to rest. 

God's garden must be beautiful, 

For He takes only the best. 


—Ever ‘remembered by daughter © 


Irene, Freddie and ch children. 


CARDS OF 7 THANKS | 


~T would tike to ihioe By t 
nehbors and relatives fi . 
ely fiowers, many cards + 
while IT ita A 

thanks — to Gibson. 
Roilins, MP and Mre. Rol- 
Second Thurkey 
Hastings = Manor. 


special 
Clarke 
ins Quinte WI, 
Neighbors Aid. 
Res. 


L an, UCW and Unit 3 of | 


Taberrac 
nutees and staft of 
special thanks to ait. 


Jaited Church. Also the 
@th level, A 


Bertha Athina, ||| 


Tne family of the late Mary Ann 
Newton wish to 


their relatives, friends and neigh- 


bois for Moral arrangements, cards, | 


Gongtions and exoressions of syn , 
pathy during their recent Dereave- 
ment. We would piso like ‘to thank | 


sincerely thank — 


i 





| 


the Jchn R.. Bush Funeral | 


Ladies’ Auxillary of the Legion, + 
ant Royal Canadian Legion mem 


‘ 


bem Branch 99 for thelr thought” 


fulness. 








nc. Newtons | 


| 












S\ Catt 903-777 













nerd 


: : oe) 


Resistance Workers on Tour 


The sounds of O ¢anada and The Marseillaise blended yesterday at 


Prince Edward Yacht Club, when 62 men and women, all former French 
resistance workers, were luncheon guests of Prince Edward Chamber of 
Commerce. The group, on a self-sponsored tour of Ontario and Quebec, was 
»welcomed by Mayor Margaret Ackerman and County Warden Allan Anderson. 


- Picton Mayor Objects 
To Permit Routine 


» PICTON (Staff} — Mayor 
Margaret Ackerman termed 
Jast night's presentation of re- 
quests to council for building 
permits ‘a farce” since sev- 
eral of thé~permits in ques- 
tion already had been issued, 

Earlier in the meeting Mrs. 
Ackerman demanded to know 
why routine requests for build- 
ing permits cannot be handled 
by town building. inspector, 
Leonard Tripp. 

She said unusual situations 
such as the proposed construc- 
tion of sectional homes on 
Simeon Street understandably 
might come before council but 
questioned the efficiency of 
confronting councillors with 
routine applications. 

The mayor said she consid- 
ered it a duplication and felt 
applications could be han- 
“ed through the public works 
ittee if necessary. 

She was supported by Pic- 
ton reeve Albert Piroth who 
éaid monthly presentation of 
commonplace building permit 
applications is “making a rub- 


: 


THE LOYAL 


ORDER MOOSE 


Soctal Evening. Tonight, 8 o'clock. 


Early Bird, 7.30 pm. Admission 
23<. 117 Church Street. 


Mé-ev-Tucs-tf 





J 
Of general“ interess at Public Lib- 


rary. Pinnacie St.. 
toder 6.57.90 - 900 p.m. Everyone 
Wweicome. Na admission fee. isi 


COFFEE PARTY BAKE SALE OC- 
tober 6, 9.30 to 11.0 a.m. Auspice 
LA United Transportation Union. 
Devge of Mrs. W. Smith. 4 Prince 
of eles Dr. 33. Door Prize. 


BENIOR CivizENs ANNUAL RAZ- 
al 1.20 to 


October 7. 


. Thursday, 
m., Christ 
¢: Street. Admission 23e. 
f& SURE TO RESERVE FRIDAY. 


“Oct. 29 for the annual Diack and 
Gold Ball, Club Cedars. 
C¥.B. TRENTON CURLING CLUB « 
Ladiet Social afternoon Wednesday, 
* October 6 1.30 p.m. curling club. 
) All tervicewomen are invited ta 
*. come out and meet the ladies. Baty- 
Ritter tn attendance 
RESERVE OCT 19. FASHIONS BY 
Woodley’ St. Columba Church. 
Tickets available from members. 
. O37 
\ ¥egye HAT TO HEM “rASHION 
the Ages” + paintings by fa- 
mous artists Octotxr 6th to 2th. 
Beeville Public Library, 2723 Pin- 
E poco @ ito 9) Monday thru Sate 


yurch Parish ial, 





WIRING SUPPLIES 


Yor Cottage Owners 
at 





a 


ab 
MONEY 
TALKS 
let ~ 2nd o¢ 3rd Migz. 
Also ry 
BUSINESS 
LOANS 
Toronto Funds Now 


Available For This Area 


Valted muty. Services 

371 Front St., Belleville 
bd creed 
ee NY 


Wednesday. Ocd 












ber stamp out of council." 

Mayor Ackerman unsuccess- 
fully moved that council 
amend its existing bylaw to 
permit the building inspector 
to.authorize the issue of build 
ing permits, now the town 
clerk's job. 

Several councillors suggest 
ec this plan could place too 
much responsibility with Mr. 
Tripp who verified he is lia 
bie for permits he might is- 
she. 

Under the present system 
council remains liable for the 
permits it aporoves. 

Shortly before the close of 
last night’s council session, 
receve Piroth successfully 
moved that Picton's building 
permit bylaw should be re 
viewed by the town solicitor 





and discussed at council's 
next mecting in November. 

In the meantime, building 
permits approved by Mr. 
Tripp will be :ssued as usual 
by the town clerk 

Mr. Tripp observed that he 
hos held the job of building 
inspector for nine years and 
is puzzled by present protests 
to sectional homes on Simeon 
Street. 

He said he does not feel the 
cumplaining residents object 
to the buildings themselves 
but to the fact they will be 
erected on their strect. 

Mr. Tripp added he cannot 
refuse the sectional home 
builders a permit because 
“they are within the letter of 
the law.” 


Cleanup Starts 
Next Weekend 


More than 500 Belleville 
and = secondary 
school students on Saturday, 
October 16 will be out to 
prove that fighting pollution 


can be fun. 


elementary 


That is the day for the 
planned Moira River cleanup 
from Highway 401 to the new 
Dundas Street bridge being 
planned by the city’s anti 
pollution group, PAGE 
(People Against a Contamin 
ated Environment), 

Monday evening an organi- 
zaticnal mecting for the 
river cleanup was held at the 
Sir Mackenzie Bowell public 
school in west Belleville. 

The students will assemble 
at the Federal Building at 9 
a.m. on the 16 and will march 
up Station Strect and Cannif- 
ton Read to break off at pre- 
selected points along the riv- 
er, 


City Public Utilities trucks 


















will pick up the htter cleaned 
oat of the nver. 

Fo'lowing the river cleanup 
the participants will take in a 
{ee dance on the market 
square with the fun to, start 
a. & p.m. A number of local 
bands have offered their ser 
vices for the event. 

Bet October 16 will not be 
the only day for fighting pol 
lution. 

Mayor J. Russell Scott will 
proclaim the week of Oct. 11 


as Fightung Pollution Can” Ber 


Fun Week with different days 
of the week to be designated 
for specific activities. 
Tuesday Oct. 12 will be 
“fon’t throw it on the ground” 
day, Wednesday will sce a 
survey of the city for the dif- 
ferent types of “‘sign™ pol- 
lutien, ‘Thursday will be 
“cleen up your yard" day and 
Friday “‘start a compost pile’’ 
day. 


ae 


by LENNY WILLIAMSON 
Staff Reporter 

The regional office of the 
department of education in 
Kingston wil finally get Hast- 
Ings county's list of required 
new schools — but only after 
the board agonized for 3% 
hours last night over the five- 
year capital works forecast, 

The capital works forecast 
was issued to trustees a week 
ago, but they deferred discus- 
sion of it until a special mect- 
ing 

The department of education 
Tequires approval of the fore- 
cast by Oct. 15, as an aid to 
plarning and appropriating 
money from the Capital Aid 
Fund. But trustees found’ so 
trany ifs in the predictions of 
schol needs that they. balked 
at rpproving the 1972 to 1976 
forecast, 


A weighty book outlining 
the reasons and needs for 
school buildings, prepared by 
the administration, showed 
that elementary enrolments 
are declining and secondary 
school enrolments soaring. 
Althcugh two new secondary 
schools will be needed by the 
mid 1970s,-enrolment of sen- 
jor students is expected to 
fall off drastically by the 
126s, resulting in empty 
classrooms in newly built high 
schools. : 

But, trustees were told by 
director of education Eric 
Ruracres, by 1877 there will 
be 1,829 high school students 
with no place to go to school 
unless a secondary school 
building program gets under 
way next year. 

In addition, 2,130 pupils are 
now in classrooms rated sub- 
standard by the department of 


a 


% 


B School Building Forecast 


Clarke that “we can't really 
do a five-year forecast”, with 


aware of the implications of 
what i asked for,” sald Mr. 


to begin next year, und an- 
other shortly afterward in east 


“I don't give a damn what 


PECI Students Hear 


PICTON (Staff) — Provin- 
cial candidates for the Prince 
Edward - Lennox riding in the 


ass oe 21 clection met with 
i 


ince Edward Collegiate In- 
stitute students yesterday af- 
ternoon to outline party poli- 
cies and answer questions on 
their platforms. 

Bryan Beazer, New Demo- 
¢ratic Party candidate remind- 
ed students two issues in the 
coming election are vital to 
those who can vote this 
month. 

He mentioned auto insur- 
ance and the need for its cost 
reduction and also spoke of 
unemployment among young 
persons. 

Mr. Beazer emphasized auto 
insurance and employment are 
interwoven since without a 
job it is difficult to own a car. 

He said his party is willing 
to introduce a compulsory. 
universal, nofault = driver 


scheme for a family ‘our. 
at approximately one tyfrd of 
the present cost. ‘ 

Mr. Beazer claimed Canada 
has been sold “lock, stock and 
barrel’ to the United States 
by political leaders in past 
generations, 

The situation can be rever- 
sed by achieving control of 
the economy and the crea- 
tion of job opportunities, he 
said. 

Mr. Beazer suggested his 
party would make a winter 
works program available with 
$73 million to be paid out to 
emplovees 

He said the federal govern 
ment is wrong in cutting em- 
ployment ta stem inflation 
and ylso criticized the provin- 
cial government for permit- 
ting American industry to 
gain its present foothold. 

Liberal candidate Barty 
Young stressed involvement is 
vital ameng today’s vouth 
and said he became a candi- 
date becaure he was “Ted up” 
with government. He said to- 
day's voters generally {cel the 
government Lot responding 
to their cencerns. Political 
parties make promises before 
an election then scem to take 
no further actign. “I agree 
there is a basis for a lot of 
this turnedoff idea.” added 
the Napanee lawyer. 

Mr. Yeung told students his 
pyrty will appoint an ombuds- 
mon te police Ontario's civil 
servants and report any “raw 
deals nanded to the individ: 
ual, 

He eriticied the Conserva- 
tive gavernment in this riding 
fSr a 2-year term in office 
without opening en olfice tor 
the persons in Prince Ed- 













STAUL, ELLIOTT & MILL 
MARSHALL and MERRETT; 
Architects 
273 Ontarte St., Kingitom 
¥. Thomas Mill, B. Arch., 


M.R_A.E.C. 
‘Telephone (613) S42-453¢ 










1425 Montaln St, Montreal 33 








PRESCRIPTIONS 












> 


SHOPPERS 
DRUG MART 


ward-Lennox with problems. 1— 


“This is tantamount to a sin 
in trying to keep in contact 
with the people,” he suggest- 
ed. 

A chemical review board to 
test and supervise the intro- 
duction of all potentially 
harmful chemical products in 
Ontario will be set up by the 
Liberals in the fight against 
pollution, Non-returnable bot- 
ues and non-destructable 
plrstic containers will be 
banned. 


Pollution groups also will 
receive financial support in 
their efforts to research 
cases. Citizens’ groups with- 
out funds can be “shot down" 
by government ard industry 
since “you can't fight city 
hall." 


Education will be tackled by 
the Liberals with plans to 
abolish grade 13 over a four- 
year period. 

Efforts will be made to tie 
the community with Its 
schools and schools will be 
governed experimentally to 
discover the best approaches 
to education, 

Progressive Conservative 
candidate James Taylor 
stressed his party does not 
discount its youth, 


Premier William Davis ev- 
idenced his faith in today's 
young people when he lower- 
ed the voting age to prove he 
is not afraid to involve youth 
in the political” process. 


Developer_to Get 
PO Project Brief 


TRENTON (Staff) — Coun- 
cillor Ted Parker reported to 
council last night that a brief 
has been forwarded to post 
office project developer David 
Linden outlining the positions 
of owners of properties that 
must be assembled for com- 
pletion of the scheme. 


He said that he and Coun- 
cillor Pete Aziz had discussed 
the possible sale of the lands 
to Mr. Linden and that Mr, 
Linden will be sending coun- 
cil a letter. outlining his posi- 
tion sometime this week. The 
matter will be discussed at 
next week's regular commit- 
tee of the whole mecting. 


Mr. Linden told The Intel- 
ligencer this summer that 


asking prices for rtics 
around the old post_Difice on 
Dundas West were dnrealis- 


tic, Without securing them, 
the post office project as or- 
iginally planned would not go 
ahead. 






than half the cost. 


BY CONTRIBUTING TO THE 
1971 UNITED APPEAL 
You 
MAKE IT POSSIBLE 
FOR 
BELLEVILLE FAMILY Y.M.C.A. 
Oe et sw emt et 


@ To train leaders for Community Service. 


@ To provide use of facilities for various groups of students, 
the retarded children and other community. groups at less 


@ To provide use. of the pool and other “Y" facilities at no 
charge during summer for Youth programs. 

@ To make day-camping scholarships available. 

@ To buiid “muscle” in a child's character too! 


If you do it — it will get done! 


UNITED APPEAL OF . BELLEVILLE 
& DISTRICT 


224 JOHN STREET, BELLEVILLE 
962-9531 


a Views of Candidates 


Conser- 


ed other parties 


Mr. Taylor noted the extra 
y would be raised 
through increased taxes and 


The’ Conservative party is 
concerned with pollution and 
last June passed the Environ- 
ment Act covering even un- 
known pollutants. 

A -nofauk auto insurance 
program concerning person- 
al injury will be introduced 
Next year, 

Mr. Taylor disagreed with 
the need for an ombudsman 
and stated that each MP 
stould serve his riding in this 
capacity. 

He challenged the NDP 
stand that today’s youth is 
faced with “a mess” involv- 
ing unemployment. / 

Tre Conservative candidate 
cautioned, “Don't be crepe- 


hangers, you have a great- 


world and you are going to 
be its leaders.” 

He added nationalization 
urged? by the NDP creates 
only more civil servants and 
referred to a takeover of the 
news media in western Can- 
aga. He called this “the first 
sep of a dictator. 

“There is ‘ 
precious than the persdm and 
the dignity of man,.”* he fin- 
ished. ‘ 

Student. questions touched 
0. regional government and 
each candidate's future plans 
concerning their present jobs 
if elected. 

