Skip to main content

Full text of "North Carolina Highway Bulletin Aprile 1925"

See other formats










APRIL, 1925 


A SAFE HIGHWAY—RALEIGH-WAKE FOREST ROAD 












Ask any 
Contractor 


Who Owns One 


The low overall height of the Smith 
Paver permits easy passage under 
raised city tracks. 

No page of road building history is complete without its 

ead of Smith Paver accomplishment. For years Smiths have 

\\h#en making records of speed, accuracy and endurance, and 

time and again they have proven by their economy of ope- 

ration and length of service that they are quality pavers 
without equal. 


Their low overall height, simple one-man control, speedy 
power discharge, full-length traction—all are features that 
mean efficiency in paver operation. 


The result is that the 
Smith is a paver the con- 
tractor wants. Not only is 
it simple and easy to 
handle, but it is ruggedly 
built to stand continuous 
heavy duty throughout a 
long life. 


Ask Any Contractor 
Who Owns One 





: —_ a 


There is no swperstructure to dis- 
mantle when shipping a Smith Paver. 
It clears all raiiroad trestles. 


The 1. L. Smith Company 


1058 32d St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


DisTRIBUTOR: 
AMERICAN HARDWARE & EQUIPMENT CO. 
Cuartorts, N. C. 

























s § \ \} \ 


What are Your Profits Going 
to be This Year? 





P&H with crane boom and grab bucket 


Many contractors could have increased their profits on last year’s 
jobs—many will resolve to replace inefficient equipment during 1925— 
reduce expensive delays—many will forget this, however, and go 
through another year with lower profits than they really should have. 

Some, however, will benefit—they will realize that new P & H. 
Corduroy Excavators, Shovels, Draglines, Cranes, Back-fillers, Trenchers, 
will save them money, speed up the work, lower maintenance costs. 


GET READY NOW 
How do you classify yourself—will you make an extra effort to 
revamp your equipment and put yourself in a position to become more 
permanently established in your business through more certain profits 
on every job? 


P & H Excavators will help you more than ever because competition 
makes close figuring necessary. And whether close figures are required 
or not—P & H equipment, economical, dependable day in and day out, 
puts dollars in your pocket. 


P & H has had 
the advantage of a 
greater number of 
years of actual ex- 
perience with gaso- 
line excavators—ev- 
ery part is time 
proven—every part 
has been put through 
the acid test of 
actual operation over 


long periods. 





Replacing the crane boom with shovel boom 

is a matter of only a few hours. The 

powerful crowding motion is an exclusive 
P&H development. 





HARNISCHFEGER CORPORATION 


Successor to 


PAWLING & HARNISCHFEGER CO, 


Excavating Machinery 
Division 
Established 1884 
3853 National Avenue 
MILWAUKEH, WIS. 


Sales Representative 





Tractor & Machinery 
Sales Co. 
RICHMOND, VA. 


P&H Dragline has many features which 
give wt vemarkable diyging capacity, long 
life and low maintenance, 




















NORTH CAROLINA 
HIGHWAY BULLETIN 















Vol. VI. No. 2 


H. K. WITHERSPOON, Editor 


April, 1925 








Unusual Features 07 Project No. 537-B 


By P. L. Fire, Resident Engineer 





HE Greensboro-Asheboro road, designated as 


State Highway Project No. 537-B, consisted of 
four miles of wornout asphalt macadam road adjoining 
the city of Greensboro. Just beyond this was six miles 
of newly constructed roadbed, the grading and drain- 
age of which was covered by Project No. 537-A, and 
was entirely a new location. The balance of the road 
was over the old topsoil road, ending at the Randolph 
County line. The total mileage of the whole project 
is twelve miles. 


be built without the usual difficulties encountered when 
using piles. When the structure is complete the tracks 
will be moved back, and the trains may proceed as be- 
fore. The excavation can then be completed and the 
paving connected on either side. 


The paving inside the city limits of Greensboro was 
done with the usual inspection of the State, and the 
work consisted of 1.3 miles of five-inch concrete base 
with a wearing surface of two-inch Topeka, a curb of 
granite, and a brick gutter, was used throughout. Nearly 





THE FINISHED RoApD 


The contract for this project was let to the Zieglar 
& Dalton Construction Company of Greensboro, and 
was dated July 3, 1924. The outstanding types of con- 
struction features of the work are as follows: 


The work inside of the city limits of Greensboro con- 
sisted of an underpass at the Atlantic & Yadkin Rail- 
road crossing on Elm Street. Due to the heavy rock 
excavation at this point, the idea of pile support for 
the track had to be abandoned, and after careful study 
of the situation, the track was detoured to about thirty- 
five feet south. The excavation has been completed on 
both sides of this detour track, and the structure will 


- 


DETOURED TRACK IN UPPER RIGHT HAND CORNER 


a half mile was thirty-five feet wide and the balance 
was thirty feet wide. This was poured in one operation. 
The materials and work over this section were covered 
exclusively by the city of Greensboro specifications, and 
all necessary engineering was handled by the State 


residency at Greensboro. 


From the city limits of Greensboro to the Randolph 
County line the drainage was handled by reinforced 
concrete pipe, and reinforced. concrete structures. . The 
pavement was of the 8-7-8-inch section 18 feet wide, with 
the aggregate mix of 1-2-4, and the full width of road- 
way, through cuts was 35 feet, and on fills 30 feet. 


4 Nortu Carouina Highway BULLETIN 


The rough grading was handled with wheeler gangs, 


with the exception of the underpass, where an Erie 
shovel and dump wagons were used. 

Approximately thirty days after the signing of the 
eontract Mixer No. 1 started pouring concrete. The 
first twenty-five days this mixer averaged 575 lineal 
feet per day. Just two months later Mixer No. 2 was 
started about three miles from Greensboro, and pro- 
ceeded in that direction; when this mixer arrived at 
the city limits the city had the street torn up and the 
installation of water and sewers was in progress. Rather 
than lay off the experienced crew of this mixer, the con- 
tractor requested permission to operate Mixer No. 1 at 
night with this crew; the permission was granted on 
October 20 and proceeded until December 13. Thus the 
day and night shifts with this mixer poured 16,511 
lineal feet in 17 days, averaging about a mile every six 


days. One unusual feature of this work was the con- 


tinuous pouring of 5,226 lineal feet without the use of 
a construction joint, made possible by the night and day 
shifts starting and stopping within a few minutes of 
each other. The actual time for the pouring of all con- 
erete, including the widened portion in Greensboro, was 
only four months and eleven days. 

There were but four material stock piles over this 
twelve-mile stretch. Bins holding sand and stone were 
used and loaded by Koehring cranes, two five-bag batch 
trucks were used to haul and load the 21E Koehring 


mixers. 


The coarse aggregate was furnished locally and a. 


large portion was shipped in from the Harris Granite 
Co., Stacy, N. C., and the R. G. Lassiter Co., Summer- 
ville, N. C. The fine aggregate was shipped in by the 
West End Sand Co., West End, N. C. The cement was 
furnished exclusively by the Lehigh Portland Cement 
Co., Lehigh, Pa. 


Fire Destroys Truck Repair Shop 


A disastrous fire which occurred about noon on Satur- 
day, April 4, completely destroyed the truck repair shop 
of the State Highway Commission’s motor equipment 
depot located about four miles west of Raleigh on Route 
10. But for the efficient work of some of the employees 
at the depot and of the Raleigh Fire Department some 
of the other units of the depot would undoubtedly have 





SHED WHICH WAS DESTROYED 


been destroyed, thus entailing a much more serious loss. 
Flames were discovered bursting through the side of 
the building shortly after noon when practically all of 
the force had left the depot. Due to the combustible 
nature of the contents of the building, the flames gained 


rapid headway and within a few minutes after the fire 
was discovered the whole building was a veritable fur- 


nace. 


The building, a view of which is shown on this page, 
was formerly used as an aeroplane hanger during the 
war when Camp Polk was situated near the present 
site of the garage. 
cost to the State except for the labor involved. The 
metal sheathing was supported by a wooden framework 
which gave way and precipitated the building to the 
ground. It was the only building of the number com- 
posing the depot which was not fireproof. 

As stated the building was used as a repair shop for 
trucks used in State maintenance and at the time of 
its destruction contained sixteen trucks of which num- 
ber three were saved through the efforts of the em- 
ployees. Five of the trucks were to have been sent out 
in the State the following week. Explosion of the gas- 
oline tanks and several acetylene gas tanks aided the 
flames in their destructive work. There was practically 
no machinery in the building, the greatest loss in this 
respect being the tools of the mechanics. 

As soon as the debris had cooled sufficiently to be 
handled, a force of State convicts was put to work clear- 
ing it away. Measurements have been made and plans 


will be drawn up-immediately for a building of fire- 


proof construction. 

The total loss is estimated at $25,000 though the ac- 
tual loss is not that much as the building and practically 
all of its contents was turned over to the State under 
the Surplus War Materials Act. Repair work on the 
trucks will not be held up as temporary quarters in 
some other section of the garage will be used. 


The building was erected without. 


roa 











North Carouina Hicuway BuLueETIN . 5 





Laboratory Control of Concrete Materials 


By Franx 8S. Prironertr, Physical Testing Engineer 


LL materials entering into any concrete work 
under the specifications of the North Carolina 
State Highway Commission are tested at the Concrete 
Laboratory of the Highway Commission at Raleigh. 
The Conerete Laboratory has been located on the Cary 
road adjoining the Mechanical Department four and 
one-half miles from Raleigh, but lately has been moved 
to new quarters on the first floor of the main offices of 
the Highway Commission. It is found that in the new 
location a closer coordination of the work is obtained 
and a more economic operation will result. During the 
three and one-half years the present Concrete Labora- 
tory has been functioning a number of situations have 
arisen which are peculiar to a highway organization and 
program of this size. The State is divided into nine 
districts, each with a district office and a corps of engi- 
neers, headed by a district engineer. This system has 
been found to work out very satisfactorily, but for the 
sake of standardization of all testing methods, as well 
as economy, one concrete laboratory does all the 
testing of concrete materials for the entire State. 
No doubt but that this is the best arrangement, but 
when it is considered that the most outlaying project 
is located four hundred and seven miles from the Con- 
erete Laboratory the necessity for a very close and ef- 
ficient contact between the Concrete Laboratory and 
the various projects will be realized. An average dis- 
tance for all projects can be assumed as one hundred 
miles and this, taken with a maximum of one hundred 
and twenty-five projects under construction at one time, 
shows the necessity of there being no delay in the test- 
ing of samples or in transmitting the results of tests to 
the district and resident engineers. The Concrete Lab- 
oratory is operated with two ideas in mind, first, keep- 
ing all doubtful or unsuitable materials out of the work, 
and second, to approve or reject all materials with the 
least possible delay to construction. 
I will outline briefly the manner in which the quality 
of the various materials is controlled. 


Cement 


Each car or part car of cement is tested before it is 
allowed for use. To expedite this testing certain ap- 
proved commercial laboratories represent the Highway 
Commission at all of the cement mills manufacturing 
cement for use in Highway Commission work. LEacl: 
car is sampled and sealed with N. C. S. H. C. seals, 
bearing a distinguishing number immediately prior to 
shipment. These samples are tested at once. Prelim- 
inary tests in all cases and preliminary and seven-day 
tests in most cases are available before the cars have 
arrived at the project. Provided these tests are satis- 


factory the resident engineer is instructed that this par- 
ticular car of cement may be allowed for use. Im the 
event of any doubtful or unsatisfactory test results the 
resident engineer is instructed to withhold that car from 
use but to allow it to be stored in a satisfactory store- 
house and to immediately forward a check sample to 
the Concrete Laboratory at Raleigh. If this sample 
passes all requirements the cement is used, but in the 
case of any failure it is definitely rejected and required 
to be removed from the project to avoid its being con- 


fused with any subsequent shipments which are satis- 


factory and might be stored for other reasons than 
doubtful quality. 

From time to time check tests are made on the com- 
mercial laboratories, representing the Highway Commis- 
sion, by means of check tests made by the Concrete 
Laboratory on cement already tested by them. It is 
eratifying to note that in practically all cases essentially 
the same results have been secured. 

When any cement is stored on the project for a period 
of time greater than threé months, or for any reason 
does not appear to be satisfactory, a representative sam- 
ple is required to be submitted from each two hundred 
barrels and these samples must be tested and approved 
before the represented cement is allowed to be used. 
This is required even though the cement had passed all 
the necessary tests when first put in storage. 

In this connection it is interesting to note that the 
standard brands of cement as manufactured today can 
be stored, without any loss in strength, for periods in 
excess of five years. For a period as great as this, how- 


ever it is necessary to provide absolutely ideal storage 


conditions—perfectly dry and practically air-tight. <A 


ground, covered inside and out with a good grade of 
roofing paper, no air spaces at the eaves and with 
closely-fitting doors, is recommended for cement storage. 

Sand 

The native sands of North Carolina are, with the 
exception of a number of good deposits, of a poor quality 
for eonecrete work. This is especially true in the Pied- 
mont and mountain sections. This condition has re- 
quired an exceptionally large amount of sand testing 
to be carried on by the Conerete Laboratory. When 
tested by the standard tension tests it is found that 
approximately ninety per cent of the available sources 
of sand are of doubtful quality, requiring them to be 
rejected entirely or used only with an increase in the 
cement content of the concrete to protect its resulting 
strength and to keep it up to the standard requirements. 
However, it has been possible through a considerable 


— 


iets frame building set at least eighteen inches off the 





(Continued on page 8) 


6 Nortu Carouina Hicoway BULLETIN 


cs 


egy felix 





PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION 
RALEIGH, NoRTH CAROLINA 


H. K. WitTHERSPOON, Editor 


COMMISSION 
RRANK “PAGE CHGINMOAN Ro eee oe See enn ere Raleigh 
Js) Be (CAMERON « aioe atcen oie tcceeetels soe) storey epeva neta eas nome ented Kinston 
JG. CSTIKELEATHERS set sos + taba elakee are sear ere its Asheville 
WA. FART Me ees esis. © cs abstaaes anauete ra terete cuteats uae ones Tarboro 
W.T A. MOGERT Fad tatyte ace osc siege eisbetepetateres sratere oveke feraione Wilmington 
JouNn SPRUNT PHIL] -4-6 eee SEE Pe ee Rane eee Durham 
J SEL W OOD CORE Sor cic seis ores onctatereley Siete chem evaehmrnna ate ys High Point 
Wi Cor, WHLEGINSON Seek eisteteccs cn cae onto cs eect eee een Charlotte 
ASS. TLANES fas .o tise a eeie «5. tere Oe eee ore Winston-Salem 
ASM. KiSPiBRpis cis cbse tte cake vate + toes es reat eres s Morganton 
CHAS. M. UpHAam, State Highway Hngineer........... Raleigh 


Address all communications in regard to BuLierrn to the 
Editor, Box 1140, Raleigh, N. C. 


This BULLETIN will be sent gratis to any State or county 
official, contractor, newspaper, trade publication, library, or 
other person interested in the improvement of roads and in 
the work of the Commission. Advertising rates may be ob- 
tained on application. 


