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FINAL INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 



2018/2019 


o 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


IDP 2018/2019 

PAGE 

SECTION A 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

A. SPATIAL DESCRIPTION .5 

A.l VISION, MISSION and Core Values.12 

A.2 Legislative Framework.14 

A.3 Purpose and compliance of Integrated Development Plan (IDP).14 

A. 4 Approach and Methodology adopted.15 

SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 

SECTION B 

B. DEMOCRAPHIC PROFILE OF MUNICIPALITY .18 

B.l Maluti-A-Phofung Economic Profile .23 

B. 2 Households profile.29 

SECTION C 

C POWERS AND FUNCTIONS OF THE MUNICIPALITY .33 

C. l Maluti-A-Phofung Municipality’s Powers and Functions .33 

C. 2 Sustainable Developmental Goals.36 

SECTION D 

D PROCESSES FOLLOWED TO DEVELOP THE IDP.40 

D. l Process Plan .40 

D. 2 Process Plan Schedule 2018/2019 .51 

SECTION E 

E. SPATIAL ECONOMY AND DEVELOPMENT RATIONALE.58 

E.l Spatial Economy and development rationale.58 

E.l Spatial Development Framework .59 

E.2 Spatial Development Objectives.60 

E. 3 Pending township establishments .62 

STRATEGIES 

SECTION F 

F. STATUS QUO ASSESSMENT.78 

F.l Risk Management.78 


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F.2 Service Delivery.78 

F.3 Social Services.83 

F.4 Public participation and Good Governance.99 

F.5 Community Participation and needs assessment.100 

F.6 Municipal Organogram.112 

F.7 Financial Viability.121 

F.8 Local Economic Development.163 


SECTION G 

G. DEVELOPMENTAL STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES AND PROGRAMMES.168 

G. l Strategies, Objectives and Key Performance Indicators:.168 

Alignment of the IDP with National, Provincial and District. 

Priorities.168 

SECTION H 

H. SECTOR PLANS .187 

H.l Status of Sector plans.187 

H.2 Budget related Policies .188 

H.2 Spatial Development Framework.189 

H.3 Integrated Monitoring and Performance Management (PMS Framework).191 

H.4 Integrated HIV/AIDS.192 

H.5 Integrated Housing Chapters.193 

H.6 Integrated Local Economic Development (LED) Programme.193 

H.7 Disaster Management Plan.193 

H.8 Water Services Development Plan.194 

H. 9 Communication Strategy.194 

SECTION I 

I. DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES, PROGRAMME AND PROJECTS.197 

1.1 Basic Service Delivery and Infrastructure investment.197 

1.1.1 Roads, storm water and Public transport.197 

1.1.2 Electricity provision.202 

1.1.3 Improve water distribution and sanitation work.202 

1.2 Human settlements.203 

1.3 Community facilities and recreational centre.204 

1.4 Local Economic Development and Economic priorities.205 

1.5 Municipal Financial Viability and Management.210 

1.6 Municipal Transformation and Institutional Arrangements.211 

1.7 Good Governance and Public Participation.212 


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SECTION J 

J ALIGNMENTWITH NATIONAL AND PROVINCIAL OBJECTIVES 

AND PROGRAMMES.214 

J.l Alignment of the IDP with National, Provincial and District priorities.214 

J. 2 Alignment of priorities with National Key Performance Areas.219 

SECTION K 

K PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS OF OTHER SPHERES.223 

K. 1 PROJECTS LISTS.223 

K.1.1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH.223 

K.1.2 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 2018/19 PROJECT LIST.227 

INHOUSE PROJECTS IMPLEMENTED BY EDUCATION .227 

K.1.3 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND INFRASTRUCTURE. 

CAPITAL PROJECTS IMPLEMENTED BY PUBLIC WORKS AND. 

INFRASTRUCTURE.227 

K.1.4 DEPARTMENT OF POLICE, ROADS AND TRANSPORT. 

PROJECTS 2018/19 .228 

LIST OF PROJECTS DISTRICT AND TOWN ON 2018/19 MTEF.228 

K.1.5 PRMG PROJECTS .228 

K.1.6 DEPARTMENT OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM.229 


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SECTION A 


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 



A. SPATIAL DESCRIPTION OF MALUTI-A-PHOFUNG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY 


Maluti-A-Phofung local municipality is situated in the Free State province of South Africa. It was 
established in terms of the provincial Gazette No. 14 of 28 February 2000 issued in terms of Section 
21 of the Local Government Notice and Municipal Demarcation Act No.27 of 1998. Maluti-A- 
Phofung is a local municipality FS194 and was established on the 5 th December 2001. Maluti-A- 
Phofung is made up of four former TLC Local Authorities which are QwaQwa Rural, Kestell 
Phuthaditjhaba and Harrismith. Figure 1 below shows the locality of Maluti-A-Phofung. 



Figure 1: Maluti-A-Phofung Demarcation 

The municipality comprises of 35 wards and covers approximately 4 421 km 2 in extent. 
Phuthaditjhaba is the urban centre of QwaQwa and serves as the administrative head office of Maluti- 
A-Phofung municipality. 


5 














Surrounding Phuthaditjhaba are rural villages of QwaQwa established on tribal land administered by 
Department of Land Affairs. Harrismith is a service centre for the surrounding rural areas and a 
trading belt serving the passing N3 which links the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. 
Harrismith is surrounded by Tshiame located 12 km to the west and Intabazwe, which is located 
1,5km to the north. The town is an economic hub for people living in Tshiame, Intabazwe and 
Qwaqwa. Kestell is a service canter for the surrounding agricultural oriented rural area with Tlholong 
as the township. 

Kestell is situated along the N5 road that links Harrismith with Bethlehem. The rural areas of Maluti - 
A-Phofung comprise commercial farms and major nature conservation centres such as Qwaqwa 
National Park, Platberg, Sterkfontein Dam and Maluti Mountain Range. 

The area is not only a tourist attraction destination, but also makes a big contribution in generating 
gross agricultural income for the whole of the Free State Province and is also highly regarded for its 
beef production in the sector of agriculture. 

In comparison with the demographic composition of the rest of the Thabo Mofutsanyana District, 
MAP municipality has the highest population density with the 3 rd highest population density in the 
Free State. Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality (MAP) is a Category B municipality located in the 
eastern part of the Free State Province. The municipality forms part of a scenic tapestry, which 
changes dramatically with each season, the beauty and tranquillity of which is palpable and almost 
overwhelming, which has as its rock-bed the famous Maluti Mountains, from which the municipality 
is named after. Majestic mountains with sandstone cliffs, fertile valleys of crops that stretch as far as 
the eye can see, fields of Cosmos and the golden yellow hues of Sunflowers, are just a few of the 
enchanting sights that make this region unique. Battle sites and memorials left over from bygone 
wars, ancient fossil footprints from a prehistoric era, a wealth of art and craft and renowned resorts 
make this part of the region a destination to explore. The municipality is made up of three major 
towns, namely: Harrismith; Kestell and Qwaqwa / Phuthaditjhaba. The following figures points out 
where various development would be taking place within the three towns of Maluti-A-Phofung in the 
next financial year. 


6 




MALUTIA PHOFUNG SPATIAL 
DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

Map g 

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 


LEGENO 

— CtosIRoad 

— Cb»2Roid 

— Ctus 3 Road 

— CtoJdRoid 

Stwa^t WO fn Biff# Zono 
Urban [fl 9 « 

□ Qufftr Zeros 

EXISTING 

Industrial 
Repdonfci 
| Landfdl Sites 

□ Pr*«o Op*n Spaces 

□ Plrvato Open Spaces 

■ Sevwafe Works 

□ Cemetiry 

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 

□ F\rt*e Rendemu Ertenion 
0 Rural Restructuring 

S| Proposed Cemetary 


SSwfc.,*’ 


w 


QwaQwa - Phuthaditjhaba 


7 










MALUTIA PHOFUNG SPATIAL 
DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 


HARRISMITH, INTABAZWE 
ANDTSHIAME 


LEGEND 

0' Interchange 

— Rivers 

— Class 1 Road 

— Class 2 Road 

— Class 3 Road 
=-= Railway lines 
Q Urban Edge 

ri Sewerage 500m Buffer Zone 
^Rivers 30m Buffe Zoner 
EXISTING 

| Business 
| Agriculture 
[J Community Facility 
[J Education 
| Industrial 

□ Residential 
| Government 

□ Service Industry 

□ Institutional 

□ Municipal Purposes 


[J Public Open Spaces 

□ Airport and related uses 
| Dump Site 

| Sewerage Works 
@ Cemetary 

□ Taxi Rank 

| Roads and Streets 

□ Medium Residential 
| Noxious Industry 
FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 

Q Future Neighbourhood Development 
| Proposed Cemetary 
22 Future Industrial 
0 Future Business 
Q Restructuring Zone 


Gommowmiaai 


I Id INI I i ; 


Harrismith, Intabazwe and Tshiame 


8 





























MALUTIA PHOFUNG SPATIAL 
DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 

KESTELL-THOLONG 


LEGEND 

— Class 1 Road 

— Class 2 Road 

— Class 3 Road 

— Rivers 
0 Urban Edge 

!"! Sewerage 500m Buffer Zone 
□ Rivers 30m Buffe Zoner 

EXISTING 


H Community Facility 
[] Education 

■ General Industry 

■ General Residential 

■ Government Purposes 

□ industrial 

□ Municipal Purposes 
[] Public Open Space 

□ Service Industry 

□ Single Residential 

■ Sewerage Works 
0 Cemetary 

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS 

□ Residential Extension 


A 


cocpsrasw gwerara 
jndtrcnicrilaHiiri 

4 CnvnN Umtixw 


•'W>' 

W' 


Kestell - Tlholong 


9 














Special Economic Zone (SEZ) Spatial Development Layout 



CULTURAL & HISTORICAL INFORMATION 

Cultural and historical landscape of Maluti-A-Phofung Municipality lies within a rich heritage 
heartland of the Free State Province. Traditional systems of governance are prevalent and 
consistently applied within the municipal jurisdiction. Maluti-A-Phofung is imbued with historical 
sites of heritage significance. The list of such sites is presented below and according to their 
locations and towns within the municipality’s area of jurisdiction. Therefore, it is imperative to 
preserve and promote such heritage sites so that they could contribute maximally to social cohesion 
and economic participation of local people. Non preservation and protection of these heritage sites 
and cultural resources could impact on the social cohesiveness of the area and the quality of life of 
residents. It could also result in the loss of economic opportunities available through the growing 
international market in cultural tourism. 


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The following sites obtained the status of World, National and Provincial heritage sites in 
terms of the new Act (SAHRA, 2003): 


Phuthaditjhaba heritage sites 


SITE NAME 

DECLARATION TYPE 

uKhahlamba Drakensberg 

World Heritage Site 

Chief Wetsies’ Cave 

San Paintings sites 


Source: SAHRA 2013 


Kestell heritage sites 


SITE NAME 

ARCHIVE STATUS 

DECLARATION 

TYPE 

Olivier Street, Kestell, 

Register 

Heritage Register 

Olivier Street, Kestell 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage 

Site 

Nederduitse Gereformeerde Church, 

Van Riebeeck Street, Kestell 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage 

Site 


Harrismith heritage sites 


SITE NAME 

ARCHIVE STATUS 

DECLARATION 

TYPE 

Retiefklip, Kerkenberg, Harrismith District 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 

Nederduitse Gereformeerde Church, Church 
Street, Warden, Harrismith District 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 

Town Hall, Warden Street, Harrismith 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 

36A Boys Street, Harrismith 

Register 

Heritage Register 

Badenhorst Building, Warden Street, 
Harrismith 

Register 

Heritage Register 

A E Odell Building, Stuart Street, 

Harrismith 

Register 

Heritage Register 

Nederduitse Gereformeerde Church, Van 
Riebeeck Street, Kestell 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 

Old Toll-bridge, Wilge River, Swinburne, 
Harrismith District 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 

Swalu Bridge, Landdrost, Harrismith 

District 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 

Farmhouse, Klerksvlei, Harrismith District 

National Monument 

Provincial Heritage Site 


Source: SAHRA 2013 


Number 

Heritage site 

Locality 

1 

Groenkop 

Kestell 

2 

Paulus Mopeli Statue 

Phuthaditjhaba 

3 

Botlokwa Monument 

Phuthaditjhaba 

3 

Voortrekker Monument 

Kestell 

4 

Dutch Reformed Church 

Kestell 

Source: SAH 

[RA 2013 


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Summary of Cultural Heritage sites: 


Heritage type 

Phuthaditjhaba 

Harri smith 

Kestell 

Historic or 
period buildings 

*Morena Wetsi Cave 
*San paintings 

*San paintings 

*Dithako 

Historic dwelling 
houses or hostels 

*Matswakeng (Chief Koos Mota 
kraal) 

*Market Hall 

*Pops Station 

Monuments and 
Structures 

*Jwala-Boholo (mountains and 
graves) 

*Sefika sa Botlokoa(Monument) 

*President Brand 
Bridge 

* Graves not 
declared 

monuments 

Natural land 

areas 

*Caves in the mountains 

* Botanical Garden 
*Purified Tree 

*None 


Source: SAHRA 2013 


A.l VISION AND MISSION 


VISION 


To be a sustainable, service oriented, tourist destination of choice 


MISSION 


To collectively provide sustainable and quality municipal services 


STRATEGIC GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 


O To ensure the provision of Infrastructure development and service delivery 
LJ To promote local economic development 
O To ensure spatial planning 

O To ensure good corporate governance and public participation 
LJ To ensure municipal transformation and organisational development 
O To ensure municipal financial viability 


CORE VALUES 


O Professionalism 
LJ Teamwork 
O Accountability 
O Integrity 


12 


















The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa bestows upon government, and municipalities in 
particular, a developmental mandate in as far as service delivery should be planned, focused and 
carried out. Practical manifestation of this Constitutional provision is further found in the promulgation 
of the Municipal Systems Act (No 32) of 2000, which warrants that preparation of an Integrated 
Development Plan (IDP) should be a legislated requirement. Such legislative provisions seek to 
ensure service delivery through preparation and usage of IDPs as prime instruments and tools to 
deliver on the above developmental mandate and role of local government. 

Legislatively, such an instrument facilitates inter and intra-sectional, governmental relations and 
collaborations with a view to making key decisions on matters relating to plans, budgets and 
performance management for all functional areas of municipal operations. Section 152 of the 
Constitution succinctly provides the Objects of Local government as to provide democratic and 
accountable government for local communities, to ensure the provision of services to communities in a 
sustainable manner, to promote social and economic development, to promote a safe and healthy 
environment; and to encourage the involvement of communities and community organisations in the 
matters of local government. Communities must participate in planning processes through 
consultative meetings and fora. 

Over and above consultation of all stakeholders, Traditional Leaders are consulted during the time of 
IDP as per the provision of Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act, No. 41 of 2003 
and Regulations as the municipality’s governance is entrenched richly in Traditional Leadership. 

The Municipal Systems Act further posits that an IDP must be reviewed annually to re-evaluate and re¬ 
assess the municipality’s development priorities, challenges and seeks to accommodate development 
nuances and obtaining realities prevalent in communities. 

Deliberate focused efforts at functionally involving communities and other stakeholders on its plans 
and overall performance have made certain that Maluti-A-Phofung municipality operates within the 
required legal parameters thus bringing government to the people. As such, this entire exercise 
conforms and complies with the review mandate and legal requirements. 

The challenges the municipality faced is the negative Audit opinion, high rate of unemployment, 
massive roads and storm water backlogs, reliable water, electricity supply and land availability for 
cemeteries in rural areas, mushrooming of informal settlements, community unrest and possible 
disconnection of electricity by Eskom. The problems were assessed after the processes of IDP and 
prioritization of what needs to be done first. There is also development on the prioritized challenges 
as there is agreed upon payments with Eskom. The Action plan for the Audit opinion is in place and 
some of roads are currently in construction. There is development in the municipality of many projects 
that are implemented. 


13 



CiQCiCiCiCiCiCiCi 


A.2 LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK 


Given the political history and socio-economic background of South Africa, sections 152 and 
153 of the Constitution bestow the powers and responsibilities for community development 
categorically upon municipal authorities. From the backdrop of parallel development and 
uncoordinated planning, Constitution further enforces principles of vertical and horizontal 
coordination and cooperation for purposes of sustained improvement of livelihoods among all 
spheres of government. At the centre of these processes, are elements of inclusiveness, 
responsiveness, quality service, buy-in, openness, transparency, public participation, value for 
money and democratic order. 

Importantly, these are Batho Pele Principles that guide all spheres of government in 
discharging their assigned mandates and responsibilities. An IDP is informed by national 
priorities as outlined by the President, Ministers whose portfolios intersect with local 
government, Free State Growth and Development Priorities, district & municipal 
considerations, and community needs on the ground. 

Such a dispensation is underpinned by the following legislative framework: 

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa 

New Development Plan 2030 

National Spatial Development Perspective 

Free State Provincial Growth & Development Strategy 

IDP Guidelines 

Spatial Development Framework (SDF) and Land Use Management 
Municipal Systems Act 
Municipal Structures Act 
Municipal Finance Management Act 


A.3 PURPOSE AND COMPLIANCE OF THE INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN (IDP) 

Integrated Development Plan serves the purpose of consolidating municipal-wide planning 
process that provides a framework for the future planning of development in a municipality. It 
ensures vertical coordination and integration across the three spheres of government, viz, 
national, provincial and local. It guides and informs municipality in all planning, budgeting, 
management and decision-making processes. It is through an IDP that municipality endeavours 
to develop a set of long term goals and five year objectives that will form the basis of its yearly 
business planning and budgeting to be implemented by various divisions on an on-going basis. 
This framework is strengthened by provision of Municipal Finance Management Act of 2003, 
section 21(1) (b) in that: 

“The Mayor of a municipality must coordinate the process for preparing the annual budget 
and for reviewing of the municipality’s IDP and budget-related policies to ensure that the 
tabled budget and any revision of the IDP are mutually consistent and credible”. 


14 



According to section 3(4) (b) of Municipal Planning and Performance Regulations, “the ward 
councillor and ward committees must assist to coordinate and facilitate public participation 
during IDP hearing sessions 

Key to ensuring the coordination of the IDP and Annual Budget is the development of the 
Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP). To map out the delivery-success 
path, SDBIP should include monthly revenue and expenditure projections, quarterly service 
delivery targets and performance indicators. Through this IDP, municipality will be informed 
of the challenges faced with and will further be guided by information on available resources. 
In this way, municipality will be able to develop and implement appropriate strategies and 
intervention measures to address challenges. 

Thus the objectives of institutionalization of efficiency, deepening of democracy, 
rationalization of resources for purposes of closing the gap between rural and urban areas and 
promotion of intergovernmental relations for improvement of people’s livelihoods. 

Given its legal status, an IDP supersedes all other plans that guide developments of 
municipality. It must conform to the credibility framework for the purpose of compliance. The 
Cooperative Governance & Traditional Affairs Department in their guide for credible IDP 
framework provides that every municipality’s IDP be comprehensive and exhaustive in their 
scope of coverage, to include all areas of municipal operations and work and must respond to 
the following national key performance areas: 

Basic Service Delivery; Local Economic Development (LED); 

Municipal Transformation & Organizational Development; 

Municipal Financial Viability & Management; 

Good governance and Public Participation 

Long term development vision of the municipality; municipality’s development priorities and 
goals for its elected term; municipality’s development strategies which must be aligned with 
national and provincial sectoral plans and planning requirements and the Spatial Development 
Framework (SDF) 

A.4 APPROACH & METHODOLOGY ADOPTED 

Inherent within the people-cantered approach adopted during review of the IDP document, was 
an element of extensive consultations with role-players, ward committees, community 
development workers, NGOs, businesses sector. Community Based Organisations (CBOs), 
Faith Based Organisations (FBOs) and various interested parties to validate the outcome of the 
process undertaken thus fully comprehending the immediate challenges facing the municipality 
and practical interventions needed to resolve such. 

The involvement of ward councillors, ward committees and traditional leaders has been an 
effective role by ensuring that communities participate effectively in the planning of 
development within the IDP processes. This approach ensures collective engagement and 
communal involvement in matters concerning the collective good of the local communities at 
large. As such, challenges and achievements are jointly owned by all role-players including the 
municipality and the community. 


15 



Maluti-A-Phofung municipality recognizes its Constitutional mandate of facilitating 
development processes in an integrated manner. The municipality must seek to base its 
planning and allocations towards rural development initiatives thus tapping into provincial and 
national priority allocations to execute the task at hand. 

The approach adopted validates an attempt to consistently align the document with realities of 
the resource-based available (both human and financial within MAP Municipality). A synergy 
has thus been created between and among all concerned stakeholders and role-players in as far 
as community development is concerned. This is, however, the cornerstone of a successfully 
developed and implemented IDP per legislative provisions. 


16 



SECTION B 


17 



B. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE MUNICIPALITY 


Figure 1: P opulation distribution by age group and sex^Free State, 1996/2001/2011 


Population pyramid 1996 


85 + 


Population pyramid 2001 


Population pyramid 2011 


85 + 
80-84 
75-79 
70-74 
65-69 
60-64 
55-59 
50-54 
45-49 
40-44 
35-39 
30-34 
25-29 
20-24 
15-19 
10-14 
5-9 
0-4 


10.0 5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 

■ Female ■ Male 


80-84 

75-79 

70-74 

65-69 

60-64 

55-59 

50-54 

45-49 

40-44 

35-39 

30-34 

25-29 

20-24 

15-19 

10-14 

5-9 

0-4 


10.0 5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 

■ Female ■ Male 


85 + 
80-84 
75-79 
70-74 
65-69 
60-64 
55-59 
50-54 
45-49 
40-44 
35-39 
30-34 
25-29 
20-24 
15-19 
10-14 
5-9 
0-4 


10.0 5.0 0.0 5.0 10.0 

■ Female L Male 





Source: Statistics South Africa, census 1996/2001/2011 


18 





















Population pyramids depict and represent bulge at the lower levels age groups 10- 24 for 1996, 10-19 for 
2001 and 15-24 years old for 2011. This shows that the Maluti a Phofung municipality consists of the 
young population who still needs to go to school and enter the labour market in few years. It also shows 
that the older population 60 years and above lives longer. Females seem to be out living the males as 
shown in the pyramid that on the female side for older population it is wider than the male side. In 2011 
the pyramid shows that there was an increase in fertility or the improvement in child mortality rates, a 
reflection of the decline in child mortality. .At the moment the 5% decline of population may not 
specifically be attributed to specific variables, which may be: - Deaths as a result of opportunistic 
diseases, migration as a result of job opportunities outside Maluti-A-Phofung. 


Table 1: Population Profile by sex and age group 


Age group 

Male 

Female 

Total 

0-4 

19604 

19386 

38991 

5-9 

18480 

18365 

36845 

10-14 

17256 

16605 

33861 

15-19 

19676 

19274 

38950 

20-24 

16468 

17915 

34383 

25-29 

12389 

15420 

27809 

30-34 

9446 

12157 

21603 

35-39 

7958 

10694 

18652 

40-44 

6848 

10336 

17184 

45-49 

6302 

9613 

15914 

50-54 

5198 

8243 

13441 

55-59 

4314 

7190 

11504 

60-64 

3457 

5400 

8856 

65-69 

2313 

3850 

6163 

70-74 

1552 

2995 

4547 

75-79 

978 

2357 

3335 

80-84 

517 

1524 

2041 

85 - 120 

453 

1252 

1705 


153209 

182576 

335785 

Source: Statistics Sout 

i Africa, 2011 


Age group 

Male 

Female 

Total 





Children: 0-14 

53741 

54138 

107879 

Youth: 15-34 

67512 

75123 

142635 

Adult: 35-64 

30763 

43969 

74732 

Elderly: 65+ 

9259 

18946 

28206 

TOTAL 

161275 

192177 

353452 

Dependency ratio 



62.6 


STATSSA: Community Survey 2016 


The figures above indicate density of youth population within MAP Municipality. Out of gross 
population of 335 785, the youth in the age group category of 15 - 34 years, constitute 122 745 in total. 


19 







































This is a huge municipal population percentage of 39.5% which clearly denotes that future planning and 
creation of opportunities by the municipality and respective role-players must take into account this 
“energy”. The number of youth within municipality had decreased compared to the total number in 2001 
Census to 2011. The dwindling numbers of youth comes to the fore as a result of migration to other 
Provinces for job opportunities, including also deaths of various opportunistic diseases amongst other 
causes of a decline of youth in numbers. The number increased in 2016 Community Survey to 142 635 as 
a result of migration to education and some job opportunities. 

Community and civic activity may be enhanced for positive reasons if constructive intervention measures 
are timeously implemented. In terms of youth and gender development, much has to be done by 
respective directorate/s within MAP municipality to address issues of creation of opportunities for higher 
learning, mainstream & non-mainstream economic participation opportunities, higher levels of health 
education & literacy for prevention of diseases, establishment of recreational facilities, development of 
sports, deliberate promotion & development of arts and culture, etc. as these are the most applicable 
means of edu-training and properly channelling youth energies. 

Distribution of population by population group, Maluti a Phofung 1996,2001 and 2011 


Population group 


120 

100 

qj 

So 80 

to 

1 60 

U 

v 40 

Q- 

20 

0 



Black 

African 







Coloured 

Indian or 

Asian 

White 

Other 

1996 

98.3 

0.1 

0.1 

1.5 

0 

■ 2001 

98.5 

0.1 

0.1 

1.3 

0 

■ 2011 

98.2 

0.2 

0.2 

1.3 

0.1 


Source: Statistics South Africa, census, 1996, 2001 and 2011 

There were more males in the Indian population than females (i.e. 157, 132 and 129 males per 
100 females respectively) 



Male 

Female 

Total 

Black African 

159814 

190444 

350258 

Coloured 

232 

291 

523 

Indian/Asian 

203 

63 

266 

White 

1027 

1379 

2406 

TOTAL 

161275 

192177 

353452 

STATSSA: Community Survey 2016 : Created 

on 26 October 201 

6 


The figure above indicates that the Black African population is dominant in the municipality. It is 
also evident that the white population is declining. The figures underneath reflects population 
distribution by racial groups. Here are the figures as captured in both the Census 2001, 
Community Survey of 2007 and Community Survey 2016. 


20 

































Population of Maluti-A-Phofung 



Population 

Census 2001 

360 787 

CS 2007 

385 413 

Census 2011 

335 785 

Community Survey 2016 

353 452 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011, 2016 Community Survey 

The figures above indicate density of youth population within MAP Municipality. There is an 
increase of population between 2011 and 2016. 


However this information may not be disputed since Census is an authorized body for stats. However in 
Miletus Consulting engineers while were contracted by MAP municipality in 2007 cited that 385 413 was 
very low and as part of another project Miletus Consulting Engineers physically counted individual 
houses and dwellings in the QwaQwa area, and a total of 83 300 households were digitally logged. In 
line with a generally accepted density of 6 persons/dwelling, the 2007 population of QwaQwa was 
estimated at 500 000. 

This is one area that warrants urgent municipal attention for gathering of proper statistical evidence for 
planning purposes, with more reliable and credible updated data . 


Figure 3: Distribution of population by functional age groups and dependency ratio, Maluti a Phofung: 1996, 2001 and 
2011 


Population distribution by functional age group and 
dependency ratio 


80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 

10 

0 


1996 


2001 


2011 



0-14 


37.3 


34.5 


32.7 



15-64 


58.2 


60.6 


62 


65+ 


4.4 


4.9 


5.3 



Dependency ratio 


71.7 


65.1 


61.2 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 

Figure above indicate functional age group and dependency ratio of Maluti a Phofung local municipality 
over the three consecutive censuses. It is evident that dependency ratio declined from 72% in 1996 to 
61% in 2011. This implies that, the working age group (15-65 years) increased whereas the young (0-14 
years) and the elderly (15-65 years) decreased gradually. 


21 










































Distribution of population by sex ratio and population group, Maluti a Phofung: 1996, 2001 and 2011 



Geography hierarchy by sex 

Male 

161275 

Female 

192177 

TOTAL 

353452 

Sex ratio (Males per 100 Females 

84 


STATSSA: Community Survey 2016: Created on 26 October 2016 


The figure above shows the sex ratio of Maluti a Phofung local municipality over the years 
1996, 2001 and 2011. Over the years 1996, 2001, 2011 and 2016, there were more females than 
male (i.e. 84, 85 and 84 males respectively for every 100 females). 

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


60.0% 

50.0% 

40.0% 

30.0% 

20 . 0 % 

10 . 0 % 


VJ.VJ/0 

1996 

1998 

2000 

2002 

2004 

2006 

2008 

2009 

2010 

2011 

2012 

♦ Free State 

19.7% 

24.6% 

26.4% 

33.1% 

31.5% 

29.9% 

26.5% 

27.8% 

29.4% 

30.1% 

30.5% 

M Thabo Mofutsanyane 

24.2% 

28.1% 

28.7% 

35.4% 

35.1% 

33.3% 

29.9% 

31.4% 

33.1% 

34.0% 

34.2% 

A Setsoto 

13.1% 

15.8% 

17.0% 

21.0% 

21.2% 

20.4% 

17.6% 

18.6% 

19.9% 

20.6% 

20.2% 

)( Dihlabeng 

15.3% 

17.8% 

18.8% 

24.0% 

23.8% 

22.6% 

19.6% 

20.7% 

22.0% 

22.5% 

22.3% 

)l( Nketoana 

12.8% 

15.6% 

16.8% 

21.1% 

20.8% 

19.7% 

16.7% 

17.6% 

18.8% 

19.4% 

19.1% 

• Maluti a Phofung 

37.5% 

43.2% 

42.5% 

51.3% 

50.4% 

47.8% 

44.3% 

46.2% 

48.3% 

49.3% 

50.0% 

1 Phumelela 

14.0% 

17.3% 

18.9% 

24.6% 

24.8% 

23.5% 

19.8% 

20.7% 

22.1% 

23.1% 

23.2% 

Mantsopa 

19.0% 

21.9% 

23.4% 

29.2% 

28.1% 

26.4% 

23.0% 

24.2% 

25.7% 

26.6% 

26.4% 


Source: Global Insight, Regional eXplorer, 2013 



22 








































































An analysis of the employment distribution of Maluti-A-Phofung municipal area in the various economic 
sectors revealed that 24% of the total workforce was employed in the social services sector, compared to 
14% by private households, 13.6% by manufacturing and 11.7% by trade. The primary sectors namely 
agriculture and mining were only responsible for 6.2% of all employment opportunities. 

The unemployment rate in Thabo Mofutsanyane is the highest, followed by Motheo, Xhariep, 
Lejweleputswa and Fezile Dabi. If one compares the unemployment levels with the other local 
municipalities in Thabo Mofutsanyane, it is evident that Maluti-A-Phofung Municipal area has an 
unemployment rate that is more than double that of other local municipal areas. Maluti-A-Phofung 
Municipal area is also responsible for 66% of the unemployment of the district. The unemployment rate 
for Maluti-A-Phofung Municipal area was 51% according to the Demarcation Board (2000). 


B.l MALUTI-A-PHOFUNG ECONOMIC PROFILE 


] ■ 6 -income" . 

i-iRhRWv;-;-;- 
:\«!R4Ql-Tf(8QQ 
! ■ MR 8Q1tR1’66o’\ ‘ 

. ;.*.R.i;69i;-.R.3 2pq.;.; 
-; ■■■r 3;2pi>ft-6 4pq-; 

-! ■-R 6 4Ol>R-i2 8q0>; 
■\WR 12-m-\R.2SWQ' 

'. M R 25° 601'-! r! 51'200 
'■'■'R 5-1'20-1'- R-102400- 



Coloured 


No income 
I R 1 - R 400 
R 401 - R 800 
R 801 - R 1 600 
R 1 601 - R 3 200 
R 3 201 - R 6 400 
R 6 401 - R 12 800 
i R 12 801 - R 25 600 
R 25 601-R 51 200 
R 51 201 - R 102 400 
R 102 401 - R 204 800 
R 204 801 or more 
Unspecified 
Not applicable 



23 





























































































































::::::::::::: : Kidlah or Asian 

No.ih.come. 

:HR4bi-:R:80Q 

■ R-8QirRi-6ob:::- 

iisRiebi- R3 2bo:;:;::;::; 

' ■ R 3' 20i r ’R *6 400 
\m R6;4bi ^:r i2 - 80o: ■: ■: ■: ■: ■: ■: ■: ■: 

■ p R- a 8°oi ■ r;256o]o : -: -: *; •: •; ■; ’; ” 

■ R25bQi>R-5i:2bQ-:::::::-: 

■ R-5-1 201- R 102 400 -; ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 

; ■; r io 2 401-; r; 204 soo- 

■ ■ R- 204 BOlor more ■; ■ 

’ I Unspecified - 

■ Not applicable 


White 




Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


The figures above show a disturbing pattern. The figures above depict a picture of inequality with regard 
to income generation amongst the community. There range between the low and the high earning people 
is still high, comparing also the level of unemployment with those who do not earn an income. The 
situation has not yet changed as compared to the research conducted in 2001 and Community survey of 
2007 by STATSSA. Over 50% of the community of Maluti-A-Phofung municipality is still 
unemployed. Just around 25% is earning in the region of R400 per month. The other 12, 5% of the 
MAP Municipality is earning in the region of R800 per month. 

Therefore, one can conclude that only 40% of the municipal population is economically active with an 
average income of R600p/m, as a figure covering +-250 000 people per the table above. 

Surely this is 25% below the national baseline of R800pm for basic living wage. Various sectors of 
economy have to bring about intervention mechanisms to better the economy of MAP This would only 
be done through LED for job creation and enhancement. Non-formal job creation systems as practiced 
by rural communities of MAP municipalities have to be encouraged. 


24 








































































































































































































Backyard gardens, community gardens, small scale communal projects by rural inhabitants have to be 
supported in partnership with the department of social development, department of youth, gender & 
women, department of agriculture, department of public works & rural development, etc., to broaden 
and increase income network base and threshold. Municipality must supporting meaningful local 
economic development (LED) initiatives that foster micro and small business opportunities and job 
creation These programmes are of vital importance to sustain and improve the livelihoods of 
unemployed groups. Social Development and Community Services Social and Human Development 
Protecting should assist with programmes that will enable the poor to change their status from the worst 
impacts of the economic downturn to a better living. 

Distribution of individual income within MAP according to Gender: 



Official employment status within MAP according to Gender 


25 































70000 




Employed Unemployed Discouraged Other not Age less than Not applicable 

work-seeker- ’ economically 15 years 
— Male -p Female act ' ve 



Male 

Employed 

Female 

Employed 



■ Unemployed 

15% 

■ Unemployed 


17% 




40% 

10% 

■ Discouraged 
work-seeker 

12% 

36% 

Discouraged 

work-seeker 


5% 

^Other not_ 

6% 

0% 31% 

Other not 

0% 

.nmmurnm 

28% 

economically 

active 

Age less than 

15 years 

economically 

active 

Age less than 
15 years 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


Distribution of individual monthly income within MAP according to population groups 


Income range 

Black 

African 

Coloured 

Indian or 

Asian 

White 

Other 

Total 

No income 

132421 

232 

344 

1274 

67 

134338 

R 1 - R 400 

96793 

126 

24 

105 

36 

97084 

R 401 - R 800 

16766 

34 

16 

40 

20 

16877 

R 801 - R 1 600 

42627 

66 

52 

285 

45 

43075 

R 1 601 - R 3 200 

11300 

26 

53 

255 

35 

11669 

R 3 201 - R 6 400 

6384 

21 

87 

521 

17 

7030 

R 6 401 - R 12 800 

5393 

19 

54 

582 

8 

6056 

R 12 801 -R 25 600 

2901 

19 

29 

459 

11 

3419 

R 25 601 -R 51 200 

600 

5 

16 

137 

3 

762 

R 51 201 -R 102 400 

70 

1 

1 

48 

- 

120 

R 102 401 - R 204 800 

90 

- 

1 

23 

- 

114 

R 204 801 or more 

65 

1 

2 

20 

- 

88 

Unspecified 

11384 

43 

73 

304 

18 

11823 

Not applicable 

3001 

90 

21 

204 

14 

3330 

Total 

329795 

684 

776 

4256 

273 

335784 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


26 























































































Community Survey 2016 

18% of the population is unemployed 
48% other not economically active 
25.4% employed 
9% discouraged work seekers 


Official employment status within MAP according to Gender 


Employment status 

Male 

Female 

Total 

Employed 

26614 

26254 

52867 

Unemployed 

16129 

21873 

38002 

Discouraged work- seeker 

7039 

11340 

18379 

Other not economically active 

42274 

56774 

99048 

Age less than 15 years 

0 

0 

0 

Not applicable 

61153 

66335 

127488 

Total 

153209 

182575 

335784 

Unemployment rate 

37.7 

45.4 

41.8 


Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


The following table provides to the reader the socio-economic profile of the Maluti-A-Phofung 
Municipality as per current Census 2011. Given the rurality and extreme deprivation of the 
community from the main sources of economic activity, the extrapolation one can make is that 40% of 
the population is earning a salary. The greater majority may still be dependent on subsistence farming 
and backyard gardens as characteristically is the case with agricultural landscape and topology of MAP 
Municipality. The mushrooming of support and service sectors, i.e. arts & crafts, bead-work, sculpting, 
pottery, entertainment, cultural heritage projects, B&Bs, conservation product owners, etc. could serve 
to confuse the statistical picture as some people in MAP are self-employed and others engaging in 
these cultural artifacts for preservation purposes though earning some living out of it. Hence it is 
crucial that a thorough study by the municipality be commissioned to corroborate the facts. 

Maluti a Phofung unemployment rate by gender (15-64 years) 


Unemployment rate 


80 

<u 

8? 60 

g 40 

5 20 

“■ 0 


- f - =* - 


1996 

2001 

2011 

» Male 

45.8 

54.7 

37.7 

■ Female 

54.9 

59.9 

45.4 

A Overall 

50.8 

57.5 

41.8 


Source: Statistics South Africa Census 1996, Census 2001 and Census 2011 


The above indicators, the overall unemployment rate for Maluti a Phofung decreased from 50.8% in 1996 
to 41.8% in 2011 whereas in 2001 it was 57.5%. Female unemployment rate over the years 1996, 2001 
and 2011, is greater than that of males. 


27 































Although the population size has decreased, it did not affect the margin of unemployment rate within the 
jurisdiction area of MAP. South Africa is having an unemployment rate way beyond 56%. 

According to the graphic presentation above, there is a still a gap in terms of the previously disadvantaged 
individuals, such physically challenged, women and youth. The chart illustration depicts an 
unemployment picture of females being high in numbers. 

It is important that Maluti-A- Phofung and other stakeholders who are contributing to economy of MAP 
ensures that women are taken on board for empowerment, needless to mention the compliance and 
adherence to the provisions of Affirmative Action legislation. The greater proportion of these figures 
signifies rurality and unemployment. This picture looks gloom and grim for the Municipality as it is 
primarily rural and has a non-active / no-income base making up 155 429 (62.7%)of its total population. 
This is worrying as traditional sectors of job creation have either collapsed or shifted due to prioritization 
of new business grounds outside of the municipal jurisdiction. Also that composite parts of the 
municipality’s labour force traditionally operated as supply centres / reservoirs for the mine sector/s 
outside of the municipal boundaries. 

Greater and focused attention must be given to this situation hence the national and provincial focus on 
rural development, job creation and improvement of sustained better livelihoods National Development 
Plan with its vision of 2030 has earmarked and identified Maluti-A-Phofung, with regard to National 
Infrastructure plan, as one of Strategic Infrastructure Projects beneficiaries (SIP 2):- 

Durban-Free State-Gauteng logistics and industrial corridor. The Harrismith Logistic Hub is aimed at 
minimizing and eradicating high unemployment rate. The following are mayor projects which will cater 
for the achievements of NDP 2030 objectives. The hub will set up a fuel distribution depot, as well as on 
phase one of the new multi-product pipeline which will run between Johannesburg and Durban and 
transport petrol, diesel, jet fuel and a detailed comparison of unemployment rate in the FS has been 
undertaken covering the period from 1996 to 2012. The analysis is provided by Global Insight in 2013. 

The Free State province had the highest unemployment rate in the country at 30.5% in 2012. 

The Thabo Mofutsanyane unemployment rate was above the provincial average at 34.2% in 2012. Since 
1996, the unemployment rate in Thabo Mofutsanyane has been consistently above the provincial rate. 
Maluti a Phofung has the worst unemployment rate within the Thabo Mofutsanyane District at 50%. The 
rest of the local municipalities have unemployment rates that are below the district and provincial 
unemployment rates. The following graph depicts a comparison of Maluti-A-Phofung vis-a-vis other 
local municipalities within the district, of Thabo Mofutsanyane. 


28 



B.2 HOUSEHOLDS PROFILE 


Table 1: Distribution of households by size and % single member households 



1996 

2001 

2011 

2016 

Households 

80745 

90349 

100228 

110725 

Household size 

4.4 

4.0 

3.4 

5.2 

% single member households 

13.9 

14.6 

21.8 

25.3 


Source: Statistics South Africa Census 1996, Census 2001, Census 2011 and Community Survey 20 


6 


Number of households increased from 80 745 in 1996 to 100 228 in 2011, while the household 
size decreased from 4 person per household to 3 persons per household. 

Percentage of single member households increased from 14% in 1996 to 22% in 2011. 


Number of house hold increased from 80 745 in 1996 to 100228 in 2011 and to 110725 in 2016 
according to STATSSA Community Survey at Schoonplas, Makgolokoeng and Tshiame D. 


Household weight 


Tenure status 

Households 

Percentages 

Rented from private individual 

4753 

4.3 

Rented from other (incl. municipality and social 
housing ins 

507 

0.5 

Owned; but not yet paid off 

6754 

6.1 

Owned and fully paid off 

85791 

77.5 

Occupied rent-free 

10127 

9.1 

Other 

2117 

1.9 

Do not know 

597 

0.5 

Unspecified 

78 

0.1 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


Type of dwelling 

Households 

Percentages 

Formal dwelling 

84978 

76.7 

Informal dwelling 

15058 

13.6 

Traditional dwelling 

9294 

8.4 

Other 

1395 

1.3 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


Distribution of marital status in the municipality according to population group 


Marital status 

Black African 

Coloured 

Indian or 
Asian 

White 

Other 

Total 

Married 

62492 

134 

369 

2119 

101 

65215 

Living together like married 
partners 

20338 

63 

30 

200 

26 

20655 

Never married 

224660 

447 

354 

1429 

137 

227028 

Widower/ Widow 

17546 

32 

15 

323 

9 

17924 

Separated 

2991 

2 

1 

23 

- 

3018 

Divorced 

1768 

5 

7 

162 

1 

1943 

Total 

329795 

683 

776 

4256 

274 

335783 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


29 















































Relationship to head of household according to population group 



Black African 

Coloured 

Indian or 
Asian 

White 

Other 

Total 

Head/Acting head 

92771 

155 

236 

1524 

109 

94796 

Husband/W ife/Partner 

29576 

68 

159 

1019 

38 

30861 

Son/daughter 

108827 

216 

232 

1057 

38 

110370 

Adopted Son/Daughter 

1148 

4 

4 

7 

- 

1163 

Stepchild 

1255 

1 

2 

32 

- 

1290 

Brother/sister 

10261 

15 

19 

45 

18 

10358 

Parent Mother/Father 

1003 

3 

3 

49 

- 

1059 

Parent-in-law 

104 

1 

7 

25 

- 

136 

Grand/Great-Grandchild 

55239 

76 

23 

89 

10 

55437 

Son/Daughter-in-law 

2751 

4 

5 

26 

- 

2785 

Brother/Sister-in-law 

1341 

5 

8 

22 

3 

1379 

Grandmother/Father 

186 

1 

1 

1 

- 

189 

Other relative 

19833 

34 

37 

100 

29 

20033 

Non-related person 

2499 

9 

19 

57 

15 

2598 

Unspecified 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Not applicable 

3001 

90 

21 

204 

14 

3330 

Total 

329795 

684 

776 

4256 

273 

335784 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


Distribution by disability in the municipality 



Walking/ 

Climbing 

stairs 

R|e|membering 

/Concentrating 

Communication 

Seeing 

Hearing 

Self- 

Care 

Total 

Some 

difficulty 

8562 

16258 

3698 

37728 

12001 

7876 

86123 

A lot of 
difficulty 

2947 

4852 

995 

8865 

2597 

2795 

23051 

Cannot do 

at all 

741 

848 

474 

548 

363 

2754 

5728 


114902 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


30 






































Annual Household income according to gender 




No 

income 

Rl- 

R4800 

R4801 - 

R9600 

R9601 - 

R19 600 

R 19 601 - 

R 38 200 

R 38 201 - 

R 76 400 

R 76 401 - 

R 153 800 

R 153 

801-R 

307 600 

R 307 601 

- R 614 

400 

R 614 001 

- R 1 228 

800 

R1228 

801-R2 

457 600 

R 2 457 

601 or 

more 

Unspecifi 

ed 

Total 

■ Male 

8686 

3853 

5309 

9556 

9988 

5213 

3075 

2066 

1115 

205 

60 

68 

1 

49194 

■ Female 

4875 

5212 

8452 

14161 

10720 

3782 

2165 

1206 

335 

56 

47 

24 

0 

51033 

H Total 

13561 

9065 

13760 

23717 

20708 

8994 

5240 

3272 

1451 

261 

106 

92 

1 

100228 



Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


Employment status of head of household according to Gender 


Employment status 

Male 

Female 

Unspecified 

Total 

Employed 

19876 

12947 

- 

32823 

Unemployed 

7281 

7519 

- 

14801 

Discouraged work-seeker 

3187 

3891 

- 

7077 

Other not economically active 

18775 

26618 

- 

45392 

Age less than 15 years 

76 

59 

- 

134 

Total 

49194 

51033 

- 

100228 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 

Employment status of head of household according to population group 


Employment status 

Black 

African 

Coloured 

Indian/ 

Asian 

White 

Other 

Unspecified 

Total 

Employed 

31416 

70 

186 

1076 

76 

- 

32823 

Unemployed 

14709 

26 

12 

44 

11 

- 

14801 

Discouraged work¬ 
seeker 

7056 

8 


10 

3 


7077 

Other not economically 
active 

44849 

59 

37 

425 

22 


45392 

Age less than 15 years 

133 

- 

- 

1 

- 

- 

134 

Total 

98162 

162 

235 

1557 

112 

- 

100228 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


31 

















































SECTION C 


32 



C. POWERS AND FUNCTIONS OF THE MUNICIPALITY 

In terms of Section 156 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, Maluti-A- 
Phofung Local Municipality has executive authority in respect of, and has the authority to 
administer Local Government Matters listed in Part B of Schedule 4 and Part B of Schedule 5 and 
any other matter assigned to it by national or provincial legislation. Furthermore, this 
municipality is accordingly empowered to do anything reasonably necessary for, or incidental to, 
the effective performance of its functions and the exercise of its powers and this includes making 
and administering by-laws. 

The table that follows here under provides an overview of the original and legislative 
powers and functions assigned to Maluti-A-Phofung local municipality by the 
Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. 

C.l MALUTI-A-PHOFUNG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY’S POWERS AND FUNCTIONS: 
RSA CONSTITUTION ACT, 1996, MUNICIPAL SYSTEMS ACT NO. 32 OF 2000 
CHAPTER 5 


Constitutional mandates 
Schedule 4 (Part B) 

Schedule 5 (Part B) 

Definition 

Air pollution 

Any change in the quality of the air that adversely affects human health or 
wellbeing or the ecosystems useful to mankind, now or in the future. 

Building Regulations 

The regulation, through by-laws, of any temporary or permanent structure 
attached to, or to be attached to, the soil within the area of jurisdiction of a 
municipality, which must at least provide for: Approval of building plans. 
Building inspections, and 

Child Care facilities 

Facilities for early childhood care and development which fall outside the 
competence of national and provincial government 

Electricity reticulation 

Bulk supply of electricity, which includes for the purposes of such supply, 
the transmission, distribution and, where applicable, the generation of 
electricity, and also the regulation, control and maintenance of the 
electricity reticulation network. 

Fire fighting equipment 

Planning, co-ordination and regulation of fire services and specialized 
firefighting services such as mountain, veld and chemical fire services; 
coordination of the standardization of infrastructure. 

Local Tourism 

The promotion, marketing and, if applicable, the 

Development, of any tourist attraction within the area of the municipality 
with a view to attract tourists; to ensure access, and municipal services to 
such attractions, and to regulate, structure. 

Municipal planning 

The compilation, review and implementation of integrated development 
plan in terms of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 
(Act No. 32 of 2000) 


33 












Municipal public transport 

The regulation and control, and where applicable, the provision of 
services for the carriage of passengers, whether scheduled or unscheduled, 
operated on demand along a specific route or routes or, where applicable, 
within a particular area. 

Storm water 

The management of systems to deal with storm water in built-up areas. 

Trading Regulations 

The regulation of any area facility and/or activity related to the trading of 
goods and services within the municipal area not already being regulated 
by national and provincial legislation. 

Potable water 

The establishment, operation, management and regulation of a potable 
water supply system, including the services and infrastructure required for 
the regulation of water conservation, purification, reticulation and 
distribution as well as bulk supply to local supply. 

Sanitation 

The establishment, provision, operation, management, maintenance and 
regulation of a system, including infrastructure, for the collection, 
removal, disposal and/or purification of human excreta and domestic 
waste-water to ensure minimum standard of service. 

Amusement facilities 

A public place for entertainment and includes the area for recreational 
opportunities, available for public use and any other aspect in this regard 
which falls outside the competence of the national and provincial 
government 

Billboards and the 
display of advertisements 
in public places 

The display of written or visual descriptive material, any sign or symbol 
or light that is not intended solely for illumination or as a warning against 
danger which: promotes the sale and / or encourages the use of goods and 
services found in the municipal area 

Cemeteries 

The establishment conducts and control of facilities for the purpose of 
disposing of human and animal remains. 

Cleaning 

The cleaning of public streets, roads and other public spaces either 
manually or mechanically 

Control of public nuisance 

The regulation, control and monitoring of any activity, condition or thing 
that may adversely affect a person or a community 

Control of undertakings 
that sell Liquor to public 

The control of undertakings that sell liquor to the public that is permitted 
to do so in terms of provincial legislation, regulation and licenses, and 
includes an inspection service to monitor liquor outlets for compliance to 
license requirements. 

Facilities for 
accommodation 

The provision of and/or the regulation, control and monitoring of 
facilities which provide accommodation and care for well or sick animals 
and the burial or cremation of animals, including monitoring of 
adherence to any standards and registration required. 

Fencing and fences 

The provision and maintenance and/or regulation of any boundary or 
deterrents to animals and pedestrians along streets or roads. 

Licensing 

The control over the number and health status of dogs through a 
licensing mechanism. 


34 




Licensing and control of 
undertakings that sell food 
to the Public 

Ensuring the quality and the maintenance of environmental health 
standards through regulation, a 

licensing mechanism and monitoring of any place that renders in the 
course of any commercial transaction, the supply of refreshments or meals 
for consumption 

Local Amenities 

The provision, management, preservation and maintenance of any 
municipal place, land, and building reserved for the protection of places or 
objects of scenic, natural, historical and cultural value or interest and the 
provision and control of any such or other facilities. 

Local Sports Facilities 

The provision, management and/or control of any sporting facility within 
the municipal area. 

Markets 

The establishment, operation, management, conduct, regulation and/or 
control of markets other than fresh produce markets including market 
permits, location, times, conduct etc. 