Yesterday's Jiscussion was 
org: nized by a group of six 
PECI students representing 
each of the three political par- 
ties. Chairman was Ana 
Lynn Walker, a PECI student 
ir.volved in student politics. 





























A ‘Hot 


the press to go out and say. 


the board of education ap- 


tion is being focused on board 
ol educati ii 


tion shifts and stating that 
each building proposal would 
be carefully reviewed before 


Tequesting approval from the’ 


department. . 

“How can we submit some- 
thing we haven't approved?” 
asked Macdonald Smith, He 
requested a récorded vote and 
voted against the submission. 


approval next year. In addi- 
tfon to the controversial Stir- 
ling secondary school, ‘the 
board will ask approval of an 
elementary stool in Fox- 
boro and renovations, altera- 
jons and additions to Tweed- 
Hungerford Senior Elemen- 
tary school, Moira Sccondary 






Approvals 
2nd and 3rd Mortgages 
Arranged in the Convenience 
Of Your Home 
LOW cost, You can call to 10 p.m. 
fie! frag aeie a 
itd, <2, bey Btreet, Toronto, 


Ca 4 
366-9586, Evgs. 231-8146 


REAL ESTATE 


cance, 


location 


cooooy 





WHAT COUNTS MOST 
IN BUYING A HOUSE ? 


wally means a spot 


Location means anything that bears on marketa' 
pony price except the type and condition of 


A professional Realtor fs a location 
underlies every assessment. 
ce - 


5 s . . 
THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, im 3 





Potato 


School, Queen _ Elizabeth 
School in Trenton, Queen Al- 


z 


pure 
Abe i 


& 










i 
it 
[ps 


YYYEREE 
es 
ry 
B 
3 
i 


Coles Jewellers 

























on the map, Ii 
e character of the ae : 


type of com. 


and a 

and 

expert. His of 

It Is being up-dated b: 
thering and it is yours for the 








Ont. 


Wednesday, 


— 


TION OF 
HOTELS (Q 


STORE MANAGER 


Interesting and rewarding 
work in Canada’s leading toy 
chain, TOY WORLD LIMIT- 
ED, Quinte Mall. Phone for ap-~ 
pointment —Wednesday, Oct. 
6th — 962-2352. Please bring 
copy of "background particu- 
lars. Otherwise forward. to 
Head Office, 860 Belfast Road, 
Mobile Route No. 1, Ottawa, 


PUBLIC. MEETING 


- BELLEVILLE SUBORDINATE 
PLANNING ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


City Hall, Council Chignber 


October 6th, 1971 


7:30 p.m. 


FOR THE PURP®SE OF CONSIDER- 
ING BY-LAW NUMBER 9104. WHICH 
IS A BY-LAW TO REZONE A POR- 
BELLEVILLE MOTOR 

S MOTOR HOTEL) 
PROPERTY AT DUNDAS STREET 
EAST, TO PERMIT THE USE OF THE 
PROPERTY BY THE BELLEVILLE 
GENERAL HOSPITAL AS AN EX- 
TENDED CARE UNIT. 


Comments of those persons affected will be welcomed. . 






















































NS 





“. 


+. 


THE INTELLIGENCER," TUESDAY, OCT. 5, 1972 





, 


THE INTELLIGENCER 
* Intelligencer Established 1834 — Ontario 1878 


Published Dally by . 
INTELLIGENCER LIMITED 





A . Gerald A. Morton: Publisher 
.H. Myles Morton: President and General Manager 
Subscription Rates: 3 ; 
} By ‘carrier Sc weekly. 
| By mail‘in Canada $23.00 per year; 6 months $15.00; 
3 months $8.00; 1 month $3.00. 
By mail in’ U.S.A. and other foreign countries, ene 
year $36.00; one month $3.75. 
Single copy rate 10c.'” 
Back copy rate 20c each. ~ 
Authorized as Second Class Mail by the Post Office Dent., 
Ottawa, Ont. Reg. No. 1714. - 
Member: Canadian: Raily Newspaper Association; Cana- 
‘dian Press and The Audit Bureau of Circulation. 
ne 


The Name Game 


What's in a name? The Ontarlo Hospital 
Service Commission has a point when it sug- 
gests the “Lodge” in Queen's Lodge sounds t6d 
j much. like an old folks home. 

i A new name is being sought for the 
Queen's Motel on Dundas Street East, sched- 
uled for conversion Into a convalescent. ex- 
tended care hospital aliied to Belleville Gen- 
eral Hospital. : 
We do not know who has the final word 
— the OHSC apparently, for according to hos- 
pital administrator Philip Rickard the com- 
mission has not officially approved any name, 
One that has been mentioned,- however, is 
Queen's Pavilion, but that sounds equally un- 
imaginative; pavilions, if no one in the OHSC 
has thought of it already, are related more in 
the public mind to sport — although, admit- 
tedly, the dictionary has it also as “any of the- 
separate or connected parts of a group of re- 
lated buildings, « Jota hospital or sanitarium.” 
So what other possibilities are there? 
Queen’s Annex .. . Queen’s Acres .. . Queen's 
Concourse. Or maybe some completely differ- 
ent name would be appropriate, but whatever 
the choice it should be that of the hospital ad- 
ministration and board here whether the OHSC 
likes it or not. When it comes to having the 
bureaucrats in Toronto pick a name for.such 
establishments then we must surely be closer 
to 1984 than we had imagined. However, we 
_ do agree with the OHSC’s thoughts on “lodge.” 
As for the Queen’s Motel, its life as a motel 


and restaurant drawing to a close, there is a 
sense of loss tosthe many people locally and 
from beyond, tourists and businessmen, at its 
passing as a fine hostelry and eating place. 

: 





Fires Costly 


There is a billboard ad on display at the 
moment which points out that fire can break 
your heart. An unusual! analogy perhaps, but 
is there anything indeed, more heartbreaking 
in its devastation and material loss, not to 
mention the lives that ere often taken? 

A note in the current bulletin of Belleville 
Rotary Club says that property loss in Canada 
in 1970 was $203,000,000. This was $6 million 
more than in 1969 and far ahead of the $166,- 
000,000 of 1968. Nor do these figures include 
losses from forest fires and government estab- 
lishment.fires. 

According to the Dominion Fire Commis- 
sioner indirect losses from fire, including pro- 
duction stoppage and unemployment, are five 
times the direct loss. Overall loss to the econo- 
my, he says, is $1,000,000,000. 





Lottery? 


Alderman Gerald Joyce's suggestion for a 
hospital sweepstake lottery to raise auxiliary 
funds has merit.\, 

.. Faced with the need of two hospital ele- 
vators at a cost of some $206,000, a third of 
which would have to be met by the city, Mr. 

Joyce feels this could be readily and more fair- 

ly met by establishment of a lottery. 

_» For one thing lotteries have the sanction 
of the provincial government; for another 
thousands of dollars are going out of the 
country as it is — notably to the Irish repub- 
lic for the benefit of its hospitals, as well as to 
European lotteries. 

Why not provide an opportunity to chan- 
nel such funds into ateas of need at home? 

A chance exists to do just this, to provide 
Belleville General with its new elevators. 


4 ; 





Police Patrols 


The current need for two-man police pat- 
rols at night in“Belleville may be just another 
sign of the times, or it may be only a sudden 
flare-up in nocturnal misbehavior by some of 
the more rowdy elements in the city. 

Certainly we are aware of the increasing 
instance of break-ins and theft, not to men- 
tion the occasional outbreaks of vandalism; 
but for all that Belleville remains one of the 
most law-abiding communities in the province,. 
in the sense at least of being relatively free of 
homicides and serious assaults against the 
person. 5 

Chief Crosble’s decision ‘nevertheless-is a 
wise one. We have an. efficient police force 
here, and a busy one. They deserve our support; 
as a community this means backing any meas- 
ures aimed at facilitating the .work Of the 
force. THe two-man patrols at night are inJine / 

, with this premise, ‘ 


More on the Backroom “Wordsmiths’ 


P.M. Better. Off the Cuff Than at Set Speeches 


By RICHARD JACKSON 
OTTAWA = 'So Donald Pea- 


cock, newspaperman-turned-po- 
Utical - publicist.- turned - gov- 
ernment-informationist, dream- 
ed up “The Just Society". 

Offered it first to his boss 
at the time, then Agriculture 
(now Energy, Mines and Re- 
sources) Minister Joe Greene, 
was told he was nuts, so gave 
it to Pierre Trudeau when he 
joined: the Prime Mimister's 
staff. 

And you know what Pierre 
Trudeau did with the “Just 
Society" — did not explain it or 
make any promises as to what 
it would bring, but used it as 
tie star-phrase to which he 
hitched his winning campaign 
wagon. . 

The “Just y" was — 
and if it stiff exists, remains — 
"s be blunt about 


{ster in preference’ to another 
goodie, the “Enterprise of In- 


Pierre Trudeau has a staff 
of them headed by, an appropri- 
ately - named head, Ivan Head. 

A former Calgary University 
professor, he does what the 
Prime Minister's staff calls the 
“biggies” in the speech depart- 
ment. 

It is the thing to say — and 
even > mi 


He cannot, 


= 
N 
N 


SS 


. 


His difficulty is he cannot 
read it without making it sound 
like a written’ classroom lec- 


. ture. © 


He “whizzes along,"’ one sym- 
pathetic staffer in the PMO 
powerhouse related, “‘so damn 
fast you lose the punch-lines”, 

But off the cuff, especially in 
question - and - answer ding: 


Big Man in any party leader's 
office where campaign itinera- 
ties and entourages are being 
roughed out. y 

Conservative Leader Stanfield ’ 
relies on a team of writers who 
have become attuned to his 
quict wry wit and increasingly 
able to pace his speeches more 
and more on the upbeat. 

The ‘Top Typewriter" could 
be Tom Sloan, former Toronto 
Newspaperman - turned - uni- 
versity - professor. Big on hard - 
facts, 


"I'S TIME MRTRUDEAU SHOWED HE 
FEELS SOMETHING FORTHE UNEMPLOYED ‘ 


The Comparison with Europe 


s 


& 
2 


He ts backed up by former 
radio station program manager 


don, Ontario, newsman 
magazine writer, and Murray 
Coolican, who came out of uni- 
versity to go with Robert Stan- 
field when he. won the lead- 
ership, Jook after the research 


‘and are free to do what they 


5 


can as “idea men”. 
Stanfield, 


refashions it after his own style, 
with a touch here and a switch 
there. : 


New Leader 
David Lewis has two on his 
staff who insist all they do is 
“research” the speeches, com- 
ing up with the required factu- 
al and statistical’ background 
required for whatever the cho- 
sen subject. © 

Both are former newsmen, 
Murray Weppler, who covered 
the Ontario Legislature for The 





Ottawa Citizen, and Lewis 
Seale, graduate of the Toronto 
Globe and Mail's big Ottawa 


bureau. 

“David Lewis does the writ- 
ing,” says Lewis Seale, “Mur- 
tay and I are only the Iegmen.”* 

Former Prime Minister John 
Diefenbaker had the hottest 
speech-writing team going in 
‘years, ex-newspapermeri Thom- 
as Van Dusen and Gregor 
Guthrie, 


Van Dusen now bats it out for 
Privy Council “President and 
Government House Leader Al- 
lan MacEachen, being versatile 
and hyper-talented cnough to 
turn the stuff out for anyone, 
Liberal or Conservative, al- 
though perhaps not New Dem- 
ocratic. ' 

Guthrie and Van Dusen 
“talked” rather than actually 
wrote Dief’s speeches, There 
the three of them would sit. 
vastly enjoying the exercise, 
kicking around fighting phrases 
and honing ‘honeyed words, 


THE SPECTATOR » HAMILTON 


North America’s Crummy City Core Areas 


Winnlpeg Free Press 

In the ancient cities of Eur- 
ope the old city centres age 
gently, become quaint, pictur- 
esque, something to be admir- 
ed and photographed by tour- 
ists. In North America the old 
centres become repulsive and 
dangerous slums, Much thought 
and money have been expended 
on projects to restore Amcri- 
can city centres to their old 
role. In Winnipeg, millions 
were spent by the Centénnial 
Corporation and the city of Win- 
nipeg, and the Main Street arca 
is now resplendent with a con- 
cert hall, a muscum, a planct- 
arium, a theatre, a city hall 
and even a glorious police sta- 
tion with up-to-date lock-up faci-’ 
lities, Yet all this multi-million 
dollar splendor sticks out like 
so many sore thumbs amidst 
the pawn-shops, junk shops 
wooden shacks, and, above all, 
cheap beer parlors, <———, 

One of the reasons why the 
Royal Alexandra Hotel could 
not be converted into a hospit- 
al, or so we are told, is that no 
nurse would dare to go on or 
off shift in that neighborhood, 
When performances take place 
in the huge complexes, dead 
during the day and at>week- 
ends, people hurry through the 
underground tunnel to and from 
their cars or hurricdly. cross 
the street from or to the wait- 
ing buses, td get out of the re- 
gion as fast as possible, There 
is no lingering there in pleas- 
ant “theatre supper restau- 
ranjé, or in cafes, as there is in 
alrhost every other capital, It is 

huge wasteland. 

The question has never been 
answered whether a city, which 
is a living organism, can really 
be rejuvenated. whether those 
limbs that have died ca2 be 
restored with new life pulsating 
through them. The Lincoin Cen- 
tre was a huge debacle, “Win- 
nipeg’s centennial centre threat- 
ens to become a similar de- 
bacle, and the Main Street Mer-~ 
chants’ Association is only too “ 
right in pointing to its members’ 
plight, Thers is a blighted area 
and there is only one way to 

an .improvement.: to 
/climinate all the multiplicity of 
cheap hotels which are really 
nothing else than glorified beer 


parlor hang-outs of the city's 
alcoholics, A bylaw that would 
keep cach such hotel at Icast a 
mile apart from its nearest 
competitor would do much to 
clean up the neighborhood. 


Hunters 


Kingston Whig - Standard 

The guns of autumn have be- 
gun to sound once again. The in- 
vasion of the countryside is un- 
der way. 

Hunting is not a right, but a 
privilege granted by licence. It 
is a privilege which too often is 
abused by those: whose Icast 
concern seems to be for the 
safety and property of others. 
Once out of the city they seem 
bound to adopt the attitude that 


Whether # would be sufficient 
is hard to say. But it would be 
a beginning. The general idea 
that if there is enough moncy 
everything will turn up roses 
just does not work. Eight il- 


lion dollars or more spent on 
the centennial buildings did no- 
thing for the arva. The beer 
parlors would have to go first. 
Only then could one begin to 
plan for parks, apartment 
blocks, shops and restaurants 


that might being new life to 
Main Street. Whether or not 
they would, or whether city 
life has definitely moved out 
west, leaving this area as a de- 
caying slum, is something only 
the future will tcll. 


