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Foreword 






1 


New Perfection Wick Blue Flame Oil Cook- 
Stove in the kitchen is a continued source 
of satisfaction. If installed in the sum¬ 
mer, the comfort of being able to work 
without the heat of the range is what first 
commends its use to the housekeeper. Soon she dis¬ 
covers this to be only one of its desirable features. 
Not only can she prepare meals in comfort, but more 
easily and with better results. 

Think of the convenience of always having an oven 
just right! This can always be the case with a New 
Perfection Oven, for by means of the easily adjusted 
burners, the amount of heat is absolutely under the 
control of the cook. The result cannot fail to be better 
food. 



Good bread is the cook’s pride and having once 
baked it in a New Perfection Oven, she will be loth to 
return to the use of the range, for the scientific con¬ 
struction of the oven insures a dry, even heat, which 
turns out a perfectly baked loaf with a crust of fine 
fibre which holds the moisture in the loaf and causes 
it to keep fresh longer than when baked the old way. 


Through the glass door of the oven, the cook can 
watch her bread and cake without continually opening 
the door, and the convenient height of the oven does 
away with the discomfort of kneeling and receiving a 








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blast of hot air in the face while peering into a dark 
range oven. 

A similar satisfaction is experienced when cooking 
directly over the flame. The heat is started when 
wanted — the full amount may be turned on in an in¬ 
stant and stopped as quickly. 

With the use of the New Perfection Broiler, a cut of 
which is given on page 28 , meats may he broiled 
as satisfactorily as when cooked over the coals, a feat 
never before accomplished on an oil cook-stove. 

Since everything can he cooked well, some things 
better and all things more easily by its use, the New 
Perfection Oil Cook-Stove proves to he a perfect sub¬ 
stitute for the coal range in all instances when the 
range is not required for purposes of heating. Even 
when a range fire is started in the fall, the cook who 
has become accustomed to the convenience of a New 
Perfection Oil Cook-Stove is sure to continue its use 
for many things. 

For the convenience of all who use the New Perfec¬ 
tion Oil Cook-Stove, this little hook of recipes, giving 
full directions for the preparation and cooking of each 
dish, is offered. The “best recipes” of fifteen ex¬ 
perienced cooks are presented in the collection, and, 
with a few exceptions, all have been tested in a house¬ 
hold which uses the New Perfection Oil Cook-Stove 
exclusively. 



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COPYRIGHT, 1»1t f BY THE CLEVELAND FOUNDRY CO. 


































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INDEX 


Page 

Foreword . 1 

Directions and Suggestions 
for Using New Perfection 
Wick Blue Flame Cook- 

Stoves .5-10 

Uow to Measure . 11 

How to Cook Cereals. 11 

New Perfection Oven . 12 

New Perfection Heating Plate 12 

New Perfection Toaster .27 

New Perfection Broiler. 28 

BREAD AND ROLLS 

Bread . 1.2 

Brown Bread . 12 

Rolls . 14 

Quaker Oats Bread . 14 

BISCUITS, BREAKFAST CAKES 
AND SHORT CAKES 


Biscuits . 

Muffins . 

Spider Corn Cake . 

Blueberry Cake or Muffins. 

Strawberry Shortcake . 

Apple Tea Cake . 

Sour Milk Griddle Cakes... 
Cream Doughnuts . 


EGGS 

Boiled Eggs . 

Scrambled Eggs . 

Fried Eggs . 

Omelet . 

Eggs Baked in Tomatoes... 

SOUPS 

Consomme . 

To Clear Soup . 

Bouillon . 

Cream of Tomato Soup . 

Tomato Soup . 

Clam Bisque . 

Cream of Celery Soup. 

Cream of Potato Soup . 

Pea Soup . 

Chicken Soup . 

Bean Soup . 

SEA FOODS 

To Boil Fish ... 

Time-Table for Boiling Fish 

To Bake Fish . 

Time-Table for Baking Fish 

Baked Haddock . 

Baked Bluefish . 

Baked Mackerel . 

Baked Halibut . 

Tomato Sauce .* 

Drawn Butter ./. 

Egg Sauce . { .k _ 

Hollandaise Sauce .* 

Stuffing for Baked Fish. 

Oyster Stuffing . 

Frying Fish . 

Batter for Oysters or Clams 
Scalloped Oysters .. 


11 

15 

15 

16 
16 
16* 
17 
17 

17 

17 
IS 

18 
18 

IS 

18 

19 

19 

19 

20 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 

2 ? 

22 

22 

22 

09 

22 

23 

23 

23. 

23 

24 
24 
24 
24 

24 

25 
2b 


32 

32 

33 
33 
33 

33 


* Page 

Fish Balls . 25 

Steamed Clams . 25 

Oyster Stew . 26 

Maine Clam Chowder . 26 

MEATS 

Broiled Steak and Chops.... 29 

Roast Beef . 29 

Beef ft la Mode. 29 

Roast Beef Gravy . 29 

Pot Roast . 30 

New England Boiled Dinner 30 

Roast Leg of Lamb . 31 

Braised Shoulder of Lamb.. 31 

Roast Veal . 81 

Veal Loaf . 32 

Roast Pork . 

Pork Chops & Fried Apples 

Boiled Ham . 

Sausage Rolls . 

Sausages Baked in Potatoes 

Broiled Bacon . 

Maine Baked Pork and 
Beans . 

POULTRY AND GAME 

To Prepare a Bird for 

Cooking .. . 

Roast Chicken and Gravy.. 

Old Fashioned Stuffing . 

Roast Turkey . 

Chicken Fricassee . 

Chicken Pie . 

Roast Goose . 

Roast Wild Duck . 

Venison . 

Rabbit Saut6 . 

VEGETABLES 

Time-Table for Boiling 

Vegetables . 

Escalloped Potatoes . 

French Fried Potatoes . 

Potato Croquettes . 

Creamed Potatoes . 

White Sauce . 

Potatoes au Gratin . 

Escalloped Parsnips . 

Escalloped Tomf toes . 

Corn Pudding — Southern 

Style . 

Corn Fritters . 


SALADS 

Boiled Dressing . 

Directions for Making Salad 

LUNCHEON DISHES AND 
LEFT-OVERS 

Salmon Loaf . 

Shrimp Wiggle . 

Macaroni and Cheese . 

Welsh Rarebit . 

English Monkey . 

Beefsteak Pie . 

Casserole of Beef .. 


40 

40 

40 

40 

41 
41 
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34 

35 
35 
35 

35 

36 
36 

36 

37 
37 


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Page 

Eggs Scalloped with Meat 

or Fish .:. 42 

Vegetable Hash . {^ 

Ham South 6 . 4- 


PIES 

Paste . 

Apple Pie . 

Blueberry Pie . 

Apple Custard . 

Custard Pie . 

Squash or Pumpkin Pie -. . 

Rhubarb and Strawberry Pie 

Mince Pie . 

Old-Fashioned Mince Meat. 

* * * . . . 

Sugar Pies—Southern Style. 
Lemon Pie . 


42 

43 
43 
43 

43 

44 
44 
44 

44 

45 
45 
45 


PUDDINGS 


Delicate Pudding . 45 

Thanksgiving Plum Pudding 46 

Hard Sauce . 46 

Indian Pudding . 40 

Suet Pudding . 47 

Egg Sauce (No. 1 and No. 2) 47 
Bread and Butter Pudding.. 47 

Cottage Pudding . 4S 

Lemon Sauce . 48 

Strawberry Sauce . 48 

Scalloped Apples . 48 

Chocolate Custard . 48 

Boiled Custard . 49 

Orange Pudding . 49 

Fruit Custard . 49 

Cup Cxistard . 49 

Chocolate Pudding . 49 

Pudding Sauce . 50 

Dumplings . 50 

Vanilla Ice Cream . 50 

Chocolate Sauce . 50 

GINGERBREAD AND COOKIES 

Sour Cream Gingerbread.... 51 

Molasses Gingerbread . 51 

Vermont Gingerbread . 51 

Molasses Cookies . 51 

Hermits . 52 

Brown Sugar Cookies . 52 

Cream Cookies . 52 

Peanut Cookies. 52 

Filled Cookies . 53 

Oat Meal Crisps . 53 

German Stuffed Cookies .... 53 

Lace Cakes . 54 

Brownies . 54 

Chocolate Cookies . 54 


CAKES AND FROSTINGS 

Directions for Baking Cake 54 


Plain Cake . 55 

“Stirred Up” Cake . 55 

Cornstarch Cake . 55 

Large Layer Cake . 56 

Gold Cake . 56 

Orange Cake . 56 

Orange Frosting . 57 


Page 


Chocolate Cake (No. 1 and 2) 

Fruit Cake . 

Fruit Cake Without Eggs.. 

Spice Cake . 

Apple Sauce Cake . 

Hot Milk Cake . 

Genuine Sponge Cake . 

Sponge Cake . 

Angel Cake . 

White Cake . 

Cream Cakes . 

Boiled Frosting . 

Chocolate Frosting . 

Brown Sugar Frosting . 


57 

57 

58 
58 
58 

58 

59 
59 

59 

60 
60 
60 
61 
61 


BEVERAGES 

Coffee . Cl 

'Pea—Russian . 61 

Tea—Iced . 62 

Cocoa . 62 

To Make Chocolate for 
Afternoon “At Home” ... 62 

Grape Juice . 62 

Raspberry Shrub . 62 


CANDIES 


Chocolate Fudge . 63 

Divinity Fudge . 63 

Peanut Butter Fudge . 63 

Penoche . 63 

Ice Cream Candy . 61 

Molasses Candy . 64 

Butter Scotch . 64 

Caramels . 64 


CANNING. PRESERVING AND 


PICKLING 

Directions for Canning . 65 

Directions for Sealing with 

Parowax . 65 

Canned Peaches or Pears- 66 

Blueberries or Huckleberries 66 
Raspberries or Strawberries 66 

Canned Tomatoes . 66 

Tomatoes Canned Whole- 66 

Orange Marmalade . 67 

Rhubarb Jam . 67 

Apple Jelly . 67 

Currant Jelly . 6S 

Grape Jelly . 68 

Spiced Jelly . 68 

Sweet Pickled Peaches or 

Pears . 69 

Sliced Tomato Sweet Pickle 69 

Virginia Chow Chow . 69 

Corn Relish . 69 

Chili Sauce . 70 

Tomato Catsup . 70 

Cucumber Pickles (No. 1 & 2> 70 

RECIPES FOR THE SIC K 


Oatmeal Water . 71 

Oatmeal Gruel . 71 

Corn Meal Gruel . . 71 

Arrowroot Gruel . . 71 1 

*••*••>••*•••• 72 

Chicken or Mutton lirnth... 72jv 
Broiling in Buttered Paper.. 72kg 


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Directions and Suggestions 


FOR USING 


Nos. 1, 2, 3, 20, 25 and “Junior” 
New Perfection Wick Blue Flame 
Oil Cooking Stoves 


While the operation of these stoves is generally like that 
of a lamp, and quite as simple, there are differences that 
should be understood; and no one should undertake to 
light or operate a stove without first having read these 
Directions. 

Use a good grade of kerosene. Never use gasoline. 


To Fill Oil Tanks of Nos. 1, 2 and 3 Stoves 


'Fake upper tank off lower tank, turn it upside down, 
and unscrew nozzle. 

After filling, replace nozzle, set tank in place with 
nozzle down in opening of lower tank. (Never pour oil 
into lower tank, as this changes oil level and burners will 
not work so well.) 

Let the wick saturate for 5 minutes after filling the 
stove, before lighting for the first time. 


Proceed as with ordinary lamp, filling tank through 
filler cap opening. A tube connecting the tanks of Double 
Junior” permits them to fill simultaneously. 



To Fill Oil Tanks of Nos. 20, 25 and 
“ Junior ” Stoves 


To Light Burner 

Open the door. 

Turn the wick slightly above wick tube (about half-way 
between wick tube and under side of flame spreader allows 













































the wick to be lighted easily) and light in one or more 
places. 

Note. — The wick will ignite more readily, if, while 
applying the lighted match, the flame spreader is slightly 
tilted. To tilt the spreader, lift up on small black latch at 
the bottom of burner. 

Before closing the door, turn down wick until flame 
burns without smoke. 

Close the door and allow the flame to encircle the wick. 
Now the wick may be turned up to get a flame of the 
desired height, as shown in the cuts on opposite page, i. e., 
low, medium, high and highest. 

Character of Flame 

The lower flames will be generally blue with tendency 
to cream color. 

With the larger flames there will be yellow points above 

the blue body of the flame, with a distinct blue line dividing 

the top of the blue flame body from the points. With the 

highest flame these yellow points will extend from one- 

half to one inch above the blue. The combustion with such 

flame is perfect and without smoke or odor. 

Never turn the flame so high as to lose the distinct 

blue line between the blue flame body and the vellow 

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points, as in such case the whole flame will become yellow 
and smoky, will tend to overheat the burner, and as a mat¬ 
ter of fact will not heat the vessel so well as the flame with 
blue in it. 

The best guide for determining the height of flame is the 
eye, and a short experience will show you the best way to 
operate the stove for the work in hand. 

Be sure that the wick does not touch the under side 
of the flame spreader after lighting. 

This is to be avoided because it prevents the air from 
passing up through the center tube and out through the 
space between top of wick and under side of spreader, re¬ 
sulting in a smoky flame and in the serious overheating of 
the burner. 

Note. — The Flame Spreader is that portion of the 
burner which projects over the top of the wick. 

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Cleaning Wick 

Yellow streaks or roughness in the low or medium flames 
are caused by dirt or char on wick; and to produce best 
results, the wick should be wiped clean after every six or 
eight hours’ burning. It is necessary that the wick be per¬ 
fectly clean and smooth to get the best and most satisfac¬ 
tory flame. 

To clean the wick, remove the chimney, flame spreader 
and outside collar upon which the chimney rests. 

Now raise the wick slightly above the wick tube (prac¬ 
tically level with the wick tube) and wipe it off from the 
center outwardly, with a smooth cloth, leaving no ragged 
points or loose threads. When the wick is clean, pat it 
down lightly with the fingers to get it perfectly smooth 
(the smoother the surface of the wick, the better the flame). 

Never touch the wick with scissors or wick trimmer ex¬ 
cept to remove loose threads. 

Do not allow the stove to burn dry, as each time this 
occurs a portion of the wick is burned off, materially short¬ 
ening the life of the wick. 

It is a good plan to form the habit of filling the upper 
"tank each morning, and with proper care a wick will last 
at least an entire season. 

When the wick has burned off, so that when turned up 
the top of the metal which holds it shows above the wick 
tube, a new wick is required. 

If, with oil in the tank, the flame dies down after burn¬ 
ing a few minutes, it is a sure indication that the wick is 
in the condition above indicated, and too short to reach 
down to the oil. 

New Wicks 

To avoid the trouble and annoyance of rewicking, so 
common in the old style wick stove, the wick used in the 
New Perfection Stove is fastened in a metal holder or car¬ 
rier, and is burnt off clean and smooth ready for use, and 
packed in a fibre can. When it becomes necessary to re- 
wick the stove, remove the old wick and carrier and throw 




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both away, replacing with a new wick and carrier. You 
cannot affix a new wick to the old carrier — do not try it. 

These wicks are supplied by dealers at a nominal cost. 


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Leaks 




To guard against leaks, every stove is tested with air 

pressure and also filled with oil and operated before leaving 

the factorv. 

* 

Sometimes excessive jarring and vibration in transit may 
loosen the burner joints or pipe cap and cause a slight leak 
at one of these points. 

For leak at burner joint, simply tighten the set screw 
in the clamp which holds the burner to the feed pipe. A 
hole lias been provided in the head of the set screw so that 
a nail of suitable size can be used as a wrench for this pur¬ 
pose. 