No. 2 


Volume VI April, 1925 
Table of Contents 
€ 

Unusual Features on Project No. 587-B___________- 3 
Fire: Destroys Truck Repair Shop et _ i222. 2 4 
Laboratory Control of Concrete Materials_____-___ 9) 
Kiditorial go. 7) 92). oes ee ae eae ee ee 6 
Projects Awarded=March ‘24thies- 922 oe ome 7 
Twenty Projects Advertised for May 5th___________ 11 
Charles Ross Appointed Highway Attorney_______-_ Ai 
Motoristss=Shy) at dee ot Higiwayes ss. een eee 12 
Cohoon Retires :As “Attorney- 22.5) 1 eee ees 12 
Status of State Work in North Carolina___________ 13 
Advertisements: s 252... sae) os, eee ee ee 21 


Editortal 
¢ 


Safeguarding the highway for the motorist is one of 
the important branches of highway work. The illus- 
tration on the cover this month is typical of the method 
This 


particular installation of wire guard rail is on Route 50 


used in this State to prevent wrecks on curves. 


near Raleigh. 
0 


During the four years that he served as Attorney for 
the State Highway Commission, Walter L. Cohoon filled 
the position with eminent satisfaction to those with whom 
he came in contact. An able lawyer, he was also a man 
who made friends and it is regretted that his connection 
with the Commission was terminated through certain 
legislation enacted by the General Assembly recently 
adjourned. His successor, Mr. Charles Ross, is also a 
capable attorney of wide experience and a man of pleas- 
ing personality and the Editor feels sure that Mr. Ross 
will find all of the engineers of the Commission glad to 
cooperate with him in his work. 


O 


The testing of concrete materials is of vital importance 
to the life of paved roads and concrete bridges. Every 
bit of the materials entering into North Carolina roads 


is carefully tested as described in the article on page 5. 
0) 

With the opening of Spring highway construction will 

go forward rapidly and within the next two months a 


large mileage of paved roads will be put under construc- 
tion so as to take advantage of the working season. 


i 


This department will be glad to furnish information 
as to routes and road conditions to those contemplating 
trips. It is requested that a stamped envelope be en- 


closed for reply. Address requests to the Editor. 


0 


The letting of May 5th will require the expenditure 
of approximately $3,570,000 according to preliminary 
estimates and will be one of the largest lettings yet 
held. Indications point to a large number of bidders. 
The following letting will be held in the early part of 
June. 


7 














Nortu CaroLtinA Hicuoway BULLETIN 





Projects Awarded March 24th 





Contracts for 43.8 miles of concrete paving, 6.6 miles 
of topsoil road, 29.2 miles. of erading, and one under- 
pass were recently awarded as a result of the letting 
held March 24th when seventy-five bids were received on 
the ten projects advertised. The contracts awarded 
represent an expenditure of approximately $1,881,362, 
a portion of which will come out of the twenty million 
dollar bond issue authorized by the General Assembly 
just adjourned. In detail the projects let were as 
follows: 


Projects Nos. 161-297, Nash and Wilson counties, 
consisting of grading, draining and paving 12.77 miles 
on Route 40 between Wilson and Rocky Mount, were 
awarded to the Highway Engineering and Contracting 
Co., of Selbyville, Del., for grading and paving with 
plain conerete on a bid of $393,202. Structures on the 
same project were let to Peterson & Harnhardt, of 
Durham, for $13,830. 


Project No. 215, Craven County, consisting of fine 
erading and paving 10.77 miles on Route 10 between 
Croatan and Havelock was awarded to the Virginia 
Engineering Company, of Newport News, Va., for pav- 
ing with plain conerete on a bid of $277,520. 

Project No. 448, Lee County, consisting of grading, 
draining and topsoiling 6.62 miles on Route 60 between 
Sanford and Cumnock, was awarded to C. B. Hester, 
of Greensboro, on a bid of $48,548, while the structures 
on the same project were let to Peterson & Earnhardt, 
of Durham, for $18,951. 


Project No. 487-A, Wake County, grading 6.57 miles 
on Route 90 between Raleigh and Wakefield, was let 


to C. B. Hester, of Greensboro, for $52,311. Structures 
on the same project, including a bridge over Neuse 
River, were let to the Roanoke Iron and Bridge Works, 
of Roanoke, Va., on a bid of $77,471. 

Project No. 537-C, Guilford County, an underpass on 


Project No. 537, was awarded to the Roanoke Iron and 
Bridge Works on a bid of $19,564. 


Project No. 720-C, Caldwell County, fine grading and 
paving 12.61 miles on Route 17 between Lenoir and 
Granite Falls was awarded to Thompson-Caldwell Com- 
pany, of Cherryville, N. C., for plain concrete paving, 
on a bid of $318,352. 

Project No. 753-C, Stokes County, grading and plain 
eonerete paving on 3.44 miles on Route 89 between 
Walnut Cove and Fulp was awarded to George R. 


Martin, of Salisbury, on a bid of $99,137. 


Grading on Project No. 824, Cleveland County, 10.19 
miles on Route 20 between-Shelby and Ellenboro was 
awarded to BE. A. Wood & Co., of Andrews, N. C., for 
$60,871; while the structures on the same project were 
awarded to H. A. Wood & Co., of Andrews, N. C., for 
$69,284. 


Concrete paving on Project No. 915-A, Cherokee 
County, 8.62 miles on Route 10 between Andrews and 
Murphy was awarded to the Appalachian Construction 
Company, of Knoxville, Tenn., for $223,963. 

Paving on Project No. 915-B, Cherokee County, 8.35 
miles on Route 10, also between the above named towns, 
was awarded to R. H. Wright & Son, of Dillsboro, for 
$208,358. 








GENERAL VIEW OF STATE ProgEct No. 148-B, OVER THE CHOWAN RIVER NEAR WINTON ON RovUTE 30 


The bridge which is 761 feet in length, consists of twenty spans 30 feet in length and one draw span 158 feet in length. 
The Roanoke Iron and Bridge Company are contractors for this work which is being carried on under the supervision 


of P. Y. K. Howat, Resident Engineer. 
complete, will cost in round figures $148,500. 


The bridge, whichwas begun April 15, 1924, and is now approximately 95 per cent 
It is expected that the bridge will be opened to traffic about June ist. 


8 NortH Carotina Highway BULLETIN 





Laboratory Control of Concrete Materials 


(Continued from page 5) 


amount of laboratory research to adopt as standard a. 


comprehensive concrete test in three inch by six inch 
cylinders which more accurately determines the quality 
of the sand and its subsequent performance in actual 
construction than the previous standard test using’ a sand 











Figure 2 (See text) 


cement mortar and testing in tension. The new method 
of testing sand, fig. 1, has been in use three years and a 
great number of sands. which would otherwise be re- 
jected or require an expensive increase in the cement 
content have been allowed for use without endangering 
the quality of the resulting concrete. It has been esti- 
mated that the saving to the Highway Commission ef- 





fected by this method of testing has more than paid the 
operating expenses of the Concrete Laboratory. 

It has been necessary to classify all sources of sand, 
according to quality and amount of production, in order 
to avoid unnecessary testing of sources of good, uniform 
quality and to concentrate on the testing of sources which 
show results very close to the minimum requirements 


and of which the quality is doubtful. 

A source classified as “Commercial’’ is 
one of good quality and from which the 
production is large enough to justify 
the expense of the Highway Commission 
maintaining an inspector at the plant. 
This inspector has had previous training 
in the Conerete Laboratory and is at the 
plant during all the time it is in opera- 
tion. His duties are to inspect the opera- 
tion of the plant, as well as to pass on 
the sand produced by the plant for ship- 
ment to State work. A check on the 
quality is made by means of samples 
which are submitted to the Concrete 
Laboratory at stated periods. All ears 
accepted by the inspector are sealed with 
N. C. 8S. H. C. seals which show to the 
resident engineer on the project to which 
that car is shipped that it has been ac- 
cepted and may be allowed for imme- 
diate use. In addition the inspector 
sends to the resident engineer a postcard 
giving the car number, the seal number, 
and the date of shipment. In this man- 
ner there is absolutely no delay or doubt 
as to the acceptability of the material. 

There is another class of commercial 
souree at which no inspector is main- 
tained on account of the production not 
justifying the expense. In eases of this 
kind a representative of the Concrete 
Laboratory visits the source and takes 
a number of samples representative of 
the available material. In the event that 
these samples pass the requirements the 
producer is allowed to ship to State work 
and each car is inspected by the resident 
engineer on arrival at the project and 
weekly check samples are submitted. 
The results of these samples are watched 
closely and charted so that the general 
trend of the quality of the sand from 
that source may be observed. If any falling off in quality 
is noted a sample is required from each car and that 
car is not allowed for use until seven-day results are 
available. 

In some eases it is economy to use sand from a deposit 
near by the work under construction and a slightly dif- 
ferent arrangement is necessary. Test holes on twenty- 

















atts fod 7 





Norte Carouina Highway BULLETIN 


five centers are dug over the deposit or that part which 
will be used and one sample from each test hole. In this 
manner it is possible to either reject or accept all or a part 
of the deposit. Provided the samples are satisfactory the 
material is allowed to be removed and may be used with- 
out further testing other than oecasional check samples. 

The last source of sand is probably smallest in total 
production but requires more testing than all other 
sources taken together. It is classed as ‘‘local sand”’ 
and is covered in the Highway Commission specifica- 
tions by the ‘‘local sand requirements.’’ This class is 
usually a comparatively small deposit of doubtful qual- 
ity and generally located in the beds of streams. Stream 
bed sand is in most cases of very ununiform quality, 
changing overnight or with every rain of any amount. 
In using sand of this nature it is required to be removed 
and placed in stock piles of convenient size and repre- 


sentative samples are taken from each two hundred — 


and fifty cubic yards. These stock piles are not allowed 


for use until the samples are tested and seven-day tests - 


completed. A separate ruling is made for each sample 
and, while an effort is made to keep these rulings uni- 
form, it is generally necessary to make different re- 
quirements for each stock pile on account of the ununi- 
formity of the material. This has caused considerable 
‘misunderstanding in the past between the field and 
Laboratory as the ununiformity in the material cannot 
be picked out by a visual inspection. Lately, however, 
this situation has been considerably improved by an 





Figure 1 
explanation of each particular case rather than a rou- 
tine notification of the test results. 


Stone 

It seems that where nature has given North Carolina 
a poor supply of concrete sand she has made up for it 
in an abundant stock of stone suitable for use in con. 
crete. There are of course a number of deposits un- 
suitable and certain localities, particularly in the eastern 
section, where suitable stone cannot be found. 

There is a considerable number of large and small 
commercial quarries in the State which furnish a good 
grade of concrete stone. Inspectors are not maintained 


9 


at stone quarries, but a check is made on the quality of 
stone from each source by means of samples submitted 
from the material after it is received on the job or by 
samples taken directly from the quarries by a repre- 
sentative of the Concrete Laboratory. 

There are two features which govern the acceptability 
of stone for use as coarse aggregate in concrete—quality 
and grading. The Highway Commission has experi- 





FIGURE 3 


enced very little trouble ‘with the actual grading of 
stone after the quality has been passed upon. It has 
been found that. practically all stone producers make 
an exceptional effort to furnish stone which will meet 
the State specifications. There have been cases where, 
due to stockpiling or handling several times, segregation 
has oceurred which has necessitated adjustment. It 1s 
very difficult to accurately sample a large amount of 
stone so that the grading of the sample will truly rep- 
resent the grading of the represented amount. . For this 
reason each resident engineer has been furnished with 
a set of screens and the necessary equipment to make 
field grading tests. In this manner a greater number 
of tests can be made at closer intervals.and any de- 
parture from the grading specifications.can be corrected 


at once without waiting for results from a sample for- 


warded to the Laboratory. Check tests, however, are 
made at the Laboratory whenever requested and a rep- 
resentative of the Laboratory has visited each resident 
engineer and standardized the method of making the 
field grading tests. Where pebbles are used as coarse 
ageregate the situation is handled in the same manner 
except in some cases where pebbles are shipped from a _ 
source which also supplies sand, and at which an in- 
spector is maintained. In this event the sand inspector 
also passes on the ears of pebbles and when received 
with his official N. C. 8. H. C. they may be used without 
further testing unless segregation occurs in. handling 
which is taken care of in the same manner. in which 
stone is handled. ; 

Water 
Samples of water to be used in mixing and curing 
concrete are required to be submitted from each source 


10 


NortH Carouina Highway BULLETIN 





proposed for use by the resident engineer. These sam- 
ples are tested by means of physical tests for any erratic 
action, as well as chemically to determine the presence 
of any deleterious impurities. In only a very few cases 
has a sufficient quantity of impurities been found which 
would cause any harmful results. 


Reinforcing Steel 


’ Several plans have been used at various times in 
securing tests on all reinforcing steel. The method now 
in effect, and which appears to function most satisfac- 
torily, is that of employing a commercial laboratory to 
represent the State at the point of manufacture of the 
steel. In this manner all shipments are accepted be- 
fore they are released and no delay results in submitting 
samples and testing after the reinforcing steel arrives 
at the project. A check is made on this commercial 


MACHINE FoR TESTING SAND (See text, page 8) 


laboratory by means of testing, at the Raleigh Labora- 
tory, from time to time, several samples of steel from 
shipments which have already been accepted by the 
commercial laboratory. No discrepancies have been 
found in any of the test results. All steel-is subject to 
the visual inspection of the resident engineer before use. 
If steel is stored on the project and rusts to any extent 
it is required to be brushed thoroughly with wire brushes 
before being used. 


Roadway Cores 


The laboratory determinations made on drilled road- 
way cores are rather interesting as they are the final 





check on all previous tests made on the materials as 
well as manipulation entering into the work. The High- 
way Commission maintains a portable core drilling out- 
fit (fig. 2) which takes cores from all sections of hard- 
surface roadway before the final estimate is paid. The 
cores are drilled at stated intervals along the roadway 
from both the center and sides. Each core is numbered 
and indicated on a location sketch and forwarded to 
the Concrete Laboratory. The core is then cleaned and 
accurately measured for height with a special measur- 
ing device. The height or length of the core is essen- 
tially an exact measurement of the thickness of the 
pavement at the point from which the core is drilled. 
This measuring device has been developed in the Con- 
erete Laboratory after a large number of experiments 
had been made to find the most accurate method.  Re- 
cently sixty cores were drilled from a certain project 
and were measured in the regular manner on this de- 
vice. Several days later they were remeasured and it 
was found that the two averages of all cores checked 
within three one-thousandths of an inch. 

After being measured the cores are capped top and 
bottom with a standard brand of aluminous cement and 
broken in the standard testing machine (fig. 3). The 
pounds per square inch compressive strength is com- 
puted from the total load sustained. This strength is, 
therefore, an exact indication of the strength and quality 
of the pavement from which the core was drilled. While 
the Highway Commission does not specify any certain 
required strengths for cores the results from these cores 
have been on inestimable value in choosing the best ma- 
terials and avoiding those which have a tendency to 
lower the quality of the concrete. 