Must Observe Property Rights 


the rules of safety and decency 
no longer apply. : 
Some hunters, for example, 
seem to believe that all land in 
this province is theirs to use or 
abuse as they eee fit, They tres- 
Pass on private property and are 
outraged when any farmer or 
other land - owner has.-the te 
merity to forbid, by sign or 
otherwise, entry on to their pro- 
perty, These po — while a 
minority — are ing a de- 


A Look at Sesame Street 


Brockville Recorder and Times 
What's this? : 
First the British Broadcast- 

ing Corporation bans Sesame 

Street as “too authoritarian.” 

Then a homegrown psychiatrist 

slams the highly acclaimed 

serics for children as’*‘too stim 
ulating.”* of 

Were wall Jed astray by 
the almost universal praise lav- 
ished on Sesame Street when it 
first appeared? Or is it merely 
a case Of a few belated sour 
gripes? 

In the first instance, British 
supporters of *Streét"" do, in- 
decd, suggest that the BBC is 
jealous. ; 

“Obviously, it's hard for 
them to conceive that anyone 
can do anything better than 
the BBC,” says reading re 
searcher Sir James Pitman, 

However, Monica Sims, head 
of BBC's chikdren’s program: 
ing, says she is “particularly 
worried about the program's 
authoritarian aims, Right ans- 
wers are demanded and prais- 
Od evanere 
As for the psychiatrist, Dr. 
Natalie Sahiness, her criticism 
is that program ckements come 
at children “at such a rapid 


rate that they have hardly 
time to absorb “it, let alone 
think what it is. 

“There is a kind of keyed up 
quality that these children will - 
develop from watching this pro- 
gram over and over,” she told 
a U.S. Senate subcommittee. 
“They will have no tolerance of 
an empty sccond anywhere.” 

Kids will learn, she says, if 
we will just ‘leave them alone 
and make reading or other 
things interesting and show that 
we like to do it ourselves. 

It is the problem at Icast as 
old as Socrates: How on the 
one hand do you import great 
quanuties of dry knowledge to 
kids without. making schools 
into “grim and joyless” places, 
as some critics claim they are 
today, and how on the oper 
hand do you make leaming > 
exciting adventure without suc- 
cumbing to the superficial and 
the Mashy? * 

In 2,000 years no one has 
come up with an answer ac- 
ceptable to everyone, including 
the kids themselves. Thus we 
shall probably still be experi- 
menting with teaching  gim- 
micks and arguing about their 
effectiveness 2,000 years from 
now, 


. 
- 


cided nuisance; a menace to 
property and lives of other 
humans as We} as livestock. 
The curious fat about this 
whole problem is that most pri- 
vate lands are accessible to 
hunters — just so long as they 
ask permission to enter and ob- 
serve the rules of safety a 
decency, Each year ondeg 
pleas are made to hunters to 
respect the rules. It seems obvi- 
ous, however, that the pleas 
have fallen on too many deaf 
ears to ignore the seriousness 
of the situation. The result is 
that more and more rural land- 
owners are denying hunters the 
privilege of hunting on their 


property. 

As we have pointed out many 
times, right, in this matter, is 
all on the side of the property 
owner. Hunters have no right to 
enter any man’s property should 
that man de trypermission 
whether by voice or sign. Con- 
sidering the selfish and dan- 
geTous attitudes displayed by a 
number of hunters cach year, 
no farmer or land-owner can be 
blamed if he bars all hunters 
from entering his property 
And if he needs official help in 
ensuring that his “wishes. are 
respected it should be given 
willingly and with determina 
tion. 


Today in History 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 


Oct. 5, 1971. 


American forces under 
Gen, W.H. Barrison de- 
feated a combined British 
and Indian force near Mora- 
viantown, Ont. , 158 years 
ago today—in 1813--during 
the war of 1812. The British 
commander, Cok Henry A. 
Proctor, escaped but the In- 
dian chief Tecumseh was 
‘killed. Following the battle” 
the village of Moraviantown 
-was destroyed, 

1960—A South African 
white plebiscite showed a 
majority of 74,000 in favor - 
of republican states, 

19388—The constitution of 
France's Fifth Republic 
came Into force. 

1955—The government dis 

. Closed plans for a large 

* ‘power plant in Pakistan to 
be built under the Colombo 
Plan. 

1950—The United States | 
announced its troops had 


> 


suffered 20,756 casualties in 
Korea, 

1938—Eduarnd Benes 
signed as Czechoslovakia's 
president. 

1934—A revolutionary gen 
eral strike began throughout 
Spain and fighting occurred 

* in Madrid and many other 
centres, h 
193l—The first non-stop 
trans-Pacific flight, by 
Cipde Pangborn and Hugh 
Herndon, Jr. 

1930—An airplane crashed 

in Beauvais, France, killing 
“46. > 


re- 


cackling out’ wisecracks and 
dropping apt quotations’ from 
Churchill, Lincole, Washington, 
Gladstone, - Eisenhower,“ Ghan- 
di, Socrates, Joe E. Lewis and 
Jack Benny alike>— 


It was tremendous fun, sn 


Diet would jot random thought 
theirs and his, down on sli 
of paper and lay them like tiles 
on his office floor, gathéring 
them up later, all in order, to 
make a well-structured — if 


Somebody usually opened the 
olfcc door before it was all 
done and the notes scattered 
like Autumn leaves in’ the 


lack of continuity, But the raty 
material was always there .in 
loose-leaf form, and Dief knew 
how to use it with greatest im- 
pact. 

“Speech - writing is a ghost 
Profession, but some of the 
phantoms back of the men on 
the podium are livelier than 
others. 


LOOKING > 


BACKWARD 


GLEANINGS FROM OUR 
FILES OF BYGONE YEARS 


20 YEARS AGO 
October 5,°1951 : 
The hunting bug is biting — 
but good, according to licence 
issuer Ed, Thomas, Since: last 


Saturday over 400 gun licences _ 


have been sold, a marked in- 
crease over the same period 
of a year ago. Deer licences 
are moving slowly. 

Mayor of Picton, Harvey J. 
McFarland, is making it pos- 
sible for between 1.000 and 1,- 
500 elementary and secondary 
school pupils to go to Trenton 
on October 12 on the occasion” 
of the visit there of Princess 


Elizabeth and Prince Philip 4 


Registration will 
on Saturday in the Armores 
for the 7th Annual. Hastings 
and Prince Edward Regiment 
Reunion, being held in the city 
this year, 


3@ YEARS AGO 
October 5, 1941 


A new children’s ward to be. 
known as the Dr. Connor Mem- 
orial Ward will,be fully furnish- 
ed and equipped by members of 
the Belleville Nurses’ Alumnae. 
The Alumnae members feel 
that the new ward will reflect 
the genuinely helpful character 
and many other fine qualities 
of thé late Dr. Emma Cornor, 
to whose memory the ward will 
be equipped. De 

George Maybee, retiring 
fanist and choir master 
Christ Churca was suitably 


honored prior to his departure | 


from the city when choir mem: | 


bers and congregation gathered 
at the Parish Hall in a farewell 
party. Mr. Maybee, who came 
to Belleville from Madoc, has 


accepted the position of organ- 


ist at St. George's Cathedral in 


Kingston. 
40 YEARS AGO 
“October 5, 193f 

D. A. McDonnell of Hillside 
Street brought to the editorial | 
room of the Ontario Intelligen- 
cer today a number of straw- 
berries picked from the vines 
in his garden. * 

The Rev. Dr. Albert T. Moore | 
of Toronto, secretary of t'ha’| 
General Council of the Ury 
Church, and Mrs, Moore 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. George 
F. Stewart, Highland Ave. | 

E. V. Ilsey, manager of the | 
local branch of the Bank of 
Commerce, hooked and landed 
a 23-pound ‘lunge while trawl- 
ing in Muscote Bay with George 
Wallbridge. 

50 YEARS AGO 

October 5, 1921 
In New York City recently, | 
Mr. and. Mrs. John Muir cele- | 
brated the 53rd anniversary of 
their wedding. When they were 
married in Belleville in 1868, | 
Mr. Muir was engaged in the | 
clothing and shoe business here. 
For a number of years he has 
been living in New York where 


oSghe is engaged in pape 
W. H. Finkle spent yeste: | 


in Peterborough. 
George 0. Tice of this city 
was the starter at the horse) 


races at the Warkworth Fair. | 


~ NOTICE TO READERS: 


Letters to this newspaper should be as brief as possible and | 


preferably np more than 500 words, While for publication 


purposes a pseudonym may be used, Jetiers must also bear the 
handwritten signature and address of the sender. Letters may be 


subject to editing. 








, 


ervatives finally granted our 


election. 
» Libe 


Vote 


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28 years, 
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Ann Landers 


‘Model’ Son Behaves 
In A Brazen Manner’ 


ey 


La ter 
cf 
g 
t 
R 


ji 


at 
if 
E 


; 


¢ Bod. a model 


Eig 


tives. I ordered the girl out, but 
said nothing to my husband for 
fear he'd take the roof off the 
place, regardless of the rela- 
tives. I'told my son I wouldn't 
tolerate such bizarre behavior 


. in the future and if he. did i 


¢ 


again he'd have to leave. 

This morning I found him in 
bed with another girl. I ordered 
them both out and told my son 
to get out—for good Tonight I 
had to tell my husband and he 


‘backed me up. 


What a bitter decision for a 
«mother to make. I am heart- 
sick. But there are two younger 
children to consider. I am sick 


done? What can we do now?— 
No Name Please. 

Dear N.N.P.: You did the 
right: thing. That ‘model’ boy 
behaved in a most brazen and 
‘fnconsiderate manner. I can't 
see that"you had an alternative. 
You had to kick him out. 


) SHE: INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER: 5, 3971 


| 
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ul 


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ee 


al 
- 

FLAG 
sala 


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gF 
sh 


Underweight? Gradually in- 

crease the amount of 

eat. A little more milk, egos, 
frvits, 


meats, en 
tiched cereals and breod 
should do the trick. 


If the boy wants to come back 
—with the understanding, of 
course, that he will never again 
repeat the insult—I would give 


crowded (the dog got sick, my 
glasses, the bank called me to 


wanted to remove my, hat. I 
said no. A few minutes later she 
asked again—adding, ‘Aren't 
you roasting?” I said, “I’m just 
fine.” Soon she was at me 
again. I told her my hairwas 
awful and I wanted to keep the 
hat on, r 

By this time several other 
guests had arrived 


remove my turban, Another|- 


guest sald, “You're overly. sen- 


says I should have removed my 
hat and ended the discussion. 
What do you say?—Alpena 


peared in a football hlemet she 
shduld have kept her mouth 


shut. Your only’mistake was not 
telling Ger and enjoying the 
evening. 


Li 


EE 

‘ 

fl 
F 
% 


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f 


: 
gp 


: 
* 


a 
is 
i 


2B 


= 
thee 


2B x2 









suGG, LIST'9.95 - 









Would’ you watch the phone 
for a call from just anybody? 
You still love,-my poor sick 
girl. Go through the: motions 
of affection, “ind thoughts, 
imaginative and loving ges- 
tures;| you can” regéncrate 
the’ whole thing. But ‘y3u do 
-heed to communicate. Com- 
municate everything. 

eee? 3 

Dear Doris: I am M4, and 
I have a spoiled 12-year-old 
brother. He is so babied ‘and 
pampered thet I could 


allowance. I get 75 cents for 
doing breakfast, lunch and 
supper dishes and making my 
bed and keeping my room neat 
while my brother gets 60 cents 
for mowing the lawn once a 
week, a chore svhich he rare- 
ly docs. 

My mother agrees with him 
whenever we have an argu- 
ment, She washes his hair, 


ed at having to do so much 
of the work. x 
Recently I confronted her 
with the above facts and she 
told me I didn't have to work 
at all and I wouldn't have 


* any allowance, I could be a 


Jazy bum for all she cared: 
didn't get any allowance 





LIQUID 12 oz. 
or 


TABLETS 40’s 


SUGG. LIST 3.09 ea. 


t 
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22 Mother |. 
fiction. 


» ponsibility and a job-well-done 
right 





spoiled 
wish he had the sense of res- 


riend. : 
- Confidential to - Graduate 


Kitchen Tested Recipes 


Pitted Black Cherries Make - Excellent Pie - 


By MARY:MOORE - 

For years I have yearned 
for one of our Canadian can- 
ning plants to pack sweet 
black cherries without the 
pits. Now one of them has 
done it ‘and. cpened up a 
whole new ficld of easy cher- 
Ty cookery. 


I am a perennial timer and_ 


timed myself. pitting a can of 
black cherries ‘and it; took me 
12 minutes and (stained. my 
fingers. . Now. an™ ingenious 
machine is doing it for: us. 
Early on the Sabbath\morn- 
ing I made a swect black 


TUESDAY 


Dinner Menus 


Chilled Blended Fruit Juice; 
Roast Lamb» Leg: Caper 
Gravy; Corn’ on the, Cob; 
Braised Celery: Dutch 
Apple Cake; Coffee. 


UNADVERTISED 
IN-STORE FEATURES 


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AND HUMIDIFIER 


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18's SUGG. LIST 99¢ 





cherry pie that I predict will 
have“a long run in Canadian 
cuisine. - 
SWEET BLACK CHERRY PIE 
(one deep 9”) 
* Pastry: : 
2 cups stirred but not sifted 
cake and pastry flour 
1 tsp. salt 
233 cup shortening 
2 tbsps. butter 
2 tbsps. cold water 
Filling: : 
Two 14-0z. cans pitted sweet 
black cherries drained 
1 cup cherry syrup (meas- 
ured after draining above) 
44 cup sugar a 
3 tbsps. minute tapioca 
3% tsp. almond extract 
Make filling’ first for it fs 
cooked’ and has to be cooled: 
Into medium saucepan meas 
ure the 1 cup syrup drained 
from canned sweet black cher- 
ries, Mix sugar with tapioca 





GUARD YOUR HEALTH 
GUARD YOUR POCKETBOOK 


(ISTERINE 
= PRICE OF 20 


Sere 


——— 


SUGG. LIST 1.83 


LISTERINE 
ANTISEPTIC 
26 oz. FOR THE 





Now. Replace Loving Gesture 


\ his fellow students, and’ then 


take a look at the future.’ He 


well and stir into syrup and 
cook stirring until thick and 2 
min, longer. Cool to room tem- 
perature by standing pot in ice 
water. Add’ almond extract 
and drained cherries. 
Meanwhile make Pastry by 


~ cutting shortening and: butter 


inte flour and salt until size of 
peas. Drizzle in water, tossing 
with fork until you can pack it 
into a ball between “your 
palms, Roll out half on well- 
floured board and line 9 deep 
pie. plate. Pour in codled fill- 
ing. Cover with remaining 
dough rolled out to fit top and 
_ Bashed. Seal and vrimp ed- 
ges. Brush top with. 1 tbsp. 
milk and 1 tbsp: sugar mix- 
ture. Bake at 425 deg. Fahr. 
13 min, then’ reduce beat to 
350 deg. Fahr. for 15. or 20 
min. longer. Remember the 
‘filling is cooked and’ this pie 
does not take as long to bake 













rp 


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6 oz. 


