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Library 

of  the 

University  of  Toronto 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2012  with  funding  from 

University  of  Toronto 


http://archive.org/details/stationeryoffice1910toro 


VOL.  XXVI.,  No.  1. 


& 


PRICE,  $1.00  PER  YEAR 


PfflLER&POli 

*  and      W/ 


Canadian  Newsdealer 


Official  Organ  of  the  Canadian  Book,  Stationery  and  Publishing  Trades  Association 

and  for  Twenty-Four  Years  the  Recognized  Organ  of  the  Book,  Stationery  and  Fancy  Goods  Trades  of  Canada. 

MONTREAL,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Bldg.        TORONTO,  10  Front  St.  E.     WINNIPEG,  511  Union  Bank  Bldg.         LONDON,  ENG.  88  Fleet  St.  E.C. 


PUBLICATION    OFFICE:     TORONTO,     JANUARY,     1910 


Merit 


got  this  contract. 

This  letter  is  typical  of  many 
such  that  we  are  receiving  from 
our    agfents  : 


John  A.  Hart  Company 


BOOKSELLERS    AND    STATIONERS 


//,/.*yfcy.  '/j'««m/u 


Dec.  20th,    1909. 


Messrs.    John  Underwood  &  Ho., 
90  Richmond  St.   E,, 

Toronto. 

Dear  Siro;- 

You  will  "be  glad  to   knew  that   the 
Gover  uteri  t  here  have   taken  up  your  Gold  Hedal 
Carbon,   and   that  v;e  have   supplied   them  with   it 
in  plftz-t,  of  many  other  makes  which   they  have 
previously  had. 

Yours  truly, 

P.P.   John  A.  Hart  Co. 


Get    busy  pushing 
Underwood  Goods. 

Quality  Pays  ! 


Which  Pen 

will  you  push 

in 

1910? 


r^jEOPLE  are  tired  of  old-fash- 
ioned, leak}',  mussy,  fussy, 
dropper-filler  Fountain  Pens. 
The  Pen  they  want  is  the  ONOTO 
— the  Safety  Self-Filling  Vacuum 
Fountain  Pen  with  twelve  separate 
and  distinct  features  which  you 
cannot  obtain  in  any  other  Fountain 
Pen  at  any  price.  ONOTO  sales 
for  1909  prove  it. 


Four    sizes,     $2. 50, 
$3,  $4   and   $5. 
Fifteen  different 
style  points  in  each 
size. 

Sold  on  an  absolute 
guarantee  of  "Sat- 
isfaction, New  Pen 
or  Money  Back.' 


If  you  have  not  yt  t 
stocked  the  ONOTO, 
write  at  once  for 
trade  price  list  and 
full  particulars. 
Do  it  now — TO-DAY 
— every  day  you  de- 
lay you  are  losing 
profitable  sales. 


ONOTO  PEN  CO.,    261  Broadway,  New  York 

Canadian  Office:  314  Lirdsay  Bldg.,  Montreal 


BOOKSELLER     A  X  D     S T A  T I O X  E R 


PEACH  BLOOM 
STATIONER  Y 


THE  very  latest  creation  in  Station- 
ery for  the  New  Year  is  Peach 
Bloom,  and  is,  as  the  name  suggests, 
the  delicate  tint  of  the  bloom  or 
Peaches,  fresh  and  exquisite. 

This  new  line  of  popular  linen  crash- 
finished  paper  is  made  in  Writing 
Tablets,  various  sizes  with  attractive 
covers,  handsomely  boxed  Papeteries, 
Note  Paper  and  Envelopes  to  match, 
at  a  moderate  price  that  will  ensure 
its  success. 

In  introducing  this  line  we  feel  it  is 
breaking  away  from  the  orthodox  dead 
white,  and  while  not  a  color,  Peach 
,  Bloom  is  a  very  pale  blush  pink  tint, 
which  can  only  be  appreciated  on 
inspection. 

SAMPLES  MAILED    ON  REQUEST 

IVarwkk  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Limited 

Makers  of  Stationery 
Toronto 


BOO  K  S  E  L  L  F.  R     AND     STATIO  N  E  R 


1910- 


a 

M 

K 

K 

X 

8 


a?  it 

be  tfje 

tiesit  pear  pou  tjabe  eber  geen==anb 
tf)e  toorsrt:  pear  pou  eber  tofll  £ee 


CHAS.   :  GOODALL  :  SONS  :  LIMITED 

AUBREY   O.  HURST 


24  Scott  Street 


Phone  M.  1479 


TORONTO,  CANADA 


Are  you  handling 

Imprint  Fountain  Pens? 

You  can't  be  too   particular  about  the   kind 
of    pen   you   are   putting    your    imprint 
on  !     Branded  goods  indicate  a  good 
article  because  the  maker  or  dealer 
is   willing   to  stake    his  reputa- 
tion on  its  quality. 

SANFORD  & 


BENNETT'S 

Fountain 
Pens 


are  on- 
ly made  in 
high  -  grade 
lines.  There  are 
lines  to  suit  every 
writer,    and     we     are 
patentees  of  the    "  Auto- 
pen"       (Self     Filler),     the 
"Gravity    Stylo-Pen"    and    the 
Commercial "    Fountain  Pen.     It 
pay  you  to  see  our  samples  before 
placing    your    imprint    orders.     Get  into 
touch  with  us  to-day. 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Co. 


31-53  Maiden  Lane, 


NEW  YORK,  U.S.A. 


B  O  O  K  S  E  L  L  E  R     A  X  I )     S  T  A  T I  O  X  E  R 


HEADQUARTERS        FOR 

ACCOUNT  BOOKS 

Prepare    for    Coming     Year 

Large    Stock    on    Hand,  Every   Description, 
High  Standard  Maintained 


JpgggjJJJI 

w 

p     1 

LEDGERS 
JOURNALS 
DAY  BOOKS 
CASH  BOOKS 
MINUTE  BOOKS 
INVOICE  BOOKS 
BILL  BOOKS 
DOCKETS 
TRIAL  BALANCE 

MEMO  AND 
PRICE  BOOKS 

LOOSE  LEAF 

Ledgers,  Binders, 
etc.,  our  specialty 

RECEIPTS,  NOTES, 
DRAFTS,  ETC. 


SPECIAL  PATTERNS 
MADE  TO  ORDER 


\. 


BROWN  BROS. 

Account  Book  Makers  and   Stationers 

51-53  Wellington  Street  West,  TORONTO     I 


CELEBRATED 


DAVIDS 


INK 

Unsurpassed  for 
Quality    and  Value 

Electro-Chemical 

Blue  Black 
Fountain  Pen 
Carmine 

Manufactured  by 
Thaddeus    Davids   Co. 

NeW      York.     Established  1825 

BROWN  BROS. 

Limited 
Canadian  Agents,       Toronto 


Carter's 


Permanent 
Free  Flowing 
Fine  Writing 


Larger  sizes  have 
Carter's  Patent  Pour- 
out— most  conven- 
ient on  the  market. 


Send  in  your  order  at  once  before  continued  cold 
weather  makes  risky  shipping. 

THE  CARTER'S  INK  CO. 

154  Cra'ifl  St.  West,  Montreal 
Boston  New  York  Chit:! 


Bl  >OK  S  E  LI,  E  R     A  X  I)     ST  VTION  E  U 


Half  American 
Russia   Binding 


At  the  beginning  of  the  year  have 
your    Blank    Book    stock   complete 

GAGE'S 
BLANK  BOOKS 

ARE 

THE  STANDARD  OF 
VALUE 

We  manufacture  every  kind  of  Blank  Book 
from  the  cheap  pocket  memo,  book  to  the 
finest  full  bound  Bank  Ledger. 

W.  J.  GAGE  &  CO.,  Limited 

Manufacturing  Stationers 

TORONTO,  ONT. 

Paper   Mills  at  St.    Catharines 


iiiiiiiiiiii 


Half  Sheep 
Binding 


^ 


A 


Duck  and  Russia 

Binding 


Miniature  Series 
Rus  sia  Back  and   Corner;. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Special  Off er~$5.00  Globe  for  $1.00 


Ball  is  12"  in  diameter  and  map  lithographed  in  ten 
permanent  oil  colors,  highly  finished,  impervious  to  water. 
Has  adjustable  time  disc,  showing  the  time  of  every 
city  in  the  world.      The  stand  is  of  Oak  Mission  Finish. 

How  to  get  this  latest  Globe  on 
the  market : 

With    each    first    order  for    not  less    than  one   gross    of 

Crayograph  Crayons 

this  globe  will  be  shipped  for  $1.00.  Only  one  at  this  price. 
Order  a  gross  from  jobbing-  houses  and  ask  for  Globe. 
The  sale  of  Crayograph  Crayons  has  been  phenomenal, 
solely  on  their  merit. 

This  is  an  opportunity  for  dealers  to  make  a  hit  and  profit 
at  the  same  time.      Be  first  to  have  them  in  your  locality. 

Makers  :-  THE  AMERICAN  CRAYON   COMPANY 

Canadian  Agency  : —  A.  J.  McCRAE,  23  Scott  Street,  Toronto 


fit 

W 

0 

R 

L 

D 


We  Don't  Advertise 


merely    to    sell    more     Blotting,    but    to    sell     better    Blotting    Paper 

NONE  BUT  THE  GOOD  KINDS 

are  worth  advertising.       Our  slogan   is  quality.       If  you  have  not  used 

"WORLD"    "HOLLYWOOD" 

or 

"RELIANCE" 

Send  for  samples  and  see  the  qualities. 

The  Albemarle  Paper  Manufacturing  Co. 

Makers  of  Blotting  Paper  Only 


RICHMOND 


VIRGINIA 


B 
L 
0 


I 

N 
G 


15  ( )  O  K  S  E  L  L  E  R     A  XI)     STATIONER 


Staunton 

Wall  Paper 

does  not  shoot  over  the  heads 
of    the    people.      These   papers 
satisfy  because  they  are  beautiful 
and    artistic     without    being   non- 
commercial! y  faddish.   They   please 
on  sight  and  continue  to  please  when 
on  the  walls. 

Is  it  any  wonder  that  they  sell  ?     Can  you  con- 
ceive  better  reasons  for  carrying  them  ? 

We  ask  for  the  privilege   of  placing  the 
new  Staunton  Wall  Papers   before  you. 

WRITE    US 


STAUNTONS    Limited 

Wall  Paper  Manufacturer* 

933  Yonge  Street 
TORONTO 


Higgins'   Inks   and  Adhesives 

1 


The  Higgins  Inks  and  Adhesives  are  in  a  class  by  themselves.  Thej  arc 
the  best  goods  that  original  thought,  conscientious  workmanship  and  sustained 
high  ideals  can  produce.  They  are  largely  imitated  but  never  equalled.  Thev 
give  unvarying  satisfaction  to  consumers  and  dealers,  and  every  unit  is  backed 
by  our  absolute  guarantee.     Price  Lists  and  Discounts  on  Request. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  New  York,  Chicago,  London 


Originators  and  Manufacturers  of  Inks  and  Adhesives 
MAIN  OFFICE,  271  Ninth  .St 
FACTORY,  24u,  244  Eighth  St 


Brooklyn,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


FOR    BEST   VALUE    IN 


SCHOOL  FURNITURE 


Write 


The  JAMES  SMART    MFG.   CO.,    Limited 

and  Winnipeg,  Man 


Brockville,    Out. 


Canadian  Authors  and  Publishers 


Authors  and  publishers  desiring 
complete  sets  of  reviews  and 
notices  of  their  books  appearing 
in  the  Canadian  newspaper  press, 
can  be  supplied  promptly  and 
.  satisfactorily  by  us,  at  reasonable 
rates.     Write  for  full  particulars. 

The  Canadian  Press  Clipping  Bureau 

Rooms  781-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Building,  MONTREAL 
10  Front  Street,  East,    TORONTO 


fountain   pens  WHOLESALE    ONLY  stylographic   pens 

CONWAY,  STEWART  &  CO.,  LTD.,  of  33  PATERNOSTER  ROW,  LONDON,  ENG.,  being  the 
actual  manufacturers  of  all  kinds  of  FOUNTAIN  and  STYLO  Pens, invite  enquiries  from  the 
wholesale  only. 

SPECIALTIES-" STEWART'S"   Self-Filling   Fountain   Pen  (Patented). 


Made  on  the  natural  principle  of  a  syringe.     Perfect  in  its  simplicity. 

•STEWART'S"  Self-Filling  STYLO   (Patented) 


The  first   and   ONLY    Self-filling   Stylo.     Retail.  $1.00. 


BO  O K  S E L L E K     A N D     S  T A T I O N E R 


E.  MORRIS  &  CO. 

(Wholesale) 

STATIONERY 
SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 
POSTCARDS 

LOCAL   VIEW  POSTCARDS 

We  have  the  exclusive  handling  of  the  Products  of 
Three  of  the  leading  German  Postcard  Factories — 
Specialists   in   their  own   particular  style   of  card. 

CHRO  VIOTYPE  BLACK  and  WHITE 

HAND-COLORED  SEPIA     BROWN 

MARINE— BLUE 

PRICES  from  $4.50  m. 

Write    for   samples,   which    will   convince    you   that 
we  a>e  showing   high-grade  cards  only. 

VANCOUVER.B.C. 


The  Northern  Mills  Co. 


PAPER     MANUFACTURERS 


PRINTING 


AND 


WRITING 
PAPERS 


Super-calendered,  Velvet  and  Machine 
Finished  Book,  Litho  and  Antique  Print- 
ing, Engine  Sized  Writing  and  Envelope 
Papers,     White    and    Tinted    Bond. 

Typewriter  Papers  (Glazed  and  Rough 
Finished, )    Envelopes,   Bill    Heads,   etc. 

Ask  for  "Canadian  Bond,"  "Provincial 
Bond,"  "Adelia,"  "Northern  Mills," 
and     "Federal      Writing   Manilla." 


Head  Olfice,  Montreal,  278  St.  Paul  St. 

Mills,  St.  Adele,  Que. 


. 


Tatum  Post  Price  Book 

For    Loose    Leaves 

Sheets  do  not   tear  out   as  in   Rintc   Books. 
For  pocket    or  desk    Use. 

FOR  SALE  BY    STATIONERS. 


Patented  July   13,   1909 

THE  BEST   FOR   PRICE  LISTS,  CATALOGUES  AND 
OTHER  HARD  USE. 

Opens  with  coin.     No  loose  screws.     Expansion.  70  percent. 
Quick -acting  screws  fasten  at  any  point  within  range. 
Eight  stock  sizes.     Special  sizes  also  furnished. 


THE    SAM'L    C.  TATUM    CO. 

Manufacturers   of   Stationers'  Specialties,  Loose    Leaf   Devices 
Power  Punches  and  Perforators 

No.  3318  Colerain  Ave.,  CINCINNATI,  OHIO,  U.S.A. 
New  York  Office,  No.  197  Fulton  Street 


OUR  LINE  FOR 

NINETEEN  TEN 


"VTOU  will  share  our  enthusiasm  over  it  after 
■*■  our  salesmen  have  exhibited  it  to  you. 
Anticipating-  that  this  will  be  the  best  station- 
ery year  in  our  history,  we  have  made  prepara- 
tions accordingly.  The  justly  celebrated  < 
CRANE  PAPERS  appear  in  a  number  of 
new  forms.  The  tints  in  these  papers,  intro- 
duced last  year,  met  with  such  hearty  favor 
that  we  have  added  others.  We  have  also  pre- 
pared a  line  of  dinner  and  menu  cards,  in  gold 
bevel  and  other  attractive  designs,  which  we 
are  confident  will  meet  with  public  approval. 
Q  In  other  lines  we  have  added  a  number  of 
new  finishes  and  new  styles  in  envelopes.  Our 
new  papeterie  designs  excel  all  previous  at- 
tempts in  attractiveness. 

Q  We  believe  that  it  will  be  well  worth  your 
while  to  wait  for  our  representative  before 
placing  your  order. 

Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Company 

Pittsfield,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 

New  York  Office.  Brunswick  Building.  225  Fifth  Ave. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Mr.  A.  Roy  MacDougall 


has  secured  the  exclusive  Canadian  agency  for  the  following  well-known  manufacturers  : 
ACME  STAPLE  CO.,  LIMITED,  Camden,  N. J.,  Acme  Binders  and  Fasteners;  FULTON  RUBBER 
TYPE  CO.,  Elizabeth,  N.. I.,  Sign  Markers,  Business  Outfits,  Daters,  [nk  Pads ;  THE  TRUSSELL 
MANUFACTURING  CO.,  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y.,  Loose  Leal  Price  Books  and  Memorandums; 
RADCLIFFE  &  COMPANY,  New  York,  Bridge  Whist  Accessories:  THE  H.  HOCK  COMPANY, 
New  York,  Fountain  Pen  Clips,  Thumb  Tacks,  Letter  Openers;  M.  T.  SHEAHAN,  Boston,  High 
Grade  Passepartouts,  Post  Cards,  Art  Calendars.  The  above  lines  will  be  carried  in  addition  to 
those  he  has  formerly  carried. 

Mr.  MacDougall  has  adopted  the  firm  name  of  "A.  R.  MacDougall  iV  0 pany,"  and  will  con- 
tinue to  carry  on  business  under  this  name  at 


42  Adelaide  St.  W. 
Toronto  Ontario 


"Sports"  Playing  Cards 


Leaders   in 
a  second 

grade 

Good 

Luck 

and 

St. 
Lawrence 


.ACRO.S.SE    DESKJTs 


Special  card  for  whist  players  Colonial  Whist 

We  are  headquarters  for  Playing  Cards— Made 

in  Canada— Style  and  finish  equal 

to    Imported   Cards. 

Advertising  Cards  of  all  sorts,  Novel  designs 
Coated  Litho.  and  Book  Papers 

FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES  APPLY 

CONSOLIDATED  LITHOGRAPHING  AND  MANU- 
FACTURING CO.,  LIMITED 

Successors    to    The   Union    Card    and    Paper  Company,  Montreal. 


National  B 


LANK 
OOKS 


TRADE 


MARK 


MADE  in  all  sizes,  rulings    and 
bindings    to    meet    every    re- 
quirement of  the  accountant. 
They  contain  paper  of  extra  fine  qual- 
ity— the  best  products  of  the  Holyoke 
Mills  being  used  for  the  purpose. 

The  National  Line  also  includes  a 
wide  variety  of  Loose  Leaf  Ledgers, 
Price  Books  and  Memoiandums. 


National  Blank  Book  Co. 

HOLYOKE  MASSACHUSETTS 


The  Very  Thing  Your  Customer  Wants — 


(!) 


OOOOOuOOOOODOOUOOOO      i 

—4 


3» 

CUT  BEIMEN  HOLES  AND  UNWIND 
Made  in  a  variety  of  handsome  styles,  plain  or  ornamental,  rubber  tipped,  hard  or  soft  leads,  or  in  any  of  the  varying 
grades  of  lead,  suitable  for  all  purposes  and  at  prices  that  are  cheap  or  expensive  as   the  necessities' of  your  trade 
may  require. 

BLAISDELL  PAPER  PENCILS 

are  away  in  advance  of  anything  of  the  kind  yet  invented.  Never  need  sharpening  and  are  always  ready  for  immed- 
iate use.  Show  them  to  a  customer  and  you  make  a  sale.  Ladies  particularly  appreciate  their  great  convenience 
and  economical  qualities.     FOR  SALE  BY  THE  WHOLESALE  TRADE  OF  CANADA. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


WE  NOW  STOCK 


A  FULL  LINE  OF: 


Manilla  Wrapping  Paper,   Sheets  and  Rolls 
"Kraft"  Wrapping  Paper,    Sheets  and  Rolls 

(WESTERN  AGENTS    FOR  THE  NEW  BRUNSWICK    PULP    &    PAPER    CO.,    MAKERS  OF  KRAFT) 

Drug  Paper  Rolls,  Twines — Sea   Island,   Cotton,  Hemp,  Sisal. 

Suit  Boxes,     Paper  Bags,    Wax  Paper,     Twine  Holders,     Paper 
Cutters,      Vegetable  Parchment.      White  and  Coloured  Tissues. 

Samples  and  Prices  on  application. 

SMITH,  DAVIDSON  (EL  WRIGHT,    Limited 

WHOLESALE  STATIONERS  AND  PAPER  DEALERS  VANCOUVER,  B.C. 


It  is  always  ready  for  use.  Twice  the  size  of  Illustration. 
It  holds  up  to  10  lbs.  in  wall  or  woodwork.  Your  customers 
will  appreciate  its  many  good  features,  and  our  advertising 
>vill  give  the  necessary  assistance  to  make  it  a  good  seller 

ASK   YOUR  JOBBER  OR  WRITE 

THE  MANUFACTURERS  SALES  COMPANY 

(Canadian  Agents  for  August  Goertz  &  Co.,  Newark,  N.J.) 
F.  H.  REID  -  -  14-315  B1RKS  BLDG,  MONTREAL 


"  Modern  B  "  Pen  &  Pencil  Clips 

5  CENTS  EITHER  SIZE 


Duryea-Hoge  Company,  Inc.  Manufacture™ 

108  FULTON  STREET,  NEW  YORK  CITY 


THE  FACT 

that  we  are  supplying  the  two  largest 
cities  in  America  and  the  U.S.  Gov- 
ernment with  solid  crayons  is  evidence 
that  the  best  and  cheapest  aTe  made  by 


The  Standard  Crayon  Mfg.  Co. 

Danvers,  Mass. 


Artists'  Materials 


AND 


School  Supplies  ^etropole 


Colors,  Brushes, 

Papers, 

Drawing  Instruments,  etc# 

Catalogue  on  Application. 

THE    ART  METROPOLE,    Limited 

149  YONGE  STREET,  TORONTO 


Fancy  Leather 
Goods 


We  make  an  extensive  line  suit- 
able for  dealers  in  Fancy  Goods, 
Stationery,    Haberdashery,    etc. 


Send  jor  Illustrated,  Catalogue 

C.  F.  Rimipp  &  Sons 


Established 
1850 


PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  U.S.A. 


New  York  Salesrooms 


683-68S  Broadway 


Auln  Luncheon  Outfit 


BOO  K  SELL  E  R     AND    S  T  A.  T  I  O  \r  E  k 


An  Unbroken  Line  of  Success 


MANUFACTURED    BY 


THE  WEEKS-NUMAN  CO. 

SUCCESSORS    TO    THE   BUSINESS  OF 


A.  A.  Weeks  Mfg.  Co. 

STATIONERS'  HARDWARE. 
GLASSWARE  and  SPECIALTIES 


C.  H.  Numan  Co. 

GARDNER  -  ROYAL  -  VICTOR  - 
NUMAN  INKSTANDS 


Wilkes  Files 

Stick  Files 

Standing  Files 

Hoard  and  Paper  Clips 

Safety  Inkstands 

Handy  Flexible  Ruler 

Glassware 

Hardware 

Wire  Goods 

General  Stationery 


Gardner  Inkstands 
Royal  Inkstands 
Victor  Inkstands 
No  Air  Inkstands 
Numan  Inkstands 
Automatic 

Inks'and  Sets 
Library  Inkstands 
Library  Bases 
Gut  Glass  Bases 


39-41  Park  Place,  one  block  from  Broadway 

New  York,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 

We  also  beg  to  extend 

to  our  friends  in  Canada  our 

heartiest  well  wishes  for 


1910 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Waterman's 
IDEAL 
Fountain 
Pen 


STANDARDS 


L.  &  C. 
Hardtmuth's 
KOH-I-NOOR 
Pencil 


Maintain  a 

Complete 

Assortment 


Waterman's  Ideal  Fountain  Pens 
sell  with  very  little  effort  throughout 
all  seasons  of  the  year.  This  pen  is 
the  recognized  standard,  and,  to  assist 
dealers  with 'their  sales,  is  being  adver- 
tised, in  new  styles  and  sizes  and  in 
new  fields,  continually.  With  our  in- 
creasing co-operation  dealers  can  enjoy 
larger  sales  every  year. 

We  particularly  desire  our  dealers  to 
be  well  and  consistently  stocked  for  the 
large  demands,  and  to  maintain  a  con- 
sistent assortment  to  a  given  quantity 
whereby  additional  profits  can  be  earn- 
ed. Dealers  should  write  to  us  at  once 
for  full  information  in  this  respect. 


New  Lines 
to  Fill  the 
Growing  Demands 


Koh-I-Noor  Pencils  are  continually 
increasing  in  popularity  as  their  supe- 
rior qualities  and  economy  become 
better  known.  The  specializing  of 
Koh-I-Noor  Pencils  has  led  all  makes, 
and  provided  always  the  satisfactory 
grades  for  special  requirements  or  pur- 
poses. 

Koh-I-Noor  Copying  Pencils  are 
now  made  in  a  hard  degree,  at  the 
same  price  as  the  regular  grade,  espe- 
cially for  Manifolding  purposes.  Deal- 
ers should  introduce  this  new  line  at 
once  and  secure  this  additional  busi- 
ness. 

Write  for  complete  information  and 
catalogues  to-day. 


L.  E.  WATERMAN  COMPANY,  Limited,  136  St.  James  Street,  Montreal. 


10 


poofeseiier  anb  Stationer 


anb  Canabtan  J^etosbealer 


A  monthly  journal  devoted  to  the  interests 
of  the   Bookselling  and  Stationery  Trades 


Subscription:    One  Dollar  a  Year 
Single  copies     :        :     Ten  Cents 


Vol.  XXVI 


TORONTO,  CANADA,  JANUARY,   1910 


No.  1 


Editorial    Comment. 

With  1909  finishing-  up  in  record  fashion  and  1910 
starting-  off  hopefully,  there  is  elation  in  all  branches  of 
t'Ue  trade.  Canadian  booksellers  and  stationers  had  a  good 
Christmas  turnover,  as  is  abundantly  evidenced  by  the 
ease  witih  which  New  Year  drafts  are  being  met.  Lead- 
ing tradesmen  state  that  a  new  record  has  been  establish- 
ed in  the  volume  of  holiday  sales  which  will  be  hard  to 
beat  next  year.  Meanwhile,  the  traveling  men  are  out 
again  filling  up  the  gaps  which  have  been  created  and 
taking  orders  for  new  lines  for  1910.  'Several  English 
travelers  are  already  on  hand  and  representatives  of  Am- 
erican houses  are  coming  in  daily.  In  the  book  depart- 
ment quietness  still  reigns.  Publishers  are  concluding  ar- 
rangements for  tbeir  spring-  imprint  lines,  as  well  as  for 
1910  import  goods,  and  travelers  will  not  likely  get 
started  until  about  Februarv  1. 


President  Cloke,  of  the  Canadian  Booksellers  Asso- 
ciation, has  made  an  innovation  this  year  in  addressing 
through  our  columns  a  New  Year's  message  to  the  retail 
■trade  of  the  country.  We  have  no  doubt  that  every  read- 
er of  the  paper  will  peruse  this  message  carefully.  We 
are  glad  to  see  the  active  interest  which  Mr.  Cloke  is 
taking  in  association  work,  as  evidenced  by  this  letter,  and 
hope  that  he  and  other  officers  of  the  association  will 
have  something  to  say  quite  frequently  in  future  in  our 
columns.  Only  by  keeping  the  work  of  the  association 
constantly  before  the  eyes  of  the  trade,  will  results  be 
secured.  Meanwhile,  how  many  booksellers  are  going  to 
start  the  New  Year  right  by  sending  along  their  mem- 
bership fees? 

*      *      * 

We  were  advised  the  other  day  by  one  of  our  sub- 
scription canvassers  that  a  certain  firm  down  east,' which 
had  not  been  subscribing  to  this  journal  for  some  years, 
had  decided  to  resume  their  subscription.  They  were 
quite   frank  in    stating   that    they   didn't   think    much   of 


the  paper  editorially,  but  that  they  were  interested  in 
the  ads.  This  little  piece  of  news  has  naturally  tickled 
the  advertising  manager  considerably,  and  he  has  adopted 
a  very  superior  attitude  towards  the  editor.  Of  course, 
we  don't  like  to  hear  our  paper  criticized  that  way,  but 
all  the  same,  it  is  gratifying  to  learn  that  the  ads.  are 
popular.  We  want  to  see  them  more  popular  and  more 
carefully  read.  The' subscriber  to  Bookseller  and  Sta- 
tioner, who  fails  to  go  over  the  advertising  pages  month 
by  month,  is  not  alive  to  his  own  interests.  He  is  bound, 
to  lose  something  worth  while. 


For  instance,  in  this  very  number,  one  of  our  adver- 
tisers is  making  a  very  attractive  offer,  which  will  not 
likely  be  repeated.  Those  who  make  it  a  point  to  scan 
the  advertising  pages  carefully  will  see  this  and  will 
doubtless  profit  by  it.  The  careless  reader  will  miss  it 
and  later  on  will  wonder  why  he  never  heard  of  the 
proposition.  It  is  just  in  this  way  that  profitable  busi- 
nesses are  built  up.  Make  it  a  New  Year  resolution, 
therefore,  to  read  the  ads.  carefully  and  catch  the  good 
things  as   they  come  along. 


It  is  oftentimes  worth  while  to  ask  successful  book- 
sellers and  stationers  some  questions  as  to  their  methods 
of  securing  business.  The  successful  man,  strange  to  say, 
is  seldom  reticent  about  telling  his  methods.  The  inquirer 
will  nearly  always  find  that  he  is  keenly  alive  to  the  op- 
portunities which  are  afforded  him  by  the  manufacturers 
and  wholesalers  to  do  business.  If  be  is  selling  books 
he  will  make  use  of  all  the  printed  matter  which  is  sup- 
plied to  him.  If  he  is  selling  stationery,  he  will  display 
all  the  show-cards,  etc.,  that  accompany  shipments.  In 
this  way  he  utilizes  every  possible  device  for  increasing 
sales,  whether  he  can  see  results  in  so  doing  or  not.  The 
Bookseller  and  Stationer  intends  to  'Continue  its  inter- 
views among  members  of  the  trade,  who  have  ideas,  dur- 
ing 1910.  and  will  publish  these  from  month  to  month 
for  the  benefit  of  its  readers. 


II 


A  Few  Words  from  the  President  of  the  Booksellers'  Association 

Mr.  Cloke  Points  Out  that  the  Canadian  Trade  are  Making  no  Profit 
in  Selling  Books  at  25  Per  Cent.  Discount — Refers  to^Conditions 
in  the  United  States  where  an  Increased  Discount  is  Being  Agitated  For 


To  the  Booksellers  and  Stationers  of  Canada. 

Another  Christmas  .season  is  over  and  we  have  time 
lo  consider  where  we  have  been,  where  we  aire  al,  and 
where  we  are  going,  from  a  hook  trade  standpoint.  We 
have  been  buying  many  books,  notably  (he  better  class 
(tiie  higher-priced  ones,  consequently  the  slower  sellers) 
al  25  per  cent,  discount.  We  are  to-day  a,t  the  point 
where  we"  realize  there  is  no  profit  in  selling  books  at 
'J.')  per  cent.- discount.  Where  we  are  going  is. tile  great 
consideration. 

Our  experience  in  Canada  is  much  the  saine  as  that 
of  booksellers  in  the  United  States,  as  the  following  ex- 
tract taken  from  the  Publishers'  Weekly  will  show:  "Re- 
cently those  mi  si  interested  in  the  welfare  of  tiie  retail 
bookseller,  prompted  by  their  own  experiences  in  selling 
books,  have  carefully  canvassed  the  trade  in  this  country, 
state  by  state,  and  have  collected  data  concerning  the 
difference  between  the  actual  cost  of  laying'  in  stock  and 
placing  it  in  the  hands  of  the  consumer,  as  compared 
with  the  returns  on  the  transaction,  that  are  little  short 
of  startling.  The  reports,  exclusively  from  the  more  en- 
terprising- booksellers,  and  in  some  cases  from  the  man- 
agers of  the  book,  interests  of  important  department 
stores — men  who  have  been  prominent  in  upholding  the 
reform  measures  all  along  the  line,  and  who  have  even 
stood  out  for  the  highest  prices  on  fiction  obtainable  un- 
der prevailing  conditions — show  that  the  cost  of  doing 
business  ranges  from  'about  twenty  to  twenty-eight  per 
cent.,  on  a  business  that  yields  a  profit  of  but  little  above 
twenty-five  per  cent. 

Cutting  Out  the  Book  Departments. 

"In  the  eases  where  booksellers  have  begun  io  draw  the 
line  sharply  at  each  separate  department  of  their  busi- 
ness, the  conviction  has  been  reached  thai  while  the  vol- 
ume of  business  in  books  has  been  great  the  profits  have 
shrunken  to  such  extent,  where  they  have  not  vanished 
altogether,  that,  unless  assured  of  a  fairer  living-  and 
greater  security  in  doing  business,  their  book  depart- 
ments would  be  eliminated  altogether,  and  the  capital  and 
energy  hitherto  expended  in  maintaining  them  devoted  to 
their  other  and  more  profitable  lines.  Allowing  most  lib- 
erally for  possible  exaggerations,  the  situation  is  not  a 
comfortable  one.  Although  the  expenses  of  living  and 
doing  business  have  .steadily  risen  throughout  tiie  coun- 
try, and  while  the  prices  of  all  kinds  of  commodities  and 
merchandise  have  been  advanced  from  twenty  to  forty 
per  cent.,  book  prices  have  remained  practically  the  same 
— in  some  eases  going  down,  in  but  few  eases  going  up. 
Store  rents,  for  example,  especially  in  the  larger  cities, 
have  reached  points  thai  cause  one  to  marvel  how  any 
retailer,  much  less  a  bookseller,  can  realize  enough  profit 
io  cover  them,  leaving  out  of  the  question  his  other  ex- 
'  penses  and  his  own  living.  And  -yet  a  book  has  a  known 
price  and  cannot  be  sold  at  a  cent  beyond  thai  price,  as 
can    a  .piece   of  jewelry,    fill's   or   other    luxuries,    the    prices 

of  which  are  not  known.  If  his  profit,  therefore,  is  as  (dose 
as  has  been  shown  in  this  canvass,  il  is  little  wonder  thai 
the  'bookseller  considers  himself  near  the  brink  of  a  preci- 
pice, and   in  despair  cries  out    for  help.      And   il    were  lime 


in  thai  ease  for  all  concerned  to  lay  their  heads  together 
and  devise  way.-  and  means  to  secure  the  stability  of  the 
profession  which  we  all  regard  so  highly  and  for  which 
so   many   sacrifices  have   already  been   made." 

The  Situation  in  Canada. 

There  is  no  doubt  if  the  same  careful  and  critical 
examination  of  the  bookselling  business  were  to  be  made 
in  this  country,  the  conditions  would  be  found  to  be 
practically  the  sa'me.  This  being  the  case,  we,  as  retail 
booksellers,  must  persistently  cut  out  as  much  as  pos- 
sible all  books  on  which  there  is  only  a  discount  of  25 
per  cent.  The  cheap  rebounds  which  are  so  much  in 
evidence  in  every  bookshop  should  be  given  a  back  seat, 
instead  of  being  kept  to  the  front  as  they  are  in  many 
stores.  Al  50  cents,  the  present  prevailing  price,  there 
is  no  profit  in  them,  they  certainly  should  not  be  pushed. 
There  are  many  other  matters  we  should  look  into  care- 
fully, such  as  manufacturers  and  publishers  advertising 
their  wares  and  selling  to  consumers  and  never  so  much 
as  intimating  that  they  can  he  purchased  from  any  one 
but  themselves.  We  think  they  should  at  least  make 
it  known  thai  other  dealers  can  supply  their  products. 
Every  manufacturer  or  publisher,  who  sells  his  wares  to 
retailers  throughout  the  country,  should  give  the  retail- 
ers all  the  help  they  can  to  sell  the  goods.  In  doing 
this  they  would  really  be  helping  themselves.  We  note 
with1  pleasure  that  many  publishers  in  their  advertise- 
ments say.  "At  all  booksellers,"  but  many  do  not  say 
anything  about  it.  This  also  applies  to  the  leather  goods 
manufacturers    and    others. 

Increasing  the  Discount. 

We  ,-ee  the  Booksellers'  Association  in  the  U.  S.  A. 
is  conferring  with  the  publishers  in  regard  to  making 
the  discount  one-third,  instead  of  one-quarter,  on  net 
books,  and  as  the  publishers  and  retailers  are  working 
together  with  a  view  to  mutual  helpfulness,  we  expect 
something  satisfactory  will  result  from  their  conference. 
We  hope  the  trade  throuphout  Canada  will  keep  -  the 
items  mentioned  here  steadfastly  before  them  and  write 
the  secretary  of  our  Booksellers'  and  Stationers'  Asso- 
ciation in  regard  to  any  matter  that  may  be  helpful  -to 
the  trade.  We  also  hope  the  executive  committee  will 
do  their  utmost  during-  the  coming  year  to  help  the  re- 
tailer in   the  business  of  the  year. 

Remember  our  P's — Proper  Prices,  Proper  Profits, 
Proper  Protection.  More  anon.  Wishing  all  a  good  New 
Year. 

J.  G.  CLOKE, 

* 

Pres.   B.   and   S.   Assn.    of   Canada. 


A  TRADE  GRIEVANCE  IN  THE  WEST. 

Edmonton.    Dec.    20.   lflOfl. 
Editor    Bookseller    and    Stationer. —  I     notice    in    your 
December  issue  a  letter  from  Winnipeg  regarding  the  drug 
stores   handling  the   stationers'    line    of  goods.      The   snow- 
is  true  in  manv  other  cities  in   the  west   besides  Winnipeg. 


12 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  writer  knows  whereof  be  speaks  regarding  two  other 
cities,  namely,  Calgary  and  Edmonton,  where  the  same 
thing  is  carried  on.  Now,  the  writer  would  like  to  know 
how  the  druggists  gel  these  lines,  and  often  they  are 
the  very  same  lines  as  the  stationer  himself  is  selling;  they 
must  be  supplied  by  the  wholesale  houses,  [f  such  is  the 
ease,  the  wholesaler.-  are  to  blame.  The  only  remedy  would 
be  for  the  stationery  trade  to  form  a  Booksellers'  and 
Stationers'  Association,  and  when  these-  travelers  come 
around  that  peddle  their  goods  to  all  the  little  drug  and 
grocery  stores,  why,  turn  them  down.  When  a  wholesale 
Ionise  goes  so  far  as  to  let  their  travelers  puddle  their 
samples  around  to  these  places  they  nm.-i  be  hard  up  for 
business.  The  stationery  trade  in  tins-  western  provinces 
had  better  wake  up  and  grasp  the  situation  while  it  is 
young,  for  in  many  cases  where  they  have  drug  stores 
in  their  respective  cities  to-day,  they  will  ha,ve  drug  and 
stationery  stores  to-morrow,  and  then  it  will  be  up  to  the 
pool-  stationer  to  add  some  new  lines  in  order  to  get  busi- 
ness, and  possibly  it  may  be  patent  medicines,  perfumes, 
confectionery,  etc.  If  yon  have  tin-  space  to  put  this  in 
your  valuable  paper,  please  do  so. 
I  am.  yours  truly, 

AX   EDMONTON    STATIONER. 


AN  ONTARIO  STATIONERY  CONCERN'S 
Expedient  for  Increasing  Business  in  School  Supplies 
—The  Guessing  Contest  conducted  by  Weaver  of 
Berlin— Brought  in  Shoals  of  Customers. 

The  public  have  long  since  become  familiar  with  the 
guessing  contest,  conducted  by  retail  stores  with  the  aim 
of  increasing  aforesaid  public's  interest  in  their  slocks. 
We  have  frequently  been  asked  to  guess  the  number  ol 
beans  in  a  bottle;  what  a  certain  pile  of  new-minted  coins 
amounted  to;  the  number  of  dots  in  an  article  of  mer- 
chandise or  a  firm  name  contained  in  a  newspaper  adver- 
tisement; and  the  sum  total  of  the  crowd  which  would 
attend  the  opening  game  of  the  baseball  season.  As  a 
reward  for  our  diligence  and  assiduity  for  solving  these 
ponderous  mathematical  problems  we  have  been  offered 
prizes  ranging  from  a  season  ticket  to  a  roller  rink  to  a 
grand  piano  or  a  building  lot.  So  runs  the  ingenuity 
of  the  advertising  brain.  But  it  seem-  foolish  to  cavil  at 
an  idea  that  has  been  found  successful.  Of  course,  the 
primary  principle  of  this  kind  of  advertising  relies  for  its 
success  on  an  inherent  weakness  of  human  nature— the 
desire  to  get  something   for  nothing. 

However,  1  would  not  care  to  impute  this  motive  to 
every  concern  that  undertook  to  hold  a  guessing  contest 
in  order  that  it  might  do  more  business.  Regularly  con- 
ducted they  are  just  as  legitimate  as  any  other  department 
of  advertising — besides  in  some  cases  being  eminently 
more  successful. 

F.  I  Weaver  &  Co..  of  Berlin  and  Waterloo,  must  have 
been  satisfied  with  their  recent  contest  for  they  say  it 
"brought  customers  in  shoals."  How  they  managed  it  is 
interesting  and  affords  an  opportunity  to  the  trade  of 
obtaining  some  new  ideas  em  an  ever-present  problem. 

Just  before  school  opening  time  came  round 'they  in- 
serted in  the  local  paper  a  large  advertisement  six  columns 
wide  by  38  inches  deep,  which  is  shown  here  in  reduced 
form.  Then  to  supplement  this  ad  as  it  were  and  par- 
ticularly attract  the  attention  of  the  school  children  to 
the  contest  a  large  number  of  cards  were  printed  and  dis- 


tributed  to  the  scholars  at   the  school  gates  which   broughl 

them  to  the  stores  in  Large  numbers. 

The  concern  state  that  they  found  both  the  newspaper 
and  the  cards  a  good  investment.  And  this  is  e-asily  be- 
lieved if  one  will  take  the  trouble  to  read  the  ad.  Its 
prominent  feature  is  its  definiteness.  There's  nothing  of 
a   general   or  hit  -or-miss   style   about    it. 

If  there  is  one  thing  particularly  commendable  about 
F.  I.  Weaver  &  Co.'s  advertising  policy,  it  is  the  fact  that 
they  are  not  afraid  to  buy  sufficient  newspaper  spare  in 
which  to  tell  their  story.  They  seemingly  believe,  and 
are  quite  right  in  that  surmise,  that  an  unusual  event  de- 
mands mure  than  ordinary  treatment.  Had  they  been 
content  to  use  a  sma.ll  part  of  a  single  column  it  is  not 
probable  that  the  contest  would  have  attracted  anything 
like  the  attention  it  did  and  consequently  the  result  and 
volume  of  business  would  not  have  been  as  large.  So  they 
were  fully  repaid  for  their  extra  expenditure. 

The  arguments  set  forth  in  the  ad.  are  logical,  straight- 
forward, and .  convincing,  but  the  typography  of  the  an- 
nouncement might  have  received  more  favorable  treat- 
ment. And  it's  a  question  if  the  advertisement  would  no! 
have  drawn  a  still  larger  crowd  if  it  had  been  given  a 
more  attractive  setting.  The  most  important  feature  of 
the  ad. — the  conditions  of  the  contest  have  been  sub- 
ordinated to  the  rest  of  the  ad.  instead  of  the  reverse 
Then  there  is  too  much  heavy  rule  work  resulting  in  a 
hard,  auct  ioneer-jiosler-effect  out  of  harmony  altogether 
with  the  subject  matter.  The  design  would  have  gained 
in  eye-compelling  quality  if  it  had  been  set  in  a  style 
similar  to  the  reproduced  layout.  The  choice  of  Gothic, 
Post  in  conjunction  with  Cheltanham  was  hardly  in  good 
taste,  as  they  fail  to  harmonize.  A  series  of  Cheltenham 
which  affords  both  light  and  heavy  faces  would  have  been 
a  belter  choice  and  given  the  ad.  a  clean,  well-balanced 
appearance3  which  it  now  lacks.  Also  a  more  even  dis- 
tribution of  white  space,  especially  as  regards  the 
right  and  left-hand  panels,  would  have  displayed  the 
type  to  better  advantage.  However,  as  before  mentioned, 
the  copy  is  excellent,  and  the  only  regret  is  that  the  work 
of  the   compositor  is   not    of   the   same   high   standard. 


Prizes    at   Weaver's 

Something   for    Every    Pupil 

1  One  Diana  high  grade  lead  pencil  and  a  good  compa*«  to 
every  pupil  bu\ing  50c.  worth  of  school  supplies.  These 
are  premiums  worth  while,  articles  you  will  nied  in 
school.     It  means  60c.  worth  of  goods  for  50c. 

•>  MAP  DRAWING  CrNTE8T  in  which  $1000  worth  of  boys- 
own  and  girls'  own  annuals  will  be  given  away  by  the  pub- 
lishers. You  can  enter  by  bu\  ing  one  of  the  Canadian  art 
exercise  books  or  scribblers,  price  5  cents. 

3      CUESS1NC  CONTEST.     (See  our  window.) 

/  guess  that  there  are marbles  in  the  jar 

NAME 

Fill  in  above  blank  and  sign  your  name.  It  may  win  the$2.00 
urownie  camera  to  be  given  to  the  boy  or  girl  guessing  the 
nearest  to  the  correct  number. 

SEE   OUR    WINDOW    FOR    1'CRTItER    PARTICULARS 

1  Ruler  and  Blotter  free  with  every  purchase.  Compare  our 
Exercise  Books  and  Scribblers  with  any  others  in  the  two 
towns  andyou  will  agree  that  we  have  by  far  the  prettiest 
covers  and  better  paper  as  »  ell. 

F»   I.  WeftVer  (So  dO.»  Berlin    and    Waterloo 

We  buy  in  larger  quantities  and  get  better  pr'ces. 
VOL-   GET  THE  BENEFIT-we  get  the  business. 


A  reproduction  of  a  card  used  by  F.  I.  Weaver  &  Co.  in  their  recent 
guessing  contest.  These  cirds  were  distributed  among  the  school 
children  and  resulted  in  an  evtra  large  business  in  school  supplier. 
The  slogan  "  You  get  the  benefit  — we  get  the  business,"  is  a  good  one. 
It's  apparent  fairness  is  likely  to  appeal  to  the  public's  self-interest. 


13 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


News  from  Canadian  Trade  Centres 

Interesting  Items  Gathered  from  all  Parts 
of  Canada  -  Business  Good  Everywhere 
— Changes    and    Improvements    Noted. 

A  Good  Year  for  St.  John. 

ST.  JOHN,  JAN.  9.— The  year,  1909,  was  a  prosperous 
one  for  the  booksellers  and  stationers  of  St.  John.  In 
practically  every  branch  of  the  business  there  was  a  good 
turnover.  During  the  summer  the  tourist  trade  was  brisk 
and  all  the  year  round  the  demand  for  books  and  maga- 
zines was  such  as  to  cause  the  dealers  do  feel  well  satis- 
fied. The  Christmas  trade  was  well  up  to  the  average  and 
in  most  cases  it  was  reported  to  be  better  than,  usual. 
People  seemed  to  be  well  supplied  with  money  and  fancy 
goods  of  all  kinds  met  with  a  ready  sale. 

E.  G.  Nelson  &  Co.,  and  Hall's,  bad  their  special  Christ- 
mas showrooms  well  stocked,  a,nd  they  had  a  steady  stream 
of  buyers.  D.  McArthur,  in  addition  to  his  regular  show- 
rooms, rented  a  portion  of  the  store  adjoining  and  stocked 
it  with  dolls,  toys,  books,  etc.,  during  Christmas  week,  and 
the  venture  proved  a  thorough  success.  There  were  very 
few  special  Christmas  salesrooms  as  in  other  years,  and  in 
consequence  the  regular  dealers  had  about  all  the  busi- 
ness to  themselves. 

E.  G.  Nelson  &  Co.,  having  sold  their  present  building 
to  P.  W.  Daniel  &  Co.,  dry  goods  dealers,  have  secured 
the  four-storey  building  on  King  Street  formerly  occupied 
by  Reid  Bros.,  dealers  in  wallpaper,  window  blinds,  etc., 
and  will  utilize  the  entire  building  for  their  business.  The 
building  is  now  occupied  as  a  Japanese  art  store,  and  in 
consequence  of  having  'been  sold  to  Nelson's,  the  Japs 
are  auctioning  off  their  stock  of  china,  bric-a-brac,  etc. 
Nelson  &  Co.  take  possession  in  April  and  will  remodel 
the  store  to  meet   their  needs. 

The  Holiday  Trade  in  Montreal. 

MONTREAL,  JAN.  9.— With  the  annual  Christmas 
and  New  Year  rush  at  an  end,  Montreal  booksellers  and 
stationers  are  now  busily  engaged  re-arranging  their  stock 
and  weeding  out  all  articles  which  are  likely  to  prove 
stickers  during  the  coming  season.  Every  stationer  inter- 
viewed reported  a  big  business  during  the  holidays,  also 
that  the  jear  just  closed,  from  a  sales  standpoint,  was 
away  ahead  of  previous  years. 

An  "Amen"  Corner,  devoted  to  prayer  and  hymn 
books,  just  as  you  enter  the  door,  is  noticeable  on  enter- 
ing Chapman's  bookstore. 

It  was  noticed  last  month  that  the  public  in  general 
were  paying  more  attention  this  year  to  the  wrapping  of 
Christmas  gifts.  There  has  been  an  increased  demand  for 
special  paper,  fancy  colored  tape  and  labels,  etc.,  etc. 

During  the  Christmas  rush  the  demand  for  standard 
sets  of  books  was  rather  slow,  as  expected,  while  books 
with  highly-colored  illustrations  were  favorites. 

The  most  prominent  book  of  the  month  was  "The  For- 
eigner," by  Ralph  Connor.  This  book  has  been  a  general 
favorite  since  its  publication.  With  the  publication  of 
"Anne  of  Avonlea,"  which  is  proving  quite  popular,  the 
demand  for  "Anne  of  Green  Gables"  has  revived  and  the 
two  books,  written  by  L.  M.  Montgomery,  are  among  the 
foremost  of  Canadian  fiction. 

William  de  Morgan  is  once  again  prominently  before 
the  public  with  his  book,  entitled,  "It  Can  Never  Happen 


Again.'  Judging  by  present  sales,  this  book  will  prove 
a  good  seller  in  the  future.  "The  Silver  Horde,"  by  Rex 
Beach,  still  continues  strong.  Among  other  good  books 
are  "Bella  Donna,"  by  Robt.  Hichens;  "John  Marvel, 
Assistant,"  by  T.  N.  Page;  "The  White  Sister,"  by  F.  M. 
Crawford;  "Northern  Lights,"  by  Sir  Gilbert  Parker; 
"Ann  Veronica,"  by  H.  G.  Wells;  "The  City  of  Beau- 
tiful Nonsense,"  by  Thurston,  and  "Old  Rose  and  Sil- 
ver," by  M.  Reed. 

Movements  Among  the  Trade  in  Toronto. 

WINNIPEG,  JAN.  8.— Winnipeg  booksellers  and  sta- 
tioners were  not  disappointed  in  their  holiday  trade.  They 
are  now  buying  to  replace  depleted  lines. 

Fancy  books  and  greeting  cards  were  leaders  in  the 
holiday  rush.  Those  who  handled  calendars  were  more  or 
less  dissatisfied,  owing  to  the  fact  that  prices  were  cut. 
The  mail-order  houses  were  the  guilty  parties.  They  also 
cut  the  prices  of  books,  especially  "The  Foreigner"  and 
"Songs  of  a  Sourdough,"  and  the  book  trade  had  to  fol- 
low suit.  In  this  connection  a  leading  local  bookseller 
slated  that  he  was  strongly  of  the  opinion  that  pi.olishers 
should  control  the  retail  prices  of  books. 

Harrison  Fisher's  gift  books  were  very  popular,  as 
were  also  Underwood's  and  Montgomery  Flagg's.  The 
demand  for  fancy  books  of  this  kind  was  remarkably 
heavy.  Fancy  stationery  and  writing  materials  went 
well  as  gift  goods  and  stocks  have  been  greatly  depleted. 

In  December,  as  usual,  office  .stationery  trade  fell  off, 
but  present  indications  are  for  a  heavy  trade  in  these 
lines  from  now  on. 

One  interesting  market  feature  is  the  advance  in  price 
of  rubber  bands  and  all  plain  and  course  papers.  Local 
wholesale  stationers  report  scarcities  on  the  paper  market 
and  possibilities  of  further  advances.  On  December  28 
last,  paper  went  up  1£  cents,  and  that  was  the  second 
advance  within  two  weeks. 

MOVEMENTS  AMONG  THE  TRADE  IN  TORONTO. 

TORONTO,  JAN.  9.— After  Christmas  business  is  over, 
there  is  usually  a  lull  among  the  retailers,  but  among  the 
publishing  houses  and  wholesale  stationers  there  is 
renewed  activity  in  preparation  for  spring  busi- 
ness. Practically  all  the  publishers  have  been  represented 
in  New  York  during  the  last  few  days. 

Walter  StanfieM,  Truro,  N.S.,  was  noticed  in  the  city 
last  week,  on  a  buying  trip. 

Norman  Brown,  of  The  Brown  Bros.,  has  gone  to  New- 
York,  accompanied  by  Mrs.  Brown.  While  business  is  said 
to  be  the  principal  reason  for  the  trip,  still  it  is  hinted 
I  hat  they  were  both  anxious  to  inspect  the  new  Cafe  de  1' 
Opera. 

Arthur  Hall,  New  York,  successor  to  George  Munro  & 
Sons,  was  in  town  last  week,  and  is  putting  on  the  market 
again  about  one  thousand  of  the  best  titles  in  the  famous 
old  Seaside  Library.  An  arrangement  was  made  with 
McLeod  &   AHen,   to   act   as  selling  agents  in   Canada. 

John  McClelland,  of  McClelland  &  Goodchild,  spent 
the  first  week  of  the  New  Year  calling  on  the  New  York 
publishers. 

C.  J.  Mussen  and  W.  C.  Bell,  of  the  Mussen  Book  Co., 
have'  been  in  New  York  making  arrangements  for  spring 
importations. 

According  to  information  banded  out  by  Henry  Button, 
of  Cassell  &  Co.,  it  is  expected  that  Arthur  Spurgeon, 
J. P.,  general  manager  of  the  house,  will  visit   Canada  in 

14 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


April  or  May.     He  will  land  at  New  York  and  will  visit 
Montreal,  Ottawa,  Toronto,  Winnipeg  and  Chicago. 

George  Savoy,  of  the  National  Blank  Book  Co.,  Hol- 
yoke,  is  back  from  his  regular  Cuban  trip,  and  is  spending 
a  few  days  in  Toronto. 

Thomas  Allen,  of  McLeod  &  Allen,  is  spending  the 
week  of  Jan.  9  in  New  York,  where  he  joined  his  partner, 
Mr.  McLeod,  who  put  in  his  Christmas  vacation  at  his  old 
home  in  Boston. 

W.  J.  Scott,  manager  of  the  book  department  in 
Eaton 's  Winnipeg  store,  is  at  present  in  the  city,  making 
some  purchases. 

E.  J.  Boyd,  who  has  been  manager  of  the  Booklovers' 
Library,  for  the  past  few  years,  has  joined  the  traveling 
staff  of  Thomas  Y.  Crowell  &  Co.,  New  York,  and  will 
cover  Canada  and  part  of  the  States. 

Sir  Frederick  Macmillan,  head  of  Macmillan  &  Co., 
the  great  English  publishing  house,  arrives  in  Toronto  to- 
day, to  spend  a  couple  of  days  with  Frank  Wise,  presi- 
dent of  the  Canadian  company.  Sir  Frederick  and  Lady 
Macmillan  are  on  a  short  pleasure  trip  to  America,  and 
are  coming  to  Toronto  principally  to  see  the  new  building 
now  in  course  of  erection  on  Bond  Street.  While  in  t lie 
city,  Sir  Frederick  will  be  entertained  privately. 

W.  J.  Moore,  formerly  city  traveler  for  Warwick  Bros. 
&  Rutter,  has  joined  the  staff  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  and 
will  cover  the  city  for  them. 

Button  Copp,  son  of  William  Copp,  who  has  been  on 
a  survey  party  in  the  Northwest,  has  returned  home  and 
will  join  the  C.C.  force9. 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.'s  traveling  staff  for  1910  will 
be  made  up  of  D.  H.  Burn,  who  was  for  many  years  with 
Barber  &  Ellis  and  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.;  Roy  Hicking- 
buttom,  late  of  the  Sa-ult  Stationery  Co.;  Geo.  D.  Scott, 
who  was  with  A.  Roy  Macdougall  last  year,  and  Mr. 
Macdougall  himself.  Mr.  Scott  will  continue  to  carry  lea- 
ther goods;  Mr.  Burn  will  take  the  stationery  lines  to 
the  west,  and  Mr.  Hickingbottom  will  cover  the  east,  while 
Mr.  Macdougall  will  take  the  larger  cities. 

Sigmund  Birn,  of  Biru  Bros.,  the  English  manufac- 
turers of  fine  art  goods,  was  in  Toronto  last  week,  con- 
cluding 'arrangements  for  the  establishment  of  a  Cana- 
dian branch.  This  will  be  located  at  42  Adelaide  Street 
West,  where  a  stock  will  be  carried.  A.  R.  MacDougall 
&  Co.  will  be  selling  agents. 

Ronald  H.  Wilkinson  has  been  showing  the  1910  lines 
of •  T.  Fisher  Unwin,  Nisbet  &  Co.,  and  Sandeli  Bros,  in 
Toronto  this  month.  He  has  been  occupying  a  sample 
room  in  the  Carlaw  building,  and  leaves  for  the  west 
about  February  1. 

•Horace  Wooiett  passed  through  the  city  about  the 
New  Year  on  his  annual  trip  in  the  interests  of  Frederick 
Warne  &  Co.,  'Set-ten  &  Durward,  F.  H.  Ayres,  Limited, 
etc.  Mr.  Woollett  made  the  -acquaintance  of  the  Cana- 
dian  trade  last  year,  and   will  be  welcomed  ba.ck. 

F.  H.  Bailey,  representing  the  Religious  Tract  So- 
ciety, London,  En°\,  is  again  on  his  annual  visit  to  this 
country.  He  is  carrying  a  full  range  of  samples  of  the 
R.  T.  S.  publications,  and  it  would  certainly  be  worth 
while  for  all  who  have  not  hitherto  handled  this  Society's 
many  popular  series  of  prize  and  reward  books  to  get 
into  touch  with  Mr.  Bailey.  He  will  be  visiting  all  the 
important  towns  in  the  Dominion. 

Kingston  Bookseller  Surprised. 

KINGSTON,  DEC.  17.— This  morning,  Thus.  McAuley, 

a  veteran  bookseller  of  this  city,  received  quite  a   shock. 

when  a  well-known  Kingstonian  walked  into  his  store  and, 

producing  an  empty-  ink  bottle,  said:   "Mr.  McAuley,  what 


would  a  bottle  of  Stevens'  ink  of  this  size  be  worth?" 
Mr.  McAuley  examined  the  bottle  and  label  and  informed 
the  questioner  that  that  brand  of  ink  sells  now,  and  has 
sold,  for  fifty  -cents  a  bottle  of  the  size  produced,  and  he 
then  inquired  why  ihe  other  wished  to  know.  "Because," 
replied  the  man  with  the  bottle,  "forty  years  ago,  when 
the  bottle  wias  filled  with  ink,  I  stole  it  from  you  as  you 
were  having  unpacked  and  taking  in  a  case  of  goods  into 
the  store  on  King  Street  you  then  occupied.  Ever  since 
then  I  have  been  unable  to  get  rid  of  the  remorse  I  felt 
about  stealing  that  bottle  of  ink,  and  scores  of  times  have 
tried  to  muster  up  courage  enough  to  come  to  you  and 
make  restitution,  but  scores  of  'times  I  failed.  Now  I 
want  to  pay  you  for  the  ink  I  took.    How  much  is  it?" 

Mr.  McAuley  assured  him  that  the  ink  is  worth  no 
more  now  than  it  was  then,  and  that  fifty  cents  would 
square  the  account.  The  money  was  paid,  and  will  go, 
Mr.  McAuley  says,  with  an  additional  amount,  at  least 
equal  to  it,  into  the  coffers  of  the  Salvation  Army  as  a 
small  Christmas  contribution. 

Returns  to  England. 
TORONTO.  JAN.  7.— John  R,  Irwin,  who  for  the  past 
five  years  has  been  special  agent  for  the  Harmsworth 
publications  in  Canada,  has  returned  to  England,  where 
he  will  reside  in  future.  Poor  health  has  compelled  him 
to  take  a  rest  and,  after  a  vacation,  he  will  accept  a  posi- 
tion in  the  London  office  of  the  Amalgamated  Press.  The 
work  of  distribution  of  the  Harmsworth  periodicals  in 
Canada  has  been  placed  in  the  hands  of  the  Imperial  News 
Company.  During  Mr.  Irwin's  stay  in  Canada,  he  has 
built  up  the  circulation  of  these  periodicals  from  4,000 
a  month  to  250,000  a  month,  which  shows  the  rapid  in- 
crease in  the  popularity  of  these  publications. 

Warners'  Limited  to  Open  in  Regina. 
REGINA,  DEC.  20.— Another  big  firm  is  casting  its 
eyes  Reginawards,  this  time  Warners'  Limited,  of  Bran- 
don, who  handle  books,  toys  and  all  kinds  of  general  sta- 
tionery. They  'have  already  opened  a  Saskatchewan 
branch  in  Saskatoon,  but  in  a  short  while,  if  a  suitable 
site  can  be  obtained — and  no  difficulty  is  looked  for  in 
this  direction — they  will  open  up  an  extensive  branch 
here.  Mr.  Hills,  the  manager,  is  looked  for  to  visit  this 
city  in  the  course  of  the  next  fortnight,  and  while  here  it 
is  expected  that  he  will  make  all  the  final  arrangements 
necessary.  If  the  plans  materialize  as  expected  a  hand- 
some building  will  be  put  up  and  a  large  stock,  both  of 
wholesale  and  retail  goods,  will  be  placed  here. 

Western  Conditions. 
VANCOUVER,  DEC.  22.— L.  Morris,  of  E.  Morris  & 
ro.,  has  just  returned  from  a  five  months'  trip  through 
Alberta,  Saskatchewan  and  British  Columbia.  Business  in 
the  outside  points  was  splendid,  says  Mr.  Morris,  particu- 
larly in  Saskatchewan.  ."I  was  astonished  at  the  progress 
made  in  Saskatchewan.  Saskatoon  is  growing  rapidly,  and 
the  new  Grand  Trunk  line  is  making  some  good  towns." 
It  is  the  intention  of  the  E.  Morris  Co.  to  devote  par- 
ticular attention  to  business  in  this  field.  L.  Morris  works 
the  outside  points  in  the  three  provinces,  along  with  J. 
W.  Johnston. 

$ 

Mrs.  Selina  M.  Hendei's,  Port  Arthur,  has  sold  her 
fancy  goods  Business  to  S.  M.  Lowery. 

E.  E.  Clark  has  been  appointed  manager  of  the  W-illson 
Stationery  Co. '9  branch  at  Calgary.  Mr.  Clark  has  been 
in  .charge  of  the  Regina  branch  ever  since  it  was  started 
three  years  ago.  He  has  been  succeeded  there  by  J.  M. 
Merry,  of  the  Winnipeg  house. 


15 


What  Manufacturers  and  Jobbers  are  Offering  This  Month 

Activities  Among  the  Supply  Houses — Getting  Ready  for 
Spring  Business — Travelers  Begin  their  Rounds  Once  More. 


Pen  Points. 

Those  stationers  who  run  steel  or  fountain  pens  stamp- 
ed with  their  own  imprint  should  put  themselves  in  com- 
munication with  MacniveD  &  Cameron,  Ltd.,  the  pen  mak- 
ers at  Waverley  Works,  Edinburgh.  At  the  Waverley 
Ten  Works,  Birmingham,  they  manufacture  large  quanti- 
ties of  imprint  steel  pens  and  fountain  pens  in  their  en- 
tirety, and  as,  in  addition,  they  are  large  manufacturing 
stationers,  printers,  lithographers  and  box-makers  to  the 
trade,  they  have  unique  advantages  for  quoting  favorable 
terms.  Owing  to  increasing  business  this  firm  have  trans- 
ferred their  London  offices  and  warehouses  from  Farring- 
don  Avenue  to  large  and  commodious  premises  at  30  Shoe 
Lane,  E.C. 

New  Goodall  Cards. 

A.  0.  Hurst's  new  sample  book  of  Goodall 's  playing 
cards,  which  he  will  show  to  the  trade  this  season,  con- 
tains some  new  backs,  which  are  veritable  gems  of  beauty. 
To  the  imperial  Club  series  have  been  added,  among 
other  backs,  the  Cowboy,  the  Golf  Girl  and  Fernlea.  To 
t lie  Colonial  Gilt  Edge  series,  five  new  conventional  de- 
signs have  been  added.  In  the  Salon  series,  a  new  hunting 
scene,  a  new  Indian  Princess,  a  new  Indian  Chief,  Lady 
Hamilton  at  the  Spinning  Wheel,  Flora  (one  of  the  old 
Masters),  Water  Lilies  £with  maple  leaf  border)  are 
features.  In  the  Society  scries,  a  moonlight  water  scene 
of  exceptional  charm,  is  a  new  number.  All  these  cards 
are  very  charming  and  should  sell  rapidly. 

Briggs'  Lines  of  Calendars. 

William  Briggs  announces  that  he  will  handle  again 
I  his  year  Collier's  calendars  and  valentines  in  Canada. 
He  will  also  show  Anaeker's  line  of  artistic  Christmas 
cards,  which  were  in  such  favor  last  year.  Besides  these 
he  will  make  a  specialty  of  local  calendars,  in  which  there 
are  several  attractive  *styles.  The  Maxfield,  Parrish  and 
Frederic  ,  Remington  pictures  will  also  be  included  in 
Briggs'  showing. 

A   Generous  New  Year's   Offer. 

A.  J.  MeCrae,  Canadian  agent  of  the  American  Crayon 
Co.,  is  making  a  liberal  offer  to  Canadian  stationers, 
which  merits  careful  attention  at  this  time  of  the  year. 
A  handsome  large  $5.00  globe,  specially  adapted  for  school 
use,  is  offered  witli  each  first  order  for  a  gross  of  ('my- 
ograph crayons,  for  (he  sum  of  $1.00.  That  is  to  say  a 
stationer  can  make  four  hundred  per  cent  profit  on  the 
sale  of  the  globe  besides  the  liberal  profit  from  selling 
I  he  crayons. 

Some  stationers  may  be  inclined  to  think  that  they 
could  not  tackle  the  sale  of  a  gross  of  crayons,  lint  is  it 
such  as  impossibility  even  in  a  small  place?  Crayons  are 
coming  more  and  more  into  use  in  the  schools,  and  even 
i.1  a  small  school,  a  gross  of  crayons  won't  go  very  far.  A 
little  energy  directed  to  the  sale  of  the  goods  and  the 
globe,  will  bring  results.  Don't  delay  in  ordering  as  the 
supply  of  globes  is  limited. 


Special  Day  Cards. 

The  Elliott  Co.,  North  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  have  a  line  of 
special  day  tally  and  place  cards  that  commend  them- 
selves to  the  best  trade.  The  great  variety  of  designs  in- 
cludes new  and  catchy  ideas  for  St.  Valentine's  Day,  St. 
Patrick's  Day,  Lincoln's  .Birthday,  Washington's  Birth- 
day, Easter,  etc.  These  designs  in  both  tally  and  place 
cards  are  offered  in  an  entirely  new  assortment,  making  it 
more  convenient  for  the  dealer  to  handle  them  success- 
fully.    Samples  can  always  be  secured  promptly. 

Artgum. 

Artgum,  an  artificial  rubber,  was  invented  in  1899,  by 
Adolph  Sommer,  the  discoverer  of  viscol  and  numerous 
rubber  substitutes  and  waterproofing  compounds.  It  has 
proven  to  be  a  valuable  cleaning  substance,  and  already 
•has  a  very  extensive  use.  In  its  natural  condition,  it  has 
a  pale  yellow  color  and  a  faint  sweet  odor,  but  it  may  be 
secured  in  any  color  and  scented  in  any  way  desired. 

While  artgum  does  not  possess  the  elasticity  and  hard- 
ness of  pure  rubber,  in  its  cleaning  and  renovating  prop- 


5  £=STHE  DRY  CLEANER  r^S^W 

W.  AND     MASSAGER  .^j 


i 


Viscol   Company      East  Cambridge,  Mass.    W 

erty  it  greatly  excels  rubber.  Its  toughness  and  its  freedom 
from  grit  and  grease  make  artgum  a  good  material  for 
cleaning  the  surface  of  wall  paper,  drawing  paper,  leather, 
felt  and  numerous  other  articles,  which  must  not  be 
sera  ((died. 

Different  grades  of  artgum  are  made  for  special  uses. 
For  use  in  schools,  a  grade  called  "school  artgum"  is 
prepared,  which  is  somewhat  harder  than  the  regular 
grade  of  artgum. 

The  product  is  manufactured  by  the  Viscol  Co.,  of 
East  Cambridge,  Mass.,  and  sold  through  Clark  Bros., 
wholesale   stationers,    Winnipeg. 

Many  New  Stationery  Lines. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  added  quite  a  number  of  new 
lines  to  their  stationery  stock  this  season,  which  the  trade 
will  find  interesting.  "Scotch  Plaid''  is  to  be  the  leader. 
This  may  be  had  in  Salisbury  size  notepaper  banded  in 
quires  and  boxed  in  ]  reams,  and  Salisbury  envelopes, 
di-imond  cut,  boxed  in  hundreds.  There  are  also  papeter- 
irs  in  Salisbury  size,  24  envelopes  and  24  sheets  to  the  box 
and   tablets,  octavo  plain,  quarto  plain  and   Salisbury. 

New  designs  in  tablets  are  Overseas  Linen  in  quarto, 
octavo  and  Salisbury,  Norfolk  in  quarto  plain  and  ruled, 
Derbyshire  in  octavo  plain,  Bobby  Burns  in  quarto  plain 
and  ruled.  Signal  in  octavo  plain  and  ruled  and  Onion 
Skin  in  octavo  plain. 


16 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


The    Canadian    Bookman. 

The  publishers  of  the  Canadian  Book- 
man are  prepared  to  supply  copies  of 
the  paper  each  month  in  quantity  to 
booksellers  for  free  distribution  among 
book-buyers  in  their  localities.  A  spec- 
ial price  has  been  arranged  which  will 
enable  them  to  secure  quite  a  good  sup- 
ply at  a  low  expenditure.  By  rubber- 
stamping  the  issues  with  the  dealer's 
name  and  address,  they  will  advertise 
the  fact  that  all  the  books  referred  to 
in  the  issue  may  be  secured  from  them. 
The  fact  that  the  Canadian  Bookman 
covers  Canadian  publications  so  thor- 
oughly makes  it  of  considerable  value, 
while  its  careful  survey  of  publishing 
activities  elsewhere  renders  it  a  valua- 
ble medium. 

Koh-i-noor  at  the  Pole. 

Koh-i-noor  pencils  have  the  honor  of 
going  to  the  North  Pole — that  is,  some 
of  them.  Commander  Peary  says  that 
his  records  of  the  momentous  journey 
were  written  with  pencils  manufactured 
by  L.  &  C.  Hardtmuth.  He  has  writ- 
ten to  this  effect  a  letter,  which  wc 
produce  in   facsimile. 

Big  Line  of  Agencies. 

A.  Roy  MacDougall,  manufacturers'  agent,  Toronto, 
has  formed  a  company  to  be  known  as  A.  R.  MacDougall& 
Co.,  which  will  continue  t he  business.  They  have  ar- 
ranged for  several  new  agencies  this  season,  which 
should  interest  the  Canadian  trade.  They  will  show 
I'he  (lilt  Edge  line  of  price  honks,  etc.,  made  by  the 
Trussell  Mfg.  Co.,  the  products  of  the  Acme  Staple  Co. 
and  the  new  H.  Hoge  Co.,  the  Rad-Bridge  lines  of  Rad- 
cliffe  &  Co.,  and  the  products  of  the  Fulton  Rubber  Type 
Co.  Besides  these  they  will  have  all  the  lines  carried  last 
year,  including  those  of  the  Powers  Paper  Co.,  Birn  Bros., 
etc.,  etc 


At  the  North  Pole  With  Peary 

November  30th, 1909. 

L.  &  C.  Hardtmuth, 

New  York  City. 
Centleraen:- 

Hsrdtmuth'a  "Kohinoor"  Percil3  were  carried' 
by  me  on  the  northward  3ledge  journey,   and  some  of 
them  were   carried  to  the  Pole.     A3  a  matter  of  fact,,* 
have  one  or  two  left  that  were  taken  to  the  North  Pole. 
My  records  were  written  with  "Rohinoor"  pencils. 

Very  truly  yours, 


LEK. 


~~S 


VALUABLE   YEAR    BOOK. 

The  Year  Book  of  the  National  Association  of  Station- 
ers and  Manufacturers  of  the  United  'States,  has  appear- 
ed. It  contains  the  official  verbatim  report  of  tike  fifth 
annual  convention  at  Toledo,  and  makes  an  imposing 
volume  of  L62  pages.  To  Canadians  desirous  of  familiar- 
izing themselves  with  the  character  and  scope  of  the  work 
of  the  American  association,  the  Year  Book  will  be  found 
of  considerable  value.  The  addresses  on  "Care  of  Stock," 
"Expenses  and  Profits,"  and  "The  Man  Behind  the 
Counter,"  appear  in  full.  George  E.  Damon,  of  Geo. 
E,   Damon   Co.,  Boston,  is  this  year's  secretary. 


HURD'S  LAWNETTE 

is  unquestionably  tKe  selling  paper  of  tKe  year.  Its  richness  and  quality 
appeal  to  all  who  appreciate  fine  correspondence  papers.  It  is  different 
from  the  general  run  and  yet  its  writing'  surface  is  delig'htful. 

TKe  tints  in  which  it  is  made  are  especially  attractive.     TKe    OrcKid 
color  Has  recently  been  added  and  you  should  Have  it. 

A    telegraph    or    mail    order    for    a    holiday    box    assortment   -will    be 
expressed  the  day  received.     State  quantities  and  prices. 


GEO.  B.  HURD  Ol  CO. 
Fine   Paper    MaKers 

425  CEL  427  Broome  Street,  New  YorK,  U.  S.  A. 

*7 


TRADE    MARK 


Reg  US  Pat.  Otlic 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Of  Interest  to  Canadian  Newsdealers 

What  is  Being  Done  in  Magazine- 
dom  —  Changes  in  Price  —  New 
Publications  to  Appear    This  Spring. 

Cassell  &   Co.   will  launch   a    new    magazine   in   May 

called  "Outdoor  Magazine,"  It  will  sell  in  Canada  at 
20  cents. 

A  campaign  in  the  interests  of  "Chums"  is  to  he  work- 
ed shortly  by  Cassell  &  Co.  Buttons  will  be  distributed 
among1  school  children. 

Cassell  &  Co.  begin  the  puhlication  in  February  of 
of  "The  Sea  Serial"  in  twenty-four  parts. 

Scribner's -Magazine  has  secured  for  serial  publication 
during  1910,  Maurice  Hewlett's  "Rest  Harrow,"  in  which 
the  eccentric  hero  of  "Halfway  House"  and  "Open 
Country,"  John  Senhouse,  figures  again.  The  Roosevelt 
series  is  to  be  continued  during  the  year,  and  this  will 
undoubtedly  prove  very  popular.  An  entertaining  article 
in  the  January  number,  deserving  of  attention,  is  "Old 
London,"  in  which  many  of  the  quaint  features  of  the 
old  city  are  described. 

Chambers'  Journal  starts  the  new  year  with  a  serial 
by  John  Oxenham,  entitled  "Lauristons."  An  article  of 
more  than  passing  interest  in  the  January  number  deals 
with  the  theories  that  Mars  is  a  habitable  world;  the 
writer,  Alexander  W.  Roberts,  D.  Sc.  reasons  against  these 
theories.  Another  good  feature  is  "The  Philosophy  of 
Digestion,"  in  which  we- are  given  much  useful  informa- 
tion about  the  comparative  times  of  digestion  of  numerous 
foods. 

"The  Landscape  Paintings  of  James  Aumonier.  KM.." 
by  Walter  Bayes,  with  eleven  illustrations,  is  the  leading 
feature  of  the  International  Studio  for  January.  Another 
interesting  article  by  Frank  Newbolt,  deals  with  "Etched 
Book  Plates."  There  is  a  striking  illuminated  text  by  P. 
Sangorski  and  by  (1.  Sutcliffe,  besides  five  other  plates  in 
color.  The  other  contributions  include:  "Leon  Dabo, 
Landscape  Painter,"  "Some  American  Figure  Painters," 
"Emma  Ciardi,  Painter  of  Old  Italian  Gardens,"  "Lea.ves 
from  the  Sketchbook  of  Norman  Irving  Black,"  etc. 

Jubilee  of  the  Cornhill. 

That  admirable  little  English  monthly,  the  Cornhill, 
has  just  been  celebrating  its  jubilee.  Established  in 
January,  18G0,  by  George  Smith,  of  Smith,  Elder  &  Co., 
with  Thackeray  in  the  editor's  chair,  the  Cornhill  has  seen 
li^ty   years   of   existence,    and,    while    its   contemporaries 


like  Longman's,  Macmillan's  and  the  Gentleman's,  have 
disappeared,  it  continues  to  flourish.  The  Jubilee  number 
contains  much  interesting  material  bearing  on  the  career 
of  the  magazine.  It  appears  that  the  basic  idea  in  its 
founder's  brain  was  to  combine  the  custom  of  publishing 
novels  in  serial  parts  with  the  usual  magazine  formula  of 
that  day,  and  it  was  with  this  object  in  view  that  he  ar- 
ranged to  have  Thackeray  take  charge.  The  latter  was  to 
supply  a  novel,  which  instead  of  being  published  in  parts 
by  itself,  would  form  a  section  of  the  magazine.  The 
idea  worked  well  and  has  become  a  permanent  feature  in 
modern  magazine  publishing.  The  Cornhill  has  always 
maintained  its  reputation  for  its  fiction,  and  among  the 
novelists  whose  work  has  appeared  in  its  columns  are: 
Anthony  Trol'ope,  Charles  Lever,  George  Eliot,  Mrs.  Gas- 
kell.  YYilkie  Collins,  Charles  Reade,  William  Black,  James 
Payn  and  Henry  Seten   Merriman. 

SUCCESSFUL  CARTER  CONFEREENCF. 

BOSTON,    DEC.    2S.—  From   Monday,    December   20th, 

through  Wednesday,  the  22nd,  representatives  of  the  Cart- 
er's Ink  Company  from  all  over  the  country  were  in  at- 
tendance at  a  conference  at  the  factory  in  Boston.  The 
company  has  held  these  conferences  from  time  to  time, 
believing  that  the  exchange  of  ideas  and  experiences  with 
tine  another,  as  well  as  the  encouragement  and  instruc- 
tion received  IVom  the  offices  of  the  company  insures  add- 


I'^v 


.  .**'■"•* }~ 


spgi'tll  life 

-  f£S  ES  FS  &.  iibc  EEC  SCC  EEC 


! jJHtllB  :B.i@JB  6  B5F  &  JMSIilp 
ijjHpB^'f'^  m  ££  fit  --9&iiiaBiaaa»i" 


^_ 


New  Home  Carter's  Ink  Co. 

ed  enthusiasm  as  well  as  actual  profit  to  the  men.  Plans 
are  formulated  and  new  campaigns  laid  out,  which  can  be 
thoroughly  discussed  by  the  men  on  the  ground.    . 

Sessions  were   held  morning  and   afternoon,   at    which 
i.pics  of  general  interest   to  all,  and  more  technical  mat- 


A  QUICK  TURNOVER 


is  a  profitable  one.  Goods  for  which 
the  demand  is  already  created  are  quickly 
and  readily  sold.  All  teachers  know  our  supplies  to  be  the  best  for  school  use.  More  of  the  trade  every 
month  are  handling-  our  Art  Materials  and  School  Supplies.  Are  you?  There  is  easy  selling  and  good 
money  in  them  for  you. 

No.  8,  3  color  box  with  long  10c.  brush,  sells  25c. 
B-l  8  color  box  with  long  10c.  brush,  sells  30c. 
A-l        8  color  box  with  brush  on  quill  handle,  sells  25c. 

Crayons,  Paper,  Charcoal,    Fixitif,    Prang's  Art  Books,    Books  on    Modelling,  Weaving,  Manual  Training 

and  Kindergarten  Work. 
Chalks— all  kinds,  single  boxes  or  case  lots.         Colore 3  Chalks-  1   doz.,  2  doz.,  or  gross  sticks  in  box. 
SEND    FOR    CATALOGUE    AND    DISCOUNTS   TO-DAY. 

THE  GEO.  M.  HENDRY  CO.,  Ltd.,     wholesale  School  supplies,     TORONTO,   ONT. 


18 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


tera   for  both    ribbon   and   carbon   ami   ink  and   adhesive 
men  were  taken  up  and  carefully  considered. 

The  conference  this  year  was  noteworthy  as  giving 
the  men  a  chance  to  inspect  the  new  reinforced  <•  mcrete 
building  into  which  the  company  will  soon  move.  One  en- 
tire afternoon  was  given  over  to  this  and  the  plant  was 
viewed  from  top  to  bottom. 

Wednesday  night  brought  the  conference  to  a  close 
with  a  banquet  at  the  Hotel  Westminster,  presided  over 
by  R.  B.  Ganter,  president  of  the  company,  and  C.  B. 
Gordon,  general  manager.  About  forty  representatives  sat 
down  to  the  'tables  and  after  a  good  "eat,"  enjoyed  a 
programme  presented  by  "home  talent,"  which  included 
some  very  neat  sleight-of-hand  tricks  by  L.  G.  Stevens, 
of  the  Chicago  territory. 


INFRINGING  THE  WATERMAN  NAME. 
L.  E.  Waterman  &  Co.,  New  York,  have  secured  a 
permanent  injunction  against  the  Standard  Drug  Co.,  en- 
joining them  not  to  infringe  the  complainants'  trade  marks. 
The  legal  document,  containing  the  decree  of  the  court, 
has  been  circulated  by  the  Waterman  Co.  It  gives  a  de- 
tailed list  of  what  constitutes  an  infringement,  and  the 
Waterman  Co.  intimate  thai  all  persons  found  indulging  in 
unfair  trade  practice-  in  violation  of  its  terms,  will  be 
vigorously  proceeded  against. 


Austin's  Book  Store.  Main  Street,  Gait,  was  destroyed 
by  fire  on  the  morning  of  December  29.  The  loss  entailed 
amounted  to  about  $10,000.  The  store  was  owned  by  C. 
Austin,  and  managed  by  E.  Westcott,  late  of  Beterboro. 


FOUNTAIN    PENS 


STYLOGRAPHIC    PENS 


GOLD    PENS 


Being  practical  makers  of  over  25  years' experience  and  now  having  the  most  up-to-date  FACTORIES,  we  are 
prepared  to  supply  the  BEST  at  LOWEST  rates.  Special  designs  and  patents  made  (and  if  necessary  put  on  the 
English  Market)  so  as  to  secure  English  protection.    Send  particulars  and  receive  our  quotations. 

JEWEL  PEN  COMPANY,  io2Fenchurch St.,  London, Eng. 

(Sole  Makers  of  The  Red  Giant  Stylo). 


ABOUT  six  months  ago  we 
booked  an  order  for  shipping 
tags  (the  cheapest  kind  we  make) 
for  a  Company  shipping  castings 
and  machine  parts. 

The  other  day  they  wanted  an- 
other lot  of  tags  and  we  suggested 
using  a  tougher  tag.  It  didn't  take 
much  to  persuade  them,  as  the 
cheaper  tag  was.  not  sufficiently 
strong  to  carry  their  heavy  mer- 
chandise. We  are  now  running  their 
order  on  a   four  grade   better  tag. 

Let  us  check  up  your  tag  situation. 
Samples  of  all  kinds  on  request. 


SOUTHAM'S 

SHIPPING 

TAGS 


PRICES 

ON    ALL    GRADES 
IN    STANDARD 
OR  ODD  SIZES 

ON    APPLICATION. 


SOUTHAM  LIMITED 


MONTREAL 


Ticket,  Tag  and   Label  Department 


i9 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Music  and  Musical  Instruments 

The  New  Year  a  Good  Time  to  Stir 
up  this  Department  and  Place  it  on 
a    Sound   and     Progressive    Footing. 

To  establish  a  music  department  dues  not  necessarily 
imply  that  a  large  capital  is  needed.  Upon  establishing 
a  department,  a  small  supply  of  songs  is  quite  sufficient. 
If  customers  require  a  sheet  of  music  which  at  the 
you  have  not  in  stuck,  it  can  be  convenientlj  sent  for  by 
mail.  Further,  if  a  dealer  has  been  frequently  asked 
for  a  certain  song,  he  can  secure  any  number  of  copies 
by  express  at  a  very  small  cost. 

One  of  the  best  ways  to  start  a  music  department,  on 
a  small  scale  at  first,  is  to  get  in  touch  with  a  few  jobbing 
and  supply  houses  such  as  Whaley,  Royce  &  Co..  and  the 
Anglo-Canadian  Music  Co.,  Toronto,  or  the  Delmar 
Music  Co.  and  the  MeKinley  Music  Co.,  Montreal.  These 
firms  always  carry  a  fully  assorted  stock  of  all  current 
publications.  Their  buying  facilities  are  such  as  to  allow 
them  to  secure  large  quantities,  and  supply  the  retail 
trade,  giving  it  first-class  service.  If  a  dealer  does  not 
care  to  work  on  this  scale,  he  may.  write  to  the  music 
publishers  in  the  United  States.  This  way  involves  time 
where  just  as  good  satisfaction  may  often  lie  had  from 
the    Canadian    supply    houses    mentioned    previously, 

A  Drawing  Card. 

If  f,,r"  no  other  reason' than  that  a  music  department 
serves  as  a  good  drawing  card,  no  book  and  stationery 
house  should  be  without   one.     It   is  asto  "  the 

crowds  which  throng  the  music  department  of  one  of 
Montreal's  largest  and  m*?t  up-to-date  departmental 
stores.  As.  this  is  the  desired  end,  large  crowds  are  con- 
tinually passing  in  and  out,  and  if  other  goods  are  artis- 
tically displayed   sales  are   sure   to   result. 

'in  successfully  running  a  sheet  music  department,  sal- 
ary is  not  a  heavy  expense.  The  department  can  be  easily 
put  in  charge  of  girls,  who  have  a  taste  for  music,  at  a 
salary  of  from  $3  to  $5- pet  week,  according  if'  the  size  pf 
the  town.  If  one  of  tin  hands  employed  is  competent  to 
play  a,  piano,  it  is  much  better,  as  a  person  who  sets  a 
-  ing-to  his  liking,  in  many  cases  prefers  to  have  it  play- 
ed over  before  buying.  Jn  many  cases,  in  establishing  a 
sheet  music  department,  the  salary  question  can  hardly 
be   considered   a   burden. 

Profits  are  Good. 

The  profits  of  a  music  department  are  hum.  as  a 
of  the  current  publications  can  be  bought  at  from  LOc  to 
LSc,  and  generally  retail  at  from  25c  to  35c.  Songs  of 
the  popular  variety,  such  as  home  and  mother  songs,  or 
ballads,  waltzes,  coon  and  comic  songs  and  marches,  can 
be  bought,  in  mos'l  cases,  at  LOc,  and  the  high-class  bal- 
lads al  18c.  Book  and  stationery  stores  will  do  well  to 
consider  the  question  of  <  pening  a  music  department. 
Many  large  departmental  houses  do  a  biz  mail  order 
business,  while  this  trade  could  be  successfully  catered 
to  by  local  stores  in  the  numerous  towns  and  villages 
throughout    the   country. 

Current  Music. 
During   the    la.-;    two   weeks   in    December   and    also   a 

few  days  of  the  present  month,  the  demand  for  popular 
songs  fell  off.  However,  Christmas  hymns  were  much 
sought  after,  and.  in  a  way,  this  partlj  made  up  for  the 
small   trade  put    through   in    the  popular  lines. 


The  sale  of  sheet  music  is  usually  quiet  dining  these 
two  months,  but  the  beginning  of  February  will  show  a 
big  change  for  t'.ie  better.  Below  is  to  be  found  a  list 
of   current   songs. 

The  Delmar  Music  Co.,  Montreal,  is  rapidly  forging 
ahead  with  a  catalogue,  comprising  some  of  the  best  ma- 
terial obtainable.  Murchison  and  Hodge,  two  of  this 
company's  prominent  song  writers,  are  responsible  for  the 
following  songs:  "I'm  Feelin'  Blue,"  "Moonlight,  Dear, " 
"Only  Baby  Fingers,"  "Every  Adam  lias  an  Eve."  and 
''I'm  Going  Back  to  Work  Down  on  the  Farm." 

The  two  successes,  "Strolling,"  and  "In  Dear  Old 
Sweetheart  Days."'  by  Murray,  Michael  &  Zimmerman. 
are  still  bidding  their  own,  -"  Strolling"  particularly,  be- 
ing  in   favor. 

Another  good  song  with  a  pleasing  melody  published 
by  this  house  is,  "Sing  Me  a  Song  Like  You  Used  to 
Sing, "    by    Walter   Bruce. 

A  new  song  handled  by  this  house  is,  "You  Remind 
Me,  Dear  Girl,  of  My  Own  Sweet  Marie."  The  demand 
so   far  for  same  is  fair. 

The  Delmar  Music  Co.  also  is  the  publisher  of  "My 
Every  Thought  is  of  You,"  by  Sandy  Chapman  and  Mac. 
Arthur;  "I  was  Born  with  Nothing,"  by  H.  W.  Schubert, 
and   "Jus!   Because  I  Love  You  So." 

A  song  which  this  firm  is  doing  exceptionally  well  with 
is,  "It  is  Love."  This  piece  is  of  a  semi-classical  na- 
ture. "When  My  Ship  Comes  Home"  is  by  the  same 
author. 

"0,  Canada."  a  national  song  for  Canadians,  writter 
by  His  Honor  Mr.  Recorder  Weir,  D.'C.L.,  with  melody  by 
C.  Lavallee,  is  reported  to  be  very  popular. 

Three  instrumental  pieces  for  which  this  house  is  re- 
sponsible are,  "Garlta  Waltz,"  by  Herbert  Niekson; 
"Raggity  Rag,"  by  J.  B.  La  Freniere,  and  "Rag  Tags 
Rag,"  by   Harry  Thomas. 

A  lew  id'  the  good  songs  published  by  the  McKinley 
Music  Company  thai  are  expected  bo  sell  well  in  Canada 
are,  "Ciribiribin,"  a  waltz  song  by  "Pestalozza";  "The 
(How  Worm,"  idylle  for  piano,  adopted  from  Theodor 
Oeston;  "Petite  Tonkinoise,"  by  Scotto  and  Christine; 
"La.  Sorella"  March,  by  Borel  and  Clerk;  "Simple 
Simon,"  march  and  two-step,  by  Win.  Murray  Simpson; 
"Sun  Rise,"  reverie,  by  Henry  S.  Sawyer;  "The  Dream- 
land of  Love  Waltzes,"  Henry  S.  Sawyer;  "Louisiana 
Waltzes."  by  Rodirigo;  "Just  a  Little  Empty  Stocking." 
by  Bishop;  "In  the  Moonlight  with  the  Girl  You  Love," 
by   Stanley,   and   "My  Rosary,"  by  Bishop. 

Remick,  New  York,  is  the  publisher  of  the  five  fol- 
lowing compositions,  "Pul  on  Your  Old  Gray  Bonnet." 
"Lady  Love,"  "Moontime,"  "There's  a  Big  Cry  Baby 
in  the  Moon."  and  "Mandy,  How  do  Yon  do?"  All  of 
the  above-mentioned  songs  have  been  heard  frequently 
in  the  theatres  on  this  side  and  the  demand  for  same  is 
all    that   can   be  desired. 

"I  Wonder  How  the  Old  Folks  are  at  Home,"  pub- 
lished by  Vanderslooi  Music  Pub.  Co..  Williamsport,  is 
taking  well  in  Montreal. 

Victor,  Kremer  Co.,  Chicago,  have  a  good  number  in 
"Jungle    Moon." 

"He's   a    College   Boy"   and   "On  a  Monkey  Honey- 

i 'n."    I  wo  songs  published    bj    Theo.   Morse  Pub.   Co.. 

\'"w    York,  have  become  general  favorites  here. 

Harry  Von  Til/.er.  New  York,  has  an  extremely  good 
number  in  "The  Cubanola  Glide." 

The  demand  for  the  song  hit  "My  Cousin  Caruso"  is 
still  big.  This  song  is  published  by  Gus  Edwards  Mus!e 
Pub.  Co.,  New  York.    Another  one  of  their  mw  sou--  is. 


20 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  R     A  X  I )    S  T  A  T  I  O  N  E  I< 


McKINLEY  MUSIC  COMPANY 


CHICAGO 


NEW  YORK 


MONTREAL 


JOIN  THE  ARMY 

of  successful  McKinley  dealers.  Only  a  few  dollars  invested  now  will 
start  you  in  the  best  paying  proposition  on  the  market.  Retails  at  10c. 
a  copy  big  sales  big  profits.  Bear  in  mind  that  the  McKinley 
House    is  the  largest   Mail   Order   Music    Supplv  House  in   the  World. 

OUR  SYSTEM  IS  YOURS 

We  supply  you  with  catalogues,  portfolios,  covers,  posters,  etc.,  rfCC 

JOIN  US 

Sample  music,  catalogues,  etc.,  free  to  responsible  dealers  on  application. 

INVESTIGATE  NOW 


Henri  Dupuis,  Sales  Agent,  107  St.  James  Street,  Montreal 


Assistant  Manager 
Wanted 


Tbe  Bookseller  and  Stationer  is  in 
need  of  an  assistant  manager — a 
young  man,  thoroughly  versed  in 
the  book  and  stationery  business, 
who  can  handle  the  advertising 
department  competently.  A  good 
chance  for  the  right  man.  The  posi- 
tion is  open  now  and  will  be  filled 
at  once.  In  sending  in  applications, 
state  age  and  experience. 


ADDRESS,   MANAGER 

Bookseller  &  Stationer 

c/0  MacLean  Publishing  Co. 
Toronto 


"Victor"  Quality 


'HIS    WASTER'S    VOICE" 

RElj.U.o.PAT.OFF. 


Quality  is 
the  argu- 
ment that 
convinces 
people. 
You  can 
prove  t  o 
them  that 
the 


Victor  Gramophone 

is  the  best  musically  and  mechanically.  This 
means  greater  business  and  more  profits  for  you. 
Tell  people  that  the  voices  of  the  greatest  sing- 
ers in  the  world  are  recorded  exclusively  for  the 
Victor-Gramophone  ;  that  the  foremost  bands 
and  orchestras  make  Records  for  the  Victor- 
Gramnphone  only — and  you  will  be  abundantly 
repaid  for  your  efforts  Victor-Gramophone  pro- 
fits are  worth  looking  into.  Send  for  catalogs 
and  dealers'  prices. 

Berliner  Gramophone   Co. 

MONTREAL 


LIMITED 


21 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


WM.  RITCHIE  &  SONS, 

Limited 

of  EDINBURGH,  SCOTLAND 

Have    pleasure    in     announcing-    their 

1910  Collection 

of  their 


RELIABLE 
SERIES 


RELIABLE 
SERIES 

CHRISTMAS 
BOOKLETS 
CALENDARS 

Birthday  and  Easier  Booklets 

Pictorial  Post  Cards 

A  distinctive  and  commanding-  col- 
lection, embracing-  many  novel  features 
and  original  designs. 


Our  Managing  Director,  Mr.  A. 
Spottiswoode  Ritchie,  will  be  in  New 
York  from  January  15th  for  a  fortnight, 
and  will  be  glad  to  have  enquiries  or 
appointments. 

Address  : 

GRAND   UNION  HOTEL, 

42nd   Street,   NEW  YORK 


WM.  RITCHIE  &  SONS, 

Limited 

ELDER  STREET 
EDINBURGH,         -         SCOTLAND 

Cables  : — Reliable,  Edinburgh 
Also  at  London,  Manchester,  Leeds  and  Glasgow 


"I  Love  My  Wife,  so  Keep  Away."  Not  very  much 
has  been  heard  of  this  last  mentioned  piece  as  yet,  how- 
ever. 

New  Agency  in  Montreal. 

The  McKinley  Music  Co.,  Chicago  and  New  Fork,  re- 
cently appointed  Mr.  Henri  Dupiiis  to  accomodate  the 
music  trade  in  Canada.  Mr.  Dupius  has  accordingly  opened 
an  office  at  107  St.  James  St.,  Montreal.  He  has  on 
hand  a  full  range  of  all  the  famous  McKinley  publica- 
tions, which  consist  of  instrumental  and  vocal  pieces,  also 
pieces  suitable  for  guitar  and  mandolin,  cornet,  violin  and 
piano,  etc.  The  addition,  further,  comprises  a  good  range 
of  classical  pieces,  all  of  which  are  sold  at  the  standard 
McKinley  price. 

The  McKinley  house,  which  is  the  largest  mail  order 
music  supply  house  in  the  world,,  also  controls  the  Frank 
K.  Root  &  Co. 's  publications,  which  puts  Mr.  Dupius  in 
a  position  to  offer  his  customers  a  range  of  nearly  2,000 
pieces. 

DUTY   ON   SERIAL   PUBLICATIONS. 

OTTAWA,  DEO.  4.— By  Tariff  Decision  No.  362,  the 
"World's  Great  Books,"  which  are  being  issued  by  the 
Amalgamated  Press,  London,  in  42  fortnightly  parts,  enter 
Canada  under  tariff  item  No.  169  and  are  dutiable  at  15 
per  cent,  under  the  British  preferential  tariff. 


A  man  went  into  a  book  store  the  other  day  and  asked 
the  gum-chewing  grande    dame   behind   the   counter: 
"Do  you  have  'The  Cricket  on  the  Hearth?'  " 
To  which  the  young  woman  loftily  replied: 
"We    don't    keep    them    indoor    games    except    round 
Christ  mas  season, " 


Sheet  Music  and 
Music  Books 

of  the  Better   Class 

We  are  sole  representatives  in  Canada  of  the 
leading  English  music  publishers  and  carry  a 
very  complete  stock  of  standard  publications 
for  educational  and  general  use. 
NEW  SONGS,  PIANO  MUSIC,  VIOLIN 
and  ORGAN  MUSIC,  ANTHEMS  and 
CHORUSES  in  great  variety.  Liberal  dis- 
counts to  the  trade.  BOOKSELLERS  and 
STATIONERS  giving  some  attention  to 
.  this  branch  of  business  will  find  it  profitable. 
Many  Canadian  Societies,  Churches,  Choruses 
and  private  individuals  send  to  the  States  for 
their  musical  supplies.  We  can  help  you  to 
hold  this  trade  in  the  country.  Write  for 
particulars,  mentioning  this  paper. 

A  SELECTED  CATALOGUE  of  best 
selling   pieces    mailed    on    application. 

Anglo-Canadian  Music 
Publishers  Association,  Ltd. 

(Ashdown's  Music  Store) 

144  Victoria  Street  Toronto 


22 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Condensed    or    "  Want "    Advertisements 


AGENTS  WANTED. 

This  is  the  problem  of  many  Eng.ish  and 
American  manufacturers  and  publishers.  Why  not 
use  an  Ad.  under  this  heaa.ng  r 

MEN  sslling  on  commission,  01  men  whose  time 
is  not  fully  employed,  should  become  our 
agents.  The  Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods 
Review,  Hardware  and  Metal,  Printer  and  Pub- 
lisher, Bookseller  and  Stationer,  Plumber  and 
Steamfitter,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Power 
House  are  all  well  known  and  highly  regarded 
trade  papers  with  a  large  circulation  throughout 
Canada,  United  Sta'es  and  Great  Britain.  The 
circulation  must  be  maintained  and  increased.  We 
pay  large  commissions  to  men  who  push  for  new 
subscribers.  If  you  can  do  anything  in  this  way 
write  the  Circulation  Department,  giving  refer- 
ences.   The  MacLean  Publishing  Co.,  Toronto. 

WANTED— in  every  town  and  village,  a  re- 
presentative to  take  charge  of  the  circula- 
tion of  our  various  publications  :— Hardware 
and  Metal,  Canadian  Grocer,  Financial  Post, 
Plumber  and  Steamfitter,  Dry  Goods  Review, 
Printer  and  Publisher,  Bookseller  and  Stationer, 
Canadian  Machinery,  and  Busy  Man's  Magazine. 
Good  financial  standing  and  business  connection 
a  strong  recommendation.  Just  the  position  for  a 
retired  business  man  for  his  spare  t'me-  The 
MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY  Limited. 
Toronto.  (t.f. 


BOOKS  FOR  SALE. 

How  to  dispose  of  shop-worn  or  unsaleable  books 
is  the  problem  of  many  a  bookseller.  Try  an  adver- 
tisement under  this  headine. 

AUTHORS,    WHO    PUBLISH    THEIR    OWN 
books    will    find    the    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER  a  good  medium  through  which 
to  interest  the  trade  in  their  publications. 