Should a leak appear at the end of the feed pipe, the 
feed pipe cap should be tightened in the same manner. 


Use highest flame. Time, 17 to 25 minutes, according 
to thickness of steak. 


Toasting 

Rather low flame. Use toaster, resting on top of grate. 

Boiling 


Use highest flame. 



SUGGESTIONS 

Broiling 


Roasting 


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Use medium flame and allow 20 minutes for every pound 
of meat (60 minutes for three pound roast, 120 minutes for 
six pound roast, etc.). 




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Baking 

Have oven over flame about 15 or 20 minutes before 
using, so that it will be hot and ready for the work. 

When baking small quantities place same on upper shelf 
and leave there until done. If using both shelves at once, 
change the baking from lower to upper and from upper 
to lower shelf when nearly done to bake evenly. 

Biscuits — Require hot oven; use high flame; time, from 
10 to 20 minutes. 

Cookies — Require hot oven; use high flame; time, G to 
10 minutes. 

Pies — Medium hot oven; use medium flame; time, 17 
to 30 minutes. 

Bread — Rather slow oven; use medium flame; time, 
about 45 minutes. 

Perfection Iron Heating Plate 

A Perfection Iron Heating Plate, and suitable lifter 
for handling it, are supplied with every stove without 
additional charge. 


Ironing 

Use Perfection Iron Heating Plate provided with stove. 
Lay this plate on top of grate, with its smooth side up. 

The plate will allow the use of three irons over one 
flame. Start with the highest flame, but watch closely 
until you are familiar with this plate, as the irons heat 
more quickly on it than over the open fire. 

When using plate with two irons it is not necessary to 
shift irons to the center, as is the practice with an open 
flame. 

Although this plate is designed especially for heating 
flatirons, it is very valuable in all kinds of cooking where 
a well distributed heat is desired, particularly when using 
thin pans or utensils of small diameter. For whatever 
used, it gives the greatest efficiency for the smallest oil 
consumption. 

This is due to the great amount of heating surface on 
the bottom of the plate, it having 115 square inches of 




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surface. An ordinary cooking utensil has about 50 square 
inches at the bottom, and a medium sized sadiron about 
15 square inches. 




In order to get the highest efficiency, the top of this 
plate, which is polished smooth, should be kept clean, free 
from rust or any deposit caused by food boiling over on it. 



HOW TO MEASURE. 

With some exceptions, in which cases full directions are 
given, all measures indicated in the following recipes 
should be level measures. 

Jn measuring liquids, take all the cup or spoon will 
hold; measuring dry ingredients, have the cup measures 
level with the rim, and with a knife level the spoon 
measures. 

Use measuring cups of tin or glass, with the fractional 
divisions marked upon them; tablespoons and teaspoons of 
regulation size. 

Flour should be sifted before measuring. 

In recipes calling for baking soda and cream of tartar, 
if it is desired to substitute baking powder, note the amount 
of cream of tartar recommended and use double that amount 
of the baking powder. 


TO COOK CEREALS. 

Add boiling water and salt to cereals and cook in a 
double boiler. Finely ground cereals like wheat germ 
should be mixed with a little cold water just to prevent 
lumping. 

To 1 cup rolled oats, use 1% cups water; to 1 cup 
wheat germ and other finely ground wheat preparations, 
use 3% cups water. Cook 30 minutes. 

Mush left from breakfast may be moulded in greased 
cups or baking powder cans and sliced and browned in 
butter in a frying pan. Serve with maple syrup. 

















































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New Perfection Steel Oven 


WITH GLASS DOOR 



T HE New Perfection Oven is scientifically constructed 
and will bake bread and pastry, and will roast meats 
better than any other oven; but, like other ovens, it should 
be thoroughly heated before it is used. 


New Perfection Iron Heating Plate 



T HE New Perfection Iron Heating Plate is very useful 
in all cooking where an even heat under a saucepan is 
required. Jt is especially valuable when dishes of small 
diameter are used. By use of the heating plate, flatirons 
can be heated more quickly than over an open fire. 





















































BREAD 


3 Pints bread flour. 

2 Rounding tablespoons 


sugar. 


Bread, 


Bread, Rolls, etc. 


despoons \ Yeast cake. 

Milk. 

1 Scant tablespoon salt. 


1 Heaping tablespoon lard. 



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Scald 1 pint milk and allow it to partially cool. Dissolve 
% yeast cake in a little lukewarm milk. Sift flour, sugar 
and salt together and work in lard with the finger tips. 
Add dissolved yeast and enough milk to make dough of 
right consistency to knead, adding cold milk if more than 
the pint of scalded milk is required. Knead until dough 
is smooth, elastic to the touch, and bubbles may be seen 
under the surface. 

Place in a large bowl or a bread raiser; cover with 
clean cloth and board or tin cover. Let it rise overnight 
in a temperature of about 65° F. In morning, cut down 
with a knife and let it rise again to about double its size; 
then shape into loaves, place in greased pans, having pans 
nearly half full. Cover pans and let bread rise again to 
double its bulk, and bake over a low flame (just below 
* medium). 

Experience is the best guide for regulating the height 
of flame. Bread should rise during first 15 minutes, begin 

S to brown and continue browning during the next 20 minutes 
and finish baking in 15 minutes more. When done, bread 
does not cling to pan and comes out easily. Bread can 
be baked successfully in the New Perfection Oven in 
less than the time given. It should never require longer. 




BROWN BREAD 

1 Cup each of corn meal, rye 


% Tablespoon soda. 
1 Teaspoon salt. 

\ Cup molasses. 


meal and graham flour. 
2 Cups sour milk. 


Mix meal, flour, soda and salt. Add molasses and milk, 
put in a buttered mould (1 lb. coffee cans will serve), and 
steam 3^2 hours. Fill moulds only two-thirds full and 


cover tightly. 1% cups sweet milk may be substituted for 



sour milk. 



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Scant \ cup molasses. 


QUAKER OATS BREAD 

1 Cup Quaker Rolled Oats. 

2 Cups boiling water. 1 Tablespoon lard. 

Heaping teaspoon salt. 1 Yeast cake. 

1 Quart sifted bread flour. 

Pour boiling water on oats, add molasses, salt and 
shortening. Let mixture stand until cool. Add Y** yuast 
cake dissolved in a little lukewarm water and Hour. 
Knead, let it rise overnight, make into loaves; let rise 
again and bake. 



ROLLS 

1 Pint milk. 1 Tablespoon sugar. 

Butter size of egg. 1 Yeast cake. 

\ Teaspoon salt. Bread flour. 

Scald milk and add butter, salt and sugar. When luke¬ 
warm, add yeast cake dissolved in a little lukewarm milk 
or water, and sufficient Hour to knead. Let dough rise 
until double in size; knead again and roll to V 2 
thickness; spread with butter; cut with large biscuit cutter; 
fold: let rise again until double in size, and bake over 
a low flame. 

Biscuits, Breakfast Cakes 
and Shortcakes. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT 

2 Cups flour. 1 Tablespoon butter. 

1 Teaspoon salt. 1 Tablespoon lard. 

4 Teaspoons baking % Cup equal parts milk 

powder. and water. 

Mix flour, salt and baking powder and sift twice. Work 
in butter and lard with finger tips; add milk and water 
gradually, mixing with knife. When just stiff enough to 
be handled, turn on a well floured board and toss till well 
floured, but do not knead the dough. Pat with the rolling 
pin until dough is of one-half inch thickness. Shape with 
biscuit cutter and bake ten to fifteen minutes over highest 
flame. In case there is a tendency to burn on the bottom, 
lower the flame. 


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SODA AND CREAM OF TARTAR BISCUIT 

1 Quart of flour. 2 Teaspoons cream tartar 

1 Teaspoon salt. (rounding). 

1 Even teaspoon pulverized 1 Large tablespoon 
soda. butter. 

Sweet milk. 

Mix and bake as Baking Powder Biscuit, using sufficient 
milk to make dough of right consistency. 


RYE OR GRAHAM MUFFINS. 


1 Cup rye or graham 
flour. 

1 Cup flour. 

2 Tablespoons sugar. 

1 Tablespoon melted butter. 


1 Teaspoon salt. 

1 Cup milk. 

1 Egg. 

4 Teaspoons baking 
powder. 


Mix and sift dry ingredients; add milk gradually, egg 
well beaten, and butter. Bake over a rather high flame in 
previously heated and buttered iron gem pans, or in muffin 
pans, twenty-five minutes. 



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CORN CAKE OR CORN MUFFINS 


% Cup corn meal. 
1% Cups flour. 

\ Cup sugar. 

K Teaspoon salt. 


4 Teaspoons baking powder. 
1 Cup milk. 

1 Egg. 

1 Tablespoon butter. 


Mix and sift dry ingredients; add milk, egg well beaten, 
and butter; bake in a shallow buttered pan or in muffin 
pans, 20 minutes, over highest flame. If oven proves too 
hot, lower the flame. 



SPIDER CORN CAKE 


% Cup corn meal and flour 
to fill the cup. 

1 Cup sweet milk. 

% Cup sour milk. 

1 Tablespoon sugar. 


% Teaspoon salt. 

Jjj Teaspoon soda 
(scant). 

1 Egg. 

1 Tablespoon butter. 


Mix meal, flour, salt, sugar and soda. Beat the egg; 
add | *> of the sweet milk and all of tlie sour milk. Stir 
this into the dry mixture. Melt the butter in a hot spider 
. >*** ( ^ P°ur the mixture into it. Pour the remaining l/> cup 
















































of sweet milk over the top, but do not stir it in. Bake 
20 minutes. Start with highest flame, and reduce to medium 
or lower in case there should be a tendency to burn. 


1 Cup sugar. 

2J^Cups flour. 

1 Teaspoon soda. 

2 Teaspoons cream tartar, 


BLUEBERRY CAKE OR MUFFINS 

Jjj Cup milk. 

1 Egg. 

Butter size of an egg. 

1 Pint blueberries. 

slightly rounding. 

Mix and sift dry ingredients, reserving *4 CU P A°ur 
to mix with berries. Work in butter; add milk gradually y 
egg well beaten, and blueberries mixed with reserved flour. 
Bake over a medium flame. 


STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE 


2 Cups flour. 

4 Teaspoons baking powder. 
3^ Teaspoon salt. 


2 Teaspoons sugar. 
% Cup milk. 

% Cup butter. 


Mix dry ingredients and sift twice; w T ork in butter and 
add milk gradually. Toss on a floured board and divide in 
two parts. Roll out and place in buttered Washington pie 
tins and bake 12 minutes over a high flame. Split and 
spread with butter. Allow from one to one and one-half 
?>oxes of strawberries to each cake. Sweeten the berries 
to taste, place on back of stove until warmed, crush slightly 
and put between and on top of shortcakes. Serve with or 
without whipped cream. 


APPLE TEA CAKE 



1 Pint flour. 

% Teaspoon salt. 

3 Teaspoons baking powder. 
A few grains of cinnamon. 

2 Tablespoons sugar. 


1 Tablespoon butter. 
1 Egg. 

1 Scant cup of milk. 
5 Medium sized 
apples. 


Mix and sift dry ingredients; work in butter; add milk 
graduallv, and egg well beaten. Spread in well buttered 
baking pan. Cut apples in eighths or sixteenths and stick 
in the dough. Sprinkle sugar and a few grains of cinna¬ 
mon over the top. Bake over a medium flame. Serve with 
butter. 




— 16 — 




































SOUR MILK GRIDDLE CAKES 

2% Cups flour. 2 Cups sour milk. 

% Teaspoon salt. 1% Teaspoons soda. 

1 Egg- 

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add sour milk and egg 
well beaten. Drop bv spoonfuls on a hot, greased griddle. 
When puffed and full, of bubbles, turn and cook on the 
other side. Serve with butter and sugar, or butter and 
maple syrup. 

CREAM DOUGHNUTS 

1 Cup sugar. 1 Teaspoon soda. 

3 Eggs. 2 Teaspoons cream tartar, 

% Cup cream. slightly rounding. 

% Cup milk. 1\;Teaspoons salt. 

% Teaspoon cinnamon. % Teaspoon grated nutmeg. 

Flour to roll. 

Beat yolks of eggs; add sugar, cream, milk, soda, cream 

tartar, spices and salt mixed and sifted with part of Hour, 

whites of eggs beaten until stiff, and Hour to make a dough 

stiff enough to roll out. Shape and fry in deep fat. 

Doughnuts should come to the top quickly, cook on one 

side, then be turned and cooked on the other. If fat is 

too cold, doughnuts will absorb fat; if too hot, they will 

cook on the outside before suflicientlv risen. Start with 

* 

high flame and turn down if grease becomes too hot. 


Eggs, 



BOILED EGGS 

To boil eggs, cover them with boiling water in a sauce¬ 
pan, set pan where it will keep hot, and let eggs remain 
6 to 8 minutes for soft* boiled, or 40 to 50 minutes for 
hard boiled. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS 

To 5 eggs use % cup milk, salt, pepper and 2 table¬ 
spoons butter. Beat eggs slightly; add milk, salt and 
pepper, and pour into a hot frying pan in which the 
butter has been melted. Stir and scrape from bottom of 
pan, cooking until eggs’are creamy. Use high flame. 









































I1£I3ESE£E£2£^ 




OMELET FOR FOUR PERSONS 

4 Lggs. 4 Tablespoons hot water. 

% Teaspoon salt. 1 Tablespoon butter. 

Pepper. 

Beat yolks of eggs till thick; add salt, pepper and hot 
water. Beat whites of eggs until stiff and add to first 
mixture. Melt butter in frying pan, spreading it over 
bottom and sides. Pour in mixture and cook slowly until 
omelet is well puffed and a delicate brown on the bottom. 
If pan is placed upon a Perfection Iron Heater the omelet 
will brown very evenly upon the bottom. Use high Hame. 

FRIED EGGS 

Use pork, ham or bacon fat. Heat fat in frying pan, 
slip in eggs, cook on one side, then turn, and cook on the 
other; or if sufficient fat is used, it may be dipped over 
the eggs with a spoon and they may be cooked without 


turning. 


Use high flame. 


EGGS BAKED IN TOMATOES 

C ut off top of perfect, ripe tomatoes, scrape out pulp, 
slip in eggs, sprinkle with buttered crumbs and bake over 
a low flame till crumbs are brown. 


CONSOMME 


Soups. 


3 Lbs. beef from the 
round. 

1 Carrot. 

1 Turnip. 

1 Onion. 


Celery (tough outside stall; s may be used). 

Cover the meat with if quarts water and let simmer for 
4 hours. Add the other ingredients (scrape the carrot) 
and cook 1 hour. Strain and let stand overnight. Skim 
off the grease; clear, strain, and serve. Use high flame. 

TO CLEAR SOUP 

Remove fat from stock and put amount to be cleared in 
a saucepan, allowing the white and shell of 1 egg to each 




1 Parsnip. 

1 Red pepper. 

1 Tablespoon whole cloves. 
1 Tablespoon chopped 
parsley. 














































-quart. Mix egg and shell with the cool soup stock, adding 
more seasoning if needed; beat well and set on stove over 
a medium flame. Stir until hot, to keep egg from settling. 
Let it boil 2 minutes; then lower the flame so that it will 
just simmer for 10 minutes. Remove scum and strain 
through a double thickness of cheesecloth over a fine wire 
strainer. 


BOUILLON 


% Cup each of carrot, turnip, 
onion and celery cut in 
dice. 