Municipal Abattoirs 

The establishment; conduct and/or control of facilities for the slaughtering 
of livestock. 

Municipal parks and 
recreation 

The provision, management, control and maintenance of any land, gardens 
or facility set aside for recreation, sightseeing and/or tourism and include 
playgrounds but exclude sport facilities. 

Municipal roads 

The construction, maintenance, and control of a road which the public has 
the right to and includes, in addition to the roadway the land of which the 
road consists or over which the road extends and anything on that land 
forming part of and/or connected therewith. 

Noise pollution 

The control and monitoring of any noise that adversely affects human 
health or well-being or the ecosystems useful to mankind, now or in the 
future. 

Pounds 

The provision, management, maintenance and control of any area or 
facility set aside by the municipality for the securing of any animal or 
object confiscated by the municipality in terms of its by-laws. 

Public places 

The management, maintenance and control of any land or facility owned 
by the municipality for public use. 

Refuse removal, refuse 
dumps and solid 
waste disposal 

The removal of any household or other waste and the disposal of such 
waste in an area, space or facility established for such purpose, and 
include the provision, maintenance and control of any infrastructure or 
facility to ensure a clean and healthy environment. 

Street lighting 

The provision and maintenance of lighting for the illuminating of streets 
in a municipal area. 

Traffic and parking 

The management and regulation of traffic and parking within the area of 
the municipality, including but not limited to, the control over operating 
speed of vehicles on municipal roads. 

Municipal Public Works 

Any supporting infrastructure or services to empower a municipality to 
perform its functions 


35 




SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS (SDGs) 


Background 

□ Adopted by world leaders in September 2015 and implemented at the start of 2016, 
more than 150 countries have pledged to mobilize efforts to end all forms of poverty, 
fight inequalities, and tackle climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind. 

□ The SDGs build on the work of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that were 
emphasized from 2000 to 2015. The new SDGs are unique in that they are broader in 
their scope of eradicating all forms of poverty by calling for action by all countries, rich 
and poor, to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. 

What does this mean for South Africa as part on the UN Member States? 

In January 2016 the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) replaced the Millennium 
Development Goals as the main international mechanism for guiding development in all United 
Nations member states until 2030; hence SDGs are associated with Agenda 2030.1n the Continent 
of Africa SDGs are in alignment with Agenda 2063, in South Africa this agenda is aligned to the 
National Development Plan (NDP) at national level and Integrated Development Plans (IDPs) at 
the local level. There is clear connection from global to local which basically affords all citizens 
of the world to be part of one development agenda. 

These global goals concern a wide range of targets, including poverty alleviation, economic 
growth and environmental objectives. National government however cannot realise these 
ambitious goals on their own. Collective and individual efforts at local, provincial, national and 
international levels are necessary. Moreover, governments will need the broad involvement of 
other stakeholders, such as the private sector, the general public and civil society 

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS): 

The UN resolved on the SDGs following the 17 steps to ensure that the following developmental 
impediments are addressed to sustain the livelihood of communities in attainment for a better 
world 

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere 

2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable 
agriculture 

3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages 

4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for 
all 

5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls 

6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 

7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all 

8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment 
and decent work for all 

9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and 
foster innovation 



10. Reduce inequality within and among countries 

11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 

12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 

13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts 

14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable 
development 

15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage 
forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss 

16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice 
for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels 

17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable 
development 



4 The onset of SDG’s provides a global template for development for all, as the SDGs are 
entrenched in the principle of leave no behind. 

4 The 17 goals of the SDGs have been clustered into 4 themes as reflective of the nature of 
development programming and service delivery and partnerships in our communities. 

4 These themes are the basic services, environment and climate change, local economy and 
sustainable development and partnerships and collaborations for goals. 

❖ Basic Services 

> Goal 1. End poverty in all forms everywhere 

> Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote 

sustainable agriculture 

> Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all stages 

> Goal 4 Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning 

opportunities for all 

> Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide 

access to justice for all and build effective accountable and inclusive institutions 
at all levels 


37 



















♦♦♦ Environment and Climate Change 

> Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all 

> Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy 

> Goal 13.Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impact 

> Goal 14. Converse and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for 

sustainable development 

> Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, 

sustainably manage forests, combat desertification and halt and reserve land 
degradation and halt biodiversity loss 

❖ Local Economy and Sustainable Development 

> Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable growth, full and productive 

employment and decent work for all 

> Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialisation 

and foster innovation 

> Goal 11 .Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable 

> Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns 


38 



SECTION D 


39 



D. PROCESS FOLLOWED TO DEVELOP THE IDP 


D.l Process Plan 

Integrated Development Planning Processes 

In terms of Section 28(1) of the Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 2000), the Municipal Council 
needs to adopt a process set out in writing to guide the planning, drafting, adoption of their 
Integrated Development Plan. The Process Plan fulfills the function of assessing the functioning 
of a business plan or an operational plan during the IDP processes. Section 34 of the MSA 
embodies and relates to the essence and objectives of the process plan, i.e. assessing the 
Municipality’s performance against organisation objectives as well as implementation of projects 
and programmes of municipality, and also taking cognisance of new information and changed 
circumstances. 

Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 2000) defines Integrated Development Planning as a process 
through which Municipalities prepare a strategic development plan. Every new Council that 
assumes power into municipal Council must after elections prepare its own IDP which will guide 
them for their five year term of office. The IDP is a principal strategic planning instrument which 
guides and informs all planning, budgeting, management and decision-making in a municipality. It 
has a legal status and supersedes all other plans that guide development at Local Government 
level. Integrated development planning is an interactive and participatory process which requires 
involvement of all municipal stakeholders. The IDP processes do, however, informs other 
components of the Municipal business process including institutional and financial planning and 
budgeting. 

In terms of Section 28(1) of the Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 2000), the Municipal Council 
needs to adopt a process set out in writing to guide the planning, drafting, adoption of their 
Integrated Development Plan. The Process Plan fulfils the function of assessing the functioning of 
a business plan or an operational plan during the IDP processes. Section 34 of the MSA embodies 
and relates to the essence and objectives of the process plan, i.e. assessing the Municipality’s 
performance against organisation objectives as well as implementation of projects and 
programmes of municipality, and also taking cognisance of new information and changed 
circumstances. 

The Municipal Systems Act (MSA), Section 25 provides that: 

(1) Each municipal council must, within a prescribed period after the start of its elected term, 
adopt a single, inclusive and strategic plan for the development of the municipality which— 

O links, integrates and co-ordinates plans and takes into account proposals for the development 
of the municipality: 

O aligns the resources and capacity of the municipality with the implementation of the plan: 

O forms the policy framework and general basis on which annual budgets must be based; 

LJ complies with the provisions of this Chapter; and 

Q Is compatible with national and provincial development plans and planning requirements 
binding on the municipality in terms of legislation. 


40 



The IDP will primarily deal with the following: 

During compilation of an IDP, the following activities have been embarked upon:- 


LJ Distribution of Roles and Responsibilities 
LJ Organisational Arrangements 

O Mechanisms and Procedures for Community and Stakeholder Participation 
LJ Action Programme with Timeframe and Resource Requirements 
O Mechanisms and Procedures for Alignment 

O National and Provincial Binding Legislation and Planning Requirements 
O Budget Implications 

f Process Plan Committee and Steering Committee - IDP and Budget Steering Committee 

The Council should appoint a Section 80 Committee which will be known as the Process Plan 
Committee to continue with the preparation of the Process Plan. This committee comprises of the 
following members: 


COUNCILLORS 

OFFICIALS 

Executive Mayor 

Municipal Manager 

MMC: IDP and Performance Management 
Systems 

Municipal Manager / Manager IDP & PMS 

MMC: Financial Services 

Chief Financial Officer 

MMC: Municipal Infrastructure 

Director Municipal Infrastructure 

MMC: LED, Tourism, SMMEs & Agriculture 

Director LED, Tourism, SMMEs & Agriculture 

MMC: Human Settlements, Spatial 

Development Planning & Traditional 

Leadership 

Director Human Settlements, Spatial 

Development Planning & Traditional 

Leadership 

MMC: Corporate Services 

Director Corporate Services 

MMC: Public Safety, Transport & Security 

Director Public Safety, Transport & Security 

MMC: Sports, Arts & Culture 

Director Sports, Arts & Culture 

MMC: Women, Children & People with 
Disability 

Director Community Services 

MMC: Community Services 

Director Community Services 


Chief Risk Officer 


Manager Internal Audit 


♦♦♦ External role players will have the following roles and responsibilities: 

> Civil Society 

Apart from the Ward Committee representatives (see Chapter 5) it is also imperative to engage other 
legitimate civil society structures to form part of the IDP Process that will represent different civil 
society groups. It can be announced that not all individuals and groups will participate in the Ward 
Committee system and it is therefore essential to provide mechanisms for other civil structures and 
interest groups to participate during the IDP Process. To ensure legitimacy of the process it is 
therefore essential to engage with existing non-governmental organisations (NGOs), community 
based organisations (CBOs) and faith based organisations (FBOs) in each of the concerned towns in 
the area of jurisdiction. The basis of understanding is that all existing organisations will be invited to 
participate during the process. The civil society is responsible to represent interests and contribute 
knowledge in the planning process by: 


41 




O participating in the IDP Representative Forum to: 

O inform interest groups on relevant planning activities and their outcomes, 

O analyse issues, determine priorities, negotiate and reach consensus, 

O participate in the designing of project proposals and assess them, 

O discuss and comment on the draft IDP, 

O ensure that annual business plans and budgets are based on and linked to the IDP 

❖ District Municipality 

The District Municipality will be responsible to: 

O ensure horizontal alignment with the IDP process of the Municipality, 

O ensure vertical alignment between district and local planning, 

O facilitate vertical alignment with other spheres of government and sector departments 
O Prepare joint strategy workshops with the Local Municipality. 

❖ Provincial Government and Corporate Service Providers 

Although it is not compulsory to engage government departments throughout the process, it is 
advisable that government departments that are active in the area of jurisdiction should be 
consulted throughout the process. 

Olt is essential in order to comply with the principle of integrated planning and also 
considering that the budget for potential projects would be sourced from provincial and 
national government departments. 

Olt is also imperative that national and provincial priorities and policies are applied at local 
level and the respective departments will be able to provide the linkage between national, 
provincial and local priorities. 

❖ The roles and responsibilities of the departments are as follows: 

O Ensuring vertical / sector alignment between provincial sector departments / provincial 
strategic plans and the IDP Process at local level by: 

o guiding the provincial sector departments’ participation in and their required 
contribution to the Municipal planning process and 
o Guiding them in assessing the draft IDP and alignment of sectoral programmes 
with the IDP. 

o Efficient financial management of provincial IDP grants, 
o Monitoring the progress of the IDP Process. 

o Facilitation and resolution of disputes related to the IDP Process of the 
Municipality. 

o Assist the Municipality in the IDP where required, 
o Co-ordinate and manage the MEC’s assessment of the IDPs. 
o Contribute relevant information on the provincial and national departmental 
plans, programmes, budgets, objectives, strategies and projects in a concise and 
accessible manner. 

o Contribute sector expertise and technical knowledge to the formulation of the 
Municipal strategies and projects. 

o Engage in a process of alignment with the District Municipality. 


42 



♦♦♦ IDP Representative Forum 

The IDP Representative Forum is the structure, which institutionalises and guarantees 
representative participation in the IDP Process. The composition of the IDP Representative Forum 
is explained in Chapter 6 as part of the Public Participation Plan. The terms of reference for the 
IDP Representative Forum includes to: 

O represent the interests of their constituents in the IDP Process, 

O provide an organisational mechanism for discussion, negotiation and decision making 
between the stakeholders including the Municipal Council, 

O ensure communication between all the stakeholder representatives including the 
Municipal Council; 

O monitor the performance of the planning and implementation process. 

O Internal role players will have the following roles and responsibilities: 

❖ Municipal Council 

The Council should monitor the overall management and co-ordination of the planning process 
which includes ensuring that: 

O all relevant actors are appropriately involved, 

O appropriate mechanisms and procedures for public consultation and participation are 
applied, 

O Planning events are undertaken in accordance with the approved IDP and Budget Process 
Plan. 

Othe planning processes are related to the real burning issues in the Municipality, 

Othe sector planning requirements are satisfied and 

❖ Ward Committees 

Ward Committees are instituted in accordance with the Municipal Structures Act as democratic 
representative bodies. Ward Committees need to be instituted according to the prescribed legal 
framework to represent the views, needs and aspirations of the demarcated wards, as determined 
by the Municipal Demarcation Board. 

Each ward is represented by ward Councillors and the Ward Committee system will be a critical 
element of the IDP participation processes. 

Ward councilors are the major link between the Municipal Government and the residents. Their 
role will therefore be to: 

Olink the planning processes to their constituencies and / or wards, 

Obe responsible for organising public consultation and participation 

❖ Mayoral Committee 

This committee is an Executive body of the municipality, therefore its role and 
function in the development of an IDP is to ensure the following: 

O submit the Process Plan of the IDP and Budget to the Municipal Council for adoption, 

O manage, co-ordinate and monitor the process and drafting of the IDP together with the 
Municipal Manager, 

O Submit the draft and final IDP to the Municipal Council for adoption. 


43 



❖ IDP Manager 

OThe IDP Manager will manage and co-ordinate the IDP Process. Responsibilities of the 
IDP Manager are as follows:- 

O ensure the preparation of the IDP and Budget Process Plan, 

O undertake the overall management and co-ordination of the planning processes, 

O ensure that all relevant actors are appropriately involved, 

O nominate persons in charge of different roles, 

Obe responsible for the day-to-day management of the drafting process, 

O ensure that the planning process is participatory, strategic and implementation orientated 
and is aligned with and satisfies sector planning requirements, 

O ensure proper documentation of the results of the planning of the IDP document and 
O adjust the current IDP in accordance with the MEC for Local Government’s proposals. 

❖ Heads of Departments and other Key Officials 

As the persons in charge for implementing the IDP of the Municipality, the officials will be fully 
involved in the planning process to: 

O provide relevant technical, sector and financial information for analysis to determine 
O priority issues, 

O contribute technical expertise in the consideration and finalisation of strategies and 
identification of projects, 

O provide departmental operational and capital budgetary information, 

Obe responsible for the preparation of project proposals, the integration of projects and 
sector programmes. 

❖ IDP Steering Committee 

The composition of the IDP Steering Committee is explained in Chapter 6 as part of the Public 
Participation Plan. The terms of reference for the IDP Steering Committee includes to: 

O co-ordinate and integrate the IDP Process, 

O ensure that key deliverables are completed within the time frames, 

O provide guidance and support to the process, 

O co-ordinate departmental responsibilities within the local government, 

O oversee the implementation of key aspects of the IDP formulation and revision process 
including the participation, communication and empowerment strategy as outlined in the 
Process Plan, 

O refer IDP disputes for mediation and arbitration to the Council, 

O provide terms of reference for the various planning activities, 

O commission research studies, 

O consider and comment on: 

♦ inputs from sub-committee/s and study teams 

♦ inputs from provincial sector departments and support providers 

♦ process, summarize and document outputs, 

♦ make content recommendations, 

♦ prepare, facilitate and document meetings, 

♦ consult and establish sub-committees for specific activities and outputs which should 
include additional persons outside the Steering Committee. 


44 



❖ Public Participation Plan & Methodology 

Since the IDP Process involves participation of a number of stakeholders, it is crucial for the 
Municipality to adopt an appropriate approach and also put in place appropriate structures to ensure 
effective participation. One of the main features about the Integrated Development Planning Process 
is the involvement of the community and stakeholders. Participation of affected and interested parties 
ensures that the IDP addresses the real issues that are experienced by the communities of the 
Municipality. 

❖ Principles of Public Participation 

□ The elected Council is the ultimate decision-making forum on IDPs. 

□ The role of participatory democracy is to inform and negotiate with stakeholders and to give the 
opportunity to provide input on the decisions taken by the Council. 

□ In order to ensure public participation, the legislation requires the Municipality to create 
appropriate conditions that will enable participation as a minimum requirement. 

□ Community and stakeholder groups will be encouraged to get involved. 

♦♦♦ Conditions for Public Participation 

□ The residents and stakeholders will be informed on the Municipality’s intention to embark on the 
IDP Process. 

□ Appropriate forms of media will be utilised in order to reach as many people as possible. 

□ All relevant community and stakeholder organisations will be invited to register as members of the 
IDP Representative Forum. 

□ An appropriate language and accessible venue will be used to allow all stakeholders to freely 
participate. 

□ The IDP Representative Forum meetings will be scheduled to accommodate the majority of the 
members. 

□ The community and stakeholder representatives will be given adequate time to conduct meetings 
or workshops with the groups, they represent. 

□ Copies of the IDP documents will be accessible for all communities and stakeholders and 
adequate time provided for comment. 

□ The Council meeting regarding the approval of the IDP will be open to the public. 

❖ Public Participation Plan and IDP Process Methodology: 

In considering an appropriate structure that will ensure effective participation, the following issues 
need to be considered: 

□ The plan and programme for the municipality should be informed by local communities and a 
detailed research and study. 

□ That the principle of representation should be applied to ensure effective planning. 

□ Ensure that feedback is provided to the broader community. 

It is essential to apply mechanisms that will consider the above issues and allow for the representative 
views of the communities but at the same time are able to progress with the formulation of the IDP. 
Due to the large geographical area of the Municipality it is essential to provide mechanisms whereby 
all communities will be able to provide input to the IDP. 

The Executive Mayor and the Speaker embarked on community engagement throughout the 
municipal area as per the schedule in order to gather community needs: 

Qwaqwa, Harrismith, Kestell, Traditional Leaders, Business People, People leaving with disability, 
Farmers and Youth 


45 



Ward Committees 


Thirty Five (35) Ward Committees were established by the municipality as per Council 
Resolution. The establishment process of Ward Committees was completed with working together 
with Provincial CoGTA in 2017. 

The newly elected members of the Ward Committees were trained during the cause of the year to 
ensure that they are capable to execute their duties as committee members. Ward committee 
meetings schedules were drawn and the Councillors have report back meetings according to the 
developed Ward operational plans developed. 

❖ Approval: 

An advertisement will be published to give notice of the IDP to provide opportunity for comments by 
the community. The IDP will also be circulated to the Governmental departments and other 
stakeholders for comment. Once all comments received have been evaluated and amendments made 
accordingly, the IDP will be adopted by the Council. The approved and revised IDP will then be 
submitted to the MEC for CO-operate Governance and Traditional Affairs together with the approved 
Process Plan. 

❖ Conflict Resolution: 

If an agreement cannot be reached within the IDP Steering Committee regarding certain planning and 
review issues, conflict will have to be resolved by means of a decision within the formal Council. The 
Council decision regarding the outcome will be conveyed to the Steering Committee for 
implementation. 

❖ Alignment Procedures 

Alignment is the instrument to synthesise and integrate the top-down and bottom-up planning process 
between different spheres of government. The alignment procedures and mechanisms will be arrived at 
between the local and district municipalities, provincial and national sphere of government. 
Subsequent to that all parties and stakeholders involved in the planning process of IDP will be 
informed of the outcome of IDP assessment. 

♦ Principles for Alignment 

O Alignment requirements should be minimised to keep the co-ordination requirements on a 
manageable level. 

O Different alignment mechanisms will be suitable for the different alignment needs and at different 
stages. 

OThis implies with regard to alignment mechanisms to keep the number of alignment events (such 
as workshops/meetings) to a minimum due to the financial and time resources required 
O Events with numerous participants from different sectors and spheres will require a competent 
facilitator. Alignment with Provincial Departments can also be achieved through provincial visits 
to the District. 

OThe Municipality may have to align on a bilateral basis with neighbour Municipalities for issues 
that affect both. 


46 



♦♦♦ Alignment with Non-Government Organisations 

It will be critical to receive contributions from the different identified NGOs through the process. 
Consultation will thus occur on a continuous base with relevant Departments which in some instances 
may also serve on the IDP Steering Committee. Governmental Organisations will be invited on 
national and provincial level that will attend these sessions or send regional official representatives. 

GOVERNANCE STRUCTURES 

# Roles and Responsibilities of Section 79 and 80 Committees 

> MUNICIPAL PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE (MPAC) 

The following are the members to MPAC: 

LJ Cllr S Mahlangu Khumalo:- Chairperson 

LJ Cllr Maditse Moloi 

LJ Cllr Tumelo Thebe 

O Cllr Mandla Tshabalala 

LJ Cllr Mamorwanyana Mositi 

LJ Cllr Gauta Motaung 

LJ Cllr Manthona B Lebesa 

LJ Cllr Henry Mdakane 

LJ Cllr Mahlomola Majake 

LJ Cllr Peter Beukes 

LJ Cllr Peter Ramokoena 

# Roles and Responsibilities 

LJ MPAC must interrogate the following financial aspects as addressed in MFMA: 

O Consider the expenditure and make recommendations to council (Unforeseen and unavoidable 
expenditure. 

O Report to council to council on the appropriateness of any criminal or civil steps taken from 
the report of the Municipal Manager. 

O Ensure that the SDBIPs - Quarterly reports are submitted to council 

O MPAC must interrogate the monthly budget statement report if there is any matter of concern 
MPAC must be provided with financial statements and proof that Auditor General received 
them. 

O MPAC must consider Annual Report and compile an Oversight Report. 

O Ensure that the Audit Committee is operational. 

O Monitor the review of IDP post-election by Executive mayor. 

LJ Monitor annual review of IDP 

LJ Monitor whether the annual performance plan is prepared. 

LJ Monitor whether all councillors have completed their declaration of interest forms and update 
them annually. 

> AUDIT COMMITTEE (AC) 

LJ Chairperson position: Vacant 
O Mr 1 Mahonga 
O Mr L Munsamy 
LJ Mr N Sifumba 


47 



# Roles and Responsibilities 

LJ Advise the municipal council, the political office-bearers, the Accounting Officer and the 
LJ management of the municipality in matters relating: 

* Internal financial controls; and 

* Internal Audit matters; 

* Risk management; 

* Performance management and all other matters of compliance; 

* Review the annual financial statements to provide the council of the municipality with an 
authoritative and credible view of financial position of the municipality. 

> RISK MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE (RMC) 

LJ Chairperson position: Vacant 
LJ Chief Financial Officer 
LJ Director Corporate Services 
LJ Director Infrastructure 
LJ Manager Internal Audit 

# Roles and Responsibilities 

LJ The responsibilities of the Risk Management Committee should be formally defined in a 
charter approved by the Accounting Officer / Authority 
LJ The chairperson of the Risk Management Committee should be an independent external 
person, appointed by the Accounting Officer / Authority 
LJ The Risk Management Committee is appointed by the Accounting Officer / Authority to 
assist them to discharge their responsibilities for risk management. 

LJ The membership of the Risk Management Committee should comprise both management 
and external members with the necessary blend of skills, 

LJ In discharging its governance responsibilities relating to risk management, the Risk 
Management Committee should: 

o review and recommend for the Approval of the Accounting Officer / Authority, the: 
o risk management policy; 
o risk management strategy; 
o risk management implementation plan; 
o Institution’s risk appetite, ensuring that limits are: 

* supported by a rigorous analysis and expert judgement; 

* expressed in the same values as the key performance indicators to which they apply; 

* set for all material risks individually, as well as in aggregate for particular 
categorisations of risk; and 

* consistent with the materiality and significance framework. 

o Institution’s risk tolerance, ensuring that limits are supported by a rigorous analysis and 
expert judgement of: 

* the Institution’s ability to withstand significant shocks; and 

* the Institution’s ability to recover financially and operationally from significant 
shocks. 

LJ Institution's risk identification and assessment methodologies, after satisfying itself of their 
effectiveness in timeously and accurately identifying and 

* assessing the Institution’s risks. 

* assess implementation of the risk management policy and strategy (including plan); 

48 



* evaluate the effectiveness of the mitigating strategies implemented to address the 
material risks of the Institution; 

* review the material findings and recommendations by assurance providers on the 
system of risk management and monitor the implementation of such 
recommendations; 

> MUNICIPAL PLANNING TRIBUNAL (MPT) (SPLUMA Section 36) 

A Municipal Planning Tribunal consist of: 

• Officials in the full-time service of the municipality, and 

• Persons appointed by the Municipal Council who are not municipal officials and who 
have knowledge and experience of spatial planning, land use management and land 
development or the law related thereto 

S External members 
Mt Thuso S Lungwana 
Mr Moeketsi Mosala 
Adv. Themba D Diba 

^ Municipal members 

Mr S. Nhlapho 
Ms T. Makhubele 
Mr S Nyembe 
Mr J Letino 
Mr M. Mokoena 
Ms J Mokoena 

Roles and responsibilities 

❖ It is important to remember that an MPT is a decision-making body / land development regulator. 

❖ Assess complex & non-complex applications (referrals from AO) 

❖ Make determination on all matters related to applications 

❖ Approve, in whole or in part or refuse applications 

❖ Impose conditions 

♦♦♦ Conduct investigations 
♦♦♦ Appoint technical advisors 

❖ Facilitate land use & land development 

> SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 

The Municipality has developed and reviewed a Supply Chain Management Policy which 
complies with the requirements of Section 111 of the Municipal Finance Management Act and 
Model Policy, as developed by the National Treasury. The Policy has been implemented and 
proven to be effective. Progress has been made in reference to complying with the contents 
of the SCM Policy and other legislations that are responsible 


Architecural Draughtsman 
Project Manager 
Advocate 

Environmental Specialist 
Town Planner 
Additional member 
Additional member 
Additional member 
Civil Engineer 


49 



The Supply Chain Management function is to ensure that goods and services are procured in 
accordance with the authorised processes only, and the system of Demand Management is in 
good order so as to ensure that the resources required to support the strategic and operational 
commitment of the Municipality are delivered at the correct time, at the right location, and that 
quantity and quality satisfy the Municipality. 

BID COMMITTEES 

The procurement processes through tendering, is functional and complies with the SCM Policy 
and all three bid committees, namely Bid Specification, Bid Evaluation and Bid 

Adjudication which were established and are operational. The bid committees were established in 
accordance with Regulation 26,27,28,29 of the SCM Regulations and SCM Policy. 


50 



D.2 PROCESS PT AN SCHEDULE FOR 2018/2019 


PROCESS PLAN SCHEDULE FOR 2018/19 


IDP& 

BUDGET 

PHASES 

INPUTS AND PROCESS 

RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON 

DATES 

PREPARATORY 

JULY-AUGUST 

Executive Mayor tables in Council IDP & 

Budget Process Plan outlining the key 

deadlines for: preparing, tabling and 

approving the budget related policies and 

consultation processes at least 10 months 

before the start of the budget year. 

Executive Mayor 

27 July 2017 

Submission of IDP and Budget Process Plan 

to Thabo Mofutsanyana District 

Municipality, National and Provincial 

Treasuries. 

Municipal Manager 

04 August 2017 

Advertisement of IDP and Budget Process 

Plan. 

Municipal Manager 

04 August 2017 

ANALYSIS 

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 

Assessment of the current status quo of 

development and analysis of opportunities 

and priority issues. 

Municipal Manager 

17 August 2017 

Executive Mayor begins planning for the next 

three-year budget in accordance with co¬ 
ordination role of budget process. Planning 

includes review of the past year (2016/2017) 

financial and non-financial performance. 

Finance Portfolio 

Committee 

8 September 

2017 

Initiate Public Participation to consolidate 

community needs. 

Office of the 

Speaker and 

Municipal Manager 

23 August 2017 

- 21 September 

2017 

£ <0 S ( 

S a U 

“ o “ i 

CO U} " 

Executive Mayor establishes a budget 

steering committee in terms of Budget 

Regulations. 

Executive Mayor 

09 October 2017 


51 
















IDP& 

BUDGET 

PHASES 

INPUTS AND PROCESS 

RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON 

DATES 


Analyse, review and refine municipal 

Strategies, Objectives, and KP’Is to influence 

the budget. 

Executive Mayor 

28 September 

2017 

Consultation with senior managers 

Municipal Manager 

29 September 

2017 

IDP Steering Committee to prioritise IDP 

projects; 

Executive Mayor 

05 October 2017 

IDP Priorities to be confirmed by MAYCO; 

IDP Multi-year Scorecard Revised and 

presented to MAYCO; 

Municipal Manager 

10 October 2017 

Municipal objective, strategies, KPIs and 

targets to be approved by MAYCO; 

Municipal Manager 

24 October 2017 

Quarterly SDBIP performance progress 

report first quarter 2017/18 financial year. 

Municipal Manager 

27 October 2017 

MSCOA Progress Report 

Municipal Manager 

27 October 2017 

Formulation of Project Proposals; 

Executive Mayor 

31 October 2017 

PROJECTS 

NOVEMBER - 

DECEMBER 

Screen, adjust, consolidate and agree on 

Project Proposals 

Executive Mayor 

07 November 

2017 

Alignment with District, provincial and 

National; 

Municipal Manager 

07 December 

2017 

INTERGRATION 

JANUARY - FEBRUARY 

Integration of sector plans and service plans 

into IDP; 

Municipal Manager 

11 January 

2018 

Submit to the Mayor, NT and Provincial 

Treasury by 25 th January each year, a mid¬ 
year budget and performance assessment 

reflecting information required by s72 

(l)(a)(i)(II, (hi), (iv)(b),(2) and (3). 

Municipal Manager 

25 January 

2018 

Quarterly SDBIP performance progress 

report for second quarter of 2017/18 

financial year; 

Municipal Manager 

25 January 

2018 


52 



















IDP& 

BUDGET 

PHASES 

INPUTS AND PROCESS 

RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON 

DATES 


MSCOA Progress Report 

Municipal Manager 

25 January 

2018 

Publicise mid-year budget and performance 

assessments on the municipality website 

within five working days after approved by 

Council 

Municipal Manager 

5 days after mid¬ 
year has been 

tabled 

01 February 

2018 

Finance prepares indicative allocation per 

vote on the projected income and also 

provide budget guidelines for 2018/19 

budget; 

Municipal Manager 

CFO 

12 February 

2018 

Where necessary, revise approved annual 

budget through an adjustment budget in the 

appropriate format; 

Council 

27 February 

2018 

Table the 2017/18 adjustments budget 

within prescribed limitations before the 28 th 

February 2018; 

Executive Mayor 

27 February 

2018 

2017/18 Mid-year budget and performance 

assessment visits 

Provincial Treasury 

February - March 

2018 

TABLING 

MARCH - APRIL 

Heads of department to prepare and submit 

2018/19 draft operating budgets inputs and 

draft operational plans; 

Municipal Manager 

12 March 2018 

The 2018/19 draft budget to be discussed by 

budget steering committee then after to be 

circulated to different portfolio committees. 

Executive Mayor 

20 March 2018 

5 days after 

submission 

Publicise adjustment budget on municipality 

website and newspaper and submit to NT 

and Provincial treasury within 10 working 

days after approval; 

Executive Mayor 

Within 10 

working days 

after Council 

approval 

Table the 2018/19 annual Budget and IDP 

at a Council meeting at least 90 days before 

the start of the budget year. 

Executive Mayor 

30 March 2018 

Make public the adopted 2018/19 draft IDP 

Municipal Manager 

Within ten days 


53 

















IDP& 

BUDGET 

PHASES 

INPUTS AND PROCESS 

RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON 

DATES 


and Budget and associated documentation 

immediately after the tabling in Council, and 

invite the community to make 

repre sentations; 


after it has been 

adopted 

Submit the 2018/19 draft budget and draft 

IDP as tabled in printed and electronic form 

to NT, the provincial treasury, MEC: COGTA 

and others as prescribed. 

Municipal Manager 

Within ten days 

after it has been 

adopted 

Approval: Advertisement for public 

comments on Draft IDP and Draft Budget. 

Municipal Manager 

06 April 2018 


Quarterly SDBIP performance progress 

report for third quarter of 2017/18 financial 

year 

Municipal Manager 

30 April 2018 

MSCOA Progress Report 

Municipal Manager 

30 April 2018 

Public participation on the 2018/19 Draft 

Budget and Draft IDP 


10 April - 03 May 

2018 

APPROVAL 

MAY- JUNE 

When the 2018/19 annual budget has been 

tabled in Council, consider the views of the 

local community, NT, the provincial treasury 

and other provincial and national organs of 

state. 

Council 

11 May 2018 

Budget and Benchmark Assessments 

Provincial Treasury 

April - May 2018 

Provide the Mayor with an opportunity to 

respond to budget submissions made and if 

necessary revise the budget and table 

amendments for Council consideration 

Executive Mayor 

15 May 2018 

Approval: Council approval of the 2018/19 

final IDP base on Final assessments by 

government departments. 

Executive Mayor 

31 May 2018 


54 
















IDP& 

BUDGET 

PHASES 

INPUTS AND PROCESS 

RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON 

DATES 


Consider the approval of the 2018/19 

annual budget at least 30 days before the 

start of budget year. 

Council 

31 May 2018 


Approve measurable performance objectives 

for revenue by source and expenditure by 

vote. 

Council 

31 May 2018 


Approve annual budget by Council 

resolution, with resolutions to impose and 

set taxes and tariffs and changes to the IDP 

and budget-related policy before the start of 

the budget year. 

Council 

31 May 2018 


Submit the approved 2018/19 annual 

Budget and IDP to NT, and Provincial 

treasury. 

Municipal Manager 

Within 10 days 

after the approval 


Accounting Officer publishes approved 

budget, IDP and tariffs on the local 

newspaper. 

Municipal Manager 

Within 10 days 

after the approval 


The approved budget and related documents 

be placed on the website of the municipality 

and local newspaper. 

Municipal Manager 

Within 10 days 

after the approval 


Implement the 2018/19 approved budget in 

accordance with s69(l) 

Municipal Manager 

01 July 2018 


Submit to the mayor a draft service delivery 

and budget implementation plan no later 

than 14 days after the approval of the 

annual budget 

Municipal Manager 

13 July 2018 


Submit to the mayor drafts of annual 

performance agreements for the municipal 

manager and senior managers no later than 

14 days after the approval of the annual 

budget 

Municipal Manager 

16 July 2018 


Approve service delivery and budget 

implementation plan within 28 days after the 

Executive Mayor 

27 July 2018 


55 
















IDP& 

BUDGET 

PHASES 

INPUTS AND PROCESS 

RESPONSIBLE 

PERSON 

DATES 


approval of the budget 




Ensure that revenue and expenditure 

projections for each month and the service 

delivery targets and performance indicators 

for each quarter as set out in the service 

delivery and budget implementation plan are 

made public no later than 10 days after its 

approval 

Executive Mayor 

within 10 days 

after the approval 

of the SDBIP 


Ensure that performance agreements of the 

municipal manager, senior managers and 

other officials prescribed are made public no 

later than 14 days after the approval of the 

service delivery and budget implementation 

plan, and that copies of such performance 

agreements are submitted to the council and 

the MEC for local government in the province 

Executive Mayor 

within 14 days 

after the approval 

of the SDBIP 


Quarterly SDBIP performance progress 

report for fourth quarter of 2017/18 

financial year 

Municipal Manager 

27 July 2018 


MSCOA Progress Report 

Municipal Manager 

27 July 2018 


56 











SECTION E 


57 



E. SPATIAL ECONOMY AND DEVELOPMENT RATIONALE 


E.l SPATIAL ECONOMY AND DEVELOPMENT RATIONALE 

Maluti-A-Phofung local municipality is situated in the Free State province of South Africa. It was 
established in terms of the provincial Gazette No. 14 of 28 February 2000 issued in terms of 
Section 21 of the Local Government Notice and Municipal Demarcation Act No.27 of 1998. 
Maluti-A-Phofung is a local municipality FS194 and was established on the 5 December 2001. 
Maluti-A-Phofung is made up of four former TLC Local Authorities which are QwaQwa Rural, 
Kestell, Phuthaditjaba and Harrismith. 

The municipality comprises of 35 wards and covers approximately 4 421 km 2 in extent. 
Phuthaditjhaba is the urban centre of Qwaqwa and serves as the administrative head office of 
Maluti-A-Phofung municipality. Surrounding Phuthaditjhaba are rural villages of Qwaqwa 
established on tribal land administered by Department of Land Affairs. Harrismith is a service 
centre for the surrounding rural areas and a trading belt serving the passing N3 which links the 
Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Harrismith is surrounded by Tshiame located 12 km to 
the west and Intabazwe, which is located 1,5km to the north. The town is an economic hub for 
people living in Tshiame, Intabazwe and Qwaqwa. Kestell is a service Centre for the surrounding 
agricultural oriented rural area with Tlholong as the township. Kestell is situated along the N5 
road that links Harrismith with Bethlehem. The rural areas of Maluti-A-Phofung comprise 
commercial farms and major nature conservation centres such as Qwaqwa National Park, 
Platberg, Sterkfontein Dam and Maluti Mountain Range. The area is not only a tourist attraction 
destination, but also makes a big contribution in generating gross agricultural income for the 
whole of the Province and is also highly regarded for its beef production. 

In comparison with the demographic composition of the rest of the Thabo Mofutsanyana District, 
MAP municipality has the highest population density with the 3 rd highest population density in the 
Free State. Maluti a Phofung Local Municipality (MAP) is a Category B municipality located in 
the eastern part of the Free State Province. Maluti a Phofung forms part of a scenic tapestry, which 
changes dramatically with each season, the beauty and tranquillity of which is palpable and almost 
overwhelming, which has as its rock-bed the famous Maluti Mountains, from which the 
Municipality is named after. Majestic mountains with sandstone cliffs, fertile valleys of crops that 
stretch as far as the eye can see, fields of Cosmos and the golden yellow hues of Sunflowers, are 
just a few of the enchanting sights that make this region unique. Battle sites and memorials left 
over from bygone wars, ancient fossil footprints from a prehistoric era, a wealth of art and craft 
and renowned resorts make this part of the region a destination to explore. The municipality is 
made up of three major towns, namely: Harrismith; Kestell and Qwaqwa/Phuthaditjhaba. 


58 



E.2 SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 


The Maluti-A-Phofung Spatial Development Framework 2013 forms an integral part of the 
Maluti-A-Phofung integrated development planning process. The dynamic nature of the Maluti-A- 
Phofung environment within Maluti-A-Phofung requires the continuous revision and refinement 
thereof. The aim of the Spatial Development Framework is to give direction to development and 
take into account the need for and compatibility of the main land uses. The purpose of the Spatial 
Development Framework as a land use management tool is to plan and direct development but it 
does not provide land use rights. The Spatial Development Framework forms part of the existing 
land use management process of the municipality and provides the necessary guidance of land 
uses at local level in order to ensure the application of the development principles of 
sustainability, integration, equality, efficiency and fair and good governance in order to create 
quality of living, investors’ confidence and security of Tenure. 

Developmental Objectives and Priorities 

The assessed community needs can be clustered into the following developmental priorities 
agreed to in the Maluti-A-Phofung Municipality IDP 

□ Sustainable infrastructure and services 

□ Economic development and job creation 

□ Social development and community services 

□ Good governance and public participation 

□ Public safety 

The spatial vision that emerged from the developmental objectives and priorities from the Maluti- 
A-Phofung Municipality and reflecting the needs from the people of Maluti-A-Phofung can be 
defined as follows: 

“An ecologically and socially sustainable urban and rural spatial development pattern focussed on 
providing quality livelihoods 

Settlement patterns within planning areas: 

The settlement patterns within the planning areas over the period 2003 to 2011 reveal the 
following: 

□ QwaQwa, consists of a predominant urban area including Phuthaditjhaba and a large rural 
area under tribal authority experiencing: 

□ A very low growth rate of 0.2% per annum in both the rural and urban areas 

□ An average take up rate of 28 dwelling units per annum for the rural residential areas 

□ An average take up rate of 52 dwelling units per annum for the urban residential areas 

□ Very low gross densities in the rural areas (traditional) of 3.98 units per hectare in 2011 

□ A strong concentration ( 56%) of erven within the 400-1000 m2erf size category 

□ A limited densification rate of 0.55% per annum in the informal areas 

□ Higher densities in the urban areas with the 

□ Net densities concentrated in the categories 20 units per hectare of more 

□ Erf sizes concentrated in the categories 400m2 or less 

□ Gross densities of 8.7 units per hectare 

□ A densification rate of 0.23 % per annum 

59 



□ A decline in certain areas. 


Tshiame experienced: 

O A growth rate of 2.2% per annum 
O An average take up rate of 97 dwelling units per annum 
O A very low gross density of 3.65 units per hectare 
O A densification rate of 2.6 % per annum 

O A strong concentration (67.9%) of erven within the 400m2 and less erf size categories 
O Net densities concentrated in the categories 20 units per hectare of more 

Harrismith/Intabazwe experienced: 

LJ A growth rate of 0.6% per annum 

LJ An average take up rate of 45 dwelling units per annum 

LJ A very low overall gross density of 3.65 units per hectare attributed to very low densities in 
LJ Harrismith. The Intabazwe gross density is 14.8 Units per hectare 
LJ A densification rate of 0.63 % per annum 

LJ A strong concentration (60.5%) of erven within the 300-500 m2 erf size category 
LJ Net densities concentrated in the categories 30 units per hectare of more (58.4%) 

Kestell experienced: 

O A growth rate of 4.2% per annum 
O An average take up rate of 75 dwelling units per annum 
O A gross density of 6.68 units per hectare 
O A densification rate of 4.2 % per annum 

O A strong concentration (67%) of erven within the 300-400 m2erf size category 
O Net densities concentrated in the categories 25 units per hectare of more 
O The densification within the areas is very slow due to the limited growth experienced 

E.3 SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES 


Objectives reflecting the outcomes of the analysis and issues determined by the priority spatial 
issues are identified. Objectives will indicate the desired long term result related to a specific 
aspect of the vision. Where appropriate, objectives should be measurable and expressed as key 
performance indicators that will inform the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation 
framework. Strategic Interventions the development priorities providing focus to strategic 
development interventions support the crucial components that underlie sustainable development, 
i.e. need for basic infrastructure and development for the poor, economic growth and 
development, environmental conservation and improved livelihoods. Development priorities will 
guide specific decisions regarding the spatial development and arrangement of land uses, within 
and between settlements to guide investment and development spending in the municipal area. 

Strategic interventions hinging on managing future growth and associated change in a way that 
protects natural resources, biodiversity and lifestyle values, require a highly sustainable pattern of 
development, based on efficient utilisation of land and infrastructure and tighter controls over ad- 
hoc and dispersed forms of development. The ultimate success in managing growth in the area 
depends upon the ability to adopt the best possible urban development practices and most suitable 


60 



governance arrangements. Strategic interventions for areas of intervention (focus areas) will also 
be formulated. 


In terms of Maluti-A-Phofung Spatial Development Framework, it is cited that SDF needs to give 

effect to the developmental role of the state by: 

□ Supporting the vision of the Provincial Growth & Development Strategy (PGDS) to provide 
economic growth and development, especially where it addresses job-creation and poverty 
reduction, in an environmentally sustainable manner within a spatial context and 
incorporating the principles of good governance 

□ Providing spatial development strategies in support of development strategies, including the 
National Growth Path, the National Development Plan, Free State Vision 2030, the FPGDS 
and the 

□ Provincial Growth Path and Free State Spatial Development Framework, attending to priority 
intervention areas 

□ Emphasising provincial economic growth priorities such as targeted growth areas, priority 
sectors and corridors, the creation of jobs and the eradication of poverty 

□ Providing a system of accessible and interactive economic nodes supported by vibrant rural 
areas accommodating and catalysing growth and development 

□ Promoting high-level spatial interactions and linkages both within the province and between 
the municipality and its neighbours, including corridor development and national and 
provincial infrastructure development plans 

□ Promoting the pristine natural and cultural resources and mitigating the negative impacts of 
economic and human activities 

□ Providing land for low income and affordable housing to support the delivery of housing units 
on land accessible to work and services 

□ Providing affordable and efficient public transportation 


The following maps points out where various development would be taking place within the three 
towns of Maluti-A-Phofung in the next financial years 


61 



E.4 PENDING AND COMPLETED TOWNSHIP ESTABLISHMENTS 



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Remaining extent of farm Bluegumbosch 199 = 654 stands 

Title Deed registered on the 26-06-2016 in the name of MAP 


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Phuthaditjhaba Ext 10 (phase 2) = 394 stands. Layout plan approved on 26 February 2016 


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64 






































































Harrismith Ext. 34 = 319 stands 

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Layout approved by Township’s Board on the 26-02-2016 (Site Identified and to be rezoned for a shopping mall) 


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Portion 71 of Witsieshoek 1903 (Next to University) 652 stands 



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Lotusville (432 stands = middle to high income) 

Layout plan with Townships board for approval. Infrastructure comments still to be obtained for access roads 

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Portion 11 of the farm Randfontein 1880. Tshiame B Extension 1; allocation of 974 Stands - Township proclaimed 


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Restitution project with 226 stands under claim and 100 completions (remainder of stands for 2019 claim) 



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Tshiame A - 1051. Proclaimed without services 



71 











































































Intabazwe Ext. 1 Informal Settlement formalization = 690 stands and 680 stands: 394 beneficiaries allocated permanent stand. Process 
in progress 



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72 


































Intabazwe/ Harrismith Corridor; allocation of 1458 stands (low/ middle income with 330 stands serviced, 
Identified for FLISP development/ GAP housing 



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Phuthaditjhaba Ext. 10; allocation of 208 Stands - Site sold with 12 still available 


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74 






































Tshiame D allocated 554 stands. 132 Houses completed 


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Westerson allocation of 201 stands - Proclaimed but not serviced 


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76 


































SECTION F 


77 



F. STATUS QUO ASSESSMENT 


F.l RISK MANAGEMENT 
Top 15 Risks 

1. Disaster Recovery & Business Continuity Plan not in place 

2. Reduced Equitable Shares as a result of conditional grants used for other expenditure 

3. Non-compliance with MFMA s65(2)(e) (not paying invoices/ statements within 30 days 
after being received. 

4. Irregular Expenditure 

5. Municipality might not function as a going concern 

6. Loss of revenue 

7. Non-compliance with mSCOA 

8. Critical posts vacant 

9. Litigations 

10. Inability to collect rates and taxes (billing) 

11. Electricity cut-off to the whole municipal area by Eskom 

12. Distribution loss (mostly electricity) 

13. Continuous power interruptions 

14. Ineffective contract management system 

15. High level of labour disputes 

F.2 SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

Strategic Objective: Eradicate backlogs in order to improve access to services and ensure proper 
operations and maintenance for sustainable delivery of improved services to all households. 


Backlogs: 2017/2018 


DESCRIPTION 

ACCESS TO BASIC 

SERVICES 

BACKLOG TO BASIC 

SERVICES 

Water 

44 168 

72 692 

Sanitation 

82 334 

65 309 

Electricity 

94 947 

10 778 

Roads 

4 081 

10 201 

Housing 

189 000 

55 000 

Refuse 

96 128 

14 597 


The increase to backlogs is due to new many informal settlements which are to be formalised.. 


78 




❖ WATER 


Distribution of Maluti a Phofung households having access to piped water 


Main source of water for drinking 

Piped (tap) water inside the dwelling/house 

24704 

Piped (tap) water inside yard 

66994 

Piped water on community stand 

1606 

Borehole in the yard 

370 

Rainwater tank in yard 

333 

Neighbours tap 

3462 

Public/communal tap 

1806 

Water carrier/tanker 

8569 

Borehole outside the yard 

415 

Flowing water/stream/river 

657 

Well 

222 

Spring 

835 

Other 

752 

TOTAL 

110725 


STATSSA: Community Survey 2016 


Not all households in Maluti-A-Phofung municipal area have access to water on site and inside the 
dwelling yet. They make use of communal taps. Some of these taps are located further than 200m, 
which means women and children need to walk far, each day to fetch water. Communal taps and other 
water connections (some illegal) are not metered and a lot of water is wasted due to a lack of reporting 
by the community, thus, it is very difficult for Maluti-A-Phofung Water (Pty) Ltd to collect revenue 
effectively and make it impossible to apply the indigenous policy of free water in those areas. Maluti - 
A-Phofung is a Water Service Authority and there have been attempts by the Department of Cooperative 
Governance and Traditional Affairs to pursue MAP to forge relations with neighbouring local 
municipalities in order to technically support them with water related issues. 

❖ SANITATION 

Distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung by type of toilet facility 


Toilet facility 

Households 

Percentages 

Flush toilet / Chemical toilet 

40470 

36.6 

Pit latrine 

65143 

60.1 

Ecological toilet (e.g. urine diversion; 
enviroloo; etc.) 

192 

0.2 

Other 

1600 

1.4 

None 

1865 

1.7 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


Policy and practice regarding sanitation provision is outlined in the White Paper on Water Supply & 
Sanitation Policy. The immediate priority is to provide sanitation services to all, which meets basic 
health and functional requirements including the protection of the quality of both surface and 
underground water. Ventilated Improvement Pit toilets (VIP) if constructed to agreed standards and 
maintained properly provide an appropriate and adequate basic level of sanitation service. 

79 





RDP targets are such that all inhabitants of the area are empowered to have access to sanitation 
services, and that the provisions of the services are undertaken within a framework of sound 
environmental principles. Given that MAP municipality has achieved a 58.4% success in ventilated 
pit latrines, attests to the fact that the municipality is adhering to and conforming to generally 
accepted standards of environmental practice. Notwithstanding the above, a lot still has to be done to 
provide better state of the art and/or flush toilets connected to a sewerage system for the entire 
municipality. 

This remains a challenge to the municipality as planning and allocation of resources has to prioritize 
on this area of service need. Hygienic conditions and safe living environment have informed 
municipal operations and rolling out of services to its immediate community. Bucket system has 
primarily been eradicated within urban areas. 

WASTE MANAGEMENT AND WASTE REMOVAL 
Distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung by type of refuse removal 


Refuse removal 

Households 

Percentages 

Removed by local authority/private company/community 
members at least once a week 

23361 

21.1 

Removed by local authority/private company/community 
members less often than once a week 

1159 

1.0 

Communal refuse dump 

5682 

5.1 

Communal container/central collection point 

278 

0.3 

Own refuse dump 

65648 

59.3 

Dump or leave rubbish anywhere (no rubbish disposal) 

12181 

11.0 

Other 

2415 

2.2 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA: Community Survey 2016 


The figure above shows distribution of households with type of refuse removal. Households with own 
refuse dump decreased from 62.4% in 2011 to 59.3%. This signals a functional and successful working 
municipal strategy to continually remove refuse on a weekly basis. 

Refuse disposal 

LANDFILL SITES 

• FS-Establishment of New Landfill site in Qwaqwa 
The landfill site is licensed. 

Beneficiaries are estimated to 120 being: Women = 66, Youth = 78, Youth F = 43, Youth M = 35 
and People with Disability. The proposed landfill site is classified as GLB+, The location: The 
proposed landfill site will be located on the Portion 110 of the Farm Witsieshoek, 1903 Ward 34, 5 
km from (Pereng). Current status is that cconstruction work is in progress. 

• Management of Kestell, Harrismith and Qwaqwa Landfill sites 

The management and maintenance of Kestell, Qwaqwa and Harrismith landfill sites is done on 
daily basis by Khabokedi Waste Management (Pty) Ltd with employment of 50 people. 


80 




❖ ELECTRICITY 


Distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung using electricity 


Access to electricity 

Households 

Percentages 

In-house conventional meter 

13165 

11.9 

In-house prepaid meter 

89948 

81.2 

Connected to other source which household pays for (e.g. con 

1734 

1.6 

Connected to other source which household is not paying for 

87 

0.1 

Generator 

20 

0.0 

Solar home system 

16 

0.0 

Battery 

16 

0.0 

Other 

649 

0.6 

No access to electricity 

5088 

4.6 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


The above figure shows the distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung municipality with 
access to electricity. 