BOOKS  IN  FOREIGN  LANGUAGES 

EMCKE  &  BUECHNER,  11  EAST  17TH 
St.,  New  York.   (All  foreign  books.)    (1209) 

EMCKE  &  BUECHNER,  11  East  17th  St., 
New  York.  Best  facilities  for  supplying  books 
in  all  languages. 


L 
L 


INFORMATION  WANTED. 

THE  EDITOR  OF  THE   BOOKSELLER   AND 
Stationer  desires  to  be  kept  posted  on  the  pub- 
lication of  all  new  books  and  magazines  in  the 
Dominion  of  Canada.     Readers  will  confer  a  favor 
by  acquainting    him    of    any  omissions  from  the 
lists  published  each  month. 


MISCELLANEOUS 


ANY  MAN  who  has  ever  lost  money  in  the  mails 
has  had  occasion  to  learn  by  painful  exper- 
ience that  the  only  properway  to  remit  money 
is  by  Dominion  Express  A'.oney  Orders  and  For- 
eign Drafts.  If  lost  or  delayed  in  the  mails,  a 
prompt  refund  is  arranged,  or  new  order  issued 
without  further  charge. 

DOUBLE  your  floor  space.  An  Otis-Fensom 
hand-power  elevator  will  double  your  floor 
space,  enable  you  to  use  that  upper  floor  cither  as 
stock  room  or  as  extra  selling'  space,  at  the  same 
time  increasing  space  on  your  ground  floor.  Costs 
only  $70.  Write  for  catalogue  "B."  The  Otis- 
Fensom  Elevator  Co.,  Traders  Bank  Building, 
Toronto.  (tf) 

DOES  YOUR  FIRE  INSURANCE  POLICY 
protect  you?  There  are  points  in  connection 
with  fire  insurance  policies  that  need  expert 
handling  to  secure  proper  protection.  We  are  fire 
insurance  experts.  We  can  safeguard  your  inter- 
ests and  procure  the  lowest  rates.  Mitchell  & 
Ryerson,  Confederation    Life    Building,   Toronto. 

(tf) 

ELIMINATE  FIRE  RISK,  save  Insurance,  re- 
duce maintenance  costs  and  s  ve  money  r.n 
your  actual  building  work  by  using  the  KAHN 
SYSTEM  of  Fireproof  Construction.  Used  in 
many  of  the  largest  business  premises  on  this 
Continent.  Write  for  catalogue.  Trussed  Con- 
crete Steel  Company  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Walker  Rd., 
Walkerville.Ont.  (tf) 

ELLIOTT-FISHER     Standard      Writing-Adding 
Machines     nuke    toil    easier.     Elliott-Fisher 
Limited,  513   No.  83  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal, 
and  129  Bay  St.,  Toronto. 


ERRORS  AVOIDED,  LABOR  SAVED  — Using 
th°  Shouperior  Autographic  Register.  Three 
copies  issued  at  one  writing.  1st,  Invoice; 
2nd,  Delivery  Ticket ;  3rd,  Charge  Sheet,  perforata 
ed  for  filing.  No  handling  of  carbons.  High 
grade  printing  and  neat  invoices.  Make  full  in- 
quirr.  Autographic  Register  Co.,  St.  Paul  and 
St.  Nicholas  St.,    Montreal.  (tf) 

FIREPROOF  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,  made 
strictly  to  the  Fire  Underwriters'  require- 
ments, reduce  your  insurance  rates  and  pro- 
tect your  building.  We  are  experts  in  this  line 
and  guarantee  you  really  fireproof  goods  and  the 
maximum  insurance  allowance.  Let  us  give  you 
our  figure.  A.  B.  Ormsby,  Ltd.,  Sheet  Metal 
Workers.     Factories:  Toronto,  Winnipeg. 

GET  THE  BUSINESS;  INCREASE  YOUR 
SALES.  U?e  Multigraph  typewritten  letters. 
Typewritten  letters  three  thousand  per  hour 
on  the  Multigraph.  The  Multigraph  does  abso- 
lutely every  form  of  printing.  Saves  you  25  p  c. 
to  75  p. c.  of  your  printing  bill.  Multigraph  yoi-r 
office  forms,  letterheads,  circular  letters.  Write 
us.  American  Multigraph  Sales  Co..  Ltd.,  129 
Bay  Street,  Toronto.  (tf) 

GET  THE  1910  CANADIAN  ALMANAC  — In- 
formation on  Customs  Tariff,  Bank  Stocks, 
Foreign  Exchange,  Pest  Offices,  Insurance. 
Assurance,  Patents,  Weights,  Measures,  News- 
papers, Magazines,  Succession  Duties  Paper 
cover,  50c;  cloth,  75c.  At  all  dealers  or  postpiid 
on  receipt  of  price.  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd.,  Dept. 
C,  86  Front  St.  West,  Toronto. 
TNSURE  HEALTH  by  installing  Pullman  System 
1  of  natural  ventilation.  Simple,  inexpensive. 
Fresh  air  introduced  under  window  sash  is 
gradually  diffused  throughout  room.  All  foul  air 
in  room  expelled  through  special  outlets.  Use  in 
store,  office  and  home.  Send  for  free  booklet. 
Wm.  Stewart  &  Co.,  Saturday  Night  Building, 
Toronto  ;  Board  of  Trade  Building,  Montreal,    (tf) 

JUST  NOW  we  are  holding  a  special  sale  of 
second-hand  typewriters.  All  makes  are  repre- 
sented :  Underwood,  Remingtons,  Olivers, 
Empires,  Smith  Premiers,  etc.  They  have  been 
carefully  rebuilt  and  are  in  good  wo-kab'e,  wear- 
ab'e  condition.  The  Monarch  Typewriter  Co., 
Ltd.,  98  King  St.  West,  Toronto,  Ont  (tf) 

KEEP  ACCOUNTSWITHOUT  BOOK-KEEP- 
ING. A  century  ago  accounting  meant  keep- 
ing books.  To-day  you  can  keep  accounts 
cheaper,  better,  quicker  and  more  accurately  by 
throwing  away  all  books  and  installing  a  McCaskey 
Account  Register.  Don't  be  skeptical — investiga- 
tion costs  nothing.  Write  us  to-day.  Dominion 
Register  Co.,  Ltd.,  lOOSpadina  Ave.,  Toronto,  (tf) 

KAY'S  FURNITURE  CATALOGUE  No.  36, 
contains  160  pages  of  fine  half-tone  engrav- 
ings of  newest  designs  in  Carpets,  Rugs, 
Furniture,  Draperies,  Wall  Papers  and  Pottery 
with  Cash  prices.  It  brings  you  into  close  touch 
with  the  immense  stocks  and  sp' en  id  manufacturing 
facilities  of  John  Kay  Company,  Limited.  36  King 
St.  West,  Toronto.  Write  for  a  copv  to-day.  It's  free. 

MODERN  FIREPROOF  CONSTRUCTION. 
Our  system  of  reinforced  concrete  work,  as 
successfully  used  in  many  of  Canada's  larg- 
est buildings,  gives  better  resuUs  at  lower  cost. 
"  A  strong  statement,"  you  will  «ay.  Write  us  and 
letus  prove  our  claims.  That's  fair.  Leach  Con- 
crete Co.,  Ltd.,  100  King  St.  West,  Toronto,  (tf) 
PROBABLY  the  most  talked  about  machine  in 
Canada  is  the  Hainer  Book-keeping  Machine. 
It  combines  in  one  machine  the  cash  and 
credit  register,  time  recorder  and  account  register. 
Representatives  wanted  everywhere.  Write  for 
our  proposition.  Book-keeping  Machines,  Ltd., 
424  Spadina  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 

USE  the  best  carbon  paper.  Our  "Klear-Kopy" 
carbon  gives  clear,  unsmudged  copies  of  your 
letters  and  other  documents  It  has  been 
selected  by  a  leading  government  against  43  com- 
petitors. "Peerless:'  typewriter  ribbons  give 
clear  letters  and  will  not  clog  the  tvpe.  SoM  by 
all  dealers.  Write  us  for  samples.  Peerless  Car- 
bon and  Ribbon  Co.,  Toronto  (tf) 
SHOW  CASES  AND  STORE  FIXTURES  for 
every  business  Send  for  illustrated  catalogue. 
Jones  Bros.  &  Co.,  Limited,  30-32  Adelaide 
St.  W.,   Toronto,  Ont.  (tf) 

SAVE  50%  OF    THE   COST    OF    HANDLING 
merchandise  by  installing  a  Beath    System  of 

Overhead  Carriers  Saves  valuable  floor 
space  because  the  trackage  is  on  the  ceiling.  Sys- 
tems for  all  kinds  of  businesses,  large  or  small. 
Write  us  for  illustrated  catalog.  W.  D  Beath  & 
Son.  193  Terauley  St.,  Toronto.  (tf) 

^AVE  70      OF  YOUR  LIGHT    BILL    by    using 
O    the  "JUST"  Tungsten  Lamp.   Fits  antsocket. 

Burtis  any  angle.  AH  candle-powers  from  six- 
teen up.  Prces  as  low  as  50  cents.  Better  write 
us  to-day.  Sterling  Electric  Supp'y  Co.,  Ltd  .  369 
Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  Ont.  (tf) 

THE  MONEY  you   are  now   losing  through  not 
having  a  National  Cash    Register  would    pay 
its  cost  in  a  short  time.    Write   us    for  proof. 
The  National  Cash  Register  Co.,   285  Yonge  St., 
Toronto. 

23 


THE     PERRY     PICTURES  -  EXTENSIVELY 
adve  tised.      Millions   sold.      Very    popular. 

Every  one  should  have  them.  Send  4  cents 
in  stamps  for  illustrated  catalogue  and  prices  to 
the  trade.  The  Perry  Pictures  Co.,  Box  440, 
Maiden,  Mass.  (2-10) 

THE     METAL    REQUIRED    IN    A   MODERN 
1      CONCRETE     BUILDING.       Our     special 

facilities  enable  us  to  produce  at  minimum 
cost  Concrete  Reinforcements,  Fenestra  Steel 
Sash,  Automatic  Fire  Shutters  and  Steelcrete 
Metal  Lath.  Complete  stock;  quick  delivery. 
Before  deciding  write  us  for  catalogue  and  prices. 
Expanded  Metal  and  Fireproofing  Co.,  Ltd., 
Fraser  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 

-"The  "KALAMAZOO"  Loose  Leaf  Binder  is   the 
*■      only  bindef  that  will  hold  iust  as  many  sheets 

as  you  actually  require  and  no  more.  The  back 
is  flexible;  writing  surface  flat;  alignment  perfect. 
It  cannot  get  out  of  order.  No  exposed  metal  parts 
or  complicated  mechanism.  Write  for  booklet. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter  Ltd.,  King  and  Spadina, 
Toronto. 

VJTANTED— A  splendid  opportunity  for  dealers 
"  to  handle  the  best  combination  Duplicat.ng, 
Addressing  andOffice  Printing  Machine  on 
h  e  market.  Exclusive  territory.  Send  name  and 
address,  giving  occupation  and  references,  to  the 
Canadian  Writerpress  Company,  Ltd  ,  33  John 
St  ,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

WHEN   buying  bookcases   insist  on    having  the 
best  on  the  market,  "Macey  Sectional    Book- 
cases."   Carried  in  stock  by   all   up-to-date 
furniture  dealers.     Illustrated  booklet  sent  free  on 
request.     Canada    Furniture   Manufacturers,    Ltd. 
General  offices,  Woodstock,  Ont.  (tf) 

WHY  IMPORT  Loose-Leaf  Binders  and  Metal 
Parts  when  you  can  buy  "  Systems   Quality" 
from  us?    We  make  the  best  binders  in  the 
world;  make  them  to  match,  too.    Ours  are   the 
Canadian    Loose-Leaf   Standatds.     Business   Sys- 
tems Limited,  Manufacturing  Stationers,  Toronto. 

(tf) 
■yOU  need  the  best  possible  protection  from  fire  ! 
1  If  your  valuables  are  In  one  of  our  safes,  you 
can  rest  at  ease;  no  fire  is  too  hot  for  our 
safes  and  vaults  to  withstand.  We  manufacture 
vaults  and  safes  to  meet  every  possible  require- 
ment. Write  for  catalogue  "S."  The  Goldie  & 
McCulloch  Co.,  Ltd.,  Gait,  Ont,  (tf) 

<£„..  BUYS  THE  BEST  DUPLICATING  MA- 
vP7s  CHINE  on  the  market.  ACME  will  print 
yJ  anything  a  job  printer  can  do.  Complete 
outfit:  Acme  Duplicating  Machine,  one  tubular 
stand  fitted  with  type  cases,  compartments  plainly 
lettered  and  arranged  like  universal  keyboard  of 
the  standard  make  of  typewriters;  one  drawer  for 
accessories  and  forms,  20  lb.  font  of  typewriter 
type,  one  chase,  one  Acme  ribbon  any  color  with 
typewriter  ribbon  to  match,  one  pair  tweezers,  two 
quoins,  one  key,  one  oil  can  and  one  set  of  reglets. 
Sold  with  a  guarantee.  Acme  Duplicator  Co., 
Baltimore,  Md.,  U.S.A.  (tf) 

PERIODICALS. 

KEEP  POSTED-The  leading  authority    in    Ca- 
nada on  groceries  and   food  products  is  THE 
CANADIAN  GROCER.     Important  tradecon- 
ditions  generally  discussed  every  week.     Price  $2 
per  year. 

THE  market   reports    make    HARJDWARE   AND 
METAL  a  necessity  to  every  hardware  merch- 
ant,  paint  and  oil    dealer   in    Canada.     It   is 
mailed   everv  Friday.     Subscription   price   $2    per 
year.     Address  HARDWARE  AND  METAL.  Mont- 
real, Toronto  or  Winnipeg. 

SITUATION  WANTED 

ADVERTISER  is  open  for  a  position  whereen- 
terprise,  hard  work  and  strict  attention  to 
business  count.  Can  show  a  successful 
record  in  build  ng  up  businesses.  Was  manager 
for  two  different  stationery  and  news  stores  and 
increased  the  turnover  in  each  case  over  100  p.c. 
Address,  "Worker,"  care  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER,  Hartney,  Chambers,  Vancouver, 
B.C. 

WANTED 

WANTED — By  new  mail  order  news  agency, 
terms,  etc.,  from  publishers  Address,  Box 
222,  BOOKSELLER  .AND  STATIONER,  To- 
ronto.  (1-10) 

WANTED— Capable  youngman  to  handle  Book, 
Stationery  and  Office  Supply  Business  in 
western  city.  Must  be  of  good  address,  have 
ability  and  thoroughly  honest.  Grand  opportunity 
for  the  right  young  man  toobtsin  an  interest  in  a 
growing  business  without  investing  much  money, 
provided  he  can  handle  the  business  successfully. 
Applicants  must  furnish  reference  or  thev  will 
not  be  considered.  Apply  Box  223,  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER,  Toronto. 


CLASSIFIED  LIST  OF  ADVERTISEMENTS 


Artists'  Materials. 

Ramsay,    A.,    &    Sons,    Montreal. 

Art  Publishers. 

Copp.   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 

Books  and  Magazines. 

American   Code   Co..   New  York. 

Baker's    Book  Shop,    Birmingham,    Eng. 

Busy   Man's  Magazine,  Toronto. 

Briggs,    Wm.,    Toronto. 

Cassell   &    Co.,    Toronto. 

Clark  Bros.,   Winnipeg,  Man. 

Copp.    Clark    Co.,    Toronto 

Frowdc,   Henry,   Toronto. 

Gage.   W.    J.   &  Co. 

Harcourt   &   Co.,    E.   H.,    Toronto. 

Macmillan    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

MeLeod   &    Allen,    Toronto. 

Morton,   Phillips   &   Co.,    Montreal. 

Museum    Book    Store,    London,    Eng. 

Musson   Book    Co.,    Toronto. 

Page   &   Co.,   L.   C,   Boston,   Mass. 

Religious   Tract    Society,    London,    England. 

Renouf   Publishing   Co..   Montreal,    P.    Q. 

Blank  Books. 

Brown   Bros.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,    Gillies   &   Co.,   Hamilton. 

Copi     Llark  Co.,  Toronto. 

National    Blank   Book   Co.,   Holyoke,    Mass. 

Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright.  Vancouver,   B.C. 

Warwick    Bros.,    &    Rutter.    Toronto. 

Carbon  Paper. 

Carter's   Ink   Co.,    Boston,    Mass. 
Mittag   &    Volger,   Park   Ridge.    N.    J. 
Underwood.    John,    &    Co.,   Toronto. 

Christmas  Cards,  Calendars,  Labels. 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Hamilton.  Ont. 
Cambridge    Corporation    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Copp.  Clark  Co..  Toronto. 

Crepe  Paper,  &c. 

Tuttle   Press   Co..   Appleton,   Wis. 

Fancy  Goods — Novelties. 

Brown   Bros..    Toronto. 

Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Clark   Bros.,    Winnipeg.   Man. 

Copp.  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

Fancy    Goods   Co.,   of   Canada,   Toronto. 

Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,   B.C. 

Warwick  Bros.   &   Rutter,  •  Toronto. 
Young    Bros.,    Toronto. 

Financial  Institutions  and  Insurance 

British-American    Assurance    Co.,    Toronto. 
Western   Assurance   Co.,    Toronto. 

Fountain  Pens. 

Brown    Bros.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Copp.  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 
Mabie,    Todd    &    Co.,    High    Holborn,    Lon- 
don,  W.C. 
Warwick  Bros.   &   Rutter,    Toronto. 
,  Waterman,    L.    E.,    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Fountain  Pen  Klips. 

Waterman.    L.    E..    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal 


Mabie.    Todd     &    Co..      High    Holborn. 
London,    W.C. 

Glue,  Paste  and  Mucilage, 

Carter's  Ink  Co..  Montreal. 

Higgins,    Chas.    M.    &    Co.,    Brooklyn 

Underwood,     John    &    Co..    Toronto, 

Glue  Pencils. 

Carter's  Ink  Co.,  Boston. 

Gramaphones. 

Berliner   Gramapnone   Co.,    of    Canada.,    Ltd., 
Montreal,    Uue. 

Ink  Stands. 

Weeks-Numan  Co.,   New  York,   N.   Y. 

Inks — Writing. 

Brown  Bros..  Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
L(  i  laiK  Co.,  Toronto. 

Carter's   Ink   Co.,   Montreal. 
Davids.  Thaddeus  Co.,   New  York. 
Higgins,    Chas.    M.    &    Co..    Brooklyn. 
Mabie.    Todd   &    Co..    High    Holborn,    Lon- 
don,  W.   C. 
Payson's. 

Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright.  Vancouver,  B.C. 
Underwood.   John,   &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Warwick   Bros.   &   Rutter,    Toronto. 
Gage.   W.    J..   &   Co. 
Waterman,    L.    E.,    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Leather  Goods. 

Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Rumpp,   C.   V.,   &  Sons,   Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Letter  Presses. 

Jas.  Smart  Mfg.   Co.,  Brockville,   Ont. 
Music  Publishers. 

Anglo    Canadian    Music    Publishing    Associa- 
tion,  Toronto. 
Delmar    Music    Company,    Montreal. 
McKinley  Music  Co.,  Montreal,  P.  Q. 

Paper. 

Albermarle     Paper     Mfg.    Co.,      Richmond, 

Va..    U.S.A. 
Brown  Bros.,  Ltd..   Toronto. 
Buntin,   Gillies  &  Co.,   Ltd.,   Hamilton. 
Eaton,   Crane   &  Pike  Co.,   Pittsfield,   Mass. 
Hurd.   Geo.   B.,   &  Co.,  New   York. 
Gage,    W.    J.,   &   Co. 

Pens. 

Brown   Bros.,    Toronto. 
Buntin,    Gillies   Co..   Hamilton,    Ont. 
Conway   Stewart   &   Co.,   London.   Eng. 
Copp.   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
Heath,   John,   London. 
Jewel    Pen   Co.,   London,    Eng. 
Mabie,' Todd    &    Co.,    High    Holborn,    Lon- 
don,   W.   C. 
Macniven  &  Cameron,  Edinburgh  and  Birm 

ingham. 
Onoto   Pen   Company,   New   York   Ciey. 
Sanford  &  Bennett  Co.,  New  York. 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 


Spencerian    Pen    Co..    Birmingham.    Eng. 
Warwick   Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto. 
Waterman.  L.   E..   Co.,  Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Pencils — Crayons — Erasers. 

American  Crayon    Mfg.    Co.,  Waltham,  Mass. 
Blaisdell   Paper   Pencil   Co.,   New  York.  N.Y. 
Brown  Bros.,   Ltd..   Toronto. 
Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co..  Ltd..  Hamilton.  Ont. 
Copn.   Clark   Co..  Toronto. 
Mabie,    Todd    &    Co..    High    Holborn.    Lon- 
don,   W.   C. 
Ramsay,  A.,  &   Son.   Montreal. 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright.  Vancouver.  B.C. 
Standard   Crayon  Co..    Danvers,   Mass. 
Warwick   Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto. 
Gage,   W.    J.,   &  Co. 
Waterman,    L.    E.,    Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

-  Photographic  Supplies. 

Ward   &   Co..   Montreal. 

Playing  Cards,  Games,  etc. 

Buntin.   Gillies  &   Co.,  Hamilton. 
Consolidated    Lithographing    &    Mfg.      Co.. 

Montreal. 
Copp.   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
Goodall,   Chas.,    &  Sons,   London. 
Hurst,    A.   0.,   Toronto. 
Warwick  Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto. 
Gage,   W.    J.,   &   Co. 

Post  Cards. 

European   Post   Card    Co.,    Montreal,    P.    Q. 

Post  Card  Cabinets 

Gier  &  Dail  Mfg.  Co.,  Lansing,  Mich. 

Publishers  and  Printers. 

Southam.    Limited,    Montreal.    P.    Q. 

School  Supplies. 

Buntin.  Gillies  Co..  Hamilton. 
Clark  Bros.  Co.,   Winnipeg. 
Copt'.   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
Hendry.    Geo.    M.    Co.,    Ltd..   Toronto. 
Morris,    E.    &    Co.,    Vancouver.    B.C. 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver.  B.C. 
Warwick   Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto. 
Gage,   W.    J.,   &  Co. 

Souvenir  and  Picture  Post  Cards. 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Copp,   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
Warwick   Bros.   &  Rutter.   Toronto. 

Telegraph  Codes. 

American   Code  Co.,   New  York. 

Typewriter  Supplies. 

Carter's  Ink  Co..   Montreal. 
Peerless    Carbon    &    Ribbon    Mfg.    Co..    To- 
ronto. 
Mittag   &   Volger,   Park   Ridge,   N.J. 
Underwood,    John.  &  Co.,  Toronto. 


Wall  Papers. 


Stauntons  Limited,   Toronto. 


Accountants    and    Auditors     43 

Albermarle    Paper    Mfg.    Co 4 

American    Code  'Co ". 27 

Anglo    Can.   Music   Co 22 

Art    Metropole    Co 15 

B 

Baker's   Book   Shop 27 

Berliner    Gramaphone    Co 22 

Blaisdell    Paper    Pencil    Co 7 

British-America    Assurance    Co 27 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd 2 

Buntin,   Gillies  &  Co.   ...  outside  cover  and  31 

C 

Canadian    Press    Clipping    Bureau    5 

Carter's    Ink    Co •. 2 

Cassell    &    Co.,    Ltd. 41 

Consolidated    Lithographing    &    Mfg.    Co.  7 

Conway,    Stewart    &    Co 5 

Copp,    Clark    Co 35—36 

D 

Davids,    Thaddeus    Co 2 

Delmar   Music   Co 21 

Duryea-Hoge    Co 8 

E 

Eaton,    Crane   &    Pike    Co 6 

European  Post  Card  Co 10 

F 

Financial    Post    41 

Frowde.    Henry   41 


Gage,    W.    J.,    &    Co. 
Goodall's    


H 


Heath,    John    28 

Hendry,    Geo.   M.,   Co 78 

Higgins.    Chas.    M.    &    Co 5 

Hotel    Directory    43 

Huebsch,    B.    W 17 

Hunt,    C.    Howard.    Pen    Co 25—26 

Hurd.    Ceo.    B.,    &    Co 24 

Hurst.    A.    0 1 

J 

Jenkins.    Wm.    R.,    Co 24 

Jewel    Pen    Co W 

L 

Lemeke    &    Bucchner.    33 

M 

MacDougall    A.    Hoy   : 7 

Macniven    &    Cameron    28 

Mabie.    Todd    &    Co 44 

Manufacturers    Sales    Co ••  8 

McKinley    Music    Co 21 

Mittag     &      Volger    ...    ..-.    outside   back   cover 

Morris,    E.    &    Co 6 

Morton.    Phillips    &    Co 43 

Museum    Book    Store    27 

N 

National    Blank    Book    Co 7 


Northern   Mills   Pulp   &    Paper   Co 6 

Payson's   Indelible   Ink    43 

R 

Ramsay.    A.,    &    Son    Co 28 

Renouf    Publishing   Co 27 

Religious   Tract  Society   42 

Ritchie,    Wm.    &    Sons    22 

Rumpp   &    Sons,    C.    F 8 

S 

Sanford   &  Bennett   Co 1 

Smith.    Davidson    &    Wright    8 

Smart,    James    Mfg.    Co 5 

Southam,    Limited   19 

Spencerian    Steel    Pens    28 

Standard   Crayon    Co : 8 

Stauntons.    Ltd 5 

T 

Tatum.    Samuel    C.    Co 6 

Tattle    Press    Co 43 

U 
Underwood,    John   &   Co..   outside  front  cover 

W 

Ward    &    Co 27 

Warwick    Bros.    &    Rutter.    Inside    front    cover 

and  14 

Waterman,    L.    E.,    Co..    Ltd 10 

Weeks-Numan   Co 9 

Western    Assurance    Co 28 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


* 


BJI  IKIT'C    ROUND 

nUn         3  POINTED 


PENS 


RECEIVED  THE  ONLY 


THEY 

DON'T 

SCRATCH,    BLOT 


OR  SPURT 


GOLD   MEDAL 

AWARDED   TO   STEEL   PENS   AT   ST.    LOUIS    FOR 


THEY 

DO 

WRITE    RIGHT 
WEAR    LONG 


EXCELLENCE  OF  MANUFACTURE 
AND  SUPERIORITY  OF  FINISHED  PRODUCT 


FOR  GENERAL  WRITING 


EssD 


No.  IB.  GIGANTIC— Firm  action.    Exception- 
ally durable  writing  pen.    90  cents. 


,  ©courier") 

BgggfeTOUWMwrinpBlay 


No.  700.     COURIER    PEN  — Medium  points. 
For  general  writing.    80  cents. 


JalisJ 


No.  7.    TRIBUNE  PEN— Medium  points.  Very 
popular  for  general  writing.    80  cents. 


No.  97.    FALCON  PEN-Medium  fine  points. 
Made  in  colors,  white  or  bronze.    65  Cts. 


®  MERCANTILE  ) 


No.  10.    MERCANTILE-In  white  or  bronze. 
Fine  pen  for  general  purposes.    75  cents. 


**i£ 


3® 


BANKING 

DUNDPOINTEDPENS 


No.  57.    BANKING- In  white  or  bronze.    A 
popular  general  writing  pen.    75  cents. 


„        ..  C.H0WAR0 HUNTPEHCo\ 
Bl  H       ,       JOURNAL         ) 

?r__;  ^n^'jtjDPOiNrejPENS/ 

No.   27.     JOURNAL     PEN  —  Medium    points. 
Good  business  pen,  new.    75  cents. 


No.  42.  RIGID— Very  firm  action.  Exten- 
sively used  bv  Banks  and  business 
houses.    75  cenis. 


No.  9.    "H"  or  HOMER  PEN— Medium  points. 
For  general  writing,  new.    80  cents. 


l[I 


CHOWARDHUNrPENCo  "'W 

©ELASTIC 


No.  46.      ELASTIC — M«dium    point,    springy 
action.    75  cents. 


No.   54.     STRAND    PEN  — Elastic   action. 
Medium  fine  points.    75  cents. 


No.  24.  LEDGER— Ideal  Pen  for  bookkeep. 
ing,  correspondence  and  card  entries. 
Fine  point.     80  cents. 

No.  4.     ARROW— 75  cents 


THEY  ARE  THE 

RESULT  OF  OUR  PROCESS  OF 

ROUNDING  THE  POINTS 


TURNED  UP  POINTS  AND 
MANIFOLD   PENS 


No.  16.  SPEAR  POINT  PEN— Medium  fine 
point,  long  nib,  flexible  action.  A  very 
desirable  pen.    75  cents. 


0)©SPEEDAWAY  J 
0UNOF0INTEOPET1S/ 


No.  6.    SPEEDAWAY  PEN -Turned  up  point, 
rigid  action  ;  holds  plenty  of  ink.   75  Cts. 


/n^     m     C. HOWARD  HUNTPEf 
(£)    ^    RAPID  WRITER 


'       ) 

US  J 


No.  86.    RAPID  WRITER— Turned  up  points. 
For  rapid  writing.    75  cents. 


No.  86  E.  F.     RAPID   WRITER  —  Turned   up 
point.     Finer  point  than  Ko.  86.    75  cts. 


No.  513.    GLOBE-Point  dented,  like  a  half 
ball.    75  cents. 


Siiiigy  .»„.HUNtv;s"\ 

,     ld>@TRlPLICAT0R     ) 

V|f.^,,.„i,„Mj/ 

No.  64.    TRIPLICATOR-Ideal  pen  for  making 

clear  carbon  impressions.     Extra  heavy 
steel.    $1.00. 


V'c HOWARD  HUNT  PE'fic'o'A 

BC  MAIJ I  FOLD  1 

PTUNO  POINTED  PENS   / 


No.  74.     MANIFOLD   PEN— Very  desirable  for 
carbon  copies.    75  cents. 


No.  29M.  MEDIUM  NIB— A  very  superior  pen, 
new.  Made  in  colors,  black  and  white. 
76  cents. 


No.  29B.  BROAD  NIB— A  very  superior  pen, 
new.  Made  in  colors,  black  and  white. 
75  cenis. 


jhHUNTpenc: i    \ 
DIPT  POINT 
tQUND  POINTED    J 


No.  8.      DIPT    POINT— Verv   desirable   for 
entering  figures.     Fine  point     75  cents. 


FOR   STUB  WRITING 


No.    70.      TRIBUNE    STUB  —  Medium   broad 
points,  stiff  action,  new.     80  cents. 


No.  709.  COURIER  STUB  PEN  — Medium 
broad  points.  A  very  popular  stub,  new. 
80  cents. 


1  ^CHOWARO  HUNT  PEN  Coi 

IS         REGIT  — 
\  O  ROUND  P0IN 


j  HUNT  PEN  Co  % 
3NUM  I 

3IN1F.DPENS/ 


No.  420.  REGNUM  PEN— Medium  stub  points. 
Very  smooth  writing,  special,  new;  not 
made  of  steel.    $1.00. 


No.  65.  MANUSCRIPT  PEN— Popular  busi- 
ness stub  pen.  Medium  coarse  points. 
75  cents. 


i€@En    „    auiLL    '     ) 

V^*  wl        ROUNDPOINTEDPENS   / 


No.  75.  QUILL  PEN— Medium  fine  stub.  Pop- 
ular with  those  who  like  the  old-fashion- 
ed goose-quill  effect.     75  cents. 


*o     38.      RECORDER      PEN— Medium  broad 
points,  slightly  elastic.    76  cents. 


.     C.HOWPWC  HUNT  TEN  uT\ 

^C"©CO       DISPATCH     .    ' 

SJM*r..  ■     .ROUNDPOINTED  Prf.^  / 

ad  point 
ior    enj 

TrScoV 
D  ) 

ED  PENS    / 


No.  79.  DISPATCH  PEN— Broad  pointed  stub. 
Chocolate  color.  Superior  engrossing 
pen.    76  cents. 


..t.woWAnONUIlfl  _ 

0  WORLD 
;,ROUNDP0IHTEDP 


No.  25.  WORLD  PEN— Medium  stub  points. 
Very  smooth  writing.  Not  made  of  steel. 
76  cents.  ' 


CH0WAR0HUNTPENLo\ 
©      FERN     ■        I 

ROUMCPaiNTEDPCNS/ 


No.  63.  FERN  PEN— Medium  broad  stub 
points.  Excellent  engrossing  pattern. 
75  cents. 


tgl  j*OUND  POINTED  w    J 


No.  30.  ROUND  POINTED  STUB  PEN-Nickel- 
silver  plated,  embossed  K,  blued.  Most 
perfect  and  handsomest  stub  pen  made. 
$1.00. 


■;,     -.C.HOW/tftOHUHTPfflSk 
%    g®    VASSAR  ) 

R  O  UUP  POINTED  PEN^/ 


No.  62.    VASSAR  PEN— Medium  fine  engross- 
ing points.    75  cents. 


>--       oh.HUNTpfn 

S  PENNSYLVANIA 

^—     ROUhOPOli 


FNC0  \ 

ANIA 


No.   1681.     PENNSYLVANIA— New  Style   for 
general   commercial    use.       Long    nibs. 
75  cents. 
No.   18.     F.  NAT'L  SLANT— $1.00 


No.  26     SUN-$l.00 

Write   for   show    case   proposition,    "  The    Great    Time   Saver,"   to   our    sales    agents   for    Canada 
McFARLANE,   SON   &   HODGSON,  Limited,   MONTREAL 


# 


25 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


— 


* 


HUNT'S  ROUND  POINTED  PENS 

ALL  NUMBERS  SILVER  PLATED,  $1.00  PER  GROSS;  GOLD  PLATED,  $1.50 


CO 
y  v 


uj  <;  j2 


FOR   SCHOOLS 


s  a 


No.  400.    LETTERING  PENS— Seven  different  points.    $1.00  per  gross. 


pTi^rf  LETTERING  P«\\ 

v  W4®  400      J 

L-     ^^J    chowaod  hunt  PEH COy 


Ink  Reservoir  for  fettering  Pens. 


SPECIAL  STYLES 


No.  102.  CROW  QUILL  PEN-Each  pen  in  a 
black  Japanned  Penholder.  One  dozen 
pens  and  one  dozen  holders  on  card. 
$6.00  per  gross. 


No.  73.  LAUNDRY  —  Firm  action.  Silver 
metal.  Made  expressly  for  marking 
linen,   etc.    $  1 .00. 


No.  71.  MUSIC  PEN— Three  points,  two 
slits.  A  perfect  pen  for  making  the  dash 
and  dot  in  music  writing.    $  1 .00. 


b     II       o        ®  HAWK  ClUIU.        I1 


No.  107.  HAWK  QUILL  PEN  —  Extra  fine 
point,  more  stiff  than  No.  102  and  very 
durable.  Each  pen  in  a  black  Japanned 
Penholder,  and  one  dozen  holders  on 
card.    $5.00  per  gross. 


No.  43.  NUGGET— A  superior  metal  pen.  75c. 


~^T  ■~^o.«ii.ui.r«iiei'\ 
O©    ARTIST  PEN     J 


No.  100.    ARTIST  PEN— Very  delicate  point. 
For  lithographers  and  map  drawers.  $1.00 


No.  72.    TWO  LINE  RULING  PEN— Makes  two 

fine  lines  at  once  ;  largely  used  by  book- 
keepers and  others  for  ruling.     $1 .50. 


FOR  BANKS,  BUSINESS  COLLEGES  AND  FINE  WRITERS. 


*  ©   EaSSmEH      '  )  <sjf*fflf&     01  @CDROOp"p0INT       J 


No.  47.    E.  Z.  RITER— Fine    point.     An   ex- 
ceptionally easy  action.     75  cents. 

"~"       "        tKUV,(.R«I.T,E,ti.        ""V 

Jo  (2)  FIRST  NATIONAL     J 


NO.    1.    FIRST    NATIONAL*— Medium    points, 
very  popular  with  Banks.    80  cents. 


O?)    FINE  FALCON        1 


No.  44.  GRAPHIC-In  white  or  blue.  The 
most  popular  general  writing  pen  made. 
75  cents. 


No. 


No 


5.     0R00P    POINT— Rigid    action.    Good 
clerical  pen.    75  cents. 


No.  96.  FINE  FALCON— Firm  points.  Between 

our  No.  97  and  95'iu  action.     75  cents.  no 


»•    Cy^    THt BOURSE 

■■■—  -  t°  R0UN0  POINTED  PENg^/ 

232,  THE  BOURSE— Fine  point,  easy 
action.  One  of  the  best  general  purpose 
pens.    75  cts. 

f ^  CH  0  W  A  R  □  mjNTPEHr>\ 

^©BULLETIN       ) 

y^_RQUND  POINTED  PENS/ 

45.     BULLETIN  PEN -Medium  fine,  pleas- 
ant action.     75  cents. 


©,'    UNIVERSITY 

W  ROUND  POINTEI 


ITPENCoA 

5ITY 

OPENS  y 


No 


59.  UNIVERSITY  PEN— Medium  fine,  new. 
Moderate  action,  very  popular.   75  cents. 


No.  41.    EDDYST0NE— Extra  fine  point,  holds 

plenty  of  ink  and  is  a  very  desirable  pen.        |y0 
75  cents. 


S  c.«  HUNT  pen 
m©  UNIVERSITY 
ri  ROUND  POINTED 


.  59  E.  F.  UNIVERSITY  PEN— Extra  fine 
point,  flexible  action.  Very  desirable 
for  Commercial  Colleges  and  expert 
work.    75  cents. 


No.  98.  STIFF  FALCON— An  extra  stiff  Falcon 
Pen,  medium  fine  point.     Metal  heavier 
and  more  durable  than  any  other  style  of        No. 
Falcon.    Satisfaction  guaranteed.    75  Cts. 

Write    for   show    case   propositi 
McFARLANE 


3.     STATE— The  pen  of  pens  for  posting 
and  fine  figures.     75  cents. 


mROHUNTPEitCoN 
ENTURY  ) 
JPDIHTLO  PE^S/ 


No 


No 


No. 


20.  CENTURY  PEN  — Very  fine  points, 
new.  Elastic  action.  For  very  fine 
writing.    76  cents. 

C.HOWARD  HUNT  PEN  CoA 

{©SUCCESS  1 

ROUND  POINTED    PENS^ 

17.  SUCCESS  PEN— Fine  point.  Moder- 
ate action,  excellent  for  figures.    75  cts. 


22.      EXTRA  FINE  — Elastic   action.    An 
ideal  pen  for  artistic  writers.    80  cents. 


No.  21.    COMPANION  PEN— For  fine  writing 
and  bookkeeping.     75  cents. 


No.  101.  IMPERIAL  PEN— Extra  fine  points, 
triple  elastic  action.  For  experts  only, 
where  they  desire  a  hair  line  and  heavy 
shading      $1.00 


No.    95.     LADY    FALC0N- 

popular  with  ladies. 


Fine   point. 
75  cents 


Very 


No.  99.     DRAWING 
$1  00. 


PEN— Extra  fine   points, 


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THE    BLINDNESS    OF    DR.    GRAY 

Or,  The  Final  Law. 
A  Novel  of  Cleric  &1  Life  by  the  Very  Rev.  Canon  P.  A.  Sheehan 

Author  of  "Luke  Delmege,"  "Lifiheen,"  "Glenanaar," 
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DEFENCE 

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A  Child's  Hero— Conscience  or  King— The  Little  Abbess— Gordon— The  Crime  of  Thcodosius-  Palissy  the  Potter. 


ESSAYS    IN    POLITICS 

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GARIBALDI  AND  THE  THOUSAND 

By  George  Macaulay  Trevelyan 

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28 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Appreciation  of  Dr.  Harper's  Book 

The  "  Battle  of  the  Plains  "  Receives 
a  Favorable  Review  from  David  Rus- 
sell Jack,  of  St.  John,  N.B.,  who 
was  Editor  of  "  Acadiensis." 


As  are  tihe  plays  of  Aeschylus,  and  Sbapkespeare 's 
Henry  VI.,  so  is  this  latest  literary  production  from  the 
pen  of  Dr.  J.  M.  Harper,  a  trilogy.  Though  written  in 
the  ballad  form  of  verse,  the  book  may  be  said  to  com- 
prise three  distinct  bits  of  dramatization,  which,  although 
each  of  them  is  complete  in  itself,  bear  a  mutual  relation 
to  one  another,  and  form  the  several  parts  of  a  complete 
historical  picture. 

A  life  devoted  to  literary  work  of  various  kinds,  a. 
thorough  knowledge  of  our  Canadianism  in  its  ethical  and 
historical  aspects,  not  to  speak  of  a  love  of  the  beautiful, 
whether  in  music,  in  painting,  in  grace  of  language,  or  in 
natural  scenery,  of  which  the  country  around  Quebec 
forms  a  notable  example  of  what  is  to  be  met  with  else- 
where in  Canada — these  have  equipped  Dr.  Harper  for  the 
task  which  he  has  just  completed  and  which  is  the  occasion 
of  our  present  review. 

The  writer  of  history  usually  deals  with  his  topic  in 
the  plainest  and  most  direct  English  he  has  at  command. 
But  when  he  have  a  man  of  Dr.  Harper's  literary  at- 
tainments combining  the  love  of  history  with  the  love  of 
verse,  the  result  of  his  labors  is  usually  far  from  being 
the  dry  reading  which  has  led  history  to  be  looked  upon 
by  many  of  our  modern  readers  of  books  as  something  to 
be  avoided,  rather  than  to  be  run  after.  Indeed,  in  taking 
up  with  "The  Battle  of  the  Plains,"  all  classes  of  readers 
may  feel  assured  of  coming  in  touch  not  only  with  the  plain 
food  of  stern  facts  and  grim  realities,  but  an  intellectual 
feast  worthy  appreciation  by  the  most  fastidious  literary 
palate. 

The  world's  readers  are  all  now  pretty  well  familiar 
with  the  story  of  old  Quebec,  and  of  the  death  of  Wolfe 
and  Montcalm  out  on  'the  Plains  of  Abraham.  We  are 
beginning  to  have  our  household  words  in  the  stories  of  our 
past ;  and  the  effort  of  Dr.  Harper  to  make  such  a  house- 
hold word  of  the  story  of  the  taking  of  Quebec  can  hardly 
miss  being  appreciated  by  every  Canadian,  whatever  be 
the  views  he  may  entertain  as  to  the  ultimate  political 
destiny  of  the  land  that  is  his.  For,  of  a  certainty,  the 
story  is  told  by  him  so  graphically  that  we  all  but  forget 
that  it  is  fact  and  not  fiction  that  is  engrossing  our  at- 
tention, when  we  are  reading  this  latest  splendid  addition 
to  our  Canadian  literature. 

Whether  one's  sympathies  are  with  the  French  or 
with  the  British,  while  tracing  the  details  of  the  terrific 
struggle  in  which  Wolfe  and  Montcalm  figured  so  prom- 
inently, we  must  admit,  on  laying  Dr.  Harper's  latest  book 
aside,  after  a  careful  perusal  of  it,  that  the  author  has 
dealt  faithfully  and  impartially  to  a  fault  with  his  subject. 

From  the  city  end  of  the  Dufferin  Terrace,  the  authoi- 
patiently  lays  before  us,  as  a  preliminary  to  the  proper 
understanding  of  the  story  he  has  to  tell,  the  whole  plan 
of  Wolfe's  first  attempt  to  bring  Montcalm  out  into  the 
open,  beginning  with  the  little  parish  church  of  Ste.  Pet- 
ronille,  on  the  Island  of  Orleans,  where  was  the  first 
camping  ground  of  the  British  troops,  and  where  the 
British  general  first  directed  his  field-glass  against  the 
long  line  of  the  city's  defences  up  from  the  Beauport 
beach.  Thereafter,  the  story  of  the  unsuccessful  assault 
made  by  General  Wolfe  at  the  eastern  end  of  General 
Montcalm's  line  of  defence,  which  extended  all   the  way 


from  the  city  to  Montmorency  river,  as  the  first  event 
of  the  siege  is  treated  of.  Then  are  depicted  the  various 
scenes  connected  with  the  preliminary  drif  tings  of  the 
fleet  up  and  down  the  river,  as  well  as  the  main  event  of 
the  battle  after  Wolfe  and  his  army  had  arrived  on  the 
battlefield  proper,  to  the  rear  of  the  town.  And  lastly, 
the  battle  of  Sainte-Foye  is  admirably  and  graphically 
dealt  with,  the  poem  in  connection  with  which  concluding 
with  the  following  stirring  lines : 

'Twas  a  victory  say  you;  nay,  a  rout — the  brave  against 
the  brave; 

The  vanquished  now  in  full  pursuit  of  their  victors'  bro- 
ken wave ; 

The  carnage  left  to  be  enhanced  by  the  devil  and  his 
mates,  ' 

With  an  only  refuge  near  at  hand  within  the  city's  gates; 


DR.    J.    M.    HARPER 

'Twas  a  victory  say  you;  nay,  a  rout — the  brave  against 
the  brave; 

The  baptism  of  blood,  alas!   our  brotherhood  to  save. 

And  still  the  brooklet  wakes  our  pride,  on  the  spot  where 
nations  bled,  . 

Where  the  monument  stands  sentinel  near  the  brooklet's 
narrow  bed ; 

Ay,  here  we  con  our  heroes'  names  and  read  tradition's 
praise, 

With  no  ceasing  in  the  soul's  refrain,  as  still  we  stand 
and  gaze; 

Alas!  how  strange  the  blending  of  the  best  and  worst  in 
man, 

When  the  victor  and  the  vanquished  pause,  war's  cruel- 
ties to  scan. 

The  book,  it  may  finally  be  said,  is  copiously  supplied 
with  biographical  and  other  notes,  which  aid  in  giving  a 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


clearer  understanding  of  the  story  itself  and  the  part 
played  by  the  several  heroes,  now  all  our  own,  who  took 
part  in  the  struggle  for  the  supremacy  of  a  continent.  The 
illustrations  are  appropriate  and  attractive,  as  is  also 
the  binding,  in  which  this  choice  sample  of  the  latest  of 
Canadian   historical  literature  is  encased. 

D.  R.  JACK. 


Forthcoming    Books  by  Canadians 

With  Some  Mention  also  of  Books 
about  Canada  by  Other  Authors,  Ap- 
pearing Here  and  Elsewhere. 

A  third  volume  of  verse  by  R.  W.  Service,  he  of  Sour- 
dough fame,  is  reported  by  William  Briggs  to  be  in  pre- 
paration.    The  title  has  not  yet  been  selected. 

Professor  Osborne,  of  Winnipeg,  has  an  important 
book  entitled,  "The  Religion  of  a  Layman,"  coming  out 
in  March,  through  Cassell  &  Co.  Those  who  have  seen 
it  state  that  it  is  a  very  strong  piece  of  work.    ('$1.00  net). 

Mrs.  Arthur  Murphy,  of  Edmonton,  who  is  well  known 
as  a  clever  newspaper  writer,  has  written  a.  book  of  im- 


DR.    J.    H.    O'DONNELL 

Author  of   "  Manitoba  as  I  Saw  It." 

(Musson  Book  Co.), 


fall,  will  soon  be  ready.  The  first  volume  is  complete 
and  the  publishers,  the  Musson  Book  Co.,  expect  to  have 
the  second  volume  shortly. 

John  M.  Copeland,  Toronto,  has  issued  in  booklet  form 
his  article  on  "The  Crusade  of  United  States  Railway  In- 
terests in  Canada,"  which  appeared  originally  in  Busy 
Man's  Magazine. 

An  important  two-volume  work  on  which  Dr.  George 
Bryce,  of  Winnipeg,  and  Dr.  Wilfred  Campbell,  of  Ot- 
tawa, are  collaborating,  is  to  be  issued  this  year  by  the 
Musson  Book  Co.  The  book  will  deal  with  "The  Scot  in 
Canada,"  Dr.  Bryce  taking  western  Canada,,  and  Dr. 
Campbell,  eastern  Canada. 

Frank  Wise,  president  of  the  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada., 
has  compiled  an  interesting  little  book  called,  "The  Em- 
pire Day  by  Day,"  which  contains  a  calendar  record  of 
British  valor  and  achievement  on  five  continents  and  on 
the  seven  se-as.  It  will  be  issued  shortly  by  the  Mac- 
millan  Co.    (25  cents). 

The  Westminster  Co.,  Toronto,  will  publish  in  the 
spring,  Marian  Keith's  new  novel.  The  title  has  not  yet 
been  selected. 

A  small  volume  on  "Canadian  Etiquette,"  showing 
what  is  good  form  in  Canadian  society,  compiled  by  Mrs. 
Forsyth  Grant,  is  among  this  year's  Canadian  publications 
of  the  Musson  Book  Co. 

"Boyish  Reminiscences  of  H.  M.  the  King's  Visit  to 
Canada,  in  1861,"  is  the  title  of  a  voiume  to  be  published 
this  spring  by  John  Murray,  London.  The  book  is  by 
Lieutenant  Thomas  Bunbury,  who  at  the  time  was  a  mid- 
shipman on  H.M.S.  Hero. 

Dr.  Wilfred  Campbell,  of  Ottawa,  has  in  preparation 
a  volume  dealing  with  the  Great  Lakes.  The  title  has  not 
yet  been  definitely  decided  upon,  but  it  will  likely  be 
"Our  Great  Lakes,"  and  the  book  will  appear  in  the 
spring  through  the  Musson  Book  Go. 

A.  C.  Nash.  M.D..  of  Peaichland,  B.C..  has  collected 
a  volume  of  verse,  which  will  be  published  in  February 
by  William  Briggs,  Toronto,  under  the  title,  "An  Ode 
to  Canada  and  Other  Poems." 

"The  Canadian  Apple  Growers'  Guide,"  by  Linus 
Woolverton,  M.D.,  announced  for  publication  last  year, 
will  be  ready  about  the  middle  of  February. 

This  month  William  Briggs  publishes  "Reminiscences 
and  Incidents  Connected  with  the  Life  and  Pastoral  La- 
bors of  the  Rev.  John  Anderson,"  by  Rev.  J.  D.  An- 
derson, B.A.,  of  Beauharnois,  which  will  be  issued  in  very 
handsome  form. 


pressions,  entitled,  "Janey  Canuck   in   the  West,"  which 
will  be  published  in  April  by  Cassell  &  Co.  ($1.75  net). 

Nellie  L.  McClung's  new  story,  "The  Second  Chance," 
which  was  announced  for  publication  last  fall,  will  not 
appear  until  the  summer.  It  is  to  be  published  by  Wil- 
liam Briggs. 

L.  C.  Page  &  Co..  Boston,  promise- a  new  Montgomery 
book  some  time  during  the  summer  of  1910.  Miss  Mont- 
gomery has  created  for  her  new  book  another  unusual 
heroine,  "Kilmeny,"  a  young  Scotch  girl,  who  promises  to 
outrival  the  irresistible  Anne  herself. 

Father  A.  G.  Morice's  "History  of  the  Catholic  Church 
in  Western  Canada,"  which  was  to.  have  appeared  last 


NEW  EDITIONS. 

McLeod  &  Allen  will  publish  on  February  1,  popular 
editions  (cloth  50c,  paper  25c),  of  the  following  copy- 
right novels:  "Whispering  Smith,"  "The  Lightning  Con- 
ductor," "The  Princess  Passes"  and  "The  Message." 

Something  special  in  the  way  of  sets  of  the  works  of 
Dickens,  Thackeray,  George  Eliot,  Stevenson,  etc.,  is  be- 
ing- offered  to  the  trade  this  spring  by  McLeod  &  Allen, 
who  will  show  samples  a  little  later. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  brought  out  a  new  edition 
of  "The  Elusive  Pimpernel,"  with  several  half-tone  illus- 
trations.   The  original  edition  had  no  illustrations.  ($1.25). 


30 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Notable  Books  Appearing  in  England 

Some  Interesting  Particulars  About 
the  New  Productions  of  English  Pub- 
lishing Houses  in  all  Departments  of 
Literary  Activity. 

After  an  autumn  season,  in  which  there  was  a  pleni- 
tude of  all  classes  of  books,  the  volume  of  book  publish- 
ing has  dwindled  to  very  small  dimensions  for  the  first 
month  of  the  year.  However,  there  are  a  few  titles 
worthy  of  consideration. 

Fiction. 

Gertrude  Atherton  is  bringing-  out  through  John  Mur- 
ray, her  new  novel,  "Tower  of  Ivory." 

William  Le  Queux  's  new  romance,  which  Eveleigh  Nash 
b  to  publish,  has  the  title,  "The  Treasure  of  Israel." 

Quiller  Couch  has  collected  a  volume  of  short  stories 
of  adventure,  to  be  called,  "Corporal  Sam  and  other 
Stories,"  and  this,  Smith,  Elder  &  Co.  are  to  bring-  out. 

"A  Winter's  Comedy"  is  the  title  of  Halliwell  Sut- 
cliffe's  new  story,  to  be  published  by  Werner  Laurie.  It 
is  concerned  with  the  intrusion  of  Saul  Dene,  a  nouveau 
riche,  into  a  Yorkshire  county  set. 

John  Murray  announces  "The  Luck  of  the  Lantern." 
by  Robert  Aitken  and  "Outland"  by  an  anonymous 
writer. 

Werner  Laurie  publishes  this  month,  "Master  John," 
the  story  of  an  Irish  cardriver,  by  Shan  F.  Bullock; 
"Black  Sheep,"  by  Portal  Hayatt,  and  "Eternal  Fires," 
by  "Victoria  Cross." 

Chatto  &  Windus  issue  "The  Stone  Ezel,"  by  Mrs. 
Antrobus,  "Oportunity, "  by  Margaret  B.  Cross,  "A 
Call,"  by  Ford  Madox  Hueffer,  and  "Service,"  by  Con- 
stance Smedley. 

Allen  Raine's  posthumous  novel,  "Under  the  Thatch" 
is  to  appear  through  Hutchinson  &  Co. 

Blackwood  &  Co.  publish  "Major  Owen  and  Other 
Tales,"  by  Dr.   Christopher  N.   Johnston. 

Chapman  &  Hall  announce  the  publication  of  "The 
End  of  the  Rainbow,"  by  Stella  M.  During-. 

H.  de  Vere  Stacpoole's  new  novel,  "Garryowen," 
comes  from  the  publishing-  house  of  T.  Fisher  Unwin. 

History  and  Biography. 

"Emerson's  Journals,"  containing  the  diary  which  lie 
kepi  all  his  life,  is  to  be  published  early  in  the  new  year, 
by  Chapman  &  Hall. 

Two  additional  volumes  of  Hon.  John  W.  Fortescue's 
"History   of   the    British   Army,"   covering   the   period 
from  1802-1809,  are  announced  by  the  Macmillan  Co. 

The  life  of  George  Sand,  the  French  novelist,  by  Rene 
Dumie,  translated  by  Alys  Hallard,  is  to  appear  through 
Chapman  &  Hall. 

Cassell  &  Co.,  publish  a  small  volume  by  A.  McKilliam. 
entitled    "Makers  of  History." 

The  Macmillan  Co.  have  two  books  on  India,  ready 
for  publication:  "The  Gates  of  India,"  by  Sir  Thomas 
Holdich,  and  "Administrative  Problems  of  British  India," 
by  Monsieur  Chailley. 

Blackwood  &  Co.  announce,  "The  Life  and  Times  of 
Akhuaton,  Pharaoh  of  Egypt,"  by  Arther  E.  P.  Weigall. 


An  interesting  story  of  an  artist's  life  is  to  be  publish- 
ed by  Longmans.  The  artist  was  Monsieur  Rodolphe 
Christen,  who  was  horn  in  a  remote  valley  of  Switzer- 
land, but  who  eventually  became  a  naturalized  British 
subject  and  settled  in  (lie  Scottish  Highlands.  The  book 
is  by  his  wife. 

Lord  Acton's  "Lectures  on  the  French  Revolution" 
are  to  be  brought  out  this  month  by  Macmillan  &  Co. 

"Events  of  the  Indian  Mutiny  at  Ferasepore  and 
Through  the  Seige  of  Delhi,"  being  the  personal  memories 
of  Captain  Griffiths,  is  announced  by  John  Murray. 

"England  Before  the  Conquest,"  a  history  of  the 
country  from  the  days  of  the  Celts  to  the  time  of  the 
Norman  Invasion,  by  Professor  Oman,  is  to  appear  from 
the  publishing  house  of  Methuen  &  Co. 

Williams  &  Norgate  announce  a  critical  study  of  the 
life  and  works  of  Lawrence  Sterne,  by  Walter  Sichel. 

A  monograph  on  that  interesting-  man,  John  Lyly,  is 
announced  by  the  Cambridge  University  l'icss  for  earlj 
publication.     It  is  the  work  of  Professor  Feuillerat. 

Nature  and  Travel. 

"Travels  in  Spain,"  by  Philip  Sanford  Marden,  who 
has  already  issued  a  pleasing  book  on  "Greece,"  is  to 
come  from  Constable  &  Co. 

"Leaves  from  an  Afghan  Scrap-Book."  an  account  of 
a  residence  of  some  length  in  Afghanistan,  by  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Thornton,  is  announced  by  John  Murray. 

"Travel  and  Sport  in  Turkestan."  by  Captain  Price 
Wood,  is  an  imposing  book,  which  Chapman  &  Hajl  are 
to  publish. 

"In  the  Torrid  Soudan,"  a  book  of  travel,  by  H.  Lin- 
coln Tangye,  is  announced  by  John  Murray. 

Political  and  Social. 

"Through  Afro-America"  is  the  title  of  William  Arch- 
ers "study  of  the  race  problem  in  America.  Chapman  & 
Hall  are  to  be  the  publishers. 

Booker  T.  Washington's  "The  Story  of  the  Negro" 
is  about  to  be  issued  by  T.  Fisher  Unwin. 

An  important  book  announced  by  Long-mans  &  Co.    is 


Illustration  from  "Old  Burgundy. 
(L.  C.  Page  &  Co.) 


91 


.11 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


"History  of  the  Irish  Parliamentary  Party  from  1870  to 
1890, ' '  by  F.  Hugh  0  'Donnell. 

"The  Governance  of  Empire,"  a  work  by  Major  P.  A. 
Silburn,  D.S.O.,  Member  of  the  Legislative  Assembly  of 
Natal,  is  to  be  published  shortly  by  Longmans  &  Co. 

Professor  Lees   Smith  is  issuing  through  Constable  & 


sociation.  It  is  entitled  "Geology  in  the  Field,"  and  con- 
sists of  a  series  of  articles  by  competent  authorities  on 
the  various  districts  in  England  and  Wales,  visited  by  the 
association  on  their  excursions  during  the  last  fifty  years. 


WILLIAM  WATSON 

Co.  a  book  based  on  a  series  of  lectures  which  he  deliver- 
ed in  India  on  the  tariff  question. 

"Ancient  and  Modern  Imperialism,"  an  address  de- 
livered by  Lord  Cromer  before  the  Classical  Association, 
is  bVir.2  issued  in  book  form  by  John  Murray. 

"Health  Progress  and  Administration  in  the  West 
Indies,"  by  Sir  Robert  Boyce,  is  on  John  Murray's  list 
for  early  publication. 

"The  Passing  of  the  Shereefian  Empire,"  by  Ellis 
Ashmead-Bartlett,  is  to  appear  through  Blackwood  &  Co. 

Faith  and  Knowledge. 

"Science  from  an  Easy  Chair,"  a  popular  treatise  on 
a  large  variety  of  subjects  by  Sir  E.  Ray  Lankster,  is 
to  appear  with  Methuen  &  Co. 

'  T.  &  T.  Clark  are  issuing  the  second  volume  of  "The 
Encyclopedia  of  Religion  and  Ethics"  (Arthur  to  Bun- 
van),  which  Dr.  James  Hastings  is  editing,  with  the  as- 
sistance of  one  hundred  and  sixty-nine  contributors.    . 

"The  Conquest  of  Consumption,"  a  work  by  Dr. 
Arthur  Latham  and  Dr.  C.  H.  Garland,  is  announced  by  T. 
Fisher  Irwin. 


E.  P.  OPPENHEIM 

The  Clarendon  Press  is  publishing  an  "Atlas  of 
Economies,"  by  J.  G.  Bartholomew. 

Edward  Stanford  is  publishing  in  four  parts  a  work 
designed  to  celebrate  the  jubilee  of  the  Geologists'  As- 


Early  Announcements  of  Spring  Lists 

Several  Novels  by  Noted  Writers  to 
Appear  During  the  Approaching 
Spring  Season — Other  Books, 

That  there  is  to  be  a  new  novel  by  Marie  Corelli  this 
year  is  an  interesting  piece  of  information  brought  home 
from  England,  by  E.  W.  Walker,  of  the  Methodist  Book 
&  Publishing  Co.,  who  publish  all  her  works  in  Canada. 
The  title  has  not  yet  been  announced. 

G.  B.  McCutcheon  's  contribution  to  the  spring  list  will 
be  a  novel  entitled,  "The  Butterfly  Man,"  which  William 
Briggs  will  publish  in  Canada. 

Louis  Joseph  Vance,  author  of  "The  Brass  Bowl," 
"The  Bronze  Bell,"  etc.,  will  depart  from  his  usual  cus- 
tom of  giving  his  books  titles  beginning  with  B.,  and 
will  give  us  this  spring  a  story  entitled  "The  Fortune 
Hunter."  William  Briggs  will  issue  the  Canadian  edi- 
tion. 

McLeod  &  Allen  will  have  ready  early  in  February  a 
new  novel  by  Hallie  Erminie  Rives,  author  of  ' '  Satan 
Sanderson,"  which  will  have  the  title,  "The  Kingdom  of 
Slender  Swords." 

A  new  British  Columbia  story  by  Harold  Bindloss  will 
appear  in  February  through  McLeod  &  Allen.  It  will  be 
entitled  "Thurston  of  Orchard  Valley." 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  will  publish  early  in  the  year,  a 
new  novel  by  Baroness  Orczy,  the  title  of  which  has  not: 
yet  been  fixed  upon. 

Winston  Churchill's  new  novel  is  definitely  announced 
by  the  Macmillan  Co.,  for  February  publication.  Its  title 
will  be  "A  Modern  Chronicle,"  and  it  is  a  love  story  of 
modern  life  in  the  outwardly  prosaic  surroundings  of  the 
big  cities  of  the  twentieth  century.     ($1.50). 

Cassell  &  Co.  announce  a  long  list  of  fiction  for  spring 
publication.  For  February  they  will  have,  "The  Rust  of 
Rome,"  by  Warwick  Deeping  and  "The  Goddess  Girl," 
by  Dorothea  Deakin.  For  March,  "The  Girl  With  the  Red 
Hair,"  by  Max  Pemberton,  "Our  Flat,"  by  A.  W.  Bar- 
rett and  "The  Morning  Star,"  by  Rider  Haggard.  For 
April,. "A  Strong  Man's  Love,"  by  Walter  Wood,  "The 
Road  Back,"  by  Sydney  Warwick,  "The  Mystery  of 
Barry  Ingram,"  by  Annie  S.  Swan,  "The  Brown  Mask," 
by  Percy  Brebner.  For  May,  "At  the  Call  of  Honor,"  by 
A.  W.  Marchmont,  "London  and  a  Girl,"  by  Alfred  Gib- 
son and  "Fate  and  the  Man,"  by  T.  Hanshew.  For  June. 
' '  Freda, ' '  by  Katharine  Tynan. 

Yet  another  posthumous  novel  by  Marion  Crawford  is 
to  appear  this  season.  It  will  be  published  in  February 
by,  the  Macmillan  Co.  with  the  title  "The  Undesirable 
Governess."     ($1.50). 

Three  novels  announced  for  February  publication  by 
the  Macmillan  Co.,  of  Canada,  are:  "A  Life  for  a  Life," 
by  Roger  Herrick,  "An  Interrupted  Fi-iendship,"  by  Mrs. 
Voynich,  and  "Nathan  Burke,"  by  Watts.  All  three  will 
he  published  at  $1.25. 


32 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Importations  by  Canadian  Publishers 

Books  of  English  and  American  Pub- 
lishers, which  will  be  Shown  this 
Spring  by  Canadian  Publishers. 

William  Briggs  has  arranged  for  the  Canadian  market 
for  the  new  Memorial  Edition  of  the  works  of  George 
Meredith,  which  Archibald  Constable  &  Co.  are  to  issue. 
The  edition  will  comprise  twenty-six  or  twenty-seven  vol- 
umes and  will  contain  all  Meredith's  writings.  It  will  be 
sold  by  the  set  only. 

Books  for  boy  scouts  have  now  become  quite  a  feature, 
and  William  Briggs  announces  that  he  will  carry  a  stock 


Illustration  from  "Flying  Plover,"  by  Theodore  Roberts. 
(L.  C.  Page  &  Co.) 


of  several  titles — "Scouting  for  Boys,"  by  Lt.-General 
Baden  Powell,  "Yarns  for  Boy  Scouts"  and  "Scouting 
Games,"  by  the  same  author,  "Boys  of  the  Otter  Patrol," 
by  Breton-Martin,  "Things  all  Scouts  Must  Know," 
"Camping  Out,"  by  Victor  Bridges,  and  "The  Phantom 
Battleship,"  by  Rupert  Chesterton. 

Dent's  Bible  Dictionary,  a  comprehensive  one-volume 
dictionary,  will  be  carried  in  Canada  by  William  Briggs. 
($3.50). 

A  remarkable  series  of  reprint  copyright  fiction  is  be- 
ing imported  by  the  Canadian  branch  of  the  Oxford  Press. 
These  books  are  published  by  Henry  Frowde  in  conjunc- 
tion with  Hodder  &  Stoughton,  and  are  to  be  called  the 
"Oxford  Copyright  Fiction  Series."  They  are  admirably 
printed,  with  attractive  three-color  illustrated  jackets, 
and  include  the  most  popular  works  of  Joseph  Hocking. 
David  Lyall,  Ian  Maclaren,  J.  M.  Barrie,  John  Oxenham, 
Max  Pemberton,  S.  R.  Crockett,  Anthony  Hope,  etc.  They 
can  be  sold  profitably  at  35  cents,  and  at  this  price  are 
remarkable  value. 

An  array  of  juveniles  surpassing  in  interest  the  splen- 
did line  of  1909  will  be  shown  this  season  by  Henry 
Frowde.  The  books  are  published  in  England  in  con- 
junction with  Hodder  &  Stoughton.  At  their  head  comes 
a  superb  edition  of  "Robinson  Crusoe,"  in  two  cloth 
bindings  and  one  leather  binding,  illustrated  in  color  by 

33 


Noel  Pocock  (7s.  6d.  net  and  10s.  6d.  net).  Three  more 
books  compiled  by  the  inimitable  Cecil  Aldin  follow,  these 
aie:  "The  Twins,"  a  companion  volume  to  last  year's 
"Pickles,"  "Farm  Babies,"  along  the  line  of  "Zoo 
Babies,"  and  "The  White  Kitten  Book,"  recalling  the 
"White  Puppy  Book"  and  "Black  Puppy  Book."  All 
three  are  profusely  illustrated  in  color.  "Locomotives 
of  the  World,"  by  J.  R.  Howden,  is  an  interesting  and 
instructive  book.  Other  strong  titles  are  "The  Bird 
Book,"  "Ballads  of  Famous  Fights,"  and  "Sheaves  of 
Gold."  There  is  also  an  admirable  series  of  six-penny 
juveniles  with  color  frontispiece,  including  such  popular 
titles  as  "Robinson  Crusoe,"  "Tales  from  Shakespeare," 
"Coral  Island,"  "Little  Women,"  "Andersen's  Fairy 
Tales,"  etc. 

Henry  Frowde  supplies  "The  People's  Budget,"  by 
Rt.  Hon.  David  Lloyd-George,  published  in  England  by 
Hodder  &  Stoughton.     (30  cents). 

Macmillan's  Library  of  Foreign  Travel  is  being  made 
up  by  the  Macmillan  Co.  It  will  include  such  books  as 
Sven  Heden's  "Trans-Himalaya,"  Col.  Patterson's  "In 
the  Grip  of  the  Nyika, "  etc. 

The  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada  are  importing  a  series 
of  recent  copyright  novels  in  decorated  cloth  bindings, 
which  they  call  Macmillan 's  Dollar  Library.  Among  the 
titles  received  are:  "White  Fang,"  by  Jack  London, 
"Antonio,"  by  Ernest  Oldmeadow,  "A  Lady  of  Rome," 
by  Marion  Crawford,  "Sebastian"  by  Frank  Danby,  "The 
Heart  of  a  Gypsy,"  by  Rosamond  Napier,  "Chateau 
Royal,"  by  J.  H.  Yoxall,  "Spies  of  the  Kaiser,"  by 
William  Le  Queux,  etc. 

A  cheap  edition  of  Sven  Hedin's  splendid  book  of 
travel,  "Trans-Himalaya,"  will  be  issued  in  February  by 
the  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada.  It  will  come  in  two  vol- 
umes, at  $2.50. 

'-'Games  for  the  Playground,  Home,  School  and  Gym- 
nasium," by  Jessie  H.  Bancroft,  containing  a  collection 
of  400  games,  is  announced  by  the  Macmillan  Co.  (Cloth. 
$1.50  net). 

The  Macmillan  Co.  offer  this  month  "A  Book  of 
Operas,  Their  Histories,  Their  Plots  and  Their  Music," 
by  Henry  Edward  Krehbiel.     ($1.75  net). 

"The  People's  Law  or  Popular  Participation  in  Law 
Making,"  by  Charles  Sumner  Lobingier,  Ph.D.,  is  an  im- 
portant compendium  published  by  the  Macmillan  Co. 
($4.00  net). 

The  Macmillan  Co.  will  bring  out  this  month  "Child's 
World  in  Picture,"  containing  story-like  descriptions, 
illustrated  by  pictures  of  life  in  far-away  and  unknown 
lands.     ($1.00  net). 


The   Art  of  the   Belgian  Galleries. 
(L.  C.  Page'&  Co.) 


The  Canadian  Monthly  List  of  Books   for   December 

Containing  a  Record  of  Books  Published  in  Canada, 
Books  by  Canadian  Authors  and  Books  About 
Canada     Issued    During    the     Month    of    December. 


--Allison,    W.    T.      The   Amber  Army   and    Other  Poems. 

Toronto:  Briggs.     85  pages,  5y$x8  inches.     Cloth,  $1.00. 
Bancroft,  Jessie  H.     Games   for  the  Playground,  Home. 

School   and   Gymnasium.     Toronto:   Maemillan.     Cloth. 

$1.50   net. 
Blackwood,  A.   "The  Education  of  Uncle  Paul.     Toronto: 

Maemillan.     Cloth,  $1.25. 
Browne,  Edith  A.     Greece.     Peeps  at  Many  Lands  Series. 

Illustrated.     Toronto.  Maemillan.     50  cents  net. 
Buckley,   Arabella  B.     Wild   Life   in   Woods  and  Fields. 

Toronto:  McClelland  &  Goodchild.    Limp  cloth,  15  cents. 
—  By   Pond   and   River.      Toronto:    McClelland    & 

Goodchild.      Limp   cloth,   15  cents. 

-Plant   Life  in   Field  and  Garden.     Toronto:  Mc- 


Clelland &  Goodchild.    Limp  cloth,  15  cents. 

Birds  of  the  Air.     Toronto :  McClelland  &  Good- 


child.     Limp  cloth.  15  cents. 

Trees    and    'Shrubs.      Toronto:    McClelland    & 


Goodchild.     Limp  cloth,  15  cents. 

Insect  Life.     Toronto:  McClelland  &  Goodchild. 


Limp  cloth,  15  cents. 

Cambridge  Modern  History.  Planned  by  the  late  Lord 
Acton,  LL.D.  Vol.  VI.  The  Eighteenth  Century.  To- 
ronto: Maemillan.     Cloth,  $4.00  net. 

**Canadian  Almanac,  1910.  Edited  by  Arnold  Thomas. 
Toronto:  Copp,  Clark.  490  pages.  6x9  inches.  Cloth, 
75  cents;  paper,  50  cents. 

Church,  A.  J.  Stories  of  King  Arthur.  Toronto:  Mc- 
Clelland &  Goodchild.     Limp  cloth,  15  cents. 

- Stories  from  Ancient  Greece.  Toronto:  Mc- 
Clelland &  Goodchild.     Limp  cloth.  15  cents. 

Stories  from  Ancient  Rome.     Toronto.   McClel- 


land &  Goodchild.     Limp  cloth,  15  cents. 

dnyngton,  M.  How  to  Help:  A  Manual  of  Practical 
Charity.     Toronto:  Maemillan.     Cloth,  $1.50  net. 

** Cumberland,  F.  Barlow.  History  of  the  Union  Jack 
and  Flags  of  the  Empire:  Their  Origin,  Proportions 
and  Meanings  as  Tracing  the  Constitutional  Develop- 
ment of  the  British  Realm  and  with  References  to  Other 
National  Ensigns.  Third  edition,  new  and  enlarged, 
with  index.  69  illustrations  and  9  colored  plates.  To- 
ronto: William  Briggs.  320  p'ages,  5V2x7%  inches. 
Cloth,  $1.50  net. 

De  Morgan,  William.  It  Never  Can  Happen  Again.  To- 
ronto:  Henry  Frowde.     2  volumes.     Cloth,  $1.75. 

English  Men  of  Letters.  New  Pocket  Edition.  Sterne. 
Thackeray,  Wordsworth.  Toronto:  Maemillan.  Each 
25   cents  net. 

Emerson,  F.  U.  Manual  of  Physical  Geography.  To- 
ronto:   Maemillan.     Cloth,  $1.40. 

Gale,  Zona.  Friendship  Village  Love  Stories.  Toronto: 
Maemillan.      Cloth.   $1.25. 

Gwynn,  Stephen.  Robert  Emmet  (An  Historical  Ro- 
mance).     Toronto:    Maemillan.      Cloth,   $1.25. 

Hedin,  Sven.  Trans-Himalaya  (Discoveries  and  Adven- 
tures in  Tibet  ).  2  volumes.  Toronto:  Maemillan.  Cloth. 
$7.50  net. 

••;:::;Herrington,  W.  S.  Martyrs  of  New  France.  Toronto. 
.  William  "Briggs,     159  pages.  5'  [\7C  inches.     Cloth.  00 

•    cents  net. 


Housman,  Lawrence.  Stories  from  the  Arabian  Nights.  50 
plates  in  color,  by  Edmund  Dulac.  Toronto:  Musson. 
Boxed,  $5.00. 

Krehbiel,  Henry  E.  A  Book  of  Operas.  Toronto:  Mae- 
millan.    Cloth,  $1.75  net." 

Lobingier,  Chas.  S.  The  People's  Law.  Toronto:  Mae- 
millan.    Cloth,  $4:00  net. 

Lowell,  Percival.  The  Evolution  of  Worlds.  Toronto: 
Maemillan.     Cloth,  $2.50  net. 

Lyon  and  Fippin.  Principles  of  Soil  Management.  Rural 
Science  Series.     Toronto:  Maemillan.     Cloth,  $1.75  net. 

:;!:;:McClung,  Rev.  J.  A.  In  Dixie  and  Manitoba:  A  true 
story  of  real  life.  Second  Edition  (Originally  published 
as  being  by  Rev.  J.  A.  Murray),  5x7^2  inches,  13  pages, 
paper  covers.     Toronto;  Briggs.     15  cents. 

Mclsaac,  Isabel.  Bacteriology  for  Nurses.  Toronto:  Mae- 
millan.    Cloth,  $1.25  net. 

Machray,  Robert.  Life  of  Robert  Machray,  D.D.,  LL.D., 
D.C.L.,  Archbishop  of  Rupert's  Land,  Primate  of  all 
Canada,  Prelate  of  the  Order  of  St.  Michael  and  St. 
George.     Toronto:  Maemillan.     Cloth,  $5  net. 

Mackaye,  Percy.  Poems.  Toronto:  Maemillan.  Cloth, 
$1.25  net. 

**Mackeracher,  W.  M.  Jean  Bateese  at  the  Carnival. 
Toronto:  Briggs.  16  pages,  5J4x7V^s  inches.  Paper 
cover,  35  cents. 

*::!Memoirs  of  the  Late  Sandy  Stewart.  By  a  Friend  of 
His  Youth.  Toronto:  Briggs.  Published  privately.  49 
pages,  5x7y2  inches.    Paper  cover. 

Nesbit,  E.  Harding's  Luck.  Toronto:  Henry  Frowde. 
Cloth.  $1.25. 

Patterson,  Lt.-Col.  J.  H.  In  the  Grip  of  the  Nyika.  To- 
ronto: Maemillan.     Cloth,  $2  net. 

Peabody,  Francis  G.  The  Approach  of  the  Social  Ques- 
tion.    Toronto:  Maemillan.     Cloth,  $1.25  net. 

Ramsay,  Dean.  Reminiscences  of  Scottish  Life  and  Char- 
acter. Latest  edition,  containing  author's  final  addi- 
tions and  corrections.  16  illustrations  in  color  by  Henry 
W.  Kerr,  Toronto:  Mussen.     $1.50. 

Shakespeare,  William.  Merchant  of  Venice.  36  plates 
in  color  by  Sir  James  D.  Linton,  R.I.  Toronto:  Mus- 
sen.    Boxed,  $3.50. 

Smith,  Gipsy.  The  Lost  Christ.  Toronto:  Henry  Frowde. 
Caper,  30  cents. 

--Thompson,  G.  B.  The  Kullurkampf.  Toronto:  Mae- 
millan.    VH.  4-141  pages.    Cloth.  $1.25  net. 


The  Maemillan  Co.  of  Canada  are  bringing  together 
a  number  of  their  old  and  new  books  about  Canada,  and 
making  up  a  Library  of  Canadian  Travel.  So  far  this 
library  will  consist  of  Dr.  Grenfell's  "Labrador,"  Miss 
Higginson's  "Alaska,"  On  tram's  "In  the  Heart  of  the 
Canadian  Rockies,"  General  Sir  W.  Butler's  "The  Wild 
North  Land"  and  "The  Great  Lone  Land."  "The  North- 
west Passage  by  Land,"  by  Viscount  Milton  and  Dr. 
Cheadle,  "Vancouver's  Discovery  of  Puget  Sound,"  Ly 
Edmond  S.  Meany.  "The  Western  Avernus."  by  Morley 
Roberts,  and  the  new  "Life  of  Archbishop  Machray." 


34 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


0 

6  Rf^e  [DIKING  THG  DGffiilND 
^fe  RSK  YOU  TO  mRKG  TH6  SALES 


Stationery 


35 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


There  is  nothing  that  is  stronger  than  the  truth,  than  honest  intentions, 
expressed  by  honest  words,  stating  honest  facts  ;  therefore,  in  our  introduction  of 

jj>rotrij  pate  g>tatumgn| 

to  the  trade,  we  are  depending  on  a  straightforward  statement  of  the  merits 
of  this  new  Line,  simply  because  it  is  a  commodity  whose  good  qualities  are  so 
apparent  that  it  does  not  feel  the  need  of  any  statement  other  than  the  truth. 

In  the  first  place  we  want  to  impress  you  with  the  fact  that  Scotch 
Plaid  Stationery  is  not  a  bargain  ;  that  is,  in  the  ordinary  use  of  the  word 
"  bargain."  Consequently,  we  are  not  going  to  launch  out  into  a  lengthy  price 
argument,  except  to  declare  that  you  will  have  room  for  a  satisfactory  profit, 
and  to  remind  you  that  the  sweetness  of  low  prices  is  nothing  compared  to  the 
bitterness  of  poor  quality. 

The  Paper  and  Envelopes  present  a  finished  linen  surface,  most  agreeable 
to  the  pen  touch,  with  none  of  that  disagreeable  fuzziness  so  detrimental  to 
neat,  non-ink-splattered  correspondence. 

The  variety  of  forms  in  which  you  may  offer  this  Line  to  the  consumer  are 
sure  to  make  it  a  strong  favourite,  as  it  comes  in  every  form  suitable  for 
business  and  private  correspondence,  viz  : — 

Note — Boxed  in  quarter  reams,  Salisbury  size. 

Envelopes — Boxed  in  hundreds,  Salisbury  size. 

Papeterie — Cabinet  contains  24  sheets  Paper  and  24  Envelopes. 

Tablets — -Salisbury,  Large  Octavo,  Large  Quarto. 

The  design  shown  on  other  page  is  lithographed  on  boxes  and  tablets. 

For  advertising  purposes,  we  supply  a  handsome  Display  Card,  18x12 
inches,  lithographed  in  colours,  also  very  pretty  and  attractive  Circulars, 
printed  on  Scotch  Plaid  paper,  lithographed  in  colours,  and  containing  your 
own  imprint. 


The  Copp,  Clark   Company,   Limited 

64    &    66     FRONT     STREET     WEST 
TORONTO.    CANADA 


36 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Copyrights  Recorded  in  December 

A  List  of  Books  Entered  During  the 
Month  at  the  Copyright  Branch  of  the 
Department  of  Agriculture,  Ottawa. 

21647.  McAlpine's  Prince  Ed-ward  Island  Directory, 
1909.  McAlpine  Publishing  Company,  Limited,  Halifax, 
25th  November. 

21652.  Illustrated  Chart  of  Canadian  History.  By 
John  C.  Saul,  M.A.  United  Editors  Limited.  Toronto,  26th 
November. 

2165.3.  The  Broken  Trail.  Pages  from  a  Pastor's 
Experience  in  Western  Canada.  By  George  W.  Kerby, 
B.A.  (Book.)  George  W.  Kerby,  Calgary,  Alberta,  27th 
November. 

21677.  The  Canadian  Men  and  Women  of  the  Time. 
Part  One.  Illustrated  with  Portraits.  Second  Edition. 
Edited  by  Henry  James  Morgan,  LL.D.,  D.C.L.,  F.R.S.C. 
(Book.)  Albert  Henry  Proctor  Morgan,  New  Liskeard, 
Out.,  1st  December. 

21678.  A  History  of  Simcoe  County.  By  Andrew  F. 
Hunter.  In  Two  Volumes.  Andrew  F.  Hunter,  Barrie, 
1st  December. 

21679.  The  Kulturkampf.  An  Essay.  By  Gordon 
Boyce  Thompson.  M.A.  With  a  Prefatory  Note  by  George 
M.  Wrong.  M.A.  (Book.)  The  Macmillan  Company  of 
Canada.  Limited.  Toronto,  2nd  December. 

21685.  Canadian  Patent  Office  Practice.  By  W.  J. 
Lynch.  Chief  Clerk  of  the  Canadian  Patent  Office.  (Book.) 
William  Joseph  Lynch.  Ottawa,  3rd  December. 

21692.  History  of  the  Union  Jack  and  Flags  of  the 
Empire.  By  Barlow  Cumberland,  M.A.  Third  Edition. 
I  Book.)     Barlow  Cumberland,  Port  Hope,  7th  December. 

21700.  Stories  from  Prairie  and  Mountain.  By 
Margaret  Bemister.  (Book.)  The  Copp,  Clark  Company, 
Limited,  Toronto,  9th  December. 

21704.  Verse  from  a  Western  Isle.  By  Frederic 
Philips.  (Book.)  Frederic  Philips,  Ganges,  British  'Col- 
umbia. 9th  December. 

21715.  Turn    Wellandward.      (Book.)      Louis    Blake, 
Duff.  Welland,  Out..  13th  December. 

21716.  History  of  New  Brunswick.  By  James  Han- 
nay,  D.C.L.  Volumes  I  and  H.  James  Hannay,  Oak 
Point,  Out..  13th  December. 

21731.  A  Funny  Mouse  Trap  and  Other  Rhymes.  By 
Mary  Whiting  Bullis.  (Booklet.)  Mary  Whiting  Bullis, 
Emerson  Manitoba,  16th  December. 

21732.  Ontario  High  School  Laboratory  Manual  in 
Chemistry.  By  Ellis  and  MacClement.  (Book.)  The 
Macmillan  Company  of  Canada,  Limited,  Toronto,  16th 
December. 

21733.  Ontario  High  School  Chemistry.  By  Ellis  and 
MacClement.  Pupils'  Text  Book.)  The  Macmillan  Com- 
pany of  Canada,  Limited,  Toronto.  16th  December. 

21746.  Choix  de  Chansons.  (Livre.)  C.  B.  Perreault. 
Montreal.  20th  December. 

21747.  The  Martyrs  of  New  France.  By  W.  S.  Her- 
rington.  (Book.)  W.  S.  Herrington,  Napanee  Ont.,  20th 
December. 

21756.  Casselman  Consolidated  Business  Accounting 
System.  (Book.)  Chester  Casselman,  Chesterville,  Ont., 
22nd  December. 

21757.  English  Accentuation.  By  Rev.  F.  T.  Bane, 
C.S.C.  (Livre.)  T.  Tbeophile  Barre,  C.S.C.,  Saint-Laurent. 
Que.  22nd  December  ,;i  I  WJW 

21763.     A  Gazetteer   of  British   Columbia.     (Book.) 

37 


Provincial  Publishing  Company,  Vancouver,  British   Col- 
umbia, 22nd  December. 

21764.  An  Introductory  English  Grammer.  By  S.  E. 
Lang,  Winnipeg.  The  Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited, 
Toronto,  22nd  December. 

21765.  Le  Roi  des  Tenebres.  Grand  Drame.  Par 
Arthur  Tremblay  et  J.  E.  Corriveau.  (Livre.)  Arthur 
Tremblay  et  J.  Eugene  Corriveau,  Quebec,  Que.,  22nd 
December. 

21767.  Historic  Prince  Edward.  By  Maude  Benson. 
(Temporary  Copyright.)  (Book.)  Mrs.  Maude  Benson, 
Picton,  23rd  December. 

21768.  The  Township  of  Sandwich,  Past  and  Present. 
By  Frederick  Neal.  Illustrated.  (Book.)  Frederick 
Neal,  Sandwich,  Ont.,  23rd  December. 

21777.  The  Canadian  Almanac,  1910.  (Book.)  The 
Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited,  Toronto,  27th  December. 

21778.  Prairie  Patchwork;  or,  Western  Poems  for 
Western  People.  By  Cecil  E.  Selwyn.  Illustrated  by 
Ryal  \X.  Hathway.  (Book.)  Cecil  Edward  Selwyn,  Win- 
nipeg, 27th  December. 


THE  INVALUABLE  CANADIAN  ALMANAC. 

Once  again,  and  this -time  for  the  sixty-third  year,  the 
Canadian  Almanac  makes  its  appearance.  It  has  now  at- 
tained such  proportions,  it  covers  so  much  ground,  and  its 
information  is  so  complete,  that  it  has  become  indispens- 
able to  its  regular  subscribers,  and  invaluable  to  any  one 
desirous  of  getting  faiCts  and  figures  about  Canada.  There 
is  hardly  a  phase  of  life^  which  is  not  touched  on.  The 
Governments  of  the  Dominion  and  the  provinces,  with  the 
names  of  officials,  the  clergy  of  all  denominations,  the 
barristers  and  solicitors,  the  county  and  'township  of- 
ficers, the  militia  list,  post  offices,  newspapers,  books,  etc.. 
etc.  With  every  'copy  of  the  1910  issue  is  supplied  a 
large  map  of  the  Nipissing  district.  (Copp.  Clark  Co.  50 
cents). 

4— 

JANUARY  FICTION  APPEARING  IN  CANADA. 

Anthony  Partridge,  author  of  "The  Kingdom  of 
Earth,"  has  written  another  romance  entitled  "Passers- 
by,"  which  the  Mussen  Book  Co.  publish  on  or  about  Jan- 
uary 12.  It  has  London  as  its  scene.  Its  heroine  is  a 
street  singer,  Christine,  who  comes  to  London,  accom- 
panied by  Ambrose  Drake,  a  hunchback,  with  a  piano  and 
a  monkey.  The  fortunes  of  these  two  are  strangely  link- 
ed with  those  of  an  English  statesman,  who  in  his  youth 
led  a  wild  and  criminal  career  in  Paris,  as  the  leader  of 
a  band  of  thievesi  and  gamblers.  Here  is  material  for  a 
thrilling  tale.     (Cloth,  $1.25). 

"The  Up  Grade,"  a  story  by  a  new  author.  Wilder 
Goodwin,  will  be  published  by  the  Mussen  Book  Co.,  on 
January  12.  It  is  a  strong  story  of  the  southwest,  having 
for  its  theme  a  man's  regeneration  from  weakness  and 
failure.  Stephen  Loring,  who  has  thrown  away  every  ad- 
vantage of  birth,  education  and  friends,  is  started  on  the 
up  grade  by  his  love  for  the  daughter  of  the  manager  of 
the  San  Quentin  mines,  and  how  he  finally  wins  his  way 
t<  the  top,  is  related  in  a  succession  of  dramatic  incidents. 
($1.25). 

William  Briggs  announces  five  novels  for  January  pub- 
lication. They  are  Baroness  Orczy's  story,  "The  Nest 
of  the  Sparrowhawk, "  "In  the  Shade,"  by  Valentina 
Hawtrey,  "Mary  up  at  Gaffries,"  by  S.  C.  Xethersole. 
"The  Man  Outside,"  by  Wyndham  Martyn  and  "Gloria-," 
by  G,  Frederick  Turner, 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Best   Sellers  During   December 

Reports  from  the  Leading  Centres  of  Trade 
in  Canada,  with  a  Summary  Showing 
the  Most  Popular    Books  of  the    Month. 

Brantford. 
Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Westminster. 
Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 
Silver  Horde.    Rex.  Beach.     Harper. 
Inner  Shrine.     Anonymous.     Mussen. 
New  North.     A.  D.  Camern.     Mussen. 
Northern  Lights.     Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

Chatham. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.    Westminster. 
Attic  Guest.     R.   C.  Knowles.     Westminster. 
Truxton  King.    G.  B.  McCutcheon,    Briggs. 
Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Rage. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Edmonton. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 
Northern  Lights.     Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 
Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.    R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 
Broken  Trail.     R.  W.  Kerby.     Briggs. 
New  North.     A.  D.   Cameron.     Appleton. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.  Montgomery.    Page. 

Guelph. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

Calling  of  Dan  Matthews.     H.  B.  Wright.     McLeod. 

Attic  Guest.     R.   E.  Knowles.     Westminster. 

John  Marvel.     T.  N.  Page.     Copp. 

Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Songs  of  a  'Sourdough.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Hamilton. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 
Attic  Guest.  R.  E.  Knowles.     Westminster. 
When  a  Man  Marries.     Rinehart,     McLeod. 
Actions  and  Reactions.    Rudyard  Kipling.    Macmillan. 
'Northern  Lights.     Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 
It     Never    Can    Happen    Again.      Wm.    De    Morgan. 
Frowde.  ' 

London. 
Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 
Calling  of  Dan  Matthews.     H.  B.  Wright.     McLeod. 
Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 
Old  Rose  and  Silver.     Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 
Attic  Guest.     R.  E.'  Knowles.     Westminster. 
John  Marvel,  Assistant,     T.  N.  Page.     Copp. 

Moncton. 

Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

Songs  of  a  Sourdough,     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Truxton   King.     G.   B.  McCutcheon.     Briggs. 
5     Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.    Westminster, 
(i     Danger  Mark.     R.  W.  Chambers'.     McLeod. 

Montreal. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

3  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

4  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

5  It    Can    Never    Happen    Again.      Wm.    De    Morgan. 

Frowde. 

6  John  Marvel,  Assistant.     T.  N.  Page.     Copp. 


Ottawa. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Stradella.     F.  M.  Crawford.     Macmillan. 

3  Northern  Lights.    'Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

4  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

5  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

6  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Westminster. 

Peterborough. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

3  Old  Rose  and  Silver.     Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 

4  Northern  Lights.     Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

5  Goose  Girl.     Harold  MacGrath.     Westminster. 

6  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.    R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 

Port  Arthur. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

3  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

4  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

5  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.    Page. 

6  Round  the  Fire  "Stones.    Conan  Doyle.     Copp. 

Quebec. 

1  Attic  Guest.     R,  E.  Knowles.    Frowde. 

2  Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.     Westminster. 

3  Bridge  Builders.     A.  C.  Ray.     Mussen. 

4  Little  Sister  Snow.     Frances  Little.     Mussen. 

5  Going    Down     From     Jerusalem.      Norman      Duncan. 

Harper. 

6  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

St.  John,  N.B. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.    R.  E.  Knowles.    Frowde. 

3  Anne  of  Green  Gables.    L.  M.  Montgomery.    Page. 

4  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

5  'Songs  of  a  Sonrdougii.    R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 

6  Old  Rose  and  Silver.     Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 

Stratford. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.    R.  E.  Knowles.    Frowde. 

3  Truxton  King.     G.  B.  McCutcheon.     Briggs. 

4  Little  Sister  Snow.     Frances  Little.     Mussen. 

5  Northern  Lights.     Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

6  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

Toronto. 

1  Attic   Guest.     R.   E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

2  New  North.     A.  D.  Cameron.    Briggs. 

3  Bella  Donna.    R,  Hichins.     Copp. 

4  Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.     Westminster. 

5  Cardillaic.     Robert  Barr.     McLeod. 

6  Northern  Lights.     Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

Winnipeg. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.    R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 

3  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

4  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
5.  Northern  Lights.     Sir  Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

0  Suitable  Child.     Norman  Duncan.     Frowde. 

Canadian  Summary. 

Points. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor   150 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles 99 

3  Anne   of  Avonlea.     L.   M.   Montgomery    44 

4  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service 44 

5  Northern  Lights.     Gilbert  Parker   44 

6  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach    33 


38 


Conducting  a  Circulating  Library 

A  Librarian  Tells  Some  of  Her 
Experiences  and  How  She  Has 
Solved  Some  of  the  Problems 
That      Have      Confronted     Her 

By  Mrs.   Marvin,  Before  the  American  Booksellers'  Association 


Let  him  who  thinks  the  duties  of  the  librarian  are 
simply  to  stamp  and  hand  books  across  the  desk  pause, 
ere  he  chooses  this  for  a  profession.  She  must  know  her 
books  and  study  her  people,  making  them  feel  she  takes 
a  personal  interest  in  them  and  the  books  they  read. 

Only  the  librarian  knows  too  well  the  problems  are 
many  which  confront  her.  If  she  has  solved  the  greatest 
problem  of  all,  how  to  keep  her  temper  amid  the  many 
trials  and  provocations  of  the  day,  she  has  gained  a  vic- 
tory not  to  be  lightly  esteemed. 

It  was  nearly  three  years  ago  I  sent  out  my  first  lib- 
rary book,  explaining  to  the  people  the  books  were  loan- 
ed for  two  cents  a  day,  no  deposit  required,  the  rental 
the  be  paid  when  the  book  was  returned.  I  was  asked, 
of  course,  how  we  dared  ta,ke  the  risk.  I  answered,  "We 
trust  in  the  honor  of  the  New  Haven  people."  It  is  to 
their  credit,  I  can  say,  only  in  a  few  cases  has  the  trust 
been   misplaced. 

Keeping  Records. 

We  tried  many  methods  for  keeping  our  records,  but 
they  were  cumbersome  and  not  suited  for  rapid  work. 
It  was  a  happy  day  when  the  firm  consented  to  buy  me  a 
card  filing  cabinet.  This,  I  think,  is  the  quickest  and 
most  accurate  system  for  library  uss.  Our  books  are 
catalogued  by  author,  each  with  their  own  number,  and 
easily  found  on  the  shelves.  They  are  neatly  covered 
with  a  paped  cover;  this  is  removed  when  the  book  is 
returned  and  replaced  with  a  fresh  one.  It  means  work, 
but  the  clean  appearance  of  our  books  pays  for  the  ex- 
tra  trouble. 

The  library  had  only  been  running  a  short  time  when 
we  were  besieged  to  reserve  books.  This  we  decided 
would  only  lead  to  dissatisfaction  in  the  end.  We  have, 
therefore,  adhtred  strictly  to  the  rule,  "No  books  re- 
served." To  this  fact  I  attribute  in  a  great  measure  our 
success.  Every  one,  no  matter  what  his  station  in  life, 
has  the  same  opportunity  to  obtain  the  new  books.  I 
have  been  offered  money,  candy,  flowers,  etc.,  to  break  the 
rule,  but  our  absolute  refusal  to  do  so,  I  feel  sure,  has 
been  of  no  loss  to  us,  rather  a  gain. 

Shall  we  deliver  books?  This  we  debated  for  some 
time,  finally  deciding  it  would  be  a  saving  of  both  time 
and  money  to  refuse  this  request  also.  We  are  sincerely 
thankful  we  kept  out  of  this  pitfall.  It  would  have  taken 
one  person's  time  the  entire  day  to  wrap,  address  books 
and  receive  telephone  orders. 

The  Over-time  Problem. 

What  to  do  about  books  that  are  not  returned 
promptly  soon  became  a  problem  that  needed  careful 
consideration.  How  to  approach  the  delinquent  and  yet 
not  offend.  If  the  book  has  been  out  for  three  weeks  we 
send  a  postal  card  with  this  formula  printed  on  it:  "We 

beg  to  remind  you  that  a  copy  of  which  you 

took  out  on  has  not  yet  been  returned."     This 

in  most  cases  has  proved  sufficient,  still  in  all  folds  there 
are  some  black  sheep.     If  after  three  notices  have  been 


39 


sent  the  book  has  not  been  brought  back,  we  put  it  in 
the  handc  of  our  collector.  ^That  his  pathway  is  not 
strewn  with  roses  he  could  tell  you  better  than  I. 

Some  of  the  excuses  given  why  the  books  have  not 
been  returned  are  unique,  to  say  the  least.  Our  store 
was  closed  Washington's  birthday.  About  three  weeks 
afterward  a  book  was  brought  in  by  a  young  lady,  who 
said,  "I  tried  to  return  this  book  on  Washington's  birth- 
day, but  could  not  get  in  the  store.  Must  I  pay  the  ex- 
tra fine?"  When  I  called  her  attention  to  the  fact  that 
quite  a  time  had  elapsed  since  the  22nd  of  February  and 
the  15th  of  March,  she  still  could  not  see  why  she  was 
expected  to  pay  the  full  amount.  Another  patron,  after 
keeping  out  a  book  for  over  a  month,  returned  it  with 
this  excuse:  "I  went  to  New  York  just  after  I  took  out 
this  book,  the  maid  put  it  in  the  bookcase,  and  I  sup- 
posed it  had  been  returned,  until  I  received  your  notice 
this  morning.  You  surely  do  not  intend  to  charge  me  a 
month's  dues."  The  fact  that  had  the  book  been  returned 
promptly,  it  would  have  been  paying  for  itself,  does  not 
seem   to   occur  to   them. 

Is  a  Catalogue  Advisable? 

The  "pros  and  cons"  of  a  catalogue  were  discussed 
at  length.  The  library  grew  to  such  an  extent  it  seemed 
wise  to  publish  one.  We  do  not  regret  the  expense. 
Books  that  have  been  standing  on  our  shelves  for  months 
have  taken  a  new  lease  of  life,  many  people  saying, 
"I  did  not  know  you  had  that  book  in  the  library  until 
I  saw   it   in   your  catalogue." 

How  many  copies  of  the  popular  books  to  put  in  the 
library  each  librarian  must  judge  for  herself.  It  depends 
upon  the  demand  and  the  number  of  patrons.  We  put 
in  from  ten  to  thirty  copies,  these  more  than  pay  for 
themselves. 

As  the  books  in  the  library  became  soiled  ar.d  the  de- 
mand for  others  dropped  off  the  question  arose  what  to 
do  with  them.  We  clean  these  and  put  then  on  sale  for 
25  cents  a  copy.  We  are  always  able  to  sell  them,  peo- 
ple coming  in  every  day  to  see  what  I  have  on  hand. 
Many  libraries  throughout  the  state  buy  these  books  in 
large  quantities.  So  until  the  last  our  library  book  brings 
in  an  income. 

In  my  opinion  the  circulating  library,  when  properly 
managed,  is  a  paying  adjunct  to  any  bookstore.  The  pub- 
lic library  does  not  put  in  a  large  supply  of  fiction  and 
it  is  new  fiction  the  public  taste  craves.  This  want  the 
circulating  library  fills  at  a  small  expense.  Our  experience 
has  been  that  the  profits  from  the  library  far  exceed  the 
profits  from  the  sale  of  books.  Whether  the  sale  of 
fiction  has  decreased  since  the  library  opened  we  have 
not  decided.  This  fact  I  do  know— many  books  have 
been  read  from  the  library  and  afterwards  copies  bought 
to  keep  or  give  to  friends 

Do  Libraries  Stimulate  Trade? 
Has  trade  in  other  parts  of  the  store  been  stimulated 
since   opening   the   library?     This   is   a   point   on   which 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


we  differ.  I  can  only  speak  from  a  personal  standpoint. 
I  do  know  people  have  come  into  the  store  since  the 
library  was  established  who  never  entered  it  before.  Many 
of  them  stop  to  buy  things  from  departments  near  the 
library;   (here  my  point  of  view  ends. 

For  fear  I  ride  my  hobby  too  long  and  so  become  tire- 
some. I  will  relate  a  few  amusing  incidents  that  have 
come    under    my    notice. 