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REGULAR 
OR MINT 


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as 2 pie {led with raw frult 
such as apples o¢ rhubarb. 
Another ‘Faristocrat 


oo ae 
Check oll escape rovies if 


ou're bobysitting in a new 
ewe for the first time, 









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ROLLS 
FOR 


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PRINTED PATTERN 





New Fall Wardrobe Plan 


5 ‘ : 
For Misses’ ,and Half - Sizes 

Interchange — Sew two patterns and get a wardrobe of 
new fall looks designed by prestigious’ Harwyn. Begin with 
fashion’s favorite, the beautifully shaped blazer that goes with 
the pants in Printed Pattern M397. Then, sew the dress 
(Printed Pattern M143) and wear it alone or as an ensemble 
with the blazer jacket when the weather turns sooler. Co-ordi- 
nate fabrics and colors for a beautiful blending — harmonizing 
tweeds and flannel, or wool knit in go-together colors. 

Printed Pattern M397 (blazer and pants) comes in New 
Misses’ Sizes , 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and New Half Sizes 10%, 124, 


146, 1642, 18%, 20!2. 


Printed Pattern M143 (dress) comes th New Misses’ Sizes 8, 


10, 12, 14, 16, 18. New Half Sizes 10'y. 


2033. 


12'a, 14%, 16%, 1842, 


Send ONE DOLLAR FOR EACH PRINTED PATTERN, 
M397 and M148, to THE INTELLIGENCER, 60 FRONT ST. W., 
TORONTO 1, ONTARIO, Pattern Department, Please printe 
plainly YOUR NAME, ADDRESS with STYLE NUMBER and 


-—GIZE. 
Ontario residents add 5 cents sales tax. 
FASHION PREDICTIONS — Icngths, 

COUTURE PATTERN BOOK! Dresses, costumes, separates, 


looks, drama in 


pantsuits, Includes — How To Fit Pants Professionally, 50c 
coupon — apply to any 91 pattern in Rook. Send S0c. 
INSTANT FASHION BOOK! Learn to stretch, accessorize, 
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avoid mistakes. 123 pages. hundreds of pictures. $1.00. { 
INSTANT SEWING BOOK helps you to wear tomorrow 
what you start sewing today. 500 illustrations. Only $1.00, 


The Experts Say 


Previous to her recent mar- 
riage Mrs. Carl Brooks (nee 
Janice Patterson) was honor- 
ed at miscellaneous showers 
given by Mrs. Carol Scott as- 
sisted by co-hostess Miss Ann 
Marie Deryaw and by Mrs. 
Archie Grier. A linen shower 
was giveh by Mrs. Earl Bue- 
low, ~Trenton ad a presenta- 
tion given by fellow workers 
at UIC. . - 

Tee Ses toe) 

Prior to fier ‘recent. wed- 
ding Mrs. James Gilmour 
(nce Patricia Roote) was 
guest-of honom at a miscel- 
laneous shower held at the 
home of Mrs.- Barb Souddard 
with Mrs. Evonne. Weese as 
bestess; at a >ersonal show- 
ex held at the home of Mrs. 
Ross Row with Mrs, Brian 
McFaul as co-hostess. Follow- 
ing the rehearsal a party 
was held at the home of the 
b-idegroom’s parents. 

x ke * 
Prior to her recent wed- 
ding Mrs. David Lyon (nee 

Margaret Turner) was honor- 
ed at a miscellaneous show- 
er held by Mrs. Wayne Hop- 

kins at the home of Mrs. 
Vernon Goyer and at a show- 
er beld by Mrs, Denis Clem- 
ents which was attended by 
her co-workers, the nurses of 
the seventh level, Belleville 

General Hospital. 

es ek * 

Previous to her marriage 
Mrs. Michael Hunt (nee Maria 
Kot) was honored at showers 
in Flinton given by Mrs, B. 
Kot and Miss Marg. Davison, 
and in Tweed, by Mrs. Mc- 
Taggart/ Mary Jane Hunt. 





Woit for the waiter or your 
dole to pull out your choir 


when being seoted In o restou- 


font. 


Advance Clothes Promotion Unfair 


MONTREAL (CP) 
Women who are fed up with 
seeing bathing suits in the 
stores in February and wool 
in July have an unex- 

champion in Montreal 

wfacturer Irwin (Dizzy) 


Besides being unfair to con- 
. sumers who don’t like having 
either to buy out of season or 
put up with last year's re- 
jects, he said in a recent in- 
terview, fashion is too volatile 
now for the customary habit 
of designing and selling three 
+ months in advance. 
Furthermore, since store 
‘buyers commit themselves in 
May to clothes designed for 
September, they are forced to 
proceed with plans to adver- 
tise the garments even though 
a sudden switch in clothing 
fads has made them outdated. 
For example, Mr. Dizgun 
said, hot pants were the big- 
gest thing going last May. 


Since the style which finishes 


season strong traditionally 
ds the next season as well, 
“ designers planning their fal! 

lines had little reason to fear 
that hot pants would not still 
be extremely popular in Octo- 
ber. oe iets 

But by June, the trend was 
shifting to warm pants, 
blazers and pleated skirts 
which hadn't been secn for 
years . 

Hot pants were out, he said, 
‘and “I was embarrassed to 

~see in August a full-page ad 

for fall hot pants that we ha 
manufactured.” / 

Promoting even slightly 
out-of-date clothes as up-to: 
the-minute styles De because 
a store is stuck with them is 


% unfair tothe customer, Mr. 


Dizgun continued, adding that 
was this realization which 





‘we find 


NEW STUDIO 
OPENED 


REGISTRATIONS BEING TAKEN 
FOR PIANOFORTE AND | THEORY 


MRS. M. BURT - 962-6729 ° 


prompted him ‘to transform 
the entire manufacturing sct- 
up of Marty K Fashions Ltd. 

Since June, his designers 
and assembly line have been 
working on an abbreviated 
schedule—six weeks from de- 
sign to delivery and market- 
ing. 

What it means is that “we 
used to have 98 or 100 styles 
for advance buying and now 
we're down to 45 or 50." 

“Instead of waiting for cus- 
tomer reaction, we must de- 
cide for ourselves what is so- 
called ‘in’ and right. 

“It took a little courage and 
perhaps a little more money 
in the bank to begin with, but 
the operation cx- 
tremely casy now. 

“True, we may lose a little 
business now, but I'm confi- 
dent we will catch up later 
on." 

Mr. Dizgun said that 
whereas.department store 
chains used to commit 60 per 
cent of their clothing budget 
to advance purchasing, @the 
amount will drop to 50 per 
cent next year and “‘l advised 
them to go to 40 per cent.” 

The remaining 50 or 60 per 
cent of the budget will be 
used for reorders of popular 
items and fill-ins from manu 
facturers “who have scen the 
light" and are on the six-week 
plan. 7, 

Mr. Dizgti¥said his com- 
pany is not the only one te 
break into the shortened re 
gime, but there are still a-lot 


. of holdouts who are, in his 


words, “‘just a little pig- 
headed.” 

Their stubbornness in cling. 
ing to the method of designing 
three months ahead, he ex- 
plained, arises from a fashion 


tradition of trying to be first 


with a new style by rushing , 


the scason. 

This worked for many 
years, Mr. Dizgun said. but 
now that fashion is so fickle. 
manufacturers and stores 
can't afford to sink their 
funds into styles which may 
be old before they reach the 
rack. 

Asked about the potential of 
a four-week schedule, he said 
it was not technically possiblc 
at present. 

“Besides, there Isn't any 
need—what' woman can afford 
to change her wardrobe every 
month?"* 


CLUB AC 


ALPHA DELTA KAPPA, 
LAMBDA CHAPTER 


The September mecting of 
Alpha Delta Kappa was held 
recently at “West Winds," 
Lake Consecon, the cottage 
of president Helen Cainan. 
The meeting took the form of 
a pot-luck supper at which 
some invited guests were 
present. These gucsts were 
interested in learning more 
about the sorority and were 
censidering the possibility of 
becoming members. 

Following the meal every 
one was welcomed to “West 
Winds" by the president. The 
minutes of the last evening 
were approved and the trea- 
surer’s report was given by 
Jean Sczerba. Programs for 
the year 1971-72 were dis- 





























‘DON’T \ 
| GET IN SHAPE NOW 
FOR FALL AND WINTER FASHIONS 


@ Miss Rene’s can get e | pe Personal 


you down 2 dress 
sizes in a month. 


BELLEVILLE —, 

























MISS DARLENE LOHNES, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Carl 


Lohnes, 83 Mill Street, Frank- 
ford graduated recently from 
the Oshawa General Hospital 


4 


School of Nursing. 
Lohnes £faduated {rom 
Secondary School, Bellevi 


Miss 










MR. AND MRS, 





JAMES GILMOUR 


HUNT — KOT 


Rev. Father J. P. Carty of- 
ficiated at the recent wed- 


\ ding ceremony in St. John the 


Evangelist Roman Catholic 
Church in Flinton, with Hev. 
Father P. H. Murphy of Sa- 
ered Heart Parish, Madoc, as- 
sisting, when Maria Regina 
Kot, daughter of Mr. and 


(4. Mrs, Kazimierz Kot and Mich- 


ael Joseph Hunt, son of Mr. 


| and Mrs. Ambrose J. Hunt, of 
Tweed, were united in mar- 


riage. Miss Charlotte Lahey, 
of Madoc, organist and Mr. 
Donald Campbell, soloist, pro- 
vided music for the cecasion, 

Given in marriage by her 
father, the bride wor: a floor- 
length gown of Chantilly lace 
featuring full-lengta sleeves, 
empiré waist and staid-up col- 
Jar accented by tiny pearls. 


ad LéE q 





- Gilmour - Roote 


Patricia Lynn Roote, daugh- 
ter of Mrs, Cecelia Roote and 
the late Bruce Roote was 
united in marriage to James 
Harry Gilmour, son of Mr. 
and Mrs, Rex Gilmour on 
September 4 at the Church of 
St. Michael the Archangel. 
Rev. Father James MacGilli 
vray conducted the ceremony 
while wedding music was play- 
ed by Dorothy Grant on the 
organ. 

Given in marriage by her 
brother Jack Reote, the bride 
chose a full length A-line gown 
of peau de sie with a roll 
collar and long bell sleeves. 
A panel of white guipure lace 
Nowing down from the collar 
to the hem adorned the front 
of the dress. Her finger tp 
veil ef nylon tulle was secur- 
ed by a tiara encrusted with 
crystal pebbles and seceded 
pearls She carried a nosegay 
of shasta daisies and pink ro 
ses mingled with sprigs of” 
ivy 

The matron of honor Mrs. 
Bonnie Boyce wore ai full 
length Aline gown of deep 
pink crepe with a stand-up 
collar, and long puffed sheer 
sleeves ending in wide button- 
ed cuffs. Her bouquet was a 
nosegay of white baby "mums 
and pink roses with pink and 
white streamers. 


The bridesmaids. Miss 
Evonne Weese and Mrs. Sher- 
TIVITIES 


tributed by Fay Burnett. 

Plans for the rummage sale 
to be held on Saturday, 
October 16 at Bridge Street 
United Church were discussed 
by Grace Anderson, convener. 

Fay Burnett _ introduced 
Heather Grant who showed 
colorful slides of her trip last 
summer to the West coast. 
She. was thanked by Grace 
Andersen. 

Laura Fisher and Phyllis 
Beatty explained to the 
gucsts, what ADK means and 
described the altruistic pro- 
jects and programs which 
were held last year. 

Anne Colbourne thanked 
Helen Calnan for opening 
her lovely cottage to the 
members. Refreshments were 
served by Helen .Calnan. > 







, @ Conte and Inspect Latest Ce 
Our Facilities. Equipment 
PHON s MISS. RENE'S Now. 968-5022 


MISS RENE’S FIGURE SALON . 


180 NORTH FRONT STREET 
7 (PARK PLAZA) 
Mon. 4Fri. 9a.m. +9 p.m. — Sat. 9 a.m. - Noon. 





WAIT! 


ry Lynch wete dressed identi- 
cally to the matron of honor 
with identical bouquets, All 
wore matching pink Mowers in 
their hair. 

The best man was Peter 
Gilmour, the bridegroom's 
brother, while the ushers were 
Tom Shannon and Jim Harri- 
son, 

The reception was held at 
the Knights of Columbus hall. 
The bride's mother wore a 
moss green suit of English 
fortrel consisting of an A-line 
sleeveless dress and long 
sleeved, jacket. Her accessor: 
ies were beige and brown 
and her corsage was of yel- 
low roses. : 

The bridegroom's mother 
chose a long sleeved A-lined 
dress of beige wool crepe with 
brown accessories and a cor- 
sage of pink roses. 

For her going.away outfit, 
the bride chose a pant. suit 
consisting of royal blue slacks 
and a matching printed poly- 
ester top. Her corsage was of 
white carnations. 

The newly married couple 
will take up residence at 54 
Adelaide Street, Lindsay. Ont. 


Women’s Institutes 
MOUNTAIN VIEW WI) 


MOUNTAIN VIEW — The 
highlight of the September 
meeting of Mountain View 
Women's Institute was a tour 
through the Brooke Bond 
Foods Ltd. plant at Belleville. 

There were 27 members and 
one visitor in attendance for 
the lour arranged by conven- 
er of Canadian Industries Mrs, 
Burle Summers. All found the 
event most interesting and the 
group was also invited to have 
ccffce at the plant. 

Operetum, to the home of 
Mrs. Clifford Barber, a bus- 
iness meeting was conducted. 
At this time a committee was 
appointed to prepare for the 
short course to be held Oct. 
28 at the Wesley United 
Church. 

The hostess was thanked for 
the hospitality after which she 
served lunch prepared by the 
lunch committee, Mrs. Rich- 
ard “Wilson and ~Mrs, Ken 
Woodall. A social hour was 
enjoyed. 



















968-5022 


Her headdress was a cap if 
the Elizabethan style with a 
chapel length veil of nylon il- 
Jusion, featuring a border of 
floral lace. She carried a bou- 
quet of pale pink carnations, 
daisies, baby's breath and 
leather fern entwined with 
white ribbon. 

Matron of honor, Miss Hel- 
ena. Kot, sister of the bride, 
wore a foor - length gown of 


tangerine chiffon over taffeta, 


trim of delicate daisies, fea- 
turing long flowing slewes 
with tight wrists. In her hair 
she wore white daisies and 
carried a o white 
shasta daisies entwined with 
white ribbon, 

The bridesmaids Miss Ter- 
esa Kot, sister of the bride, 
the Misses Elizabeth and Mary 
Jane Hunt, sisters of > the 
bridegroom, and Miss Mar- 
garet Davison were dressed 
similarly to the matron of 
honor, with white bodices of 
crinkle chiffon, featuring long 
flowing sleeves with ‘ght 
culfs‘and bottom of yellow 
Nowered voile. They wore 
white daisies in their hair and 
carried of white 
shasta daisies entwined with 
yellow ribbon, : 

Best man was Raymond 
Trudeau, and ushers were 
John and Aaron Hunt, broth- 
ers of the bridegroom, John 
Kot, brother of the bride and 
Paul Cassidy, cousin of the 
bridegroom. 