Source of energy for lighting 

Households 

Percentages 

Electricity from mains 

103686 

93.6 

Other source of electricity (e.g. generator; etc.) 

240 

0.2 

Gas 

95 

0.1 

Paraffin 

1070 

1.0 

Candles 

5187 

4.7 

Solar 

124 

0.1 

Other 

32 

0.0 

None 

100 

0.1 

Unspecified 

192 

0.2 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


The above figure shows the distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung municipality with 
access to electricity for lighting. 


Source of energy for cooking 

Households 

Percentages 

Electricity from mains 

98073 

88.6 

Other source of electricity (e.g. generator; etc.) 

99 

0.1 

Gas 

2674 

2.4 

Paraffin 

4105 

3.7 

Wood 

4753 

4.3 

Coal 

371 

0.3 

Animal dung 

183 

0.2 

Solar 

- 

- 

Other 

104 

0.1 

None 

294 

0.3 

Unspecified 

67 

0.1 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


The above figure shows the distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung municipality with 
access to electricity for cooking. 


81 






STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


Source of energy for space heating 

Households 

Percentages 

Electricity from mains 

67148 

60.6 

Other source of electricity (e.g. generator; 
etc.) 

203 

0.2 

Gas 

2193 

2.0 

Paraffin 

12200 

11.0 

Wood 

13317 

12.0 

Coal 

3421 

3.1 

Animal dung 

263 

0.2 

Solar 

10 

0.0 

Other 

1637 

1.5 

None 

10171 

9.2 

Unspecified 

160 

0.1 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


The above figure shows the distribution of households in Maluti a Phofung local municipality with 
access to electricity for heating. 

❖ Roads 


DESCRIPTION 

ACCESS TO BASIC 

SERVICES 

BACKLOG TO BASIC 

SERVICES 

Roads 

4 081 

10 201 


The municipality have provincial road network, with the N3, R57, R58 and internal roads 
proclaimed as national and provincial roads. The present condition of both tarred is going up 
although most of the internal gravelled roads in rural areas are very poor, thus limiting access to 
communities and economic opportunities. 

Most of the roads are maintained by established Developers of youth. The municipality is busy 
paving roads and this needs a further focus on functions relating to road infrastructure in future. 

❖ Storm water 

Storm-water systems are in place in most of semi-urban areas, as maintenance of the storm water is 
continuously attended by different programmes (CWP, EPWP, Contractor Development and 
municipal officials). However, road and storm water maintenance need to be attended as is the most 
prioritised by community during public participation for access to schools, clinics and other essential 
places. Currently the municipality is developing Road and Storm Water Master Plan. 


82 





F.3 SOCIAL SERVICES 


• Housing 

Backlogs and housing needs 


DESCRIPTION 

ACCESS TO BASIC 
SERVICES 

BACKLOG TO BASIC 
SERVICES 

Housing 

189 000 

55 000 


Household weight 


Tenure status 

Households 

Percentages 

Rented from private individual 

4753 

4.3 

Rented from other (incl. municipality and 
social housing ins 

507 

0.5 

Owned; but not yet paid off 

6754 

6.1 

Owned and fully paid off 

85791 

77.5 

Occupied rent-free 

10127 

9.1 

Other 

2117 

1.9 

Do not know 

597 

0.5 

Unspecified 

78 

0.1 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


Type of dwelling 

Households 

Percentages 

Formal dwelling 

84978 

76.7 

Informal dwelling 

15058 

13.6 

Traditional dwelling 

9294 

8.4 

Other 

1395 

1.3 

Total 

110725 

100.0 


STATSSA Community Survey 2016 


ERF. NUMBERS IN RURAL AREAS (FORMALIZATION) 


No. 

Township 

Ward 

Erven 

1 . 

Qholaqhwe 

2 

827 

2. 

Dithotaneng 

7 

1,029 

3. 

Makhaloaneng 

8 

890 

4. 

Matebeleng 

9 

1,200 

5. 

Bolata 

13 

727 

6. 

Matsieng 

15 & 16 

823 

7. 

Makeneng 

19 

847 


83 














8. 

Matsikeng 

2 

914 

9. 

Lusaka 

24 

626 

10. 

Boiketlo 

26 

1,695 

11. 

Sebokeng 

16 

693 

Total 

10 271 


The above figure shows the formalised erfs in the rural areas. 

TOWN PLANNING PROJECTS 

The town planning proposals for short term future development for the 2018 - 2023 Budget 
(as indicated on the SDF maps) are listed in the table below: 


PHUTHADITJHABA 

REFERENCE 

NUMBER 

ON 

SDF MAP 

PROJECT NAME 

NUMBER OF 
ERVEN 

BUDGET 2018 - 

2023 

1 . 

Bluesumbusch 

Township Establishment: 

Planning & surveying, and 
Opening of Town Register 

Services 

654 

R6 million 

R70 million 

2 

Phutaditihaba Ext 10 (Ph 2) 

Township Establishment: 

Planning & surveying, and 
Opening of Town Register 

Services 

394 

R600 million 

R5.5 million 

3. 

Phuthaditjhaba Portion 71 Witsieshoek 
(next to University) 

Purchasing of Land and Township 
Establishment: 

Planning & surveying, and 
Opening of Town Register 

Services 

1907 

R30 million by HD A 
R75 million 

4 

Planning of a Regional Cemetery 


R 1 million 


• Health Services ( Clinics and Hospitals) 

There are clinics in Qwaqwa including Phuthaditjhaba, Kestell, Harrismith, Intabazwe and 
Tshiame. The District hospitals are Thebe and Elizabeth Ross Hospital and one Regional 
hospital: Mofumahadi Manapo Hospital in Phuthaditjhaba for covering community as far as 
Vrede in Phumelela. There are also mobile clinics and the Emergency Medical Services 
(ambulances) as below: 


84 





Organisation unit 

Data 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

Maluti-a-Phofung Local 
Municipality 

Total 

population 

343342 

343970 

344821 

345752 

346234 

Agriqwa Farms Mobile 1 

Total population 

882 

964 

804 

456 

170 

Bluegumbosch Clinic 

Total population 

12421 

14474 

15277 

14718 

16203 

Boiketlo Clinic 

Total population 

23543 

19947 

19156 

18504 

17652 

Bolata Clinic 

Total population 

8488 

9310 

10146 

10130 

10512 

Dinkweng Clinic 

Total population 

2686 

2891 

2335 

2377 

2484 

Eva Mota Clinic 

Total population 

3753 

4277 

5716 

6230 

6729 

Harrismith Clinic 

Total population 

13864 

15493 

15307 

17299 

18695 

Harrismith Mobile 2 

Total population 

924 

1283 

1256 

1413 

1374 

Harrismith Mobile 3 

Total population 

918 

1307 

1278 

1558 

6729 

Highway Junction Clinic 

Total population 

933 

978 




Intabazwe Clinic 

Total population 

6997 

8503 

11684 

14771 

17102 

Kestell Mobile 1 

Total population 

784 

549 

603 



Kestell Mobile 2 

Total population 

894 

713 

989 

959 

859 

Khosatsana Masetjhaba Clinic 

Total population 




3986 

5049 

Kopanong Clinic 

Total population 

9468 

9824 

9217 

10481 

10398 

Lesedi Clinic 

Total population 

9383 

9484 

9960 



Ma-haig Clinic 

Total population 

8816 

7211 

7395 

8643 

8389 

Makeneng Clinic 

Total population 

8629 

10175 

10601 

10737 

10689 

Makhalaneng Clinic 

Total population 

6730 

8006 

8839 

8810 

9747 

Makoane Clinic 

Total population 

13574 

13489 

14956 

15162 

14144 

Malesaona Clinic 

Total population 

411 

5010 

5261 

4700 

4400 

Marakong Clinic 

Total population 

17026 

16621 

15135 

15744 

14237 

Matsieng Clinic 

Total population 

2439 

2733 

2970 

3390 

3446 

Monontsha Clinic 

Total population 

12533 

12485 

117681 

11681 

10156 

Mphatlalatsane Clinic 

Total population 

8721 

10641 

10952 

13167 

13306 

Namahali Clinic 

Total population 

15818 

16773 

17098 

16758 

14722 

Nthabiseng Clinic 

Total population 

9430 

9827 

8505 

7963 

7647 

Paballong Clinic 

Total population 

12559 

12486 

12589 

12250 

11833 

Phuthaditjhaba Clinic 

Total population 

23772 

23556 

20838 

18991 

23055 

Qholaqhwe Clinic 

Total population 

15146 

14508 

14162 

14'99 

13248 

Qwa-Qwa Mobile 2 

Total population 

2021 

2087 

2184 

2195 

2403 

Riverside Clinic 

Total population 

11763 

12900 

12723 

15577 

15733 

Sekamotho Mota Clinic 

Total population 

5867 

6414 

7201 

7056 

6637 

Tebang Clinic 

Total population 

15478 

11891 

10267 

9798 

9649 

Thaba Bosiu Clinic 

Total population 

8586 

5394 

5763 

5812 

5939 

Thabang Clinic 

Total population 

4918 

5349 

5763 

5812 

5939 

Tina Moloi Clinic 

Total population 

5453 

4400 

4576 

4630 

4237 

Tseki Clinic 

Total population 

14465 

11464 

11262 

10922 

9875 

Organisation unit 

Data 

2013 

2014 

2015 

2016 

2017 

Tshiame B Clinic 

Total population 

13086 

13465 

13099 

12384 

11165 

Tshirela Clinic 

Total population 

6452 

7018 

7128 

7287 

7658 


Major causes of death 

Tuberculosis (Including MDR /XDR TB) 

Diabetes Mellitus 

Influenza and Pneumonia 

Immune Deficiency 

Other forms of Heart Disease 

Intestinal Infectious Diseases 

Unnatural diseases (Accidents) 


85 




The following trends can be highlighted 

Teenage pregnancy 
Extended hours of clinics 

Availability of professional medical staff and related accommodation 

SPECIAL PROGRAMMES 

Functions of the Women, Children and people with Disabilities 

The Women, Children and People with Disability Division of the Office of the Executive 
Mayor is responsible for the co - ordination , advocacy and mainstreaming of Community 
Development services in the community and comprises of 7 programmes. 

1. MAP Pauper and Indigent burials Policy 

The municipality provides pauper and indigent burial in compliance with the MAP Pauper 
and Indigent Burial Policy. There are consultative meetings with relevant stakeholders to 
ensure compliance with the requirements of the Health Act and other legislations. The Ward 
Councillors and stakeholders such as Funeral Undertakers are raising awareness on Funeral 
Insurance Policies in the community and the media. This awareness campaigns assist in 
reducing the number of indigent burials applications and costs to the municipality. 

2. Older Persons Programme 

The Older Persons Forum and all relevant stakeholders are engaging older persons in 
various sport codes, talks that promote their rights and health, support to the vulnerable 
people, and visits to other municipalities so that older persons to relate and interact for 
empowerment. 

3. Substance abuse Programme 

Substance abuse has shown to be destroying child and family life, promote criminal 
behaviour, contribute to the spread of HIV/AIDS, lead to loss of productivity and 
unemployment, increased poverty and play a significant role in accidents, violence and 
abuse of women and children. In response to that, the municipality is working together with 
other stakeholders on prevention and treatment of substance abuse. Substance abuse 
awareness campaigns are being held in compliance with the Free State Mini Drug Master 
Plan and Local Drug Action Committee’s action plan focusing on the community at large, 
this include community dialogues, door to door , Ke-Moja programmes at school etc. 
Annually, consultative meetings are held with Central Drug Authority to evaluate Local 
Drug Action Committee. 


86 



4. Gender Programme 

The Victim Empowerment Forum is responsible for promoting the rights and 
responsibilities of gender based community. At the workplace, this is by sensitizing the 
employer to comply with equity related legislation and to ensure that skills of all employees 
are improved. Community organizations are holding Life Skills Education programmes to 
empower victims of domestic violence and groups such as Lesbian, Gay, and Bi - sexual, 
Trans - gender and Inter sex (LGBTI). They are doing door to door campaigns and seminars 
to prevent violence within families and in the communities. 

5. Children’s programme 

MAP Children’s Forum was established to promote the realization of children’s rights to 
survival, development, protection, and to mobilize resources on all levels in terms of the 
National Plan of Action for Children in South Africa (NPAC) 2012 - 2017. There is a high 
number of children without birth certificates, abusing drugs and without proper care 
especially the boy children. The Department of Home Affairs requires paternity test report 
for children born form a SA citizen father and foreign national mother. The municipality is 
working together with the government departments and non - governmental organizations 
to assist vulnerable families to raise funds for paternity so that the children are able to access 
education and social grants. The Forum is also providing the Child and Youth Care Workers 
with skills they need to affect change in their communities. 

6. Disability Programme 

The division and Disability Forum have action plans, which were developed in terms of the 
MAP Disability Policy. These plans focus on facilitating access to specialized services by 
people with disabilities such as life skills, entrepreneurship skills, mobility training, and sign 
language training to improve communication among and between deaf people and 
government and private sector. There are group work sessions with the families to raise 
awareness on disability and how to access special education and grants. Workshops are held 
with various stakeholders. The Taxi Industry is one stakeholder which was sensitized on the 
rights of people with disabilities. 

7. HIV, AIDS and STI Programme 

HIV, AIDS, TB and STI implementation strategic Plan: 2017 - 2022 was launched in the 
year 2017. All Health facilities provide HIV, TB & STI treatment and testing daily. The 
relevant stakeholders are raising awareness on HIV, TB &STI with school children, older 
persons and in the communities there are groups doing door to door visits. There are 
support groups in all our Health Care facilities, which were established to empower and 
support for people living with HIV to live a healthy life style 


87 



Education 




Maluti-A-Phofung 

School Attendance 


Yes 

No 

Do not know 


128792 

188249 

580 

STATSSA: Community Survey 201 

16 


The figure above shows the education level attained by population. 

Distribution by level of education in MAP Municipality 


Level of education 

Male 

Female 

Total 

Grade 0 

6307 

6478 

12785 

Grade 1 / Sub A 

6118 

6394 

12512 

Grade 2 / Sub B 

5747 

6606 

12353 

Grade 3 / Std 1/ABET lKha Ri Gude;SANLI 

5686 

6508 

12194 

Grade 4 / Std 2 

6463 

7753 

14216 

Grade 5 / Std 3/ABET 2 

6435 

7395 

13829 

Grade 6 / Std 4 

6954 

7783 

14737 

Grade 7 / Std 5/ ABET 3 

7311 

8261 

15572 

Grade 8 / Std 6 / Form 1 

9522 

10529 

20051 

Grade 9 / Std 7 / Form 2/ ABET 4 

8967 

9550 

18517 

Grade 10 / Std 8 / Form 3 

13242 

15013 

28254 

Grade 11/ Std 9 / Form 4 

12189 

16573 

28763 

Grade 12 / Std 10 / Form 5 

22697 

31238 

53935 

NTCI / Nl/ NIC/ V Level 2 

206 

254 

460 

NTC II / N2/ NIC/ V Level 3 

153 

159 

312 

NTC III /N3/ NIC/ V Level 4 

262 

285 

546 

N4 / NTC 4 

258 

302 

560 

N5 /NTC 5 

249 

339 

588 

N6 / NTC 6 

345 

429 

774 

Certificate with less than Grade 12 / Std 10 

98 

115 

212 

Diploma with less than Grade 12 / Std 10 

154 

217 

371 

Certificate with Grade 12 / Std 10 

960 

1399 

2359 


88 





































Level of education 

Male 

Female 

Total 

Diploma with Grade 12 / Std 10 

1229 

1978 

3208 

Higher Diploma 

1085 

1696 

2781 

Post Higher Diploma Masters; Doctoral Diploma 

262 

278 

540 

Bachelors Degree 

733 

851 

1584 

Bachelors Degree and Post graduate Diploma 

402 

338 

741 

Honours degree 

405 

534 

939 

Higher Degree Masters / PhD 

290 

192 

482 

Other 

258 

215 

473 

No schooling 

6911 

11931 

18842 

Unspecified 

- 

- 

- 

Not applicable 

21312 

20983 

42296 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


Highest level of education 


No schooling 

16422 

Grade 0 

10575 

Grade 1 / Sub A/Class 1 

10301 

Grade 2 / Sub B/Class 2 

8843 

Grade 3 / Std 1/ABET 1 

14828 

Grade 4 / Std 2 

14119 

Grade 5 / Std 3/ABET 2 

13580 

Grade 6 / Std 4 

16267 

Grade 7 / Std 5/ ABET 3 

15385 

Grade 8 / Std 6 / Form 1 

18299 

Grade 9 / Std 7 / Form 2/ ABET 

23359 

Occupational certificate NQF Level 1 


Grade 10 / Std 8 / Form 3 

34900 

Occupational certificate NQF Level 2 


Grade 11 / Std 9 / Form 4 

35415 

Occupational certificate NQF Level 3 


Grade 12 / Std 10 / Form 5/Matric/NCV Level 4 

62628 

Occupational certificate NQF Level 3 


NTCI/N1 

284 

NTC II / N2 

177 


89 



































NTC III /N3 

563 

N4 / NTC 4/ Occupational certificate NQF Level 5 

1337 

N5 /NTC 5/ Occupational certificate NQF Level 5 

838 

N6 / NTC 6/ Occupational certificate NQF Level 5 

1507 

Certificate with less than Grade 12 / Std 10 

235 

Diploma with less than Grade 12 / Std 10 

368 

Higher/National/Advanced Certificate with 

Certificate with Grade 12 / Occupational Certificate NQF 

1493 

Diploma with Grade 12 / Std 10/ Occupational Certificate NQF Level 6 

4413 

Higher Diploma/ Occupational Certificate NQF Occupational Certificate NQF 7 

2080 

Post Higher Diploma Masters; 

1090 

Highest level of education 


Bachelors Degree/ Occupational Certificate NQF Level 7 

1874 

Honours Degree/Post graduate Diploma/Occupational Certificate NQF Level 8 

1341 

Master’s/Professional Master’s at NQF Level 9 degree 

223 

PHD (Doctoral degree/Professional doctoral degree at NQF Level 10) 

145 

Other 

1124 


STATSSA: Community Survey 2016: Created on 26 October 2016) 


Schooling and level of education within municipal boundaries seem to be fairly balanced. The number of 
learners / students across levels of education represents a fair balance. This demonstrates consistency at the 
level of the rolling out of education facilities, infrastructure, focus and attention to detail. National 
concerns at the level of numeracy and literacy seem to be fairly dealt with in the context of MAP 
municipality. This successful intervention measure must then translate into comparative advantage for 
purposes of skills preparation for economic participation 

STATISTICS OF BURSARY HOLDERS FOR 2018 FUNDEDE BY MUNICPALITY 


UNIVERSITIES 


UNIVERSITY NAME 

TOTAL 

1. University Of Free State 

194 

2. Central University Of Technology 

20 

3. University Of Johannesburg 

22 

4. Wits University 

11 

5. North West University 

10 

6. Vaal University Of Technology 

09 

7. Durban University Of Technology 

06 

8. Tshwane University Of Technology 

13 

9. Stellenbosch University 

01 

10. University Of Cape Town 

01 

11. University Of The Western Cape 

01 

12. University Of Pretoria 

01 

13. University Of Zulu Land 

01 

TOTAL 

290 


90 







































COLLEGES 


COLLEGE NAME 

TOTAL 

l.MalutiTVET College 

2 

2. Motheo TVET College 

3 

3. Taung Agricultural College 

4 

4. Glen Agricultural College 

1 

5. Boston City Campus 

2 

6. Boston Media House 

1 

7. Damelin 

1 

8. Gauteng City College 

1 

9. Rosetech College 

1 

10. CTI 

1 

11. Person Institute 

1 

12. MSC Business College 

1 

13. AIR 43 Aviaition School 

1 

14. MACH 1 Aviation Academy 

1 

15. Denel Aviation School 

1 

TOTAL 

22 


91 







































DC19 MALUTI-A-PHOFUNG LIST OF SCHOOLS: DATA SOURCE: SA-SAMS FEBRUARY 2018 


EMIS Nr 

School Name 

Type of 
School 

Category of 
School 

Quintiles 

Circuit 

Circuit 

Manager 

LONG 

LAT 

Section 21 

Teaching 

Language 

Hostel 

Geographical Loc 

Tel Nr 

Learners 

Educe 

445109039 

AKOFANG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q2 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.818526 

-28.517242 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7131367 

619 


445101260 

BEACON S/S 

Public 

Ordinary Sec 

Q4 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.783025 

-28.521908 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MABOLELA 

VILLAGE 

7133993 

796 


445109063 

BLUEGUMBOSCH 

S/S 

Public 

Ordinary Sec 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.845854 

-28.479751 

Partly 
Section 21 

English 

No 

BLUEGUMBOSCH 

7141126 

335 


445109055 

BODIBENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.84136 

-28.557907 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

Marakong 

7897010 

796 


445109012 

BOIKETLONG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.825192 

-28.551407 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

BOIKETLO 

VILLAGE 

7896451 

895 


441705107 

BOIPOPO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

29.017705 

-28.306254 

Section 21 

English 

No 

TSHIAME A 

6352340 

162 


445105188 

BOITELO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.870361 

-28.521242 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

TEBANG LOCATION 

7128324 

1184 


445109062 

BOITSEBELO 

JUNIOR TECHNICAL 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q3 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.791901 

-28.530498 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7133945 

179 


445109051 

BOLATA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 

NTSHEFU 

28.794691 

-28.572405 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

6937453 

328 


445109058 

CLUB VIEW P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.837693 

-28.49891 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

CLUB VIEW 

7141932 

690 


445109057 

CLUB VIEW S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.83986 

-28.50091 

Section 21 

English 

No 

CLUB VIEW 

7140964 

552 


440401291 

DEOTREFES 

CHRISTIAN PI/S 

Independent 

Primary 


9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.703101 

-28.304301 


English 

No 

KESTELL 

6531345 

56 


445109005 

DIKWENA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.825692 

-28.570073 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7891155 

181 


445101232 

DIN ARE S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.768523 

-28.586405 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

POELONG 

7131367 

303 


445109014 

DIPHAKWENG P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.818692 

-28.586405 

Section 21 

English 

No 

HOSPITAL 

7133993 

409 


445105200 

DIQHOBONG P/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.883028 

-28.55724 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

QWAQWA 

7141126 

661 


445101258 

DITHOTANENG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.775857 

-28.557906 

Section 21 

English 

No 

DITHOTANENG 

VILLAGE 

7897010 

220 


441701191 

ED-U-COLLEGE QQ 
PI/S 

Independent 

Primary 


12 

MRPZIM 

28.782358 

-28.518075 


English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7896451 

529 


441701192 

ED-U-COLLEGE QQ 
SI/S 

Independent 

Ordinary 

Sec. 


12 

MRPZIM 

28.7825 

-28.517833 


English 


LEFIKA 

7132525 

248 


441705125 

EERAM IF/S 

Farm 

Intermediate 

Ql 

16 

MR MA 
MALEKA 

29.036208 

-28.101101 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

HARRISMITH 

7219952 

112 



92 




441705211 

HARRISMITH 

CHRISTIAN 

ACADEMY CVS 

Independent 

Combined 


8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.129709 

-28.270424 


English 

No 

HARRISMITH 

6221664 

126 


441705197 

HARRISMITH 
HOeRSKOOL S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q5 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.134709 

-28.269424 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

HARRISMITH 

6221170 

458 


441705199 

HARRISMITH P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q5 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.123875 

-28.258092 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

HARRISMITH 

6231931 

761 


441705033 

HARRISMITH S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q1 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.105542 

-28.242926 

Section 21 

English 

No 

HARRISMITH 

6223598 

520 


445105189 

HLAJOANE S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q1 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.835692 

-28.641902 

Section 21 

English 

No 

TSHESENG 

7894076 

200 


445101240 

HLATSENG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q1 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.717022 

-28.551073 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MONONTSHA 

CLUSTER 

7136171 

184 


445109015 

ITEBOHELENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.807025 

-28.587738 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7890083 

880 


441705012 

ITLH AH ANELEN G 

P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.088208 

-28.243592 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

INTAB AZWE 

6223964 

412 


445101242 

ITLOTLISENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.790525 

-28.538574 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7893019 

431 


445109059 

JUSTICE LEFUMA 

P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q2 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.848694 

-28.479577 

Partly 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

BLUEGUMBOSCH 

7141128 

1115 


445101245 

KARABELO I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.783858 

-28.552906 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7210050 

335 


445105158 

KATLEHO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.854193 

-28.639736 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7150232 

583 


441705208 

KGETHATSEBO- 
KHETHULWAZI S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q2 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.992301 

-28.32607 

Section 21 

English 

No 

TSHIAME B 

6353348 

992 


445109042 

KGOPJANE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.802191 

-28.576239 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NEAR ATANG 

STORE 

7898275 

930 


445101244 

KGOTSONG P/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.772191 

-28.541074 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

5248411 

289 


445109052 

KHOTHALANG C/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.785524 

-28.574739 

Section 21 

English 

No 

BOLATA VILLAGE 

7524553 

658 


445101237 

KOALI S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.785191 

-28.537574 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7130435 

201 


445105168 

KOOS MOTA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.868193 

-28.634403 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7210144 

405 


445101238 

LEBOHANGP/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Q2 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.773857 

-28.535074 

Section 21 

English 

No 

71 MATEBELENG 
VILLAGE 

7893023 

736 


445101230 

LEKGULO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.76769 

-28.574238 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7136304 

704 


445109045 

LEPANYA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.789691 

-28.584405 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

SEPHURWANENG 

7134468 

200 


445105186 

LERATO P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.851027 

-28.519575 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

QHOLAQHWE 

7162027 

1292 


441705201 

LERATO UTHANDO 

cs/s 

Public 

Comp. Sec. 

Q3 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.09319 

-28.24517 

Section 21 

English 

No 

INTAB AZWE 

6221851 

890 


445101254 

LESAOANA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.719855 

-28.568905 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7150748 

786 



93 




445109061 

445109043 

445109031 

445109054 

445101243 

445105155 

441705063 

445109024 

445109016 

445105169 

445109026 

445101239 

445109040 

445101246 

445105191 

445109002 

445105159 

445101236 

445105160 

445101247 

445109023 

445105183 

445101248 

445109001 

445109017 

445109034 


LETLOTLO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

ll 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.801858 

-28.575905 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

LEEUW STREET 

7134268 

1773 


LETOTOLO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q2 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.784691 

-28.522241 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

MABOLELA 

VILLAGE 

7130464 

1617 


LETSHA-LE- 
MADUKE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.837526 

-28.555407 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

LETSHA LE 

MADUKE VILLAGE 

7894152 

871 


LETSIBOLO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.809859 

-28.549907 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7136319 

876 


LIBE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.76819 

-28.567572 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

TSEKI 

9971401 

354 


MAANANKOE S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.854859 

-28.640402 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

THIBELLA 

7890008 

202 


MABATE IF/S 

Farm 

Intermediate 

Ql 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.989034 

-28.370251 

Non- 

Section 21 

English 

No 

HARRISMITH 

4907286 

73 


MABELA C/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.822859 

-28.548074 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7894104 

1037 


MABEWANA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.822359 

-28.562239 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7896173 

679 


MACHAEA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.872194 

-28.555074 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

QWA QWA 

7130239 

939 


MADIBOHO I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.810192 

-28.559906 

Section 21 

English 

No 

BOLATA VILLAGE 

7136021 

581 


MAFIKA-DITSHIU 

P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.769023 

-28.586238 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

POELONG 

7136153 

557 


MAFUBE I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.816859 

-28.521575 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7130995 

410 


MAJARA P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.76669 

-28.559406 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MAKHALOANENG 

VILLAGE 

7132273 

141 


MAJWENG PF/S 

Farm 

Primary_ 

Ql 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.884197 

-28.306753 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

QWA QWA 

5029784 

205 


MAKABELANE CS/S 

Public 

Comp. Sec. 

Q2 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.784025 

-28.524908 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7133491 

697 


MAKENENG P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.820525 

-28.607737 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7890005 

981 


MAKGABANE S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.720355 

-28.567238 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7139030 

123 


M AKGETHEN G P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.841525 

-28.653235 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7895163 

283 


MAKHALOANENG 

P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.785358 

-28.537907 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7893001 

747 


MAKONG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.806858 

-28.592904 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

0603753 

181 


MAKWANE PS 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.884861 

-28.543408 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NEXT TO 

MOHALADITWE S. 
SEC 

0040026 

357 


MAMOSA PS 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.790191 

-28.606904 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7133514 

189 


MAMPOI S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.816375 

-28.584072 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

MOKODUMELA 

7891211 

947 


MANGAUNG PS 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.821525 

-28.575072 

Section 21 

English 

No 

QWAQWA 

7896070 

386 


MANTSHATLALA PS 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.835359 

-28.569406 

Section 21 

English 

No 

LETSHALEMADUKE 

7890090 

845 



94 




445105154 

MASOPHA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Qi 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.892694 

-28.625237 

Section 21 

English 

No 

DINKWENG 

7891151 

56 


445109018 

MATSIENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.804191 

-28.587238 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

2342508 

533 


445109064 

MATSIKENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.848034 

-28.50146 

Partly 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

2978143 

512 


445105182 

MATSWAKENG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.883194 

-28.639569 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

TSESENG 

7898921 

255 


445109044 

MEHLODING P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.794024 

-28.573072 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

6901151 

654 


445105149 

METSI-MATSHO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.872194 

-28.593405 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7890107 

336 


445105170 

MIRI P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.892528 

-28.589072 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7128291 

360 


445105203 

MMATHABO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.856028 

-28.490243 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7162098 

712 


445105150 

MOHALADITWE S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.875028 

-28.543574 

Section 21 

English 

No 

DIKGAKENG 

7136659 

646 


445105161 

MOHALE P/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.819858 

-28.61957 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MAKENENG 

7890060 

714 


445101234 

MOHATO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.755523 

-28.556906 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MONONTSHA 

7150908 

811 


445105171 

MOHLAKANENG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.900861 

-28.623737 

Section 21 

English 

No 

REITPAN 

7894107 

95 


445109019 

MOJATSOHLE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.819859 

-28.571239 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7891103 

751 


445109041 

MOLIBELI P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q2 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.834693 

-28.539574 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MANGAUNG 

7136000 

962 


445101249 

MONONTSHA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.740023 

-28.560239 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7150090 

199 


445105151 

MOOKODI S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.820858 

-28.618403 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7890122 

501 


445109067 

MORENA 

MOKOPELA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.793161 

-28.568046 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7890125 

535 


445802150 

MORENA TSHOHISI 
MOLOIII P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.99075 

-28.32404 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 


KHUTLONG SA 
KHOLOKOE 

4568657 

1080 


445109010 

MOTEKA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q2 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.833026 

-28.539907 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NAMAHADI 

7890007 

240 


445109032 

MPHATLALATSANE 

P/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.83636 

-28.507742 

Partly 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

3966020 

854 


441705027 

MPHOPHOMO C/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.387215 

-28.290925 

Non- 

Section 21 

English 

No 

VAN REENEN 

9583586 

219 


445101250 

NAKA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.767024 

-28.536907 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7130173 

534 


445109033 

NAMAHADI P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.834359 

-28.56024 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

QWA QWA 


241 


445109035 

NEOP/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.822859 

-28.584238 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7897600 

1002 


441705122 

NEXUS P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.987701 

-28.321587 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

TSHIAME C 

6353155 

1303 


441705065 

NHLAKANIPHO I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.107042 

-28.243426 

Section 21 

English 

No 

INTAB AZWE 

6232360 

607 



95 




440101190 

445109025 

445105172 

445101286 

445101251 

445109046 

445109048 

445105174 

445105162 

441705123 

445105194 

441705061 

445109036 

445109037 

445109049 

445802170 

445109003 

440101270 

441705106 

441705142 

445101233 

445105175 

445105163 

445105164 

445101231 

445105165 


NKARABENG S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Qi 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.692357 

-28.324917 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

KESTELL 

6531104 

879 


NKHOBISO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Qi 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.820859 

-28.573239 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7891420 

383 


NTEBOHISENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.885362 

-28.536075 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7128294 

644 


NTHABISENG S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.77019 

-28.574072 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NEXT TO 

MAGISTRATES 

COURTS 

7892383 

225 


PAB ALLONG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.768357 

-28.537074 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

PAB ALLONG 

7136063 

648 


PHAHAMENG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.76869 

-28.589571 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

BOLATA VILLAGE 

6578761 

575 


PHAMONG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.805525 

-28.555073 

Partly 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

BOLATA VILLAGE 

0716912218 

519 


PHETA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.851693 

-28.605238 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MOEDING 

7897085 

524 


PHIRI I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.801191 

-28.622236 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MAKENENG 

7894670 

414 


PULAMADIBOHO 

P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.087541 

-28.251425 

Section 21 

English 

No 

INTAB AZWE 

6221054 

810 


QHOLAQHWE I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.852194 

-28.518909 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MAKWANE 

7162025 

1215 


QHUBEKA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.099708 

-28.252758 

Partly 

Section 21 

IsiZulu 

No 

INTAB AZWE 

6221621 

815 


QIBI P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.84036 

-28.571573 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

MAQHWELENG 

VILLAGE 

8132679 

440 


QWABI P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.83486 

-28.543907 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

HARANKOPANE 

VILLAGE 

7893975 

1058 


QWAQWA C/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.800025 

-28.524741 

Section 21 

English 

No 

BEIRUT 

7130418 

512 


QWAQWA SAFE 
SCHOOL SPEC 

Public 

Specialised 


14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 


Non- 

Section 21 

English 


PHUTHADITJHABA 

7187000 

25 


REAHOLA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.816692 

-28.519242 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7135627 

614 


RETIEF C/S 

Public 

Combined 

Q4 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.692357 

-28.318085 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

KESTELL 

6531254 

1425 


SASAMALA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q3 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

29.109208 

-28.271591 

Section 21 

English 

No 

HARRISMITH 

6252355 

584 


SCHREINER'S 

CLAIM PF/S 

Farm 

[ Primary 

Ql 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.233212 

-28.176598 

Non- 

Section 21 

IsiZulu 

No 

HARRISMITH 

6232668 

49 


SEANAKWENA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.783358 

-28.558073 

Section 21 

English 

No 

POELONG 

7210051 

253 


SEDIBENG P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.854526 

-28.62207 

Section 21 

English 

No 

TSESENG VILLAGE 

7895125 

222 


SEKGOMPEPE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.851359 

-28.636069 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

TSHESENG 

9971569 

480 


SEKGOTHADI P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.808524 

-28.62307 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7892404 

759 


SEKGUTLONG S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.739022 

-28.567739 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

MONONTSHA 

7210077 

672 


SELEBALO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.808691 

-28.607904 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

QWAQWA 

7128301 

328 



96 




445109006 

SELELEKELA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q3 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.804525 

-28.522575 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7132911 

212 


445109050 

SELEMELA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.793191 

-28.563573 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

0723837776 

341 


441705060 

SENTEBALE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.099875 

-28.210094 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

INTAB AZWE 

6223330 

484 


445101261 

SENTINEL P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.773191 

-28.521075 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7131657 

995 


445109022 

SEPHOKONG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q3 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.818193 

-28.502076 

Section 21 

Parallel: 
Eng/S otho 

No 

ENGEN GARAGE 

7132533 

283 


445101241 

SETSOTO I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.790025 

-28.53824 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NEXT TO UNITING 
CHURCH 

7893003 

182 


445105202 

SHAKHANE S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Qi 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.818025 

-28.607071 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MAKENENG 

VILLAGE 

7128308 

206 


445105177 

SHOESHOE P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.886362 

-28.543408 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

MAKWANE 

7897012 

578 


441705026 

SOB A PF/S 

Farm 

Primary 

Ql 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

28.684358 

-28.205757 

Non- 

Section 21 

English 

No 

KESTELL 

0762471678 

127 


445101255 

TABOLA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.792025 

-28.541907 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7893021 

1053 


445109066 

TATAISONG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.808982 

-28.532378 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7131764 

1371 


445109038 

TEBANG I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.836859 

-28.575572 

Section 21 

English 

No 

- STADIUM, PASS 

BY MAMPOI HIGH 

7895252 

127 


445105176 

TEBOHO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.883695 

-28.533741 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

NEAR MAKWANE 
MAGISTRATE 

COURT 

7107951 

1073 


445105178 

THABA-BOSIU I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.875027 

-28.590405 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

2363161 

474 


445109008 

THAHAMESO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.787191 

-28.574905 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

9448419 

298 


445109004 

THALABODIBA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.840026 

-28.571239 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NEXT TO QIBI 
PRIMARY SCHOOL 

7893964 

871 


445109068 

THAROLLO I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Q2 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.828193 

-28.510209 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 


BLOCK L 

9970312 

1121 


445101256 

THEBE-YA-KGOMO 
P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.739689 

-28.568405 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

MONONTSHA 

VILLAGE 

7107154 

427 


445101257 

THEJANA P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.739856 

-28.567072 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

MONONTSHA 

VILLAGE 

7150334 

216 


445105166 

THIBELLA I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.853359 

-28.639736 

Section 21 

English 

No 

TSHESENG 

7891861 

269 


445109060 

THIBOLOHA SPEC 

Public 

Specialised 


12 

MRPZIM 

28.816526 

-28.538407 

Section 21 

Sign 

Language 

Yes 

RIVERSIDE 

7130048 

363 


445109009 

THOKOANA 
MAKAOTA S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Q2 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.803359 

-28.517408 

Section 21 

English 

No 

QWAQWA 

6598862 

389 


445109030 

TIISETSO P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.808359 

-28.509576 

Partly 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7133770 

1000 


445109029 

TLHORONG S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.812359 

-28.561406 

Section 21 

English 

No 

WITSIESHOEK 

7892382 

481 


441705214 

TLOKWENG P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.860153 

-28.627123 

Partly 

Section 21 

SeSotho 

No 

TSESENG VILLAGE 

7897518 

338 


445109027 

TSEBO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Ql 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.823859 

-28.546574 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MOTEBANG ROAD 

7897041 

1116 



97 




441705207 

TSEBONG- 
OLWAZINI P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Q3 

9 

MR TP 

MOSEA 

29.089708 

-28.260424 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

HARRISMITH 

6353360 

1107 


445101228 

TSEKI S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Qi 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.734356 

-28.500575 

Section 21 

English 

Yes 

WITSIESHOEK 

7890042 

187 


445105181 

TSESENG P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Qi 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.87186 

-28.635236 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

TSHESENG 

7895196 

215 


445109007 

TSHIBOLLO S/S 

Public 

Ordinary 

Sec. 

Qi 

13 

MR MJ 
NTSHEFU 

28.805358 

-28.585905 

Section 21 

English 

No 

MOKODUMELA 

7891708 

300 


445101283 

TSHITSO P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

14 

MR SD 

SEJAKE 

28.774524 

-28.569905 

Section 21 

English 

No 

NEXT TO TSEKI 

HIGH SCHOOL 

7890091 

197 


445105167 

TSHWARA-THEBE 

I/S 

Public 

Intermediate 

Ql 

10 

MR TP STAAT 

28.800691 

-28.625569 

Section 21 

Parallel: 

Eng/Sotho 

No 

TSHIRELA 

7128312 

267 


441705001 

VULINDLELA P/S 

Public 

Primary 

Ql 

8 

MRLMM 

LETHEPA 

29.104875 

-28.252592 

Section 21 

IsiZulu 

No 

HARRISMITH 

6231704 

1138 


445101266 

WITSIESHOEK P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Q4 

12 

MRPZIM 

28.803859 

-28.537407 

Section 21 

English 

No 

PHUTHADITJHABA 

7130396 

1150 


445109077 

ZR MAHABANE P/S 

Public 

Primary_ 

Ql 

11 

MR JM 

TWALA 

28.885395 

-28.540208 

Partly 

Section 21 

English 

No 

THABONG LUSAKA 

7101076 

1150 



Maluti-a-Phofung municipality have Maluti TVET Colleges in QwaQwa and Harrismith and the University of Free State QwaQwa Campus for further education. 


98 




F.4. PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND GOOD GOVERNANCE 


Developmental Objectives and Priorities on the IDP 

Following an extensive and interactive consultation processes between the elected leaders, municipal 
administration, communities and stakeholders the municipality has agreed to the following developmental 
priorities that should be achieved in the next five years. These development priorities are steeped within 
the overall cluster system of government. 


SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE 

AND SERVICES 

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND JOB 
CREATION 

Water 

Agricultural development 

Sanitation 

Tourism development 

Electricity 

Land reform 

Waste management 

Industrial development 

Roads, streets, storm-water 

Skills development 

Housing 

Cemeteries 

Land development 

SMME development 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT AND 

GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

PARTICIPATION 

Health services 

Increased revenue base from rates and taxes 

Environmental management 

Corporate governance 

Education and training 

Institutional transformation 

Parks, Sports and recreation services 

Library services 

Transport 

Community-based planning 

PUBLIC SAFETY 



Disaster Management 
Safety and Security 
Traffic Control 


Emergency services 


> Strategic Objective: Promote a culture of accountability and clean governance 

> Strategic objective: To ensure effective coordination of governance processes and compliance to 
legislative requirements 

■ Intended outcome: Compliance to government processes and legislative requirements 


Governance structures 


Area of focus 

Availability/ 

Non-availability 

Functionality 

Internal Audit function 

Available 

Functional 

Audit Committee 

Available 

Functional 

Oversight committee 

(MPAC) 

Available 

Functional 


99 


















Ward committees 

Available 

Functional 

Council committee 

Available 

Functional 

Supply chain committee 

Available 

Functional 

mSCOA committee 

Available 

Functional 

Municipal Planning 

Tribunal (MPT) 

Available 

Functional 


Management and operational systems 


Area of focus 

Availability/ 

Non¬ 

availability 

Functionality 

Challenges 

antidotes 

Complaints 
management system 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Fraud prevention 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Communication 

strategy 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Stakeholder 
mobilisation strategy 
or pubic 
participation 
strategy 

Available 

Functional 




F.5. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT 

The following are the needs which were captured during the IDP, Cash suspense, Indigent process. 
Introduction to flat rate, Revenue enhancement, Spatial Development Framework (SDF) and water by¬ 
laws public road shows conducted to all the 35 Wards around the Maluti-A-Phofung Municipality. During 
these community participation sessions, a number of issues were raised by the members of the 
community. Amongst others were those needs which are the competency of the local government sphere 
whereas others were the competency of the other two spheres of government. At the level of planning, 
municipality realized the importance of capturing these needs as per NSDP objectives and critically 
identifies such needs as per Wards. These made it manageable for the various directorates within the 
municipality to incorporate the funded needs into their Services Delivery Budget Implementation plan. 


WARD 1 

CLLR THABO MOLOI 

WARD 2 

CLLR KEMELO MOLOI 

WARD3 

CLLR SEBINA MAHLANGU 

WARD 4 

CLLR SIBONGILE 

MSIMANGA 

Top 5 priorities 

a. 200 households 

electricity connections 
b. Water connections 
Makgolokoeng 

c. Sewer connections 
Makgolokoeng 

d. Paved road 8km 
Makgolokoeng 

e. Sites 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Re-graveling of roads 

b. Paved main access 
roads 2.1km Matsikeng 
and 770m 

Mphatlalatsane 

c. VIP toilets - 
Matsikeng 

d. High mast lights 

e. Sports, Arts and 
recreational facilities 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Water connections Ext. 5 

b. Sewer Ext. 4 and 
Boipatong 

c. Bridge next to clinic 

d. Sites - affordable prices 

e. Roads maintenance 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Installation of high 
mast lights and their 
maintenance 

b. 8km streets pavement 

c. Formalization of 
shacks 

d. Formalization of sites 

e. VIP toilets at 

Silahliwe and 

Dumping site 


100 























High mast lights 

Street lights maintenance 

Bridge Phahameng 

Roads maintenance 

High mast lights maintenance 

Electricity formalization 
Matsikeng and Difariking 

Primary School 

Speed humps 

Streets pavement 

Foot bridge - Matsikeng 

Clinic for 24/7 

RDP houses 

Shacks formalization 

Site for graveyard 

RDP houses 

Re-gravelling of roads 

VIP toilets 

Township formalization 

Storm water channels Extension 4 

Gravel for stopping water to 
shacks 

Gravel for stopping water to 
shacks 

Proper sewer network 
connection 

Security for Bloemfontein 
ambulance 

Electricity connections - 
Silahliwe 

Re-gravelling of roads 

Leaking sewer 

Upgrading of Sports ground 

EPWP - for cleaning 

EPWP - for cleaning 

Leaking water 

Sports & recreational facilities 

Solar geysers 

Solar geysers 

High mast lights 

Unfinished RDP houses 

Street lights maintenance 

Street lights maintenance 

Electricity cut offs 

High mast lights 

Water cut offs 

Taxi rank 

Vending stations and solar 
geysers 

Fencing of Social Development 
Office 

Overhead bridge - Lotusville 

Vending stations 

Clinic - Matsikeng 

Fair appointment of tenders 

Upgrading of water network 


Community Hall 

Fire emergency 

Clinic 


RDP houses 

Paving of roads 

EPWP - cleaning 


Budget for Ward based planning 

Youth Centre/Information Centre 

Crime prevention 


24/7 hours Mphatlalatsane clinic 

Upgrading of Netball 

Court/Security 



Electricity transformers 

Sewer leakages, 



Maintenance of graveyards 

Functioning of Computer Lab 



Speed humps 

Clean water at farms 



Job opportunities/ Youth 
programme 

Mobile clinic at Ysterlig farm & 
others 




MAP Water Satellite office 



WARD 5 

CLLR MANDLA 

TSHABALALA 

WARD 6 

CLLR MAY TSOTETSI 

WARD 7 

CLLR MATSHEDISO 

TSOEU 

WARD 8 

CLLR KGAUTA MOTAUNG 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Improvement of water 
supply at Pholani 

Section 

b. Paving of roads 

c. Regraveling of roads 

d. Storm water drainages 
in Pholani 

e. Installation of high 
mast lights 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Street paving - 
Tshiame C 

b. Resurfacing of streets - 
Wilgepark and Town 

c. High mast lights and 
street lights - 
TshiameBC, Town and 
Schoon Plaas 

d. Jojo tanks in 15 farms 

e. Community hall - 
Wilgepark 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Re-graveling of roads 

b. Vending stations 

c. Water connections 

d. Electricity 
transformers 

e. Crescent mall hiring 
of workers 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Public roads 
maintenance 

b. Re-graveling of roads 

c. Upgrading of water 
networks-leakages 

d. Vending stations 

Pheella and ha 

Mosikidi 

e. Upgrading of Lekgulo 
Sports Ground 

Streets pavement 

Paved roads - S1437 

Road 

VIP toilets 

High mast lights - Lebohang 
school, Lekgulo and Mabopane 

High mast lights maintenance 

Re-graveling of streets 

Electricity meter boxes 

Streets maintenance 

Gravel for stopping water to 
shacks 

Storm water drainage 

Water -and clean water 

Taboha School 

Upgrading of sports ground - 
Lekgulo 

Shacks formalization 

Provision of water bulk services 

RDP houses 

Storm water channels 

Solar geysers 

Speed humps 

Roads maintenance 

Clinic 

Electricity connections - 
Dumping side 

Sports facilities 

Indigent registration 

Incomplete RDP houses 

New RDP houses 

Rehabilitation of Landfill site - 

closed 

Refuse bins 

High mast lights maintenance 

Electricity connections- new 
stands 


101 






































EPWP cleaning 

High mast lights maintenance 

High mast lights 

Electricity cut offs 

Water connections Mkhondo 

informal settlement 

Provision of electricity 

Crime prevention - Rape 

Paved road from Mabopane to 
Masechaba 

Water cut offs 

Title deeds 

Hiring at Crescent Mall 

Electricity transformers 

Upgrading of water networks 

Taxi rank 

Cracking of the school 

sub-contractors be ward based 

Re-gravelling of roads 

Vending stations 

Electricity bridging 

Paved road Makgalaneng to 
Lebohang 

Formalization of sites 

Upgrading of sports grounds 

Paved roads 

Budget for electricity destroyed 
appliances 

Sports grounds upgrading 

Sites for residential, businesses 
and churches 

Re-graveling of streets 

Foot bridges: Tikathole to 
Lebohang, Phomolong to 
Makgalaneng, 

Tshwaranang to Ha Jimmy 

VIP toilets 

Electricity house connections 


Graveling of Mosikidi road 

Street lights maintenance 

Community parks 


Youth employment 

Roads maintenance 

Shopping mall 


Permanent job creation 


VIP toilets to farm communities 


Upgrading of sewer networks 


Incomplete RDP houses 


Solar geysers 


RDP houses 


SAPS Sattellite police station 


Solar panels to farm 
communities 


VIP toilets 


Recreational facilities 


Community Hall 




Library Makgalaneng & 
Matebeleng 




Bursaries 




Learnerships/Internships 




Youth Centre 


WARD 9 

CLLR MANONO 

MOTSHWENENG 

WARD 10 

CLLR MOJALEFA NALEDI 

WARD 11 

CLLR JOSEPH 

RANTSANE 

WARD 12 

CLLR THABO HATLA 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Re-graveling of roads - 
the whole ward 

b. Foot bridges - 
Between Paballong and 
Poelong and 

Kudumane 

c. Speed humps - Leribe 
next to Naka school 

d. High mast lights 
maintenance 

e. Vending stations: 
Poelong, Paballong 
Phase 1, Leribe 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Electricity house 
connections - Poelong 

b. 1.8km paved roads - 
Dinare, Sekgutlong and 
Tsoha o iketsetse 

c. Foot bridges - 
Sekgutlong to 

Sedibeng, Masaleng, 
Mphatlalatsane 
Cemetery, Masaleng to 
Tseki, Masimong to 
Khanyane, 

d. Provision of water 

e. High mast lights 
installations - 
Sekgutlong and 

Sedibeng 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Roads re-graveling 

b. Water connections: 
Mantsubise Tribal 
office, Next Mohato 
School, Masimong, 
Phallang and 

Namoha 

c. Electricity Network 
& house connections 

d. Vending stations 

e. Installation of 
boreholes Leratong 
Village 

Foot bridge Poelong 
to Namoha 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road from 
Makgalanyane to 
Dikgakeng school and 
around Thella Boy 

b. Upgrading ofand 
maintenance of 

Masimog and Diteneng 
road and Rantjhabeng 

c. Vending stations 

d. VIP toilets 

e. Foot bridges Thella 

Boy to Lepanya, 

Naledi to Makong and 
Masimong to 
Maboshoane 

f. Water leakages after 
Mofomo project 

Storm water channels 

Storm water drainages 

Streets maintenance 

RDP houses 

Paved roads 

Vending stations 

Roads maintenance 

High mast lights 

Bridges 

Bridges 

RDP houses 

High mast lights maintenance 

Bulk water services 

Roads re-graveling 

Storm water channels 

Electricity cut offs 

High mast lights 

Speed humps 

Installation of boreholes 
Leratong 

Crime prevention 


102 


































Electricity households 
connections 

Sports facilities 

Paved road from Hlatseng to 
Golden Gate (R712) 