Field Specimens 

In some of the larger bridge projects the resident 
engineer has been furnished with sufficient laboratory 
equipment to allow him to make 6x12 inch concrete 
cylinders at the project. Several of these cylinders are 
made each day that concrete is being poured and are so 
made that they will accurately represent the strength 
of the complete structure. Samples of the concrete are 
taken as it comes from the mixer and this concrete is 
made into the cylinder moulds according to standard uni- 
form methods. These cylinders are left for twenty- 
four hours to harden and are then removed from the 
moulds and given the same storage or curing conditions 
that the part of the structure of which they are repre- 
sentative will receive. At about twenty-four days they 
are removed from storage, packed in damp sand and 
shipped to the Concrete Laboratory for compressive 
tests at the age of twenty-eight days. The progress of 
the work can be followed in this manner and the exact 
quality of the concrete being poured can be followed. 
In several cases it has been possible, by this method, to 
make certain adjustments in the manipulation and the 
character of the materials and a concrete of considerably 
higher strength has been secured at no increased cost. 











Nortu Caroiina Hicguway BuLueEtin 11 





Twenty Projects Advertised for May 5th 


Bids will be opened on May 5th on twenty projects, 
totaling 179.12 miles, on 104.6 miles of which bids will 
be asked for hard-surfacing. This is one of the largest, 
if not the largest, lettings that have been held since the 
present highway program began. 

The following projects will be offered for letting: 

First District 

Project No. 105-C, Beaufort County, five miles of 
16-foot pavement between Washington and Pantego. 

Project No. 105-E, Beaufort County, ten miles grad- 
ing and structures between end of Project No. 105-C and 
Pantego. 

Project No. 107-C, Bertie County, 4.46 miles of 16- 
foot hard-surface between Windsor and Aulander. 

Project No. 128, Edgecombe County, 18.13 miles of 
grading and bridges, between Tarboro and Pitt County 
line on Route 12. 

Project No. 181, Perquimans County, 3.5 miles of 
hard-surface, closing gap in pavement between Hert- 
ford and Elizabeth City. 

Second District 

Project No. 235, Johnston County, grading and 
bridges on 12.7 miles of Route 10 from Smithfield east 
to the Wayne County line. 

Project No. 283, Wayne County, 9.38 miles of 18-foot 
hard-surface from Goldsboro to the Johnston County 
line on Route 10. 
Third District 

Project No. 310, Brunswick County, five miles of 
sand-asphalt on Route 201, between Wilmington and 
Southport. 

Project No. 396, Robeson County, eleven miles grad- 
ing and structures, between Fayetteville and Lumber- 
ton on Route 21. 

Fourth District 

Project No. 450, Lee County, four miles of hard-sur- 

-face from Sanford north to intersection of Routes 50 


and 53. Project No. 488-B, Wake County, 4.74 miles 
of hard surface from Wendell to the Franklin County 
line. 


Fifth District 

Project No. 534, Guilford County, 7.6 miles of hard- 
surface between Guilford College and the Forsyth 
County line on Route 60. 

Project No. 564, Moore County, ten miles of sand- 
asphalt between the Hoke County line and Pinehurst on 
Route 70. 

Project No. 565, Moore County, seven miles of sand- 
asphalt between Southern Pines and Lakeview on 
Route 50. 

Project No. 581, Randolph County, 15.2 miles grading 
and bridges between Asheboro and the Montgomery 
County line on Route 70. 


Sixth District 
Project No. 609, Anson County, 7.5 miles grading, 
structures and topsoil surfacing from Lilesville to the 
Pee Dee River on Route 20. 
Project No. 660, Mecklenburg County, 10.4 miles of 


hard-surface between Charlotte and Mount Holly, on 
Route 27. 


Seventh District 
Project No. 746, Forsyth County, 12.1 miles of hard- 


surface between Winston-Salem and the Stokes County 
line on Route 66. 


Ninth District 
Project No. 953-B, Jackson County, 12.72 miles of 
paving or macadam between Dillsboro and the Macon 
County line on Route 285. 
Project 967, Macon County, 8.69 miles of paving or 
macadam between Franklin and the Jackson County line 
toward Dillsboro on Route 285. 


Charles Ross Appointed Highway Attorney 


Mr. Charles Ross, of Lillington, has been appointed 
Assistant Attorney-General and assigned to the State 
Highway Commission under the provisions of the act 
passed by the General Assembly of 1925 abolishing the 
office of attorney to the Highway Commission and placing 
the work under the Attorney-General. Mr. Ross succeeds 
Mr. Walter L. Cohoon who very pb served as attorney 
for the past four years. 

Mr. Ross, who was candidate for A Hories Geneeals in 
the last election, was born in Randolph County in 1878 
and was educated at the Asheboro High School, the State 


University, and the Law School of George Washington 
University. During 1903-4 he was private secretary 
to Congressman R. N. Page. In 1905 he moved to Har- 
nett County and has since practiced his profession at 
Lillington. - He was chairman of the school board, for 
Six years county attorney, for twelve years chairman of 
the County Democratic Executive Committee, twice a 
member of General Assembly, chairman of the County 
Council of National Defense and -Food Administrator 
during the World War, and State manager for Robt. N. 
Page in his campaign for Governor in 1920. 


12 Nortuy CarouinA Highway BULLETIN 





Motorists Shy at Edge of Highway—Truck 
Drivers Not Road Hogs 


Does the average motor car driver keep to the right 
of the road as far as possible or crowd over to the middle? 
The United States Bureau of Public Roads finds that the 
answer to the question is affected by the width of the 
road, curves, grades, slope of road surface, and con- 
dition of the surface adjacent to the pavement. This 
conclusion is based on observations of the habits of 
drivers on highways of various kinds, widths, and lo- 
cation. Points were selected for observation and the 
width of the pavement was marked off with white paint 
into one-foot sections so that the position of passing 
vehicles could be observed. 

In most cases the cars were not passing other vehicles 
at the instant of observation. The investigation, there- 
fore, indicates the road position preferred by the average 
driver. Few automobile drivers prefer a position closer 
to the edge of pavement than 214 feet and on meeting 
other cars the average driver will sacrifice clearance 
rather than drive closer to the edge than he instinctively 
feels to be safe. 

Truck drivers who, as a class, are sometimes accused 
of being road hogs are found by the bureau to be not 
guilty. Most of them were observed to drive a foot 


with a reasonable amount of clearance. 


closer to the edge of the pavement than drivers of motor 
cars and under all circumstances they adhered more 
closely to the side of the road. 

Eighteen feet is found to be the minimum width of 
roadway which will permit passenger vehicles and trucks 
driven in the preferential positions to pass in safety and 
This will allow 
a distance of 2.7 feet between the outer wheel and the 
edge of the road for automobiles and 1.8 feet for trucks 
with 1.9 feet clearance between vehicles. 

Observations on curves showed that there is a general 
tendency to shift to the inside of the curve, particularly 
by the traffic moving on the outside. Improper banking 
of the road surface, poor shoulders and steep embank- 
ments on the outside of the curve all tend to make 
drivers crowd to the inside. White lines in the center 
of the road were found to be very effective in keeping 
traffic in its proper channel. 

A report on the investigation has been issued by the 
bureau and it is felt that the data will be helpful to 
engineers in deciding on road widths and other problems 
of road design. 


Cohoon Retires as Attorney 


The passage of legislation by the General Assembly 
of 1925 which consolidated all legal activities of the 
various State departments under the office of the 
Attorney-General automatically terminated the position 
of Attorney for the State Highway. Commission, which 
was created under the provisions of the Doughton- 
Connor-Bowie Act of 1921, and which for the past four 
years has been most capably filled by Walter L. Cohoon 
of Hlizabeth City. By his personality as a man and 
his ability as a lawyer, Mr. Cohoon has won the friend- 
ship and commanded the highest respect of those with 
whom he worked during the period of his office. It is 
regretted that his term is at an end by reason of the 
law mentioned above. 

The high esteem in which Mr. Cohoon was held by 
members of the State Highway Commission is evidenced 
by the following resolution which was unanimously 
adopted at the meeting on April 1: 


Mr. Cohoon goes back to Elizabeth City to resume 
his private practice of law. 


Whereas, The General Assembly of North Carolina, in the 
regular session of 1925, enacted legislation codrdinating and 
consolidating the various activities of the State Government 
to the end that the several activities might be grouped into 
certain departments logically organized to perform the re- 
quired statutory duties; and 

Whereas, This new legislation produced the effect of auto- | 
matically vacating the position of Attorney to the State 
Highway Commission by transferring all legal activities of 
every branch of the State government to the office of the 
Attorney General; and, 

Whereas, the position of Attorney to the State Highway 
Commission has been filled the past four years by Walter L. 
Cohoon of Elizabeth City: Now, therefore, be it 


Resolved, That the State Highway Commission of North 
Carolina, in regular session, assembled, does, as a whole and 
individually, recognize in Mr. Cohoon a professional and pub- 
lic service of commanding fidelity and efficiency; that through 
him its legal affairs have been administered most capably; 
that his demeanor has been uniformly courteous, eminently 
fair and at all times reflecting a high order of integrity; that 
it is with profound and sincere regret that his tenure is now, 
by operation of law, terminated. 











Nortu Caroitina Hicnway Butietin oe sent 13 














STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA 


Projects Under Construction 





oljea_"N“#70awwhalaaNaaaooooqQqQeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ee — 








NO. COUNTY LENGTH }. TYPE 
102 iBeaukorbes se =e 8.62 Graded |$ 
OfAMMEDeAULOLL Me nee sl seme roe Recon. Br. 
POA NM DeAWiOrietee == See lon. eee Recon. Br 
HOG |p berties. 2 ee= = 5.00 ARG 
LOBee le Bertier. 2 es 12.00 PGs 
ita Gamden® ose cece 5.39 Graded 
113B Chowan 2.2225. 2220 pe Ace 
117 Curritpucke see 6.43 Graded 
118 Gurritueks-2222c2l) 3.40 ae Se 
119 Garrick =a 29.90 AE Se 
122 DD) arene ce an 9.00 Graded 
124 Ay iidsceconibesee se= 1s2 eee. Recon. Br. 
126{F 4! Edgecombe..--.--| 7.72 | P. C. 
128p | Edgecombe. --_.-_-_|-------- Bridge 
131. Caress ae ee 15. 95 aS Ss 
133 Gates- Pasquotank _| 14. 07 Gravel 
134 Garces Aa 16.65 aS 
136 (Fle its xe er 15.31 aS 
138B | Northampton- 

Pinlitaxcens Soo e lees 2-5) Bridge 
47 Deeleelertiord= 22.2. 2- 8.98 PG: 
148 ifertiord-Gates==. |=. s2s—=- Bridge 
149 CER Ord eee ae 4.95 of es) 
152 Ebvidesse=2 on oe 10.89 Sets 
156 Mantinieen- = 2) 17.51 Graded 
168 Northampton- ---- 16. 30 Si 
170 Mormsmpton.....|-=-cs=-- Recon. Br. 
172 Pasguctank... ..-.|-.-s==-~- Recon. Br. 
186 Perquimans ------ 9. 96 Pe Cy 
1850} Fe i 23 ng 14.35 | 

164 

187/F A (Di ie >i! 4,48 aC 
Boo Lyre e. + RA se 8 Se Recon. Br. 
205 (Gipnyaih 2 2. ee Bee Recon. Br. 
ADA || LOR eee oe an re Br. 
206 Cravens. - = ee sere cee Recon. Br. 
212 (CHER A te ee 10.76 Graded 
213 Tet Rigi ww eee 10. 48 ea Ge 
221 F : EU Vite apa ereean 5) Se Recon. Br 
222" 3| Duplin_.--------- 10.00 | 5S. A. 
223 Papline 2-32 -< 16.00 Amy 
20% Aa) PORDBLOM. 25.2— -. Se .51 Grade 
257 Wen Gina ees thn e e S Recon. Br. 
265 Pamlieoss 92-22 >" 10. 82 Grade 
266 Pamicon-e = 2S eA Grade 
2754 | Sampson- -------- 13.12 S. A. 
276 Deanne. 22. =. ~~ 9.5 S. A 
284 Uo.) aes 13.76 ALC 
296 LES a eg. aie dee Br 
318 Brunswick-_-- ----- 8.13 <i 
367 Onslow -..2!_---=4 15.22 S.A; 
390 Robeson. ....=-_<- 14.08 Graded 
404p | Chatham--_------ aLSO7, B,C. 
MAGN EC hatha. 9. 2..22|.0.+-=-5 Bridge 
Moran nathan. 2.2. —.|.-.2---- Br. 
415 Dearie es ee 8.Q1 Graded 
418 Mranidin=, o-oo ea 2.93 4s teh 
422 Franklin]. 222... 8.23 120), 
432 Granville._..=.--- 6.48 Graded 
433 Granville_____=--- i3ate Graded 
440 ate tieesse==ete 7.78 Graded 
AAN Aen carmett.-—-—--=- - 3.61 Th TSE 
464 RersOnm eh ae oe = 15S ES 
a7 2Rw lVaAncese = aes 4.66 es 
474. Vien G Ose ees neat ee 8a dae Grade 
488 yee ote lo. 4.73 Grading 
613 Gaswellye aes 235 16. 34 4 Sk 
Hlsmeworanvess== =~ 22 2.00 et Sy 
Dot preleollOrd=ee=. = a2-._ 3.40 P: GC. ~ \$ 
570 Niooresee oe oJ aoe (Roos: 
BRO Puy kus Ol pier wes 5 Sede. Br. 
610 Anson—Richmond__-|-- ------ Bridge 
611 PAYS Tae, Meee pre 94. PG; 
617 Cabarrnus= Se=ne? 7.03 AsO: 
642 rece llamas eet 11.14 iAwiCs 
CAG Be plancoln 2 Lee S= 7.09 P. C, 
6471 lebincolmense se eases La? kee Bridge 
6488  lebincoln. S22 3 5.03 Gs 


ESTIMATED COST 


50, 020. 00 
16, 190. 00 
18, 260. 00 
154, 196.00 
347, 017. 00 
30, 770.00 
121, 000. 00 
42, 120.00 
17, 840. 00 
123, 360. 00 
70, 000.00 
8, 990. 00 
288, 480. 00 
10, 000.00 
157, 130. 00 
213, 250.00 
99, 321.00 
99, 727 .00 


381, 910. CO 
252, 163. 00 
148, 410. 60 
51, 910.00 
137, 180. 00 
214, 350. 00 
107, 230. 00 

3, 660. 00 

4, 330. 00 
249, 190. 00 
481, 940. 00 


171, 700. 00 

7,510.00 
20, 000. 00 
29, 945 .00 
40, 000. 00 
117, 476 .00 


447, 200. 00 
3, 820. 00 
305, 490. 00 
372, 812.00 
84, 250. 00 
3, 930. 00 
132, 198. 00 
50, 263. 00 
301, 560. 00 
185, 070. 00 
448, 863.00 
18,716.00 
98, 221.00 
152, 200.00 
71, 059.00 
315, 639.00 
68, 4C0.00 
68, 006 .00 
136, 553.00 
20, 816 .00 
283, 160.00 
60, 886 .00 
113, 748 .00 
35, 282.00 
30, 815.00 
85, 470. 00 
84, 110. 00 
59, 197. 00 
50, 898.00 
200, 490. 00 


253, 254.00 
89, 800. 00 
45, 630. 00 

290, 000.00 


194, 200. 00° 


68, 843. 00 
499, 124.00 
194, 936 .00 

24, 350. 00 
105,794.00 


BEGUN 


4—8- 24 
10-25-22 
5- 29-23 
11-12-24 
8-22-24 
11-16-24 
4—9 23 
11-14-24 
10- 10- 23 
11—7- 23 


6-12-23 


8-22-22 


10—8- 23 
10—6- 23 


11-15-23 
7-21-22 





CONTRACTOR 


H. M. Beasley. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

F. G. McGuire. 

Frank Mitchell Construction Co. 