The reception was heid at 
Flinton town hall where the 
bride's mother greeted the 
guésts wearing a shrimp col- 
ored crimpknit and Jac> en- 
semble with white accessores 
and a corsage of miniature 
daisies. 

The bridegroom’s mother 
assisted wearing a blue A-line 
dress of crimp-knit with blue 
woven, wide - brimmed hat, 
champagne accessories and a 


ge of miniature carna- 
cm for. the reception was 


provided by the Land O'Lakes 
Cruisers. 

For the honeymoon trip to 
the East Coast. the bride don 
ned a U-neck. A-line dress of 
pink crepe, featuring an em- 
pire waist and long flowing 
sleeves gathered at the elbow. 
with white accessories. 

On their rectum the couple 
will reside at Denbigh, On- 
tanio. 


Church Groups 


READ CWL 


The first mecting of the 
season of the Read CWL was 
held in St. Mary's School on 
Tuesday, Sept. 21. The mect- 
ing was opened by the presi- 
dent, Mrs. J. Jordon. 

Reports from the canvenors 
of the standing commitices 
were read which brought 
members up to date on par- 
ish activities during the 
summer months and also 
ilems scheduled for the 
coming year, Mrs. Jordon at- 
tended the 
mecting held in Kingston on 
Sept. 18. She gave the high- 





lights of that mecting and | Sfer another reported “very 


mentioned there would be a 
change in the fees for the 


to attend the regional mect- 
ing to be held in Marmora 
an Nov, 7. rf 

Mrs, J. Murphy introduced 
the guest speaker, Mrs, Her- 
bert Brown of Picton. She 
Showed slides and explained 
the highlights of her trip to 
India last year. She said she 
and her hlisband are on the 
development and peace pro- 
gram. She said this moncy 
would go a Jong way in help- 
ing out in places of need. 











ke : 
LUMB'! 
BABY OF THE WEEK 


Something new! For those who 
want good natural color por- 
traits of their children under .12, 
we are offering “Econocolor 
Portraits’. Choose from a sel- 
ection of poses. Econocolor 
prices are less than our black 
and white prices. Phone Lum- 
bers Studio at 962-5954 for in- 
fggmation and prices. 

imothy is the 13 month old 
son of’ Mr a.nd Mrs. Jas. Hogan 
of Belleville. 


~ 
. 


THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 191 7 





v 





MR. AND MRS. CARL WALLACE BROOKS 
Brooks — Patterson 


Rev. J. William Lamb of- 
ficiated at the wedding cere- 
mony solemnized recently in 
Holloway Street United 
Church, when Janice Lynn 
Patterson, daughter of Mrs. 
Dora Patterson, Belleville was 
united in marriage to Carl 
Wallace Brooks, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Brooks, 
Frankford. Miss Linda John- 
ston provided traditional wed- 
ding music. 

Given in marriage by her 
brother - in - law Jack Gib- 
son, the bride wore a floor 
length sheath style gown of 
imported silk corded taffeta 
featuring an empire bodice 
and lily point sleeves of Chan- 
tilly lace and scooped neck- 
line. The back of the gown 
was highlighted with a umatch- 
ing cathedral train trimmed 
with Chantilly lace. Her head- 
dress was a cluster of daisies 
encrusted with tiny pearls and 
aurora borealis drops from 
which extended a four tier silk 
illusion scalloped veil. She 
carried a bouquet of roses, 
mixed carnations and ivy 

Matron of honor was Mrs. 
Dorothy Buclow, sister of the 
bridegroom who wore a floor 
length gown of pink polyester 
cashmere featuring bell 
sleeves with a pink velvet rib- 
bon at the empire waist. She 


wore a matching velvet head- 
piece and carried a bouquet 
of mauve shade carmations 


‘and daisies. Bridesmaids Don- 


na Lee Uitbeyerse and Pam- 


-ela_ Leavens, niece of the 


bride were dressed Hentical- 
ly to the matron of honor but 
in mauve. Each carried a 
bouquet of mixed carnations 
and daisies centred with a 
rose, 

Case Uitbeyerse attended the 
bridegroom, while the ushers 
were Lyall Leavens of Osh- 
awa and Allan Simpson of 
Durham, Ring barer was 
Bryon Leavens of Oshawa, ~ 
nephew of the bride. 

A reception was held in the 
church parlor, where the 
bride’s mother greeted the 
guests wearing a blue two- 
piece ensemble of lace over 
taffeta with white accessories 


mother assisted wearing a 
two-picce pink lace ensemble 
of lace over taffeta, brown 
accessories and a corsage of 
pink and white ‘mums. | 
a corsage of pink and 
white ‘mums. 
For travelling to points 
west, the bride donned a 
green crimplene dress with a 
corsage of red sweetheart ro- 
ses. 





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* 


COMING SOON 


Commencing the week of October 18, 1971, Loyal- 
ist College will be ofering the following courses 
an Starting dates and times to be announc- 


Art — Water Colors 
Art — Oil Painting 
Print Making A 
Geology Relating to Mineral Prospecting 
Geology Relating to Gem Stone Deposits 
Advanced Dress Design 
Creative Cooking 
Effective Public Speaking 
Snowmobile Maintenance and Operation 
Advanced Auto Mechanics ~ 
Women-Understand Your Automobile 
Music Appreciation 
Further difails regarding registration procedures 


and payment of tuition fees will be adveftised in 
the very near future. Watch for this information, 




































LOYALISE C COLLEGE 















} 
} 
} 
iy 









_ + Okay2” | 





Ne “ 


8 THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1971 ~ : 
OFF THE RECORD 





by Ned Ridonw 





PICTON (Staff) — A group 
of Simeon Street ratepayers 
has ‘ petitioned town council 
to halt the construction of sec- 
tional homes in their neigh 
borhood protesting alleged dis- 
crepancies in zoning and build- 
ing bylaws and deed restric- 
tions. 

Spokesman for a delegation 
of approximately 15 persons. 
Stewart Kerr told — council 
Simcon Street residents would 
hike a restrictive bylaw gov- 
ering the type of housing 
permitted in the Greenwood 
subdivision 

Mrs. Mervin Haight, a res- 
ident of the Simcon ‘Street 
neighborhood added that. a 
town bylaw prohibits trailers. 
and movable or temporary 
cwellings except in authorized 
trailer parks and charged that 
the sectional homes fall in one 
of these categories.- 

Town solicitor Jack Ward 
explained the term “trailer” 
is expanded by the other re 
ferences and, in fact, the by 
law applies to trailers, not 
other types cf housing. 

Mrs.° Haight countered the 
sectional homes presumably 
were advertised as movable 
dwellings and was reinforcea 
in her opinion by Mr. Kerr 
who said they had been des 
cribed this way 
vertisoements 


med RIDE 


“Harry? I’ve had some car trouble buc 
I'll be there in time for our date. 





“aeAnd os a sales incentive, the LOW man gets 
two free tickets to my gronddaughter's 
piono recital.“ 

F “ 





i 
: 


Sram VY 


20 wee 





L_10-s ji 


ib local ad 


Two ef the sectional homes 
proposed for construction on 
Simeon Street already have 
been erected but comply with 
the town’s building bylaw and 
a land use bylaw 


Mr. Kerr remarked he did 
ap] net object toi ce of build 
AHLL GIT IN TOUCH 
WIF HER BYES. = 


} ‘| irg per but said Qurcil 
must agree when homeown 
~) crs invest “upwards of &25 
060. they develop an inte 
est on future real estate val 
ention tewn » t ab 
Ward tad conf S ! 
° i x rots orn 
_— ss type us 1 
Cus 
’ ¢ 




















THASS A JOB ONLY 
MOONBEAM McSWINE 

















1S-UGH?-FITTEN FO—, “ EXTRY-SENSIBLE 
SHE'S TH’ FORT PRO-JECKSHUN= 
KNOX O’GLOP 7 ee i 
CC 
& 


ball pitchers 
” proved a bon 





artis, whe made splinters out 
of Frans Cita’ Store an Vie 


j tou Avenue, aver the week 





Lae More wianew will cost 
was Che brick 
Larewn in as wn added bon 
Other minor 


S41 te replace 












pohce 





Lae wethemd 


wantow and the theft at 123 


am. Sunday 





eta the car was es 
{oat SIS and value of 


tolen yoods at $123 





, Neighbors Are Upset. 
By Sectional Homes 


Mr. Kerr balked at the 
term “discrimination” but was 
reminded by councillor Lane 
that it becomes discriminatory 
when only $25,000 houses can 
be built on a particular street. 

The problem, referred to the 
plannirg . and* development 
committce for further investi- 
gation, was described by Mr. 
Lane as a matter requiring 
“a Jot ofostudy.” =e 

He suggested outside experts 
probablt will have to be con® 
sulted to assist council in its 
éecision. 

When pinpointed concerning 


* specific objections to the sec Concept of construction with- 


tional homes, Mr. Kerr said 
he felt their cost was their 
strongest fault. 

A second member of the 
delegation said the chimney 
on the sectional home near 
her was inferior to her chim- 
ney. =! 
Leonard Tripp. Picton build- 
ing inspector, said he has in- 
spected the sectional house 
and admitted it does not fit 
its foundation. Akthough it is 
approximately four inches 
“out”. the house passed in- 
spection, 

Mr. Tripp remarked a regu- 
lar hese with the same fault 
would have passed too, since 
such a variance is the indi- 
vidual home builder's preoga- 
tne. . 

A Simeen Strect homeown 
er complained at this point 
that construction for the sec 


Most Active Stocks 
TORONTO 


An 1100 am. report from the 
Nelleville offices.of Walwyn. Stod- 
aell and Co, Lid, 141 Pinnecle 
Street 

Follow: stock, pumber of sales, 
last sale price and change. 


INDUSTRIALS 
Imp. Oil 17.529, 30%. up % 
Shell Wts. 4.280. 1627 up T'2 
Gulf Qil Cada 13.184, 237+, up 
a 


Ven. Power 12.642. 135. up 10 


Power Corp. 12.412. Sts. dewn | 


MINES 











Red Poplar 6.500. 12'2, 
dewn 06 
Sulvermaque 5.500 20's, 
down 01 
Northrock Expl 3.350. 10. 


no change 
OILS 
Con Bonanza 39.600, 145. up 


Lochiel 20.200. 1.35. up Ol 
Svebens Oil 19.905, 9.30. up 40 


Ranger 14.325. 12%». up ts 





BP Gas Oc 887). 6.90. up 20 


Theatre 
Feature Times 





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% 


TRENTON AT BAYSIDE 
JOHN FORSYTHE 


“THE HAPPY © 
ENDING” 


tional home's foundation be 
gan in August and no mention 
of it was made in a list of 
building permits presented to 
council in September. 

Mr. Tripp commented. the 
properties were going through 
the committee of adjustment 


at the ime. Gone 
Chairman for last night's 
committee of the whole ses- PLUS 


+ sion in Council, Ross Cronk- 
wright, surgested disturbed 
homeowners — should meet 


“The Christine 
Srchaenedt Cantina Jorgensen Story’ 


ssid he did net support the | Restricted to Persons 


18 or over. 
out a permit, 


is RG | 
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Television’ Debate Flat 


‘As No New Policy Made! 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 

A televised debate among the 
Jeaders of the three major par- 
ties dominated the Ontario elec- 


EF 


criticism of the format, rather 
than comment on the subjects 


Economic issues and the sub- 
ject of grants to separate 
schools dominated the hour-long 
program which saw Premier 
William Davis, Liberal Leader 
Robert Nixon and Stephen 
Lewis, leader of the New Demo- 
cratic Party, restricted to timed 
answers to questions from two 


iateryiewers. 

No new statements of policy 
were made. The only news to 
come out of the session was the 
announcement by Premier 


Davis that he has asked Prime 
Minister Trudeau to set an ear- 
lier date for a federal-provincial 
conference on the economy now 
set for Dec. 68. 

Mr. Lewis had his own ideas 
about economic conferences 
Monday, and announced them to 
a meeting of party workers in 
Galt. He said an NDP govern- 
pas eaten hold a conference of 

business, agricul- 
ore Sand re leaders shortly 
after coming to power. They 
would be asked to plan a course 
for x job-producing economy. 

Liberal Leader Nixon also 
concentrated on economic is- 
sues during the day. He criti- 
cized the government for taking 
power from small municipali- 
ties, an action which sometimes 
frustrated their allempts to 


THE LITTLE WOMAN 





“The next time we remodel our bathroom, I’ 
moving to 2 hotel!” “ 


House Fails Again 
To Debate Test 


OTTAWA (CP) — The Com- 
mons failed again Monday to 
speak with one voice against nu- 
clear-weapons tests and the 

United Sratés™est in 
the Aleutian Islands in particu- 
Jar. } 

Liberal and New Democrat 
MPs have tried three times in 
the last two wecks to have the 
Commons condemn the U.S. test 
proposed for this month on Am- 
chitka Island in the Aleutians. 

Such motions require unani- 
Mous consent to be put to de 
bate or a vote. 

The first motion was denied 
by voices that seemed to come 
from Liberal ranks, the second 
by Donald MacInnis (PC—Cape 
Breton-East Richmond) and the 
third by Jack McIntosh (PC— 
Swift Current-Maple Creek). 

In a turnaround Monday. Mr. 
McIntosh proposed a motion 
that would protest against nu- 
clear tests by the Soviet Union, 
China and France, as well as 
the US. 

This time, unanimous consent 
was denied by a shouted “no” 
from .James Jerome (L—Sud- 
bury), parliamentary secretary 
to Privy Council President Allan 
MacEachen. 

Mr. Mclntosh had said last 
Thursday, when he denied con- 
sent to consider a Liberal mo- 
tion, protesting against the Am- 
chitka test, that the Commons 
should got single out the U.S. 

Mr, MacEachen, meantime. 
polio no move ‘to bring in a 

cored mation 
opposing Seeing whe bitka test. He 
had said Jast week he would do 
go Monday provided MPs 


agreed to limit debate to one 
speaker from each party. 

An allparty group of MPa 
was being organized in the ab- 
sense of a clearcut stand by 
the Commons to sign a protest 
against the Amchitka test. 

Mark Rose (NDP—Fraser 
Valley West) would present the 
protest to President Nixon if a 
meeting could be arranged, 

Pacific coast MPs in particu 
lar have expressed fears that a 
nuclear blast in the Aleutians. 
situated near a natural earth: 
quake zone, might cause dam- 
age along the West Coast. 


China Wants 


Taiwan Ousted 


UNITED NATIONS (CP) — 
The People’s Republic of China 
is expected to say through its 
spokesman today that it will not 
sit in the UN while Taiwan is 
present. 

The statement will be made 
when Albania speaks in the 130 
country General Assembly. just 
a day after State Secretary Wil- 
liam Rogers made a strong plea 
for acceptance of the American 
twoChina proposal. 

Albania long has been the Pe- 
king spokesman here and for 
many .years .has carried the 
fight for the expulsion of the 
Nationalist Chinese of Taiwan 
and seating of the Communists 
of Peking. 


boost their local economics. 