4 Lbs. lean beef from 
the middle of the 
round. 


2 Lbs. bone. 


1 Tablespoon salt. 
4 Cloves. 


2 Quarts cold water. 


Wipe and cut meat and bone into small pieces; add the 
water and heat slowly; simmer 5 hours over a low flame; 
add seasoning and vegetables and boil 1 hour. Roil down 
to 3 pints, strain, remove fat, and clear. Serve in cups. 


TOMATO SOUP 


Roil a soup bone until meat will drop from bone. Take 
out meat and bones and skim off the grease. Add 1 can of 
tomatoes. Take a small onion and stick into it seven or 
eight cloves; add to the soup. Season with salt and 
pepper. Cook 1 hour over a low flame, then strain and 
serve. 


CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP 


h Can tomatoes. 

1 Small tablespoon sugar. 
% Teaspoon soda. 

% Cup butter. 


1 Quart milk. 

1 Slice onion. 

4 Tablespoons flour. 
1 Teaspoon salt. 


% Teaspoon pepper. 


Scald milk with onion; remove onion and thicken with 
flour mixed with cold water until smooth enough to pour. 
Cook 20 minutes, stirring constantly at first. Cook toma¬ 
toes and sugar 15 minutes; add soda and rub through a 
strainer. Combine mixtures and strain into a heated dish 








































an 




CLAM BISQUE 




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25 Large clams in shells (alive). 2 Tablespoons allspice. 

1 Large cup milk or cream. 2 Tablespoons flour. 

2 Tablespoons butter. Yolk of 1 egg. 


Wash clams thoroughly; put in kettle with 1 pint boil¬ 
ing water and cook until shells open. Remove the clams 
and separate the dark part from the soft part and discard 
it. Chop clams finely and add them to the water in which 
they were cooked. Boil until thick and well cooked; then 
add allspice. Heat the milk. When ready to serve, pour 
milk into clam broth; add the well beaten egg yolks and 
a dash of red pepper, and strain. 


CREAM OF CELERY SOUP 

lig Pints milk. 2 Tablespoons butter. 

1 Quart celery cut in pieces. 1 Slice onion. 

2 Tablespoons flour. 1 Blade mace. 

1 Cup cream. 

Boil celery in a quart of water 45 minutes. Boil mace, 
onion .and milk together. Mash the celery in the w r ater 
and add it to the boiling milk. Melt butter in a saucepan; 
add flour slowly until it thickens; cook 3 or 4 minutes, and 
add to boiling soup. This method of thickening soup w'ith 
flour and butter cooked together is called binding it. Sea¬ 
son with salt and pepper. Strain, and serve immediately, 
adding 1 cup of whipped cream after soup is in the tureen. 


CREAM OF POTATO SOUP 


3 Potatoes. 

1 Pint milk. 

1 Tablespoon flour. 

1 Tablespoon butter. 


1 Tablespoon chopped onion. 
1 Teaspoon salt. 

Speck of white pepper. 

1 Tablespoon finely chopped 
parsley. 


Cook potatoes until soft; heat milk in double boiler with 
onion; drain and mash potatoes; add boiling milk and sea¬ 
soning to mashed potatoes; rub all through strainer, and 
return to double boiler. Bind with butter and flour cooked 









































together according to directions given under Cream 
Celery Soup; let boil 5 minutes, add parsley, and serve. 


of 


BEAN SOUP 

1 Pint dried pea beans. 
3 Quarts cold water. 


Lb. salt pork cut in strips. 

3^ Medium-size onion cut fine. 


Soak beans overnight in lukewarm water. In the morn¬ 
ing drain and put in kettle with the cold water, salt pork, 
and onion. Cook over a low flame four hours, stirring 
often. Boiling water may be added at intervals if neces¬ 
sary to keep soup of right consistency. Season with salt 
and pepper. 



PEA SOUP 


1 Cup dried split peas. 
3 Pints cold water. 
Teaspoon sugar. 


1 Tablespoon butter. 
1 Tablespoon flour. 
Salt and pepper. 


Soak the peas overnight. Drain, and put them on to 
boil in the cold water over a low flame, letting them sim¬ 
mer until tliev soften and dissolve. Add water as it boils 
away, to keep 3 pints of liquid in the kettle. Scrape from 
sides of kettle when necessary. Hub through a strainer 
and put on to boil again. Bind with butter and flour, 
according to directions under Cream of Celery Sou]). Add 
salt and pepper; let it simmer 10 minutes over a low 
flame, and serve. 




) 



CHICKEN SOUP 

6 Cups of the stock in which 
a fowl has been boiled. 

3g Carrot cut in dice, 
f Sliced onion. 

Salt. 


2 Stalks celery cut fine. 

3$ Bay leaf. 

% Teaspoon peppercorns. 
% Cup hot boiled rice. 


Add seasoning to stock, heat gradually to boiling point, 
and boil !/•> hour. Strain, and add rice. A tablespoon of 
lean, uncooked ham is sometimes added to the seasoning. 
When ham is used, omit salt. Use medium flame. 















































Sea Foods. 


WAYS OF COOKING FISH. 

BOILING.:—Small haddock, cod or cusk are cooked 
whole in boiling, salted water, to which is added a little 
lemon juice or vinegar to keep the fish white. A frying 
basket is useful to place fish in, in the kettle. Large fish 
like salmon or halibut are cut in thick pieces and tied 
in a piece of cheesecloth before being placed in the kettle. 
If skin is not removed before serving, scald and scrape 
off the dark part. Cook until fish leaves the bone. 

Time-Table for Boiling Fisii 

Lobster . 25 to 30 minutes 

Cod and haddock (3 to 5 lbs.) . 20 to 30 minutes 

Bass or bluefish (4* to 5 lbs.) . . 40 to 15 minutes 

Halibut (2 to 3 lbs.). 30 to 45 minutes 

Salmon (2 to 3 lbs.). 30 to 35 minutes 

Garnish haddock or halibut with slices of hard-boiled 
eggs and parsley, and serve with drawn butter, egg sauce, 
or Hollandaise sauce. 

Garnish salmon with slices of lemon and parsley, and 
serve with any preferred sauce. 

BAKING.—Clean fish and bake on a greased fish sheet 
in a dripping pan. In the absence of a fish sheet, strips 
of white cloth may be placed under fish by which to lift 
it from the pan. 

Time-Table for Baking Fish 
Bake thick cuts, weight 3 to 4 lbs. 45 to 60 minutes 

Bake small fish.. 20 to 30 minutes 

Use medium flame. 

BAKED HADDOCK 

About four pounds is a good size to bake. Clean fish, 
sprinkle with salt, stuff, and sew. Cut four or five slits 
each side of the backbone and insert narrow strips of fat 
salt pork. Place in pan, sprinkle with a few grains of 
pepper, brush over with melted butter, dredge with flour, 
and place around fish small bits of pork. Bake 1 hour 
over a medium flame, basting as soon as fat tries out, and 






i 



1 


I 














































every 10 minutes afterward. In case fish seems to bake 
too fast, lower the flame. Serve with drawn butter or 
Hollandaise sauce. 

t 

BAKED BLUEFISH 

Bake as haddock, omitting to insert pork in back. Baste 
with ^/3 cup butter melted with 2/3 cup water. 

BAKED MACKEREL 

Remove head and tail. Split fish. Put in buttered pan, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, dot over with butter and 
pour over 2/3 cup milk. Bake 25 minutes over a medium 
flame. 




BAKED HALIBUT with Tomato Sauce 

Put 2 lbs. cleaned fish in baking pan, pour around it 
half the tomato sauce and bake 35 minutes, basting often. 
Use medium flame. Remove to hot platter, pour around 
remaining sauce and garnish with parsley. 

SAUCES FOR BAKED OR BOILED FISH 

TOMATO SAUCE 

2 Cups tomatoes. 3 Tablespoons butter. 

1 Cup water. 3 Tablespoons flour. 

1 Slice onion. \ Tablespoon sugar. 

Cloves. Salt and pepper. 

Cook tomatoes, water, onion, 3 cloves and sugar together 
20 minutes. Melt butter, add flour and stir into the mix¬ 
ture. Add % teaspoon salt and a dash of pepper; cook 
10 minutes and strain. 

DRAWN BUTTER 

Cup butter. ^ Teaspoon salt. 

3 Tablespoons flour. % Teaspoon pepper. 

lh Cups hot water. 

Melt half the butter; add flour mixed with seasoning and 
then hot water gradually. Boil 5 minutes and add remain¬ 
ing butter in small pieces. 



































EGG SAUCE 


Add 2 hard boiled eggs cut in slices to drawn butter, or 
add beaten yolks of two eggs and a little lemon juice to 
drawn butter. 


HOLLANDAISE SAUCE 

\ Cup butter. % Teaspoon salt. 

2 Egg yolks. Few grains cayenne. 

1 Tablespoon lemon juice. % Cup boiling water. 

Wash butter with cold water and divide in three parts. 
Put first piece in saucepan with egg yolks and lemon juice; 
place this pan in a larger saucepan containing boiling 
water and stir with a wire whisk until butter is melted; 
add second piece of butter and. as it thickens, the third. 
Add water, cook 1 minute and add salt and cayenne. 


STUFFING FOR BAKED FISH 

1 Cup bread and cracker crumbs. % Teaspoon salt. 

% Cup melted butter. ^ Teaspoon pepper. 

% Cup hot water. Onion juice. 

Mix ingredients, using only a few drops of onion juice. 

OYSTER STUFFING 

1 Cup cracker crumbs. \\ Teaspoons lemon juice. 

% Cup melted butter. 1 ” Cup oysters. 

% Teaspoon salt. % Tablespoon chopped parsley. 

\ Teaspoon pepper. 

Mix seasoning and butter with crumbs. Remove tough 
parts of oysters; add soft parts to the mixture, moistening 
with 2 tablespoons oyster liquor. 

FRYING 

Cl ean fish and dry it; sprinkle with salt, dip in mea., 
flour or crumbs, then in egg and again in Hour or crumbs 
and fry in deep fat. Fish may be seasoned, rolled in meal 
and sauted in a frying pan, using butter or pork fat. 

Fry scallops, oysters and clams as fish, or dip them in 
bailer and fry in deep fat. Use high flame. 












































BATTER FOR OYSTERS OR CLAMS 



2 Eggs. Jg Teaspoon pepper. 

1 Teaspoon salt. 1 Cup bread flour. 

\ Cup milk. 

Beat eggs, add milk, flour, salt and pepper. 


SCALLOPED OYSTERS 

1 Pint oysters. % Cup bread crumbs. 

4 Tablespoons oyster liquor. Salt and pepper. 

2 Tablespoons milk or cream. Jg Cup melted butter. 

1 Cup cracker crumbs. 

Brown the crumbs slightly and mix them with melted 
butter. Sprinkle a thin layer of crumbs on bottom of 
shallow buttered baking dish; cover with oysters, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper; add half of oyster liquor and half 
of milk; repeat and cover top with remainder of crumbs. 
Bake 30 minutes over a medium flame. 


STEAMED CLAMS 

Clams must be in the shell and must be alive. Wash 
thoroughly; put in large kettle, allowing !/2 cup hot water 
to 4 quarts clams; cover closely and cook until shells 
partially open. Serve with individual dishes of melted 
butter. Add a small quantity of hot water to dishes and 
butter will float and keep hot longer. Use high flame. 


FISH BALLS 



1 Cup salt fish picked fine or 
cut with scissors. 

1 Pint potatoes. 


1 Egg. 

?g Teaspoon pepper. 
Salt, if needed. 

1 Teaspoon butter. 

Wash fish and free it from bones. Pare potatoes and 
cut them in quarters. Put fish and potatoes in saucepan, 
cover with boiling water and boil 25 minutes, or till 
potatoes are soft. Drain off water and mash and beat fish 
and potatoes until they are light. Add butter and pepper, 
and, when slightly cooled, the egg well beaten. Shape and 
fry in a basket in smoking hot lard 1 minute. Drain on 
brown paper. Use high flame. 



































OYSTER STEW 

\\ Pints oysters. 

1 Quart scalded milk. 


% Cup butter. 
Salt and pepper. 


Pick over oysters and cook in strained oyster liquor till 
they are plump and the edges commence to curl, adding 
a spoonful of water if necessary. Add hot milk, butter, 
salt and pepper and serve at once. Use medium flame. 


MAINE CLAM CHOWDER 


1 Quart clams. 

4 Cups potatoes cut in dice. 
1% Inch cube fat salt pork. 

1 Onion. 


1 Tablespoon salt. 


4 Tablespoons butter. 
1 Quart scalded milk. 
8 Common crackers. 


Remove dark part from soft part of clams and chop 
hard parts finely. Reserve clam water, heat and strain it. 
Cut pork in small pieces, try out and strain it into stew- 
pan. Parboil potatoes 5 minutes, drain and put a layer in 
bottom of stewpan; add chopped clams, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper and dredge with Hour; add remaining potatoes, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper and dredge with Hour; add 
2V2 cups boiling water; cook 10 minutes; add milk, soft 
part of clams and butter. Roil 3 minutes and add crackers 
split in halves. Reheat clam water, thicken with 1 table¬ 
spoon flour and one of butter and add with the remainder 
of the butter just before serving. 






— 26 — 





























T HE New Perfection Toaster here illustrated is es¬ 
pecially designed for use on the New Perfection 
Wick Blue Flame Oil Cook-stove. It also involves an 
entirely new principle never before utilized in a toasting 
device and is designed to give the best possible results 
with the New Perfection stove. With it, four large pieces 
of bread can be toasted at one time, as the heat is dis¬ 
tributed over the entire toasting surface evenly. It is un¬ 
necessary to shift the toast except to turn it over when 
properly browned on one side. 

Any desired result may be secured by turning the flame 
up or down and thus increasing or decreasing the heat. 
If verv dry toast is desired, a low fire should be used. 
If a nicely browned toast with soft center, that is “soft 
toast,” is preferred, it can be secured by using a high 
flame. If directions are followed, the toast is browned 
uniformly over the entire surface. 

This utensil is attractive in design and finish. Its 
body is finished in blue vitreous enamel. The grating on 
which the toast is placed is made of “expanded metal,” 
and may be removed to permit the removal of crumbs from 
underneath. A convenient wooden handle which remains 
always cool is provided, with an eyelet for hanging it up. 





— 27 — 


' 


























































£ 







T HE New Perfection Broiler here illustrated is espe¬ 
cially designed for use on the New Perfection Wick 
Blue Flame Oil Cook-stove. It is the result of ex¬ 
tended experiment and is constructed on an entirely new 
principle as applied to broiling devices. 

In the operation of broiling, neither meat nor drip-pan 
is placed over the fire, but is set at one side. The cover 
or hood, which is placed over the grill of the broiler, pro¬ 
jects over one burner, thereby diverting all the heat from 
that burner, which passes over and under the meat. It is 
therefore unnecessary even to turn the steak. 

Due to the fact that the drip-pan is not over the fire, 
there is no smoke; neither is there any of the obnoxious 
odor ordinarily incident to the broiling process. As the 
meat is broiled on both sides at once, all its juices are 
retained. 


The broiler is easily attached to the stove, as shown in 
the directions accompanying each broiler. The hood is 
finished in mottled blue vitreous enamel. 


Time required for broiling, 17 to 25 minutes, according 
to thickness of meat. 

The burner should be operated at highest flame. 


I MSkMtm 


— 28 — 












































-r ' 








Meats. 

BROILED STEAK AND CHOPS 

Sirloin, porterhouse, cross-cut of rump and top of the 
round are all good cuts of steak. Steak should be cut at 
least one inch thick. Wipe with a cloth wrung out of cold 
water, and remove superfluous fat. Place steak, or chops, 
on grill of a New Perfection Broiler, and set broiler with 
the hood projecting over one burner of the stove (broiler 
itself is not placed directly over the flame) ; see instruc¬ 
tions on each broiler. Use highest flame. Remove steak 
to a hot platter, spread with butter, and sprinkle with salt 
and pepper. 