One  Saturday  night  a  young  lady  rushed  in  and 
breathlessly  asked  if  I  had  a  Scuttle  in  the  library.  I 
went  to  the  shelf,  took  down  the  "Shuttle,"  stamped 
and  gave  it  to  her.  I  have  often  wondered  if  she  ever 
awoke  to  her  mistake.  A  few  minutes  afterwards  a 
girl  came  in  and  asked  for  "Jim  Crow's  Daughter."  This 
was  too  much  for  my  assistants,  they  started  to  laugh;  so 
when  I  banded  her  "The  Daughter  of  Anderson  Crow" 
she  quickly  saw  her  mistake  and  laughed  with  us.  'But 
best  of  all  was  the  request  for  "The  Splinter's  Farm"; 
.just  for  a  second  I  hesitated,  then  realized  the  "Spin- 
Morgan's  books  one  day  I  said:  "Some  people  compare 
him  to  Dickens."  The  person  asked:  "Has  Dickens 
written  anything  new  lately?"  And  this  the  20th  cen- 
ster's  Farm"  was  wanted.  In  recommending  one  of  De 
tury. 

Thus  goes  the  day's  work,  much  that  annoys  mingled 
with  much  that  amuses,  and  I  am  glad  to  say  the  bright 
spots  far  outnumber  the  dark  ones. 


SEYMOUR   CHARLTON. 

The  Canadian  publishers  of  "'Seymour  Charlton."  'by 
W.  B.  Maxwell,  (The  Copp,  Clark  Co.),  intend  to  start 
a  special  campaign  to  introduce  this  book  more  intimately 
to  the  attention  of  Canadian  readers.  The  novel  is  un- 
doubtedly one  of  the  most  important  of  the  day.  It  has 
been  highly  praised  by  the  most  discriminating  critics  and 
has  had  a  great  reception  in  England.  Now  that  the  pub- 
lic are  having  a  little  leisure  to  pick  out  novels  worth 
while,  from  the  avalanche  of  last  fall,  this  book  will  un- 
doubtedly come  to  its  own. 


ROYAL  USERS  OF  IDEAL  PENS. 

The  Daily  Mail,  of  London,  recently  contained  an  ad- 
vertisement of  the  London  house  of  the  L.  E.  Waterman 
Co.  There  was  a  noticeable  list  of  users  of  Waterman  's 
Ideal  fountain  pens,  as  follows.  His  Majesty  the  King  of 
England,  His  Majesty  the  King  of  Italy,  His  Majesty  the 
King  of  Spain,  His  Majesty  the  King  of  Greece,  Her 
Majesty  the  Queen  of  Greece,  and  the  President  of  the 
United   States. 


AMONG  THE  PUBLISHERS. 

A  new  firm,  composed  of  William  J.  Barse  and  John  H. 
Hopkins,  to  be  known  as  Barse  &  Hopkins,  has  been  es- 
tablished at  296  Broadway,  New  York.  They  have  pur- 
chased the  entire  publishing  business  of  Brewer,  Barse 
&  Co.,  Chicago.  It  is  the  purpose  of  the  firm  to  carry  on 
a  general  publishing  business  along'  original  and  popular 
lines. 

J.  M.  Dent  &  Co.,  London,  have  been  turned  into  a 
private  company,  under  the  title  of  J.  M.  Dent  &  Sons, 
Ltd.  J.  M.  Dent,  as  chairman  of  directors,  will  continue 
to  guide  the  policy  of  the  business,  while  Hugh  Railton 
Dent  becomes  managing  director. 

On  December  10  the  centenary  of  the  establishment  of 
the  firm  of  Blackie  &  Sons,  Limited,  was  celebrated  'by  a 
complimentary  soiree  and  concert,  given  by  the  employes 
in  the  city  hall,  Glasgow. 


Illustration  from  "  Seymour-  Charlton"  by  W.  B.  Maxwell. 
(Copp,  Clark  Co.) 


TRADE   CHANGES. 

G.  P.  Minaker,  publisher  of  the  Gladstone  (Man.)  Age, 
has  opened  a  book  and  stationery  store  in  connection  with 
the  Age  Publishing  Co. 's  business. 

Stewart  &  Thomas,  61  Albert  Street,  Toronto,  station- 
ers -and  bookbinders,  have  dissolved  partnership.  The 
business  will  be  continued  by  F.  'S.  Thomas,  under  the 
style  of  F.  S.  Thomas  &  Co. 

The  partnership  heretofore  subsisting  between  Alvin 
Grigg  and  Percy  C.  Doran,  as  the  Grigg  Book  &  Stationery 
Company,  Pembroke,  has  'been  dissolved.  Alvin  Grigg  will 
continue  the  business  under  the  old  name. 

W.  B.  W.  Armstrong,  Parry  Sound,  has  sold  his  book 
and  stationery  business  to  his  brother,  J.  E.  T.  Armstrong, 
of  Toronto,  and  will  give  his  whole  time  and  attention  to 
the  C.P.R.  ticket,  telegraph  and  express  agency  in  Parry 
Sound. 

The  item  in  November  Bookseller  and  Stationer  to  the 
effect  that  W.  A.  Douglas,  of  Edmonton,  had  secured  the 
business  of  R.  J.  Stephenson,  late  of  Wetaskiwin,  was 
incorrect.  The  change  that  did  take  place  was  that  Mr. 
Stephenson  became  manager  of  the  wholesale  and  retail 
departments  of  the  Douglas  Co.,  Edmonton.  His  Wetaski- 
win business  was  sold  to  E.  A.  Hutchins  in  August,  and 
then  Mr.  Stephenson  took  a  trip  to  the  coast. 


40 


„  a —  «.  —  *. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     S  T  A  T  T  O  N  E  R 


NOW    IS     THE     TIME     FOR 

CHEAP  EDITIONS 

SEE  OUR  LISTS 


OF 


Paper  Novels  .  .  15c 
Board  Novels         .  30c 

People's    Library,   cloth,   25c 

Technical  Handbooks,  nearly 
100  different  titles,  edited 
by  Paul  N.  Harwick,  30c  up 


Cassell  &  Company 

Limited 

42   Adelaide  Street   West       -      Toronto 

LONDON  NEW  YORK  TORONTO  MELBOURNE 


Che  financial  Post 

of  Canada 

TORONTO  MONTREAL  WINNIPEG 

VANCOUVER  LONDON,  ENG. 

the  authoritative  tinanciil  journal  of  the  Dominion 

Annual  Review  and 
Statistical  Number 

was  issued  on  Saturday,  Jan.  8th 

Special  articles  by  eminent 
authorities. 

Opinions  by  financial  and 
business  leaders. 

Tables     of     all    important 
statistics. 


10c.  per  copy. 


$3.00  per  annum 


Oxford  University  Press 


CANADIAN 
BRANCH 


JANUARY  SALES  OF 

DeMorgan's  "It  Never  Can  Happen  Again" 
and  Knowles'  "The  Attic  Guest" 

indicate  that  these  books  move  and  are  in  demand.  There  are  few  modern  authors  whose  first  stories  still  sell. 
Joseph  Vance  and  St.  Cuthbert's  are  in  constant  demand.  Keep  your  eye  on  ROBERT  E.  KNOWLES, 
Up-to-date  Bookseller.     At  the  present  rate  of  progress,  his  books  will  soon  be  one  of  your  best  assets. 

Our  travellers  now  beginning  their  trips,  among  many  wonderful  Juveniles  will  show  you  the  Grandest 
Edition  of  ROBINSON  CRUSOE,  embellished  with  plates  after  designs  by  Noel  Pocock ;  Hodder  and 
Stoughton  and  Henry  Frowde  combination  in  EASTER  BOOKLETS,  CHRISTMAS  BOOKLETS 
and  CALENDARS. 

STRANG  BOOKS  and  a  host  of  NEW  JUVENILES  with  colored  plates  cannot  be  approached. 

Keep  a  comer  of  your  store  near  the  front  for  OXFORD  GOODS.  Others  find  it  a  paying 
plan.  It's  the  QUALITY  that  makes  OXFORD  FAMOUS.  The  new  Prayer  and  Hymnal  in 
Oxford  Bindings  has  swept  the  country,  and  the  Booksellers  in  every  town  are  making  profitable  sales. 


HENRY  FROWDE,     -     TORONTO 


41 


BOOKSELLER     AND    STATIONER 


A  Capital  Selection  of  Books 

Theodore  Roosevelt's  Pigskin  Library 
Contains  the  Cream  of  the  Wortd's 
Literature — A  Simple  and  Service- 
able List   of  Books. 

Theodore  Roosevelt,  big  game  hunter,  took  with  him 
on  his  African  journey  a  small  library  of  books,  the 
titles  of  which  are  given  in  his  first  contribution  to  Scrib- 
ner's  Magazine,  recounting  his  adventures  in  Africa 
"The  books,"  says  Mr.  Roosevelt,  "were  carried  in  a  light 
aluminum  and  oilcloth  icase,  which,  with  its  contents, 
weighed  a  little  .less  than  sixty  pounds,  making  a  load 
for  one  porter.  Including  a  few  volumes  carried  in  the 
various  bags,  so  that  I  might  be  sure  always  to  have  one 
with  me,  and  Gregorovius,  read  on  the  voyage  outward,  the 
list  was  as  printed  below.  It  represents  in  part  Kermit's 
taste,  in  part  mine;  and,  I  need  hardly  say,  it  also  repre- 
sents in  no  way  all  the  books  we  most  care  for,  but  mere- 
ly those  which,  for  one  reason  or  another,  we  thought 
we  should  like  to  take  on  this  particular  trip." 
Bible. 


Apocrypha. 

Borrow  : 

•'Bible   in    Spain." 

"Zingali." 

"Lavengro." 

"Wild   Wales." 

"The  Romany  Rye. 

Shakespeare. 

Spencer  : 

"Faerie   Queen." 

Marlowe. 

Mahan  : 

"Sea  Power." 

Macaulay  : 

History. 

Essays. 

Poems. 

Homer  : 

"Iliad." 

"Odyssey." 

La   Chanson   de 

Roland. 

"Nibelungenlied. 

Carlyle  : 

"Frederick    the    Great." 

Shelley  : 

Poems. 

Bacon  : 

Essays. 

Lowell  : 

Literary   Essays. 

"Biglow   Papers." 

Emerson  : 

Poems. 

Longfellow. 

Tennyson. 

Poe  : 

Tales. 

Poems. 

Keats. 

Milton  : 

"Paradise  Lost"  (Books  I  and  II) 

Dante  : 

"Inferno"   (Carlyle's  translation) 

Holmes  : 

"Autocrat." 

"Over  the  Teacups." 

Bret   Harte  : 

Poems. 

"Tales   o'f  the   Argonauts." 

"Luck   of   Roaring   Camp." 

Browning  : 

Selections. 

Crothers  : 

"Gentle    Reader." 

Mark    Twain  : 

"Huckleberry    Finn." 

"Tom    Sawyer." 

Bunyan's    "Pilgram's  Progress." 

Euripides    (Murray's   translation.)     "Hippolytus." 

The   Federalist. 

"Baechae." 

Gregorovius  : 

"Rome." 

Scott  : 

"Legend    of    Montrose." 

"Guy   Mannering." 

"Waver  ley." 

"Rob   Roy." 

"Antiquary." 

Cooper  : 

"Pilot." 

"Two    Admirals." 

Froissart. 

Percy's   Reliques. 

Thackeray's 

"Vanity    Fair"  and  vI'cnJ  >niiis' 

Dickens  : 

"Mutual    Friend." 

"Pickwick." 

The  list  is  a  good  one,  as  any  sensible  person  must 
admit.  It  is  simple  in  its  character,  and  yet  most  com- 
prehensive. The  ex-president  has  demonstrated  his  ability 
to  discern  true  values  in  literature.  The  pigskin  library 
will  become  famous. 


jSe    empir1|nnual 

?oF      ^GANADIAN^ 


THE  RELIGIOUS  TRACT 
SOCIETY 

(LONDON,  ENGLAND) 

The  many   popular   works  published   by   this   firm   are 
fast   becoming    household     favorites    in    the   Dominion. 


TWO  NEW  IMPORT. 
ANT  ANNUALS 

Price 
84  cents  each. 

The  Empire   Annnal  for  Canadian  Boys 
The  Empire  Annual  for  Canadian  Girls 

Each  384  pages,  with  8  coloured  and  many  other  illustrations. 
These  volumes  contain  a  series  of  stories  and  articles  of 
absorbing   interest   to  all  Canadian  Boys  and  Girls. 


THE  BOUVERIE  COLONIAL  LIBRARY 

(A)  Stiff  Paper  Covers.     (B)  Cloth  Gilt. 

The   authors  whose  works   appear  in   the  series  include  : 

S.  R.  Crocket,  Silas  K.  Hocking,  David  Lya.il, 

Amy  Le  Feuvre,  J.  Bloundelle  Burton 

and  many  others. 


The  R.T.  S.  has  on  it 

List 

OVER  1000   PRIZE 

ant/ 


REWARD  BOOKS 

(All  copyright  stories) 

Ranging  in  price  from  8  cents  to  $1.50.  Tbe  authors  in- 
clude such  well-known  names  as  Talbot,  Baines  Reed, 
Amy  Le  Feuvre,  Hesba  Stretten,  Mrs.  O  F. 
Walton,  E.  Everett  Green,  Rosa  N.  Carey, 
Mrs.  de  Home  Vaizey,  and  many  others. 


The  R.   T.  S.  List   also  includes  many  volumes    in   the 
following  departments : 

DEVOTIONAL 

BIOGRAPHICAL 

MISSIONARY 

NATURAL  HISTORY 

THEOLOGICAL,  ETC     ETC. 


All  Booksellers  who  have  not  hitherto  carried  the  publications  of  the  R.T.  S.  should  at  once  send  for 
complete  catalogue  and  particulars  of  terms.     Address,  4  Bouverie   Street,   London,  England. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


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and  book  of  days  combined  at  3  to  8    per 
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Tables         Price,  $2.00 

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A  complete  catalogue  of  all  the  above  publications 
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43 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


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BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


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Our    Import 

propaganda 
means  holiday 
trade  success  in 
19 10. 

Thousands    of 
New  Lines 

Lots  of 

"  Specials  " 

Ready  first  of  March 

Arrange  Visit  to 
Toronto 

Showing  Unique 

in  Canadian 

Business 

A  card  will  bring  you 
particulars  of  plan. 


Travellers  now  on  the  road  with  Spring  Samples  and  to 
Arrange  Import  Appointments. 


The  Fancy  Goods  Co.  of  Canada,  Limited 

156  Front  Street  West,  °ppstldonnion  Toronto 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Seasonable  Goods 


Playing  Cards,  Tally  and  Place 
Cards,  At-Home  Cards,"Bridge" 
and  "500"  Score  Pads,  Lace 
Paper  Doylies,  Japanese  Nap- 
kins, Valentine  and  Easter 
Post  Cards. 


Made 
from 
solid 
steel 


HOLD3  LIKE  A  VISE  from  two  to  sixty  papers.    It  grips  both  ways— lengthwise 
and  sideways.     Papers  cannot  slip;   does  not  mutilate  the  papers;  no  points  to 
catch;  easy  to  put  on  and  to  take  off.   A  perfect  paperclip.   Send  for  samples  and  prices. 


Has 

no 

equal 


Buntin,  Gillies  &  Company,  Limited 

Hamilton  and  Montreal 


niTYOL 


TYPEWRITER* 

CARBON 


MITTAC 


VOLCEP 


PAMN    RIOCC     H.  J^  U-S-A. 


It  is     our  line"  that  must 
itself    among  the    fastidious 

writer  Ribbons  and 
Carbon  Papers,  as  it  is 
the  aristocrat  of  its  kind. 

Our    goods   are    distinguished    for 

their  Richness  of  quality  and 

the  possession  of  every 

required    property. 


forever   impress 


users   of    Type- 


BRANCBES-New  York,  N.Y  ,  280  Broadway 
Chicago,  III.,  200  Monroe  St. 
London,  7  &  8  Dyers  Bldg.,  Holborn,  E.C. 

AGENCIES-In  every  part  of  the  world 

In  every  city  of  prominence 


:J° 


'"iiiiiiiiumi  HniniFpi 

=J°VE  ITSELF  SUPEBI0 
^  OTHER  BRANjj 


MITTAG  &  V.OLGER,  Inc.  S£c&°E 

Principal  Office  and  Factories,  Park  Ridge,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 


MANUFACTURERS  FOR  THE  TRADE  ONLY. 


VOL.  XXVI.,  No.  2. 


PRICE,  $1.00  PER  YEAR 


|0DM» 


Canadian  Newsdealer 


Official  Organ  of  the  Canadian  Book,  Stationery  and  Publishing-  Trades  Association 

and  for  Twenty-Four  Years  the  Recognized  Organ  of  the  Book,  Stationery  and  Fancy  Goods  Trades  of  Canada. 

MONTREAL,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Bldg.        TORONTO,  10  Front  St.  E.     WINNIPEG,  51 1  Union  Bank  Bldg.        LONDON,  ENG.  88  Fleet  St.  E.C. 


PUBLICATION     OFFICE:     TORONTO,     FEBRUARY,     1910 


UNDERWOODS 

FOUNTAIN  PEN 

INK 


This  ink  can  be  used  in  any  style  of 
Fountain  Pen  made.  Are  you  handling- 
it  ?      There's   a  good    profit  attached. 


JOHN    UNDERWOOD    ®L   CO. 


90  Richmond  Street  East 


TORONTO 


No  Glass  Dropper! 
No  Inky  Fingers! 

TO  fill  the  Onoto  Fountain 
Pen  it  is  but  necessary  to 
pull  out  the  Plunger,  dip  the 
pen  point  in  ink-well,  and 
press   the   Plunger  forward. 

Simple  — quick — clean — abso- 
lutely sure. 

Eleven  other  equally  distinc- 
tive features. 

Yet  the  Onoto  costs  no  more 
than  old-fashioned,  unsatis- 
factory,  unguaranteed    kinds. 


Three 
$2.50  up. 


sizes, 


§ 


Fifteen  s  t  y  1  e 
points. 

Sold  on  an  abso- 
lute guarantee  of 
"Satisfaction, 
New  Pen  or 
Money    Back." 


If  you  have  not 
yet  stocked  the 
O110/0,  write  at 
once  for  trade 
price  list  and  full 
particulars. 
Do  it  now — TO- 
DAY— every  day 
you  delay  you  are 
losing-  profitable 
sales. 


i 


ONOTO  PEN  CO.,   261  Broadway,  New  York 

Canadian  Office:  314  Lit  dsay  Bldg.,  Montreal 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Blank  Book  Building 


Skilled  workmanship  is  as  necessary 
for  the  building  of  a  Blank  Book  as 
the  Construction  of  a  Dreadnought, 
they  must  be  built  of  the  best  material 
by  competent  workmen,  and  on  scien- 
tific principles. 

Our  factory  is  the  most  modern  in 
Canada,  equipped  with  the  latest 
•improved  machinery  and  labor-saving 
devices,  enabling  us  to  manufacture 
at  the  lowest  possible  cost,  every 
variety,  from  a  vest  pocket  memoran- 
dum book  to  a  loose-leaf  ledger. 

With    our   experience  of  over  half  a 
century,    quality     and    lowest    prices 
,  are  guaranteed. 


Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Limited 

Manufacturing  Stationers  Toronto 


Bookseller  and  stationer 


GOODALL'S 

IMPERIAL  CLUB  PLAYING  CARDS 

Are  the  Best  Twenty-five  Cent  Card  Made 

ALL  FIRSTS -NO  SECONDS.     Wrapped  and  Sealed. 
60  different  backs  to  select  from,  including 

Bicycle   -   Golf   -  Fernlea  -  Cow  Boy 


AUBREY  O.  HURST 

REPRESENTATIVE 


ORDER   FROM   YOUR   JOBBER 


Main   1479 


24  SCOTT  ST. 

TORONTO 


y  SANFORDfcBENUiTT 

1  AUTOPEN 

A  NEWYORK,U.S.A.FWT.DEC.I9.I90S 

DSBDDDS 


Not  Theories,  but  Crystallized  Experience 

has  enabled  us  to  produce  a  full  range  of  Fountain  Pens  for  foreign  and 
domestic  trade  of  the  highest  grade,  and  which  embodies  all  the 
qualities  that  make  for  satisfaction.  Every  pen  is  guaranteed 
unconditionally,  and  we  make  a  special  feature  of  "imprint"  orders. 
We  are  patentees  of  the 

"Autopen  Safety,"  "Gravity"  Stylo  and  "Commercial"  Fountain  Pen 

three  lines  that  have  "made  good"  with  the  leading  stationers  and  jewel- 
ers of  Canada  and  the  United  States. 

The  "Autopen  Safety,"  illustrated  above,  is  a  self-filler,  is  non-leakable.  We 
call  special  attention  to  the  safety  cap  which  prevents  leakage.  This  is  a 
new  principle  in  non-leakables.  Made  in  vest  pocket  size  to  supply  the  pop- 
ular demand  for  short  "Safety"  pen  for  the  vest  pocket  or   lady's    handbag. 


SIB  i 
U.S.A.J 


May  we  not  send  you  our  catalogue  ?     There  are  many  points  of  interest  in  it  for  you. 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Company 

51-53  Maiden  Lane,  New  York 


)  S&B  I 
/(JtwYbRuN 
U.S.A.y 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


OFFICE  SUPPLY 
and  STATIONERY 
WAREHOUSE— 

COMPLETE  STOCK 

Inkstands  a  Specialty 


OUR  OWN  MAKE  -GREAT  VARIETY 


BANKERS'-SAFETY-ALL  KINDS 


SPONGE  CUPS-PEN  RESTS,  ETC. 


THE  AMERICAN  BLOTTING  STONE 

Desk  Blotter  of  Absorbent  Stone 


BROWN  BROS.  * 

51-53  Wellington  St.  W.,  Toronto. 


% 


DAVIDS' 

CELEBRATED 

INK 

Unsurpassed  for 
Quality  and   Value 

Electro-Chemical 

Blue  Black 
Fountain  Pen 
Carmine 

Manufactured  by 
Thaddeus  Davids  Co. 

NeW     York.     Established  1825 

BROWN  BROS. 

Limited 
Canadian  Agents,     TofOntO 


Tatum  Post  Price  Book 

For   Loose   Leaves 

Sheets  do  not  tear  out  as  in  Ring  Books. 
For  pocket  or  desk  Use. 

FOR  SALE  BY    STATIONERS. 


Patented  July   13,   1909 

THE  BEST   FOR   PRICE  LISTS,  CATALOGUES  AND 
OTHER  HARD  USE. 

Opens  with  coin.    No  loose  screws.    Expansion,  70  per  cent. 
Quick-acting  screws  fasten  at  any  point  within  range. 
Eight  stock  sizes.     Special  sizes  also  furnished. 


THE    SAM'L    C.  TATUM    CO. 

Manufacturers   of   Stationers'  Specialties,  Loose    Leaf   Devices 
Power  Punches  and  Perforators 

No.  3318  Colerain  Ave.,  CINCINNATI,  OHIO,  U.S.A. 
New  York  Office,  No.  197  Fulton  Street 


ROOKS  E  L  L  K  K     A  N  1)     S  T  A  T  I  ( )  X  E  R 


HOLLAND 

LINEN 


(TRADE  MARK   REGISTERED) 


Holland  Linen  has  all  the  good  points  of  other  writing  papers 
End  none  of  the  bad  ones.  It  is  even  in  tone,  firm  in  fibre,  and 
the  linen  finish  gives  that  rich  appearance  so  necessary  to  polite 
correspondence. 

The  texture  is  so  soft  and  smooth  that  even  a  bad  pen  never 
spatters  when  used  on  it. 

Holland  Linen  Note  Paper  and  Envelopes 
Five  sizes,  three  tints  in  each  size. 

Holland  Linen  Papeteries 

Five  sizes,  three  tints  in  each  size. 

Holland  Linen  Tablets 

All  standard  sizes,   different  tints. 

Holland  Linen  Invitation  Cabinets 

Different  sizes,   engraved  or  plain. 

Holland  Linen  Visiting  Cards 
All  sizes,  thick  or  thin. 

Holland  Linen  Black  Bordered 

Paper  and  Envelopes 
All  widths. 

We  put  up  a  special  $10.00  assortment  of  Holland  Linen  goods 
containing  a  selection  of  all  above.  Can  we  send  you  one?  Your 
stock  of  High  Grade  Stationery  is  incomplete  without  Holland  Linen. 

SAMPLES     SENT     ON     APPLICATION 

W.  J.  GAGE  &  CO.,  Limited 

82-94  Spadina  Ave.,  TORONTO 

Paper     Mills     at     St.      Catharines 


BOOKSELLER  AMD  STATIONER 


A.  R.  MacDoug'all  CgL  Co. 


Are  now  showing-  the  trade  a  full  range  of  samples  of  the  lines  made  by  the  following 
manufacturers:— STANDARD  CRAYON  CO.,  Danvers,  Mass.,  Chalks,  Wax 
and  Oil  Crayons.  ERIE  ART  METAL  CO.,  Erie,  Penn.,  Fancy  Metal  Office 
Baskets.  FULTON  RUBBER  TYPE  CO.,  Elizabeth,  N.J.,  Rubber  Type 
Goods,  etc.  TRUSSELL  MFG.  CO.,  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y.,"Gilt  Edge"  Line  of 
Loose  Leaf  Price  Books  and  Memos.  SPIRO  MFG.  CO.,  New  York,  Steel  Arch 
Files  and  Pencil  Sharpeners.  THE  HOGE  MFG.  CO.,  New  York,  Pen  and  Pencil 
Clips,  Letter  Openers  and  Thumb  Tacks,  Buyers  visiting  Toronto  are  cordially 
invited  to  visit  our  showrooms 

42  Adelaide  Street  W. 
Toronto,  Ontario 


ART  SUPPLIES 

W Insor  &  Newton*  OH  Colors 
"     Water  Colors 
"  "     Canvas 

••  "      Papers 

"  "     Brushes 

"  "      Boxes 

All  kinds  of  goods  for  artists:  Crayons,  Oils,  Mediums,  Easels,  Studies,  &c 

SEND     POR     CATALOGUE 

A.  Ramsay  &  Son  Co., 

MONTREAL 

Agents  (or  WINSOR  &  NEWTON.  London 


"  Modern  B"  Pen  &  Pencil  Clips 


5  CENTS  EITHER  SIZE 


Duryea-Hoge  Company    Inc.  Manufacturer. 

108   FULTON  STREET.  NEW  YORK  CITY 


Artists'  Materials 


AND 


School  Supplies    ffvmml 

M.     1  lh-1  LIMITED 

_       .  TO9Y0HGE  STREETS 

Colors,  Brushes, 

Papers, 

Drawing  Instruments,  etc# 

Catalogue  on  Application. 

THE    ART   METROPOLE,    Limited 

149  YONGE  STREET,  TORONTO 


THE  MANUFACTURERS  SALES  CO.,   - 


Write 
for 
Price 
Birks  Bldg.,  MONTREAL 


Fancy  Leather 
Goods 


We  make  an  extensive  line  suit- 
able for  dealers  in  Fancy  Goods, 
Stationery,    Haberdashery,    etc. 


Send  for  Illustrated  Catalogue 


THADG  \   ^D    /  MARK 


Established 
i856 


Toilet  Cases 


\R/w      C.  F.  Rumpp  &  Sons 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  U.S.A. 
New  York  Salesrooms  :  :  :  :  :  683-685  Broadway 


.  t    Luncheon  Outfit 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


IF   YOU   HAVE   HANDLED 

The  "VICTOR"  INKSTAND 

you  know  the  reason  they  are  such  public  favorites, 
and  if  you  don't  we'll  only  be  too  glad  to  tell  you ! 

The  "Victor"  Inkstand  gives  you 


JUST  ENOUGH  INK  TO  INK  THE  PEN, 
and  no  more.  It  is  impossible  to  dip  the  pen  too 
deeply  in  the  inkstand.  The  "VICTOR"  is  easily 
taken  apart  and  cleaned. 

SOLD    BY    ALL    CANADIAN    WHOLESALERS 

There  s  a  liberal  margin  of  profit  for  you. 


The    Weeks-Numan   Co. 

39-41  Park  Place, 
NEW  YORK  CITY 


Carter's 


Writing 


Permanent 
Free  Flowing 
Fine  Writing 


Larger  sizes  have 
Carter's  Patent  Pour- 
out —  most  conven- 
ient on  the  market. 


Send  in  your  order  at  once  before  continued  cold 
■weather  makes  risky  shipping. 

THE  CARTER'S  INK  CO. 

154  Craig  St.  West,  Montreal 
Boston  New  York  Chicago 


E.  MORRIS  &  CO. 

(Wholesale) 

STATIONERY 
SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 
POSTCARDS 

LOCAL   VIEW  POSTCARDS 

We  have  the  exclusive  handling  of  the  Products  of 
Three  of  the  leading  German  Postcard  Factories — 
Specialists   in   their  own   particular  style   of  card. 

CHROMOTYPE  BLACK  and  WHITE 

HAND-COLORED  SEPIA— BROWN 

MARINE— BLUE 

PRICES  from  $4.50  m. 

Write    for  samples,  which    will  convince   you  that 
we  ate  showing  high-grade  cards  oniy. 

VANCOUVER!!). 


A  DEFINITION 

OF  "QUALITY" 

Quality:  the  condition  of  being  of 
such  and  such  a  sort  as  distin- 
guished from  others — Webster's 
Dictionary. 

Distinguished  from  others  in  each 
detail  of  their  manufacture  are  the 
celebrated  writing  papers  of  the 
EATON,  CRANE  &  PIKE  CO. 
Their  texture,  finish,  color  and 
character  of  putting  up  are  of  such 
a  sort  as  to  place  them  in  a  class 
by  themselves. 

Your  customers  know  that  the  "Made 
in  Berkshire"  trademark  of  the  Eaton, 
Crane  &  Pike  Company  is  the  hallmark 
of  Quality.  Our  many  years  of  success- 
full  experience,  and  our  constant  and  ex- 
tensive advertising  have  placed  our  name 
foremost  in  the  minds  of  the  letter  writ- 
ing' public. 

Follow  the  line  of  least  resistance.  Con- 
centrate upon  the  Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike 
Company's  line  of  writing  papers,  at  the 
forefront  of  which  are  the  justly  cele- 
brated papers  made  by  the  Messrs. 
Crane,  of  Dalton,  and  Highland  Linen. 

Eaton,  Graine  &  Pike  Co. 

PITTSFIELD      :      MASS.,  U.S.A. 

New  York   Office,   Brunswick   Building,   225   Fifth  Avenue 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


SPECIAL  SPRING  NUMBER 

°f  The  Bookseller  and  Stationer 

will  be  issued  on  March  Ninth  and  will  be  given 
an  extra  large  circulation.  Advertisers  will  find 
in  this  Special  Number  an  exceptionally  good 
opportunity  to  reach  the  Trade  in  Canada.  All 
departments  will  be  enlarged  and  strengthened 
for  the  occasion.  For  rates  and  all  information 
address  any  office  of  the  paper. 


Toronto 

Montreal 

London 

New  York 

10  Front  E. 

E.  T.  Bank  Bldg. 

88  Fleet  St.,  E.C. 

Room  1109-1111 
160  Broadway 

"Sports"  Playing  Cards 


Leaders   in 

a  second 

(*rade 

Good 

Luck 

and 

St. 
Lawrence 


LACROSSE    DESICN 


Special  card  for  whist  players  Colonial  Whist 

We  are  headquarters  for  Playing  Cards— Made 

in  Canada— Style  and  finish  equal 

to   Imported  Cards. 

Advertising  Cards  of  all  sorts,  Novel  designs 
Coated  Litho.  and  Book  Papers 

FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES  APPLY 

CONSOLIDATED  LITHOGRAPHING  AND  MANU- 
FACTURING CO.,  LIMITED 

Successors    to   The   Union   Card    and   Paper  Company,  Montreal. 


HIGGINS' 
TAURINE  MUCILAGE 


THE  demand  for  a  clean, 
tenacious  and  pure  muci- 
lage, secure  against  the 
corrosive  influences  affecting 
the  average  product  in  this  line, 
induced  us  to  put  upon  the 
market  Higgins'  Taurine  Muci- 
lage. It  avoids  the  defects  of 
the  cheap  and  nasty  dextrine 
and  the  dear  and  dirty  gum 
mucilages.  It  is  stronger, 
catches  quicker  and  dries  more 
rapidly  than  any  other  mucilage, 
and  is  perfectly  c'ear,  clean, 
non-corrosive,  non-sedimentary 
pnd  pleasant  to  sight  and  scent. 
It  is  put  up  in  both  bottles  and 
safety  shipping  cans,  and  will  be  found  not  only 
C3nvenient  for  use,  but  entirel  i  satisfactory  so  far 
as  its  working  qualities  are  concerned.  It  will 
please  your  trade. 


HIGGINS"  AMERICAN  DRAWING  INKS 

BLACKS  AND  COLORS 
1  he  Standard  Liquid  Drawing  Inks  of  the  World 


CHAS.   M.   HIGGINS    &    CO.,   Manufacturer. 
NEW  YORK  CHICAGO  LONDON 

Main  Office  and  Factory,  BROOKLYN,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Something 
NEW 

in 

Xmas 
Cards 


A  STRICTLY  Canadian  line  of  Xmas  Cards,  Postals,  Cal- 
endars, and  Xmas  Stationery,  designed  to  meet  the 
growing  demand  for  goods  especially  Canadian  in  character. 
The  designs  are  very  beautiful  and  a  specimen  of  one  of  the 
verses  is  shown  in  the  bottom  right  hand  corner  of  this  ad* 
This  line  will  be  extremely  popular  all  over  the  Dominion. 


Our  regular  lines  for    1910   include  Special    Designs  in 

XMAS  CARDS 


Postal i,  Calendars,  Xmas  Stationery,  Xmas  Tags  and  Wafers, 
N  jvelty  Rocking  Cards,  Photogravures,  Religious  Mottos  and 
Texts. 

Our  travelers  are  now  showing  the  trade  samples  of  these 
goods. 


BIRN  BROS.,  JiS^J  London,  England 

A.  R.  MacDOUGALL  &  CO.,  42  Adelaide  St.   W.,  Toronto,  Canadian  Representatives 


"The  Arms  of  the  Land  of  the  Maple 
Let  us  toast  them  with  three  times 
three; 

May  no  Sinister  Bar 

The  Escutcheon  e'er  mar 
Of  Canada,  Land  of  the  free." 


if 

Ufnrlrl" 

"Hollywood" 

Best  Blotting  made 

Our  Blotting  Papers 

Second  only  to  "World" 

Do  Not  Blot ! 

But  they  dry  the  ink  on  the  paper  at  the  first  application  without  the 
semblance  of  a  blot  or  smudge. 

Isn't  this    the    line,  Mr.  Stationer,  that   you    have    been    looking"   for, 
especially  as  this  feature  holds  g"ood  with  every  one  of  the  five  qualities 
mentioned  in  the  corners  of  this  ad  ? 

We  don't  ask  you   to   accept  our   unsupported  statement.      Send  for  a 
full    range    of   samples  ;   use    the    blotting  yourself  and 

BE   CONVINCED  ! 

T 

he  Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

"Reliance" 

RICHMOND                                                                    VIRGINIA 

"Vienna  Moire" 

"Directoire" 

Une 

lualled  at  the  price 

Ull  UlHUII  u 

Leading  Fancy  Blot 

tings 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


FOUNTAIN    PENS 


STYLOGRAPH IC    PENS 


GOLD    PENS 


Being  practical  makers  of  over  25  years' experience  and  now  having  the  most  up-to-date  FACTORIES,  we  are 
prepared  to  supply  the  BEST  at  LOWEST  rates.  Special  designs  and  patents  made  (and  if  necessary  put  on  the 
English  Market)  so  as  to  secure  English  protection.    Send  particulars  and  receive  our  quotations. 

JEWEL  PEN  COMPANY,  io2Fenchurch St.,  London,Eng. 

(Sole  Makers- of  The  Red  Giant  Stylo). 


WE  NOW  STOCK 


A  FULL  LINE  OF:— 

Manilla  Wrapping  Paper,   Sheets  and  Rolls 
"Kraft"  Wrapping  Paper,    Sheets  and  Rolls 

(WESTERN  AGENTS    FOR  THE  NEW  BRUNSWICK    PULP    &    PAPER    CO.,    MAKERS  OF  KRAFT) 

Drug  Paper  Rolls,  Twines — Sea  Island,   Cotton,  Hemp,  Sisal. 

Suit  Boxes,     Paper  Bags,    Wax  Paper,     Twine  Holders,    Paper 
Cutters,      Vegetable  Parchment.      White  and  Coloured  Tissues. 

Samples  and  Prices  on  application. 

SMITH.  DAVIDSON  (&  WRIGHT,    Limited 


WHOLESALE  STATIONERS  AND  PAPER  DEALERS 


VANCOUVER,  B.C 


Staples  (No.  18)  5,000  in  a  box. 


per  1,000.  30  cent» 


A  Modern 
Device 

The   Acme   No.  2    Binder 

This  is  a  machine  that  drives  a  flat 
staple  (hat  holds.  It  penetrates  the 
thickest  and  toughest  paper  and  will 
not  tear  the  thinnest.  Easy  and  con- 
venient to  work  and  will  not  get  out 
ot  order,  because  it  is  simply  made. 
The  price  is  moderate  and  is  one  of 
the  least  inducements  that  will  sell 
it  to  the  busy  office  worker. 

Ask  your  jobbing  bouse  about  it. 


Acme    Staple   Company,    Limited 


112  North  Ninth  St. 


Camden.  N.J..  U.S.A. 


, TU17    rAPT 

i  nil/  rAij  i 

that  we  are  supplying  the  two  largest 
cities  in  America  and   the  U.S.  Gov- 
ernment with  solid  crayons  is  evidence 
that  the  best  and  cheapest  are  made  by 

The  Standard  Crayon  Mfg.  Co. 

Danvers,  Mass. 

FOUNTAIN    PENS  WHOLES  ALU     ONLY  STYLOGRAPHIC    pens 

CONWAY,  STEWART  &  CO.,  LTD.,  of  33  PATERNOSTER  ROW,  LONDON,  ENG.,  being  the 
actual  manufacturers  of  all  kinds  of  FOUNTAIN  and  STYLO  Pens,  invite  enquiries  from  the 
wholesale  only. 

SPECIALTIES-"  STEWART'S "   Self-Filling  Fountain  Pen  (Patented). 


Made  on  the  natural  principle  of  a  syringe.     Parfect  in  its  simplicity. 

•STEWART'S"  Self-Filling  STYLO   (Patented) 


The  first   and  ONLY   Self-filling    Stylo.    Retail,  $1.00. 

8 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


SCOTCH  PLAID  STATIONERY 

Wc  are  daily  in  receipt  of  glowing  tributes  of  praise  re- 
garding this  leading  line,  recently  placed  with  the  trade; 
in  fact,  it  is  almost  impossible  for  us  to  keep  in  stock  an 
adequate  supply  to  fill  all  orders  received. 

Notepaper 

Salisbury  size,  banded  in  quires  and  boxed  in  quarter  reams,  $1,75  per  ream 

Envelopes 

Salisbury  size,  diamond  cut,  boxed  in  hundreds.  -  $3.50  per  1000. 

Papeteries 

Salisbury  size,  attractive  cabinet,  contains  24  sheets  paper  and 

24  envelopes  $2.50  per  doz. 

Tablets 

Salisbury  size  contains  60  sheets  $2.00  per  dozen 

Large  Octavo  size  "         60      "  1.20    "       " 

Large  Quarto    "  "         60      "  2.40  "       " 


The  lithographed  design  on  boxes  and  tablet  covers 
gives  an  elegant  appearance  to  the  goods,  which  means 
much  in  creating  observation  and  enquiry. 

You  know  what  that  means 

Display  card,  12x18  inches,  lithographed  in  colors,  is  al- 
so supplied. 

Your  orders  will  receive  our  prompt  attention 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd. 

TORONTO 


mm 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  Imprint  that  Means  Quality 


_     ns 
FoiifSS2iiren 


ie  pen  wi 


There  never  was  a  writing  implement  so  universally  well  known  and  of  such  superior 
quality  as  Waterman's  Ideal.  Our  history  is  one  of  inventing  fountain  pen  pefections  and 
fulfilling  the  demands  of  the  trade  of  the  entire  world.  Our  advertising  selling  campaigns  are 
consistent,  complete  and  most  extensive.     Our  advertising  increases  yearly  with  our  sales. 

The  prestige  of  stationery  stores  is  largely  determined  by  the  display  and  sale  of  this 
line.  Waterman's  Ideal  Fountain  Pens  are  the  most  popular  and  profitable  individual  gift 
line  of  any  that  the  stationer  sells. 

Standard,  Safety  and  Self-Filling  Styles. 

Send  for  our  84-page  Catalogue  and  Selling  Suggestions.  Sell  Waterman's  Ideals  and 
get  all  the  Fountain  Pen  business  you  should. 


136  St.  James  St. 


MONTREAL 


fmsn 


10 


poofesieller  anb  Stationer 


anb  Canadian  i^etosfoealer 


A  monthly  journal  devoted  to  the  interests 
of  the    Bookselling  and   Stationery  Trades 


Subscription:    One  Dollar  a  Year 
Single  copies     :       :     Ten  Cents 


Vol.  XXVI 


TORONTO,  CANADA,  FEBRUARY,   1910 


No.  2 


Editorial    Comment. 


special  issue  was  first  inaugurated,  a  couple  of  years  ago, 
some  doubt  was  expressed  as  to  its  utility.  Two  years' 
experience  have  abundantly  justified  its  publication.  While 
it  does  not  equal  the  Fall  Special  in  size  and  importance, 
it  is  still  a  growing  and  useful  number,  and  this  year 
we   hope    to    present   our   readers    with   a    most    attractive 


A  meeting  of  the  executive  of  the  Booksellers'  Associa- 
tion has  been  summoned  by  President  Cloke  for  February 
16,  when  important  business  is  to  be  taken  up.  Members 
of  the  trade  who  have  matters  to  lay  before  the  executive 
are  requested  to  communicate  at  once  with  the  secretary 
at  10  Front  Street  East,  Toronto.     This  is  an  opportunity      issue. 

for   any    one    to    bring   forward    any   business     which    the  »     ,     , 

executive    can   handle.      That    is    what    the   executive   was 

elected  for — to  serve  the  trade,  and  any  action  they  mav 

,         .,,  ,  ,,,     ,      ,  .  „  ,.  ,.  .   ,.  lu  spite  of  the  rigorous  provisions  of  the  Secret  Com- 

take  will  have  the  backing  or  the  entire  association. 

missions  Act,  which  prohibits  the  giving  of  secret  rebates 
»     *     * 

and  commissions,  there  are  still  some  salesmen  who  in  their 

This  meeting  is  a  reminder  that  as  yet  a  good  many  desire  to  get  business  are  resorting  to  practices  which  are 
of  the  trade  have  not  contributed  their  little  quota  to-  forbidden  by  the  Act.  Our  attention  is  frequently  drawn 
wards  keeping  the  organization  alive.  How  can  any  book-  to  flaoTant  breaches  of  the  Act,  and  one  of  the  most  corn- 
seller  expect   that   the  Association  can  get   along  without  mon  practices  in  this  regard  appears  to  be  the  passing  from 


money  ?  He  should  feel  ashamed  of  himself  to  sit  still 
and  see  others  working  for  him,  while  he  fails  to  put  his 
hand  in  his  pocket  and  help  things  a.long.  Just  before 
the  executive  meeting  will  be  an  excellent  time  to  send  in 

I  he  annual  fee. 

*     it-     * 

A  special  circulation  solicitor  has  been  despatched  by 
the  MacLean  Publishing  Co.,  publishers  of  The  Book- 
seller and  Stationer,  to  the  West  Indies,  where  he  will 
spend  three  or  four  months  canvassing  for  the  various 
trade  newspapers  issued  by  this  house.  While  the  bulk 
of  the  orders  coming  in  from  him  are  for  the  papers  of 
wider  scope,  yet  he  hopes  to  secure  quite  a  number  of  new 
subscriptions  for  this  paper.  This  is  an  interesting  fact, 
which  should  be  noted  carefully  by  our  advertisers.  There 
is  a  good  market  in  the  West  Indies  for  many  lines  of 
stationery  and  should  Mr.  Williams'  canvass  result  in 
opening  up  a  few  new  accounts  for  advertisers  in  Book- 
seller and  Stationer,  his  visit  will  indeed  be  fruitful. 


the  pocket  of  the  salesman  to  the  palm  of  the  customer 
a  sum  of  money  sufficient  to  induce  the  latter  to  place  an 
order  for  goods  on  which  there  is  a  fixed  selling  price. 
Aside  altogether  from  the  moral  aspect  of  such  practices 
they  are  proofs  of  poor  rather  than  goods  salesmanship. 
When  a  salesman  resorts  to  secret  rebates  and  other  dis- 
honest practices  in  order  to  secure  business  it  is  an  ac- 
knowledgment of  his  own  inefficiency  to  sell  goods  in  the 
ordinary  way.  The  true  salesman  is  he  who  relies  upon  the 
merits  of  his  goods,  plus  his  own  personality,  to  effect 
sales;  not  he  who  is  so  unwise  as  to  run  the  risk  of  in- 
curring severe  legal  penalties  in  order  to  accomplish  that 
which  he  cannot  do  by  legitimate  means.  One  thing  that 
perhaps  can  be  said  in  favor  of  the  salesman  who  is  ready 
to  break  the  law  in  order  to  effect  a  sale  is  that  he  is  at 
least  courageous  in  view  of  the  fact  that  he  is  running  the 
risk  of  a  maximum  penalty  of  a  $2,500  fine  or  two  years' 
imprisonment.  Those  who  have  to  substitute  crookedness 
for  efficiency  should  either  learn  the  secret  of  true  sales- 
*      *      *  manship  or  embark  in  some  vocation  in  which  dishonesty 

March  9  is  the  publication  date  of  the  Special  Spring      rules    all   actions.      Some    day    somebody    will    be    caught, 
Number    of    The    Bookseller    and    Stationer.      When    this      when   there  will  be  wailing  and  gnashing  of  teeth. 


Interior  of  R.  A.  J.  Little's  Store  in  St.  Thomas. 


Some  Useful  Ideas  Gleaned  in  a  St.  Thomas   Book   Store 

R.  A.  J.  Little,  a  Most  Resourceful  Bookseller,  Discloses  Some  of  His  Secrets — 
Has  a    Splendid    Store — Cultivates    Customers  by  Variety  of  Little  Attentions 


For  original  advertising',  novel  methods  and  trade- 
bringing'  propositions,  no  bookseller  in  Canada,  is  prob- 
ably more  resourceful  or  practical  than  R.  .A.  J.  Little, 
of  St.  Thomas.  He  has  long  been  a  leader  in  his  line  and 
is  a  liberal  patron  of  printers'  ink.  He  uses  large  space 
some-days  and  smaller  the  next,  according  to  the  specialty 
that'  he  has  to  present.  Then  he  employs  liners  as  supple- 
mentary publicity  to  the*  display  announcements,  the  read- 
ing matter  of  which  'he  changes  every  day.  He  never  has 
exactly  the  same  story  to  tell  simultaneously  in  the  two 
St.  Thomas  papers.  He  will  take  one  advertisement  out, 
and,  after  studying  its  weaknesses  and  strength- 
ening it,  use  it  "in  the  paper  ■  in  which  it  has 
not  appeared.  Invariably -he  quotes  prices  and  has  what- 
ever goods  he  features  in  his  ads.  displayed  in  his  win- 
dows at  the  same  time.  In  tickets  and  fags  he  is  a  great 
believer  for  it  enables  him  to  display  his  prices  in  plain 
figures. 

Mr.  Little  began  life  as  a  school  teacher  in  the  his- 
toric county  of  "Waterloo.  Then  he  went  into  the  book 
business  in  Oshawa.  which  he  conducted  for  several  years 
with  splendid  success.  Nearly  two  years  ago  he  disposed 
of  his  interests  and  went  west,  establishing  the  West  End 
Stationery  Store  in  Edmonton.  A  few  months  since  he 
bought  the. business  of  M.  G-.  Hay,  of  St.  Thomas,  who 
had  "been  in  that  line  seven  years.  Mr.  Little  has  a  high 
class,  neat  and  artistic,  store.  He  still  conducts  his  Ed- 
monton establishment  which  is  in  charge  of  his  sister-in- 
law,  Miss  Richardson.  He  is  a  man  of  ideas  and  takes 
naturally  to  the  book  business  and  extending  his  trade. 
In  every  rural  school  he  follows  the  ingenious  plan  of 
securing  the  name  of  some  reliable,  honest  boy,  to  whom 
he    sends    at    various    times    during    the    year,    blotters, 


buttons,  folders,  dodgers  and  other  attractive  advertis- 
ing matter,  which  is  distributed  to  the  pupils  in  the 
school  after  the  day's  session  is  over.  To  the  lad,  who 
looks  after  this  task,  Mr.  Little  forwards  a;t  the  end  of 
every  quarter  or  term  a  pocket  knife,  fountain  pen  or  some 
other  new  souvenir.  The  boy  really  acts  as  Mr.  Little's 
representative  in  that  district  and  is  often  the  means 
of  sending  him  customers.  Another  scheme  is  to  give 
something  to  every  young  child.  There  are  always  soiled 
picture  books,  cards,  part  of  games  or  blocks  or  pictures. 
etc.,  accumulating.  These  he  saves  for  the  kiddies,  while 
advertising  cards  or  blotters  come  in  for  the  older  chil- 
dren. They  please  them  and  delight  the  mothers.  If  a 
big  pile  of  old  sheet  music  keeps  on  increasing  in  size  so 
as  to  become  a  nuisance,  Mr.  Little  prints  a  neat  adver- 
tisement on  the  front  page  and  has  a  copy  left  at  every 
house  in  the  city  or  a  bundle  mailed  to  his  representative 
in  each  school  district. 

Mr.  Little  has  other  hobbies,  and  one  is  keeping  a  store 
in  spick  and  span  condition.  His  premises  are  110  feet 
long  and  22  feet  wide  and  on  fhe  second  floor  he  has  a 
space  60  x  22.  At  the  rear  he  has  an  office  which  is 
separated  by  a  light  partition  from  the  front  of  the  store, 
and  here  most  of  the  books  for  the  libraries  of  the  country 
schools  are  kept.  The  slore  front  is  imposing  and  pleas- 
ing. The  windows  are  declared  by  travelers  to  be  the 
li nest  in  the  province.  They  are  known  as  show  case 
windows  and  are  lined  throughout  with  mirrors.  Over- 
head are  Luxfer  Prisms  which  shed  a  flood  of  light  in 
the  slore.  The  floor  is  of  hardwood",  the  ceilings  are  high 
and  the  main  aisle  wide  and  regular.  There  is  a  sense 
of  roominess  about  the  premises  and  a  silent  invitation 
to  wander  around  through  the  open  spaces,  and  examine 


12 


_.  _   w>  _ 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


the  books  on  the  shelves.  On  the  left  of  the  entrance  are 
office  supplies,  leather  goods  in  silent  salesman  showcases, 
high  class  stationery,  inks,  school  books  and  supplies, 
newspapers,  Butterick's  patterns,  etc.  At  the  rear  .is  a 
magazine  rack  of  Mr.  Little's  own  invention.  The  periodi- 
cals instead  of  lying  down  flat  stand  on  end  and  can  be 
instantly  viewed.  A  glance  will  tell  whether  any  monthly 
which  the  visitors  desire  is  in  stock  or  not.  By  means  of 
this  there  is  no  danger  of  any  magazine  getting  covered 
up  by  others  or  scattered  around.  Then,  the  caller  fre- 
quently sees  something  and  buys  it  before  leaving  the 
store. 

On  the  right  of  entrance  is  one  of  the  best  and  most 
varied  assortments  of  miscellaneous  books  seen  anywhere. 
There  are  a  number  of  tables  which  hold  choice  volumes 
of  reading,  and  in  showcases  of  the  latest  type  are  art 
goods  and  souvenirs  of  various  kinds.  Mr.  Little  handles 
sporting  goods  to  a  certain  extent  but  no  fancy  goods,  toys, 
china  or  other  side  line.  About  30  feet  at  the  rear  of  his 
store  is  used  for  wall-paper  to  which  he  devo'tes  a  great 
deal  of  attention. 

In  the  room  already  spoken  of  at  the  rear  of  the  store, 
where  Mr.  Little  has  his  private  desk,  there  is  a  repre- 
sentative collection  of  books  sanctioned  by  the  Ontario 
government  for  use  in  the  libraries  of  rural  schools.  Here, 
the  inspector,  Mr.  Atkin,  and  trustees  from  different  sec- 
tions of  Elgin  County,  may  be  frequently  seen  selecting 
new  works  for  school  libraries.  Largely  througii  the 
aggressiveness  and  encouragement  of  the  inspector,  every 
school  in  the  county — and  there  are  about  100  all  told — 
has  a  fairly  well  equipped  library,  an  institution  that  no 
doubt  will  tend  to  make  the  coming  generation  more  and 
more  one  of  book  lovers  and  general  readers. 

Mr.  Little  runs  a  circulating  library  in  which  he  has 
evolved  some  good  ideas.  It  costs  a  member  50  cents 
annually  to  join  and  ten  cents  each  time  a  book  is  taken 
out.  It  helps  the  sade  of  books,  as  Mr.  Little's  experience 
is  that,  after  a  reader  peruses  a  thrilling  tale,  he  or  she 
will  often  say,  "I  think  that  I  will  buy  one  of  those 
books"  and  so  extra  copies  are  purchased  to  send  a 
friend.  A  popular  novel  will  soon  pay  for  itself  at  ten 
cents  for  every  occasion  it  is  taken  out  or  loaned  by  llie 
library.  Supposing  it  is  a  $1.25  copyright,  every  time 
it  leaves  the  store  a  private  mark  is  made  and  often  after 
the  volume  has  been  read  six  or  seven  times  it  is  sold  for 
50  or  60  cents.  Thus,  first  cost  has  been  obtained,  while 
the  book  has  done  good  service  in  the  renting  library. 
Mr.  Little's  library  has  about  100  members  and  he  finds 
that  it  brings  a  desirable  class  of  people  to  the  store  and 
gives  them  an  intimate  connection  and  acquaintance  with 
the  reading  matter  of  the  day.  They  learn  to  come  fre- 
quently and  to  make  the  book  shop  their  headquarters. 

St.  Thomas  is  a  great  reading  centre  and  new  copy- 
right fiction  enjoys  a  big  sale  there — probably  to  a  greater 
extent  than  in  any  similar  sized  city  in  Canada.  Mr. 
Little  does  not  handle  any  paper-covered  books  but  he 
has  a  superior  selection  of  reprints  and  English  classics. 
"Any  good  book  sells  well"  is  one  of  his  axioms.  It  is 
a  great  advantage  'to  a  bookseller  to  have  some  definite 
knowledge  of  the  contents  of  present  day  fiction.  Mam- 
persons  go  by  his  advice  and  are  constantly  consulting 
him.  Advertising  books,  Mr.  Little  announces  the  sale 
of  only  one  series  at  a  time,  mentioning  title,  prices  and 
other  particulars. 

Regarding  school  books  he  says  that  he  disposes  of 
them  at  the  printed  price  and  handles  them  in  very  much 
the  same  sense  as  a  grocer  sells  sugar — viz.,  he  has  to,  in 
order  not  to  disappoint  the  public.    It  is  part  of  his  busi- 


*3 


ness.  Mr.  Little  closes  his  store  at  six  o'clock  the  year 
around  except  Saturday.  He  carries  all  kinds  of  office 
and  typewriter  supplies.  His  is  purely  a  book  store — not 
a  variety  shop  or  fancy  fair. 

Of  the  handling  of  wallpaper  he  is  very  fond.  The 
selling  of  it  to  an  advantage  for  one  thing  depends  on 
your  ability  to  size  up  a  customer.  If  a  dealer  suspects 
that  a  woman  is  only  a,n  inquirer,  and  not  an  immediate 
purchaser,  he  should  deftly  and  ingeniously  become  pos- 
sessed of  the  object  of  her  mission  by  asking  the  size  of 
the  room  she  is  about  to  paper,  what  pattern  she  has  i 
preference  for,  etc.  As  much  time  need  not  be  spent  on  such 
a  shopper  as  on  one  who  is  going  to  make  a  definite  pur- 
chase; still  the  service  should  be  polite  and  obliging  and 
even  if  there  is  no  prospect  of  making  a  sale,  a  customer 
should  not  be  neglected.  The  sample  book  may,  however, 
be  leafed  over  a  little  rapidly.  All  wallpaper  is  sold  by 
Mr.  Little  from  sample  books. 

Speaking  generally  of  his  methods  of  disposing  of 
goods  in  this  and  other  departments,  he  said  "When  I 
get  new  wallpaper  stock  in  winter  I  get  the  factory  to 
send  us  sample  books  that  they  are  through  with.  These 
I  cut  up  and  have  advertisements  printed  on  the  back 
for  dodgers.  If  I  have  any  large  stock  of  one  design, 
I  have  tried  having  a  few  rolls  cut  into  dodger  size  and 
an  ad.  printed  on  the  back  mentioning  the  price  of  that 
particular  paper.  Whenever  a  publisher  or  manufacturer 
sends  us  a  circular  blotter  or  other  advertisement  of  a 
line  we  carry,  that  I  think  would  all  right  for  us  to  use 
as  a  advertising  matter,  I  write  at  once  for  a  price  per 
1.000  with  our  imprint.  They  usually  quote  a  very  low 
figure,  as  the  advertising  is  of  benefit  to  them  as  well  as 
to  us. 

"it  has  always  been  our  rule  to  keep  a  complete  report 
of  each  season's  school  goods, business  with  columns- for 
name  of  article,  amount  sold  at  time  report  is  filled  in, 
amount  to  be  ordered,  amount  ordered,  where  ordered, 
remarks.  This  we  have  found  very  useful  in  helping  us 
to  place  our  orders,  to  see  that  no  items  are  omitted  and 
right  quantities  are  ordered. 

"A  rule  thai  I  have  followed  for  years  was  to  write  a 
few  rough  notes  of  the  mouth's  business  in  my  day  book 
after  each  month's  entries,  telling  what  lines  of  goods 
sold  well,  whose  lines  sold  best  or  worst,  what  lines  I 
would  change,  etc.,  as  well  as  other  remarks  about  adver- 
tising, store  management,  clerks,  expenses,  etc.  I  often 
get  very  useful  hints  by  reading  over  these  notes  in  last 
year's  day  book. 

"I  send  out  statements  of  accounts  every  month  for  all 
accounts  in  ledger  with  a  word  or  two  of  explanation  of 
our  system  of  sending  statements. 

"An  enquiry  book  is  kept  at  the  desk  and  every  time  a 
customer  asks  for  an  article  that  we  have  not  in  stock, 
a  clerk  must  write  her  name  and  full  particulars  of 
article  and.  if  possible,  get  her  order.  This  book  we  keep 
mosl  methodically  with  a.  column  for  customer's  name. 
another  for  name  of  article,  one  for  initials  of  firm  we 
write  to,  one  for  date  written,  and  one  for  remarks.  As 
soon  as  we  hear  from  the  firm  we  write  in  remarks  column. 
It  a  customer  should  come  in  a  month  later  to  enquire, 
we  can  turn  up  our  enquiry  book  and  find  full  particulars! 
\\  e  use  tin.  hook  very  often  in  ordering  stock.  By  means 
of  it  we  can  tell  what  we  ordered,  from  whom,  when 
quantity  and  how  to  be  shipped.  This  book  is  verv  simple' 
and  most  useful.  We  have  used  it  for  years  and  would  not 
do  without  it.  We  just  employ  an  ordinary  two-column  cash 
book  for  this  enquiry  book." 

Mr.  Little,  who  has  been   14  years  in   the  stationery 
business,  uses  embossed  letter  heads.    Also  gummed  labels 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  R     A  X  I)     STATI  O  X  E  R 


and  cards  of  the  same  design.  He  occasionally  puts  on  a 
sale  to  clear  out  certain  lines,  and  he  makes  preparations 
for  it  by  having  the  goods  in  the  window  and  placing 
plain  figures  on  them. 

"We  sell  postage  stamps  and  in  doing  so,"  went  on 
Mr.  Little,  "we  do  not  look  as  if  we  were  conferring  a 
favor  or  extending  an  accommodation  to  the  purchaser. 
We  strive  to  get  rid  of  the  facial  expression  that  we  are 
not  making  any  money  out  of  the  transaction  and  to  be  as 
polite  and  attentive  when  selling  stamps  as  we  do  in  the 
case  of  a  $5  leather  satchel.  We  handle  newspapers,  but 
deliver  them  only  to  the  business  people.  There  may  not 
be  a  great  profit  in  postage  stamps  or  papers  but  they 
bring  people  to  the  store  and  that  is  what  I  want.  This 
stand  has  been  a  book  store  for  over  40  years  and  is 
well  known  throughout  the  great  Southern  Ontario 
district." 

Mr.  Little  added  that  local  view  cards  were  ready, 
steady  sellers  and  that  the  demand  for  other  kinds  was 
decreasing.  The  picture  post  card  has  passed  the  experi- 
mental stage  and  found  a  permanent  place  in  the  com- 
munity. There  would  always  be  a  fair  demand  for  them 
and  particularly  so  in  tourist  centres. 


Specializing  in  the  Buying  End 

Greater  Care  Needed  in  Purchasing 
Stock — The  Advantages  of  Under- 
Stocking,  Rather  Than  Over-Stocking 

By  L.  J,  Harkness. 

The  present  trend  in  the  retail  business  seems  to  be 
that  of  greater  concentration  upon  the  buying  end  of  the 
business.  The  influences  which  have  brought  about  this 
condition  may  not  be  difficult  to  discern.  As  years  go 
on  business  efficiency  in  every  line  is  becoming  more  and 
more  pronounced. 

The  science  of  specialization  has  been  taking  deep 
root  everywhere.  The  merchant  of  fifty  years  ago  is  not 
the  merchant  of  to-day  ;  not  necessarily  because  there 
was  a  laxity  in  concentration  on  everyday  business  prin- 
ciples in  the  older  daj>s,  but  because  the  merchant  of 
to-day  is  compelled,  by  the  very  nature  of  the  business 
world  in  which  he  lives,  to  make  an  acute  specialized 
study  of  his  business.  Every  dollar  he  invests  must 
bring  such  returns  as  will  justify  that  investment  in  the 
light  of  modern  business  opportunities. 

Another  influence  which  may  have  contributed  toward 
better  buying  tendencies  is  the  fact  that  in  recent  .years, 
more  than  ever  before,  merchants  have  been  buying  in 
smaller  lots  and  more  frequently.  In  this  way  the  mer- 
chant has  purchased  goods  for  immediate  sale  and  the 
money  which  he  had  paid  out  formerly  for  future  goods  is 
retained  in   the  business. 

Within  the  past  year  this  condition  has  become  prom- 
inent in  western  Canada.  Wholesale  houses  are  opening 
up  branches  everywhere,  making  it  more  convenient  for 
the  merchant  to  purchase  his  stocks.  He  may  order 
stocks  for  a  period  of  two  or  three  months  where  for- 
merly he  ordered  stocks  for  a  year.  Everywhere  in 
Canada  the  wholesale  competition  has  become  keener  and 
better  opportunities  for  short  orders  prevail.  The  re- 
sult is  that  merchants  ha-ve  become  .aware  of  the  value 
of  retained  capital. 

It  is  not  necessary  to  enumerate  the  conditions  which 
have  brought  about  a  more  careful  consideration  of  buy- 


ing problems,   only  in   so  far  as  they  throw   light    upon 
solutions. 

As  an  outcome  of  the  condition  referred  to  above  the 
tendency  would  naturally  be  toward  smaller  stocks  in  the 
retailers'  hands.  This,  however,  involves  other  pro- 
blems, one  is,  how  is  the  merchant  to  secure  the  best 
buying  price  if  he  adheres  to  the  principle  of  restricted 
surplus  stock  ?  And  is  it  not  best  to  make  a  special 
effort  to  take  advantage  of  as  large  a  discount  as  pos- 
sible in  the  cash  payment  for  a  large  quantity  of  goods  ? 
And  another  problem  may  be,  if  an  effort  is  made  to 
keep  stocks  limited  and  under  control,  would  it  not  in- 
cur more  work  in  management,  and  would  there  not  be 
risks  in  running  out  of  goods  which  for  the  time  being 
have  either  advanced  or  gone  off  the  market  ? 

All  these  questions  are  on  the  surface  favorable  to 
the  idea  of  heavy  buying;  and  it  would  seem  that  it  is 
just  such  arguments  as  these  that  have  led  many  mer- 
chants into  the  error  of  keeping  surplus  stocks  which  be- 
come a  bugbear  and  a  hindrance  to  the  general  health  of 
the  business. 

In  the  first  place,  there  are  few  who  would  wisely 
conduct  their  business  on  the  principle  of  small  stocks  or 
stock  restriction,  but  rather  upon  the  principle  of  stock  con- 
trol. The  argument  is  in  favor  of  better  and  more  ca,reful 
manipulation  of  salable  goods.  Just  what  might  be 
called  a  small  or  a  large  stock  varies  according  to  the 
custom  which  the  business  supports.  But  there  are 
stationers  who  carry  as  large  stocks  as  their  competitors 
who  do  double  or  one-half  more  retail  business. 

The  object  of  the  merchant  in  the  smaller  business, 
of  course,  is  to  buy  at  the  best  possible  figures.  That 
merchant  needs  to  be  reminded,  however,  that  his  turn- 
over is  not  gained  so  quickly  as  that  of  his  competitor, 
and  his  goods  are  eating  away  profits  as  they  decorate 
the  shelves. 

Regarding  taking  advantage  of  discounts  or  cash 
payments,  this  is  always  wise,  but  it  is  obvious  that 
money  is  worth  too  much  to  have  it  tied  up  in  super- 
lliiiiiis  stocks  even  if  a  considerable  discount  is  granted  for 
large  purchases.  So  in  an  effort  to  buy  in  quantities  and 
obtain  a  liberal  discount  the  business  might  be  seriously 
strained  if  the  money  is  not  returned  by  a  rapid  turn- 
over. 

The  bookseller  and  stationer  in  particular  is  liable 
to  over-reach  in  his  investment  in  stocks.  But  it  is 
always  best  to  buy  small  and  often,  if  necessary,  in 
order  that  the  money  might  be  retained  to  pay  off  such 
discounts  as  may  be  offered. 

A  fresh,  bright  stock  is  a  great  asset  to  any  mer- 
chant. The  day  of  the  old  shop-worn  books,  through 
whose  pages  grey-haired  sages  solemnly  peruse,  is  past. 
The  latest,  newest,  and  most  beautiful  goods,  with  the 
latest  and  most  attractive  store  setting  is  modern  and 
profitable  because  it  is  modern.  And  the  only  way  to 
maintain  the  business  in  this  condition  is  in  the  careful 
manipulation  of  stocks. 

That  this  system  of  careful  buying  would  mean  more 
work  for  the  management  does  not  necessarily  follow. 
But  it  does  follow  that  there  would  be  more  expert  man- 
agement. It  would  mean  a  keen  scrutiny  of  business  de- 
tails, and  this  is  necessary  in  every  business. 

An  expert  stock  keeper  is  as  essential  as  an  expert 
salesman,  and  it  seems  reasonable  that  the  man  who 
keeps  his  stock  well  under  control  to  such  an  extent  that 
no  capital  is  lost  in  overstocking,  and  at  the  same  time 
to  have  every  article  on  hand  when  it  is  asked  for,  is 
the  most  valuable  man  in  the  business. 


1.1 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


News  from  Various  Trade  Centres 

Interesting  Items  Gathered  from  all  Parts 
of  Canada  —  Business  Good  Everywhere 
— Changes    and    Improvements    Noted. 

Dr.   Briggs  Honored  by  the   Old  Boys. 

Toronto,  Jan.  29. — Last  night  there  took  place  at  the 
new  Ontario  Club,  an  event,  which  is  probably  without 
parallel  in  the  book  and  stationery  business  in  Canada, 
if  not  in  any  other  business.  This  was  the  tendering  to 
Dr.  William  Briggs,  the  Book  Steward,  of  a  compliment- 
ary dinner  by  the  Book  Room  Old  Boys — men  who  had 
worked  there  in  years  gone  by  and  were  now  in  business 
for  themselves  or  in  the  employ  of  other  firms.  The  idea 
originated  with  Martin  N.  Merry,  for  many  years  account- 
ant in  the  Book  Room,  and  was  enthusiastically  support- 
ed by  over  sixty  old  boys,  some  of  whom  came  from  out- 
side points  to  express  their  esteem  for  their  old  chief. 

The  chair  was  occupied  by  Mr.  Merry  and  supporting 
him  were  such  notabilities  as  S.  B.  Gundy,  manager  of 
the  Oxford  Press,  Thomas  Allen,  of  McLeod  &  Allen,  John 
McClelland  and  Goodchild,  of  McClelland  &  Goodchild, 
E.  S.  Caswell,  secretary  of  the  public  library,  Ed.  Ilues- 
tis,  A.  G.  Watson,  ex-manager  of  the  Book  Department, 
E.   C.   Berkinshaw,  of  Scribner's,  and  others. 

S.  B.  Gundy  handled  the  toast  to  the  Doctor  and  Rev. 
Dr.  Rose  made  an  eloquent  address,  recalling  the  old 
times.  Ed.  Huestis  sang  in  touching  fashion  "The  Boys 
of  the  Old  Brigade,"  and  other  musical  numbers  were  con- 
tributed by  J.  H.  W.  Mackie  and  John  McClelland.'  So 
enjoyable  a  time  was  spent  that  all  present  vowed  they 
would  repeat  the  celebration  every  other  year. 

Important    Changes    in    Vancouver. 

Vancouver,  Jan.  19. — T.  H.  Ilibben  &  Co.,  the  pioneer 
stationery  firm  of  Government  Street,  are  removing  from 
their  old  premises  to  their  building  just  across  the  street. 
The  store  which  they  are  vacating  will  be  remodelled  and 
enlarged  and  occupied  by  the  White  House  as  an  annex. 

Norman  Caple  &  Co.  have  disposed  of  their  re-tail 
book  and  stationery  business  to  the  Thomson  Stationery 
Co.  Mr.  Caple  will  retain  the  agency  for  the  mainland 
of  .B.C.  of  the  Smith-Premier  typewriters.  He  has  been 
in  the  book  and  stationery  business  in  Vancouver  for 
twenty  years. 

W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.  Cut  up  a  Melon. 

Toronto,  Jan.  24— Following  the  practice  of  recent 
years,  W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.,  Limited,  have  made  distribution 
of  profits  to  each  of  the  members  of  their  staff  and  manu- 
facturing departments  who  have  had  at  least  twelve 
months'  continuous  service  with  the  company,  and  who 
do  not  hold  stock  in  the  company.  This  distribution,. ag- 
gregating $5,000,  is  equivalent  to  two  weeks'  additional 
pay  to  all  those  whose  service  extends  to  two  years  and 
over,  and  one  week's  additional  pay  to  those  whose  ser- 
vice extends  to  one  year  and  over.  A  system  of  profit 
sharing  which  permits  all  who  have  taken  part  in  the 
work  to  share  in  the  profits  has  been  found  of  equal  in- 
terest and  benefit  to  the  employe  and  to  the  company. 
In  addition  to  those  who  have  participated  in  the  above, 
a  number  of  the  employes  hold  stock  in  the  company  and 
share  in  the  dividends  declared. 

Bookseller  Runs  for  Mayor. 

St.  John,  Feb.  1. — Doug-las  McArthur,  bookseller  and 
stationer,  will  run  for  mayor  of  the  city  in  the  elections 
to  be  held    in      April.    Mr.     McArthur     entered    business 


twenty-seven  years  ago,  purchasing  Wm.  K.  Crawford's 
business.  He  has  continued  practically  in  the  same  stand 
ever  since,  removing  only  twice  and  in  each  case  going 
into  an  adjoining  building.  He  now  carries  one  of  the 
largest  assorted  stocks  in  the  maritime  provinces. 

Mr.  McCarthur  has  recently  purchased  from  the  estate 
of  the  late  Thomas  J.  Flood  all  the  fine  fittings,  show 
cases  and  a  large  part,  of  the  stock  of  the  Flood  business, 
Mrs.  Flood  having  decided  to  retire.  This  should  give 
Mr.  McArthur  one  of  the  best  appointed  stores  in  St. 
.John. 

He  entered  civic  politics  in  1896  as  an  alderman-at- 
large  and  served  for  four  years',  when  he  voluntarily 
withdrew.  He  re-entered  the  civic  arena  as  a  candidate 
for  Dufferin    Ward  in  1907    but    was    defeated    by  a  small 


DOUGLAS  McARTHUR 
St.  John  Bookseller  who  is  running  for  Mayor. 

margin.  He  now  at  the  solicitation  of  a  large  number  of 
the  business  men  of  the  city  will  contest  the  mayoralty 
with  Aid.   James  H.  Frink,  as  his  opponent.. 

Winnipeg  Happenings. 

Winnipeg,  Feb.  2— What  the  booksellers  and  station- 
ers lost  in  book  sales  during  January,  they  amply  made 
up  in  stationery  lines.  Business  in  all  kinds  of  office  sup- 
plies has  been  excellent. 

Wholesale  houses  report  business  good  everywhere  in 
the  west  and  they  are  having  difficulty  in  getting  sup- 
plies from  manufacturers. 

Display  features  have  been  excellent  in  local  stores 
during  the  past  month.  Odd  lines  of  holiday  cards,  cal- 
endars and  picture  books  have  been  arranged  in  the  win- 
dows in  pleasing  manner. 

Lisgar  Lang,  of  Russell,  Lang  &  Co.,  leaves  this 
month  for  a  tour  of  Great  Britain  and  the  continent  and 
will  be  away  for  about  three  months. 

John  A.  Hart  has  installed  a  large  case  standing 
about  twelve  feet  high,  with  plate  glass  doors  and  finished 
in  light  oak,  in  which  church  goods  exclusively  are  dis- 
played. On  the  same  side  of  the  store  two  show  cases  of 
glass  afford  excellent  silent  salesmen  facilities  for  fancy 
goods  and  fountain  pens  The  opposite  wall  is  equipped 
with  shelves  forty  feet  in  length  and  fitted  with  glass 
siding  doors.  The  whole  effect  of  the  store  is  attractive 
and  pleasing. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Trade  Changes  and  Incidents. 

George  Walker  has  opened  a  book  and  stationery  store 
a,t  19  York  Street,  Hamilton. 

Minerva  Book  Co.,  who  have  made  a  specialty  of  books 
and  magazines  in  foreign  languages,  have  removed  from 
the  corner  of  Church  and  Adelaide  streets,  opposite  the 
Public  Library,  to  385  Yonge  'Street,  Torontb. 

Young  Bros.,  Toronto,  manufacturers  of  leather  and 
fancy  goods,  have  removed  to  larger  premises  at  485  King 
Street  West.  Their  old  plant  was  at  the  corner  of  Rich- 
mond and  Church. 

The  Grigg  Book  and  Stationery  Co.,  Pembroke,  have 
moved  into  a  new  store  in  the  Fraser  block,  which  has 
just  been  erected. 

'Henry  H.  Marshall  has  opened  up  a  stationery  and 
post  card  business  at  91  Gottingen  street,  Halifax. 

J.  D.  Meekison,  bookseller  and  stationer,  Strathroy, 
has  been  succeeded  by  J.  D.  Meekison  &  Co. 

John  Mills,  the  London  bookseller,  had  the  misfortune 
to  be  struck  by  a  street  ear  on  the  morning  of  January  27 
and  received  some  minor  injuries. 

The  assets  of  J.  J.  Masse,  stationer,  Montreal,  were 
sold  by  tender  on  February  10. 

The  Black  Printing  Co.,  wholesale  stationers,  Amherst, 
N.S.,  Were  burned  out  last  month. 

The  Geo.  M.  Hendry  Co.  Expand. 

Toronto,  February  4. — The  new  premises  of  the  Geo. 
M.  Hendry  Co.,  Limited,  at  215-219  Victoria  Street,  are 
indeed  a  revelation,  not  only  on  account  of  the  large  in- 
crease in  space  over  their  former  home  on  Temperance 
street,  but  more  particularly  in  view  of  the  introduction  of 
some  unique  features  in  sample-room  arrangement.  A 
portion  of  the  large  sample  room  has  been  partitioned  off, 
and  fitted  up  as  a  model  school  room — desks,  teacher's 
table,  blackboards  and  every  requisite  for  a  complete 
school  room  being  shown.  In  another  corner  a  dark  room 
has  been  made  for  the  exhibition  of  lanterns  a,nd  slides. 


New  premises  Geo.  M.  Hendry  Co  ,  Toronto. 

A  plant  is  being  installed  in  the  basement  for  the  manu- 
facture of  some  of  the  supplies  now  handled  by  the  com- 
pany as  selling  agents.  The  trade  would  certainly  enjoy 
a  .visit  to  these  new  premises,  and  would  no  doubt  receive 
helpful  ideas  in  show  case  and  department  arrangement. 


The  Carter's  Ink  Company  Moves. 

Boston,  Jan.  19. — With  the  moving  of  the  main  offices 
from  Columbus  Avenue,  Boston,  The  Carter's  Ink  Com- 
pany began  doing  business  to-day  in  its  new  re-enfo:ced 
concrete  factory  just  across  the  river  in  Cambridge.  It 
may  be  of  interest  to  the  many  friends  of  this  firm  that 
their  post  office  address  is  now  Cambridge  "C"  Poston, 
Mass.  They  are  still  to  all  intents  and  purposes  a  Bos- 
ton House. 

A  full  description  of  the  new  building  has  appeared  in 
this  paper  before.  The  great  thing  that  the  Carter's  Ink 
Company  needed  at  this  time  was  room  to  falce  care  of 
its  rapidly  increasing  business.  The  old  building  had  been 
outgrown  a  number  of  years  ago,  and  there  was  absolute- 
ly no  chance  of  extension.  The  new  plant  contains  110,- 
000  square  feet  with  a  frontage  of  187  feet— just  three 
times  the  frontage  of  the  Columbus  Avenue  building.  The 
floor  space  of  the  ribbon  and  carbon  department  alone  has 
been  increased  fourfold. 

The  manufacturing  plant  is  complete  in  every  detail, 
including  the  latest  ink,  adhesive,  ribbon  and  carbon 
making  machinery,  color  grinding  and  mixing  machinery, 
and  labor  saving  devices  for  labeling,  etc.,  etc. 

A  word  should  be  said  of  the  laboratories  which  oc- 
cupy nearly  the  whole  of  the  front  of  the  fourth  floor. 
They  represent  the  latest  and  best  ideas  in  this  country 
and  abroad  for  the  taking  of  the  exhaustive  tests  which 
have  made  Carter's  Inks  and  adhesives  a  standard  the 
world  over.  Mr.  Charles  Schmitt,  the  head  chemist,  who 
recently  spent  some  months  abroad,  has  embodied  many 
of  the  latest  suggestions  found  there  with  the  most  ad- 
vanced ideas  here  until  the  laboratories  are  well  nigh 
perfect. 

What  is  Doing  in  Montreal. 

Montreal,  February  4. — Last  month  booksellers  and 
stationers  devoted  a  great  deal  of  attention  to  clearing 
out  lines  that  had  not  sold  actively,  and  where  this  has 
not  been  entirely  accomplished,  they  are  continuing  spe- 
cial sales.  Special  attention  has  beengiven  to  displaying 
sets  of  standard  works  in  high  class  bindings,  as  well  as 
the  less  expensive  sets,  and  considerable  interest  was 
aroused  among  booklovers,  who  appreciated  these  oppor- 
tunities of  supplementing  the  contents  of  their  book- 
shelves with  high  class  literature  at  a  price  lower  than 
that  usually  demanded. 

Reports  from  all  the  good  retail  stores  are  to  the  ef- 
fect that  business  up  to  the  present  this  year  has  been 
well  ahead  of  last  year.  Naturally  there  has  been  no 
great  rush,  but  trade  conditions  are  in  a  healthy  state, 
and  there  is  a  good  demand  for  the  usual  amount  of  fic- 
tion. American  reprints  of  recent  books,  those  that  have 
passed  their  first  flush  of  popularity,  but  cannot  be  con- 
sidered old,  are  exceptionally  good  sellers.  This  class  of 
books  retails  at  50  cents,  and  they  are  well  printed  and 
well  bound. 

It  was  anticipated  that  the  Winter  Carnival  would 
create  a  demand  for  souvenirs  of  all  kinds  at  least  equal 
to  the  demand  last  year,  but  this  demand  failed  to  ma- 
terialize to  any  extent,  though  of  course  some  interest 
was  manifested.  The  event  this  year  lacked  the  novelty, 
of  a  year  ago,  which  doubtless  accounts  for  the  lack  of 
interest  of  the  nature  that  would  benefit  the  book  and 
stationery  dealers. 

While  there  is  a  certain  demand  for  picture  postcards, 
it  is  not  quite  so  active  as  a  year  ago.  It  is  likely, 
however,  that  with  the- coming  of  warm  weather  and  the 
annual  influx  of  tourists,  the  demand  will  be  revived  for 
local  and  Canadian  views.  Holidays  always  create  an  in- 
terest for  suitable  cards,  and  at  the  present  time  the  de- 
mand is  for  the  Valentine  postals.    The  regular  order  of 


16 


ROO K  sK LLER 

valentines  are  doing  well  at  present  writing  Manufac- 
turers of  this  line  of  goods  issued  specially  attractive 
valentines  this  year,  which  have  created  considerable  in- 
terest in  this  trade. 

A.  T.  Chapman  is  contemplating  further  improvements 
in  his  store  by  the  erection  of  additional  fixtures  at  one 
end.  This  space  will  be  devoted  to  Bibles,  hymn  books, 
prayer  books,  etc. 

A*u  Phelan's  bookstore  on  St.  Catherine  St.,  interest 
was  stimulated  in  the  stationery  department  by  especial- 
ly attractive  displays,  both  in  the  windows  and  in  the 
department.  This  exhibit  was  personally  superintended  by 
Miss  Bessie  Weaver,  of  New  York,  representing  Eaton, 
Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

F.  E.  Phelan,  of  Phelan's  bookstore,  leaves  this 
month  for  the  West  Indies  with  a  "stag"  party,  on  a 
purely  pleasure  trip  of  a  month  or  more.  Mr.  Phelan  is 
fortunate  in  being  able  to  leave  his  business  in  charge  of 
his  sons,  and  forget  it  entirely  for  a  time. 

B.  G.  Hay,  Toronto,  representing  the  Eaton,  Crane  &i 
Pike  Co.,  was  in  the  city  last  week  on  a  business  trip. 

S.  B.  Gundy,  of  Toronto,  was  calling  on  the  trade  in 
this  city  recently,  in  the  interests  of  the  Oxford  Univer- 
sity Press. 

Among  the  representatives  of  the  publishing  firms 
visiting  the  book  stores  in  Montreal  last  month  was 
Harold  Copp,  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 

C.  J.  Musson,  of  the  Musson  Book  Co.,  Toronto,  was 
in  Montreal  during  January,   in   the  interests  of  his  firm. 

Travelers'  Movements. 

J.  J.  F.  Smith,  who  traveled  Canada  last  year  for  L.  C. 
Page  &  Co.,  Boston,  is  with  George  W.  Jacobs  &  Co..  New 
York,  this  year. 

B.  G\  Hay,  Canadian  representative  of  the  Eaton, 
Crane  &  Pike  Co.,  started  westwards  on  the  first  of  the 
month. 

W.  J.  Kelly,  the  veteran  representative  of  McLoughlin 
Bros.,  New  York,  was  in  Toronto  recently.  He  also  visited 
Ottawa  and  other  Canadian  centres. 

Edward  J.  Boyd,  who  is  at  present  calling  on  the  Can- 
adian trade  with  Thomas  Y.  Crowell  &■  Co.  's  line  for  1910, 
intends  to  cover  the  entire  country.  The  Canadian  trade 
will  find  in  Mr.  Boyd  a  man  thoroughly  versed  in  books 
and  the  book  business,  and  the  line  he  is  showing  is  a 
worthy  one. 

Doings  of  the  Big  Fellows. 

Toronto,  February  5. — W.  P.  Gundy,  general  manager  of 
W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.,  left  last  week  for  a  month's  vacation 
trip  in  the  southern  States. 

The  presidency  of  the  Board  of  Trade  has  fallen  this 
year  on  the  shoulders  of  W.  J.  Gage,  president  of  W.  J. 
Gage  &  Co.  Mr.  Gage  is  evidently  going  to  take  the  office 
seriously,  for  he  has  already  announced  an  interesting 
policy  on  harbor  improvement   and  management. 

The  Toronto  office  of  Cassell  &  Co.  have  been  advised 
that  the  general  manager,  Arthur  Spurgeon.  J. P.,  will  sail 
for  America  on  April  23,  and  will  proceed  to  Toronto  via 
New  York,  Montreal  and  Ottawa,  thence  going  on  to  Win- 
nipeg and  returning  by  Chicago. 

A.  F.  Rutter,  of  Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  accompanied 
by  Mrs.  Rutter  has  sailed  for  a  trip  to  the  Mediterranean. 

Peterboro  Bookstore  Sold. 

PETERBORO,  JAN.  26.— A.  H.  Stratton  &  Co.  an- 
nounce in  the  local  press  that  they  have  disposed  of  their 
business  to  P.  and  F.  M.  Trebilcock,  of  Toronto,  who  will 


AND     STATIONER 


lake  possession  on  February  1.  Mr.  P.  Trebilcock  is 
western  traveler  for  the  Copp.  Clark  Co.,  and  a  son  of 
P.  C.  Trebilcock,  the  Bowmanville  bookseller.  F.  W. 
Trebilcock  is  a  brother,  who  has  been  in  the  ernp'oy  of 
Beatty.  Kerr  &  Werner,  Toronto,  fancy  dry  goods. 

M.  G.  Hay,  of  St.  Thomas,  will  manage  the  business 
until  the  .Messrs.  Trebilcock  can  adjust  their  affairs  to 
take  charge  themselves.  Mr.  P.  Trebilcock  expects  to  get 
back  from  his  western  trip  on  March  1,  and  Mr.  F.  W. 
Trebilcock  will  stay  with  his  present  firm  until  the  fall. 

Important  Change  in  Vancouver. 

VANCOUVER,  JAN.  31.— Tile  business  of  Norman 
Caple  &  Co.,  Granville  Street,  has  been  purchased  by 
Manfred  J.  Gaskell,  Edward  F.  Odium  and  Albert  Stabler, 
owners  of  the  Thomson  Stationery  Co.,  Ltd.,  and  will  be 
run  by  them  in  conjunction  with  their  big  main  store  as 
a  double-header. 

The  transfer  was  made  on  the  10th  of  January,  and 
already  extensive  alterations  have  taken  place.  The  entire 
main  floor,  50x120  feet,  is  being  remodeled  to  meet  the 
demands  which  t lie  reorganization  of  the  business  will 
make.  A  new  system  of  lighting  is  being  installed,  and 
windows  altered  and  relighted.  A  spacious  waiting  and 
writing  room,  with' rugs,  easy  chairs,  writing  tables  and 
telephone,  is  being  established,  and  all  that  would  en- 
hance the  already  large  and  high-class  trade  of  this  west 
end  store  is  being  done.  To  the  book  and  stationery  stock 
is  being  added  a  complete  line  of  office  requisites,  loose- 
leaf  systems  and  supplies,  mimeographs  and  the  Empire 
typewriter.  Job  printing,  bookbinding,  blank  book  manu- 
facturing, elect rotyping,  engineers'  and  surveyors'  sup- 
plies and  office  furniture  will  also  be  added,  while  a  spe- 
cial feature  will  be  a  large  stock  of  kodaks  and  photo- 
graphic sundries.  Walter  Hagel,  of  Gaskell,  Odium  & 
Stabler's  main  store  (Thomson  Stationery  Co.),  with  a 
capable  staff  of  assistants,  is  in  charge.  Mr.  Hagel  has 
had  manjT  years'  experience  in  the  book  and  stationery 
business,  both  in  Vancouver  and  elsewhere. 

The  buying  and  general  supervision  of  this  branch  will 
he  done  through  Mr.  Gaskell,  the  present  head  of  the  firm. 

Items  From  St.  John. 

St.  John,  Feb.  1,  1910. — Business  has  been  rather  quiet 
since  the  first  of  the  year  and  the  merchants  who  handle 
wall  papers  are  preparing  for  the  spring  rush  in  that 
direction. 

Work  was  started  this  week  remodelling  the  building 
on  King  Street  which  will  be  occupied  by  E.  G.  Nelson 
&  Co.,  dealers  in  books,  stationery  and  camera  supplies, 
etc.  The  building— a  four  storey  structure— will  be  prac- 
tically rebuilt  inside  and  an  up-to-date  plate  glass  front 
put  in  on  the  ground  floor.  New  fixtures  and  plate  glass 
show  cases  have  been  ordered  and  everything  will  be  of 
the  most  modern  type.  The  entire  four  floors  will  be 
utilized,  the  upper  storey  serving  for  stock  purposes. 


AN  APPRECIATED  APPRECIATION. 

The  Bookseller  and  Stationer,  published  by  the  Mac- 
Lean  Publishing  Company  of  Toronto,  has  celebrated  its 
25th  anniversary,  by  issuing  a  silver-jubilee  number. 
The  story  of  the  origin  and  progress  of  this  excellent  per- 
iodical, which  was  formerly  known  as  Books  and  Notions, 
makes  interesting  reading.  Very  few  trade  journals  in 
Canada  have  reached  their  25th  birthday,  and  Colonel 
MacLean  is  to  be  congratulated  on  the  fine  appearance  of 
the  special  September  number,  and  on  the  valuable  ma- 
terial which  it  contains. — Inland  Stationer. 


'7 


Attractive  Little  Window-Cards  Create    an   Atmosphere 

A  Tone  of  Refinement  and  Culture  Imparted  to  a  Store 
by  the  Use  of  Carefully  Worded  and  Neatly  Printed  Cards 


Suggestive  little  display  cards  placed  conspicuously  in 
a  show  window  are  found  by  those  who  use  them,  to  be 
of  undoubted  value  in  creating  an  atmosphere  of  quality 
and  correctness  about  a  store. 

Any  other  merchant  may  be  pardoned  for  using  poor- 
ly made  cards  but  a  stationer  has  no  excuse  to  offer  for 
defective  cards.  He  is  dealing  in  goods  which  are  always 
neatly  and  artistically  made  and  boxed,  and  his  advertis- 
ing methods  should  harmonize  with  the  character  of  his 
stock-in-trade. 

Books,  also,  even  the  poorest  and  cheapest  of  them, 
have  about  them  characteristics  of  eveness  and  neatness, 
which  should  be  reflected  in  any  advertising  matter  that 
is  used  in  reference  to  them. 

The  cards  illustrated  on  this  page  have  been  used  from 
time  to  time    in    the    window-displays    of    Tyrrell's    Book 


If  you  enjoy  looking  at  our  windows,  you 
will  probably  find  greater  pleasure  in 
seeing  our  stock,  and  you  are  as  welcome 
to  do  one  as  (be  other. 


Wm.  Ctrrill  i  O. 


Shop,  Toronto.  They  have  been  evolved  as  occasion  de- 
manded by  Mr.  Tyrrell  himself  and  they  are  suggestive  of 
the  bookish  atmosphere  of  the  store. 

Mr.  Tyrrell  finds  that  the  cards  have  been  helpful. 
Passers-by  pause  to  read  "them  and,  unconsciously  perhaps 
are  given  an  impression,  which  is  lasting.  They  are  sug- 
gestive of  the  charms  of  books  and  anything  which  re- 
minds humanity  of  the  solaces  provided  by  books,  will 
lead  to  increased  sales. 

The  cards  are  printed  in  a  face  of  type  which  har- 
monizes with  the  thought  to  be  conveyed.  In  size  they 
are  only  4 J  x  10  inches.  They  are  all  of  the  same  size 
and  the  same  style.  By  changing  them  frequently,  the 
passer-by  comes  to  be  on  the  lookout  for  new  themes 
each  time  he  goes  by. 

Members  of  the  book-trade  visiting  Toronto  and  call- 
ing on  Mr.  Tyrrell  have  been  struck  with  the  effectiveness 
of  these  little  cards  and  have  asked  for  samples,  which 
Mr.  Tyrrell  has  been  kind  enough  to  supply,  whenever 
able. 

The  trade  might  well  copy  these  cards  or  modify  them 
to  suit  particular  requirements.  If  a  bookseller  is  unable 
to  think  out  bright  sayings  himself,  there  are  plenty  of 
volumes  full  of  charming  sentiments  about  books  and  the 
love  of  reading,  which  may  be  copied.  Above  all  things, 
in  making  the  cards,  have  them  harmonize  with  the  char- 
acter and  quality  of  the  goods,  they  are  intended  to  ad- 
vertise. 


the  use  of  good  stationery  is 
reguisite  both  for  good  taste  and 
expediency,  the  writer  of  a  letter 
is  often  judged  by  it. 


McClelland  &  Goodehild.  Toronto,  have  'been  appointed 
Canadian  agents  for  the  Orange-Judd  agricultural  books, 
and  will  carry  everything  in  stock,  becoming  thereby  head- 
quarters  fur   this   class   of  literature. 


Wm.  tpmtl  i  C«. 


'  Buying  books  is  the  happiest  kind 
of  shopping,  the  book=buyer  pur- 
chases more  than  merchandise  he 
purchases  self  respect."  *■<••> 

Wm  tfmll  i  O. 


"  Books  seem  to  tell  you  that  they  have  got 
something  inside  their  covers  that  will  be 
good  for  you  and  that  they  are  willing  and 
desirous  to  impart  to  you.  Value  them 
much"  »'■'"- 


Wm.  Z?mll  &  Cc. 


Books  on  gardening  and  out=door  life 
are  full  of  live  interest  just  now.   the 
large  assortment  we  have  gathered 
together  is  worth  your  knowing. 
Seeing  involves  no  obligation  to  buy. 


Wm.  Zymll  i  Co. 


"  Tereign  Buidt  Bcoks  " 

those  contemplating  a  trip  abroad  will  greatly 
enhance  the  pleasure  of  the  journey  by  carefully 
informing  themselves  both  before  and  during 
the  tour,  this  can  be  done  in  a  pleasant,  concise 
and  precise  manner  by  an  intelligent  use  of 
our  guide  books. 

Wm  Cfmll  i  C- 


A  Series  of  Window  Cards  used  Effectively  by  William  Tyrrell   &   Co.,  Toronto. 

18 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Of  Interest  to  Newsdealers 

No  Trace  of  the  Bogus   Agents  who 

Victimized    Ontario  Newsdealers  — 

Changes  in  the  Magazines  and  Other 

Features. 

Swindling  News  Agents  at  Work. 

TORONTO,  FEB.  5.— No  trace  of  the  two  men  who 
successfully  victimized  quite  a  number  of  Ontario  news- 
dealers during-  December  has  been  found  by  the  Provincial 
Detective  Department.  These  men,  calling-  themselves 
Dixon  and  Griffiths,  canvassed  the  trade  as  representatives 
of  a  concern  called  the  Publishers'  Book  and  News  Com- 
pany, of  New  York,  with  branches  in  Montreal  and  To- 
ronto, which  apparently  has  no  existence.  They  suc- 
ceeded in  collecting-  payment  in  advance  for  well-known 
periodicals  at  prices  at  which  they  could  never  be  sup- 
plied. 

Red  Book  Enlarged. 

Beginning  with  the  March  issue,  out  February  23rd, 
the  Ked  Book  Magazine  will  be  increased  in  size  to  192 
pages,  making  it  the  largest  illustrated  fiction  magazine 
in  the  world.  The  increased  size  of  the  magazine  will 
permit  the  publication  in  each  issue  of  many  more  stories 
than  formerly.  Among  the  writers  whose  work  is  an- 
nounced thus  for  ahead  for  1910  are  Alfred'  Henry  Lewis, 
James  Oliver  Curwood,  Gouvernuer  Morris,  'Hamlin  Gar- 
land, Ellis  Parker  Butler,  Emerson  Taylor,  Jack  London. 
Seuinas  MacManus,  Emery  Pottle,  James  Oppenheim. 
Clarence  Mulford  and  others,  no  less  well  known. 

Physical  Culture  Charts. 

Beginning  with  the  February  issue  of  Physical  Culture 
will  appear  the  first  instalment  of  a  new  series  of  charts 
for  remedying  physical  defects  and  improving  undevelop- 
ed parts  of  the  body,  which  should  be  of  special  interest 
and  value.  This  series  will  provide  detailed  instructions 
as  to  the  exercises  essential  for  developing  certain  parts 
of  the  body.  The  articles  will  be  published  in  approxi- 
mately the  following  order:  (1)  Straightening  Round 
Shoulders,  (2)  Exercises  for  Chest  Development,  (3)  Build- 
ing a  Powerful  Stomach,  (4)  Developing  the  Upper  Arm, 
(5)  Strengthening  a  Weak  Back,  (6)  Rounding  and  De- 
veloping the  Hips,  (7)  Exercises  for  Developing  the 
Shoulders,  (8)  Strengthening  the  Muscles  of  the  Upper 
Legs,  (9)  How  to  Develop  the  Calves,  (10)  How  to 
Acquire  a  Powerful  Grip,  (11)  Developing  the  Muscles 
of  the  Neck. 

Children's  Encyclopedia  as  a  Monthly. 

Nearly  three  years  ago  the  publishers  of  the  "Chil- 
dren's Encyclopedia"  announced  that  they  were  about  to 
produce  the  greatest  book  for  boys  and  girls  which  the 
world  had  ever  seen.  The  lapse  of  time  has  proved  that 
their  description  was  not  only  quite  accurate,  but  that 
this  has  been  recognized  by  parents  and  lovers  of  chil- 
dren the  world  over.  "The  Children's  Encyclopedia" — 
the  last  fortnightly  part  of  which  has  just  been  issued — 
is  acknowledged  to  be  all  that  it  was  claimed  it  would 
be.  Not  only  children,  but  the  grown-ups,  have  found  in 
the  "Children's  Encyclopedia"  a,  source  of  learning  such 
as  had  never  before  been  at  their  disposal — a  means  of 
self-education  at  once  intensely  interesting  and  wholly 
recreative. 

Encouraged  by  the  really  tremendous  success  achieved 
by  the  volumes  now  just  completed,  the  publishers  have 
decided  to  continue  the  publication  in  the  form  of  a 
monthly  magazine,  and  No.  1  of  the  New  Children's  En- 


cyclopedia makes  its  appearance  about  the  middle  of  Feb- 
ruary. The  new  monthly  will  retain  many  of  the  best 
features  of  the  fortnightly,  while  it  will  in  many  respects 
be  a  great  improvement  on  the  latter.  The  price  will  re- 
main the  same  as  that  of  the  fortnightly. 


The  Trade  Twenty-Five  Years  Ago 

Interesting  Extracts  from  the  Pages  of 

the  February,    1 885,  Issue  of  "Books 

and  Notions,"  now  "The  Bookseller 

and  Stationer." 


Twenty-five  years  ago,  school  book  troubles  were 
agitating  the  Ontario  trade  very  much  the, same  as  they 
are  to-day.  The  February,  1885,  issue  of  Books  and 
Notions  (The  Bookseller  and  Stationer)  is  full  of  the 
woes  of  the  booksellers,  for  a  new  set  of  Ontario  Read- 
ers had  just  been  issued,  on  which  the  discount  had  been 
cut  to  20  per  cent. 

In  accordance  with  the  call  for  a  meeting  of  repre- 
sentatives of  the  Book-trade  of  Ontario,  there  met  at 
the  Queen's  Hotel,  Toronto,  on  the  14th  January,  the 
following  : 

James  Bain,  sr.,  G.  M.  Rose,  D.  A.  Rose,  Guy  War- 
wick, Geo.  Warwick,  K.  McKay,  P.  T.  Perrott,  (The 
Barber  &  Ellis  Co.),  Toronto  ;  T.  J.  Day  and  J.  A. 
Nelles,  Guelph  ;  A.  H.  Elmslie,  for  himself  and  others, 
Gait  ;  E.  A.  Taylor,  W.  Bryce,  J.  I.  Anderson  and  J. 
S.  Saunders,  London  ;  Alex.  Gillies  and  J.  G.  Cloke, 
(J.  Eastwood  &  Co.),  Hamilton  ;  H.  F.  Sharp  and  J. 
P.  Rice,  St.  Mary's  ;  G.  B.  Fotheringham,  Ingersoll  ; 
J.  G.  McCrae,  Sarnia  ;  Chris.  Dickson,  Clinton  ;  E.  S. 
Warne,  Brampton  ;  A.  D.  Weeks,  Uxbridge  ;  representa- 
tives of  the  Toronto  Mail,  London  Free  Press  and  J.  J. 
Dyas,  publisher  "Books  &  Notions." 

Mr.  T.  J.  Day  was  chosen  chairman,  and  Mr.  J.  J. 
Dyas,   secretary. 

The  secretary  stated  that  614  dealers  in  school 
books  in  432  villages,  towns  and  cities  of  Ontario,  had 
signed  the  petition  to  the  Minister  of  Education,  asking 
for  30  p.c.  discount  on  school  books  to  the  trade,  and 
15  p.c.  extra  to  jobbers.  This  list  was  afterwards 
swelled  to  over  700.  A  large  number  of  letters  were  re- 
ceived accompanying  the  petitions. 