Bursaries 

Upgrading of electricity 
transformers 

Upgrading of sports grounds 

Culverts installation at 

entrance 

Renovation of Dikgakeng 

School 

Sports facilities 

Water leakages 

Street lights maintenance 

Bridge Masimong road 

Upgrading of sports grounds 

VIP toilets 

High mast lights 


Water borne system 

Coucillor’s office 

Fencing of graveyards 



Provision of cemeteries 

Upgrading of sports grounds 


Provision of water at schools 

Fencing of cemeteries 

Community Hall 


Water leakages 

Upgrading of electricity 
transformers 

Donga rehabilitation to stop 
graveyards erosion 


Job creation 

Electricity cut offs 

Job creations 


Youth employment 


Recreational parks 

Recreational parks 




VIP toilets: Marallaneng 

Phase 2, Hlatseng, 

Sehlajaneng and Leratong 




Building of Namoha 

Monument (battle of Namoha) 




Shortage of nurses at 
Malesaooana and Monontsha 

clinics 




Satellite Police Station 



WARD 13 

CLLR PULANE 

MOFOKENG 

WARD 14 

CLLR MATSEBETSEBE 

MHLAMBI 

WARD 15 

CLLR MASEKAO 

LEBUSA 

WARD 16 

CLLR AZAEL NHLAPO 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved access roads - 
Malakoane Street and 
Thahameso streets , 

Road to Kgoptjane 
School and unfinished 
Thahameso paved 
road, 

b. Vending stations 
Kgoptjane and Jesu o 
teng 

c. Electricity transformer 
- Bolata Central 

d. VIP toilets 

e. Roads graveling - Jesu 
o teng Theosane 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Electricity 
connections B-Strong 

b. Paved road Madiboho 
road 

c. Foot bridges- Selebalo 
le Makong, B-Strong 
to Kgoptjane, Dikoena 
to Mahlabatheng 

d. VIP toilets 

e. Vending stations- 
Boiketlo, Theosane, 
Whiteshop 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road - 
Sekgutlong 

b. Re-graveling of 
internal roads/streets 
and roads to 
graveyards 

c. Water connections 
Peete School and 
Tshirela 

d. Mobile clinic 

e. Vending stations - 
Thabong 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road- Matsieng, 
Mantolo, Thabang and 
Turfontein 

b. Re-gravelling of roads: 
Next to community 
hall, Matsieng, 
graveyards, Thaba 

Chitja access road. 

c. Footbridges :,Sekoto 
Dering, Thapelo 
mortuary, Tribal office 
Makong 

d. Water house 
connections Turfontein 

e. Upgrading of sports 
ground Turfontein 

f. Street lights 

Bolata Central water available 
during the night only 

Re-gravelling of internal roads 

Streets maintenance 

Storm water channels 

Water leakages - old water 
networks 

RDP houses 

Bridges 

Speed humps, Moreneng, 

Sefateng and Makeneng 

Water leakages:- Illegal 
connection Jeru 

Incomplete RPD houses 

Incomplete RDP houses 

Incomplete RDP houses 
Makeneng 

Incomplete RDP houses 

Upgrading of sports grounds 

RDP houses 

VIP toilets 

Foot bridge Jesu o teng to Ward 
25 

Electricity cut offs 

VIP toilets 

Shopping Centre 

Sites 

High mast lights 

High mast lights 

RDP houses 


103 






























Notification for electricity cut 
offs 

High mast lights maintenance 

High mast lights maintenance 

High mast lights 

High mast lights 

Job creations 

Street lights 

Electricity cut offs 

High mast lights maintenance - 
Bolata Central 

Speed humps - 

Upgrading of sports grounds 

Electricity transformers 

Mantolo 

Street lights Khothalang and 
others 

Road bridge to Dikwena from 
Mahlabatheng 

Food parcels 

Vending stations 

Youth empowerment 


Electricity cut offs 

Water network - Mantolo 

Electricity connections B- 
Strong 


Upgrading of the water main 
pipe 

Renovation of Makeneng 
community hall 

Installation and closing of 
electricity meter boxes 


Sustainable projects 

Building of Turfontein Primary 
school 

RDP houses- Machabakung, 
Marasenyalo 


Bursaries 

Wiennie Park sports ground 
upgrading 

Indigent registration not for all 



Leaking water in the ward 

Vandalised unoccupied RDP 
houses 



Equal job opportunities at 

Maluti Mall 

Sustainable projects for 
employment 



Youth centre for the ward 

Customer Care services poor 
and nor responding in time 





WARD 17 

CLLR MALITSE MOLOI 

WARD 18 

CLLR MALEWATLE 

NTHEDI 

WARD 19 

CLLR DITABA NHLAPO 

WARD 20 

CLLR NARE RAMOHLOKI 

Top 5 priorities 

a. High mast light 
maintenance: Ha 
Morake 

b. Paved road next to 
Sebokeng Graceland 
mortuary and 

Magazela 

c. Re-graveling of all 
roads 

d. Vending stations - 
Mangaung and 
Phahameng 

e. Storm water channels 
- Sebokeng 

f. Foot bridge 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Sports ground - Letsha- 
le-maduke 

b. Park upgrading - 
Namahadi 

c. High mast lights 
installation and 
maintenance 

d. Graveling of access 
roads HaSethunya 

e. Vending stations - 
Namahadi, Letsha-le- 
maduke and 

Harankopane 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Provision of pipeline 
from Mangaung / 
Hasethunya 
toThaba-Bosiu 
reservoir 

b. Community halls 

c. Upgrading of 
internal roads and re¬ 
graveling 

d. High mast lights 

e. Water network 
connections 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paving of 4km road 

b. Installation of high 
mast lights and 
maintenance 

c. Re-graveling and 
upgrading of all streets 

d. 385 house hold 
electricity connections 

e. RDP houses 

Job creation with good wages 
by contractors: Mangaung & 
Bophelong 

Fraud- electricity auditors 

Incomplete roads projects 

Bus to pass via ward 20 


Amount of flat rate 

Vending stations 

Solar geysers 

RDP houses Matlakeng 

RDP houses: Letsha-le-maduke, 
Kgatleng, 

High mast lights 

Refurbishment of Fika Patso 

resort 

Electricity cut offs 

Water connections: Letsha-le- 

Maduke 

High mast lights maintenance 

Vending stations 

Upgrading of roads to 
graveyards 

Leaking water Letsha-le-maduke 

Community library - Ha- 
Sethunya 

Electricity meter boxes abnormal 
price 

Electricity upgrading 

Leaking reservoir: Tribal Council 

Ward Councillor’s office 

Water network upgrading 

Street lights 

Sewer leaking Ha Mafose 

Crime prevention 

Centre for hand work 

Foot bridge - Matlakeng 

Foot bridges: Letsha-le-maduke, 
Kgatleng, 

RDP houses 

Clinic Lejoaneng 


104 






























Water leakages : Mahlaphong 

Re-graveling of roads: 

Makunyeng, Ha Mafose,ations 
Kgatleng 

Sites next to St. John Church 

Fencing and cutting of grass at 
the park 

Sports and recreation facilities 

Sewer pipe at dongs 

Water for house hold entire 
community 

Water connections Lejoaneng 

SMMEs assistance 

Water pipe leaking Letsha-le- 
maduke 

Stand pipes entire ward 

Electricity network upgrading 

Learnership/Internship adverts 
to Tribal Office 

Vending stations 

Incomplete RDP houses 

Learnerships adverts not be 
above 35yrs 

Streets maintenance 

Sites 

Primary school 

Bursaries 


High mast lights Namahadi 

Recreational facilities 

Paved main access roads 


Upgrading and fencing of sports 
ground Namahadi 

Library 

Customer care centre for the 

ward 


Sponsorship Maphiring Creche 

Satellite Police station 



VIP toilets Makunyeng, Letsha- 
le-maduke 

Communal animal kraal 



Forest cutting next to AME 
church 

Youth development 
programmes 



High mast lights maintenance 

Steel Foot bridges: 

HaSethunya to Thaba Bosiu, 
and jwalaboholo 



Incomplete RDP houses 

Job creation 



Open electricity meter boxes 

Upgrading of reservoir 



Youth employment 

Shopping centre 



Formalization of illegal electricity 
connections 

Graveyards fencing 




Job creation 




Storm water channels 




Speed humps 




Storm water channels and 
stoppers at water meters 




Road from MetsiMatsho - 
Mollakwekwe to Qoqolosing 
and Qoqolosing to Rietpan 




Funding for SMME projects 




VIP toilets 




Revitalization of Arts and 
Culture 




Water line at Mollakwekwe, 
Winnie park and HaSethunya 



WARD 21 
CLLR LEKENA 
MOKOENA 


WARD 22 

CLLR TUMELO THEBE 


WARD 23 
CLLR SEFATSA 
DIPHAPANG 


WARD 24 
CLLR SHASHAPA 
MOTAUNG 


Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road from 
Manthatisi to 
Marabeng cemetery, 
Sedibeng to Masene 
Park 

b. Re-graveling of all 
access roads 

c. High mast lights 
installation and 
maintenance 

d. Vending stations 

e. Upgrading of sports 


Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved street Tshiame A 6km 

b. Street lights maintenance 

c. High mast lights maintenance 
Intabazwe 

d. Sites 

e. Formalization and installation 
of electricity and water in 
Intabazwe 


Top 5 priorities 

a. Electricity households 
connections - Marakong and 
Masimong 

b. High mast lights installation 
and maintenance 

c. Re-graveling of roads - all 
streets 

d. Paved access roads - 
Katlehong to Masimong, 
Marakong clinic 

e. VIP toilets 


Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road - Lusaka si499 
since 1997 

b. Electricity house hold 
connections Qholaqhwe and 
Lusaka 

c. Community Hall - 
Qholaqhwe 

d. House hold water connections 
- Matshekgeng and Matsikeng 

e. Foot bridge Lusaka and 
Qholaqhwe 


105 


































ground next to 
Manthatisi, 

Setjhabeng ground 




RDP houses 

Rehabilitation of Town Hall park 

Storm water channels 

VIP toilets 

Recreational facilities 

Formalization of Intabazwe 

Informal settlement 

Foot bridges 

Sewer problems 

Foot bridges 

Re-gravelling of roads in Informal 
settlements 

Bridges 

High mast lights and streets 
lights at danger zones 

Leaking water 

Water network upgrading 

Speed humps 

Road maintenance and paving 
all access roads 

Renovation of Phomolong 
Community Hall 

Multipurpose hall in Tshiame A 

Sports facilities 

Re-graveling , stone pitches and 
storm water channels 

Leaking sewerage - pipe burst 

RDP houses Tshiame and 

Intabazwe 

Upgrading of sports grounds 

Unfinished paved road in 

Lusaka 3km since 2014 

Water crises: Sedibeng, 
Moeding 

Storm water drainages Tshiame A 

Upgrading of electricity 
transformers 

Parks and graveyard security 
houses renovations 

Graveyards fencing 

Installation of high mast lights 

Vending stations 

Foot bridges: Lusaka to 
Qholaqhwe, Matsikeng to 

Bagdad 

Learnerships and internships 

Paved streets Tshiame A 


Car bridge Matsikeng to 

Bagdad, Matsikeng to 

Graveyard 

Road to college wiped by 

water 

Water channel from the mountain 

Tshiame A 


Bridge from Matsikeng to 
Clubview CCV school 

Bursaries 

RDP houses Tshiame A 


Satellite Police station 


Parks Tshiame A 


Clinic/Mobile at Lusaka 


Sports grounds 


Speed humps in all paved roads 
along schools and main roads 




Sports facility poles 




Old aged shelter 




Solar geysers 




Upgrading of graveyard fencing 




Unemployed graduates, skilled 
labourers and semiskilled 


WARD 25 

CLLR CONSTANCE 

RAMOOANA 

WARD 26 

CLLR NQHAE MOKOENA 

WARD 27 

CLLR TEBOGO BAAS 

WARD 28 

CLLR MARY CROCKETT 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Upgrading of Mighty 
Swallows sports ground 

b. Foot bridges - Phamong, 
mimosa to Maqhekung, 
Diteneng 

c. VIP toilets and leaking 
water meters 

d. High mast lights installation 
and maintenance 

e. Refuse bins 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Storm water channels internal 
roads 

b. VIP toilets - Senyamo 

c. Sewer system 

d. Re-graveling of roads 

e. High mast lights maintenance 
and installation 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Electricity cut offs 

b. Blocked storm water 
channels 

c. Paved roads 

d. Additional high mast lights 
and high mast lights 
maintenance 

e. Speed humps on busy 
streets 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road in Phahameng 

b. Street lights in Phahameng, 
Elite and Chishani 

c. VIP toilets 

d. Foot bridges in Kgotsong 
school and Tribal office 

e. Road maintenance for 
potholes in main roads 

Storm water channels 

Water shortages - Senyamo 

Blocking and spilling sewer 

Bridge Mahankeng 

Roads re-gravelling 

Electricity cut offs 

Leaking water 

Road re-gravelling Chrishani 

Paved access roads - 
Phamong, Maqhekung, 
Riverside 

RDP houses 

Foot bridge between Bibi and 
Sasol Garage 

Water network connections 

Chrishani 

Dermacation 


Street lights 

High mast lights 


106 

































Sites at Phamong 

Removal of electricity 
transformer 

Roads maintenance 

Graveyard 

RDP houses 

Incomplete paved road - Ha- 
Rankopane 

RDP houses 

RDP houses 

Road full of mud - Riverpark 


Refuse removal 

Recreational facilities 

Electricity 

Vending stations 

Illegal dumping 

Youth employments in small 
roads 

Illegal connections and too 
low cable 

Upgrading of water networks 

Job creation 

Women employment for 
scraping of roads 

Incomplete projects by 
contractors-Makhufeng 

Notice of water and electricity cut 
offs 

Recreational facilities 

Sites 

Consideration of cooperatives 
in ward projects 

Upgrading of road to Mangaung 

Extension of the park 

Sports grounds 

Removal of hiring toilets 
Riverside entrance 

Speed humps road to Mangaung 

Swimming pool 

Small bridges 

Refuse removal in shoprite 
platics 

High mast lights maintenance 

Selling of Maqhekung houses 

Paved roads 

Refuse bins 

High mast lights 


Water 

Job adverts at the municipality 

Street lights maintenance 


Electricity meter boxes 

Learnerships 

Water leakages 


Electricity transformers 


Footbridge to Phazama 


Paypoint 


Paved road internally 


Library 


New electricity meter boxes 




WARD 29 

CLLR MAFOLE 

RALETHOHLANE 

WARD 30 

CLLR TSIETSIMOTLOKOA 

WARD 31 

CLLR GILBERT 

MOKOTSO 

WARD 32 

CLLR HLABATHE 

DLAMINI 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Phuthaditjhaba Hall 
renovation 

b. Paving of roads 

c. Re-graveling of roads - 
Ntshehele Bochabela 

d. Speed humps All ward 

e. Foot bridges: Mahlaphong, 
Bochabela 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved roads - Kgotsong 
and Mphotleng 

b. Clinic / Mobile Clinic 

c. Re-graveling and maintenance 
of roads 

d. Electricity network, 
formalization and upgrading of 
transformers 

e. Street lights Lusaka 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Vending stations 

b. Roads maintenance 

c. Foot bridge Comet to 
Makwane 

d. Paved road 
Molapo/Honeyville road 

e. High mast lights and high 
mast lights maintenance 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved road 520km to landfill 
site 

b. Electricity house hold 
connections - houses 800 

c. Water network connections: 
Kgabisi, Bagdad, Namoha and 
Kgabisi Ext. 17 

d. 6km paved road : Taba di 
Mahlong and Bluegumbosch 
cemetery 

e. High mast installation and 
maintenance 

Roads 

RDP houses 

RDP houses 

Paved access roads 

Road next to Justice Lefuma 

school 

High mast lights 

Unoccupied RDP houses for 
crime 

Paved road Metsimatsho 

Sites at Disaster Park 

High mast lights maintenance 

VIP toilets 

PTOs Molapo 

Sewer leakages 

Street lights maintenance 

High mast lights maintenance 

Toilets draining - Molapo 

Title deeds process to be speed 
up 

Water leakages 

Closing of dongas 

Recreational facilities 

Water drainages in paved roads 

Sewer leakages 

Corrupt and fraudulent electricity 
auditors 

Leaking sewer Makwane 
clinic 

Bluegumbosch stadium be used 
by all members of community 

Job creation 

Name tags for auditors 

Job creation / Employment 

Shopping mall 


Foot bridge Lusaka to Qholaqhwe 

Sewer network installation 

Electricity network connections 

K Kgabisi, Bagdad, Namoha 
and Kgabisi Ext. 17 


107 

































Houses 

High mast lights 

Streets gravelling and 
maintenance 

8 km pave road to the landfill 
site 

Water networks Bochabela 

Refuse removal trucks 

Water and water leakages 

Employment opportunities 

Youth employment 

Water, electricity and toilets for 
the old aged 

Illegal dumping Molapo 



WARD 33 

CLLR MELITA MLANGENI 

WARD 34 

CLLR KHANYSWA MOLEFE 

WARD 35 

CLLR MAMOTSHEARE MOSIA 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Regraveling of streets 

b. Sewer system Slovo park 

c. Paving main access streets in the 
ward 

d. Upgrading of footbrisges Section 

1, Section 2, Section 3 and Slovo 

Park 

e. Electricity formalization (poles) 

Top 5 priorities 

a. High mast lights and 
maintenance 

b. Sites 

c. Paved roads 

d. Speed humps 

e. Vending stations 

Top 5 priorities 

a. Paved roads: Makoane Clinic 

Sphola to Taba di mahlong 

Tebang clinic to Lusaka 

Kholedi to Pereng and landfill site 

Boitelo to Bluegumbosch cemetery 

b. Footbridges: Dipolateng to Makwane, Monyakeng to 
Lusaka 

c. High mast maintenance Sekgutlong 

d. Community Hall 

e. 200 houses electricity connections 

Paved roads to Makoane and Tebang clinics 

Sites for evicted residents 

Mobile Clinic 

Leaking sewer Makwane Clinic 

Roads maintenance 

More electricity transformers 

Re-gravelling Makwane clinic passage 

Sites 

More sports grounds 

Streets maintenance and re-graveling 

Water and sewer leakages 

RDP houses 

Vending station Phahameng 

RDP houses next to Maqhekung 

Water drainages in paved roads 

Access bridges in Monyakeng 

RDP houses next to Thiboloha 

Clinic at Disaster 

Storm water channels in gravel roads 

Thiboloha formalization 

Satellite Police Station 


Electricity connection Slovo 

Clinic signage 

Additional high mast lights 

Upgrading of water network Slovo 

Park 

Satellite Police station 

Streets lights 

Section 4 formalization 


Building 159 RDP houses 

Section 4 water connections 


Unoccupied RDP houses, vandalised and promote 
crime 

Section 4 sewer connections 


Incomplete RDP houses 

Building of a new school 


Incomplete VIP toilets Sphola 

Clinic 


Unused VIP toilets 

Community hall 


Leaking sewer Tebang Clinic (Sphola) 

Upgrading of the foot bridge to 
Maqhekung 


Funding for creches 

CWP and EPWP be permanent 
employment 


Increase EPWP, CWP and Mayoral projects 

Ward Cooperatives be part of leaking 
water and sewer problems 


Electricity cut offs 



Open electricity meter boxes 



Recreational facilities 



Sports grounds maintenance 



Illegal dumping Monyakeng 



Skilled people for projects 


STAKEHOLDER 

NEEDS 

Community Development Workers 

All wards 

Flat rate to include refuse removal 


108 






































(CDWs) 

Vending stations in all wards 

Water connections and meters installation 

Ward based electricity auditors 

Electricity system to show tempering of boxes 
Completion of incomplete RDP houses 

Traditional Leaders 

Royal Councils 

Water leakages in wards 

Shortage of water and the plan 

Roads maintenance 

Illegal dumping 

Vending stations 

Sewer leakages - Tseseng and others 

Sewer plant vandalised and Manthatisi pipe burst 

Cutting of trees along the roads 

Illegal electricity connections 

Mobile clinics 

Police station for certifying and affidavit 

No water since 2015 

Illegal sand mining 

High mast lights 

Sports grounds in rural areas 

Re-gravelling of roads to graveyards, clinics and 

Schools 

Check alien trees at Fika Patso Dam 

Youth employment 

People with Disability 

All wards 

Multipurpose centre for People with Disability -Kestell. 
Logistic hub to incorporate people living with disability 

- Paballong 

RDP houses must be user friendly People with disability 

- Khalanyoni 

Computer school for people with disability- Harrismith 
Waste/ refuse removal services - around Bochabela 
Provision of unused old government buildings tier 
projects - ward 15 

Provision of a site -Setsing 

Accessibility in all buildings so as enable them to walk 
free ward 17. 

MAP council to have a Disability desk - Social 
Development 

People with disability not to be isolated in locations 
Business plans for People with Disability 

Transport - bus 

Refuse bins - ward 25 

Additional people with disability employment. 


The community needs or development priorities are identified and further crystallised into 5 priorities per ward. 

Out of 35 wards of Maluti-a-Phofung Local Municipality, 26 wards needs upgrading of roads and storm-water, 24 wards 
needs maintenance of roads and storm-water, 22 wards needs electricity services (household connections), 13 wards 
needs water services and 11 wards needs basic sanitation. 


109 




The common needs in all wards are: 


• Maintenance of roads; Gravelling, resealing, paved streets 

• Electricity connections, high mast lights and street lights 

• Vending stations 

• Water connections 

• Community halls, sport facilities, parks 

• Sewerage connection and eradication of VIP toilets 

• Formalization of internal settlement and allocation of sites 

• Storm water channels 

• Completing and Building of RDP houses 

• Clinics 

Preceding the intense efforts to compile in a consolidated manner the demands made by communities per ward 
as outlined in the table below. In summary, the following were deeming as priority needs as they took 
dominance in demand during the IDP public participation process. The priorities that received consent from the 
public are: 

• Upgrading of roads and storm-water 

• Maintenance of roads and storm water (re-gravelling, foot bridges, unblocking storm-water and 
maintenance of roads) 

• Provision of electricity services 

• Provision of water services 

• Provision of basic sanitation 

RURAL CHALLENGE 

The following section provides some background on the current challenges and issues identified through 
a desktop assessment of the different IDP and Spatial Development Frameworks : 

1. Development Issues within the Area: 

□ Loss of biodiversity and heritage resources; 

□ Pressures on service delivery; 

□ Availability of water for irrigation purposes. 

□ Poor environmental management; 

□ High levels of unemployment; 

□ Limited support for small business; 

□ High unemployment & crime rate; 

□ Lack of funding for development; 

Whilst municipality of Maluti-A- Phofung have set itself the abovementioned key priorities for service 
delivery and sustainable development and livelihood, the NDP 2030 embraces the optimal integration of 
the aspects of social, economic, institutional, political, physical and engineering services into decision 
making as a prerequisite for coherent growth and the alignment of policies, institutions and strategies. In 
line with municipality’s key priorities, NDP 2030 sets a framework of key priorities within which MAP 
must operate in order to alleviate poverty, reduce high unemployment and minimise dependency on social 
grants especially on economically active communities. The following are 2030 priorities: - 


110 




O An economy that will create more jobs 

O Improving infrastructure 

O An inclusive and integrated rural economy 

O Improving the quality of education, training and innovation 

O Quality health for all 

O Social protection 

O Reforming the public sector. 

O A comprehensive drive to enhance both social equity and competitiveness; 

O Systemic changes to mobilise domestic investment around activities that can create sustainable 
employment; and 

• The New Growth Path Framework(Vision 2030) has identified the following drivers as the 
key to boost the country’s economy and reduce levels of poverty within communities: 

■ Substantial public investment in infrastructure both to create employment directly, 
in construction, operation and maintenance as well as the production of inputs, and 
indirectly by improving efficiency across the economy. 

■ Taking advantage of new opportunities in the knowledge and green economies. 

■ Fostering rural development and regional integration. 

■ In each of these areas, we will have to make a special effort to generate 
opportunities for young people, who face the highest unemployment rate 

Institutional Development and Transformation 

4 Strategic objective: To ensure effective administrative management and coordination of 
strategic issues by all managers 


Area of focus 

Availability 

/Non¬ 

availability 

Functionality 

Challenges 

antidotes 

Information 

technology 

Available 

Functional 

“ 

“ 

Availability of skilled 
staff 





Organisational 

structure 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Skills development 
plan 

Available 

Functional 

” 

” 

Human resource 
management strategy 
or plan 

Not 

available 

To be 
developed 


The Director Corporate 
Services and HR 

Manager to develop the 
plan 

Individual 
performance and 
organisational 
management systems 

Available 
for Section 

56 

Managers 

To be cascaded 
to lower staff 

No enough 

staff for PMS 

Appointment of staff 

Monitoring, 
evaluation and 
reporting processes 
and systems 

Not 

available 

To be 
developed 

Shortage of 

PMS staff 

No committee 
for monitoring 
and evaluation 

Appointment of enough 
staff 

Development of the 
Committee 


111 














F.6. Municipal Organogram 


ttoposed 

Structure 


Proposed Organizational Structure 
of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 


/ 


\ 

Municipal Manager 

Date 





Executive Mayor 

Date 


Council Resolution no. 

Date. 

V _ 


_/ 


OFFICE OF THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


Bast 

Municipal Manager 


SUB-DIRECTORATE 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER SUPPORT 


PROJECT MONITORING UNIT 


DIRECTORATE 

CORPORATE SERVICES 


INFRASTRUCTURE & 
ELECTRICITY SERVICES 


Post: 

lx Service Point Manager 


Post: 

lx Service Point Manager 


SPLUM. HUMAN SETLLEMENTS & 
TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS 


PUBLIC SAFETY. TRANSPORT 
AND PROTECTION SERVICES 


DIRECTORATE 


DIRECTORATE 


DIRECTORATE 

LOCAL ECONOMIC 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 

SERVICES 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 


DEVELOPMENTJOURISM.SMME.AGRICULTURE, 




ENVIRONMENT PLANNING AND MANGEMENT 


[ uport Services| I I Co re Services | |StaReho4ders| 


112 




























































Proposed 

Structure 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 


2 



inputs from Division Risk 
Management not provided 


113 
































f^ropD'Led 

Sductuit 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 


8 



114 


































Proposed 

Sfrucruxe 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 


17 


f - 


A 

Municipal Manager 

□ate 



Executive Mayor 

Date 


Council Resolution no. 

Date. 







DIRECTORATE 


FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES 


POSTS: 

1 k Chief Financial Offic-erCv) 


SECTION: 
Admin Support 


Post: 

Ik Personal Assistant 
1 k Ad miim Officer 


1 - 

-1- 

--1- 

- ~T 

SUB-DIRECTOR ATE 



S U B -DIR E CTORATE 



S U B -D 1 R ECTOR ATE 



S U B -Dl R E CT O RAT E 

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING 



REVENUE MANAGEMENT 



SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT 



HARRISMITH UNIT 






SUB-DIRECTORATE 


BUDGET AND REPORTING 


SUB-DIRECTORATE 


EXPENDITURE 


SUB-DIRECTORATE 


ASSETS, STORES AND DISPOSAL 


115 







































■TTOpOSeCL 

StlliLfUIB 


27 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 




\ 

Municipal Manager 

□ate 



Executive Mayor 

Date 


Council Resolution no. 

□ ate. 

v_ 


_ J 


_ DIRECTORATE _ 

INFRASTRUCTURES ELECTRICITY SERVICES 
PO STS : 

Ik Director: Municipal Infrastructure & Electricity SerY®ces<v) 



SECTION: 

Admin Support 


Post: 

2k Secretary 



SUB-DIRECTORATE: 

EL EC TRIC A L ENG IN EERIIN G 


116 



































Propos ed 
Structure 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 


32 



No functions provided for: 

1. Environmental! management 

2. li brary s ervices 


117 










































rmp-os ea 
Slmcfui-e 


41 


Proposed Organizational Structure 
of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 



118 































iro-poieti 
£ true hue 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Maluti a Phofung Municipality 


46 



119 































Fropos Ed. 

Structure 


Proposed Organizational Structure 

of 

Mlaluti a Phofung Municipality 


54 



120 


































F.7 FINANCIAL VIABILITY 


Strategic objective: To improve overall financial management in municipalities by developing 
and implementing appropriate financial management policies, procedures and 
systems. 

Intended outcome: Improve financial management and accountability 

PARENT MUNICIPALITY 
AUDIT OPINION - 2015/2016 

Report of the auditor-general to the Free State Legislature and the council on the Maluti-A- 
Phofung Local Municipality which comprise the statement of financial position as at 
30 June 2016, the statement of financial performance, statement of changes in net assets, cash 
flow statement and the statement of comparison of budget information with actual information 
for the year then ended, as well as the notes, comprising a summary of significant accounting 
policies and other explanatory information was: 

Qualified opinion 

Except for the possible effects of the matters described in the basis for qualified opinion 
paragraphs, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial 
position of the Maluti-A-Phofung Local Municipality as at 30 June 2016 and its financial 
performance and cash flows for the year then ended, in accordance with SA Standards of 
GRAP and the requirements of the MFMA and DoRA. 

Emphasis of matters 
In respect of these matters: 

Irregular expenditure 

As disclosed in note 53 to the financial statements, the municipality incurred irregular 
expenditure of R117 547 638 (2015: R30 761 895) due to non-compliance with supply chain 
management (SCM) requirements. 

Significant uncertainties 

With reference to note 45 to the financial statements, the municipality is involved in a legal 
dispute over the validity of an electricity maintenance contract as the municipality believes the 
contract is invalid. The ultimate outcome of the matter cannot presently be determined and no 
provision for any liability that may result has been made in the financial statements. The matter 
has been disclosed as a contingency of R8 700 000 000 (2015: R2 000 000 000) for royalties in 
the financial statements. 


121 



Area of focus 

Availability/ 

N on-availability 

Functionality 

Challenges 

antidotes 

Tariff policies 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Rates policies 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

SCM policy-staff 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Staffing of the finance 
and SCM units 

Available 

Functional 



Payment of creditors 

Available 

Functional 

- 

- 

Auditor- General 

findings 

Available 

Functional 

- 


Financial management 
systems 

Available 

Functional 




❖ MUNICIPALITY FINANCIAL PLAN 

The preparation of the proposed draft annual budget for the 2018/19 financial year shall be 
informed by the following: (based on National Treasury Circular 91): 


• Annual IDP of the Municipality, 

• Actual results for 2016/2017 financial year, 

• Approved Annual and Adjustment Budgets 2017/18 

• Expected results for 2019/20 financial year 

• Expected changes in the macro-economic environment, and 

• Circular 89 and Circular 91 

• Circular 82 on Cost containment measures 

• The departmental service delivery budget implementation plan 

The municipality has not transacted on the financial system since July 2017 as the mSCOA 
regulation. This has led to inaccurate reporting and none submission of reports in compliance 
with the following MFMA regulations and requirements in the 2017/18 financial year, i.e, 
monthly reports (S71), quarterly reports (Sll(4)a, 66, 52d) , Mid-year reporting (S72), 
Adjustment budget (S28). 


Section 24 of the MFMA states that 

(1) The municipal council must at least 30 days before the start of the budget year consider 
approval of the annual budget. 

Note should be taken that the municipality’s proposed budget is based on the following: 

• Pre-audited outcomes for 2016/17 as the Audit has not been finalised 

• Actual results for five months (July-November) and estimations for seven months due 
to the non-existence of the fully operational financial system 

• The original budget for 2017/18 


122 















In terms of section 13 of the MPRA No 6 of 2004 and sections 24 and 42 of the MFMA No 56 of 2003 
new tariffs for property rates, electricity, water and any other taxes and similar tariffs may only be 
implemented from the start of the municipal financial year (1 July) after Council’ approval otherwise 
section 139 of the Constitution will apply. Unrealistically low tariff increases and an over-ambitious 
capital expenditure programme will lead to unfunded municipal budgets that threaten the municipal 
financial sustainability and service delivery. It is therefore imperative that municipalities refrain from 
suspending credit control and debt collection efforts. Expenditure appropriations aligned to the policy 
intent as described in the integrated development plans (IDPs) should be prioritised. Infrastructure 
provisioning for water, sanitation, roads and electricity remain key priorities. 

The South African economy and inflation targets 

The local economy is beginning to recover after a short recession in early 2017 however the 
improvement is insufficient. Growth has remained stagnant at less than 2 per cent and unemployment 
remains high at 26.7 per cent. The prerequisites for increased revenue and expanded service delivery 
are more rapid growth, investment and job creation. 

The GDP growth rate is forecasted at 1.5 per cent in 2018,1.8 per cent in 2019 and 2.1 per cent in 
2020. Statistics South Africa’s December 2017 economic statistics showed an unexpected 
improvement in the economic outlook, largely as a result of growth in agriculture and mining. 

The main risks to the economic outlook are continued policy uncertainty and deterioration in the 
finances of state-owned entities. The drought experienced in several provinces poses significant risks 
to agriculture and tourism for the period ahead, and this may threaten jobs in these sectors. The current 
water crisis will affect economic growth. While the drought’s impact is uncertain much depends on 
how long it will prevail; the extent to which specific catchment areas are affected; and the success of 
mitigation measures. 

These economic challenges will continue to exert pressure on municipal revenue generation and 
collection levels hence a conservative approach is advised for revenue projections. Municipalities 
affected by the drought should also consider its impact on revenue generation. In addition, 
municipalities will have to improve their efforts to limit non-priority spending and to implement 
stringent cost-containment measures. 

Local government conditional grants and additional allocations 

Local government direct and indirect transfers absorb 18.8 per cent of the reductions. A total of R13.9 
billion has been cut from direct local government conditional grant allocations for the Medium 
Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) period ahead since the 2017 MTBPS was tabled. Indirect 
grants to local government have been reduced by an additional R2.2 billion. 

The reductions did not affect all conditional grants, and not all grants were reduced by the same 
percentage. The infrastructure conditional grants, particularly the larger ones, were mainly affected as 
this was considered the most practical approach. The overall impact of reducing this funding affects 
capital programmes; therefore, local government’s share of the reductions is higher than their share of 
the division of revenue, given that municipalities receive a number of infrastructure grants. The 
average reductions over the medium term are 3.5 per cent of local government allocations. 

Conditional grant funding targets delivery of national government’s service delivery priorities. It is 
imperative that municipalities understand and comply with the conditions stipulated in the Division of 
Revenue Act (DoRA) in order to access this funding. The equitable share and the sharing of the 
general fuel levy constitute additional unconditional funding, of which the equitable share is designed 
to fund the provision of free basic services to disadvantaged communities. 


123 



Municipal Standard Charts of Accounts (mSCOA) 


The mSCOA Regulations apply to all municipalities and municipal entities with effect from 1 July 
2017. Technically, for a municipality to be regarded as mSCOA compliant on 1 July 2017 it must be 
able to transact across all the mSCOA segments and its core system and all sub-systems (including that 
of its municipal entities) must seamlessly integrate. 

The Municipality could not transact on the mSCOA compliant system since July 2017 due to the failed 
conversion from old financial system to the transversal contract procured through National Treasury. 
As a result, the municipality could not bill and capture transactions since that period. 

That led to non-compliance with MFMA No.56 of 2003 reporting legislation and regulations. The set 
timelines were not met as per the approved IDP / Budget process plan; hence the Draft Budget is only 
submitted this late. 

Revenue management 

National Treasury encourages municipalities to maintain tariff increases at levels that reflect an 
appropriate balance between the affordability to poorer households and other customers while ensuring 
the financial sustainability of the municipality. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) inflation is forecasted 
to be within the upper limit of the 3 to 6 per cent target band; therefore, municipalities are required to 
justify all increases in excess of the projected inflation target for 2018/19 in their budget narratives, 
and pay careful attention to the differential incidence of tariff increases across all consumer groups. In 
addition, municipalities should include a detail of their revenue growth assumptions for the different 
service charges in the budget narrative. 


Local government also confronts tough fiscal choices in the face of financial and institutional problems 
that result in service-delivery breakdowns and unpaid bills. Municipalities can offset these trends by 
improving own revenue collection, working more efficiently and implementing cost containment 
measures. 

Where revenue collection is not well planned or managed, or where tariffs are not properly set, serious 
financial problems can arise. Eskom’s recent move to cut off power supply to municipalities that have 
not paid electricity bills is an indication of what can happen when municipalities fail to manage this 
risk. 

Eskom bulk tariff increases 

The NERSA document proposes a 6.84 per cent guideline increase for municipal electricity tariffs for 
2018/19. This is based on a bulk tariff increase for municipalities of 7.32 per cent. 

Employee related costs 

The Salary and Wage Collective Agreement for the period 01 July 2015 to 31 June 2018 has come to 
an end. The process is under consultation; therefore, in the absence of other information from the 
South African Local Government Bargaining Council communication will be provided at a later stage. 


124 



Remuneration of councillors 


Municipalities are advised to budget for the actual costs approved in accordance with the Government 
Gazette on the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers Act: Determination of Upper Limits of Salaries, 
Allowances and Benefits of different members of municipal councils published annually between 
December and January by the Department of Cooperative Governance. Any overpayment to 
councillors contrary to the upper limits as published by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and 
Traditional Affairs will be irregular expenditure in terms of section 167 of the MFMA and must be 
recovered from the councillor(s) concerned. 

Unspent Conditional Grants for 2017/2018 

In addition to the requirements outlined in the previous MFMA Circulars regarding unspent 
conditional grants, municipalities must know that the National Treasury uses the pre-audited Annual 
Financial Statements (AFS) to determine the unspent conditional grants. The decision is made based 
on the pre-audited AFS. Therefore, there will not be a review of the unspent conditional grants once 
the audited AFS are available. It is therefore imperative that municipalities ensure that there is 
completeness in reported figures on the pre-audited AFS 

The Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations 

YAT will increase from 14 per cent to 15 per cent from April 2018. In terms of Section 7(4) of Value- 
Added Tax Act (No. 89 of 1991), the VAT increase takes effect on 1 April. It is a tax increase as result 
of tax legislation that municipalities must implement and not an increase of tariffs by the 
municipalities. Therefore Section 28(6) of the Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (No. 56 of 
2003) (MFMA), is not applicable in this regard. 

Whether the additional amount is recoverable from the customer or not, the supplier must account for 
VAT on any supplies made on or after 1 April 2018 at the increased VAT rate. 

Budget process and submissions for the 2018/19 MTREF 

Budgeting for the audited years on the A schedule (mSCOA) 

According to international learning practices, it is appropriate to reclassify historical information in 
accordance with the changes that occur in the Standard Chart of Accounts. Municipalities must capture 
the reclassified audit outcomes for 2014/15 to 2016/17 in version 6.2 of the Schedule A when 
compiling 2018/19 MTREF budgets. 

Budget process and submissions for the 2018/19 MTREF: 

To facilitate oversight of compliance with the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations, 
accounting officers are reminded that: 

• Section 22(b)(i) of the MFMA requires that, immediately after an annual budget is tabled in the 
municipal council, it must be submitted to the National Treasury and the relevant provincial 
treasury in both printed and electronic formats. If the annual budget is tabled to council on 29 
March 2018, the final date of submission of the electronic budget documents and 
corresponding electronic returns was Tuesday, 03 April 2018. The deadline for submission of 
hard copies including council resolution was Friday, 06 April 2018. 


125 



• Section 24(3) of the MFMA, read together with regulation 20(1), requires that the approved 
annual budget must be submitted to both National Treasury and the relevant provincial treasury 
within ten working days after the council has approved the annual budget. If the council only 
approves the annual budget on 30 June 2018, the final date for such a submission is Friday, 13 
July 2018, otherwise an earlier date applies. 

• The municipality will submit the documents after the budget is tabled to council 

The municipal manager must submit: 

• the budget documentation as set out in Schedule A (version 6.2) of the Municipal Budget and 
Reporting Regulations, including the main Tables (A1 - A10) and ALL the supporting tables 
(SA1 - SA38) in both printed and electronic formats; 

• the draft service delivery and budget implementation plan in both printed and electronic format; 

• the draft integrated development plan; 

• the council resolution; 

• signed Quality Certificate as prescribed in the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations; 

• the budget locking certificate; and 

• schedules D specific for the entities. 

The guideline growth limits are only for self-generated revenue sources. It excludes the increased 
national allocations provided for the purpose of expanding infrastructure and providing basic 
services to more households 

An annual budget set out certain service delivery levels and associated financial implications. 
Therefore, the community should realistically expect to receive these promised service delivery levels 
and understand the associated financial implications. Major under-spending due to under collection of 
revenue or poor planning is a clear example of a budget that is not credible and unrealistic. 
Furthermore, annual budgets tabled for consultation at least 90 days prior to the start of the budget year 
should already be credible and fairly close to the final approved budget. 

The effects of the economic challenges experienced over the past years still linger and continue to 
place pressure on the community at large which results in difficulties for the municipality in terms of 
revenue collection and this also impact on service delivery. 

Revenue estimates should be realistic, as the operating expenditure budget will be funded by the total 
revenue budget. It should also be reiterated that the council may not budget for a deficit and the budget 
should be fully funded. 

Maluti-A-Phofung municipality strategy is built around the following key components: 

• National Treasury’s guidelines and macro-economic policy; 

• Projected Municipality growth and continued economic development; 

• Realistic revenue management, which provides for the achieving of the collection rate target 

• Electricity tariff increases as approved by the National Electricity Regulator of South Africa 
(NERSA); 

• Setting of trading services “user charges at levels which are reflective of these services” cost 
recovering nature; 

• The municipality’s Property Rates Policy approved in terms of the Municipality Rates Act, 
2004 (Act 6 of 2004) (MPRA); 

• The municipality’s indigent policies to assist the poor and rendering of free basic services; and 

• Tariff policies. 


126 



The following growth limits have been published by the National Treasury and it shall form the basis 
of increase in the tariff and related expenditure which should range between 5.3 to 5.5 per cent. (N.B. 
The 2018/19 actual is an estimate by NT) 


FISCAL YEAR 

2017/18 

Estimates 

2018/19 

Forecast 

2019/20 

Forecast 

2020/21 

Forecast 

Consumer Price 
Inflation (CPI) 

5.3% 

5.3% 

5.4% 

5.5% 

Real GDP 

growth 

1.0% 

1.5% 

1.8% 

2.1% 


127 



Table 1 CONSOLIDATED OVERVIEW OF THE 2018/19 MTREF 


FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung ■ Table A4 Consolidated Budgeted Financial Performance (revenue and expenditure) 


2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 

Forecast 

Pre-audit 

outcome 

Budget Year 

2018/19 

Budget Year 

+12019/20 

Budget Year 

+2 2020/21 

120 001 

405424 

71289 

49 226 

27 700 

208 270 

273 034 

42 927 

54 593 

32 826 

158 750 

283 358 

69 867 

38375 

34 829 

207 596 

558 165 

78 315 

41 577 

34 832 

- 

207 596 

558 165 

78315 

41 577 

34 832 

- 

207 596 

376 253 

83 014 

44 072 

36 921 

220 052 

398 828 

87 995 

46 716 

39137 

233 255 

422 757 

93 274 

49 519 

41 485 

850 

759 

16 771 

880 

394 689 

1064 

2 036 

24 926 

37 662 

454 043 

1142 

2 304 

31 514 

17 863 

458 944 

1284 

2 900 

31800 

14 012 

503 632 

- 

1284 

2 900 

31800 

14 012 

503 632 

- 

1346 

2 900 

33 708 

14 853 

547 804 

1426 

3 074 

35 730 

15 744 

597 768 

1512 

3 258 

37 874 

16 689 

647 753 

448 256 

19 233 

156 076 

236 765 

- 

236 765 

- 

240484 

266 212 

279 684 











1 535 845 

^ 1 150 612 

r 1 253 024 

r 1 710 878 

r 

* 1 710 878 

r 

r 1 588951 

r 1 712 682 

r 1 827 061 

337 544 

415 083 

462 666 

455 734 


455 734 


489671 

514 206 

546 608 

23489 
(162 674) 

23134 

255 270 

r 24 223 

r 56 026 

23 357 

270 000 


23 357 

270 000 


24 758 

250 000 

26 244 

265 000 

27 819 

280 900 

279 224 

279 489 

268 781 

285 000 

- 

285 000 

- 

270 940 

287 187 

304409 

4 206 

20 685 

r 23 829 

4 000 

- 

4 000 

- 

8 960 

10 290 

10 704 

426 541 

675 051 

600 636 

608 750 

- 

608 750 

- 

631 596 

669 741 

708 721 

466 701 

103 010 

r 112 685 

94 680 

- 

94 680 

- 

79450 

84 217 

89 270 

66105 

425501 

68145 

346 939 

96 878 

109 000 

524 167 

82143 

115 540 

306 675 

- 

82143 

115 540 

306 675 

- 

71842 

127 094 

167 639 

72 992 

134 720 

191 934 

75846 

142 803 

202 615 

6 256 

663 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1 872 893 

2 187 470 

2 278 891 

2 245 878 

- 

2 245 878 

- 

2121 951 

2 256 531 

2 389 693 

(337 048) 

(1 036 858) 

(1 025 867) 

(535 000) 

- 

(535 000) 

- 

(533 000) 

(543 849) 

(562 632) 

206474 

186197 

178 731 

215 732 

_ 

215 732 

_ 

223 321 

231 963 

263435 





















(130 574) 

[ (850 661) 

f (847 136) 

(319 268) 

f . 

f (319 268) 

f . 

(309 679) 

f (311 886)' 

f (299 197) 











.(130 574) 

f .(850 661) 

r "p!) 

f .(319 268) 

W .-. 



r .(309 679) 


r^gglgT) 











(130 574) 



r ~l mm 

f 


- 














(130 574) 

\ (850 661) 

r (847 136) 

(319 268) 

* - T (319 268) 

r . 

(309 679) r (311 886) 

r (299 197) 


Description 


R thousand 


Revenue By Source 

Properly rates 

Service charges - electricity revenue 
Service charges - water revenue 
Service charges - sanitation revenue 
Service charges - refuse revenue 
Service charges - other 
Rental of facilities and equipment 
Interest earned - external investments 
Interest earned - outstanding debtors 
Dividends received 
Fines, penalties and forfeits 
Licences and permits 
Agency services 
Transfers and subsidies 
Other revenue 
Gains on disposal of PPE 


Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers 
and contributions) 


Expenditure By Type 

Employee related costs 
Remuneration of councillors 
Debt impairment 
Depreciation & asset impairment 
Finance charges 
Bulk purchases 
Other materials 
Contracted services 
Transfers and subsidies 
Other expenditure 
Loss on disposal of PPE 


4,5 


Total Expenditure 


Surplus/(Deficit) 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary 
allocations) (National / Provincial and District) 
Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary 
allocations) (National / Provincial Departmental 
Agencies, Households, Non-profit Institutions, 
Private Enterprises, Public Corporatons, Higher 
Transfers and subsidies - capital (in-kind - all) 
Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & 
contributions 
Taxation 

Surplus/(Deficit) after taxation 

Attributable to minorities 

Surplus/(Deficit) attributable to municipality 

Share of surplus/ (deficit) of associate 


Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 


128 




















































FINANCIAL OVERVIEW OF THE CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL 


BUDGET 


TOTAL CONSOLIDATED OPERATING ANNUAL BUDGET 

The projected annual revenue amounts to Rl, 588,950,754 (R1.6 billion) for the 2018/19 financial 
year, which represents a decrease of R122 million which is (7%) less than the approved Annual Budget 
for 2017/18. For the 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial years the annual budgeted revenue amounts to 
Rl,712,682,074 (R1.8 billion) which represents an increase of R124 million (8%) and Rl,827,060,981 
(R1.8 billion) which represents an increase of R114 million (7%) respectively. The total consolidated 
annual operating expenditure budget for the 2018/19 financial year amounts to R2, 121,950,754 
(R2.1 billion), which represents a decrease of R124 million less than the approved annual budget for 
2017/18. For the 2019/2020 and 2020/21 financial years the proposed annual operating expenditure 
budgets amounts are R2,256,531,241 (R2.3 billion) and R2,389,693,349 billion respectively, which 
represent an increase of R133 million or (6%) and R133 million or (6%) for the two outer years. 

The capital budget of R230,321,000 (R230 million) for 2018/2019 is 15% less when compared to the 
2017/2018 annual budget. The decrease is due to the own source projects that were put on hold due to 
the cash flow situation of the Municipality. The capital programme increases to R232 million in 
2019/20 and a further increase to R263 million for 2020/21 which represents an increase of 1% and 
14% respectively. The capital budget will be funded from the capital grants only as the Municipality 
has not billed its customers since July 2017. 

The table below is a consolidated overview of the proposed 2018/19 Medium -term Revenue and 
Expenditure Framework: 


Description 

Pre- Audited 
Outcomes 
2016/17 

Original 

Budget 

2017/18 

MTREF 

Budget Year 
2018/19 

Budget Year+1 
2019/20 

Budget Year+2 
2020/21 


R'000 

R'000 

R'000 

R’000 

R’000 

Operating Revenue 

1 253 024 

1 710 878 

1 588 951 

1 712 682 

1 827 061 

Operating Expenditure 

2 278 890 

2 245 879 

2 121 951 

2 256 531 

2 389 694 

Surplus/-Deficit 

-1 025 866 

-535 001 

-533 000 

-543 849 

-562 633 

Capital Expenditure 

187 862 

272 432 

230 321 

231 963 

263 435 


TOTAL CONSOLIDATED OPERATING ANNUAL BUDGET 


The table Expenditure Framework: below is a consolidated overview of 
proposed 2018/19 Medium -term Revenue and Expenditure Framework: 


Description 

Pre- Audited 
Outcomes 
2016/17 

Original 

Budget 

2017/18 

MTREF 

Budget Year 
2018/19 

Budget Year+1 
2019/20 

Budget Year+2 
2020/21 


R'000 

R'000 

R'000 

R’000 

R'000 

Operating Revenue 

1 253 024 

1 502 962 

1 601 857 

1 712 682 

1 827 061 

Operating Expenditure 

2 278 890 

2 037 962 

2 152 976 

2 276 345 

2 409 216 

Surplus/-Deficit 

-1 025 866 

-535 000 

-551 119 

-563 663 

-582 155 

Capital Expenditure 

187 862 

272 432 

223 321 

231 963 

263 435 


129 



































































CONSOLIDATED REVENUE BY SOURCE OF FUNDING 


Summary of revenue classified by main revenue source 


Description 

Past performance 

Current Year 

Medium Term Revenue & Expenditure Framework 

Pre- Audited 
Outcomes 
2016/17 

Original Budget 
2017/18 

Budget Year 
2018/19 

Budget Year+1 
2019/20 

Budget Year+2 
2020/21 

Property rates 

158 750 217 

207 596 000 

207 596 000 

220 051 760 

233 254 866 

Service charges - 
electricity 

283 358 414 

558 165 343 

376 252 629 

398 827 786 

422 757 454 

Service charges - water 

69 867 017 

78 314 920 

83 013 816 

87 994 645 

93 274 323 

Service charges - 
sanitation 

38 375 203 

41 577 440 

44 072 086 

46 716 411 

49 519 396 

Service charges - refuse 

34 828 938 

34 831 600 

36 921 496 

39 136 786 

41 484 993 

Income received by the 
entity 

136 652 000 

207 916 256 

225 278 508 

250 093 733 

262 598 420 

Rental of facilities and 
equipment 

1 142 043 

1 283 720 

1 345 743 

1 426 488 

1 512 077 

Interest earned - 
external investments 

2 303 804 

2 900 000 

2 900 000 

3 074 000 

3 258 440 

Interest earned - 
outstanding debtors 

31 514 495 

31 800 000 

33 708 000 

35 730 480 

37 874 309 

Fines 

17 862 852 

14 012 000 

14 852 720 

15 743 883 

16 688 516 

Transfers recognised - 
operational 

458 944 253 

503 632 000 

547 804 000 

597 768 000 

647 753 000 

Other revenue 

19 424 324 

28 848 658 

15 205 756 

16118102 

17 085 188 

Total Revenue 

1 253 023 560 

1710 877 937 

1 588 950 754 

1712 682 074 

1827060 981 


130 
































Percentage growth in revenue by main revenue Source 



Past performance 

Current Year 

MTREF j 

Description 

Pre-audited 

Outcomes 

2016/17 


Original 

Budget 

2017/18 

1 

Budget Year 
2018/19 

1 

Budget Year+1 
2019/20 


Budget Year+2 
2020/21 



R'000 

% 

R'000 

% 

R'000 

% 

R'000 

% 

R'000 

% 

Property rates 

158 750 

13% 

207 596 

12% 

207 596 

13% 

220052 

13% 

233 255 

13% 

Service charges - electricity 

283 358 

23% 

558 165 

33% 

376 253 

24% 

398 828 

23% 

422 757 

23% 

Service charges - water 

69 867 

6% 

78315 

5% 

83 014 

5% 

87995 

5% 

93274 

5% 

Service charges - sanitation 

38 375 

3% 

41577 

2% 

44 072 

3% 

46716 

3% 

49 519 

3% 

Service charges - refuse 

34829 

3% 

34831 

2% 

36921 

2% 

39 137 

2% 

41485 

2% 

Income received by the entity 

136652 

11% 

207916 

12% 

225 279 

14% 

250094 

15% 

262 598 

14% 

Rental of facilities and equipment 

1142 

0% 

1284 

0% 

1346 

0% 

1426 

0% 

1512 

0% 

Interest earned - external 
investments 

2 304 

0% 

2900 

0% 

2900 

0% 

3 074 

0% 

3 258 

0% 

Interest earned - outstanding 
debtors 

31514 

3% 

31800 

2% 

33 708 

2% 

35730 

2% 

37 874 

2% 

Fines 

17 863 

1% 

14012 

1% 

14852 

1% 

15744 

1% 

16 689 

1% 

Transfers recognised - operational 

458944 

37% 

503 632 

29% 

547804 

34% 

597768 

35% 

647 753 

35% 

Other revenue 

19 424 

2% 

28 849 

2% 

15206 

1% 

16118 

1% 

17 085 

1% 

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUE 

1253022 

100% 

1 710 877 

100% 

1 588 951 

100% 

1 712682 

100% 

1827059 

100% 


PROPERTY RATES 

The municipality is in a process of transferring private properties that are still under the municipal 
name to rightful owners; sites that are being developed; formalisation of rural areas & the 
introduction of flat rate intended to be implemented in 2019/2020 which will improve collection 
from rates & taxes. This source of revenue constitutes 13% of the total proposed revenue and it 
forms part of core functions of the municipality revenue base. It didn’t increase because many 
processes affecting rates and taxes are still in progress. 