Start lamb, or mutton chops the same way; then lower 
the flame and finish cooking. Season chops with salt and 
pepper. 

The time required for broiling steak, chops, etc., varies 
from 17 to 25 minutes, according to the thickness of the 
meat. 

ROAST BEEF 

For roasting the best cuts are top or middle of sirloin, 
back of rump or first three ribs. Wipe meat, put on a rack 
in dripping pan, skin side down, in a very hot oven (use 
highest flame) without salt or water; let it remain until 
seared over, then remove pan. Season meat with salt, 
dredge meat and pan with flour and return it to oven. 
When flour in pan is browned, reduce heat by lowering the 
flame to medium and baste every 10 minutes w T ith the fat in 
the pan. If necessary, a small quantity of water may be 
added. When about half cooked, turn meat over and dredge 
with flour for final browning. 

ROAST BEEF GRAVY 

Remove all but three tablespoons of fat from the pan. 
Place over flame and add 3 tablespoons flour, stirring until 
well browned. Add gradually 1^4 cups boiling water, cook 
5 minutes, season with salt and pepper, and strain. 

BEEF A LA MODE 

Have a round of beef (about 3 pounds) well larded with 
salt pork. (Beef in this style should preferably be cooked 




:zzz 


— 29 — 




m 


\ 












































****** 




V V 






in an iron saucepan.) Put in saucepan 2 or 3 slices of 
fat salt pork and try out well; then add a small lump of 
butter. Sprinkle surface of meat with Hour, add 8 small 
onions and brown together in the fat in the saucepan. 
Pour over 1 pint of water and add a bouquet of parsley, 
thvine and bayleaf and 2 cloves. Allow meat to simmer 
over a low flame 2 hours, adding water when necessary. 
Add 8 small carrots and 1 small turnip cut in slices and 
cook 1 hour§ longer or until meat and vegetables are 
done. A few minutes before meat is done, pour over 1 
small wine-glass of Sherry or Madeira wine. 

Larding meat is inserting narrow strips of fat salt pork 
into the surface. 

POT ROAST 



B 


I 

I 

EJM 

E2j 

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m 

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.Melt in a hot frying pan a small piece of butter; while 
very hot put in roast and brown it on all sides by rolling 
it over in the pan. Do not insert a fork as that will cause 
juices to escape. Put browned meat in a kettle, preferably 
an iron pot, which has been heated; put water in frying- 
pan to obtain any juice which may have escaped, and pour 
over the meat. Cover closely and place over a high flame 
until boiling point is reached; then lower the flame and 
cook slowly 3 hours, turning meat occasionally. Keep 
about 1 cup of water under meat, and 15 minutes before 
removing from kettle, sprinkle over the meat a little flour 
and salt. Remove meat and thicken gravy. Browned po¬ 
tatoes mav be served with a pot roast. Boil either white 
or sweet potatoes until nearly done, roll in flour and place 
in gravy in the kettle after meat has been removed; when 
well browned, remove them and place them in a hot oven, 
while the gravy is being thickened. 

NEW ENGLAND BOILED DINNER 

A boiled dinner consists of warm boiled corned beef 
served with vegetables which have been cooked in the water 
in which the meat was boiled. Wipe meat and tie securely 
in shape. Cover with cold water and bring slowly to 
boiling point, using a low' flame at first, then gradually 'J 
raising it. Boil 5 minutes; remove scum; then lower flame 


I 

a 




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30 






























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iEEBEBSEi$£3E5££5BE2EE&32E£ 





and cook until tender. Cook carrots, turnips, cabbage and 
potatoes with meat. (Carrots require longest cooking; 
potatoes least.) Cook beets separately. Serve cabbage 
and beets in separate dishes, other vegetables on same dish 
with meat. 

ROAST LEG OF LAMB 

Wipe meat with dam]) cloth, sprinkle with salt and pepper 
and place in baking pan, dredging meat and bottom of pan 
with flour. Place in oven over a medium flame and when 
flour in pan is browned, baste with the fat in the pan, 
adding water if necessary. Baste every 15 minutes. Time 
required for cooking is about 1 *%. hours. Make gravy, fol¬ 
lowing directions for Roast Beef Gravy. 

A leg of lamb may be boned and stuffed with the fol- 
“ * 

lowing stuffing: 

\ Cup melted butter. Teaspoon pepper. 

1 Cup cracker crumbs. \ Tablespoon poultry seasoning. 

\ Teaspoon salt. \ Cup boiling water. 

BRAISED SHOULDER OF LAMB 

Bone a shoulder of lamb, leave knuckle and fill cavity 
with a stuffing. Place in a deep pan. Cook five minutes in 
one-fourth cup butter a slice each of onion, carrot and 
turnip cut in small pieces, one-half bay leaf, a sprig of 
thyme and one of parsley. Add three cups hot water, salt 
and twelve peppercorns; pour over lamb, (over closely 
and cook over a low flame for three hours, uncovering for 
the last half-hour. Remove to hot platter. Strain liquid in 
pan and thicken with four tablespoons flour browned with 
three tablespoons butter. There should be one and three- 
fourths cups of the sauce. 

ROAST VEAL 

The fillet makes an especially nice roast. Have the 
bones removed and stuff with the stuffing given under Roast 
Leg of Lamb. Tie carefully in shape; season highly with 
salt and pepper, dredge with flour and lay slices of pork 
on top. Scatter a little flour over the bottom of the pan 
and cook over a medium flame without adding water until 




































I 







this flour has browned- Then add a little water and baste 
often. Place a buttered paper over it when it is sufficiently 
browned. Allow half an hour to a pound, as veal must be 
well done to be wholesome. 

VEAL LOAF 

3 Pounds lean veal. 1 Cup cracker crumbs. 

% Pound salt pork. 3 Eggs, well beaten. 

Salt, pepper, sage. 

Chop the veal and pork very fine and mix ingredients, 
seasoning with salt, pepper and sage. Press in a bread 
pan and bake two and one-half hours. Melt one table¬ 
spoon of butter in one cup hot water and every half hour 
pour a spoonful over the meat. Set pan into a larger pan 
partly filled with hot water during the last hour of baking, 
and if it browns too fast on top, cover with a paper. ’ The 
same recipe may be used for beef loaf and either may be 
served hot with tomato sauce or sliced cold. Use medium 
flame. 

ROAST PORK 

Wipe pork, sprinkle with salt and pepper, place in 
dripping pan and dredge meat and pan with flour. Bake 
over a medium flame three or four hours, hasting every 
fifteen minutes with the fat in the pan. Add a little water, 
if necessary. Make gravy as for Roast Beef. 

PORK CHOPS AND FRIED APPLES 

Season the chops with salt and pepper and a little pow¬ 
dered sage; dip them in bread crumbs and saute about 
twenty minutes—or until they are done. Place them on 
hot platter; pour off a part of the gravy to make a brown 
gravy. Pare apples and slice them across in circles two- 
thirds of an inch thick. Remove cores from centres and 
brown in the fat which remains in the frying pan. Pour 
brown gravy over the chops and place slices of apple 
around edges of platter. 

BOILED HAM 

Soak overnight or for several hours in water to cover. 
Wash thoroughly, trim off hard skin near the bone, place 


1 

II 




— 32 — 








































r 



1 


EBBBE 




in a large kettle, cover with cold water and heat to boil¬ 
ing point over a medium flame. Lower flame a trifle and 
cook until tender. A ham weighing 12 to I t pounds re¬ 
quires 4 or 5 hours’ cooking. Remove kettle from stove 
and allow ham to partially cool; then take it from water, 
remove outside skin, sprinkle with fine cracker crumbs and 
stick with cloves 1 inch apart. Bake 1 hour over a low 
flame. Serve cold, thinly sliced. 


SAUSAGE ROLLS 

Make a rich biscuit dough, roll thin and cut with a large 
cookie cutter. Have the fried sausages hot; roll 1 link 
in each disc of dough, pinch the ends together and bake 
over a medium flame. Serve on a hot platter with brown 


gravy around them. 


BROILED BACON 



SAUSAGES BAKED IN POTATOES 

Pare large potatoes and cut a liule in them lengthwise 
with an apple corer. Draw through each potato a small 
sausage; place them in a pan and Lay a slice of bacon on 
top of each potato. Baste with hot water if necessary 
and bake until potatoes are done. Use medium flame. 


The best way to cook bacon is to broil it. Cut the bacon 
in the thinnest possible slices, rejecting the rind. Lav the 
pieces close together on grill of a New Perfection Broiler. 
Place broiler with hood projecting over the flame (broiler 
itself is not placed directly over the flame ) ; see instructions 
on each broiler. Use highest flame. The fat which falls 
into the pan may be used for frying potatoes. Drain the 
bacon on brown paper. 

To serve calf’s liver with bacon, sprinkle the liver with 
salt and pepper, roll it in flour and fry brown in the bacon 
drippings. 


MAINE BAKED PORK AND BEANS 

1 Quart dry beans. 1 Tablespoon molasses. 

\ to 1 lb. salt pork. 1 Teaspoon salt. 

Pick over beans, cover with cold water and soak over¬ 
night. In the morning drain and place in bean pot. Scald 




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— 33 — 












































rind of Ik* salt pork (or more, if preferred), selecting 
a piece all fat or mixed fat and lean, according to taste. 
Make inch deep cuts in the rind, a half inch apart, and 
bury pork in beans, leaving the rind exposed. Add molas¬ 
ses, salt and boiling water to cover the beans. Cover the 
bean pot, place in oven and bake over a medium flame for 
two 1 lours, then lower the flame and bake for five or six 
hours longer. Add water, a little at a time, as needed. 

Many people think that a slice of onion improves the 
flavor of baked beans and that 1 teaspoon of mustard makes 
them more easily digested. Any kind of dry beans may 
be used. The California pea bean is preferred by many. 


Poultry and Game. 

To determine the age of poultry, examine the feet and 
cartilage at the end of breastbone. If both are soft it is 
a chicken; if hard, a fowl. 

To prepare a bird for cooking singe it by holding over 
a flame and turning it until hairs are removed. Remove 
pin feathers. Cut the skin around the leg an inch and a 
half below the leg joint, taking care not to cut the tendons, 
then place leg at that point over the edge of a board or 
table and snap the bone; then pull off foot and tendons. 
In a fowl tendons may have to be pulled one at a time. 
Make a cut below the breastbone and remove the entrails, 
heart, gizzard and liver. Remove gall bladder from liver. 
Remove the lungs from either side of backbone and the 
kidneys which lie near the hollow. Remove windpipe 
from neck and crop. Cut off the neck close to the body, 
leaving the skin. Remove oil bag. Wash outside care¬ 
fully and run water through llie inside to cleanse it. The 
heart, liver and gizzard are called giblets. Remove veins 
and blood from heart and fat and membrane from gizzard. 
Cut through the thick part of gizzard and remove the part 
inside. Wash giblets and neck and cook together in a 
little water. 



— 34 — 






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ROAST CHICKEN 




Having dressed a chicken, stuff it, using stuffing given 
under Roast Lamb or Old Fashioned Stuffing. Truss it by 
crossing tlie drumsticks, tying them with a long string and 
then tying to the tail. Fasten the wings close to the body 
with a skewer and draw the skin at the neck under the 
back and pin with another skewer. Then turn the bird on 
its breast and draw string which is fastened to tail around 
skewers, fasten it and cut it. Rub chicken with salt and 
rub breast and legs with butter and Hour worked together. 
Place in pan and sprinkle bottom of pan with flour. 
Place in oven over a medium flame till flour is browned. 
Then lower the flame and baste often. Melt butter half 
the size of an egg in •% cup hot water and use it for 
basting while it lasts. Then use fat in the pan. Turn 
bird occasionally that it may brown alike on all sides. 
Cook until breast meat is tender, which will be about 1*4 
hours for a 4 pound chicken. Remove strings and skewers 
and serve. 


GRAVY 

Brown 4 tablespoons of flour in 4 tablespoons of fat from 
pan in which chicken was roasted; add 2 cups stock in 
which giblets and neck have been cooked. Boil 5 minutes; 
season with salt and pepper, strain and serve. Sometimes 
giblets arc chopped and added to gravy. 

OLD FASHIONED STUFFING 

% Cup butter. 



2 Cups hot mashed potatoes. 
1% Cups soft bread crumbs. 

% Cup chopped fat salt pork. 
1 Finely chopped onion. 


1 Egg. 

Ih Teaspoons salt. 
1 Teaspoon sage. 


ROAST TURKEY 


Proceed as with Roast Chicken, using twice as much 
stuffing. A turkey weighing 10 pounds will cook in about 
3 hours. 


CHICKEN FRICASSEE 

Dress, wash and cut up a chicken or fowl and cook in 
boiling water until it is tender. Sprinkle with salt and 








— 35 — 









































mtiitiit) h i wwffr**-^********^ 


pepper, dredge with flour and brown slightly in butter in 
a frying-pan. Arrange on slices of dry toast on a hot 
platter and pour around the following sauce: 

Boil down the stock in which fowl was cooked until 
there remain 2 cups. Strain and take off the fat. Add 
4 tablespoons flour to 3 tablespoons melted butter, stirring 
until smooth, and pour on gradually the stock. Season 
with salt and pepper. Instead of serving on toast, chicken 
fricassee may be served with very small baking powder 
biscuit arranged around rim of platter. Use highest flame. 





CHICKEN PIE 


Joint and prepare for boiling 2 chickens weighing 3 
pounds each. Use water to cover and add sufficient water 
to keep them covered during period of cooking. When 
done, while hot, strip meat from bones with a silver knife 
and fork. Line a deep pudding dish with rich pie crust 
rolled a trifle thicker than for ordinary use; lay in the 
chicken, thicken and season the stock, boiling it down if 
there is too much; pour over the chicken and cover with 
top crust, leaving a round opening in center to allow steam 
to escape, and bake over a low flame 2 hours or more. 
Serve hot or cold. 


ROAST GOOSE 


Dress a goose, washing and scrubbing it with a brush 
and hot soap-suds. Wash in cold water and dry. Stuff 
with Old Fashioned Stuffing, sprinkle with salt and pepper 
and lay 5 or 6 thin strips of fat salt pork on the breast. 
Bake over a medium flame 2 hours, basting often with fat 
in the pan. Remove the pork before goose is done. Serve 
with apple sauce. 

ROAST WILD DUCK 

Clean and prepare as a goose, using less salt pork. Bake 
about a half hour, starting with a flame above medium 
and reducing to medium. Serve with currant jelly. Stuff 
with a bread stuffing. 


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VENISON 

Ji roil venison steak and cook leg of venison as a leg of 
lamb, only not as long, as it should be served rare. 

* B 

RABBIT SAUTE 

Have rabbit cut in pieces. Put meat and a few small 
onions in a saucepan with a little hot butter and lard. 
Sprinkle with a scant tablespoon flour. Have ready a 
large glassful ot white wine which has been put in a 
separate saucepan and allowed to simmer for 2 or 3 min¬ 
utes. Pour wine over the rabbit and add a bouquet of 
parsley, thyme and bay-leaf. Add water if necessary. Cook 
slowly over a low flame for about 1 hour. 



Vegetables. 

Vegetables should be washed in cold water, using a 
small scrubbing brush when necessary, and cooked in boil¬ 
ing salted water. I lie time for cooking varies according 
to the size of vegetable and the season; but the following 
time-table may be used as a guide. Use highest flame. 

Time-T a bee for Boiling Vegetables. 