The  meeting  resolved  itself  into  the  "Ontario  Book- 
sellers' Association,"  when  the  officers  were  elected  as 
follows  : 

President,  T.  J.  Day,  (iuelph  ;  1st  vice-president, 
Thomas  Menzies,  Peterboro  ;  2nd  vice-president,  E.  A. 
Taylor,  London  ;  secretary-treasurer,  J.  J.  Dyas,  To- 
ronto ;  executive  committee,  James  Bains,  Toronto  ; 
John  Hart,  Perth;  H.  Fred  Sharp,  St.  Mary's;  W. 
Middleton  (John  Henderson  &  Co.),  Kingston  ;  John  G. 
Cloke,  (J.  Eastwood  &  Co.),  Hamilton  ;  A.  Scott, 
Barrie, 

•       *       • 

In  Manitoba  the  school  book  question  is  creating  a 
disturbance  in  the  trade.  The  books  used  are  Gage's,  on 
which  only  a  discount  of  20  per  cent,  is  allowed.  It 
costs  the  bookseller  outside  of  Winnipeg  10  per  cent,  to 
lay  down  goods,  and  his  current  expenses  are  greater 
than  in  Central  Canada,  consequently  he  is  much  worse 
off  than  even  his  suffering  Ontario  brother,  and  if  he 
sells  at  list  price  he  will  lose  money  on  every  sale.  The 
consequence  is,  he  has  been  charging  from  5  to  15  cents 
more  than  the  list  to  save  himself. 


iQ 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Some  New   Lines  on   the   Market 

Items  Gathered  from  the  Manufatur- 
ers  and  Supply  Houses  — Not  Much 
Doing    this    Month  in  New  Goods. 

New  Price  on  Clips. 

Canadian  jobbers  should  be  interested  in  the  new  price 
on  Modern  B  clips  which  the  Duryea-Hoge  Co.  supply. 
This  company  are  also  making  a  new  size  to  fit  smaller 
pens. 

Offering  in  Hamilton. 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Hamilton,  are  calling  attention 
to  a  special  assortment  of  paper  napkins  at  $3.20  per 
thousand.  Dealers  should  write  for  particulars  of  this 
attractive  offer.  They  are  also  offering  seasonable  lines, 
such  as  St.  Patrick's  and  Plaster  post  cards,  carpet  felt, 
shelf  paper,  window  blind  and  other  lines,  which  are  in 
demand  at  this  season.  The  sales  of  Dimity  and  Dutch 
Fabrik  fine  note  papers  are  increasing  every  day.  Live 
stationers  who  intend  starting  the  year  right  will  put  in  a 
stock  of  these  two  lines,  which  are  recognized  as  leaders 
from  coast  to  coast,  and  are  sold  everywhere  by  the  best 
dealers.  Selling  helps,  such  as  show  cards  and  news- 
paper electros  ai'e  supplied  with  orders,  and  handsome 
cabinets  are  furnished  for  counter  trade. 

Art  Metal  Goods. 

Clark  Bros.,  Winnipeg,  are  showing  a  handsome  line 
of  art  metal  goods,  in  the  shape  of  letter  trays  and  waste 
paper  baskets.  The  tray  is  designed  for  the  better  c'ass 
of  office  trade  and  is  substantial,  as  well  as  practical.  It 
is  made  of  cold-rolled  steel,  is  electroplated,  and  finely 
finished  in  oxidized  or  antique  copper.  Each  tray  is  a  com- 
plete unit,  and  may  be  used  singly  or  built  up  in 
super-imposed  sets  as  desired.  A  feature  of  the  tray  is 
that  it  is  fitted  with  rubber  feet,  making  the  accidental 
scratching  of  furniture  impossible. 

The  waste-basket  is  of  the  same  material  and  suitable 
for  hotels,  offices  and  public  buildings.  Its  strong  fea- 
tures are  that  it  is  durable,  handsome  and  fire-proof. 

The  Vogue  of  Holland  Linen. 

W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.  repbrt  a  constantly  increasing  de- 
mand for  their  Holland  Linen  stationery  of  all  kinds.  The 
sales  for  1909  were  far  in  excess  of  any  previous  year 
and  already  1910  gives  evidence  of  a  still  greater  sale  for 
these  popular  goods.  Holland  Linen  is  manufactured  in 
three  shades,  white,  azurette  and  grey,  and  in  five  popular 
sizes  of  note  paper,  with  envelopes  to  match.  It  is  a 
paper  of  splendid  finish,  with  a  beautiful  velvety  writing 
surface.  The  texture  is  everything  that  the  most  exacting 
can  desire  and  it  possesses  all  the  refinement  and  attrac- 
tiveness of  a  linen-finish  paper,  and  at  the  same  time  has 
a  smooth,  even  surface  that  makes  letter-writing  a  posi- 
tive pleasure.  This  line  of  high-grade  paper  is  also  put 
up  in  papeteries  and  writing  tablets.  Holland  Linen  in- 
"vitation  cabinets,  containing  invitation  cards,  with  en- 
velopes to  match,  and  Holland  Linen  visiting  cards  have 
also  become  very  popular  for  use  in  fashionable  society. 

New  Elliott  Catalogue— Very  Clever. 

A  dainty  little  catalogue  has  been  issued  by  the  Charles 
H.  Elliott  Co.,  Philadelphia,  for  the  season  of  1910.  In 
this  catalogue,  for  the  first  time,  net  prices  appear.  Here- 
tofore, this  company's  goods  were  catalogued  at  a  long 
lis*  price,  from  which  there  was  a  discount  of  50  per  cent., 
to  enable  the  dealer  to  show  the  catalogue  to  a  consumer. 


But  this  was  found  to  be  confusing,  so  that  the  system 
of  net  prices  has  been  established.  The  catalogue  is  vest- 
pocket  size  and  very  complete.  A  novelty  in  it  is  a  series 
of  quotations  running  on  the  left-hand  pages,  which  make 
the  book  most  entertaining. 

Holiday  Novelties. 

The  Chas.  H.  Elliott  Co.,  of  Philadelphia,  is  making 
some  good  things  for  the  trade  this  year.  Dealers  who  are 
tired  of  seeing  the  same  old  familiar  ideas  each  year  in 
the  line  of  holiday  novelties  should  endeavor  to  see  this 
line. 

Patented  Post  Card  Calendar. 

One  of  the  most  interesting  things  offered  to  the  trade 
this  year  is  the  Chas.  H.  Elliott  Co.'s  new  patented  post 
card  calendar.  The  idea  of  the  calendar  is  unique  and 
will  be  a  money-maker  fur  stationers  who  handle  post 
cards.  It  has  a  simple  adjustable  arrangement  for  util- 
izing a  post  card  as  part  of  a  calendar  mount,  the  mount 
being  an  artistic  production  itself. 

Artgum. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  are  featuring  the  new  patent 
cleanser,  Artgum,  at  present.  This  preparation  cleans 
shoes,  gloves,  hand-bags,  slippers,  jewelry  and  leather 
goods,  and  renovates  pictures,  books,  wallpaper,  silks, 
satins  and  other  fabrics.  One-inch  cubes  cost  $3.75  per 
gross;  2xlxl-inch  cubes,  $9  per  gross,  and  3x2xl-inch 
r ulies.  $1.60  per  dozen. 

"Eyesight"  Blotting  Paper. 

The  latest  thing  in  blotting  paper,  being  shown  by  the 
Copp,  Clark  Co.,  is  a  green  blotting  paper.  According  to 
authorities,  this  color  is  much  easier  on  the  eyes  than 
the  white,  as  there  is  no  harmful  reflection  from  it.  It 
has  been  appropriately  called  "Eyesight,"  and  costs  15 
cents  per  pound. 

St.  Patrick's  Day  Cards. 

These  post  cards  consist  of  a  large  variety  of  designs. 

without  the  objectionable  features  that  appeared  in  form- 

■  er  years.     The   Shamrock   and    the  Irish  lads  and  lassies 

are  all  brought  out   with  ai tractive  effect.     Price.  $1  per 

100  cards.   (Copp,  Clark).   ' 

New  Stationery  Offerings. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  are  offering  several  new  lines  in 
pens,  pencils,  stationery,  etc.  No.  310  counter  case,  with 
glass  cover,  contains  three  dozen  penholders  and  one 
gross  pens,  assorted.  The  case  costs  90  cents  complete. 
By  selling  one  penholder  and  four  pens,  a,t  five  cents,  the 
retailer  realizes  10'0  per  cent,  profit.  "Airship"  assort- 
ment, No.  1170,  contains  half-gross  pencils,  ($2.25  each). 
No.  7083.  is  a  display  card  containing  one  dozen  circular 
erasers.  ($4.80  per  gross).  No.  5546.  Pastograph  copy- 
ing pencils  are  fitted  with  patent  sliding  point  protector, 
suitable  for  round  and  hexagon  pencils,  one  dozen  on 
display  card    (65  cents  per  dozen). 

A  new  assortment  of  pens.  15  all  different,  on  display 
card,  made  by  one  of  the  leading  pen  makers  in  England, 
($3.60  per  gross  of  cards). 

New  line  of  deed  boxes,  japanned,  handles  at  side,  lock 
and  t'wo  keys.  These  come  in  four  sizes,  and  are  excep- 
tionally good  value.  14-inch,  $1.65  each;  16-inch,  $2  each; 
18-inch,  $2.40  each;  20-ineh,  $3  each. 

Shorthand  Trophy. 

The  illustration  shewn  herewith  represents  a  beautiful 
cup  awarded  to  Willard  B.  Bottome,  official  stenographer 
of  the  Supreme  Court,  who  made  a  record  of  2S0  words 
a  minute  at  the  American  shorthand  contest  recently  held 


20 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


at  Lake  George,  N.Y.    A  letter  from  Mr.  Bottome  to  the 
Waterman  Company  is  of  interest : 

October  19,  1909. 
Messrs.  L.  E.  Waterman  Co.,  173  Broadway,  New  York; 

Gentlemen, — For  the  past  ten  years  I  have  used  in  my 
shorthand  reporting  and  court  work  two  of  your  fountain 


pens.  They  have  given  entire  satisfaction.  I  consider 
the  pen  the  very  best  for  rapid  writing  of  shorthand  and 
I  cheerfully  recommend  it  to  all  stenographers. 

I  used  the  Waterman  Ideal  pen  in  the  shorthand  con- 
test held  at  Lake  George  for  the  American  shorthand 
trophy. 

Yours   very   truly, 

(Signed)     Willard  B.  Bottome. 

R.  T.  S.  Books  Shown  in  Canada. 

Toronto,  Feb.  1.— F.  H.  Bailey,  representing  the  Re- 
ligious Tract  Society,  closed  his  sample  room  at  the  King 
Edward  Hotel  to-day  and  proceeded  west.  Mr.  Bailey  re- 
ports having  done  an  excellent  business  here.  The  exten- 
sive lines  of  boys'  and  girls'  books,  which  his  house  pub- 
lish, were  found  to  satisfy  all  requirements.  He  noted  a 
splendid  sale  for  "The  Empire  Annual  for  Boys"  and 
"The  Empire  Annual  for  Girls,"  which  were  first  intro- 
duced last  year.    These  handsome  books,   each  containing 


eight  color  plates  and  a  collection  of  stories  about  va- 
rious parts  of  the  empire  are  remarkable  value  at  -i-K. 
The  Talbot  Baines  Reed  series  of  boys'  books,  numbering 
eleven  titles,  still  command  a  big  sale.  Other  series  for 
boys  were  the  Boys'  Own  Series,  twenty-eight  titles  by 
David  Ker,  Gordon  Stables,  etc.,  and  Every  Boys'  Book- 
shelf, 13  titles,  both  of  which  give  a  big  range  to  choose 
from.  For  girls  the  books  of  Evelyn  Everett  Green, 
twenty  titles,  and  the  series  in  Every  Girls'  Bookshelf  of- 
fer a  splendid  choice.  In  smaller  books,  a  good  showing 
was  made  with  the  Sunshine  Series,  45  titles  at  9d.,  and  the 
Golden  Sunbeam  Series,  25  titles.  All  these  have  color 
plates.  The  various  editions  of  "The  Pilgrim's  Progress," 
illustrated  by  Harold  Copping  are  always  in  demand.  Mr. 
Bailey  also  took  advance  orders  for  Harold  Begbie's  au- 
tumn novel  entitled  "The  Shadow." 

Import  Connections  for  1910. 

Toronto,  February  1. — William  Copp.  manager  of  the 
book  department  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.  has  returned  from 
Xew  York,  where  he  completed  arrangements  for  the 
American  import  lines  for  this  year.  Prior  to  his  visit  to 
Xew  York,  Mr.  Copp  had  called  on  the  trade  in  England. 
The  result  of  his  visits  to  both  markets  is  that  he  has 
secured  a  fine  range  of  books,  including  something  excep- 
tional in  leather  bindings  and  a  larger  showing  than  ever 
of  books  illustrated  in  color. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  are  agents  this  year  for  the  follow- 
ing British  publishers:  T.  C.  and  E..C.  Jack,  Edinburgh 
and  London;  R.  &  T.  Washbourne,  London;  George  G. 
Harrap  &  Co.,  London;  Hills  &  Co.,  London;  Everett  & 
Co.,  London ;  David  Douglas,  Edinburgh ;  Blackie  &  Son, 
Glasgow;  Archibald  Constable  &  Co.,  Edinburgh;  David 
Bryce  &  Sons,  Glasgow. 

A  select  representation  of  the  lines  of  the  following 
publishers  are  carried,  for  many  of  which  the  Copp,  Clark 
Co.  control  the  Canadian  market:  George  Bell  &  Sons,  Lon- 
don; Chatto  &  Windus,  London;  James  Clarke  &  Co., 
London;  Chapman  &  Hall,  London;  Wm.  Collins,  Sons  & 
Co.,  Glasgow;  Duckworth  &  Co.,  London;  Greening  &  Co., 
Hutchinson  &  Co.,  John  Lane,  Methuen  &  Co.,  Mills  & 
Boon,  John  Murray,  London;  W.  P.  Minimo,  Hay  &  Mitch- 
ell and  Oliphant.  Anderson  &  Ferrier,  Edinburgh;  George 
Routledge  &  Sons,  <Seeley  &  Co..  T.  Fisher  Unwin,  Gay  & 
Hancock,  Stanley,  Paul  &  Co.,  London. 

Tn  the  United  States,  they  carry  lines  of  the  publica- 
tions of  Henry  Altemus  &  Co.,  John  C.  Winston  Co.; 
Reilly  &  Britton ;  Rand.  McXally  &  Co.;  Raise.  Hopkins 
&  Co.  and  Charles  Scribners'  Sons. 


LAWNETTE  BOND 

One  of  our  new  Spring  papers,  promises  to  duplicate  the  success  of  the 
regular  Lawnette,  than  wHicH  tKere  has  not  been  a  better  seller  on  the 
marKet  for  years.  These  are  beautiful  papers,  and  the  lig'hter  weight  in 
the  bond  -will  appeal  to  those  -who  write  long'  letters  or  prefer  the  bond 
surface.     We  make  it  in  Steel  "White  and  Blue. 

Our  assortment  of  Bridge  Whist  Pads  is  very  large  and  attractive. 
Samples  will  be  sent  upon  request. 


1RADE    MARK 


GEO.  B.  HURD  Ol  CO. 

Fine  Paper   MaKers 

425  OL  427  Broome  Street,  New  YorK,  U.  S.  A. 

21 


Reg.  U.S.  Pat.  Office 


Departmentalizing  a  Book  Store  in  an  Ontario  City 

W.  J.  F.  Mallagh  Builds  up  a  Successful   Business  in  London — Specializes 
in  Books  and  Knows  His  Stock — Some  Methods  He  Adopts  to  Win  Trade 


A  bookstore  departmentalized.  This  aptly  describes 
the  method  adopted  by  W.  J.  F.  Mallagh,  in  the  manage- 
ment and  plan  of  his  large  and  admirably  appointed  book 
shop  in  London,  Ontario.  The  slogan  of  his  establishment 
is 

"If  it's  books,  it  must  be  Mallagh's 
"If  it's  Mallagh's,    it  must   be  books." 

Another  tenet'  to  which  he  clings  and  attributes'  a 
large  measure  of  his  prosperity  is  that  satisfactory  ser- 
vice is  the  secret  of  business  success,  and  Mr.  Mallagh 
endeavors  to  give  a  satisfactory  service  in  all  that  the 
term  implies — courteous  attention,  prompt  delivery,  hon- 
est values,  and  reliable  goods. 

For  ten  years  he  conducted  a  progressive  book  and 
stationery  trade  in  busy  Brant  ford.  Disposing  of  his 
stock  over  a  year  ago  to  Stedman  Brothers,  he  bought 
out  the  business  of  J.  I.  Anderson  &  Company,  of  Lon- 
don. The  store  is  roomy  and  inviting.  In  length  it  is 
135  feet  and  in  width  20  feet,  ti  inches.  At  the  rear  is  a 
children's  department  15x22.  The  floors  are  of  hardwood 
and  the  ceiling  metallic,  while,  back  of  all  is  a  large  stock 
room.  There  is  an  abundance  of  light  both  at  the  front 
and  rear.  Advanced  ideas  are  everywhere  in  evidence. 
Mr.  Mallagh  is  an  enthusiastic  bookman.  He  does  not 
touch  fancy  goods,  toys,  china,  wallpaper  or  small  wares, 
as  he  says  that  the  larger  a  city  is  the  more  exclusive 
you  can  make  your  store  along  certain  lines.  A  lover  of 
books  and  a  reader  as  well,  he  revels  in  their  atmosphere, 
their  binding,  printing,  history  and  contents.  He  has  a 
children's  department,  a  religious  publication  department, 
the'  People's  library,  Every  Man's  library,  a  Sunday 
School  department,  and  several  others.  He  has  separate 
tables  for  rebound  fiction,  and  special  offerings  of  one 
kind  and  another,  the  table  decorations  being  changed  fre-- 
Muently,  so  as  to  give  the  interior  of  his  store  an  altered 
appearance  and  avoid  any  sense  of  monotony.  He  be- 
lieves in  variety— the  kind  that  the  good  housewife  gets 
bv  shifting  the  articles  in  a  bedroom  or  parlor  to  differ- 
ent  corners  and  nooks  of  the  room. 

He  is  thoroughly  convinced  of  the  efficacy  of  advertis- 
ing and  the  part  it  plays  in  successful  merchandizing.  To 
Bookseller  and  Stationer  he  said  "I  advertise  to  get 
people  into  my  store  and  to  let  new  comers  to  the  city 
know  that  I  am  in  the  book  business.  It  might  other- 
wise take  them  some  time  to  find  it  out.  I  want  them  to 
get  so  accustomed  to  coming  to  Mallagh's  for  books  that, 
whenever  they  think  of  that  subject,  they  will  gravitate 
here  as  it  were  by  instinct.  It  does  not  do  to  advertise 
in  a  merely  general  way.  The  tendency  of  business  is  to 
move  in  circles.  It  is  by  publicity  that  you  get  into  the 
circle  and  enlarge  your  circumference  of  trade.  I  favor 
quoting  prices  every  time.  A  great  many  people  seeing 
the  goods  and  knowing  the  figure  at  which  they  sell  prac- 
tically wait  on  themselves.  Plain  figures  coupled  with  ab- 
solute freedom  to  examine  what  you  have  to  offer  tell  a 
tale  often  as  well   as  a  salesman  or  saleslady  could." 

Mr.  Mallagh  believes  and  practices  artistic  window  cUst- 
plays  and  trimmings.  Twice  a  week  he  changes  his  win- 
dows and  he  always  puts  plain  printed  price  tags  on 
anything  particular  that  he  has  to  offer.  He  keeps  a 
book  in  which  is  entered  the  address  of  every  teacher  in 
the  county  and  at  different  times  he  sends  them  circulars 
or  other  interesting  trade  announcements. 


On  the  right  as  the  visitor  enters  the  commodious 
store  he  finds  memo  books,  ladies  and  gentlemen's  sta- 
tionery, school  and  office  supplies  and  what  is  known  as 
staple  lines.  On  the  left  in  glass  cases  are  Bibles,  prayer 
and  hymn  books,  editions  of  the  poets  and  all  classes  of 
fancy  bound  volumes.  Then  come  the  well  stocked  and 
heavily  laden  rows  of  shelves  of  miscellaneous  books,  Eng- 
lish classics,  copyright  fiction  and  rebound  copyrights,  the 
latest  novels  and  other  lots.  He  does  not  run 
a  circulating  library.  The  new  copyrights;  al- 
ways sell  well  in  London,  which  is  a  reading  centre.  Mr. 
Mallagh  added  that  it  paid  to  have  one  or  two  copies  of 
all  the  latest  works.  It  adds  to  the  reputation  and  stand- 
ing of  a  bookseller  of  being  up-to-date,  directs  attention 
to  his  store  and  tends  to  cultivate  the  reading  habit 
among     his   patrons.    The     function     of  a  bookman   is   to 


W.  J.  F.  MALLAGH 


foster  and  nourish  the  reading  habit.  •'Sometimes,"  he 
declared,  "when  a  popular  author  has  got  out  a  new 
work  which  the  name  of  the  writer  itself  will  sell,  I  ad- 
vise a  prospective  customer  not  to  buy  it  if  it,  is  not  up 
to  the  standard  which  I  know  he  expects.  I  may  be  los- 
ing the  sale  of  a  copy  at  the  time  but  I  gain  more  in  the 
end  as  that  man  or  woman  feels  that  he  or  she  can  rely 
on  me  and  my  word.  It  pays  in  the  long  run  to  have  his 
or  her  confidence.  They  place  dependence  in  you  and 
know  that  you  are  more  anxious  to  please  them  than  sim- 
ply to  make  a  sale.  A  bookman  learns  to  know  his  cus- 
tomers and  becomes  their  counsellor  and  friend,  having 
knowledge  of  their  tastes  and  the  particular  class  of  read- 
ing they  desire  to  pursue." 

All  reading  matter  is  classified  as  much  as  possible 
and,  when  the  new  fiction  comes  in  each  season,  it  is 
divided  among  Mr.  Mallagh  and  his  assistants.  They  all 
read  a  certain  number  of  books.  Then  they  interchange 
<  iews  and  opinions  so   that  every   one  in   (lie  store  has  a 


22 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


good  idea  of  the  contents  and  character  of  each  produc- 
tion. This  greatly  aids  in  the  sale  of  the  latent  editions. 
Many  people  depend  nowadays  on  the  bookman  for  their 
information  and  he  must  be  in  a  position  to  give  it  to 
them.  To  sell  books  you  must  know  books.  This  js  one 
of  Mr.  Mallagh's  mottos. 

As  to  newspapers,  while  Mr.  Mallagh  handles  them  he 
does  not  encourage  their  delivery  because  of  the  boy  pro- 
blem. Magazines  of  all  kinds  are  sold  and  their  trade 
stimulated  in  every  way.  They  are  kept  from  the  front 
of  the  store  so  that  subscribers  and  prospective  purchas- 
ers have  to  walk  some  distance.  They  thus  get  a  glance 
of  what  the  store  has  to  offer  in  other  lines  and  frequent- 
ly buy  something  else  before  departing.  With  respect  to 
school  books  he  does  not  find  fault  with  the  Eaton  Com- 
pany for  tendering  and  remarked  with  a  smile  that  he 
would  probably  do  the  same  thing  himself  if  he  had  an 
opportunity,  but  what  he  does  resent  is  the  action  of  the 
Ontario  Government  in  stipulating  that  any  one  paying 
cash,  be  he  a  private  individual  or  retailer  can  buy  from 
the  publishers  at  twenty  per  cent,  below  the  prices  print- 
ed on  the  cover.  "That  means,"  asserted  the  speaker,  "a 
child  taking  one  copy  gets  as  much  consideration  as  a 
business  man  who  perhaps  may  purchase  a  thousand 
copies.  This  is  decidedly  unfair  to  the  bookseller.  We  are 
selling  the  readers  here  at  the  list  prices — the  figure  thai 
is  printed  on  the  cover." 

As  already  stated  Mr.  Mallagh  does  not  sell  fancy 
goods,  wall  paper,  toys,  china  and  other  lines  often  form- 
ing part  of  the  stock  of  a  bookstore.  The  only  sporting 
goods  that  he  handles  are  golf  clubs.  The  year  round  he 
closes  at  six  o'clock  except  on  Saturday  nights.  lie  sells 
postage  stamps  but  they  are  looked  after  by  the  office 
staff  and  a  sign  in  the  store  indicates  where  they  may  be 
obtained.  They  are  run  separately  and  the  fact  that  call- 
ers after  stamps,  travel  fully  half  the  length  of  the  store 
to  get  them,  frequently  means  more  than  the  sale  of  a 
stamp — perhaps  it  is  a  magazine,  a  book,  some  station- 
cry,  a  pencil  or  other  article. 

A  plan,  which  was  recently  tried  with  gratifying  re- 
sults, was  an  invitation  to  write  on  an  ordinary  sized 
pest  card  these  words,  "Mallagh  Sells  Waterman's  Ideal 
Fountain  Pens."  Prizes  were  offered  the  competitors  and 
many  responses  received.  The  successful  contestant  man- 
aged to  get  the  six  words  on  a  government  sized  paste 
board  1575  times.  On  the  walls  and  shelving  of  Mal- 
lagh's bright  store  are  hung  suggestive  mottos  and  ex- 
pressive phrases  telling  of  books  or  something  connected 
with  the  store.  The  proprietor  runs  an  engraving  and 
embossing  department  and  takes  orders  for  wedding  sta- 
tionery, ladies'  and  gentlemen's  calling  cards,  reception 
invitations,    etc.    Under  a  glass    topped     counter    samples 


are  placed.  These  are  changed  frequently  and  sometimes 
other  cards  are  put  under  the  crystal  surface — such  as 
tally  cards,  playing  cards   and   that  line  of  goods. 

Mr.  Mallagh  is  original  in  his  plans  to  increase  and 
build  up  business.  He  recently  sent  out  the  following  let- 
ter in  a  lady's  handwriting  on  initialed  society  station- 
ery, with  envelopes  to  match. 

London,  Canada,  July  17th,  Plnii 
My  Dear,— 

I  suppose  you  think  that  I  am  a  regular  tramp  for 
not  writing  to  you  on  my  usual  date  but  when  I  tell  you 
I  have  had  a  houseful  of  company  you   may  forgive  me. 

Before  I  attempt  any  answer  to  your  most  interest- 
ing letter  I  want  to  talk  business.  You  have  heard  me 
speak  of  the  Mallagh  Bookshop  (Anderson's  old  stand). 
Well  !  while  I  was  down  town  last  week,  their  window 
was  full  of  linen  note  paper  ticketed  at  ten  cents  a  quire. 
It  looked  good  to  me  so  I  stepped  inside  to  examine  it 
more  closely  as  it  seemed!  to  be  remarkably  cheap. 

1  found  out  that  at  this  price  they  embossed  free  of 
charge  any  initial  on  the  paper,  a  sample  of  which  with 
the  embossing,  I  am  using  in  this  letter,  so  that  you  can 
see  for  yourself — my  bargain.  This  is  only  one  of  the 
many  specials  which  the  Mallagh  Bookshop  is  offering  to 
secure  new  business. 

Now  to  get  at  your  letter— but  pshaw  !  it  is  so  fear- 
fully hot,  I  will  leave  it  over  until  your  visit  next  week, 
when  we  can  have  one  of  our  old  time  talks,  so  au  revoir 
for   the  present. 

Always  affectionately, 

BETTY. 

This     artistically   gotten      up   communication   was   for- 
warded   to    hundreds      of   ladies    in     the    Forest    City,    the 
names    being    secured    from      the    directory,    the    telephone 
■book   and    other    means.     The   business    resulting   from    the 
venture  was  decidedly   satisfactory. 

"I  want  every  one  who  enters  my  bookshop  to  feel 
perfectly  at  home,  to  be  entirely  free  to  wander  around, 
and  go  in  and  out  among  the  hooks  and  tables  examining 
what  is  offered  at  their  leisure.  The  closer  a  bookman 
gets  to  the  people  and  lives  up  to  this  ideal,  and  the 
nearer  callers  follow  this  practice,  is  the  true  bookshop 
in  sight.  We  never  importune  persons  to  buy.  When  they 
enter  we  can  very  soon  tell  whether  they  have  some  de- 
finite object  in  view  or  merely  want  to  look  around,  it 
is  pari  of  our  business  to  read  and  understand  human 
nature.  We  strive  to  make  this  the  rendezvous  of  all  who 
are  interested  in  books  whether  they  desire  to  purchase, 
get  information,  or  just  saunter  about.  All  classes  arc 
equally  welcome." 


Five  Days  Ago 


a  stationer  ordered  an   assortment  of  School  Art  Materials, 
color  boxes,  brushes,  charcoal,  fixitif,  paper,  etc. 


To-Day 


he  sends  a  repeat  order  for  several  times  the  quantity,  say- 
ing that  he  will  stock  them,  as  the\-  are  the  best  school  line 
he  ever  saw.  Now  we  will  create  the  demand  for  these  and 
all  you  do  is  handle  them.  Write  to-day  for  our  selling 
plan,  illustrated  catalogue  and  discount  sheet. 

The  GEO.  M.  HENDRY  CO.,  Limited  Manufa^Z™L7Xsesa]eTS 

Note  Our  New  Premises  215-219  Victoria  Street,  Toronto,  Ontario 


23 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Our  32nd  Annual  Import  Season 


To  Make  Money 
in  Fancy  Goods 
is  to  buy  Import 


FANCY 


Face  to  face  with  opportunity.  Buy  your 
Holiday  Goods  direct  from  the  Best  Markets 
in  the  World.  Justice  to  your  business  de- 
mands that  this  chance  should  not  be  neglected. 


Make  Your 
Appointment    Early 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  ," 


Will  Open  March  the  14th 


GOODS 


We  Supply  you 
with  Adver- 
tising   Matter 


Undoubtedly  the  largest  range  of  Holiday 
Goods  e  ver  shown  in  Canada.  You  may 
share  in  our  success,  and  profit  by  the  experi- 
ence of  our  buying.      Just  one  chance  in  a  year. 


Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Ltd. 

Toronto 


•  j 


500KSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Music  and  Musical  Instruments 

The  Increasing  Popularity  of  Songs 
and  Dance  Music  among  all  Classes, 
Makes  its  Sale  a  Valuable  Adjunct. 

Not  many  years  ago  a  sheel  musk-  counter  in  a  depart- 
mental store  was  an  unheard  of  thing-.  To-day  in  numer- 
ous large  departmental  stores  throughout  Canada  can  be 
found  a  music  counter  suitable  to  the  size  of  the  estab- 
lishment. On  these  counters  you  are  sure  to  rind  all  the 
popular  songs  of  the  day  displayed.  Merchants  interviewed 
mi  the  subject  have  nothing  but  praise  for  the  day  when 
a  music  department   was  established  in  their  store.      ■  ■ 

The  prejudice  of  high-class  singers  against  the  popu- 
lar variety  of  songs  was  overcome  when  Mme.  Adelina 
l'atii  introduced  and  sang  in  America,  on  her  farewell 
lour,  a  popular  song,  written  especially  for  the  occasion, 
by  an  American  composer,  who  is  now  one  of  the  fore- 
most popular  song  writers  in  the  world.  The  introduction 
of  a  popular  song,  by  so  talented  an  actress,  finally  broke 
down  all  opposition,  and  to-day  any  high-class  performer 
will  gladly  introduce  on  (he  market  a  popular  ballad. 

Another  reason  why  popular  songs  have  met  with 
marked  favor  to-day,  lies  in  the  fact  that  only  a  few  years 
ago,  ;;  person  who  was  the  proud  owner  of  a,  piano,  was 
known  as  a  possessor  of  wealth.  In  these  days,  with  few 
exceptions,  every  person,  no  matter  of  what  station  in  life, 
whether  he  be  rich  or  poor,  owns,  or  could  if  he  wished, 
a  piano  or  other  musical  instrument.  The  fact  that  there 
are  so  many  of  these  instruments  used  creates  a  greater 
demand   than   ever  for  the  lig»hter  class  of  popular  music. 

Then  again,  most  public  schools,  at  the  present  time, 
teach  the  rudiments  of  music.  In  fact,  just  now  it  is  part 
of  almost  every  child's  education. 

Phonographs,  graphophones  and  pianolas  have  also 
created  quite  a,  feeling  for  this  class  of  music.  It  might 
here  be  stated  that  these  instruments  are  coming  more 
into  favor  every  day  owing  to  the  success  with  which  a 
ballad,  morch,  or  popular  instrumental  piece  can  be 
adapted  to  them.  Song.-  of  the  popular  class  have  fur- 
ther been  brought  to  a  prominent  place  in  the  public 
estimation  by  the  introduodLon  of  illustrated  slides  describ- 
ing the  scenes  and  characters  of  a  song.  These  slides  are 
both  interesting  and  artistic  and  give  a.u  added  rinkh  to 
the  rennderiug  of  a  song. 

Si  ill  another  item  which  has  been  instrumental  in 
creating  and  increasing  the  sale  of  popular  songs  is  the 
increasing  number  of  vaudeville  and  musical  comedy  per- 
formances produced  on  the  stage.  In  nearly  every  in- 
stance these  performances  are  made  up  almost  entirely  of 
songs  of  a  popular  variety,  with  up-to-date  comedy  a,s  a 
background. 

Twentieth  century  book  and  stationery  retailing  has 
placed  itself  among  the  fine  arts.  In  no  other  branch  of 
.•commerce  is  refined  agression,  practised  diplomacy,  good 
breeding,  a  knowledge  of  human  nature  and  sound  com- 
mon sense  used  to  more  advantage.  These  are  qualities 
as  valuable  in  supplying  the  public  with  music  as  in  suc- 
cessfully handling  other  lines  of  goods. 

Sheet  music  belong  essentially  to  the  book  store,  for 
the  publication  and  sale  of  this  music  is  carried  on  along 
lines  similar  to  books.  A  furniture  store  will  provide  you 
with  a  bookcase  but  you  have  to  go  to  the  bookstore  to 
fill  it.  Just  the  same  a  piano  store  will  sell  you  an  instru- 
ment and  why  should  not  the  bookseller  provide  the  music? 


MUSIC 


We     would    like     to     interes 
you     in    CHOIR     MUSIC. 

Write    us    for  sample   copies 
which  we  gladly  send  you  on 

approval.     Show    them   to   your    local    choir   leaders    and 

business  will  result. 

Our  NEW  CATALOGUE  of  "Selected  Best  Sellers," 
including'  songs,  piano  music,  books,  etc.,  is  now  ready. 
You  can  make  it  very  useful  in  your  business. 

Copies  for  the  asking. 

Anglo-Canadian  Music  Publishers  Assn.,  Ltd. 

ASHDOWN'S  MUSIC  STORE 
144   Victoria   Street  -  -  TORONTO 


The  Delmar  Music  Co. 

Publishers  and  Jobbers  of 
Popular  Music 

Delmar  Building,  MONTREAL 

a  Hit  from       i      Moonlight  Dear 

Words  and  Music  by 

Coast  to    Coast  »«        ■  •  p   u    j 

I  Murchison  &  Hodge 


The  National  Song' 

O  Canada 

by 
Mr.  Recorder  Weir 


The  Waltz   Success 

Carita 

by 
Hubert  Nickson 


The  greatest  of  all  Rag-time  compositions 

Raggity-Rag 

by 
J.  B.  Lefreniere 


A  Song  that  will 
live    always 


Sing  Me  a  Song  Like 
You  Used  to  Sing 

by 
Walter  Bruce 


"ROB  ROY" 


PENS 


Sold  by 

All  Stationers 

in  6d.,  1/-  and 
Gross  Boxes 


H1NKS,  WELLS  &  CO.. 


This 

series  of  Pens 

is  made  of  the 

same  material,  by  the 

same  tools,  by  the  same 

of  process  and  at  the  same 

works  as  the  series  of  '  Waver- 

ley  '  Pens  which  Hinks, Wells  & 

Co.  have  for  30  years  and  upwards 

(prior  to  Sept.,    1901),  manufactured  for 

and  supplied  to  the  Proprietors  thereof. 

BIRMINGHAM,  ENGLAND 


26 


B  O  O  K  S  E  L,L  E  R     A  XI)     S  T  A  T  I  O  X  E  K 


"Victor"  Quality 


'HIS    MASTER'S    VOICE" 

REG.U.S.PAT.OFF. 


Quality  is 
the  argu- 
ment that 
convinces 
people. 
You  can 
prove  t  o 
them  that 
the 


Victor  Gramophone 

is  the  best  musically  and  mechanically.  This 
means  greater  business  and  more  profits  for  you. 
Tell  people  that  the  voices  of  the  greatest  sing- 
ers in  the  world  are  record  id  exclusively  for  the 
Victor-Gramophone  ;  that  the  foremost  bands 
and  orchestras  make  Records  for  the  Victor- 
Gramophone  only — and  you  will  be  abundantly 
repaid  for  your  efforts — Victor-Gramophone  pro- 
fits are  worth  looking  into.  Send  for  catalogs 
and  dealers'  prices. 

Berliner  Gramophone   Co. 

MONTREAL 


LIMITED 


British  America  Assurance  Company 

A.  D.  1833 

FIRE  &  MARINE 

Head  Office,  Toronto 

BOARD  OF  DIRECTORS 

Hon.  Geo  A.  Cox,  President  W.  R.  Brock,  Vice-President 

Robert  Blckerdike,  M. P.,  W.  B.  Melkle,    E.  W   Cox.  Geo.  A.  Morrow, 

D.  B.  Hanna,  Augustus  Myers,  John  Hoskin,  K.C.,  LL.D. 
Frederic  Nlcholls,  Alex.  Laird,  James  Kerr  Osborne,  Z.  A.  Lasb,  K.C. 

Sir  Henry  M.  Pellatt,   E.  R.  Wood. 

W,  B.  Melkle,  General  Manager!  P.  H.  Sims,  Secretary 

CAPITAL        -.-..-  $1,400,000.00 

ASSETS 2,162,753.85 

LOSSES  PAID  SINCE  ORGANIZATION      29.833,820.96 


w 


ESTER1N 


Incorporated 
1851 

ASSURANCE 
•  •  COMPANY. 


FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 


Head  Office— TORONTO,  ONT. 

Assets  over      -  $3,570,000 

Income  for  1906,  over     3,609,000 

HON.  GEO.  A.  COX,  President, 

W.  R.  BROCK,  Vice  President 

W.  B.  MEIKLE,  General  Manager 

C.  C.  FOSTER,  Secretary 


SPENGERIAN 

STEEL  PENS. 

The  Standard  Brand  in  United  States  for 
over  fifty  years,  among  expert  and  careful 
writers,  and  recognized  by  accountants 
and  correspondents  as 

THE  BEST 

Works  :  BIRMINGHAM,  ENGLAND 

Imported  by  all  the  leading  stationers  in 
Canada. 

Proprietors  :  Spenccrian  Pen  Co.,  New  York 


HAVE  YOU  TRIED 

THIS 
ONE 


JOHN  HEATH'S   PENS 

Supplied    by    leading    Wholesale 
Houses   in   Toronto  and   Montreal. 
London  (Eng.)  Export  Agency  : 

8  St.  Bride  St.,  London,  E.C. 

0278  TELEPHONE  PEN.  Reg  in  Canada 


The 


REG:  IN  CANADA 


WAVERLEY 
PENS 

■       THE  WORLD'S  FAVORITE        - 


THE  RE8ERVOIR  WAVERLEY  WRITES 
250   WORDS   WITH    ONE  DIP  OF  INK 

SOLD  EVERYWHERE 

MACNIVEN   &  CAMERON,   LTD. 

Steel,  Gold  and  Fountain  Pen  Makers  to  the  Trade 

WAVERLEY     WORKS,    EDINBURGH 


Information    Supplied 

Tne  Editor  of  The  Canadian  Bookman  is  prepared  to  supply 
any  information  desired  about  where  books  mentioned  in  the 
paper  are  to  be  procured  and  the  price  at  which  they  are  sold. 
He  will  also  supply  publishere'  names  to  authors  desirous  of 
having  mauuscript  published  in  book  form. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


SQUIBS. 


PAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK 


Cause  and  Effect. 

The  woman  was  the  author  of  a 
cook  book  that  had  been  published 
at  her  request  with  wide  margins 
and  occasional  blank  pages  for  notes 
and  additional  recipes.  Often  she  had 
expressed  a  wish  to  see  an  old  copy 
of  the  book  and  find  out  to  what  use 
the  blank  spaces  had  been  put.  One 
day  in  a  second-hand  store  her  hus- 
band unearthed  an  old  volume.  Notic- 
ing that  it  had  been  annotated  freely 
he  bought  it.  After  a  day  or  so  he 
he  said  : 

"How  about  the  notes  in  that 
cook  book  ?  Were  they  interesting  V 

"No,"  she  said  curtly,  "they  didn't 
amount  to  anything." 

He  looked  through  the  book  him- 
self. Every  note  the  book  contained 
was  a  remedy  for  dyspepsia  and 
stomach  trouble. 


Napoleon's  Card  Made  Him  Sick. 

There  is  being  shown  in  Paris,  says 
a  weekly  paper,  a  collection  of  visit- 
ing cards  of  Napoleon  III.  The  cards 
used  by  the  Emperor  in  1868  are  of 
a  bright  lustrous  white,  which  was 
obtained  by  the  use  of  a  special  var- 
nish prepared  by  the  chemists  of  the 
Tuileries,  and  which  had  an  arsenic 
base.  One  day  a  prefect  of  a  prov- 
ince, having  received  a  card  from  the 
Emperor  for  some  service  he  had 
rendered,  was  so  overcome  by  the 
honor  that  he  kissed  the  card.  He 
was  taken  ill,  and  it  was  discovered 
that  he  was  in  the  first  stage  of  ar- 
senical poisoning.  This  fact  was  re- 
ported to 'the  Emperor,  who  immed- 
iately prohibited  the  use  of  the  var- 
nish. ' 


Good  Place  for  Camels. 

Governor  Glasscock,  of  West  Vir- 
ginia, while  traveling  through  Ari- 
zona, noticed  the  dry,  dusty  appear- 
ance of  the  country. 

"Doesn't  it  ever  rain  around 
here  ?"  he  asked  one  of  the  natives. 

"Rain  ?"  The  native  spat.  "Rain  ? 
Why,  say,  pardner,  there's  bullfrogs 
in  this  yere  town  over  five  years  old 
that  hain't  learned  to  swim  yet." — 
Everybody's  Magazine. 


COLLECTIONS,  ETC. 


THE 
MERCHANTS  MERCANTILE    CO. 

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to  oursubscribers  (jives  prompt  and   reliable  in. 

formation  to  date.     Every  modern  facility  for  the 


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replete  u)it)suclj$cis 
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letter  class  of  trade, 
ffljalh  the  class  you 
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DAVID  FORREST 

129  Bloor  St.,         Toronto,  Can. 
Canadian  representative 

28 


irade  supplied  by  all  Leading  Wholesale 
Drug  Houses  in  the  Dominion. 

Received  Highest  Award  Medal  and  Diploma 
at  Centennial,  Philadelphia,  1876;  World's  Fair, 
Chicago,  1893,  and  Province  of  Quebec  Exposi- 
tion, Montreal,  1897 


The  Topaz  Pencil 

As  good  as   any   at  any  price. 
Better  than  any  at  the  same  price. 

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without  rubbers. 

INDELIBLE  COPYING 

Medium  and  Hard. 

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Wholesale  Stationers,  TORONTO. 


HOTEL   DIRECTORY. 


THE    GRAND    UNION 


The  most  popular  hotel  in 
OTTAWA,    ONT. 


JAMES  K.  PAISLEY, 


Proprietor 


HALIFAX   HOTEL 

HALIFAX,   N.S. 


ACCOUNTANTS   AND   AUDITORS. 


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HARDY 

Assignees,  Chartered 

Ace 

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Fire  Insu 

ance  Agents. 

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printer  &  $ut)ltgf)er 

is  the  authority  on  typography  in 
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Montreal  Toronto  Winnipeg 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Your  Pen  From  Your  Pocket 

Will  Not  Slip  if  You 

Fasten  it  With  a 


m? 


SEVERAL  SIZES 
FITS    ANY    PEN 

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Samples  sent  on  request. 

The  ROLLAND  PAPER  CO., 

MONTREAL,   QUE. 

Limited 

There  is  a  Line 

on  one  side  or  the  other  of  which  every 
wall  paper  dealer  stands. 

On   One  Side  On  the  Other  Side 


is  the  man  who  puts 
energy  and  brains  into  the 
conduct  of  the  depart- 
ment, but  despile  his  best 
efforts  the  returns  are  not 
what  they  should  be. 


is  the  man  who  puts  in  no 
more  effort,  but  gets  the 
maximum  profit.  The 
difference  is  not  in  the 
man  but  in  the  goods  he 
sells. 


WALLPAPER 


is  for  the  merchant  who  is  determined  to  get  the 
utmost  from  his  wall  paper  department.  The 
saleability  of  goods,  and  consequently  the  ex- 
cellent price  which  they  bring,  spells  PROFIT. 
Do  not  miss  the  best  line.      Write  us. 

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29 


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SOME  OF  OUR  LINES: 


CREPE  PAPER  NAPKINS  in  sanitary  packages 

A  Protection  and  Convenience  to  both  dealer  and  consumer 

PARIS  TRI-COLOR  and  PLAIN  RIBBON  CREPE  PAPER 

The  great  convenience  and  time-saver  in  decorating.     Fifty  varieties. 

Decorated  and  Plain  Crepe  Papers  and  Paper  Napkins  in  endless  varieties 

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THE  TUTTLE  PRESS  CO.,  Manufacturers,  Appleton,  Wis. 


Standard 
C  ommercial  Works 


Matte's  Interest  Tables 

at  4  to  1 6  per  cent Price,  $3.00 

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at  3   per  cent Price,  $3.00 

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and  book  of  days  combined  at  3  to  8    per 
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and  Exchange  Tables. 

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Mounted  on  card Price,  35c 

Import  Costs 

A  new  Advance  Table  .......  Price,  $1.50 

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Price,  50c 

A  complete  catalogue  of  all  the  above  publications 
sent  free  upon  application. 

Morton.  Phillips  &  Co. 

PUBLISHERS 

1  1  5  and  1  1  7  Notre  Dame  St.  Welt,  MONTREAL 

N  B.-The  BROWN  BROS.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  carry 
a  full  line  of  our   publications. 


This  is  what  the  Trade  is 
Waiting  for 

1910     EDITION     OF 

5000  FACTS 


-ABOUT- 


CANADA 


WITH  FACTS  ABOUT  THE  BRITISH  EMPIRE 


SELF-INDEXING 
CHAPTERS  ON 

Area 

Agriculture 

Alberta 

British  Columbia 

Banking 

Canals 

Education 

Financial 

Fisheries 

Immigration 

Insurance 

Militia 

Marine 

Mining 

Maritime  Provinces. 

Manitoba 

Ontario 

Manufacturies 

Population 

Post  Offices 

Quebec 

Railways 

Religions 

Saskatchewan 

Temperance 

Timber 

Trade  and  Tariff 

Telegraphs 

Western  Canada, etc 


Canadian  Parliamentary  Library,    Ottawa. 


COMPILED  BY 

FRANK     YEIGH 

TORONTO 
Price     -     -     -  25  cents. 


The  Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co, 


667  Spadina  Avenue. 


Toronto,  Ontario. 


Entered  according-  to  Act  of  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  in  the  year  lqio,  by 
Frank  Yeigh,  in  the  office  ot  the  Minister  of  Agriculture,  Ottawa. 


30 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Condensed    or    "  Want "    Advertisements 


BOOKS  FOR  SALE. 

How  to  dispose  of  shop-worn  or  unsaleable  boo.cs 
is  the  problem  of  many  a  bookseller.  Try  an  adver- 
tisement under  this  heading. 

AUTHORS,    WHO    PUBLISH    THEIR    OWN 
books    will    find    the    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER  a  good  medium  through  which 
to  interest  the  trade  in  their  publications. 

BOOKS  IN  FOREIGN  LANGUAGES 

LEMCKE  &  BUECHNER,  30  West  27th  St., 
New  York.     (All  foreign  books.)        (12-10) 

LEMCKE  &  BUECHNER,  30  West  27th  St., 
New  York.  Best  facilities  for  supplying  books 
in  all  languages. 

INFORMATION  WANTED. 

THE  EDITOR  OF  THE   BOOKSELLER   AND 
Stationer  desires  to  be  kept  posted  on  the  pub- 
lication of  all  new  books  and  magazines  in  the 
Dominion  of  Canada.     Readers  will  confer  a  favor 
by  acquainting    him    of    any  omissions   from  the 
lists  published  each  month. 

ARTICLES  FOR  SALE 

TO  CHRISTMAS  CARD  MANUFACTURERS 
—  A  firm  of  English  manufacturers  have  for 
disposal  at  low  pricesa  large  number  of  Dies 
and  Blocks  that  have  already  been  used  in  the  pro- 
duction of  Christmas  cards,  and  will  be  pleased  to 
furnish  proofs  and  prices  to  likely  buyers.  Ad- 
dress, "  Blocks,"  care  Dawson's,  121  Cannon  St., 
London,  Eng. 


MISCELLANEOUS 


ANY  MAN  who  has  ever  lost  money  in  the  mails 
has  had  occasion  to  learn  by  painful  exper- 
ience that  the  only  properway  to  remit  money 
is  by  Dominion  Exp-ess  Money  Orders  and  For- 
eign Drafts.  If  lost  or  delayed  in  the  mails,  a 
prompt  refund  is  arranged,  or  new  order  issued 
without  further  charge. 


A  BOOK-KEEP  NG  STAFF  IN  ITSELF,  doing 
the   work  with    machine  precision    and  accu- 
racy, the  National  Cash  Register.     Write   for 
demonstration  liter-iture.     National  Cash  Register 
Co.,  285  Yonge  St.,  Toronto 


stock  room  or  as  extra  selling'  space,  at  the  same 
time  increasing  space  on  your  ground  floor.  Costs 
only  $70.  Write  for  catalogue  "B."  The  Otis- 
Fensom  Elevator  Co.,  Traders  Bank  Building, 
Toronto. 


(tf) 


DOES  YOUR  FIRE  INSURANCE  POLICY 
protect  you?  There  are  points  in  connection 
with  fire  insurance  policies  that  need  expert 
handling  to  secure  proper  protection.  We  are  fire 
insurance  experts.  We  can  safeguard  your  inter- 
ests and  procure  the  lowest  rates.  Mitchell  & 
Ryerson,  Confederation    Life    Building,   Toronto. 

(tf) 

ELLIOTT-FISHER     Standard      Writing-Adding 
Machines     make    toil    easier.     Elliott-Fisher 
Limited,  513    No.  83  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal, 
and  Room  314  Stair  Building,  Toronto. 

ELIMINATE  FIRE  RISK,  save  insurance,  re- 
duce maintenance  costs  and  s  ve  money  on 
your  actual  building  work  by  using  the  KAHN 
SYSTEM  of  Fireproof  Construction.  Used  In 
many  of  the  largest  business  premises  on  this 
Continent.  Write  for  catalogue.  Trussed  Con- 
crete Steel  Company  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Walker  Rd., 
Walkerville.Ont.  (tf) 

ERRORS  AVOIDED,  LABOR  SAVED-Using 
the  Shouperior  Autographic  Register.  Three 
copies  issued  at  one  writing.  1st,  Invoice; 
2nd,  Delivery  Ticket ;  3rd,  Charge  Sheet,  perforat  • 
ed  for  filing.  No  handling  of  carbons.  High 
grade  printing  and  neat  invoices.  Make  full  in- 
quiry. Autographic  Register  Co.,  191-193195 
Dorchester  St.  East,  Montreal.  (tf) 


FIRE  INSURANCE.     Insure    in    the    Hartford. 
Agencies  everywhere  in  Canada. 

FIREPROOF  WINDOWS  AND  DOORS,  made 
strictly  to  the  Fire  Underwriters'  require- 
ments, reduce  your  insurance  rates  and  pro- 
tect your  building.  We  are  experts  in  this  line 
and  guarantee  you  really  fireproof  goods  and  the 
maximum  insurance  allowance.  Let  us  give  you 
our  figure.  A.  B.  Ormeby,  Ltd.,  Sheet  Metal 
Workers.     Factories:  Toronto,  Winnipeg. 

GET  THE  1910  CANADIAN  ALMANAC  —  In- 
formation  on  Customs  Tariff,  Bank  Stocks, 
Foreign  Exchange,  Post  Offices,  Insurance. 
Assurance,  Patents,  Weights,  Measures,  News- 
papers, Magazines,  Succession  Duties.  Paper 
cover,  50c;  cloth,  75c.  At  all  dealers  or  postpaid 
on  receipt  of  price.  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd.,  Dept. 
C,  86  Front  St.  West,  Toronto. 

GET  THE  BUSINESS;  INCREASE  YOUR 
SALES.  Use  Multigraph  Typewritten  Letters. 
The  Multigraph  does  absolutely  every  form  of 
printing.  Saves  you  25  p  c.  to  75  p.c.  of  your 
printing  bill.  Multigraph  your  office  forms, 
letterheads,  circularletters.  Write  us.  American 
Multigraph  Sales  Co.,  Ltd.,   129  Bay  St.,  Toronto. 

INSURE  HEALTH  by  installing  Pullman  system 
of  natural  ventilation.  Simple,  inexpensive. 
All  foul  air  In  room  expelled  through  special 
outlets.  Use  in  store,  office  and  home.  Send  for 
free  booklet.  Wm.  Stewart  &  C  o.,  Saturday  Night 
Building,  Toronto;  Board  of  Trade  Building, 
Montreal.  ('f) 

JUST  NOW  we  are  holding  a  special  sale  of 
second-hand  typewriters.  All  makes  are  repre- 
sented: Underwood,  Remingtons,  Olivers, 
Empires,  Smith  Premiers,  etc.  They  have  been 
carefully  rebuilt  and  are  in  good  norkable,  wear- 
able condition.  The  Monarch  Tvpewriter  Co., 
Ltd.,  98  KingSt.  West,  Toronto,  Ont.  (tf) 

KAY'S  FURNITURE  CATALOGUE  No.  36, 
contains  160  pages  of  fine  half-erne  engrav- 
ings o'  newest  designs  in  Carpets,  Rugs, 
Furniture,  Draperies,  Wall  Papers  and  Pottery 
with  Cash  prices.  It  brings  you  into  close  touch 
with  the  immense  stocks  and  sp'enidminufactu  ring 
facilities  ol  John  Kay  Company,  Limited.  36  King 
St.  West,  Toronto.  Write  for  a  copv  to-dav.  It's  free. 

KEEP  ACCOUNTS  WITHOUT  BOOK-KEEP- 
ING.  A  century  ago  accounting  meant  keep- 
ing books.  To-day  you  can  keep  accounts 
cheaper,  better,  quicker  and  more  accurately  by 
throwing  away  all  books  and  in- tailing  a  McCaskey 
Account  Register.  Don't  be  skeptical— investiga- 
tion costs  nothing.  Write  us  to-day.  Dominion 
Register  Co.,  Ltd.,  100  Spadina  Ave,  Toronto,  (tf) 

MODERN  FIREPROOF  CONSTRUCTION. 
Our  system  ofcrelnforced  concrete  work,  as 
successfully  used  in  many  of  Canada's  larg- 
est buildings,  gives  better  results  at  lower  cost. 
"  A  strong  statement,"  you  will  'ay.  Write  us  and 
letus  prove  our  claims.  That's  fair.  Leach  Con- 
crete Co.,  Ltd.,  100   King  St.  West,  Toronto,      (tf) 

PROBABLY  the  most  talked  about  machine  in 
Canada  is  the  Hainer  Book-keeping  Machine. 
It  combines  in  one  machine  the  cash  and 
credit  register,  time  recorder  and  account  register. 
Representatives  wanted  everywhere.  Write  for 
our  proposition.  Book-keeping  Machines,  Ltd., 
424  Spadina  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 

SHOW  CASES  AND    STORE    FIXTURES    for 
every  business    Send  for  illustrated  catalogue. 
Jones  Bros.  &  Co.,    Limited,    30-32  Adelaide 
St.   W.,   Toronto,  Ont.  (tf) 

SAVE  50  i  OF  THE  COST  OF  HANDLING 
merchandise  by  installing  a  Beath  System  of 
Overhead  Carriers.  Saves  valuable  floor 
spaoe  because  the  trackage  is  on  the  ceiling.  Sys- 
tems for  all  kinds  of  businesses,  large  or  small. 
Write  us  for  illustrated  catalog.  W.  D.  Beath  & 
Son,  193  Terauley  Street,  Toronto,  (tf) 

THE  "KALAMAZOO"  LOOSE  LEAF  BINDER 
is  the  only  binder  that  will  hold  iust  as  many 
sheets  as  you  actual'y  requir-  and  no  more. 
The  back  is  flexible,  writing  surface  flat,  align- 
ment perfect.  No  exposed  metal  parts  or  compli- 
ca  ed  mechanism.  Write  for  booklet.  Warwick 
Bros.  &  Rutter,  Ltd.,  King   and   Spadina,  Toronto. 

THE  METAL  REQUIRED  IN  A  MODERN 
CONCRETE  BUILDING.  Our  sp.cial 
facilities  enable  us  to  p'oduce  at  minimum 
cost  Concrete  Reinforcements,  Fenestra  Steel 
Sash,  Automatic  Fire  Shutters  and  Steelcrete 
Metal  Lath.  Complete  stock;  quick  delivery. 
Before  deciding  write  us  for  catalogue  and  prices. 
Expanded  Metal  and  Fireproofing  Co.,  Ltd., 
Fraser  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 

3i 


THE     PERRY    PICTURES  -  EXTENSIVELY 
advertised.       Millions   sold.       Very    popular. 
Every  one  should  have  them.    Send  4   cents 
in  stamps  for  illustrated  catalogue   and    prices  to 
the    trade.     The    Perry    Pictures    Co.,    Box    440, 
Maiden,  Mass.  (2- 10) 

[TSE  the  best  carbon  paper.  Our  "Klear-Kopy" 
'-'  carbon  gives  clear,  unsmudged  copies  of  your 
letters  and  other  documents  It  has  been 
selected  by  a  leading  government  against  43  com- 
petitors. 'Peerless''  typewriter  ribbons  give 
clear  letters  and  will  not  clog  the  type.  Sold  by 
all  dealers.  Write  t\s  for  samples.  Peerless  Car- 
bon  and  Ribbon  Co.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


VT7AREHOUSE     AND    FACTORY    HEATING 
TT       Systems.      Taylor-Forbes     Company,    Ltd. 
Supplied  by  the  trade  throughout  Canada. 


WHEN  BUYING  BOOKCASES  insist  on  hav- 
ing  the    best  in   the   market— "Macey    Sec- 
tional Bookcases."     Carried  in  stock  by  all 
up-to-date   furniture   dealers.     Illustrated   booklet 
sent  free  on  request.     Canada   Furniture  Manufac- 
turers, Ltd. ;  General  offices,  Woodstock,  Ont.(tf ) 


w; 


'ANTED— A  splendid  opportunity  for  dealers 
tohandle  thebest  combination  Duplicat  ng, 
Addressing  andOffice  Printing  Machine  on 
he  market.  Exclusive  territory.  Send  name  and 
address,  giving  occupation  and  references,  to  the 
Canadian  Writerpress  Company,  Ltd.,  33  John 
i>t  ,  Hamilton,  Ont. 


WHY  IMPORT  Loose-Leaf  Binders  and  Metal 
Partswhen  you  can  buy  "  Systems  Quality" 
from  us?  We  make  the  best  binders  in  the 
world;  make  them  to  match,  too.  Ours  are  the 
Canadian  Loose-Leaf  Standaids.  Business  Sys- 
tems Limited,  Manufacturing  Stationers,  Toronto 
(tf) 

VOU  need  the  best  possible  protection  from  fire  ! 
If  your  valuables  are  in  one  of  our  safes,  you 
can  rest  at  ease;  no  fire  is  too  hot  for  our 
safes  and  vaults  to  withstand.  We  manufacture 
vaults  and  safes  to  meet  every  possible  require- 
ment. Write  for  catalogue  "S."  The  Goldie  & 
McCulloch  Co.,  Ltd.,  Gait,    Ont,  (tf) 

a>n  BUYS  THE  BEST  DUPLICATING  MA- 
vP/S  CHINE  on  themarket.  ACME  will  print 
Y  anything  a  job  printer  can  do.  Complete 
outfit :  Acme  Duplicating  Machine,  one  tubular 
stand  fitted  with  type  cases,  compartments  plainly 
lettered  and  arranged  like  universal  keyboard  of 
the  standard  make  of  typewriters;  one  drawer  for 
accessories  and  forms,  20  lb.  font  of  typewriter 
type,  one  chase,  one  Acme  ribbon  any  color  with 
typewriier  ribbon  to  match,  one  pair  tweezers,  two 
quoins,  one  key,  one  oil  can  and  one  set  of  reglets. 
Sold  with  a  guarantee.  Acme  Duplicator  Co., 
Baltimore,  Md.,  U.S.A.  (tf) 


PERIODICALS. 

KEEP  POSTED-The  leading  authority    in    Ca- 
nada on  groceries  and   food  products  is  THE 
CANADIAN  GROCER.     Important  trade  con- 
ditlonsgenerally  discussed  every  week.     Price  $2 
per  year. 

THE  market   reports    make    HARDWARE   AND 
METAL  a  necessity  to  every  hardware  merch- 
ant,  paint  and  oil    dealer    in    Canada.     It  is 
mailed   every  Friday.     Subscription    price  $2    per 
year.     Address  HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  Mont- 
real, Toronto  or  Winnipeg. 


SITUATION  WANTED 


ADVERTISER  is  open  for  a  position  where  en- 
terprise, hard  work  and  strict  attention  to 
business  count.  Can  show  a  successful 
record  in  build  ng  up  businesses.  Was  manager 
for  two  different  stationery  and  news  stores  and 
increased  the  turnover  in  each  case  over  100  p.c. 
Address,  '•Worker,"  care  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER,  Hartney,  Chambers,  Vancouver 
B.C. 


WANTED 


TT7ALI.  PAPER  TRAVELERS  for  year  1910. 
»»  Road  experience  desirable.  Must  know 
something  r>f  wall  paper  and  be  able  to 
produce  results.  Write  full  particulars  of  ability, 
experience,  salary  required  to  interest,  etcetera. 
to  P.  F.,  sales  manager.  Box  185,  Toronto.    (3,10) 


CLASSIFIED  LIST  OF  ADVERTISEMENTS 


Artists'  Materials. 

Art   Metropole   Limited,   Toronto. 
Ramsay,    A..    &    Sons,    Montreal. 

Art  Publishers. 

Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

Books  and  Magazines. 

Amalgamated    Press,    London,    E.E. 
American   Code   Co.,   New   York. 
Baker's    Book  Shop,    Birmingham,    Eng. 
Busy   Man's  Magazine,  Toronto. 
Briggs,    Wm.,    Toronto. 
Cassell   &   Co.,    Toronto. 
Clark  Bros.,   Winnipeg,  Man. 
Copp,    Clark    Co.,    Toronto 
Crowell,   Thos.   Y.    &   Co.,    New   York,   N.Y. 
Frowde,  Henry,   Toronto. 
Gage,   W.    J.   &  Co. 
Harcourt   &   Co..   E..   H.,    Toronto. 
Macmillan    Co.,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
McLeod  &   Allen,   Toronto. 
Morton,   Phillips   &   Co.,    Montreal. 
Musson   Book    Co.,    Toronto. 
Religious   Tract   Society,    London,   England. 
Renouf   Publishing  Co.,   Montreal,   P.   Q. 

Blank  Books. 

Brown   Bros.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,   Gillies   &   Co.,   Hamilton. 

Copp.  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

National   Blank   Book   Co..   Holyoke.    Mass. 

Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright.  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Warwick    Bros..    &    Rutter,    Toronto. 

Carbon  Paper. 

Carter's   Ink   Co.,    Boston,    Mass. 
Mlttag   &    Volger,   Park   Ridge,   N.    J. 
Underwood,    John,    &    Co.,   Toronto. 

Christmas  Cards,  Calendars,  Labels. 

Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co..  Ltd..  Hamilton.  Ont. 
Copp.  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

Crepe  Paper,  &c. 

Tuttle   Press   Co..   Appleton,   Wis. 

Fancy  Goods — Novelties. 

Brown   Bros.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Clark  Bros.,   Winnipeg.   Man. 

Copp.  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

Fancy    Goods   Co.,   of   Canada,    Toronto. 

Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Warwick  Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto 

Young    Bros.,    Toronto. 

Financial  Institutions  and  Insurance 

British-American    Assurance    Co..    Toronto. 
Western   Assurance   Co..    Toronto. 

Fountain  Pens. 

Brown   Bros.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Hamilton.  Ont. 

Copp.  Clark  Co..  Toronto. 

Mabie,  Todd  &  Co.,  124  York  St.,  Toronto. 

Warwick-  Bros.   &   Rutter,    Toronto. 

Waterman,    L.    E.,    Co.,    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Fountain  Pen  Klips. 

Waterman.    L.    E.,    Co..    Ltd.,     Montreal 


A 

Accountants  and  Auditors  28 

Acme  Staple   Co '. 8 

Albermarle   Paper  Mfg.    Co.   < 7 

Amalgamated   Press    46 

American   Code   Co 33 

Anglo   Can.   Music   Co 26 

Art  Metropole  Co:   6 

B 

Baker's   Book   Shop   33 

Berliner    Gramaphone    Co 27 

Briggs,  Wm 44 

British-America    Assurance    Co....  27 

Brown  Bros.,   Ltd 2 

Buntin;     Gillies    &  Co.      outside 

cover  and  31 

Busy   Man's   Magazine   44 

C 

Canadian   Facts   Pub.    Co 30 

Carter's  Ink  Co 4 

Consolidated       Lithographing     & 

Mfg.  Co 5 

Consolidated    Safety   Pin    Co 29 

Conway,    Stewart  &.  Co 8 

Copp,    Clark   Co 48—  9 

Crowell,  Thos.   Y.  &J  Co 45 

D 

Davids,   Thaddeus   Co 2 

Delmar  Music  Co 26 

Duryea-Hoge  Co.   ..».. 6 


Mabie.   Todd  &  Co.,  124   York  St..  Toronto. 

Glue,  Paste  and  Mucilage. 

Carter's  Ink  Co..  Montreal. 

Higgins,    Chas.    M.    &    Co.,    Brooklyn 

Underwood,    John    &    Co.,    Toronto. 

Glue  Pencils. 

Carter's  Ink  Co.,   Boeton. 

Gramaphones. 

Berliner   Gramaphone   Co..    of    Canada.,    Ltd.. 
Montreal.   Que. 

Ink  Stands. 

Weeks-Numan  Co.,   New  York,   N.   Y. 

Inks — Writing. 

Brown  Bros..  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co..  Ltd.,  Hamilton.  Ont. 

Lop      Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

Carter's   Ink   Co..   Montreal. 

Davids,  Thaddeus  Co..  New  York. 

Higgins,    Chas.    M.    &   Co.,    Brooklyn. 

Mabie,  Todd  &  Co..  124  York  St.,  Toronto. 

Payson's. 

Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Underwood.   John,  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

Warwick  Bros.   &  Rutter,   Toronto. 

Gage,   W.    J..   &  Co. 

Waterman,    L.    E.,    Co.,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Leather  Goods. 

Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,   Toronto. 

Rumpp,  C.  F..  &  Sons.  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Letter  Presses. 

Jas.  Smart  Mfg.   Co..  Brock ville,   Ont. 

Music  Publishers. 

Anglo    Canadian   Music    Publishing    Associa- 
tion, Toronto. 
Delmar   Music   Company.   Montreal. 
McKinley  Music  Co.,  Montreal,  P.  (J. 

Paper. 

Albermarle     Paper     Mfg.    Co.,      Richmond, 

Va..    U.S.A. 
Brown  Bros..  Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 
Eaton,   Crane  &  Pike  Co.,  Pittsfield,  Mass. 
Hurd,  Geo.   B..   &  Co..  New   York. 
Gage.   W.    J..  &  Co. 
Holland   Paper   Co.,    Montreal,    P.Q. 

Pens. 

Brown   Bros.,    Toronto. 

Buntin,    Gillies   Co.,   Hamilton.    Ont. 

Conway  Stewart  &  Co.,   London,   Eng. 

Copp.  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 

Heath,   John,  London. 

Hinks,   Wells  &   Co.,   Birmingham. 

Jewel   Pen   Co.,    London,    Eng. 

Mabie,  Todd  &  Co..  124  York  St.,  Toronto. 

Macniven  &  Cameron.  Edinburgh  and  Birm 

Ingham. 
Onoto   Pen   Company,   New  York  Ciey. 

INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS 

E 

Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co 4 

Elliott,  Chas.  H.   Co :..     28 

F 

Fancy     Goods      Co.      of     Canada 

inside   back  cover 
Financial   Post   45 

G 

Gage,  W.  J.,  A-  Co 3 

Goodall's  1 

H 

Heath,   John  27 

Hendry,  Geo.   M.,   Co. 23 

Higgins,   Chas.  M.  &J  Co 5 

Hinks,   Wells  &  Co. 26 

Hotel  Directory  43 

Hurd,   Geo.   B.,   &   Co .• 21 

Hurst,   A.   O. 1 

Jewel  Pen   Co 8 

L 

Lemcke  <fr  Buechner  31 

M 

MacDougall,    A.    Roy   7—8 

MacLean   Publishing   Co 29 

Macniven  &   Cameron   27 

Mabie,   Todd  &   Co.    5 

Manufacturers   Sales    Co 6 

Mittag  &  Volger     outside  back  cover 


Sanford  &  Bennett  Co.,  New  York. 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,  B.C. 
Spencerian   Pen    Co.,   Birmingham,    Eng. 
Warwick  Bros.   &   Rutter,   Toronto. 
Waterman.  L.   E..   Co..   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Pencils — Crayons — Erasers. 

American  Crayon    Mfg.    Co.,  Waltham,  Mass. 

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BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


PROFESSOR  VTILLIAM  BENNETT  MUNRO 

Gossip  of  the  Month 

To  be  the  subject  of  a  press  despatch  is  an  honor 
which  rarely  befalls  a  literary  man.  If  we  were  to  mea- 
sure an  author's  greatness  thereby,  few  indeed  would 
measure  up  to  the  standard.  Yet  a  youthful  professor  at 
Harvard,  William  Bennett  Munro,  was  last  month  made 
the  subject  of  a  despatch,  which  appeared  in  several  Can- 
adian newspapers.  The  announcement  that  he  had  writ- 
ten an  important  volume  on  "The  Government  of  Amer- 
ican Cities,"  was  thought  to  be  of  sufficient  interest,  to 
make  it  worth  while  stating  that  he  was  a  Canadian. 
Professor  Munro  has  had  a  distinguished  academic  career 
and  has  already  written  several  books.  Pie  was  born  in 
Almonte  in  1875  and  is  still  attached  to  the  place  of  his 
birth,  for  he  has  a  summer  home  there,  where  he  manages 
to  spend  a  pleasant  month  or  so  in  each  year's  vacation 
period.  His  education  was  secured  at  the  Almonte  High 
Schoal'and  Queen's  University,  where  he  graduated  in 
1896.  He  pursued  post  graduate  studies  at  the  University 
of  Edinburgh,  Harvard  University  and  the  University  of 
Berlin  and  is  now  Assistant  Professor  of  Government  in 
Harvard.  His  first  book  "The  Seigniorial  System  in  Can- 
ada," appeared  in  1907.  The  following  year  he  issued 
through  the  (  hamplam  Society,  "Documents  relating  to 
Seigniorial  Tenure."'  "The  Government  of  European 
Cities"  appeared  last  year  and  was  highly  commended  by 
the  critics,  and  this  year  will  see  the  publication  through 
the  Macmillan  Co.,  of  his  new  book  on  "The  Government 
of  American  Cities." 

*-        *•        * 

In  the  minds  of  some  radicals  the  Senate  of  Canada 
may  be  a  useless  appendix  to  the  governmental  organism, 
•  but  if  the  wrath  of  the  Senators  at  the  congested  con- 
dition of  the  Parliamentary  Library  is  'going  to  work  re- 
forms in  that  quarter,  then  we  can  forgive  them  a  great 
deal.  For  Canada,  as  a  young  nation,  should  never  forget 
1he  importance  of  building  well  to-day  the  lower  courses 
of  the  national  fabric.  The  careful  preservation  of  her 
literary  products  is  a  great  work,  just  as  important  in 
its  way,  as  the  careful  building  of  her  railways,  canals 
and  other  public  works.  The  Parliamentary  Library 
should  be  all  that  the  name  implies— a  well-equipped  and 
commodious  store-house    for    the    preservation    of    the    na- 

34 


tion's  books.  Any  agitation  which  will  lead  the  Govern- 
ment to  deflect  a  few  thousand  dollars  from  useless  pub- 
lic works  to  invaluable  improvements  in  the  library  should 
be  welcomed  and  supported. 

*      *      * 

It  is  altogether  likely  that  the  near  future  will  wit- 
ness the  holding  of  a  conference  of  colonial  represent- 
atives for  the  discussion  of  copyright  in  the  Empire. 
Proposals  for  such  a  conference  have  been  made  and  we 
understand  that  the  Canadian  Government  have  at  pre- 
sent under  consideration  the  choice  of  representatives  for 
this  country.  This  projected  conference  is  the  outcome  of 
the  last  International  Convention  held  in  1908. at  Berlin. 
Following  its  meeting,  the  British  Government,  through 
the  President  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  appointed  a  com- 
mittee to  consider  British  copyright  in  all  its  phases  and 
to  bring  in  recommendations,  which  might  be  used  in 
placing  the  British  copyright  in  harmony  with  the  Berlin 
convention.  This  committee  in  presenting  their  report  a 
few  weeks  ago  referred  particularly  to  the  colonies  and 
expressed  the  hope  that  they  would  fall  into  line  with 
Great  Britain,  so  that,  as  far  as  possible,  there  should 
be  one  law  throughout  the  Empire.  Whether  or  no,  such 
a  desirable  end  can  be  reached  is  doubtful  but  the  confer- 
ence will  show  the  attitude  of  the  various  overseas  domi- 
nions towards  the  copyright  question  and  may  result  in 
clearing  up  some  of  the  difficulties    which  surround  it. 


Statistics,  when  presented  in  the  proper  comparative 
form,  usually  awaken  interest  and  sometimes  even  prove 
fascinating.  The  figures  of  book  production  in  the  old 
country,  which  the  Publisher's  Circular  compiles  so  assi- 
duously at  the  turn  of  the  year,  are  a  case  in  point.  The 
bookman  is  naturally  curious  to  know  if  literary  people 
are  as  prolific  writers  of  books  as  they  used  to  be  ; 
whether  the  theologians  are  maintaining  their  place  in  the 
ranks  ;  how  the  poets  are  prospering.  To  all  of  these 
questions,  the  Circular's  statistics  give  a  substantial  and 
accurate  reply.  Yes,  1909  was  a  splendid  year.  For  the 
first  time  in  the  history  of  the  English  book  trade,  the 
total  production  has  exceeded  10,000,  the  actual  figures 
being  10,725.  This  is  an  increase  of  904  volumes  over 
1908.  Fiction,  of  course  leads,  with  a  total  of  2,881 
books  ;  arts  and  sciences  take  second  place  with  a  record 


REV.  W.  T.  ALLISON 
Author  of  "The  Amber  Army  and  Other  Poems."     (Briggs.) 


BOOK  S  E  L  L  E  K     A  X  D     S  T  A  T  I  O  X  E  R 


REV.  A.  G.  MOR1CE,  O.M.I. 
British  Columbia's  Indefatigible  Historian. 

of  1,201  titles  ;  religion  and  philosophy  follow  with  1,022 
titles  ;  then  come  history  and  biography,  913  ;  political 
and  social  economy,  752  ;  educational,  629  ;  etc.  The 
largest  increase  over  1908  was  in  books  of  religion  and 
philosophy,  which  were  100  ahead  ;  fiction  gained  93  ;  po- 
litical and  social,  81  ;  history  and  biography  53.  The 
most  notable  decrease  was  in  the  department  of  poetry, 
which  declined  94. 

It  is  rather  astonishing  to  learn  that  Canada's  pur- 
chases of  books  from  the  United  States  now  total  over 
three  million  dollars  per  annum.  In  other  words  Can- 
ada's English-speaking  and  literate  population  spends 
nearly  one  dollar  apiece  on  American  books  each  year. 
Another  interesting  feature  of  this  international  book 
trade  is  the  announcement  that  of  the  total  exportation 
of  books  from  the  United  States,  the  Dominion  absorbs 
forty-five  per  cent.,  or  nearly  half.  All  of  which  goes  to 
demonstrate  that  this  Canada  of  ours  is  one  of  the  great- 
est book-buying  countries  in  the  world  in  proportion  to 
population. 


rian  of  (he  Carnegie  Library,  Ottawa,  contributes  to  the 
New  York  Nation,  he  expresses  the  opinion  thai  in  ima- 
ginative literature  the  year's  record  was  far  from  remark- 
able. Such  a  statement  sets  one  thinking.  Is  it  true  af- 
ter all  ?  Are  we  Canadians  boasting  of  a  literary  output 
which,  when  we  view  it  dispassionately,  is  lacking  sadly 
in  the  attributes  of  greatness?  To  concede  this,  to  our 
mind  would  mean  a  pretty  general  condemnation  of  liter- 
ary work  in  this  country.  Ii  1(11)9  was  a  weak  year,  then 
1908  was  even  weaker,  and  it  is  doubtful  when  we  have 
ever  had  a  more  noteworthy  year. 


Canadian  letters  Lave  lost  a  prominent  figure  in  the 
person  of  Dr.  James  Hannay,  of  St.  John,  NIL,  who  has 
contributed  so  many  excellent  volumes  to  the  list  of  Can- 
adian books.  His  work  was  not  of  a  spectacular  nature 
but  it  was  well  worth  while  and  future  historians  will 
find  a  wealth,  of  valuable  material  preserved  in  his  va- 
rious historical  writings.  It  was  his  "History  of  the 
War  of  1812,"  which  appeared  serially  in  the  Canadian 
Magazine  some  years  ago,  that  first  attracted  general  at- 
tention to  him  and  he  has  since  given  us  the  life  of  Sir 
Leonard  Tilley,  and  just  prior  to  his  death,  a  two-volume 
history  of  his  native  province. 


It  is  a  pleasant  relief  to  find  at  least  one  Canadian 
newspaper  breaking  away  from  the  habit  of  conducting 
popularity  and  guessing  contests  in  its  columns  and  estab- 
lishing a  competition  really  worth  while.  The  'Sherbrooke 
Daily  Record,  the  leading  newspaper  in  the  Eastern  Town- 
ships, has  inaugurated  an  historical  story  contest,  in  con- 
nection with  the  centennial  celebration  of  the  settlement 
of  the  Townships.  This  contest  is  divided  into  two  sec- 
tions, one  open  to  all  excepting  students  and  the  other 
confined  to  students  attending  local  schools,  and  prizes 
of  hooks,  ranging  from  sets  of  Dickens  and  Parkman  down 
to  subscriptions  to  Canadian  magazines  are  offered.  The 
idea  has  hern  warmly  commended  and  should  serve  to 
bring  out   much  latent  literary  talent. 


Have  we  any  Canadian  literary  fakers  ?  Perhaps  some 
of  our  learned  bibliographers  may  be  able  to  post  us  in 
this  matter.  It  is  by  no  means  inconceivable,  that  there 
are  books  of  history,  travel  and  description  on  the  shelves 
of  our  libraries,  which  are  impostures,  either  exposed  al- 
ready or  destined  to  be  exposed  in  process  of  time.  Such 
a  thought  has  been  suggested  by  the  New  York  Evening 
Post's  list  of  fakers'  writings,  from  the  spurious  pro- 
ducts of  Annius  down  to  the  books  written  by  Dr.  Cook, 
the  discredited  polar  explorer.  Librarians  apparently 
rather  relish  these  books  and,  instead  of  casting  them 
forth  as  unworthy  of  a  place  among  respectable  tomes, 
they  make  them  welcome,  and,  as  in  the  case  of  the  Bos- 
ton Public  Library,  even  set  apart  a  place  for  their  ac- 
commodation. One  cannot  help  admiring  the  effrontery 
of  these  writers,  their  nerve  and  above  all  the  remarkable 
ability,  which  enables  them  to  write  so  learnedly  and  ap- 
parently accurately  of  tlr'ngs  they  have  never  seen. 


In  the  admirable  and    concise     summary    of   the  Can- 
adian books  of    1909,    which   Lawrence    J.    Burpee,    Libra- 


THE    LATE    DR.    JAMES    HANNAY 


35 


Will  the  West  Have  a  Distinctive   Literature  of  its  Own? 

A  Pertinent  Query  Answered  in  the  Affirmative  by    a   Wes- 
tern Writer  Who  Sees  a  Wealth  of  Material  all  About  Him. 

By  ARTHUR  R.  FORD 


"RALPH   CONNOR" 

Who  has  pictured  the  rough  pioneer 

life  of  the  West  in  a  number 

of    novels. 


Nellie   McClung,      Agnes 
Robert  Service  and  R.   J. 


Will  the  west  have  a  dis- 
tinctive literature  of  its 
own  ?  In  view  of  the  frank 
materialism  of  the  west,  of 
the  absorption  of  the  coun- 
try in  the  development  of 
its  resources  and  of  the  gen- 
eral lack  of  culture  natural 
to  a  new  country,  the  ques- 
tioo  seems  premature  if  not 
preposterous. 

However,  the  west  in  the 
past  few  years  has  produced 
sufficient  writers  who  '  have 
made  an-  impress  on  the 
literary  world  to  make  the 
query  a  very  pertinent  one. 
Some  of  the  greatest  Cana- 
dian successes  of  recent 
years  have  been  by  western 
authors  on  western  subjects. 
To  mention  a  few  of  them 
there  is  Ralph  Connor,  Mrs. 
Dean  Cameron,  Agnes  Laut, 
C-  Stead. 

If  ever  there  was  a  country  to  inspire  the  novelist 
or  the  poet  it  is  Western  Canada.  Superlatives  come 
naturally  to  a  westerner.  They  take  the  place  of  garden 
variety  adjectives.  Much  as  one  might  want  to  avoid 
them  he  must  of  necessity  turn  to  them  to  describe  the 
west's  literay  mine  which  is  still  practically  undeveloped. 
It  is  an  inexhaustible  field  and  a  territory  which  has 
been  as  little  scratched  over  by  the  pen  as  by  the  plough- 
share. 

There  are  several  distinct  fields  for  the  novelist,  au- 
thor and  poet,  each  of  them  furnishing  the  widest  var- 
iety of  romance.  There  is1  the  redman  of  the  west.  Their 
legends,  their  wars,  their  loves,  their  hates  and  their 
gradual,  but  stubborn  retreat  before  the  advance  of  civ- 
ilization, form  an  endless  mass  of  material.  Then  in  the 
west's  hinterland  is  to  be  found — the  only  place  on  the 
continent — the  Indian,'  a  pagan  savage^  with  all  his  cus- 
toms and  his  habits  as  before  the  advent  of  the  white. 

Then  there  is  another 
source.  The  story  of  the 
early  western  discoverers  is 
as  romantic,  as  thrilling  and 
as  adventuresome  as  any 
history  can  furnish.  The 
lives  of  La  Verandyre,  Mc- 
Kenzie,  Sir  James  Douglas, 
Fraser,  Thompson  and 
dozens  of  other  intrepid  ex- 
plorers, would  furnish  the 
plots  for  innumerable  tales. 
The  richest  western  field 
of  all  is  probably  the  re- 
cords of  the  Hudson  Bay 
Co.  Its  history  is  the  most 
romantic  of  any  corporation 
the  world  has  ever    known. 


The  stories  of  its  sturdy  Scotch  factors  and  trappers  in 
their  tight  with  nature,  with  Indians  and  with  white 
foes  is  so  .thrilling  as  to  be. almost  unreal. 

The  history  of  the  Mounted  Police  furnishes  also 
fruitful  material  for  the  west's  great  novelist  when  he 
arrives.  The  courage  and  the  spirit  of  this  handful  of 
men,  the  pick  of  the  world's  wanderers,  who  have  kept 
law  and  older  in  an  empire,  form  the  basis  of  thrilling 
tales  of  audacious  pluck  and  stirring  adventure.  The 
tales  which  have  been  written  so  far  about  the  Mounted 
Police  have  been  by  men  who  have  gleaned  their  infor- 
mation from  the  station  platforms  of  Regina  and  Cal- 
gary and  got  their  color  from  a  hurried  view  of  the 
force  on  parade. 

Then  the  early  settlement  of  Manitoba  furnishes  an- 
other rich  field.  The  dream  of  Lord  Selkirk,  an  optimis- 
tic  idealist— the   formation    of   a   British   colony   on     the 


ROBERT  J.  C     STEAD 
Poet  of  the  Plains 


NELLIE  L.  McCLUNG 
A  western  story-teller  who   has   won    high   praise    for   her   work. 

Banks  of  the  Red  river — was  a  most  daring  and  perilous 
undertaving.  The  struggles  of  the  early  Scotch  Kildonan 
settlers  is  a  tale  of  absorbing  interest.  As  for  the  early 
French  voyageur  he  is  always  picturesque,  and  always 
romantic — in  the  west  particularly  so. 

But  all  of  the  romance  of  the  west  is  not  in  the 
past.  The  railway  builders,  the  homesteaders,  the  ranch- 
ers, the  cowboys,  the  foreigners,  the  English  settler,  the 
American  farmer  and  all  the  unnumerable  types  of  the 
cosmopolitan  west,   each  has  his  story. 

Ralph  Connor  in  his  latest  novel,  "The  Foreigner," 
has  given  a  glimpse  of  the  field  there  is  for  novelist  and 
social  writer  in  the  foreign  emigration  with  the  vexa- 
tious problems  it  has  introduced  into  Western  Canada. 
The  lonely  and  often  pathetic  life  of  the  homesteader, 
dropped  a  hundred  miles  from  nowhere  with  nothing  but 
prairie  sky  in  the  summer  and  the  glare  of  a    thousand 


36 


BOOKSI-ILLER     AND    STATIONER 


miles  of  snow  in  the  winter,  in 
his  fight  for  a  fresh  start, 
forms  another  still  unwritten 
romance. 

"The  story  of  the  home- 
steader is  an  epoch,"  said 
Ralph  Connor,  lately  to  the 
writer.  "It  is  hard  to  appre- 
ciate his  courage  in  driving 
twenty-five,  thirty,  forty,  fifty 
or  a  hundred  miles  to  make  a 
home  on  the  waste.  It  is  a 
wonderful  story,  the  man's 
fight  with  isolation,  finally 
emerging  triumphant." 

The  whole  wonderful  develop- 
ment of  the  west  ;  towns 
springing  up  over  night,  great 
districts  settled  as  it  were  by 
magic,  the  enthusiasm,  the  hopefulness,  the  virility,  the 
throbbing,  pulsing  red-blooded  life  of  the  west  forms  the 
material  for  hundred  upon  hundreds  of  human  interest 
stories. 

If  the  west  does  not  produce  a  literature  of  its  own, 
if  it  does  ne>  turn  out  writers  of  merit  who  will  make 
their  mark  in  the  world  of  letters,  it  will  not  be  for  lack  of 
material.  The  poems  of  Robert  Service  and  of  R.  J.  C. 
Stead  in  his  recent  work,  "The  Empire  Builders,"  are 
marked  by  unusual  virility,  they  breathe  of  the  great 
outdoor  world.  They  are  typically  western  in  spirit, 
and  although  they  are  the  pioneers,  it  seems  likely  that 
they  arc  the  forerunners  of  a  western  literature  bearing 
manv  of  the  same  characteristics. 


CHARLES  NAIR 

Explorer  of  Northern  Wilds 


THREE  HANDSOME  GIFT  BOOKS. 

The  Art  of  the  Belgian  Galleries.  By  Esther  Singleton. 
Illustrated.  Boston:  L.  C.  Page  &  Co.  Cloth,  $2.00  i><-i. 
This  is  the  ninth  volume  in  the  scries  of  illustrated 
descriptive  books  on  the  famous  art  galleries  of  Europe. 
It  is  a  handsome  volume,  containing  358  pages  of  letter- 
press and  48  full-page  plates,  reproducing  the  most  not- 
able paintings  in  the  Belgian  galleries.  Short  biogra*phies 
of  the  chief  masters,  whose  works  appear  in  the  galleries, 
are  appended  and  their  individual  art  qualities  and  their 
influence  on  others  are  described.  The  descriptions  of 
the  pictures  are  all  simple  and  concise. 

Castles  and  Chateaux  of  Old  Burgundy.    By  Frances  Mil- 
toun,  with  many  illustrations  reproduced  from  paint- 
ings made  on  the  spot,  by  Blanche  McManus.  Boston : 
L.  C.  Page  &  Co.     Cloth,  boxed,  $3.00. 
This  is  indeed  a  charming  volume,  redolent  of  the  ro- 
mance of  mediaeval  days.     Its  author  is  already  known 
as  the  author  of  numerous  travel  books,  including  "Ram- 
bles  in   Normandy,"   "The    Cathedrals   and  'Churches   of 
the  Rhine,"   "Italian  Highways   and   Byways,"   etc.     In 
the  present  volume  she  describes  a  country  famed  for  its 
castles  and  chateaux,  weaving  about   them  the  stories  of 
the  past.     The  illustrations,  many  of  them  in  color,   are 
features  of  the  book,  which  is  destined   to  delight   many 
a  travel-lover. 

Guatemala  and  Her  People  of  To-day.    By   Nevin  0.  Win- 
ter.     With    many    illustrations    from    special    photo- 
graphs.     Boston:    L.    C.   Page    &    Co.      Cloth,   boxed, 
$3.00. 
This  is  a  comprehensive  descriptive  work  by  the  author 

of  ''Mexico,  and  Her  People   of  To-day."     To  any  one 

desirous   of   securing   a   good  general   idea    of   Guatemala. 

Honduras    and    the    other    Central    American    slates,    this 


book  offers  distincl  advantages.  It  has  been  written  from 
personal  experience,  supported  by  much  careful  research, 
and  the  author  shows  himself  to  be  in  thorough  sympathy 
witli  his  subject.  The  numerous  illustrations  add  ma- 
terially to  the  interest  of  the  book. 


A  STRONG  NOVEL.  »  ' 

Candles  in  the  Wind.  By  Maud  Diver.  John  Lane  & 
Co.  New  York.  $1.50. 
A  story  of  Anglo-Indian  life,  conceived  and  written  in 
the  same  spirit  of  fine  literary  insight  thai  characterizes 
the  author's  two  preceding  novels — "Captain  Desmond," 
and  "The  Great  Amulet" — of  which  it  is  the  complement. 
Whether  Mrs.  Diver  writes  of  the  everlasting  hills  with 
her  mystery  and  their  fascination — of  the  strenuousness  of 
frontier  life — or  of  the  problems  arising  out  of  the  social 
conditions  of  mixed  races,  her  facile  pen  discourses  with 
equal  power  'and  sympathy.  Her  delineations  of  charac- 
ter are  true  to  the  types  she  has  chosen,  while  the  whole 
scope  of  the  story  reveals  an  aim  and  a  purpose  loyal  to 
the  best  instincts  of  human  nature.  For  charm  and  en- 
lightenment, no  recent  work  of  fiction  on  India  is  better 
worth   reading. 

ENTERTAINING  BOOK  OF  TRAVEL. 

"The  New  North,"  by  Agnes  Deans  Cameron.  I). 
Appleton  &  Co.:  New  York   and   London. 

While  all  eyes  and  the  hopes  of  many  are  turned  to 
the  Canadian  Northwest  as  to  a  land  of  promise,  the 
present  volume  from  the  pen  of  Miss  Cameron  comes  as 
a  welcome  addition  to  the  literature  which  treats  of  the 
deve'opment  of  those  great  stretches  (if  territory  which 
until  recently  were  characterized  as  the  Greal  Lone  Land. 
Possessing  the  qualifications  of  a  good  traveler,  a  close 
observer  and  an  entertaining  story-teller,  a,nd  with  pen 
and  camera  for  tools,  .Miss  Cameron  has  produced  a 
really  tine  book,  to  which  full  justice  lias  been  done  by 
her  publishers  in  its  handsome  binding.  The  story  of  the 
author's  travels  covers  the  whole  distance  from  Winnipeg 
to  the  Arctic  ocean,  and  while  it  is  largely  descriptive  of 
the  adventures  and  incidents  of  the  journey,  it  is  made 
at  the  same  time  the  medium  of  communicating  much  in- 
formation concerning  the  political  and  industrial  de- 
velopment of  the  country.  The  book  reads  like  a  romance, 
yet  carried  with  it  the  conviction  of  reality.  It  is  worthy 
of  extensive  reading. 


REV.    R.   G.  MacBETH,  M.A. 
\V   ho  has  described  Western  Canada   in   the    making. 


37 


BOOK  S  J':  LLER     A  N  D     S  T  A  T  I  O  N  E  R 


A  Review  of  the  Spring  Lists 

The  Offerings  of  the  Various  Publish- 
ers make  up  a  big  Array  of  Books 
of     Varied     and     Unusual    Interest. 


By  February  1  it  is  possible  to  give  a  fairly  accurate 
idea  of  the  books  which  will  be  published  during-  the 
spring  and  of  the  approximate  dates  at  which  they  will 
appear.  That  there  is  a  wide  range  of  choice  in  the 
spring  books  will  be  apparent  after  a  perusal  of  the 
offerings  of  the  various  publishers. 

■  William  Briggs.  ■  ■ 

William  Briggs  presents  an  attractive  spring  list  of 
which  "The  Man  Outside,"  by  Wyndham  Martyn,  and 
"Mary  up  at  Gaffries,"  by  S.  C.  Nethersole,  have  already 
appeared.  These  will  be  followed  by  "The  Nest  of  the 
Sparrowiiawk."  by  Baroness  Orezy,  "in  the  Shade."  by 


H.   deVERE    STACPOOLE 
Author  of   "Pools  of  Silence."    (Copp,  Clark   Co.) 

Valentine     Hawtrey,      and      "Gloria,"     by    G.    Frederick 
Turner. 

Louis  Joseph  Vance's  new  novel  "The  Fortune 
Hunter"  will  be  published  this  season  by  William  Briggs, 
as  will  also  "White  Magic,"'  by  David  Graham  Phillips, 
and  "The  Butterfly-Man,"  by  George  Barr  McCutcheon. 
"The  Mystery  of,  the  Green  Heart,"  by  Max  Pemberton, 
is    another    interesting    announcement. 

Other  new  titles  will  be  "Under  the  Thatch,"  by 
Allen  Kaine,  "Henry  of  Navarre,"  by  May  Wynne,  "Sir 
Walter  Raleigh,"  by  Wm.  Devereux,  "Don  Q's  Love 
Story,"  by  K.  and  Hesketh  Pritchard,  and  Marie 
Corelli's  new  novel,  the  title  of  which  has  not  yet  been 
announced.  They  will  also  bring  out  Nellie  L.  McClung's 
new   story    "The   Second   Chance." 

Cassell  &  Co. 

Cassell  &  Co.  announce  a  long  list  of  fiction  for 
spring  publication.  For  February  they  will  have,  "The 
Rust  of  Rome,"  by  Warwick* Deeping  arid  "The  Goddess 
Girl,"  by  Dorothea  Deakin.  For  March,  "The  Girl  With 
the  Red   Hair,"   by  Max    Pemberton,    "Our  Flat,"    by  A. 

38 


W.  Barrett  and  "The  Morning  Star,"  by  Rider  Hag- 
gard. For  April,  "A  Strong  Man's  Love,"  by  Walter 
Wood,  "The  Road  Back,"  by  Sydney  Warwick,  "The 
Mystery  of  Barry  Ingram,"  by  Annie  S.  Swan,  "The 
Brown  Mask,"  by  Percy  Brcbner.  For  May,  "At  the 
Call  of  Honor,"  by  A.  W.  Marchmont,  "London  and  a 
Girl,"  by  Alfred  Gibson  and  "Fate  and  the  Man,"  by 
T.   Hanshew.    For  June,   "Freda,"   by  Katharine  Tynan. 

Copp,  Clark  Co. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  now  ready  three  of  their 
spring  novels.  These  are  "Pools  of  Silence,"  by  H.  de 
Vere  Stacpoole,  a  story  of  the  Congo  ;  "Cab  No.  44," 
by  R.  F.  Foster,  author  of  the  books  on  bridge  ;  and 
"Two  Women,"  by  the  Baroness  d'Anethan,  wife  of  the 
Belgian  Minister  to  the  Japanese  Court  and  a  sister  of 
H.  Rider  Haggard. 

Other  novels  to  come  along  during  the  next  few 
months  are  "The  Losing  Game,"  by  Will  Payne,  now 
running  serially  in  Saturday  Evening  Post  ;  "A  Petti 
coat  Government,"  (not  a  suffragette  story)  by, Baroness 
Orezy;  "The  Man  Who  Stole  the  Earth,"  by  Holt 
White  ;  "The  Prodigal  Father,"  by  J.  Storer  Clouston  ; 
"The  Englehearts,"  by  E.  V.  Lucas  ;  and  "Queen  She- 
ba's   Ring,"   by   H.    Rider  Haggard. 

They'  are  preparing  cheap  cloth  editions  of  "That  Girl 
Montana,"  by  Marah  Ellis  Ryan  and  "Butternut  Jones," 
by  Tilden  Tilford,  uniform  with  the  75c  edition  of  "Told 
in  the  Hills."  A  new  edition  of  "Northero  Lights"  :s 
also  ready. 

They  announce  a  cheap  re-print  edition  of  four  of 
Parker's  novels,  cloth  bound,  lithographed  wrapper  and 
half-tone  frontispiece.  The  first  to  appear  will  be  "The 
Weavers,"  and  following  it  along  will  likely  be  "The 
Right  of  Way,"  "The  Battle  of  the  Strong,"  and  "Seats 
of  the  Mighty"  in  the  order  named. 

An  important  work  on  aviation  is  to  appear  shortly, 
entitled  "Vehicles  of  the  Air."     This  is  by  Victor  Loug- 
heed   and   contains    550    pages,    140    halftones,    130    draw- 
ings and  working  plans.     ($2.50  net). 

They  are  adding  this  year  two  new  titles  to  the 
Canadian  edition  of  Henty,  viz.,  "In  Greek  Waters"  and 
"St.  Bartholomew's   Eve." 


Among  the  fine 
three  handsomely  i 
"Myths  of  Greece 
men,"    and    "Myth 


import  books  they  are  showing  are 
ust rated  volumes  by  H.  A.  Guerber. 
and  Rome."  "Myths  of  the  Norse- 
and  Legends  of  the  Middle  Ages." 
Other  interesting  illustrated  volumes  are,  "Legends  and 
■Stories  of  Italy  for  Children,"  "A  History  of  Story- 
Telling,"  "The  Child's  English  Literature,"  and  "The 
Book  of  Friendship." 

Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada. 

March  23  is  the  date  fixed  for  the  appearance  of  Win- 
ston Churchill's  new  novel.  "A  Modern  Chronicle."  Ger- 
trude   Atherton's    new    novel. will 

be    ready   on   Feb.   23.    F.   Marion    Crawford's  "The  Un- 
desirable' Governess,"   will   not   appear   until   April. 

James  Lane  Allen's  spring  book,  to  be  called  "The 
Brood  of  the  Eagle,"  is  announced  for  Apri1.  Charles 
G.  D.  Roberts'  book  of  animal  stories.  "Kings  in  Exile." 
is  to  appear  in  February.  "Lost  Face,"  by  Jack  Lon- 
don, is  announced  for  March,  and  Mary  Osgood  Wright's 
new    novel   for    May. 

As  a  companion  to  "The  Book  of  Christmas,"  they 
will    issue    shortly,   "The    Book    of    Easter."    by     Bishop 


B  O  O  K  S  E  L L  E R     A  N  D     S  T  A  T TONER 


Doane,  of  Albany.  "The  Religion  of  the  Chinese  "  is  an- 
other important  volume  for  early  publication.  Its  author 
is  J.  J.  M.  De  Groot.  To  their  Pocket  Classics  they  are 
adding   ''The  Oregon  Trail,"  by  Francis  Parkman. 

The  Macmillan  Co.  are  arranging  for  the  immediate 
publication  of  thirty  re-bound  novels,  embracing  titles  by 
Churchill,  Hocking,  Wister,  Atherton,  Major,  London, 
Trollope,  Herrick,  Mason,  etc.  These  will  compete  with 
the  American   re-bounds. 

McLeod  &  Allen. 

As  a  first  hook,  McLeod  &  Allen  present  "The  King- 
dom of  Slender  Swords."  by  Hallie  Ermine  Rives,  author 
of  "Satan  Sanderson."  They  have  also  ready  "The 
Furnace  of  Gold,"  by  Philip  Verrill  Mighels,  a  western 
story.  1 

This  month  they  issue  a  new  Tracy  book,  entitled 
"Son  of  the  Immortals,**  and  an  ingenious  story  by  the 
author  of  "The  Web  of  the  Golden  Spider,"  Frederick 
Orin  Bartlett,  entitled    "The  Seventh  Noon." 