Nello L. Teer—Gwathmey-Saddler Co. 

State Forces. 

Nello L. Teer—Gwathmey-Saddler Co. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

Public Service Production Co. 

State Forces. 

Bacon & Moore—W. D. Murray—Saddler Corp. 
C. W. T.acy—Pittsburg-Des Moines Steel Co. 
Smith Bros.—Gwathmey & Saddler. 

Nello L. Teer—J. S. Bowers. 


Pensacola Shipbuilding Co. 
Roberts Paving Co. 
Roanoke Iron and Bridge Co. 
E. Ray James. 

O. A. Mann & Co. 

Nello Teer—J. A. Peterson. 
Nello Teer. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

Smith Brothers, Inc. 
Groves & Shephard. 


Public Service Production Co. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

Eagle Engineering Co.—Pittsburg-Des M oines 
Steel Co. 

F. G. McGuire—Eagle Engineering Co. 

State Forces. 

Highway Engineering and Construction Co. 

Highway Engineering and Construction Co. 

Jameson & Bro.—Dameion & Sparling. 

State Forces. 

J. F. Mulligan—R. W. Curtis. 

J. F. Mulligan—Bradley & Gooch. 

Highway Engineering and Construction Co. 

Hudson & Scruggs. 

Noll Construction Co.—Gooch & Loving. 

T. J. Newell. 

W. F. Bowe, Jr. 

State Forces. 

Gus Ginn—J. 8. Bowers. 

Hagedorn Construction Co. 

Atlantic Bridge Co. 

Atlantic Bridge Co. 

B. F. Teeter—J. A. Peterson. 

T. C. Hurlacker. 

J. M. Gregory—Keuhn-Englehard & Thorne. 

T. N. Chandler. 

W. W. Tuck & Son—E. A. Wood & Co. 

Lavender Bros. 

C. G. Kershaw. 

Micheaux Construction Co. 

C. A: Ragland—Rhyne & Kitchen. ~ 

C. A. Ragland. : 

C. B. Hester—E. A. Wood. 

Nello Teer—R. W. Curtis. 

Nello L. Teer. 

Zeigler & Dalton. 

Jamison Bros. i 

Dameron & Sparling. 

Hardaway Contracting Co. 

Jas. O. Heyworth. 

Noll Construction Co. 


~~ ee Ol 


14 Norta CaroitinA Hicuway BULLETIN 





STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA SGM ee 


Projects Under Construction (Continued) 

















NO. COUNTY LENGTH TYPE ESTIMATED COST BEGUN CONTRACTOR 
659 Mecklenburg_.----- 7.93 Graded |$ 50; OO008 OG tenn eae County Forces—Luten Bridge Co. 
659B | Mecklenburg------ 7.93 tetas 255, 030. 00 10-22-23 | Mecklenburg County. 
662B | Richmond_------- 6.17 AO; 180, 251000. \o eeeen eee ae Noll Construction Co. 
666 Richmond s— see. 4.65 PG: 175, 050. 00 1—8-24 | Geo. R. Martin & Co. 
679 Scotlande=-eee—=— ties Pa Cs 402, 070. 00 7—1-23 | P. R. Ashby—E. T. Gwathmey. 
6S6B. | Stanleyi2s-22 2222 12.00 re Ge 414; 810000. eee Noll Construction Co. 
607.Ai ls Unionis 25-2 gees 9.5 Pac. 307, 180. 00 9—1-23 | Jas. O. Heyworth. 
704 Alleghany - - ------ 6.50 Gravel 28, 02000 ace eee ee Tucker—Gambill Co. 
712 Nshebee 2 S235 sere oe 11.06 Gravel 197, 690. 00 10-24-22 '| J. T. Plott. 
714 Nehews- eee ee 5.33 Gravel 37, 500. 00 5-19-24 | State Forces. 
720 Caldwell. 222s | eee Bridge 39, 920. 00 3-17-24 | W. C. Carter-Berry-Fortune Const. Co. 
721 Caldwell =a 13.75 TS: 168, 680. 00. 4-14-24 | J. T. Plott—Harris & Spaulding. 
Wook! BLOKES Sea ere 2.36 Graded 13, 930.00 1—9-25 | Hagedorn Construction Co. 
(OSA LOUITY ste soe eee 10. 54 Graded 164, 1380. 00 10-24-23 | McDowell Contracting Co.—C. A. Heilig. 
TO3B SISSUrTy ec ee eee 10.54 ae 1G 323, 309.00 10-21-24 | Zeigler & Dalton. 
770B> | Watauga i255. 223 8.90 Gravel 93, 500. 00 4-16-23 | State Forces. 
(1A). Watauga oe oe 2.50 | Bit. Mac. 30, 000. 00 9—7-22 | State Forces. 
780 Wilkes 82 wiser 7.83 Recon. 25, 000. 00 11-25-21 | J. F. Mulligan—State Forces. 
780B | Wilkes-Alleghany._| 5.39 Grade 106. 053. 00 9-24-24 | J. F. Mulligan. 
TO1B WY adbine a 3-22 6.80 Po. 250, 412.00 12-12-24 | L. L. Tindall. 
792 Wadkin: © cee. 2s 6.28 Graded 55, 474.00 1—2-25 | W. E. Graham—Rehyne & Kitchen. 
Si28F | sBurkess. sae eee GelZ 1 AGE 195, 367. 00 8-11-24 | Overstreet & Nance. 
835 Henderson-_------- 6.82 |W.B. Mae. 281, 170.00 1-27-25 | W. E. Graham. 
857 ING chie] aaa 5.74 Graded AQ; 000.000) Sameera State Forces. 
88205 | Ruthertord se see=e |e ere Bridge 1353005 008 este nee ae State Forces. 
888 Yancey 525 se sere. 15.22 |W. B. Mac. 308, 000. 00 6-23-24 | The Luck Co. 
891 GAN CCV on Sees le Bil Grade 36, 404. 00 11-28-24 | W. H. Anderson Constr. Co. 
900¢ ,| Buncombe--_------ 9.09 Grade 195, 902. 00 8-25-24 | W. E. Graham—J. M. Gregory & Co. 
901{448 Buncombe.-.------ 1.02 Bo 359, 730. 00 11—6-22 | R. C. Stevens—A. J. Wardrep. 
912 Gherolees Fo eee fleets se Bridge 93,670. 00° |anee= Semoeee W. T. Moore. 
GIZA 4) Cherokee.c 222. 8.62 Graded 80110} 00wlg ee bees Wilson Construction Co. 
9128 .°Cherokee. 8.35 Graded 36, 280) 001 | a= ees W. T. Moore. 
944 Ext| Haywood__.------ 1.45 A. C. 59; 680200 20 noone State Forces. 
945 Hay wodd 22.2. - - 4.00 Graded 50; 00000 hes sl eee Se State Forces. 
951 Jackson 2 = oaaen. 11.58 |W. B. Mace. 269, 540. 00 8-17-22 rae Wright & Sons—W. T. Moore Cone. Prod. 
0. 
O5 ZAG) Jacksons ee sare 10. 35 Graded 220, 000. 00 8-17-22 | Brooks-Calloway Co. 
953 Jackson eee as Graded 118, 200. 00 7—1-22 | C. C. McCabe. 
962 Macone=== = e—- 13.58 |W. B. Mac. 177, 840. 00 5-19-22 | O’Brien Constr. Co.—Griffin Constr. Co. 
963 Macon==ae=2-eo=" 8.68 Graded 125, 220. 00 11-10-22 | Costello Bros.—Brooks-Calloway Co. 
971 Madisonec = 225. 6. 74 Gravel 183, 090. 00 5-15-23 | Reynolds Constr. Co.—Moore Cone. Prod. Co. 
974B.) Maeoneee cee 5.26 Graded wt fies pees eee 2-18-24 | State Forces. 
975 Madison== 22sec 4.0 Grading |$ 25, OCO. 00 3-25-24 | State Forces. 
980 Macon-Swain- -_-- 17.84 |W. B. Mac. 278, 050. 00 3- 20-22 | Costello Bros—Condon & Condon. 
981 Swain ei Tse 6.12 |W. B.Mac 11458800 vise see eee Asheville Construction Co. 
990 Transylvania_-___- 8.87 |W. B. Mace. 158, 020. 00 6—5-22 | Sam L. Davis Constr. Co.—R. C. Stevens. 
991 Transylvania_ - - _ - 1. 03 Graded 156, 650. 00 3—6-23 | Gibson Construction Co. 
992 Transylvania__-_-__- 1257 Graded AG O80 200. |: eae W. H. Anderson Construction Co.—R. C. Steven 


Projects Completed 

















NO. COUNTY ° LENGTH TYPE APPROXIMATE COST | COMPLETED CONTRACTOR 
100 Beaulorta.cc8 o-28 10. 50 R. C.  |$ 396, 580. 00 3-15-23 | W. T. Hadlow. 
101 Beautort= == 4.23 PC: 146, 820. 00 2-15-24 | Public Service Production Co. 
103 Beautorjees sas . 03 Rac: 1, 740. 00 7—8- 22 | R. G. Lassiter. 
105A | Beaufort_____-_-- 2.00 P. C 72, 560. 00 7- 16-23 | J. L. McGhee Contracting Co. 
L05B. siebeauhorve= == ee 5.04 BaG: 154, 300. 00 4-15-24 | Public Service Production Co. 
106 Bertie 622355202 7.12 db Se 70, 480. 00 12—3-23 | J. F. Mulligan Constr. Co— Boney & Hostetler 
107 Berties = 2204 .ee 19.30 Graded 129, 400.00 10-30-24 | Nello Teer—Atlantic Bridge Co. 
108 Bertie. 22 fess el eeee ee Sheet P. 14, 540. 00 1-17-24 | E. T. Gwathmey. 
110 Camden. .=2222.-- etl RaGes 123, 910. 00 7- 20-23 | State Forces. 
113 Chowar=sa9ss0,5- 10. 32 Graded 55, 060. 00 3—1- 23 | Nello Teer—Gregory & Talbot. 
114 cee Ee ie i 10. 40 Graded 52, 570. 00 4-14-23 | Battershill & Goode—Chandler & Ragland. 
115 owan- ; 

Perquimans- _--_- 11.83 Pa 326, 300.00 3-10-25 | Smith Brothers. Inc. 
125 Edgecombe---.-. -- 15.11 A. C 421, 480. 00 4-23-23 | R. G. Lassiter. 
129 Edgecombe----_-_-- 8.10 Lae 36, 000. 00 1-12-24 | State Forces. 
132 Crates foes ae eee 10. 90 dra = 69, 950. 00 2—1-24 | J. A. Marrow. 
137 Halifax:, 2 230th? 5.95 Pac: 229, 810. 00 1-19-24 | O. I. Leighton—A. C. House. 
138A | Hal.fax- ; 
Northampton_--_| 12.59 8. C 132, 820. 00 5-14 24 | Nello Teer—Richards Bros. 

139 dialifaxee 2. lee 0. 55 an 20, 830. 00 8-25-22 | Chandler & Ragland—Porter & Peck. 
140 Halifax =) eas ae eet Bridge 11, 060. 00 5—5-22 | Von Glahn & Talbott. 
141 Halifax-Edgecombe| 18.76 SDs 220, 680.00 1-24-25 | J. P. Dicus—J. A. Peterson. 
145 Hertlordses2sseee 12.88 Graded 139, 590. 00 11-23-23 | Jamison & Brothers—Atlantic Bridge Co. 


146 Hertford-Bertie___| 6.42 T. §S. 60,780.00 12-2-24 | Nello Teer—Atlantic Bridge Co. 


NortuH Caro.tinA Hicuway ButietIn 15 








STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA---Continued 


Projects Completed (Continued) 








NO. 


147 
151 
154 
154B 
155 
155B 
157A 
157B 
159, 
160 
162 
163 
166 
167 











COUNTY LENGTH |_| TYPE 
Hertford-Bertie.--| 17.36 Graded |$ 
Ety deve ese ce ee 4.30 os: 
ING Rant. Sea tes leks 127 A. C. 
ILE EN a RO oS oe 1. 34 A. C. 
igre ine en ee 19.3 Sac, 
Vaan ee ere ee ce 19.30 PY C: 
Miemtiniresss - 2 12. 41 ity Se 
IMG gah ee 12. 36 ARISE 
INigia hisiareeye seo 11,22 isee Ge 
Frklin.-Wake-Nash| 9.81 SG: 
INS ee kere sae 12.16 iS: 
[Nie hemes ed 14.96 PGs 
Northampton_--_-- 47 Bridge 
Northampton. --_- 20.48 dk fst. 
Pasq.-Camden___-}| 2.40 Cord. 
Perquimans— 

Pasquotank 7.22 nies Os 
Pasquotank__--_-_- 9.50 Brick 
Perquimans- ---- -- 1-0 A. C. 
[Sgt SOS Mie rename 13. 54 Pits. 
Peg Vance o> i ashe ee Bridge 
ith ae be ok te | 7.14 PAC: 
17] 5 ae le ee 14. 35 Graded 
ethies sar eee ce oa. Se oe Les. 
Pitt eeestas ne ea 3 9.57 eC: 
Loti e eties Sie te 5.30 PW; 
“ivanell mere ee 6.91 so C: 
Washington__._-_- 15.18 Si Ck 
Washington_-____-- 14. 93 S.C: 
Carteret 2... =- 13.68 Graded 
Canteretats.j2-2+5 13.68 S. A. 
Warpetet. 2c. = <2 - 14. 14 Grade 
Ors) tao ee Bridge 
Cravens oases > = 3.00 Gravel 
Gravene- a ae. 8: 4.50 Gravel 
Gravensanee = 2. 2.65 Re 
Cravenwe sees. 8.34 A. G. 
Cravens. sss. 9.93 AC: 
Wayne-Duplin__--| 16.06 Graded 
Duplin-Lenoir___-- 15. 80 Grade 
Wayne-Duplin__-_-_] 14.53 C. 
Greene. =.= .-..22 6.81 A. C. 
Greenest see 5.40 ea: 
Jonnston= 2 === 14.83 A. C, 
Ones awe ck 2 15. 80 eG: 
(Pavey ge SRP S SNeiery |e eee Bridge 
enon ee ee . 82 Sule 
encit seers eee aaa see Bridge 
Pamilicos ssa 2255" 12.03 _ C. 
Craven-Pamlico.._.|_..----- Bridge 
Sampson vic. 22 16. 47 Graded 
PAMpsoOm.b. 20 3.76 aC. 
AIG OROU a tone || See ae ee Bridges 

Aye 30: 0 aap. 10. 01 AC. 