Sweet potatoes . ] 



20 

to 

35 

minutes 

15 

to 

25 

minutes 

20 

to 

CO 

minutes 

1 

to 

2 l/o hours 

1 

to 

1 *4 hours 

20 

to 

30 

minutes 

45 

to 

55 

minutes 

3 

to 

4 

hours 

40 

to 

60 

minutes 

30 

to 

45 

minutes 

40 

to 

60 

minutes 

25 

to 

30 

minutes 

12 

to 

15 

minutes 

30 

to 

45 

minutes 

20 

to 

25 

minutes 

15 

to 

20 

minutes 


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1 

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s 

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ESCALLOPED POTATOES 

Pare, soak and cut 1 large potatoes in *4 inch slices. 
Put a layer in buttered baking»dish, sprinkle with salt and 
pepper, dredge with flour and dot over with butter; repeat; 
then add hot milk until it can be seen through the top 
layer. Bake 1^4 hours—or until potatoes are thoroughly 
cooked—over a medium flame. 

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES 

Wash and pare small potatoes; cut them in eighths, 
lengthwise, and soak 1 hour in cold water. Dry between 
towels and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper. If 
fat is too hot, potatoes will brown before they are cooked 
through. Use high flame. 




m 




1 




Yolks 3 eggs. 

Salt and cayenne. 


POTATO CROQUETTES 

2 Cups hot potatoes, riced. 

2 Tablespoons butter. 

Mix ingredients, seasoning with salt and cayenne. 
Shape in balls, then roll with pointed ends. Roll in flour 
and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper. Use highest 
flame. 

CREAMED POTATOES 

Cut 2 cups cold boiled potatoes into dice and reheat in 
iy 4 cups White Sauce. 

WHITE SAUCE 

Put 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan, stir until meited 
and bubbling; add 2 tablespoons flour, a little salt and 
pepper, and stir until well mixed. Pour on gradually 1 
cup milk, stirring until well mixed and smooth. 

Almost any other cooked vegetable may be served in 
White Sauce in the same manner. 

POTATOES AU GRATIN 

Rice potatoes and mix with White Sauce. Put in but¬ 
tered baking-dish, sprinkle with grated cheese, cover with 
buttered crumbs and bake over a medium flame until crumbs 
are brown. • 









— 38 — 































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ESCALLOPED PARSNIPS 

Cut cold boiled parsnips in dice. Put into a buttered 
baking-dish in layers with crumbs, chopped parsley and 
grated cheese between them. Place crumbs mixed with 
grated cheese and butter on top. Pour over White Sauce 
to moisten mixture and bake until well browned over a 
medium flame. 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES 

Cover bottom of buttered baking-dish with buttered 
crumbs; cover with tomatoes, sprinkle with salt, pepper — 
and a bit of sugar, if preferred sweet — and a few drops 
of onion juice; cover with buttered crumbs and bake over 
a medium flame until crumbs are brown. 


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CORN PUDDING—SOUTHERN STYLE 

6 Ears of corn. % Teaspoon salt. 

2 Eggs. 2 Tablespoons sugar. 

\\ Cups* milk. 

Grate the corn, beat the eggs with a spoon and mix all 
the ingredients together. Butter a deep earthen dish and 
pour in the mixture. Bake over a low flame an hour or 
more. Serve hot. If the corn is old, use more milk. 

CORN FRITTERS 










6 Ears of corn. 
2 Eggs. 


2 Tablespoons cream. 
2 Tablespoons flour. 


Salt and pepper. 

Score and cut corn from ears and mix ingredients, add¬ 


ing whites of eggs, beaten stiff, last. Saute in butter over 
.a medium flame. 


BOILED SALAD DRESSING 


2 Egg yolks. Tablespoons sugar. 

2 TeasDoons salt. % Tablespoon flour. 

1 Teaspoon mustard. Tablespoons melted butter. 

Cayenne. % Cup vinegar. 

\ Cup milk. 



Mix dry ingredients, add eggs beaten a little, then the 
butter, milk and vinegar. Cook in a double boiler until it 




\ 


— 39 — 
































— 





thickens. W hen ready to use, if dressing is too thick, thin 
with cold vinegar. 

When making salads, mix oil and vinegar with salad 
mixture and let stand a short time; then mix with boiled 
dressing. 


Luncheon Dishes and Warmed 

Over Dishes. 

SALMON LOAF 

1 Can salmon picked fine 4 Tablespoons butter. 

with a fork. \ Cup bread crumbs. 

4 Eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Combine ingredients and steam 1 hour in a quart bowl. 
Serve with White Sauce or Egg Sauce. 

SHRIMP WIGGLE 

2 Cans shrimps. % Can tomatoes. 

1 Pint cream. 1 Tablespoon chopped onion. 

1 Cup cooked rice. Butter half the size of an egg. 

Cook onion in butter, add tomatoes and cooked rice; 
when hot add shrimps cut in thirds; add cream, season 
with salt and pepper and serve hot on crackers. Will 
serve ten persons. 

MACARONI AND CHEESE 

Boil 14 pound macaroni broken in small pieces in 3 
pints salted water 20 minutes; turn into a colander; pour 
over cold water and drain. Make a White Sauce (recipe 
given under Creamed Potatoes). Put a layer of grated 
cheese in buttered baking-dish, then a layer of macaroni, 
and pour over half the sauce; repeat, and cover top with 
fine bread crumbs dotted over with butter. Bake until 
browned over a medium flame. 

WELSH RAREBIT 


\ Lb. cheese. 
% Cup milk. 

1 Egg. 


Pinch of cayenne. 



40 — 





1 Teaspoon salt. 

I Teaspoon mustard. 
1 Tablespoon butter. 
































Melt cheese in saucepan, mix melted butter, salt, mustard 
and cayenne with a little cold milk and add to cheese; 
then add egg, beaten slightly, and, last of all, milk. Serve 
on toast or crackers. Use low flame. 


ENGLISH MONKEY 

1 Cup bread crumbs. 

! Cup milk. 

Cup mild cheese. 


1 Egg. 

1 Tablespoon butter, 
Salt and cayenne. 


Soak bread crumbs in milk la minutes. Melt butter in 
saucepan, add cheese cut in small pieces and let it melt; 
then add soaked crumbs, egg beaten a little, teaspoon 
salt and a few grains cayenne. Cook 3 minutes. Serve 
on crackers. 


Ways of Using Left-Overs. 

BEEFSTEAK PIE 


Cut left-overs of steak or roast beef in dice. Place in 
a saucepan with !/> onion; cover with boiling water and 
cook 1 hour over a low flame. Remove onion, thicken 
gravy with flour mixed with cold water and season with 
salt and pepper. Cut potatoes in slices and cook in boiling 
water 8 minutes. Add potatoes to meat and gravy and 
place in a buttered baking-dish- When cool, cover with a 
biscuit dough or with pie crust. Bake over a medium flame. 


CASSEROLE OF BEEF 


Cut the lean meat of cold roast beef into small cubes, 
removing fat and tough parts. Boil y 4 pound of macaroni 
in water until tender, then drain it. Add left-over gravy 
to stewed tomatoes. Put into a casserole alternate layers 
of macaroni and meat, pouring the gravy and tomatoes 
over each meat layer. Cover the top with bread crumbs 
and bake over a medium flame until crumbs are brown. 
Allow a little over 1 pint of gravy and tomatoes to each 
cupful of meat. 



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EGGS SCALLOPED WITH MEAT OR FISH 

6 Hard-boiled eggs. % Cup buttered cracker crumbs. 

\ Cup chopped meat 1 Pint white sauce, 
or fish. 

Sprinkle the bottom of a buttered baking-dish with 
crumbs; cover with Vl2 the eggs chopped finely. Cover the 
eggs with sauce and the sauce with meat; then repeat and 
cover the top with crumbs. Place in oven and bake over 
medium flame until the crumbs are brown. Ham, chicken, 
sausages, veal or fish may be used. 




VEGETABLE HASH 

Chop finely equal parts of cabbage, beets and turnips, 
left from a boiled dinner, and as much potato as there is 
of all the rest. Heat beef drippings in a frying-pan. 
Pour in hash and cook over a low flame until heated 
through. 

HAM SOUFFLE 

To 2 cups minced ham, add white of an egg and beat 
until smooth. Add a dash of paprika, 1 cup whipped cream 
and whites of 2 eggs, beaten until stiff. Pour into an 
oiled mold, bake over a low flame and serve hot with 
Tomato Sauce. 


PASTE 

W z Cups flour. 

\ Teaspoon salt. 


Pies. 

\ Cup lard or lard and butter 
in equal parts. 

Cold water. 



Mix flour and salt. Reserve 1% tablespoons lard and 
w’ork remainder into flour, using a knife or the finger tips. 
With cold water, moisten to a dough. Toss on a floured 
board, pat and roll out. Spread with 1 tablespoon lard, 
dredge with flour, roll, pat and roll out; roll up again and 
cut from end of roll a piece large enough to line a pie plate. 
Roll this piece out, keeping it as nearly circular as pos- , 
sible. Use the remainder of the lard, or lard and butter, 
to dot over the top crust of pie before putting it in the 

- A. 

















































oven, to give the pie a flaky appearance. This amount of 
paste will make two pies with one crust or one pie with 
two crusts and a few puffs. 


APPLE PIE 

4 or 5 Sour apples. 

% Cup sugar. 

% Teaspoon grated nutmeg 
or cinnamon. 


3g Teaspoon salt. 

1 Teaspoon butter. 

1 Teaspoon lemon juice. 


9 

3 


Pare, core and cut apples in thin slices. Line a pie plate 
with paste. Put a row of slices of apple around the plate 
y^> inch from the edge, and work toward the center until 
plate is covered; then pile on the rest. Mix sugar, spice, 
salt and lemon juice and sprinkle over apples, then put 
butter in small pieces over the top. Wet the edges of the 
under crust with water, cover with upper crust and press 
edges together. Cut a few perforations in upper crust to 
allow steam to escape. The lemon juice may be omitted. 

Some cooks think a few grains of cayenne improve the 
flavor. Bake 45 minutes. Use low, but not lowest, flame. 

BLUEBERRY PIE 

Line a deep plate with paste and fill it with berries 
slightly dredged with flour; sprinkle with y% cup sugar 
and y# teaspoon salt; cover and bake 40 to 45 minutes over 
a low flame. 


APPLE CUSTARD 


3 Eggs. 

1 Cup sugar. 


Beat eggs, add sugar, melted butter, apples and vanilla. 
Line round muffin pans with pastry; fill with mixture and 
bake over a low flame until crust is done. 



\ Cup butter. 
Vanilla. 


1 Cup sifted sour apples. 


CUSTARD PIE 

2 Eggs. 

3 Tablespoons sugar. 


Nutmeg. 


% Teaspoon salt. 
\\ Cups milk. 


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— 43 — 









































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Beat eggs slightly, add sugar, salt and milk. Line a 
rather small pie plate with paste and build a fluted rim. 
Strain the mixture and fill plate, sprinkling a few grains 
of nutmeg over the top. Set in oven over medium flame to 
set the rim, then lower the flame. Test with a knife as in 
case of cup custards. 






SQUASH OR PUMPKIN PIE 


1% Cups steamed and strained 
squash or pumpkin. 

% Cup sugar. 

1 Egg. 


\ Teaspoon salt. 

% Teaspoon cinnamon, 
ginger or nutmeg. 
\ Cup milk. 

Mix sugar, salt, spice and squash or pumpkin; add 
egg, well beaten, and milk gradually. Bake in a deep 
plate in a crust with a fluted rim. Set in a hot oven 
(medium flame) to set the rim; then decrease the heat. 
Bake as Custard Pie. 


RHUBARB AND STRAWBERRY PIE 


Cut rhubarb fine and put in oven to dry. Cover a 
deep plate with rich crust; fill level full of rhubarb;, add a 
heaping cup of sugar, a little salt or a few pieces of butter, 
and a layer of strawberries. Cover with upper crust and 
bake like an Apple Pie. 


MINCE PIE 


Bake mince pies with two crusts, using the following rule 
for mince meat: 


OLD FASHIONED MINCE MEAT 


2 Bowls chopped apples. 1 Cup sugar. 

1 Bowl meat. 2 Lbs. suet, chopped fine. 

lJg Cups molasses. 1 Quart water, in which beef 

1 ** Pint old cider. was cooked. 

1 Lb. raisins. Salt. 

1 Lb. currants. % Pound citron chopped fine. 



Mix ingredients, heat gradually, stir occasionally and 
cook slowly two hours over a low flame. Add ground 
spices to taste after mince meat is cooked or when making 
pies. 
















































1 




TARTS 

3 Cups flour, Teaspoon soda. 

h Cup butter. White of 1 egg beaten stiff. 

Jg Cup lard. Jg Cup cold water. 

1 Teaspoon cream tartar. 

Make a paste of the ingredients and roll inch thick. 
Shape with a round cutter dipped in Hour; with a smaller 
cutter remove centers from half the pieces, leaving rings 
one half inch wide. Brush the larger pieces near the 
edge with cold water;' fit on the rings, pressing lightly. 
C hill thoroughly and bake 15 minutes over a medium flame; 
lower flame in case tarts show a tendency to burn. If the 
tops of rings are brushed with beaten egg yolk diluted with 
water, they will present a glazed appearance. When cool 
fill with jelly. 

SUGAR PIES—SOUTHERN STYLE 

3 Cups light-brown’sugar. * h Cup cream. 

H Cup melted butter. 3 Eggs. 

Mix ingredients, beating well. Season with lemon and 
bake in pastry without a top crust. Use low flame. 


LEMON PIE 

1 Heaping tablespoon cornstarch. 1 Teaspoon butter. 

1 Cup sugar. Juice of 1 large lemon. 

1 Scant cup boiling water. 2 Eggs. 

Mix cornstarch with sugar, add boiling water and boil 5 
minutes. Then add butter, lemon juice and yolks of eggs 
well beaten. Bake in one crust. When done make & a 
meringue of the whites of the eggs beaten until stiff, 2 
tablespoons of powdered sugar and y 2 tablespoon lemon 
juice, or *4 teaspoon lemon extract; spread on top of pie 
and bake over a low flame 15 minutes. 


Puddings. 

DELICATE PUDDING 




h Cup rice. 2 Cups milk. Jg Cup sugar. 

Cups water. 4 Eggs. % Teaspoon salt. 

\ Teaspoon vanilla. 



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Boil rice in water. When it is nearly done, add milk 
and salt and cook until it is soft. Add the yolks of the 
eggs beaten with sugar. Take from the stove and stir in 
the beaten whites of 2 eggs and vanilla. Make a meringue 
of the remaining two whites with l/*> cup sugar. Spread 
over top of pudding and set in the oven over a medium 
flame to brown. 

THANKSGIVING PLUM PUDDING 



6 Crackers. 

3 Pints milk. 

% Cup butter. 

1 Cup sugar. 

Soak crackers in milk. 


3^ Teaspoon salt. 

1 Teaspoon mixed spices. 
6 Eggs. 

1 Pound stoned raisins. 


Cream butter and sugar; add 
salt, spice and eggs well beaten, and stir mixture into the 
milk. Add raisins. Bake in a deep pudding dish, well 
buttered with cold butter, for three or four hours over a 
low (not lowest) flame. Stir several times during the first 
hour to keep raisins from settling. Serve with or without 
hard sauce or whipped cream. 

HARD SAUCE 

1 Cup powdered sugar. 1 Tablespoon cream. 

% Cup butter. % Teaspoon vanilla. 

% Teaspoon lemon extract. 

Cream butter, add cream, sugar and flavoring. 




1 Teaspoon salt. 

1 Teaspoon ginger or cinnamon. 
1 Cup cold milk. 



INDIAN PUDDING 

1 Quart milk. 

3s Cup cornmeal. 