For  March  they  promise  "Thurston  of  Orchard  Val- 
ley," a  British  Columbia  story  by  Harold  Biudloss;  "The 
Living  Mummy,"  by  Ambrose  Pratt,  and  "Little  Knight 
of  the  X  liar  B,"  by  Mary  K.  Maule.  A  tittle  later  will 
come  "The  Castle  Builders,"  by  Charles  Clark  Munn. 
They  also  have  Frances  de  Wolfe  Fenwick's  book.  "The 
Arch-Satirist." 

McLeod  &  Allen  are  issuing  this  spring  cheap  editions 
of  the  following  popular  novels:  "Whispering  Smith." 
by  Frank  H.  Spearman;  "The  Lightning  Conductor,"  and 
"Princess  Passes."  by  ('.  X.  and  A.  M.  Williamson,  and 
•'Wheel  0'  Fortune."  by  Louis  Tracy. 

Musson  Book  Co. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  has  arranged  for  an  extensive 
list  of  fiction.  Their  outstanding  book  will  be  Mrs. 
Humphry  Ward's  new  Canadian  story,  entitled  "Lady 
Merton,  Colonist.'*  Publication  days  is  May  12.  (Incident- 
ally, they  announce  that  in  May.  1912.  they  will  publish 
by  the  same  author  "Robert  Ellsmere.  Twenty  Years 
After." 

They  have  arranged  for  a  Canadian  edition  of  "Lord 
Loveland  Discovers  America."  by  C.  X.  and  A.  M.  Wil- 
liamson, which  is  now  on  the  market.  "The  Vanity 
Box."  by  Alice  'Stuyvesant,  will  appear  in  March.  Miriam 
Michelson's  new  novel.  "The  Awakening  of  Zojas,"  will 
be   ready  early  in   April. 

This  month  they  will  have  ready  "A  Village  id'  Vaga- 
bonds," by  F.  Berkeley  Smith,  and  "Over  the  Quick- 
sands," by  Anna  Chapin  Ray.  In  March  will  appear 
"The  Illustrious  Prince."  by  E.  P.  Oppenheim,  and  "The 
Personal  Conduct  of  Belinda. "  by  Eleanor  Hoyt  Brainerd. 
0.  Henry's  collection  of  short  stories.  "Strictly  Busi- 
ness," will  come  along  later. 

In  conjunction  with  Harper  &  Brothers  they  will  issue 
on  May  19.  "The  Wild  Olive,"  by  the  author  of  ".The 
Inner  Shrine."  They  will  issue  similarly.  "Going  Some," 
by  Rex  Beach;  "Snow-fire."  by  the 'author  of  ."The 
Martyrdom  of  an  Empress";  "Ship  Dwellers,"  by  Al- 
bert Bigelow  Paine;  "The  Ramrodders,"  by  Holman  Day; 
"Bianca's  Daughter."  by  J.  M.  Forman;  "The  Apple 
Tree  Cottage,"  by  Elinor  Macartney  Lane;  "The 
O'Flynn,"  by-  Justin  Huntly  McCartney,  and  "Hearts 
Contending."  by  George   Schock. 

They  are  issuing  immediately  a  new  edition  of  "The 
City  of  Beautiful  Nonsense,"  by  E.  Temple  Thurston,  and 

39 


a,   new   edition   of  "They    and    I,"   by   Jerome   K.   Jerome. 
"Passers-by,"  by  Anthony  Partridge,  was  cleared  out  on 

publication  last   month  and  a  new    edition  is  now  in. 

They  announce  also  the  immediate  publication  ..I'  Sir 
A.     Cona,n     Doyle's    "The    Crime    of    the    Congo,"    and    A. 

Radclyffe   Dugmore's    "Camera     Adventures    in    African 
Wilds." 

Two  books  b\  Stewart  Edward  While  will  be  pub- 
lished by  the  Musson  Co.— one  in  the  autumn  and  the 
other  in  the  following  spring.  They  are,  "Rules  of  the 
Game"  and  "The  Cabin." 

L.  C.  Page  &  Co.,  Boston. 

L.  C.  Page  &  Co..  who  always  have  a  number  of  books 
on  their  list  of  interest  to  Canada,  announce  for  early 
spring  publication,  four  novels,  two  bonks  of  travel  and 
one  volume  on  art.  The  fiction  includes  "Kilmeny  of  the 
Orchard,"  by  L.  M.  Montgomery;  "Commencement 
Days."  by  Virginia  Church;  "A  Cavalier  of  Virginia," 
by  Theodore  Roberts,  and  "My  Heart  and  Stephanie," 
by  Reginald  Wright  Kaufmann.  For  the  travel  lover, 
they    announce     "In   Unfamiliar    England,"    by    Thomas 


BARONESS  d'ANETHAN 

Author  of  "Two  Women"  and  a  sister  of  H.  Rider  Hageard. 

(Copp,  Clark  Co.) 

1).  Murphy,  ami  "Susan  in  Sicily."  by  Josephine  Tozier. 
For  the  art  lover  they  have  a  new  volume  by  Julia  de  W. 
Addison   on   "The   Boston    Museum   of  Fine    Arts." 

Henry  Frowde. 

Henry  Frowde  announces  a  new  novel  by  W.  J.  Locke 
I'm-  publication  in  May.  This  will  be  entitled,  "Simon 
the  Jester."  He  will  also  publish,  this  spring,  a  new 
story  by  S.  R.  Crockett.  "The  Dew  of  Their  Youth." 

There  will  be  a  new  book  by  R.  B.  Knowles  in  the 
autumn,  the  title  of  which   has  not   yet   been   selected. 

A  remarkable  series  of  reprint  copyright  fiction  is  be- 
ing imported  this  spring.  These  books  are  published  by 
Henry  Frowde.  in  conjunction  with  Hodder  iS:  Stoughton, 
and  are  to  be  called  Frowde's  Si.  Cuthbert's  Series.  They 
are  admirably  printed,  with  attractive  three-color  illus- 
trated jackets,  and  include  tiie  most  popular  works  of 
Joseph  Hocking,  David  Lyall,  Ian  Maclaren,  J.  M.  Barrie, 
John  Oxenham,  Max  Pemberton,  S.  R.  Crockett.  Anthony 
Hope.  etc.  They  can  be  sold  profitably  at  35  cents,  and 
at    this  price  are  remarkable  value. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Forthcoming  Books   by  Canadians 

Two  Notable  Volumes  of  Collected 
Verse  to  Appear  this  Spring — Addi- 
tions to  the  Library  of  Canadian  Mas- 
terpieces. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  announce  a  collected  edition  of 
E.  Pauline  Johnson's  poems.  This  is  the  first  compilation 
of  her  work.    The  poetess  is  now  resident  in  Vancouver. 

The  Macmillan  Co  of  Canada  announce  in  their 
Highways  and  Byways  series,  a  work  by  Clifton  John- 
ston, on  "The  Picturesque  St.  Lawrence,"  which  will  be 
profusely  illustrated. 

"The  Stampeder"  is  the  title  of  a  novel  written  by  S. 
A.  White,  a  school  teacher  of  Snelgrove,  Ontario,  which 
William  Briggs  will  publish  this  spring.  The  scene  is  laid 
for  the  most  part  in  the  Yukon. 


t 


H.   A.    CODY,  M.A. 

Who  has   written   a  striking  novel   of  life    in  the  Yukon. 
k 

McClelland  &  Goodchild,  Toronto,  have  published  a 
small  paper  covered  book  by  James  L.  Hughes,  Public 
School  Inspector,  of  Toronto,  on  the  woman's  suffrage 
question,  entitled  "Equal  Suffrage." 

A  new  novel  by  Rev.  K.  E.  Knowles,  of  Gait,  is  an- 
nounced for  fall  publication. .  Marian  Keith's  new  novel 
will  appear  in  the  early  summer  and  there  is  to  be  a 
small  gift  book  from  Ralph  Connor  for  holiday  trade. 

The  collected  poems  of  Frederick  George  Scott,  one  of 
Canada's  most  noted  poets,  are  to  be  published  by  Ar- 
chibald Constable  &  Co.,  in  England,  and  the  Musson 
Book  Co.,  in  Canada.  The  edition  will  be  ready  imme- 
diately. 

.  D.  W.  Hamilton,  Ph.D.,  of  the  Normal  School,  Fred- 
ericton,-  has  written  a  text-book  on  "Noxious  Weeds  of 
Canada."  which  the  Macmillan  Co.  are  bringing  out  this 
month  in  a  cheap  pocket  edition  for  schools.  It  will  be 
fully  illustrated. 

"Kilmeny  of  the  Orchard,"  is  to  be  the  title  of  Miss 
L.  M.  Montgomery's  new  novel,  announced  by  L.  C.  Page 
&.  Co.,  Boston.  It  is  a  love  story  and  has  for  its  setting 
Prince  Edward  Island.  The  volume  will  be  produced  in 
handsome  form  with  four  full-page  illustrations  in  color 
by  George  Gibbs. 


A  young  Montrealer,  Miss  Frances  De  Wolfe  Fenwick, 
is  represented  on  the  spring  fiction  list.  Her  novel.  "The 
Arch-Satirist,"  will  be  published  in  Canada  by  McLeod 
&  Allen.  Miss  Fenwick  has  done  work  on  the  Montreal 
Herald  but  this  is  her  first  novel.  It  is  understood  that 
much  of  the  action  of  the  story  takes  place  in  Montreal. 

William  Briggs,  Toronto,  announces  a  "find"  in  "A 
Story  of  Yuku."  a  Japanese  tale,  by  Dorothy  Dean  Tate, 
of  Toronto,  which  will  bo  published  in  March.  Miss  Tate, 
who  is  a  granddaughter  of  the  late  Judge  Dean,  of  Lind- 
say, and  a  cousin  of  Rev.  Dr.  Meacham,  of  Japan,  is  only- 
twenty  years  of  age,  but  she  has  produced  an  exceptional 
book. 

The  p'ace  of  the  Yukon  in  Canadian  literature  is  be- 
coming- more  and  more  noticeable.  'A  striking  novel  en- 
titled "God's  Frontiersman,"  with  scene  laid  in  this  ter- 
ritory, is  announced  by  William  Briggs.  The  author,  Rev. 
H.  A.  Cody,  MA.,  has  been  stationed  at  White  Horse  for 
the  past  eight  years,  and  is  thoroughly  familiar  with  the 
ground.  He  is  a  personal  friend  of  R.  W.  'Service,  who 
was  his  vestry  clerk. 

The  1910  edition  of  that  popular  little  booklet,  "5,000 
Facts  About  Canada,"  will  soon  be  issued  from  the  press 
and  ready  for  the  trade.  An  added  feature  of  value  will 
be  "100  Facts  About  the  Empire."  Mr.  Frank  Yeigh  is 
editing  the  publication,  the  Canadian  Facts  Publishing 
Co.,  667  Spadina  Avenue,  Toronto,  being  the  publishers. 
Nearly  ten  thousand  of  last  year's  edition  were  sold,  the 
copies  finding  their  way  around  the  wofld. 

Theodore  Roberts,  who  is  known  of  course  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  talented  Roberts  family  of  New  Brunswick,  lias 
a  new  novel  on  the  spring  list  of  L.  C.  Page  iV  Co.,  Bos- 
ton, entitled  "A  Cavalier  of  Virginia."  It  is  a  story  of 
the  old  chivalric  days  of  colonial  Virginia,  although  part 
of  the  action  takes  place  upon  the  high  seas  and  the  scene 
shifts  for  a  short  time  to  England,  Spain  and  the  unset- 
tled parts  of  North  America.  The  publishers  think  this  is 
the  liuesl    story   Mr.  Roberts  has  yet    produced. 

An  historical  work  promised  for  this  spring,  which 
will  have  a  considerable  interest  for  Canadians  is  "The 
Story  of  Pierre  La  Moyne,  Sieur  DTberville,"  which  has 
heen  written  by  Charles  B.  Reed,  a  brother  of  Myrtle 
Reed,  the  novelist,  and  a  resident  of  Chicago.  Sieur 
DTberville  was  a  conspicuous  figure  in  the  early  days  of 
French  Canada,  carrying  the  flag  of  France  to  Hudson 
Bay  and  the  Gulf  of  Mexico.  He  was  the  founder  of 
French  Louisiana.  The  book  is  to  be  published  by  A.  C. 
McCTurg  &  Co.,  Chicago.     ($2.00  net.) 

The  series  of  little  Canadian  Masterpieces,  which  the 
Musson  Book  Co.  inaugurated  last  fall  with  the  publica- 
tion of  five  small  volumes  compiled  by  Lawrence  J.  Bur- 
pee, of  Ottawa,  is  to  be  further  enriched  this  spring  by 
the  addition  of  "Canada,  my  Home  and  Other  Poems," 
by  Grant  Balfour,  "Madame  Janvier's  Church,"  by  Mary 
E.  Hiekson,  "A  Century  of  Canadian  Sonnets,"  "Humor 
of  the  North,"  "The  Romance  of  Canadian  Towns," 
"Highways  and  Byways  in  Canada,"  "Canadian  Pathfind- 
ers," and  "Canadian  Eloquence,"  all  by  Lawrence  J. 
Burpee. 

A  little  volume,  which  will  have  considerable  interest 
in  Canada,  has  just  been  issued  by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 
It  is  entitled  "Our  Lady  of  the  Sunshine  and  her  Inter- 
national Visitors,"  and  contains  a  series  of  impressions 
written  by  representatives  of  the  various  delegates  at- 
'  tending  the  quinquennial  meeting  of  the  International 
Council  of  Women  held  in  Toronto  last  June.  Lady  Aber- 
deen has  edited  the  book,  which  is  well  illustrated.  The 
same  publishers  will  issue  shortly  a  volume  containing 
transactions  of  the  meeting,  also  edited  bj  the  Countess 
of  Aberdeen. 
40 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  Canadian  Monthly  List  of  Books 

A  Record  of  Books  Published  in 
Canada,  Books  by  Canadian  Authors, 
etc.,  Issued  in  January  and  Early  in 
February. 

A  (*)  placed  before  a  title  indicates  that  the  book  has 
been  printed  in  Canada.    Two  asterisks  (**)  indicate  that 
the  book  has  also  !been  copyrighted  at  Ottawa. 
Aberdeen,   Countess  of.     Our  Lady  of  the   Sunshine  and 

her  International  Visitors.     Edited  by  Lady  Aberdeen. 

Toronto:    Copp,    Clark.      February.      Paper   boards,    35 

cents. 
An  interesting  little  collection  of  impressions  written 
by  representatives  of  the  various  delegations  attending  the 
quinquennial  meeting-  of  the  International  'Council  of 
Women,  Toronto,  June,  1909.  Illustrated. 
*  "Anderson,  Rev.  J.  D.  Reminiscences  and  Incidents  con- 
nected with  the  Life  and  Pastoral   Labors  of  the  Rev. 

John  Anderson.    Edited  by  his  son,  Rev.  J.  D.  Anderson, 

B.A.,   Beaunarnois,    Que.      Toronto:      William     Briggs. 

January.     310  pages,  5V'zxSy8.    Cloth,  $1.25  net. 
Askew,  Alice  and  Claude.    The  Sporting  Chance.    London, 

Melbourne   and   Toronto:   Ward,   Lock   &    Co.   January. 

Cloth,  $1.25. 
A  racing  story,  with  the  Derby  at  the  beginning  and 
at  the  finale.  The  hero,  who  is  disowned  by  his  straight- 
laced  father  for  attending  the  Derby,  is  helped  by  an 
American  friend.  He  makes  a  wager  with  a  young  wo- 
man that  within  live  years  he  shall  win  the  race.  The 
story  recounts  how  he  wins  this  wager,  and  the  large 
part  the  girl  plays  in  it  all.  For  those  who  like  a  good 
tale  of  the  turf,  here  is  an  opportunity  for  them  to  satisfy 
their  desire. 
Bartlett,  Frederick  Orim.     The  Seventh  Noon.     Toronto: 

MeLeod  &  Allen.  February.  Cloth,  $1.12.'). 
A  rather  remarkable  situation  is  created  early  in  the 
book.  The  hero,  weary  of  a  life  of  struggle  for  the  attain- 
ment nl'  his  dreams,  takes  a  drug,  which  he  believes  will 
end  his  life  in  precisely  seven  days,  but  will  enable  him 
to  enjoy  life  during  the  week.  He  takes  all  his  money  and 
prepares  to  live  on  the  millionaire  sca.le  in  the  interim,  but 
bargains  with  himself  to  help  any  one  who  may  need  his 
assistance.  He  is  thrown  in  contact  with  a  young  woman 
in  distress  and  in  his  endeavors  to  aid  her  falls  in  love 
with  her.  Fortunately  the  drug  does  not  possess  the  power 
its  inventor  claimed  for  it  and,  instead  of  dying,  the  hero 
lives  to  marry  the  heroine. 
D'Anethan,   Baroness.      Two     Women.     Toronto:      Copp, 

Clark.     February.     Cloth,  $1.25. 
De  Groot,  J.  J.  M.     The  Religion  of  the  Chinese.    Toronto: 

Macmillan.     January.     Cloth,  $1.25  net. 
Fowler,  Ellen  Thornycroft.     Miss  Fallowfield 's  Fortune. 

Toronto:  Cassell  &  Co.    January.     New  paper  cover  edi- 
tion.    30  cents  net. 
Goodwin,   Wilder.      The     Up-Grade.      Toronto:      Musson. 

January.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
The  hero,  Stephen  Loring,  who  has  thrown  away  every 
advantage  of  birth,  education  and  friends,  is  started  on 
the  up-grade  by  his  love  for  the  daughter  of  the  man- 
ager of  the  'San  Quentin  mines,  and  he  finally  wins  his 
way  to  the  top  in  a  spirited  enough  manner  to  make  a 
vigorous  tale. 
Hardy,  Thomas.    Time's  Laughingstoeks,  and  Other  Verses. 

Toronto:  Macmillan.    January.     Cloth,  $1.50  net 
Hill,  W.  Henry,  Arthur  F.  and  Alfred  E.     Antonio  Stradi- 


vari, His  Life  and   Work.     Toronto:    .Macmillan.     Janu- 
ary.    Cloth,  $2.50. 
-Hughes,  James  L.    Equal  Suffrage.    Toronto:  McClelland 
&  G-oodehild.     January.     68  pages,  6^x4%-     Paper,  25 

cents. 
Martin,  Wyndham.  The  .Man  Outside.  Toronto:  William 
Briggs.  January.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
Having  found  thai  the  girl  to  whom  he  is  engaged  is 
in  love  with  another  man,  and  has  been  forced  into  the 
engagement  by  her  mother.  Lord  Mountcastle  decides  that 
he  will  step  outside  his  class  for  a  while  and  be  accepted 
for  himself,  not  for  his  title  and  fortune.  He  meets  an 
American  girl  and  they  fall  in  love  with  each  other,  but 
just  as  they  become  engaged  the  girl  mysteriously  dis- 
appears. In  finding  his  ladylove  Mountcastle  has  to  deal 
with  an  unscrupulous  Wall  Street  man,  and  himself  com- 
mits what  is  practically  piracy  on  the  high  seas. 
Mighels,  Philip  Verrill.  The  Furnace  of  Gold.  Toronto: 
MeLeod  &  Allen.  January.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
A  story  of  life  in  a  western  mining  camp,  full  of  ex- 
citing incidents  and  hairbreadth  escapes.  The  heroine,  an 
eastern  girl,  who  comes  out  west  to  meet  her  brother, 
early  encounters  the  hero,  a  stalwart  miner.  Escaped 
.convicts  and  other  villains  take  a  hand  in  the  plot  and 
there  is  sufficient  excitement  to  keep  a  reader  awake  till 
the  small  hours. 

Nethersole,    S.   C.     Mary   up  at    Gaft'ries.     Toronto:   Wil- 
liam  Briggs.      January.      Cloth.   $1.25. 
Parkman,   Francis.      The   Oregon    Trail.     Pocket   Classics 

Series.  Toronto:  Macmillan.  January.  25  cents  net. 
Partridge,  Anthony.  Passers-by.  Toronto:  Musson.  Janu- 
ary. (Moth.  $1.25. 
The  heroine  of  "Passers-by"  is  a  streef  singer,  Chri>- 
tine,  who  comes  to  London  accompanied  by  Ambrose 
Drake,  a  hunchback,  with  a  piano  and  a  monkey.  The 
fortunes  of  these  two  are  strangely  linked  with  those  of 
an  English  statesman,  the  Marquis  of  Ellingham,  who  in 
his  youth  has  led  a  wild  and  criminal  career  in  Paris  as 
the  leader  of  a  band  of  thieves  and  gamblers,  the  Bla,ck 
Foxes.  The  mystery  surrounding  (he  girl  is  only  solved 
after  much  trial  and  danger  are  encountered  by  all  who 
are  interested  in  her. 

Pemberton,  Max.  White  Walls.  London.  Melbourne  and 
Toronto:  Ward,  Lock  &  Co.  January.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
Max  Pemberton  has  here  gone  to  the  salt  mines  of 
Rabka,  in  Hungary,  for  a  scene  for  his  novel.  These  won- 
derful mines,  of  tremendous  extent,  provide  ample  field 
for  a  thrilling  romance.  The  owner  of  the  mines,  the 
Countess  riusia,  is  a  young  woman,  who  at  the  opening 
of  the  story  comes  to  her  inheritance  from  a,  convent  in 
Vienna.  She  is  immediately  immersed  in  the  labor  prob- 
lems which  vex  the  community,  and  comes  into  touch  with 
the  hero,  who  is  a  leader  of  the  people.  There  are  many 
characters  ami  much  plot  interest. 
Phelps,   W.   L.     Essays  on   Modern   Novelists.     Toronto: 

Macmillan.     January.     Cloth,  $1.50  net. 
"Rita."     The  House  Called  Hurrish.     Toronto:  Macmil- 
lan.    January.     Cloth,  $1.00. 
Smith,  Samuel  G.     Religion  in  the  Making.    Toronto:  Mac- 
millan.    January.     Cloth.  $1.25  net. 
Stacpoole,  H.  de  Vere.     Pools  of  Silence.     Toronto:  Copp, 

Clark.     February.     Cloth.  $1.25. 
Weyman,  Stanley  J.     From  the  Memoirs  of  a  Minister  of 
France.     Toronto:  Cassell  &  Co.     January.     New  paper 
cover  edition.     30  cents   net. 
Williams,  C.  F.  A.     The  Rythm  of  Modern  Music.  Toronto: 

Macmillan.     January.     Cloth,  $1.50  net. 
Winchester,  C.  T.     A  Group  of  English   Essayists  of  the 
Early  Nineteenth  Century.     Toronto:    M.-o-milhin.   Janu- 
ary.'   Cloth.  $1.5(1   net. 


41 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Best  Sellers  During  January 

Reports  from  the  Leading  Centres  of  Trade 
in  Canada,  with  a  Summary  Showing 
the     Most    Popular     Books    of    the     Month. 

Owing  id  an  oversight  last  month  it  was  stated  in 
several  reports  that  the  publishers  of  "The  Attic  Guest" 
were  the  Westminster  Co.  This,  of  course,  should  have 
been  Henry  Frowde. 

Belleville. 

1  Foreigner.,   Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  John  Marvel.    T.  X.  Page.    Copp. 

3  Attic  Guest.     R.   E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

4  Old  Rose  and  Silver.     Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 

5  Calling  of  Dan   Matthews.     H.   B.   Wright.     McLeod. 
(i  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Brantford. 

1  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

2  Lords  of  High  Decision.    Meredith  Nicholson.    Musson. 

3  Woodcarvers   of  Lympus.     Waller.     Musson. 

4  Girl  of  the  Limberlost.     G.  Porter.     Dou'bleda.y. 

5  Florentine  Frame.     Elizabeth  Robins.     Moffat. 
G  Cardillac.     Robert  Barr.     McLeod. 

Calgary. 

1  Sheriff  of  Dyke  Hole.    Ridgwell  Cullum.    Copp. 

2  It  Can  Never  Happen  Again.   Win.  De  Morgan.  Frowde. 
Bella  Donna.     R.  Hichens.     Copp. 
John  Marvel.  Assistant..   T.  N.  Page.     Copp. 
Fmily  Fox  Seton.    F.  H.  Burnett.     Copp. 
Anne  of  Avonlea,.     L.  M.  Montgomery.    Page. 

Charlottetown. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 
Stradella.     F.  M.   Crawford.     Macmillan. 
Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 
i 
Chatham. 

Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

White  Sister.     F.  M.   Crawford.     Macmillan, 

John  Marvel,     f.  N.  Page.     Copp. 

Bella  Donna.     R.  Hich'ens.     Copp. 

Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

Guelph. 

1  Ballads  of  a.  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

•J  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

3  Calling  of  Dan    Matthews.     H.   B.   Wright.      McLeod. 

4  New  North.     A.  D.  Cameron.     Appleton. 

5  -Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

6  John  Marvel.     T.  N.  Page.     Copp. 

Hamilton. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

3  Actions  and  Reactions.    Rudyard  Kipling.    Macmillan. 

4  When  a  Man  Marries.     M.  A.  Reinhart.     McLeod. 

5  It  Never  Can  Happen  Again.     De  Morgan.     Frowde. 
(i  OKI  Wives'  Tale.     A.  Bennett.     McLeod. 


Kingston. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.   E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

3  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

4  Old  Rose  and  Silver  Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 

5  John  Marvel.     T.  N.  Page.     Copp. 

6  White   Sister.     F.   M.   Crawford.     Macmillan. 

Moncton. 

1  Songs  of  a  Sourdough.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

2  Danger  Mark.     R.  W.  Chambers.     McLeod. 

3  Pool  of  Flame.     L.  J.  Vance.     Briggs. 

4  Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.     Westminster. 

5  Three  Keys.     F.   Ormond.     McLeod. 

6  Bella  Donna.     R.  Hichens.     Copp. 

Montreal. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

3  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

4  White  Sister.     F.  M.  Crawford.    Macmillan. 

5  City  of  Beautiful  Nonsense.     E.  T.  Thurston.     Musson. 

6  Tyrant.     Mrs.  De  La  Pasture. 

Ottawa. 

1  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

2  Foreigner.      Ralph    Connor.      Westminster. 

3  Anne  Veronica.     H.  G.  Wells.     Copp. 

4  Stradella.     F.  M.  Crawford.     Macmillan. 

5  Furnace  of  Gold.     P.  V.  Mighels.     McLeod. 

6  Lord  Loveland  Discovers  America.  Williamson.  Musson. 

Peterborough. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

3  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

4  White  Sister.     F.  M.   Crawford.     Macmillan. 

5  Northern  Lights.     Gilbert  Parker.     Copp. 

6  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

Stratford. 

1  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

2  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     R.  W.  Service.     Briggs. 

3  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

4  Inner  Shrine.     Anonymous.     Musson. 

•">     Foreigner.     Ralph.     Connor.     Westminster. 

St.  Catharines. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  Truxton  King.    G.  B.  McCutcheon.    Briggs. 

3  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles.     Frowde. 

4  Bella  Donna.     R.  Hichens.     Copp. 

5  Anne  Veronica.     H.  G.  Wells.     Copp. 

6  Lords  of  High  Decision.     Meredith  Nicholson.     Musson. 

Toronto. 

1  White  Walls.     Max  Pemberton.     Ward. 

2  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.     H.  E.  Rives.     McLeoo. 

3  Beechy.     B.  Von  Hut  ten.     Musson. 

4  Furnace  of  Gold.     P.  V.  Mighels.     McLeod. 

5  .Up  Grade.     Wilder  Goodwin.     Musson. 

6  'White  Prophet.    Hall  Caine.    McLeod. 

Winnipeg. 

1  Foreigner.     Ralph  Connor.     Westminster. 

2  'Suitable  Child.     Norman  Duncan.     Frowde. 

3  Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.     Harper. 

4  Friendship  Village  Love  Stories. '  Zona  GaJe.   Macmillan. 

5  Susannah  and  Sue.    K.  D.  Wiguin.    Briggs. 

6  Actions  and  Reactions.     Rudyard  Kipling.     Macmillan. 


42 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  l<     A  N  I )     S  T  A  T  1  O  \  E  \i 


Canadian   Summary. 

Points. 

1  Foreigner.-     Ralph   Connor    10!) 

2  Attic  Guest.     R.  E.  Knowles    57 

3  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.   M.   Montgomery '   57 

4  Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.     K.  \V.  Service 30 

0  Silver  Horde.      Rex   Beach    V. 2S 

6     John    Marvel.      T.   N.    Page 23 

United   States   Summary, 

(As   Reported   by   the   American    Bookman.) 

Points. 

1  The   Foreigner.     By   Ralph    Connor    .223 

2  Little  Sister  Snow.     By  Frances  Little 180 

3  John  Marvel,  Assistant.  By  Thomas  Nelson  Page.  162 
i     When  a  Man  Marries.     By  M.  R.  Rinehart "  156 

5  Truxton  King.     By  G.  B.  McCutcheon 119 

6  Silver  Horde.     By  Rex  Beach 116 


Copyrights  Recorded  in  January 

A  List  of  Books  Entered  During  the 
Month  at  the  Copyright  Branch  of  the 
Department  of  Agriculture,  Ottawa. 

21811.  Utopian  Snap  Shots.  By  A.  J.  Kappele.  A. 
J.  Kappele,  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  30th  Decem- 
ber,  1909. 

21833.  Jean  Bateese  at  the  Carnival.  By  W.  M. 
MacKeracher.  W.  M.  MacKeracher,  Montreal,  31st  De- 
cember,  1909. 

21863.  Thin  Ice.  By  Isabel  Ecclestone  MacKay. 
(Temporary  Copyright.)  Isabel  Ecclestone  Mai-Kay.  Van- 
couver, British  Columbia,    3rd   January,   1910. 

21877.  The  Amber  Army  and  Other  Poems.  By  Wil- 
liam T.  Allison.  William  Talbot  Allison,  Middlefteld, 
Connecticut,   U.S.A.,   7th   January. 

21892.  All  Else  in  the  World.  Alexander  M.  Ken- 
nedy, Toronto,   12th   January. 

21896.  Spalding's  Official  Canadian  Hockey  Gufde, 
1909-10.  Canadian  Sports  Publishing  Co.,  Limited, 
Montreal,    13th    January. 

'21904.  Appendix  to  the  Annual  Financial  Review, 
November,  1909.  (Book.)  William  Robert  Houston,  To- 
ronto,   15th   January. 

21905.  Bank  Directory  of  Canada,  January,  1910. 
(Book.)  William  Robert  Houston,  Toronto.  15th  Janu- 
ary. 

21917.  Canadian  Art  Club  Catalogue,  1910.  The  Can- 
adian Art  Club,   Toronto,    19th   January. 

21918.  The  Ontario  Weekly  Reporter  and  Index 
Digest.  May-December,  1909.  Edited  by  Edward  B. 
Brown,  K.C.,  and  Walter  E.  Lear.  Volume  XIV.  The 
Carswell  Company,  Limited,  Toronto,  19th  January. 

21937.  Haliburton.  ("Sam  Slick.")  A  Sketch  and 
Bibliography.  Second  Edition.  By  A.  H.  O'Brien.  M.A. 
Arthur  Henry  O'Brien,   Ottawa,   21st   January. 

21938.  The  Canada  Law  Journal,  1909.  Volume 
XLV.  Editor  :  Henry  O'Brien,  K.C.  Associate  Editor  : 
C.  B.  Labatt.  Arthur  Henry  O'Brien,  Ottawa,  21st 
January. 

21939.  Review  of  Current  English  Cases.  Published 
in  "The  Canada  Law  Journal."  (Temporary  Copyright.) 
Arthur  Henry   O'Brien,    Ottawa,    21st    January. 

21942.  Canadian  Civics.  By  R.  S.  Jenkins,  M.A. 
Saskatchewan  Edition.  The  Copp,  Clark  Company, 
Limited,   Toronto,    24th    January. 


21915.    Tide   Charts   for    1910.     Applying    to    Vane 
ver    and    Adjacent    Waters,    With    International    Rule 
the  Road,  etc.    Bayfield  &  Archibald,   Vancouvei     !'■> 
Columbia,    21th    January. 

21946.    Reminiscence.,   and    [ncidents   Connected     with 
the  Life  and  Pastoral   Labors  of  The  Reverend  John  An 
derson.     Edited   by    His  Son  :    Rev.    .J.    1).    Anderson.    B.A. 
J.  D.   Anderson,  Bcauharnois,   Que.,   24th    Janua] 

21953.     The     Assessor's    Guide.     By    James    Morrison 
Glenn,   K.C,   LL.B.    The   Municipal    World.    Limited,   St 
Thomas,    Ont.,    25th    January. 

21951.    The  Principles  of  Argument.   Bj    Edwin    B 
LL.B.     Edwin  Bell,   Toronto,   25th   January. 


]  205 


INTERIM  COPYRIGHTS. 

The      Golden      Rose    of    Arlington;    or,    \\  ■ 


Love     Leads.    By  Nellie   \V    Borden.     Nellie   W.    Borden 
Digby,  Nova  Scotia,   7th   January. 

1206.  Troublous  Times  in  Canada.  A  History  of  thi 
Fenian  Raids  of  1866  and  1870.  By  John  A.  Macdonald 
John  A.   Macdonald,   Toronto,    10th    January. 

1210.  Ungava.  La  Nuit  dans  de  NTord.  An  our  Tin 
eotte   Genest,   Ottawa,    13  Janvier. 

1211.    A.  E.  Ou.  Hem?  Revue  d'Actualites  en    3   AH.- 
et   10   Tableaux     precedes"    d'un     prologue.      Par    Ernesl 
Tremblay    et    Georges    Dumestre.      Ernest    Tremblay     & 
Georges   Dumstre,  Montreal,  15  Janvier. 

1212.  The  Union  Jack  Explained.  Henry  Bell.  Mon 
treal,   17th  January. 

1213.  Les    Aventures    d'un      Acadien.       Drame 
Actes.       Par   Reverend    Monsieur    Preville.    Rev.    M.    Pre- 
ville,    St.      Polycarpe,      comte    de      Soulanges,     Que.,    25 
Janvier. 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

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Limited.       MONTREAL. 


fllTYOL 


TYPEWRITER* 

CARBON 


j^2»gt5r;a^v<ga& 


It  is  our  line"  that  must  forever  impress 
tself  among  the  fastidious  users  of  Type. 
writer  Ribbons  and 
Carbon  Papers,  as  it  is 
the  aristocrat  of  its  kind. 

Our   goods   are    distinguished    for 

their  Richness  of  quality  and 

the  possession  of  every 

required    property. 


BRANCHES— New  York,  N.Y  ,  280  Broadway 
Chicago,  111.,  200  Monroe  Sr. 
London,  7  &  8  Dyers  Bldg.,  Holborn,  E.C. 

AGENCIES— In  every  part  of  the  world 

In  every  city  of  prominence 


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RovEnrgiQH 


^0X  TYPEWRITER "B^ 
!|ftOYE  ITSELF  SV&0 
Wm.  OTHER  BRANPf 


MITT  AG  ■&  VOLGER,  Inc.  g£<&°E 

Principal  Office  and  Factories,  Park  Ridge,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 


MANUFACTURERS  FOR  THE  TRADE  ONLY. 


I 


Mwmm 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


PAPETERIES 


r  ^HERE  is  always  a  certain  amount  of 
^  anxiety  to  the  manufacturer  when  intro- 
ducing an  entirely  new  range  of  goods.  This 
applies  especially  to  such  seasonable  lines  as 
Holiday  Papeteries,  but  we  are  pleased  to  say 
the  result  of  our  efforts  as  now  being  shown  in 
this  year's  line  is  more  than  satisfactory.  By 
the  study  of  harmonious  coloring,  beauty  in 
richness,  utility,  and  dependable  quality,  we 
have  pleased  the  most  severe  critic. 

These  Papeteries  are  unique  in  shape  and  dainty 
in  design,  even  in  the  low  priced  lines.  They 
are  worthy  of  their  name,  the 

"DE  LUXE"  SERIES 

The  increasing  demand  for  this  class  of 
"  Holiday  Gift  "  goods  is  deserving  of  serious 
thought.  May  we  suggest  that  you  see  our 
samples  before  buying  ? 

Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Limited 

Manufacturing  Stationers  TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


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Manufacturers  of 
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and 

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for  all  kinds 
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Rules,  Etc. 


^THE  BEST  CLUB  CARD 

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IMPERIAL 
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This  qualitv  is  highly  recommended  for 
Clubuse.  beinj  manufactured  from  carefully 
selected  material  and  rendered  absolutely 
waterproof  by  a  special  process. 


CHAS.  GOODALL  &  SON.  LTD.,  LONDON.  N.W. 


Manufacturers  of 
Bridge 
Whisl 
Poker 
Besique 
Cribbage  Sets 
Dummy  Bridge 
Etc. 


GOODALL'S 

=ENGLISH= 

Playing  Cards 

IMPERIAL  CLUB  SERIES 

50  Regulation  backs.     THE  MOST  ENDUR- 
ABLE and  best  25c.  card  made. 

No.  1909  EXTRA  LARGE  INDEXES 

For  Bridge,  25c.        Also  made  in  Linette,  35c. 

LINETTE  PLAYING  CARDS 

The  Card  of  the  Future.     Linen  Finish  ;  latest 
production  ;  no  misdeals ;  easy  shuffling,  35c. 

SALON,  SULTAN,  CLAN  TARTAN  SERIES 
Handsomely  boxed ;  gold  edges ;  exclusive 
and  dainty;  picture  backs;  large  assortment,  50c. 

For  Samples  and  Ou°tati°ns,  also  Designs  for  Special  Club 
and  Advertising  Cards  write 


AUBREY  O.  HURST 

REPRESENTATIVE 

ORDER  THROUGH  YOUR  JOBBER 


24  SCOTT  ST. 
TORONTO 


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BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


ACCOUNT  BOOKS 

PEERLESS-STANDARD  QUALITY 


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New  Style    Flat   Opening 


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Half  Red  Russia,  Green  Cloth  Sides.      Lettered  on  Side.     All  Thicknesses. 


Every  Style,  Description,  Style  and  Pattern,  make  and  value  unsurpassed 


Full  Bo^nd  Fnds  and  Bands 
300  to   1000  Pages 


Ledgers,  Journals,  Cash  Books, 

Day  Books,  Every  Size  from  the 

Largest  Ledger  to  the  Smallest 

Vest  Pocket  Memorandum. 

NEW  STYLE  SHORT  DEMY  LEDGER 

150  to  500  pages,  14  x  10     . 


Half  Leather  Extra, 
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MEMORANDUM 
and  PRICE    BOOK. 

1-P  LOOSE  LEAF 

MEMO,  and  PRICE 
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an  exceptional  LARCE 
LINE 


NEW  PRIVATE  LEDGERS, 
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Large  8vo.  Full  Grained  Seal 
9k  x  6—300  and  400  Pages 


LOOSE   LEAF   LEDGERS,  Binders  and  Specialties,  Trial  Balance  Books,  Dockets, 

Notes,  Drafts,  Receipts,  Etc. 

Paper,  Binding  and  Make  of  the  Highest  Order.  '  Established  In  Toronto  1846. 

BROWN  BROS.,"**. 


Wholesale  and  Manufacturing  Stationers, 


51.53  Wellington  Street  West,  Toronto 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Gages 
fioliday  Gift  Papeteries 


easfon  191041 


The  consensus  of  opinion  from  the  stationery 
trade  in  every  province  of  the  Dominion  is  that  for 
style,  quality  price  and  selling  points  our  Holiday 
Gift  Papeteries  for  last  season  were  head  and  should- 
ers above  any  Canadian  or  imported  lines.  This 
naturally  pleased  us  and  gave  us  the  incentive 
to  excel  our  own  record  and  we  have 
done  it. 

Our  line  of  Holiday  Gift  Papeteries  for 
the  season  1910-11  is  as  much  ahead  of  our 
last  season's  line  as  that  was  ahead  of  all 
others. 

In  this  our  great  "Made  in  Canada"  line  we  have  provided  for  every 
class  of  trade.      It  [includes  all  grades  from  the  modest  Gift  Papeterie  to   the 

most  elegant,  luxurious  boxes.  The  styles  are  so  varied  in  design 
and  original  in  conception,  and  the  values  so  good,  that 
we  fear  no  competition. 

We  appreciate  every  order  that  has  been  given  us  in  the  past.  Your 
interest  and  ours  are  identical  and  we  ask  you  to  wait  and  see  our  new  samples 
before  placing  any  orders  for  Holiday  Gift  Papeteries.  Our  travellers  are  now 
on  the  road  with  them. 

W.  J.   GAGE  &  CO.,  Limited 

Manufacturing   Stationers  and  Paper  Makers  TORONTO,  ONT 

Paper  Mills  at  St.  Catharines 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Watermarisgf^TlFouTitcvm  Pen 


THE  COMPLETE  STANDARD  LINE 

Special  Points  for  Special  Purposes 

The  constantly  increasing  use  of  fountain  pens  shows  the  facilities  and  ingenuity  of  the  L.  E. 
Waterman  Company,  Limited,  to  be  of  great  assistance  to  dealers  in  getting  the  business.  Banks 
discard  all  old-fashioned  equipment  and  use  our  bookkeepers'  pens  entirely ;  corporations  equip 
all  their  Stenographers  with  special  pens;  business  houses  use  our  Manifold  pens  for  their  billing 
systems;  in  fact,  everyone  who  writes,  either  for  business  or  social  purposes,  can  be  supplied.  The 
amount  of  business  to  be  done  depends  only  upon  the  effort  dealers  make  to  obtain  it  and  upon 
their  co-operation  with  us.     (Standard  Safety  and  Self-Filling). 


SMOOTH 
POINT 


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FINE 

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TURNED-UP-POINT  BOOKKEEPERS 


STENOGRAPHERS  MANIFOLD 


Waterman's  Ideal  Ink 

The  perfection  of  this  ink  marked  the  first  necessity  for  as  perfect  an  ink 

For  All  Writing  Purposes 

The  best  for  fountain  pens,  the  best  for  general  use.  Advertised 
extensively  for  its  many  superior  qualities  and  used  largely  in  offices  in 
the  large  bottles.  Small  sizes  for  individual  use.  Display  this  ink  and  it 
will  sell  itself. 

Write  for  catalogues  and  information 

L.  E.  Waterman  Company,  Ltd 

136  St.  James   Street 

MONTREAL 


New  York  London 


Paris 


poofeseller  anb  Stationer 


anb  Cahabian  Jgetosbealer 


A  monthly  journal  devoted  to  the  interests 
of  the   Bookselling  and  Stationery  Trades 


Subscription:    One  Dollar  a  Year 
Single  copies     :       :     Ten  Cents 


Vol.  XXVI 


TORONTO,  CANADA,  MARCH,  1910 


Editorial    Comment. 

The  work  of  getting  the  book  trade  thoroughly  organ- 
ized has  started  in  earnest.  At  a  meeting  of  the  executive 
of  the  Canadian  Association,  held  in  Toronto  on  Feb- 
ruary 16,  A.  H.  Jarvis,  of  Ottawa,  vice-president,  volun- 
teered to  undertake  the  work  of  lining  up  the  trade 
throughout  Ontario.  He  started  out  on  his  tour  of  the 
province  on  March  9,  and  during  the  next  few  weeks  he 
will  call  on  the  trade  in  all  the  larger  centres.  It  might 
as  well  be  understood  at  the  outset  that  Mr.  Jarvis  is  do- 
ing this  work  without  any  remuneration  whatever,  and  it 
stands  to  reason  that  his  personal  sacrifices  should  be 
recognized  by  the  trade  and  his  visits  be  made  satisfactory 
in  every  respect.  The  association,  of  course,  is  covering 
his  traveling  expenses,  but  none  the  less  the  time  and 
effort  he  is  expending  on  behalf  of  the  booksellers  and  sta- 
tioners are  deserving  of  the  heartiest  thanks  of  all. 


The  prosperity  attending  the  book  and  stationery  trade 
of  Canada  at  the  present  time  is  abundantly  evidenced  by 
the  fact  that  in  this  number  of  The  Bookseller  and  Sta- 
tioner we  publish  pictures  of  three  new  buildings,  which 
have  been  erected  by  Canadian  houses.  The  Copp.  Clark 
Company's  new  factory  now  in  operation  is  one  of  the 
most  up-to-date  manufacturing  plants  in  Canada.  The 
fine  new  warehouse  of  McFarlaue.  Son  &  Hodgson  in 
Montreal  attests  to  the  growing  importance  of  the  whole- 
sale stationery  business  in  the  east.  The  handsome  build- 
ing of  the  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada  illustrates  the  pro- 
portions to  which  the  book  business  has  expanded.  We 
are  naturally  proud  of  the  progress  shown  and  are  mure 
than  ever  convinced  that  Canada's  prosperity  is  sub- 
stantial. 


Our  present  number  deserves  a  word  or  two  of  com- 
ment. It  is  the  largest  Spring  Special  we  have  as  yet 
published.  It  is  also  a  turning  point  in  our  history.  The 
department  idea  has  again  been  adopted  and  we  have 
started  a  number  of  sections  devoted  to  the  various  out- 
standing lines  carried  by  the  retail  trade.    Notable  among 


these  is  the  Office  Appliance  Department.  Eere  we  have 
what  we  believe  is  going  to  be  the  backbone  and  perhaps 
the  salvation  of  the  trade  in  days  to  come.  The  book 
business  is  confronted  with  difficulties  right  and  left; 
society  stationery  and  fancy  goods  are  being  gobbled  up 
by  the  department  stores  and  mail  order  houses;  but  in 
office  appliances  the  trade  have  a  stable  and  profitable 
department  that  it.  will  pay  them  to  watch  closely. 

* 

We  presume  that  the  trade  will  make  the  most  of  the 
opportunities  afforded  by  the  Easter  holidays.  This  season 
of  the  year  is  growing  in  importance.  As  a  holiday  time 
it  rivals  Christmas  and  for  re-unions  and  family  gather- 
ings ii  gives  splendid  scope.  The  public  are  always  in  a 
buying  mood  at  this  time  of  the  year  and  their  purchases 
are  not  at  all  confined  to  apparel.  There  are  many  articles 
in  the  book  and  stationery  store  which  are  in  demand  and 
dealers  should  make  use  of  every  facility  they  possess  to 
show  these  goods.  Careful  attention  should  be  paid  to  the 
window  trim  and  to  interior  decorations.  In  brief,  get 
your  store  into  harmony  with   the  holiday  spirt. 


Co-operative  Bill  Killed. 

h  will  be  welcome  news  to  merchants  in  all  portions 
of  Canada  to  learn  that  the  Co-operative  bill  introduced 
in  the  Dominion  Parliament  by  Lloyd  Harris.  M.P..  has 
been  killed.     It  is  again  a  dead  letter. 

It  did  not  even  get  as  far  as  the  Senate  where  it  was 
blocked  by  a  single  vote  on  the  last  occasion  it  was  intro- 
duced. 

* 

Merchants  who  actively  opposed  the  Bill  with  this 
paper  will  now  realize  that  their  labors  to  prevent  the 
granting  of  special  privileges  to  a  few  have  not  been  with- 
out fruit.  The  circumstances  connected  with  the  opposi- 
tion also  indicate  what  can  be  done  by  means  of  organized 
effort  and  a  strong  campaign  to  protect  the  interests  of 
retail  merchants. 

* 

The  death-knell  of  the  bill  has  probably  been  sounded. 

as  it  is  not  likely  that  another  member  of  Parliament  will 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


be  foolish  enough  to  bring  in  such  another  piece  of  unfair 
legislation  as  Mr.  I  Ian-is  introduced.  Had  it  become  law 
the  country  would  have  been  a  happy  hunting  ground  for 
oily  tongued  store  promoters,  whose  sole  interest  would 
have  been  to  start  a  store,  colled  the  commission,  and  liit 
the  high  spots  for  another  bunch  of  easy  marks.  Happily 
the  latter  are  to  be.  spared  the  results  of  their  own  folly. 

Canada  and  the  U.S.  Tariff. 
The  maximum  tariff  under  the  Aldrich-Payne  Tariff 
goes  into  effect  in  the  United  States,  March  31st.  This 
tariff  is  levied  against  all  countries  which  are  held  by  the 
administration  to  accord  more  favorable  terms  to  the  im- 
ports of  any  .other  country  than  to  those  of  the  United 
States. 


Should  the  maximum  tariff,  which  imposes  an  addi- 
tional 25  per  cent,  on  the  regular  tariff,  go  into  force 
against    Canada,   there  will   eertainly   he   reprisals  on   the 

part  of  Canada.     Her  weapon  is  the  33  1-3  per  cent,  surtax. 
which  would  certainly  be  employed. 

+ 

The  so-called  balance  of  trade  is  already  largely  againsl 
Canada.  We  now  buy  from  the  United  States  double  the 
quantity  of  merchandise  they  buy  from  us.  In  other 
woids.  last  year  we  purchased  $182,600,000  worth  of  mer- 
chandise from  the  States,  while  their  purchases  from  us 
amounted  to  $92,G0O,O0'O. 

It  is  scarcely  likely  that  the  United  States  will  be  in  a 
hurry  to  levy  the  maximum  tariff  against  Canada,  and 
Canada  meantime  is  standing-  firm. 


Just  where  Canada  will  stand  when  the  maximum  tariff 
goes  into  effect  is  so  far  unknown.  Any  doubt  is  due  to 
the  British  preference.  During  the  early  stages  of  the  dis- 
cussion of  the  tariff  bull  in  Congress,  it  was  understood, 
semi-officially  at  least,  that  the  preference  which  Canada 
gave  to  the  mother  land  would  not  hi-  considered  a  dis- 
crimination against  the  United  States.  Nothing  can  be 
taken  for  granted,  however,  until  the  negotiations  at  pres- 
ent under  way  are  concluded. 

Another  feature,  which  creates  some  doubt  as  to  what 
the  attitude  of  the  United  States  is,  is  the  Canadian-French 
treaty,  which  went  into  operation  Feb.  1st.  The  effect  this 
treaty  may  have  is  made  doubly  uncertain  by  the  fact  that 
the  United  States  and  France  are  not  now  on  particularly 
amicable  terms  in  tariff  matters.  Commercial  peace  has 
just  been  assured  between  Germany  and  the  United  States, 
but  the  outcome  of  the  negotiations  now  pending  with 
France  are  problematical. 

* 

One  favorable  condition  is  the  attitude  of  President 
Taft.  He  has  more  than  once  signified  his  desire  for 
friendly  commercial  relations  with  Canada.  He  is  evident- 
ly sincere  in  this,  but  political  influence  may  be  brought 
to  bear  in,  'the  other  direction.  The  commercial  and  fin- 
ancial interests  in  the  United  States,  however,  are  opposed 
to  the  maximum  tariff  being  levied  against  Canada..  They 
know  that  Canada  is- the  third  largest- customer  the  United 
States  has,  and  that  last  year,  although  the  total  exports 
of  the  States  last  year  decreased  by  1.4  per  cent.,  exports 
to  Canada  increased  1!)  per  cent.  Great  Britain  is  the 
heaviest  buyer,  -Germany,  second,  with  Canada  a  (dose 
third,  and  France  the  fourth  in  order,  considerably  down 
in   the  list    as   far  as   the   value  of  purchases   is   concerned. 

* 

Canada  purchases  more  from  the  United  Stales  every 
year  tha.n  the  whole  of  Central  America,  Mexico  and  the 
West  Indies  combined.  In  fact,  it  is  necessary  to  include 
also  the  exports  to  China  and  Japan  in  order  to  create 
figures  sufficiently  large  to  compare  with  the  exports  to 
Canada. 


Don't  Scatter  Orders. 

Many  merchants  have  the  idea  that  the  shrewd  way 
to  buy  goods  is  to  keep  eight  of  ten  different  firms  in  the 
same  line  dangling  along  with  small  orders  to  each  one, 
rather  than  concentrating  the  orders  with  one  firm,  and 
trusting  to  that  firm  to  protect  them  on  prices. 

* 

Commercial  travelers  themselves  will  tell  the  honest 
seeker  after  information  that  the  man  who  scatters  or- 
ders doesn't  get  as  good  treatment  as  the  man  who  throws 
his  trade  to  one  house  as  long  as  that  house  treats  him 
right. 

* 

Consider  just  the  one  item  of  building  up  credit.  It 
is  better  to  do  your  business  in  one  place,  as  far  as  pos- 
sible, because  it  is  better  for  you  to  owe  money  to  one 
house  than  to  a  dozen.  Having  your  account  in  one  bas- 
ket, you  can  watch  that  basket.  Moreover,  by  central- 
izing your  trade,  you  build  up  a  solid  reputation  with 
that  house  for  credit;  you  are  recognized  as  a  valuable 
customer,  to  whom  the  concern  can  afford  to  make  con- 
cessions. 

+ 

The  representatives  of  that  house,  when  they  come 
to  your  town,  will  see  to  it  that  you  are  put  next  to  all 
the  thing's  that  you  ought  to  know;  the  close  inside  in- 
formation which  the  representatives  of  the  big  wholesale 
houses  have  is  not  distributed  hit  or  miss,  but  goes  to 
the  concerns  in  which  that  house  has  an  especial  interest. 
If  there  are  any  inside  figures  to  be  given  out,  you  will 
get  your  share  of  them.  While  a  traveling  salesman  ma.\ 
now  and  then  make  a  special  cut  to  a  new  customer  to 
get  his  trade,  he  won't  keep  the  system  up,  and  he  will 
plan  to  get  his  money  back  in  due  time. 

* 

By  concentrating  orders,  too,  a  merchant  is  able  to 
make  up  enough  of  an  order  to  save  in  freight  shipments. 
If  Hie  merchant  is  patronizing  a  number  of  places,  he 
may  try  to  make  up  enough  for  a  profitable  shipment  from 
each  one  of  these  concerns,  taking  the  risk  of  over-order- 
ing- in  some  lines  with  the  object  of  saving  freight.  The 
result  is  that  he  is  "stuck''  with  some  over-stock,  and 
loses  more  than  his  freight  savings  for  a  year. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


News  from  Various  Trade  Centres 

Interesting  Items  Gathered  from  all  Parts 
of  Canada  -  Business  Good  Everywhere 
— Changes    and     Improvements    Noted. 

Conditions  in  Montreal. 

Montreal,  March  8. — Montreal  bookstores  and  book  de- 
partments are  making  active  preparations  for  a  big  Easter 
trade.  The  growing  custom  of  giving  holiday  souvenirs  in 
the  form  of  cards,  booklets,  or  some  fancy  article  sug- 
gestive of  the  holiday.  lias  the  effect  of  stimulating  inter- 
est in  these  lines,  and  gives  booksellers  and  stationers 
several  opportunities  throughout  the  year  for  special  dis- 
plays, both  window  and  interior,  which  otherwise  they 
would  not  have.  These  special  sales  of  timely  gifts  ma- 
terially increase  the  store's  revenue,  but  (his  is  not  all. 
they  prove  a  factor  in  attracting  attention  to  the  regular 
stock  of  books,  stationery,  etc. 

Last  month  St.  Valentine's  day  brought  one  of  these 
opportunities,  and  reports  are  to  the  effect  that  trade  re- 
sulting from  this  holiday  was  unusually  good.  The  better 
class  of  valentines  sold  readily,  and  the  comic  varieties 
were  in  unusually  good  demand.  Pictures  and  posters 
bearing  upon  St.  Valentine's  day  were  also  in  excellent 
request. 

At  present  writing  St.  Patrick's  Day  souvenirs  are 
being  featured  and  the  interest  shown  is  encouraging.  Sales 
are  good,  and  the  fact  that  a  great  many  novelties  are 
being  shown  which  are  entirely  new,  is  creating  a  great 
deal  of  interest. 

Preparations  are  also  b'eing  made  for  an  active  Easter 
trade.  Next  to  Christmas.  Easter  is  the  season. when 
cards  and  booklets,  appropriate  to  the  holiday,  are  in  great 
est  demand.  In  view  of  the  exceptionally  attractive  goods 
of  this  nature  supplied  this  year  by  publishers  of  cards, 
etc..  a,  lively  Easter  trade  is  anticipated. 

There  are  a  great  many  new  books  of  fiction  being 
brought  out  at  the  present  time,  and  this  keeps  up  an 
active  interest  in  this  section  of  the  book  trade.  In  view 
of  the  present  interest  in  women's  suffrage,  different  books 
and  pamphlets  dealing  with  the  subject  are  being  pub- 
lished. One  of  the  most  recent  and  best  is  "The  Women's 
Charter  of  Rights  and  Liberties,"  by  Lady  MaeLaren. 
This  is  selling  well. 

A  new  book,  dealing  with  the  French  habitant  of 
Canada  is  "Pere  Jean,"  by  Aileen  Kingston,  of  Montreal. 
It  consists  of  short  stories.  Another  somewhat  alone-  the 
same  lines  is  in  pamphlet  form,  rough  paper  binding,  by 
Mary  E.  Hickson,  also  of  Montreal,  called  "Madame 
Janvier's  Church." 

F.  E.  Phelan  has  returned  from  the  West  Indies  where 
he  has  been  enjoying  a  brief  holiday. 

Mi-.  Rightmere,  representing  the  A.  A.  Waterman  Co.. 
has  been  calling  upon   the  trade. 

II.  II.  Copp,  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co..  was  in  the  city 
last    month   in  the  interest   of  his  firm. 

The  Trade  in  Winnipeg. 
Winnipeg,  March  5. —  Stationery  forms  the  major  part 
of  the  output  from  the  jobbing  houses  just  now.  as  all  the 
offices  in  the  city  ami  country  are  healthy  consumers.  The 
approach  of  spring  warrants  a  heavy  trade  in  many  lines 
Mich  as  inks  and  summer  literature,  and  preparations  are 
being  made  for  an  excellent  year's  trade.  Thus  far  there 
has  been  no  difficulty  in  transportation  in  the  west.  Goods 
have  been  shipped  and  received  promptly,  which  is  not  al- 


ways the  case  in  this  country  of  snow  and  ice.  The  mar- 
kets are  featureless,  excepl  that  rubber  goods  are  a  Little 
easier  and  there  ma\   he  more  of  a  drop  in  these  lines. 

The  local  booksellers  and  stationers  are  anxious  to 
form  an  association  of  their  own  in  the  province  to  work 
in  co-operation  with  the  Western  Retail  Association.  Thai 
the  idea  is  feasible  is  almost  assured,  since  jhe  eompladnts 
of  stationers  everywhere  in  the  province  are  numerous, 
and  any  method  which'  would  tend  to  facilitate  such  an- 
noying grievances  as  thai  of  the  mail  order  competition 
would  be  gladly  received.  It  has  been  already  proposed 
by  the  Western  Retail  Association  members  to  approach 
the  Dominion  Government  asking  that  a  letter  rate  post- 
age he  charged  on  all  catalogues.  This  request  in  itself  is 
just,  but  it  does  not  go  far  enough.  The  ( plete  elimina- 
tion id'  the  mail  order  trade  would  he  a  more  worthy  en- 
deavor, and  the  claims  for  the  accomplishment  of  this 
purpose  are  as  justifiable  as  those  which  would  only 
partially  remedy   the  sit  nation. 

Holiday  cards  ami  novelties  always  move  well  in  local 
stores,  'flic  past  trade  in  valentine  goods  has  been  the 
heaviest   ev(  r  experienced  in  these  particular  line-. 

Travelers'  Movements. 

George  B.  Toye,  of  the  Western  Leather  Goods. Cm., 
Toronto,  is  covering  the  principal  cities  between  Montreal 
and  Winnipeg  in  the  interests  of  his  firm.  T.  C.  McGovem, 
of  the  same  firm,  i's  in  northern  and  eastern  Ontario. 

L.  B.  Hill,  of  Siegle,  Hill  &  Co.,  publishers,  London, 
was  in  Canada  during  the  month  of  February. 

E.  S.  Fowkes,  formerly  with  Blackie  &  Son,  Glasgow, 
has  joined  the  traveling  staff  of  the  Mnsson  Book  Co., 
Toronto,  and  is  now  covering  eastern  Ontario  in  their 
interests. 

Curtis  W.  Coe,  representing  the  Dodge  Publishing  Co., 
of  New  York,  is  at  present  showing  the  lines  of  this  house 
to  the  Canadian  trade. 

A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Chicago,  are  being  represented  in 
Canada  this  year  by  Mr.  Howell,  who  informs  Bookseller 
and  Stationer  that  business  has  been  excellent. 

Ups  and  Downs. 

Rush  Clay,  stationer.  Rapid  City,  Manitoba,  has  assign- 
ed to  A.  W.  Telfer,  trustee. 

Lonis  P.  Bouvier,  envelope  manufacturer,  Toronto,  had 
his  plant  damaged  by  fire  on  February  5. 

Granger  Frcres,  booksellers  and  stationers,  Montreal, 
have  been  incorporated. 

Black  Printing  Co.,  whole-ale  stationers.  Amherst.  X.S.. 
suffered  loss  by  Wrc: 

1.  P.  Dery  &  Cie.,  wholesale  and  retail  booksellers  and 
stationers,  Quebec,  have  been  succeeded  by  T.  P.  Dery  & 
Fils. 

I).  C.  Nixon,  stationer.  Moose  -law.  lias  opened  a  branch 
at  Weyburn,  Sask. 

Men  in  the  Trade. 

W.   E.  D.   Tighe,   of   the   Western    Leather  Goods   Co., 

Toronto,  has  returned  from  a  buying  trip  to  New  York, 
where  he  found  the  trade  in  fancy  leather  goods  very 
brisk. 

M.  J.  Gaskell,  managing  director  of  the  Thomson  Sta- 
tionery Co..  Vancouver,  is  in  the  cast  at  present  doing 
some  buying  for  his  firm. 

Charles  A.  Austin,  drugs  and  fancy  g Is,  Simcoe,  is 

mayor  of  the  town  for  101 0.  Another  mayor  in  the  trade 
is  T.  Tliauburn,  Brampton. 

T.  S.  Pattillo,  of  T.  S.  Pattillo  &  Co..  Truro,  made  his 
annual  buying  trip  to  Toronto  last  month. 


Some  Advice  for  the  Young  Man  in  the  Stationery  Store 


Good  Service  Means  more  to  Customers  than  Favorable  Prices — It  Brings  Business 
and  Holds  it — The  Salesman  is  Vitally  Concerned  in  the  Success  of  the  Business. 

By  Fletcher  B.  Gibbs 


The  condition  of  the  young  man  in  the  stationery  store 
is  similar  to  that  of  young  men  in  the  sales  departments 
of  other  retail  establishments.  Their  progress  is  govern- 
ed by  several  factors,  chief  of  which  are  ability  and  the 
conditions  of  the  business  in  which  they  are  engaged. 

During  the  last  decade  or  more  the  cost  of  doing  busi- 
ness has  constantly  increased  owing  to  high  rents  and  the 
necessity  of  haying  spacious  and  well-lighted  salesrooms, 
with  the  addition  of  constant  improvements  to  keep  pace 
with  competition;  furthermore,  the  merchant  has  been 
forced  to  pay  more  and  more  attention  to  the  attractive 
display  and  arrangement  of  his  goods,  necessitating  the 
purchase  of  expensive  fixtures  and  other  equipment.  In 
addition  to  these  factors  of  expense,  the  initial  eost  of 
goods  has  been  increasing  by  small  yearly  percentages, 
making  at  the  present  time  a  considerable  aggregate  in 
this  important  item. 

The  retail  prices  of  staple  items  have  become  fixed 
by  custom  at  amounts  such  as  10.  25  and  50  cents,  etc., 
which  are  not  susceptible  to  small  advances.  These  in- 
creased oosts  mentioned  in  a  previous  paragraph  have  had 
to  be  borne  by  the  dealer — a  burden  which  has  occasioned 
a  considerable  pressure  to  fall  upon  the  salaries  of  the 
minor  salesmen,  for,  next  to  merchandise,  salaries  are  the 
most  considerable  item  of  expenditure. 

But  in  some  respects  the  salesman  in  the  stationery 
store  is  responsible  for  much  that  is  undesirable  in  his 
conditions.  Salaries,  especia.lly  in  a  business  where  em- 
ployer and  employe  are  so  closely  associated  as  they  are 
in  this  business,  depend  upon  the  margins  between  the 
cost  of  merchandise  and  the  selling  prices.  Contrary  to 
genera!  assumptions,  only  a  few  stationery  stores  in  the 
large  cities  are  making  even  a  reasonable  income  on  the 
capital  invested,  and  there  isn't  a  particle  of  doubt  in 
my  mind  that  this  condition  arises  in  part  from  the  habit 
of  the  salesman,  abetted  by  the  weakness  or  the  good 
nature  of  the  employer,  of  giving  discounts  from  net  retail 
prices  t)f  goods. 

When  a  man  goes  into  a  shoe  store  and  is  told  that 
I  he  price  of  the  shoes  he"  wants  is  five  dollars,  it  never 
occurs  to  him  to  ask  what  the  discount  is;  nor"  does  he 
demand  a  discount  when  the  clothier  tells  him  he  must 
pay  $30  for  a  suit  of  clothes,  or  when  the  haberdasher 
demands  $1.50  for  a  shirt.  The  druggist  has  a  standard 
price  for  putting  up  a' prescription  and  it  never  occurs  to 
tbe  business  man  to  ask  the 'druggist  what  his  discount  is. 
Why,  then,  should  the  stationer  give  discounts  from  his 
prices?  T  submit  that  there  is  no  logical  reason  why  he 
should  do  so,  but  cm  the  contrary,  there  is  every  reason 
why  he  should  not.  Year  by  year,  the  stationery  sales- 
men have  fallen  more  and  more  into  the  habit  of  think- 
ing that  the  prices  given  them  are  not  net  and  they  can- 
not consummate  a  sale  unless  they  can  put  forward  some 
•inducement  in  the  way  of  a  discount  from  marked  prices. 
These' discounts  during  the  course  of  a  year  in  a  business 
of  any  magnitude  amount  to  a  startling  sum;  they  rob 
the  salesmen  of  the  salaries  they  ought  to  be  getting,  be- 
cause they  represent  the  profits  of  the  business. 

Retail  prices  are  carefully  computed  on  volume  of 
business,  expense  account  and  net  profit,  and  do  not  con- 
template discounts.  The  system  has  been  forced  by  a  firm 


making  discounts  to  attra.ct  trade,  followed  by  another 
firm  making  similar  discounts  and  vice-versa,  until  sales- 
men have  come  to  believe  and  seriously  to  argue  that  the 
only  way  they  can  hold  tra.de  for  their  store  is  upon  the 
basis  of  a  lower  price  than  that  which  someone  else  is 
demanding. 

There  is  no  way  possible  whereby  the  young  man  in  the 
stationery  store  can  improve  his  salary  conditions  except 
through  the  most  intelligent  and  conscientious  co-operation 
with  his  employer.  The  retail  stationer  is  in  such  a  posi- 
liun  that  he  cannot  extend  a  more  liberal  hand  except 
to  those  whose  marked  fidelity  and  capacity  to  produce 
results  make  their  work  profitable  above  that  of  their 
fellows.  However  altruistically  inclined  the  stationer  may 
be;  however  intense  his  interest  in  and  friendship  for  the 
co-workers  in  his  store,  the  question  of  salaries  must  al- 
ways be  closely  related  to  profits,  otherwise  the  whole 
machinery  of  the  business  may  sooner  or  later  come  to 
an'  abrupt  termination  and  salaries  cease  for  everyone. 
There  is  room  for  nothing  in  the  stationery  store  that 
does  not  have  in  view  the  unification  of  all  its  forces  to  a 
common  end.  That  object  is  the  sale  of  goods  at  a  profit. 
No  profits  make  a,  poor  basis  on  which  to  ask  for  salary 
advances.  Small  and  insufficient  net  profits  necessarily 
mean  small  salaries  and  that  without  relation  to  the  hours 
or  to  the  'work  done.  It  is  not  a  question,  always,  of  what 
the  employer  wants  to  do,  but  what  he  'can  do  safely. 

The  stationer  should  impress  upon  his  salesmen  that 
in  a,  stationery  store  it  is  service  which  means  the  most 
to  the  'customer,  not  prices.  Service  brings  business  and 
holds  it.  No  permanent  success  in  this  business  can  be 
built  upon  any  other  foundation  than  giving  the  customer 
the  best  possible  service  his  money  can  buy.  Whether 
the  customer  leaves  his  order  or  not.  if  we  have  done 
some  service  for  him,  he  will  sometimes  recall  it  and 
may  return.  Appreciation  of  good  service  remains  long 
after  the  price  of  the  goods  is  forgotten,  therefore,  give 
the  best  service  and  tbe  best  goods  possible  and  charge 
prices  that  will  leave  a  reasonable  margin  of  profit.  The 
customer  in  the  long  run  will  thank  you  and  stand  by  you. 

When  these  first  principles  are  understood,  when  they 
are  given  the  weight  in  the  minds  of  the  clerks  to  which 
their  importance  entitles  them,  it  will  then  be  but  a  step 
io  the  necessary  conclusion  that  the  clerk  or  salesman 
himself  is  the  one  most  vitally  concerned  in  the  success 
of  the  business.  The  employer  usually  has  something 
somewhere  he  can  fall  back  upon  in  an  emergency,  but 
with  the  salaried  man,  the  partition  between  money  in 
his  pocket  and  being  "broke"  is  usually  uncomfortably 
thin  and  insubstantial.  The  success  of  the  business  is  a 
vital  matter  to  the  employe.  Indeed,  it  is  so  important 
that  a  body  of  employes  working  for  one  concern  cannot 
afford  to  tolerate  anion?  their  number  a  man  who  has  not 
the  interests  of  the  business  at  heart.  Independent  of  the 
efforts  of  the  employer  there  should  be  enough  of  the  com- 
munriy  spirit  among  salesmen  and  other  employes  to  create 
an  esprit  du  corps  which  will  enthuse  every  individual, 
making  him  put  forth  his  best  efforts  in  whatever  he  may 
be  called  upon  to  do. 

Even  one  indifferent,  inefficient  employe  makes  loss 
and   trouble  for  the  whole  establishment.     He  affects  its 

8 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


profits,  adds  to  the  labors  of  the  efficient  employes  and 
at  the  same  time  robs  each  man  of  a  little  of  what  ought 
to  be  coming  to  him  in  salary.  Half  a  dozen  inefficient 
men  in  an  establishment  may  mean  that  the  firm  will  fail 
to  make  several  thousand  dollars  in  a  year  that  it  other- 
wise would  have  made  without  any  additional  work.  Divide 
that  loss  and  add  the  half  to  salary  aceount  and  see.  what 
the  results  are!  The  additional  money  the  firm  might 
have  been  able  to  give  in  salaries  might  mean  a  good  deal 
to  every  individual — might  have  marked  the  turning  point 
between  living  up  everything  and  that  savings  account 
long  looked  forward  to  for  a  rainy  day — might  have  meant 
that  last  year's  overcoat  would  not  have  to  do  for  another 
year — in  fact,  might  have  meant  the  possession  of  so  many 
things  that  a  little  more  money  is  such  an  important  factor 
in  getting. 

The  fact  that  a  few  thousand  men  in  this  city  spend 
so  much  money  in  dissipation,  in  what  is  worse  than  noth- 
ing at  all,  and  that  so  ma,ny  other  men,  equally  gifted, 
are  living  from  hand  to  mouth,  yet  working  honestly  and 
conscientiously  every  day,  is  a  terrific  indictment  of  our 
civilization;  and  the  one  remedy,  the  one  hope,  lies  in 
the  solid,  sound  sense  of  the  middle  class  men  and  women 
to  Which  class  we  as  stationers  a,nd  our  employes  belong. 
We  must  regard  each  other  is  mutually  dependent — must 
have  confidence  in  the  good  will  and  best  efforts  of  each 
to'ward  the  other.  Having  this  good  will,  this  determina- 
tion to  do  and  to  learn  what  is  best,  to  work  with  all  our 
hearts  for  the  respective  concerns  with  which  we  are 
allied,  we  shall  be  fulfilling  a  high  duty,  not  alone  to  each 
other,  but  to  our  city  and  our  state,  by  our  example  in- 
culcating industry,  temperance  and  morality,  and  forming 
a  body  of  men  whose  faces  are  set  against  abuses  and  ex- 
travagance wherever  found. — Office  Appliances. 


DISPLAY  OF  BOOKS. 

The  display  of  books  being  made  this  year  by  the 
Dodge  Publishing  Co.,  of  New  York,  is  one  which  should 
interest  every  Canadian  bookseller.  The  Dodge  line  is 
specially  adapted  to  the  bookstore,  as  the  books  are  suited 
in  the  main  for  gift  purposes,  and  there  is  thus  no  com- 
petition with  agents  and  libraries.  Moreover,  the  margin 
of  profit  is  large. 

Special  mention  might  well  be  made  of  the  ooze  lea- 
ther bindings  in  which  the  Dodge  Pub'ishing  Co.  special- 
ize extensively.  A  great  many  of  their  popular  series  are 
bound  up  in  this  way. 

■  They  also  show  lines  of  calendars,  cards,  guest  books. 
baby  books,  mottoes  and  novelties,  which  will  be  found 
highly  interesting.  Curtis  W.  Coe,  the  Canadian  repre- 
sentative of  the  house,  is  now  in  Canada  calling  on  the 
trade. 


5,000   FACTS   ABOUT    CANADA. 

The  1910  edition  of  this  popular  publication  is  meet- 
ing witli  a  ready  sale,  as  in  previous  year.  No  more  valu- 
able compendium  of  Canadian  facts  has  been  compiled,  as 
it  makes  accessible  to  the  busy  man  what  is  otherwise  hid- 
den in  blue  books  and  other  sources  of  information.  The 
compiler,  Mr.  Frank  Yeigh,  is  to  be  congratulated  on  the 
successful  working  out  of  a  happy  and  original  idea.  It 
is  published  by  the  Canadian  Facts  Publishing:  Co..  667 
Spadina  avenue,  Toronto,  and  is  carried  by  the  lea.dinar 
news  companies  and  dealers. 


HOW  ONE  STORE  GETS  THE   TRADE 

of  Students  Coming  to  its  Locality — The    Method 
employed    by    W.    J.      F.     Mallagh      of   London 

When  the  Mallagh  Bookshop,  London,  Ont.,  adver- 
tises, its  publicity  matter  is  usually  distinguished  by  its 
clearly-expressed  arguments,  made  suggestive  in  pur- 
pose, and  the  clever  and  artistic  work  of  the  printer. 
Both  of  these  factors  are  necessary  before  advertising 
can  become  profitable.  One  of  the  latest  ideas  from  the 
Mallagh  shop  is  a  sm'all  3V2x5i4-inch  four-page  folder, 
which  they  sent  out  to  the  homes  of  students  who  were 
coming  to  London  to  attend  the  Normal  School.  The 
text  was  made  cordial  in  character,  and  conveyed  an  in- 
vitation to  the  students  to  visit  the  stores  and  inspect  the 
assortment  of  books  to  be  found  there.  Definite  direc- 
tions were  also  given  as  to  how  to  find  the  store,  which 
the  strangers  most  likely  would  appreciate.  "Books  You 
Will  Require"  was  made  the  subject  of  another  page,  and 
a  list  of  books,  comprising  seven  in  all,  was  given  in 
rotation.  Coupled  with  this  was  an  offer  to  deliver  the 
books  to  the  buyer's  boarding  house,  "thus  making  your 
shopping   as   easy   as   possible." 

A  special  offer  to  Normal  students  was  "a  special 
quality  of  note  paper  at  10c  per  quire,"  which  included 
embossing  free  of  charge  of  the  purchaser's  own  inttial 
in  a  style  shown  on  the  head  of  the  page.  The  offer  cer- 
tainly was  timely,  and  the  natural  temptation  to  take 
advantage  of  the  inducement  was  reinforced  by  the  as- 
sertion that  as  the  student  would  be  constantly  using 
note  paper  it  offered  him  an  exceptional  opportunity  at 
the  beginning  of  the  school   term. 

The  appearance  of  the  folder  is  unusually  clean  and 
artistic,  and  the  common-sense  typographical  arrange- 
ment is  especially  pleasing.  The  use  of  the  initial,  while 
intended  primarily  as  an  illustration,  gives  the  folder  a 
distinctive  touch,  which  will  not  be  lost  upon  the  people 
into  whose  hands  it  is  intended  to  fall.  Probably  no  bet- 
ter se'ection  of  type  could  have  been  made  than  the  Chel- 
tenham, which  is  used,  and  tastefully  framed  in  generous 
margins.  The  stock  chosen  was  a  linen-finished  paper,  on 
which  the  text  in  blue  ink  showed  up  well.  A  slight  de- 
fect in  the  composition  is  the  use  of  a  rule  border  around 
the  signature  on  the  two  middle  pages;  this  has  the  effect 
of  crowding  the  text  above  in  a  way  that  is  rather  no- 
ticeable. Also,  the  text  matter  should  have  been  raised 
about  an  eighth  of  an  inch  on  this  pa°re,  so  that  the 
lars-e  margin  would  be  at  the  bottom  and  at  the  outside 
edges,  where  they  really  should  be  in  book  work.  The 
matter  contained  in  the  panel  on  the  front  page  would 
have  been  easier  to  read  had  it  been  set  in  lower-case 
type,  instead  of  capitals;  or,  almost  the  same  result  mi?ht 
have  been  obtained  by  spacing  between  the  lines,  which 
would  have  relieved  the  crowded  appearance  which  it 
has  now.  However,  these  are  not  serious  defects,  and 
might  be  easily  corrected,  which  leads  us  to  observe  that 
in  printinsr.  as  in  evervthing  else,  it's  the  close  attention 
to  minor  details  that  helps  to  make  up  the  sum  total  of 
perfection. 


The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  will  have  ready  about  April  1  the 
new  cheap  cloth  edition  of  "The  Weavers."  by  Sir  Gil- 
bert Parker.  The  other  Parker  novels  in  this  series  will 
follow  rapidly. 


D.  C.  Nixon,  bookseller  and  stationer,  Moose  Jaw,  made 
a  trip  east  in  February. 

Mr.  Bell,  of  the  Consolidated  Sfationerv  Co..  Winnipeg, 
was  east  during  February.  Mr.  Clark,  of  Clark  Bros,  wa^s 
also  down  from  Winnipeg. 

J.  McNaughton.  representing  Craig  &  Sons.  Caldercruix, 
Scotland,  manufacturers  of  blotting  paper,  wall  paper,  etc.. 
in  company  with  A.  O.  Hurst,  the  firm's  Canadian  repre- 
sentative,  has  been   visiting  Canadian  centres. 


General    View   of  the   Girls'  [Foom    in   the    Bindery. 


Description  of  the  New  Factory  of  the  Copp,  Clark   Co. 

A  Modern  Building,  Equipped  with  the  Latest  Machinery  —  Situated 
in  an  Excellent  Locality  for  the  Purpose — Capable  of  Turning ^Out 
the   Best  Work — Plant  Now  in  Full  Operation. 


Without  any  ostentatious  blowing  of  horns,  the  Copp, 
(  lark  Co.  have  quietly  vacated  their  time-worn  premises 
en  Colborne  Street,  Toronto,  and  have  started  work  in 
their  fine  new  factory  on  Wellington  Street  W.  The 
move  had  for  some  time  become  imperative.  The  old 
quarters  were  cramped  and  entirely  inadequate  to  handle 
the  growing  volume  of  business  being  put  through.  It 
was  accordingly  deemed  wise  to  secure  property  in  a  less 
congested  district,  and  to  put  up  a  modern  building  with 
up-to-date  facilities. 

in  the  construction  and  layout  of  their  new  building, 
the  Copp,  Clark  Do.  acknowledge  a  belief  in  the  principle 
that,  a  pleasing  environment  will  have  an  effect  both  upon 
the  quality  ami  quantity  of  the  product  of  their  employes. 
Located  mi  West  Wellington  Street,  apart  altogether 
Prom  the  Congested  business  section  of  the  city,  the  sur- 
roundings (  I'  the  building  are  clean  and  pleasing  in  ap- 
pearance,  while   the   use   of  practically   all-glass   walls   in 


'he    four    sides    of   the   building,    and    the   enforcement    of 
slrict  rules  as  to  cleanliness  make  the  inside  of  the  build- 
tig  bright  and  (dean,  and  conducive  to  enthusiastic  effort 
on  the  part   of  the  employes  engaged  therein. 

It  was  recently  the  privilege  of  one  of  the  members  of 
.'in'  editorial  staff  to  make  a  tour  of  the  various  depart- 
ments in  the  new  building  under  the  guidance  of  the 
lOurteous  superintendent,  J.  M.  Young. 

The  building  has  a  frontage  on  Wellington  Street  of 
"(I  feet,  and  runs  back  to  a  depth  of  21.1  feet.  It  consists 
id'  two  stories  and  a  basement — the  latter  being  to  all 
intents  and  purposes  as  valuable  a  flat  as  those  above  it, 
the  height  of  room  being  the  same,  and  the  distance  of 
floor  below  ground  level  but  two  feet.  The  building  is 
of  the  type  commonly  called  "mill  construction."  is  fire- 
proof, and  the  arrangements  for  light  are  as  before  stated 
practically  perfect. 


A   Corner   in  The    Ruling    Room. 


Standing    Presses   in   the    Bindery. 


10 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  executive  offices  of  the  factory  occupy  the  front 
portion  of  the  main  floor.  Immediately  adjoining  are  the 
lithographic  artists'  room,  and  the  transfer  room,  where 
I  lie  designs  for  the  Copp,  Clark  line  of  scribblers,  exercise 
books,  pad  covers,  and  so  forth,  are  prepared  under  the 
direction  of  A.  W.  Cameron. 

The  type-setting  room  which  is  located  in  the  rear 
portion  of  the  main  floor  gave  a  pleasing  impression  of 
order  and  cleanliness.  The  aisles  between  the  frames  and 
other  fittings  of  the  room  are  very  spacious,  affording 
ample  room  for  the  going  and  coming  of  the  employes.. 
Spotlessly  clean  hardwood  floors  gave  proof  of  the  en- 
forcement of  the  "no-spitting"  and  "paper  in  the  waste 
basket"  rules. 

After  meeting  the  foreman  of  the  printing  depart- 
ment, R.  M.  Briggs,  we  next  visited  the  press  room  in 
the  basement  of  the  building.  The  basement  floor  is  of 
concrete,  thus  giving  a  perfectly  solid  foundation  for  the 
heavy  machinery.  Four  lithographic  presses,  driven  by 
individual  motors,  are  arranged  along  the  front  of  the 
building,  where  the  light  from  the  large  windows  shines 
directly  down  upon  the  finished  product  as  it  comes  from 
the  press. 

On  the  west  side  of  the  basement  is  the  cylinder  press 
department,  where  are  five  large  presses  of  the  latest 
type,  also  equipped  with  individual  motors.  On  the  east 
side  is  the  job  press  room,  consisting  of  three  job  presses. 

The  entire  top  floor  is  given  up  to  the  bindery.  Here 
the  various  books  and  publications  are  bound  up  and 
shipped  out  in  their  finished  state. 


A  BUDGET  FROM  BERLIN. 

Berlin,  March  7 — Pierced  brass  has  caught  on  here  and 
promises  to  eclipse  pyrography  in  popularity.  The  sale 
thus  far  is  confined  to  the  bookstores,  who  have  found  it 
a  mighty  good  aid  to  business  in  a  naturally  slow  month. 

The  Canadian  Kodak  Co.,  will  bring  their  exhibit  to 
Berlin  for  a  two-day  show  next  month.  Concordia  Hall, 
the  largest  in  the  town,  has  been  engaged  and  the  local 
dealers  are  arranging  to  co-operate  with  an  aggressive 
advertising  campaign ;  all  of  which  indicates  a  good  year 
in  the  kodak  and  amateur  supply  business. 

All  the  local  bookstores  handle  wallpaper  and  with 
well  selected  stocks  are  successfully  holding  up  their  end 
in  competition  with  the  other  dealers.  The  sample  bonk 
men,  however,  eat  into  the  trade  pretty  badly. 

The  Retail  Merchants'  Association  are  about  to  adopt 
the  collection  system  employed  in  Guelph.  The  present 
system,  that  provided  by  the  central  office  of  the  Retail 
Merchants'  Association  of  Canada  will  be  retained,  but  it 
is  felt  that  to  make  it  a  success  it  must  be  in  charge  of  a 
collector  or  agency  devoting  entire  attention  to  that  work 
and  to  that  end  an  arrangement  is  to  be  made  to  have 
the  collection  end  of  the  association's  work  taken  over 
by  a  mercantile  agency  similar  to  the  method  adopted  i  ; 
Guelph  with  such  excellent  results. 

There  should  be  an  opening  for  the  Booksellers'  Asso- 
ciation to  get  in  some  good  work  for  the  members  in  an 
endeavor  to  restrict  the  indiscriminate  sale  of  lines  prop  r- 
ly  belonging  to  bookstores;  to  grocers,  barber  shops, 
druggists,  tobacco  stores,  etc  Good  missionary  work 
could  be  done  here  and  no  doubt  similar  conditions  obtain 
in  all  other  towns.  Why  not  provide  the  members  with  a 


Transfer    Room,  fLithograph'c   Depaitment. 

list  of  the  wholesale  firms  who  treat  the  booksellers  and 
stationers  properly  in  this  respect?  Such  an  "Honor 
List,"  would  make  a  "Black  List"  unnecessary. 

One  of  the  local  dealers  speaking  of  the  school  book 
question  recently  said  he  was  going  to  use  his  influence 
to  have  the  School  Board  supply  everything  the  children 
require  in  the  schools,  as  under  present  conditions  with  no 
sign  of  relief  in  sight  it  does  not  pay  to  carry  these  lines. 
The  latest  books  for  instance,  the  new  blank  drawing 
books,  like  the  readers  show  an  actual  loss  when  the  car- 


Some   of  the   Lithographic   Presses. 

riage  and  expense  of  doing  business  is  taken  into  con- 
sideration. The  dealer's  suggestion  has  been  taken  up  by 
the  school  board  with  a  view  of  having  the  new  drawing 
books  supplied  by  contract  as  in  the  case  of  scribblers, 
ink,  pencils  and  other  lines  which  the  board  has  been  sup- 
plying during  the  past  few  years.  The  next  step  will  be 
the  readers.  This  is  a  straw  which  shows  which  way  the 
wind  is  blowing.  It  is  evident  that  the  Whitney  Govern- 
ment 's  policy  is  going  to  completely  ruin  the  school  book 
business  as  respects   the   retail    trade. 


Section  of  Printing   Press  Room. 


II 


STATIONERY     DEPARTMENT 


Hints  on  Selling  Stationery  at  Retail 

The  best  Times  for  Certain  Displays 
— How  to  Conduct  a  Bargain  Sale — 
The  right  way  to  Advertise  Goods. 


It  goes  without-saying  that  all  kinds  of  stationery  from 
box  papers  to  blank  books  should  be  well  displayed;  cer- 
tain showcases  should  be  set  aside  for  the  purpose  and 
used  for  nothing  else.  Sell  from  these  cases,  but  do  not 
use  them  for  the  storage  of  surplus  stock.  Keep  the 
latter  somewhere  else  and  replenish  the  goods  in  the  cases 
as  needed.  In  this  way  the  display  is  constantly  changing 
and  the  stock  has  no  chance  to  become  faded  or  soiled. 


McFarlane,   Son   &   Hodgson's   New    Building 
in   Montreal. 


Window  displays  should  be  frequent  if  not  continuous. 
High  class  writing  paper  in  boxes  can  be  profitably  dis- 
played at  least  three  times  a  year,  viz.:  Christmas,  Easter 
and  commencement.  This  with  ordinary  box  paper,  tab- 
lets with  envelopes  to  match,  pound  goods,  office  sta- 
tionery, school  supplies,  diaries  and  blank  books  should' 
keep  such  a  window  occupied  fifty-two  weeks  in  the  year. 

Of  course  all  displays  either  in  windows  or  show  cases 


should  have  plenty  of  plainly  lettered  price  tickets  and  a 
few  neat  sign  cards  with  some  sharp,  easily  read  sentences. 

The  Special  Sale. 

One  of  the  best  methods  of  stimulating  a  stationery 
business  is  the  special  sale,  and  by  this  I  mean  a  real 
bargain  sale  where  the  customer  is  given  unusual  value 
for  his  money.  These  sales  can  also  be  used  to  the  direct 
profit  of  the  dealer  if  he  has  bought  his  stock  right.  Box 
papers  are  a  staple  article  for  such  sales  and  a  good  sup- 
ply can  be  procured  from  various  sources;  (1)  ask  your 
jobber  what  he  has  in  the  way  of  odds  and  ends.  Do  not 
take  everything  he  offers  you  but  make  a  careful  selection 
and  see  that  he  gives  you  a  low  price.  (2)  The  large 
manufacturers  are  constantly  discontinuing  some  kinds 
and  are  glad  to  sell  what  they  have  on  hand  at  a  low 
price.  (3)  Take  the  slow  moving  numbers  from  your  own 
stock  and  mark  them  right  down  with  the  others.  Adver- 
tise that  you  have  so  many  hundred  boxes  of,  for  instance, 
25  cent  paper  that  you  were  fortunate  enough  to  get  from 
the  jobber  or  manufacturer  at  a  very  low  price  and  tell 
the  reason  for  the  price.  Say  that  the  lot  will  be  put  on 
sale  at  a  certain  time  at  2  boxes  for  25  cents  "while  it 
lasts,"  but  only  two  boxes  to  a  customer.  In  this  way  you 
practically  compel  each  buyer  to  take  two  boxes  instead  of 
one  and  you  can  make  a  fair  profit  if  you  use>  reasonable 
care  in  buying.  Make  a  pretty  window  display  and  watch 
il  go.  I  think  it  well  not  to  run  a  sale  of  this  kind  longer 
than  one  week  even  if  the  stock  is  not  all  sold. 

Publicity. 

Now  in  regard  to  publicity. — The  constant  aim  of  the 
dealer  should  be  to  educate  his  customers  up  to  better 
things.  Talk  quality  to  the  customer  at  the  counter  and 
preach  it  in  the  newspapers  and  by  means  of  well  written 
circulars  and  booklets.  A  woman  should  be  taught  by 
advertising  and  by  tactful  conversation  that  she  should 
have  the  proper  writing  paper  for  every  occasion.  It  is 
not  only  wasteful  but  also  bad  form  for  her  to  use  her 
monogram  stationery  on  which  to  write  groceries,  neither 
will  her  best  friend  appreciate  it  if  she  sends  her  a  letter 
written  on  paper  torn  from  a  five  cent  school  tablet. 

Most  manufacturers  of  high  grade  writing  paper  will 
supply  the  dealer  with  material  for  window  displays,  with 
electros  for  newspaper  advertising  and  with  attractive 
booklets  containing  the  dealer's  imprint.  The  latter  usu- 
ally come  enclosed  in  suitable  envelopes  all  ready  to  be 
addressed  by  the  lady  clerk  or  the  proprietor's  wife  and 
sent  out  to  a  mailing  list,  which,  by  the  way,  every  dealer 
who  handles  stationery  should  have. 

A  booklet  or  an  attractive  circular  should  go  to  each 
one  on  the  mailing  list  three  or  four  times  a  year,  but 
don't  send  a  cheap  one.  Better  send  one  good  one,  well 
written  and  neatly  printed,  than  four  cheap  ones  which 
would  do  your  stationery  department  no  credit. 

The  Newspapers. 

I  have  purposely  left  the  most  important  method  of 
advertising  until  the  last  and  that  is  the  newspapers.  Of 
course  in  the  large  cities  newspaper  space  is  too  high  to 
be  profitable  to  the  average  dealer,  so  he  must  depend  on 


T2 


BOOKSEI.L  E  K      \.V  I)     S  T  \TIONER 


his  windows  and  his  mailing  list,  but  in  the  smaller  cliite 
and  towns  there  is  no  better  or  more  profitable  medium. 
Use  space  as  often  as  possible  and  never  run  the  same 
"copy"  twice.  If  you  have  a  special  sale  on  feature  it 
at  the  same  time  in  the  papers;  if  you  have  a  window  full 
of  blank  books  talk  it  in  your  advertising.  Get  all  the 
"team  work"  possible  into  your  various  forms  of  pub- 
licity. One  thing  should  never  be  forgotten  in  preparing 
"copy"  for  either  newspapers  or  booklets  and  tha.t  it  to 
quote  prices  on  everything  which  you  advertise. 

As  for  the  actual  writing  of  "copy"  I  recommend  that 
you  do  it  yourself  rather  than  have  it  done  by  an  "ad- 
smith."  Follow  this  maxim  sent  out  years  ago  by 
"Printer's  Ink,"  and  you  cannot  go,  far  wrong:  "When 
you  advertise  have  something  definite  to  say  about  some- 
thing definite  that  you  have  to  sell.  Say  it  plainly,  ex- 
plicitly,  truthfully  and   then  shut  up." 


Fine  New  Building  in  Montreal. 

McFarlane,  Son  &  Hodgson,  Limited,  one  of  Montreal's 
prominent  wholesale  stationery  and  paper  firms,  take  pos- 
session the  latter  part  of  this  month  of  their  handsome  and 
commodious  new  building  erected  on  St.  Alexander  Street, 
near  the  corner  of  Craig  St.  The  new  building,  CD  ft.  x 
SO  ft.  with  six  storeys  and  basement,  is  of  modern  fire- 
proof construction  throughout  and  particularly  axlapted  to 
the  needs  of  this  large  and  growing  business.  It  is  well 
lighted  and  has  comfortable  offices  on  the  ground  floor, 
and  floor  space  which  will  double  the  capacity  they  at 
present  enjoy.  The  step  is  necessitated  by  their  rapidly 
increasing  business  which  this  year  celebrated  its  nine- 
teenth anniversary.  The  opening  of  a  warehouse  in  Win- 
nipeg a  couple  of  years  ago  with  a  complete  stock  for  the 
western  trade  was  also  an  important  milestone  in  the 
history  of  this  progressive  firm. 


Death  of  Matthew  Riddell. 

Toronto,  March  4. — A  cablegram  received  to-day  an- 
nounced the  death  in  London,  England,  of  Matthew  Rid- 
dell, of  the  firm  of  Hart  and  Riddell,  wholesale  stationers, 
40  Wellington  street  east.  Two  months  ago  Mr.  Riddell 
went  to  London  to  consult  a  specialist  and  at  intervals 
since  messages  told  of  his  improvement  and  progress  to- 
wards recovery.  His  death  was,  therefore,  quite  unexpect- 
ed. The  late  Mr.  Riddell  was  accompanied  to  England  by 
his  wife. 

Deceased  came  to  Canada  some  eighteen  years  ago  from 
Scotland  where  he  was  identified  with  the  well-known 
ho-use  of  Sir  William  Collins,  Sons  &  Company,  in  Glas- 
gow. From  the  time  of  his  arrival  he  had  been  in  part- 
nership with  S.  R.  Hart  and  was  a  highly  successful  busi- 
ness man.  He  was  also  associated  with  the  firm  of 
William  Tyrrell  &  Co.  The  late  Mr.  Riddell  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Board  of  Trade,  the  St.  Andrew's  Society  and 
was  the  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Managers  of  Bloor 
street  Presbyterian  Church.  Deceased  is  survived  by  his 
widow,  two  sons,  M.  R.  of  the  University  of  Toronto,  and 
Andrew,  a  student,  and  three  daughtei-s,  one  of  whom  is 
new  a  student  at   Harvard. 


Fancy  Calendar  Pads. 

Judging  from  the  samples  of  fancy  calendar  pads  we 
have  just  received  from  the  Chas.  H.  Elliott  Co.,  Phila- 
delphia, that  firm  must  have  met  with  success  in  the  line 
as  the  pads  we  have  from  them  are  wonderful  productions 
of  the  art  preservative. 


Suggestions  on  Window  Trimming 

The  Use  of  Moving  Objects  to  At- 
tract Attention  —  Attractive  Signs 
Should  be  Made  to  Sell  the  Goods- 
Timeliness  and  Cleanliness  Essential. 


Window  trimming  is  an  art,  says  A.  A.  Belanger,  writ- 
ing in  the  Inland  Stationer.  It  can  not  be  taught  or 
learned  in  schools  successfully.  It  is  a  natural  gift.  The 
public  is  curious  and  easily  attracted  by  moving  objects, 
especially  in  a  window.  Everybody  is  aware  of  this  fact, 
yet  how  many  window-trimmers  take  advantage  of  it? 
It  does  not  necessarily  require  any  large  money  expense. 
Any  simple  mechanical  device — something  with  a  faint 
suggestion  of  mystery — never  fails  to  draw  attention. 

Attention   is   what    the   window   trimmer  is   aiming   for 
and  he  should  always  bear  that  fact  in  mind.     Draw  the 


Attractive  Display  by  F.  E.  Phelan,  Montreal. 

crowd  to  your  windows  by  curiosity,  and  the  goods  dis- 
played will  get  their  share  of  attention  when  that  curi- 
osity is  abated. 

Attractive  Signs. 

Attractive  signs  should  be  displayed  conspicuously, 
extolling  the  merit  of  your  goods.  Try  to  be  original,  but 
don't  overdo  it.  Use  simple  language  and  plain  lettering. 
Fancy  language,  and  signs  which  require  an  encyclopedia  to 
decipher,  are  useless.  Signs  should  be  made  to  sell  goods, 
not  to  be  admired.  You  are  selling  goods,  not  signs.  Tel! 
the  truth — even  a  hint  of  deceit  should  be  avoided.  A 
harmless  humorous  sign  will  sometimes  add  a  new  cus- 
tomer and  turn  a  scowl  into  a  smile. 

Do  not  crowd  the  windows — leave  plenty  of  breathing 
space.  Goods  should  be  changed  at  least  once  a  week,  and 
always  display  fresh  stock. 

Specialize  when  possible.  Divide  your  stock  into 
classes.  For  instance,  if  clips  are  to  be  shown,  fill  your 
window  with  the  different  styles — each  style  by  itself,  with 
neat  price-cards  attached.     This  acts  as  a  silent  salesman 


13 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


■ — the  customer  selecting  the  kind  suited   to  his  own  par- 
ticular line  of  work. 

Timeliness. 
At  the  height  of  the  Cook-Peary  controversy,  the  writer 
displayed  a  simple  device,  showing  Cook  and  Peaj-y 
circling  around  the  north  pole.  The  motive  power  con- 
sisted of  a  large  magnet,  concealed  under  a  sheet  of  black 
paper.  There  was  an  air  of  mystery  and  it  attracted  de- 
cided attention — even  by  the  press. 

The  window-trimmer  of  to-day  must  not  only  use  his 
brain,  but  also  keep  posted  on  the  topics  of  the  day.  He 
must  watch  his  competitors  closely  and  excel  them.  It  is 
easy  when  you  get  the  habit.  One  success  will  be  food  for 
another. 

Like  the  artist,  the  orator  or'  the  actor,  the  window- 
trimmer  must  show  individuality  in  his  work  if  he  hopes 
to  be  successful.  His  windows  must  show  harmony  and 
a  different  face  each  time  they  are  changed. 

Keep  your  customers  guessing  and  on  the  lookout  for 
your  next  exhibit.  When  that  is  once  achieved  it  will  re- 
pay you  for  your  most  arduous  labor.  If  you  are  con- 
templating a  new  idea  do  not  allow  the  first  pessimist  you 
happen  to  meet  discourage  you,  but  work  it  out,  and  nine 
times  out  of  ten  it  will  prove  successful. 
Cleanliness. 

Cleanliness  will  appeal  to  everybody — clean  goods, 
clean  signs,  etc. — will  impress  the  passers-by  more  than 
fancy  fixtures.  When  "yours  truly"  took  up  this  line 
of  work  his  employer  insisted  upon  cleanliness  and  neat 
price-cards  on  every  article  displayed.  Even  a  dead  fly 
had  to  be  removed  as  soon  as  discovered.  This  was  strictly 
adhered  to  at  first,  in  vi<  w  of  the  fact  that  a  "call-down" 
would  be  forthcoming  for  failure  to  do  so.  After  a  time, 
however,  it  became  a  habit. 

This  habit  has  been  a  source  of  pleasure  and  revenue. 
Worth  something,  isn't  it?     Try  it  yourself. 


-4- 


Big  Prize  Contest  for  Schools. 

Sandusky.  Ohio,  February  21. — The  American  Crayon 
Co.  will  spend  about  $10,000  within  the  next  90  days  in 
advertising  Crayograph  to  the  schools.  The  contest  is 
being  advertised  in  over  50  publications.  Part  of  these 
circulate  among  teachers  and  educators  and  the  others 
among  .children.  Seven  hundred  and  fifty  dollars  in  prizes 
will  be  distributed  among  the  school  children  of  the  United 
States  and  Canada  for  the»best  drawings  made  with  Crayo- 
graph.   This  contest  will  be  divided  into  five  classes.   There 


will  be  490  prizes  given  direct  to  the  boys  and  girls,  as  a 
reward  for  the  merits  of  their  drawings.  Eleven  beautiful 
prizes,  costing  $25- each,  will  be  presented  to  the  schools 
to  which  the  pupils  belong.  These  prizes  will  be  awarded 
to  the  teachers  of  the  pupils  winning  the  first  and  second 
prizes  in  each  of  the  five  classes  in  this  contest. 