During the TV debate, the op- 
position leaders and Mr. Davis 
took familiar stands—on oppos- 
ite sides of the fence—in dis- 
cussing the government's recent 
decision not to extend aid to 
separate schools beyond the 
present cut-off point of Grade 
10. 

Premier Davis reiterated an 
earlier charge that Mr, Nixon 
had misrepresented the govern- 
ment’s policy, His rain point 
‘was that grants should not go to 
the higher separate school 
grades because they are part of 
a private school system—and 
the does not want 
to fracture the educational sys- 
tem by aiding such sc! 


Both Mr. Nixon Mr. 


Lewis rejected the premier's 


stand, saying it was unfair that 
all separate school grades 
should not be put on an equal 
footing with public schools, 

On economic issues, the oppo: 
sition leaders criticized Mr. 
Davis for not taking any imme- 
diate action to relieve unem- 
ployment and offset the effects 
of the United States supplemen- 
tary duty on imports, 

Mr. Davis noted that the gov- 
ernment is planning a winter 
works program and will con 


tinue its policy of giving tax! 


eredits to corporations for 
equipment purchases. 

The government was willing 
to wait to judge the effective- 
ness of proposed federal legisla- 
tion which would give financial 
aid to compenies affected by 
the U.S. economic measures. 
The province was making pleas 
of its own should Ottawa fail. he 
said. 

Out on the hustings, Premier 
Davis arrived in Oxtawa Mon 


day night and was met by a: HIGHLINER 


delegation of senior iorest-i 
dustry officials who said soe 


agent regulations on logging in} 


Algonquin Park could force 
many companies to close down. 

After the private mecting, Mr. 
Davis said the government is) 


awaiting the final report, ev} 


pected in abbut a month, of the 


advisory commission on the} ALL VARIETY 
park before deciding on long: | 


term policy. 

Mr. Nixon took his campaign 
to the town of Paris, north of | 
Brantford and in his home rid 
ing. where he visited industrial 
plants and a local hospital. 

He blasted the covernment 
over a proposal that could see 
the hospital consolidated with 
hospitals in Brantford, saying 
that the maintenance of such 
community services “1s one 
way that the government can 
convince industry that the town 
is a viable economic force.” 

He continued that theme in| 
Galt, where he attacked govern 


ment: centralization asd the re-| 
gional governrent program|CIL — 10's . 


under which 
poorly served.” 

Mr. Lewis told the Oshawa 
meeting that his economic con 
ference would not involve any 


"citize sid are! 


“grandiose grandstanding” but | OVEN PRIDE 


would set out to achieve an in- 
ventory of manpower require 
ments, an estirrate of economic 
growth rates and productivity. 


It also would try to establish a} 


permanent advisory committce 


to work with the government's |. 


economic plarning board. 

He also blasted government 
economic policy earlicr in the 
day in speaking to party work- 
ers and later to students at 
Trent University in Peterbor- 
ough, 

Mr. Lewis will be in Toronto 
today. Mr. Nixon visits the 
Stratford area and the Niagara 
Peninsula. Mr. Davis will tour 
several communities in the Ot- 
tawa area. 


Accountants Initiated 
Return of Money 


SUMMERSIDE, P.E.I. (CP) 
— Two men agcused of stealing 
$414,000 from the bank where 
they worked are free on $10,000 
bail each after returning here to 


+ face charges. 


Accountants Archibald Mac- 
Leod, 2, and William Mac- 
Donald, 29, returned Monday 


from the United States without. 


police knowledge and surren- 
dered following a manbunt 
which involved the RCMP, the 
U.S. Federal Bureau of Investi- 
“gation and Interpol, the interna- 
tional police organization, 

They were immediately 
charged with theft of more than 
$50 and remanded until next 
Tuesday for plea. 

Police’Chief S. D. A. Wanna- 
maker of Summerside, who took 
the pair into custody when they 
walked into the police station 
early Monday, said police forces 
were “in the dark” about their 
whereabouts and plans to re. 
turn. . 

“I knew nothing about it until 


I got the phone call this morn- 
ing from their lawyer,” he said 
in an interview. 

Charlottetown lawyer Charles 
McQuaid said one of the sus- 
pects made contact with him 
from “somewhere outside Can- 
ada™ last’ week asking that he 
represent them. 7 

Chief Wannamaker said the 
pair ‘planned their return last 
week when MacLeod telephoned 
his wife here and ‘made ar- 
rangements to” have Mel Sim- 
mons of Toronto, a security 
agent with the Canadian Impe- 
rial Bank of Commerce, mect 
him in Boston Sept. 28. ? 

MacLeod and Simmons then 
flew to Phoenix, Ariz., and met 
MacDonald there Oct, 1. 

The three few to Los Angcles 
where some moncy had been 
deposited in a berk ard re- 
turned to Buffalo, N.Y., rented 
a carand drove to Toronto. 

Chic Wannamaker said they 
flew to Saint John, N.B.. rented 
acar and arrived here shortly 


after midnight Monday. ~ After 
making contact with Mr. Mc- 
Quaid they surrendered to po- 
lice about 7:50 a.m. 

They appeared at the “police 
station here dressed in sports 
jackets, “neat. clean and well 
&roomed."* McLeod had grown a 
moustache. 

Police sity a but $5.000 
of the $414,647 taken in the theft 
was recovered. Except for 
$11,000 in U.S. funds, the money 
was in Canadian currency. 

Neither man would answer re- 
porters’ questions when they ap- 
peared in court-and their wives 
also refused comment. 

The MacDonalds have four 
children and the MacLeods two. 

The theft, described by police 
as'the largest in the province’s 
history, was discovered by offi- 
cials of the Canadian Imperial 
Bank of Commerce branch here 
at about noon Sept. 9 after 
MacDonald afd MacLcod, the 

tant and assistant 


bank's acco At sis 
a gtant/ respectively, failed 
to report to work, 


Hamburg 49° 
























% 


( Lac s 
* THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5S, 1971 * £ 








OPEN EVENINGS TIL 10 p.m. RES 


PLUS!! WE ARE OPEN SUNDAYS II u ia ts 6 p.m. 


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SOCKEYE 
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GARBAGE BAGS : 








9 
DREAD 22°: 10:2": 


ONT. No, 1 — 50 LB. BAG 
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a CLIP THIS COUPON 20¢ mE 
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‘ 


JQ THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 191° 








Easy 
Picking | 


| = 
} 
league championship. 

The final series now stands 
at three wins apiece with one | PRE 
game Aicd, 

Donna Brant hurled a sev- 
en-hitter with three strik $ 
and one walk to best xd 
opponent Saundra -Claus wo 
yielded 17 hits for the losers 
She fanned three Dstters 
issued no walks. 

Brant aided her own cause* 
by slamming two triples who 
Irma Barberstock and Ct 
Tene Quinn i 
bles and a s 
er Lil Barberstock 
pair of singks and m 
outstanding defens 
the game with a runni 
handed grab in the fu 
ning. 

Verna Hill paced 
attack with a hon 
gle while Sharon 


Even when they held a 30 
,lead in their Women’s Soft- 
ball finals series, Cosy’ Grill 
must have been aware that 
they weren't picking any po- 
sies by mecting Weese’s Flow- 

Weese’s had won the rézti- 
lar season pennant and then 
staged a comeback win in the 
semi-finals after trailing Dairy 
Queen 2-1 in the best - of - 
five series to prove they were 
quite capable of bouncing 
back, 





Monday night they bombed 
Cosy 102 to stop the Grill 
team for the fourth time in 
their attempt to capture the 


































double and is Women’s Softball fina!s contest. The sociation Senior A series scored 
a double and sin "s Hi say af taboo dh aEneds two goals in the final three min- 
The deciding ° R = BPA PPESTeS LODE Up LATS: utes Monday to eke out a 44 tie 
series will be p Vedres Well rapping out 17 bats for a 10-2 victory to with Tulsa Oilers of the Central 
day at the Alemite + © their senes with Cosy Grill at three wins — Hockey League in an exhibition 


at 6.30 p.m. 


Well Aiea 


Barberstock of Weese’s Flowers gets Recess. 
KINGSTON (CP) — Kingston 


tye: arm action as she rounds first base in Aces of the Ontario Horkey As- 








se 


ville Saturday morning when 
Towers Food City Novice all- 
stars hold their first open 
practice at 7.30 in the Mem- 
orial Arena. ‘ 


TRENTON (Staff) — Bay- 
side Secondary School gener- 
ated a pair of touchdowns, 
but all they were able to 
manage for their efforts were 
a 66 tie in their Bay of Quinte 
COSSA junior gridiron battle 
with Napanee yesterday, 

A major score by Al Mc- 
Intosh gave Bayside the lead. 


By THE CANADIAN PRESS 
Bruce MacGregor, 


layoff has not hurt him a bit. 


tion game Monday. 
* * * 





game. 





Free to travel as much as you like, 
it suits you. That's the 
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This new plan applies to travel on CN 
Red Bargain 0a hen the Red fare 
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The discount is 2 olf basic trans- 
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SON and. DAVISON 


“CN. AUTHORIZED AGENTS” 
BELLEVILLE 





“YOUR C.N. CITY TICKET OFFICE” 


S TRAVEL CENTRE 


“CERTIFIED TRAVEL/CONSULTANTS” 


modationscan be purchased at regular 
tates. Advance reservations accepted. 

To qualify, simply purchase, on proof 
of age, a CN Identification Card for 
$3 at your nearest Travel Agent or 
CN Passenger Sales Office. 


And what better time to travel than 
on CN’s Red Bargain Days when rait 
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about the 65+- Fare Plan today. / 


. 


DIAL 962-3404 






DIAL 962-9201 


Novices” Open 
The minor hockey season wee hopefuls hit the Sce Sat- 


will officially start in Belle.  urday at 9.15, followed by the 
Kinsmen Bantams at 11 Sun- 


tice at 9 a.m., followed by the 
bpd Tire juveniles at 
4S. , 





zone later in the game to al- 
low Napanee to salvage 
646 deadlock. 

_ It was the second game 
for Bayside, who opened 
season with a 14-6 win over 
Centennial. Napanee now car- 
ries a record of 1-1-1. 


the 
ever 
the 


Sports in Brief 


CLEVELAND (AP) — Oak- 


20 victory over Cleveland 
Monday night that the summer Browns before a scilout crowd 
of 84.285 in a nationally-tele- 
The right winger notched a vised National Football League 
pair of goals on home ice as the game Monday night. 
Rangers breezed to a 4-1 win 
over Boston Bruins in the only 
National Hockey League exhibi- 


‘ 


“Intelligencer Sport 


Only One Helped Sports ~ Seconda 


Calendar 


TONIGHT — for 
Belleville Fairwsys st Memorial 
Atenas, 68 pm. 

FRIDAY — 
we Kingston Frontenses at King 

SIGH SCHOOL 
ESDAY — Centre Hast- 
ings vs BCI. 

THURSDAY — Moira ve Centen- 
al 

FRIDAY — Trenton ve Nap- 
anes. 

ea 
meeting “4 besketball 
for 
ofticssls at Quinte Secondary 
School, 7. 


ANAF Darts 


Quickies 6, Mot Reds 1; Jets 
S. Misfits 2 

ee ee eee = Becks Feee 
a. 


Minor Hockey 


a 


= 
Hedge will 


‘The Wilson Tykes, this winter. 
coached this season by Ted menage the while 
Soule, will be formed from Murrey will be aided by as- 
house Jeague players later. sistert Dave Jones and man- 

Soule, Food City’s Leroy ager Ron Hutchinson. 
McBrien; and the bentams’ Ken Brooks Will again be at 
Doug Murray are new faces the helm of the Rollins pee- 
on the all-star coaching scene wees, who will be managed 





BAY OF QUINTE 
HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER 


LAST WEEK'S RESULTS 


Bss % THS 0; CSS 4 OSD ¢; 
Sous 0 BervS & Ima & Cae 
1 
Qss 3, PEcr oe. 
stnion 
TH? 6, BSS ¢; CSS & AC 3: BSS 
2_AC 3; BCIVS 1. MSS ¢; TRS @ 
CSS ¢; O85 0, Pec 0 
STANDINGS 
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\and youre down tn the Aagemente 
dovetailng Chat JOoIne 


and the phone rigs G2SIaS 


and you 


have to drop - 


everything dru 


war DOME. 


pti Wish youliad 


His 
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CUERE TE PER 
ital 
ist is 
eHitee 


ry Soccer. 





tf; 





















ie Gotcha! 


~ «Orlole first baseman Boog Powell picks off 


gol a snap throw from plitcher Mike Cuellar, 


é 








Oakland’s Bert Campaneris in fifth-inning Umpire is Jake O’Ronnell. (AP Wirephoto) 

action Monday at Baltimore Stadium. Powell 

Denson ANDY CAPP 
ORR» 


2488s 


ERRR» 


Ready | 


MONTREAL (CP) — Mont- 
real Alouettes likely will return 
to their original backfield when 
they entertain Toronto Argo- 
nauts in an Eastern Feoiball 
Conference game Sunday. 


Da ess as 

















@ A club spokesman said Mon- if PRIS TMS Oo. E r TE ELE RESE CTE aH 
boaw day that Moses Denson, out for ? THERE'S B08 GONE TH! TCH! SUPROSE WE EACH 
the last seven games because of ; FROM THE RENT MONEY PAY FIVE BOB AN' SAY NOS\ 
oat CARAS . = ‘NOU AN! ME <3 m=, MORE ABOUT IT = is 
an ankle injury, will join Bruce WERE THE ONLY , . 
Van Ness in the running back ONES WHO KNEW BS | 
position for the Argorau‘ con- Lea! Le 4 
beta UNDER THE pa 4 
Denson's spot had been filled MATTRESS! B 
by Bill Massey, a University of te 
Hawaii graduate. Massey was ks ‘ 
expected to take Denson's place i ta 
on the 30day injured Hst be y ! 
cause of a recurring neck in eRBLT Wie Se eg, ae tat ol SARE fis 





jury. aggravated on the Western 


‘imlach Last of Dying Breed 


By BRUCE LEVETT 
saa Canadian Press Sports Editor | 


| quit to go into the houw con-} New York Rangers—A gener- 
struction business. | atty anonymous crew without 

The following year—1970.71—| undebateable superstars who 
Winning the Stanley Cup. once] everybody expected the Bruins! have absolutely no business giv- 


Boudrias, Orland Kurtenba 
Wayne Maki. Rosaire Paieme 


Jocelyn Guevremont, Dale Tal-! 


the dream of every coach. has!t9 repeat under Tom Johnson, | ing fits to the likes of Montreal 


become something of a night- 
mare since the National Hockey 
League expansion of 1967-68. 

For a variety of reasons, the 
top pride in hockey has beecme 
a tickct to oblivion for the last 
four Cup-winning coaches. 

In 1966-67, Punch Imlach led 
Toronto Mezple Leafs to their 
fourth Cup under his tutclage. 
Two years later, he was fired. 
only to rebound as coach of the 
expansionist Buffalo Sabres. 