ELECTRICITY REVENUE 

The estimation for electricity revenue has decreased by R181, 9 million from the Annual budget. 
This source of revenue constitutes 24% of the total operating revenue. Owing to the increases in 
Eskom’s bulk tariffs, it is clearly not possible to fund all these necessary upgrades through 
increases in the municipality electricity tariff since the resultant tariff increase would be 
unaffordable for the consumers, however the municipality has to invest on the revenue 
enhancement strategies to control tempers, illegal connections and distribution losses, if the 
revenue improves in six months, it will be adjusted accordingly. 

An installation of the Automatic Meter Reading System (AMR) smart meters on most businesses 
and urban residential areas has to be prioritised. Disconnections have to start when the billing of 
accounts has started. Educational road shows have to be conducted through the wards constituency 
meetings in trying to bring back the culture of paying services. 


131 




































































































WATER & SANITATION REVENUE 

These services constitute 5% and 3% of the total operating revenue respectively. The Municipality 
should consider smart metering for urban arears and renewal of infrastructure network 

INCOME RECEIVED BY THE ENTITY (SERVICE CHARGES- WATER AND 
SANITATION) 

Income received by the Entity constitutes 14% of the total proposed revenue. The billing for all 
municipal services is run in the Municipality and the collection thereof is paid into the 
Municipality’s bank account, the Entity then bills the Municipality for all cash received for water 
and sanitation on a monthly basis. Note should be taken that water and sanitation are the 
responsibility of Maluti-A-Phofung Water Entity. 

REFUSE REMOVAL REVENUE 

This source of revenue constitutes 2% of our proposed revenue. The Municipality does not have 
fully functional yellow fleet to can provide this service and this is one area that should be looked at 

GOVERNMENT GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES 

This category constitutes 34% of our total operating income and the grants and subsidies consist of 
the following- see a table below: The equitable share allocations supplement municipalities’ own 
revenues for the provision of basic services to poor households. 


Operating Transfers and Grant Receipts 




| MTREF Allocation I 


Original 

Budget 

Budget 

Budget 

Description 

Budget 

Year 

Year+1 

Year+2 


2017/18 

2018/19 

2019/20 

2020/21 

OPERATING GRANTS 

R'OOO 

R’OOO 

R’OOO 

R’OOO 

National transfers 

501 132 

545 054 

594 418 

644 143 

Equitable Share- LGES 

493 768 

538 719 

591 738 

641 031 

Finance Management - Grant - 

I^G-FMG 

2 145 

2 215 

2 680 

3 112 

Expanded public works 
programme integrated grant 
for municipalities (EPWP) 

5 219 

4 120 



Provincial transfers 

2 500 

2 750 

3 350 

3 510 

Municipal support grant 

2 500 

- 

2 OOO 

2 HO 

Sports, Arts and Culture and 

Re ere ation 


2 750 

1 350 

1 500 

Total Operating Grants 

503 632 

547 804 

597 768 

647 753 


132 



































CONSOLIDATED OPERATING REVENUE FRAMEWORK 


PROPOSED TARIFF SETTING 

Detailed Proposed tariffs for the 2018/19 financial year are attached to the budget document on 
Annexure 3, however the summary of the proposed increase is as follows: 


Summary of proposed taril 

ffs 

Description 

Average Increase 

Rates and Taxes 

0% 

Electricity 

6,84% 

Water 

6,00% 

Refuse 

6,00% 

Sanitation 

6,00% 

General Tariffs 

6,00% 

Community Services 

6,00% 

Cemetry 

6,00% 

Advertising 

6,00% 


Rates and Taxes Tariff 

There is no proposed increase on the Property Rates tariff for 2018/19 financial year because the 
new valuation roll was implemented as from the 1 st of July 2015, the following tariffs will apply: 


Property rates Comparison 


PROPERTY RATES AND TAXES TARIFFS 

Category 

2018/2019 PROPOSED 

PROPOSED 

2018/2019 

Rate per 
Rand 

Rebate % 

Rebate 
Value per 
Rand 

Rate 
Payable 
per Rand 

Tariff 

Codes 

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 

Market value (developed) 

0,0076 

0,3802 

98% 

0,3726 

0,0076 

VA0001 

Market value (undeveloped) 

0,0380 

0,3802 

90% 

0,3422 

0,0380 

VA0002 

Indigent 

0,0000 

0,3802 

100% 

0,3802 

0,0000 

VA0003 

Old Age / Pensioners 

100% Rebate on first R200 000 of the market 

value 

0,0000 

0,3802 

98% 

0,3726 

0,0076 

VA0001 

(Rebate on first R110 000 of market value is 
granted) 

BUSINESS 

Market value (developed) 

0,0380 

0,7604 

95% 

0,7224 

0,0380 

VA0004 

Market value (undeveloped) 

0,0760 

0,7604 

90% 

0,6844 

0,0760 

VA0005 

STATE OWNED PROPERTY 

Market value (developed) 

0,0655 

0,0851 

23,00% 

0,0196 

0,0655 

VA0025 

Market value (undeveloped) 

0,0655 

0,0851 

23,00% 

0,0196 

0,0655 

VA0024 


133 



National Treasury’s MFMA Circular No.51 deals inter alia with the implementation of Municipal 
Property Rates Act, with the regulations issued by the Department of Co-operative Governance. These 
regulations came into effect on the 1 July 2009 and prescribe the rate ration for the non-residential 
categories, public services infrastructure and agricultural properties relative to residential properties to 
be 0, 25:1. The implementation of these regulations was done in the past budgets processes. 

The following stipulations in the Property Rates Policy are highlighted: 

The first R110 000 of the market value of a property used for residential purposes is excluded from 
rate-able value and 100% rebate will be granted to registered indigents and on the 1 st R200 000 of the 
market value for old age and state pensioners in terms of Indigent Policy. 100% per cent rebate will 
be granted to registered non- profit organisation 

Sale of Water and Impact of Tariff Increases 

South Africa faces similar challenges with regard to water supply as it did with electricity, since 
demand growth out-strips supply. The municipality is currently in the process of reviewing the current 
water tariff structure to ensure that water tariffs structures are cost reflective by 2019 and also to 
ensure that: 

• Water tariffs are fully cost - reflective - including the cost of maintenance and renewal of 
purification plants, water networks and the cost associated with reticulation expansion; 

• Water tariffs are structured to protect basic levels of service and ensure the provision of free 
water to the poorest of the poor (indigent); and 

• Water tariffs are designed to encourage efficient and sustainable consumption. 


Comparison between current water charge and increase 


WATER SERVICES TARIFFS 


APPROVED 

PROPOSED 

PROPOSED 

SERVICE 

RATES 

% 

RATES 

2017/2018 

INCREASE 

2018/2019 


R 


R 

TARIFF-1 




MAP AREA - DOMESTIC USERS OLD AGE H0M1 

ES, HOSTELS AND FLATS 


0-6 kl 

8,09 

6,00% 

8,57 

7-12 kl 

9,90 

6,00% 

10,49 

13-25 kl 

10,21 

6,00% 

10,83 

26-40 kl 

10,53 

6,00% 

11,17 

41kl and upwards 

11,70 

6,00% 

12,41 

0-6kl free basic water for registered indigents only 




0-6 kl non inc municipal area, Plots & Farms 

6,38 

6,00% 

6,77 


134 




Sanitation and impact of tariffs increases 

A tariff increase of 6 per cent for sanitation from 1 July 2018 is proposed. This is based 
on the input cost assumptions related to water. The following factors also contribute to 
the proposed tariff increase: 

• Sanitation charges are calculated according to the percentage water discharged as indicated in 
the table below; 

• Free sanitation (100 per cent subsidy) will be applicable to registered indigents; and 

• The total revenue of sanitation expected to be generated amounts to R44 million for the 
2018/19 financial year 


Comparison between current Sanitation charge and increase 


WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT (SANITATION) TARIFFS 


APPROVED 

PROPOSED 

PROPOSED 

SERVICE 

RATES 

% 

RATES 

2017/2018 

INCREASE 

2018/2019 


R 


R 

TARIFF -1 




DOMESTIC - BASIC CHARGE PER STAND 




Harrismith & Kestell: Domestic, Flats, Old age & Hostels 
(Residentials town) 

142,04 

6,00% 

150,57 

Residentials @ townships 

85,65 

6,00% 

90,79 

Charged monthly 


Electricity and impact of tariff increase 

According to Circular 91, the NERSA document proposes a 6.84 per cent guideline increase for 
municipal electricity tariffs for 2018/19. This is based on a bulk tariff increase for municipalities of 

7.32 per cent. 


135 




The following table compares the current and approved tariffs 

Comparison between current Electricity charge and increase 


ELECTRICITY TARIFFS 

ELECTRICITY 

kWh 

APPROVED 

RATES 

2016/2017 

R 

APPROVED 

% 

INCREASE 

APPROVED 

RATES 

2017/2018 

R 

PROPOSED 

% 

INCREASE 

PROPOSED 

RATES 

2018/2019 

R 

Consumer Cost (Tariffs do not include VAT) 1 

TARIFF -A- DOMESTIC TARIFFS 


House, Flats, Old Age Homes, Hotels, Church 
Offices, Charity Organisations, Schools, Sport 
Grounds, Clubs, Agricultural Societies. 

BASIC LEVY - PER MONTH 

Single Phase (Conventional Meters) 


189,95 

1,00% 

191,85 

6,84% 

204,97 

Three Phase (Conventional Meters) 


189,95 

1,00% 

191,85 

6,84% 

204,97 

Rural tariff 


194,61 

1,00% 

196,56 

6,84% 

210,00 

TARIFF PER UNIT 

DOMESTIC NON RURAL 


Conventional Normal meter-per kWhfsingle 
phase)summer tariff 

(0-50kWh) 

0,84 

1,00% 

0,85 

6,84% 

0,91 


(51-350kWh) 

1,08 

1,00% 

1,09 

6,84% 

1,17 

(351-600kWh) 

1,52 

1,00% 

1,54 

6,84% 

1,64 

(>600kWh) 

1,73 

1,00% 

1,75 

6,84% 

1,87 



Conventional Normal meter-per kWhfsingle 
phasejwinter tariff 

(0-50kWh) 

0,88 

0,77% 

0,89 

6,84% 

0,95 


(51-350kWh) 

1,16 

0,78% 

1,17 

6,84% 

1,25 

(351-600kWh) 

1,68 

1,26% 

1,70 

6,84% 

1,81 

(>600kWh) 

1,78 

1,00% 

1,80 

6,84% 

1,92 

Basic charge conventional NON 
RURAL(single/three phase) 


189,95 

1,00% 

191,85 

6,84% 

204,97 

1 

Conventional Normal meter-per kWhfthree 
phasejsummer tariff 

(0-50kWh) 

0,88 

1,00% 

0,89 

6,84% 

0,95 


(51-350kWh) 

1,18 

1,00% 

1,19 

6,84% 

1,27 

(351-600kWh) 

1,69 

1,00% 

1,71 

6,84% 

1,82 

(>600kWh) 

1,78 

0,00% 

1,78 

6,84% 

1,90 


1 

Conventional Normal meter-per kWhfthree 
phasejwinter tariff 

(0-50kWh) 

0,93 

1,00% 

0,94 

6,84% 

1,00 


(51-350kWh) 

1,35 

1,00% 

1,36 

6,84% 

1,46 

(351-600kWh) 

1,76 

1,00% 

1,78 

6,84% 

1,90 

(>600kWh) 

1,80 

1,00% 

1,82 

6,84% 

1,94 


1 

Prepaid meter - per kWhfSingle phase&three 
phasejsummer tariff 

(0-50kWh) 

0,85 

15,26% 

0,98 

6,84% 

1,05 


(51-350kWh) 

1,24 

5,07% 

1,30 

6,84% 

1,39 

(351-600kWh) 

1,66 

6,48% 

1,77 

6,84% 

1,89 

(>600kWh) 

1,78 

7,24% 

1,91 

6,84% 

2,04 


1 

Prepaid meter - per kWh(Single phase&three 
phasejwinter tariff 

(0-50kWh) 

0,97 

7,25% 

1,04 

6,84% 

1,11 


(51-350kWh) 

1,35 

5,49% 

1,42 

6,84% 

1,52 

(351-600kWh) 

1,66 

6,48% 

1,77 

6,84% 

1,89 

(>600kWh) 

1,78 

7,24% 

1,91 

6,84% 

2,04 


136 







Waste management and impact of tariff increases 


Currently solid waste removal is operating at a deficit. It is widely accepted that the rendering of this 
service should at least break even, which is currently not the case. The Municipality will have to 
implement a solid waste strategy to ensure that this service can be rendered in a sustainable manner 
over the medium to long-term. The main contributors to this deficit are repairs and maintenance on 
vehicles, increases in general expenditure such as petrol and diesel and the cost of remuneration. 

Considering the deficit, the municipality is doing a comprehensive investigation into the cost structure 
of solid waste function and that this include investigating alternative service delivery models. The 
outcomes of this investigation will be incorporated into the next planning cycle. An average of 6 per 
cent increase in the waste removal tariff is proposed from 1 July 2018 


Comparison between current Refuse removal charge and increase 


WASTE MANAGEMENT TARIFFS 


APPROVED 

PROPOSED 

PROPOSED 

SERVICE 

RATES 

% 

RATES 

2017/2018 

INCREASE 

2018/2019 


R 


R 

REFUSE REMOVAL 

TARIFF (excl. VAT) 

Residential: 

Per month for 


Per month for 

one refuse 


one refuse 


removal per week 


removal per week 

Residential properties 

89,91 

6,00% 

95,30 

Businesses, including businesses operated from 
residential dwellings (per container per month) 

321,33 

6,00% 

340,60 


Industrial Small 208 

368,68 

6,00% 

390,80 

Industrial Medium 600 

793,21 

6,00% 

840,80 

Industrial Larger 1800 

2 378,04 

6,00% 

2 520,70 

Building Waste - Self dumping 

free 


free 

Government, Magistrate, Police 

988,46 

5,99% 

1 047,70 

Market value (undeveloped) 




Schools 

504,34 

6,00% 

534,60 

Hospitals 

1 345,43 

6,00% 

1 426,20 

Universities 

3 561,21 

6,00% 

3 774,90 

Colleges 

1 452,36 

6,00% 

1 539,50 

Dumping of refuse by Businesses & Industrial - self 
dumping per ton 

43,09 

5,82% 

45,60 

Flats (Per Units) 

1 161,89 

6,00% 

1 231,60 

Business 

399,00 

5,99% 

422,90 

Emptying of cages measured by m 3 

22,34 

5,62% 

23,60 

Taxi Ranks 

1 428,95 

5,99% 

1 514,60 

Garages 

1 428,95 

5,99% 

1 514,60 

FDC Complexes (Rural) 

1 152,31 

6,00% 

1 221,40 

Hostels and Restaurants 

399,00 

5,99% 

422,90 


137 



Overall impact of tariff increases on households 


The following table shows the overall expected impact of the tariff increase on large and small households, as 
well as an indigent household receiving free basic services. 


MBRR Table SA14- Household bills 

FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung - Supporting Table SA14 Household bills 


Description 


Ref 


Rand/cent 


2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & Expenditure 

Framework 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

I Budget Year 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 

2018/19 

+12019/20 

+2 2020/21 







% incr. 














275,50 

392,67 

392,67 

392,67 

- 

392,67 

- 

392,67 

392,67 

392,67 

157,28 

167,82 

176,47 

178,23 

- 

178,23 

6,8% 

r 190,43 

r 201,85 

r 213,96 

1 224,72 

1 298,21 

1401,00 

1 415,01 

- 

1 415,01 

6,8% 

r 1 511,80 

r 1 602,50 

r 1 698,65 



_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 



r 

f 

314,61 

333,48 

354,64 

377,34 

- 

377,34 

6,0% 

r 399,98 

r 423,98 

r 449,41 

71,79 

126,30 

133,50 

142,04 

- 

142,04 

6,0% 

r 150,57 

r 159,60 

r 169,18 

75,42 

79,95 

84,50 

89,91 

- 

89,91 

6,0% 

r 95,30 

r 101,02 

r 107,08 

r 2 119,33 

2 398,43 

2 542,78 

f 2 595,20 


r 2 595,20 

5,6% 

r 2 740,74 

r 2 881,62 

f 3 030^96” 











f 2119,33” 

V 2 398,43 

r 2 542J8 



r ^i595^T 


r ^2 740 jT 

f 2 881 52 

r 3 0 3 67 % 


13,2% 

6,0% 

2,1% 

(100,0%) 

- 


5,6% 

5,1% 

5,2% 










1 

| 

314,61 

266,00 

266,00 

283,02 

- 

283,02 

- 

283,02 

283,02 

283,02 

157,28 

167,82 

176,47 

178,23 

- 

178,23 

6,8% 

188,93 

200,26 

212,28 

528,09 

559,78 

598,31 

604,29 

- 

604,29 

6,8% 

640,55 

678,98 

719,72 

191,01 

202,47 

214,54 

228,27 

_ 

228,27 

6,0% 

241,97 

256,48 

271,87 

71,79 

76,10 

80,50 

85,65 

- 

85,65 

6,0% 

90,79 

96,24 

102,01 

75,42 

79,95 

84,50 

89,91 

- 

89,91 

6,0% 

95,30 

101,02 

107,08 

1 338,zT 




- 


— 


----- 












1 338 ill 

~~73~52,7^ 



- 


— 


----- 



1,0% 

5,0% 

3,5% 

(100,0%) 

- 


4,8% 

4,9% 

4 , 9 % 











487,73 

42,50 

324,00 

327,24 

_ 

327,24 

6,8% 

346,87 

367,69 

389,75 

117,99 

43,32 

125,72 

133,77 

- 

133,77 

6,0% 

141,79 

150,30 

159,32 

t . 

605,72 

w . 

85,82 | 

449,72 

r 461,01 


* 461,01 

6,0% 

488,67 

517,99 

549,07 

f 605,72 

f 85,82 

f 449J2™ 



9 

F 

f 488^T 

' 517,99 



(85,8%) 

424,0% 

2,5% 

(100,0%) 

- 


6,0% 

6,0% 

6,0% 


Monthly Account for Household - 'Middle j 1 
Income Range' 

Rates and services charges: 

Property rates 
Electricity: Basic levy 
Electricity: Consumption 
Water: Basic levy 
Water: Consumption 
Sanitation 
Refuse removal 
Other 

sub-total | 

VAT on Services 

Total large household bill: 

% increaseZ-decrease 

Monthly Account for Household - 'Affordable 1 2 

Range' 

Rates and services charges: 

Property rates 
Electricity: Basic levy 
Electricity: Consumption 
Water: Basic levy 
Water: Consumption 
Sanitation 
Refuse removal 
Other 


sub-total 


VAT on Services 

Total small household bill: 
% increaseZ-decrease 


Monthly Account for Household - 'Indigent' ] 3 
Household receiving free basic services 

Rates and services charges: 

Properly rates 
Electricity: Basic levy 
Electricity: Consumption 
Water: Basic levy 
Water: Consumption 
Sanitation 
Refuse removal 
Other 


sub-total 


VAT on Services 

Total small household bill: 
% i n crease/-d ecrease 


138 




























































SOCIAL PACKAGE 


The following social package will be provided during 2018/19 financial year. 


Social packages 


Service charges 

Residents (non-indigents) 

Indigents 

Electricity 

0 

50kWh per month 

Water 

0 

6kl per month 

Refuse removal 

0 

100% 

Sanitation 

0 

100% 

Assessment rates 

(Rebate on first 110 000 of 
market value is granted) 

100% 


CONSOLIDATED OPERATING EXPENDITURE FRAMEWORK 

The expenditure section of the operating budget outlines out all the operating expenses and cash 
outflows to both internal and external sources. 

In order to facilitate accountability departments must budget for all expenditure necessary for the 
performance of their respective functions. 

However, departments are required to address only the expenditure items directly manageable by the 
relevant department. 

The zero-based types of analysis where all activities are open to in-depth review and scrutiny during 
the budget process provides an opportunity for the reallocation of resources to important priorities and 
avoid continuous growth in the budgeted expenditure of low priorities. 

The expenditure budget consists of operational service delivery items and provides, inter alia, for the 
following: 


Operating Expenditure by Standard classification item 


Description 

Pre- Audited 
Outcomes 2016/17 

Original Budget 
2017/18 

MTREF j 

Budget Year 
2018/19 

% in relation to 
2018/19 budget 
year 

Budget 

Year+1 

2019/20 

Budget 

Year+2 

2020/21 


R'000 

R'000 

R'000 


R'000 

R'000 

Employee related costs 

462 666 

455 734 

489 672 

23% 

514 206 

546 608 

Remuneration of Councillors 

24 223 

23 357 

24 758 

1% 

26 244 

27 819 

Debt impairment and debt relief 

56 026 

270 000 

250 000 

12% 

265 000 

280 900 

Depreciation 

268 781 

285 000 

270 940 

13% 

287 187 

304 409 

Repairs and maintenance 

112 685 

94 680 

79 450 

4% 

84 217 

89 270 

Finance charges 

23 829 

4 000 

8 960 

0% 

10 290 

10 704 

Bulk purchases 

600 636 

608 750 

631 596 

30% 

669 741 

708 721 

Contracted services 

96 878 

82 143 

71 842 

3% 

72 992 

75 846 

Grants and subsidies paid 

109 000 

115 540 

127 094 

6% 

134 720 

142 803 

General expenses 

524 167 

306 675 

167 639 

8% 

191 934 

202 615 

TOTAL OPERATING 

EXPENDITURE BY TYPE 

2 278 891 

2 245 879 

2 121 951 

100% 

2 256 531 

2 389 695 


139 




























































General Grants & 
expenses; 8% bsidies, 6% 


Contracted 
services, 3% 



Re incineration 
of Councillors; 
1 % 


Debt 

impairme nt; 
12 % 


Finance 
charges; 0% 


Depreciation; 

13% 


Repairs and 
maintenance; 4% 


Employee related costs - Remuneration of Councillors Debt impairment 

- Depreciation - Repairs and maintenance - Finance charges 

- Bulk purchases - Contracted services - Grants and subsidies paid 

- General expenses 


The following table gives a breakdown of the main expenditure categories for the 
2018/19 financial year: 


Operating Expendi 

iture By Vote 

Expenditure By Vote 

Pre- Audited 

Outcomes 

2016/17 

Original 

Budget 

2017/18 

MTREF 

Budget Year 
2018/19 

% in 

relation to 
2018/19 
budget 
year 

Budget Year+1 
2019/20 

Budget Year+2 
2020/21 


R'000 

R'000 

R'000 


R'000 

R'000 

Legislative Authority 

127 005 

97 574 

49 359 

2% 

52 320 

55 459 

Office of the Municipal 
Manager 

39 944 

45 136 

28 139 

1% 

29 828 

31 617 

Corporate Services 

62 760 

52 684 

48 322 

2% 

51 221 

54 295 

Financial services 

845 844 

787 784 

766 907 

36% 

813 254 

862 320 

Municipal Infrastructure 

131 214 

71 296 

67 402 

3% 

71 446 

75 732 

Community Services 

14 480 

62 996 

65 173 

3% 

69 083 

73 228 

Public Safety & Transport 

115 323 

102 953 

82 003 

4% 

86 924 

92 139 

Sports, Parks, Arts & 
Culture 

43 033 

68 472 

42 286 

2% 

44 824 

47 513 

LED & Tourism 

23 103 

37 073 

20 660 

1% 

17 532 

18 584 

Human Settlements 

9 066 

11 286 

9 581 

0% 

10 156 

10 766 

IDP/PMS 

894 

7 991 

5 241 


5 555 

5 889 

Spatial Development, 
Planning & Traditional 
Affairs 

9 402 

14 225 

13 591 

1% 

14 407 

15 271 

Electricity Department 

671 730 

678 491 

698 008 

33% 

739 888 

784 282 

Maluti Water (Pty) Ltd 

185 092 

207 916 

225 279 

11% 

250 094 

262 598 

Total 

2 278 890 

2 245 877 

2 121 951 

100% 

2 256 532 

2 389 693 


140 













































EMPLOYEE RELATED COST AND REMUNERATION OF COUNCILLORS 


• The allocation for employee related cost for 2018/19 amount to R489 million which equals to 
23 per cent of the total operating expenditure, and R24 million for remuneration of 
Councillors allowances which constitutes 1% of the total operating expenditure. The increase in 
employee related costs is mainly due to the provision of salary increase in the next financial 
year (2018/19). The Salary and Wage Collective Agreement for the period 01 July 2015 to 31 
June 2018 has come to an end. The process is under consultation; therefore, in the absence of 
other information from the South African Local Government Bargaining Council 
communication will be provided at a later stage 

REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE 

Repairs and Maintenance constitutes 4% of our total annual operating expenditure. This category 
includes all labour, vehicle and material costs for the repair and maintenance of the assets of the 
Municipality. It includes both contracted services and services performed by employees. The total cost 
of asset maintenance is disclosed in this category to enable an evaluation of asset performance. 

The repairs and maintenance of buildings, fixed assets, roads, grounds and open spaces, motors and 
pumps, network reticulations, substations, VIP toilets, storm water systems, vehicles, transformers and 
CCTV cameras will be included in this category. The deferral of maintenance expenditure on assets 
has the effect of increasing future maintenance costs and also has potential for reducing the economic 
life of the asset and hence the flow of economic benefits. Deferrals and the impact thereof should be 
indicated clearly in the operational plans. 

In determining the budget under this section, the following should also be allowed for: 

o New assets to be acquired during the course of the year and which would require maintenance. 

o Capital assets to be sold or disposed of in the course of the year and which would not require 
further maintenance. 

Departments must indicate their needs to maintain the assets of the Municipality in the repairs and 
maintenance master plans. Departments must also indicate in their operational plans their annual 
requirements and the deferred maintenance needs. 


141 



Repairs and Maintenance per asset class 


DESCRIPTION 

ORIGINAL 

BUDGET 

2017/18 

PROPOSED 
BUDGET 2018/19 

PROPOSED 

BUDGET 

2019/20 

PROPOSED 

BUDGET 

2020/21 

R & M - BUILDINGS 

3 000 000 

1 500 000 

1 590 000 

1 685 400 

R & M - COMPUTER EQUIPMENT 

800 000 

100 000 

106 000 

112 360 

R & M - EQUIPMENT & TOOLS 

400 000 

50 000 

53 000 

56 180 

R & M - FURNITURE 

300 000 

- 

- 

- 

R & M - RESURFACING OF 

ROADS 

33 400 000 

33 000 000 

34 980 000 

37 078 800 

R & M - GROUNDS & OPEN 

SPACES 

1 000 000 

500 000 

530 000 

561 800 

R & M - MOTORS & PUMPS 

330 000 

300 000 

318 000 

337 080 

R & M - NETWORK 

RETICULATION 

15 000 000 

10 000 000 

10 600 000 

11 236 000 

R & M - MAINTANANCE OF VIP 

TOILETS 

3 000 000 

3 000 000 

3 180 000 

3 370 800 

R & M - STREETS & 

STORMWATER (COOPERATIVES) 

5 000 000 

3 000 000 

3 180 000 

3 370 800 

R & M - SUBSTATIONS 

8 500 000 

14 000 000 

14 840 000 

15 730 000 

R & M - VEHICLES 

3 500 000 

2 000 000 

2 120 000 

2 247 200 

R & M - TRANFORMERS 

6 800 000 

12 000 000 

12 720 000 

13 483 200 

R & M- CCTV CAMERAS 

1 200 000 

- 

- 


R & M- MAP WATER 

12 449 866,80 

- 

- 

; 

TOTAL 

94 679 866.80 

79 450 000.00 

84 217 000.00 

89 269 620.00 


142 









CAPITAL BUDGET 


The IDP process informs the budget and the preparation of the capital budget is based on the capital 
development priorities approved through the Integrated Development Plan (IDP). 

The capital budget consists of the non-operational needs of the community as well. The procurement 
of assets, with a lifespan of more than one year is classified as capital expenditure also. 

CONSOLIDATED CAPITAL BY FUNDING SOURCE 

The projected annual capital budget amounts to R223.3 million for the 2018/19 financial year, which 
represents a decrease of R49 million (18%) above the approved annual capital budget for 2017/18. 


Medium Term Capital funding 


| MTREF I 

Description 

Original 
allocation for 
2017/18 

Budget 

Year 

2018/19 

Budget 

Year+1 

2019/20 

Budget 

Year+2 

2020/21 

CAPITAL GRANTS 

R'000 

R'000 

R'000 

R'000 

Municipal Infrastructure Grant 

(MIG) 

165 732 

159 321 

162 763 

172 285 

Integrated Electrification 
Programme (INEG) 


29 000 

19 200 

38 400 

Water Services Infrastructure 
Grant (WSIG) 

50 000 

35 000 

50 000 

52 750 

Total National Grants 

215 732 

223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

OWN FUNDS ALLOCATIONS 





Capital Fixed Assets 

9 000 

7 000 



Capital projects 

47 700 




Total own funds allocation 

56 700 


- 

- 






TOTAL ASSETS 

272 432 

230 321 

231 963 

263 435 


143 

















































Consolidated Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, standard classification and funding 
source 


FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung - Table A5 Consolidated Budgeted Capital Expenditure by vote, functional classification and funding 


Vote Description 

R thousand 

Ref 

1 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Full Year 

Forecast 

Pre-audit 

outcome 

Budget Year 

2018/19 

Budget Year 

+1 2019/20 

Budget Year 

+2 2020/21 

Capital expenditure ■ Vote 












Multi-vear expenditure to be appropriated 

2 











Vote 1 - Legislative Authority 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 2 - Office of the Municipal Manager 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 3 - Corporate Services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 4 - Financial Services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 5 - Municipal Infrastructure 


153 779 

204 464 

143 998 

263 432 

- 

263 432 

- 

223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Vote 6 - Community Services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 7 - Public Safety & Transport 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - Sports, Parks, Arts & Culture 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - LED,Tourism,SMME's,Rural & agricultural de 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - Human Settlements j 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - IDP- PMS Department j 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - Spatial Development, Planning & Traditional 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - Electricity Department 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - Maluti Water (Pty) Ltd 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15-[NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_- 

_- 

Capital multi-year expenditure sub-total 

7 

153 779 

204 464 

143 998 

263 432 

- 

263 432 

- 

223 321 

~ 3i g 3 

263 435 

Sinqle-vear expenditure to be appropriated 

2 











Vote 1 - Legislative Authority 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 2 - Office of the Municipal Manager 


781 

221 

209 

2 000 

- 

2 000 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 3 - Corporate Services 


- 

- 

120 

500 

- 

500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 4 - Financial Services 


808 

194 

6 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 5 - Municipal Infrastructure 


- 

- 

42 896 

5 000 

- 

5 000 

- 

7 000 

- 

- 

Vote 6 - Community Services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 7 - Public Safety & Transport 


- 

- 

633 

1 500 

- 

1 500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 8 - Sports, Parks, Arts & Culture 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 9 - LED,Tourism,SMME's,Rural & agricultural de 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 10 - Human Settlements \ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 11 - IDP- PMS Department j 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 12 - Spatial Development, Planning & Traditional 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 13 - Electricity Department 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 14 - Maluti Water (Pty) Ltd 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Vote 15-[NAME OF VOTE 15] 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Capital single-year expenditure sub-total 


1 590 

415 

43 864 

9 000 

- 

9 000 

- 

7 000 

- | 

- 

Total Capital Expenditure - Vote 


155 369 

204 879 

187 862 

272 432 

- 

272 432 

- 

230 321 

231 963 ] 

263 435 

Capital Expenditure - Functional 












Governance and administration 


1 590 

415 

336 

7 500 

- 

7 500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Executive and council 


781 

221 

329 

7 500 


7 500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Finance and administration 


808 

194 

6 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Internal audit 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Community and public safety 


32 367 

51 002 

84 916 

85 202 

- 

85 202 

- 

61 520 

24 742 

22 897 

Community and social services 


12 810 

13 040 

30 043 

56 830 

- 

56 830 

- 

45 532 

17 444 

15 144 

Sport and recreation 


19 557 

37 962 

54 240 

26 873 

- 

26 873 

- 

15 988 

7 299 

7 753 

Public safety 


- 

- 

633 

1 500 

- 

1 500 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Health 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Economic and environmental services 


26 571 

62 226 

41 237 

54 202 

- 

54 202 

- 

38 595 

12 278 

16 344 

Planning and development 



- 




- 

- 




Road transport 


26 571 

62 226 

41 237 

54 202 

- 

54 202 

- 

38 595 

12 278 

16 344 

Environmental protection 






- 

- 

- 




Trading services 


94 841 

91 235 

45 690 

117 186 

- 

117 186 

- 

122 240 

186 805 

215 579 

Energy sources 


38 994 

37 340 

4 595 

12 600 


12 600 

- 

29 798 

19 200 

49 898 

Water management 


31 548 

32 620 

32 314 

61 405 

- 

61 405 

- 

52 919 

117 809 

120 698 

Waste water management 


24 299 

21 276 

8 782 

43 181 

- 

43 181 

- 

39 522 

49 796 

44 983 

Waste management 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other 


- 

- 

15 683 

8 342 

- 

8 342 

- 

7 966 

8 138 

8 614 

Total Capital Expenditure - Functional 

3 

155 369 

204 879 

187 862 

272 432 

- 

272 432 

- 

230 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Funded bv: 












National Government 


116 824 

186 197 

187 862 

215 732 


215 732 


223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Provincial Government 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

District Municipality 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other transfers and grants 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_-J 

- 

Transfers recognised - capital 

4 

116 824 

186197 

187 862 

215 732 

- 

215 732 


223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Public contributions & donations 

5 


- 

- 

- 


- 


- 

- 

- 

Borrowing 

6 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Internally generated funds 


38 545 

18 682 

r 

56 700 

- 

56 700 

- 

7 000 

- 

- 

Total Capital Funding 

7 

155 369 

204 879 

187 862 

272 432 

- 

272 432 

- 

230 321 

231 963 | 

263 435 


144 



































List of Capital Project for 2018/19 


LIST OF PROJECTS 

SOURCE OF 

FUNDING 

WARD NO 

PROGRESS 

FINAL BUDGET 
2018/19 

FINAL BUDGET 
2019/20 

FINAL BUDGET 
2020/21 

WATER PROJECTS 

Fika Patso Purification project 

WSIG 

20 

20% 

- 

15 000 000 


Kestel Bulk line 

WSIG 

3 

Tender stage 

35 000 000 

35 000 000 

52 250 000 

Phuthaditjhaba: Provision of water services for 
network extensions and 2940 erf connections 
(Qwaqwa Rural) Phase 3B 

MIG 

12 & 17 

99,5% 

731 901 

- 

- 

Phuthaditjhaba: Provision of water services for 
network extensions and 3907 erf connections 
(Qwaqwa Rural) Phase 3C 

MIG 

12 & 35 

30% 

5 361 000 

257 964 

- 

Intabazwe/Harrismith: Rectification of water 
supply pipeline (MIS:278789) 

MIG 

6 

Tender stage 

3 391 686 

158 314 

- 

Intabazwe Ext. 3: Construction of Internal Water 

Reticulation with Water Meters 

MIG 

5 

Budget for 2018/19 is for 
professional fees 
Project delayed 

1 950 782 

19 250 000 

17 646 063 

Matebeleng 3ML Reservoir 

MIG 

8 

Registration 

- 

9 000 000 

4 000 000 

Hlatseng: Water Network 200 stands and supply 
line 

MIG 

11 

Registration 

- 

5 930 000 

270 000 

Mphatlalatsane: Water Network 500 stands and 
supply line Phase 1 

MIG 

2 

Registration 

- 

4 851 999 

9 472 336 

Wilge: Construction of a 4 ML Reservoir 

MIG 

6 

Registration 

5 317 198 

4 030 802 

5 652 000 

Monontsha: Water Network 500 stands and supply 
line Phase 1 

MIG 

_ 

11 

Registration 

1 166 842 

5 983 158 

9 850 000 

Chris Hani Park: Water Reticulation 500 Stands 


28 

Registration 

- 

9 350 000 

7650000" 

Thaba Bosiu Water Pipeline 

MIG 

19 

Registration 

L 

8 996 532 

7 457 774 



9,11,12,14,16, 





Upgrading of wate r pump stations 

MIG 

19,21,25,27,29, 

Registration 

- 

- 

3 059 174 



34,35 





Construction 4M1 Reservoir in Qholaqwe 

MIG 

24 

Registration 

- 


2 890 524 

TOTAL 

52 919 409 

117 808 770 

120 197 871 

COMMUNITY FACILITY PROJECTS 

Intabazwe/Harrismith: New Commuter 
infrastructure facility (MIS:264316) 

MIG 

22 

68% 

3 101 164 

1 166 842 

- 

Phuthaditjhaba/Qwaqwa: New taxi facility - phase 

1 (MIS:226018) 

MIG 

7 

49% 

13 571 108 

5 023 981 

2 374 802 

Kestell/Tholong: Construction of a new taxi 
facility (MIS:255150) 

MIG 

3 

Tender stage 

15 949 916 

5 528 134 

1 082 478 

Harrismith/Tshiame B: Construction of a new 
taxi facility (MIS:255146) 

MIG 

1 

12% 

12 909 581 

5 724 836 

1 237 130 

Phuthaditj haba: Upgrading of Town Hall 
(MIS:269245) 

MIG 

29 

Project delayed; only 
professional fees paid 

- 

- 

10 450 000 

TOTAL 

45 531 770 

17 443 793 

15 144 411 

ELECTRICITY PROJECTS 

Upgrading of E-Ross Substation- Phase 1 

DOE 

17 

Design stage 

15 000 OOOi 

1 19 200 000 

| 34 200 000 

Tshiame D - electrification 

DOE 

1 

Design stage 

14 000 000 j 

.-. 

i 

Kgabisi electrification - Phase 2 

j DOE j 

.32 

To commence in 2020 

L 


4 200 M. 

Maluti-a-Phofung: High mast lights in 4 towns 
(Phase 2) 

MIG 

To be announced 

To be implemented in 
2020 

798 089 

- 

11 498 000 


29 798 089 

19 200 000 

49 898 000 


145 














































LIST OF PROJECTS 

SOURCE OF 

FUNDING 

WARD NO 

PROGRESS 

FINAL BUDGET 
2018/19 

FINAL BUDGET 
2019/20 

FINAL BUDGET 
2020/21 

WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT/ SEWERAGE PROJECTS 

Wilge: Upgrading of the Wilge Waste Water 
Treatment Works - Phase 1 (MIS:268482) 

MIG 

6 

99% 

1 836 597 

- 


Harrismith/Intabazwe-Ext3: Construction of 
sewer outfall line and rising main (MIS:236415) 

MIG 

5 

Tender stage 

5 313 046 

398 249 

- 

Thabong: Construction of sewer reticulation 
network to 1209 stands (MIS:264287) 

MIG 

24 

38% 

12 562 889 

2 551 378 

1 246 609 

Bluegumbosch: Construction of sewer reticulation 
network to 2367 stands - phase 1 (MIS:264308) 

MIG 

34 

35% 

12 440 179 

933 826 

- 

Khotsong: Construction of sewer reticulation 
network to 510 stands (MIS:264119) 

MIG 

30 

32% 

2 006 032 

361 266 

- 

Intabazwe Ext. 3: Construction of Waterborne 

Sewer Network 

MIG 

5 

Registration 

1 507 493 

14 725 000 

12 401 604 

Namahadi: Construction of Sewer Network 
(Harankopane) 

MIG 

26 

Registration 

3 855 909 

8 207 792 

10 898 000 

VIP Toilets Project Phase 12A 

MIG 

21,23,25 

Registration 

- 

12 000000" 

I^5™694 

Refurbishment of Sewer Pump Stations 

MIG 

7,13,15,17,19, 
21,23,24, 26, 27, 
29, 30, 32,33,34 

Registration 

- 

10 618 446 

9 691 521 

TOTAL 

39 522 144 

49 795 957 

44 983 428 

OTHER 

PMU Establishment 

7 966 050 

8 138 150 

8 614 250 

ROADS PROJECTS 

Intabazwe: Paving of 6km roads - Phase 2 

MIG 

5 

97% 

3 419 584 


- 

Tshiame B: Paving of 6km roads - Phase 2B 

s' MIG 

1 

85% 

558 066 

- 

- 

Namahadi: Construction of 5km paved roads and 
storm water phase 2 (MIS:240386) 

( MIG 

18 

35% 

13 613 773 

3 100 169 

1 519 978 

Tshiame: Construction of 4.5km paved roads and 
storm water drainage phase 3 (MIS:240998) 

MIG 

1 

12% 

14 003 731 

9 177 642 

915 237 

Phuthaditjhaba: Upgrading of 1km paved road 
Motebang - phase 1 (MIS:276324) 

MIG 

27 

Project delayed 

- 

- 

11 300 000 

Monontsha:Construction of footbridge 

MIG 

11 & 12 

Project delayed 

- 


2 609 000 

TOTAL 

31 595 154 

12 277 811 

16 344 215 

SPORTS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Bluegumbosch: New indoor Sport and 

Recreational Facility (MIS:245891) 

MIG 

34 

35% 

4 224 394 

1 498 519 


Intabazwe: Upgrading of recreational and sports 
facilities at Intabazwe Stadium (MIS:264315) 

MIG 

22 

70% 

11 763 990 

5 000 000 

2 026 334 

Refurbishment of Charles Mopedi Stadium 

MIG 

17 

Registration 

- 

800 000 

4 000 000 

Upgrade of Platberg Stadium Phase 1 

MIG 

22 

Registration 

- 


1 726 491 

TOTAL 

15 988 384 

7 298 519 

7 752 825 

TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS FROM GRANTS 

223 321 000 

231 963 000 

262 935 000 

FIXED ASSETS 

Yellow fleet (Plant & Machinery) 

OWN SOURCE 



7 000 000 

- 

- 

TOTAL FIXED ASSETS 

7 000 000 

- 

- 

TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS 

230 321 000 

231 963 000 

262 935 000 


146 





























































PROPOSED ANNUAL BUDGET TABLES -PARENT MUNICIPALITY 


The following tables present the Municipality’s main budget tables as required in terms of section 8 of 
the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations. These tables indicate operating income and 
expenditure budget for 2018/19 and two outer years. 


Budget summary 


FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung - Table A1 Budget Summary 


Description 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousands 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year! 

Budget Year 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

Financial Performance 











Properly rates 

120 001 

152 732 

158 750 

207 596 

- 

207 596 

- 

207 596 

220 052 

233 255 

Service charges 

556 963 

370 987 

426 430 

712 889 

- 

712 889 

- 

540 260 

572 676 

607 036 

Investment revenue 

1 116 

2 974 

2 304 

2 900 

- 

2 900 

- 

2 900 

3 074 

3 258 

Transfers recognised - operational 

403 189 

454 043 

458 944 

503 632 

- 

503 632 

- 

547 804 

597 768 

647 753 

Other own revenue 

r 465 568 

r 70 495 

r 70 006 

r 75 944 

r 

r 75 944 

r 

r 65 112 

r 69 019 

f 73 160 

Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers 
and contributions) 

1 546 837 

1 051 231 

1 116 434 

1 502 962 

~ 

1 502 962 

~ 

... 

1 363 672 

1 462 588 

1 564 463 

Employee costs 

256 577 

318 397 

348 550 

343^85" 

— 

343^85^ 


”™™356 25T 

377 5251 

.400 283 

Remuneration of councillors 

23 489 

22 926 

24 141 

23 357 

- 

23 357 

- 

24 758 

26 244 

27 819 

Depreciation & asset impairment 

278 171 

265 602 

268 475 

280 100 

- 

280 100 

- 

270 000 

286 200 

303 372 

Finance charges 

3 985 

5 389 

9 009 

4 000 

- 

4 000 

- 

5 000 

5 300 

5 618 

Materials and bulk purchases 

913 542 

595 956 

681 720 

661 430 

- 

661 430 

- 

679 450 

720 217 | 

763 430 

Transfers and grants 

100 222 

102 917 

109 000 

115 540 

- 

115 540 

- 

127 094 

134 720 

142 803 

Other ex penditure 

312 903 

700 946 

652 903 

610 349 

- 

610 349 

- 

434 120 

456 132 | 

483 771 

Total Expenditure 

1 888 890 

2 012 133 

2 093 798 

2 037 962 

- 

2 037 962 

- 

1 896 672 

2 006 437 j 

2 127 095 

Surplus/(Deficit) 

(342 053) 

(960 902) 

(977 364) 

(535 666) 

- 

('535 666) 

- 

(533 666) 

(543 849) I 

(562 632) 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary alloc 

206 474 

185 373 

178 731 

215 732 

- 

215 732 

- 

223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Contributions recognised - capital & contributed a 

r 

r 

r _ 

r 

w 

r 

r 

r 

r _ ! 

r 

Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & 

contributions 

(135 579^ 

(775 529)1 

(798 633) 

(319 268)* 

~ 

Jmm) 

~ 

(309 G79T 

(311 886)1 

(299 197) 

Share of surplus/ (deficit) of associate 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

r 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 

(135 579) 

(775 529) i 

(798 633) 

(319 268) 

~ 

(319 268) 

~ 

(309 679) 

(311 886) i 

(299 197) 

Capital expenditure & funds sources 











Capital expenditure 

204 269 

207 186 

187 862 

272 432 

- 

272 432 

- 

230 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Transfers recognised - capital 

204 269 

186 516 

187 862 

215 732 

- 

215 732 

- 

223 321 

231 963 

1 263 435 

Public contributions & donations 

- 

- ! 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- ! 

- 

Borrowing 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

! 

i 

Internally generated funds 

r 

20 670 

- 

56 700 

- 

56 700 

- 

7 000 

- 

| 

Total sources of capital funds 

204 269 

207 186 

187 862 

272 432 

- 

272 432 

- 

230 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Financial position 











Total current assets 

714 205 

411 059 

576 384 

896 039 

- 

943 577 

- 

606 672 

643 323 

682 515 

Total non current assets 

3 058 709 

3 600 979 

3 519 072 

3 133 054 

- 

3 146 343 

- 

3 734 004 

3 958 044 

4 195 527 

Total current liabilities 

1 058 011 

1 737 463 

2 617 957 

1 744 655 

- 

1 872 713 

- 

3 172 569 

2 933 892 

3 109 926 

Total non current liabilities 

74 897 

69 293 

70 850 

81 630 

- 

81 630 

- 

78 445 

80 141 i 

81 590 

Community wealth/Equity 

2 640 007 

2 205 282 

1 406 650 

2 202 809 

- 

2 135 578 

- 

1 089 661 

1 587 333 | 

1 685 098 

Cash flows 











Net cash from (used) operating 

207 756 

206 394 

189 610 

251 321 

- 

249 981 

- 

238 689 

237 036 

268 385 

Net cash from (used) investing 

(189 570) 

(200 950)! 

(187 850) 

(245 189) 

- 

(245 189) 

- 

(230 321) 

(231 963)| 

(263 435) 

Net cash from (used) financing 

(16 630) 

(4 215) 

(600) 

(5 000) 

- 

(5 000) 

- 

(4 500) 

(4 500) 

(4 000) 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year end 

(42 313) 

7 957 

9 117 

4 382 

- 

8 082 

- 

5 368 

5 941 

6 891 

Cash backinq/surplus reconciliation 











Cash and investments available 

6 729 

7 957 i 

9 117 

4 382 

- 

8 082 

- 

9 156 

9 956 

11 147 

Application of cash and investments 

586 616 

1 227 909 

2 218 663 

1 174 869 

- 

1 116 976 

- 

2 810 924 

2 550 549 

2 672 246 

Balance - surplus (shortfall) 

(579 887) 

(1 219 952) 

(2 209 546) 

(1 170 486) 

- 

(1 108 895) 

- 

(2 801 768) 

(2 540 593) 

(2 661 100) 

Asset management 











Asset register summary (WDV) 

3 057 917 

2 980 846 

3 512 974 

3 129 888 

- 

3 143 177 


3 723 753 

3 947 178 

4 184 009 

Depreciation 

278 171 

265 602 

268 475 

280 100 

- 

280 100 


270 000 

286 200 

303 372 

Renewal of Existing Assets 

8 995 

- | 

- 

12 566 

- 

12 566 


- 

11 418 i 

13 692 

Repairs and Maintenance 

461 075 

107 031 

106 738 

82 230 

- 

82 230 


59 450 

63 017 

66 798 

Free services 











Cost of Free Basic Services provided 

57 927 

45 873 

18 529 

42 558 

- 

42 558 

5 284 

5 284 

28 997 

30 737 

Revenue cost of free services provided 

Households below minimum service level 

715 927 

3 444 860 

2 830 320 

2 852 700 

- 

2 852 700 

2 852 700 

2 852 700 

3 023 862 

3 205 294 

Water: 

4 

4 

4 

4 

- 

13 

13 

13 

13 | 

13 

Sanitation/sewerage: 

4 

4 

4 

4 

- 

3 

3 

3 

3 ! 