3g Cup molasses. 

Heat 1 quart of milk and stir in the meal slowly until 
it thickens. Take from the stove and add molasses, salt 
and spice. Put mixture into a buttered earthen pudding 
dish and add cold milk. Bake over a low flame for 2 
hours. After the pudding is partly cooked a little more 
cold milk may be added if desired. Serve with or without 
cream. 




— 46 — 









































SUET PUDDING 


1 Cup molasses. 

1 Cup milk. 

1 Cup suet, chopped fine. 
3k Cups flour. 


1 Cup chopped raisins. 

1 Heaping teaspoon soda, 
mixed with molasses. 


Ik Teaspoons salt. 


Teaspoon each cinnamon, clove and nutmeg. 


Mix and sift dry ingredients. Add molasses and milk 
to suet. Combine mixtures and add raisins. Turn into a 
buttered mold, cover and steam 4- hours. Serve with hard 
sauce or egg sauce. Use medium flame. 


EGG SAUCE NO. 1 


k Cup butter. 

1 Cup powdered sugar. 


1 Egg. 

2 Tablespoons wine. 


Cream butter, add sugar, egg beaten until foamy, and 
wine. Heat over hot w r ater, beating continually. 


EGG SAUCE NO. 2 


2 Eggs. 

1 Cup sugar. 


1 Teaspoon vanilla or 


Teaspoon vanilla and 


1 Tablespoon brandy. 


Beat eggs until foamy, add sugar, continually beating, 
and flavoring. 


BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING 


1 Loaf of dry bread or its 
equivalent in dry slices. 
Butter. 

% Cup sugar. 



3 Eggs. 

1 Quart milk. 

% Teaspoon salt. 
Raisins. 


Butter a pudding dish. Spread bread with butter and 
arrange in layers with seeded raisins sprinkled between 
them. Beat the eggs slightly, add sugar, salt and milk 
and pour over the bread. Let it stand a half hour and 
then bake 1 hour over a low flame. Cover during first 
half of baking; then remove cover to allow pudding to 
brown. Serve with egg sauce. 


— 47 — 






_ 
























































SCALLOPED APPLES 


% Cup butter. 
% Cup sugar. 
1 Lemon. 


The equivalent of a small loaf of 
baker's bread. 

1 Quart sliced apples. 

Nutmeg. 

Rub bread crumbs through a coarse strainer or a col¬ 
ander; melt butter and stir it in lightly. Cover the bottom 
of a buttered pudding dish with crumbs; cover crumbs with 
half of the apples, sprinkle with half the sugar and a few 
grains of nutmeg and half the lemon. Cover with crumbs 
and repeat the process, arranging a layer of crumbs on 
top. Rake 40 minutes over a medium dame. Serve with 
cream and sugar. 

COTTAGE PUDDING 

1 £&£• 1 Cup milk. 

% Cup butter. 2% Cups flour. 

% Cup sugar. % Teaspoon salt. 

3 Rounding teaspoons baking powder. 

Mix and bake like a cake. Serve with lemon sauce or 
strawberry sauce. Use medium flame. 

LEMON SAUCE 

Beat together until foamy 1 egg and 1 cup sugar mixed 
with a scant tablespoon flour. Add nearly a pint of boil¬ 
ing water and butter the size of a walnut. Let it come to 
Flavor with lemon. 


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a boil. 



STRAWBERRY SAUCE 

1 Cup powdered sugar. % Cup strawberries, fresh or 
White of 1 egg. canned. 

% Cup butter. 

Cream butter and sugar, egg (white) beaten stiff, aijd 
mashed berries. Beat thoroughlv. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD 

1 Pint milk, heated to boiling. \\ Tablespoons cornstarch. 
3% Tablespoons grated choco- \ Cup sugar. 

late. \ Teaspoon vanilla. 

\ Cup cold milk. 




— 48 — 






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Mix chocolate, cornstarch and sugar, and add cold milk, 
stirring until smooth. Add this to the boiling milk and cook 
15 minutes in a double boiler. Flavor with vanilla and 



turn into cuns or 


glasses 


when cold. 


BOILED CUSTARD 


1 Pint hot milk. ^ Cup sugar. 

\ oiks 3 eggs. Teaspoon salt. 

Jjj Teaspoon vanilla or orange. 

* 

Beat the eggs a little; add sugar and salt and then the 
hot milk, stirring constantly. Cook in a double boiler 
until mixture thickens and a coating forms on the spoon, 
stirring all the time. Strain, cool and flavor. Should the 
custard curdle beat with a Dover egg-beater until smooth. 

ORANGE PUDDING 

Arrange slices of sweet oranges in a dish and pour over 
them boiled custard. Put on top a meringue made of 
whites of eggs and powdered sugar, 

FRUIT CUSTARD 

Arrange alternate layers of stale cake and slices of 
bananas, canned peaches or pears or fresh berries, and 
pour over boiled custard or chocolate custard. 

CUP CUSTARD 

Nutmeg. 


4 Cups hot milk. 
4 Eggs. 


\ Cup sugar. 

% Teaspoon salt. 


Beat eggs slightly; add sugar and salt, then pour on 
slowly hot milk. Strain mixture into cups; place cups in 
a pan of hot water and sprinkle a few gratings of nutmeg 
over each one. Bake over a low flame until custard is firm 
and a knife can lx? inserted and removed without the 
custard sticking to it. Do not let water in pan boil or 
custard will whey. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING 

1 Large tablespoon butter. % Cup milk. 

•z Cup sugar. 1 I easpoon baking powder. 

1 1 Square Baker’s chocolate. 



Vanilla. 




1 Cup flour. 


V 





















































e|pEE 




Z ZZKZZZZZ7ZFA 


1 Egg. 

% Cup hot milk. 


Beat egg, add sugar, milk and Hour mixed and sifted 
with baking powder. Melt chocolate and butter together, 
and add to mixture. Flavor with vanilla. Steam 1 hour, 
and serve with the following sauce. 

PUDDING SAUCE 

1 Cup sugar. 

Flavoring. 

Beat egg to a froth and add other ingredients. 

DUMPLINGS 

1 Pint flour. 

I Cooking spoon lard. 

1 Level teaspoon soda. 

Work lard into flour which has been mixed and sifted 
with cream tartar, soda and salt. Add sufficient milk to 
make a soft dough. Roll and cut into squares. Place 
slices of cooked apples, peaches or pears, or fresh berries 
on each square. Fold over and pinch edges. Turn upside 
down in a bread pan, four to a pan. Make a syrup of 1 
cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter and 1 pint boiling water. 
Pour syrup over dumplings and bake over a low flame 45 
minutes. Serve with or without cream. 


Milk. 

2 Rounding teaspoons cream 
tartar. Salt. 


1 Pint cream. 

1 Pint milk. 

2 Eggs. 


1 

1 


m 

1 


VANILLA ICE CREAM 

1 Cup sugar. 

2 Scant tablespoons flour. 

\ Teaspoon salt. 

\\ Tablespoons vanilla. 

Mix sugar, flour and salt. Beat eggs until light; add 
1 /^ cup milk and combine with first mixture. Heat cream 
and remainder of milk to boiling point and add to mixture. 
Cook all in double boiler 20 minutes, stirring constantly 
until smooth. Strain, cool, add flavoring and freeze, using 
1 part salt to 3 parts ice. This will serve six persons. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE for Vanilla Ice Cream 

Mix 1 cup sugar and 1 teaspoon cornstarch; add 1 cup 
boiling water, gradually, stirring until smooth; add melted 
chocolate and boil until it thickens. 





























* 

m 


Gingerbreads and Cookies 

SOUR CREAM GINGERBREAD 


I Cup molasses. 

% Cup butter. 

Jg Cup sour cream. 



3g Teaspoon ginger. 
1 Teaspoon soda. 
2\ Cups flour. 


Mix in order given, sifting dry ingredients together. 
Bake over medium flame, lowering flame in case there 
should be a tendency to burn. 

MOLASSES GINGERBREAD 

1 Cup molasses. Dg Teaspoons ginger. 

Jg Cup boiling water. 1 Teaspoon soda. 

2\ Cups flour. Jg Teaspoon salt. 

4 Tablespoons melted butter or other shortening. 

Add water to molasses and add dry ingredients which 
have been mixed and sifted together. Add butter and beat 
vigorously. Bake in a shallow pan over a medium flame. 

VERMONT GINGERBREAD 


1 Cup sour milk. 

1 Teaspoon salt. 

1 Dessertspoon cinnamon. 
1 Teaspoon mixed spices. 

1 Teaspoon soda. 


1 Cup sugar. 

2 Tablespoons molasses. 

4 Tablespoons melted butter. 

1 Egg. 

1 Cup chopped raisins. 

2 Cups flour. 

Mix sugar, molasses, butter, salt and spices. Add egg 
well beaten and sour milk. Sift soda with flour and then 
sift into mixture. Add raisins and beat 2 minutes. Bake 
over a medium flame 40 minutes. 


MOLASSES COOKIES 


?g Cup sugar. 

1 Cup molasses. 

3g Cup butter or other 
shortening. 

1 Teaspoon salt. 


% Cup cold water for soft cook¬ 
ies or boiling water for 


crisp cookies. 

2 Rounding teaspoons soda. 

1 Teaspoon ginger. 

Sufficient flour to roll out. 

Mix sugar, molasses and shortening. Add water and 2 
cups of flour mixed and sifted with soda, salt and spices. 
Add enough more flour to roll out. Bake over a high flame. 







— 51 — 




































i* 

^K32SS£zSi3i5S£S5ESi *Szfj&2&ufSt jSIji 

EX3ESX3Sx2zxx333ZX3SSXx3^a&xX3E!K£ELXXX3c33U&2azZil 


2 Cups brown sugar. 2 Tablespoons hot water. 

1 Cup butter. 1 Cup chopped raisins. 

3 Eggs. Teaspoon ginger. 

1 Teaspoon soda. 1 Small teaspoon each of cin- 

Flour to mix a soft dough. namon, cloves and nutmeg. 

Combine brown sugar, butter and yolks of eggs well 
beaten; add whites of eggs beaten until stiff, soda dis¬ 
solved in hot water, 2 cups of flour mixed and sifted with 
spices and raisins mixed with a little 
enough more flour to mix a soft dough. 


and make as Molasses Cookies. 


flour; then add 
Roll out, shape, 


Use high flame. 


BROWN SUGAR COOKIES 

2 Eggs. 1 Teaspoon vanilla. 

l%Cups brown sugar. 2 Teaspoons cream tartar. 

?3 Cup butter and lard 1 Teaspoon soda, 

in equal parts. % Teaspoon salt. 

3 Rounding cups flour. 

In measuring sugar, pack solidly in cup. Combine 
sugar, butter and eggs well beaten. Add Hour, soda, cream 
tartar and salt, mixed and sifted together, and vanilla. 


Roll thin and shape with a small cutter, 
cookies. Use high flame. 


Bake like other 


CREAM COOKIES 

2 Eggs. 

1 Cup sugar. 

1 Cup thick cream. 


3 Cups flour. 

3 Teaspoons baking powder. 
1 Teaspoon salt. 





1 Teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat eggs; add sugar, cream, and flour mixed and sifted 
with baking powder. Chill, shape and bake. V 2 cup 
caraway seeds may he substituted for vanilla. Use high 
flame. 


PEANUT COOKIES 

2 Tablespoons butter. 

% Cup sugar. 

* Egg. 

1 Teaspoon baking powder. 


% Teaspoon salt. 


Cup flour. 

2 Tablespoons milk. 

\ Cup chopped peanuts. 
^ Teaspoon lemon juice- 
























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22222 


Cream butter, add sugar and well beaten egg. Mix and 
sift flour, baking powder and salt; add to first mixture, 
then add milk, nuts and lemon juice. Drop from teaspoon 
on a buttered sheet far enough apart to allow for spread¬ 
ing. Bake 12 to 15 minutes over a high flame. 

GERMAN STUFFED COOKIES 


4 Eggs. 

2 Cups sugar. 

2 Cups butter. 

1 Teaspoon cream tartar. 

Chopped raisins and walnuts. 


1 Teaspoon soda. 

K Cup milk (scant). 
1 Teaspoon vanilla. 
Jelly. 

Flour to roll out. 


Combine ingredients and roll out. Spread on one half, 
first a layer of jelly, second one of chopped raisins, third 
one of chopped walnuts. Turn the other half over the 
portion spread, pat or roll slightly, and shape. Bake in 
usual way. Use high flame. 


FILLED COOKIES 

1 Cup sugar. 
yi Cup shortening. 

1 Egg. 
yi Cup milk. 


Zyi Cups flour. 

2 Teaspoons cream tartar. 
1 Teaspoon soda. 

1 Teaspoon vanilla. 


Mix, roll thin and shape. Put cookies in buttered pans, 
place a teaspoon of filling on each, not allowing it to 
spread to the edge; place another cookie gently on top and 
bake in usual way. 

FILLING 

1 Cup chopped raisins. 
yi Cup sugar. 

Cook until thick, stirring carefully, as it burns easily. 

OATMEAL CRISPS 



1 Teaspoon flour. 
yi Cup water. 


2 yi Cups dry oatmeal. 2 Tablespoons melted butter. 

2 Eggs. 2 Teaspoons baking powder. 

1 Cup sugar. Teaspoon salt. 

Vanilla to taste. 

Mix, drop on buttered tins and bake in usual way, using 
high flame. 


ZZZZZZZZ2ZZ2ZIZZZZ 















































LACE CAKES 

1 Tablespoon butter well creamed. 

1 Cup sugar. 

2 Scant teaspoons baking powder. 
1 Cup uncooked Rolled Oats. 

1 Cup Force Breakfast Food. 


% Teaspoon salt. 

% Cup flour. 

2 Well-beaten eggs. 
1 Scant teaspoon 


almond extract. 



1 


Mix and drop from teaspoon on buttered tins. Bake 
over a high flame. 


m 


BROWNIES 



1 Cup sugar. 
% Cup flour. 


\ Cup broken walnuts. 
2 Eggs. 

2 Squares chocolate. 


% Cup melted butter. 


Mix and bake in a shallow pan, garnishing the top with 
nuts. Cut in squares. Use high flame. 


CHOCOLATE COOKIES 





Cup butter. 

1 Cup sugar. 

1 Egg. 

% Teaspoon salt. 


2 Squares chocolate. 

2^ Scant cups flour. 

2 Teaspoons baking powder. 
% Cup milk. 


Mix in usual way, adding melted chocolate just before 
adding flour. Roll thin, shape w ith small cutter and bake,, 
using high flame. 


Cake. 


Directions for Baking Cake. 

The success of a cake depends more upon the baking 
than the mixing. Cake should begin to rise during the 
first quarter of the period of baking, continue to rise and 
begin to brown during the second quarter, continue to 
brown and finish baking during the remainder of the 
period. Arrange the flame evenly at the point termed 
medium. If cake rises too fast or begins to brown too* 




































CB3XE3 


•> v v v y ? 

4-» /-*— na *a m 


soon, lower the flame. The progress of baking may be 
watched through the glass door of the Perfection Oven, 
or providing it is done carefully, the door may be opened 
and closed with no danger of the cake falling. After 
cake has risen to its full height, it may be moved in the 
oven with safety. Loaf cake requires less heat than small 
cakes and sponge cake should be baked over a low flame. 
Butter and flour cake pans or line them with paper. 



PLAIN CAKE 


2 Eggs. 

1 Cup sugar. 
% Cup butter. 
1% Cups flour. 


2% Teaspoons baking powder. 
% Cup milk. 