The  contest  will  close  at  noon,  Tuesday,  May  31st,  1910. 
The  drawings  will  be  sent  immediately  to  the  jury  of 
awards  and  the  prizes  will  be  sent  out  as  soon  as  they 
have  been  awarded.  Full  announcement  of  the  prize  win- 
ners will  appear  in  the  September  issues  of  the  different 
educational  magazines. 

This  is  not  an-  ordinary  prize  contest,  but  is  really  two 
contests  in  one,  or  what  might  be  called  a  parallel  contest. 
Prizes  are  offered  to  the  schools,  as  well  as  the  pupils  in- 
dividually. The  prizes  to  the  schools  are  beautiful  pic- 
tures and  busts.  This  makes  it  an  incentive  for  the  school 
superintendents  and  the  school  teachers  to  take  an  active 
part  in  the  contest.  In  towns  and  cities  where  the  pupils 
enter  this  contest,  and  the  schools  of  the  city  are  trying  to 
win  some  of  the  big  prizes,  there  will  be  a  great  demand 
for  Crayograph,  and  the  dealers  in  these  cities  can  reap 
a  rich  harvest  selling  the  Crayograph. 


Stationer  Taken  for  Detective. 

An  amusing  occurrence  happened  to  C.  H.  Numan,  of 
the  Weeks-Numan  Company,  on  a  train  en  route  west  a 
few  days  ago.  It  was  a  bit  amazing  at  first,  but  Mr. 
Numan  soon  saw  the  joke  and  tells  it>  on  himself  with  a 
smile.  Feeling  the  need  of  a  refreshing  wash.  Mr.  Numan 
went  into  the  toilet  room  of  the  Pullman,  pulled  off  his 
coat,  rolled  up  his  sleeves  and  went  to  work  on  his  ablu- 
tions. In  a  few  moments  he  saw  that  the  other  occupants 
moved  away  from  him  and  eyed  him  suspiciously.  His 
cleansing  finished,  he  returned  to  his  seat  in  the  car,  and 
again  the  peculiar  glare  from  his  fellow  passengers  an- 
noyed him.  Soon  the  conductor  came  through  and  leaning 
over  to  Mr.  Numan  asked  him  if  he  was  a  detective,  receiv- 
ing of  course,  a  negative  answer. 

"Guess  you're  a  Secret  Service  man,  then,"  replied 
the  conductor,  "or  you  would  not  carry  two  revolvers  in 
your  back  pocket." 

Mr.  Numan  indignantly  stated  that  he  never  carried 
anything  more  deadly  than  a  handkerchief,  but  the  rail- 
road man  quickly  responded  that  he  saw  the  guns. 

"Do  you  mean  these?"  said  the  stationer,  at  the  same 
time  reaching  for  his  hip  and  pulling  out  two  of  his  new 


THe  Spirit  of  Progressiveness 

compels  us  continually  to  add  new  facilities,  new  papers,  new  finisHes, 
new  sizes  and  original  novelties  suitable  for  higH-grade  stationery- 
trade.  Everyone  Knows  that  tKe  best  and  most  up-to-date  stationery 
line    is    tKe    one    witH    "Hurd's"    Name    on    tKe    Box. 


Are   you   preparing    for   the   after    Lenten    wedding   business?     If   so,   you 
should  have  our  stocks  or  samples  and  prices.    They  are  the  satisfactory  kind. 


TRADE    MARK 


GEO.  B.  HURD  OL  CO. 
Fine  Paper   MaKers 

425  CO.  427  Broome  Street.  New  YorK,  U.  S.  A. 

14 


Reg.  U.S.  Pat.  Office 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


WE  MANUFACTURE 


Celantan 
Canterbury 


anb 


diking 


Tablets,  Notepaper  and  Envelopes 


McFarlane,  Son  &  Hodgson 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL  and  WINNIPEG 


15 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


specialties,  <i  dime  savings  hank,  made  exactly  in  the  shape 
of  a  revolver.  It  was  some  moments  before  the  conductor 
came  near  enough  to  see  for  himself,  and  then  explain  to 
the  passengers. — Geyer's  Stationer. 


L.  &  C.  Hardtmuth's  New  London  Headquarters. 

London,  March  1. — L.  &  C.  Hardtmuth,  manufacturers 

of  Koh-LNoor   pencils   and    European    representatives   of 

Waterman's  Ideal  fountain  pen,  are  erecting  a  large  and 

handsome   new  Koh-I-Noor  house   as   their  London  head- 


p 

* 

i 

>• 

mmSSK 

BhKiaJy 

Koh-i-Ni,or  house,  London,  in   Course  of   Construction. 

quarters.  The  building  is  now  being  erected  on  the  new 
Kingsway  Boulevard,  just  off  Cheapside.  at  the  corner 
of  Kemble  Street— one  of  the  now  important  sections  of 
London, 

The  basement  is  designed  for  the  receiving,  packing 
and  despatching  of  goods*  The  ground  floor  will  be  used 
as  a  store,  specially  fitted  up  in  oak  for  the  fountain  pen 
business  with  a  corner  entrance,  and  behind  the  store  will 
be  the  stock  rooms.  The  first  floor  will  be  devoted  to 
counting-house,   offices    and   export,    and   the   other   three 


floors  devoted  to  stuck,  packing-rooms  and  manufacturing 
purposes. 

The  frontages  are  executed  in  Portland  stone.  The 
carving  is  by  Mr.  Gilbert  Seale,  the  corbel  figures  at  the 
comer  of  the  second  floor  level  being  the  most  important 
part  of  the  architectural  carving.  The  whole  building  is 
being  erected  of  fire-resisting  materials.  The  high  roof  is 
of  concrete  and  steel,  covered  with  grey  slates.  Electric 
lifts  for  passengers  and  goods  are  provided,  and  the  whole 
building  will  be  warmed  by  hot-water  radiators. 


A  Tribute  From  England. 

The  Stationer,  of  London,  England,  has  some  very  nice 
tilings  to  say  about  the  L.  E.  Waterman  Co.  of  Canada  in 
a  recent  issue.  "The  receipt  of  information,"  say  the 
Stationer,  "to  the  effect  that  the  large  factory  erected  by 
the  L.  E.  Waterman  Company,  Limited,  at  St.  Lambert. 
Province  of  Quebec,  early  in  1909,  is  already  taxed  to  its 
fullest  capacity  is  not  only  interesting  but  an  excellent 
marker  of  the  trade  conditions  of  the  Dominion.  It  will 
be  recalled  that  the  establishment  of  this  now  British 
industry  in  Canada  was  the  first  complete  fountain  pen 
plant  in  the  country.  The  trade,  therefore,  has  been 
greatly  benefited  by  convenient  access  to  the  factory  and 
office  facilities,  all  of  which  has  been  very  enthusiastically 
received  and  helpful  in  the  furthering  of  the  sales  of  this 
standard  line  in  Canada. 

"The  L.  E.  Waterman  Company,  Limited,  are  increas- 
ingly conducting  educational  advertising  throughout  all  of 
Canada  in  the  education  of  this  vast  population  in  the  use 
of  this  modern  necessity.  There  is  also  conducted  a  very 
comprehensive  system  of  educational  trade  advertising  in 
the  trade  papers  of  Canada,  which  is  supported  by  a 
quarterly  house  publication  and  other  literature  to  assisf 
in  the  introduction  of  the  many  popular  and  improved 
styles,  sizes  and  patterns  of  this  well-known  make.  The 
close  co-operation  of  the  L.  E.  Waterman  Company,  Limi- 
ted, with  its  dealers  is  well  known  for  its  completeness  and 
the  assistance  which  goes  to  help  the  dealer  in  his  sales 
of  a  pen  which  needs  no  other  introduction  than  the  men- 
tion of  the  name." 


New  Scribblers. 
On  the  back  cover  of  this  number  are  shown  three  of 
the  new  scribblers  and  exercise  books  which  Buntin,  Gillies 
&  Co.,  Hamilton,  are  getting  up  for  the  spring  trade.  The 
cover  designs  represent  appropriate  and  up-to-date  sub- 
jects and  are  beautifully  printed  in  colors.  The  follow- 
ing are  some  of  the  covers:  Old  Hickory,  Comet,  Aero- 
plane, Capital,  Battleship,  Dominion,  Champion,  Roses, 
Full  Sail,  Home  Defence,  Phylliss,  Red  Coat. 


Manufacturers  and  Wholesale  Dealers  in 


SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 


OF  EVERY 
KIND 


Write  for  Catalogue  and  Trade  Discounts 


THE  GEO.  M.  HENDRY  CO.,  Limited, 

Call  in  and  see  our  new  Sample  Rooms.    They  will  surprise  you 

i6~ 


215-219  VICTORIA  STREET 
TORONTO,  ONT. 


tt O  O K S  E  L L  ER     AND     STATIONER 


Pnice  Underwood's  Inks — Ask  y°ur  Jobber 


IF  you're  bent 
on  getting 
results, 
you'd  better 
get  straight 
information 
on 

Carbon 
Papers 
and 
Ribbons 

-Underwood's 
,  preferred 


LOOK  up 

Under- 
wood's 
Inks 

if  you  want 
your 
business 
results 


PS 


to 
"  look 


up 


l_ 


Jl    -Underwood's 


LiULL)        __  _^_J 1  5  oz_  jn  Carton  to  sell  at  10  cents. 


ORDER  NOW. 


Underwood's  Inl^s  last  as  long  as  the  paper 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATION Ek 


THE  MERMAID 

AS  A  SYMBOL  FOR 

DRAWING  INKS 


was   first   used    by    us  in  an    advertisement  in    "The  Architectural   Record"    for  August,    1903,    as  above.      Thus  in  this, 
as  jn  all  other  matters  relating  to   Drawing   Inks, 

Hi^ihs'  American  Drawing  Inks 

blaze   the  way   for  those  who  find  it  easier  to  copy  than  create.     Year  by  year  these  splendid  inks  have  gone  on  their  way 
constantly  gaining  new  admirers  while  retaining  old  friends,  seeming  to  thrive  on  so-called  self-styled  "competition." 

HIGGINS'  AMERICAN  DRAWING  INKS  have  sold  more  largely  during  the  past  year  than  ever  before  in  their  history. 
This  has  been  due  in  a  great  measure  to  our  liberal  policy  of  advertising,  and  to  absolute  fair  dealing  with  our  friends 
in  the  trade,  but  above  all  to  the  unapproachable  high  quality,  standard  and  reputation  of  these  inks,  which  have  made 
them   from   the  beginning  and   always 

The  Standard  Liquid  Drawing  links  of  the  World 


WRITE  FOR  PRICES 


CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO. 


8£5&«oi  Inks  and  Adhesives 


NEW  YORK 


CHICAGO         LONDON 


MAIN  OFFICE 
FACTORY: 


.J222  sli::; }  Brooklyn,  n.y.,  u.s.a. 

18 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Herns'  Inks  9 and  Adhesives 


LONDON  BRANCH.  11  FARRINODON  AVENUE,  LONDON,  E.C.-(Sfore  and  Basement,  each  25X75) 

THE  HIGGINS  INKS  AND  ADHESIVES,  through  honest  merit  in  their  origin- 
ality and  quality  and  honest  American  enterprise  and  push  in  their  exploitation,  have 
penetrated  to  the  most  remote  points  of  civilization,  until  now  they  are  well  known  and 
largely  used  in  Canada,  Central  and  South  America,  Mexico,  Great  Britain,  South 
Africa,  Australia,  New  Zealand,  Philippines,  Japan,  China,  Norway,  Sweden,  etc., 
etc.,  as  well  as  ever  maintaining  their  unique  position  in  their  birthplace,  the  United 
States  of  America.  The  home  trade  has  always  shown  its  appreciation  of  and  reliance 
on  these  goods,  and  it  will  always  be  our  effort  to  merit  the  confidence  of  the  trade  in 
every  respect. 


WRITE  FOR  DISCOUNTS 


CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO. 


M^irr^rof  Inks  and  Adhesives 


NEW  YORK 


CHICAGO 


LONDON 


MAIN  OFFICE  :  27 1  Ninth  Street 

FACTORY :  240-244  Eighth  Street 


}  BROOKLYN,  N.Y.,    U.S.A. 


19 


BOO  K  S  K  L  I.  E  k     AND    S  T  A  T  I  O  N  E  R 


^X^ORLDft  The  Best  Blotting  Made. 

"HOLLYWOOD"  Second  Only  to     World. 

"RELIANCE"  Unequalled  at  the  Price. 

"VIENNA  MOIRE" 

and     "DIRECTOIRE' *      The  Leading  Fancy  Blottings 

The  superior  qualities  and  absorbent  properties  of  these  blottings 
are  well  and  favourably  known  throughout  the  U.S.  and  Canada. 
All  leading  dealers  handle  them.    Write  for  full  line  of  samples. 


THE 


Albemarle  Paper  Manufacturing  Co. 


MAKERS  OF  BLOTTING  ONLY 


RICHMOND 


VA. 


20 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


A  Mighty 

Adjunct 

to  your  Business 


ALINE  of  "  Staunton  "  wall-paper  is 
the  most  sensible  of  lines  for  the 
bookseller  and  stationer,  It  lends  itself 
splendidly  to  display,  it  is  non-perishable 
and  a  clean  line  to  handle.  It  makes  a 
strong  appeal  to  women,  and  women  form 
a  large  percentage  of  the  regular  cus- 
tomers of  the  store. 


WALLPAPER 


Yields  a  magnificent  profit.  Its  remark- 
able welling  qualities  have  brought  it  to 
the  very  front  rank,  causing  it  to  com- 
mand a  distinctly  better  price  in  the  retail 
market. 

The  very  highest  designing  ability,  the 
best  of  manufacturing  facilities  and  the 
finest  materials  are  combined  in  these 
papers  with  rock-bottom  prices. 

Why  lose  the  profit  possible  from  a 
line  of  Staunton  wall-paper— a  profit 
which  your  present  premises  and  staff'  can 
be  made  to  yield  ? 

Write  us  to  place  our  samples  before 
you.  No  obligation  to  purchase  if  you 
are  not  satisfied  that  we  can  serve  you  best. 

WRITE     US     TO-DAY. 


Stauntons  Ltd. 

Wall    Paper    Manufacturers 

933  Yonge  Street 

TORONTO 


Things  Different  in  "Likely  Things" 

KARNAC  BRASS. 

Easily  at  the  head  of  ALL  Brass  Goods,  constituting  a  lot 
of  unique  features. 

Sole  Canadian  Jobbers  for  Ontario  and  Montreal. 
HAND  HAMMERED  BRASS 

Quality— Size — Appearance  at  minimum  prices. 
KINRAN  CHINA. 

Giving  forth  the  most  magnificent  effects  ever  produced  in 
china.  Gloriously  fascinating.  A  grand  selection  we  offer. 
A  money-maker  for  the  retailer. 

AUTOCRAT  STATIONERY. 

Decidedly  attractive  and  undoubtedly  correct  in  style,  fin- 
ish and  shape.  "Autocrat  "  ought  to  interest  you.  Worth 
your  while  to  give  us  "A  Look  In.  " 

Sole  Canadian  Representatives  for  "Autocrat." 
ART  CALENDARS. 

Popular  prices — a  nifty  range  for  appreciative  trade.  Retail 
10c.  to  $1.50. 

POST  CARDS. 

Our  Postals  differ  from  Postals  generally.  Color  not  being 
the  only  thing  we  care  for.  There  are  other  features  that 
characterize. 

We  are  sanguine  the  sightliness  and  values  of  the  attractive 
ranges  we  are  showing  will  thoroughly  interest  you,  and  ask 
for  "A  Look  In.  " 

^e  e#>utclttfe  Company, 

77  YORK    ST.,    TORONTO. 

Things  Different  in   "  Likely  Things". 


The  Northern  Mills  Co. 


PAPER    MANUFACTURERS 


PRINTING 


AND 


WRITING 
PAPERS 


Super-calendered,  Velvet  and  Machine 
Finished  Book,  Litho  and  Antique  Print- 
ing, Engine  Sized  Writing  and  Envelope 
Papers,    White    and    Tinted    Bond. 

Typewriter  Papers  (Glazed  and  Rough 
Finished,)    Envelopes,   Bill    Heads,  etc. 

Ask  for  "Canadian  Bond,"  "Provincial 
Bond,"  "Adelia,"  "  Northern  Mills," 
and     "Federal      Writing  Manilla." 


Head  Office,  Montreal,  278  St.  Paul  St. 


Mills,  St.  Adele,  Que. 


21 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


FOUNTAIN    PENS  STYLOGRAPHIC    PENS 

GOLD    PENS 


Being  practical  makers  of  over  25  years' experience  and  now  having  the  most  up-to-date  FACTORIES,  we  are 
prepared  to  supply  the  BEST  at  LOWEST  rates.  Special  designs  and  patents  made  (and  if  necessary  put  on  the 
English  Market)  so  as  to  secure  English  protection.    Send  particulars  and  receive  our  quotations. 

JEWEL  PEN  COMPANY,  102  FenchurchSt.,  London,Eng. 

(Sole  Makers  of  The  Red  Giant  Stylo). 


J& 


HE  standard  leatherette 
washer  used  as  rein- 
forcement about  the 
string  hole  in  Southam 
quality  tags  may  again 
be  strengthened  by  the 
addition  of  a  metal  eyelet  at  small 
extra  charge.  Ask  for  the  metal 
eyelet,  and  thereby  secure  to 
yourself  complete  satisfaction  in 
buying  a  perfect  tag.  The  brass 
eyelet  is  just  the  finishing  touch 
for  strength,  and  strength  is 
what  is  usually  required  in  a  tag. 


SOUTHAM'S 

SHIPPING 

TAGS 


PRICES 

ON    ALL    GRADES 
IN   STANDARD 
OR  ODD  SIZES 

ON    APPLICATION. 


Tags,  Labels  and  Specialties 


fountain    pens  WHOLE-SALE    ONLY  STYLOGRAPHIC   pens 

CONWAY,  STEWART  &  CO.,  LTD.,  of  33  PATERNOSTER  ROW,  LONDON,  ENG.,  being  the 
actual  manufacturers  of  all  kinds  of  FOUNTAIN  and  STYLO  Pens,  invite  enquiries  from  the 
wholesale  only. 

SPECIALTIES-" STEWART'S''   Self-Filling   Fountain   Pen  (Patented). 


Made  on  the  natural  principle  of  a  syringe.     Perfect  in  its   tin-plicity. 

"STEWART'S"  Self-Fuling  STYLO   (Patented) 


The  first  and  ONLY  'Self. filling    Stylo.    Retail.  $1.00. 


22 


BOOKSELLER     AND    STATIONER 


The  Fountpen  of  Quality! 

DOUBLE  FEED,  RELIABLE  AND  SIMPLE 

THERE  is  no  question  about  the  goodness  of  "SWAN" 
Pens.  The  flow  is  perfect;  the  gold  pen,  recognized 
by  experts  the  best  in  the  world.  Everyone  doesn't 
know  this,  but  you,  at  any  rate,  should  know  how  good 
"SWAN"  Pens  are.  Why  not  push  them?  We  will  boost 
your  sales  by  means  of  Electric  Signs,  Artistic  Show  Cards, 
and  other  Window  Aids,  and  also  get  for  them  the  publicity 
you  want.  They  leave  a  splendid  margin  of  profit,  and 
always  give  satisfaction.      Here's  a  splendid  line  to  handle. 

LOOK     FOR     OUR     PROPOSITION     TO-DAY.        WRITF    US. 

MABIE,  TODD  &  CO. 


124  YORK  STREET 


TORONTO,  CANADA 


Headquarters:     79  and  Ho  High  Holborn,   London,  W.C. 


Canadian  Authors  and  Publishers 


Authors  and  publishers  desiring 
complete  sets  of  reviews  and 
notices  of  their  books  appearing 
in  the  Canadian  newspaper  press, 
can  be  supplied  promptly  and 
satisfactorily  by  us,  at  reasonable 
rates.    Write  for  full  particulars. 

The  Canadian  Press  Clipping  Bureau 

Rooms  711-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Building,  MONTREAL 
10  Front  Stnet,  East,    TORONTO 


THE  FACT 

that  we  are  supplying  the  two  largest 
cities  in  America  and  the  U.S.  Gov- 
ernment with  solid  crayons  is  evidence 
that  the  best  and  cheapest  are  made  by 


The  Standard  Crayon  Mfg.  Co. 

Danvers,  Mass. 


DAVIDS' 

^  CELEBRATED 

INK 

Unsurpassed  for 
Quality  and   Value 

Electro-Chemical 

_    Blue  Black 
-or    Fountain  Pen 


j 


Carmine 

Manufactured  by 
Thaddeus  Davids  Co. 
New  York.  E.t.bu.hed  1825 

BROWN  BROS. 

Limited 
Canadian  AgenU,     Toronto 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Carter's 
Writing 

Fluid 


Permanent 
Free  Flowing 
Fine  Writing 


At 

Every 

Step 


Larger  sizes  have 
Carter's  Patent  Pour- 
out — most  conven- 
ient on  the    market. 


Send  in  your  order  at  once  before  continued  cold 
weather  makes  risky  shipping. 

THE  CARTER'S  INK  CO. 

154  Craig  St.  West,  Montreal 
Boston  New  York  Chicigo 


What   Is  The  Reason 

That  the  wedding  paper  demanded  by  people  of 
discrimination  for  invitations  and  announcements 
is  almost  invariably 

Crane's  Kid  Finish? 

Because  for  years  this  paper  has  held  the  distinc- 
tion of  being  the  finest  made  anywhere  for  this 
purpose.  Because  on  account  of  its  perfect  finish 
it  takes  the  impression  of  the  engraving  plate  to 
perfection.  Because  your  customer  looks  upon  the 
watermark  "Crane's"  in  the  envelopes  as  a  guar- 
antee that  this  stationery  is  beyond  question  as  to 
correctness  Crane's  Kid  Finish,  as  well  as  all 
of  the  Crane  Papers,  has  a  certain  distinctiveness 
and  prestige  that  every  well-informed  person 
recognizes.     - 

June,  the  month  of  weddings,  will  soon  be  upon  us. 
Have  you  placed  your  order  for  a  sufficient  supply 
of  CRANE'S  KID  FINISH  to  meet  the  demand 
that  you  are  certain  to  have?  If  you  are  not 
familiar  with  this  paper,  write  us  'at  once  for 
samples  and  prices. 

Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

PITTSFIELD      :      MASS.,  U.S.A. 

Canadian  Office,    42  Adelaide  St.  West,  Toronto 


E.  MORRIS  &  CO. 

(Wholesale) 

STATIONERY 
SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 
POSTCARDS 

LOCAL   VIEW  POSTCARDS 

We  have  the  exclusive  handling  of  the  Products  of 
Three  of  the  leading  German  Postcard  Factories — 
Specialists   in   their  own   particular  style   of  card. 

CHRO  MOTYPE  BLACK  and  WHITE 

HAND-COLORED  SEPIA— BROWN 

MARINE— BLUE 

PRICES  from  $4.50  m. 

Write    for   samples,   which    will  convince   you  that 
we  are  t  howing  hlQh-graa~e  cards  oniy. 

VANCOUVER^. 


"Sports"  Playing  Cards 


The  Best    gin 
Value 
in  the 
Market 

One 

of 

Many 

Varieties 


Leaders   in 
a  second 

grade 

Good 

Luck 

and 

St. 
Lawrence 


LACROSSE    DESIGN 

Special  card  for  whist  players  Colonial  Whist 

We  are  headquarters  for  Playing  Cards— Made 

in  Canada— Style  and  finish  equal 

to   Imported  Cards. 

Advertising  Cards  of  all  sorts,  Novel  designs 
Coated  Litho.  and  Book  Papers 

FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES  APPLY 

CONSOLIDATED  LITHOGRAPHING  AND  MANU- 
FACTURING CO.,  LIMITED 

Successors    to   The   Union   Card    and   Paper  Company,  Montreal. 


24 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


* 


Ul  IKIT'C    ROUND 

nuni     3  pointed 


PENS 


RECEIVED  THE  ONLY 


DON'T 

SCRATCH,    BLOT 


OR  SPURT 


COLD   MEDAL 

AWARDED   TO   STEEL   PENS   AT   ST.    LOUIS    FOR 


THEY 

DO 

WRITE    RIGHT 
WEAR   LONQ 


EXCELLENCE  OF  MANUFACTURE 
AND  SUPERIORITY  OF  FINISHED  PRODUCT 


FOR  GENERAL  WRITING 


Ho.  IB.  GIGANTIC— Firm  action.    Exception- 
ally durable  writing  pen.    80  cents. 


, 


lURIER    ) 

01NJEOPEN5/ 


C.HQWARUW 

'©COURIER 

f  RQUN0P0INTEOP 


No.  700.     COURIER    PEN  — Medium  points. 
For  general  writing.    80  cents. 


jE'"I»III|||(   vj 


io@THIBUNE 


No.  7.    TRIBUNE  PEN— Medium  points.  Very 
popular  for  general  writing.    80  cents. 


No.  97.    FALCON  PEN— Medium  fine  points. 
Made  in  colors,  white  or  bronze.    66  Cts. 


No.  10.    MERCANTILE— In  white  or  bronze. 
Fine  pen  for  general  purposes.    76  cents. 


No.  67.    BANKING -In  white  or  bronze.    A 
popular  general  writing  pen.    76  cents. 


THEY  ARE  THE 

RESULT  OF  OUR  PROCESS  OF 

ROUNDING  THE  POINTS 


TURNED  UP  POINTS  AND 
MANIFOLD   PENS 


No.  16.  SPEAR  POINT  PEN— Medium  fine 
point,  long  nib,  flexible  action.  A  very 
desirable  pen.    75  cents. 


No.  6.    SPEE0AWAY  PEN-Turned  up  point, 
rigid  action  ;  holds  plenty  of  ink.   76  CIS. 


-~     m    C.HOWARD  HLNTPEK 
(*9   1J:    PAPID  WRITER 
u'  ROlNDPOINTED  pe 


:ncN 

y 


No.  86.    RAPID  WRITER— Turned  up  points. 
For  rapid  writing.    76  cents. 


_   g?  c.».H  UNTpr.t." 
'  (£3  m     RAPID  WRITER 

""  ROUND  POINTED  PENS 


No.  86  E.  F.     RAPID   WRITER  —  Turned   up 

poiut.     Finer  point  than  No.  86.    76  Cts. 


FOR   STUB  WRITING 


!  TRIBUNE  STUB    J 

'  ROUND  POINTEDPENS    J 


No.    70.      TRIBUNE    STUB  —  Medium    broad 
points,  stiff  action,  new.    80  cents. 


No.  709.  COURIER  STUB  PEN  — Medium 
broad  points.  A  very  popular  stub,  new. 
80  cents. 


liiiilH  jvC.HQWARDHUNTPENCo. 
REGNU-" 
\  OR0UNDP0IN1E 


IlINT  PEN  Co, 
MUM  I 

NTEDPEHS/ 


No.  420.  REGNUM  PEN— Medium  stub  points. 
Very  smooth  writing,  special,  new;  not 
made  of  steel.    $1.00. 


No. 


65.  MANUSCRIPT  PEN— Popular  busi- 
ness stub  pen.  Medium  coarse  points. 
75  cents. 


No.  76.  QUILL  PEN— Medium  fine  stub.  Pop- 
ular with  those  who  like  the  old-fashion- 
ed goose-quill  effect.     75  cents. 


No-    38.      RECORDER     PEN— Medium  broad 
points,  slightly  elastic.    76  cents. 


No.   27.     JOURNAL     PEN  —  Medium   points. 
Good  business  pen,  new.    75  cents. 


''  C.HC  WRflO  WUHTPEtJ'c'oWk 

g©    BICID        J 


No.  42.  RIGID— Very  firm  action.  Exten- 
sively used  by  Banks  and  business 
houses.    75  cents. 


2jCH0WAPiChONTPENCo 

'°  @  HOMER 

(0  fiCUNC  PCIN1  ED  PENS 


No.  9.    "H"or  HOMER  PEN— Medium  points. 
For  general  writing,  new.     80  cents. 


^^k=>f      &©  ELASTIC  J 

No.  46.      ELASTIC — M>edium    point,    springy 
action.    76  cents. 


No.  513. 

ball. 


GLOBE— Point  dented,  like  a  half 
76  cents. 


No.  64.  TRIPLICATOR-Ideal  pen  for  making 
clear  carbon  impressions.  Extra  heavy 
steel.    $1.00. 


-^nw— ■■■-■- ' "■■-    illinium. 

■SnP         SOi.lANIFOLD  1 

^-^,    _    ^    FOUND  PGINTVDFCN^/ 


No.  74.    MANIFOLD  PEN— Very  desirable  for 
carbon  copies.     75  cents. 


No.  29M.  MEDIUM  NIB— A  very- superior  pen, 
new.  Made  in  colors,  black  and  white. 
75  cents. 


No.  79.  DISPATCH  PEN— Broad  pointed  stub. 
Chocolate  color.  Superior  engrossing 
pen.    76  cents. 


^C.HOWAflDHlJIlTPEN 

0  WORLD 

"ROUHDPOmrEDPEWS 


'HP/ 


No.  25.  WORLD  PEN— Medium  stub  points. 
Very  smooth  writing.  Not  made  of  steel. 
76  cents. 


dHOWARO 

@    fe:r 

ROUNDPOIHTED 


ntpInSX 

IN      I 
'EDPEHS/ 


No.  63.  FERN  PEN— Medium  broad  stub 
points.  Excellent  eugrossing  pattern. 
7  5  cents. 


tjl  |*0UND  POINTED  n    J 


No.  30.  ROUND  POINTED  STUB  PEN-Niekel- 
silver  plated,  embossed  K,  blued.  Most 
perfect  and  handsomest  stub  pen  made. 
$1.00. 


No.   64.     STRAND    PEN  — Elastic   action. 
Medium  fine  points.    76  cents. 


No.  24.  LEDGER— Ideal  Pen  for  bookkeep. 
ing,  correspondence  and  card  entries. 
Fine  point.     80  cents. 

No.  4.     ARROW— 75  cents 


No.  29B.  BROAD  NIB— A  very  superior  pen, 
new.  Made  in  colors,  black  and  white. 
76  cents. 


"  C.HHUNTpt«co~\ 
@O0    DIPT  POINT 

ROUND  POINTED    J 

No.  8.      DIPT   POINT— Very   desirable  for 
entering  figures.     Fine  point     75  cents. 

No.  26    SUN— $1.00 


No-  62.    VASSAR  PEN— Medium  fine  engross- 
ing points.    75  cents. 

^-t      (ThThuN'I  penco    " 

O     S  PENNSYLVANIA 

No.   1681.     PENNSYLVANIA— New  Style   for 
general   commercial   use.       Long    nibs. 
75  cents. 
No.  18.     F.   NAT'L  SLANT— $1.00 


Write   for   show    case   proposition,    "  The    Great    Time   Saver,"   to   our    sales   agents   for    Canada 
McFARLANE,   SON   &   HODGSON,   Limited,   MONTREAL 


* 


25 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


HUNT'S  ROUND  POINTED  PENS 

ALL  NUMBERS  SILVER  PLATED,  $1.00  PER  GROSS;  GOLD  PLATED,  $1.50 


FOR   SCHOOLS 


ii  a 


sj-c 


<o-3  ? 


No.  400.    LETTERING  PENS-Seven  different  points.     $1.00  per  gross. 


\S^s^   LETTEHINC"'PE«f\ 

§~K©    4:00        J 


Ink  Reservoir  for  fettering  Pens. 


SPECIAL  STYLES 


No.  102.  CROW  QUILL  PEN-Each  pen  in  a 
black  Japanned  Penholder.  One  dozen 
pens  and  one  dozen  holders  on  card. 
$5.00  per  gross. 


No.  73.  LAUNDRY —Firm  action.  Silver 
metal.  Made  expressly  for  marking 
linen,   etc.    $1.00. 


No.  71.  MUSIC  PEN  — Three  points,  two 
slits.  A  perfect  pen  for  making  the  dash 
and  dot  in  music  writing.    $1.00. 


No.  107.  HAWK  QUILL  PEN  —  Extra  fine 
point,  more  stiff  than  No.  102  and  very 
durable.  Each  pen  in  a  black  Japanned 
Penholder,  and  one  dozen  holders  on 
card.    $5.00  per  gross. 


No.  43.  NUGGET— A  superior  metal  pen.  75c. 


S@    ARTISTPEN      J 


No.  100.    ARTIST  PEN— Very  delicate  point. 
For  lithographers  and  map  drawers.  $1.00 


Mo.  72.    TWO  LINE  RULING  PEN— Makes  two 

fine  lines  at  once  ;  largely  used  by  book- 
keepers and  others  for  ruling.     $1 .50. 


FOR  BANKS,  BUSINESS  COLLEGES  AND  FINE  WRITERS. 


No.  47.     E.  Z.  RITER— Fine    point.     An   ex- 
ceptionally easy  action.     75  cents. 


No.    I.    FIRST    NATIONAL  — Medium    points, 
very  popular  with  Banks.    80  cents, 


OA    FINE  FALCON.        1 


No.  96.  FINE  FALCON— Firm  points.  Between 
our  No.  97  and  95  in  action.     75  cents. 


No.  44.  GRAPHIC-In  white  or  blue.  The 
most  popular  general  writing  pen  made. 
75  cents. 


No.  41.  EDDYSTONE— Extra  fine  point,  holds 
plenty  of  ink  and  is  a  very  desirable  pen. 
75  cents. 


„  C  H.HUNT  PEN.. 

g   o5  STIFF  FALCON 

ROUND  POINTE 


f) 


No.  98.  STIFF  FALCON— An  extra  stiff  Falcon 
1'en,  medium  fine  point.  Metal  heavier 
and  more  durable  than  any  other  style  of 
Falcon.   Satisfaction  guaranteed.   75  cts- 


W®  DROOP  POINT      J 


No.  6.    0R00P   POINT— Rigid   action, 
clerical  pen.    75  cents. 


Good 


_M  a.„.™HUNT«h=.1\ 
(iioq     the  BOURSE       1 

M  POUND POINTED  PENgfe/ 


No.  232,  THE  BOURSE— Fine  point,  en- 
action. One  of  the  best  general  purpose 
pens.    75  cts. 


No.  45.     BULLLT1N  PEN -Medium  fine,  pleas- 
ant action.    75  cents. 


.„  C  H0WAR0  HUNTPENCol\ 

,Y1    UNIVERSITY 

F10UN0  POINTED  PENS_y 


No.  59.  UNiVERSITY  PEN— Medium  fine,  new. 
Moderate  action,  very  popular.    75  cents. 


g   CM    HUNT  PEN  CO 

m©  UNIVERSITY 
rr  ROUND  POINTED 


No.  59  E.  F.  UNIVERSITY  PEN-Extra  fine 
point,  flexible  action.  Very  desirable 
for  Commercial  Colleges  and  expert 
work.    75  cents. 


No.  3      STATE— The  pen  of  pens  for  posting 
and  fine  figures.     75  cents. 


MflPO  HUN  TPEMC0\ 
ENTURY  I 
0PDjHT|g  (  ins/ 


No.  20.  CENTURY  PEN  — Very  fine  points, 
new.  Elastic  action.  For  very  fine 
writing.    76  cents. 


C.H0WAP.0  HUNT  PEN Co 

'3SUCCESS 

"ROUND  POINTED   PENS 


D 


No.  17.    SUCCESS   PEN— Fine  point, 
ate  action,  excellent  for  figures. 


Moder- 
76  cts. 


No.  22.      EXTRA  FINE  — Elastic   action.    An 
ideal  pen  for  artistic  writers.    80  cents. 


.  c7ho  WARD  HUNTPEliSoN 
?0COMPANION       1 

ROUND  ^OII'TEaPEHS/ 

No.  21.    COMPANION  PEN— For  fine  writing 
and  bookkeeping.     75  cents. 


•—  CIIOWAB  D  HUNT  PEN  CO.  1 

O©  IMPERIAL 

^— '  ROUND  POINTED  PENSJ 


No.  101.  IMPERIAL  PEN— Extra  fine  points, 
triple  elastic  action.  For  experts  only, 
where  they  desire  a  hair  line  and  heavy 
shading     $1.00 


(>  LADY  FALCON 


Nc.    95.     LADY   FALCON-Fine  point, 
popular  with  ladies.     76  cents 


Very 


No.  99.     DRAWING    PEN— Extra  fine   points 
$1  00. 


Write    for   show    case   proposition,    "  The    Great   Time   Saver,"    to   our   sales   agents   for    Canada 
McFARLANE,   SON   &    HODGSON,   Limited,   MONTREAL 


5E= 


26 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Holiday  Papeteries 


We  have  just  received  our  1910  samples  of  Holiday  Papeteries  from 
the  Powers  Paper  Company  of  Holyoke,  Mass.  The  box  designs  of 
these  goods  are  exceptionally  varied  and  artistic,  while  the  range  is  so 
wide  as  to  permit  of  an  unusually  good  assortment.  These  "goods  are 
fully  up  to  the  high  standard  always  maintained  by  the  Powers  Paper 
Company.  Our  representative  will  call  upon  you  very  shortly  and  you 
will  certainly  be  wise  to  hold  your  orders  until  you  have  examined  our 
samples.      We  also  have  some  very  strong  values  in  staple  papeteries. 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Company 

42    Adelaide    Street    West  -  Toronto 


BLOTTING  PAPER 

When  Buying  Blotting  Get  the  Best 

USE  STANDARD  BRANDS 

"Standard,"  "Imperial"  and  "Sterling"  Plain  Blotting 
"Royal  Worcester"  and  "Defender"  Enameled  Blotting 
"Curi-Curl"  and  "Banker's  Linen  Finish"  Embossed  Blotting 

Samples  and  prices  on  application 

AGENCIES  IN  MONTREAL,  TORONTO  AND  WINNIPEG 


fy  "m  ■*      W^  "m    M  f  f*%  Largest  Exclusive  Blotting  Manufacturer 

.Standard  raper  Mrg.  Co.,  Richmond,  va. 


THE  ALL 
BRITISH! 


Classic  Series 

Christmas  and  New  Year  Cards, 

Blanks,  Autograph  and 

Autograph  Boxes. 


Fashionable    Designs    in    Christmas 
Greeting  Stationery  for  1910. 

Wedding  Menu,  Memoriam  and 
Fancy  Cards,  Wreaths  and  Con- 
dolence Cards. 

New  Season's  patterns  are  now 
ready.  Canadian  enquiries  will 
have  prompt  attention. 

Further  announcements  later 

W.  N.  Sharpe,  Ltd. 

Publishers  of  the  "Classic"  and  "Joy"  Series 

Bradford,  Yorks, 
ENGLAND 


Premium  Mucilage,  Lithogram 
and  Litho  Composition 

ACME   CLEANSING  POWDER 

FOR  PRINTERS  AND   GENERAL    USE 

SAMPLES  AND    PRICES    ON  APPLICATION 

Auld  Mucilage  Co,,  23  eieury  st.,  Montreal 


-FOR    BEST   VALUE   IN 

SCHOOL  FURNITURE 


Write 


The  JAMES  SMART   MFG.   CO.,   Limited 

Brockville,    Out.  and  Winnipeg,   Man. 


-/ 


If  there  be  one  field  in  which  department  stores  and 
mail  order  houses  have  failed  to  make  headway,  it  is  that 
of  office  appliances.  Business  men  for  some  reason  or 
other  do  not  buy  their  supplies  from  these  sources  but  de- 
pend on  office  appliance  stationers  or  where  there  are  no 
such  stores,  on  the  manufacturers  who  sell  to  them  direct. 
This  fact  offers  food  for  reflection. 

The  great  developments  of  recent  years  in  labor-saving 
appliances  for  the  office  have  brought  into  being  a  brand 
new  business  and  a  profitable  one.  They  have  been  the 
reason  for  the  establishment  in  the  larger  cities  of  stores 
devoted  exclusively  to  the  sale  of  these  goods.  And  on 
investigation  it  will  be  found  that  these  office  appliance 
stores  are  the  most  profitable  stationery  stores  in  their 
respective  cities. 

The  sale  of  a  single  machine  opens  up  a  long  series 
of  subsequent  sales  of  supplies.  A  typewriter  for  instance 
will  require  carbon  paper  and  ribbon,  besides  the  paper, 
envelopes,  etc.,  which  are  always  so  necessary.  It  will 
thus  be  seen  that  the  business  is  not  made  up  of  a  number 
of  .unrelated  sales,  but  that  each  sale  bears  a  relation  to  its 
predecessor.  Any  stationer  will  admit  that  this  is  a  most 
desirable  si  ale  of  affairs. 

The  development  of  an  office  appliance  department  in  the 
average  stationery  store  is  greatly  to  be  commended.  As  a 
rule  a  bookseller  and  stationer  must  make  a  multiplicity  of 
sales  before  he  begins  to  show  anything  of  a  profit.  His 
wares  are  small  and.  on  the  average  sale  the  profit  is  very 
little.  But  when  he  handles  office  appliances,  a  single  sale 
is  likely  to  net  him  as  much  as  a  score  of  smaller  sales. 

Lack  of  Effort  on  the  Part  of  the  Trade. 
"Experiencing  many  difficulties  in  securing  up-to-date 
office  supplies  and  equipments  in  various  parts  of  the 
country."  writes 'a  business  man.  "I  have  noted  with  in- 
creasing surprise  the  apparent  lack  of  any  effort  on  the 
part  of  the  trade  to  inform  and  educate  the  consumers  as 
to  modern  equipment  and  modern  methods  which 
would  "necessitate  the  "use  of  the  newest  forms  of  office 
equipment.  Apparently,  there  is  no  effort  put  forth  in  any 
systematic  or  adequate  fashion  to  inform  the  average  busi- 
uess  man.  the  one  who  is  not  himself  aggressive  enough 
in  his  appreciation  of  modern  methods  to  follow  the  trade 
papers  or  periodicals  devoted  to  business  methods.  This 
group  of  business  men  constitute  the  larger  proportion  of 
them,  and  certainly  ought  to  include  a  tremendous  amount 
of  potential  business;  but  when  the  leading  retail  stationers 
in  several  cities  will"  not  offer  for  sale  material  which  has 
already  become  staple  in  office  use  in  the  stationery  trade. 
one  can  not  imagine  that  the  trade  is  doing  the  least  thing 
for  itself  in  cultivating  large  territories  where  there  ought 
to  be  an  increasing  demand  for  the  latest   and  best." 

How  to  Make  a  Profit. 

According  to  George  Et.  Chamberlin,  writing  in  the 
Inland  Stationer,  a  dealer  must  first  thoroughly  familiarize 
himself  with  the  goods  that  he  is  handling  or  expects  to 
handle,  and  the  numerous  advantages  -fo  be  derived  from 
their  use.  Secondly,  he  must  display  the  goods  to  advant- 
age, and  lastly,  he  must  go  after  the  business, 
visit  the  store  should,  stand  high  in  comparison  with  the 
values  offered  by  other  stores. 

There  are  certain  devices  which  are  constantly  needed 
in  almost  every  office  and  by  everj  business  man,  and,  in 


advertising  the  new  business  equipment  department,  only 
those  articles  tha.t  will  sell  quickly  to  the  largest  numbers 
should  be  used  to  advertise  as  leaders. 

Experience  has  taught  me  that  a  dealer  who  fails  to 
observe  any  one  of  the  above  requirements  invariably 
either  fails  completely  to  build  up  a  satisfactory  business, 
or  else  meets  with  indifferent  success. 

The  mistake  that  a  good  many  dealers  make  who 
handle  a  line  of  office  files  is  that  they  look  upon  them  as 
so  many  pieces  of  furniture  and  attempt  to  sell  them  as 
such.  Impress  upon  your  prospective  purchaser  the  money 
and  labor-saving  features  of  the  different  sections,  and  the 
task  of  landing  the  order  is  a   comparatively   easy   one. 

In  other  words,  sell  him  an  up-to-date  business  system 
suited  to  his  requirements,  for  the  successful  carrying  out 
of  which  a  certain  number  of  sectional  units  are  necessary. 
Once  he  is  convinced  of  the  logic  of  your  argument,  the 
sale  of  the  cabinets  is  assured. 

The  sooner  dealers  realize  the  necessity  of  pursuing  this 
plan,  (he  sooner  will  they  begin  to  reap  the  profit  that  is 
sure  to  come  to  them  from  the  handling  of  this  line  of 
goods. 

Advantage  of  Exclusive  Agency. 

If  a  dealer  sells  a  man  a  ledger,  or  a  box  of  carbon 
paper,  it  behooves  him  to  keep  alert  and  prevent  his  com- 
petitor from  getting  the  next  order,  which  is  bound  to 
follow  sooner  or  later.  If  the  same  dealer  sells  a  section 
or  two  of  filing  equipment,  he  need  never  lie  awake  at 
night  wondering  where  the  next  order  for  a  vertical  letter 
file  or  document  section  will  land.  He  knows  instinctively 
that  thai  order  will  come  to  him,  since  his  customer  has 
started  with  the  goods  that  he  handles  exclusively  in  that 
town,   ami  his   reasoning  is   invariably  substantiated. 

Where  is  there  another  business  proposition  that  is 
quite  as  appealing'  from  every  angle:  and.  I  might  also 
add.  where  is  there  another  one  containing  so  many  possi- 
bilities that    is  treated   with   as   much   indifference? 

I  know  of  numberless  instances  where  dealers  have  in- 
stalled a  modern  filing  system  on  a  very  small  scale,  in 
offices  where  they  were  skeptical  as  to  the  benefits  to  be 
derived  as  the  result  of  such  installation,  but  where  they 
almost  immediately  awakened  to  the  fact  that  they  had 
been  away  behind  the  times,  so  far  as  the  conduct  of  their 
office  was  concerned.  Invariably  these  consumers  would 
throw  out  their  antiquated  equipment  and  place  an  order 
for  sufficient  goods  to  put  their  offices  on  an  up-to-date 
basis.  This,  in  many  cases,  required  the  buying  of  several 
hundred  dollars'  worth  of  cabinets,  and  meant  for  the 
dealer  a  handsome  profit,  to  say  nothing  of  the  increased 
prestige  accruing  thereby. 

Opening  a  Business  Equipment  Department. 

The  first  thing  to  do  in  opening'  a  new  business  equip- 
ment department  is  to  select  a  line,  or  several  lines,  which 
are  in  popular  demand  or  advertised  extensively,  lines 
which  will  sell  readily  and  quickly,  says  Medford  Parker 
in    Inland   Stationer. 

The  lines  of  equipment  selected  to  place  on  display 
must  be  well-known,  standard  lines,  and  they  should  be 
offered  at  prices  that  the  average  business  man  will  easily 
recognize  as  fair  and  just. 

In  selecting  devices  to  be  advertised  as  leaders,  care 
should  be  taken  that  every  leader  has  a  good  value.  The 
articles  that  axe  to  be  used  to  induce  the  business  men  to 


28 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Which  Fountain  Pen  Will 
YOU   Push   During  1910  ? 

THE  "WISE"  dealer  is  quick  to  grasp  an  OPPORTUNITY. 

The  biggest  "OPPORTUNITY"  that  has  offered  itself  in 
many  a  day  is  the  ONOTO  SELF-FILLING  FOUNTAIN 
PEN — the  pen  that  fills  itself  and  can  not  leak. 

Those  dealers  who  have  been  keen  enough  to  realize  the 
ONOTO  opportunity  have  been  rewarded  handsomely  for  their 
foresight,  as  is  illustrated  in  the  fact  that  ONE  FIRM  SOLD 

AT  RETAIL  DURING  THE  TWO  WEEKS  PRIOR 
TO  CHRISTMAS  $1,200  WORTH  OF  ONOTO 
FOUNTAIN  PENS. 

*D  Were  your  entire  sales  of  fountain  pens  as  great  as  this,  even  including  the  old-fashioned, 
leaky,  mussy  dropper  fillers  and  the  impracticable  rubber  sack  pens  ?  Did  you  sell  one-half  as 
many  ?  Did  you  sell  one-quarter  as  many  ?  If  not,  it  is  your  fault — not  ours.  You  haven't  grasped 
your  opportunity.  You  have  thought  your  customers  would  be  satisfied  with  the  antiquated  dropper 
filler  pens  and  the  unsatisfactory  sack  pens,  simply  because,  perhaps,  the  manufacturers  of  these 
pens  (frightened  out  of  their  wits  at  the  onward  march  of  the  ONOTO)  have  told  you  so. 


C  Stop  that  kind   of  thinking — it  is  costing  YOU 
too  much  money. 

C  Be  a  leader — not  a  trailer. 

C.  Don't  wait   until  the  other  fellow  has  taken  all 
the  "  CREAM." 


C  Get  some  of  it  yourself  ! 

C  Ask  us  how. 

C  A  penny  postal  will  give  you  all  the  information 
you  need  to  show  you  why  you  should  HANDLE 

AND  PUSH  THE  ONOTO. 


ONOTO  PEN  CO. 


261   Broadway 


NEW  YORK 


Canadian   Headquarters:     314   Lindsay   Bldg.,   Montreal 


29 


BOOKSELL E R     A  N  I )     S T A T 1 O N E  R 


Attracting  buyers  to  the  new  department  depends  en- 
tirely mi  the  enthusiastic  spirit  and  truthful  tone  of  the 
advertising.  New  customers  are  attracted  only  when  they 
know  that  the  values  of  the  goods  offered  are  genuine,  and 
of  some  special  benefit  or  profit  to  them. 
Advertising. 

The  public  forms  its  first  opinion  of  a  new  department 
by  the  cleverness  with  which  it  is  advertised  and  the  bin- 
cere  tone  of  the  selling'  talks.  The  advertisement  that  pulls 
trade   to  a   new   department    must   be   unusually   attractive. 

The  very  first  advertisement  exploiting  a  new  depart- 
ment should  have  an  individuality  which  will  mark  it  as 
distinctive  from  the  advertising  of  other  stores,  and  which 
will  make  the  public  easily  recognize  and  watch  for  the 
advertising-  that  follows. 

The  first  thing  the  advertisement  should  call  attention 
to  is  the  location  of  the  new  department  and  the  date  of 
the  opening-.  Next  should  follow  the  special  offer  for  the 
opening  day  and  a  list  of  desirable  devices  or  office  equip- 
ment to  be  found  on  display. 

In  order  to  make  the  new  department  distinctive,  the 
advertisement  should  be  cleverly  illustrated,  using-  new 
cols  to  attract  attention. 

Attention  should  be  called  to  the  new  department  at 
least  a  week  before  the  opening.  Small  advertisements, 
planned  to  arouse  curiosity,  are  most  effective  in  centreing 
attention  on  a  new  department  in  a -store  of  any  size. 
These  curiosity  arousers  should  be  brief  and  sensational 
in  character. 

A  good  idea  would  be  to  call  the  new  department 
"Business  Equipment  Exhibit"  and  have  the  small  adver- 
tisements ask  the  business  men  to  watch  for  the  opening 
of  the  department,  which  will  have  on  display  the  best 
equipment  for  office  or  library  use. 

In   case   the  merchant    can   not    cover  the  entire  field 
through  newspapers,  he  should  resort   to  circular  advertis- 
ing-,  to  make   as  many  people  as  possible  acquainted  with 
the  opening  of  the   new  department. 
Special  Service. 

'Phe  thing  that  will  attract  business  men  to  a  new  de- 
partment is  to  advertise  the  special  service  they  will 
receive.  In  each  advertisement  you  should  offer  to  send  a 
man  to  explain  your  lines  of  equipment  and  office  devices, 
providing  a  business  man'has  not  time  to  come  to  the  store. 

The  first  aim  of  the  different  forms  of  advertising 
should  'be  to  attract  attention.  The  newspaper  and  cir- 
cular advertisements  should  arouse  curiosity  and  stimulate 
desire  to  visit   the  department   on  the  opening  day. 

After  the  department  has  been  opened,  various  kinds 
of  offers  should  be  used  to  keep  the  business  men  watch- 
ing- the  advertisements.  One  method  is  to  give  short,  inter- 
esting- talks  on  the  manufacture  of  the  device,  also  what 
it  saves  in  time  and  labor,  and  what  it  produces  in  con- 
veniences and  comfort. 

These  talks  should  be  followed  by  suggestions  on  the 
proper  selection  of  certain  kinds  of  equipment  for  certain 
kinds  of  office  work.  There  are  a  lot  of  small  things  which 
have  no  direct  bearing  on  selecting-  merchandise,  but  which 
are  valuable  information  and  attract  the  attention  of  busi- 
ness men.  Tn  opening  a  new  department  all  of  these 
things,  which  business  men  appreciate,  should  be  con- 
sidered.    The  following  style  of  copy  might  be  used: 

YOU  WANT  COPYING 
that  is  profitable,  don't  you?  Well,  the  Blank 
style  in  your  own  office  provides  the  way — right 
at  hand- — for  making  the  cleanest,  neatest,  most 
perfect  copies,  at  the  rate  of  ONE  PER  SECOND. 
For  circular  letter  ^revk  it  is  matchless. 


Public  Demonstrations. 

Some  plan  of  inducement,  such  as  a  public  demonstra- 
tion of  a  new  time  and  labor  saving  device  will  attract 
business  men  to  the  new  department.  There  is  no  better 
way  to  get  business  men  to  visit  a  new  department  than 
by  some  special  demonstration.  The  best-known  plan  to 
get  the  men  to  visit  the  new  department  would  be  to 
advertise  the  exhibit  as  something  very  unusual  and  have 
a  series  of  demon.-,!  rations  that  will  be  interesting  and 
instructive.  Most  manufacturers  will  provide  demonstrat- 
ors for  a  special  event  of  this  kind.  I  am  sure  some  will 
even  assist  to  a  very  liberal  extent  in  a  "Business  Equip- 
ment   Exhibit." 

The  policy  of  the  new  department  should  be  conserva- 
tive; the  advertising  of  the  new  department  should  be 
dignified  and  talk  quality  and  prices. 

The  new  department  should  be  especially  decorated  and 
arranged  for  the  opening,  and  the  method  of  decoration 
and  arrangement  should  be  of  such  a  nature  as  to  give 
prominence  to  the  displays.  Business  men  always  form 
their  opinion  of  a  new  department  by  the  things  which 
come  to  the  eye  first,  and  if  the  first  impression  is  favor- 
able, the  chances  are  that  first-time  buyers  will  become 
regular  customers. 

It  must  be  remembered  thai  the  floor-space  and  walls 
of  the  department  are  just  as  valuable  advertising-space 
as  that  which  is  paid  for  in  the  newspapers. 

At  the  same  time  the  opening  of  the  new  department 
is  announced,  one  of  the  display-windows  should  be 
covered,  and  signs  should  be  used  to  excite  the  curiosity  of 
the  public  in  regard  to  the  opening  of  the  new  department. 

Each  day  the  signs  should  be  changed,  so  that  the  men 
passing  the  store  will  have  their  attention  called  to  some 
unusual  feature  or  offering  to  be  found  at  the  new  depart- 
ment. 

When  the  new  department  is  finally  opened,  this  win- 
dow should  be  given  an  original  and  strikingly  clever 
trim,  so  that  the  business  men  will  be  doubly  induced  to 
visit  the  store.  The  same  offers  described  in  the  news- 
paper advertisements  should  be  arranged  in  the  window 
so  as  to  give  the  public  the  impression  that  a  complete 
slock  of  business  equipment  may  be  obtained  inside. 
The  Window  Display. 

Tn  order  to  make  the  window  a  profitable  selling 
medium,  the  displays  must  be  easily  comprehended — that 
is.  the  devices  on  display  must  have  a  harmonious  scheme 
of  arrangement.  The  devices  which  are  placed  on  display 
should  be  marked  both  with  a  brief  description  and  the 
price.  Profitable  results  can  not  'be  expected  if  the  people 
have  to  guess  about  the  devices  and   the  price. 

Business  men  are  not  mind-readers,  and  they  always 
buy  the  goods  they  know  the  most  about.  They  acquire 
knowledge  from  being  told  often  and  in  as  many  ways  as 
possible.  That  is  why  it  will  pay  to  sell  advertised  lines 
and   then   advertise   the   new   department    thoroughly. 

Besides  having  the  devices  show  up  attractively,  the 
window-cards  and  price-tickets  should  tell  the  business 
men  the  same  things  that  they  would  be  told  by  the  clerks. 

When  the  lines  of  business  equipment  have  been  dis- 
played and  given  an  arrangement  to  show  their  best  quali- 
ties, the  business  men  should  further  be  made  acquainted 
with  the  excellent  features  of  the  goods  by  display-cards 
and  price-tickets,  while  the  exhibit  is  being  held. 

The  new  department  should  be  opened  with  the  pur- 
pose of  educating  people  to  read  and  believe  in  advertis- 
ing signs.  '  A  department  will  make  fifty  per  cent,  more 
sales  when  its  purpose  is  clearly  explained.  Everything 
must  not  be  left  to  the  clerk.  Then,  a  cloverly  worded  and 
illustrated  advertising-  sicn   makes  a  go*-*  *"*"»ression. 


30 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


«S0 


Sanford    &    Bennett    Fountain    Pens 

The  Fountain  Pens  it  will  pay  you  to  handle! 

We  are  the  largest  manufacturers  of  Imprint  Fountain  Pens  in  America.     Our 
business   has  been   built  upon  quality.     We  make  only  high  grade  goods 
that  bear  our  absolute  guarantee— the  only  kind  that  dealers  can  afford 
to  handle.    Samples  cheerfully  submitted.     We  invite  enquiries 
from  the  Canadian  stationers  and  jewellers  who  are  desir- 
ous of  establishing  the  fountain  pen  department 
of  their  business  upon   a  sound  basis. 


A 


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Here  are  three  lines  that  have  made  good 
throughout  Canada  and  the  United  States,  which 
you  should  stock : 

"AUTOPEN  SAFETY" 


<< 


GRAVITY"  STYLO 

AND 

''COMMERCIAL" 

FOUNTAIN  PEN 


May  we  send  you  our  catalogue?    Send  request  to-day. 


)  S&B 

U.S.A. 


SANFORD  &  BENNETT  CO. 

51-53  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK 


S&B  1 

/|JewYoiw\ 

U.S.A.- 


SANFORD  &  BENNETT 

AUTOPEN 

NEW  Y0RKU.SA.MTDECI9.I905 


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BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


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WASHBURNE'S  PATENT  ADJUSTABLE 

iir\   IT*  99     PAPER 

FASTENERS 


O.K. 


75  000  000WASHBURNE'SPAT- 

"fl  K  "    PAPER 

VJ.  IV.      FASTENERS 

SOZ-D     Me     past    YEAR 

I  should    convince     YOU    of    their 
[SUPERIORITY 

There  is  genuine  pleasure  in 
their  use  as  well  as  Perfect  Se- 
curity Easily  put  on  or  taken 
off  with  the  thumb  and  finger. 
Can  be  used  repeatedly  and 
"they  always  work*"  Mad* 
of  brass  in  3  sizes.  Put  up  in  brass  boxes  of  1 00  Fasteners  each. 
HANDSOME  COMPACT  STRONG  No  Slipping,  NEVER  J 
I  Note  our  trademark  "O.  K."  stamped  on  every  fastener. 
I  All  stationers.  Send  10c  for  sample  box  of  50,  assorted. 
(Illustrated  booklet  free.      Liberal  discount  to  the  trade. 

The  0.  K.  Mfg.  Co.,  Syracuse.  N.  Y.,  U.  S.  A.  ^  ,e 


The  above  "ad."  is  now  running  in  the  following  mediums: 


WEEKLIES 


Associated  Sunday 
Magazine. 

Collier's. 

Illustrated  Sunday 
Magazine. 

Independent. 


Life. 

Literary  Digest. 
Outlook  Magazine 
Saturday  Evening  Post. 
Scientific  American. 


Ainslee's. 
American  Banker. 
American  Industries. 
American  Magazine. 
Angler  and  Hunter. 
Army  and  Navy. 
Atlantic  Monthly. 
Banker's  Magazine. 
Bank  Notes. 
Book-keeper. 
Bookman. 
Busy  Man's. 
Case  and  Comment. 
College  Mercury., 
Cosmopolitan. 
Current  Literature 
E.  P.  C.  Bulletin. 
Everybody's. 
Good  Literature. 
Hampton's. 
Human  Life. 


MONTHLIES 

McClure's. 


Munsey's. 

National. 

Normal  Instructor. 

Overland. 

Pearson's. 

Postal  Service. 

Primary  Plans' 

Progressive 

Stenographer. 

Public  Officials 
Magazine. 

Red  Book. 

Review  of  Reviews. 

Strand. 

Success. 

Sunset. 

System. 

Technical  World. 

Van  Norden's. 

World's  Work.    • 


MR  DEALER 

There  are  just  two  reasons  why  some  Paper  Fasteners 
are  not  advertised.  Either  they  are  not  worth  advertising,  or 
else  they  are  so  cheap  that  the  manufacturer  cannot  afford 
to  advertise  them. 

It  should  interest  you  to  know  that  we  don't  he  down 
after  we  have  made  a  demand  for  our  goods.  You  can  see 
that  we  are  alive  to  the  best  interests  of  our  trade,  by  a  look  at 
the  accompanying  illustration  of  our  advertisement  at  the  head 
of  our  list  of  advertising  mediums. 

Had  you  not  rather  handle  a  line  of  well  advertised 
goods  like  ours  that  your  customers  will  swear  BY  and  not  AT  ? 

When  you  pass  a  box  of  our  WASHBURNE'S 
PATENT  "O.  K."  PAPER  FASTENERS  over  the 
counter  to  a  customer,  he  will  tell  you  they  look  "good  enough 
to  eat".  Yes,  Sir,  every  time,  and  he  will  come  back  again 
very  soon,  hungrier  than  ever  for  more.  This  is  why  with 
extensive  advertising  we  are  now  selling  SEVENTY- FIVE 
MILLION  of  these  smart  Paper  Fasteners  per  year,  —  with 
sales  increasing  all  the  time.  These  Paper  Fasteners  are 
most  attractively  put  up  and  are  superior  both  in  quality 
and  appearance  to  ALL  others  now  on  the  market,  accordingly 
they  never  fail  to  please  the  most  fastidious. 

Listen,  we  have  never  asked  you  to  create  a  demand 
for  our  Fasteners  and  we  are  not. going  to.  We  simply  ask 
you,  if  you  are  our  customer,  to  keep  up  your  stock  at  all  times 
and  if  you  are  not  our  customer  we  want  you  to  become  one 
NOW.  Don't  put  it  off.  Order  through  your  jobber 
today. 

Washburne's  Pat.  "O.  K."  Paper  Fasteners  are  made 
of  BRASS  in  three  sizes  and  put  up  in  BRASS  boxes  of  1 00 
fasteners  each,  ten  boxes  to  a  carton. 

RETAIL  PRICES:  Size  No.  0B  and  1  B  20  cents 
a  box.  $1.65  per  thousand;  No.  2B  25  cents  a  box,  $2.10 
per  thousand. 

OUR  EFFORTS  TO  INCREASE 

YOUR  SALES  NEVER  CEASE 

THE  0.  K.  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

Jas.  V.  Washburne,  Prest.  and  Treas. 

Syracuse,  New  York. 

L.  &  C.  HARDTMUTH.  1 2  Golden  Lane.  London,  England. 
Selling  agents  for  Europe,  India,  Australia,  New  Zealand  and  South  Africa 


NP  I  B 


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BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Tatum  Post  Price  Book 

For   Loose    Leaves 


Furnished  in  any  size  or 
any  binding. 

A  penny  or   any  small 
coin  opens  it. 

No  key  and  no  projecting 
screws. 

Expansive. 

Adapted  for  Catalogue 
Covers,  Price  Books,  and 
Office  Records  of  all 
kinds. 

Ask  about  it. 


SHEETS    DO 

NOT  TEAR 

OUT. 


THE    SAM'L    C.  TATUM    CO. 

Manufacturers  of  Stationers'  Specialties,  Loose   Leaf  Devices, 
Power  Punches  and  Perforators 

No.  3318  Colerain  Ave.,  CINCINNATI,  OHIO,  U.S.A. 
New  York  Office,  No.  197  Fulton  Street 


"Just  enough  ink  to  ink  the  pen" 

Here's    a    recommendation   that    will    sell   the 

"Victor"  Inkstand 

every  time  it  is  shown.  It  keeps  the  ink 
clean  and  liquid,  and  is  easy  to  clean  and  fill. 
Covers  move  easily  at  pen-point  touch.  This 
stand  contains  more  practical  utility  features 
than  any  on  the  market.  Liberal  discounts 
offered.     On  sale  by  all  Canadian  Wholesalers. 


The  Weeks-Numan  Go. 

39-41  Park  Street, 

New   York  City 


Your  Pen  From  Your  Pocket 

Will  Not  Slip  if  You 

Fasten  it  With  a 


SEVERAL  SIZES 
FITS    ANY    PEN 

Steel  •  -  5c 
German  Silver  10c 
Rolled  Gold   ■    25c 


Show  Cards  for  counter 
display,  1  doz.  to  3  doz. 
clips  on  card,  according  to 
style  of  clip.   Sells  on  sight. 

DISCOUNT  TO  THE  TRADE  ON 
APPLICATION 

Consolidated  Safety  Pin  Co. 

DEPT.  1 

BLOOMFIELD,  N.J. 


National  B 


LANK 
OOKS 


TRADE 


MARK 


MADE  in  all  sizes,  rulings    and 
bindings    to    meet    every    re- 
quirement of  the  accountant. 
They  contain  paper  of  extra  fine  qual- 
ity— the  best  products  of  the  Holyoke 
Mills  being  used  for  the  purpose. 

The  National  Line  also  includes  a 
wide  variety  of  Loose  Leaf  Ledgers, 
Price  Books  and  Memoiandums. 


National  Blank  Book  Co. 

HOLYOKE  MASSACHUSETTS 


33 


O  O  K  S  E  L  L  !•:  R     A  X  1 )     S  T  A  T  I  ( )  \  E  U 


"  Modern  B  "  Pen  &  Pencil  Clips 

5  CENTS  EITHER  SIZE 

o 


Duryea-Hoge  Company    Inc.  Manufacturer. 

108   FULTON   STREET,  NEW  YORK  CITY 


A  Modern 
Device 

The    Acme    No.   2    Binder 

This  is  a  machine  that  drives  a  flat 
staple  that  holds.  It  penetrates  the 
thickest  and  toughest  paper  and  will 
not  tear  the  thinnest.  Easy  and  con 
venient  to  work  and  will  not  get  out 
ot  order,  because  it  is  simply  made. 
The  price  is  moderate  and  is  one  of 
the  least  inducements  that  will  sell 
it  to  the  busy  office  worker. 

Ask  your  jobbing  house  about  it. 

Acme    Staple   Company,    Limited 


Staples  (No.  18)  5,000  in  a  box, 
per  1,000,  30  cents 


112  North  Ninth  St. 


Camden,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 


"ROB  ROY" 


PENS 


Sold  by 

All  Stationers 

in  6d.,  1/-  and 
Gross  Boxes 


HINKS,  WELLS  &  CO., 


This 

series  of  Pens 

is  made  of  the 

same  material,  by  the 

same  tools,  by  the  same 

process  and  at  the  same 

works  as  the  series  of  *  Waver- 

ley'  Pens  which  Hinks.Wells  & 

Co.  have  for  30  years  and  upwards 

(prior  to  Sept.,    1901),  manufactured  for 

and  supplied  to  the  Proprietors  thereof. 

BIRMINGHAM,  ENGLAND 


It  is  always  ready  for  use.  Twioe  the  size  ot  illustration. 
it  holds  up  to.  10  lbs.  in  wall  or  woodwork.  Yourcustomers 
will  appreciate  its  many  good  features,  and  our  advertising 
fvill  give  the  necessary  assistance  to  mak"e  it   a  good  seller 

ASK  YOUR  JOBBER  OR  WRITE 

THE  MANUFACTURERS  SALES  COMPANY 

(Canadian  Agents  for  August  Goertz  &  Co.,  Newark,  N.J.) 
P.  H.  REID  -  -  4-315  BIRK.S  BLDG.,  MONTREAL 


SPENGERIAN 

STEEL  PENS. 

The  Standard  Brand  in  United  States  for 
over  fifty  years,  among  expert  and  careful 
writers,  and  recognized  by  accountants 
and  correspondents  as 

THE  BEST 

Works  :  BIRMINGHAM,  ENGLAND 

Imported  by  all  the  leading  stationers  in 

Canada. 

Proprietors s  Spencerian  Pen  Co.,  New  York 


HAVE  YOU  TRIED 

THIS 
ONE 


JOHN  HEATH'S   PENS 


Supplied   by   leading   Wholesale 
Houses   in   Toronto  and   Montreal. 
London  (Eng.)  Export  Agency  : 

8  St.  Bride  St.,  London,  EC. 

0278  TELEPHONE  PEN.  Reg.  in  Canada 


The 


REG! IN  CANADA 


WAVERLEY 
PENS 

■        THE  WORLD'S  FAVORITE        ■ 


THE  RESERVOIR  WAVERLEY  WRITES 
250   WORDS   WITH    ONE  DIP  OF  INK 

SOLD  EVERYWHERE 

MACNIVEN   &  CAMERON,   LTD. 

Steel,  Gold  and  Fountain  Pen  Makers  to  the  Trade 

WAVERLEY     WORKS,    EDINBURGH 


THE  AIRSHIP  BOYS  or  The  Quest  of  the  Aztec  Trea- 
sure. By  H.  L.   Sayler,  Chicago:   The  Reilly  &  Britton 
Co.     Cloth  $1.00. 
Having-    heard    of    his    fame    as    an    aeronaut,    Major 
Honeywell  sends  for  Ned  Napier  and  asks  him  to  under- 
take the  discovery  of  a  hidden  Aztec  treasure.    Ned  agrees 
and  builds  a  dirigible  balloon,  in  which  he  sets  out  with 
his  chum  Alan  Hope,  a  colored  boy,  Elmer,  and  a  young 
reporter.    After  hairbreadth  escapes  from  the  Indians  the 
boys  at  last  discover  the  torquois  temple  and  its  treasures 
of  gold    and  jewels.      Their  balloon   being  disabled   they 
make  their  way  back  on  foot  over  the  burning  desert,  and 
return  to  their  friends  covered  with  glory. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


COLLECTIONS,  ETC. 


THE 
MERCHANTS  MERCANTILE    CO. 

260  St.  James  St.,  Montreal 
Mercantile  Reports  and  Collections 
Our  method  of  furnishing  commercial  reports 
to  our  subscribers  gives  prompt  and    reliable  in- 
formation to  date.     Every  modern  facility  for  the 
collection  of  claims.  Tel.   Main  198  i 


HOTEL    DIRECTORY. 


THE 

GRAND 

UNION 

The  most  popular  hotel  in 
OTTAWA,    ONT 

JAMES  K 

PAISLEY, 

Proprietor 

HALIFAX   HOTEL 

HALIFAX,  N.S. 


ACCOUNTANTS    AND    AUDITORS. 


JENKINS   &  HARDY 

Assignees,  Chartered  Accountants,  Estate  and 

Fire  Insurance  Agents. 
15'/?  Toronto  St.  465  Temple  Bid- 

Toronto  Montreal 


Keep  in  mind  the  domin- 
ant fact  that  mankind  from 
its  first  appearance  on  the 
earth  has  been  schooled  by 
nature  to  look  for  signs  ; 
for  invitations  to  taste;  for 
suggestions  as  to  what  to 
wear.  Tell  your  story 
briefly,  forcibly,  truthful- 
ly, and  address  it  through 
the  proper  media  and  you 
can  successfully  apply  ad- 
vertising as  a  means  to 
increased  distribution. 


SQUIBS. 

Obliging. 
(Newsdealer  sarcastically  to  man 
who  is  examining  magazines  without 
buying)  :  "If  you  ain't  got  time  to 
finish  that  magazine  right  now,  Mis- 
ter, I'll  keep  your  place  till  you 
come  back." — Browning's  Magazine. 


Another  bookshop  story.  Two 
ladies  call  and  one  asks  for  a  copy 
of  the  Church  Service,  which  is  duly 
hunted  out.  Meanwhile  the  ladies, 
looking  around  a  little,  come  upon 
"Captain  Cook's  Voyages."  And 
from  their  whisperings  there  floats 
out  the  remark,  "Oh,  of  course,  it's 
about  his  recent  discovery  of  the 
North  Pole  !"—  Book  Monthly. 

If  you  live  in  Can'tville,  for  hu- 
manity's sake  move.  Its  mayor  is 
an  undertaker  and  the  town  event  a 
funeral.  Hang  out  the  "gone-never- 
to-return"  sign  and  made  a  noise 
like  receding  steps.    If  you  don't  see 


it  that  way,  for  sanitary  reasons 
bury  yourself.  You're  dead  and 
don't  know  it. — Magazine  Dealer. 

The  regular  news-stand  operator  in 
one  of  the  down-town  hotels  was  call- 
ed away  from  his  place  and  had  tt> 
leave  a  small  boy  in  charge.  The  boy 
succeeded  famously  in  selling  period- 
icals and  postcards.  But  it  happened 
that  the  news-stand  also  handled 
theatre  tickets. 

A  guest  at  the  hotel  saw  the  sign 
and  stepped  up  to  the  counter.  "What 
is  doing  at  the  theatres?"  he  asked. 

"Vaudeville  at  the  Orph'um;  Rob- 
ert Mantell  at  the  Columbia,"  re- 
plied the  boy. 

"Mantell — he's  good;  what  is  he 
playing  to-night?" 

The  boy  looked  over  the  card  and 
pondered  for  several  seconds.  Then 
a  gleam  of  intelligence  lighted  his 
face.  "Louis  Cross-Eye,  he  said,  en- 
lighteningly. 

"Louis  Cross-Eye ?"  exclaimed  the 
hotel  guest.  "What  in  the  world  is 
that?" 

"I  dunno, "  replied  the  lad,  "un- 
less it  is  some  sort  of  an  optical  de- 
lusion, but  the  bill  says  Louis  Cross- 
Eye  as  plain  as  anything." 

While  the  guest  was  sputtering,  the 
boss  of  the  news-stand  returned. 

"For  the  love  of  heaven,  tell  me 
what's  playing  at  the  Columbia  to- 
night?"  shouted   the   guest. 

"Mantell  in  Louis  XI,"  said  the 
boss. — S.  F.  News-Letter. 

A  moderately  fond  father  discover- 
ed his  young  hopeful  reading  a  dime 
novel. 

"Unhand  me,  villain,"  the  detected 
boy  thundered,  "or  there  will  he 
blood-shed!" 

"No,"  said  the  father  grimly, 
tightening  his  hold  on  his  soil's  col- 
lar. "Not  bloodshed — woodshed." — 
Everybody's. 

The  literary  boarder  fastened  his 
eyes  upon  the  hash. 

"Kindly  pass  the  Review  of  Re- 
views,"  lie    said. — Everybody's. 

"Will  you,"  a  customer  wrote  to 
a  London  bookseller  the  other  day, 
"please  forward  me  a  copy  of  Tenny- 
son's poems?  Do  not  send  one  bound 
in  calf,  because  I  am  a  vegetarian!" 
— Book  Monthly. 

If  an  American  bookseller  had  had 
that  order  he  would  have  sent  a  copy 
bound  in   tree  calf. 

35 


The  Topaz  Pencil 

As  good   as   any   at   any   price. 
Better  than  any  at  the  same  price. 

HB,    H,    with    rubber    tip*, 

HB,H,  2H,  3H,4H,B,  2B 

without  rubbers. 

INDELIBLE  COPYING 

Mediifm  and  Hard. 

Write  for  Samples  to 

Warwick  Bros  &  Rutter,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers,  TORONTO. 


►<^»WVWVWWVWWV^*V 


The  1910 
Edition 
of 

"5,000 
Facts 
About 
Canada 
and  the 
Empire" 
is  now 
Issued. 
Order 
now 

from  your 
News 
Company 
or  from 
Canadian 
Facts 
Pub.  Co. 
667 

Spadina 
Avenue, 
Toronto 


When  writing  advertisers  kindly  men- 
tion having  seen  the  advertisement  in 
this  paper. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


PAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK 


irade  supplied  by  all  Leading  Wholesale 
Drug  Houses  in  the  Dominion. 

Received  Highest  Award  Medal  and  Diploma 
at  Centennial,  Philadelphia,  1876;  World's  Fair, 
Chicago,  1898,  and  Province  of  Quebec  Exposi- 
tion, Montreal,  1897 


Standard 
Commercial  Works 


Matte's  Interest  Tables 

at  4  to  16  per  cent Price,  $3.00 

Matte's  Interest  Tables 

at  3  per  cent Price,  $3.00 

Hughes'  Interest  Tables 

and  book  of  days  combined  at  3  to  8   per 
cent Price,  $5.00 

Hughes'  Supplementary  Interest 

Tables         Price,  $2.00 

Hughes'  Interest  Tables 

at 6  and  7  per  cent.,  on  folded  card 

Price,  $1.00 

Hughes'  Savings   Bank   Interest 
Tables 

at  2^,  3  or  2,%  per  cent.,  each  on  separate 
card Price,  $1.00 

Buchan's  Sterling  Exchange 

Tables         Price,  $4.00 

Buchan's  Sterling  Equivalents 
and  Exchange  Tables. 

Price,  $4.00 

Buchan's  Par  of  Exchange 

(Canadian) 
Mounted  on  card Price,  35c 

Import  Costs 

A  new  Advance  Table Price,  $1.50 

The  Importer's  Guide 

Advance  Table  .  . ■ : Price,  75c 

The  Canadian   Customs    Tariff 

Price,  50c 

A  complete  catalogue  of  all  the  above  publications 
sent  free  upon  application. 

Morton,  Phillips  &  Co. 

PUBLISHERS 

J  1 5  and  117  Notre  Dame  St.  West.  MONTREAL 

N.B.-The  BROWN  BROS.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  carry 
a  full  line  of  our   publication*. 


K^JV 


lax 


oil 

l$eni^out([ouik>ur 
customers  tastem&sb 
escoullfasuppkifror)} 
tMllMlktiJbareyos 
(eifinpjeoppoitun^o^ 
flcopyofourhteskat- 
abguetfouHputjpu-) 
mxttosowgooltljuip. 
InitaKsowphuMst- 
ionsfor^utfci/iffolBd 
mkiyjifefopuhrWe 
tomirstore.  <z^m 

rpatleupojpiofitp^iii^ 
([uicl{seuiiijpom/iesr, 

%HlasX&lioitCo. 

tfortffl}Melpfiia?a. 


DAVID  FORREST 

129  Bloor  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 

Canadian  representative 
36 


$750.00 

IN  CASH 
%  PRIZES 

TO  BE  GIVEN  AWAY 

TO   PUPILS  AND 

SCHOOLS 

Dealers:  Inform  scholars 
and  teachers  in  your  com- 
munity of  the  free  CRAYO- 
GRAPH  Contest,  and  make 
many    customers  for 

Crayograph 
Crayons 

Simple  Conditions,  viz.: 

Drawings    to  b  e 

done  with  these 

Crayons. 

CRAYOGRAPH  Cray- 
ons are  exactly  what  teach- 
ers and  scholars  have  been 
looking  for.  Last  four  times 
as  long  as  ordinary  crayons. 
Write  at  once  for  a  free  sup- 
ply of  Contest  Announce- 
ments for  giving  to  teachers 
and  scholars.  This  is  an 
exceptional  opportunity  for 
having  a  big  sale  of  these 
crayons. 

Wholesale  houses  carry 
CRAYOGRAPH  Crayons 
in  stock. 

The   American 
Crayon    Co'y 

Educational  Dept. 

SANDUSKY       -       OHIO 


BOOKSELLER     AND     S T A TiONER 


Condensed    or    "  Want "    Advertisements 


BOOKS  FOR  SALE. 

How  to  dispose  of  shop-worn  or  unsaleable  boo.cs 
is  the  problem  of  many  a  bookseller.  Try  an  adver- 
tisement under  this  headine. 

AUTHORS,    WHO    PUBLISH    THEIR    OWN 
books    will    find    the    BOOKSELLER    AND 
STATIONER  a  good  medium  through  which 
to  interest  the  trade  in  their  publications. 

BOOKS  IN  FOREIGN  LANGUAGES 

LEMCKE  &  BUECHNER,  30  West  27th  St., 
New  York.     (All  foreign  books.)        (12-10) 

LEMCKE  &  BUECHNER,  30  West  27th  St., 
New  York.  Best  facilities  for  supplying  books 
in  all  languages. 


BOOK  PLATES  (EX  LIBRIS) 

ROBERT  SNEIDER  CO.,  55  Fulton  St.,  corner 
Cliff,  New   York.     Designers   and    engravers 
of  book  plates  (ex  libris)  heraldic  and  mono- 
gram dies,  pearl   inlaid  stamping,   for  stationery. 
(2-11) 

INFORMATION  WANTED.  _ 

THE  EDITOR  OF  THE   BOOKSELLER   AND 
Stationer  desires  to  be  kept  posted  on  the  pub- 
lication of  all  new  books  and  magazines  in  the 
Dominion  of  Canada.     Readers  will  confer  a  favor 
by  acquainting    him    of    any  omissions   from  the 
lists  published  each  month. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

ANY  MAN  who  has  ever  lost  money  in  the  mails 
has  had  occasion  to  learn  by  painful  exper- 
ience that  the  only  properway  to  remit  moriey 
is  by  Dominion  Express  Money  Orders  and  For- 
eign Drafts.  If  lost  or  delayed  in  the  mails,  a 
prompt  refund  is  arranged,  or  new  order  issued 
without  further  charge. 

COPELAND-CHATTERSON  SYSTEMS-Short, 
simple.     Adapted    to   all  classes   of  business. 
Copeland-Chatterson-Crain,     Ltd.,     Toronto 
and  Ottawa. 

CUT   DOWN    THE    COST    OF    YOUR     FIRE 
INSURANCE.     Our  illustrated  catalog  "O" 
on   fire-proof  windows,  doors,   etc.,  contains 
full  information  as  tohow  you  can  save   money  on 
your  insurance.  You  will  find  it  interesting.   Write 
for  it  to-day.    A.  B.OrmsbyCo.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

DOUBLE  your  floor  space.  An  Otis-Fensom 
hand-power  elevator  will  double  your  floor 
space,  enable  you  to  use  that  upper  floor  either  as 
stock  room  or  as  extra  selling  space,  at  the  same 
time  increasing  space  on  your  ground  floor.  Costs 
only  $70.  Write  for  catalogue  "B."  The  Otls- 
Fensom  Elevator  Co.,  Traders  Bank  Building, 
Toronto.  (tf) 

DOES  YOUR  FIRE  INSURANCE  POLICY 
protect  you?  There  are  points  in  connection 
with  fire  insurance  policies  that  need  expert 
handling  to  secure  proper  protection.  We  are  fire 
insurance  experts.  We  can  safeguard  your  inter- 
ests and  procure  the  lowest  rates.  Mitchell  & 
Ryerson,  Confederation  Life  Building,  Toronto. 
(tf) 

ELLIOTT- FISHER     Standard    Writing-Adding 
Machines    make     toil    easier.      Elliott-Fisher 
Limited.  513.  No.  83  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal, 
and  Room  314  Stair  Building,  Toronto. 

ELIMINATE  FIRE  RISK,  save  Insurance,  re- 
duce maintenance  costs  and  save  money  on 
your  actual  building  work  by  using  the  KAHN 
SYSTEM  of  Fireproof  Construction.  Used  in 
many  of  the  largest  business  premises  on  this 
Continent.  Write  for  catalogue.  Trussed  Con- 
crete Steel  Co  npany  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Walker  Rd., 
WalkerviIle,Ont.  (tf) 

ERRORS  AVOIDED,  LABOR  SAVED  — Using 
the  Shouperior  Autographic  Register.  Three 
copies  issued  at  one  writing.  1st,  Invoice; 
2nd,  Delivery  Ticket ;  3rd,  Charge  Sheet,  perforat 
ed  for  filing.  No  handling  of  carbons.  High 
grade  printing  and  neat  invoices.  Make  full  in- 
quiry. Autographic  Register  Co.,  191-193195 
Dorchester  St.  East,  Montreal.  (tf) 


FREE  TEST.— Prove   our    claim     that     "Klear 
Copy"  Carbon  gives   the  best,   clearest,   tin- 
smudged  copies   of  all    typed  matter  at    our 
expense.       Send   for  sample    package    "K"   free. 
Peerless  Carbon  ani  Ribbon  Mfg.  Co.  of  Canada, 
Ltd.,  180  Richmond  St.  West,  Toronto.  (tf) 


POR  FILING  PAPERS,  LETTERS  and  Vouch- 
■*•  ers,  fastening  bulky  envelopes  or  backing 
statements  the  ACME  No.  2  Binder  is  indis- 
pensable in  every  office.  Penetrates  the  thickest 
paper  and  perforates  and  binds  in  one  operation. 
For  pale  by  all  stationers.  A.  R.  MacDougall  & 
Co.,  Canadian  Agents,  Toronto. 


PA5.HION  DECREES.-Holland  linen  corres- 
*■  pondence  stationery  correct  in  style.  Its 
beautiful  writingsurface  most  attractive.  En- 
velopes to  match.  Fashionable  sizes  and  colors. 
Visiting  Cards,  Invitation  and  At-Home  Cabinets 
and  Writing  Tablets.  Ask  your  stationer.  W.  J. 
Gage  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


FIRE   INSURANCE.     INSURE  IN  THE  HART- 
FORD.    Agencies  everywhere  in  Canada. 

GET  THE  BUSINESS;  INCREASE  YOUR 
SALES.  Use  Multigrnph  typewritten  letters. 
The  Multigraph  does  absolutely  every  form  of 
printing.  Saves  you  25  p.c.  to  75  p.c  of  your 
printing  bill.  Multigraph  your  office  forms, 
letterheads,  circular  letters.  Write  us.  American 
Multigraph  Sales  Co.,  Ltd.,  129  Bay  St.,  Toronto. 


TNSURE  HEALTH  by  installing  Pullman  System 
•^  of  Natural  Ventilation.  Simple,  inexpensive. 
All  foul  air  in  room  expelled  through  special 
outlets.  Use  in  store,  office  and  home.  Send  for 
free  booklet.  Wm.  Stewart  &  Co.,  Saturday  Night 
Building,  Toronto;  Board  of  Trade  Building, 
Montreal.  (tfl 


IUST  NOW  we  are  holding  a  special  sale  of 
second-hand  typewriters.  All  makes  are  re- 
presented— Underwood,  Remingtons,  Olivers, 
Empires,  Smith  Premiers,  etc.  They  have  been 
carefully  rebuilt  and  are  in  good  workable,  wear- 
able condition.  The  Monarch  Typewriter  Co., 
Ltd.,  98  King  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont.  (tf) 


KAY'S  FURNITURE  CATALOGUE  No.  36, 
contains  160  pages  of  fine  half-tone  engrav- 
ings of  newest  designs  in  Carpets,  Rugs, 
Furniture,  Draperies,  Wall  Papers  and  Pottery 
with  Cash  prices.  It  brings  you  into  close  touch 
with  theimmensestocksandsplenid  manufacturing 
facilities  of  John  Kay  Company,  Limited,  36  King 
St.  West,  Toronto.  Write  for  a  copy  to-dav.  It's  free. 


KEEP  ACCOUNTS  without  book-keeping.  A 
century  ago  accounting  meant  keeping  books, 
To-day  you  can  keep  accounts  cheaper,  better, 
quicker  and  more  accurately  by  throwing  away  all 
books  and  installing  a  McCaskey  Account  Register. 
Don't  be  skeptical  — investigation  costs  nothing. 
Write  us  to-day.  Dominion  Register  Co.,  Ltd., 
100  Spadina  Ave.,  Toronto,  (tf) 

MODERN  FIREPROOF  CONSTRUCTION. 
Our  system  of  reinforced  concrete  work,  as 
successfully  used  in  many  of  Canada's  larg- 
est buildings,  gives  better  results  at  lower  cost. 
"  A  strong  statement,"  you  will  say.  Write  us  and 
letus  prove  our  claims.  That's  fair.  Leach  Con- 
crete Co.,  Ltd.,  100  King  St.  West,  Toronto,      (tf) 


DROBABLY  the  most  talked  about  machine  In 
*  Canada  is  the  Hainer  Book-keeping  Machine. 
It  combines  in  one  machine  the  cash  and 
credit  register,  time  recorder  and  account  register. 
Representatives  wanted  everywhere.  Write  for 
our  proposition.  Book-keeping  Machines,  Ltd., 
424  Spadina  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


SHOW  CASES  AND    STORE    FIXTURES    for 
every  business    Send  for  illustrated  catalogue. 
Jones  Bros.  &  Co.,    Limited,   30-32  Adelaide 
St.   W.,   Toronto.  Ont.  (tf) 

SAVE  50/;  OF  THE  COST  OF  HANDLING 
merchandise  by  installing  a  Beath  System  of 
Overhead  Carriers.  Saves  valuable  floor 
space  because  the  trackage  is  on  the  ceiling.  Sys- 
tems for  all  kinds  of  businesses,  large  or  small. 
Write  us  for  illustrated  catalog.  W.  D.  Beath  & 
Son,  193  Terauley  St.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


SCOTCH  PLAID  STATIONERY  is  the  latest 
O  creation  for  business  and  society  correspon- 
dence. Paper  and  envelopes  present  a  finish- 
ed linen  surface,  most  agreeable  M  the  pen  touch. 
Leading  stationers  have  it.  Write  for  samples. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

THE  "KALAMAZOO"  Loose  L  af  B  nder  is 
x  the  only  binder  that  will  hold  iust  as  many 
sheets  as  you  actually  require  and  no  more. 
The  back  is  flexible,  writing  surface  flat,  align- 
ment perfect.  No  exposed  metal  parts  or  compli- 
cated mechanism.  Write  for  booklet.  Warwick 
Bros.  &  Rutter,  Ltd.,  King  and  Spadina,  Toronto. 

THE  METAL  REQUIRED  IN  A  MODERN 
CONCRETE  BUILDING.  Our  sptcial 
facilities  enable  us  to  produce  at  minimum 
cost  Concrete  Reinforcements,  Fenestra  Steel 
Sash,  Automatic  Fire  Shutters  and  Steelcrete 
Metal  Lath.  Complete  stock;  quick  delivery. 
Before  deciding  write  us  for  catalogue  and  prices. 
Expanded  Metal  and  Fireproofing  Co.,  Ltd., 
Fraser  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


TT7AREHOUSE    and    Factory  Heating   Systems. 
"      Taylor-Forbes  Company,  Limited.    Supplied 
by  the  trade  throughout  Canada. 

WHEN   BUYING  BOOKCASES  Insist  on  hav 
ing  the    best  in  the  market— "  Macey    Sec 
tional  Bookcases."     Carried  in  stock  by  al 
up-to-date   furniture   dealers.     Illustrated    bookie 
sent  free  on  request.     Canada   Furniture  Manufac 
turers,  Ltd. ;  General  offices,  Woodstock,  Ont.(tf) 


TT7ANTED — A  splendid  opportunity  for  dealers 
"  to  handle  the  best  combination  Duplicating, 
Addressing  and  Office  Printing  Machine  on 
the  market.  Exclus  ve  territory.  Send  name  and 
address,  giving  occupation  and  references  to  the 
Canadian  Writerpress  Company,  Ltd.,  33  John  St., 
Hamilton,  Ont. 

WHY  IMPORT  Loose-Leaf  Binders  and  Metal 
Parts  when  you  can  buy  "  Systems  Quality" 
from  us?  We  make  the  best  binders  in  the 
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(tf)  _ 

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can  rest  at  ease;  no  fire  is  too  hot  for  our 
safes  and  vaults  to  withstand.  We  manufacture 
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to  P.  P.,  sales  manager,  Box  185,  Toronto.    (3,10) 


37 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Brief  Notices  of  Some  Recent  Books 

Interesting  Novel  of  Adventure  on  the 
Congo  by  H.  deVere  Stacpoole  — 
Some  Books  on  Health  and  Life  from 
London. 

Fiction. 

Pools  of  Silence.     By  K.   de  Vere  Stacpoole.     Toronto: 
Copp,  Clark  Co.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

The  atrocities  on  the  Congo  are  here  made  to  serve  as 
material  for  a  powerful  story  of  adventure,  on  the  Dark 
Continent.  The  hero,  a  young  American  doctor,  joins  the 
expedition  of  a  big  game  hunter,  a  Frenchman,  who  pur- 
poses penetrating  into  the  interior  of  Africa.  '  This 
Frenchman  is  a  somewhat  remarkable  character,  who  con- 
ceals beneath  a  conventional  exterior  a  cruel  and  brutal 
nature.  He  is  in  reality  hand-in-glove  with  the  Congo 
murderers.  The  expedition  is  finally  almost  annihilat- 
ed in  a  midnight  stampede  of  a  big  herd  of  elephants,  and 
it  is  only  with  the  greatest  difficulty  that  the  doctor  brings 
the  Frenchman  back  to  civilisation.  The  latter  has  been 
injured  in  such  a  way  as  to  change  his  whole  nature. 
The'etory  is  a  most  vivid  and  realistic  one. 


Two  Women.  By  Baroness  D'Anethan.  Toronto:  Copp, 
(lark  Co.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

The  authoress,  who  is  a  sister  of  H.  Rider  Haggard,  has 
given  us  a  modern  society  story  with  the  scene  laid  in 
England.  A  mother  and  her  daughter  tell  the  story  in 
their  diaries.  A  situation  of  some  delicacy  is  created, 
both  in  the  case  of  mother  and  daughter.  This  the  writer 
handles  quite  openly. 

Miscellaneous. 
Art  of  Sympathy,  The.     By  T.  Sharper  Knowlson.    Lon- 
don :  Frederick  Warne  &  Co.     Cloth  2s.  6d.  net. 

This  is  the  third  of  a  series  of  manuals,  of  which  the 
first  was  "The  Art  of  Thinking,"  and  the  second  "The 
Art  of  Success."  Mr.  Knowlson  attempts  to  show  how 
deep  and  wide  are  the  effects  of  sympathy  in  relation  to 
our  intellectual  life,  our  well-being  and  even  our  political 
future.     It  is  a  stimulating  book. 

Scientific  Living  for  Prolonging  the  Term  of  Human  Life. 
By  Laura  Nettleton  Brown.  New  York:  Health  Cul- 
ture Co.,  1133  Broadway.     Cloth  $1. 

The  author  emphasizes  a  great  truth,  namely,  that  in 
the  ordinary  processes  of  cooking  the  organic  elements 
become  inorganic  and  food  values  are  destroyed.  She 
demonstrates  the  new  way  of  living,  providing  food 
tables,  recipes  and  menus.  The  volume  is  thoroughly 
sensible  and  enlightening. 


INDEX     TO     ADVERTISERS 


Accountants  and  Auditors 

Acme  Staple  Co 

Albermarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

American   Code   Co 

American    Crayon   Co 

Anglo  Can.  Music  Co 

Art  Metropole  Co 

Aukl  Mucilage  C<> 


28 
34 
20 
55 
30 
58 
69 
27 


B 


Baker's  Book  Shop 

Berliner  Gramaphone  Co 

Blaisdell  Paper  Pencil  Co 

Briggs,    Wm 

British-America  Assurance  Co. 
Brown   Bros.,    Ltd 


Buntin.     Gillies     &     Co.,    outside 

cover  and 

Busy   Man 's   Magazine    

C 

Canadian  Facts  Pub.  Co. 

Canadian  Press  Clipping  Bureau 

Cassell  &  Company 

Carter 's  Ink  Co 

Columbia  Phonograph   Co 

Consolidated      Lithographing      & 

Mfg.   Co. 

Consolidated    Safety    Pin    Co.... 

Conwav,  Stewart   &   Co 

Copp,  Clark  Co 49,  68, 

Crowell,   Thos.   Y.   &   Co 

D 

Davids,  Thaddeus  Co 

Duryea-Hoge  Co 

-E 

Eafon,  Crane  &  Pike  Co 

Elliott,  Chas.  H.  Co ' 

F 
Fancy  Goods  Co.  of  Canada,  in- 
side back  cover  and 


58 
66 
39 
55 
2 

31 

44 

25 
23 
52 
24 
60 

24 
33 
8 
72 
54 

23 
34 

24 
36 


70. 


Financial    Post    57 

Frowde,  Henry  39 

C 

Gage,  W.  J.  &  Co 3 

Goodall's    1 

H 

Heath,   John    34 

Hendry,  Geo.  M.,  Co 23 

Higgins,  Chas.  M.  &  Co IS  li) 

Hinks.  Wells  &  Co 34 

Hotel  Directory    43 

Hunt,  C.  Howard,  Pen  Co 

Hurd.  Geo.   B.,   &   Co 21 

Hurst,  A.  0 1 

J 

Jewel  Pen  Co 22 

L 

Lemcke  &  Buechner   37 

M 

MaieDougall,  A.  Roy   66  27 

Macmillan  Company   54 

MacNiven  &  Cameron 34 

Mabie,  Todd  &  Co 23 

Manufacturer  Sales  Co 34 

McFarlane,  Sou  &  Hodgson 15 

McKinley   Music   Co.,  Ltd 58 

McLeod  &  Allen    50 

McClelland    &    Goodehild    57 

Mil  tag  &  Volger.  .  .outside  back  cover 

Morris,  E.  &^Co 24 

Morton.  Phillips   &   Co 36 

Musson  Book  Company    51 

Mutual  Book  Co '. 66 

N' 

.National  Blank  Book  Co 23 

Northern  Mills  Pulp  &  Paper  Co.  21 

O 

Onolo   Pen    Company    29 

O.K.  Mfg.  Co 32 

3"? 


Payson's  Indelible  Ink 
R 


Ramsay,  A.,  &  Son  Co 

Religious  Tract  Society 
Rumpp  &  Sons.  C.  F 

S 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Co 

Sharpe,  Ltd.,  W.  N 

Smart    Mfg.    Co.,   James..., 
Smith,  Davidson   &  Wright 

Southam  Limited   

Spencerian  Steel  Pens   

Standard  Crayon  Co 

Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co..., 

Stauntons,   Ltd 

Sutcliffe  Company   


Tatum,  Sam'l  C.  Co.  .. 

Tuttle  Press  Co 

Tuck  &  Sons,  Raphael 

U 
Underwood,  John  &  Co. 

V 


Valentine  &   Sc 


W 


Ward  &  Co 

Ward,  Lock  &  Co 

Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter, 

Inside  front  cover  and  62 

Waterman,  L.  E.,  Co.,  Ltd 

Weeks-Numan    Co 

Western  Assurance  Co 

Western    Leather    Goods    Co 

Westminster  Company   

Whaley,  Royce  &   Co 


36 


70 
52 
65 


31 
59 
27 

22 
34 
23 

27 
21 
21 


33 
66 

71 


17 


65 


55 
48 

63 
4 
33 
55 
65 
53 
58 


BOOKSKLLER     AND     STATIONER 


OXFORD  UNIVERSITY  PRESS 


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39 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


REV.  D.  V.   LUCAS,   D.D., 
Author  of  "The   Maoris   of  New   Zealand." 

Gossip  of  the  *  Month 

Palmer  Cox  has  been  for  years  a  name  to  conjure 
with  among  the  little  folks  and  his  Brownies  have  become 
prominent  in  all  walks  of  life.  Most  people,  not  aware 
of  the  fact,  would  be  ready  to  dub  him  an  American, 
the  minute  any  reference  was  made  to  his  nationality. 
But,  though  he  may  vote  in  the  United  States,  his  heart 
is  still  in  the  place  of  his  birth  and  Granby  may  well  be 
proud  of  her  son.  It  is  astonishing  to  note  what  a  really 
important  part  Canada  is  playing  to-day,  both  in  the 
field  of  letters  and  on  the  stage  in  the  United  States.  It 
must  be  a  common  experience  of  others,  as  it  is  of  the 
writer,  to  hear  people  of  prominence  in  a  literary  or 
theatrical  way  referred  to  as  being  originally  from  Can- 
ada. These  individuals  seem  to  crop  up  everywhere  and 
if  one  were  to  start  to  emunerate  them  the  total  would 
likely  reach  unexpected  proportions.  In  any  such  record 
a  foremost  place  should  be  accorded  to  Mr.  Cox. 