3 

Energy: 

45 

42 

47 

36 

- 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

Refuse: 

73 

73 

73 

73 

- 

87 

87 

87 

87 

87 


147 






























Explanatory notes to MBRR Table Al- Budget Summary 

• Table Al represents a high-level summary of the Municipality’s budget, providing a view that 
includes all major components of i.e. (Operating, Capital expenditure, financial position, cash flow, 
and MFMA funding compliance) 

• The table provides an overview of the amounts approved by Council for operating performance, 
resources deployed to capital expenditure, financial position, cash and funding compliance, as well 
as the municipality’s commitment to eliminating basic services delivery backlogs. 

• Financial management reforms emphasise the importance of the municipal budget being 
funded. This requires the simultaneous assessment of the Financial Performance, Financial 

Position and Cash Flows Budgets, along with the Capital Budget. The Budget Summary provides 
the key information in this regard: 

1) The municipality’s financial performance shows a deficit position over 2018/19 MTREF 
contributed by non-cash items. 

2) The municipality’s capital expenditure is funded from the following 

Transfers recognised- capital as reflected on the Financial Performance 

3) The municipality’s deficit reconciliation over the 2018/19 MTREF shows a negative and 
increasing trend, which is an indication that the Municipality will struggle to afford its 
commitments over the next three years. Revenue enhancement strategies should be urgently 
developed 


148 



FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung - Table A4 Budgeted Financial Performance (revenue and expenditure) 


Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

1 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

Revenue Bv Source 












Property rates 

2 

120 001 

152 732 

158 750 

207 596 

- 

207 596 

- 

207 596 

220 052 

233 255 

Service charges - electricity revenue 

2 

408 748 

256 905 

283 358 

558 165 

- 

558 165 

- 

376 253 

398 828 

422 757 

Service charges - water revenue 

2 

83 542 

49 443 

69 867 

78 315 

- 

78 315 

- 

83 014 

87 995 

93 274 

Service charges - sanitation revenue 

2 

36 972 

34 277 

38 375 

41 577 

- 

41 577 

- 

44 072 

46 716 

49 519 

Service charges - refose revenue 

2 

27 700 

30 362 

34 829 

34 832 

- | 

34 832 

- 

36 921 

39137 

41 485 

Service charges - other 


- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

Rental of facilities and equipment 


850 

1 064 

1 142 

1 284 

- 

1 284 

- 

1 346 

1 426 

1 512 

Interest earned - external investments 


1 116 

2 974 

2 304 

2 900 

- 

2 900 

- 

2 900 

3 074 

3 258 

Interest earned - outstanding debtors 


16 771 

24 926 

31 514 

31 800 

- 

31 800 

- 

33 708 

35 730 

37 874 

Dividends received 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Fines, penalties and forfeits 


880 

21 405 

17 863 

14 012 

- 

14 012 

- 

14 853 

15 744 

16 689 

Licences and permits 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Agency services 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Transfers and subsidies 


403 189 

454 043 

458 944 

503 632 

- 

503 632 

- 

547 804 

597 768 

647 753 

Other revenue 

2 

447 067 

23 100 

19 487 

28 848 

- 

28 848 

- 

15 206 

16118 

17 085 

Gains on disposal of PPE 












Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers 
and contributions) 


F 1 546 837 

1 051 231 

f 1 116 434 


- 

r 1 502 962 

- 




Expenditure Bv Tvoe 












Employee related costs 

2 

256 577 

318 397 

348 550 

343 185 

- 

343 185 

- 

356 250 

377 625 

400 283 

Remuneration of councillors 


23 489 

22 926 

r 24141 

23 357 

- 

23 357 

- 

24 758 

26 244 

27 819 

Debt impairment 

3 

(162 674) 

225 468 

r 63 327 

270 000 

- 

270 000 

_ 

r 250 000 

r 265 000 

r 280 900 

Depreciation & asset impairment 

2 

278 171 

265 602 

268 475 

280 100 

- 

280 100 

- 

270 000 

286 200 

303 372 

Finance charges 


3 985 

5 389 

r 9 009 

4 000 


4 000 

- 

5 000 

5 300 

5 618 

Bulk purchases 

2 

452 467 

488 924 

574 983 

579 200 

- 

579 200 

- 

600 000 

636 000 

674 160 

Other materials 

8 

461 075 

107 032 

106 738 

82 230 


82 230 

- 

79 450 

84 217 

89 270 

Contracted sen/ ices 


60 778 

81 700 

94 457 

82 143 

- 

82 143 

- 

63 000 

66 780 

70 787 

Transfers and subsidies 


100 222 

102 917 

109 000 

115 540 

- 

115 540 

- 

127 094 

134 720 

142 803 

Other expenditure 

4, 5 

408 543 

392 987 

495 119 

258 206 

- 

258 206 

- 

121 120 

124 352 

132 084 

Loss on disposal of PPE 


6 256 

792 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total Expenditure 


1 888 890 

2 012 133 

2 093 798 

2 037 962 

_ 

2 037 962 

_ 

1 896 672 

2 006 437 

2 127 095 

Surplus/(Deficit) 


(342 053) 

(960 902) 

(977 364) 

(535 000) 

- 

(535 000) 

- 

(533 000) 

(543 849) 

(562 632) 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary 
allocations) (National / Provincial and District) 


206 474 

185 373 

178 731 

215 732 

_ 

215 732 

_ 

223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Transfers and subsidies - capital (monetary 
allocations) (National / Provincial Departmental 
Agencies, Households, Non-profit Institutions, 
Private Enterprises, Public Corporatons, Higher 

6 











Transfers and subsidies - capital (in-kind - all) 












Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & 

contributions 


f 

f (775 529) 

f (798 633) 

(319 268) 

- 


- 

W (309 679) 

r (311 886) 

r (299 1971 

Taxation 












Surplus/(Deficit) after taxation 


w .'(135 579)' 

f .(775 529) 

^^798 633) 

r .(319 268)' 

r .. 

* .(319 268) 

r .. 


*.(311 886) 

r .(299 197) 

Attributable to minorities 












Surplus/(Deficit) attributable to municipality 


* (135 579) 

(775 529) 

^^7t98 633[ 

(319 268) 

r - 

f (319 268) 

" - 


* (311 886) 


Share of surplus/ (deficit) of associate 

7 











Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 


(135 579) 

(775 529) 

^^^(798^ 

(319 268) 

f - 

r (319 268) 

' .-. 


W (311 886) 

* (299 197) 


Explanatory notes to Table A4-Budgeted Financial Performance (revenue and expenditure) 

• Table A4 is a view of the budgeted financial performance in relation to the revenue by source 
and expenditure by type. The projected annual revenue as reflected in this table amounts to 
Rl,363,672,246 (R1.364 billion) for the 2018/19 financial year, which represents a decrease of 
R139.2 million (9%) less than the Annual budget for 2017/18. The projected annual 
expenditure as reflected in this table amounts to Rl,896,672,246 (R1.897 billion) which 
represents a decrease of R141.2 million (7%). 

• Revenue to be generated from Property Rates amounts to R207, 596 million in the 2018/19 
financial year and increases to R233, 255 million by 2019/20. This revenue represents 15% of 
the operating revenue base of the municipality and therefore remains significant funding source 
for the municipality. 


149 
































• Service charges relating to Electricity, Water, Sanitation and Refuse Removal constitute the 
biggest component of the revenue basket of the municipality totalling to R540,260 million for 
the 2018/19 financial year and increasing to R572,676 million and R607,036 million in 
2019/20 and 2020/2021 respectively. For the 2018/19 financial year, service charges are 40% 
of the total anticipated revenue. 

• Transfers Recognised- Operating includes the equitable share and the finance management 
grant from national government. The grants receipts from National government seem to be 
more by 9 per cent in 2018/2019 as compared to 2017/2018, the allocations increase by 9% for 
2018/19 and 8% for the 2020/21 outer years. 


The following graph illustrates the major revenue items per type. 



• Bulk purchases have increased from R579 million from the annual budget 2017/2018 to R600 
million in 2018/2019. This change is attributed to substantial increase in the cost of bulk 
electricity from Eskom. 

• Employee related costs is also the main cost driver within the Municipality’s operating 
Expenditure, i.e. from R366,542 million to R381,008 million a provision has been made as per 
circular 91 and other critical vacant positions. 

• Other Expenditure consist mainly of various line items relating to daily operations of the 
municipality like, fuel cost, bank charges, consultant fees, audit fees, telecommunication, 
printing and postage cost, bursaries, etc. 

• printing and postage cost, bursaries, etc. 


150 


















FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung ■ Table A7 Budgeted Cash Flows 


Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

i Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

1 Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

I +12019/20 

+2 2020/21 

CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Properly rates 


120 001 

90183 

81 375 

134 937 

- 

134 937 

- 

103 798 

110 026 

116 627 

Service charges 


195 943 

671 687 

326 423 

458 913 

- 

458 913 

- 

361 781 

383 488 

406 497 

Other revenue 


283 382 

150102 

38429 

200 875 

! 

200 875 

| 

23 808 

25 236 

26 751 

Government-operating 

1 

393 995 

454 043 

455 266 

503 632 


503 632 


547 804 

597 768 

647 753 

Government-capital 

1 

206 474 

187 265 

182 520 

215 732 

- i 

215 732 

- 

223 321 

231 963 

263 435 

Interest 


17 530 

26 962 

33 818 

23 425 

- 

23 425 

- 

19464 

20 632 

21 870 

Dividends 1 









- 

- 

- 

Payments 












Suppliers and employees 


(1 146 594) 

(1 349 141) 

(833 788) 

(1 167 993) 


(1 167 993) 


(910 991): 

(989 210) 

(1 059477) 

Finance charges 


(4 206) 

(20 685) 

(9 009) 

(4 000) 

- j 

(4 000) 

- 

(4 500)1 

(4 770) 

(5 056) 

Transfers and Grants 

1 

- 

- 

(85425) 

(115 540) 

_-J 

(115 540) 

- 

(133 000) 

(142 590) 

(154 350) 

NET CASH FROMZ(USED) OPERATING ACTIVITIES 

66 526^ 

210 415 

189 610 

249 981] 

r~j 

249 9 £J 

- 

2314J55 

1 232 543] 

264 050 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Proceeds on disposal ofPPE 


6 256 

663 

4 024 

- 

- ! 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Decrease (Increase) in non-current debtors 


- 



- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Decrease (increase) other non-current receivables 

8 236 

(1 631) 

(3 887) 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Decrease (increase) in non-current investments 


196 

(12) 

(125) 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Payments 












Capital assets 


(155 369) 

(204 879)1 

(187 862) 

(245 189) 

- 

(245 189) 

I 

(223 321) 

(231 963) 

(263 435) 

NET CASH FROMZ(USED) INVESTING ACTIVITIES 

(140 681) 

(205 858) 

(187 850) 

.[245 189) 

1 .-"] 

.(245 189) 

| . - . 

(223 321) 

j.(231 963) 

nw 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Short term loans 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

Borrowing long term/refinancing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Increase (decrease) in consumer deposits 


- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Payments 












Repayment of borrowing 


(16 217) 

(3 222) 

(600) 

(5 000) 

- 

(5 000) 

- 

- 

! 

- 

NET CASH FR0M/(USED) FINANCING ACTIVITIES 

(16 217) 

(3 222) 

(600) 

(5 000) 

! - i 

(5 000) 

- 

- 

1 - j 

- 

NET INCREASE/ (DECREASE) IN CASH HELD 


(90 372) 

1335 

1160 

(208) 

- 

(208) 

- 

8164 

580 

615 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year begin: 

2 

97 089 

6 717 

7 957 

8 290 

! 

8 290 

- 

1500 

9 664 

10 244 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year end: 

2 

6 717 

8 052 

9117 

8 082 

! 

8 082 

- 

9 664 

10 244 

10 859 


Explanatory notes to Table A7 - Budgeted Cash Flow Statement 

1. The table shows the cash and cash equivalents of the Municipality during the 2018/19 to 
2020/21 MTREF. 

2. The Municipality is under Section 139(1) b of the Constitution and various strategies of 
revenue enhancement are still in the process of being determined. This will include the total 
solutions especially on Electricity. The billing has started and statements will be out to 
customers in June 2017. 

For the 2018/19 MTREF the budget has been prepared to ensure high levels of cash and cash 
equivalents over the medium-term, with cash levels anticipated to be R9.6 million by 2018/19 
and steadily increasing to R10.8 million by 2020/21. 


151 

























FS1S 

4 Maluti-a-Phofung ■ Tab 

e A6 Budgeted Financial Position 

Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015116 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

| Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+12019/20 

+2 2020/21 

ASSETS 

Current assets 










; 


Cash 


6 729 

7957 

9117 

4 382 

- 

8 082 

- 

5368 

5941 

6 891 

Call investment deposits 

1 

- 

- 


- 

- 

i 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Consumer debtors 

1 

520 053 

321 316 

504 879 

793 029 

- 

793 029 

- 

535 172 

567282 

601 319 

Other debtors 


183 933 

79007 

58 354 

95 711 

- 

136 383 

- 

61855 

65 567 

69 501 

Current portion of long-term receivables 


1214 

645 

1864 

678 

- 

| 678 

- 

1976 

2095 

2 220 

Inventory 

2 

2 277 

2133 

2170 

2 240 

- 

5406 

- 

2 300 

2438 

2 585 

Total current assets 


714205 

411 059 

576 384 

896 039 

- 

943 577 

- 

606 6721 

643 323 

682 515 

Non current assets 












Long-term receivables 


361 

2 590 

5 259 

2 688 

- 

2 688 

- 

5 574 

5 908 

6 263 

Investments 




- 

- 

- 

j 

- 

3 788! 

4015 

4256 

Investment property 


69 579 

51413 

51413 

71765 

- 

71765 

- 

54498 

57 768 

61234 

Investment in Associate 


0 

0 

0 

0 

- 

! 

- 

0 

o 

0 

Property, plant and equipment 

3 

2 986 706 

3544 919 

3459 536 

3 056 781 

- 

3 070 070 

- 

3 667 1081 

| 3 887 135 

4 120 363 

Agricultural 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Biological 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

j 

- 

- 


- 

Intangible 


1632 

1279 

2 025 

1343 

- 

1343 

- 

2147 

2 276 

2412 

Other non-current assets 


!_430^ 

777 

839 

477 

- 

477 

- 

889! 

942 

999 

Total non current assets 


l .3 058 709 

.3 600 979 

[.3 519 072 

3 133 054 

- 

:.3 146 343 

- 

.3 734 004 j 

.3 958 044 

.4195527 

mASSETS™. 


3 772 914 

4 012 038 

j 4 095 456 

4 029 093 


f" 4 089 921 

- 


4 601 367 

4878 042 

LIABILITIES 

Current liabilities 












Bank overdraft 

1 


- 


- 


| 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Borrowing 

4 

- 

- 


- 

- 

; 

- 

- 

j 

- 

Consumer deposits 


11721 

11867 

12111 

12319 


12319 

- 

12 838 

13 608 

14425 

Trade and other payables 

4 

1 046 290 

1 725 595 

2 605 845 

1 732 336 

- 

1 1 860 393 

- 

3 159 731 | 

| 2 920 284 

3 095 501 

Provisions 


- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total current liabilities 


r i 058 011 

1 737 463 

! 2 617 957 

1 744655 

r .. 

j 1 872 713 

- 

3 172 569 | 

| 2 933 892 

j 3 109 926 

Non current liabilities 












Borrowing 


9 077 

5729 

4 865 

7 000 

- 

7 000 

- 

8 500 

6 000 

3 000 

Provisions 


65819 

63 564 

65986 

74 630 

- 

74630 

- 

69 945 

74141 

78 590 

Total non current liabilities 


| 74897 

69 293 

70 850 

81630 

- 

81630 

- 

78445 

80141 

81590 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 


1 132 907 

1 806755 

2 688 807 

1 826285 

- 

! 1 954 342 

- 

3 251 0141 

i 3014034 

| 3191516 

NET ASSETS 

5 

2 640 007 

2 205 282 

1 406 650 

2 202 809 

- 

| 2 135 578 

- 

1 089 6611 

1 587 333 

1 686 526 

COMMUNITY WEALTH/EQUITY 












Accumulated Surplus/fDeficit) 


2 640 007 

1 928 457 

1 129 824 

2 202 809 

- 

2 135578 

- 

1 089661 

1 587 333 

1 685098 

Reserves 

4 


276 825 

276 825 

" 


" 

" 


" 


TOTAL COMMUNITY WEALTH/EQUITY 

nn 

2 640 007 

2 205 282 

1 406 650 

2 202 809 

- 

| 2 135578 

- 

1 089 661 

r 1 587 333 

1 685098 


152 








































Explanatory notes to Table A6 - Budgeted Financial Position 


1. The budgeted Statement of Financial Position of the Municipality has been prepared on a basis 
consistent with GRAP 1 and international accounting standards and as such makes it 
comparable with the present Statement of Financial Position and those of previous years, to 
enable all stakeholders to interpret the impact of the budget as such on the Statement of 
Financial Position. 

2. The assets are in the order of relative liquidity and liabilities according to their priority of 
being met with cash and an extensive table of notes (MBRR Table SA3 which can be found on 
page 96) are provided with details of the major components of items such as: 

□ Call Investment Deposits 

□ Consumer Debtors 

□ Property, Plant and Equipment 

□ Trade and Other Payables 

□ Non-Current Provisions 

□ Changes in Net Assets 

□ Reserves 

3. Movements on the Budgeted Statement of Financial Performance will impact on the Budgeted 
Statement of Financial Position. Assumptions made on the collection rate for instance, will 
affect the budgeted cash position of the Municipality and the budgeted impairment of debtors. 
As such the assumptions form a critical link in determining the applicability and relevance of 
the budget, the determination of financial indicators, the assessment of funding compliance and 
the general viability of the municipality. 


153 



FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung ■ Table A7 Budgeted Cash Flows 


Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Rthousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

| Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 | 

i +12019/20 

+2 2020/21 

CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Property rates 


120 001 

90183 

81375 

134 937 

- 

134 937 

- 

103 798 

110 026 

116 627 

Service charges 


345 730 

r 598232 

326 423 

458 497 

- 

458 913 

- 

342 969 

363 547 

427 635 

Other revenue 


279 913 

45 569 

38429 

29697 

- 

200 875 

- 

23 808 

25236 

26 751 

Government-operating 

1 

402 495 

455 111 

455 266 

503 632 

- 

503632 

- 

547 804 

597 768 

647 753 

Government-capital 

1 

206 474 

186197 

182 520 

215 732 

- 

215 732 

- 

223 321 

231 963 

263435 

Interest 


17 530 

27 900 

33 818 

23425 

- 

23425 

- 

22 835 

20 632 

21870 

Dividends 









- 

- 

- 

Payments 












Suppliers and employees 


(1 160402) 

r (1 191 409) 

(833 788) 

(995 059) 

- 

(1 167 993) 

_ 

r (900 606) 

(976 688) 

(1 089256) 

Finance charges 


(3 985) 

(5 389) 

(9 009) 

(4 000) 

- 

(4 000) 

- 

(4 500)! 

(4 770) 

(5 056) 

Transfers and Grants 

1 

i 

- 

(85425) 

(115 540) 

_-J 

(115 540) 

- 

(120 739) 

(130678) 

(141 375) 

NET CASH FROMZ(USED) OPERATING ACTIVITIES 

.207 756 

r 206 394 | 

r .189 610 

251 321 

f .-""j 

f .249981 

f - 

238 689 

237 036 

268 385 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Proceeds on disposal of PPE 


6 022 

7 851 

4 024 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

r 

- 

- 

Decrease (Increase) in non-current debtors 


- 



- 

- 

- 


r 

- 

- 

Decrease (increase) other non-current receiv ables 

8236 

(1661) 

(3 887) 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Decrease (increase) in non-current investments 


440 

45 

(125) 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Payments 












Capital assets 


(204 269) 

(207 186) 

(187 862) 

(245 189) 


(245 189) 

- 

(230 321) 

(231 963) 

(263435) 

NET CASH FROMZ(USED) INVESTING ACTIVITIES 

1(189 570)' 

(200 950) 

|(W85^ 

(245 189) 

- j 

(245 189) 

. 

(230 321) 

(231 963) 

(263435) 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES 
Receipts 












Shortterm loans 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Borrowing long term/refinancing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Increase (decrease) in consumer deposits 


- 


- 

- 

- 


- 


r 

r 

Payments 












Repayment of borrowing 


(16 630) 

(4 215)! 

(600) 

(5 000) 

- 

(5 000) 

- 

(4 500) 

(4 500) 

(4 000) 

NET CASH FROMZ(USED) FINANCING ACTIVITIES 

(16 630) 

(4 215) 

(600) 

(5 000) 

- 

(5 000) 

- 

(4 500) 

(4 500) 

(4 000) 

NET INCREASE/ (DECREASE) IN CASH HELD 


1557 

1228 

1160 

1132 

- 

(208) 

- 

3 868 

573 

950 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year begin: 

2 

(43 870) 

6 729! 

7 957 

3 250 

- 

8 290 

- 

1500 

5 368 

5 941 

CashZcash equivalents at the year end: 

2 

(42 313) 

7957 

9117 

4 382 

- 

8 082 

- 

5 368 

5941 

6 891 


Explanatory notes to Table A7 - Budgeted Cash Flow Statement 

1. The table shows the cash and cash equivalents of the Municipality during the 2018/19 to 
2020/21 MTREF. 

2. The Municipality is under Section 139(1) b of the Constitution and various strategies of 
revenue enhancement are still in the process of being determined. This will include the total 
solutions especially on Electricity. The billing has started and statements are out to customers 
already (July-September 2017). 

3. For the 2018/19 MTREF the budget has been prepared to ensure high levels of cash and cash 
equivalents over the medium-term, with cash levels anticipated to be R5.3 million by 2018/19 
and steadily increasing to R6.8 million by 2020/21. 


154 


























FS194 

Illaluti-a-Pho 

fung - Table A 8 Cash bac 

ked reserves/accumulated surplus reconciliation 

Description 

Ref 

2014/15 

2015116 

2016117 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue 81 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 


Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Pre-audit 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

outcome 

2018/19 

+12019/20 

+2 2020/21 

Cash and investments available 












Cash/cash equivalents at the year end 

1 

(42 313) 

7957 

9117 

4382 

- 

8 082 

- 

5 368 

5941 

6891 

Other current investments >90 days 


49 042 

0 

- 


f 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Non current assets-Investments 

mJ 

r 

r 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

3 788 

4015 

4256 

Cash and investments available: 



7 957~ 

9117 



8 082 

- 

9156 


11147 

Application of cash and investments 












Unspent conditional transfers 


1787 

3 678 

3 789 

- 

~ 

- 

- 

70 000 

r 

f 

Unspent borrowing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

- 


- 

- 

~ 

Statutory requirements 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

j 

Other working capital requirements 

3 

584 829 

1 224 231 

2 214 875 

1 174 869 

~ 

1 116 976 

- 

2 740 924 

2 550 549 

2 672 246 

Other provisions 


- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

| 

Long term investments committed 

4 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Reserves to be backed by cash/investments 

5 

- 

- 

- 

- 

~ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

i 

Total Application of cash and investments: 


586616 

1 227 909" 

2218663 

1 174869 

- 

1 116976 

r .■■■ 

2810924 

2 550 549" 

2 672246 

Surplus(shortfalij 


(579 887) 

(1 219952) 

(2209546) 

(i 170486) 

- 

(1108 895) 

- 

(2801 768) 

(2 540 593) 

(2 661 100 ) 


Explanatory notes to Table A8 - Cash Backed Reserves/Accumulated Surplus 
Reconciliation 

1. The cash backed reserves/accumulated surplus reconciliation is aligned to the requirements of 
MFMA Circular 42 - Funding a Municipal Budget. 

2. In essence the table evaluates the funding levels of the budget by firstly forecasting the cash 
and investments at year end and secondly reconciling the available funding to the 
liabilities/commitments that exist. 

3. The outcome of this exercise would either be a surplus or deficit. A deficit would indicate that 
the applications exceed the cash and investments available and would be indicative of non- 
compliance with the MFMA requirements that the municipality’s budget must be “funded” 

4. From the table it can be seen that for the Municipality experienced a shortfall net cash flow 
position for the period 2014/15 to 2020/2021. 

5. As part of the budgeting and planning guidelines that informed the compilation of the 2018/19 
MTREF, the end objective of the medium-term framework was to ensure the budget is funded 
and aligned to section 18 of the MFMA, but due to the R3 billion eskom bill, its impossible for 
now 

6. As can be seen, the budget moves from a shortfall of R2.3 million in 2018/19, R2.5 million in 
2019/20 and R2.6 million in 2020/21. 


155 































FS194 Maluti-a-Phofung ■ Table A9 Asset Management 


Description 


Ref 


R thousand 


2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 

2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 

+1 2019/20 

+2 2020/21 

195 273 

207 186 

187 862 

243 464 

. 

243 464 

218 557 

215 545 

224 241 

75 471 

62 226 

40185 

54 202 

- 

54 202 

31 595 

12 278 

5 044 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

_ 

- 

38 994 

37 340 

4 595 

12 600 

- 

12 600 

29 798 

19 200 

49 898 

31 548 

32 620 

21 182 

61 405 

- 

61 405 

52 919 

117 809 

120 698 

24 299 

21 276 

8 782 

43181 

- 

43181 

39 522 

39178 

35 292 

- 

- 

19 565 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

170312 

153 462 

94 307 

171387 

- 

171387 

153 835 

188464 

210 932 

10 878 

15 347 

36 053 

44 263 

- 

44 263 

45 532 

17 444 

4 694 

12 494 

37 961 

54 240 

10471 

- 

10 471 

4 224 

1499 

- 

23 371 

53 309 

90 293 

54 734 

- 

54 734 

49 756 

18942 

4 694 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 


- 

747 

8 342 

- 

8 342 

7 966 

8138 

8 614 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

747 

8342 

- 

8 342 

7 966 

8138 

8 614 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

59 

1240 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

59 

1 240 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

781 

194 

142 

3 000 

- 

3 000 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

1000 

- 

1000 

- 

- 

- 

808 

162 

1132 

5 000 

- 

5 000 

7 000 

- 

- 

8 995 

- 

- 

12 566 

- 

12 566 

- 

11418 

13 692 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

10 618 

9 692 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

10 618 

9 692 

1932 

- 

- 

12 566 

- 

12 566 

- 

- 

- 

7 063 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

800 

4 000 

8 995 

- 

- 

12 566 

- 

12 566 

- 

800 

4 000 

- 

- 

- 

16 402 

- 

16 402 

11764 

5 000 

25 503 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


11300 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


10 450 

- 

- 

- 

16402 

- 

16 402 

11764 

5 000 

3 753 

- 

- 

- 

16402 

- 

16402 

11 764 

5 000 

14 203 

75 471 

62 226 

40185 

54 202 

- 

54 202 

31 595 

12 278 

16 344 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

38 994 

37 340 

4 595 

12 600 

- 

12 600 

29 798 

19 200 

49 898 

31 548 

32 620 

21 182 

61 405 

- 

61 405 

52 919 

117 809 

120 698 

24 299 

21 276 

8 782 

43181 

- 

43181 

39 522 

49 796 

44 983 

- 

- 

19 565 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

170 312 

153462 

94 307 

171387 

- 

171387 

153 835 

1990831 

231 924 

12 810 

15 347 

36 053 

56 830 

- 

56 830 

45 532 

17 444 

15144 

19 557 

37 961 

54 240 

26 873 

- 

26 873 

15 988 

7 299 

7 753 

32 367 

53 309 

90 293 

83 702 

- 

83 702 

61520 

24 742 [ 

22 897 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

747 

8 342 

- 

8 342 

7 966 

8138 

8 614 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

747 

8342 

- 

8 242 

7 966 

8138 

8 614 

- 

59 

1240 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- j 

- 

- 

59 

1240 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

781 

194 

142 

3 000 

- 

3 000 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

1000 

- 

1000 

- 


- 

808 

162 

1132 

5 000 

- 

5 000 

7 000 


- 

204269 

207 186 

187 862 

272 432 

- 

272 432 

230 321 

_ 231 96^ 

263 435 


ICAPITAL EXPENDITURE 
Total New Assets 

Roads Infrastructure 
Storm water Infrastructure 
Electrical Infrastructure 
Water Supply Infrastructure 
Sanitation Infrastructure 
Information and Communication Infrastructure 
Infrastructure 
Community Facilities 
Sport and Recreation Facilities 
Community Assets 
Investment properties 
Operational Buildings 
Housing 
Other Assets 

Biological or Cultivated Assets 
Servitudes 
Licences and Rights 
Intangible Assets 
Computer Equipment 
Furniture and Office Equipment 
Machinery and Equipment 

Total Renewal of Existing Assets 

Sanitation Infrastructure 

Infrastructure 

Community Facilities 
Sport and Recreation Facilities 

Community Assets 

Total Upgrading of Existing Assets 
Infrastructure 

Community Facilities 
Sport and Recreation Facilities 

Community Assets 

Total Capital Expenditure 

Roads Infrastructure 
Storm water Infrastructure 
Electrical Infrastructure 
Water Supply Infrastructure 
Sanitation Infrastructure 
Information and Communication Infrastructure 
Infrastructure 
Community Facilities 
Sport and Recreation Facilities 
Community Assets 
Investment properties 
Operational Buildings 
Housing 
Other Assets 
Licences and Rights 
Intangible Assets 
Computer Equipment 
Furniture and Office Equipment 
Machinery and Equipment 
ITOTAL CAPITAL ExFeN dTtU^ 


156 






























ASSET REGISTER SUMMARY - PPE (WDV) 

5 










Roads Infrastructure 


633 022 

683 175 

1 006 424 

717 334 

- 

717 334 

1 066 809 

1 130 817 

1 198 667 

Storm water Infrastructure 




- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Electrical Infrastructure 


443 073 

458 645 

457 107 

481 577 


481 577 

484 533 

513 605 

544 421 

Water Supply Infrastructure 


419 901 

423 039 

426 288 

444 191 


453 832 

451 865 

478 977 

507 716 

Sanitation Infrastructure 


178 375 

191 659 

167 833 

201 242 


201 242 

177 903 

188 577 

199 891 

Information and Communication Infrastructure 


242 212 

- 

- 



3 648 

- 

- 

- 

Infrastructure 


1 916 583 

1 756 518 

2 057 651 

1 844 344 

- 

1 857 633 

2 181110 

2311 976 1 

j 2450 695 

Community Facilities 


106 621 

102 922 

157194 

108 068 

- 

108 068 

166 626 

176 623 

187 221 

Sport and Recreation Facilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

j 

- 

Community Assets 


106 621 

102 922 

157194 

108 068 

- 

108 068 

166 626 

176 623 

187 221 

Heritage Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Revenue Generating 


69 579 

68 347 

51 413 

71 765 

- 

71 765 

54 498 

57 768 

61 234 

Non-revenue Generating 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- i 

- 

Investment properties 


69 579 

6g347l 

51413 

71765 

- 

71765 


57 76gj 

61 234 

Operational Buildings 


963 503 

1 051 780 

1 244 691 

1 104 369 


1 104 369 

1 319 372 

1 398 535 

1 482 447 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

i 

- 

Other Assets 


963 503 

1 051 780 

1 244 691 

1 104 369 

- 

1 104 369 

1 319 372 

1 398 535 

1 482 447 

Biological or Cultivated Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Servitudes 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Licences and Rights 


1632 

1279 

2 025 

1 343 


1 343 

2147 

2 276 

2 412 

Intangible Assets 


1632 

7279] 

2 025 

1343 

- 

1343 

2147 | 

2 276] 

2412 

TOTAL ASSET REGISTER SUMMARY - PPE (WDV) 

5 

3 057 917 

2 980 846 

3 512 974 

3 129 888 

- 

3143177 

3 723 753“ 

! 3 947 178 

\ 4 184 009 

EXPENDITURE OTHER ITEMS 











Depreciation 

7 

278 171 

265 602 

268 475 

280 100 

- 

280 100 

270 000 

286 200 

303 372 

Repairs and Maintenance bv Asset Class 

3 

461 075 

107 031 

106 738 

82 230 

- 

82 230 

59 450 

63 017 

66 798 

Roads Infrastructure 


38 384 

70 992 

53 314 

33 400 

- 

33 400 

25 000 

26 500 

28 090 

Storm water Infrastructure 


- 

- 

- 

5 000 

- 

5 000 

3 000 

3 180 

3 371 

Electrical Infrastructure 


28176 

22 501 

20 365 

30 300 

- 

30 300 

24 000 

25 440 

26 966 

Sanitation Infrastructure 


- 

- 

17 808 

3 000 

- 

3 000 

3 000 

3 180 

3 371 

Infrastructure 


66 560 

93 492 1 

91487 

71700 

- 

71 700 

55 000 

58 300 

61 798 

Community Facilities 


181 

501 

126 

1000 

- 

1000 

500 

530 

562 

Sport and Recreation Facilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Community Assets 


181 

501 

126 

1000 

- 

1000 

500 

530 

562 

Heritage Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

Investment properties 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

! 

- 

Operational Buildings 


391 516 

7 603 

2 386 

3 000 

- 

3 000 

1500 

1 590 

1685 

Housing 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

i 

Other Assets 


391 516 

7 603 1 

2 386 

3 000 

- 

3 000 

1 500 1 

1 590 j 

1685 

Intangible Assets 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

Computer Equipment 


107 

416 

118 

2 000 

- 

2 000 

100 

106 

112 

Furniture and Office Equipment 


- 

1890 

11471 

300 

- 

300 

50 

53 

56 

Machinery and Equipment 


- 

- 

127 

400 

- 

400 

- 

- 

- 

Transport Assets 


2 711 

3129 

1023 

3 830 

- 

3 830 

2 300 

2 438 

2 584 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE OTHER ITEMS 


739 246 

372 633 

375 212 

362 330 

- 

362 330 

329 4501 

349 217 

370 170 

Renewal and upgrading of Existing Assets as % of total capex 

4,4% 

0,0% 

0,0% 

10,6% 

0,0% 

10,6% 

5,1% 

7,1% 

14,9% 

Renewal and upgrading of Existing Assets as % ofdeprecn 

3,2% 

0,0% 

0,0% 

10,3% 

0,0% 

10,3% 

4,4% 

5,7% 

j 12,9% 

R&M as a % of PPE 


15,4% 

3,0% 

3,1% 

2,7% 

0,0% 

2,7% 

1,6% 

1,6% 

1,6% 

Renewal and upgrading and R&M as a % of PPE 


15,0% 

4,0% 

3,0% 

4,0% 

0,0% 

4,0% 

2,0% 

2,0% 

3,0% 


Explanatory notes to Table A9 - Asset Management 

1. Table A9 provides an overview of municipal capital allocations to building new assets and 
renewal of existing assets, as well as spending on repairs and maintenance by asset class. 

2. At this stage spending on repairs and maintenance cannot be reflected by asset class due to the 
misalignment of the existing asset classes with the plant maintenance asset classes on the 
financial system. To ensure compliance the Municipality will embark on an asset creation 
project which will be finalised over a couple of years. 


157 




































OVERVIEW OF BUDGET FUNDING 


Breakdown of operating revenue over the medium term 




Medium Term Revenue & Expenditure Framework |( 

Description 

Budget 

Year 

2018/19 


Budget 
Year +1 
2019/20 


Budget 
Year +2 
2020/21 



R'OOO 

% 

R’OOO 

% 

R’OOO 

% 

Rates & Taxes 

207 596 

15% 

220 052 

15% 

233 255 

15% 

Service 
charge s 

540 260 

40% 

572 676 

39% 

607 036 

39% 

Interest 

revenue 

36 608 

3% 

38 804 

3% 

41 133 

3% 

Transfers 
recognised - 
operational 

547 804 

40% 

597 768 

41% 

647 753 

41% 

Other own 

revenue 

31 404 

2% 

33 288 

2% 

35 286 

2% 

TOTAL 

OPERATING 

REVENUE 

1 363 672 

ioo% 

1 462 588 

ioo% 

1 564 463 

ioo% 


Revenue to be generated from property rates is R207.5 million in the 2018/19 financial year and 
increases to R220 million by 2019/20 and R 233.3 million by 2020/21 which represents an average of 
15 per cent of the operating revenue base of the municipality. It increases by 6% over the medium- 
term. In addition, there are still outstanding objections. 

Services charges relating to electricity, water, sanitation and refuse removal constitutes the biggest 
component of the revenue basket of the municipality totalling R540.3 million for the 2018/19 financial 
year and increasing to R607 million by 2020/21. For the 2018/19 financial year services charges 
amount to 40 per cent of the total revenue base and grows by 6 per cent per annum over the medium- 
term. This growth can mainly be attributed to the increase in the bulk prices of electricity and other 
tariff charges. 

Operational grants and subsidies amount to R547.8 million, R597.7 million and R647.7 million for 
each of the respective financial years of the MTREF, or 40 per cent of operating revenue. It needs to be 
noted that in real terms the grants receipts from national government are growing rapidly over the 
MTREF by 8% average. 

Interest revenue contributes to 3% of the total operating amounting to R36.6 million, R38.8 million 
and R41.1 million for the respective three financial years of the 2018/19 MTREF. 


158 




Breakdown of the capital revenue for MTREF 


1 - 

2018/19 MTREF | 

CAPITAL GRANTS 

Original 

Budget 

2017/18 


Budget Year 
2018/19 

% 

Budget Year+1 
2019/20 

% 

Budget Year+2 
2020/21 

% 

Funded bv: 


1 

National Government 

215 732 

79% 

223 321 

97% 

231 963 

100% 

263 435 

100% 

Internally generated funds 

56700 

21% 

7 000 

3% 


0% 


0% 

Total Capital Funding 

272 432 

100% 

230 321 

100% 

231963 

100% 

263 435 

100% 


Capital grants and receipts from national government equals to 97 per cent of the total funding source 
which represents R230.3 million for the 2018/19 financial year and 3% of internally generated funds 
intended for yellow fleet, it increases by 1% to R232 million by 2019/20, further increases to R263.4 
million by 2020/21 which is 14%. Grants from national sources are the only significant funding source 
for the 2019/20 to 2021/22 Capital Budget. 


159 













ANNUAL BUDGETS OF MUNICIPAL ENTITY (MALUTI-A-PHOFUNG WATER (SOC) Ltd 


MAP WATER BUDGET 2018/19 MTREF 


DESCRIPTION 

ORIGINAL 

FINAL BUDGET 

FINAL BUDGET 

FINAL BUDGET 

BUDGET 

2018/19 

2019/20 

2020/21 

EXPENDITURE 


SALARIES AND ALLOWANCES 

112 548 335 

132 946 882 

136 074 292 

145 806 537 

REMUNERATION OF BOARD OF 
DIRECTORS 


474 531 

506 733 

519 054 

REPAIRS &MAINTENANCE 

12 449 867 


- 

- 

DEPRECIATION 

4 900 000 

940 404 

987 424 

1 036 796 

FINANCE CHARGES 

- 

3 959 596 

4 989 902 

5 085 892 

CONTRACTED SERVCES 

- 

8 841 839 

6 212 425 

5 058 750 

BULK PURCHASES 

29 549 500 

31 596 347 

33 740 506 

34 560 923 

OTHER EXPENDITURE 

48 468 555 

46 518 910 

67 582 451 

70 530 468 

SUB-TOTAL EXPENDITURE 

207 916 256 

225 278 508 

250 093 733 

262 598 420 

REVENUE 


WATER 

-63 989 256 

-66 897 012 

-76 507 222 

-79 744 456 

SANITATION 

-28 387 000 

-31 087 496 

-38 641 871 

-39 821 145 

OPERATING GRANTS AND SUBSIDIES 

- 

- 

- 

- 

EQUITABLE SHARE 

-115 540 000 

-127 094 000 

-134 719 640 

-142 802 818 

OTHER INCOME 

- 

-200 000 

-225 000 

-230 000 

TOTAL REVENUE 

-207 916 256 

-225 278 508 

-250 093 733 

-262 598 419 

SURPLUS/ DEFICIT 

0 

-0 

0 

0 


160 










































2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 




2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 




Municipal entity services 






Expenditure Framework 

Ref. 


Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 






Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 

+12019/20 

+2 2020/21 



Household service targets (000) 










Maluti-a-Phofung Water (SOC) Ltd 


Wafer 












Piped water inside dwelling 

85488 

85488 

85420 

85488 


j 91 698 

91698 

91698 

91698 



Piped water inside yard (but not in dwelling) 

10 890 

10890 

10 881 

10 890 

- 

5 771 

5 771 

5771 

5771 


8 

Using public tap (at least min.service level) 











10 

Other water supply (at least min.service level) 












Minimum Service Level end Above sub-totel 

' 

9 96 378 

' 96l~ 

9 96378" 

f-—— 

r 97 469* 

' 97 469" 

* M 

" 97 W 


9 

Using public tap (< min.service level) 











10 

Other water supply (< min.service level) 

No water supply 

3850 

3 850 

3 927 

3 850 

- 

13283 

13283 

13283 

13283 



Below Minimum Service Level sub-totel 

r 3850 

9 3 850' 

' 3 927 


r 

rnw 

r n32f 

r ~l328f 

r "T3283‘ 



Total number of households 

100 228 

100 228 

100 228 

100 228 

- 

1 110 752 

110 752 

110 752 

110 752 

Maluti-a-Phofung Water (SOC) Ltd 


Senitetion/sewem: 












Flush toilet (connected to sewerage) 

35 642 

35642 

35 642 

35642 


32 893 

32 893 

32 893 

32 893 



Flush toilet (with septic tank) 

2 633 

2633 

2 633 

2 633 

- 

2104 

2104 

2104 

2104 



Chemical toilet 

2 099 

2099 

2 099 

2 099 

- 

5473 

5473 

5473 

5473 



Pit toilet (ventilated) 

21900 

21900 

21900 

21900 

- 

23497 

23497 

23497 

23497 



Other toilet provisions (> min.service level) 

33 600 

33600 

33 600 

33600 

- 

43 293 

43 293 

43293 

43293 



Minimum Service Level end Above sub-totel 

95 874 

95874 

95 874 

95874 

- 

j 107 260 

107 260 

107260 

107260 



Bucket toilet 

- 

- 










Other toilet provisions (< min.service level) 

2154 

2154 

2154 

2154 

- 

1600 

1600 

1600 

1600 



No toilet provisions 

2 200 

2 200 

2 200 

2 200 

- 

j 1865 

1865 

1865 

1865 



Below Minimum Service Level sub-totel 

4 354 

4 354™ 

4 354 

4 354 

- 

3465" 

3465~ 

3465“ 

3465 



Total number of households 

100 228 

100228 

100 228 

100 228 


i 110 725 

110 725 

110725 

110725 










2018/19 Medium Term Revenue & 




2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

Current Year 2017/18 




Detail of Free Basic Services (FBS) provided 






Expenditure Framework 




Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Original 

Adjusted 

j Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 







Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2018/19 

+12019/20 

+2 2020/21 

Electricity 

Ref. 

Locetion of households for each type of FBS 












Formal settlements ■ (50 kwh per indigent 










50kWh - Free to all registered indigents 


household per month Rands) 

45048477 

15 177000 

10 658 035 

10492278 

- 

10492 278 

1 925 700 

2 041 242 

2 163717 



Number of HH receiving this type of FBS 

100 228 

70228 

25 295 

19917 

- 

19917 

36 680 

38514 

40 825 

Water 

Ref. 

Locetion of households for each tvoe of FBS 












Formal settlements ■ (6 kilolitre per indigent 










6 kl ■ Free to all registered indigents 


household per month Rands) 

2798470 

20 221 776 

17138 

22 601 971 


22 601 971 

1 886 086 

25 395575 

26 919310 



Number of HH receiving this type of FBS 

5 706 

36955 

36 955 

26 528 


26 528 

36 680 

38514 

40 825 

Sanitation 

Ref. 

Locetion of households for each type of FBS 












Formal settlements ■ (free sanitation service to 






: 

f 

r 

r 

Registered indigents 


indigent households) 

4915 934 

5 108441 

4253 229 

4 602 609 


4 602609 

824 486 

873955 

926392 



Number of HH receiving this type of FBS 

5 706 

5594 

5 594 

4518 


| 4518 

6 832 

' 7174 

9 7604 

Refuse Removal 

Ref. 

Locetion of households for each type of FBS 












Formal settlements ■ (removed once a week to 






1 

r 

r 

r 

Per month for one refuse removal per week ■ Registered indigr 

indigent households) 

5 164 297 

5 366212 

3600 868 

4 861 505 


i 4 861 505 

647 264 

686 100 

727265 



Number of HH receiving this type of FBS 

5 706 

5594 

5 594 

4518 



6 832 

f 7174 

9 7604 


Total cost of FBS ■ Refuse Removal for informal settlements 

* 

f 

t 

f 

f 

! 

r 

f 



161 


















































F.8 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 


Strategic Objective: Create an environment that promotes development of the local economy and 
facilitate job creation. 

Intended Outcome: Improved municipality economic viability. 


Official employment status within MAP according to Gender 


Employment status 

Male 

Female 

Total 

Employed 

26614 

26254 

52867 

Unemployed 

16129 

21873 

38002 

Discouraged work- seeker 

7039 

11340 

18379 

Other not economically active 

42274 

56774 

99048 

Age less than 15 years 

0 

0 

0 

Not applicable 

61153 

66335 

127488 

Total 

153209 

182575 

335784 

Unemployment rate 

37.7 

45.4 

41.8 


Source: Statistics South Africa, Census 2011 


Job creation initiatives 


Project Name 

No. of people 
employed 

Project Description 

Current Status 

Facilitate the establishment 
of Harrismith logistic hub 
(MAP SEZ) 

Estimated (29 900) 

Intermodal and Multi- 
nodal Harrismith 
Logistics Hub 

The project was launched by 
the President on the 24 th April 
2017. The implementation 
phase is in progress. 

Facilitation on upgrading 
and development of 
existing taxi ranks 

50 Men 

150 Youth 

80 Women 

Construction of new 
Taxi Ranks 

Construction work in progress 
for both Phuthaditjhaba and 
Intabazwe ranks. 

Wholesale and Retail Seta 

26 SMMES 

Women = 19 

Man = 7 

Basic Management 
and Accredited 

Course 

26 SMMEs received training 
and for 10 days in business 
management. 

LG SETA 

100 participants 
were employed on : 

- Plumbing 

Welding 

Motor 

Mechanic 

Spray 

Painting 

Three years Artisan 
Project 

Project implementation phase 
in progress 

Poultry (Layers) Farming 

4 

Layer House to carry 
3000 amberlink layers 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 


6 

Support of the 
existing layer 


Feedlot 

6 

Intensive animal 
feeding establishment 
used in animal 
farming for finishing 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 


162 





Fencing and Water Storage 
Implements 

5 

Providing of equipment 
and material required for 
farm(s) with the aim of 
attaining production 
efficiency e.g. windmills, 
5000 litre Jo Jo Tanks, 
Solar Systems etc. 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 

Dairy Farming 

8 

Purchasing of 15 
gestating Ayrshire cows 
and equipment 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 

Fodder Bank 

7 

Grazing management 
System that includes the 
cultivation of pasture, 
harvesting of pasture, 
baling and storage; in the 
preparation for droughts, 
floods, veld fires etc. 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 

Vegetable Garden 

35 

River Valley Garden that 
requires a Travelling 

Gun Irrigation System 
for cultivating potatoes, 
and the renovation of a 
tunnel that got damaged 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 

Backyard Gardens 

38 

Development of 38 
backyard gardens to 
promote food security 
among individual 
households and groups. 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 

Farm Produce Market 

50 

A Farmers Market is a 
predominantly fresh food 
market that operates 
regularly within a 
community, at a focal 
public location that 
provides a suitable 
environment for farmers 

The project is at conceptual 
phase 

Biogas Project for Rural 
Households 

60 

The Maluti-A-Phofung 
Local Municipality 
identified the need of 
reducing the use of 
electricity by considering 
the concept of installing 
bio-digestible system 

The project is at conceptual 
phase 

Bio-resources Centre 
including Skills and 

Training Facilities 

10 

Establishment of a centre 
that will specialise in the 
collection of data 
concerning climatology 
(including a weather 
station), soil 

The project is at conceptual 
phase 


163 






classifications, soil and 
water conservation, 
botanical species, 
entomology studies etc. 


Orchard 

50 

A piece of enclosed land 
planted with fruit trees, 
specialising in temperate 
fruits. 

The project is at conceptual 
phase 

Constructors Development 
Program 

15 

Commit available 
resources to develop 
previously disadvantaged 
emerging constructors in 
order to increase their 
CIDB Grading, capacity, 
sustainability, quality & 
performance 

The project has been 
launched 

Facilitated the 
establishment of 
Qwaqwa Guest 

House 

Total = 120 

Women = 66 

• Youth = 

78 

• Disability = 

0 

• Youth F = 

43 

• Youth M = 

35 

Design and construct a 
guest house (lodge) with 
associated amenities. 

This includes an entrance 
gate, Restaurant, chalets 
with necessary access 
and services 

Construction work is in 
progress. The project is 
having challenges with 
regard to the provision of 
water and electricity 

FS-Qwaqwa 
Environmental 
Education Centre 

Estimated =185 

Women = 101 

Youth =121 

Youth F = 67 

Youth M = 54 

People with 
Disability = 0 

This project is about the 
establishment of 
Environmental Education 
Centre that will provide 
community with access 
to information that 
includes Environmental 
Management, Eco- 
Tourism, Arts and 

Culture 

The project is partially 
completed and practical 
handover was done to the 
municipality 

FS-Upgrade of 
access road to 
sentinel hiking 
trails. 

Estimated =150 
Women = 83 

Youth = 97 

Youth F = 53 

Youth M = 44 

People with 
Disability = 0 

This project is about the 
upgrading of sentinel 
hiking trails, 
accommodation 
facilities, coffee shop and 
establishment of picnic 
site 

Construction work in 
progress 

Scholar Patrol 

Project 

Total = 45 

Women = 25 

Youth = 29 

Youth F =16 

Youth M = 13 

Assisting school kids on 
pedestrian crossing 

The project is In progress 


164 




Maluti -a- Phofung 
EPWP 

1850 (50 per ward, 
complexes and 
hospitals) 

Women = 1100 
Youth = 1300 

Youth F = 715 
Youth M = 585 
People with 
Disability = 0 

Cleaning and 
beautification 

The project is on the 
implementation phase 

Cash for waste 

350 (10 per wards) 
Women = 96 

Youth = 114 

Youth F = 63 

Youth M = 51 

People with 
Disability = 0 

Working on waste 

The project is in progress. 

Mayoral project 

205 (all wards) 
Women =113 

Youth = 133 

Youth F = 74 

Youth M = 59 

People with 
Disability = 0 

Maintenance 

The project is in progress. 

Cleaning and 
Beautification of 
Cemeteries 

105 

Cleaning and 
beautification of 
cemeteries 

The project is in progress 

Grass Cutting 

Project 

100 

Cutting grass around 
Maluti-a- Phofung 

The project is in progress 

Home base care 

105 

Assisting elderly people 

The project is in progress 


165 




SECTION G 


166 



G.l. DEVELOPMENTAL STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES 


Subsequent to consultative meetings municipality embarked in with elected leaders, municipal 
administration, communities and stakeholders, municipality agreed to the following developmental 
priorities that should be achieved in the next five years. These development priorities are steeped 
within the overall cluster system of government. 