1 Teaspoon vanilla or % tea¬ 
spoon lemon extract. 


C ream butter, add sugar, yolks of eggs well beaten, 
milk and flour mixed and sifted with baking powder. Beat 
whites of eggs until stiff and add with flavoring last. 


“STIRRED UP” CAKE 


1 Cup sugar. 

1 Cup flour. 

2 Eggs. 

% Teaspoon salt. 


1 Teaspoon cream tartar. 
% Cup butter. 

Milk. 

Vanilla. 

Teaspoon soda. 

Silt flour, sugar, soda, cream tartar and salt together 
twice. Put butter in tin measuring cup and melt it. Break 
the eggs into the cup containing the butter and then fill 
the remaining space with milk. Pour this on the sifted 
ingredients, beat vigorously and add vanilla. 


CORNSTARCH CAKE 


% Cup milk. 

Whites of 3 eggs. 

% Teaspoon soda. 

1 Teaspoon cream tartar. 


1 Cup sugar. 

L Cup butter. 

\ Cup cornstarch. 

1 Heaping cup flour. 

Flavoring to taste. 

Cream butter and add sugar. Mix and sift flour, corn¬ 
starch, soda and cream tartar and add alternately with the 
milk. Add eggs beaten until stiff, and flavoring. 









C03 


_ 


— 55 — 









































LARGE LAYER CAKE 



— 


— 


— 




zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzz. 


1 Cup butter. 

2 Cups sugar. 

3 Cups flour. 

1 Teaspoon lemon extract. 


Whites of 8 eggs. 

1 Cup milk. 

2 Rounding teaspoons baking 

powder. 


Cream butter, add sugar, flour (mixed and sifted with 
baking powder) alternately with milk, whites of eggs 
beaten until stiff, and lemon. Bake in 3 tins. Add broken 
English walnuts to boiled frosting and spread between 
layers and on top of cake. One-half this recipe makes a 
cake of good size and yolks of eggs may be used in Gold 
Cake. 


GOLD CAKE 

1 Cup sugar. 

^ Cup butter. 

Yolks of 4 eggs. 
\ Cup milk. 


■ 

1 Teaspoon cream tartar. 
% Teaspoon soda. 

2 Cups flour. 

\ Teaspoon vanilla. 


Cream butter, add sugar, eggs well beaten, milk, flour 
mixed and sifted with soda and cream tartar, and vanilla. 


ORANGE CAKE 

?3 Cup butter. 

2 Cups sugar. 
Yolks 5 eggs. 


Whites of 4 eggs. 



2 Teaspoons orange extract. 
3% Cups flour. 

1 Cup milk. 

3 Rounding teaspoons baking 

powder. 

Cream butter and add 1 cup sugar. Beat yolks of eggs 
until thick and lemon-colored and add 1 cup sugar. Com¬ 
bine mixtures, beating well, and add orange extract. Mix 
and sift together flour and baking powder; add alternately 
with the milk; then fold in whites of 4 eggs beaten until 
stiff and bake in four shallow Washington pie plates. 
"When cakes are cool, put them together with the following 
filling between the layers and frost with Orange Frosting. 

FILLING 

To the juice of 5 oranges and grated rind of 1 orange 
add enough powdered sugar to make it of a smooth con¬ 
sistency ; then spread. 


1 


YZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ 




— 56 — 



































_ 


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ORANGE FROSTING 

Grate rind of 1 orange, add 1 tablespoon orange juice 
and let it stand 1 hour. Squeeze through a fine cloth into 
a bowl; add white of 1 egg (which remains from cake) 
and 1 scant cup powdered sugar. Beat 2 minutes and 
spread on cake. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE NO. 1 


1% Gups sugar. 

% Cup butter. 
2 Eggs. 

2 Cups flour. 


1 Teaspoon soda. 

2 Teaspoons cream tartar. 

1 Cup milk. 

3 Small tablespoons cocoa. 

1 Teaspoon vanilla. 

Cream butter, add sugar, whites of eggs beaten until 
stiff, yolks of eggs beaten, milk, flour, cocoa, cream tartar 
and soda mixed and sifted together, and vanilla. 1* rost 
with Boiled Frosting. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE NO. 2 


\\ Cups sugar. 
\ Cup butter. 
2“ Eggs. 

\ Cup cocoa. 


\ Cup hot water. 

2 Cups flour. 

1 Rounded teaspoon soda. 

2 Teaspoons vanilla. 

% Cup sour milk. 


Cream butter, add sugar, yolks of eggs beaten slightly, 
sour milk, hot water, flour, soda and cocoa sifted together, 
vanilla and whites of eggs beaten until stiff. 



FRUIT CAKE 

1 Lb. currants. 

1 Lb. seeded raisins. 

Lb. citron cut in small 
pieces. 

1 Cup nut meats, broken. 
Juice of 1 lemon. 
Grated rind of 1 lemon 
and 1 orange. 

1 Cup molasses. 


2 Eggs. 

2 Cups flour. 

1 Teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 Teaspoon nutmeg. 

\ Teaspoon cloves. 

Teaspoon salt. 

1 Cup light brown sugar. 

1 Scant cup butter. 

^ Cup coffee with 1 teaspoon 
soda dissolved in it. 


1 


i 


I 

1 

1 


J2 





























E33EB3&EE&& 

Mix ingredients together with the fingers and let it stand 
overnight. In morning butter and line with paper two 
bread pans. Put cake in pans and bake 2 hours over a 
low flame. 

FRUIT CAKE WITHOUT EGGS 


\ Cup sugar. 

?2 Cup molasses. 

1 Cup sour milk. 

1 Cup seeded raisins. 


4 Tablespoons butter. 

1 Teaspoon each of cinnamon, 

cloves, nutmeg and soda. 

2 Cups flour. 


Mix and sift Hour, spices and soda. Cream butter, add 
molasses, sour milk, sifted mixture and raisins. 
Bake in loaves. 


Sll«iVU% 


SPICE CAKE 

1 Cup sugar. Teaspoon cloves. 

?» Cup butter. 1 Cup seeded raisins. 

1 Cup sour milk. 2% Cups flour. 

^ oik of 1 egg. 1 Rounding teaspoon soda. 

\ Teaspoon cinnamon. 

Combine ingredients and bake in loaves. Frost with 
Boiled Frosting. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE 


1 Cup apple sauce. 

1 Teaspoon soda. 

1 Cup sugar. 

% Cup seeded raisins. 



Cup butter. 

2 Cups flour. 

1 Teaspoon each of cinnamon, 
cloves and nutmeg. 

Cream butter and add sugar. Mix soda in apple sauce 
and add to butter and sugar. Mix and sift flour and 
spices, reserving a little flour to mix with raisins, and add 
to first mixture. Add raisins last. 

HOT MILK CAKE 


2 Eggs. 

1 Cup sugar. 
1 Cup flour. 


1 Teaspoon butter. 

\ Teaspoon lemon extract. 

1 Teaspoon baking powder. 
\ Cup boiling milk. 

Beat eggs well; add sugar; add flour mixed and sifted 
with baking powder twice; add hot milk with butter melted 
in it, and flavoring. 


n 
















































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3SE 


GENUINE SPONGE CAKE 



6 Eggs. 1 Tablespoon lemon juice. 

1 Gup sugar. Grated rind of 4 2 lemon. 

1 Cup flour. % Teaspoon salt. 

Beat yolks of eggs until thick and creamy and add 
sugar a little at a time, beating with an egg-beater. Add 
lemon juice and grated rind, then the whites of the eggs 
beaten until stiff. When the whites are partly mixed with 
the yolks and sugar, add flour mixed and sifted with salt, 
cutting and folding it into the mixture. Bake 1 hour over 
a low flame, using a deep narrow pan. 


SPONGE CAKE 

1*2 Cups sugar. 2 Teaspoons cream of tartar. 

3 Eggs. 2 Cups flour. 

'2 Cup cold water. 1 Teaspoon lemon extract. 

1 Teaspoon soda. 

Beat yolks of eggs until thick; add sugar. Mix and 
sift together flour, soda and cream tartar and add to eggs 
and sugar alternately with cold water. Beat whites of 
eggs until stiff and add to mixture. Flavor. Bake over a 
flame below medium. 

ANGEL CAKE 





Whites 8 eggs. ^ Cup flour. 

1 Cup sugar. % Teaspoon salt. 

1 Teaspoon cream tartar. % Teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat egg whites until they are frothy, then add cream 
tartar and beat until they are stiff. Add sugar gradually, 
continuing the beating. Mix flour and salt and sift 4 
times; then fold it into the eggs and sugar and add vanilla. 
Bake in an unbuttered angel cake pan 40 to 50 minutes. 
; Start with medium flame and lower it after cake rises_ 

sooner, if cake seems to rise too fast. 

* * * 







































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ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZXJJC 


WHITE CAKE 

1 Cup sugar. x /t Cup milk. 

Whites 3 eggs. 1?4 Cups flour. 

% Cup butter. 2 y Teaspoons baking powder. 

Vanilla and lemon extract. 

Cream butter, add sugar, milk, flour and baking powder 
sifted together, and egg whites beaten until stiff. Fill a 
teaspoon 2/3 full of vanilla, then . fill it with lemon and 
add to cake. Bake in usual way. 



% Cup sugar. 

% Cup flour. 
Teaspoon salt. 



Frostings for Cake. 


BOILED FROSTING 

1 Cup sugar. 

£ Teaspoon cream tartar. 

Beat the white of egg stiff; 
sugar 


White of 1 egg. 
Flavor with lemon. 



CREAM CAKES 

y 2 Cup butter. 4 Eggs. 

1 Cup boiling water. 1 Slightly rounding cup of flour. 

Put butter and water in a saucepan and place on stove. 
As soon as it comes to boiling point, add flour all at once, 
stirring vigorously until mixture is smooth. Remove from 
stove and add unbeaten eggs one at a time, thoroughly 
beating each one into the mixture before adding the next. 
Drop from a spoon on a buttered pan an inch and a half 
apart, piling mixture slightly in the centre and shaping as 
nearly round as possible. Bake 30 minutes over a me¬ 
dium flame. When cakes appear to be done, remove one. 
If it does not fall, it is proof-they art* done. When cool, 
make a cut in each cake and fill with cream. 

FILLING 

1 Pint milk. 

1 Teaspoon vanilla or % tea¬ 
spoon lemon flavoring. 

2 Eggs. 

Mix dry ingredients; add eggs beaten slightly. Heat 
milk and pour it on gradually. Cook in double boiler 15 
minutes, stirring constantly until it has thickened. Flavor. 




I 



and the cream tartar. 


add 1 tablespoon of the 
Put the rest of the 


sugar 




»t 


\ 



- 






































with a little Mater on stove and boil until the syrup threads 
from the spoon. Then pour syrup on egg and beat until it 
is ready to spread on cake. Flavor. Broken nut meats 
may be added if desired. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING 

Beat together l 1 /-? cups powdered sugar, 6 tablespoons 
grated chocolate and the whites of 2 eggs. Heat in double 
boilpr until mixture has melted and is smooth. Add 1 tea¬ 
spoon vanilla. 

BROWN SUGAR FROSTING 

1 Cup brown sugar. 2 Tablespoons boiling water. 

White of 1 egg. 

Boil sugar and water 2 1 /o minutes after it begins to 
bubble vigorously. Beat white of . egg stiff. Pour syrup 
over egg and beat until ready to spread. 


Beverages. 

COFFEE 

Allow 1 tablespoon of coSJeeror each person to be served 
and one for the pot. Moisten with the white of an egg 
and sufficient water to make a thick paste. Add as many 
cups of boiling water as spoonfuls of coffee used. Boil 3 
minutes. Pour a little to free the spout of grounds and 
return it to the pot. Let stand on stove where it will 
keep hot, but not boil, 10 minutes before serving. For 
after-dinner coffee, use more coffee to the same amount of 
liquid. 

TEA 

2 Cups boiling water. 3 Teaspoons tea. 

Scald an earthen or china teapot and dry it. Put in 
tea and pour over it the’ boiling water. Let it stand in 
a warm place 5 minutes before serving. 

RUSSIAN TEA 

^ Make tea in usual way and serve it hot or cold with a 
slice of lemon to each cup. Sugar may be added to taste 

m m ' 




-y ~ 


— 61 — 
















































/ 


ICED TEA 

Strain tea into glasses Vii full of cracked ice. The flavor 
is better if chilled quickly. Serve with lemon and sugar 
to taste. 

COCOA 

Tablespoons cocoa. 2 Cups milk. 

2 Tablespoons sugar. 2 Cups boiling water. 

Add sugar and a few grains of salt to cocoa, mix with 
1 /j cup boiling water and stir to a smooth paste; add the 
remaining water and boil 1 minute. Add scalding milk and 
beat with an egg-beater to prevent scum forming. 

To Make Chocolate for an Afternoon “At Home” 

Provide 1 pound Baker’s chocolate for every twenty 
guests. Cut each pound into small pieces and add a pint 
of boiling water and 1 pound of brown sugar. Boil to¬ 
gether until a thick syrup is formed which is smooth and 
creamy, stirring often. 

Allow 1 quart of milk to every quart of chocolate syrup 
if a rich beverage is desired. Heat milk and add gradually 
to syrup until it is sufficiently Thinned to pour well. Re¬ 
move from fire, add vanilla if desired, and beat with an 
egg-beater. 

GRAPE JUICE 

Select grapes which are not over-ripe. Add ^4 pint 
water to 3 quarts of fruit and boil, stirring occasionally, 
until fruit is soft. Pout into a cheesecloth and drain over¬ 
night. Add % pound of sugar to 1 quart of juice and 
bring it to boiling point. Boil a few minutes and skim 
thoroughly. Bottle and seal with melted Parowax. Keep 
in a cool, dark place. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB 

Cover 4 quarts berries with vinegar and let stand 24 
hours. Drain off liquid, squeeze out juice and measure 
the whole. Add an equal measure of sugar. Put in kettle 
and boil 20 minutes. Bottle, seal with Parowax and keep 
in a cool dark place. A 1 


— 62 — ' 

4 " ^ [ M 

- - -_ ___ __♦_, • _ ..1 




















Candies. 

C andy making is more successful on a clear day, as a 
damp atmosphere aflects the boiling of sugar. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE 

3 Cups sugar. ^ Cup milk. 

2 Squares chocolate. Butter size of an egg. 

2 Tablespoons molasses. 

Mix ingredients and boil six minutes, stirring constantly. 
Remove from stove, add one teaspoon vanilla and beat 
until it begins to grain. Pour in buttered tins and cut in 
squares when sufficiently cool. 

DIVINITY FUDGE 

2^ Cups sugar. Cup water, 

r. Cup Karo corn syrup. “ Whites 2 eggs. 

1 Cup broken walnuts. 

Mix sugar, syrup and water, and boil until when dropped 
in cold water mixture will form a firm ball between the 
fingers. Beat the eggs stiff. Pour half the boiling mix¬ 
ture over the eggs, beating constantly. Return the re¬ 
maining half of mixture to stove and boil until when 
dropped in cold water it forms a hard ball. Then remove 
from the stove and pour slowly into the first half, beat¬ 
ing constantly. Add walnuts and vanilla, pour into a 
buttered pan, and cut in squares. 

PEANUT BUTTER FUDGE 

2 Cups powdered sugar. 1 Cup milk. 

2 Heaping tablespoons peanut butter. 

Mix ingredients and place over flame. When it begins 
to boil vigorously, cook 5 minutes. Beat, pour in buttered 
pan and cut in squares. 

PENOCHE 

1 I.b. brown sugar. 

2 Lbs. English walnuts, 

broken. 