RYNCSEAS ee oe Sie ees aaa Bridge 

AYNC 32 eee. 14. 22 AG. 
Wolsongses. 200 7.63 A. C. 
Wiilsoitag: U2 | oe Bridges 

ee a See 0.31 Graded 

iL SOn Ee ee = = 8.99 LAG: 
RESON fe ent ke ae Bridge 
Wilson sek ke 9. 92 Recon. 
IBladense se aes 11.99 S. C. 
Bidens ee 25 Se 
Bindent.. cet 2 13. 17 Lae 
Brunswick-__------ 0.5 Graded 
Brunswick_-_---.--- 9.77 RIC 
Brunswick. -2-= 3.44 A. C. 
Brunswick_._---_- 15. 82 S. C. 
Brunswick-_--_---- 112, 1 re Ce 
ISsMNne Wick oe fae eases Bridge 
Columbisass. 7.8 11.22 ees: 
Columbus. +)... -< 13.61 ish (Or 
Columbus. - --_---- 5.20 Sin C. 
Columbus2s.9 5 — 7.03 PG: 
Columbus. ------- 12.89 P. ©; 
Columbusss 22525 11.22 A. C. 
Cumb.-Sampson_ _|------.-| Bridge 
Harnett-Comb.___| 7.54 es: 


APPROXIMATE Cost 


122, 250. 00 
84, 000. 00 
407, 940. 00 
43, 830. 00 
128, 100. 00 
551, 800.00 
102, 530. 00 
104, 180. 00 
98, 990. 00 
54, 000. 00 
49, 110.00 
448, 490.00 
24, 190. 00 
117, 260.00 
70, 820. 00 


239, 450.00 
222, 213.00 
28, 700. 00 
390, 180. 00 
32, 340.00 
228, 670. 00 
33, 470. 00 
5, 180. 00 
248, 360. 00 
193, 370. 00 
81, 550. 00 
76, 660. 00 
89, 100. 00 
137, 300. 00 
240, 000.00 
90, 760. 00 
20, 540.00 
3,810. 00 
7, 400. 00 
119, 470. 00 
305, 410. 00 
269, 616. 00 
97, 190. 00 
159, 500. 00 
394, 300. 00 
235, 540. 00 
220, 570. 00 
475, 320. 00 
407, 090. 00 
73, 420.00 
30, 380. 00 
64, 040. 00 
291, 880. 00 
24, 460. 00 
98, 750. 00 
113, 720. 00 
8, 770. 00 
318, 940. 00 
22, 080. 00 
411, 050. 00 
203, 490. 00 
17, 540.00 
15, 530. 00 
384, 220. 00 
19, 360. 0C 
122’ 676. 00 
75, 700. 00 
286, 470.00 
100, 860. 00 
5, 400. 00 
373, 560. 00 
112, 030. 00 
116, 720.00 
84, 640. 00 
18, 340. 00 
136, 570. 00 
241, 400. 00 
61, 620. 00 
220, 900. 00 
401, 510. 00 
364, 900.00 
14. 655. 00 
10, 535. 00 


COMPLETED 


5- 23-24 
3- 28-24 
11-16-23 
10—8- 23 
8—9- 23 


11—1-24 


11-23-23 
if IU Raye: 
11- 23-23 
10-29-24 
6—2-23 
7- 14-23 
10-13-24 
6-13-22 
10—9- 23 
11-21-24 
3—9-25 
9- 26- 22 


CONTRACTOR 


Nello Teer—Atlantic Bridge Co. 

C. W. Lacy—Porter & Peck. 

So. Willite Paving Co.—O. F. Leighton, Inc. 
State Forces. 

J. P. Dicus—J. M. Gregory. 

W. T. Hadlow. 

Jamison Bios.—J. A. Marrow. 

J. F. Mulligan Constr. Co.—Batson-Cooke Co. 
J. A. Kreis & Co. 

Chandler & Ragland—Southern Dray Co. 
J. F. Mulligan Construction Co, 

Public Service Production Co. 

W. D. Murrey—Sadler Corp. 

Virginia Contracting Co.—Bacon & Moore. 
D. E. Williams. 


Williams & Williams. 

County Commissioners. 

Built by Town. 

S. J. Groves & Sons. 

B. J. Boyles. 

Public Service Production Co. 

J. A. Marrow. 

Force Account. 

Cheatwood & Driscoll. 

Smith Bros.—Pittsburg-Des Moines Steel Co. 
C. W. Lacy—M. M. Jones. 

L. M. Lee & Co. 

W. N. Thompson. 

Eagle Enginee1ting Co.—Batson-Cooke Co. 
State Forces. 

Duplin Construction Co.—Batson-Cooke Co. 
Roanoke [ron and Bridge Co. 

State Forces. 

State Forces? 

Eagle Engineerirg Co. . 

West Construction Co.—A. P. Gilbert. 
Union Paving Co. 

C. W. Lacy. 

Chitwood & Carpenter. 

Union Paving Co. 

West Construction Co.—Union Paving Co. 
Smith Bros.—Pittsburg-Des Moines Steel Co. 
R. G. Lassiter & Co. 

Hyde & Baxter. 

Roanoke Iron and Bridge Works. 

West Construction Co. 

Englehardt-Kuehn Co. 

Union Paving Co. 

Rhyne & Kitchen. 

R. E. Martin—Striblin-Standdy & Newell. 
Eagle Engineering Co. 

Rhyne & Kitchin. 

Union Paving Co. 

P. R. Ashby. 

Union Paving Co. 

P. R. Ashby. 

John M. Ogden & Co. 

C. S. Wheeler. 

Smith Bros.—Pittsburg-Des Moines Steel Co. 
Stearns Brothers. 

Highway Engineering & Construction Co. 

fhe WW. Chandler—Nello Teer. 

J. T. Plott—Atlantic Bridge Co. 

J. F. Mulligan—Powell Paving and Constr. Co. 
C. R Wise. 

Alabama Con. Prod. Co.—Batson-Cooke Co. 
Sou. Willite Paving Co.—Rvanoke Br. Works. 
Hagedorn Construction Co. 

B. Frank Price—Batson- Cooke Co. 

Atlantic Bridge Co. 

J. A. Kreis—Cornell & Young & Co. 

J. T. Plott—J. A. Kreis & Co. 

J. A. Kries. 

L. L. Tindall. 

Jas. O. Hayworth. 

Coastal Construction Co. 

Roanoke Bridge & Iron Works. 


8-31-22 ; Porter & Boyd. 
—X—x—K—V——>>>>>>>>>>>l>>—  ———————————————————————— 


16 


——————— eS 


NortH CarotinaA Highway BULLETIN 


STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA---Continued 
Projects Completed (Continued) 


























NO COUNTY LENGTH TYPE | APPROXIMATE COST | COMPLETED CONTRACTOR 
340 Cumberland _ - ---- 11.07 P> Cains 395, 970.00 12-18-24 | Alabama Cone. Products Co.—Hobbs & Peabody. 
341 Cumb-Hoke_ ____- a2 Graded 1, 050. 00 2-28-22 | W. B. Covington. 
342 Cumberland_ ----- 5. 91 AC. 183, 970. 00 4—7-24 | A. J. Wardrep. 
343 Gumbetland 225 ses| serene oe Bridge 2520002007) Sawn ee eee are State Forces. 
344 Cumberland_--___- 5.02 IPA G@.Ts 174, 080.00 2—4-25 | Alabama Concrete Products Co. 3 
351 New Hanover----- 10. 64 A: C. 243, 560. 00 3-10- 24 | Norfolk Equipment Co. 
352 New Hanover- 
Brunswick___-___ 2.31 |W.B. Mac. 53, 010.00 6-11-24 | Highway Engineering & Construction Co. 
363 Onsloyanees sete 15. 24 Deas 250, 990. 00 7—9- 24 | Newell Const. Co.-Pittsburg-Des Moines Steel Co. 
36448 Onslow sue eee 12. 84 Bie: 53, 770. 00 4—7-23 | R. E. Martin. 
3468 | Onslowsistwere ees 12. 84 es: 108, 130. 00 8—8- 24 | A. W. McClay. 
366 Onslowl2 22 o-oo 18.50 8. A. 200, 000.00 12-23-24 | State Forces. 
375 Pender 520 58s 15. 56 sn, Or 65, 440. 00 11-21-22 | A. W. McClay. 
376 Pender. asses 7.64 Graded 107, 820. 0C 3—5- 23 | C. G. Kershaw-Cornell-Young Co. 
377 Pender. 2 ba 1.61 Graded 75, 560. 00 4-30-23 | R. E. Martin—Hazell Connerate-Quist Co. 
378 Pender eae 14.12 | W.B. Mace. 272, 040.00 | 6-18-24 | C. W. Lacy. 
379 Pender sees oa. 10. 50 S. A. 107, 660. 00 4-20-23 | State Forces. 
380 Penders. 2 Wik 8.98 |W. B. Mac. 185; 200.00 4 ee ee C. W. Lacy. 
381 Pender. ee eae he 11.99 Sav As 264, 300.00 2-23-25 | Highway Engineering & Construction,Co. 
382 Pender panna os 5. 60 S. A. 75, 000. 00 4-30 24 | State Forces. : 
300-1| Robeson ie .2o25: =* 19.80 Pec. 646, 200.00 3—15-24 | James O. Heyworth. 
388 Robeson ee=2 a5 3.35 hoe! 134, 100. 00 9-28-22 | C. W. Lacy—Roanoke Bridge & Iron Co. 
389 Robeson-Columbus} 1.56 Se (OE 83, 460. 00 3-10-24.| L. A. Chitwood. 
SOLA” | 2tobesons sa= eae .00 SA: 45, 420. 00 11-21-23 | R. G. Lassiter & Co. 
3018 .| Robeson_-7e2222. < 1.10 T28: 19, 630. 00 4-26-24 | H. M. Beasley. 
392 Robeson: Seeenns ter 1406 Toe 50, 780. 00 12-14-23 | Robeson County Com.—E. T. Gwathmey. 
400 Chatham. -:. 3 22ee lee see Bridge 66, 440. 00 5-18-23 | R. M. Walker & Co. 
ANOA | s@hatham sae sa 0. 39 Grading 7,920. 00 8-27-23 | C. B. Hester. 
402 hia (a. _sceeten = 6.91 Meh 35; JO0L00 Sree tee a W. N. Thompson. 
403 Chatham? ene 7.01 Gravel 82, 500.00 6-17-24 | C. G. Kershaw. 
404A | Chatham_______-- 11.25 Grade TAT} 870, OO: (ore Cees W. W. Tuck & Son—Atlantic Bridge Co. 
408 Auman seers 5 S: A: 16, 090. 00 9-20--23 | Murray Construction Co. 
409 Durham sss eee 0.5 Graded 5, 410. 00 8—7-22 | J. P. Dicus. 
410 Durkan Ssese- Qe oe RSC; 81, 220. 00 9-28-22 | C. D. Riggsbee. 
411 Durhantewesme Lael PAC: 218, 590. 00 7-12-23 | Hutton Engineering and Construction Co. 
412 Durirana se eee 8.80 PAG: 252, 590.00 8-16-24 | L. L. Tindall. 
119 Franklin® = Be 12. 82 TS: 71, 380. 00 7-31-23 | Jamison & Brother—J. A. Marrow. 
120 Frankina=e2 seme e = 1256 Tee 54, 550. 00 5-29-23 | Chandler & Ragland. 
421 Frankiin) ad wee... 8.23 Grade 60,060. OD: ie rae J. A. Morrow. 
AD TB at Prank eae ee 8.23 pee 285 LOO OOS ee are ope R. G. Lassiter & Co. 
427 Granvillemee ssa by gelD, AAG 175, 670. 00 -1—4-23 | R. G. Lassiter & Co. 
428 Granville=28 See 4,19 Re (Cs 142, 640. 00 10—1-23 | Pittman Construction Co. 
429 Granville’. 235504 6.94 RU, 261; 400: 00" jase ere Be R. B. Sandidge. 
431 Granvilless 242 3.83 Ras: 42,130,050: (op eee ee Micheaux Construction Co. 
436 Harmettivess=e ens 21.91 Gravel 206, 610. 00 1--15-23 | C. G. Kershaw Constr. Go.—Hobbs & Kitchin. 
437 Harnett eee 10.74 Gravel LOL 10200) | pees ee F. P. Holden—T. J. Newell. 
438 Harnett. cases: 3.82 P. C. 158;520.00° | Sea ee J. M. Gregory—T. J. Newell. 
444 Lee-Harnett_____- 7.00 Gravel 32,000.00) | Seeeeee weeks State Forces. 
445 Teena! kee 5.91 A ast 24, 330. 00 1- 15-23 | C. B. Hester. 
446 Licata Se eae 5.05 NA: 200, 610. 00 1-15-24 | Atlantic Bitulithic Co.—O. A. Mann. 
449A | Lee___----------- 2.50 Graded 295020) 00a Berto ete Austin & Ritchie—N. B. Boyle Co., Inc. 
453 Orange. 2525 2S ae eee Bridge 46, 810.00 1—9-23 | Geo. W. Kane. 
454 Orange: soe 4.28 Pa. . 186, 340. 00 3—6-22 | Elliott, Sholes & Teer. 
455 Oranee’. meee es 4.19 LES 55, 640. 00 9-28-22 | J. F. Mulligan Constr. Co.—P. R. Ashby. 
456 Oranee sek ra ee 9.81 Graded 51, 970. 00 10-25-23 | Crawford & Crawford—Nello Teer. 
AB TAM Oranve tae a an 7.45 Graded 85, 460. 00 2-22-24 | Dicus Bros.—Richards Bros. 
457.15 Orangery 2225 G2 7.382 PHC; 258010, OO) be ee L. L. Tindall. 
460 Orange... ese ae 9.87 A. C. 296, 840. 00 12-21-23 | ‘R. M. Hudson & Co. 
463 Persons. 332s aes 11.24 i gone 327, 170.00 7-25-24 | Porter & Boyd. 
AUDA. «eViein Ce aes Senne OW Conc. 30, 740. 00 12-21-23 | R. G. Lassiter & Co. 
{73hF 8 Vance____- etre 7.83 Br. 265, 570. 00 1-21-23 | R. G. Lassiter & Co. 
484088) Wake bib tere 34 7.40 A. C, 287, 690. 00 7-30-23 | Union Paving Co.—P. R. Ashby. 
482 Wiakesit= ot ae 6. 64 pvc G3 184, 710. 00 9-23-22 | R. M. Hudson Co. 
483 Wakes: 663 paces 0. 54 Lie By 19, 580. 00 8—7-22 | C. D. Riggsbee. 
484 Wake fica eos 8.79 Pa. 311, 630. 00 10-29-24 | P. R. Ashby—Booz-Boyd Co. 
484 BG Soe ae a Soe en Ee eats I Bridge 13, 120.00 10--29-24 | Booz-Boyd Co. 
AS DAC FIG, Win) ken amen sea eee 1eOo Graded 92 820/007 Be sie eeee C. G. Kershaw—T.. J. Newell. 
485 Baty Wakeuciee atte s<. 7.81 jes kOe Zils 100200; ae See R. G. Lassiter & Co. 
AS5 Gel Wakeo C8 2 soos 0. 50 Grade 10, 710. 00 7-31-23 | Booz-Boyd—Nello Teer. 
486 Wake oes: aieke 9.04 TS: 49, 500.00 3-25-24 | O. A. Mann & Co. 
492 Warne nmaasar acme 4.48 Bit. Mac 122, 470. 00 11—9-23 | Porter & Peck—A. C. House. 
493 Warreneret: bs ae. 3.88 | Bit. Mac 77, 870.00 5—1-24 | Porter & Peck. 
494 Warret Ler es 6. 21 An TC. 208, 130. 00 5-13-24 | Clifford Engineering Co. fi 
495 Warten sea 7.96 aR Se 69, 930.00 2-25-25 | J. A. Marrow. 
500 Alamance_._:___-- 5. 22 Graded 36, 880. 00 1-17-22 | W. W. Tuck & Son—A. M. Hazzell, Connerate- 
Quist Construction Co. 
501 Alamance_-___-_-- Teel 10s Se 36, 230.00 2-28-23 | W. M. Shook-Hanford Bros. 
502 Alamance____.---- 17.43 eC 158, 990. 00 9-13-23 | W. E. Graham—Hanford Brothers. 
503 Maman cet tan see ee Se aes Bridge $74, 710. 00 7-20-23 | Atlantic Bridge Co. 