It  has  been  -the  custom  of  a  good  many  people  for 
years  back  to  sneer  at  the  efforts  of  our  Canadian  au- 
thors to  make  a  name  for  themselves.  They  have  viewed 
it  as  an  utter  impossibility  for  any  writer,  residing  in 
the  Dominion,  to  produce  anything  worth  reading  or  to 
sell  it,  should  it  chance  to  be  worth  reading.  For  awhile 
this  may  have  been  the  case,  but  to  any  one  who  has 
studied  the  lists  of  best  sellers  in  Canada  for  the  last 
year  or  two,  the  reverse  must  be  apparent.  During  the 
holiday  season  of  last  year  at  least  four  of  the  six  best- 
selling  books  in  the  Canadian  bookstores  were  by  Cana- 
dian authors,  and  they  were  not  the  authors  who  had 
deserted  Canada.  This  fact  must  be  sufficient  to  dis- 
prove the  theory  that  nothing  good  in  a  literary  way 
can  come  out  of  the  Dominion. 
■  »     •     • 

The  handsome  new  building  which  the  Macmillan  Co. 
of  Canada  are  now  erecting  in  Toronto,  is  an  indication 
that  the  book  business  of  this  country  is  reaching  big 


proportions.  While  this  publishing  house  will  not  at  first 
occupy  the  entire  building,  still  the  portion  to  be  used 
by  them  is  sufficiently  large  to  make  the  foregoing 
statement  true.  The  Macmillans  have  always  stood  for 
a  high  standard  in  all  departments  of  their  business,  and 
it  is  fitting  that  the  Canadian  company  should  be  housed 
in  a  building  of  such  attractive  appearance.  It  is  the 
first  structure  of  the  kind  to  be  erected  in  Toronto  and 
so  much  admired  has  it  been,  that  already  two  build- 
ings of  somewhat  similar  design  are  being  projected  by 
other  business  houses  in  the  city. 
*     *     * 

That  Canada  is  reaching  national  proportions  is  to 
be  daily  deduced  from  the  character  of  her  publications, 
both  books  and  periodicals.  The  appearance  this  month 
of  the  "Dominion  Who's  Who,"  modelled  almost  exactly 
on  the  English  publication  of  the  same  name,  indicates 
that  we  have  become  big  enough  to  require  such  a  book, 
from  which  information  about  the  leading  men  of  Canada 
may  be  readily  obtained.  This  is  but  one  instance  of 
this  growth.  The  increasing  number  of  our  periodicals 
and  the  development  of  the  leading  magazines  of  the 
country,  is  another  sure  indicator  of  national  growth. . 
»     *     * 

There  are  a  good  many  people  in  Canada,  who  are  in 
a  state  of  ignorance  as  to  the  existence  and  work  of  The 
Royal  Society  of  Canada.  They  may  run  across  an 
item  in  one  of  the  daily  papers  once  a  year  to  the  effect 
that  the  Society  is  meeting  and  that  Dr.  So-and-So  has 
delivered  an  address  or  read  a  paper  before  it,  but  be- 
yond that  they  have  no  knowledge  of  the  organization. 
Yet,  viewing  it  from  a  literary  standpoint  the  Royal 
Society  is  doing  splendid  work  for  Canada.  It  produces 
each  year  a  big  volume,  running  usually  to  over  1,000 
pages,  in  which  are  published  all  the  papers  read  before 
it.  Many  of  these  papers  are  of  great  value  and  doubt- 
less would  never  have  been  put  in  type,  had  it  not  been 
for  the  kind  assistance  of  the  Royal  Society. 
*      *     * 

The  annual  volume  containing  the  transactions  of 
the  Royal  Society  is  published  in  a  limited  edition,  and 
the  bulk  of  its  circulation  is  gratuitous.  Thus  every 
Member  of  Parliament  and  Senator  comes  in  for  a  free 
copy,  by  reason  of  his  office.  One  wonders  how  some  of 
our  eminent   politicians   view  the   cumbrous   tome,    as   it 


R.  F.  FOSTER 

Author  of  "Cab  No.  44. 
(Copp,  Clark.) 


40 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


is  deposited  on  their  desk.  The  combination  strikes  one 
as  ludicrous  in  a  good  many  cases  and  it  would  be  much 
more  fitting  were  the  books  distributed  to  Canadians, 
•who  really  appreciated  them.     But,   unless   a  member     is 


DOROTHY  DEAN  TATE 

The  young  Torontonian  who   has  written  a 

charming  Japanese  story. 

generous  enough  to  hand  over  his  copy  to  some  ambi- 
tious constituent  the  poor  public  must  scramble  for  the 
remaining  copies  and  pay  five  dollars  apiece  for  them  at 
that. 

*       =k       * 


Here  is  an  opportunity  for  some  of  our  young  students 
in  political  economy  to  do  excellent  work  during  their 
vacations.  We  believe  that  a  carefully  edited  volume 
of  reminscences  of  some  of  our  Canadian  patriarchs,  would 
receive  recognition,  not  only  from  the  publishers,  but  from 
from  the  public 


The  writer  had  an  opportunity  recently  lo  look  over 
a  list  of  the  women  writers  of  Canada.  The  number  of 
these  aspirants  to  literary  fame  was  astonishingly  large. 
and  every  one  of  them  had  done  some  work  worthy  of 
note.  Perhaps  in  some  future  number  it  would  be  in- 
teresting to  have  an  article  on  this  subject,  showing  just 
what  the  women  writers  of  Canada  have  accomplished. 


While  there  is  no  outstanding  Canadian  work  announc- 
ed as  yet  for  this  year,  one  cannot  say  with  an  finality 
that  there  will  be  nothing  of  special  importance.  Publish- 
ing is  done  so  queerly  oftentimes  in  this  country,  that 
nothing  may  be  known  about  a  book  until  it  is  out.  There 
are  several  reasons  for  this,  all  of  which  may  be  em- 
braced in  the  single  explanation  that  the  publishing  busi- 
ness has  not  yet  reached  that  degree  of  systematized 
effort,  when  there  is  one  department  for  this  and  another 
department  for  that,  all  working  harmoniously.  With 
us  it  is  usually  a  one-man  affair  from  beginning  to  end 
and,  in  the  actual  work  of  producing  a  book,  he  has  no 
time  left  for  advertising  it. 


The  authors  of  papers  appearing  in  the 
Transactions  of  the  Royal  Society  are 
presented  with  one  hundred  copies  of 
their  article  in  separate  form,  for  dis- 
tribution to  whom  they  will.  Occasion- 
ally an  author  will  arrange  to  issue  ad- 
ditional copies,  as  in  the  case  of  Mr. 
O'Brien's  "Sketch  and  Bibliography  of 
Haliburton,"  reference  to  which  is  made 
in  this  number.  This  gives  an  author  a 
good  opportunity  to  bring  his  work  to 
the  attention  of  people  likely  to  be  in- 
terested in  it. 


It  is  to  be  regretted  that  more  of  oui 
public  men,  who  have  served  their  day 
in  the  councils  of  the  nation,  and  have 
now  retired,  do  not  find  it  possible  to 
set  down  in  writing  their  reminiscences 
of  earlier  times.  A  few,  it  is  true,  have 
done  this,  but  there  are  many  others 
who  might  give  us  most  interesting 
books,  if  they  only  tried.  Of  course, 
there  is  always  the  excuse  that  not 
every  one  is  gifted  with  the  ability  to 
write,  and  this  must  hold  good  of  a 
great  many  of  the  public  men  of  a  young 
nation  like  Canada.  But  oftentimes  it 
is  just  the  man  who  is  full  of  the  most 
interesting  reminiscences,  who  is  unable 
to  turn  a  sentence  properly,  when  con- 
fronted with  pencil  and  paper.  In  such 
cases,    why   not  employ   an    amanuensis  ? 


K,Dtn|aon    *   Sli 

Artistic  Front  of  the    New  Macmillan    Buldlng  in   Toronto,    now   in   Course  of    Erection. 
41 


An  Interview  with  Palmer  Cox,  the  Brownie  Man 

The  Creator  of  the  Brownies  and  the  Recounter  their  of  Ludicrous  Adventures  Vis- 
ited in  his  home,  "Brownie  Castle,"  at  Granby,  Quebec,  the  Place  of  His  Birth. 

By  C.  D-  Chown 


~£  cd.  et}own. 

^  Know  ye  not",   die  Brownie  cries, 
At  our  Comirip  Irouible  ftie.s. 
Joy  ?ncl  peace  andgooclly  gaivi, 
Surely  follow  in  our  tVairj, 
Give  me  fbcrl  up°*]  you-r  srjelf 
c"iew«£  covner  for  myself. 


Souvenir  and   Autograph. 

The  Town  of  Granby,  Quebec  possesses  several  claims 
.to  distinction.  Not  least  of  these  must  be  reckoned  the 
the  fact  that  it  is  the  birthplace  and  the  home,  for  a  great 
part  of  the  year,  of  a  man,  who  has  contributed  vastly  to 
the  enjoyment  of  countless  children,  young  and  old,  dur- 
ing the  past  thirty  years.  While  the  success  of  most  men, 
even  of  writers,  is  reckoned  in  dollars  and  cents,  that  of 
Palmer  Cox  must  be  summed  up  in  the  clean,  wholesome 
pleasure  he  has  given,  wherever  his  Brownie  stories  have 
been  circulated. 

On  the  highest  spot  in  town,  near  its  boundary  line, 
and  adjoining  the  open  country,  stands  Brownie  Castle, 
the  residence  of  Mr.  Cox,  when  he  finds  time  to  spare  for 
a  month  or  two's  enjoyment  of  the  delightful  scenery  and 
bracing  air  of  his  former  home.  This  winter,  for  private 
reasons,  he  has  remained  in  Granby  and  chancing  to  be 
in  the  town  recently  I  was  fortunate  enough  to  be  grant- 
ed the  privilege  of  an  interview. 

I -found  the  author-artist  hard  at  work  in  his  study,  a 
room  adjoining  his  studio,  which,  to  secure  the  best  light 
possible,  is  situated  in  the  upper  pare  of  the  tower,  shown 
in'  the  illustration.  He  was  buisily  engaged  putting  the 
finishing  touches  to  a  ,series  of  sketches  to  accompany  his 
latest  Brownie  story  for  St.  Nicholas  magazine.  Affable 
in  the  extreme,  Mr.  Cox  was  nor  at  all  averse  to  relating 
the  story  of  his  life  and  telling  how  he  began  to  write 
the  adventures  of 'the  Brownies. 

Palmer  Cox  was  born  in  Granby  on  April  28th,  1840. 
and  at  an  early  age  developed  astonishing  skill  with  pen 
and  pencil.  The  caricatures  which  he  produced  at  school 
were  so  telling  that  as  a  punishment  he  was  often  made 
to  stand  on  the  schoolroom  floor,  exposing  his  work  on  his 
slate. 

When  seventeen  years  of  age  he  went  to  the  Eastern 
States,  but  in  a,  short  time  removed  to  Lucknow,  Ontario. 
Then  attracted  by  the  gold-mining  boom  in  Californa, 
he  went  west.  -It  was  there  that  he  discovered  where  his 
talent  really  lay  and  he  began  writing  articles  for  the 
western  papers  and  illustrating  them  as  opportunity  offer- 
ed. Gradually  h'e  found  his  writing  taking  a  secondary 
place  to  his  drawing,  but  as  California  did  not  offer  much 
encouragement  to  him  in  those  days,  he  decided  to  re- 
turn to  the  east,  where  he  had  already  formed  some  fav- 
orable connections  with  -New  York  publications. 


The  year  1878  found  him  in  New  York  devoting  his 
whole  time  to  literary  and  illustrative  work  for  the  comic- 
papers.  By  chance  his  work  brought  him  into  touch  with 
a  German  firm,  who  called  his  attention  to  the  tales  writ- 
ten in  Germany  for  children,  telling  him  that  they  discern- 
ed in  his  comic  stories  indications  of  his  ability  to  write 
interesting  children's  stories.  He  accordingly  prepared  a 
clean,  wholesome  tale,  that  would  bear  the  inspection  of 
mothers,  illustrated  it,  and  submitted  it  to  the  editor  of 
St.  Nicholas,  then,  as  now,  a  young  people's  magazine. 
It  was  promptly  accepted  and  immediate  arrangements 
were  made  with  him  for  other  stories  on  similar  lines. 

Each  of  these  stories  had  a  separate  indentity,  but  in 
time  Mr.  Cox  conceived  the  idea  of  originating  some  char- 
acter, which  would  be  the  central  figure  of  a  series. 
Memories  of  his  boyhood  days  recalled  the  tales  he  had 
heard  from  his  Scotch-Canadian  neighbors  of  the  Brownie 
legends,  and  in  these  mythical  little  people  he  felt  he 
had  just  the  kind  of  material  he  wanted.  He  set  to  work 
to  ransack  encyclopedias  and  books  of  reference  in  pur- 
suit of  information  about  the  traditions  surrounding  the 
Brownies.  He  found  that  they  were  small  male  spirits 
similar  to  the  fairies,  and  that  they  were  the  reverse  of 
the  Old  English  gnomes,  being  kind  and  careful  little 
fellows,  delighting  in  performing  acts  of  kindness  for  the 
farmer  and  his  wife.  All  that  was  needed  to  keep  in 
their  good  graces  was  to  leave  in  a  convenient  place  a 
bowl  of  cream  or  home-made  malt.  Their  names  was  de- 
rived from  the  way  their  skin  was  tanned  brown  by  the 
sun. 

In  the  first  series  of  Mr.  Cox's  Brownie  stories,  the 
Brownies  were  represented  as  being  all  alike,  going 
around   in   bands.     Later  on.  there  were  introduced,  one 


BROWNIE  CASTLE 
Residence   of   Palmer   Cox   at  Granby,   Quebec. 


42 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


by  one,  separate  characters,  like  the  Dude,  the  Police- 
man, the  Soldier,  the  Irishman,  until  there  were  forty- 
two  different  Brownies,  each  one  of  whom  was  separately 
copyrighted  by  the  artist. 

Naturally,  Mr.  Cox  is  intensely  fond  of  children. 
Wherever  he  goes  he  quickly  makes  friends  with  the 
young  folk  in  his  neighborhood,  romps  with  them  and 
arranges  their  games.  One  of  his  favorite  pastimes  is  to 
produce  a  Brownie  play,  in  which  his  friends,  the  child- 
ren, take  the  parts  of  the  Brownies. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  that  Mr.  Cox  derives  quite  a 
handsome  income  from  royalties  received  from  manu- 
facturers for  the  use  of  the  word  Brownie  on  cameras, 
carpets,  calico,  pins  and  on  the  stage. 

.As  I  bade  farewell  to  the  tall,  kindly  Brownie  man 
and  came  away  from  his  castle  on  the  hill,  I  felt  what  a 
splendid  achievement  it  was  for  any  man  to  spend  his 
days  diffusing  around  him  such  a  wealth  of  pleasant 
fancies  and  creating  so  much  happiness  in  the  world. 
Surely  his  name  will  go  down  to  posterity  as  blessed. 


Some  Canadian  Books  of  the  Month 

The  First  Publications  of  the  Year — 
An  Important  Historical  Work  and  an 
Interesting  Volume  of  Biography 
Ready — Other  Books  of  Interest. 

Of  the  long  list  of  Canadian  books  promised  for  pub- 
lication this  year  only  a  very  few  have  as  yet  made  their 
appearance.  Of  these  probably  the  most  important  is 
Father  Morice's  two-volume  "History  of  the  Catholic 
Church  in  Western  Canada,"  of  which  a  brief  review 
appears  on  this  page.  Information  about  other  new 
Canadiana  will  be  found  elsewhere  in   this  number. 

The  Empire  Day  by  Day. 

A  useful  compilation  of  historical  events  of  an  imperial 
significance  for  every  day  of  the  year  has  been  made  by 
Frank  Wise,  president  of  the  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada. 
These  have  been  arranged  in  a  small  book  of  31  pages, 
with  the  title,  "The  Empire  Day  by  Day."  Mr.  Wise 
has  made  a  good  selection  of  those  events  which  will  in- 
spire the  mind  with  imperial  achievements  and  ideals.  He 
has  in  this  way  done  a  great  service  to  the  cause  of  Im- 
perialism, and  as  the  book  will  be  used  extensively.  in 
the  schools,  it  will  be  bound  to  exert  a  strong  influence. 
Already  the  first  edition  of  15,000  copies  has  been  ex- 
hausted  and  a   new   edition   called  for. 


Father  Morice's  Important  History. 

Canada  has  been  blessed  with  a  plentiful  supply  of 
historians,  but  of  the  number  very  few  seem  to  have 
written  works  of  abiding  interest.  This  may  be  due 
Largely  to  the  fact  that  there  has  been  a  great  deal  of 
duplication  and  a  great  deal  of  imperfect  aQd  hurried 
writing.  Parkman  has  caught  the  spirit  of  the  early 
days  admirably  and  his  historical  works  will  go  down 
to  posterity  as  the  best  picture  of  pioneer  life  in  the 
east.  For  western  Canada,  Father  Morice  can  lay  claim 
to  having  produced  history  of  a  similarly  entertaining 
character.  In  his  latest  two-volume  "History  of  the 
Catholic  Church  in  Western  Canada,"  which  might  better 
have  been  called  simply  a  history  of  western  Canada,  he 
has  produced  a  work  of  considerable  importance.  He 
has  seized  on  all  the  romantic  elements  of  this  history  and 
has  made  the  most  of  them.  And  this,  too,  may  be  said 
of  all  Father  Morice's  work,  that  its  accuracy  is,  humanly 
speaking,  undoubted.  He  is  a  most  painstaking  investi- 
gator and  conscientious  writer,  and  in  reading  this  book- 
one  feels  that  the  author  may  be  relied  upon  to  give  the 
correct  version  of  each  incident.  It  is  true  that  lie  is 
dealing  primarily  with  the  Catholic  Church,  but  this  only 
acts,  as  it  were,  as  a  thread  upon  which  to  string  the 
whole  mass  of  western  history.  (Toronto:  Musson  Book 
( lompany). 

An  Interesting  Biographical  Volume. 

The  memorial  volume  to  his  father,  which  Rev.  J.  1). 
Anderson  has  prepared  ("Reminiscences  and  Incidents  of 
i he  Rev.  John  Anderson."  Toronto:  Briggs.  Cloth,  $1.50) 
:s  a  simple  narrative  of  facts  and  incidents.  With  re- 
markable clearness  and  spiritual  insight,  the  writer  sets 
forth  the  leadings  and  workings  of  Divine  Providence  in 
preparing  him  for  the  Christian  ministry.  The  record  of 
his  long  life  contains  some  striking  experiences  of  the 
struggle  that  goes  on  in  the  human  soul  with  the  power? 
of  evil  and  its  ultimate  triumph  through  simple  trust  in 
Cod  and  His  promises.  Vivid  pictures  are  drawn  of  his 
early  home  and  school  life  in  Scotland.  Then  follows 
the  migration  of  the  family  to  Canada,  some  years  of 
arduous  manual  labor,  his  marriage,  his  college  career,  and 
lastly,  forty  years  of  strenuous  pastoral  duties  in  various 
parts  of  Canada.  All  this,  told  with  unaffected  simplicity 
ami  realistic  directness,  reads  like  a  chapter  out  of  Bunyan, 
whom  this  writer  resembles  also  in  that  element  of  mysti- 
cism, which  he.  no  doubt,  derived  from  his  Highland  ances- 
tors. The  difficult  conditions  under  which  Oospel  minis- 
i  rations  were  carried  on  in  rural  districts  fifty  years  ago 
are  graphically  presented,  and  thus  incidentally  a  fresh 
page  is  contributed  to  ilie  history  of  the  church  in  Canada. 


Sketch  and  Bibliography  of  Haliburton. 

A.  H.  O'Brien,  M.A.,  Ottawa,  has  reprinted  the  paper 
which  he  read  before  the  Royal  Society  of  Canada  mi 
Judge  Haliburton,  in  a  pamphlet  of  26  pages.  Its  main 
value  lies  in  the  very  carefully  prepared  bibliography  of 
Haliburton 's  works,  which  it  contains.  He  has  also  added 
a  list  of  reviews  and  criticisms  of  particular  works  and 
a  list  of  biographies  and  portraits,  which  will  be  found 
most  useful  by  any  one  desirous  of  studying  the  life  and 
writings  of  America's  first  humorist.  It  is  interesting-  to 
note  that  more  attention  is  being  given  to  Haliburton  at 
the  present  day,  and  men  like  Mr.  O'Brien  are  to  be  com- 
mended for  directing  readers  to  him.  The  edition  is  limit- 
ed to  300  copies,  which  means  that  the  work  will  become 
more   and   more  valuable   as   the  years  go  by. 

43 


ADDITIONS  TO  FINSBURY  LIBRARY. 

Attention  was  directed  last  year  to  a,  new  shilling 
library  of  reprints  being  issued  by  Robert  Culley,  London. 
E.C.,  as  the  Finsbury  Library.  Six  volumes  were  published 
last  year  and  now  six  new  titles  have  been  added  to  the 
series.  These  include  "The  Trilogy;  or  Dante's  Three 
Visions"  (three  volumes).  "Rural  Rides  in  the  Counties 
of  Surrey,  Kent,  Sussex,  Hants,  Berks,  etc..  etc.,"  by 
William  Cobbett,  in  two  volumes,  and  "The  Early  Journal 
of  Charles  Wesley,"  edited  by  J.  Telford,  B.A.  The  books 
are  well  printed  on  excellent  paper  and  compare  favorably 
with  any  other  shilling  reprint  series  published. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Information  about  Copyright  Fiction 

The  Latest  Additions  to  Publishers' 
Spring  Lists — Titles  Which  have  al- 
ready   Appeared  —  Books  due  this 
Month  and  in  April. 

McClelland  &  Goodchild,  Toronto,  announce  that  they 
will  carry  a  specially  hig  stock  of  Miss  L.  M.  Montgom- 
ery's new  story,  "Kilmeny  of  the  Orchard,"  which  will 
be  published  on  April  15. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  ready  "'The  Man  Who  Stole 
the  Earth,"  by  W.  Holt  White,  ''Cab  No.  44,"  by  R.  F. 
Foster,  and  "Pools  of  Silence,"  by  H.  de  Vere  Stacpoole. 
They  have  also  ready  a  second  edition  of  "Northern 
Lights,"  by  Sir  Gilbert  Parker,  and  a  new  75c  edition 
of  "Butternut  Jones,"  by  Tilford  Tildeu.  ■    ' 

Henry  Frowde,  Oxford  University  Press,  Canadian 
Branch,  will  have  ready  for  publication  in  May  the  new- 
story  by  William  J.  Locke,  entitled  "Simon  the  Jester." 
now  running  its  serial  course  in  the  American  Magazine. 
He  is  arranging  to  bring  out  in  August  a  "find"  entitled 
"The  Circuit  Rider's  Wife,"  by  Mrs.  Harris,  which  he 
believes  is  destined  to  make  a  great  hit. 

Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  added  to  their  fiction  list  for 
spring,  "The  Sword  Maker,"  by  Robert  Barr,  "The  Sky 
Man,"  by  H.  K.  Webster,  "The  Gilded  Chair,"  by  Mel- 
ville D.  Post  and  "A  Disciple  of  Chance,"  by  Sara 
Dean.  They  have  postponed  the  publication  of  "Queen 
Sheba's  Ring,"  by  H.  Rider  Haggard,  until  August.  "The 
Losing  Game,"  by  Will  Payne,  appears  this  month. 

•  McLeod  &  Allen  have  added  to  tneir  spring  list  the 
following  titles,  which  will  be  issued  in  the  near  future : — 
•'Samuel  the  Seeker,"  by  Upton  Sinclair,  "The  Educa- 
tion of  Jacqueline."  by  Claire  de  Pratz,  "The  Emigrant 
Trial."  by  Geraldine  Bonner  and  "Joe  Muller,  Detec- 
tive," by  Grace.  Isabel  Colbron.  They  expect  to  have 
ready  next  month,  Robert  W.  Chambers'  spring  book. 
"The  Green  Mouse." 

William  Briggs  has  already  issued  of  his  spring  list. 
"The  Man  Outside,"  by  W'yndham  Martyr/,  "The  For- 
tune Hunter,"  by  Louis  Joseph  Vance,  "The  Nest  of  the 
Sparrowhawk,"  by  Baroness  Orczy,  "Henry  of  Navarre." 
by  May  Wynne,  "Sir  Walter  Raleigh,"  by  Wm.  Dever- 
eux,  "Don  Q 's  Love  Story."  by  K.  and  Hesketh  Priehard. 
"Mary  up,  at  Gaffries,"  by  S.  C.  Nethersole,  "Under 
the  Thatch/'  by  Allen  Raine  and  "In  the  Shade."  by 
Vnlentina  Haw  trey. 

A.  C.  McClnrg  &  Co.,  Chicago,  have  decided  to  discon- 
tinue selling  editions  of  their  novels  to  Canadian  pub- 
lishers, and  as  a  result  they  are  themselves  taking  orders 
direct  for  their  spring  list.  Their  three  leading  titles 
are:  "Dan  Merrithew,"  by  Lawrence  Perry,  "Hopalong 
<•assi.lv. "  by  Clarence  E.  Mulford,  author  of  "Bar  20" 
and  "The  Politician,"  by  Edith  Huntington  Mason.  Other 
fiction  titles  are  "Prince  Izon,"  by  James  Paul  Kelly. 
"A  Vigilante  Girl."  by  Jerome  Hart.  "The  City  of 
Six,"  by  C.  L.  Canfield  and  "The  Cardinal's  Pawn,"  by 
K.  -L.   Montgomery. 

The  Macmillan  Co..  of  Canada,  have  now  ready 
"Tower  of- Ivory,"- bv  Gertrude  Atherton,  "Lost  Face." 
by  Jack  London  and  "Kings  in  Exile,""  by  Charles  (J. 
D.  Roberts.  They  announce  that  "A  Modern  Chronicle," 
by  Winston § Churchill  will  appear  in  April.  "The  Un- 
desirable Governess,"  by  the  late  F.  Marion  Crawford,  is 


to  be  published  towards  the  end  of  this  month.  To  then 
published  list,  they  have  added  "Litany  Lane,"  by  Mrs. 
Baillie  Saunders,  "The  Human  Cobweb,"  by  Putnam 
Weale,  "A  Gentleman  from  Virginia,"  by  Percy  Brebner 
and  "The  Education  of  Uncle  Paul,"  by  Algernon  Black- 
wood, all  of  which  will  be  published  shortly. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  announce  May  12  as  the  date 
of  publication  of  Mrs.  Humphry  Ward's  Canadian  story, 
"Lady  Merton,  Colonist."  They  have  just  issued  a  first 
edition  of  "The  Rosary, "  by  Florence  L.  Barclay,  for 
which  they  anticipate  a  big  sale.  A  new  edition  of  "The 
City  of  Beautiful  Nonsense,"  by  E.  Temple  Thurston  is 
promised  for  this  month.  They  will  also  have  ready  short- 
ly a  new  edition  of  "They  and  I,"  by  Jerome  K.  Jerome. 
Of  %their  spring  list  they  have  already  issued  "Lord  Love- 
land  Discovers  America,"  by  C.  N.  and  A.  M.  Williamson, 
"Over  the  Quicksands,"  by  Anna  C.  Ray,  "The  Snare  of 
Circumstance,"  by  Edith  E.  Buckley,  "Strictly  Business,  ' 
by  0.  Henry. 

$ 

Importations  by  Canadian  Publishers 

Books     of    General    Interest    being 
Brought  in  for  the  Benefit  of  Canadian 
Readers — Arrangements  for  Special 
Canadian  Editions. 

McClelland  &  Goodchild,  Toronto,  have  arranged  to 
inr.ort  a  supply  of  "The  First  Great  Canadian,"  by 
Charles  B.  Reed,  published  by  A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  and 
all  orders  will  be  promptly  filled. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  have  been  appointed  selling 
agents  lor  the  "Commercial  Handbook  of  Canada"  and 
"Opportunities  in  Canada,"  two  business  publications  of 
Houston's  Standard  Publications,  Toronto. 

McClelland  &  Goodchild  have  secured  Canadian  edi- 
tions of  two  popular  nature  books,  "How  to  Know  the 
Wild  Flowers,"  by  Mrs.  W.  S.  Dana,  and  "Our  Native 
Trees  and  How  to  Identify  Them,"  by  Harriet  L. 
Keeler. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  are  now  Canadian  agents  for 
the  Rlverdale  Literature  Series,  published  by  Houghton. 
Mifflin  &>  Co.,  Boston.  They  will  carry  a  complete  stock 
of  all  the  titles  required  for  supplementary  reading  in 
Canadian   schools. 

A  new  book  in  the  popular  "When  Mother  Lets  Us" 
series,  is  now  ready.  This  practical  hand  book  "When 
Mother  lets  us  Sew,"  by  Mrs.  Ralston,  fashion  editor 
Ladies'  Home  Journal,  should  prove  a  good  seller  with 
the  trade.     (McClelland  &  Goodchild). 

Recent  works  of  a  general  nature  appearing  through 
Musson,  Toronto,  are  "Nerves  and  Common  Sense,"  by 
Annie  Payson  Call  :  "The  Crime  of  the  Congo,"  by  A. 
C'onan  Doyle,  (50  cts.);  "Accounting'  Every  Business  Man 
Should  Know,"  by  E.  E.  Garrison,  ($1.25)  and  "From 
the  Bottom  Up"  by  Alexander  Irvine. 

The  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada  have  just  brought  in  a 
stock  of  The  Bright  Story  Readers,  consisting  of  seven 
grades  for  children  from  five  to  fourteen  years  of  age. 
In  each  grade  there  are  several  titles  and  prices  run 
from  six  to  eleven  cents  net.  All  the  old  favorite  child- 
ren's stories  are  to  be  found  in  this  series. 

An  important  book  of  African  travel,  which  will 
serve  as  a  good  introduction  to  the  Roosevelt  book,  to 
appear  in  the  autumn  is  "Camera  Adventures  in  African 
Wilds,"   by  A.    Radcliffe  Dugmore,  F.R.G.S.    ($5.00  net), 

44 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


in  which  are  to  be  found  100  illustrations.  The  book  is 
being  published  this  month  by  the  Musson  Book  Co. 

McClelland  &  Goodchild,  Toronto,  have  just  publish- 
ed a  Canadian  edition  of  "England  and  the  English  from 
an  American  point  of  View,"  by  Price  Collier.  This 
very  popular  work  has  already  gone  into  seven  English 
and  six  American  oditions.  It  is  said  to  be  the  only 
work  on  the  subject  published  on  this  side  of  the  Atlan- 
tic which  has  met  with  favor  in  England. 

A  Canadian  who  has  met  with  great  success  on  the 
platform  in  the  United  States  and  elsewhere  is  Grenville 
Kleiser.  Mr.  Kleiser  is  also  the  author  of  several  books 
on  public  speaking,  which  are  having  a  large  sale.  Mc- 
Clelland &  Goodchild  have  arranged  to  carry  these  books 
in  Canada,  "How  to  Speak  in  Public,"  "How  to  Deve- 
lop Power  and  Personality  in  Speaking,"  and  "Humorous 
Hits  and  How  to-Hold  an  Audience,"  should  prove  very 
popular  with  the  Canadian  trade. 

A  book  out  of  the  ordinary  that  will  appeal  to  all 
lovers  of  the  beautiful  in  nature  has  just  been  published 
by  McClelland  &  Goodchild,  Toronto.  It  is  "The  Land- 
scape Beautiful,"  by  Frank  A.  Waugh,  professor  of 
Horticulture  and  Landscape  Gardening,  Massachusetts 
Agricultural  College,  Amherst,  Mass.  The  illustrations 
are  a  very  attractive  feature  of  the  book,  numbering  49 
full-page  engravings  by  the  leading  photographic  artists 
of  America,    ($2.00  net). 

McClelland  &  Goodchild  who  are  Canadian  agents 
for  the  Sunday  School  Times  Co.,  have  just  received 
the  following  new  publications  of  this  house  that  will 
appeal  to  the  Canadian  trade:  "Men  and  .Missions,"  by 
William  T.  Ellis  ;  "A  Man's  Book  for  Men,"  endorsed 
by  the  Layman's  Missionary  Movement,  "How  to  Speak 
Without  Notes,"  by  Robert  E.  Speer  ;  "Knowing  and 
Teaching  the  Scholar,"  by  Dr.  A.  F.  Shauffler  ;  "Evan- 
gelism Through  Bible  Study,"  by  F.  S.  Goodman  ; 
"Amuru,  The  Home  of  the  Northern  Semites,"  by  Pro- 
fessor A.  T.  Clay. 

Among  recent  importations  by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 
are  the  following  publications  of  Archiblad  Constable  & 
Co.  :  "The  Last  Poems  of  George  Meredith"  ($1.35), 
"The  Romantic  Movement  in  English  Poetry,"  by  A. 
Symons  ■  ($3.15)  ;  "Plays,  Acting  and  Music,"  by  A. 
Symons  ($1.80)  ;  "Hamewith,"  a  book  of  Scottish  poe- 
try, by  Chas.  Murray,  ($1.50)  ;  "Extinct  Animals,"  by- 
Sir  E.  Ray  Lankester  ($1.05),  "Time  and  Clocks."  by 
H.  H.  Cunyn°:ham  (75ets.)  ;  "A  German  Pompadour," 
by  Marie  Hay,  ($1.80)  ;  "War  Songs  of  Britain,"  by- 
Butler,  (60  cts.),  and  "The  Autobiography  of  Lord 
Tweedmoutb,''   ($1.50). 


Interesting   Items    about  Canadiana 

Books,  Shortly  to  Appear,  of  Special 
Interest  to  Canadians, — Several  new 
Titles  Recorded  this  Month — Books 
of  Reference  Prominent. 


April  15  is  the  dale  set  for  the  publication  of  Miss  L. 
M.  Montgomery's  third  novel,  "Kilmeny  of  the  Orchard." 
In  view  of  the  popularity  of  the  Anne  books,  this  new 
story  is  awaited  with  special  interest. 

An  important  volume  on  Labrador,  written  by  W.  G. 
Gosling,  of  St.  Johns,  Nfld.,  on  "Labrador,  its  Discovery, 
Exploration  and  Development"  will  be  published  next 
month  by  the  Musson  Book  Co.,  Toronto,  in  conjunction 

45 


with  the  original  English  publisher.  This  book,  the  most 
comprehensive  yet  published  on  Labrador,  will  run  to 
COO  pages  and  will  be  well  illustrated. 

William  Briggs,  announces  the  early  publication  of 
"The  Veteran  and  Other  Poems,"  by  Rev.  Hamilton 
Wigle,  minister  of  Zion  Methodist  Church,  Winnipeg.  The 
style  of  the  verse  is  somewhat  like  that  of  »James  Whit- 
comb  Riley. 

Rev.  D.  V.  Lucas,  of  St.  Catharines,  well-known  as  a 
lecturer,  has  prepared  a  volume  on  "The  Maories  of  New- 
Zealand, "  which  William  Briggs  has  in  course  of  prepara- 
tion. Mr.  Lucas  is  the  author  of  "Australia  and  Home- 
ward," an  interesting  travel  book. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  published  last  month  Rev. 
Father  A.  G.  Morice's  two-volume  "History  of  the  Cath- 
olic Church  in  Western  Canada."  In  their  make-up  and 
general  appearance,  these  books  are  a  credit  to  the  pub- 
lishers.    They  were  m.n.de  in  Toronto. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  will  have  ready  this  month  the 
long-expected  "Dominion  Who's  Who,"  which  has  been 
compiled  by  Fred  Cook,  of  Ottawa,  and  is  being  issued 
by  the  London  Times.  It  will  bear  a  close  resemblance 
in  its  format  to  the  original  English  "Who's  Who." 

"The  Birds  of  the  Cross,"  is  the  title  of  a  new  volume 
of  verse  by  Rev.  Arthur  John  Lockhart,  dealing  with  the 
Annapolis  Valley.  .  Mr.  Lockhart  is  a  native  of  Nova 
Scotia,  but  he  has  been  living  for  some  time  in  Maine. 
The  book  is  published  by  O.  R.  Lougee,  Winterport, 
Mare. 

The  volume  on  Pierre  Le  Moyne,  Sieur  D 'Iberville,  an- 
nounced last  month,  by  A.  C.  McClurg  &  Co.,  Chicago,  is 
to  appear  with  the  title,  "The  First  Great  Canadian," 
publication  day  being  March  19.  Its  author,  as  already 
noted,  is  Charles  B.  Reed,  a  brother  of  Myrtle  Reed,  the 
novelist. 

Those  who  appreciate  the  writings  of  Charles  F.  Ray- 
mond, which  appeared  for  some  years  in  the  columns  of 
the  Toronto  Star,  will  be  pleased  to  hear  that  he  has 
compiled  a  third  volume  for  the  Cheerful  Life  Series, 
published  by  the  Dodge  Publishing  Co.,  of  New  York, 
which  will  appear  this  year.  Its  title  will  be  "The  Happy 
Life. "  Its  predecessors  were  "Cheer  lTp"  and  "Just  be 
Glad." 

Vet  another  memorial  volume  is  being  printed  by 
William  Briggs,  this  one  being  "Daniel  McNeil  Parker. 
M.D.,  His  Ancestry  and  a  Memoir  of  His  Life,"  by  his 
son,  William  Frederick  Parker.  Wolfville,  N.S.  Tire 
subject  of  the  memoir  was  for  over  titty  years  a  practis- 
ing physician  in  Halifax,  and  for  a  time  was  a  member 
of  the  Legislative  Assembly.  His  son  is  a  lawyer,  and 
was  for  a  time  in  partnership  with  R.  L.  Borden.  The 
book  will  make  a  large  volume,  which  will  be  issued  for 
private  circulation  only. 

In  this  month 's  list  of  interim  copyrights  appears  an 
entry— "The  Dominion  of  Canada,  a  General  History  of 
the  Constitutional.  Political.  Financial,  Education  and 
Social  Growth  of  the  whole  Country  From  its  Discovery 
to  the  Present  Day,"  by  Arthur  G.  Doughty.  Dominion 
Archivist  (12  volumes).  Dr.  Doughty  on  being  inter- 
viewed with  regard  to  this  work,  stated  that  no  decided 
action  had  yet  been  taken  about  its  publication.  He  ex- 
pected that  the  tirsi  two  volumes  would  be  ready  towards 
the  end  of  the  year,  and  would  likely  be  published  in  To- 
ronto. The  work  will  be  divided  into  two  parts,  the  first 
six  volumes  dealing  with  the  Dominion  as  a  whole  and 
the  remaining  six  with  the  provinces. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  Canadian  Monthly  List  of  Books 

A  Record  of  all  Books  Bearing  the 
Imprint  of  a  Canadian  Publisher.  Is- 
sued in  February  and  Early  in  March. 

Atherton,  Gertrude.     Tower  of  Ivory.     Toronto:  Macmil- 

lan.     February.      Cloth,  $1.50. 
Barclay,  Florence.    The  Rosary.    Toronto:  Musson.  March. 

Cloth,  $1.25. 

The  heroine,  the  Honorable  Jane  Champion,  stout,  good-natured 
and  plain  of  fate,  unwittingly  causes  a  handsome  young  artist,  Garth 
Dalmain,  to  fall  in  love  with  her  by  her  wonderful  singing  of  "The 
Rosary,"  at  a  concert  given  by  her  aunt.  When  he  proposes  to  her, 
she  refuses  him  on  account  of  her  plain  looks,  but  almost  breaks 
her  heart  in  doing  so,  for  she  has  learned  to  reciprocate  his  love. 
While  she  is  traveling  around  the  world,  in  a  vain  endeavor  to  drown 
her  grief,  she  learns  that  he  has  met  with  an  accident,  through  which 
he  loses  his  sight  entirely.  She  flies  back  to  England  and  becomes 
his  nurse,  all  unknown  to  him.  The  difficulty  which  she  has  'to  solve 
is  to  convince  him  that  she  really  loves  him  and  has  not  returned 
simply  out  of  pity.  That  she  succeeds  in  this  object  is  of  course  to 
be  expected. 

Bindloss,  Harold.     Thurston  of  Orchard  Valley.  Toronto: 
McLeod  &  Allen.     February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 

In  this  novel  Mr.  Bindloss  still  deals  with  British  Columbia.  It 
is  the  story  of  an  engineer  who  throws  himself  soul  and  body  into 
the  work  of  conquering  a  mighty  river  and,  while  he  is  fighting  it.  he 
_  wins  the  love  of  a  woman,  as  proud  as  himself.  The  movement  of  the 
story  crosses  several  times  between  British  Columbia  and  the  North 
of  England,  whence  the  young  engineer  comes,  but  most  of  the  scenes 
are  laid  among  the  ranches,  the  forests  and  the  mountains  of  the 
Northwest. 

Blei,   Franz     The   Powder  Puff,  a   Ladies'  Breviary.     To- 
ronto:  Musson.    February.    Cloth,  $1.00. 
Buckley,  Edith  E.     The  Snare  of  Circumstances.   Toronto: 
Musson.    February.    Cloth.  $1.25. 

A  young  man  has  twice  been  tried  for  the  murder  of  his  uncle, 
being  acquitted  the  second  time,  but  with  the  cloud  of  suspicion  still 
hanging  over  him.  Two  years  later  a  New  York  reporter.  Elmer 
Bliss,  who  has  some  ability  as  a  detective,  is  engaged  by  a  mysterious 
old  man  to  clear  up  the  case.  Bliss  rents  Overlook,  the  house  where 
the  murder,  was  committed  and  begins  his  investigations.  Dangers 
arc  encountered  as  clue  after  clue  turns  up,  and  the  final  solution  is 
most  unexpected   and    thrilling. 

Call,  Annie  Payson.     Nerves  and  Common  Sens:-.  Toronto: 

Musson.     February.    Cloth.  $1.25  net. 
Conington,  John.     The   Aeneid  of  Virgil.     Translated   by 

John  Conington.  -  Macmillan 's  Pocket  Classics  Series. 

Toronto:  Macmillan.     February.    25  cents  net. 
Courthope,  W.  J.     A  History  of  English  Poetry.     Vol.  VI. 
•     The  Romantic   Movement   in   English   Poetry.      Effects 

of  the  French  Resolution.     Toronto:  Macmillan.  Feb 

ruary.     Cloth,  $3.25  net. 
Devereux,  William.     Sir  Walter  Raleigh.    Toronto:  Briggs 

February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 
Doyle,    A.    Conan.'     The    Crime    of    the    Congo.      Toronto: 

Musson.     February.     Cloth,  50  cents. 
Farrar,  Dean.     Eric;  or,  Little  by  Little.     New  Edition. 

Toronto:    Macmillan.      February.    C'oth,    75    cents. 
Foster,  R.  F.     Cab  No.  44.     Toronto:   Copp.     February 

Cloth.  $1,25'. 

This  is  by  all'  odds  one  of  the  best  mystery  stories  which  has 
appeared  for  some  time.  It  tells  how  two  wealthy  New  Yorkers 
make  a  bet  that  if  a  erime  be  committed  "and  the  criminal  be  given 
a  reasonable  time  10  make  his  escape,  the  police  would  not  be  smart 
i  nough  to  eateh  him.  A  young  Englishman  volunteers  to  make  the 
attempt-  In  doing  so  he  apparently  becomes  involved  in  a  much  more 
serious  crime  ? — the'  murder  of  the  friend  whom  he  had  arranged  to 
i oh.  A  great  number  of  mysterious  circumstances  surround  the 
whole  affair  through  which  the  puzzled  reader  fails  to  see  any  day- 
light at  all.  The  firirrl  explanation  is  as  simple  as  it  is  unexpected. 
Garrison,  E.  E.     Accounting  Every  Busi-ness  Man  Should 

Know.     Toronto:  Musson.     March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 
Grayson,  David.     Adventures  in  Contentment.     New  edi- 
tion.   'Toronto:  Musson.     February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 


Hawtrey,    Valentina.     In    the    Shade.      Toronto:     Briggs. 

February,     Cloth,  $1.25, 
Henry,  0.     Strictly  Business.     Toronto:   Musson.    March. 

Cloth,  $1.25. 
Hickman,  Albert.     An  Unofficial  Love  Story.     First  Cana- 
dian edition.     Toronto:  Musson.    February.  Cloth,  $1. 
Humphries,    Sidney.      Oriental    Carpets.      Toronto:    Mae- 

millan.      Colored   illustrations.   Feb.     Cloth,  $12.00. 
Irvine,  Alexander.     From  the  Bottom  Up.    Toronto:  Mus- 
son.    March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 
Jose,   A.   W.      Growth   of   the   Empire.      Toronto:   Briggs. 

February.     Cloth,  $1.25. 
King,   Irving.      The  Development   of  Religion.     Toronto : 

Macmillan.    February.    Cloth,  $1.75. 
**Morice,     The    Rev.    A.     G.,    O.M.I.     History    of    the. 
Catholic   Church  in  Western  Canada,,  from  Lake  Su- 
perior   to   the   Pacific    (1659-1895).      With   maps   and 
illustrations.     Toronto:  Musson  Book  Co.    February. 
2    Volumes.    xxiv.+362,    and    xi.+414    pages,    OxO1/. 
inches.     Cloth,  $4.0'0. 
Orczy,  Baroness.     The  Nest  of  the  Sparrowhawk.  Toronto: 
Briggs.     February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 
The  author    of     "The    Scarlet     Pimpernel"     has    few     superiors    in 
weaving  a  romance  of    adventure      and    intrigue,     and      she    has  here 
chosen  a  period  and  a  plot  which   give  the  fullest  scope  to  her  powers. 
The  time  is  that  of  the  Cavaliers  and  Roundheads.    The  Sparrowhawk 
that  is   Sir   Marmaduke  de  Chavasse.   of  Acol   Court,   in   the   Island  of 
Thanet.  a  villain  of    the    most    thoroughgoing    type,    is    when    we   first 
see  him  very     near     ruin.    The     Lord    Protector,     however,     to     whose 
party  he  belongs,    has    pitied   his    impecuniosity,    and   placed    under  his 
guardianship   Lady    Sue  Aldmarshe.    the   rich   daughter  of   the   Marquis 
of  Dover,  with  an     allowance     of     £4,000  a  year     for    her    maintenance 
until  she  comes    of  age.    The    money    is  a  mere    drop    in    the    ocean  of 
Sir  Marmadnke's  debts,   and  he  comes  to  the  conclusion  that  his  only 
means  of  salvation  will    be    to   marry   her   and   her   fortune.    As    Lady 
Sue  by  no  means  cares   for   his   person,  he   inflames   the   imagination  of 
the  lovely      young  girl    by       posing    as  a  French    prince    of    the  blood 
royal.    The  trick    is    played    with    consistent    ingenuity,    and    we    will 
not  spoil  the   reader's   pleasure   by   saying   whether  it   succeeds  or  not. 
though  we    may    state    that,  at    any    rate.  Sir    Marmaduke    ultimately 
meets  with  a  tragic    enri.     whilst    Lady    Sue    marries  Michael    Richard 
dc  Chavasse,    nephew    and    heir    of    the    Earl    of    Northallerton,    the 
mystery  of  whose  relationship    to    the    Sparrowhawk    is    very    cleverly 
interwoven  with  the  main    story. 

Paxson,  Frederick  Logan.  The  Last  American  Frontier. 
Stories  from  American  History  Series.  Toronto: 
Macmillan.     February.    Cloth,  $1.50  net. 

Pratt,  Ambrose.  The  Livins:  Mummy.  Toronto:  McLeod 
&    Allen.     February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 

Two  rival  archaeologists  meet  in  the  desert  of  the  interior  of 
Ejypt.  The  older  is  absolutely  unscrupulous  and  employs,  with  the 
help  of  another  scientist,  unseen  powers  to  overthrow  his  young 
enemy,  who  has  fallen  in  love  with  his  daughter.  The  scene  shifts 
down  the  Nile  and  thence  to  London,  where  the  two  allies  use  their 
power  over  a  long  dead  Egyptian  priest  whose  mummy  they  possess 
to  compass  the  death  of  any  one  who  opposes  them.  How  the 
masterful  hero  wins  his  ladylove  and  the  final  reckoning  for  the  arch- 
villain   make  a  surprising   and   thrilling   climax. 

Prichard,  K.  and  Hesketh.     Don  Q's  Love  Story.  Toronto: 

Briggs.     February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 
Raine,  Allen.     Under  the  Thatch.     Toronto:  Briggs.  Feb- 
ruary.     Cloth,    $1.25. 
Ray,  Anna  Chapin.     Over  the  Quicksands.    Toronto:  Mus- 
son.    February.     Cloth.  $1.25. 
Quebec  is  once     more     the   background      of     Miss   Ray's  story.    As 
usual,  the    movement  cf  the     story    is    leisurely      and   there  are    many 
pages  of  character  description  and  analysis  and  much  conversation  in- 
tended to  put    the  reader      on    intimate    terms       with    the    characters. 
Most  of  these  characters   are   young  people   into   whose  lives   come   the 
consequences  with    appalling   force  of   the   sins   of   their   parents.    It   is 
entirely  a  drama  of   the   inner  life,   with   but   few   material  happenings, 
lyit  there  are   many   intense   situations  and   not  a  little   dramatic   force 
in  tie   way   the   story   is   developed. 

Rives,.  Hallie  Erminie.     The  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords. 

Toronto:  McLeod  &  Allen.    Feb.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

America,  with  its   adventures,    scientific   invention,   and   rapid   woo- 

ings,  plants    itself    in    far    Japan   through  a  series    of    possible   events. 

The  heroine    has  two     lovers.     The    villain      has    made  a  discoverv    bv 


4* 


ROOK  S E LEER     AND     STATIONER 


which  he  can  displace  molecules  to  such  distances  that  there  is  noth- 
ing left  where  there  was  once — for  instance,  a  savage  dog.  He  plots 
to  dispose  of  battleships  through  this  molecular  displacement,  and 
the  plan  is  discovered.  Aeroplanes.  automobiles,  a  Japanese  girl,  a 
lost  father,  the  mobbing  of  the  villain,  and  the  marrying  of  the  right 
man   brings    the  book   to  a  close. 

Roberts,  Charles  G.  D.     Kings  in  Exile.     Toronto:  Mac- 
millan.    February.     Cloth,  $1.25. 
Scholar's   English   Dictionary.     Containing  nearly   14,000 
words.    Toronto:  Macmillan.  Feb.    Cloth,  10  cents  net. 
Sven,  Hedin,  Dr.     Trans-Himilaya.     Cheaper  edition,  un- 
abridged.   2  volumes.     Toronto:  Macmillan.  February. 
Cloth,  $1.50. 
Thackeray,  W.  M.     English  Humorists.     Edited  by  J.  C. 
Castleman.     Macmillan 's  Pocket  Classics  Series.  To- 
ronto: Macmillan.     February.    25  cents  net. 
Tilden,    Tilford.     Butternut    Jones.     New   cheap   edition. 

Toronto :  Copp.  February.  Cloth,  75  cents. 
Tracy,  Louis.  Son  of  the  Immortals.  Toronto :  McLeod 
&  Allen.  February.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
A  fictitious  little  kingdom  in  Eastern  Europe  figures  in  this 
story.  The  hero,  a  scion  of  the  royal  family,  who  has  been  living 
an  idle  life  in  Paris,  claims  the  crown  at  a  crisis  in  the  history  of 
the  country.  He  has  no  easy  task  and  while  he  is  accepted  by  the 
people,  he  has  to  meet  the  intrigues  of  a  rival.  The  heroine,  an 
American  artist,  whom  the  hero  had  met  in  Paris,  figures  largely  in 
the  plot.    It  is  altogether  a  fair  example  of  the  Zenda  type  of  novel- 

Underwood,  Horace  Grant.  The  Religion  of  Eastern 
Asia.     Toronto:  Macmillan.  Feb.    Cloth,  $1.50  net. 

Vance,  Louis  Joseph.  The  Fortune  Hunter.  Toronto : 
Briggs.     February.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

A  young  New  Yorker  of  good  birth  and  luxurious  upbringing  has 
been  thrown  upon  his  own  resources.  Various  business  openings  are 
found  for  him  by  a  college  friend,  but  he  can  make  nothing  of  them. 
The  friend,  a  thriving  broker,  has  one  more  suggestion  of  a  way  to 
make  a  million  in  a  year.  The  scheme  is  simple.  "Think  of  the 
country  heiresses,"  cries  its  promoter,  "with  plenty  of  money  for 
two,  pining  away,  .  .  .  hundreds  of  them,  fine,  straight  girls, 
girls  you  could  easily  fall  in  love  with,  sighing  their  lives  away  for 
the  lack  of  the  likes  of  you."  The  experiment  is  made  with  perfect 
success  :  but.  of  course,  the  hero  does  not  marry  the  country  heiress. 
or  he  would  cease  to  be  the  hero.  The  problem  is  to  have  him  marry 
the  poor  girl  of  his  heart  without  remanding  him  to  poverty  :  a 
problem  which  an  experienced  spinner  of  yarns  like  Mr.  Vance  could 
have  no  sort   of  difficulty  in  solving. 

Wellman,  Francis  L.  A  Day  in  Court.  Toronto :  Macmil- 
lan.    February.     Cloth,  $2.00  net. 

White,  W.  Holt.  The  Man  Who  Stole  the  Earth.  To- 
ronto:  Copp,  Clark.     February.    Cloth,  $1.25. 

The  author  his  essayed  a  dar'ng  plot,  quite  after  the  style  of 
Jrls  Vern°  in  its  utt  r  disregard  for  possibilities.  The  hero,  a 
yo''nT  En°-l:shman,  of  Napoleonic  determination,  comes  into  control  of 
a  wonderful  nir-ship,  which  has  been  invented  by  a  friend  of  his. 
This  same  friend  has  also  discovered  a  terrible  explosive,  which  can  be 
ctrried  around  in  small  balls,  and  more  wonderful  still  he  has  invent- 
ed a  w'reless  instrument  the  size  of  a  camera.  With  these  weapons, 
the  hero  proceeds  to  mike  war  on  the  King  of  Balkania  in  order  to 
win  his  daughter,  the  Princess  Diana.  He  becomes  involved  with  the 
other  European  nations  but  in  the  end  defeats  them  all  and  becomes 
Dictator  of  the  World. 

Williamson,  C.  N.  and  A.  M.  Lord  Loveland  Discovers 
America.  Toronto:  Musson.  February.  Cloth.  $1.25. 
A  vo-n?  Enel'sh  noMeman  is  sent  to  America  by  his  mother  to 
get  f"r  h'mself  a  wpalfhy  wifp.  He  carries  letters  of  credit  and  of 
introduction  but  soon  after  h;s  landing  matters  occur  which  make  it 
impossible  for  him  to  use  either.  He  is  cast  out  of  the  Waldorf-As- 
tom,  and  thereafter  has  an  educating  experience  as  a  penniless  so- 
journer in  a  strange  land.  The  upshot  of  it  all  is  that  he  reforms, 
ceises  to  be  conceited,  besrins  to  love  his  fellow-man  and  is  duly  re- 
warded by  the  acquirement  of  an  heiress,  whom  he  has  wooed  as  a 
poor  girl.  The  narrative  is  lively  and  commends  itself  even  to  the 
iaeted   reader. 

**Wise,  Frank.    The  Empire  Day  by  Day.    Toronto:  Mac- 
millan.    Paper  cover,  25  cents. 
Woodbury,   George  Edward.     The   Inspiration   of  Poetry. 

Toronto:  Macmillan.     February.  Cloth,  $1.25  net. 
Wynne,  May.     Henrv  of  Navarre.    Toronto:  Briggs.  Feb. 
Cloth,  $1.25. 

47 


Best  Sellers  During  February 

Reports  from  the  Leading  Centres 
of  Trade  in  Canada,  with  a  Summary 
Showing  the  Most  Popular    Books. 

Brantford. 
Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 
Son  of  the  Immortals.    Louis«Tracey.    McLeod. 
Miss  Selina  Lue.    M.  T.  Daviess.    Bobbs. 
My  Lady  of  the  South.  Randall  Parrish.    McClurg. 
Florentine  Frams.    Elizabeth  Robins.  Moffat,  Yard. 
Lord   Loveland   Discovers    America.    C.    N.    &  A.    M. 
Williamson.    Musson. 

Calgary. 
Silver  Horde.    Rex   Beach.    Harper. 
Passers  By.    A.  Partridge.    Musson. 
Foreigner.    Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 
When  a  Man  Marries,    M.  A.  Reinhart.    McLeod. 
John  Marvel.    T.   N.   Page.    Copp. 
Little  Sister  Snow.    Frances  Little.    Musson. 

Charlottetown. 
Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
Anne  of  Green  Gables.    L.   M.   Montgomery.    Page. 
White  Walls.    Max  Pemberton.     Ward  Lock, 
Sporting  Chance.    A.   and  C.  Askew.    Ward  Lock. 
Son  of  the  Immortals.    L.  Tracy.    McLeod. 

Chatham. 
Foreigner.    Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 
Songs  of  a  Sourdough.    R.  W.   Service.    Briggs. 
Hungry  Heart.    D.  G.  Phillips.    Briggs. 
Cheechako  (Ballads  of  a).  R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 
Anne   of  Avonlea.    L.    M.    Montgomery.     Page. 
Silver  Horde.    Rex  Beach.    Harper. 

Edmonton. 
Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.   Westminster. 
John  Marvel.    T.  N.  Page.    Copp. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.  Montgomery.    Page. 
Ballads  of  a  Cheechako.    R.   W.    Service.    Briggs. 
Songs   of  a   Sourdough.    R.    W.    Service.    Briggs. 
Anne  of  Green  Gables.  L.  M.  Montgomery.    Page. 

Hamilton. 
Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 
Margarita's  Soul.     J.  D.  Bacon.    McLeod. 
Lord   Loveland   Discovers   America.    C.    N.    &    A.    M. 

Wil'iamson.    Musson. 
Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 
Son   of  the   Immortals.    L.    Tracy.    McLeod. 
Furnace  of  Gold.     P.   V.  Mig-hels.    McLeod. 

Kingston. 
Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 
Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 
Calling  of  D«n  Matthews.  H.  B.   Wright.    McLeod. 
Old   Rose   and    Silver.    Mvrtle  Reed.    Putnam. 
Anne  Veronica.    H.   G.  Wells.    Copp. 
Sailors'  Knots.    W.  W.    Jacobs.    Copp. 

London. 
Attic  Guest.    R.   E.   Knowles.    Frowde. 
Lord  Loveland   Discovers  America.       C.   N.   &  A.  M. 

Williamson.    Musson. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
Silver   Horde.     Rex   Beach.    Harper. 
Foreigner.    Raloh   Connor.    Westminster. 
Inner  Shrine.     Anonymous.    Musson. 

Moncton. 
Sparrows.    H.   W.   C.   Newte.    Kennerley. 
Danger  Mark.    R.   W.   Chambers.    McLeod. 
Title  Market.    Emily  Post.    Dodd. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


McLeod. 
Page. 


C.   N.    &   A.   M. 


&  A.   M. 


Uttermost  Farthing.  M.  A.  B.  Lowndes.  Kennerley. 
Cupid's   Understudy.    E.    S.   Field.    Watt. 
Truxton  King.     G.   B.  McCutcheon.    Briggs. 

Montreal. 

Rosary.     Floience  Barclay.    Musson. 
Kingdom  of   Slender  Swords.    H.   E.   Rives. 
Anne  of  Green  Gables.    L.   M.   Montgomery. 
Tyrant.    Mrs.  De  la  Pasture 
Lord   Loveland   Discovrs   America. 

Williamson.   Musson. 
Fortune   Hunter.     ,los.    Vance.     Copp. 

Ottawa. 
Lord  Loveland  Discovers  America.      C.  N. 

Williamson.   Musson. 
Son  of  the  Immortals.    L.   Tracy.    McLeod. 
Thurston  of  .Orchard   Valley.     Harold   Bindloss.     Mc- 
Leod. 
Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.  H.  E.  Rives.     McLeod. 
Nest   of   the    Sparrownawk.    Baroness   Orezy.    Briggs. 
Furnace  of  Gold.    P.   V.  Mighels.    McLeod. 

Peterborough. 
Son  of  the  Immortals.     L.  Tracy.     McLeod. 
Kingdom  of   Slender   Swords.   H.   E.   Rives.     McLeod. 
Lord  Loveland  Dis- covers  America. 

Wil  iamson.      Musson. 
'Anne  of  Avonlea.   L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 
Foreigner.    Ralph    Connor.     Westminster. 
Attic  Guest.     R.   E.   Knowles.    Frowde. 

Port  Arthur. 
Silver  Horde.     Rex  Beach.    Harper. 
Foreigner.    Ralph  Connor.    Westminster. 
White    Sister.    F.    M.    Crawford.    Macmillan. 
Fortune  Hunter.    L.   J.   Vance.    Briggs. 


C.  N.   &  A.   M. 


Furnace  of  Gold.    P.  V.  Mighels.    McLeod. 
Up    Grade.    Wilder   Goodwin.    Musson. 

Stratford. 
The  Up  Grade.     Wilder  Goodwin.    Musson. 
Passers  By.    Anthony   Partridge.    Musson. 
Open  Country.    Hewlett.    McLeod. 
Old    Rose   and   Silver.    Myrtle   Reed.    Putnam. 
Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

St.  John,  N.B. 
Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 
Lord  Loveland  Discovers  America.       C.   N.    &  A.   M. 

Williamson.      Musson. 
Antonio.       Ernest  Oldmeadow.    Macmillian. 
Anne  of  Green  Gables.    L.   M.   Montgomery.     Page. 
Gateway.   Harold  Begbie. 
Old  Rose  and  Silver.    Myrtle  Reed.    Putnam. 

Toronto. 
Son  of  the  Immortals.    Louis  Tracy.    McLeod. 
Lord  Loveland   Discovers  America.    C.   N.    &  A.   M. 

Williamson.       Musson. 
White   Wal  s,  Max  Pemberton.     Ward,  Lock. 
Beechy.    B.    Van  Hutten.    Musson. 
Snare  of  Circumstance.    E.  E.  Buckley.    Musson. 
Living   Mummy.    Ambrose   Pratt.    McLeod. 

Canadian  Summary. 

Points. 

Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives  62 

Lord  Loveland  Discovers  America.   C.   N.   &  A. 

M.    Williamson   57 

Foreigner.     Ralph    Connor    ^ 54 

Son  of  the  Immortals.    Louis  Tracy    45 

Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.   M.    Montgomery   33 

Anne   of   Green    Gables.     L.    M.    Montgomery    24 


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BERENICE.                       E.   PHILLIPS  OPPENHEIM 

32  FULL-PAGE  ILLUSTRATIONS  BY  HOWARD  SOMERVILLE 
"Mystery"  has  always  been  the  keynote  of  Mr.  Oppenheim's  striking  roman- 
ces, and  "  Bernice"  is  full  of  it.     €ne  may  safely  assert  this  is  the  most  puzzling 
and  moving  story  the  author  has  written. 

WHITE  WALLS                  max  pemberton 

16  FULL-PAGE  ILLUSTRATIONS  BY  MAURICE  GREIFFENH AGEN 
"There  is  plenty  of  incident  of  a  kind  that  grips,  and  the  whole  tale  is  given 
with  the  nerve  and  vividness  which  one  expects  from  its  author's  pen.     There  are 
passages  of  really  fine  description,  for  which  the  scene  of  the  story  gives  excellent 
scope." — The  Queen. 

THE  SUNDIAL.                       fred  M.  white 

COLOURED  FRONTISPIECE 
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possibly  be.     Vice  is  vanquished  and  virtue  rewarded  to  the  full  satisfaction  of  the 
reader,  and  the  most  exacting  lover  of  sensations  must  own  that  Mr.  White  has  pro- 
vided many  in  "The.  Sundial." — Manchester  Courier. 

JOY.                                                          L.  G.  MOBERLEY 

8  FULL-PAGE  ILLUSTRATIONS  BY  HAROLD  COPPING 
"A  delightful  story,  and  Joy  herself  a  wholly  delightful  little  person,     Joy  is 
all  charm  and  sweetness,  spreading  happiness  around  her,  and  deserving  her  name 
in  every  way." — Freeman'' s  Journal. 

THE  SPORTING  CHANCE. 

ALICE  and  CLAUDE  ASKEW 

COLOURED  FRONTISPIECE' 
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of  the  Turf.     Readers  who  follow  the  hero's  adventures  on  the  turf  in  this  excit- 
ing book  will  be  keen  to  know  what  after  all  what  was  the  result  of  his  final  effort 
to  win  his  race,  his  fortune,  and  his  love." — The  Globe. 

mt  Wnteor 

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THE   MARCH   ISSUE 
contains    contributions    by 

F.  FRANKFORT  MOORE,  JUSTUS  MILES  FORMAN 

FRED  M.  WHITE,  CHAS.  G.  D.  ROBERTS 

MARGERY  BOWER 

(Author  of  "  The  Viper  of  Milan") 
and  others. 

The  articles  of  this  number  are  many  and  varied  : 

GOLF  COMPETITIONS 

Fully  discussed  by  SIR  HENRY  SETON  CARR 

A  fourth  article  in  the  new  series  on 

ENGLAND'S  STORY  IN  PORTRAIT  AND 
PICTURE 

14  admirable  reproductions  from  the  charming  Nature  Pictures  of 

MR.  ALFRED  PARSONS,  A.R.A. 
A  budget  of  FINE  READING,  lavishly  illustrated. 

WARD,  LOCK  &  CO.,  Li 

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ltCd             London,  Melbourne,  Toronto 

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COPP  CLARK'S  MARCH  FICTION 


Cab  No.  44 

By  R.  F.  Foster 

Author  of  "Foster's 
Complete   Hoyle,"  etc. 

"A  detective-love  cocktail 
— half  detective  story,  half 
love  story,  well  shaken." 
— Canadian  Courier. 

Cloth,  $1.25 


The  Man  Who  Stole 

the    Earth  By  Holt  White 

It  is  scarcely  possible  to  open  a  newspaper  in  these 
days  without  coming'  across  one  or  more  references  to 
airships.  The  tale,  therefore,  of  a  man  who  dominated 
the  whole  world  by  means  of  a  master  airship  should 
be  eagerly  read  by  a  large  public. 

Frontispiece  and  Wrapper  in  Color,  Cloth,  $1.25 


The  Losing  Game 

By  Will  Payne 

This  is  said  to  be  the  first  time  that  the  mechanism  of 
a  big  bucket-shop  has  been  disclosed  in  terms  at  once 
understandable,  human  and  dramatic.  The  Satitrday 
Evening  Post  published  the  story  as  a  serial — probably 
as  good  a  testimonial  as  could  be  desired  to  its  sustained 
interest  and  wide  human  appeal. 

Eight  Illustrations,  Cloth,  $1.50 


A  Disciple  of  Chance 


By  Sarah  Dean 

Author  of  "  Travers" 

The  author  has  caught  ad- 
mirably the  spirit  of  the 
days  of  the  Georges,  when 
the  young  gentleman  must 
be  a  reckless  gambler,  a 
sure-eyed  duellist,  and 
above  all,  a  polished  court- 
ier— perfect  in  dress  and 
manners — an  ideal  lover. 
Published  March  15th. 

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The  Prodigal  Father 

By  J.  Storer  Clouston 

Author  of  liThe  Lunatic  at  Large  "  etc. 

The  publishers  have  the  great"st  confidence  in  this  delightful 
story,  which  in  their  opinion  will  deservedly  repeat  the  such 
cess  of  "The  Lunatic  at  Large." 

Cloth,  $1.25 


Pools  of  Silence 

By  H.  de  Vere  Stacpoole 

What  Uncle  Tom's  Cabin  was  to  the  American  Slave,  the 
Pools  of  Silence  is  to  the  Slaves  of  the  Congo. 

Cloth,  $1.25 


Butternut  Jones 

By  Tilden  Tilford 

A  Breezy  Vi  estern  Story. 

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A  BOOK  ON  CANADA 

Our  Lady  tt  Sunshine 

and  Her  International  Visitors 

Edited  by  the  Cnuntess  of  Aberdeen,  President  I.C  W.  A 
series  of  impressions  written  by  the  represenatives  of  the 
various  delegations  attending  the  Quinquennial  meeting  of 
the  International  Council  of  Women  in  Canada.     June,  1909. 

Attractive  Cover,  35  cents 


Vehicles  of  the  Air 

By  Victor  Lougheed 

Member  of  the  Aeronautic  Society,  Founder  Member 
Society  of  Automobile  Engineers. 

A  Popular  Exposition  of  Modern  Aero- 
nautics with  Working  Drawings 

This  book  positively  presents  every  known  fact  concerning 
aerial  navigation  and  air  vehicles -with  working  drawings. 
Authentic— eomplete— up-to-the-minute  —  500  subject  he  'ding. 
—200  aeronautical  terms  defined  -'270  illustrations,  including 
working  drawings!  of  machines  and  parts— 140  halftone  views 
—history  of  1000  flights,  with  tabular  comparisons  of  success- 
ful flying  machines. 

Make  Your  Own  Flying  Machine 

The  author  rally  treats  all  phases  of  aerial  navigation— with 
particular  attention  to  modern  types  of  successful  aeroplanes. 
Willi  the  information  afforded  by  this  book  any  one  of  ordins 
ary  mechanical  abilities,  and  with  very  little  money,  can  build 
and  operate  machines  of  known  flying  capabilities. 

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49 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  Three  Outstanding 
Spring  Novels 


THE 

DANGER 

TRAIL 

By 
JAS.  OLIVER  CURWOOD 


A  CANADIAN  STORY  OF  LOVE  AND 
ADVENTURE 

The  scene  of  this  story  is  laid  in  the  Canadian  North- 
west. It  has  to  do  with  the  adventures  of  a  young  railroad 
civil  engineer,  who  is  building  a  railroad  to  Hudson's 
Bay.  From  beginning  to  end  there  is  never  a  moment 
that  isn't  breathless  with  interest. 

Striking  Illustrations  in  Color  by  Charles  Livingston  Bull,  Cloth  $1.25 


A  SON  OF 

THE 
IMMORTALS 

By 
LOUIS  TRACY 


READ    THIS   ONE  YOURSELF,  YOU  WILL 
SURELY  LIKE  IT 

This  is  the  story  that  is  so  good  that  people  are  forgetting 
that  Tracy  ever  wrote  anything  else — even  "TBE  WINGS 
OF  THE  MORNING."  It  is  a  masterly  piece  of  story-telling 
wherein  climax  treads  always  upon  the  heels  of  climax  ; 
fine  in  its  love  interest,  and  altogether  a  delight  to  the 
lover  of  romantic  situations  and  stirring  adventure. 

Illustrated  by  Howard  Chandler  Christy,  Cloth  $1.25 


THE 

KINGDOM  OF 

SLENDEfc  SWORDS 

.       By 
HALLIE  ERMINIE  RIVES 


SELLING  BIG,  AND  WILL  CONTINUE 
TO  SELL 

This  is  an  entirely  different  story  from  the  author's 
previous  successes— "SATAN  SANDERSON,"  etc.  A  story 
of  Japan,  having  a  charm  that  is  del'ghtfully  unique.  All 
the  strange  fascination  of  the  Orient  is  here  and  the 
character  drawing  is  admirable;  altogether  a  remarkable 
book  that  will  please  a  large  majority  of  your  customers. 


Embossed   Wrapper  : 


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Cloth  $1.25 


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Musson's  Fiction  List.         April  and  May 


The  Wild  Olive 

By  the  author  of  "THE  INNER  SHRINE" 
Illustrated.                               Cloth,  $1.50 

Going  Some    - 

By  REX  BEACH  . 

Cloth,  $1.25 

Ramrodders 

By  HOLMAN  DAY 
Author  of  "King  Spruce,"  etc. 

Illustrated.                               Cloth,  $1.50 

The  Biography  of  a  Boy 

By  JOSEPHINE  DASKAM  BACON 
Illustrated.                                Cloth,  $1.50 

The  O'Flynn 

By  JUSTIN  HUNTLY 

McCarthy 
Cloth,  $1.50 

A  Canadian  Story 
By 

MRS.  HUMPHRY 
WARD 

Lady  Merton, 
Colonist 

Illustrated 
Cloth,  $1.25 

Snow  Fire 

By  the  author  of 
"The  Martyrdom  of  an  Empress." 

Illustrations  in  colour 
Cloth,  net  $1.50 

Bianca's 
Daughter 

By  JUSTUS  MILES  FORMAN 
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The  Apple-Tree 
Cottage 

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ELINOR  LANE  MACARTNEY 

Illustrated 

Cloth,  net  50c. 

An  American  Baby  Abroad 

How  He  Played  Cupid  to  a  Kentucky  Beauty 
By  MRS.  CHARLES  N.  CREWDSON 

Illustrations  by  R.  F.  Outcault            Cloth,    $1.25 

Ship  Dwellers 

By  ALBERT  BIGELOW  PAINE 
Author  of  "The  Van  Dwellers,"  "Tent  Dwellers,"  etc. 

Illustrated.                               Cloth,  $1.50 

The  Top  of  the  Morning 

By  JULIET  WILBOR  TOMPKINS 

Cloth,  $1.25 

Blaze  Derringer 

By  EUGENE  P.  LYLE,  JR. 
Illustrated.                               Cloth,  $1.25 

The  Awakening  of  Zojas 

By  MIRIAM  MICHELSON 

Illustrated.                                Cloth,  $1.25 

An  Unofficial  Love  Story 

By  ALBERT  HICKMAN 

Cloth,  $1.00 
A  Canadian  story  of  interest,  and  very  humorous. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.,  Limited,     -     Toronto 


51 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


THE  RELIGIOUS  TRACT 
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last   becoming    household     favorites    in    the   Dominion 


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These  volumes  contain  a  series  of  stories  and  articles  of 
absorbing  interest   to  all   Canadian  Boys  and  Girls. 


THE  BOUVERIE  COLONIAL  LIBRARY 

An  important  and  stirring  new  novel  entitled 

"The     Shadow" 

By  HAROLD  BEGBIE 

Author  ot  "The  Priest,"  "The  Vigil,"  etc.,  will  appear  in  this  series 
in  the  Fall. 


The  R.T.  S.  has  on  it 
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and 

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Mrs.  de  Home  Vaizey,  and  many  others. 


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A  r  THE  CALL  OF  HONOUR 

A.  W.  Marchmont 

WHO  SHALL  JUDGE? 

Silas.  K.  Hocking 

THE  GIRL   WITH  THE  RED  HAIR 

Max  Pemberton 

MORNING  STAR 

H   Rider  Haggard 

THE  RUST  OF  ROME 

Warwick  Deeping 

THE  MYS7  E    Y  OF  BARRY  INCRAM 

Annie  S.  Swan 

FliEDA 

Katharine  Tynan 

LONDON  AND  A  GIRL 

Alfred  Gibson 

OUR  FLAT 

R.  Andom 

MARGARET  THE  PEACEMAKER 

Walter  Wood 

THE  GODDESS  GIRL 

Dorothea  Deakin 

FA  TE  AND  THE  MAN 

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Copyrights   Recorded  in  February 

A  List  of  Books  Entered  During  the 
Month  at  the  Copyright  Branch  or  the 
Department  of  Agriculture,  Ottawa. 

21970.  Canadian  Turf  Recollections  and  Other 
Sketches.  By  HI.  iving'  Dodds.  (Book.)  Hi.  King  DodUs, 
Toronto,  3id  February. 

21d<3.  ^re  Vou  Properly  Insured  /  Ur  Do  You 
Merely  Tiling  iou  Are"/  By  laul  von  Szeiisju.  (Book.) 
Paul  von  szelisiu,  Toronto,  ith  February. 

21uiB.  Ait  i  ortfolio  with  suggestions  to  Pupils. 
(.Print.,)  W.  j.  Ga^e  &  Company,  .Limited,  ioronto,  5tli 
February. 

21a<8.  Ontario  Blank  Drawing  Book,  Mo.  1.  Hon. 
Robert  Allan  i  yne,  minister  of  Education  for  Untario, 
Toronto,  oth  February. 

2197 9.  Ontario  blank  Drawing  Book,  Mo.  2.  Hon. 
RoDert  Allan  Tyne,  Minister  of  Education  for  Ontario, 
Toronto,    5th  I1  eoruary. 

21980.  Freehand  Practice  Copy  Book,  Mo.  6.  By  W. 
A.  Mclntyre,  B.A.,  LJL.D.  The  Copp,  Clark  Company, 
Limited,  Toronto,   7th  February. 

21982.  Educational  Handwork.  By  T.  B.  Kidner. 
(Book.)  the  Educational  Book  Company  of  Toronto, 
Limited,  Toronto,   7th  February. 

22000.  Canadian  Law  List,  1910.  (Book.)  Henry 
Cartwright  and  Reginald  A.  Wharton,  Toronto,  10th 
February. 

22U01.  Life  Insurance  and  How  to  Write  It.  Pub- 
lished in  "Office  and  Field,"  Toronto,  Ont.  (Temporary 
Copyright.)  William  Brough  Campbell,  Toronto,  10th 
February. 

22018.  The  Maritime  Financial  Calendar  and  Daily 
Memorandum,  1910.  (Book.)  Morman  Binmore,  Montreal, 
12th  February. 

22019.  Canadian  Law  Journal  Almanac,  1910. 
(Book.)   Arthur  Henry  O'Brien,  Ottawa,  12th  February. 

22020.  Montgomery's  Cheese  Factory  Ledger  and 
Account  Book.  (Book.)  William  Henry  Montgomery, 
Township  of  Kitley,  County  of  Leeds,  Ont.,  14th  Feb- 
ruary. 

22022.  The  Toronto  City  Directory,  1910.  (Book.) 
Might  Directories,    Limited,   Toronto,   14th  February. 

22033.  Index  to  Dominion  and  Provincial  Statutes 
From  the  Earliest  Period  Down  to  1st  July,  1909.  By 
A.  McNaughton  Stewart,  B.C.L.  (Book.)  John  Lovell 
&■  Son,  Limited,  Montreal,  15th  February. 

22041.  -  Fifty-five  Years  in  the  Wilds  of  the  North 
West  and  the  Rocky  Mountains.  By  Henry  John  Mob- 
erly.  (Temporary  Copyright.)  Henry  John  Moberly, 
Macdowell,   Saskatchewan,  17th  February. 

22042.  A  New  Method  of  Tuning  the  Harp.  By  A. 
Freeland,   M.D.,    CM.     (Book.)   A.   Freeland,   Ottawa. 

22048.  Whispering  Smith.  By  Frank  H.  Spearman. 
(Book.)  McLeod  &  Allen,  Toronto,  19th  February. 

22050.  Treatise  on  the  Protection  of  Forest  from 
Fire.  By  W.  C.  J.  Hall  and  B.  L.  O'Hara.  (Book.) 
William  Charles  John  Hall  and  Brian  Lynch  O'Hara, 
Quebec,    Que.,    21st  February. 

22056.  Morrey's  Directory,  1910,  for  the  Counties  of 
Brant,  Elgin,  Norfolk  and  Oxford,  and  the  Townships 
of  Dorchester  North  and  Easthope  South.  (Book.) 
Union  Publishing  Company  of  Ingersoll,  Ingersoll,  21st 
February. 

22057.  St.  Thomas  Directory,  1910.  (Book.)  Union 
Publishing  Company  of  Ingersoll,  Ingersoll,  21st  Feb- 
ruary. 


53 


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A  Page  of  News  for  Newsdealers 

Several  Important  Changes  Among 
the  Magazines — Features  of  the  Art 
Numbers — General  News  of  Trade. 

The  growth  in  circulation  and  in  influence  of  the  ma- 
gazines is  one  of  the  notable  signs  of  the  times.  This  in- 
fluence is  bound  to  increase.  Daily  papers  are  becoming 
more  and  more  the  vehicles  of  the  news  of  the  hour, 
while  the  weeklies  and  monthlies  are  digesting  this  news 
and  commenting  upon  it,  drawing  from  it  the  important 
features  and  showing  what  is  essential  and  what  is  not. 
The  increasing  importance  of  the  magazines  should  be 
carefully  noted  by  newsdealers  and  every  effort  should  be 
put  forth  to.  cultivate  the  field  and  get  an  early  hold  on 
the  business.  The  tendency  will  be  more  and  more  for  in- 
dividual magazines  to  handle  their  own  circulation,  in- 
stead of  leaving-  it  to  the  wholesale  news  companies,  and 
this  means  that  there  will  be  big  opportunities  for  the 
live  dealers  in  every  town  and  village  in  the,  near  future. 
Saturday  Evening  Post  and  Ladies'  Home  Journal  do 
their  own  circulation  work.  Success  and  the  Munsey  pub- 
lications are  now  doing  likewise.    Others  will  follow. 


Magazine  Ups  and  Downs. 

'  Putnam's  Magazine  has  suspended  publication,  after 
having  been  purchased  by  the  publishers  of  the  Atlantic 
Monthly.  Putnam's  was  a  high-class  publication  and  its 
disappearance  from  the  ranks  of  American  magazines  is  to 
be  regretted. 

Short  Stories  has  been  purchased  by  Doubleday,  Page 
&  Co.,  New    York,  and  will  be  continued  by  them. 

The  Railway  and  Travel  Monthly,  a  new  illustrated 
sixpenny  magazine,  has  been  launched  in  England,  by  G. 
A.  Sekon,  who  was  editor  and  founder  of  the  Railway 
Magazine. 

The  International  Bibliographer,  a  monthly  magazine, 
to  be  edited  by  Dr.  George  Eller,  will  make  its  first  ap- 
pearance in  April.  In  scope  it  will  include  the  principal 
'publications  of  Great  Britain,  France,  Germany,  Italy, 
and  other  countries.  It  is  to  be  published  by  Erskine 
MacDonald,  of  Surrey  Street,   Strand,  London. 

The  Tramp,  an  open  air  magazine,  is  the  latest  Eng- 
lish periodical  It  is  devoted  to  the  interests  of  those 
who  love  the  open  air  and  is  published  by  the  Adelphi 
Press,  Ltd.,  11  Adam  St.,  Strand,  W.C.  The  first  num- 
ber appeared  on  March   1.     It  is  a  sixpenny  magazine. 

After  a  life  of  three  years,  the  Van  Norden  Magazine 
lias  suspended  and  the  assets  have  been  taken  on  by  the  ments 
publishers  of  Current  Literature.  The  Van  Norden  Ma- 
gazine will  not  be  consolidated  with  Current  Literature, 
the  transaction  having  only  to  do  with  the  good  will,  the 
title  and  subserip*tion  list. 

Canadian  Periodicals. 

The  Arbor  is  the  name  of  a  new  magazine  published 
by  a  group  of  undergraduates  of  the  University  of  To- 
ronto.   It  is  , very  neat  in  appearance. 

The  University  Magazine,  of  which  Dr.  Andrew  Mac- 
phail,  of  Montreal,  is  editor,  is  now  published  by  Morang 
&  Co.,  Toronto.  It  formerly  bore  the  name  of  the  Mac- 
millan  Co.,  as   publishers. 

A  considerable  degree  of  success  has  been  achieved  by 
the  publishers  of  the  Canadian  Century,  the  new  Mont- 
real Weekly  It  has  recently  announced  a  competition  for 
Canadian  artists,  having  in  view  the  production  of  a 
Canadian  type,  to  be  used  as  a  national  figure  similar  to 
John  Bull   and   Uncle  Sam. 

Canada  West  is  now  known  as  the  Canada  Monthly 
and  is  being  published  by  Vanderhoof-Gunn  Co.,  Winni- 
peg. 

56 


Grocer  Starts  News  Agency. 

E.  V.  Mullin,  who  runs  a  grocery  store  on  the  corner 
of  Johnson  and  Division  Streets,  Kingston,  has  branched 
out  into  a  new  department,  that  of  a  wholesale  news 
agency.  On  February  22nd,  1908,  Mr.  Mullin  signed  a 
contract  with  the  Toronto  World  to  the  effect  that  he 
would  act  as  their  sole  agent  in  Kingston  and  supply  all 
book  stores  and  news  dealers  with  the  Daily  and  Sunday 
World.  Since  then  he  has  become  sole  agent  for  the  Buf- 
falo Courier,  Montreal  Standard,  Buffalo  limes  and  Buf- 
falo Express.  Besides  these  he  handles  Chicago  Blade  and 
Ledger,  Utica  Globe,  Saturday  Evening  Post  and  Toron- 
to Saturday  Night  on  a  smaller  scale.  Mr.  Mullin  em- 
ploys four  carriers  who  make  their  rounds  regularly  ;  he 
also  keeps  a  special  delivery  rig  for  this  purpose.  He  is 
always  on  the  look-out  for  any  new  agency  and  intends 
to  gradually  add  a  stationery  department  to  his  grocery 
store. 

The  Studio  for  March. 

The  color  plates  in  the  International  Studio  for  March 
include  a  charming  seascape  by  James  McNeill  Whistler, 
"A  Picardy  Farmyard,"  by  H.  S.  Hopwood,  "Bathing, 
Ghats,  Benares,"  and  "A  White  Street,  Gwalior,"  by 
Frank  Dean  and  "The  Banks  of  the  Loir,"  by  W.  A. 
Gibson.  The  letterpress  deals  with  the  paintings  of  Prof. 
Henry  Tonks,  the  work  of  Ludwig  Rosch,  the  sketches  of 
H  S.  Hopwood  and  a  profusely  illustrated  description  of 
the  Arts  and  Crafts  Society's  Exhibition  at  the  New 
Gallery,  besides  the  usual  departments,  architectural  ar- 
ticles, etc 

A  Word  to  The  News  Dealer. 

Did  you  ever  stop  to  consider  there  is  a  reason  why 
foreign  subscription  agencies  sweep  down  into  your  town 
like  a  traveling  circus  and  manage  to  pull  several  hundred 
dollars  from  the  butcher,  baker  and  candlestick  maker  ? 
questions  John  W.  Glenister,  in  The  Magazine  Dealer. 
There  is  a  reason.  A  simple  one.  The  subscription  agen- 
cies have  rounded  up  a  thousand  or  more  subagents  and 
they  are,  therefore,  in  a  position  to  command  from  many 
publishers  a  rate  that  will  enable  their  subagents  to  out- 
sell yon,  and  you  are  letting  this  business  get  away  from 
you  without  even  so  much  as  a  murmur. 

Year  after  year  the  public  library  in  your  city  makes 
an  appropriation  of  from  $100  to  $1,000  for  magazines. 
Do  you  get  this  ?  If  not,  why  are  you  paying  your  share 
toward  the  maintenance  of  that  institution  ?  The  head 
master  and  school  teachers  where  your  children  are  being 
educated  buy   many    magazines   through   clubbing   arrange- 


If  you  should  notify  your  fellow-merchants  that 
through  a  clubbing  arrangement  you  could  secure  your 
meats,  groceries,  clothes,  shoes,  etc.,  for  about  one-third 
less  than  they  are  charging  you,  do  you  think  for  a  mo- 
ment they  would  stand  idly  by  and  allow  you  to  do  so  ? 
Not  much  !  They  would  put  up  an  awful  howl.  They 
would  say  to  you  :  "Mr.  Magazine  Dealer,  we  are  your 
fellow-merchants,  you  are  one  of  us  We  are  working  to- 
gether like  one  big  family.  It  is  your  duty  to  patronize 
home  trade."  They  would  be  right,  and  so  it  is  their 
duty  to  patronize  you. 

It's  up  to  you  to  go  to  your  fellow-merchants,  manu- 
facturers, lawyers,  doctors,  ministers,  teachers  ;  in  fact, 
every  magazine  reader  in  your  vicinity,  and  tell  them  it 
is  only  fair  they  should  give  you  the  business  that  right- 
fully belongs  to  you  ! 

It's  up  to  you  to  go  the  members  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  in  your  city  and  tell  them  you  want  their  co-oper- 
ation, otherwise,  they  may  not  depend  on  you  for  any 
support  ! 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Just  Ready-  Canadian  Edition  of  Price  Collier's  Great  Book 

ENGLAND  AND  THE  ENGLISH  7^7  ^""7^ 

This  wonderfully  interesting-  book  is  destined  to  have  a  big-  sale.  It  is  the  only  book  on  the  subject 
from  this  side  of  the  Atlantic  that  the  British  papers  have  favorably  reviewed.  So  great  has  been  the 
demand  that  already  the  volume  has  gone  into  Seven  English  Editions  and  Six  American  Editions. 

THE  OUTLOOK  SAYS  :— Nobody  who  knows  England,  or  cares  fb]  the  English,  can  lay  this  uo«k  down  after  hi-  has  begun  it.  It  is  devoid  of  the  common- 
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Kilmeny  of  the  Orchard 

By  L.  M.  MONTGOMERY,  author  of  Anne  of 
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Farming  It 

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The  First  Great  Canadian 

The  story  of  Pierre  le  Moyne 
By  CHARLES  B.   REED.      - 

The  Landscape  Beautiful 

By  FRANK  A.   WAUGH,  Professor  of  Horti- 
culture and   Landscape  Gardening,   Amherst. 

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How  to  Speak  in  Public 

By  GRENVILLE  KLEISER. 
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net  $1.00 


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We  are  wholesale  dealers  in  books  of  all  publishers. 

McClelland  &  goodchild 


42   ADELAIDE  STREET  WEST 


TORONTO 


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CHAT  is  what  every  manufacturer  and  mer- 
chant is  aiming  at.  He  wants  to  progress, 
to  expand  and  develop;  but  how  can  he  go 
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BUSY   MAN'S   MAGAZINE   IS   A    BUSINESS    BUILDER 

It  circulates  thoroughly  in  Canada  from  coast 
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MUSIC 


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you    in    CHOIR    MUSIC. 

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which  we  gladly  send  you  on 

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Our  NEW  CATALOGUE  of  "Selected  Best  Sellers," 
including  songs,  piano  music,  books,  etc.,  is  now  read}-. 
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Copies  for  the  asking. 
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ASHDOWN'S  MUSIC  STORE 
144  Victoria  Street  -  -  TORONTO 


Canada's       Greatest      Music      House 


|>MUSICI 


JUST  ISSUED 

The  Mammoth 


Folio  of  Music 


The  largest  folio  of  Piano  Music  ever  published. 

It  contains  ali  the  favorite  compositions  previously  published  in  other 
folios,  together  with  a  large  edition  of  NEW  STANDARD  and  COPY- 
RIGHT WORKS  not  to  be  found  in  any  other  collection. 

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Western  Branch:  237  Yonge  Street 

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Gram-o-phones  and  Records 

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and  records  are  daily  becoming 
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"MIS    MASTER'S    VOICE' 

REG.U.6.PAT.0FF. 


58 


BOOKSELLER      \NI)     STATIONER 


Music   and  Musical  Instruments 

Survey  of  the  Month  —  The  New 
Songs  which  are  Popular — Return  of 
the  Columbia  Phonograph  Company. 

"The  air  seems  full  of  music"  were  the  words  Dickens 
put  into  the  mouth  of  his  Little  Nell  when  she  was  dying, 
adding-  and  "God  knows  it  might  have  'been."  In  the 
springtime  and  especially  Eastertime  the  air  seems  full  of 
music  Birds,  even,  sing  again  and  the  flowers  blossom  as 
if  in  the  form  of  visible  music,  so  that  gladness,  in  heart 
and  habliment  rules.  In  the  music  stores  there  is  a  good 
demand  for  popular  sheet  songs  and  from  now  until  the 
time  when  people  flock  to  the  country  smart  singers  will 
be  "trying  over"  the  songs  which  will  beguile  the  sweet- 
hearts and  others  during  the  long  summer  evenings  of 
dolce  far  niente,  not  so  very  far  away. 

Delmar  Music  Co.  are  driving  hard  on  "Sing  Me  a, 
Song,"  which  is  no  relation  of  the  famous  Gilbertian 
"Yeomen  of  the  Guard"  jester  song.  "I'm  Feelin'  Blue" 
i>  another  of  their  successes.  Both  good  songs  and  sales 
have  increased  daily. 

In  nearly  every  music  store  window  will  be  seen  copi- 
ous numbers  of  copies  of  "Arbutus  Waltz,"  by  H.  Nick- 
son.  The  cover  of  the  sheet  shows  a  'bunch  of  red  flowers 
blossoming  as  the  arbutus  is  supposed  to  do  under  snow. 
The  printing  is  not  very  good  and  most  people  would  miss 
the  point  which  the  artist  wished  to  adorn.  Nickson  was 
the  well-known  author  of  "Carita  Waltz"  and  is  a  Mont- 
realer.     It's  good.  too. 

The  Vinton  Music  Publishing  Co.,  of  Boston,  are  offer- 
ing "Elinore,"  "Won't  You  Change  Your  Name  to 
Mine."  and  good  sales  are   taking  place. 

"My  Irish  Caruso."  heralded  by  the  Daly  Music  Pub- 
lishers, Boston,  is  making  an  opportune  start  on  St.  Pat- 
rick's Day  and  period.  Evidently  it  was  an  adroit  stroke 
lo  get  it  started  in  March. 

"My  Old  Girl,"  h}  Grinell  Bros..  Detroit,  is  having 
-  hiic  "rage"  and  will  be  good  summer  stuff. 

Shapiro  are  still  to  the  fore  with  a  seller  in  "Angel 
Eyes,"  and  have  others  promised  right  away.  Theo. 
Morse  Music  Co.,  New  York,  are  winning  favor  in  "He's 
a  College  Boy,"  and  McGill  boys  have  made  it  famous  at 
their  theatricals.  "Thinking"  and  "Skylark"  are  two 
favorites  of  The  Weinstein  Co.,  of  New  York. 

Nothing  has  quite  surpassed  "Put  on  Your  Old  Grey 
Bonnet."  It  is  whistled  on  every  corner  and  sung  by  aid 
and  young.  The  idea  is  very  beautiful  and  simple  of  the 
golden  wedding  day  being  celebrated  by  the  old  costumes 
and  the  spirit  of  love  still  strong.  This  song  will  have 
a  big  sale.  It  is  one  of  Jerome  H.  Remiek  Co.'s,  New 
York,  and  others  of  theirs  are  "Mandy.  How  do  You  do," 
"Lady  Love,"  "By  the  Light  of  theOld  Silvery  Moon" 
and  "Cotton  Babe.'" 

Altogether  the  new  snugs  seems  to  be  better  in  tone 
and,  getting  around  to  songs  worth  while,  "Put  on  Your 
Old  Grey  Bonnet"  reminds  one  in  spots  of  "Silver 
Threads  Among  the  GoTd  "  and  other  old  gems. 

Philip  E.  Netten,  the  author  of  several  songs,  who  made 
a  hit  last  year  in  his  Clifton  Binghamy  song,  "When  We 
Two  Were  in  Love."  is  now  bringing  out  another  love 
song  which  will  be  ready  in  a  few  weeks. 

Murray  and  Michaels,  the  authors  of  "Strolling."  re- 
porl   that  they  are  meeting  with  success  in  all  parts  wilh 


this  Ming.  "Snioke  Dreams,"  another  of  theirs,  is  sold  to 
United  States.  They  have  a  new  song  on  the  press  which 
deals  with  a  vernacular  expression  "Stick  With  the  Big 
Show." 

*     *     * 

A  Story  of  Handel. 

Speaking  of  heavier  music  a  good  story  of  Handel,  the 
master  who  gave  us  "The  Messiah""  was  told  the  other 
day.  It  is  opportune  that  some  memories  of  Handel  might 
well  be  published  this  month,  as  he  died  according  to  his 
own   prayer  on  Good  Friday. 

Handel  had  an  utter  hatred  for  the  jarring  of  tuning 
instruments  in  his  orchestra.  At  his  own  theatre  in  Lon- 
don, he  made  it  a  rule  to  have  all  instruments  tuned  be- 
fore he  arrived,  and  in  fact  they  were  all  ready  for  the 
players  when  they  arrived.  One  evening  an  abominable 
trick  was  played.  A  wag  got  in  and  untuned  the  instru- 
ments. When  the  leader  arrived  and  Handel  himself  gave 
the  word  to  begin,  the  greatest  jangle  that  ever  offended 
sensitive  ear  was  heard.  Known  for  his  passion,  the 
musicians  watched  their  master  in  terror.  At  a  flash  he 
rushed  to  the  great  drum,  kicked  it  flying  and  then  seized 
t'.ie  kettle  drum  and  smashed  it  over  the  leader's  head. 
The  authenticity  of  this  story  has  'been  verified  in  the 
'  •  Memoirs  of  the  Masters. "  CD.  C. 


Columbia  Back  to  its  Own. 

The  Columbia  Phonograph  Co.  are  back  to  their  own 
again,  so  far  as  Canada  is  concerned.  The  Toronto  Phono- 
graph Co.  are  no  more  and  the  Columbia  people  have  taken 
over  their  assets  and  will  be  their  own  agents  in  future. 
The  Columbia  Phonograph  Co.  were  orig'inally  in  the  field 
in  Canada  and  had  several  branches  in  Canadian  cities. 
The  Toronto  Co.  was  then  formed,  taking  over  the  assets 
and  representing  the  Columbia  Co.  The  former,  however. 
did  not  succeed  very  well  and  the  Columbia  Co.  foreclosed 
the  mortgage  'Which  they  held.  The  bailiff  sold  the  assets 
to  Mr.  S.  S.  B.  Campbell,  but  Campbell  failed  to  complete 
the  purchase,  so  the  Columbia  Co.  took  possession  on 
March  1. 

From  the  trade  standpoint,  the  interesting  feature  is 
that  orders  for  Columbia  lines  can  now  be  properly  filled. 
as  a  complete  stock  will  be  carried.  It  is  the  intention 
of  the  company  to  arrange  for  exclusive  representation  in 
every  place  of  any  size  in  Canada.  Distributors  will  be 
appointed    for    e'a.ch    province.      James   P.    Bradt     is     the 

manager. 

*     *     * 

Mammoth  Folio  of  Music. 

One  of  the  most  notable  publications  in  the  way  of  a 
collection  of  popular  and  famous  piano  music  ever  produced 
in  Canada  has  just  been  issued  by  Whaley,  Royce  &  Co.. 
Toronto.  It  is  called  the  "Mammoth  Folio  of  Music" 
and  is  larger  by  thirty-two  pages  than  any  similar  publi- 
cation of  its  kind.  The  entire  work  of  setting  up  and 
lithographing  this  big  hook  of  288  pages  was  done  in  To- 
ronto, which  in  itself  is  a  most  creditable  achievement. 
The  folio  contains  a  wonderfully  comp'ete  collection  of 
all  the  best  known  music  in  the  world.  The  compilers  had 
in  mind  a  book  which  would  be  of  the  greatest  possible  use 
in  the  home,  and  they  have  accordingly  put  into  it  just 
thai  class  of  music  which  will  suit  the  requirement-  of 
the  average   Canadian    family.     There   is   dance   music   of 


?<> 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


all  kinds,  the  airs  of  all  the  old  favorite  songs,  aationa] 
music,  wedding  marches,  funeral  marches,  etc.  In  fact, 
it  would  be  difficult  to  name  a  piece  of  any  popularity 
whatever  which  is  not  to  be  found  in  this  interesting  com- 
pilation., The  price  at  which  the  book  can  'be  sold  pro- 
fitably at  retail  is  so  low  t'hal  a  big  sale  is  certain.  Here 
is  something  which  the  trade  should  take  hold  of  vigor- 
ously. 

The  same  firm  have  also  just  issued  an  interesting  col- 
lection of  "First  Pieces  in  Easy  Keys,"  which  will  be 
found  of  value  by  teachers  of  music.  Several  of  the 
pieces  have  never  before  been  obtainable  in  cheap  form 
that  the  book  has  an  interest  from  thai  standpoint.  Th< 
trade  would  do  well  to  bring  this  book  to  the  attention 
of  the  music  teacher  in   their  locality. 


ENCOURAGEMENT  TO  DEALERS. 

The  Columbia  Phonograph  Co.,  Toronto,  hands  out  the 
following  notice  to  the  trade: 

^Ontario  dealers'  orders  for  graphophones,  grafonolas, 
Columbia  double  discs  and  Columbia  indestructible  cylin- 
ders will  be  handled  direct  by  this  oompanj  in  the  future, 
the  Toronto  Phonograph  Company,  Ltd..  having  retired 
from  business. 

'  "The  Columbia  policy  of  giving,  exclusive  territory, 
which  has  been  so  successful  in  the  United  States,  will  be 
adopted  in  this  territory.  We  wish  lo  especially  encour- 
age those  dealers  who  will  handle  the  business  on  up-to- 
date  lines;  who  will  adopt  proved  selling  plans — methods 
which  an.'  being  successfully  used  in  other  parts  of  the 
world. ' ' 


DOES  YOUR  CLERK  EARN  HIS  SALARY? 

Do  clerks  ever  consider  what  they  are  worth  to  their 
employers,  or  do  the  employers  even  know  whether  certain 
clerks  earn  their  salaries?  As  mercantiling  is  becoming 
more  of  a  science  every  day,  it  also  becomes  necessary 
to  look  more  scientifically  into  the  financial  details  of  a 
merchant's  business.  It  is  well  known  that  clerks  in  most 
retail  stores  are  not  drawing  large  salaries,  but  it  does  not 
matter  so  much  what  a  man  is  paid,  as  it  does  to  know 
whether  he  earns  what  he  is  getting.  It  is  an  easy  matter 
to  ask  for  a  higher  salary,  but  a  clerk  has  no  right  to  ask 
for  an  advance  unless  he  can  show  that  he  is  worth  it. 
Some  have  an  idea,  if  they  work  in  a  store  for  a  certain 
length  of  time  they  are  entitled  to  a  raise  whether  they 
are  worth  more  or  not.  Few  really  consider  what  value 
they  render  to  their  employer  and  make  little  effort  to  be 
more  valuable,  and  yet  expect  more  wages  without  taking 
into  consideration  whether  their  employer  can  afford  to 
pay  an  advance  or  not.  After  the  clerk  has  first  made  his 
own  wages  he  begins  to  pay  the  expenses  and  what  is  left 
over  and  above  that  goes  as  profit  to  the  proprietor.  The 
value  of  a  clerk  therefore  depends  entirely  in  his  ability 
to  exceed  the  point  where  the  net  profit  of  the  proprietor 
begins. 

Tl  is  quite  probable  that  there  are  clerks  who  never 
reach  the  paying  point,  and  yet  might  think  that  thej 
should  have  more  wages. 