Today, Imlach is the only 
coach, in the NHL with his name 
inscribed on the Stanley Cup 
trophy. 

In the first year of expansion, 
Toe Blake led Montreal Cana- 
diens to their eighth Cup under’ 
his gene administration. Then 
he quit. Claude Ruel took over 
in 1968-69 and retained the Cup 
for the Habs. When he quit in 
December cf 1970, after 
“years with the club, he said: 

“I like scouting better than 
“eoaching: in this city."’ Today, 
he's Montreal's. head scout. 

The| next one to have his 
Mame engraved on the Cup was 
Harry Sinden who led a bunch 
of undisciplined flakes to the 
.pinnacle in 1969-70 to give Bos- 
ton Bruins their first Cup since 





v 
| Phil Esposito, Johnny 







who moved from his job as as 
sistant to gercral manager Milt 
Schmidt to follow Sinden. 

Instead, the Canadiens came 
| back under Al McNeil. McNeil’s 
reward? A promotion to the 
Voyageurs, Montreal's Ameri- 
} can League cousin in Halifax. 





Montreal Canadiens — Pri 
marily because you have to 
stick with the champ. Big Jean 
Beliveau is gone"and there's a 
| new hand on the helm. But Pete 
Mahovlich has blossomed and 
reokie Guy Lafleur will be an 
asset. Returnces include Pete's 
brother Frank, Yvan  Cour- 
noyer. Sefge Savard and Ken 
Dryden. still technically a 
rookie despite his. Cuy- winning 
heroics of last winter. 





Boston Bruins—When you say 
Bucyk, 
Bobby Orr, Ken Hodge, Ed 
Westfall, Derek Sanderson, then 
| add a covey of talented new- 
comers, then cogitate on the 
possibility that they may be less 
thanvenchanted about last 
year's wi@tl-up, you might just 
have the formula fer victory. If 
the Bruins had a possible weak- 






theyll probably do again this 
year, Coach Francis, a former 
foalic himself, has Ed Gia- 
comin and Gilles» Villemure 
back in his old position, which 
will cause some good shooters 
some more sleepless nights. 
Bobby Rousseau is the oniy 
i really new face on the roster 
but there's still the matter of 
filling the large skates of Tim 
Horton on defence. 

4 


| and Boston. But that's what 
| 


lon, Pat Quinn and Gary Dx 
to make things interesting wh 


ever they finish. 


Buffalo Sabres—Punch 


first expansion team to win 
Stanley Cup. He was 
“what year,” 
didn’t hear the question. 
Sabres are not without talent 
Phil Goyette. Gilles Perr: 
Gerry Meehan and rookie 0; 
Martin. Goalie Roger Crozier 


y ‘his stomach operation was a 
Toronto Maple Leafs Fourth| success. might tum some of 
place again? Well, Dave Keon,| those ties—Buffalo had 15 last 


Norm Ullman, Paul Hendersgn,| year—into victories. 


Ron Ellis and goalies Bernice 
Parent and Jacques Plante gen 


provable until later in the sea 
son. Toronto finished 15 points 
behind third-place Montreal in 
last year's final standings; 19 
ahead of the Sabres. 
cee 
Vancouver Canucks - 
place, but only because I'm 


















eee 


Detroit Red Wings—The Big} ° 
erally give of full measure, To| Guy is gone after 25 years: and 
improve, Leafs will have to! the centre who set up Gordie 
come up with «som: neto.| Howe for a good stretch of those 
‘Whether they have won't be | years Alex Delvecchio—is un 


happy over his demotion 


part-time employment. Delvec- 


chio missed only one of 1 
year's 78 games and scored 


long schedule and that he'll 


| used on the power play and to 
from Vancouver and this is my} kill penalties. What Delvecchio 
story. The Canucks finished} says is almost unprintable. With 
seven points behind Buffalo last] all the new faces—there are 


Im 
lach saxs his crew will be the 


goals and 31 assists for the sec 
ond best record on the Wings. 
Fifth New they say he can’t stand the 













“their 194041 triumph under Coo- 
ney Weiland. toa 
Sinden, a quict man, quietly 


ness in the past, however, 1 
would be in goal and nothing 
much has changed there. 


season and one point ahead of} only four_returnces from 1}. 







rdstick as any] lot of programs, 











is ax good a ya 
= 







HWY. 401 EXIT 102 
KINGSTON, ONT. 


Past 745. ee. 


@ Ime 


Wednesday, Oct. 6th 


ONTARIO’S NEWEST HARNESS RACING TRACK 
10 CARD RACE: 7 
Dining Lounges - Pari Mutuel de Acet 

















GLEN LAWRENCE $1500. 
INVITATIONAL PACE: 


last place Detroit, so sentiment} year—the’ Wings should sell a 





; Orioles Threaten Sweep 





OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — 
“When we're playing our kind 
of baseball, ain’t nobody, gonna 
beat us,”* says Baltimore first 
baseman Boog Powell. 

Powell, playing his kind of 
bascball—which is power hitting 
—despite a sore right wrist and 
hand, slammed two home runs 
Monday as the Orioles beat 
Oakland Athletics 5-1 in Balti- 
more. 


The Athletics were down to 


"their last chance today in the 


American League playoffs. 

The Orioles’ eighth victory in 
as. many American League 
playoff games over three years 
gave them a 20 lead in the 
best-otfive series which moved 
here-fef the third game today. 

With Oakland's two 20-game 
winners—Vida Blue and Jim 
(Catfish) Hunter—beaten, the 
role of stopper was assigned to 
10-game winner Diego Segui. 
Baltimore manager Earl 
Weaver countered with Jim 
Palmer, one of his four 20-game 
winners. ~ 

“We want to get 2 over with 
i we can,” Weaver said Mon- 
day, He added that he wasa't 
counting on a sweep. 

Williams admitted that he had 
said, after the Athletics had 
clinched in the American 
League West Division, that the 
Orioles wouldn't win in thre 
straight, but he pointed out: 
“You haven't heard me say it 
the last two days.” 

Powcll almost did not make 
the second game because of a 
reinjured right hand which was 
hit by a pitch late in the season 
and strained while sliding in 
Sunday's 53 victory. 

In fact, the 2-pound slugger 
who had given left-iander Mike 
Cuellar a 20 lead with a home 
run in the third inning. tried to 
bunt before he hit his clinching, 
two-run homer in the cighth. 

“Earl told me if you can't 
swing the bat, lay one down.* 
said Powell, who said he 


“couldn't grip the bat well. The 


left-handed slugger fobled off a 
bunt attempt before homering 
to right-centre field. 

“Even though his hands hurt 
he looks lke 900 pounds up 
there, and he can hit.” said 
Hunter, who also yielded ho 
mers to Brooks Robinson and 
Ellie Hendericks. 

The W year-old Cucllar gave 
up leadoff doubles in the second 
and sixth innings and a leadoff 
single in the third but the Ath- 
leucs couldn't cash in. Oak- 
land's only mm came in the 
fourth on Sal Bando’s double 
and Dave Duncan's single. 

Cucllar helped himself in the 
fifth when he picked the speedy 
Bert Campancris off first base 


| Watson and Wiegand 
Architects 


219 Front St, 
Belleville 
Ontario 


962-8639 


this year. They have Andre! 


ch, 
nt, 















rai | 


er: 






asked 
but apparently 
The 


following a one-out single and 
he might have been helped by 
Tommy Davis’ surprise’ sacri- 
fice in the sixth. It surprised 
Williams, too. 

With Jackson on second, with 
a leadoff double, Davis, the 
cleanup hitter, gave himself up 
with a bunt that moved Jackson 





oN 


: «< 
THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1971 J} 





to third. "But Jackson was 
stranded when Bando grounded 
out and Angel Mangual flied 
out, 

“I would have preferred to 
see him swing, but he was just 
trying to do his, job,” Williams 
said in explaining that Davis 
had sacrificed on his own. “He 


\ 


_ Powell Power Too Much for A’s 


was trying to make sure of get- 
ting that runner over.” 

Jacksons double turned out to 
be the last of Oakland's six hits ~ 
and Davis's sacrifice the * 
ning of a 120ut string r 
fashioned to end the gamé and 
keep the Orioles unbeaten in the 

> three years of league playoffs. 


Bookies Refusing to Accept Bets on_ Baltimore 


LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) — 
Nevada's legal bookmakers 
stopped taking bets Monday 
on Baltimore to win the 
American League pennant 
after the Orioles went 20 
ahead of Oakland Athletics in 
the playoffs. 

Pittsburgh Pirates were a 
13to-10 bet -to take the Na- 
Uonal League title, 

The Orioles were a $.to2 fa- 
vorite to win the third game 


in the American League play- 
offs for a three-game sweep 
over the Athletics, : 


- Sore’ Loser ? 


BALTIMORE (AP) — The 
charter flight. taking Oakland 
Athletics from Baltimore to the 
West Coast was delayed for 
more than a hour Monday after 
authorities at Friendship Air- 
port received atelephoned 
bomb threat, airport police said. 


¢ There Was no longer a price 


up on Baltimore to win the 
playoffs, something that 
~_Would require only that they 
win one of the next three 
games. 
San Francisco Giants, with 
Juan Marichal scheduled to 
pitch, were 6to5 favorites in 
the third game of the National 
League playoffs. Pittsburgh, 
however, was still 1340-10 to 
take the pennant series, 


Ellis Making Pirate Waves 


PITTSBURGH (AP) i 
pitching is the name of the 
game, then Pittsburgh Pirates 
could be in Ueep trouble as they 
£0 against San Francisco Giants 
today in the third game of the 
deadlocked best-of-five National 
League playoffs. . 

Pittsburgh manager Danny 
Murtaugh disclosed Monday 
that his No. 1 winner, right-han- 
der Dock Ellis, may be through 
for the playoffs because & an 
aching elbow. 

Ellis, who won 19 garnes dur- 
ing the regular season and went 
five innings as the Pirates 
evened the series at 1-1 with a 
9F victory in the sccond game 
Sunday at San Francisco. is 
going to be examined by a doc- 
tor. 

“We're not going to take a 
chance on injuring him career 
wise for the sake of one game.”* 
said Murtaugh, who sent spot 
starter Nelson Briles 84 out to 
face the Giants’ 18-game winner 
Juan Marichal today. 
Murtaugh plans to use first- 

€ starter and loser Steve 
Bliss in Wednesday’s fourth 
game against San Francisco's 
Gaylord Perry. He had Ellis in 
mind of a fifth game is neces 
sary Thursday. or might use 
him Wednesday. Perry was a 
54 winner in the first game Sat- 
urday. 

Ellis wasn’t happy with the 
scheduled visit to the doctor. 
“Hell, the season's almost 
over.” he commented. ‘There's 
no sense in secing a doctor 
now.” 

The controversial 


& 


Elis .was 


the centre of Pittsburgh's day of 


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PHONE 98-3388 


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BELLEVILL}: ONT. 
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rest Monday. He rapped Pir- 
ates’ management as cheap- 
skates, saying he had to spend 
$50 out of his pocket while the 
team was in San Francisco last 
weekend to get a hotel bed big 
enough to accommodate him. 
He also said the Pirates should 
have hired a bigger airplane. 

“They, management, don't de- 
serve to win the pennant; don't 
deserve to win the World Series 
... but we're going to win be- 
cause we're the best team,” h 
said, 

Murtaugh counted upon power 
to carry the Pirates ag t the 
Giants’ superior pitching. He's 
hoping that Willie Stargell. the 
major league's home run cham. 
pion with 48, but Ofor-9 in the 
first two games of the playoffs. 
finds the range. First bgseman 





























@ FLYING 


THANKS - 


BELLEVILLE YARDMEN BENEFIT FUND . 


NOW ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 


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608 BELLEVILLE AIR CADETS 


BELLEVILLE ‘ARMORIES 


Bob Robertson, who is 6 for 9, 
including three home runs and a 
double Sunday, has been the big 
hitter in the playoffs for Mur- 
taugh thus far. S 

San Francisco manager Char- 
lie Fox, who has a few sluggers 
in Willie Mays, Willie McCovey 
and Bobby Bonds, is willing to 
concede the Pirates their power. 

“In any contest it’s who has 
the pitching,"" Fox said Monday 
as he and Murtaugh sat in ad- 
joining rocking chairs in Mur- 
taugh’s stadium office. “You 
can have all the hitting you 
want, just give me the pitchers. 
I don't believe in that psychol- 
cgical edge (home field). I've 
got the edge, I've got Mari- 
chal.” 





















EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 P.M. TO 9 P.M. 
AGES 13 TO 18 
























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h 2 THE INTELLIGENCER, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, i971 


- 


WISHING... 
++ - that you could Sell your car, Rent an apartment, Find a home in. 
the country, Hire a housekeeper, etc. — IT’S EASY WHEN YOU — 














Fo 


7 


r Fast Action! Call 962-9171- 


REAL ESTATE FOR SALE| REAL ESTATE.FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 


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iy 


A. E. LEPAGE 
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REAL ESTATE FOR SALE| 


=e=8 
MAURICE H, j ‘ 
CONSTRUCTION LIMITED 
HOUSE FOR RENT 















REALTOR 


COTT. SINESS 
ee ne - 962-9248 


L 


1-M-1_T ED 4 BRIDGE sr. 