) 


Nortu Carorina Hicuway BuLuetin 17 





STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA---Continued 











Projects Completed (Continued) 











CONTRACTOR 





No. COUNTY LENGTH TYPE APPROXIMATE COST ] COMPLETED 
504 Alamance__....__- 155 Ps ARCS is 148, 120. 00 5—3- 23 
505 Alamance_____=_-- 0. 42 S. A. 15, 240. 00 6-23-22 
506A | Alamance________- 0. 32 Grade 11, 800. 00 8-11-23 
506B | Alamance._______- 03 Pair 12, 120. 00 1-12-24 
507 Alamaneé_—._—-- - 4.03 REG, 138, 950. 00 6— 3-24 
OL @aswelles* == <= © 14.85 AR Se 98, 830. 00 5-24-24 
512 Caswell so sess -” 11.67 abs teF 58, 150. 00 11-14-23 
524 iDavidsones 22222 0.3 S. A. 10, 200. 00 1-20-22 
525 Wavidsons<. == 10. 24 Jats (Gy 363, 290. 00 9—4-23 
525A | Davidson... -_- Bia) S.7A; 16, 420. CO 6-27-21 
526 DavidsOnwen ee see Osta Pee: 131, 820. 00 10=25-22 
528 Dawidsonmsss= = 22s 10. 24 PG? 440, 340. 00 7-25-24 
532 Catliordae a2 2 = 11. 54 A. CG, 391, 630. 00 6-27-23 
ior bne | Clot hee ye ae ees Bridges 27, 490. 00 10—8- 23 
Hoo CuslmGiuiondes ses. 5 Pec, 13, 180. 00 4-25-23 
533 Guilford-Forsyth__| 10.59 IMs (Ch 449, 340. 00 1-23-23 
535 (Gultordsee2. eae 78 Pc, 282, 550.00 5-16-24 
536 Gurltorg sas ane te o. £5 Raves 192, 120. 00 11—7- 24 
bocomt tauutord.<. J. J. 2 6. 20 Graded 46, 000. 00 3-21-25 
Hotel Coullorgs 10.99 Be has 420,480 (00). 12 oe eee 
538 Guilford ates eee eee Bridge 11, 310. 00 2-21-23 
539 Gailkordosasee= 2 0. 64 . A, 23, 400. 00 1-19-23 
540 CC aillord =e ce 18.00 Recon 16, 330. 00 1-23-22 
541 Guuilfordies 22. 202 4.31 Bit. Mac. 130, 780. 00 8-21-24 
544 HGKG 26 Ci Ga at 10. 45 reer 40,610.00 5—3- 23 
545 TOK esos es ok 9.15 ES 60, 330. 00 7—7-23 
546 Oe 0. 84 S. A. 15, 950. 00 5-30-23 
555 Montgomery------ 20. 55 oes 125, 630. 00 7-19-24 
556 Montgomery _-_---- 3.07 ASG: 829120 00 lance oat 
556B | Montgomery-__-__-_- 3.28 es: 19, 220. 00 7-28-24 
557 Montgomery ------ 2.01 Ben 69, 500. 00 10-14-24 
566 IMGOre Seek eae 7.14 Se 72, 150. 00 6-30-23 
567 WEOOMess a. -- ode 2.96 fo 10, 820. 00 9-18-22 
568 Moore lc. .sole 4.96 Graded 15, 650. O0eieeeee 8, 
569 IWiaGreneste een ca. 18.97 Sak 107, 070. 00 10-28-23 
571 Moores: oss ts. 4,94 Sr we 89, 850. 00 7-26-24 
577 Randolphe--= 2. 5- 13. 36 Cone. 423, 250. 00 2-14-24 
578 Randolphes> <2. Fendi Pee 312, 660. 00 10—3-24 
582 | Randolph_____._- 16/60 1 -T. & BS. 000. 00 joe re 
583 Randolpho. .222.- Oso ibseisk 3, 680. 00 2-24-24 
588 Rockingham__-_--_-_- 7.98 Rees 266, 520.00 38—4-24 
589 Rockingham. - ____ 9.81 Pee 437, 890. 00 11- 10-24 
590 Rockingham __--_- 3.10 Conc. 98, 370. 00 2—7-24 
592 Rockingham __--_-_- 8.22 PEC: 310, 100.00 12—1-—24 
593 Rock’gham-Caswell| 17.98 P.-C. 511, 670.00 8-18-23 
600 Mlexander-sece oe 9.30 Graded 17, 760. 00 4-14-23 
601 Alexander_____-_-- 3.07 eS: 36, 590. 00 3-31-23 
602 Wiexander Sse so. 9.28 | Bit. Mac 189, 330. 00 11-15-23 
606 Stanly-Anson..__-|.------- Bridge 61, 640. 00 6—6-23 
607 PATS ODIs oa Yee es 6.93 fish 48, 940. 00 5- 17-23 
608 ANSOT == ee «seme. 7.85 AEAGs 361, 020.00 6-30-24 
SOS. | Anson ee 3.83 Graded Shr oo Voneerer tc. ok 
614 Cabarrus== sae 9.20 Pan: 354, 080.00 5-22-24 
615 Cabarrus== pea. 3.88 rer Acs(S: 125, 980. 00 6—1-23 
Plorer te aberrs—- o2 epee Graded 3, 080. 00 3-22-24 
616 @abarrmisula ses see 8.59 (ee aee P20 2202 On| emer 
622 @apawhdaee se ee 10. 85 A. C, 342, 120. 00 5-25-23 
629 Catawba. .__---_- 7.52 PaA@: 258, 660.00 8—4-24 
Ge0ne.| Ganton 2200052 3.02 ANC: 100, 190. 00 T= -=22, 
630B | Gaston_.____----- 6. 65 yh 221, 720.00 3—8- 24 
6380B Eat) Gaston. 2--=2--- 0.95 AT hs 36, 940. 00 3—8- 24 
632 Gaston 22 2s ae 8. 50 ee Oe 291, 450. 00 1—9- 24 
H35Aes| Gaston 2. = ssae= - 7.67 A. C. 180, 000. 00 10—5- 22 
Goslss | Gaston se eu ae 3.86 A. CG. 68, 000. 00 10-14-23 
634 CesetOU tarts Uo Bridge | Recon. 4, 350. 00 10-16-22 
638 predelhe a> Soe oe 7.88 A. C. 287, 930. 00 1-20-23 
639 Iredell = Ss. 22s 10. 59 A. C. 428, 120. 00 1- 20-23 
640 Iredell zee s+ 8.17 Bit. Mac. 181, 990.00 11-10-24 
Giles radellaaces ss . 8.04 A. C. B08. 690 OD eb 8 
643 dredellzere oss 28 8.57 75 an GE Bl O16 OO ear Sik 
G4GA See lancolne | 5.5.25. 9.88 Graded £4060. 00) [Sere Ss 
647 Taweoln® os. 2-8. 7.10 Pac. 250, 100.00 7-31-24 
G48 Asse lincolnsas. = See 5.03 Graded St 4 Ue eee o> See 
651 Meek Gaston = 22osieee en. se Bridge AS 78000 Memes ees es 
652 Mecklenburg._..--|--------| Bridge 1, 930. 00 10- 30- 22 
653 Mecklenburg_-_-_--- 8. 84 Ae Ce 304, 250. 00 1- 25-24 
654 ~ | Mecklenburg_----- 10.10 ALC 308, 280. 00 12—4-23 
655 Mecklenburg__--. -- 1.57 Pe Ge 67, 180. 00 7-31-22 
656 Mecklenburg____-- 10.4 Bit. Mac. 6, 300. 00 10-30-22 
657 Mecklenburg. ---- - 13.80 Recon. 16, 560. 00 10-30- 22 


Elliot & Sholes. 

Hedrick Construction Co. 

Nello Teer. 

W. B. Kiker. 

Zeigler & Dalton. 

White & Simpson. 

Jelly Plott 

Town of Lexington. 

Elliot & Sons & Boggs—Austin Bros. Bridge Co. 
Town of Lexington. 

Hagedorn Constr. Co.—Heilig & Sherrill. 
Hagedorn Construction Co.—J. A. Peterson. 
Elliott-Sholes Co. 

L. M. Lowdermilk. 

W. B. Kiker. 

Royer-Ferguson Construction Co. 
Leaksville Lumber Co. 

Hagedorn Construction Co. 

J. M. Gregory. 

Zeigler & Dalton—Kiker & Yount. 

J. L. Brinkley. 

Robt. G. Lassiter & Co. 

Jue E lott: 

Hagedorn Construction Co. 

O. A. Mann & Co.—Chitwood & Carpenter. 
O. A. Mann & Co.—A. W. McClay. 
Dawkins Construction Co. 

Mayfield Construction Co.—F. P. Holder. 
R. G. Lassiter & Co. 

J. F. Mulligan Construction Co. 

Wm. F. Bowe, Jr. 

Gibson Construction Co.—Nello Teer. 

C. K. Teague. 

J. F. Mulligan Construction Co.-E. A. Wood & Co. 
Mayfield Construction Co. 

Wesco Construction Co. 

Royer-Ferguson Co.—J. L. Brinkley. 
Allpart Construction Co. 

Jamison Brothers. 

Nello L. Teer. 


| Cheatwood & Driscoll. 


Cheatwood & Driscoll—Atlantic Bridge Co. 
George R. Martin. 

Zeigler & Dalton—J. L. Brinkley. 

J. A. Kreis. 

Bolton Construction Co. 

Guss Ginn-R. M. Thurmond. 

W. E. Graham. 

Concrete Steel Bridge Co. 

Geer & Wilson—Booz-Lloyd & Co. 
Lampton & Burke—J. A. Peterson. 

Ben F. Teeter—J. A. Peterson. 

A. L. Harris—Oliver & Costello Bros. 
Thompson-Caldwell—Atlantie Bridge Co. 
Lee J. Smith. 

Lee J. Smith—L. M. Lefler & Smith. 
Union Paving Co. 

A. L. Harris—R. M. Thurmond & Co. 

W. F. McCanless. 

W. F. McCanless—Hobbs-Peabody Constr. Co. 
W. F. McCanless. 

Davis-Wilcox Construction Co. 

Gaston County. 

Gaston County. 

State Forces. 

Thomy son-Caldwell Co. 

R. M. Hudson Co.—Luten Bridge Co. 

W. E. Graham. 

Tredell County. 

Stearns Brothers. 

J. F. Mulligan Const. Co.—Harris & Spaulding. 
A. L. Harris—R. M. Thurmond & Co. 
Gus Ginn. 

State Forces. 

State Forces. 

Union Paving Co.—Luten Bridge Co. 
Lampton & Burks. 

Speed-Parker Co., Inc.—Luten Bridge Co. 
State Forces. 

State Forces. 


18 Nortu CarouinA HicHway BULLETIN 








STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA---Continued 
Projects Completed (Continued) 








NO. COUNTY LENGTH TYPE APPROXIMATE COST | COMPLETED CONTRACTOR 









658 Mecklenburg___--- 9.55 A. C. 18 304, 800.00 5-15-24 | Union Paving Co. 

659A | Mecklenburg_____-]____-._- Bridge 7,420. 00 9- 29-23 | Luten Bridge Co. 

661 Richmond ses. 9.76 "ya: 45, 100. 00 4-17-24 | McDonald & Brooks. 

662A | Richmond__------- 6.19 Graded 12) (aU, nlas eee T. N. Chandler—Yadkin Construction Co. 
665 RICHI OMG =a mens 5.07 Ce 201, 830. 00 10—9- 23 | A. J. Wardrep. 

670 Rowan eee ae 4.53 Cone. 142, 220. 00 11-15-23 | Harris Construction Co. 

671 ROwWaAne es ae 7.34 A. C, ol0¢(20,, 00 (ae tees a. ee Thompson-Caldwell Construction Co.—Atlan- 











































tic Bridge Co. 
672 Rowan oe 3.56 A. C. 162, 130.00 11-10-24 | Stearns Bros.—J. A. Kreis. 
673 Davidson-Rowan_.- . 59 Bridge 225, 650. 00 8-15-24 | Hardaway Constr. Co.—Elliot & Sons. 
677 Scotland-Robeson-_| 8.60 Ps 286, 350.00 8-20-24 | P. R. Ashby—J. B. Murphy. 
686 Stanly, Sheet 16.51 Graded 104, 6602009 52.2) 2 ee Lee J. Smith—J. L. Brinkley & Sons. 
691 Union 32". 2s, See Bridge 15, 940. 00 10-31-23 | J. L. Brinkley. 
692 Uiio ne <= eee 2.28 A. C. 71, 940. 00 12-28-21 |Redmon Construction Co. 
693 Union 22 es 22228 1,14 ANarey 6, 080. 00 2-23-23 | Sykes-Collins Co. 
694 Unione. 562 222 | ees ee Bridge 23, 620. 00 9-24-23 | Hagedorn Construction Co. 
695 Union == se— ae 4.51 AS Cy 138, 860. 00 9-14-22 | Redmon Construction Co. 
696 Union = 2 see 2 6. 04 Av: 187, 560. 00 12—8-23 | Redmon Construction Co. 
700 Alleghany - _------ 7.90. |W. B. Mac. - 154,000. 00 11-14-23 | W. E. Graham. 
701 Alleghany-Wilkes__| 8.00 | Bit. Mac. 201, 300. 00 5-13-24 | W. E. Graham. 
7024 | Alleghany____---- 7.75 | Bit. Mace. 945.300; OOMiae ce ee eee O’Brien Construction Co.—Luten Bridge Co. 
702B | Alleghany___-__-- 6.49 Gravel 84, 382.00 3-19-25 | Turner-Hartsoe—Luten Bridge Co. 
703{F 4) Alleghany....---- 4.99 | Bit. Mac. 27, 520. 00 1—4-24 | State Forces. 
TIO er Askew sane Aner ER etd Ge 144, 590. 00 8-17-24 | Pittman Construction Co. 
711 Assholes: S's coe 6. 50 Gravel 66, 000. 00 11—8-24 | Little Contracting Co. 
713 Ashe, Jes 25. see 3. 53 Pee) 145, 780. 00 8-14-24 | Overstreet & Nance—Concrete Steel Bridge Co. 
719 (Caldwellac > — see Melee aes tees Bridge 4,980. 00 9-19-22 | Cottrell & Howard. 
719B | Caldwell__-....--- .99 Gravel 3, 550. 00 11-15-22 | J. G. Bumgardner. 
722 Caldwell > ssa 7.40 Recon. 19, 660. 00 1-18-22 | County Forces. 
723A | Caldwell. -_-—------ 2150 Gravel 40, 000. 00 8-22-21 | Purchased. 
724 Caldwellu. _ -2=--= 4.66 de oe 68, 900. 00 7-24-23 | County Forces—R. M. Thurmond & Co. 
725 Caldwell___.----- 4.00 Recon. 28, 380. 00 2-24-23 | County Commissioners. 
726 Caldwell. 3-522 11.00 Graded 80, 000. 00 4-28-24 | State Forces. 
126A" | Caldwell. -.---22 11.00 Gravel 60, 500. 00 4-10-24 | J. F. Mulligan Construction Co. 
wal Daviess e322 9h 5.46 POG: 200, 750. 00 7-21-23 | G. R. Martin—Heilig & Sherrill. 
Renae |) Davie tas :!- 2 ose 8.07 Grade 35, 480. 00 11-12-24 | J. F. Mulligan Construction Co. 
(32 Bee Davie... eee 8.07 PAC: 311, 030. 00 10-29-24 | Hardaway Construction Co. 
741 Forsyth. 22%. ase 8.90 Cone. 321, 930. 00 3-19-24 | Hardaway Construction Co. 
742 Horsy thas eee 10. 62 : 413, 070. 00 6-11-24 | Harris Construction Co. 