Strategic 

Objective 

No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Promotion of local economic development and tourism 

LED, SMME, Environment, Tourism and Agriculture 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SONLED 1 

To draw new 

investment in the 

area 

Create incentives for new 
investments 

Number of new investments attracted 

Development of 

Investment Policy 

Number of policies developed 

Development of by laws 

Number of Bylaws developed 

Development of sector 
strategies and reviewing 

Number of sector strategies 

developed and reviewed 

Facilitate infrastructure 
projects 

Number of infrastructure projects 
facilitated (taxi ranks, shopping mall) 

SONLED 2 

To facilitate 

industrial 

development in the 
region 

Retain and implement 
agro-projects and 

businesses 

Number of companies retained 

Support emerging farmers 
and small scale farmers 

Number of emerging farmers and 
small scale farmers supported 

Formalise small scale 
mining companies 

Number of companies expanded 

SONLED 3 

To expand the 

manufacturing sector 
in the region 

Retain and support 

existing companies in the 
sector 

Number of companies retained and 
supported 

Establish new companies 
in the sector 

Number of new entrants into the 

sector 

SONLED 4 

To strengthen the 
institutional capacity 
of SMME’s and 
increase the number 
of viable emerging 
businesses 

Conduct capacity building 
programmes 

Number of SMMEs capacity 
building programmes conducted 

Support previously 

disadvantaged individual’s 
businesses to develop and 
expand 

Number of viable emerging 
businesses assisted 

Promote buying locally 

Number of networking sessions 
facilitated 

SONLED 5 

To facilitate 

expansion of the 
agricultural sector in 
the region 

Identify new agricultural 
projects 

Number of new agricultural projects 
identified 

Retain and expand existing 
agricultural projects 

Number of agricultural projects 
retained 

Implement farming 

projects 

Number of farming projects 
implemented 

Support farms on basic 
infrastructure 

Number of farms assisted on basic 
infrastructure 


167 




Strategic 

Objective 

No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Promotion of local economic development and tourism 

LED, SMME, Environment, Tourism and Agriculture 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SONLED 6 

To facilitate the 
expansion of mining 
beneficiation sector 
in the region 

Conduct capacity building 
programmes for small 
scale miners 

Number of small scale miners 
capacity building programmes 
conducted 

Facilitate infrastructure 

development 

Number of infrastructure 

development facilitated (stalls) 

Develop tourism products 

Number of tourism products 
developed 

Facilitate tourism 

infrastructure 

Number of tourism infrastructure 
facilitated 

SONLED 7 

To market Maluti-a- 
Phofung as tourism 
destination 

Review Tourism Sector 
Plan 

Number of marketing material 
developed and distributed 

Attract tourists to MAP 

area 

Number of tourism events attended 

Conduct tourism events in 
MAP area 

Number of tourism events 
organised and marketing materials 
exhibited 


Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 

Priority Need: Roads, bridges, storm water channels, electricity, water, sanitation and 
waste 

Municipal Infrastructure 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SONSDR 1 

To accelerate the 
delivery of 

infrastructure 
services 

Development of pavement 
system and construction of 
new roads, bridges and 
networks 

Number of total km paved road 
developed and bridges constructed 

Provide proper fencing 
and infrastructure to 

cemeteries 

Number of cemeteries provided 
with proper fencing and 

infrastructure 

Provide new sport indoor 
facilities 

Number of new sport indoor 
facilities built 

Upgrading of stadia 

facilities 

% of stadia facilities upgraded 

Facilitate development of 
new taxi rank 

Number of taxi rank development 
facilitated 

SONSDE 2 

To upgrade and 
expand electricity 
network 
reticulation 

Maintain electricity 
infrastructure 

Number of routine electricity 
maintenance conducted per quarter 

Expand household 

connections 

Number of household electricity 
connections 

Provide public lighting 

Number of high mast lights 
installed 


168 





Strategic KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY _ 

Objective No. Priority Need: Roads, bridges, storm water channels, electricity, water, sanitation and 

waste _ 

Municipal Infrastructure _ 



Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SONSDE 3 

To improve customer 
care 

Attendance to 

complaints 

Number of complaints attended to per 
month 

SONSDW 4 

To enable the 
development of water 

Expand bulk water 
network 

Number of bulk water expanded 


reucuidiion dnu 
supply to community 

Facilitate household 
connections 

Number of households with water 
connections 

SONSDW 5 

To upgrade water 
treatment plants 

Upgrading water 

treatment plants 

Number of water treatment plants 
upgraded 

SONSDS 6 

To upgrade sanitation 
bulk network 

Improve planning of 
sewer network 

% of improvement on sewer network 



Upgrade sanitation 

bulk network 

% of 
network 

upgrading sanitation bulk 



Manage sewer 

network 

% of managing sewer network 
quarterly 

SONSDS 7 

To install and 
upgrade sanitation 
reticulation network 
with specific focus to 

Install sanitation 
reticulation network 
with specific focus to 
rural 

Numbei 
network 
to rural 

r of sanitation reticulation 
: installed with specific focus 


rural 

Upgrade sanitation 
reticulation network 
with specific focus to 
rural 

Number of sanitation reticulation 
network upgraded with specific focus 
to rural 

SONSDEN 8 

Environmental and Waste 


To promote 

compliance to 

Manage the landfill sites 

% of landfill sites 

management 


environmental 
legislation, policies 

and bylaws 

Review Strategic 

Environmental Management 
Plan 

Number of strategic 

Environmental Management 
Plan reviewed 



Develop Air 

Management plans 

Quality 

Number of Air Quality 
Management Plans developed 



Review environmental 

Management policies 

Number of Environmental 
Management Policies 

reviewed 



Develop Air 

Management bylaws 

Quality 

Number of Air Quality 
Management bylaws 

developed 

SONSDEN 9 

To ensure that 

pollution (air, water 
and soil) are 

minimized to 

Report on emergency incidents 

Number of emergency 

incidents reported 


acceptable national 

standard in order to 

Conduct Cleanest 

competition 

Ward 

Number of cleanest ward 
competition conducted 


preserve environment 


169 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 

Priority Need: Roads, bridges, storm water channels, electricity, water, sanitation and 
waste 

Environmental and Waste 

SONSDEN 10 

To increase awareness 
by educating 
communities about 
environmental issues, 
and how to preserve 
the environment 

Conduct awareness campaigns 
and educational programmes 
for communities 

Number of workshops 

organized on environmental 
issues 

Develop waste management 
and illegal dumping bylaws 

% on progress of developing 
waste management and illegal 
dumping bylaws 

SONSDEN 11 

To implement 
Expanded Public 

Works Programme 
(EPWP) 

Implement EPWP projects 

Number of EPWP projects 
implemented 

SONSDEN 12 

To improve waste 
removal 

Implement a programme for 
the disposal of domestic waste 
and commercial services to 
industrial and business 

customers 

% on progress for disposal pf 
domestic waste and 

commercial services to 

industrial and business 

customers quarterly 

Update and maintain waste 
collection 

Number of reports on updated 
wasted collection equipment 


Housing and Spatial Development Planning 

SONSDHSS1 

To prevent and 
eradicate all 
informal settlements 

Formalize structures on un¬ 
proclaimed areas 

Number of illegal structures 
formalized 

Reallocate structures on un¬ 
proclaimed areas 

Number of illegal structures 
re-allocated 

SONSDHSS 2 

To facilitate access 
to subsistence and 
commercial farming 

Facilitate access to subsistence 
and commercial farming 

Number of leased and utilized 
town lands and camps 

SONSDHSS 3 

To secure tenure 
rights for all in MAP 

Issue title deeds to relevant 
community 

Number of title deeds given 
out through discount benefit 
scheme and registration of 
new title deeds 

SONSDHSS 4 

To enhance revenue 

Selling of sites 

Number of sites sold 

Charging building plans 

Number of building plans 
approved 

Relaxation and encroachment 

Number of towers approved 

Rezoning 

Number of rezoning approved 

Sub-division 

Number of sub-division 
approved 

SONSDHSS 5 

To manage 
advertisement space 
monthly 

Ensure monitoring over new and 
old advertisement boards billed 
accordingly 

Number of new and old 
advertisement boards 

monitored and billed 

(billboards) 

Ensure monitoring over old 
advertisement billed boards ( 
posters) 

Number of billboards billed 
(posters) 

SONSDHSS 6 

To improve access to 
land property 

Survey sites in MAP for town 
establishment 

Number of planned and 
surveyed sites approved 

SONSDHSS 7 

To facilitate land use 
and land 

Municipal Planning Tribunal 
(MPT) making determination on 

Number of applications 
approved and disapproved 


170 





management 

all matters related to applications 


Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY 

Priority Need: Safety and security 

Public safety and security 

SOBNBSDPS 8 

To create a safe and 
secured environment 

Conduct regular roadblock 

Number of regular 

roadblocks conducted 

Install speed traps to reduce 
road accident and fatalities 

% of road accidents and 
fatalities reduction in MAP 

Install CCTV cameras for 
animal theft and criminal 
activities 

Number of CCTV cameras 
installed 

Establish animal pounds 

Number of animal pounds 
established 

Impound stray animals 

Number of stray animals 
impounded 

Conduct fire safety inspections 
on buildings 

Number of fire inspections 
conducted on buildings 

SOBNBSDPS 9 

To review Disaster 
Management Plan 

Conduct consultative meetings 

Number of consultative 
meetings held 

SOBNBSCOMIO 

To provide 

municipal 

cemeteries 

Provision of graves 

Number of graves provided 

Develop electronic burial 

register systems 

Number of electronic burial 
register developed 

Develop Cemetery Master Plan 

Number of cemetery master 
plans developed 

SOBNBSCOM11 

To improve waste 
removal services 

Collecting and disposing 

commercial waste 

% of commercial waste 
collected and disposed 

Collecting and disposing 

business customers waste 

% of business customers 
waste collected and disposed 

Reporting on waste collection 
equipment upgraded 

Number of reports on waste 
collection equipment 
upgraded 

Review Integrated Waste 

Management Master Plans 

Number of Integrated Waste 
Management Master Plans 
reviewed 


171 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Priority Need: Financial Accountability & Clean Audit 

Financial Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNMFV1 

To enhance 

revenue 

collection 

Review the reliability of 
existing pay-points 

Number of increased pay points by 30 
June 2018 

Provide adequate vending 
stations to maximize 

collection of billed revenue 

Increased number of vending stations 

Introduce incentives, issue 
accounts on time and regular 
follow ups on debtors 

% increase in the collection rate on 
rates and taxes and other service 
charges (Bills against Receipts) 

Conduct Revenue 

enhancement campaigns 

Number of revenue enhancement 
campaigns conducted 

Installation of smart prepaid 
meters 

Number of smart prepaid meters 
installed 

Installation of conventional 

meters 

Number of conventional meters 
installed 

Sealing of electricity meters 

Number of sealed electricity meters 

Conduct Supplementary 

Valuation roll to 

accommodate property 

changes 

Number of supplementary valuation 
roll conducted 

Disconnections issued on 
outstanding debtors 

Number of electricity disconnections 
issued 

Registering of indigents 

Number of indigents registered 

Verify the employment 
status of registered indigents 
to ensure that the indigent 
grant is used for the 
intended purpose 

Number of verified registered 
indigents 

SOBNMFV2 

To ensure 
compliance to 
budgetary 
processes 

Compilation of Budget 
Process Plan in accordance 
with section 21(l)(b) of the 
MFMA No. 56 of 2003 

Approved IDP and Budget Process 
Plan by Council 

Compilation of Draft 

Budget in accordance with 
section 16(2)(1) of the 
MFMA No. 56 of 2003 

Draft Budget noted by Council on 31 st 
March 

Compilation of the annual 
Budget in accordance with 
section 24(1) of the MFMA 
No. 56 of 2003 

Final Budget book approved by 
Council 31 st May 

Conduct budget consultative 
meetings with different 
stakeholder in accordance 
with section 23(l)(a-b) of 
the MFMA No. 56 of 2003 

Number of budget consultative 
meetings with stakeholders 

(Traditional leaders, Business people, 
community, etc) held. 


172 




Strategic 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Objective No. 

Priority Need: Financial Accountability & Clean Audit 

Financial Services 


Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNMFV3 

To ensure the 
safeguarding and 
proper recording 
of assets 

Ensure that GRAP 

compliant asset register is 
compiled and maintained 
quarterly 

Number of regular update of assets 
register 



Regular updating of loans 
and investments on the 
financial system on 

monthly basis 

Number of update on loans and 
investments 



Receipt of insurance 
claims as and when they 
appear 

% of insurance claims actually 
received 



Recording and submission 
of insurance claims as and 
when they appear 

% of insurance claims properly 
recorded and submitted timeously 



Educate the municipal 
employees and councillors 
on the importance of FAR 
policies and procedures in 
terms of movement 

Number of financial workshops 
conducted on FAR policies and 
procedures 

SOBNMFV4 

To ensure 
compliance to 
statutory 
reporting 
deadlines 

Compilation and submission 
of annual financial 

statements to council, auditor 
general and government 
institutions two months after 
the end of the financial year 

Number of AFS to be submitted to 
Auditor General by 31 August 2018 



Ensure compliance with 
VAT Legislation 

Number VAT Returns submitted to 
SARS 



Submission of financial 
reports to management and 
other relevant stakeholders 
by no later 10 working days 
after the end of each month. 

Number of section 71 reports 
submitted to Mayor and National 
Treasury 



Submission of financial 
quarterly reports to Council 
and other relevant 

stakeholders by no later 30 
working days after the end of 
each quarter 

Number of quarterly reports (section 
52d, 66 and ll(4)(a) submitted to 
Council and National Treasury 


173 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Priority Need: Financial Accountability & Clean Audit 

Financial Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNMFV5 

To improve 
budgetary 
processes and 
controls 

Compilation of the creditors 
age analysis by continually 
requesting statements from 
suppliers 

Number of monthly reports on 
preparation monthly creditors 

reconciliations to the Accounting 
Officer 

Compilation and 

submission of quarterly 
reports to Council and other 
stakeholders in accordance 
with section 32 of the 
MFMA No.56 Of 2003 

Number of quarterly reports on 
compliance with Supply Chain 
Management Policy to Council 

Compilation and 

consolidation of 

procurement plans as 

guided by National treasury 

Number of consolidations of the 
Procurement Plans 

SOBNMFY6 

To develop 
Revenue 
enhancement 
strategy 

Develop the Revenue 
Enhancement Strategy 
documents 

Number of Revenue enhancement 
Strategy documents developed 

SOBNMFV 7 

To acquire and 
implement 
mSCOA system 

Acquire mSCOA 

compliant Financial 

systems 

Number of mSCOA compliant 
Financial systems acquired 

SOBNMFV 8 

To ensure 
Standardized 
system of controls 

Develop operating 

procedure manuals 

Number of operating procedure 
manuals developed 

SOBNMFV 9 

To enhance 
relations with 
stakeholders 

Conduct regular meetings 
with stakeholders 

Number of regular meetings held with 
stakeholders 

SOBNMFV 10 

To attend to all 
issues of 
litigations 

Attend to all litigations 
received 

% of all litigation received and 
attended to within 30 days 

SOBNMFV 11 

To minimise 
financial losses 
due to water 
distribution losses 

Reduce financial water 
losses due to water 
distribution losses 

% reduction in water distribution 
losses 

SOBNMFV 12 

To minimise 
financial losses 
due to electricity 
distribution losses 

Reduce electricity 

distribution losses 

% reduction in electricity distribution 
losses 

SOBNMFV 13 

To introduce flat 

rate to non¬ 
billable services 

Identify all none billable 
non indigent residents 

Number of non-billable non indigent 
residents 

SOBNMFV 14 

To ensure that 
tariff structure is 
aligned to Eskom 

Align tariff structures to 
Eskom tariffs structure 

Number of tariff structures aligned to 
Eskom tariffs structure 


174 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY 

Priority Need: Financial Accountability & Clean Audit 

Financial Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNMFV 15 

To achieve an 
improved audit 
opinion 

Achieve by improving 
audit opinion 

Work for Qualified Audit opinion 

SOBNMFY 16 

Public Safety, Transport and Security 

To optimise 
income 

Install speed traps 

Amount of traffic fines to be collected 

Conduct accredited 

training for fire fighting 

Number of students provided with 
accredited fire fighting training 


175 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND 
INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT 

Priority Need: Accountability & Clean Audit 

Municipal Manager 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNMTIAM 1 

To ensure effective 
Administrative 
management and 
coordination of strategic 
issues by all managers 

Submission of quarterly 
reports to Council 

Number of quarterly reports submitted 
to Council 

SOBNMTIAM 2 

To ensure internal 
controls through effective 
internal auditing and 
accounting practices 

Development of the 
audit plan 

Number of audit assignments 
concluded as part of Internal Audit 
Work Plan 

SOBNMTIAM 3 

To monitor risk 
management process 

Compilation of risk 
management report 
evaluating and 
improving the adequacy 
of risk management 

Number of risk management reports 
compiled to evaluate and improve the 
adequacy and effectiveness of risk 
management, control and governance 
processes 

Attendance of oversight 
committee meeting 

Number of oversight committee 
meetings attended to monitor 

activities and status reports of such 
committees 

SOBNMTIA 4 

To review the means of 
safeguarding assets and as 
appropriate verify the 
existence of such assets. 

Verification of policies 
relating to management 
of assets 

Number of policies relating to 
management of assets verified 

Verification of 

processes conducted on 
assets register 

Number of verification processes 
conducted on assets register 

SOBNMTIA 5 

To comply with SANS 
requirements with regard 
to response time 

Conduct fire safety 
inspections on buildings 

Number of fire inspections conducted 

Installation of radio 
communication 

% on progress of installation of the 
radio communication 


176 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 

Priority Need: Good Governance & Public Participation 


Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNGGPPI1 

To ensure proper 

coordination and 

management of IDP 
and performance 

review 

Reviewing of the IDP 
within prescribed 

legislative time frame 

100% of reviewed and completed IDP 
within prescribed legislative time 
frames 

Develop performance 
agreements within 

prescribed legislative 
time frame 

Number of signed performance 
agreements within prescribed 

legislative time frames. 

Development of 

SDBIPs and 

implementation 
thereof 

100% development of departmental 
SDBIP for implementation within 
prescribed legislative time frames (30 
June) 

SOBNGGPP2 

To encourage communities 
to participate in the 
activities of the 

Municipality 

Engage community 
(all 35 wards) and 
other stakeholders 

during IDP review 

Number of wards inclusive of 
stakeholders participated in IDP 
review 

SOBNGGPP3 

To ensure effective 

Administrative 
management and 

coordination of strategic 
issues by all managers 

Compilation of 

quarterly performance 
reports for submission 
to Council 

Compliance reports developed and 
submitted to Council 

SOBNGGPP 4 

To ensure the compilation 
of the budget in terms of 
the budget process 

(MFMA) 

Engage community 
(all 35 wards) and 
other stakeholders 

during Budget review 

Number of wards inclusive of 
stakeholders participated in the budget 
review (Rep Forum, Local 

stakeholders forum, etc) 

SOBNGGIA 5 

To ensure the reliability 
and integrity of financial 
and operating information 

Compile Internal audit 
reports 

Number of internal audit reports issued 

SOBNGGIA 6 

To monitor compliance 
with policies, plans, 

procedures, laws and 
regulations 

Compile Internal audit 
reports 

Number of internal audit reports issued 

SOBNGGIA 7 

To ensure that the 
Municipality’s functions 
are conducted efficiently, 
effectively and 

economically 

Compile Internal audit 
reports 

Number of internal audit reports issued 

SOBNGGIA 8 

To ensure internal controls 
through effective internal 
auditing and accounting 
practices 

Conduct effective 

auditing and 

accounting practices 

Annual internal audit plan 


177 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC 
PARTICIPATION 

Priority Need: Good Governance & Public Participation 

Risk Management 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNGGR9 

To ensure that risks are 
identified and 
communicated 
throughout the 
municipality 

Submit Risk 

Management reports to 
Risk Management 

Committee 

Number of risk management reports to 
Risk Management Committee 

Coordinate risk 

management action 

plans from departments 

Number of risk management action 
plans from departments 

Perform risk 

assessments 

Number of risk assessments performed 

Conduct risk re¬ 

assessments 

Number of risk re-assessments 
conducted 

Conduct risk 

management training 

Number of risk management trainings 
conducted 

Conduct Fraud 

awareness campaign 

Number of Fraud awareness 

campaigns conducted 

Hold Risk Management 
Committee (RMC) 

meetings 

Number of RMC meetings held 

SOBNGGICT 10 

Information Technology 

To improve ICT 
governance 

Review ICT policies 
and procedures 

Number of ICT policies developed 

Enforcement of ICT 
policies and 

procedures reducing 
previous years audit 
findings responded to 

Number of previous years audit 
findings responded to 

SOBNGGICT 11 

To implement 
municipal website as 
per legislative 
requirement MFMA 

Updating information 
and publish on 

website 

% legislative compliance of 
information published on website 

Development of IT 
infrastructure and 

systems 

% of maintenance on municipal 
website 

Protecting data during 
power failures 

Number of servers protected during 
power failures 

Improve business 

continuity plans 

Number of business continuity 
plans improved 


178 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): GOOD GOVERNANCE & PUBLIC 
PARTICIPATION 

Priority Need: Good Governance & Public Participation 

Communication 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNGGCOM 1 

To develop effective 
and constant 
communication to 
encourage information 
access to communities 

Publish internal 

newsletters 

Number of internal newsletters 
published 

Conduct radio 

announcements 

Number of radio announcements 
conducted 

Facilitate media 

interviews 

Number of media interviews 
facilitated 

Facilitate media 

events 

Number of media events facilitated 

Upload website 

content 

Number of website content 
uploaded 

SOBNGGCOM 2 

To promote and 
communicate by 
creating awareness on 
municipal project in a 
coherent manner 

Communicate 
advertisements on 

Imbizos, National 

Days of importance, 
etc 

Number of advertisements on 
Imbizos, National Days of 
importance, etc communicated 

SOBNGGCOM 3 

To promote use of 
corporate identity 
manual 

Review Corporate 

Identity Manuals 

Number of Corporate Identity 
Manuals reviewed 

SOBNGGCOM 4 

To develop a 
framework for effective 
communication and 
corrective measures 

Develop 

communication 

policies 

Number of policies developed 

Review 

Communications 

strategies 

Number of communication 

strategies reviewed 

SOBNGGCOM 5 

To promote a 
relationship with media 
houses 

Undertake visits to 
media houses 

Number of visits to media houses 
undertaken 

SOBNGGCOR6 

To render an effective 
and efficient record 
management system to 
Council 

Develop records 

management policies 

Number of record management 
polices developed 

Sourcing electronic 
system for record 
keeping 

Number of electronic systems 
sourced for record keeping 

SOBNGGCOR7 

To provide Council, 
Mayoral Committee 
and Portfolio 

Committees with 
administrative support 

Providing support to 
Council, Mayoral 

Committee and 

Portfolio Committees 
with administrative 

support 

Number of meetings supported 


179 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Capacity Building and Development 

Corporate Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNICBDCR 1 

To recruit competent 
employees in order for 
the municipality to 
achieve its IDP 
objectives 

Conduct appointments 
of competent 

employees 

Number of employees appointed 

SOBNICBDCR 2 

To capacitate 
employees with 
necessary skills 

Facilitate employee 
development and 

training 

Number of employees trained 

SOBNICBDCR 3 

To maintain sound 
labour relations 

Conducting Local 

Labour Forum (LLF) 
meetings 

Number of LLF meetings held 

SOBNICBDCR 4 

To ensure a well- 
balanced and healthy 
employee workforce 

Development of 

wellness policies 

Number of wellness policies 
developed 

Organise employee 

wellness programmes 

Number of employee wellness 
programmes organised 

SOBNICBDCR 5 

To ensure that legal 
matters are 

expeditiously dealt with 

Finalising of cases 

Number of cases finalised 

SOBNICBDCR 6 

To ensure contracts are 
correct and compliant 

Develop contracts 

management policies 

Number of contracts management 
policies developed 

Enter into complaint 
contracts 

Number of complaint contracts 
entered into 

Submission of 

contract registers 

Number of contract registers 
submitted 

SOBNICBDCR 7 

To provide effective 
and efficient customer 
care services 

Develop customer 

care policies 

Number of customer care policies 
developed 

SOBNICBDCS 8 

Community Services 

To provide pauper and 
indigent burials 

Provide pauper burials 

Number of pauper burials provided 

Provide indigent 

burials 

Number of indigent burials 
provided 

Conduct stakeholders 
meetings to review 
pauper and indigent 
and pauper burial 
policy 

Number of stakeholders meetings 
to review pauper and indigent and 
pauper burial policy held 


180 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Capacity Building and Development 

Corporate Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNICBDCS 9 

To develop support 
networks for older 
persons 

Conduct 

workshops/trainings 
to develop the Local 
Older Persons Forum 
skills 

Number of workshops/trainings to 
develop the Local Older Persons 
Forum skills held 

Facilitate launching of 
Older Persons Forums 

Number of Older Persons Forums 
launched 

Develop Older 

Persons Forum Action 
plan 

Number of Older Persons Forum 
Action Plan in place 

Provide 
comprehensive 
services to Older 
Persons 

Number of Older Persons receiving 
comprehensive services 

Conduct awareness 

campaigns on Older 
Persons 

Number of awareness campaigns 
on Older Persons held 

Develop Older 

Persons Master Plans 

Number of Older Persons Master 
Plans developed. 

SOBNICBDCS10 

To reduce substance 
abuse through the Local 
Drug Action 

Committee 

Review Local Drug 
Action Plans 

Number of Local Drug Action 
Plans reviewed 

Launch Local Drug 
Action Plan 

Number of Local Action Plans 
launched 

Launch LDAC3 

Number of LDAC3 launched 

Conduct substance 
abuse awareness 

campaigns 

Number of substance abuse 
campaigns held 

Provide 
comprehensive 
services to substance 
abusers 

Number of substance abusers 
receiving comprehensive services 

Develop Drug Abuse 
Master Plans 

Number of drug master plans 
developed 

SOBNICBDCS 11 

To improve people’s 
life skill 

Conduct life skills 
programmes 

Number of life skills programs 
conducted 

SOBNICBDCS 12 

To contribute towards 
the improvement of 
education 

Provide learning 

material - study 
related to non-fiction 

Number of learning material - 
study related to non-fiction issued 

Conduct educational 
programs 

Number of educational programs 
conducted 


181 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Capacity Building and Development 

Corporate Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNICBDCS13 

To improve access to 
libraries and 
functioning of libraries 

Conduct Outreach 

programmes to 

schools, ECD Centres, 
Children’s and Old 
Age homes 

Number of Outreach programmes 
to schools, ECD Centres, 

Children’s and Old Age homes 
conducted 

Conduct user 

education to new 
members 

Number of education conducted to 
new members 

Registering new 

members as library 
members 

Number of people registering as 
new members 

Conduct Children’s 
programmes 
(readiness, festival, 

spelling bee, games, 
DVDs, toys and story 
tours) 

Number of Children’s programmes 
(readiness, festival, spelling bee, 
games, DVDs, toys and story tours) 
conducted 

Conduct youth 

programmes (poetry, 
public speaking 

sessions, etc) 

Number of youth programmes 
(poetry, public speaking sessions, 
etc) conducted 

Undertaking in-house 
users/visitors 

Number of in-house users/visitors 
attended to 

Organising Library 

Advisory Committee 
meetings 

Number of Library Advisory 
Committee meetings held 

Develop Library 

Master plans 

Number of Library Master plans 
developed 

SOBNICBDCS14 

To ensure that 
community have access 
to relevant information 

Request consignment 
lists of library 

material 

Number of consignment lists of 
library material 

Received books 

Number of books received 

Conduct online user 
satisfactory surveys 

Number user satisfactory surveys 
conducted 

Special request by 
users for unavailable 
library material 

Number special request by users for 
unavailable library material 

received 

Provide special 

computer services for 
Blind Services 

Number of special computer 
services for Blind Services 
provided 

Receiving newspapers 
and periodicals 

Number of newspapers and 
periodicals received 

Conduct stocktaking 
of Library stock 

Number of library stocking 
conducted 


182 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Capacity Building and Development 

Corporate Services 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNICBDCS15 

To raise awareness on 
the rights of women, 
children and people 
living with disabilities 

Holding information 
sessions with regard 
to women, children 
and people living with 
disabilities 

Number of information sessions 
with regard to women, children 
and people living with disabilities 
held 

Holding national 

awareness days with 
women, children and 
people living with 
disabilities 

Number of national awareness days 
with women, children and people 
living with disabilities 

Facilitating attendance 
of organisations of 
women, children and 
people living with 
disabilities to IDP 
review meetings 

Number of organisations of 
women, children and people living 
with disabilities to IDP review 
meetings who attended 

Conducting know 

your IDP campaign 
workshops 

Number of your know your IDP 
campaign workshops conducted 

SOBNICBDCS16 


Formulate policies 

with regard to 

children, women and 
people with 

disabilities 

Number of formulated and 
reviewed policies with regard to 
children, women and people with 
disabilities 

Formulate plans with 
regard to children, 
women and people 
with disabilities 

Number of formulated and 
reviewed plans with regard to 
children, women and people with 
disabilities 

Conduct programmes 
for children, women 
and people with 

disabilities 

Number of programmes for 
children, women and people with 
disabilities conducted 


Parks, Sports & Culture 

SOBNICBPA17 

To upgrade parks 

Upgrading of parks 
for recreational use 

Number of parks enhanced for 
recreational use 

SOBNICBPA18 

To maintain parks 

Maintenance of parks 

Number of parks maintained 

SOBNICBPA19 

To facilitate the 
provision of playing 
equipment to the 
community 

Facilitate provision of 
playing equipment 

Number of playing equipment to 
be acquired for different 

Recreational areas 

SOBNICBPA20 

To beautify and 
enhance urban areas 
and main roads of the 
municipality 

Planting of trees 

Number of trees planted 

Upgrading of 
landscape areas 

Number of landscape areas 
upgraded 


183 




Strategic 
Objective No. 

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA (KPA): INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

Priority Need: Capacity Building and Development 

Parks, Arts & Culture 

Objective 

Strategies 

Indicators 

SOBNICBPA21 

To introduce new 
sporting codes 

Conducting 
tournaments and 

competitions 

Number of tournaments and 
competitions facilitated and 

organized 

SOBNICBPA22 

To maintain sports and 
recreational facilities. 

Maintenance of sports 
and recreational 

facilities 

Number of sports and recreational 
facilities maintained 

SOBNICBPA23 

To promote and 
develop sound arts 
cultural activities and 
festivals to the 
community 

Facilitate sound 

cultural activities and 
festivals 

Number of arts and cultural 
activities and festivals organized 


184 




SECTION H 


185 



H. SECTOR PLANS 


H.l. STATUS OF THE SECTOR PLAN 


Sector Plan 

Available / 

Not available 

Status 

Responsible Department 

Spatial Development Framework 
(SDF) 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department of HSSDP and TL 

Integrated Housing Chapters 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department of HSSDP and TL 

Comprehensive Infrastructure Plan 
(CIP) 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department of Infrastructure 
and Electricity Services 

WSDP 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department of Infrastructure 
and Electricity Services 

Water Conservation Demand and 
Management Strategy 

Not available 

To be developed 

Department of Infrastructure 
and Electricity Services 

Electricity Master Plan 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department of Infrastructure 

and Electricity Services 

Assets Management Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Property Rates Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

SCM Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Tariff Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Virement Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Indigent Policy 

Available 

Reviewed 

Financial Services 

Code of conduct for SCM 

Not available 

To be developed 

Financial Services 

Investment and Cash management 
Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Credit control and debt policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Travel and Subsistence Policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Financial Services 

Audit and performance committee 
charter 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 

Internal Audit Charter 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 

Fraud Prevention Plan 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 

Risk management policy 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 

Communication policy and strategy 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 

ICT Security policy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Executive Services 

Back-up policy 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 

Physical Access to server room policy 

Available 

Updated 

Executive Services 


186 




Performance Management Policy 

Available 

Updated 

IDP & PMS 

Performance Management Framework 

Available 

Updated 

IDP & PMS 

LED Strategy 

Available 

Reviewed 

Department LED, SMMEs, 
Tourism & Agriculture 

Strategic Tourism Plan 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department LED, SMMEs, 
Tourism & Agriculture 

Strategic Environmental Management 
Plan (SEMP) 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department LED, SMMEs, 
Tourism & Agriculture 

Integrated Waste Management Plan 
(IWMP) 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Department LED, SMMEs, 
Tourism & Agriculture 

Work Skills plan 

Available 

Updated 

Corporate Services 

HR Manual 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Corporate Services 

Employment Equity Plan 

Not available 

To be developed 

Corporate Services 

Integrated HIV/AIDS Plan 

Available 

Reviewed 

Corporate Services 

Disaster Management Plan 

Available 

Reviewed 

Public Safety, Transport & 
Security 

Disaster contingency Plan 

Not available 

To be developed 

Public Safety, Transport & 
Security 

Local Integrated Transport Plan 

Not available 

To be developed 

Public Safety, Transport & 
Security 

Public Participation Strategy 

Available 

To be reviewed 

Speaker 

Public Participation Policy 

Available 

Reviewed 

Speaker 

Standard Operating Procedures 

Not available 

To be developed 

All departments 


H.2 Budget related municipal policies 

The following policies have been used as a basis for the preparation of the annual 
budget. 

a. Tariff policy 

The Municipal System Act (section 74) requires Council to adopt a Tariff Policy. The 
general financial management functions as stated in section 62(1) (f) of the MFMA 
also states that the municipality must have and implement the policy, when 
determining this policy specific legislation applicable to each service has been taken 
into consideration. 

b. Credit control policy 

This policy has been formulated in terms of section 96(b) and 98 of the Local 
Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000. 

c. Rates policy 

This policy is formulated in terms of section 3 of the Municipal Property Rates Policy 
Act, 2004 (Act 6 of 2004) (MPRA) 


187 




d. Supply chain management & subsistence and travelling policy 

Section 111 of the MFMA requires each Municipality and municipal entity to adopt 
and implement a supply chain management policy, which gives effect to the 
requirements of the Act. This policy is under review 

e. Indigent policy 

The objective of this policy is to assist households which are not able to service their 
municipal accounts as and when they are due and payable, as result of local 
economic, social and environmental challenges other than through negligence or 
unwillingness to pay. 

f. Budget & reporting policy 

The budget policy aims to develop, maintain processes required in developing a 
municipality budget and detailing the responsibilities of all stakeholders inclusive of 
the accounting officer, the council, the public through public participation 
programmes. 

g. Cash and investment policy 

The investment Policy deals with the management of the municipality’s surplus cash 
resources and the investment thereof. 

h. Impairment of debtors and write off policy 

The policy aims to ensure that debtors are disclosed in the annual financial 
statements at the amounts deemed to be collectable and uncollectable debt is 
written off within the guidelines of existing policies and applicable legislation 

i. Virement policy 

This policy applies only to transfers between line items within votes of the 
Municipality’s operating budget 

j. Assets policy 

This policy focuses on amongst others, effective and efficient control, utilization, 
safeguarding and management of a municipality’s property, plant and equipment. 


H.3 SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 

The Maluti-A-Phofung Spatial Development Framework 2013 forms an integral part of the 
Maluti-A-Phofung integrated development planning process. The dynamic nature of the 
Maluti-A-Phofung environment within Maluti-A-Phofung requires the continuous revision and 
refinement thereof. Maluti-A-Phofung Spatial Development Framework 2013 reviews the 
Maluti-A-Phofung SDF 2010.The aim of the Spatial Development Framework is to give 
direction to development and take into account the need for and compatibility of the main land 
uses. The purpose of the Spatial Development Framework as a land use management tool is to 
plan, direct and control development but it does not provide land use rights. The Spatial 
Development Framework forms part of the existing land use management process of the 
municipality and provides the necessary guidance of land uses at local level in order to ensure 
the application of the development principles of sustainability, integration, equality, efficiency 
and fair and good governance in order to create quality of living, investors’ confidence and 
security. 


188 



Spatial Development Objectives 


Objectives reflecting the outcomes of the analysis and issues determined by the priority spatial 
issues are identified. Objectives will indicate the desired long term result related to a specific 
aspect of the vision. Where appropriate, objectives should be measurable and expressed as key 
performance indicators that will inform the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation 
framework. 1.3.6.2 Strategic Interventions The development priorities providing focus to 
strategic development interventions support the crucial components that underlie sustainable 
development, i.e. need for basic infrastructure and development for the poor, economic growth 
and development, environmental conservation and improved livelihoods.. Development 
priorities will guide specific decisions regarding the spatial development and arrangement of 
land uses, within and between settlements to guide investment and development spending in 
the municipal area. 

Strategic interventions hinging on managing future growth and associated change in a way that 
protects natural resources, biodiversity and lifestyle values, require a highly sustainable pattern 
of development, based on efficient utilisation of land and infrastructure and tighter controls 
over ad-hoc and dispersed forms of development. The ultimate success in managing growth in 
the area depends upon the ability to adopt the best possible urban development practices and 
most suitable governance arrangements. Strategic interventions for areas of intervention (focus 
areas) will also be formulated. 

In terms of Maluti-A-Phofung Spatial Development Framework, it is cited that SDF needs to 
give effect to the developmental role of the state by: 

• Supporting the vision of the PGDS to provide economic growth and development, 
especially where it addresses job-creation and poverty reduction, in an environmentally 
sustainable manner within a spatial context and incorporating the principles of good 
governance 

Providing spatial development strategies in support of development strategies, including the 
National Growth Path, the National Development Plan, Free State Vision 2030, the FPGDS and 
the 

• Provincial Growth Path and Free State Spatial Development Framework, attending to 
priority intervention areas 

• Emphasising provincial economic growth priorities such as targeted growth areas, priority 
sectors and corridors, the creation of jobs and the eradication of poverty 

• Providing a system of accessible and interactive economic nodes supported by vibrant 
rural areas accommodating and catalysing growth and development 

• Promoting high-level spatial interactions and linkages both within the province and 
between the municipality and its neighbours, including corridor development and national 
and provincial infrastructure development plans 

• Promoting the pristine natural and cultural resources and mitigating the negative impacts of 
economic and human activities 

• Providing land for low income and affordable housing to support the delivery of housing 
units on land accessible to work and services and 

• Providing affordable and efficient public transportation 


189 



H.4 INTEGRATED MONITORING AND PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT (PMS) 


The primary result/outcome the Municipality desires to achieve by implementing a 
Performance Management System (PMS) is to progressively meet local communities’ social, 
economic and material needs and to improve the quality of their lives in a sustainable, effective 
and efficient manner. Performance Management is a system intended to manage and monitor 
service delivery progress against the identified strategic objectives and priorities. In accordance 
with legislative requirements and good business practices as informed by the National 
Framework for Managing Programme Performance Information, the municipality has 
developed and implemented a performance system of which system is constantly refined as the 
integrated planning process unfolds. PMS seeks to foster a culture of performance; increase 
accountability; encourage learning and facilitates improvement; provide early warning of under 
achievement and facilitate decision-making. The Municipality's performance management 
approach is a part of a broader system of strategic management. This strategic management 
system must ensure that the Municipality is directed through the integration of planning, 
budgeting and performance management processes. 

The municipality targets, monitors, assess and reviews organisational performance which in 
turn is directly linked to individual employee’s performance. At any given time within 
government, information from multiple years is being considered; plans and budgets for next 
year; implementation for the current year; and reporting on last year’s performance. Although 
performance information is reported publicly during the last stage, the performance information 
process begins when policies are being developed, and continues through each of the planning, 
budget, implementation and reporting stages. 

The performance of the Municipality relates directly to the extent to which it has achieved 
success in realising its goals and objectives, complied with legislative requirements and 
meeting stakeholder expectations. The Municipality therefore has adopted one integrated 
performance management system which encompasses: 

• Planning (setting goals, objectives, targets and benchmarks); 

• Monitoring (regular monitoring and checking on the progress against plan); 

• Measurement (indicators of success); 

• Review (identifying areas requiring change and improvement); 

• Reporting (what information, to whom, from whom, how often and for what purpose); and 

• Improvement (making changes where necessary). 

Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plans (SDBIPs): Internal Departments 

The SDBIP gives effect to the Integrated Development Plan and Budget of the municipality. It 
is the expression of the objectives of the MAP municipality with the expected outcomes which 
will be implemented by the administration (Directorates) within MAP municipality. It includes 
the service delivery targets and performance indicators for each quarter, which should be linked 
to the performance agreements of senior management. It facilitates oversight of financial and 
non-financial performance of the Municipality and allows the Municipal Manager to monitor 
the performance of the Directors, The Executive Mayor/ Council to monitor the performance of 
the Municipal Manager, and the community to monitor the performance of the Municipality. 


190 



The Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP) will be approved the Executive 
Mayor after the approval of the annual budget. 

In terms of section 53(1) © (ii) of the MFMA, the Service Delivery and Budget 
Implementation Plan (SDBIP) is expected to be approved by the mayor within 28 days after the 
approval of the budget and in addition, the Executive Mayor must ensure that the revenue and 
expenditure projections for each month and the service delivery targets and performance 
indicators as set out in the SDBIP are made public within 14 days after its approval 

The SDBIP must contain the following: 

o Measurable objectives, 
o Monthly Projections 
o Service delivery strategies, 
o Key outputs, 

o Performance/service delivery indicators, and 
o Performance/service delivery targets. 

These plans will be used as justification for the allocation of funds, whether it is of a capital or 
an operational nature. It is important that Portfolio Committee members are involved in the 
compilation of these operational plans to ensure that they address political aspirations. 

Detail SDBIPs will be submitted to Council after the final Budget MTREF approval. 

H.5 INTEGRATED HIV/AIDS 

The Maluti-A-Phofung HIV/AIDS strategic plan focuses its intervention on three key areas. 
The first key area is Education and Awareness which seeks to improve awareness, change 
behaviour, and promote culture of acceptance, openness and reduction in the infection rate. 
Secondly, Treatment, Care and Support seeks to ensure that People Living with HIV/AIDS 
have access to proper treatment, care and support through a continuum of care provided 
through public and private sector health care and community involvement. Lastly Care for 
Orphans and Vulnerable Children that seeks to ensure that orphans and other vulnerable 
children receive adequate care and support. In order to achieve the above the strategy proposes 
the establishment of three task teams responsible for driving the work in each of the focus 
areas. The task teams comprise of Councillors, Municipal Officials, government departments 
and Civil Society Organizations that work on the three focus areas. 

The municipality is having the unit responsible for special programmes: HIV/AIDS, Gender, 
Women, Children and People leaving with Disabilities. People leaving with disabilities are 
also employees of the municipalities in customer care unit and the unit coordinating for 
participation of people leaving with disabilities. 


191 



H.6 INTEGRATED HOUSING CHAPTERS 


Section 9 (1) of the National Housing Act, Act 107 Oof 1997, categorically states that every 
municipality must be as part of the municipality’s process of integrated development planning 
recognise the housing needs and satisfy its residents. 

One of the objectives of this Housing Chapters is to provide a critical link between integrated 
development planning and the practical reality of delivering housing projects. 

H.7 INTEGRATED LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (LED) PROGRAMME 

The aim of Local Economic Development (LED) is to create employment opportunities for 
local residents, alleviate poverty, and redistribute resources and opportunities to the benefit 
of all local residents. It is important to realise that LED is about building up the investment 
competitiveness and as such, economic development actions and incentives need to be 
conceived in a proactive manner which creates and directs change as opposed to waiting 
for changes to become inevitable and only adapting to them or waiting for some action at 
the national level to spur the overall economic development. 

Local Economic Development (LED) is an on-going process, rather than a single project or 
a series of steps to follow. It involves identifying and using local resources, ideas and skills 
to stimulate economic growth and development. 

H.8 DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN 

The purpose of the Maluti-A-Phofung LM Disaster Risk Management Plan (DRMP) is to 
document the institutional arrangements for disaster risk management planning which includes 
the assignment of primary and secondary responsibilities for priority disaster risks posing a 
threat in the Maluti-A-Phofung LM. It further provides the broad framework within which the 
departments will implement the disaster risk management planning requirements of the Act and 
other entities included in the organisational structure of the Maluti-A-Phofung LM. It 
establishes the operational procedures for disaster risk reduction planning as well as the 
emergency procedures to be implemented in the event of a disaster occurring or threatening to 
occur in council’s area. It aims to facilitate an integrated and coordinated approach to disaster 
risk management in its area of jurisdiction. 

The municipal plan is identifying all disaster risks within and has the mitigation strategies 
thereof. The municipality have the stakeholder forum: Disaster Management Advisory Forum 
and hold meetings with the District municipality as part of the Provincial Fire Services 
Advisory Committee. 

In terms of the National Veld and Forest Fire Act (Act No. 101 of 1998) as amended, Maluti-a- 
Phofung is forming part of Fire Protection Association (FPAs) and in addition to Section 6 (3) 
of the Act the Chief Fire Officer is the Fire protection Officer. 


192 



Climate change 

The effect of climate change affect the municipality as the sudden climate changing of cold 
and heat in opposite seasons of the year like snow falling in earlier than the expected 
winter season. 

Drought 

The municipality also experienced water crises from 2015 to date. Agriculture sector was 
not so highly affected as plants and fodder for cattle was available. The low water levels in 
the dams was a serious problem for supplying of water to community. The solution was 
delivering of water by Jojo tankers to people. 

H.9 WATER SERVICES DEVELOPMENT PLANS 

In terms of the Water Services Act (Act 108 of 1997) all Municipalities need to prepare a 
Water Services Development Plan (WSDP). Maluti-A-Phofung had to adhere to this legislative 
mandate. The Municipality took up this responsibility as championed by the Maluti Water. The 
Municipality ensured that the WSDP process aligned with the IDP process. This ensured that 
all the issues, objectives and projects, developed during the IDP process, formed part of the 
WSDP. It also resulted in the WSDP process providing much needed input in the IDP process 
and vice versa. 

The WSDP is completed and is available at the offices of Maluti Water. Maluti Water is a 
municipality entity which strives to ensure that drinking water and waste water meet the 
required quality standards all the time. 

In two consecutive years Maluti-A-Phofung has been nominated one of the best municipalities 
in so far as the Blue and Green drop Awards were concerned. 

H.10 COMMUNICATION STRATEGY 

Communication is a strategic and planned process aimed at supporting the implementation of 
the policy and programmes designed by the government (whether national, provincial or local) 
to better the lives of community. As the municipality is the sphere of government closest to 
communities, particular onus is placed on municipality in fulfilling a wide range of 
communication functions across the spectrum of communication such as media liaison, 
marketing, advertising and branding, direct and intensive unmediated communication, 
stakeholder management, public relations and events management. 

In terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Municipal Systems Act and the 
promotion of access to Information Act, the municipality have an obligation to provide the 
public with an open access to information about policies, programmes, services and initiatives. 
Information for public use must be disseminated by and readily available in the municipalities 
at all times. 


193 



For the municipality to meet the information needs of all its citizens it must consider the 
constitutional right of people to have access to information, create integrated communication 
system, have trained and knowledgeable staff providing information to people, ensure services 
is timely, courteous, fair, efficient and offered with all due regard for the privacy, safety, 
convenience, comfort and needs of the public. The municipality is to ensure that published 
information is available on request in multiple formats to also accommodate special groups. 


194 



SECTION I 


195 



L 


DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES, PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS 


1. BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT 
1.1 ROADS, STORM WATER AND PUBLIC TRANSPORT 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.1.1 

To accelerate the delivery of 
infrastructure services 

Develop and maintain efficient 
roads, rail and public transport 
network 

Improve and preserve national, 
provincial and local road 
infrastructure. 

Consolidate and expand 
transport and logistics 
infrastructure 

1.1.2 

To improve electricity distribution 
within the municipal area 

Improve rural public transport 
services to enhance access to 

services. 

Strengthen road traffic 
management 

Renewal of commuter rail 
fleet supported by links with 
road- based services. 

1.1.3 

To ensure quality infrastructural 
Development. 

Maintain and upgrade basic 
infrastructure at local level. 

Improve transport infrastructure 
and public transport in rural 

areas. 

Create tenure security for 
communal farmers and Better 
quality public transport 


196 




I.l.l.a ALIGNED PROJECTS AND PROGRAMMES WITH NATIONAL, PROVINCIAL MANDATES 


Project Description 

Town 

Ward 

No. 

Project Value 

MIG Value 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2018/2019 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2019/2020 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2020/2021 

Bluegumbosch: New indoor Sport and 
Recreational Facility (MIS:245891) 

Bluegumbosch 

34 

42 127 939.00 

42 127 939.00 

4 224 393.68 

1 498 518.97 


Intabazwe: Upgrading of recreational and 
sports facilities at Intabazwe Stadium 
(MIS: 264315) 

Intabazwe 

22 

58 477 702.00 

58 477 702.00 

11 763 990.21 

5 000 000.00 

2 026 334.33 

Wilge: Upgrading of the Wilge Waste Water 
Treatment Works - Phase 1 (MIS:268482) 

Wigepark 

Harrismith 

6 

90 792 000.00 

90 792 000.00 

1 836 596.74 

- 


Maluti-a-Phofung: 153 High mast lights in 4 
towns 



32 381 897.00 

32 381 897.00 

798 088.96 

- 


Intabazwe: Paving of 6km roads - Phase 2 

Intabazwe 

5 

20 000 000.00 

20 000 000.00 

3 419 583.72 



Tshiame B: Paving of 6km roads - Phase 2B 

Tshiame B 

1 

29 890 800.00 

29 890 800.00 

558 066.27 

- 


Phuthaditjhaba: Provision of water services 
for network extensions and 2940 erf 
connections (Qwaqwa Rural) Phase 3B 

Mangaung & 

Naledi 

12 & 

17 

28 586 101.90 

24 960 507.00 

731 900.52 

- 


Phuthaditjhaba: Provision of water services 
for network extensions and 3907 erf 
connections (Qwaqwa Rural) Phase 3C 

Bolata 

Phahameng 

12 & 

35 

38 666 424.00 

38 022 789.00 

5 361 000.25 

257 964.23 


Intabazwe/Harrismith: New Commuter 
infrastructure facility (MIS:264316) 

Intabazwe 

22 

23 336 840.00 

23 336 840.00 

3 101 164.37 

1 166 842.00 


Phuthaditjhaba/Qwaqwa: New taxi facility - 
phase 1 (MIS:226018) 

Phuthaditjhaba 

7 

47 401 200.00 

47 401 200.00 

13 571 108.03 

5 023 981.23 

2 374 802.46 

Harrismith/Intabazwe-Ext3: Construction of 
sewer outfall line and rising main 
(MIS:236415) 

Intabazwe 

5 

6 171 627.00 

6 171 627.00 

5 313 045.65 

398 249.35 



197 





















Project Description 

Town 

Ward 

No. 