R 
until we build you a new home 


PAPINEAU LAKE. Where js that you say? Well that/o¢ your choice. Possession of 
is where we have listed a completely furnished 5-bed-jnew home can be arranged to 








Bay of Quinte, 11 cottages, 30 
trailer ‘ sites, hydro, sewage 
dumping, 3 bedroom home~oit 
furnace, 990' shoreline, docks, 
showers aod washrooms, chil- 


133 DUNDAS ST. EAST 
Belleville, Ont. 


APPLE ORCHARD 


Dial 968-6411 


_ BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO™ 


room cottage featuring a piano and large stone fire- suit you. We have lots avail- 


ome A anaes bi both West id. East 
place as lot 85' x 400°, with good sandy beach. Call |24° (i. Pita “at SmOriEaEs 3 
or directions, 


arrangements. oy Raia 
$2,000.00 DOWNPAYMENT will move you into a brand b 


to suit all tastes. 
new bungalow or split-level home between Belleville “) add 
and Trenton, 25-year mortgage already arranged for} NOW UNDER WAY! |hiowES ARE LIKE SHOES — BETTER IF THEY FIT. Try this 
you on these homes built by Peterborough Lumber. A number . of houses in the| fer size. 5 large bedrooms, double living rooms, huge separate 
Thorncliffe Drive area. This | dmg room, fainiiy room with fireplace, full high basement on 


Let me explain the details. ‘ : Aaa pegeh i 
re : f Wes k Vil over 1 acre country setting. Askin 00.1. Call Cec Ruttan 
LOOKING -FOR A FIREPLACE, for those cool fall |Bew phase of West Park Village | <1 ¢ sh ai Kip 


evenings, then here is the place for you. Located just |iow down payments. Mortgages |... SN. : ‘ 
3 miles from the city. 3-bedroom brick bungalow. Full [already arranged at 8%. Let | FOK THE-HANDY MAN — Whe wants a 4:bedroom brick bung- 
‘basement, 2 pressure systems. Immediate possession. |¥S show you this area, alow at a real oargain, and is willing to do some remodelling and 


The Oldest Name In Real 
Estate in Belleville 


CUTE AS A BUTTON 








Faber Lge Hee ge cba Scenic 40 acres with 6 
$00,000. : acres MacIntosh and Spys 
only 212 miles from Tren- 


ton, Murray Hilis. $22,000. 
LOTS 

100 x 200 ft, paved road, 

near Frankford, buy now 

to build when you are 


ready. Registered lots. — 
$2,250.00. : 


_ 
na 








BREF FARM - 


100 acres, good productive land, 
Jarge barn, in excellent repair, 
driveshed, spring coe be made 
into pond, 3 m . home, 
immaculate condition, $27,500. 
Cootact: PATRICIA KUJADT: 
STIRLING 395-2732 





















Aas PI eae. 





recreation 


room. Lovely k 
$19,500, rfise 


TRADITIONAL CHARM 


Charm and individuality 


HUNTING PROPERTY | abounds ia this lovele older 


dccorauing, 196 {t. lot, twocar garage, call Geo. Crawford at 





eS : ds coral $1,000. DOWN home oa the East Hill. Spacious N ; 

‘We have the Rey. sate amen oe 96814371. es Ss aes saa lteems Peseta Ltr ato HANDYMAN SPECIAL mas 

a8 pastes details on these and other listings call 33 ae ee GET YOUR START in this :mniculate 3:bedroom home featuring ‘eg: bonvar soa some tiniber: pepe aye sarees chee peal pe acc good clean 

962-9154. completely renovated kitchen, spacious dining room and large [on year round road, with hydro floor, Excellent residential loca. [ser 22d, Barage, 2 storey \ 
330 FRONT STREET Despite the ever incréasing | living room: This owner has sist completed his new home. Call available, close to’ good lakes | ton, frame home, set back with 


building costs the value in our | Jun Bailey 963-4571, 
Mounts quality’ hem for BEREF |. SE DROOA BRICK’ = ‘This immaculate older: hame bb becated 
down payments to you. This 3} “ith walking distance of downtown Belleville. Living room with 
bedroom back split is ideally | open fireplace, formal dining room, sun room and remodelled 
laid out and has excellent fae-| kitchen. This hume glows with warmth and comfort. See it today. 
ilities for future ree room, Call Edythe Therrien at 98-4571, 


$4,000. 


maple treed drive. Listed 


Open Evenings 'Til 9 p.m, at $10,000, 


“Growth Through Service Since 1913” 


pJOYCE, 


WEST HILL 


Pleasant six room home. Just 
minutes from downtown. Avail- 
able immediately. Low taxes. 
Reduced to $16,500. 


COTTAGE TRENT 


Ideal for the fisherman, 4 bed- 
rooms, living room, screened 
verandah, can accommodate 15 





BRICK BUNGALOW 


Exclusive area, 6% mort 
Bage, large treed lot, 3 bed- 


oJ. 


WHALEN 











sons, fully furnished and 
meas estate vit COUEES AIEEE AE re ses a pae 968-457| eaulpped, year round access, : rooms. Has to be seen to 
, bse EAST-END SPLIT at WANTED be appreciated. $22,900. 
. ’ : F Fs Contact: A : J 

Working Man's Special’ 7” Tossnssiox | Riettatte ter. regroucti BELLEVILLE meaees 19 te ast ods tire bed,| On Duty: Lorna Jensen 
93 Baldwin Street — 2 bed- Ree Hast of houses in the area. OWES é OCKS 72. recreation room. Price range ey 
Sopot yea DU asa emed #08 Tevel in E ve od Sante He | Large Kitchen with eating area, ad IN, BELLEVILLE $25,000. to $30,000. Please call if 962-9248 

: } i ast He t =| iving di g 2 > ma | i i i 5 " 
sible to purchase this home {room 12 xi with a whole wall 4 Spiteei ho tie ee | REALTOR Semi-detached duplex, new interested in selling your home./Qpen Evenings “Til 9 p.m, 


c . . u ! ; 
with a low down payment. | of closets. Large living room, | ments 
separate dining room, com-} gare. 


pletely decorated and Jandscap- 
Income Property led. Call Don Alexander for an 


Live in one half of this opportunity to inspect this pro- 
immaculate older’ duplex Per: 

and let other half help pay 
for it. One 3-bedroom and 
one 2 bedroom apartment. 


prety CapeCod style, 3 bed- 
room and 2 bedroom, rents for 
$280.00 per month, cooly $35,000. 
with $5,000, down, 


IN| BELLEVILLE 


2 storey brick duplex, F.A. 
heating, H.D. wiring, quiet 
street, solid throughout, 


Evenings Call — 

KAY TUMMON ...... 

PHIL RAY saeee 968-4789 
NORA KINCAID’ .... 962-9269 
TED SAUNDERS .... 962-1126 
LES LENNOX ...... 962-1840 
ED HAGERMAN .... 


for qualifying for mort- | Direct Toronto Line 


364-3931 





15 North Front Street -—- Open Until 9 p.m. 


PHIL COUNTRY LIVING 








HELP WANTED 


STRUCTURAL 


| mauntce #. 





just 





Located on one of nicer 
strects on older. East Hill. 





road «just 8 miles from Belle 
ville. There is loads of room, 
BUNGALOW ONLY 2 5 
“¥. | PEAT & 
MINUTES FROM TOWN| CONSTRUCTION LimiTED REAL ESTATE x 
| Sales Offices = 48.5595 teealiar y 


good size yard and three car 
With carport, separate formal | 
ms reek Il Victoria Ave \ 


. d | | 
Drive eee Mele Mg onl heey Seer Satures Wondertut| 36 BRIDGE ST. B. 
$2 BERTRAM BLVD. 





Family Home 
: . - frontage. Large ree room area | Available In Our Homes 
Nicely maintained 3° bed on" level. Ideal for someone who | 


room, brick bungalow in} 


garage. Cail 962-7070. 


OR 


Inquire now about one of our 


large 


“Approved", call now, 962-7070. 


country building 


lots. 


$28,500. with $3,000. down. 
Cootact: ROBERT MORRISON: 
Belleville 962-3926 





GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY 


Your own business, central 


main street; thriving commun- 


WELDERS 


Requirements 
Must Hold A 
Department of Labor 






180 N. FRONT ST. 


BELLEVILLE 


or 


West End. Latge, well- jee Catt Connie ae Foon 3 bedroom bungalow. Living ity, 2 storey full basement, 7 Canadian Welding Bureau 
1 d raped lot.) Owner! ment to see this lovely home r room. dining room are all ia room apartment, $9,000, down, 962-3418 Card 
landscap: p vomeme: one with a fireplace. Wall to easy terms for balance. 


open to offers. + 
231 Front Street 


; Wall carpet Large kitcheo with 
{eating space. Garage space for 
[second car, boat of snowmo- 





| 
seers | z 
PONTON PARK | 


Gibson 


WATDRFRONT HOME 


RATE OF PAY 


111 Dundas St. East 
T $3.22250 per hour 


NTON 


392-9244 
‘ely “1 487 Dundas St. West te. Phone 968-7777 for appoint: cotta - 
962-4528 it hee ee ee el Bheileville, Ontamo ment eae 2 bedeeete, un bean: DESERONTO Reply giving qualifications 
Open Evenings ‘Til 9 p.m. |foom, | dining room and hall sou-ri, OF RELLEVILLE | : Heck, Sihing ot your Geve-ntep, sic ie 


BAY OF QUINTE 


3) bedroom 


PRIVATE SALE 


close to golf course, close in 








have new wall to wall broad-! * . Y 
anes nee 4 P | $24,900. 14 acres, ees z epieinal tdon. F LOW INCOME FAMILY | TORONTO IRON WORKS 
Call: JACK JEFFREY lor, spacious kitchen with ome. Aluminum cid. Living| WATHIt FRONTAGE OF HOUSE ph cgay Ml gee ag LTD. 
962-5648 |tive cupboards, The downstairs fOOM Separate dining room. soe foot of excell : ance. 4 bedrooms, 2 storey frame , 
has a These finished : family jLarge bright kitchen. Full base. | o ‘of’ the. ee geet eee TO RENT OR ae ae ow S200. i¢ tha $08 Sentra Brees Div; 
room with fireplace, extra bed. | Ment. 4 car Rarage, and an ¢X-| rontage lots still available on SALI 3 SOE EOE oe ee +e Trenton, Ontario 
room or study and a 2-piece |? building suitable for small the Rednersville Road. For fur. FOR SALE PORT HOPE 


| business or a dwelling Ideal for 
| Hobby farmer. Mabel Kleinsteu 
, ber 962-9104 or 393-2164. 


washroom. Move in as soon as 


ther informa 
next week. 


| Bennett 98.7 






a phone Lorna 






































good buy. So call for an appoint- 
ment and see for yourself! 


139 FRONT ST. 
Member, Of The Betteville 


. If you are hunting this season Considerable §-"Mounitain peak 






Dial 962-0796. 








Central location, 1% acre, zon: 
od, R.3, potenual high rise site, 
4 bedroom home top condition, 





CRAMPED AND 
CROWDED? 


DRY WALL 





meeting people". Those are the 
words of maay Avon Represente- 


WEST SIDE | asking $20,000. down terms for| Enjoy easy living, open air at 
& | $15,900. 2 bedroom home. Large} DAILY CROSSWORD oo wby R. A. POWER balance. this country home only 15 min- BOARDMEN 
‘ JOY jliving room. Attractive kitchen Contact: BILL HOUSTON, utes northwest of Belleville on : 
Merely add to the beauty of with, eating area, Utihty ‘room. | Ee Ie Veseasva Sibsla eek Colborne 344-7883 Highway No, 14. 4 bedroom AND TAPERS | 
Bi aes Rome on sly Fiegamas “tai ae) 4905 8 Ment nome wean [Eat meee 
‘are Drive. This is a Ki {small family or a reuring coup i if ME NE . ° 
Laaigrywes pureaase us aye 962 5326 lie Tont Hollingsworth 291081 1 Conparsers ot 47 ria ase ede or Ay AR To Work In Lindsay 
s 1. ROME WKA as tow - Or S68-BRSS lyrital works inane. sf ’ t N? 
as $3,500 down. Living room with ' Haha ‘ ; ? HAVE YOU SEEN? 
firepl ace, dining room. spacious 374 FRONT STREET HAY BAY nie of ri Coaiees cubed gag MHeigdot-9 acres level iter ssastivie ca hudlitedcad kee And Peterborough 
itchen with natural wi 635°) Open EVENINGS UNTIL 9 Pat Now is the ume to buy cottaze, | 10 SA $2 Noblenen aca itteteh tata) garden, "good well, partly reno. homes where you have 18 . 
Sersilea acl aoee in eee ee — | une bedroomn, wintecizes pe disapproval SA Having a iter) BUObUL vated, space heated, nice loca-| houses to choose from, most of Experienced Only 
nelled family ‘room: with bar, j{urnished cottage ts priced only} | 5, noble tion for retirement, $12,000. them ready to move in for only 
indoor-outdoor carpet, rear exit |$7.500, Call_ Frank Scobet 962.) +4 Prece set into See phat Call Coll 698-2891 
from laundry room area, at- BOATS, CAMPERS, 204 or 82-7741 adress is Heacenee shisteaianss AAMESI $2,000 down. all Coliect Fe 
tached single car garage, ex- | 15 Prepare tor ussian tak y ANTE Ni 
cellent grounds with mature : oH MUSCOTE BAY * ubtcation 59 Part of a mite sal *, aur es ove coaaaae te en osm 
trees. Immediate possession. oy $18,500, VLA lot. Frame and) 15 Banyiona buyiding Through our Toronto office, circular drive. The best is yet 
TRAILERS TO cedar loz construction. Attrac: | sed “f 61 Showing signs he seo are in close contact with many rn be seen inside this brick TEACHERS ~ 
NEW HOMES tive bungalow. 3 bedrooms Vive) 17 0. Setters of grief 7 Smelt id ar Belleville od iran; Miteees a bungalow located on Avondale 
STORE? ing room with fireplace. KiJ-|  j. 62 Indefinite 8 Lines ane non aod area, please con-| poag. 
. . : sath d any extras “ A 39 Pit an ——, si aes : 
“omer with ‘November “posses | yf [Frank ‘Seobel 920101 oo wef, Same tee edging» | Contact: MARY BELL ousrry | ACCOUNTING 
sion. Split-levels and bungalows | !f this is your problem, then we | 741, ie Pe 9 People having 40 Predict eville 962- ANOTHER COU? Y 
some with garages and car-}May have the answer in this) . rp alate baka powerful 42 Farm “Ken Ltd, Reattor, 1OME ! Loyalist College requires part- 
ports. 8%4°* and 9% mortgages. West Side property, with its) EAST OF BELLEVILLE 22 Restore violinist build tet Eglinton Ave. “K, Toroote 19 ‘ * Time teachers for evening clas 
Call soon for details ‘|large double garage, covered | $2,500, down, This attractive 3] 24 Armadillo 65 Pay attention voices ui set, 427-3333 3 bedrooms with dining roorn | Me LOAChers FOE SVEMENE Clad: 
: breezeway and double paved | bedroom home is priced to sell.| 34 Scattered 6b Realestate 10 Raised with 43 Repeats alor to match the living room. Brick | ses in accounting, R.LA. o¢ 
“CEC GARRETT %2-8041 drive. Three bedroom brick |Spacious living room. Well ap-| 37 Verse of a paper effort 44 Deceiveds and angelstone built by one of /C.G.A. preferred, or equivalent 
? bungalow. Large lot in good re-; pointed kitchen. Large lot. Low trivial nature 67 Fine-grained 11 Relative by 46 Be in semi Belleville’s better builders. extensive experience. Apply im-" | 
a: sidential area. Early possession. |taxes. Kay, Stafford 962-9104 or b csiarene ; boa marriage “ paca mediately’ ja. writing. with a | 
=! BARRY“FORCHUK [east spkeitied age lela alle Ay et INVESTMENT INCOME {sume to. — 
32 Made a poan~ ga . oaks { 
ET] m4 YESTG 4 istak 21 Automobile you Completely renovated, this 3} PERSONNEL OFFICE 
REAL ESTATE LTD. BETTER THAN NEW . 3 Daily weed 1 Bivalve 23 Pais airport 49 Orawup Ttirtiag ~. See-aras suite apartment requires only LOYALIST COLLEGE 
Realtor a oars 35 Man's mollusk 25 V-shaped $0 Scarf worn $10,000. down for a 15% return. é 
Belleville 279 North Front St. | Tis brick and angelstone bung: nickname 2 Something fortification about the On Duty: ANNE LASHER BOX. 4200 
968-6438 ville’s better builders. Four bed. 38 Hortoe inique: Slang 27 Adroit shoulders _ | BELLEVILLE,