RG 

A. C 414, 670.00 8-12-24 | Atlantic Bithulitic Co. 

dats! 15, 000. 00 2-22-23 | Forsyth County. 

ae 91, 820. 00 3-26-24 | J. F. Mulligan. 

8: figsh 138, 400.00 12-19-24 | Mulligan Construction Co —Piedmont Const. Co. 

751 Dtokees puch oie 7.16 aT: = 35, 340. 00 8-26-22 | W. E. Graham. 

AUP ONS 

a 

idee © 

BR: C 










752 Stokesee- 2: oa. ae 9. 67 148, 500. 00 7-26-24 | W. E. Graham. 

31, 450. 00 11—5-22 | W. E. Graham. 

82, 070. 00 10- 27- 23. | Geo. R. Martin. 

: lee 50, 300. 00 2—4- 23 | Leaksville Lumber Co. 

765 Surry s 2. ae ee 3.39 Cone. 123, 750. 00 3-26-24 | Campbell Construction Co. 

770A. | Watauga_.-----.-- 3.00 | Bit. Mac. 72, 600. 00 9-16-24 | State Forces. 

(1p \Wataugae ses 13. 50 Gravel 46, 200. 00 9 16-24 | State Forces. 

781 Wilkesi 2-2 222e-)- 14.50 Recon. 250, 000.00 12-17-24 | J. F. Mulligan—State Forces. 

782 Wilkes 2 ee). sees 5.97 Ra 207, 970. 00 8—4-23 | Hyde & Baxter. 

783 Wilkes-Watauga_-__| 36.00 Gravel 175, 000. GO 9-30-23 | Chandler & Ragland. 

784 Willies fc. meee e 4.97 TS: 90, 200. 00 1- 12-24 | J. F. Mulligan Constr. Co.—Foster Constr. Co. 
785 Wilkes 4 Seay 2.52 PAG 76, 120. 00 10—1-23 | J. D. Brookshire & Co. 

790 Wacdkim=s seen. 1012 PzéC: 330450500 tec 2 2 oe Pittman Construction Co. 

791 VYadlanss20 9. 5.21613. 40 Grade 127, 960. 00 10-31-24 | W. E. Graham—Luten Bridge Co. 

800 AVIV 22. Oe Mose 5.84 ia: 199, 120. 00 11- 28-24 | O’Brien Construction Co.—J. A. Kreis. 
801 AVGrY ela see .99 |W.B. Mac. 28, 810. Ou 10- 26- 22 | Geer & Wilson. 

BOQ S| Mivery ier este ame 5.68 | Graded 118,070.00 | 12-16-24 | Hughes & Rae. 

811 Burkel ees. 5. 24 fea Nee 180, 460. 00 10- 30-23 | Southern Dray Co. 



























SIIB de Burkes Aon sc. 2c sale egos Bridge 18, 150. 00 3-19-24 | R. W. Curtis. 
SLZA = Durke 2 re ee 4.89 Graded 615.7 70700 jae es cee M. A. Kallach—Padgett & Justice. 
813 Pirkec2 2) Cee ies eee Bridge 3, 700. 00 8-11-24 | R. W. Curtis. 
814 Burkey see 72) 8.69 mG 35, 660. 00 4-25-23 | M. A. Kollock. 
815 Burke-Cleveland- 
Haneolaes awe 11.63 Aiea § 127, 020. 00 6- 17-24 | Geer & Wilson—J. L. Van Glahn. 
821 Cleveland__.-----| 1.58 PEC 60,190.00 4—4-24 | Davis- Wilcox Construction Co. 
822 Cleveland_-_-----. 10.47 Apo 408, 180. 00 9—4- 24 | Elliott & Sons—J. A. Kreis & Co. 
823 Cleveland... --- 2-7 1.90 ae Ge 80, 440. 00 8-15-22 | Southern Paving Co.—Z. B. Weathers & Son. 
833 Henderson_--..---- 5. 20 Gravel 61, 170.00 10-26-23 | S. L. Davis Constr. Co.—Asheville Constr. Co. 
836A | Henderson-__------ 9.10 Graded 175, 980.00 10-18-24 | J. B. Hawkins—J. L. Van Glahn & Co. 
836B | Henderson___----- 9.51 Pac, 311, 250.00 12—1-24 | J. M. Gregory & Co. 
837 Henderson__-_----- 5.83 |W.B. Mac 70, 000. 00 9-16-23 | Dixon Construction Co. 
837B | Henderson__-_----} 5.83 A. C. 74, 370. 00 10-20-23 | Dixon Construction Co. 
844 MeDowelles suae 1.8 PG. 61, 510. 00 12-13-21 | Bolton Construction Co. 
845 McDowell_______- 7.19 Gravel 184, 850. 00 12- 22-22 | J. W. Stay p Constr. Co.- Praytor, Howton & Wood. 
846 McDowell_______- 10. 06 Gravel 284, 980. 00 6-19-24 | Asheville Constr. Co.—W. T. Taylor Constr. Co. 
846A | McDowell_____._- Ailes Graded 28, 420. 00 6- 19 24 | Asheville Construction Co. 
847 McDowell__---_-- 8.84 Graded 107, 580.00 11—7-24 | C. W. Lacy—Oliver & Costello Bros. 










848 MeDoyellee 2s) 2 ae i 31, 130. 00 10-23-23 ' R. M. Thurmond & Co. 

















Nort Carouina Highway BULLETIN 


19 











STATUS OF STATE WORK IN NORTH CAROLINA--Continued 
Projects Completed (Continued) 








161-297 
215 

237B 
448 

487A 
537C 
570B 
720C 
753C 
824 

915A 
915B 
982 

990A 


COUNTY LENGTH 
McDowell______-_- 14.00 
McDowell____-_--_- 10.85 
Mitchell Sees == 4.97 
Miibchelleete eee ere ro Oe 
Mitchella. 2-2. 2 7.04 
IMinte hie eae a rrers ae orn 
NEreChell sere 2 ee tite: 
polewee eee e 5.96 
TREE VET C OO len et a eee a 
Ratherordea.. 2 4.80 
Rutherford2s-—- 2 9.79 
Rutherfordes- 22. 6.55 
RATE hOncwe eee eee 2 
Rit erhOr Cesare an = eee 
Hvubherford 2.22582 15.80 
CLG MeLrOrG ee een lee ee 
RUMelIOLU Saree aloe ee 
Vance yes. eee 2.48 
Buncombe__-_-_---_- TE 
Buncombe-------- 4.95 
iBuncomberseene. = 2.58 
Buncombe__--_---- 1. 60 
Cherokees__ =. 7.56 
@herokeass =o ase= 10. 33 
(Sherokeeu-o=_- 2 = 10.33 
Raye ere 2a te = 5.01 
Clayveee et = st sc 12. 37 
Grahame = 22s 12.90 
(Grahams: 2.222" 2.92 
Haywood._.-...—- LS 
ay WOOGla= = 2-2 OV 
Haywood sso = 14.7 
Haywood... -- 10.18 
AORN 24 ie 7.56 
aeksome sae 1.68 
NAconus ssa e ees 4.97 
Wiac One ee ae Adah 
Midicomme as ioe 2.85 
Madison-Yancey -_| 23.98 
Madison=. —22s— 6.60 

COUNTY LENGTH 
Nash-Wilson-__---- 12.50 
Cravenaeee = == LORaG 
Johnstoneeese a ao 
(hec@ese esas. see 6.62 
Wialke eae ema seeks 6.57 
Guillordseee sense ee ee ee 
Noone’ Sater lee, cee 
Caldwella 22-2 = 12.61 
SCOKeS yan. erro 3.44 
@leveland== 22s. 10.19 
Gherokectssee ome 8.62 
Cherokee. -__----- 8.35 
Swalneee 2 see ee 6.82 
Transylvania_ - - -- .47 





TYPE 


Gravel 


APPROXIMATE COST 


$ 75, 000.00 


237, 960.00 
253, 100. 
9, 310. 
283, 170. 
49, 500. 
157, 840. 
196, 530. 
1, 980. 
150, 490. 
106, 370. 
73, 030. 
6, 870. 
30, 880. 
166, 420. 
12, 370. 
12, 260. 
87, 051. 
359, 730. 
236, 110. 
105, 300. 
77, 750. 
146, 440. 
92, 590. 
99, 550. 
70, 810. 


198, 680. 


222, 400. 
25, 340. 
112, 550. 

6, 490. 
14,710. 
409, 680. 
241, 340. 
93, 500. 
81, 990. 


20, 000.00 











COMPLETED 


6-21-23 
10-26-23 


11-10-23 
11-26-23 


6—1-23 








CONTRACTOR 





State Forces. 

Appalachian Construction Co. 

Fisk-Carter Construction Co. 

Luten Bridge Co. 

Porter & Boyd—tL. J. Chandler. 

R. M. Thurmond & Co. 

Mulligan Construction Co.—Anderson Const. Co. 

Southern Paving Co.—Henry Constr. Co. 

Geer & Wilson. 

Fisk Carter Construction Co. 

Geer & Wilson. 

Micheaux Constr. Co.—Geer & Wilson. 

Austin Bros. Bridge Co. 

Austin Bros. Bridge Co. 

C. R. Willard & Sons. 

Micheaux Constr. Co.—Lee J. Smith Constr. Co. 

Gwathmey-Saddler Co. 

Fiske-Carter Construction Co. 

R. C. Stevens—A. J. Wardrup. 

Wilson Construction Co.—R. G. Rand. 

Asheville Paving Co.—R. C. Stevens. 

Asheville Paving Co.—R. C. Stevens. 

Ross Bros.Constr. Co.- W.T.Moore Cone.Prod.Co 

H. A. Wills—Southern Dray Co. 

Mills-Williams Construction Co. 

E. A. Wilson & Co.—W. T. Moore Conc.Pro- 
ducts Co. 

L. J. Smith Constr. Co.—W. T. Moore Cone. 
Products Co. 

Lee J. Smith Construction Co.—C. M. Dicus. 

C. M. Dicus. 

Alexander & Patton—H. A. Broun & Co. 

O’Brien Construction Co. 

State Forces. 

A. J. Wardrup. 

Wright & Nave—O’Brien Constr. Co. 

Mills- Williams Construction Co. 

J. T. Plott—J. E. Lane & Co. 

J. T. Plott—J. E. Lane & Co. 

State Forces. 

R. H. Wright & Sons—O’Brien Constr. Co. 

State Forces—C. M. Dicus. 





Projects under Contract 


ESTIMATED COST 


$ 408, 431.00 
277, 520.00 
15, 262. 00 
67, 498.00 
131, 160.00 
18, 151.00 
17, 137. 00 
99, 140.00 
130, 160.00 
223, 960.00 
208, 360.00 
72, 428 .00 
13, 460. 00 


CONTRACTOR 





Highway Engineering & Const. Co—Peterson & Karnhardt. 
Virginia Engineering Co. 

C. D. Riggsbee. 

J. F. Mulligan Construction Co.—Peterson & Earnhardt. 
C. B. Hester—Roanoke Iron & Bridge Works. 

Roanoke Iron and Bridge Works. 

Atlantic Bridge Co. 

Thompson-Caldwell Construction Co. 

George R. Martin. 

Geer & Wilson—E. A. Wood & Co. 

Appalachian Construction Co. 

R. H. Wright & Son. 

Dicus Bros.—E. A. Wood. 

Piedmont Construction Co. 