Project Value 

MIG Value 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2018/2019 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2019/2020 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2020/2021 

Namahadi: Construction of 5km paved roads 
and storm water phase 2 (MIS:240386) 

Namahadi 

18 

31 200 000.00 

31 200 000.00 

13 613 772.91 

3 100 168.71 

1 519 977.95 

Tshiame: Construction of 4.5km paved roads 
and storm water drainage phase 3 
(MIS: 240998) 

Tshiame B 

1 

29 250 000.00 

29 250 000.00 

14 003 731.02 

9 177 641.90 

915 237.10 

Kestell/Tholong: Construction of a new taxi 
facility (MIS:255150) 

Kestell 

3 

24 897 600.00 

24 897 600.00 

15 949 916.26 

5 528 133.93 

1 082 478.27 

Harrismith/Tshiame B: Construction of a 
new taxi facility (MIS:255146) 

Tshiame B 

1 

28 454 400.00 

28 454 400.00 

12 909 581.46 

5 724 836.12 

1 237 130.43 

Thabong: Construction of sewer reticulation 
network to 1209 stands (MIS:264287) 

Lusaka 

30 & 

24 

28 672 814.00 

28 672 814.00 

12 562 888.88 

2 551 378.38 

1 246 608.70 

Bluegumbosch: Construction of sewer 
reticulation network to 2367 stands - phase 1 
(MIS:264308) 

Bluegumbosch 

34 & 

32 

21 478 866.00 

21 478 866.00 

12 440 178.79 

933 826.08 


Khotsong: Construction of sewer reticulation 
network to 510 stands (MIS:264119) 

Lusaka 

24 

6 425 319.00 

6 425 319.00 

2 006 032.49 

361 265.95 


Wilge: Construction of the Wilge waste 
water treatment works - phase 2 
(MIS:268506) 

Wilgepark 

6 

121 790 000.00 

121 790 000.00 

- 

- 


Intabazwe/Harrismith: Rectification of water 
supply pipeline (MIS:278789) 

Harri smith 

6 

3 988 494.08 

3 550 000.00 

3 391 686.00 

158 314.00 


Phuthaditjhaba: Upgrading of Town Hall 
(MIS:269245) 

Phuthaditjhaba 

29 

31 635 000.00 

31 635 000.00 

- 

- 

10 450 000.00 

Phuthaditjhaba: Upgrading of 1km paved 
road Motebang - phase 1 (MIS:276324) 

Phuthaditjhaba 

27 

26 000 000.00 

26 000 000.00 

- 


11 300 000.00 

Maluti-a-Phofung: High mast lights in 4 
towns (Phase 2) 

MAP - To be 
identified 


13 000 000.00 

13 000 000.00 

- 


11 498 000.00 

Intabazwe Ext. 3: Construction of Internal 
Water Reticulation with Water Meters 

Intabazwe 

5 

38 846 845.38 

38 846 845.38 

1 950 782.09 

19 250 000.00 

17 646 063.29 

Intabazwe Ext. 3: Construction of 

Waterborne Sewer Network 

Intabazwe 

5 

28 634 097.00 

28 634 097.00 

1 507 492.52 

14 725 000.00 

12 401 604.48 


198 
























Project Description 

Town 

Ward 

No. 

Project Value 

MIG Value 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2018/2019 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2019/2020 

Total Planned 
Expenditure for 
2020/2021 

HaRankopane: Construction of Sewer 
Network 

Ha Rankopane 

28 

25 513 002.59 

22 961 701.00 

3 855 909.28 

8 207 791.65 

10 898 000.07 

Wilge: Construction of a 4 Ml Reservoir 

Wilgepark 

6 

15 000 000.00 

15 000 000.00 

5 317 197.90 

4 030 802.10 

5 652 000.00 

Monontsha: Water Network 500 stands and 
supply line Phase 1 

Monontsha 

11 

17 000 000.00 

17 000 000.00 

1 166 842.00 

5 983 158.00 

9 850 000.00 

VIP Toilets Project Phase 12A 

MAP - To be 
identified 


36 000 000.00 

36 000 000.00 

- 

12 000 000.00 

10 745 693.97 

Matebeleng 3ML Reservoir 

Matebeleng 


13 000 000.00 

13 000 000.00 

- 

9 000 000.00 

4 000 000.00 

Hlatseng: Water Network 200 stands and 
supply line 

Monontsha 

11 

6 200 000.00 

6 200 000.00 

- 

5 930 000.00 

270 000.00 

Mphatlalatsane: Water Network 500 stands 
and supply line Phase 1 

Mphatlalatsane 

2 

17 000 000.00 

17 000 000.00 

- 

4 851 999.33 

9 472 335.67 

Refurbishment of Sewer Pump Stations 



25 000 000.00 

25 000 000.00 

- 

10 618 445.83 

9 691 520.88 

Chris Hani Park: Water Reticulation 500 
Stands 

Chris Hani Park 


17 000 000.00 

17 000 000.00 

- 

9 350 000.00 

7 650 000.00 

Thaba Bosiu Water Pipeline 

Thaba Bosiu 

19 

26 000 000.00 

26 000 000.00 

- 

8 996 532.24 

7 457 773.79 

Refurbishment of Charles Mopedi Stadium 

Mangaung 

17 

11 000 000.00 

11 000 000.00 

- 

800 000.00 

4 000 000.00 

Upgrading of water pump stations 



25 000 000.00 

25 000 000.00 

- 



Construction 4M1 Reservoir in Qholaqwe 

Qholaqhwe 

24 

15 000 000.00 

15 000 000.00 

- 



Total 



1 128 785 018.95 

1 121 525 993.38 





199 
























PROJECTS FROM OWN 
FUNDS 

TOWN 

WARD 

NO 

PROPOSED 
BUDGET 2018/19 

PROPOSED 
BUDGET 2019/20 

Rectification of water network 
in Makgolokoeng 

Makgolokoeng 

1 

- 

- 

Massification Projects 

Phuthaditjhaba 

27 

- 

- 

Maluti Contractor 

Development 


25 

- 

- 

Makgolokoeng: sewer 
network 


All wards 

- 

- 

Turfontein / Makeneng Road 
phase 2 

Turfontein 

16 



Construction of Bridge 
(SANRAL) 

Harrismith 

22 


- 

Re allocation of water pipe in 
Water and Vo we Streets 

Harrismith 

22 

6 000 000 

- 

Re-gravelling of access roads 

Bolata 

14 

3 000 000 


Maqhekung Infrastructure 

Tebang 

14 

3 000 000 


MAP Transformers 


14 

- 

- 

TOTAL PROJECTS 

FROM OWN FUNDS 



115 000 000 

86 000 000 


PROJECTS FROM DWS & 
DTI 



PROPOSED 
BUDGET 2018/19 

PROPOSED 
BUDGET 2019/20 

Kestell bulk pipeline 

Kestell 

3 

35 000 000 

3,5000000 

Upgrading of Kestell 

Treatment Phase 2 

Kestell 

3 



Installation of Zonal Meter in 
MAP 





Upgrading of Dr Limpho 
Letshela Water treatment plant 

Tshiame / Sterkfontein Dam 

6 



Upgrading of Tshiame sewer 
treatment plant 

Tshiame 

1 




200 




























1.1.2 ELECTRICITY PROVISION 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

I.1.2.1 

To ensure the proper and 
safe utilisation of electricity 
by communities. 

Wards Identified Need(s): 

Providing new 
basic infrastructure 

at local level. 

Increase the 
electricity generation 
reserve margin from 
1% currently to 

19% in 2019 

Review bulk 

electrical 

infrastructure 

Ring-fence 

electricity 

redistribution 

1.1.2.2 

To manage the restructuring 
of electricity distribution 
effectively 

Dedicate funding 
for maintenance of 

current 

infrastructure. 

Develop electricity 
master plans for 
municipalities. 

Commission 
renewable energy 

sources. 

Improve government 
support for 
combating illegal 
use of electricity 

Increase 
production of 
electricity through 
renewable 

sources. 


PROJECTS FROM DOE SOURCES OF 
FUNDING 

TOWN 

WARD 

NO 

PROPOSED BUDGET 
2018/19 

PROPOSED 
BUDGET 2019/20 

Electrification of Kgabisi 

Kgabise 

32 


15 000 000 

Upgrading of E-Ross Substation 

Mangaung 

17 

24 000 000 

20 000 000 

Tshiame D electrification 

Tshiame D 

1 

5 000 000 


TOTAL PROJECTS FROM OTHER 
SOURCES OF FUNDING 



29 000 000 

35 000 000 


1.1.3 IMPROVE WATER DISTRIBUTION AND SANITATION NETWORK 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

.NDP 

1.1.3.1 

To provide a basic level of 
sanitation to all the residents 

of MAP 

Develop water, 
sanitation and 
electricity master 
plan for 
municipalities 

Establish national 

water resource 

infrastructure 

agency 

Create regional 
water and waste 
water utilities. 

1.1.3.2 

To account and manage 
water distribution 

Establish 
partnerships with 
municipalities for 
service delivery 

Develop a 
comprehensive 
investment 
programme for 
water resource 
development 

Ensure that all 
people have 
access to clean; 
potable water 
recognising the 
trade- offs in the 
use of water 


201 



























NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

.NDP 

1.1.3.3 

To ensure that residents 
have access to portable 

Water To ensure that 

residents have access to 
portable Water 

Ensure compliance 
with Blue Drop 
standard 

Review of water 

and sanitation 

norms and 

standards 

Develop a 
comprehensive 
strategy as 
investment 
programme 

1.1.3.4 

Wards Identified Need(s) 

Dedicate funding for 
maintenance of 

current 

infrastructure. 

Provide and upgrade 
Bulk services. 

Implement 
alternative 
sanitation, water and 
electricity 
infrastructure 

Provide access to 
piped water in rural 
areas 

Provide access to 
sanitation services 
in rural areas. 

Implement 
strategies for water 
conservation and 

demand 

management 

Staff at all levels 
has the authority, 
experience, 
competence and 
support they need 
to do their jobs 

1.2 

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 



NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

.NDP 

1.2.1 

To implement the Spatial 
planning and Land Use 
Management Act 

Identify and acquire 
land parcels for 
integrated 
settlements 

Adequate housing 
and improved 
quality living 
environments, with 
approximately 1.4 
million more 
households living 
in new or improved 
housing conditions 
by 2019 

Reform current 
planning system 
for improved 
coordination 

1.2.2 

To promote and implement 
urban renewal programme 

Ensure law 

enforcement in the 
planning and 
property 
development 

A functional and 
equitable 

residential property 
market with a 
target of 110 000 
new housing units 
delivered in the 
affordable gap 
market by 2019 

Introduce spatial 
development 
framework and 

norms 


202 





NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

.NDP 

1.2.3 

To maintain forward 
planning 

Improve basic town 
planning 

Informal settlement 
upgrading will be 
expanded to cover 
750 000 household, 
ensuring basic 
services and 

infrastructure in 

some 2 200 

informal settlement 

Upgrade all 
informal 
settlement on 
suitable well 
located land by 
2030 

1.2.4 

To promote and implement 
urban renewal programme. 

To 

maintain forward planning 

Release surplus 
government land for 
human settlements 

Provide Individual 

subsidies and 
housing 
opportunities to 
beneficiaries 

Strong and 
efficient spatial 
planning system 

1.3 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND RECREATIONAL CENTRE 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.3.1 

To increase access to sport 
and recreation facilities for 

all communities 

Extend the 
implementation of 
anti-rape strategy 

Implement crime 
combating 
strategies for 
serious and violent 

crime 

In 2030 people 
living in South 
Africa feels safe 
and have no fear 
of crime 

1.3.2 

To introduce new sporting 
codes 

Intensify and roll out 
victim empowerment 
programmes to all 
municipalities 

Promote 
community 
participation in 
crime prevention 

The National 

Rural Safety Plan 
must be 
implemented 

1.3.3 

To provide new sports 
equipment 

Promote the full 
diversity of arts, 
culture and heritage. 

Make provision for 
learning and 
recreational needs of 
the province 

Promote social 

cohesion and foster 

human values 

Build a society 
where 

opportunity is not 
determined by 
race or birth 

1.3.4 

To maintain sport and 
recreation facilities. 

To promote arts and culture 
in MAP. 

Promote effective 
and efficient sport 
and recreation 
development 

Provide adequate 
sport and recreation 
facilities and 
ensure that they are 
maintained 

Building 
integrated towns 
and sport 
facilities in 
communities to 
ensure sharing of 
common spaces 
across race and 
class. 


203 





NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.3.5 

To upgrade and maintain 
grounds erven and the 
developed and 
undeveloped sports facilities 

Expand mass 
participation in 
sports and recreation 
programme. 

Improve and 
maintain health care 

infrastructure. 

Encourage 
communities to 
organise sporting 
events, league and 
championships. 

Establish effective 
project 

management teams 
in Provincial 
Department 

Everyone must 
have access to 
equal standard of 
care, regardless of 
their income. 


1.4. LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND ECONOMIC PRIORITIES 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.4.1 

To manage negative 
impacts of development 
activities 

Strengthen 
agricultural research, 
knowledge and skills 

Create tenure 
security for people 
living and working 
on farms. 

Increase 

investment in new 

agricultural 

technologies 

1.4.2 

To promote compliance to 
environmental legislation, 
Policies and by-laws. 

Accelerate post 
settlement support 
programmes for 
emerging farmers 

Improve transport 
infrastructure and 
public transport in 
rural areas 

Broaden 
ownership of 
assets to 
historically 
advantage 
groups 

1.4.3 

To increase awareness, 
through educating 
communities about 
environmental issues, and 
how to preserve the 
environment. 

To control and eradicate 
alien plants and vegetation 

Strengthen rural 
security of farm 
communities. 

Support the life of 
existing mines and 
create new mining 
opportunities. 

Implement a 
government support 
programme for 
tourism development 
and growth. 

Increase and build 
human capacity for 
tourism 

development and 
service excellence. 

Mining 

Beneficiation 

Action Plan (MAP) 
developed 
implemented and 
reviewed regularly. 

National Tourism 
Strategy 

implemented and 
reviewed. 

Provide support for 
economic 
development hubs, 
nodes and linkages 
to be developed in 
historical black 
townships. 

Maintain a 
positive trade 
balance for 
primary and 
processed 
products 


204 





Facilitate land reform, 
redistribution and 
agricultural reform. 


Support agrarian 
transformation. 


Improve rural 
development and 
economic 
infrastructure 


Acquire and 
allocate 
strategically 
located land. 

Develop resource 
and implement the 
Value chain 
interventions. 

Promote skills 
development in 
rural areas with 
economic 
development 
potential 


LED, SMME, ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM PROJECTS 


Project 

Location 

Project Description 

Budget 

Maluti Mall 

Phuthaditjhaba- opposite 
Manapo Hospital 

Construction of a shopping 
mall 

R450 000 000.00 

Phuthaditjhaba Taxi 
Rank 

Phuthaditjhaba- Next to 
Manapo Hospital 

Construction of a taxi rank 

to accommodate the local 

taxis 

R 66 000 000.00 

Intabazwe Taxi Ranks 

Intabazwe 

Construction of a taxi ranks 

next to Naledi Hall and 
Mohlakeng 

R 17000 000.00 

Special Economic 

Zone 

Tshiame 

Site preparation for SEZ 
activities 

R 20 000 000.00 

Apple processing 
plant 

Tshiame (SEZ) 

Apple plant to process them 
to juice and perfume 

R 240 000 000.00 

Agave and Camel 

Dairy 

Tshiame (SEZ) 

Agave plant to produce the 
syrup and Camel dairy 
products 

R 150 000 000.00 

Railway 

Harrismith/QwaQwa and 
connection from the railway 
between Harrismith & 
Afrikaskop 

Feasibility study on railway 
development from 

Harrismith to Qwa Qwa for 
the commuters and goods. 

R 20 000 000.00 

Yellow Fish Plant 

Breeding at Sterkfontein & 
Tshiame SEZ (plant) 

Fish processing plant for 
exports 

R 50 000 000.00 

Upgrading the industrial 
areas Phase 2 

Qwa Qwa- Industrial park 1,2 
&3 

Renovations of Industrial area 

R33 000 000.00 


205 





Project 

Location 

Project Description 

Budget 

Hawkers stalls 

Phuthaditjhaba, Harrismith & 
Kestel 

Construction of hawkers 

stall to accommodate the 

SMMEs 

R 50 000 000.00 

SMME Development 

Qwa Qwa, Harrismith & 

Kestel 

Information sessions, 
workshops and facilitations 
to acquire equipment and 
material for the SMMEs. 

R 2000 000.00 

Art & Craft Centre 

Tshiame 


R 8 795 000.00 

Aluminium mine 

Kestel 

Feasibility study on the 
development of aluminium 
mine 

R20 000 000.00 

Polysillicon plant 

Harrismith 

Renewable solar energy 
upstream 

R13.6b 


TOURISM PROJECTS 


Project Name 

LOCATION 

Project description 

Budget 

(Estimated) 

Mabolela Rural 

Development Project: 
Celebrating Life Of Thabo 
Mofutsanyana 

Mabolela 

Create Tourism Hub That Include 
Heritage Site (Museum, Sediba 
Samatitta, The Church, The House 
and the grave of Thabo 
Mofutsanyana), Greening and 
paving the access road to the 
facility. 

R 25,000,000.00 

Maluti Hae Lapeng Farm 
Development 

Kgotso Farm 
situated on R57 

Develop a Theme Park that will 
comprise mainly Of Water Slides, 
Swimming Pools, Donkey Race 
Festival, And Accommodation 
Facilities 

.R 2,700.000.00 

Upgrading of 

Phuthaditjhaba and 
Harrismith Information 
Centre 

Harrismith & 

Phuthaditjhaba 

Renovating Phuthaditjhaba and 
Harrismith Information Centre 

R 2, 500,000.00 

Establishment of 
Phuthaditjhaba Commercial 
park 

Phuthaditjhaba. 

Developing commercial park with 
water fall and business facilities 

R 50,000.000.00 

Establishment of Namahadi 
Commercial park 

Thaba bosiu 

Developing commercial park with 
recreational facilities 

R 30,000,000.00 


206 





Project Name 

LOCATION 

Project description 

Budget 

(Estimated) 

Sentinel Peak Car Park 
Access, completion of 7 
km road (Phase 3) 

Tsheseng 

Construct a 7 km pavement leading 
to Sentinel Peak and parking area 

R 35,000,000.00 

Upgrade Sefika sa Mopeli 

Namahadi 

To upgrade sefika sa Mopeli 

R 2.5. 000,000.00 

Sefika sa Batlokwa 

Tsheseng 

To upgrade sefika sa Batlokoa 

R 2.5. 000,000.00 

Access road to Qwanthani 

resort 

Qwanthani Resort 

Construct a 7.5 km road to 
Qwanthani resort 

R 35,000,000.00 

Establishment of Maluti 
youth lifestyle Centre 

(SASSS) 

Phuthaditjhaba 

Renovating and converting 

Phuthaditjhaba hall in to Maluti 
youth lifestyle centre (SASSS).The 
centre include the following Maluti 
Sterkinekor Cinema Film and 
Photography Studio, Media 

Production Studio, Maluti Times 
and Television Project, Digital 
Gaming & Entertainment, Outdoor 
Gym Facilities, Skate and Bike 
Park , Career Resource Centre, 
Technology Training Centre, 

Development Centre, 

Analytics/Intelligence Centre and 
Simulated Driving Centre. 

R 50,000,000.00 


ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS 


Project Name 

Location 

Project Description 

Budget 

FS-Establishment of New 
Landfill site in Qwaqwa 
(Phase 2) 

Portion 110 of the 
Farm Witsieshoek, 

1903 Ward 34, 5 km 
from (Pereng). 

The designing and construction of 
outstanding landfill cells, recycling 
facility (buy-back centre), compost 
facility, unsurfaced accesses road, 
ring road and storm-water drainage 

R 20,000.000.00 

Construction of 7.5 km road 
to landfill site 

Pereng 

Construction of 7km road to landfill 
site (Pereng) 

R 30,000.000.00 


207 





Project Name 

Location 

Project Description 

Budget 

Allian plants clearing 

Ward 19, 20, 21 

Removal of allian clearing plants 

R 25,000,000.00 


208 




1.5 MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.5.1 

To ensure proper 

budgetary 

processes 

Support the life of 
existing mines and 
create new mining 
opportunities. 

Mining Beneficiation Action 
Plan developed 

Broaden ownership of 
assets to historically 
disadvantaged group 

1.5.2 

To manage 
expenditure in 
accordance with 
the budget 

To ensure the 
safeguarding and 
proper recording of 
asset 

Recording and 
reporting on all 
financial matters 

Improve the overall 
financial management 
in governance 
structures. 

Ensure clean audits 
and appropriate 
financing towards the 
growth and 
development of the 
province 

Support for local suppliers for 
infrastructure programme. 

Enhance institutional capacity 
and improve investment 
decisions. 

Demonstrate good financial 
governance and management. 

Monitor financial reports and 
address deficiencies. 

Corruption within local 
government is tackled 
effectively and consistently. 

Capacity building and 
professionalizing supply chain 
management. 

Strengthen implementation of 
Financial Disclosure 

Framework 

A corruption free 
society, a high 
adherence to ethics 
throughout society and 
government that is 
accountable to the 
people 


209 



1.6. MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENTS 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.6.1 

To ensure effective 

administrative 
management and 
coordination of 
strategic issues by 
all managers 

Establish a strong and 
capable political and 
administrative 
management cadre 

Strengthen governance and 
management of institutions 

A state that is capable 
of playing a 
developmental and 
transformative role 

1.6.2 

To review and 
appraise the control 
systems 

Improve the link 
between citizens and 

the state to ensure 
accountability and 
responsive governance 

Expand the production of 
highly skilled professionals 
and enhance innovation 
capacity 

Staff at all levels has 
the authority, 
experience, competency 
and support they need 
to do their jobs 

1.6.3 

To facilitate better 

communication 
integration and 
co-ordination 

within the 
municipality. 

To ensure 

consistent 

communication and 

better liaison 
among directorates. 

To communicate 
activities, 
programmes and 
successes of MAP. 

To communicate 
programmes and 
successes of the 
municipality. 

To facilitate better 

communication 
integration and co¬ 
ordination within 
the municipality 

Develop a skilled and 
capable public service 
workforce 

Improved performance of the 
skills development system. 

Public trust and credibility of 
local government improved. 

Quality of governance 
arrangement and political 
leadership enhanced. 

Municipalities demonstrate 
quality management and 
administrative practices. 

Efficient and effective 
management and operation 
system. 

Promote active citizenship and 
leadership 

Clear governance 
structures and stable 
leadership that enable 
state-owned enterprise 
(SOE’s) to achieve their 
developmental potential 


210 



1.7. GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 


NO 

MAP SO 

FSGDS 

MTSF 

NDP 

1.7.1 

To ensure internal 
controls through 
effective internal 
auditing and 
accounting 
practices. 

Improve the link 
between citizens and 

state to ensure 
accountability and 
responsive governance 

Promote citizen-based 
monitoring of government 
service delivery 

A state that is capable 
of playing a 
developmental and 
transformative role. 

1.7.2 

To monitor risk 

management 

process 

Develop a skilled and 
capable public service 
workforce to support 
the growth and 
development 
trajectory for the 
province 

Promote community 
participation and crime 
prevention. 

Promote social cohesion and 

foster values 

Promote citizen 
participation in 
governance 

Build a society where 
opportunity is not 
determined by race or 
birth 

1.7.3 

Improve ICT 
governance. 

To ensure proper 
coordination and 
management of 

IDP and 

performance 

review. 

To ensure an 

accountable and 
performance driven 
local government. 

To build inter¬ 
governmental 
partnerships 
between civil 
society, business 
community and to 
encourage 
responsible 
citizenship 


Increased routine 
accountability of service 
delivery departments to 
citizens and other service 

users. 

Improve quality of training 
through PALAMA\the school 
of Government 

A public service 
immersed in the 
development agenda 
but insulated from 
undue political 
interference 


211 




SECTION J 


212 



J. ALIGNMENT WITH NATIONAL AND PROVINCIAL OBJECTIVES AND 

PROGRAMMES 

J.l ALIGNMENT OF THE IDP WITH NATIONAL, PROVINCIAL AND DISTRICT 


PRIORITIES 


National, 
Provincial or 
District Priorities 

Objective and Purpose of alignment 

Implications for the 
Maluti-A-Phofung 

Accelerated and 
Shared Growth 
Initiative for 

South Africa 

The aims 

• Obtain balanced growth in the country’s economy and its 
employment profile; 

• Invest in infrastructure as a way to stimulate economic 
growth and job creation, and lay the foundation for fast- 
tracking expansion of the national economy; 

• Target specific sector strategies and initiatives to further 
stimulate economic growth and job creation; 

• Invest in education and skills development; 

• Eliminating the second economy, by expanding women’s 
access to economic opportunities, promote SMMEs and 
BBBEEs, improve the small business regulatory 
environment and promote youth development; and 

• Stimulate the macro-environment to promote expanded 
economic growth. 

The Maluti-A- 
Phofung’s LED 

Strategy and the 
objectives, strategies 
and programmes 
contained in this IDP 

related to economic 
development, of 
creation and SMME / 
BBBEE support 

New Growth 

Path (Department 
of Economic 
Affairs) 

Central to the New Growth Path is a massive investment in 
infrastructure as a critical driver of jobs across the 
economy. 

• The framework identifies investments in five key areas 
namely: energy, transport, communication, water and 
housing. Sustaining high levels of public investment in 
these areas will create jobs in construction, operation and 
maintenance of infrastructure. 

• The new growth path sees the infrastructure programme as 
a trigger to build a local supplier industry for the 
manufacture of the components for the build-programme. 

• Specific measures, particularly changes to procurement 
policy and regulations, are identified to ensure that this is 
achieved. Risks include the still fragile global recovery; 
competition and collaboration with the new fast-growing 
economies; and competing interests domestically. 

The New Growth Path identifies five other priority areas as 
part of the programme to create jobs, through a series of 
partnerships between the State and the private sector. 

• Green economy: expansions in construction and the 
production of technologies for solar, wind and biofuels is 

It is in the nature of 

the mandate of 
municipalities to 
contribute towards the 

aims of the New 

Growth Path, because 
it focus on energy, 
transport, water, 

sanitation and 
housing. 

The municipality is 
having a Tourism 
strategy, which also 
contribute towards 
achieving the aims of 
the New Growth Path. 


213 




National, 
Provincial or 
District Priorities 

Objective and Purpose of alignment 

Implications for the 
Maluti-A-Phofung 


supported by the draft Energy on Integrated Resource Plan. 

• Clean manufacturing and environmental services are 
projected to create 300 000 jobs over the next decade. 

• Agriculture: jobs will be created by addressing the high 
input costs and upscaling processing and export marketing. 
Support for small holders will include access to key inputs. 
Government will explore ways to improve working and 
living conditions for the country’s 660 000 farm workers. 
The growth path also commits the Government to 
unblocking stalled land transfers, which constrain new 
investment. 

• Mining: calls for increased mineral extraction and 
improving infrastructure and skills development. It focuses 
support for beneficiation on the final manufacture of 
consumer and capital goods, which can create large-scale 
employment. It foresees the establishment of a state mining 
company concentrating on beneficiation and enhanced 
resource exploitation in competition with a strong private 
mining sector. 

• Manufacturing: calls for re-industrialization in the South 
African economy based on improving performance through 
innovation, skills development and reduced input costs in 
the economy. The document targets a doubling of South 
Africa’s research and development investment to 2% of 
gross domestic product by 2018. 

• Tourism and other high-level services: hold employment 
potential and the framework calls for South Africa to 
position itself as the higher education hub of the African 
continent. 


National 

Outcome 9 

Outcome 9 deals with responsive and accountable local 
government, and focus on achieving the following outputs: 

• Implementing a differentiated approach to municipal 
financing, planning and support 

• Improving access to basic services 

• Implementing the Community Works Programme 

• Actions supportive of the human settlement outcome 

• Deepen democracy through a refined Ward Committee 
Model 

• Administrative and financial capability 

• A single window of coordination 

Maluti-A-Phofung 
Municipality planned 
to structure its IDP 

and PMS and 
reporting systems 
processes according to 
the requirements of 
Outcome 9 


214 




State of the 
National Address 


The municipality has also aligned its IDP with the commitments of the Hon. President 

Mr. Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa in the 2018 State of the Nation Speech on 16 February 

2018. In this regard, mention could be made of the following: 

O Our most grave and most pressing challenge is youth unemployment. 

It is therefore a matter of great urgency that we draw young people in 
far greater numbers into productive economic activity. Young South 
Africans will be moved to the centre of our economic agenda. They are 
already forming a greater proportion of the labour force on our 
infrastructure projects and are the primary beneficiaries of programmes 
such as the installation of solar water heaters and the war on leaks. 

We continue to draw young people in far greater numbers into 
productive economic activity through programmes such as the 
Employment Tax Incentive. If we are to respond effectively to the 
needs of youth, it is essential that young people articulate their views 
and are able to engage with government at the highest level. I will 
therefore be establishing a Youth Working Group that is representative 
of all young South Africans to ensure that our policies and programmes 
Advance their interests. 

O Special economic zones remain important instruments we will use to attract 
strategic foreign and domestic direct investment and build targeted industrial 
capabilities and establish new industrial hubs. 

The process of industrialisation must be underpinned by transformation. Through 
measures like preferential procurement and the black industrialists programme, 
we are developing a new generation of black and women producers that are able 
to build enterprises of significant scale and capability. 

We will improve our capacity to support black professionals, deal decisively with 
companies that resist transformation, use competition policy to open markets up 
to new black entrants, and invest in the development of businesses in townships 
and rural areas. 

Radical economic transformation requires that we fundamentally improve the 
position of black women and communities in the economy, ensuring that they are 
owners, managers, producers and financiers. 

The objectives and strategies from this IDP supporting the commitment in the 
SONA: 

1. To create employment opportunities in the Maluti-A-Phofung municipal area 

2. To create an environment conducive for investment and increased economic activity 
in the Maluti-A-Phofung municipal area 

3. The Municipality’s economic development strategy is currently informed by the 
Integrated Economic Development Framework. 

4. However, in terms of affordability, the Municipality’s economic development 
strategies for the 2017-2022 IDP cycle focuses on three key elements, namely: 


215 





• Job creation 

• Identify and develop economic development landmarks 

• Develop Harrismith (SEZ) as an economic development hub for manufacturing 
(industrial zones) 

• To create a business environment conducive for investment, with specific reference 
to ensuring that basic services are available to support such expansion 

• Promotion of targeted economic sectors, such as BBBEEs, SMMEs and local 

purchasing. 

Strategy related to Cooperatives 

Cooperatives must be community driven 


Spatial divides hobble inclusive development 

Facilitate sustainable human settlements 

The municipality’s resource constraints (as well as its limited status as a housing 
provider) force it to focus on infrastructure support, erven identification and 
development, the maintenance of information databases and the identification of 
beneficiaries in Government’s housing programme. 

To ensure an effective Urban Planning that will promote proper spatial planning to 
address sustainable development and social cohesion 

Outcome 8: Create 


Sustainable 

The finalization of township establishment in all towns is a critical aim in the urban 

Human 

planning strategy of the Municipality. 

Settlements and 

Housing: 

Improved Quality 

Ensure that the housing administration system of the municipality effectively supports 

of Households 

sustainable human settlements 

Follow a phased process to the implementation of SPLUMA: 

1. Municipal co-operation 

2. Establishing the municipal tribunal 

3. Managing delegations 

4. Conduct operations of the municipal tribunal 

5. Drafting and approval of by-laws 

6. Setting of targets 

Budget allocations 

Outcome 6: An 

The economy is unsustainably resource intensive 

Efficient, 

We are promoting sustainable industries through our LED Strategy, with specific 

Competitive and 

Responsive 

Economic 

reference to agriculture and the establishment of cooperatives. 

Economic development: Minimize the impact of the declining mining sector and ensure 

Infrastructure 

that existing mining potential is harnessed; expand and diversify manufacturing 

Network 

opportunities; capitalize on transport and distribution opportunities; harness and increase 
tourism potential and opportunities 


216 





Diversity and expansion of agricultural development and food security 

To create an environment conducive for investment and increased economic activity in 
the Maluti-A-Phofung municipal area. 

The Municipality’s economic development strategy is currently informed by the 

Integrated Economic Development Framework. 

Strategy related to Cooperatives 

Cooperatives must be community driven 

Outcome 2: A 
long and Healthy 
Life for All South 

Africans 

Outcome 13: An 
Inclusive and 
responsive Social 
Protection System 

The public health system cannot meet demand or sustain quality 

Provide improved quality of health care 

Provide a healthy environment by establishing parks. 

We support local health facilities through infrastructure maintenance at clinics. 

Outcome 12: An 
Efficient, 

Effective and 
Developmental 
Oriented Public 
Service 

.Public services are uneven and often of poor quality 

Maluti-A-Phofung Municipality has made a firm commitment towards service 
excellence, both through institutional development, as well as implementation of the 
Batho Pele and outcome-based management philosophies and principles 

Outcome 14: 
Transforming 
Society and 

Uniting the 

Country 

South Africa remains a divided society 

Our municipality is addressing the divisions in its communities through its social 
cohesion initiatives and strategies. 

Outcome 3: All 
People in South 
Africa are and 

Feel Safe 

Curb crime and streamline criminal justice performance 

Effective traffic control, and to optimize revenue generation from the traffic control 
function. 

Attention must also be given to taxi ranks in all units of the municipality, but due to 
capacity constraints, this will be a medium to long-term objective 

Our municipality focus our attention on municipal policing. These initiatives are 
mostly restricted to traffic control and disaster assistance. 

Outcome 10: 

Protect and 

Enhance Our 
Environmental 
Assets and Natural 
Resources 

The municipality’s core focus areas, as enabled by its budget and planning priorities, are 
as follow: 

• To ensure good quality drinking water and waste water, and 

• Ensuring the integration of minimum requirements for environmental protection in 
all its strategies and projects. 


217 




J.2 ALIGNMENT OF PRIORITIES WITH NATIONAL KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS 


Presidency had developed a strategy called National Development Plan 2030 to ensure that development 
becomes a success and that the well-being of majority of our communities is advanced. The National 
Development Plan 2030 provides the country vision for overall economic and social development, 
integrating policies, demographic shifts, and governance and state-capacity issues into a coherent 
framework. 

The National Development Plan aims to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030. South Africa 
can realise these goals by drawing on the energies of its people, growing an inclusive economy, building 
capabilities, enhancing the capacity of the state, and promoting leadership and partnership throughout 
society. 

It aims also to address the inequalities of the past in the education sector as it has been found that the 
quality of school education for most black learners is poor, apartheid spatial divide continues to dominate 
the landscape and amongst others is the youth development and over and above the legacy of apartheid 
continues to determine the life opportunities for the vast majority. 

However, the Presidency after Monitoring and Evaluation Commission, in addressing the challenges 
reflected in the NDP 2030 strategy outlined priorities which will assist to seek economic synergy within 
our communities through economic emancipation and independency through the following priorities: 

□ Raising employment through faster economic growth; 

□ Improving the quality of education, skills development and innovation and 

□ Building the capability of the state to play a developmental, transformative role. 

Development and economic advancement of Youth in our country is one of the priorities as it is 
in our municipality. Our Youth Strategic objectives are aligned to what the Minister of Economic 
Development Honourable Ebrahim Patel signed with Youth as Youth Employment Accord. 
According to Honourable Minister Ebrahim Patel “ The Accord provides for a comprehensive 
approach , which includes incentives, commitments and action to address the problem from 
its starting point: inadequate skills formation. It provides for work experience through 
internships and, most importantly, new jobs for young people. To meet the numerical 
targets in the Youth Employment Accord, government entities will adjust regulations and 
tender conditions to bring more young people into infrastructure programmes, the green 
economy, call centres and other business process services. 99 

The Government is determined through effective and efficient implementation of National 
Development Plan 2030 to:- 

Introduce active labour market policies and incentives to grow employment, particularly for young 
people and in sectors employing relatively low-skilled 


218 



O Expand public employment programmes to 1 million participants by 2015 and 2 million by 2020. 
As the number of formal- and informal-sector jobs expands, public work programmes can be 
scaled down. 

O Strengthen primary health-care services and broaden district-based health programmes, such as 
the community health worker and midwife programmes, and health education. 

LJ Expand welfare services and public employment schemes, enabling the state to service and support poor 
communities, particularly those with high levels of crime and violence.The Municipal Systems Act 
provides in Section 38 for the preparation of a Municipal Performance Management System. Section 43 
subsequently provides for regulations to determine general key performance indicators. These regulations 
were recently promulgated (Local Government: Municipal Planning and Performance Regulations, 2001, 
R.796 GN. 22605). The identified IDP Priorities were measured against the general key performance areas 
and are represented as follows: 


NATIONAL KEY PERFORMANCE AREAS 


KPAl : Social and Economic 
Development 


Related Municipal Priorities 

Improved Level of Health 
Services 

Education & Training 
Youth Development 
Welfare Service Provision 
Skills Development 
Local Economic Development 
Land Development 
Agricultural Development 
Industrial Development 
Tourism Development 
Safety and Security 
HIV&AIDS 
Poverty Alleviation 
Disaster Management 
Emergency Services 
Traffic Control 


KPA 2 : Basic Services Delivery 


Related Municipal Priorities 

Housing 
W ater Provision 
Sanitation Provision 
Streets and Storm Water 
Electricity Provision 
Refuse Removal 
Cemeteries 
Sport and Recreation 
Public Transport 


Y 


KPA 3 : Organisational 
Development and Institutional 
Trans formation 

Related Municipal Priorities 

Institutional Transformation 


r. 


KPA 4 : Public Participation 
and Good Governance 

Related Municipal Priorities 

Institutional Transformation 
Community Based Planning 


KPA 5 : Municipal Financial 
Viability 


Related Municipal _ Priorities 

Institutional Transformation 


< 


219 





























Municipal Priorities aligned to Free State Growth Development Strategy 


The Free Sate Growth and Development Strategy for 2005/2014 was prepared during 2005 and specific 
development priorities were identified for the next 9-year development cycle in the province. These 


priorities were set as guidelines for the Local Municipalities to identify their respective IDP priorities. 
In order to achieve alignment it was necessary to measure identified IDP priorities against the priorities 


of the Free State Growth and Development Strategy and the achieved alignment as represented below: 

FREE STATE GROWTH DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY 


PRIORITY 1: 

Social and Human 
Development 

Municipal Priorities 
Improved Level of Health 
Services 

Education & Training 
Youth Development 
Welfare Service Provision 
S kills Development 
HIV & AIDS 
Poverty Alleviation 
Housing 
Water Provision 
Sanitation Provision 
Streets and Storm Water 
Electricity Provision 
Refuse Removal 
Cemeteries 
T elecommunication 
Sport and Recreation 
Public Transport 


PRIORITY 2 : 

Economic Development 
and Employment Creation 

Municipal Priorities 
Local EconomicDevelopment 
Land Development 
Agricultural Development 
Industrial Development 
Tourism Development 


PRIORITY 3: 
Justice and Crime 
Prevention 


Municipal Priorities 

Safety and Security 
Traffic Control 
Emergency Services 
Disaster M anagement 


PRIORITY 4: 

Efficient Administration 
and Good Governance 






Municipal Priorities 
Institutional Transformation 
Environmental Management 
Community Based Planning 




Alignment with Provincial Government Sector Department Strategic Objectives 

The legislative mandate compels Municipalities to align their activities, programmes and projects with 
those of the other two spheres of government. Like other municipalities, Maluti-A-Phofung municipality 
through Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipality’s Intergovernmental Relations Forum as required by 
the Intergovernmental Relations Framework Act, discusses developmental issues to synchronise planning 
and implementation of such issues. Municipal, provincial and national strategies and budgets need to be 
aligned and rationalised to support integration, co-ordination, planning and implementation across 
spheres of government with regard to intergovernmental priorities. It is within this context that this 
strategic blueprint reflects the anticipated 2016/2017 sector department’s programmes and projects 
(please refer to the project list as provided herein that provides an account of the nature of project that 
varied government departments will be implementing within the municipal area during the MTREF 
period). 


220 



















SECTION K 


221 



K. PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS OF THE OTHER SPHERES 


K.l PROJECT LISTS 


K.1.1 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 


Facility Name 

Project Name 

Delivery Mechanism 
(Procurement Strategy: 
Individual or Packaged 
Project) 

Projects Activities 
(All activities to be 
performed under 
this project should 
be listed) 

Funding 

Source 

Construction 
Start Date 

Construction 

End-Date 

Mofumahadi Manapo 

Hospital 

Construction of EMS 
Station: Qwa-Qwa 
(Manapo Hospital) 

Individual Project 

Construction of 

EMS Station: 

Qwa-Qwa (Manapo 
Hospital) 

HFRG 

01 April 2017 

31 March 

2018 

Various Facilities 

Upgrades Clinics: 
Thabo 

Mofutsanyane 

District 

Packaged Program 

Upgrades Clinics: 
Thabo Mofutsanyane 
District 

HFRG 

01 April 

2018 

31 March 

2019 

Intabazwe Clinic 

Upgrading of 
Intabazwe Clinic 

Packaged Program 

Upgrade and additions 
to meet Ideal Clinic 
Standards 

HFRG 



Various Facilities 

Refurbishment of 
Clinics: Thabo 
Mofutsanyane 

District 

Packaged Program 

Refurbishment of 
Clinics: Thabo 
Mofutsanyane District 

HFRG 

01 April 2018 

31 March 2019 

Sekamotho Mota 

Clinic 

Refurbishment of 
Sekamotho Mota 

Clinic 

Packaged Program 

1. Emergency / 
resuscitation room, 
Facility manager office, 
b. Medical/bio¬ 
hazardous waste area, 
Drying area (for mops 
etc), 2. Refurbishment 
of the entire clinic 

HFRG 




222 














Thabang Clinic 

Refurbishment of 
Thabang Clinic 

Packaged Program 

1. Treatment room, 
Multipurpose meeting 
room , Staff tea room 
with kitchenette, 
Medicine collection 
kiosk (CCMDD), 
Laundry, Dirty utility 
room, b. Disabled 
parking, 

a. Domestic/general 
waste area, 

b. Medical/bio¬ 
hazardous waste area, 
Garden store room, 
Drying area (for mops 
etc), 

2. Refurbishment of the 
entire clinic 

HFRG 



Nthabiseng Clinic 

Refurbishment of entire 
Nthabiseng Clinic 

Packaged Program 

1 . Main waiting area, 

Help desk / reception / 
patient registration, 

b. Toilets , Sub-waiting 
area, Multipurpose 
meeting room , Staff tea 
room with kitchenette, 
Laundry, Dirty utility 
room, 

c. Ambulance parking, a. 
Domestic/general waste 
area, b. Medical/bio¬ 
hazardous waste area, 
Garden store room, 

Drying area (for mops 
etc), 

HFRG 




223 




Various Facilities 

District Hospitals 
Refurbishment and 
replacement of 
Generators 

Packaged Program 

Refurbishment and 
replacement of 
Generators 

HFRG 

01 June 2014 

31 March 2020 

Various Facilities 

District Hospitals 
Refurbishment and 
Replacement of 

Boilers 

Packaged Program 

Refurbishment and 
Replacement of Boilers 

HFRG 

01 June 2014 

31 March 2020 

Thebe Hospital 

Refurbishment of 

Thebe Hospital 

Individual Project 

Refurbishment of 

Thebe Hospital 

HFRG 



Elizabeth Ross 

Hospital 

Refurbishment of 
Elizabeth Ross 

Hospital 

Individual Project 

Refurbishment of 
Elizabeth Ross Hospital 

HFRG 



Various Facilities 

Provincial Hospitals 
Refurbishment and 
Replacement of 

Boilers 

Packaged Program 


HFRG 



Various Facilities 

Provincial Hospitals 
Refurbish and 
replacement 

Mechanical 

Equipment (Lifts, 
Aircons, Calorifiers, 
Autoclaves, etc.) 

Packaged Program 


HFRG 




224 















Various Facilities 

Provincial Hospitals 
Refurbishment and 
replacement of 
Generators 

Packaged Program 

Projects Activities (All 
activities to be 
performed under 
this project should 
be listed) 

HFRG 



Mofumahadi Manapo 
Hospital 

Refurbishment of 
Mofumahadi Manapo 
Mopeli Hospital 

Individual Project 

Refurbishment of 
Mofumahadi Manapo 
Mopeli Hospital 

HFRG 

01 April 2017 

31 March 2020 

Mofumahadi Manapo 
Hospital 

Refurbishment of 
Manapo Dr's 

Residence 

Individual Project 

Refurbishment of 
Manapo Dr's Residence 

HFRG 

01 March 2018 

30 August 2019 



TBC 





Various Facilities 

Maintenance District 
Hospitals Thabo 
Mofutsanyane 

Packaged Program 


HFRG 



Various Facilities 

Maintenance EMS 
Rescue Services 

Individual Projects 

Maintenance EMS 
Rescue Services 

HFRG 




225 















K.1.2 


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION: 2018/19 PROJECT LIST 


IN-HOUSE PROJECTS IMPLEMENTED BY EDUCATION 


Name of school 

Project Type 

District 

Town 

Intabazwe P/S 

New admin 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

Harrismth 

Justice Lefuma 

6 classrooms 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Nhlakanipho 

1 toilet block 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

Harrismith 

Naka 

Educators toilet 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Mohlakaneng 

2 toilet blocks 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Justice Lefuma 

3 x Grade R 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Paballong 

3 x Grade R 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Thiboloha 

3 x Grade R 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Dipelaneng E49 

Nutrition Centres 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

Kestell 

Makwane E49 

Nutrition Centres 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Qwabi E49 

Nutrition Centres 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Retief 

Refurbishment/renovation of 
hostel 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

Kestell 

Mampoi 

Refurbishment/renovation of 
hostel 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 

Tshitso 

Refurbishment of Admin block - 
completion 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

QwaQwa 


K.1.3 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND INFRASTRUCTURE 

CAPITAL PROJECTS IMPLEMENTED BY PUBLIC WORKS & 
INFRASTRUCTURE 


Name of school 

Project Type 

District 

Town 

Morena Tshohisi 

New School 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

Harrismith 


226 





























K.1.4 DEPARTMENT OF POLICE ROADS AND TRANSPORT PROJECTS: 2018/19 


LIST OF PROJECTS PER DISTRICT & TOWN ON 2018 MTEF 


District 

Project 

Total Allocation Amount 

Thabo Mofutsanyana 

• Qwa Qwa Route 4 

• Harrismith Internal 
Route (Tshiame 

Bus Route) 

• Tshiame Bus routes 

• Regravelling 

R 121 million (The whole district) 


K.1.5 PRMG PROJECTS 


2018 MTEF OPERATIONAL BUDGET: PRMG PROJECTS 

Project name 

Start Date 

End Date 

Total Budget 

2018 /19 

Budget 18/19 

30% Sub¬ 
contracting 

Jobs to be 
created 

Current 

Status 

Comments 

1. Rehabilitation, renovations and refurbishments (CAP) 

Qwa Qwa Route 4 

01-Mar-14 

31-Mar-20 

250 000 000 

20 000 000 

N/A 

212 

Ongoing 

Contractor on Site 

2. Maintenance and Repairs (CUR) 

Harrismith Internal 
Road: Tsiame Bus 
Route 

01-Jun-16 

31-Mar-19 

100 000 000 

20 000 000 

4 380 

71 

Ongoing 

Contractor on Site 


227 














































Internal 


Re-Gravelling 

Thabo 

Mofutsanyane 

01-Apr-16 

31-Mar-19 

168 000 000 

20 000 000 

N/A 

10 

Ongoing 


K.1.6 DEPARTMENT OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM 


Towns 

Project Description 

Poverty pockets 

Time Frame 

Stakeholders 

Functions 

Functiona 

1 Region 
Number 


Commodity Region 

Location 

Project Priority 

Score (0-5) 

Program Program 4 & 5 

3 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

2021/2022 

Longterm 

Of 

2 

O 

< 

111 

1— 
Vi 
111 
o 

DARD 

ROADS 

HEALTH 

< 
i — 

o 

o 

o 

EDUCATION 

□ 

□ 

HI 

cc 

NARYSEC 

Land Reform 

RECAP 

Property 

Tenure 

Restitution 

Locate project on the 

RDP Implementation 

Plan 

Not Agriculture related 

Cereal 

Fruit &Vegs 

Fats & Oils 

Poultry 

Protein 

Protein Game 

AgriHub 

FPSU 

IHhIHa 

50/50 

ALDRI 

Other 

Water 

Cluster 

Poverty Pocket 

Agriculture Focus 

Reaion 

AgriPark/FPSU 

Total 

Kestell 

Grain project 

H 

X 






X 

X 






X 







10 


X 












3 

4 

5 

3 

3 

18 

Harrismith 

Mathabo Vegetables projects 

M 

X 







X 






X 







10 



X 





X 

X 





5 

4 

3 

3 

5 

20 

Harrismith 

Makholokoeng Bakery 

M 

X 











X 


X 







10 

X 







X 

X 





3 

2 

3 

3 

5 

16 

Phuthaditjhaba 

Maluti poultry project 

H 

X 






X 

X 






X 







10 





X 



X 






3 

4 

5 

3 

4 

15 

Kestell 

Portion 31/1903 

H 

X 



















X 

3 


X 


X 

X 

X 

X 







? 

5 

3 

3 

3 

14 

Harrismith 

PSP for the designs and 
construction monitoring for 

Phase 1 of Tshiame Agri-hub - 
Phase 1 within Thabo 

Mofutsanyana 

M 





X 








X 








10 

X 







X 






5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

25 

Harrismith 

Construction of Tshiame Agri¬ 
hub Pack house/ Fresh Produce 
Market/Agro processing within 
Thabo Mofutsanyane 

M 

X 












X 








10 

X 







X 






5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

25 

Harrismith 

PSP for the designs and 
construction monitoring for 
Makholokoeng FPSU Pack 
house Electrification & Upgrade 

M 





X 








X 








10 

X 













5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

25 

Harrismith 

Construction of Makholokoeng 
FPSU Pack house Electrification 
& Upgrade 

M 

X 












X 








10 

X 













5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

25 


228 






































































Towns 

Project Description 

Poverty pockets 

Time Frame 

Stakeholders 

Functions 

Functiona 

1 Region 
Number 


Commodity Region 

Location 

Project Priority 

Score (0-5) 

Program Program 4 & 5 

3 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 

2020/2021 

2021/2022 

Longterm 

DMR 

DESTEA 

DARD 

ROADS 

HEALTH 

COGTA 

EDUCATION 

o 

Cd 

REID 

NARYSEC 

Land Reform 

RECAP 

Property 

Tenure 

Restitution 

Locate project on the 

RDP Implementation 

Plan 

Not Agriculture related 

Cereal 

Fruit &Vegs 

Fats & Oils 

Poultry 

Protein 

Protein Game 

AgriHub 

FPSU 

IHhIHa 

50/50 

ALDRI 

Other 

Water 

Cluster 

Poverty Pocket 

Agriculture Focus 

Reaion 

AgriPark/FPSU 

Total 

Harrismith 

PSP for the designs and 
construction monitoring for 
Makholokoeng FPSU Logistics 
Centre and Bulk Services 

M 

X 












X 








10 

X 













5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

25 

Harrismith 

Drilling and equipping of the 
boreholes for the APPDP 

Projects in Makholokoeng, Farm 
Randfontein 1880, Gedult Farm 
and Sivukile Project (Paul Roux) 

M 





X 








X 








10 

X 













3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

15 

Harrismith 

PSP for the designs and 
construction monitoring for 
Namahadi Hall 

Me 

diu 

m 

X 












X 








10 

X 













3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

15 

Harrismith 

Construction of Namahadi Hall 

Me 

diu 

m 


X 











X 








10 

X 













3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

15 


Merino Walk No. 1536, Portion 1 
of the farm Merino Hoek No. 

202, & Katdoringfontein No. 379 

















X 





5 


X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 





? 

5 

3 

5 

3 

16 


Rem Ext of Bronkhorspruit 142; 
Rooihoogte No 908; 

Koeienfontein No 839 

















X 





7 


X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 





? 

5 

3 

5 

3 

16 


Ptn 3 and Rem of Strypan No 

1787 

















X 





7 


X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 





? 

5 

3 

5 

3 

16 


229