Mix ingredients and boil until syrup threads from a 
spoon. Remove from stove, add nuts and vanilla, beat 
until it creams, pour in buttered pans and cut in square- 




1 Cup milk. 

Butter half the size of an egg. 



















































' 


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ICE CREAM CANDY 

3 Cups sugar. 

)4 Teaspoon cream tartar. 


yi Cup hot water. 
yi Tablespoon vinegar. 


Boil ingredients together, without stirring, until mix¬ 
ture becomes brittle when tried in cold water. Turn on 
buttered plates. As edges cool, fold them toward the 
center. When sufficiently cool to handle, pull until white 
and glossy. While pulling flavor with vanilla, orange, 
chocolate or any preferred flavoring. Cut w T ith scissors or 
a sharp knife. 


1 Tablespoon vinegar. 
Butter size of a walnut. 


MOLASSES CANDY 

2 Cups molasses. 

1 Cup sugar. 

Boil ingredients together until mixture will become 
brittle when dropped in cold water. Remove from fire, 
stir in ¥s teaspoon baking soda, cool in buttered pan suf¬ 
ficiently to pull. Pull and cut, using scissors or a sharp 
knife. 


BUTTER SCOTCH 

2 Cups sugar. 2 Tablespoons water. 

Butter size of an egg. 

Mix ingredients and boil, without stirring, until it hard¬ 
ens when dropped in cold water. Pour into a buttered 
shallow pan and crease in squares. 


CARAMELS 


\4 Cup molasses. 

1 Cup sugar. 

Butter size of an egg. 


yi Cup milk. 

y .2 Large tablespoon flour. 
yi Lb. chocolate. 



Mix sugar and flour; add other ingredients and boil 
until mixture will form a hard ball when dropped in cold 
water. Turn into a buttered pan and cut in squares. 




— 64 — 









































Directions for Canning 


Always use a porcelain-lined or granite-ware kettle. 
Fruit for canning should be fresh, perfect and not over¬ 
ripe. Allow Yz its weight in sugar and 2^ or 3 cups of 
water to each pound of sugar. Make a thin syrup by boil¬ 
ing sugar and water 10 minutes; then cook a small quan¬ 
tity of the fruit at a time in the syrup, that the fruit may 
keep its shape. When filling the jars, if there is not 
enough syrup, add boiling water, as the jars must be filled 
to overflowing. Heat the jars gradually by rolling them in 
warm water, then set them in a pan of warm water and 
pour boiling water into them. Turn out water, place rub¬ 
bers which have been dipped in hot water, and fill im¬ 
mediately, letting the jars stand in the pan of water or on 
a cloth wrung from hot water while being filled. Insert 
a spoon between fruit and jar that air bubbles may rise 
to the top. Place covers, which have been standing in hot 
water, and fasten tightly. Use new rubbers each season. 
Jars, bottles, glasses, etc., can best be sealed by the use 
of Parowax. 


Directions for Sealing with PAROWAX 

(Pure Refined Paraffine) 

Jelly Glasses 

After the preserves have thoroughly cooled, be careful 
to clean off the inside rim of the glass with a damp cloth. 
Then pour about a quarter of an inch of melted Parowax 
over the preserves. As soon as the Parowax cools the 
glasses may be set away. The preserves are now air-tight 
and no other cover is necessary. 

Fruit Jars, Bottles, Etc. 

After cover or cork has been securely fastened, allow the 
preserves to cool. Then dip top of jar or bottle into a pan 
of melted Parowax, immersing it well down over the top 
so that all openings will be filled with the Parowax. 

Parowax is on sale in one and half pound packages at 
grocers, druggists, and general stores, everywhere. 























































CANNED PEACHES 

Pour boiling water over peaches anti allow’ them to stand 
until the skins loosen. Peel, cut in halves and cook at 
once to prevent fruit’s discoloring, following the directions 
given for canning. Many prefer to cook a few of the 
peach stones in the syrup, thinking they add to the flavor. 
Cook until fruit can be pierced with a stiff straw. 

CANNED PEARS 

Pare fruit and cook whole with stems left on, or cut in 
halves or quarters, removing cores. A small piece of 
ginger root or lemon rind may be cooked with the syrup. 
( ook until fruit looks transparent and can be pierced easily 
with a stiff straw or a knitting needle. 

CANNED BLUEBERRIES OR HUCKLEBERRIES 


Pick over berries, wash them and place in a preserving 
kettle with just enough water to keep them from burning. 
Cook until soft and put in jars. 

CANNED RASPBERRIES OR STRAWBERRIES 


Select firm raspberries or firm, rather small strawberries. 
Heat jars and fill them to the rim with berries. Make a 
syrup of equal parts sugar and water. Pour boiling syrup 
over fruit, filling the jars to overflowing, and snap the 
covers. Place jars in a tub or other receptacle deep 
enough to hold water to cover them. Pour boiling water 
into the tub until jars are submerged and allow them to 
stand in the water until it is cold, w’hen fruit will* be 
found perfectly cooked. Berries canned in this way retain 
color, shape and fresh flavor. 


CANNED TOMATOES 

Pour boiling water over ripe tomatoes and remove skins; 
cut in pieces, put in a preserving kettle and cook slowly 
without the addition of water until thoroughly scalded. 
Fill jars according to directions. 



TOMATOES CANNED WHOLE FOR WINTER 

Select firm smooth fruit, not over-ripe and of a size to 
slip into the ordinary fruit jar. Peel without breaking 


* 











































and with as little scalding as possible. Have ready a 
preserving kettle full of water which has been salted 
slightly only enough to taste. Just before the water reaches 
boiling point, drop in the tomatoes one layer at a time and 
heat them through thoroughly. P° not allow the water to 
boil. Put fruit in jars, fill with the hot salted water and 
cover quickly. Seal tops of jars ■v'dth Parowax according to 
directions given. 


ORANGE MARMALADE 


8 Oranges. 


4 Lbs. cut sugar. 


4 Lemons* 


Remove peel from fruit and cook until soft in enough 
water to cover; drain and scrape white part from rind with 
a spoon. Cut thin yellow rind in strips with scissors- Di¬ 


vide oranges in section, remove seeds and tough skin and 


put them into a preserving kettle* Heat gradually to boil¬ 
ing point, add sugar gradually and cook very slowly over 
a low flame 1 hour. Add the rind and cook 1 hour longer; 
then turn into glasses. 


RHUBARB JAM 


6 Lbs. rhubarb. 
2 Lemons. 


5 Lbs* sugar. 

1 Lb* h£ s or strawberries, ac¬ 


cording to taste. 


Cut rhubarb in small pieces with skin on, mix with sugar 
and let stand overnight. In the morning cut figs (or 
strawberries) and lemons in small pieces, add to rhubarb 
and sugar and cook very slowly o ver a low flame 4 hours. 


APPLE JELLY 


Sour crab-apples, porters, grflvensteins and greenings 


all make good jelly. 


Wipe apples; remove stems ai’d blossom ends, and cut 
in quarters, save in the case of cfah^apples, which may be 
kept whole. Put in preserving kettle and add water until 
it comes nearly to the top of the apples. Cover and cook 
slowly until apples are soft; thefl mash and drain through 
a coarse w ire strainer or a sieve, bat do not squeeze them. 








































add an equal ir 


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equal measure of heated sugar. Boil 5 minutes, 
skim and test by putting a teaspoonful in a saucer, setting 
it in a cold place for a minute and then scraping it with a 
spoon. If the surface lias partly jellied turn the jelly at 
once into glasses which have been rolled in hot water. In 
case liquid does not begin to jelly under the test, boil 
longer. Seal the glasses with melted Parowax after jelly 
has stiffened and stood 21 hours — preferably in a sunny 
window. 

CURRANT JELLY 

Select firm currants; pick them over but do not remove 
stems. A lighter colored jelly may be obtained by using 
equal quantities of red and white currants. Wash, drain 
and mash with a wooden potato masher, a few at a time, 
in the bottom of the preserving kettle. When all are 
mashed, cook slowly until the color leaves the currants; 
strain through a coarse strainer and let juice drip through 
a double thickness of cheesecloth. Measure, heat to boil¬ 
ing point and cook 5 minutes; then add an equal meas¬ 
ure of heated sugar, boil 3 minutes; skim; test as in 
Apple Jelly and turn into glasses. Let stand 21 hours 
— preferably in a sunny window — then seal tops with 
melted Parowax. 

GRAPE JELLY 

Wash grapes and remove stems. Heat to boiling point 
in a preserving kettle over a low flame; mash and boil 30 
minutes; then strain and proceed as with Currant Jelly. 
Seal with Parowax. 


SPICED JELLY 


2 Tablespoons each of whole 
cloves and broken stick 
cinnamon. 


1 Peck grapes. 

1 Quart vinegar. 

6 Lbs. sugar. 

Put all but sugar into kettle and heat slowly. Cook 
until grapes are soft. Strain through a double thickness 
of cheesecloth and boil 20 minutes. Add sugar, boil 5 
minutes, test as for Apple Jelly and turn into glasses 
Seal with Parow ax. 




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SWEET PICKLED PEACHES OR PEARS 

Remove skins from fruit and cut in halves. Stick 2 
whole cloves in each piece of fruit and cook until soft in 
a syrup made by boiling together for 20 minutes 2 lbs. 
brown sugar, 1 pint vinegar and 1 ounce stick cinnamon. 
1 his amount of syrup will serve to cook 1 peck of fruit. 
Seal in glass jars with Parowax. 

SLICED TOMATO SWEET PICKLE 


1 Peck tomatoes. 
6 Onions. 

1 Quart vinegar. 


4 Lbs. brown sugar. 

2 Heaping tablespoons mixed 
whole spices. 


Put vinegar, sugar .and spices on to boil together. When 
boiling point is reached, add the prepared tomatoes and 
onions and eook until they are tender. To prepare to¬ 
matoes and onions, slice, sprinkle with salt and let stand 
overnight in an earthen dish or stone crock with a weight 
on top to aid in removing juice. In the morning, drain, 
scald in water to which some vinegar has been added, and 
drain again. 

VIRGINIA CHOW CHOW 

3 Heads cabbage. 
y . 2 Peck ripe tomatoes. 

]4 Peck green tomatoes. 

1 Yz Dozen onions. 

1 Tablespoon black 
pepper seed. 

1 Tablespoon 

Chop all finely; add 1 pint of fine salt and let stand 
overnight; then put in a wire basket to drain, after which 
put in kettle with spice; cover with vinegar and boil a 
few. minutes. 

CORN RELISH 

Chop 1 head of cabbage, sprinkle with salt and let stand 
1 hour. Boil 12 small ears of corn and cut the corn from 
the cob. To the corn add 4 large onions, 1 large or 2 
small red peppers, and chop all together; add chopped 


Dozen red and green pep¬ 
pers (seeds removed). 

2 Lbs. brown sugar. 

1 Teacup grated horseradish. 

1 Ounce tumeric. 

1 Ounce celery seed, 
ground mustard. 














































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cabbage and cover with a dressing made of U/2 quarts 
vinegar, 1 tablespoon mustard, 2 teaspoons salt, 1 table¬ 
spoon celery seed, 1 cup sugar. Let all come to a boil; 
then add 1 tablespoon Hour and 1 small teaspoon tumeric 
mixed together. Cook a few minutes. 

CHILI SAUCE 

9 Large ripe tomatoes. yi Cup sugar. 

2 Onions. 1 Cup vinegar. 

1 Green pepper. 1 Tablespoon salt. 

1 Teaspoon each of allspice, cinnamon, cloves and mustard. 

and green pepper, add tomatoes cut 


Chop 


onions 


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sugar, 


pieces and 
and spices and 
Parowax. 


salt 


and boil until thick; add vinegar, 
boil 5 minutes. Seal in glass jars with 


TOMATO CATSUP 

Put 2 quarts of ripe tomato pulp, 1 finely chopped 
onion, 2 tablespoons salt and 3 tablespoons brown sugar 
into a preserving kettle. Boil until thick; then push 
through a strainer, reserving nothing but seeds. Return 
it to stove, add 2 tablespoons ground mustard, 1 table¬ 
spoon each of allspice and cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ground 
cloves, 1 teaspoon cayenne, 1 grated nutmeg and 2 cups 
vinegar. Bring to a boil again and pour into bottles. 
The flavoring of catsup depends very largely on individual 
taste; more or less of condiments given may be used. Seal 
bottles with Parowax. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES NO. 1 

Fill j ars with small green cucumbers and pour over 
them 1 gallon strong cider vinegar, with which has been 
mixed 1 cup mustard and 1 cup salt. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES NO. 2 

Put 4 quarts small green cucumbers in a stone jar and 
pour over them 2 quarts boiling water in which 1 cup salt 
has been dissolved. Let stand 3 days; drain; bring brine 
to boiling point, pour over cucumbers, and again let stand 


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days; repeat process and then cook cucumbers in 1 gal¬ 
lon vinegar to which is added 4 red peppers, 2 sticks cin¬ 
namon, 2 tablespoons cloves and 2 tablespoons whole all¬ 
spice. Put pickles in stone jar and pour the remaining 
vinegar mixture over them. Divide the vinegar and pickles 
in order to cook a small quantity at a time. 


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Foods Prepared for the Sick. 

OATMEAL WATER 

Boil 2 quarts water and cool it; add 1 cup of oatmeal 
(riot rolled oats) and let stand in a warm place (about 
F.) 1 "*4 hours; then strain and cool. 

OATMEAL GRUEL 

Add V 2 cup coarse oatmeal and a little salt to 3 cups 
of boiling water. Cook in a double boiler three hours. 

If rolled oats be substituted for oatmeal, a little shorter 
time will be sufficient. Put through a strainer; add suf¬ 
ficient milk or cream to make it of the desired consistency 
and heat and strain again. 

CORNMEAL GRUEL 

Mix 2 tablespoons cornmeal with one tablespoon flour 
and a little salt; add enough water to make a thin mixture 
and stir into 1^4 pints of boiling water. Let it boil slowly 
1 hour if directly over the flame and dilute with milk; or 
it may be made with milk and cooked in a double boiler 
for 3% hours. 

Izl 

ARROWROOT GRUEL 

Use 1 teaspoon arrowroot to each half cup of boiling 
water. Mix with cold water to make a thin paste, adding 
a bit of salt; then add boiling water and cook 10 minutes. 
Cream or milk may be added if desired. 




71 — 












































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BEEF TEA 









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Secure 1 lb. steak from top of round; wipe, cut in small 
pieces, removing fat, and soak 15 minutes in 1 pint of 
cold water. Put meat and water in a glass fruit jar and 
cover jar. Place on a trivet in a kettle of cold water, allow' 
water to heat slowly, then cook for 3 hours. Strain, sea¬ 
son, and heat again before serving. 

CHICKEN OR MUTTON BROTH 

Clean and dry it or wipe mutton with a damp cloth. Cut 
in pieces, place in kettle with the bones, and cover with 
cold water. Let it heat gradually to boiling point; skim, 
and add salt and pepper. Cook slowly over a low' flame 
until meat is tender; then strain and remove fat. Heat 
again, add washed rice and cook until the rice is soft. 

There should be about 3 pints of stock from 1 chicken 
and to that amount of stock add 2 tablespoons rice. A 
little of the meat may be served with the mutton broth. 

BROILED IN BUTTERED PAPER 

• 

A lamb chop, beefsteak tenderloin, breast of chicken or 
a small boned bird may be broiled in buttered paper. Take 
a sheet of letter paper, butter it and place meat on one 
half of sheet, fold over the other half, bring edges together 
and fold all the edges three times. Place on the Perfec¬ 
tion Broiler and cook 10 minutes over a low flame, taking 
care that the paper does not burn. Season with salt, pep¬ 
per and butter, and serve on toast. 










































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