90 . Norte Caroumna Hicuway: BurrEetin 










WORK UNDER CONTRACT 





Summary 























































































































STATE FEDERAL AID 
TYPE 
Length Cost Length Cost 
BP. Gone ooeces ease pe eee Se al re ee 69.52 |$ 1, 500, 572,004)! So. Se ee reer eee ia 
ee. CMD es nt eee ate mites feg es Seas TES ee ee ee 51 15,262 00 42! : OME Re ee ee ee ee 
W.. B. Maes. S22 ote tee ee ee es ee AT 13, 4602005 125) <2. See Seeea oe ee eee te 
Ty Sickie Ete oe eek ee a Se ele a ne 12.48 109, I2% 00. seu 5 {eee Ee ae roe Serpe ne eres ees 
Graded = oe med. oe tcc a a eee as 30.85 176; 230.4900) 2. 37a a ate eee ee Coke 
Bridges. 2222-2202 =3-2 S25 Ces aes ee eae ee BOO OU | Bis 4a = as ee ear ae Se ee Pee 
Total. a0 223 2 ee ee 113.83 |$ 1, 8495932 007 |e. ts seceeneslee secs PRs Sins Ws, Gs 
WORK UNDER CONSTRUCTION 
ey ee ae eae i ee od ae 68.17 |$ 1; 163. 54) OO ghee See. te.) . oe a 
| SOE © AED eh hit hill ed oR wpe SF, Vo Bee PEE ae as. 120.34 3, 994; OF 000 Saw Soe Os) te ee eee 
Bs Oo Ee ra Se te, ee ee, se 76.46 25176, 225 00 face cre Sees to, es ee 
Bit. Mac.c2 eos 3 ee 2. Seen Se eae 2.50 30,000 SOU ke See ese . Lae & See ae ee 
WW Ba dM aie a see hela ee a ae ee ee ee? 1, 534, 168 0005)2 5 = eee a ee ee er 
T. Sa. .ofe es ee ee ee: eee ee ee 193 .46 1,142, 049. OQ set ek se [oie ere ae 
S. Oe a. Sens es. eee, See ar 15.86 219, T7000 | 2. ee. oes so eee eben ne. 
Graded An 258 <= Be See oa ee 255.55 3, 0405, (88008 )s cee ee Sa ee ae 
Gravel “23. (262k = = 2 ese ae Ba ee ee ae 111.16 1,482, 682,00 |. Seek ake Soe eee ee hae 
ReGOn, _2-seo252-4222b5-482 seen ene oes see ee] ee es lo ee ere | ee A eee S 
Bridges. ° 2 gt. 2.8 Sen toe a eae ea ee eee re 1, 645, 407.007) Fe! Da pe oe ee oe 
Total £23) 2232 po eee: Sa eee ae eee 921.22 |$ 16, 435), 695. OO lets Bisee es Se eee ee ere eine te ae ee 
WORK COMPLETED 
STATE FEDERAL AID 
Type 
Length Cost Length Cost 

BG, oe ote ee ee Be 2 eee eee ere ae 217.14 |$ se ROBO, aA SO a ates Be + fois tacit ieee ly een 
POG). 228 28 Be See 374.37 13, 004, 551.00 25.56 889, 940.67 
Wat Qian: oie ebed Wee ee Bee See es ee 410.44 13, 379, 920.00 42.29 1,521, 368.25 
SAMS Cell oo ee ee ee Oe ee ae ee > eee 69.93 1, 149, 910.00 22.91 763, 048 .82 
Bit: Mac... ton. 20S ee ee ee eee 77.10 1,735, 160.00 34.82 804, 336.77 
em nd SEE on Se eee ee ee ee 213.58 1, 694, 470.00 83.90 785, 198.22 
WB. Mace oe ate Be ee ee eee 63.17 1, 133, 000.00 28.39 769, 653 .07 
BD Sekt cen es Le ete ae ee ee 485 .44 4, 505, 426 .00 509.18 5, 228, 1382.54 
Gravel’ . :25ghe Se a aS 270.18 2, 316, 082.00 42.56 ~ 488, 699.18 
Greded.:.J2isc- = 9. ie. 2th eS eee eee 466.51 3, 410, 030.00 31.41 487, 267 .56 
Brick’). 2. 224... se den eee, See ee eet 9.50 233, 180500. (eos cos gue <1 os eee  e eeee 
Sheet Piles C2. 222 323.4 eee Ee oe ee ae ee ee ee 14, 180.00" (ous 4 2s ae ee eee ee 
Cord. so 3 ee es 2.40 70,950: 00:. |. teeaee cae ee ieee ee er 
Recotisc 23.254 oo Boe 2 ee eh nner oe eee ee 75.45 ATS; 600.00 15 Saeco eee eee J ee 
Bridges. J2.¢<0-82 <2 a~ sgER a Se eee ee ee es 1 OL4865% 00s | Se aeee ae ee 651, 051.10 
Totaled. sie Se ee Ce eee 2,735.21 |$ 51, 729,644.00 | 821.02 |$ 12, 388, 696.18 


LEGEND 


—tGraded. Recon.—fReconstruction. Cord.—fCorduroy. 


* Hard Surface. ¢ “G” Type. 


Total Roadway Mileage 4,591.28. Total estimated cost of Roadway $79, 057, 346.08. 
Total estimated cost of Bridges $8, 346,621.10. Corrected to April Ist, 1925. 


P. C.—*Plain Concrete. R.C.—*Reinforced Concrete. A. C.—*Asphaltic Concrete. S. A——*Sheet Asphalt. Bit. Mac.—*Bitu- 
minous Macadam. W. B. Mac.—*Water Bound Macadam. T. S.—fTop Soil. 


The figures shown in the table for the cost of “Bridges” includes only the larger bridges which were let under separate 
contracts. The cost of “Roadway” includes both roadway and small bridges and culverts. 


S. C.—{Sand Clay. Gravel—jGravel. Graded 
































Nort Carouina Highway BuLietin 33 





Washed and Screened 
iSyad: Gravel, Crushed Stone 


Conforming to the specifications of the North Carolina 
State Highway Commission 
Prompt shipments by rail or water 
Favorable freight rates to all North Carolina potnts 
| Quotations gladly furnished on request 


THE ARUNDEL CORPORATION 


MAIN OFFICE: | | BRANCH OFFICE: 
Bier? Pratt St. | 500 Natl. Bank of Commerce Bldg. 
Baltimore, Maryland Norfolk, Virginia 


BUFFALO-SPRINGFIELD 





The choice of experienced users. 


Obtainable in all weights and types— 
either steam or motor propelled. 





INQUIRIES INVITED 





The Buffalo Springfield Roller Co. 
Sprinégfield.Ohio. 





North Carolina Agent 7 E. F. CRAVEN Greensboro 
i te | “The Road Machinery Man”’ 





oe? NortH CarouinA Hicoway BULLETIN 














Report of Inspection of 


A PERMANENT CULVERT 





4 





An Armco Culvert Between Lenoir and Blowing Rock, North Carolina. 


cote cee The rugged strength and elasticity as eae fo & 
of this Armco Culvert enable it to 
ae hold up tons of rock on this mountain anew in: 


road above the clouds. 


THE DIXIE CULVERT & METAL COMPANY 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 
J. G. Batpwin, W. H. McNEIL1, 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. LaxeEview, N. C. 





ingot tron 





Nortu Carotina Highway BULLETIN 23 


NEWPORT CULVERT COMPANY 


NEWPORT, KENTUCKY 


THE OLD RELIABLE 
“GENUINE OPEN HEARTH IRON” 


CUEVAE RE 





For the convenience of our 
local customers we carry 
a large stock in Raleigh. 


lek SLAUGHTER | 


State Representative 
Office and Storage Yards Corner Mountford and Lenoir Streets 


PHONE 2424 





24 





Nortu Carouina Highway BULLETIN 






ey 
ROAD BUILDING 
and MAINTENANCE 


“OUR BESTSare used for all kinds 
of road building and road mainte- 
nance as well as rock crushing,” a 
road superintendent writes. “I find 


that they will do any job that we E 3 F C R A VEN 


have, and we save money by using “The Road Machinery Man" 
them in place of horses to do all GREENSBORO. N. C. , 
kinds of road work. We have two State Distributor 


999 


‘Thirties’ and two ‘Sixties. 


It will pay YOU to investigate the 
advantages of Best Tractors. Send 
for a list of nearby owners and let 
their testimony—man to man-—con- 


Factory Branch— Warehouse 
St. Louis, Missouri 


SALES OFFICES 


San Francisco 


vince you. _ 127 Montgomery Street 


New York City 
30 Church Street 


C. L. BEST TRACTOR CO. 


General Offices— Factory 
SAN LEANDRO, CALIFORNIA 


BEST 2S 














Nortu CaroitinA Hicuway BuLuetin DS 


GALION PLANERS 


THE CHEAPEST AND~BEST WAY 
TO MAINTAIN ROADS 


<FROM THIS 
BY MEANS OF 



















ROBERT R. GODFREY, County Surveyor 
of Ramsey County, Minn., says: 


“Our cost per mile per year previous to using 
the Galion Premier Planer was $170.50 while with 
the installation of this new equipment, the 
cost was reduced about 74% or to $44.35 per 
mile per year. The Planer covers and main- 
tains 25 miles of graveled roads in 
a day, taking the place of eight 
teams drawing pony graders. 







Catalogue 
Showing our 


complete line 


of Road Builders 
and Contractors E guipment. 


GALION IRON WORKS & MFG.CO. 


GALION OHIO 





“VINCHFIET p 
PORTLAND 
(CEMENT 








THE» ACKNOWLE DGED Soi ANDAR Dac r 
“eH; SOUMtme 


OFFICES AND MILLS 7 KINGSPORT, TENN, 











Dh 


NortH Carouina Highway BULLETIN 


In 
ti 


———— 
——SSa 
nd 
ed 


MI 





ONTRACTORS, Architects and En- 

gineers planning concrete construction 
work, can specify Lehigh Cement with the as- 
surance they will secure the highest quality 
cement—suitable for all concrete work —avail- 
able at all times—in all localities. 


LEHIGH- The National Cement, with 


—Largest Output in the World. 
—16 Mills from Coast to Coast. 
—Uniform Quality Everywhere. 
—Nation-wide Distribution. 
—Unequalled Service Facilities. 
—Largest Storage Capacity. 


1923 Output Over 16 Million Barrels 


LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY 


Pa. Chicago, Tl. 


Allentown, 
Spokane, Wash. 


Birmingham, Ala. 
NEw York, N. Y. 
BuFFALO, N. Y. 

Kansas Ciry, Mo. 


Boston, Mass. 
NEw CASTLE, Pa. 
Mason Ciry, Iowa 


PITTSBURG, Pa. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 


MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 


OMAHA, NEB. RICHMOND, VA. 


Nortu Carotina Hicuway BuLiEeTIN 





CONCRETE NORTH CAROLINA 
FOR : | FOR | 
PERMANENCE | 





~PROSPERITY 





Many Thousand Barrels used in 
the construction of North Carolina 
Highways—with perfect satisfaction 












© 
oo 








SERVICE 





TWO Annual Capacity 
Ot Dae TION SOURCES Ap proximately— 
RELIABILITY OF One and One-Quar- 
—Our VF atchwords oe 


ter Million Barrels 


ES 


SALES OFFICE 
715 EMPIRE BUILDING, BIRMINGHAM ALA. 





iia 


Nortu Caroitina Highway BULLETIN 














Adams “Leaning Wheel” Grader, with Back-sloper, finishing a flat-bottom back sloped ditch 


Better Work--and More per Dollar 


ITH Adams Leaning Wheel Graders you can do better work, you can handle 
the widest range of grading jobs, and you can do more grading per day, 
: or per dollar, than with any other grader. 
1 This is not an idle boast. Adams Graders have proved these claims in service 
for 40 years, and are reducing grading costs every day for thousands of contractors 
and road officials. 


This superiority is due to the Leaning Wheel feature of Adams Graders. It 
prevents skidding, insures perfect control, lessens the draft, increases the capacity, 
and enables them to handle unusual bank and ditch work, too difficult for straight- 
axle graders. 


THE ADAMS LINE 


Adams Graders in 6%, 7, 
Sl sand 12 ft blade 
lengths. 


Adams  Scarifier-Graders, Whether you are a contractor or road official, you can cut your grading costs and 





Scarifiers, Road Maintain- 
ers, Road Patrols, Drags, 
Plows, Scrapers, etc. 


Machines and parts in stock 
at Raleigh. 





x Have you a copy of this 


[5 catalog? 


get better results, by using Adams Graders. Send for a copy of our latest catalog. 

B the Adams has built Leaning Wheel Graders excluswely for 40 years. 

Wy / Recent wmitations lack the PROVED: PERFORMANCE which 
a + 


ws your assurance of satisfaction in Adams Graders. 

J. C. BENJAMIN:-:-:-RALEIGH, N. C. 
Office and Warehouse 723 W. Hargett Street 

Distributor for J. D. ADAMS & CO., Indianapolis, Indiana Phone 2719 


ADAMS 


ADJUSTABLE 
LEANING WHEEL 


GRADERS 


“The Original - A Proved Success Since 1885” 








30 


ounds 
Weight: BS or 6 feet 


Blade Leneth* 


THE AUSTIN STANDARD 
GRADER 


Weight: 2500 pounds 
Blade Length: 7 feet 


THE AURORA STANDARD 
AND SPECIAL GRADERS 


Weight of Standard: 2925 pounds. 
Blade Length: 8 feet 
Weight of Special: 3300 pounds. 
Blade Length: 7 or 8 feet 


THE AUSTIN MAMMOTH 
JUNIOR AND SENIOR 
GRADERS 
Weight of Junior: 6750 pounds, 
Blade Length: 10 feet 
Weight of Senior: 7600 pounds. 
Blade Length: 12 feet 


THE WESTERN No. 14 
SCARIFIER 


Weight: 11,500 pounds 


Nortu Caroitina Highway BuLueTIn 


WESTERN PATROL GRADERS 


Weight of No. 1—1400 pounds 
Blade Length: 8 feet 
Weight of No. 2: 1000 pounds 
Blade Length: 8 feet 


A-W GRADERS 


Below are mentioned, the four things that 
are the best possible advance guarantee of 
satisfactory service from any piece of road 
machinery. Let us see how A-W Graders 
meet the test. 


SCIENTIFIC DESIGN? 


The first Austin and Western graders were 
made over 40 years ago. In design and con- 
struction they are not only scientific, but 
above all things thoroughly practical, be- 
cause they embody all the worth-while 
features that these years of experience have 
developed, and no untried theories that have 
not stood the test of time. 


RUGGEDNESS? 


The second Western grader, made and sold in 
1879, is still in active service. 


QUANTITY PRODUCTION? 


Thousands of Austin and Western graders 
of all sizes are in daily use in practically every 
country in the world. 


A COMPLETE LINE? 


A-W graders range in weight from 1,000 to 
11,500 pounds; and in blade length, from 5 
feet to 12 feet. 


Whether your work be the construction of a 
new road through the roughest kind of 
country; the efficient, economical mainte- 
nance of an earth or gravel road; or ‘just 
grading’’; you will find on this page a model 
as good as made-to-order for you. General 
Catalog No. 24 tells all about these graders— 
Write for a copy. 


The Austin- Western Road 
Machinery Co. 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 


THE WESTERN STANDARD 
AND SPECIAL GRADERS 


Weight of Standard: 2675 pounds. 
Blade Length: 7 feet 
Weight of Special: 2900 pounds. 
Blade Length: 7 feet 


THE AUSTIN GIANT 

‘ GRADER 
Weight: 4150 pounds 
Blade Length: 8 feet 


THE WESTERN No. 20 
GRADER 


Weight: 11,500 pounds 
Blade Length: 12 feet 


THE AUSTIN 
JUNIOR AND SENIOR 
RIP-SNORTERS - 
Weight of Junior: 5000 pounds. 
Blade Length: 8 feet 
Weight of Senior: 9300 pounds. 
Blade Length: 9 feet 

















Buda reliability is known and 


215 E. DAVIE STREET 


valued by power users everywhere 


How well the Buda engine stands up under long, 
hard service is shown by the fact that the Buda is 
regular equipment on leading makes of industrial 
locomotives, wagon loaders, ditchers, air compressors 
and other construction machinery. Experienced con- 
tractors and engineers favor the Buda because it 
starts easily, keeps going day after day and helps 
put through every job on time. Its cost of upkeep is 
exceedingly low. You get your money’s worth when 


you buy Buda-powered machines. 


You can install a Buda engine in your present 
equipment, as there is a Buda for every power require- 
ment. Installations can be easily made in the field 


by your own mechanics. 


We carry in stock complete engines and genuine 


parts, and will give your orders instant attention. 


Motor & Equipment Company 


(Nash Motor Sales Company) 


PHONE 2440 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Tractor & Machinery Sales Co 


Distributors 
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 


\N 
DISTRICT ao 
D 


OFFICEOF A pROP 
4 


rer 
pistRict ene 


The above Tractors are from 
Seven to Nine years old and 
are still going strong. 


There's Only One CATERPILLAR’ Holt Builds It