Every  merchant  therefore  should  adopt  some  system 
by  which  he  could  tell  every  week  from  the  amount  of 
business  done,  whether  his  clerks  are  worth  the  salary  he 
pay  them  or  whether  they  are  entitled  to  more.  By  a  clean 
and  fair  investigation  some  unsuspected  ones  mis'ht  not 
measure  up  to  the  paying  point. 


Columbia   Disc  Graphophones 

$25  to   $125 

Columbia  Cylinder  Graphophones 

$18  to    $125 


The 


GRAFONOLAS:  Elite,  $135 

Regent,  $250 

DeLuxe,        $250 


Columbia  Phonograph  Company 


HAS 


ESTABLISHED 


Canadian  Headquarters  at 
264  Yonge  St.,  Toronto 

From  which  point  they  will  distribute  Graphophones,  Grafono'as,  Columbia  Double  Discs, 
Columbia  Indestructible  Cylinders  and  Talking  Machine  Supplies  to  the  Trade  of  Ontario. 

Dealers  in  Talking  Machines  in  the  other  Provinces  of  Canada  are  encouraged  to  draw 
their  supplies  from  the  following  distributors  of  the  Columbia  Phonograph  Company: 

ALBERT  A-D.  J.  Young  &  Co.,  Limited,  Calgary.  BRITISH  COLUMBIA— Fletcher  Bros 

MANITOBA— Winnipeg  Piano  Co.,  Winnipeg.  Fletcher  Bros.,  Limited,  Vancouver. 

MARITIME  PROVINCES— Maritime  Phonograph  Co.,  St.  Johns,  N.B. 

NEWFOUNDLAND-U.S.  Picture  and  Portrait  Co.,  St.  John,  Nfld. 

QUEBEC     Foisy  Freres,  210  St.  Catherine,  Montreal. 

P.  T.  Legare,  Rue  St.  Paul,  Quebec 

City;    Lavigueur   &  Hutchison, 

Quebec  City. 

SASKATCHEWAN— Talking 

Machine  Agency,  Regina. 


Victoria. 


Columbia  Double-Disc  Records, 
85  cents 

The  only  COM  PI.ETE  Ust  of  Doub'e  Record' 

'Ji):n  scl-ctions. 


2-Min.  Indestructible  Records,  45c. 
4-Min.  "  "         65c. 

They   fit    any   cylinder    instrument.     Matchless 
tonal  qualities  and  unbreakable  texture. 


6o 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The   Leather  Goods    Department 

Favorable  Conditions  Evident — The 
New  Designs  in  Bags — Continued 
Vogue  of  Hand   Bags    Noted. 


Leather  Goods. 

It  is  a  long  time  since  conditions  wore  as  favorable  for 
a  prosperous  spring  season  in  fancy  leather  goods  as  they 
are  at  present.  Very  few  cheap,  trashy  goods  are  in  the 
market,  manufacturers,  as  a  rule,  having  all  the  business 
they  can   handle  in  I  lie  'higher  grades. 

The  consequence  of  this  condition  is  that  even  those 
retailers  who  cater  to  the  cheaper  trade  are  compelled  to 
put  in  'better  goods  than  they  are  accustomed  to  handle. 
Those  who  adopt  this  course  are  generally  pleased  witli 
the  results,  as  the  profits  accruing  are  greater,  and  the 
business  done  is  more  satisfactory  with  the  higher  class 
of  merchandise. 

New  Bags. 

In  hand  bags  as  yet,  there  have  been  no  striking  de- 
velopments in  leather  finishes  or  colors.  It  is  generally 
held  that  the  medium  shades  of  lavenders,  blue  and  green 
will  be  very  good.  But  while  these  colored  bags  will  no 
doubt  sell  well,  there  is  no  getting  away  from  the  fact 
that  black  bags  will  be  the  most  popular.  Many  attrac- 
tive blacks  are  being  shown   this  season. 

These  come  in  cowhide,  walrus  and  seal,  and  are  large. 
The  ten  inch  bag  is  the  favorite  size,  and  some  of  the 
newest  models  are  almost  square,  One  of  the  seasons's 
novelties  has  a  pocket  on  the  outside  for  calling  cards  and 
a    number   of   compart  meul  s    inside.      The    large    bags    are 


made  with  broken  bottoms  and  are  twelve  inches  in 
length.  Bla,ck  bags  are  lined  in  either  black  or  tan  leather, 
and  many  are  fitted  with  purses  and  card  cases  to  match. 
In  the  matter  of  sizes,  it  is  the  general  opinion  that  the 
medium  large  will  maintain  their  present  popularity  for 
some  time  with  the  probability  of  a  shift  toward  the 
smaller  bags  later  on.  That  it  will  be  a  difficult  matter 
for  the  average  woman  to  change  from  thu  spacious  "gen- 
eral utility"  bag  now  in  vogue  to  one  of  less  generous 
proportions,  however,  is  a  fact  which  should  not  be  lost 
sight  of. 

Hand  Bags  Continue  Popular. 

Hand  bags  continue  as  popular  as  ever,  and  are  seem- 
ingly so  firmly  entrenched  in  woman's  favor  that  it  will  be 
many  years  before  they  will  take  a  secondary  position 
iiT  fancy  leather  goods  lines.  At  any  rate  no  change 
appears  to  be  possible  as  long  as  women's  dresses  are  made 
without    pockets. 

Another  feature  of  the  trade  which  is  exceedingly 
gratifying  to  both  manufacturers  and  retailers  alike  is, 
that  while  formerly  women  were  content  to  own  one  bag, 
the  fashionable  woman  at  least,  requires  a  number  of 
different  styles  for  different  occasions,  some  of  them  hav- 
ing various  bags  to  match  their  several  dresses. 

From  the  present  outlook  the  coming  season  will  be 
one  of  unprecedented  prosperity  for  the  manufacturers 
of  leather  bags,  and  judging  from  orders  already  received, 
it  would  appear  to  be  wisdom  on  the  part  of  buyers  to 
plaice  at  least  a  portion  of  their  orders  as  early  as  possible. 

Those  who  fail  to  provide  for  their  wants  in  the  line, 
will  find  themselves  badly  handicapped  in  the  race  for 
business,  and  are  likely  to  experience  a  decided  shortage 
of  desirable  goods  before  the  season  is  half  over,  and.be 
compelled   to  accept   such  goods  as  the  market    affords. 


Our  Spring   Offering 


includes  an  excep- 
tional assortment  of 
metal  frames  in  Ger- 
man Silver,  Matt 
Gold,  Butler  Silver 
and  other  finishes. 

IN 

LEATHER 

COVERED 

FRAMES 

our  line  is  also  the 
newest  and  most 
complete,  sizes 
ranee  from  8  in.  to 
12  in. 


The  Western  Leather  Goods  Co.,  Limited 


MANUFACTURERS  OF  FINE  LEATHER  GOODS 
101  King  Street  West  (Royal  Arcade)  ::  ::  :: 

WRITE    AND    OUR    REPRESENTATIVES     WILL    CALL    ON    YOU. 


TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


FROM  THE  MARKE 


IMP 


^^^^HIS  is  worthy  of  more  than  a  passing 
1  J  thought.  Consider  what  it  means. 
Here,  gathered  from  every  source  of 
good  supply,  is  a  collection  of  Holiday  Goods — 
the  largest  and  most  perfectly  assorted  range 
in  Canada. 

For  six  months  our  buyers  and  commis- 
saries have  been  busy  in  all  centres  of  manu- 
facture, armed  with  consummate  knowledge, 
aware  of  the  date  of  our  opening,  and  that 
this  year  must  eclipse  all  previous  Import 
Seasons. 


WAREROOMS 

401-405  King  Street  West 
52-56  Spadina  Avenue 

FACTORY 

57-59  Spadina  Avenue 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


TS  OF  THE  WORLD 


ORT 


LARGE     proportion     of     these     goods 
have   been   manufactured    especially   to 
our  order,  adapted  to  meet  the  demands 
of  the  Canadian  public. 

All  is  new,  all  is  fresh,  all  is  up  to-date, 
and  in  these  respects,  with  everything  of  the 
very  latest,  we  must  hold  supreme  advantage. 

Add  to  this  our  inflexible  determination 
to  sell  at  lowest  Import  Prices — and  our 
position  is  unassailable. 

The   display   is   ready. 


Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter 

Limited 
IMPORTERS   OF   FOREIGN   ART   GOODS 

TORONTO 


The  Fancy  Goods,  Novelty  and  Toy  Department 

Extensive  Range  of  Children's  Toys  for  Next  Season — Attractive  Price  Features — Opening 
of  the  Import  Sample  Displays  in  Toronto      Description  of  Some  of  the  Goods  Being  Shown 


That  merchant  who  has  never  considered  the  advis- 
ability of  handling  toys  and  other  holiday  lines,  should 
seriously  ask  himself  whether  he  has  not  been  guilty  of  a 
short-sighted  policy.  There  are  to  be  found,  from 
one  end  of  Canada  to  the  other  conclusive  ex- 
amples in  proof  of  the  profit  advantages,  which 
have  accrued  from  an  up-to-date  line  of  toys 
and  other  lines,  which  belong  almost  exclusively  lo  the 
holiday  trade.  Progressive  stores,  which  at  first  ventured 
to  equip  a  corner  of  their  store  with  these  lines,  now 
have  large  floor  spaces  devoted  entirely  to  the  realm  of 
the  little  folks  during  holiday  time — and  this  fact  is 
of  itself  striking  evidence  of  the  worth-whileness  of  the 
proposition. 

Now  that  wholesale  houses  are  preparing  their  lines 
for  next  season,  the  merchant  who  has  not  featured  these 
goods  heretofore,  should  think  it  over.  There  never  was 
a  greater  range  of  price  attractions,  or  of  ingenious  and 
fanciful  creations  in  these  lines.  These,  it  must  be  re- 
membered, are  goods  which,  for  the  most  part,  sell  them- 
selves and,  having  a  rapid  turnover. in  the  proper  season, 
should  certainly  appeal  to  the  retail  merchant. 

Dolls  in   Great  Profusion. 

In  the  doll  department  it  is  a  sure  thing  that  never 
in  any  season  have  so  many  new.  interesting  and  market- 
able productions  materialized. 

A  new  line,  but  little  developed  in  a  practical  way,  is 
the  •'character  doll,"  from  the  real  infant  with  its  baby 
head,  baby  cheeks,  baby  features,  baby  eyes,  baby  body, 
bent  baby  legs,  and  baby's  babiness  to  the  "little  girl 
and  little,  boy"  personified  in  all  their  lovable  and  en- 
gaging postures  are  to  be  had  this  year. 

Jointed  dolls;  in  fine  variety,  and  neal  modern  styles 
in  dressed  dolls  are  the  two  varieties  in  which  the  "char- 
acter doll"  is  offered. 

There  is  the  usual  profusion  of  dressed  dolls,  more 
beautiful  than  ever.  "Not  a  form  of  loveliness  has  been 
created  for  the- adornment  and  glorification  of  the  child 
or  woman,  but  has  ils  counterpart  in  the  dressed  dolls  of 
1910,  as  they  are  to  be  seen  in  Canadian  houses. 

A  distinct  novelty  "is  brought  out  this  year  in  dolls' 
heads,  and  these  are  to  be  had  also  applied  to  dressed 
dolls  and  kid  dolls,  as  well  as  in  separate  heads,  viz.,  a 
doll  which  goes  asleep  and  stays  asleep  until  wakened, 
and  which  upon  waking  up  cries  "Mama"  automatically. 

An  entirely  new  range  of  undressed  dolls  is  the  silk 
body  doll,  made  in  all  the  popular  stylos  of  the  kid  doll 
family.  It  is  a  change.  Does  not  soil  so  easily  as  the 
kid  body,  and  is  sightly  and  salable. 

A  big  feat nie  is  made  of  soft,  unbreakable,  velvet  and 
mohair  plush  dolls.  These  are  shown  in  a  good 
range.  Particularly  are  to  be  noted  the  light,  large,  fluffy 
dolls  fur  babies,  made  up  in  fine  soft  materials.  Many 
varieties  of  North  Pole  dolls  and  whole  families  of  Es- 
quimaux. The  better  lines  are  made  with  automatic 
"Mama"  voice,  so  that  they  cry  after  their  Mamas  like 
real  kids   do. 

Stuffed  Toys. 
These  popular  items  are  shown  this  year  in  variety  al- 
most   without    end.      The    cutest,    cosiest    dogs,    (without 
muzzles),  cats,  squirrels,  bunnies,  bears,  camels  elephants 

64 


and  all  the  menagerie's  favorites.  Whether  of  common 
flannel,  felt,  velvet  or  fine  mohair  plush,  whether  in  iron 
frames  and  with  wheels,  for  the  "Child  who  breaks  every- 
thing," or  made  up  for  the  small  child,  in  soft,  dainty 
varieties,  the  line  is  great,  and  its  sale  possibilities  are 
away  beyond  anything  in  the  past. 

Dolls'  Accessories. 

Dolls'  hats  and  millinery  are  to  be  had  in  almost  end- 
less varieties.  Real  hair  wigs,  mohair  wigs,  in  all  the 
popular  hair  dressings,  necklets,  corsets,  shoes  and  stock- 
ings and  garters  for  the  same,  underwear,  fur  sets, 
gloves  and  knitted  wool  outer  garments  are  all  to  be  had 
in  bewildering  profusion. 

Doll's  hair  dressing  sets  with  real  hair,  hair  curlers  and 
instruction  book,  work  sets,  embroidery  sets,  stand  work 
baskets,  dolls  trousseaux,  are  all  lines  brought  within  the 
range  of  almost  any  dealer  in  holiday  goods. 

A  unique  display  is  made  of  dolls'  houses  with  all  the 
rooms  suitably  furnished,  and  to  be  had  are  modern 
Hats,  bungalows  and  Swiss  cottages,  etc. 

An  Interesting  Toy  Ldne. 

In  the  making  of  toys  there  is  truly  no  end,  and  there 
are  this  year  so  many  new  ones  shown,  that  what  oc- 
curs to  one  on  examining  assortments  shown,  is  that 
there  is  really  little  that  is  not  quite  new. 

Of  course,  all  the  old  favorites  do  their  best  to  keep 
represented,  but  so  much  interest  attaches  to  the  new 
lines  that  some  of  the  old  and  dear  friends  in  the  toy 
line  may  well  feel  slighted. 

For  instance,  take  electric  toys.  These  are  so  im- 
proved and  changed,  both  in  execution  and  prices,  as  to 
he  rightly  termed  radically  new.  While  being  wound  for 
strong  currents  they  run  strongly  and  well,  even  with  a 
-mall  pocket  dry  battery,  and  while  they  are  to  be 
had  in  the  expensive  varieties  they  are  also  to  be  had  this 
year,  for  the  first  time,  even  as  low  as  a  dollar  retail,  the 
cheaper  varieties  still  having  all  the  perfection  of  opera- 
lion  which  the  good  ones  can  display. 

The  improved  mechanism  and  models  of  trains  on 
track  and  the  ability  of  manufacturers  now-a-days  to 
turn  out  a  really  good-running,  dependable,  modern  priced 
train  will  assure  this  year's  trains  on  track  a  big  place 
in  the  toy  order. 

Railway  Accessories. 

All  classes  of  rolling  stock,  from  the  rotary  snow  plow 
to  the  common  flat  car,  are  to  be  seen  in  miniature.  The 
new  trackage,  including  tunnels,  bridges,  gates,  stations. 
signals  (electric  and  oil  lighting),  arc  all  interesting  toys 
and   in  practical  marketable  forms. 

The  new  "Canadian  Navy"  is  already  constructed 
and  "doing  business,"  so  far  as  the  toy  world  is  con- 
cerned. Those  that  run  in  water  from  the  submarine  to 
the  majestic  cruiser,  and  those  that  must  confine  their 
running  to  the  floor  are  all  good  models  and  desirable 
1910  merchandise. 

'  One  thing  is  sure,  that  whatever  diversion  of  opinion 
there  may  be  among  grown-ups,  as  to  what  form  the 
Canadian  naval  force  will  eventually  take,  there  will  be 
unanimity  among  the  children  over  these  toy  navies. 

Life-like  frogs,  fish,  ducks,  swans,  are  all  sensible  and 
natural  working  aquatic  toys. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Post  card  projectors,  magic  lanterns,  moving  picture 
shows,  all  unique  and  up-to-date,  are  bound  to  meet  the 
approval  of  the  dealers  and  the  public. 

Military  Requisites. 

These  include  sets  of  soldiers,  tents,  soldier  suits, 
gnus,  wliips.  drums  and  reins,  to  satisfy  t'lie  greatest  buy 
fire-eater. 

In  mechanical  toys,  there  are  the  usual  number  of  new 
creations,  but  more  careful  selection  seems  to  have  char- 
acterized the  buying  in  these  lines  this  year.  They  all 
seem  to  be  winners. 

The  Automobile  Show. 

An  automobile  show  in  toys  would  be  required  to  prop- 
erly, demonstrate  the  range  of  toy  autos.  Their  beauty 
of  design  and  finish,  and  their  perfection  in  operation 
will  appeal  to  the  storekeeper  and  customer  alike. 

All  the  neatest  stunts  of  real  motorists  are  possible 
with  mighty  little  of  the  accompanying  mo'toring  expense. 

Airships  and  Aerial  Toys. 

These  creations  are  this  year  in  endless  variety.  The 
well-known  "Zepplein"  model  seems  to  be  there  by  the 
yard  and  at  ridiculous  prices.  Wrights,  Bleriots,  Paul- 
hans,  Farmans,  etc.,  are  all  there  in  many  sizes. 

Bell  toys,  rattles,  trumpets,  toy  band  instruments  in 
sets,  and  violins  are  all  popular  toys  worthy  of  special  at- 
tention, by  reason  of  the  many  new  features  in  this  year's 
line. 

Natural  plush  skin  horses,  in  staid  working  harness, 
ladies'  and  gents'  driving  turnouts,  and  gaily  caparison- 
ed circus  s'teeds,  stand  side  by  side  to  complete  a  worthy 
range    in  these  popular  toys. 

Rocking  horses  and  platform  horses,  are  also  shown  in 
satisfactory  variety. 

Games  and  Kindergarten  Sets. 

Children's  toy  dishes,  games,  blocks,  work  sets,  and 
kindergarten  toys  are  to  be  had  in  remarkably  clever  ex- 
ecutions, and  all  practically  at  popular  prices. 

This  last  item  "Kindergarten  sets"  is  worthy  of  very 
special  consideration.  They  are  really  home  kindergarten 
sets.  They  were  among  the  best  sellers  in  the  toy  and 
srame  business  last  season.  This  year's  assortment,  how- 
ever, is  so  much  larger  and  embraces  all  the  popular 
kindergarten  industries,  such  as  embroidery,  basket  mak- 
ing, stick  building,  as  well  as  Mosaic  outfits,  sewing  sets, 
etc.,  that  it  is  not  reasonable  to  make  a  comparison  with 
any  previous  season  in  this  line.  The  new  goods  are  so  com- 
prehensive from  all  standpoints. 

Truly  1910  has  a  host  of  new  offerings  in  dolls  and 
toys.     Tt  should  be  a  good  year. 

March  Import  Propaganda. 

The  Fancy  Goods  Company,  Toronto,  is  the  initiator 
of  a  new  programme  for  the  securing  of  a  "better  deal" 
for  the  average  dealer  on  holiday  goods,  consisting  of 
dolls,  toys,  fancy  presentation  goods,  gift  china,  and  sun- 
dry holiday  specials. 

The  claim  is  made  by  this  company  that  the  opportun- 
ity and  the  showing  made  are  unique  in  the  history  of 
business  in  these  lines.  Certain  it  is  that  their  newly- 
built  sample  rooms,  fitted  with  over  170  feet  of  modern 
electric-lighted  display  cases,  built  specially  for  this  show- 
ing, and  complete  from  end  to  end  with  quite  new  items 
numbering  to  the  thousands,  would  seem  to  indicate,  to 
start  with,  that  there  is  some  good  basis  in  fact  for  the 
claim. 

That  dealers  have  embraced  readily  this  opportunity 
is  conclusively  demonstrated  by  the  long  list   of  definite 

65 


Everybody  Buys 

Valentine's 


series 
of 


Canadian  View 

POST 
CARDS 

WHY? 


Because  they  are  the  post  cards  of 

perfection  and   the  line  is 

the  largest  and  most 

varied 

Many  new  and  dainty 
styles  for  1910 

"  Time  to  stock  up  ' 

"  The    tourist    will    soon  be 
along  ' 

THE  VALENTINE  &  SONS 

UNITED  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

LIMITED 

60  Front  St.  West     1  Coristine  Building 
TORONTO  MONTREAL 


BOOK  S  E  L  L  E  R     AND     S  T  A  T  I  O  N  E  K 


Buy  from  the  actual  Manufacturer 


SOME  OF  OUR  LINES: 

CREPE  PAPER  NAPKINS  in  sanitary  packages 

A  Protection  and  Convenience  to  both  dealer  and  consumer 

PARIS  TRI-COLOR  and  PLAIN  RIBBON  CREPE  PAPER 

The  jjreat  convenience  and  time-saver  in  decorating.     Fifty  varieties. 

Decorated  and  Plain  Crepe  Papers  and  Paper  Napkins 'n  endless  varieties      ,— — 

Milk  Bottle  Caps,  Holly  Papers,  Fine  Toilet  Papers.  Send  for  Prices  L 


THE  TUTTLE  PRESS  CO.,  Manufacturers,  Appleton,  Wis 


XMAS  CARDS  and  POST  CARDS 

Our  DOMINION  SERIES,  consisting-  of  X mas  Eolders,  Booklets,  Calendars  and  Post  Cards,  has  had  a  tremen- 
dous sale  wherever  shown.  This  Dominion  Series  is  quite  unique,  being  designed  especially  for  the  Canadian 
Trade  and  containing  some  of  the  most  artistic  effects  ever  produced.  Our  HERALDIC  SERIES,  which  met  with 
such  great  success  last  year,  is  again  before  the  trade  in  better  shape  than  ever. 


Our  general  line  of   Xmas  Cards,  Calendars,  Tags,  Wafers  and  Labels  is  stronger  than  ever  before. 

Hold   Your   Orders   Till   You  See   Our  Samples. 


Birn  Bros.,     -      London,  New  York  and  Toronto 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Company,  Canadian  Representatives 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


The 

Bon  Ton 

Art 
Company 

Boston,  Mass. 

U.S.A. 


T")UB  LIS  HERS  of  the  famous  Bon  Ton  line  of  Christmas  and  New  Year 
■*■  Post  Cards,  Gift  Cards,  Folders  and  Letters  of  high  quality,  with 
sentiments,  by  famous  writers,  containing  the  only  new  sentiment  to  be 
published  this  year,  by  Henry  Van  Dyke,  printed  in  high  class  style  on  finest 
stock  obtainable.      This  line  will  be  shown  in  Canada  by 

A.  R.  MacDOUGALL  &  COMPANY    :    Toronto,  Canada 

Hold  your  orders  for  this  line. 


The  Very  Thing  Your  Customer  Wants — 

oooooooooooooooo  o  o  oo  o  oo  oo  o 


CUT  Bimm  HOLES  AND  UNWIND. 
Made  in  a  variety  of  handsome  styles,  plain  or  ornamental,  rubber  tipped,  hard  or  soft  leads,  or  in  any  of  the  varying 
grades  of  lead,  suitable  for  all  purposes  and  at  prices  that  are  cheap  or  expensive  as   the  necessities  of  your  trade 
may  require. 

BLAISDELL  PAPER  PENCILS 

are  away  in  advance  of  anything  of  the  kind  yet  invented.  Never  need  sharpening  and  are  always  ready  for  immed- 
iate use.  Show  them  to  a  customer  and  you  make  a  sale.  Ladies  particularly  appreciate  their  great  convenience 
and  economical  qualities.     FOR  SALE  BY  THE  WHOLESALE  TRADE  OF  CANADA. 


66 


BOOKSELL E R    A  N  D    S T A TIONER 


appointments  which  have  already  been  secured  by  the 
eompanj  for  dealers  throughout  Ontario  and  other  parts 
of  Canada  to  visit  Toronto  during  March. 

That  customers  will  realize  an  immense  advantage  by 
such  a  showing  and  such  opportunity  for  economy  in  buy- 
ing is  evident  from  the  favorable  first  impression  of  the 
visitor  and  the  interesting  orders  already  placed  by  some 
of  the  biggest  among  the  trade. 

The  general  verdict  of  those  who  have  seen  the  show- 
ing and  investigated  the  "propaganda"  is  that  to  demon- 
strate the  abundant  success  and  far-sighted  progress  of 
the  Fancy  Goods  Company  needs  only  the  matter  of  an- 
other four  weeks'  time. 

Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter's  Import  Display. 

Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter  opened  on  Monday,  March  14, 
the  largest  display  of  import  fancy  goods  that  this 
firm  lias  ever  shown.  The  exhibit  is  held  in  the  firm's 
sample  rooms  in  the  System  Building  on  Spadina  Ave., 
just  south  of  King.  Here  some  12,000  different  samples 
are  spread  out  on  display  shelves  and  the  courteous 
salesmen  are  more  than  willing  to  answer  most  fully  all 
questions.  The  room  itself  is  profusely  decorated  and 
altogether  the  display  is  well  worth  the  time  of  anyone 
who  is  interested.  Some  of  the  newest  designs  for  this 
season  are  described  here  in  brief. 

Stand  smoker  sets  in  brass,  copper  and  bronze,  about 
two  feet  and  a  half  high  with  small  shelf  for  cards  or 
pipes,  ash  tray  and  match-holders,  curates  in  brass,  cop- 
per, nickel  and  onyx  for  five  o'clock  tea  service. 

Hammered  brass  umbrella  stands,  woodboxes,  tables, 
hatracks  and  brass  and  china  jardinieres. 

In  the  jewellry  stationery  line  the  most  striking 
thing  was  a  French  gold  and  mother-of-pearl  die.  Fancy 
vest  button  sets,  bridge  scorers  and  French  gold  jewel 
boxes,  medallion  tops  and  satin  lined  were  more  of  this 
year's  novelties. 

Brass  five  o'clock  tea  racks,  oxidized  and  brass  hot 
water  kettles  and  chime  gongs,  bronze  electrical  fixtures, 
smokers'  sundries  in  brass,  sterling  silver  goods,  candle 
sticks,  candelabra,  bronze  and  brass  chafing  dishes, 
coffee  percolators,  brass  and  copper  coal  scuttles  and 
brass  vases,  completed  the  collection  of  metals. 

Jardinieres  in  old  Roman  pottery  were  striking.  The 
ware  is  dark  green  in  color  with  a  rough  finish,  the  orna- 
mentation is  in  darker  green  and  is  very  artistic.  An- 
other handsome  design  was  a  dark  ground  almost  blue- 
black,  ornamented  with  filagree  silver. 

Chippendale  clocks,  card  trays  and  glove  and  hand- 
kerchief boxes  make  a  very  good  show,  fancy  French 
clocks,  jardiniere  stands  of  polished  weed,  antique  smoker 
sets  of  hammered  iron  in  many  grotesque  shapes,  brass 
altar  lights,  shaving  sets,  toys,  work  baskets,  fancy 
leather  goods  of  all  descriptions,  German  cut  glass  chrys- 
anthemum holders,  tobacco  jars,  chinaware,  French 
Imperial  china  vases,  druggist  sundries,  soaps  and  per- 
fumes, completed  the  most  extensive  display  of  import 
goods  that  this  firm  has  ever  attempted. 

Tuck's  Easter   Cards. 

With  the  idea  of  emphasizing  the  season  and  thereby 
drawing  trade  to  their  customers,  the  Baphael  Tuck  & 
Sons  Co.  have  prepared  an  exceptionally  fine  line  of 
Easter  cards  for  the  Canadian  trade.  Some  samples  of 
these  offerings  have  been  received  by  the  Bookseller  and 
Stationer,  which  aie  deserving  of  special  mention.  The 
larger  productions  take  the  form  of  ribbon  novelties.  With 
a  ribbon  as  a  base  the  card  proper,  usually  in  the  form 
of  a  cross,  is  mounted  upon  it,  the  whole  forming  an 
appropriate   gift   for   the  season.     The   different   cards   are 


variously  decorated,  mostly  with  lilies  and  the  ribbons 
are  of  white  or  pink.  Some  have  a  little  bunch  of  arti- 
ficial flowers  attached  to  the  end  of  the  ribbon.  The 
smaller  cards  and  post  cards  are  all  decorated  in  the 
customary  style,  in  keeping  with  the  spirit  of  the  day. 
The  trade  will  find  in  these  goods  a  great  business  stim- 
ulant. 


GLASS  HOUSES  AND  STONES. 

To  the  Editor  of  Bookseller  and  Stationer, — In  your 
issue  for  January,  "An  Edmonton  Stationer"  writes  very 
harshly  about  "(lie  little  Drug  Stores."  Probably  he  is 
young  and  inexperienced,  or  he  would  know  that  drugs 
and  stationery  have  for  very  many  years  been  carried  in 
one  store  and  in  many  localities,  the  only  place  to  buy 
stationery  is  the  drug  store.  After  such  a  state  of  affairs 
existing  for  more  than  a  century  he  desires  to  boycott  all 
who  would  dare  to  sell  those  awful  druggists  and  sta- 
tioners. This  sort  of  thing  has  been  attempted,  but  I 
think  to  the  advantage  of  no  one.  Has  not  any  person 
the  right  to  sell  stationery  in  this  great  and  free  Dominion 
of  ours?  Is  he,  then  disqualified  who  lias  the  ability  to 
become  a  druggist?  Surely  not!  How  about  the  stationer 
taking  up  other  lines.  In  the  place  where  my  lot  is  cast, 
one  of  the  stationers  has  just  issued  a  circular  (I  enclose 
it  for  your  inspection,  only)  advertising  a  sale  of  soaps. 
pottery,  china,  cloth,  hair  and  tooth  brushes,  brass  goods, 
moldings,  fancy  goods,  etc.;  if  you  want  window  glass  or 
putty  you  can  get  it  or  if  you  desire  to  have  your  barn 
or  fence  painted  he  will  take  the  job  or  he  will  paper 
your  house  for  you,  if  seats  or  desks  are  required  he  will 
try  to  get  the  order.  Under  such  a  state  of  affairs,  it  will 
hardly  be  safe  for  the  stationer  to  cast  stones.  So  long 
as  the  druggist  has  money  to  pay  for  stationery  he  will 
get  it  and  any  attempt  on  the  part  of  stationer  to  boycott 
will  injure  him  and  not  the  druggist.  Apologizing  for  he 
length  isf  my  letter. 

DRUGGIST  AND  STATIONER. 


HANDSOME  BOOK  CATALOGUE. 

One  of  the  most  tastefully  executed  publisher's  cata- 
logues yet  seen  is  that  of  Ward,  Lock  &  Co.,  London,  for 
tin'  season  of  1910.  The  catalogue  measures  9x12  inches 
and  has  an  appropriate  handlettered  cover.  It  is  profuse- 
ly illustrated,  many  of  the  cover  designs  and  illustrations 
shown   being  in   colors. 

The  leading  features  of  (he  new  list,  as  indicated  by- 
Ward.  Lock  &  Co.,  are  (1)  a  new  series  of  stories  for 
children,  with  picture  covers  and  handsome  gold  designs. 
(2)  a  new  series  of  poets.  (3)  the  Girls'  Favorite  Library. 
consisting  of  recent  copyright  stories  specially  written  for 
girls,  and  (4)  the  Lily  Series  and  Youths'  Library  in  en- 
tirely  new    bindings. 

It  would  be  impossible  to  refer  to  all  the  good  things 
in  this  excellent  catalogue.  The  trade  are  advised  to 
procure   copies   for   themselves   as   soon    as   possible. 


David  Forrest,  Canadian  representative  of  the  Chas. 
H.  Elliott  Co.,  Inc.,  North  Philadelphia,  was  in  Montreal 
this  month,  and  called  on  Bookseller  and  Stationer.  Mr. 
!•  orresl  is  on  an  extended  trip,  which  it  will  take  him 
several  month;  to  complete.  He  will  go  to  St.  Johns, 
Nfld.,  by  way  of  the  Maritime  Provinces,  and  then  back, 
through  Canada  to  the  western  coast,  finishing  in  Victoria. 


67 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


THE  AWAKENER 

Get  Ready !    Do  Not  Miss  the    Chance   to   See   Our 

Import  Samples  of  Christmas  Cards 

Calendars,    Papeteries   and    Novelties 

For  Season   1 9 10 

When  seeking  a  name  to  give  to  our  line  for  this  season  that  would  convey 
some   idea   of   its   merit,    we   could   find   nothing   more   significant   than   to  call    it 

THE    INCOMPARABLE 

We  feel  confident  that  after  you  have  had  an  opportunity  of  inspecting  the 
samples  you  will  say  with  us,  "  They  are  the  nearest  approach  to  perfection  ever  anticipated." 

We  will  show  productions  of  the  following  well-known  publishers  :  Castell  Bros., 
Auto  Cards  in  Boxes,  Assorted  Packets  Xmas  Cards,  Calendars,  etc.  :  Davidson  Bros., 
Post  Cards,  Assorted  Boxes  Xmas  Cards,  Calendars  ;  Art  Lithographic  Publishing  Co., 
Post  Cards  ;  Gibson  Art  Co.,  Art  Calendars,  Holly  Seals  and  Tags,  Holly  Boxes,  Holly 
Wrapping  Paper,  Tally  Cards,  Place  Cards,  Dance  Programs.  "Quality"  Series  Cards 
from  The  A.  M.  Davis  Co.  comprise  Christmas  Letters,  Post  Cards  and  Die  Stamped 
Cards  of  all  kinds.  The  Van  Dyke  sentiment  on  these  cards  is  the  best  selling 
proposition  ever  made,  as  well  as  verses  from  renowned  authors.  ALL  NEW  DE- 
SIGNS AND  SOLD  EXCLUSIVELY  BY  US.  Hill's  "For  the  Empire"  Series  com- 
prises designs  that  will  maintain  the  enviable  reputation  of  these  publishers,  for  whom 
we  have  been  sole  agents  for  a  number  of  years.  Cards  are  shown  in  great  variety, 
a  large  number  being  decidedly  Canadian  as  to  sentiment  and  design.  FOR  PRIVATE 
GREETING   CARDS   the   exclusiveness  as   to    the   design    gives   this   series   first   place. 

CALENDARS  PAPETERIES 

A  large  range  of  designs  in  5  and  10  cent  The  largest  range  we  have  ever  been  able 

lines.     High-class  Art  lines  in  choice  variety.         to  secure.     Designs  on  covers  are  real  works 
including  the  new  Arts  and  Crafts  effect.  of  Art,  entirely  new  and  splendid  value. 

PICTURES  DECORATIONS 

Sopia   and  colored,    at   from  40   cents  to  Ivy   Wreaths,  Vines,  Holly,  Smilax,  Oak 

$5.40  per  dozen,  also  with    Gilt   and   Black  and  Maple  Leaves.      These  are  very  natural 

Metal  Oval-  Frames,  to  retail  at  from  15  to  in  appearance,  and,  being  made  of  linen  and 

25  cents.     We  are  sole  Canadian  Agents  for  wired,  are  stronger  and  more  durable  than 

Scribner  Picture  Publications,  also  calendar  those  made  of  tissue  paper, 
for  1911. 

POPULAR    LINES   OF    POST    CARDS   AND   POST   CARD   ALBUMS 
IT    WILL     PAY    YOU     TO     SEE     THESE     NEW     LINES  —  NOT     LEFT-OVERS 

While  our  travelers  will  carry  complete  lines  of  samples  to  show  in  the  larger  places,  we  will 
also  exhibit  them  at  TORONTO  early  in  April  in  commodious  sample  rooms  at  the  KING  EDWARD 
HOTEL.  The  trade  generally  will  find  this  a  convenience  and  an  opportunity  of  making  careful 
selection  of  their  wants.     Write  at  once  for    particulars,  so  that   dates   for  appointment  may   be  arranged. 


THE    COPP,    CLARK    CO.,    Limited,    TORONTO 

68 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


NEW  GILT  FINISH  KLIP. 

Tlie  Duryea-Hoge  Co.,  New  York,  announce  a  new  gilt- 
finish  Klip,  which  sells  at  five  cents,  the  same  price  as  the 
nickel.  Their  Canadian  representative,  A.  J.  McCrae,  23 
Scott  Street,  has  the  Modern  B  clips  on  hand  For  quick 
delivery. 

NOVEL  SAMPLE  BOOK. 

McFarlane,  Son  &  Hodgson,  Montreal,  issue  a  unique 
sample  book  of  the  various  kinds  of  paper,  which  they 
stock.  The  cover  design  is  a  naval  signal.  The  outline 
of  each  flag  is  cut  away  and  underneath  the  different  kinds 
of  paper  show  through,  thereby  giving  the  cover  a  bright 
and  ca,tchy  appearance.  On  lifting  the  cover,  the  various 
samples  can  be  examined  individually.  They  take  in  sur- 
face and  enamel  papers,  marble  paper,  end  paper,  whit,' 
and  colored  gummed  paper  and  genuine  vegetable  parch- 
ment. 

SCHOOL  AND  COLLEGE  LINES. 

Dealers  who  are  located  in  communities  where  there  are 
higher  institutions  of  learning-  would  do  well  to  corres- 
pond with  The  Chas.  H.  Elliott  Co.,  of  Philadelphia,  on 
the  subject  of  the  special  things  said  concern  make  for 
that  class  of  trade.  The  Elliott  factory  is  the  only  one 
making  a  specialty  of  such  things  "for  the  trade." 


The  cheap  reprint  fever  seems  to  have  seized  nearly 
all  the  Canadian  publishers  and  Win.  Briggs  announces  that 
he  is  going  to  publish  at  once  editions  of  several  of  the 
most  important  novels  he  has  produced  in  recent  years. 
The  first  to  appear  will  probably  be  one  of  Marie  Corelli  's 
books. 


ART  SUPPLIES 

Wlnsor  &  Newton's  Oil  Colors 
"     Water  Colors 
"     Canvas 
"  "      Papers 

"  "      Brushes 

"  "      Boxes 

All  kinds  of  goods  for  artists:'  Crayons,  Oils,  Mediums,  Easels,  Studies,  &c 

SBND    FOR    CATAL-OOUB 

A.  Ramsay  &  Son  Co., 

MONTREAL 

Agents  (or  WINSOR  &  NEWTON,  London 


Artists'  Materials 


-AND 


School  Supplies 

Colors,  Brushes, 

Papers, 

Drawing  Instruments,  etc. 

Catalogue  on  Application. 

THE    ART   METROPOLE,    Limited 

149  YONGE  STREET,   TORONTO 


ANNOUNCEMENT  EXTRAORDINARY 
Christmas  Cards — Season  1910 

Celluloid  and  Parchment 

"IMPERIAL"  SERIES 

FORMERLY  KNOWN  "S"  SERIES 

Ranging  in  price  from  $2.50  to  $40.00  per  100 

EXCEPTIONALLY  GOOD  VALUE 

Owing   to   having    placed  a  specially  large  order  with  the  publishers  were  able 
to  secure  the  cards  at  a 

GREAT  REDUCTION  IN  PRICE  PLACE  YOUR  ORDER  EARLY 

SECURE  A  SUPPLY  AND  DERIVE  THE  BENEFIT 

SAMPLES  NOW  READY 

The  Copp,  Clark  Company,  Limited,       Toronto 

69 


BOOKSELL E R     A  N  D     S T A TIONER 


Now  in  Full  Swinjj ! 

OUR  MARCH  IMPORT 
PROPAGANDA 


m 


A  visit  to  our  show  rooms  will  do  this : 

Will  show  you  thousands  of  new  lines;  every- 
thing that  is  unique  in  Dolls,  Toys,  Fancy 
Goods.  A  selection  that  is  recognized  as  the 
most  important  ever  shown  in  Canada. 

Will  show  you  why  Christmas  goods  are  indis- 
pensable to  successful  modern  merchandising. 

Will  show  you  lots  of  specials,  which  insure 
your   meeting  any  competition  with  good  profit. 

DO  IT  NOW! 


Write  at  once  for  particulars  and  arrange  an  appoint- 
ment with  ms. 


The  Fancy  Goods  Company 

OF  CANADA,  LIMITED 

156  Front  St.  West,  Toronto,  Ont. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATION!'.  R 


B 


=0 


Trade  Price  List 

1910 


The  most  satisfactory  to  the  player 
the  most  profitable  to  the  dealer 


THE     CANADIAN     LINE 
THE    ONLY     LINE       -      - 


Sporting  and 

Athletic  Goods 


It?  Fancy  Goods   Co.   of  Canada 

LIMITED 

156  Front  St.  West       .       .       .       Toronto,  Canada 


B 


1910  Victor  Catalogue  Just  Ready.  A  card   will  bring  you  a  copy. 


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BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


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V  V  'vl  \j?  V  'v  W  'v  w    ? 

£     v    $    \t\    *      i    X*1  ?*<  #   '<: 


New  Scribblers  and  Exercise  Books 

The   best  we   have   ever  shown.     Fifteen  new 
books,  with  up-to-date  Covers,  printed  in  Colors 


Buntin,  Gillies  &  Company,  Limited 


1 


HAMILTON  and  MONTREAL 


This  Sentiment  has  been  voiced 
by  many  upon  trying  our  Fine 
Typewriter  Carbons,  they  sur- 
pass in  every  respect  all  others. 
Our  Quality  Line  is  the  Dealer's 
Boon. 

WE    SUIT    EVERY    PURPOSE 
WE  FILL  EVERY  REQUIREMENT 


MITTAG  &  VOLGER,  Inc. 

SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  FOR  THE  TRADE 

Principal  Office  and  Factories,  PARK  RIDGE,  N.J. 

BRANCHES 

NEW  YORK,  N.Y.,  280  Brordway  CHICAGO,  ILL  ,  200  Monroe  Street 

LONDON,  7  and  8  Dyers  Building,  Holborn,  EC. 

AGENCIES  in  every  part  of  the  world — in  every  city  of  prominence 


VOL.  XXVI.,  No    4. 


PRICE,  $1.00  PER   YKAR 


80D1PMF 

Office  Equipment  Journal 

Official  Organ  of  the  Canadian  Book,  Stationery  and  Publishing  Trades  Association 

and  for  Twanty-Five  Years  the   Recognized  Organ  of  the  Book,  Stationery  and  Fancy  Goods  Trades  of  Canada. 

MONTREAL,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Bldg.        TORONTO,  10  Front  St.  E.     WINNIPEG,  5  1  1  Union  Bank  Bldg.        LONDON,  ENG.  88  Fleet  St.   B.C. 


PUBLICATION     OFFICE:     TORONTO,     APRIL,     1910 


Representatives  from 
the  trade  will  solicit  ink 
orders  this  trip.  Ask 
them  to  talk  price  on 

Underwoods 
Inks 

Quarts,    Pints    and    Half   Pints 
Also  5c.  and  1  Oc.  Lines 

Everlasting  Bank  Ink 
Egyptian  Black  Ink 
Red  Steel  Pen  Ink 


All  Records,  Deeds  and  other 
papers  of  importance  should  be 
written  with  a  reliable  writing  fluid. 
"Underwood's  Inks  last 
as    long    as    the     paper." 


Don't  Smear  Your  Fingers    With 
Ink    With  a   Glass    Dropper 


I 


You  Do  Not  Need  Any  Kind  of  a 
Dropper  to  Fill  the 

"Onoto  Fountain  Pen" 

"The    Pen   Thai    Fills   Itself   and    Cannot    Leak' 


-  The  idea  of  filling  a  Fountain  Pen  with  a 
mussy,  fussy,  ink-besmearing'  glass  filler  is 
rapidly    becoming  obsolete.      The  "0N0T   " 

eliminates  this  evil. 

The  "ONOTO"  FILLS  ITSELF  by  vacuum  on 
the   DOWNWARD  STROKE  and   CANNOT  LEAK. 

Are  You  Pushing  ONOTO  Pots? 

If  not,  write  to-day  for  desciptive  booklet 
and  introductory  proposition. 


ONOTO  PEN  CO.,    261  Broadway,  New  York 

Canadian  Office  :  332  Craig  St.  West,  Montreal 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


New 

School  Goods 


The  range  of  new  School  Practice  Books, 
which  we  have  just  completed,  is  the 
largest  and  best  line  we  have  ever  made. 
We  have  seventy  new  lines  of 

Scribbling  and 
Exercise  Books 


and  all  kinds  of  Students'  Requisites,  such 
as  Note  Books,  Quarto  Books,  Drawing 
Books,  Drawing  Pads,  and  School  Sundries 
of  every  description.  Do  not  be  persuaded 
into  placing  orders  until  you  have  seen 
these  new  lines. 

Samples   are  now  in  the    hands  of  our  travellers 


Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Ltd. 

Wholesale  rTyr\mYiiTi 

Manufacturing  Stationers  ,  A  OlOIllO 


I 


ROOK  SELLER  AND  STATIONER 


GOOD  ALL'S 

IMPERIAL  CLUB  PLAYING  CARDS 

Are  the  Best  Twenty-five  Cent  Cards  Made 

ALL  FIRSTS— NO  SECONDS.     Wrapped  and  Sealed. 
60  different  backs  to  select  from,  including 

Bicycle  -  Golf  -  Fernlea  -  Cow  Boy 


AUBREY  O.  HURST 

REPRESENTATIVE 


ORDER  FROM  YOUR  JOBBER 


Main     1479 


24  SCOTT  ST 

TORONTO 


S&B 

(JewVobA 
U.S.A.. 


To  Sell  or 
Not  to  Sell! 

That  is  the  Question 

You  are  always  "up  against"  when 

ordering!     In  the  line  of  Fountain  Pens  no 

brand  will  sell  as  rapidly  or  give  the  same  satisfaction  as 

Sanford  &  Bennett's  Fountain  Pens 

We  specially  recommend  the  "GRAVITY"  STYLO,  illustrated  herewith,  as  a  perfect  stylo 
pen.  It  has  no  air  tubes  or  springs,  and  is  simple  of  construction.  Writes  like  a  pencil 
and  will  not  scratch.     No  shaking  required — just  write. 

We  make  a  specialty  of  pens  for  imprint  orders,  and  you'll  find  all  the  merit  in  these 
goods  that  our  trade  mark  signifies. 

Pens  upon  which  the  leading  Stationers  and  Jewelers  in  Canada  and  the  United  States 
are  willing  to  risk  their  reputations  must  first  conform  to  a  high  standard  of  quality. 
You'll  find  ours  do!     Our  catalogue  contains  full  information.    Send  for  it  to-day. 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Company 


51-53  Maiden  Lane 


NEW  YORK 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


BROWN  BROS., 

51-53  Wellington  Street  West 

TORONTO 


Complete  Stock  in  All  Departments 


Account  Books 
Stationery 
Office  Supplies 
Loose  Leaf 


Books  and 
Specialties 


Full  Stock 


Leather  Goods 
Paper 

inters  supplies 
Bookbinders  M.  na.c 


We    will    soon  'have    ready    for    inspection 
samples  of  Woodbury  E.  Hunt's 

Art  Calendars 
Greeting  Cards 
and  Novelties 

While  artistic  excellence  is  given  first  place 
in  the  production  of  this  line,  this  season's 
range  will  include  a  number  of  very  beautiful 
novelties. 


DAVIDS' 

CELEBRATED 

INK 

Unsurpassed  for 
Quality  and   Value 

Electro-Chemical 

Blue  Black 
Fountain  Pen 
Carmine 

Manufactured  by 
Thaddeus  Davids  Co. 

NeW     York.     Eatabli.hed  1825 

BROWN  BROS. 

Limited 
Canadian  Agents,       1  OFOntO 


HAVE  YOU  TRIED 

THIS 
ONE 


JOHN  HEATH'S   PENS 

Supplied    by   leading   Wholesale 
Houses   in   Toronto  and   Montreal. 
London  (Eng.)  Export  Agency  : 

8  St.  Bride  St.,  London,  E.C. 

.    0278  TELEPHONE  PEN.  Reg.  in  Canada 


The 


REG: IN  CANADA 


\. 


M 


A  Modern 
Device 

The    Acme    No.   2    Binder 


■    -.:.■» '^ 


This  is  a  machine  that  drives  a  flat 
staple  that  holds.  It  penetrates  the 
thickest  and  toughest  paper  and  will 
not  tear  the  thinnest.  Easy  and  con 
Staples  (No.  18)  5,000  in  a  box,      venient  to  work  and  will  not  get  out 


per  1,000,  30  cent* 


ot  order,  because  it  is  simply  made. 
The  price  is  moderate  and  is  one  of 
the  least  inducements  that  will  sell 
it  to  the  busy  office  worker. 

Ask  your  jobbing  house  about  it. 


Acme    Staple  Company,    Limited 

112  North  Ninth  St.        :        :        :        :        :     Camden.  N.J.,  U.S.A- 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


School 

* 

Blanks 

/ 

2 

A^EAR  after  year  our  School 
Blanks  for   each    season    have 

been  leaders  with  the  trade. 

Samples  of  our  new  Practice  and 

Exercise  Books  are  in  the  hands  of 

our  travellers  who  will   be  pleased 

to    submit    them    to    you    shortly. 

Our    line  not  only    warrants    your 

careful  consideration,    but    we    feel 
sure    will    have    your    hearty    ap- 
proval and  support. 

We  are  also  showing  all  the  new- 
est and  best  in  School  Sundries  of 
every  kind. 

i 

W.  J.  Gage  &  Co. 

¥    IlfTTrrv 

LIMITED 

T  OR  C 

)NTO 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Watermeiris^^)Fountain  Pen 


THE  COMPLETE  STANDARD  LINE 


R"":v 


Special  Points  for  Special  Purposes 

The  constantly  increasing  use  of  fountain  pens  shows  the  facilities  and  ingenuity  of  the  L.E. 
Waterman  Company,  Limited,  to  be  of  great  assistance  to  dealers  in  getting  the  business.  Banks 
discard  all  old-fashioned  equipment  and  use  our  bookkeepers'  pens  entirely ;  corporations  equip 
all  their  Stenographers  ■with  special  pens  ;  business  houses  use  our  Manifold  pens  for  their  billing 
•  systems ;  in  fact,  everyone  who  writes,  either  for  business  or  social  purposes,  can  be  supplied.  The 
amount  of  business  to  be  done  depends  only  upon  the  effort  dealers  make  to  obtain  it  and  upon 
their  co-operation  with  us.     (Standard  Safety  and  Self -Filling). 


TURNED-UP-POINT  BOOKKEEPERS 


STENOGRAPHERS  MANIFOLD 


Waterman's  Ideal  Ink 

The  perfection  of  this  ink  marked  the  first  necessity  for  as  perfect  an  ink 

For  All  Writing  Purposes 

The  best  for  fountain  pens,  the  best  for  general  use.  Advertised 
extensively  for  its  many  superior  qualities  and  used  largely  in  offices  in 
the  large  bottles.  Small  sizes  for  individual  use.  Display  this  ink  and  it 
will  sell  itself. 


Write  for  catalogues  and  information 

1 36  St.  James  Street 
MONTREAL 

New  York  London  Paris 


poofegeller  anb  Stationer 


anb  Canabtan  J^etosbealer 


A  monthly  journal  devoted  to  the  interests 
of  the   Bookselling  and  Stationery  Trades 


Subscription:    One  Dollar  a  Year 
Single  copies     :       :     Ten  Cents 


Vol.  XXVI 


TORONTO,  CANADA,  APRIL,  1910 


No.  4 


Editorial    Comment. 

It  will  be  gratifying  news  to  the  booksellers  to  hear 
that  their  organizer,  Mr.  Jarvis  met  with  such  success 
on  his  initial  trip.  Practically  every  place  he  called,  he 
met  with  a  gratifying  reception  and  he  experienced  no 
difficulty  in  enlisting  the  support  of  those  he  called  on. 
His  trip  took  him  through  southern  Ontario,  including 
such  centres  %s  London  and  Hamilton  and  it  may  be  said 
without  exaggeration  that  he  has  brought  nine-tenths  of 
the  trade  into  the   association. 


We  have  been  authoritatively  advised  that  the  new 
organization  of  book  publishers  in  Toronto  is  not  to  be 
considered  in  the  light  of  a  menace  to  the  retail  trade. 
The  matters  with  which  this  Book  Publishers'  Section  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  are  to  deal  will  be  confined  almost 
entirely  to  subjects  which  are  not  controversial  so  far 
as  the  retailers  are  concerned.  Copyright,  express  and 
freight  rates,  etc.,  will  be  taken  up  and  in  their  solution 
the  booksellers  will  benefit  just  as  much  as  the  pub- 
lishers. 

***** 

The  prospective  visit  of  the  executive  head  of  Cassell 
&  Co.  to  Canada  next  month  may  be  taken  as  an  indica- 
tion of  growing  interest  on  the  part  of  British  publishers 
in  the  Canadian  market.  This  particular  house  have  gone 
into  the  Canadian  business  whole-heartedly  and  along 
Canadian  lines,  but  they  are  being  followed  by  other 
British  houses  as  well  and  we  may  soon  expect  to  see  all 
the  big  London  publishers  represented  here  either  directly 
or  indirectly.  Mr.  Spurgeon  will  be  heartily  welcomed 
when  he  reaches  this  country  where  he  made  many  friends 
on  the  occasion  of  his  last  visit. 


Empire  Day  is  the  next  holiday  on  the  bookseller's 
calendar  and  he  will  be  wise  to  make  as  good  use  of  the 
occasion  as  possible.    By  watching  the  market  for  novel- 


ties and  utilizing  every  article  which  fits  in  with  the 
spirit  of  the  day,  he  will  be  able  to  make  some  capital  out 
of  the  occasion.  It  is  just  the  men  who  watch  for  these 
opportunities  and  act  on  them  that  win  out.  Do  not 
forget  to  plan  well  ahead  for  Empire  Day. 

Favorable  comments  have  been  heard  on  the  office 
appliance  department  launched  last  month.  The  more 
thoughtful  members  of  the  trade  are  beginning  to  realize 
the  importance  of  developing  this  end  of  the  business, 
where  profits  are  large  and  certain.  We  intend  to  con- 
tinue to  make  office  appliances  an  important  feature  of 
our  paper  in  the  future. 


Boost  Your  Firm — Or  Get  Out. 

Boosi  !  everlastingly  bo>ost  the  business  you  are  in,  be 
"with"  the  house  in  every  sense  of  the  word,  or  get  out. 
If  conditions  are  so  bad  that  they  are  impossible  to  change, 
locate  with  another  house  which  will  appreciate  your 
efforts;  but  in  the  name  of  all  that  is  honest,  as  long  as 
you  accept  money  from  a  man  give  him  the  best  that  is 
in  you.  If  this  is  not  appreciated,  leave  him  and  join  a 
house  that  will  give  you  the  opening  and  the  opportunity 
you  desire  and  believe  you  can  fill. 

If  you  have  done  absolutely  your  best  for  a  firm  which 
did  not  appreciate  you  and  borne  up  your  end  under  great 
difficulties,  you  will  have  no  trouble  locating  with  a  house 
of  the  other  kind,  and  efforts  there  will  be  doubly  effective 
because  of  the  great  change  of  conditions.  If  things  are 
too  bad  to  stand,  and  you  are  master  of  your  own  destiny. 
a  change  can  be  made. 

But  wherever  you  are,  boost!  Let  the  business  of  the 
house  be  your  business.  If  you  can't  conscientiously  do 
this,  cut  the  bluff,  stop  living  under  false  pretences  and 
being  a  traitor  to  the  banner  of  the  house  you  are  sup- 
posed) to  serve.  Get  out,  go  where  you  will,  give  the  best 
that  is  in  you  and  where  your  efforts  will  reap  the  reward 
worthy  of  them.  This  is  only  plain  honesty,  to  yourself 
and  your  employer. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Reflections  on  Advertising  of  Books 

'  Books  are  in  a  Class  by  Themselves 
— Ordinary  Methods  not  Applicable  to 
Them  — How  Publishers  are  Advertising. 

By  Robert  Seaver,  in  American  Printer- 

Every  now  and  then  some  advertising  man  rushes 
into  print  and  criticises  the  book  publishers  for  lack  of 
enterprise  in  the  matter  of  advertising.  The  favorite  ar- 
gument is  that  since  soap  and  breakfast  food  and  patent 
medicine  firms  reap  large  benefits  from  extensive  adver- 
tising of  their  products  in  periodicals,  newspapers,  bill- 
boards and  street  cars,  it  is  only  necessary  for  book 
publishers  to  adopt  the  same  methods  in  order  to  secure 
similar  widespread  demand  for  their  product. 

I  cannot  help  feeling  that  such  criticisms  are  made 
without  thorough  study  of  the  questions  that  confront 
book  publishers.  Suppose  a  firm  manufactures  a  brand 
of  soap.  Everybody  uses  soap  or  can  be  induced  to  use 
soap,  and  so  everybody  who  is  the  possessor  of  a  nickel 
or  a  dime  is  a  possible  customer  for  that  soap  firm.  All 
that  is  necessary  is  to  make  a  good  product  and  then 
keep  hammering  away  in  their  advertisments  on  the 
good  points  of  their  particular  article.  The  sale  if  that 
soap  increases  from  year  to  year,  for  the  cumulative 
effect  of  all  the  advertising  is  bound  sooner  or  later  to 
create  the  demand.  The  Pears'  soap  advertisements  of 
twenty  or  thirty  years  ago  are  still  remembered  by  the 
purchasing  public  and  they  are  helping  the  advertise- 
ments of  to-day  in  making  a  demand  for  the  Pears' 
product. 

Endurance  Wins. 

Given  a  good  article,  it  becomes  simply  a  question 
of  endurance  on  the  part  of  the  advertiser  and  if  his 
appropriation  is  large  enough  he  is  sure  to  win  even- 
tually. Every  advertising  man  will  admit  that  the 
effects  of  general  publicity  are  not  felt  at  once.  Many  a 
national  advertiser  has  spent  hundreds  of  thousands  of 
dollars  before  his  business  grew  to  proportions  that 
enabled  him  to  reap  the  benefit  of  "everlastingly  keeping 
at  it"  as  one  of  our  large  advertising  agencies  expresses 
it. 

Now  suppose  that  our  soap  firm,  instead  of  offering 
one  brand  to  the  public,  makes  a  hundred  brands  in  a 
year  ;  suppose  that  the  brands  made  now  become  un- 
salable a  year  from  now  ;  and,  suppose  still  further,  that 
these  various  brands'are  used  by  different  sorts  of  people. 
Would  he  adopt  different  methods  in  his  advertising  cam- 
paign ?    I    think    so. 

The  wares  a -book  publisher  has  to  offer  to  his  cus- 
tomer are  necessarily  widely  different  in  character.  A 
book  of  fiction  interests  one  class  of  readers,  a  book  of 
poems  interests  another  class  ;  a  treatise  on  philosophy, 
or  eduction,  or  medicine,  or  law,  or  religion  interests 
another.  Further,  it  interests  only  that  class.  Many 
books  written-  on  topics  of  the  day  are  salable  for  a 
short  time  only  and  when  a  book  is  unsalable  it  is  un- 
salable at  any  price  except  for  old  paper. 

A  few  years  ago,  for  instance,  a  book  written  on  the 
silver  question  by  an  authority  would  meet  with  a 
ready  sale  ;  to-day  such  a  book  would  fall  flat  because 
the  public  is  no  longer  discussing  this  question.  A  pub- 
lisher then  must. market  his  product  quickly,  offering  it 
to  the  class  of  people  which  is  the  most  likely  to  be  in- 
terested. 

6 


Duty  to  Authors. 

A  publisher's  duty  to  his  clients,  the  authors,  fur- 
ther binds  him  to  give  all  the  books  on  his  list  a  fair 
share  of  his  advertising  appropriation.  The  soap  man- 
ufacturer advertises  and  stands  or  falls  on  the  merits  of 
his  one  proposition.  The  publisher  is  obliged  to  divide 
his  attention  between  all  the  books  on  his  list,  interest- 
ing various  classes  of  buyers,  and  if  he  gives  an  unfair 
share  of  attention  to  one  book  he  must  neglect  another. 
Also,  if  he  plunges  on  any  one  book  all  his  publications 
feel  the  effect,  and  if,  through  unwise  methods  the  house 
fails,  every  author  on  its  list  suffers  also.  In  a  way, 
the  attitude  of  the  publisher  toward  his  advertising 
must  be  that  of  a  trustee  in  the  matter  of  investments. 
For  these  reasons  no  sound  publishing  house  can  afford 
to   indulge  in  speculative  methods  in  advertising. 

Now  let  us  examine  what  the  book  publishers  do  put 
out  in  the  way  of  advertising  matter.  The  leading  pub- 
lishers are  all  liberal  users  of  periodical  space,  often  to 
the  extent  of  two,  three,  four  and  even  more  pages  taken 
regularly  in  the  best  magazines.  Each  book  of  interest 
to  the  readers  of  that  magazine  is  given  a  place.  The 
typography  certainly  compares  favorably  with  the  other 
advertising  pages,  often  it  is  distinctly  better.  Sample 
illustrations  are  printed,  often  in  colors,  with  a  descrip- 
tion of  the  contents  of  the  volume  and  the  opinion  of 
men  whose  judgment  is  supposed  to  be  valuable.  The 
price  and  place  where  the  book  may  be  purchased  is  also 
included.  How  does  this  differ  from  the  reading  matter 
of  the  clothing  advertising,  or  the  automobile  or  the 
jewelry,  or  the  furniture  advertisements  ?  Each  contains 
description,  illustrations,  testimonials,  price  and  deal- 
er's address.  Each  tells  the  message  as  convincingly  as 
possible  to  prospective  buyers.  In  my  opinion  it  is  much 
more  to  the  point  to  say  Churchill's  new  novel  is  a  tale 
of  modern  politics  and  that  it  is  illustrated  by  Christy, 
and  to  show  one  or  two  good  reproductions  of  Christy's 
illustrations,  than  it  is  to  make  the  bold  statement  that 
Wheaterine  made  Sunny  Sim  full  of  kinks  and  give  no 
further  reason  why  one  should  buy  Wheaterine. 

Class  Journals. 

In  advertising  books  that  appeal  only  to  a  special 
class,  the  publishers  choose  periodicals  that  are  read  by 
the  people  it  is  especially  desirable  to  reach.  Publishers 
are  liberal  buyers  of  space  in  class  journals  of  all  sorts. 
Suppose  you  have  written  a  book  on  medicine.  Would 
you  prefer  to  have  it  advertised  in  the  daily  papers 
where  it  might  be  seen  by  a  thousand  medical  men,  or 
in  a  medical  journal,  where  you  knew  it  would  be  read 
by  five  times  that  number.  The  circulation  of  the  daily 
paper  might  be  one  hundred  times  greater  than  that  of 
the  medical  journal  but  the  greater  benefit  to  you  would 
come  from  the  smaller  but  specialized  circulation.  Or 
again  suppose  you  have  written  a  book  for  printers. 
Would  you  advertise  it  in  the  New  York  World  or  in 
The  American  Printer  ?  If  you  had  invented  a  new 
variety  of  breakfast  food  you  might  change  your  deci- 
sion. 

A  short  time  ago  I  read  the  claims  of  a  newspaper 
business  manager  who  was  talking  big  circulation.  He 
claimed  that  a  man  out  shooting  ducks  would  stand  a 
better  chance  of  success  by  firing  into  a  big  flock  than 
into  a  smaller  flock.  And  so  he  would  if  they  were  all 
ducks.  But  if  ninety  per  cent,  of  the  flock  were  mud  hens 
and  gulls,  and  crows,  and  herons,  he  would  do  better  if 
he  let  them  pass  and  waited  for  the  smaller  flock.  Cir- 
culation doesn't  mean  much.  It's  the  canvas  backs  in 
the  flock  that  counts,  in  other  words,  financial  standing 
and  probable  interest  of  audience  that  the  book  publisher 
must  consider.    What's  the  use  in  urging  a  dollar-and-a- 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


half  book  on  five  hundred  thousand  readers  if  eighty  per 
cent,  of  that  number  didn't  know  there  was  that  much 
money  in  the  world,  and  wouldn't  spend  it  for  books  if 
they  had  it  to  spare  ? 

Other  Methods. 

While  book  publishers  use  periodical  space  liberally 
this  is  only  one  method  of  publicity  used  by  them.  Copies 
of  each  new  book  published  are  sent  to  leading  news- 
paper editors  all  over  the  country,  and  reviews  of  these 
books  are  printed  and  are  widely  read  by  the  book- 
buying  public.  Newspaper  space  is  used  in  the  better 
papers  for  announcements  of  books  of  especial  interest. 
Beautiful  posters  are  distributed  to  all  booksellers  and 
store  window  displays  are  planned  in  the  larger  cities. 
Traveling  men  call  on  every  bookseller  in  the  country 
and  take  advantage  of  every  opportunity  to  arouse  in- 
terest in  their  stock.  In  the  case  of  books  of  special 
interest,  letters  and  circulars  are  sent  to  selected  lists 
of  names,  with  offers  of  sample  volumes  on  approval.  In 
fact  the  book  publishers  employ  every  legitimate  means 
to  bring  their  volumes  to  the  attention  of  people,  most 
apt  to  be  interested. 

Next  to  the  great  general  advertisers  I  believe  the 
great  mail-order  houses  are  considered  the  most  success- 
ful advertisers  in  the  business  world.  But  in  what  way 
do  their  methods  differ  from  those  of  the  book  publish- 
ers ?  Each  advertises  largely  in  class  magazines.  Each 
prints  elaborately  illustrated  catalogues  which  are  sent 
free  to  any  one  sufficiently  interested  to  ask  for  one. 
Each  fill  their  catalogues  with  interesting  descriptive 
matter.  And  finally  each  continues  its  advertising  me- 
thods from  year  to  year,  because  each  knows  that  adver- 
tising pays  well. 

I  wish  very  much  that  some  advertising  man  would 
state  in  just  what  respect  the  advertising  of  book  pub- 
lishers is  lacking,  and  make  some  definite  suggestions  for 
improvement,  keeping  in  mind  all  the  time  the  peculiar 
requirements  of  the  articles  advertised.  I  am  sure  such 
an  article  would  be  read  with  the  utmost  interest  by 
the  whole  book  trade,  which  is  only  too  eager  to  adopt 
really  good  suggestions.  Until  such  suggestions  are 
offered,  I  for  one  shall  continue  to  struggle  along  under 
the  impression  that  book  publishers  know  a  great  deal 
about  successful  publicity. 


Hints  on  the  Dressing  of  Windows 

Something  About  Window  Bulletins — 
Enthusiasm  Needed  to  Make  a  Good  Dis- 
play —  One    Line    at    a   Time    Displays. 

By  Frank  Farrington,  in  Publisher  and 
Retailer. 

Window  bulletins  are  often  used  and  generally  attract 
attention. 

It  is  not  wise  to  try  them  where  the  windows  are  few. 
If  you  have  plenty  of  window  space,  run  base  ball  or  foot 
ball  or  important  news  items  on  your  bulletin  in  the  back 
of  the  window,  not  on  the  glass.  Intersperse  the  news 
with  items  about  your  goods,  with  prices,  etc  If  you 
can  afford  a  stereopticon  to  run  these  with,  there  will  be 
no  limit  to  the  variety  of  work  you  can  do.  The  main 
thing  though  is  not  to  tell  the  news  but  to  sell  the  goods 
and  that  you  must  bear  in  mind.  You  do  not  want  a 
crowd  around  the  windows,  keeping  the  ladies  from  enter- 
ing the  store  or  prejudicing  them  against  your  side  of  the 
street.  As  a  matter  of  fact  the  bulletin  idea  is  better 
adapted  to  the     needs   of  a  men's   wear    store   or  a  cigar 


store,  or  sporting  goods  depot.  Women  will  not  find  much 
in  it  to  interest  them  and  the  women  are  the  best  pa- 
trons of  everything  except  the  distinctive  men's   stores 

Window  Bulletins. 

The  most  valuable  kind  of  window  bulletins  for  the 
average  store  are  those  that  tell  about  the  goods  in- 
side. People  look  into  your  windows  for  store  news  and 
if  you  offer  them  something  in  the  way  of  amusement  in- 
stead, they  will  cease  to  expect  to  learn  about  goods 
there  and  will  look  for  nonsense  or  news  items  and  your 
store  will  be  a  news  depot  instead  of  a  place  where  some 
certain  goods  are  to  be  bought  better  or  cheaper  than 
anywhere  else. 

The  main  object  of  window  display  is  to  impress 
upon  the  mind  of  the  passer-by  the  fact,  that  you  have 
a  certain  article  for  sale  at  a  certain  price.  Further 
than  that  you  want  him  to  believe  that  that  article  is 
good  of  its  kind,  perhaps  tne  best.  At  all  events  you 
want  him  to  think  that  for  the  price  it  is  the  best  ob- 
tainable. If  more  windows  were  dressed  with  this  idea 
in    mind   there    would   be   less   profitless  windows. 

Keep  Ahead  of  the  Season. 

It  is  well  to  keep  just  a  little  ahead  of  the  seasons 
in  the  window  displays,  rather  ahead  than  behind,  oh 
yes.  A  behind-the-seasons  window  display  is  like  a  last 
year's  bird  nest,  and  you  know  the  saying,  "There  are 
no  birds  in  last  year's  nest." 

Don't  forget  in  dressing  the  window  that  the  upper 
part  of  it  may  be  much  more  noticeable  from  the  out- 
side on  the  pavement  than  on  the  inside  as  you  see  it 
when  you  are  arranging  it.  The  person  on  the  outside 
edge  of  the  sidewalk  will  see  the  upper  part  of  the  win- 
dow often  over  the  heads  of  other  people,  or  will  view 
the  window  as  a  whole,  taking  in  the  upper  part  as  well 
as  the  lower  part  and  it  may  entirely  spoil  the  general 
effect  to  neglect  what  seems  from  within  to  be  unim- 
portant. 

It  makes  a  good  deal  of  difference  in  dressing  a  win- 
dow what  sort  of  a  locality  the  store  is  in.  The  win- 
dows that  would  bring  in  trade  in  a  high-class  residence 
district  would  not  be  at  all  the  sort  to  use  in  the  fac- 
tory districts.  There  are  many  classes  of  people  in  the 
make-up  of  a  large  town  and  if  your  store  is  a  local 
store,  drawing  on  the  population  that  immediately  sur- 
rounds it  for  most  of  its  business,  its  windows  should 
appeal  to  those  people.  If  it  is  a  store  that  draws  on 
thr  entire  town  for  trade,  a  different  line  of  procedure 
may  be  followed.  Windows  will  be  seen  by  all  the  town 
and  can  be  made  to  appeal  to  all  classes  of  the  popula- 
tion, but  it  is  well  to  remember  that  in  most  towns 
short  of  the  cities,  there  are  peculiarities  that  render 
them  different  in  demands  from  other  towns  but  a  short 
distance   away. 

File  Window  Literature. 

We  advise  that  you  keep  on  file  all  the  window  liter- 
ature that  you  can  find.  Clip  everything  that  you  find 
in  the  trade  or  in  the  advertising  journals  about  win- 
dow dressing  and  put  it  all  together.  A  scrap  book  is 
the  best  scheme.  That  enables  you  to  keep  all  the 
clippings  in  a  readable  condition.  This  same  plan  can 
be  followed  to  advantage  right  straight  through  all  de- 
partments   of    business-making    literature. 

The  window  dresser,  like  all  the  rest  of  the  fellows 
who  hope  to  be  successful,  must  be  an  enthusiast.  He 
must  be  devoted  to  his  work  and  feel  such  an  interest 
in  it  that  he  will  be  unhappy  when  the  store's  compe- 
titor gains  a  lap  on  him  by  outdoing  him.  Enthusiasm 
is  the  only  road  to  success  of  any  kind. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Keep  the  window  on  your  mind  all  the  time.  Watch 
everybody's  store  windows.  Whenever  you  pass  one, 
think  whether  or  not  you  can  get  an  idea  from  it.  The 
mere  fact  that  a  window  is  a  hardware  window  and 
your  stock  is  silks  and  satins  does  not  matter.  There 
are  ideas  in  every  good  window  that  are  worth  adopting 
and  there  are  ideas  in  every  bad  window  that  will  warn 
you  what  not  to  do,  whether  those  windows  are  in  your 
line  or  not. 

Ensignia  of  Business. 

If  there  is  a  customary  ensignia  that  goes  with  your 
business,  one  that  is  usually  seen  in  windows  of  your 
kind  of  store,  have  it  there.  The  druggist  who  leaves 
out  the  colored  show  bottles  is  making  a  bad  mistake. 

Good  window  displays  do  more  than  stimulate  the 
trade  on  the  particular  goods  displayed  ;  they  help  the 
store  all  around.  On  the  other  hand,  poor  displays  and 
dirty,  unattractive  windows  do  more  than  simply  fail  to 
sell  the  goods  shown  behind  the  grime.  You  can  ill 
afford  the  expense  of  a  poor  window  exhibition  or  a 
discreditable  one.  It  is  much  more  expensive  than  a 
good  window  whatever  it  costs  to  get  the  good  window 
ready. 

If  you  think  that  you  can  take  chances  on  your  win- 
dows, mixing  them  up  and  running  the  risk  that  the 
public  will  catch  on  to  what  you  are  trying  to  adver- 
tise, just  remember  that  Greece  with  all  her  wisdom, 
produced  but  seven  wise  men.  The  number  of  fools  per 
thousand  population  is,  in  proportion,  not  so  very  differ- 
ent to-day.  People  are  more  simple  minded  than  you 
think.  Make  it  easy  for  them  to  read  the  story  that 
you  are  trying  to  tell  in  the  windows. 
One  Line  at  a  Time. 

The  use  of  but  one  line  at  a  time  in  getting  up  win- 
dows has  still  another  point  to  make.  If  your  store  car- 
ries five  hundred  lines  of  goods,  counting  in  the  big  and 
little  ones  both,  will  it  not  speak  loudly  of  the  impor- 
tance of  any  particular  goods  that  you  give  up  a  window 
to,  if  one  may  think  of  that  one  item  as  being  chosen 
from  all  the  list  for  the  prominent  position  ? 

There  is  little  chance  in  the  window  display  form  of 
advertising.  If  advertising  is  a  lottery,  the  window  dis- 
play is  the  winning  ticket  every  time.  You  may  get  up 
a  window  display  that  will  not  sell  a  lot  of  goods,  but 
if  the  display  is  the  right  sort,  there  will  be  some  sales. 
There  are  always  some  returns.  Then  again,  you  can- 
not gauge  the  value  of  a  display  by  the  number  of  people 
who  come  running  right  into  the  store  to  buy  the  article 
displayed.  You  may  be  showing  something  that  few 
people  happen  to  need  at  that  moment  and  yet,  those 
same  people  who  gb  by  with  only  an  interested  look 
now,  will  think  of  your  store  when  the  need  comes  for 
the  particular  thing  that  they  saw  in  your  window. 
Avoid  Gaudy  Displays. 

Don't  get  up  any  gaudy  window  or  attempt  bizarre 
effects  which  will  not  be  appreciated.  Don't  make  dis- 
plays that  will  be  over  the  heads  of  the  lookers.  Sim- 
plicity and  understandableness  (our  own  word)  are  the 
things  to  aim  at.  Let  your  displays  fit  your  windows 
and  let  thein  harmonize  within  themselves.  It  is  not 
every  window  that  will  tell  the  men  passing  by  on  the 
other  side  of  the  street  what  you  are  selling,  but  some 
windows  will  and  they  are  the  best  kind  of  windows. 
The  more  people  who  can  be  impressed  by  your  windows 
with  that  one  cardinal  idea — something  that  you  sell 
and  the  price — the  more  people  will  respond  to  the  win- 
dow, buying  the  goods  now  or  when  they  need  them. 
The  price  has  a-  good  deal  to  do  with  the  time  of  buy- 
ing. If  it  is  an  obvious  bargain,  there  will  be  purchases 
for  the  future. 

There  is  little  danger  of  the  bigger  merchant  under- 


estimating the  value  of  his  window  space  to  the  extent 
of  allowing  it  to  be  used  by  outsiders  for  the  purpose 
of  exploiting  some  proprietary  article  that  does  not 
yield  sufficient  revenue  to  the  window  owner  to  make  it 
worth  a  display.  The  wise  man  too  does  not  allow  his 
windows  or  any  part  of  them  to  be  used  for  exploiting 
outside  affairs  in  the  way  of  theatrical  performances, 
etc.  Keep  the  extraneous  matter  out  of  the  window 
just  the  same  as  you  would  keep  it  out  of  your  adver- 
tising space. 

Price  Cards  Essential. 

Window  cards,  price  cards,  etc.,  such  as  make  up  the 
silent  salesman  to  be  used  in  connection  with  every  dis- 
play are  most  important  and  should  not  be  left  out  of 
any  window.  A  window  with  no  price  cards  or  informa- 
tion bulletins  regarding  the  goods  shown  is  like  a  deaf 
and  dumb  salesman.  It  can  show  the  goods  and  there 
its   usefulness   ends. 

The  good  window  must  in  its  way  gesticulate  vio- 
lently, pointing  the  way  to  good  values,  important  bar- 
gains, new  goods,  things  that  cannot  be  had  elsewhere 
at  all,  or  at  least  not  at  such  prices  as  you  ask.  Your 
window  is  your  show  room  for  the  people  who  will  not 
come  into  the  store  until  they  have  seen  the  goods.  You 
are  not  doing  business  on  a  Baxter  Street  basis  and 
you  cannot  stand  your  clerks  out  on  the  sidewalk  to 
rope  in  the  public.  The  window  must  be  the  silent  sales- 
man whose  duty  it  is  to  draw  them  inside  with  a  favor- 
able inclination  toward  some  department  of  the  store. 

News  from  Various  Trade  Centres 

Interesting  Items  Gathered  from  all  Parts 
of  Canada — Business  Good  Everywhere 
— Movements  of  the  Traveling  Men  — 
Changes    and    Improvements    Noted. 

Winnipeg  Doings. 

Winnipeg,  April  7. — Wholesalers,  jobbers  and  com- 
mision  merchants  have  been  greatly  stimulated  during 
the  past  few  weeks  by  the  early  opening  of  spring  and 
the  continued  spell  of  beautiful  weather.  "When  the 
weather  is  fine,"  said  a  traveler,  "it  is  an  opportune  time 
to  get  business.  All  the  stores  in  the  west  are  planing 
for  an  excellent  season,  and  a  very  wide  range  of  goods 
is  being  stocked  for  the  summer  trade."  From  one  who 
has  "been  there,"  these  words  have  force,  and  they  are 
verified  by  the  conditions  of  the  local  trade. 

All  local  stationery  wholesale  houses  have  increased 
their  staffs,  and  several  department  managers  have  taken 
to  the  road  in  order  to  land  the  ready  business  every- 
where in  the  west.  Office  stationery,  and  novelties  are 
receiving  the  heaviest  booking  just  now,  and  as  general 
business  in  the  west  develops,  office  supplies  will  con- 
tinue to  increase  in  demand.  Inks  could  not  be  shipped 
during  the  season  of  frost,  and  retailers  were  short  on 
these  lines  when  the  open  weather  made  it  possible  to 
ship  them.     Now  the  jobbers'  stocks  are  getting  low. 

A  feature  of  the  retail  business  is  the  large  stock  of 
goods  that  are  being  carried.  The  month  of  March  prov- 
ed to  be  an  excellent  one  and  the  incentive  was  given  to 
be  prepared  for  better  things  in  the  months  to  follow. 
The  winter  season  is  always  best  for  the  fiction  trade, 
t  and  this  has  dropped  off  considerably,  but  other  lines 
have  taken  their  place.  The  transient  trade  in  this  city 
is  very  large,  due  to  the  great  number  of  homeless  peo- 
ple resident  here,  and  the  continual  arrival  of  emigrants. 
Guides,  postcards  and  novelties,  as  a  result  of  this  con- 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


dition,  always  move  well,  and  this  is  a  feature  of  the 
present  trade.  A  local  store  has  recently  ordered  $3,000 
worth  of  photographers '  supplies,  and  an  excellent  season 
is  anticipated.  The  snapshot  artist  is  always  busy  in 
and  around  this  city. 

tD.  A.  Clark,  Clark  Bros.,  is  expected  home  from 
his  tour  of  Europe  sometime  during  this  month.  Mr. 
Clark  is  accompanied  by  his  wife  and  has  been  absent 
since  February. 

The  Western  News  Agency  has  concluded  an  ex- 
cellent year's  business,  on  Portage  Avenue.  It  may 
safely  be  said  that  the  news  agencies,  as  a  rule,  are  not 
sufficiently  patronized  by  the  public  to  make  them  a 
great  factor  in  the  community.  In  the  light  of  this  fact, 
the  store  refered  to  has  had  unbounded  success.  It  is  a 
favorite  rendezvous  for  all  lovers  of  literature.  This 
may  be  attributed  to  the  fact  that  the  display  features 
are  enlarged  upon  in  this  store.  It  is  a  treat  to  enter  it 
and  look  around.  One  cannot  pass  the  window  without 
noting  the  fact  that  there  is  an  innumerable  host  of  mag- 
azines and  papers  on  hand.  A  limited  quantity  of 
stationery  lines  and  cloth  bound  fiction  is  stocked,  and 
they  are  profitable. 

Two  Teeswater  Bookseller's  Assistants. 

The  accompanying  picture  shows  two  Teeswater  boys 
in  the  fancy  dress  costume  which  they  wore  last  winter  at  a 
local  carnival.  They  are  the  sons  of  0.  De  Long,  the 
Teeswater  bookseller  and  stationer,  and  we  understand, 
they  are  useful  assistants  to  their  father  when  occasion 
demands  it. 

Important  Change  at  Ottawa. 

An  important  change  has  taken  place  in  the  book 
trade  in  Ottawa.  The  Jas.  Ogilvy  business  has  been  pur- 
chased by  James  Hope  &  Sons.  These  two  stores  were 
nearly  adjacent  to  each  other  on  Sparks  Street,  right  in 
the  business  centre  of  the  city  and  both  have  done  excel- 
lent business.  The  Ogilvy  store,  it  is  understood,  has 
been  purchased  by  one  of  the  banks,  and  a  new  building 
is  to  be  erected  on  the  site.  Rather  than  move  to  new 
premises,  the  management  decided  to  sell  out  to  Hope 
&  Sons.  The  latter  firm  also  intend  to  build  in  the  near 
future.  George  Abbott,  who  managed  the  Ogilvy  busi- 
ness for  several  years,  has  gone  over  to  England,  but 
has  not  yet  decided  on  his  future  work. 
Berlin  Budget. 

Berlin,  April  7. — F.  I.  Weaver  &  Co.,  have  sold  the 
Waterloo  Bookstore,  which  they  purchased  from  George 
Cork  four  years  ago,  to  W.  H.  Walley,  druggist  and 
stationer,  of  Wingham.  Mr.  Walley  will  sell  out  his 
Wingham  business  and  will  add  an  optical  department  to 
his  business  in  Waterloo.  In  the  meantime  E.  Schiedel, 
of  Berlin,  is  in  charge  of  the  Waterloo  bookstore  for 
Mr.  Walley. 

James  C.  Jaimet,  manager  of  the  Waterloo  branch 
store  of  F.  I.  Weaver  &  Co.,  of  Berlin,  has  retired  from 
the  stationery  business  having  purchased  the  Elite  Mov- 
ing picture  theatre  in  West  Toronto.  During  the  three 
years  Mr.  Jaimet  had  charge  of  the  Waterloo  Bookstore 
the  business  there  increased  nearly  twenty  per  cent.  He 
was  well  liked  in  Waterloo  and  will  be  greatly  missed 
particularly  on  the  bowling  green,  as  he  was  an  en- 
thusiastic trundler  and  held  the  position  of  secretary  of 
the  Waterloo  Bowling  Club. 

Otto  Wachsmuth  has  resigned  his  position  of  sales- 
man in  Binder's  Bookstore,  being  succeeded  by  Miss  E. 
Moyer. 


F.  I.  Weaver  &  Co.,  have  established  a  weekly  paper 
called  The  Live  Wire,  an  advertising  sheet,  which  they 
will  conduct  in  connection  with  the  printing  end  of  their 
business.  Several  issues  have  appeared  and  the  patron- 
age has  been  so  good  that  an  enlargement  to  double  the 
present  size  is  announced. 

John  Waldschmidt  who  has  been  connected  with  the 
wholesale  house  of  Stuebing  &  Smith  here  for  several 
years,  has  severed  his  connection  with  that'  firm  to  join 
the  office  staff  of  the  Economical  Fire  Insurance  Co.,  in 
Berlin. 

Stuebing  &  Smith,  who  have  for  many  years  conducted 
a  wholesale  stationery  and  fancy  goods  business  in  Berlin, 
are  retiring  from  business,  and  are  now  holding  a  clos- 
ing out  sale.  Since  the  death  of  Mr.  Stuebing,  two  years 
ago,  Mr.  Smith  has  been  the  sole  head  of  the  concern. 


LORNE  AND  ARTHUR  DE  LONG 

The  two  sons  of  O.   De    Long,   stationer,  Teeswater, 

in   carnival   eistunie. 


Visit  of  Arthur  Spurgeon. 
Arthur  Spurgeon,  general  manager  of  Cassell  &  Co., 
will  arrive  'in  Toronto,  via  New  York  on  or  about  May 
5,  for  a  visit  of  inspection  to  the  Canadian  branch.  He 
will  also  visit  Ottawa,  Montreal  and  Winnipeg  and  may 
possibly  proceed  through  to  the  coast.  While  in  Toronto 
he  will  address  the  Empire  Club  on  "The  Literary  Out- 
look in  the  Empire,"  and  he  will  also  be  the  guest  of 
the  Press  Club. 

Cassell   &   Co.'s    Good   Year. 

The  annual  financial  statement  of  Cassell  &>  Co.  for 
the  fiscal  year  ending  December  31,  1909,  just  issued, 
shows  a  most  satisfactory  state  of  affairs. 

After  making  provision  for  bad  and  doubtful  debts 
and  after  providing  for  depreciation  and  all  expense  of 
management,  the  accounts  of  the  company  show  a  profit 
of  $112,880.33.  The  company  have  allocated  large  sums 
to  reserve  funds  and  after  paying  dividends  are  carrying 
forward  the  sum  of  $11,358.84.  The  Canadian  branch  did 
its  share  in  piling  up  this  handsome  total. 


9 


HANDLING    OFFICE    SPECIALTIES  WITH  PROFIT. 

By   U.   G.   Case,   in  Office  Appliances. 

Man's  history  from  Adam  to  the  present  moment  can 
be  divided  into  many  periods  or  epochs.  With  the  first 
exchange  of  things  business  was  instituted,  so  that  busi- 
ness is  as  old  as  mankind.  As  man  progressed  mentally 
and  in  his  environments,  so  business  advanced.  What 
has  existed  in  the  past  and  is  now  extinct,  through 
man's  effort,-  was  all  based  on  business  transactions. 
Everything  we  enjoy  as  the  fruit  of  man's*  labor,  in  the 
present  period  of  our  existence,  is  the  result  of  some 
form  of  business,  so  that  business  has  always  been  the 
mainstay  of  man's  existence  and  is  to-day.  The  growth 
reached  its  zenith  in  the  nineteenth  century  as  compared 
to  all  previous  centuries,  and  the  present  twentieth  cen- 
tury can  not  fail  to  eclipse  all  the  past.  Once  having 
been  but  "a  common  business  man"  is  changed  to-day 
to]  the  highest  honors  and  respect  man  can  attain,  and 
it  fs  money  made  through  business  that  gives  us  most 
(if1  the   pleasures    we   enjoy   in   all   the   phases  of  life. 

i  Man  has  progressed  so  much  mentally  that  his  wants 
halve  gone  far  beyond  time,  and  so  he  is  crowding  years 
into  months  and  months  into  days.  His  faculty  for  dis- 
coveries and  ingenuity  :or  inventing  are  constantly  solv- 
ing the  unexpected  things  that  benefit  mankind  and  in- 
venting the  things  that  reduce  labor  and  make  distances 
less  to  be  reckoned  with.  Eventually  we  shall  enjoy  all 
the  elements  in  every  conceivable  necessary  form  ;  labor 
will  be  reduced  to  an  automatic  process  ;  results  that 
once  meant  years  will  be  but  a  matter  of  a  few  months 
in  the  accomplishment,  and  distance  around  the  world 
but  a  matter  of  speaking'  into  one  thing  and  hearing 
one's  voice  at  the  same  time  through  the  other  end  of 
the  apparatus. 

All  things  that  make  for  the  benefit  of  mankind  are 
commercialized  in  order  to  produce,  to  sell,  and  to  use, 
and  so  business  gives  us  everything  and  rules  the  world. 
The,  higher  man's  knowledge  the  greater  the  enjoyment 
of,  his  productions. 

Commerce*  Means    Specialization. 

It  being  impossible  for  all  men  to  be  in  the  same 
business  and  all  men  conducting-  all  lines  of  business, 
commerce  must  be  divided  and  subdivided  ;  it  must  be 
specialized.  The  greater  the  need  of  production,  the 
greater  the  specialization.  To  concentrate  brains,  effort, 
time,  labor,  and  expense  in  the  production  and  in  the 
selling,  this  specializing  is  constantly  going  on.  In  the 
making  and  distributing  a  place  for  executive  direction 
in  all  its  details  is  essential.  This  is  known  as  the 
office.  To  convey  instructions,  information  and  neces- 
sary records,  various  utensils  must  be  used. 

As  general  business  grows,  as  demand  and  competi- 
tion grow,  time,  labor  and  expense  get  nearer  and  nearer 
to  annihilation,,  and  so  man  is  constantly  inventing  new 
means  to  cut  down  these  three  po'ints  in  the  manufac- 
turing and  selling.  This  means  raw  or  manufactured 
goods,  manufacturer  or  retailer,  in  all  the  things  man 
uses,  whether  for  the  internal  or  external  requirements, 
or  simply  for  reasons  of  pleasure  or  ownership.  And 
this  is  why   we  have  the  many  office  devices  at  present. 


10- 


why  they  have  been  multiplying  so  rapidly  in  the  past 
decade,  and  no  doubt  there  will  be  innumerably  greater 
inventions  to  come  in  the  future  as  necessity  in  the  near 
and  distant  future  shall  demand. 

It  is  these  devices  that  make  possible  the  manage- 
ment of  our  great  industries  to-day.  Their  importance 
and  power  can  not  be  overestimated.  They  keep  the 
wheels  of  commerce  going.  Their  very  importance  is  a 
reason  why  office  devices  are  so  generally  specialized  al- 
most into  the  making  of  but  one  article,  and  why  men 
find  it  necessary  to  specialize  in  the  selling  of  office  de- 
vices only  instead  of  handling  hundreds  or  thousands  of 
things.  The  concentration  necessary  for  the  manufac- 
turer is  almost  as  essential  for  the  retailer,  but  having 
a  very  small  territory  in  comparison,  the  retailer  can 
concentrate  on  at  least  most  office  devices  necessary  in 
an  office. 

Office  Appliance  Field  Fertile. 

If  more  men  realized  how  office  specialties  came  into 
existence,  how  rapidly  devices  are  growing  in  kinds 
through  necessity,  realized  the  necessary  demand  for 
them,  and  the  profit  there  is  in  handling  them, 
more  men  would  go  into  business  of  specializing 
on  office  devices.  A  good  many  men  in  the  leading  com- 
mercial nations  who  handle  office  devices,  one  or  a  num- 
ber, would  dispose  of  all  their  stock,  except  these  spec- 
ialties, and  push  them  only.  Many  a  high  grade  specialty 
man  would  go  into  the  business  for  himself  instead  of 
selling  for  some  one  else.  All  business  men  know  the 
difference  between  being  an  employer  and  an  employe. 
Many  men  who  are  employes  now  should  be  employers. 
What  they  lack  is  confidence  in  themselves  and  in  the 
future.  The  best  class  of  men  one  meets  in  business  are 
connected  with  offices.  It  is  the  most  interesting,  clean- 
est, most  fascinating  selling  game.  Tt  is  the  game  that 
requires  the  highest  quality  of  salesmanship,  and  so  it 
is  a  developing,  an  educating  game.  It's  a  game  of 
brains  against  brains,  quality  man  against  quality  man, 
and  hence  equality.  The  demand  is  there  to  be  filled, 
and  therefore  quality  man  and  superior  merit  of  article 
to  be  sold  must  necessarily  bring  profitable  returns.  It 
is  generally  known  that  office  devices  cost  more  to  sell 
than  to  manufacture,  but  that  shows  the  high  grade 
business  it  is.  Tt  is  also  an  undisputed  fact  that  pro- 
bably there  is  no  office  device  of  real  merit  made  but 
what  will  pay  for  itself  within  a  time  that  will  sur- 
prise the  buyer,  and  so  is  practically  always  a  most 
profitable  investment.  Office  devices  as  a  whole  are 
money  makers  for  the  owners  and  in  some  cases  they 
make  more  actual  money  than  most  office  employes  can 
make.  It  is  also  a  generally  undisputed  fact  among 
those  who  know  that  the  dealer  on  an  average  makes 
more  money  per  machine  than  does  the  manufacturer, 
showing  that  manufacturers  are  very  liberal  in  their 
discounts  and  have  to  depend  on  volume  of  business  done 
rather  than  on  individual  sales.  The  manufacturer  is 
the  one  who  makes  it  possible  for  the  dealer  to  sell  the 
goods,  and  takes  about  all  the  risk,  yet  the  dealer  has 
the  most  in  his  favor. 

One  of  the  very  best  propositions  open  to-day  for  a 
good  man  to  engage  in  for  himself  is  to  enter  the  office 
specialty  field.     There  never  was  a  period  in  the  history 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Your  Pen  From  Your  Pocket 

Will  Not  Slip  if  You 

Fasten  it  With  a 


I 


i'/'V 


SEVERAL  SIZES 
FITS    ANY    PEN 

Steel  -  -  5c 
German  Silver  10c 
Rolled  Gold   -    25c 


Show  Cards  for  counter 
display,  1  doz.  to  3  doz. 
clips  on  card,  according  to 
style  of  clip.   Sellsonsight. 

DISCOUNT  TO  THE  TRADE  ON 
APPLICATION 


Consolidated  Safety  Pin  Co. 


DFPT.  1 


BLOOMFIELD,  N.J. 


Non- 
Spill- 
ing. 


Non- 
Evapor- 
ating. 


No  Floats. 


No  Soft  Rubber  Disks 


THE  "VICTOR"  INKSTAND 

is  the  only  one  which  can  be  easily  sepa- 
rated, cleaned  and  put  together.  All  dipping 
of  pen  too  deep,  and  soiling  the  fingers  is 
obviated.  Practically  dust  and  evaporation 
proof.  A  line  in  big  demand  that  leaves  you 
a  "worth  while"  profit.  Of  all  Canadian 
wholesalers. 


The  Weeks  Numan  Co. 

39-41  Park  St,  New  York  City 


National  Be 


.ANK 
OOKS 


TRADE 


MARK 


MADE  in  all  sizes,  rulings    and 
bindings    to    meet    every    re- 
quirement of  the  accountant. 
They  contain  paper  of  extra  fine  qual- 
ity— the  best  products  of  the  Holyoke 
Mills  being  used  for  the  purpose. 

The  National  Line  also  includes  a 
wide  variety  of  Loose  Leaf  Ledgers, 
Price  Books  and  Memoiandums. 


National  Blank  BookCo. 

HOLYOKE  MASSACHUSETTS 


HIGGINS' 
TAURINE  MUCILAGE 


THE  demand  for  a  clean, 
tenacious  and  pure  muci- 
lage, secure  against  the 
corrosive  influences  affecting 
the  average  productin  this  line, 
induced  us  to  put  upon  the 
market  Higgins'  Taurine  Muci- 
lage. It  avoids  the  defects  of 
the  cheap  and  nasty  dextrine 
and  the  dear  and  dirty  gum 
mucilages.  It  is  stronger, 
catches  quicker  and  dries  more 
rapidly  than  any  other  mucilage, 
and  is  perfectly  e'ear,  clean, 
non-corrosive,  non-sedimentary 
pnd  pleasant  to  sight  and  scent. 
It  is  put  up  in  both  bottles  and 
safety  shipping  cans,  and  will  be  found  not  only 
convenient  for  use,  but  entirely  satisfactory  so  far 
as  its  working  qualities  are  concerned.  It  will 
please  your  trade. 


HIGGINS'  AMERICAN   DRAWING  INKS 

BLACKS  AND  COLORS 
The  Standard  Liquid  Drawing  Inks  of  the  World 


CHAS.   M.   HIGGINS    &    CO.,   Manufacturers 
NEW  YORK  CHICAGO  LONDON 

Main  Office  and  Factory,  BROOKLYN,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


of  office  devices  since  the  invention  of  the  typewriter, 
which  revolutionized  office  work,  that  presented  such 
favorable  conditions  as  this  year  of  1910.  In  the  last 
few  years  some  decided  improvements  have  been  made  in 
meritorious  devices,  so  that  now  one  finds  them  to  be 
almost  thinking  machines. 

Some  new  devices  have  been  marketed  that  are  prov- 
ing winners.    It  is  known  that  other  devices  are  coming. 

The  effects  of  the  business  depression  of  1907  are  at 
an  end  ;  this  year  has  again  found  its  high  level  of 
prosperity  ;  money  is  plentiful  ;  optimism  is  in  the  air  ; 
foreign  markets  are  opening  for  American  made  goods  as 
never  before,  and  business  education  and  experience  have 
increased  in  the  past  several  years  as  never  before  in 
double  the  period.    Now  is  the  accepted  time. 


You  Must  Stick  "Like  a  Barnacle  on  a  Boat's  Bottom." 

John  Wanamaker,  one  of  the  greatest  and  most  suc- 
cessful sellers  of  merchandise  in  this  country,  a,nd  who 
has  used  printers'  ink  most  scientifically  and  successfully, 
says : 

"If  there  is  one  business  on  earth  that  a  quitter  should 
leave  severely  alone,  it  is  advertising.  To  make  a  success 
of  advertising  one  must  be  prepared  to  stick  to  it  like  a, 
barnacle. on  a  boat's  bottom.  He  should  know,  before  he 
begins  it,  that  he  must  spend  money- — considerable  of  it. 
Somebody  should  tell  him  that  he  cannot  hope  to  reap 
results  commensurate  with  his  expenditure  early  in  the 
game.  Advertising  doesn't  jerk;  it  pulls.  It  begins  very 
gently  at  first,  but  the  pull  is  steady.  It  increases  day 
by  day,  and  year  by  year,  until  it  exerts  an  irresistible 
power.  It  is  likened  to  a  team  pulling  a  heavy  load.  A 
thousand  spasmodic,  jerky  pulls  will  not  budge  the  load; 
while  onejhalf  the  power  exerted  in  steady  effort  will 
start  and  keep  it  moving.  There  are  three  ways  to  make 
advertising  pay,  and  these  are  the  only  ways.  There  are 
no  others:  First,  it  is  to  keep  at  it;  second,  is  to  keep 
at  it;  third,  is  to  keep  at  it." 


The  Big  Possibilities  That  Belong  to  the  Small  Store. 

We  often  hear  it  said  that  "the  small  dealer  has  no 
chance  to  make  more  than  a  bare  living  nowadays."  It 
has  been  said  so  often  that  many  people  have  grown  to 
believe  it.  "Department  stores  and  mail  order  houses," 
say  the  croakers,  "have  cut  down  our  trade  and  our  pro- 
fits until  we  are  lucky  to  make  a  living  out  of  our  store, 
let  alone'  a  profit." 


That  kind  of  talk  is  all  nonsense  aoid  it  is  surprising 
that  intelligent  merchants  will  accept  it  as  the  truth  when 
it  is  impossible  to  look  in  any  direction  without  seeing 
plenty  of  proof  to  the  contrary.  The  small  merchant 
never  had  a  better  chance  than  he  has  to-day.  Go  where 
you  will  and  you  will  find  large  prosperous  stores  that 
have  grown  from  almost  nothing  in  the  last  five  or  ten 
years.  They  are  selling  more  goods  in  a  day  than  they  did 
in  a  month  a  few  years  ago,  and  many  of  them  are 
gradually  becoming  department  enterprises  themselves. 

Then  there  are  other  stores  that  are  small  now,  but 
are  going  ahead  so  fast  you  can  almost  see  them  grow. 
Some  of  them  almost  double  their  sales  every  year,  and 
in  a  short  time  they,  too,  will  be  big  stores.  You  don't 
hear  these  merchants  saying  "a  little  man  has  no  chance" 
— they  know  better. 

If  a  store  has  the  right  kind  of  management  it  can't 
help  growing- — it  grows  as  naturally  as  a  healthy  boy  does. 
But  the  right  kind  of  store  management  does  not  mean 
sitting  still  and  waiting  for  something  to  turn  up.  It 
means  hustling  early  and  late,  watching  every  chance 
and  letting  no  opportunity  escape.  It  means  buying  the 
kind  of  goods  that  people  want  and  selling  them  quickly 
at  prices  people  can  afford  to  pay.  In  short,  the  right 
kind  of  store  management  means  keeping  stock  and  money 
always  moving. 

+ 

When  the  Customer  Goes  Out. 

"Always  leave  them  laughing  when  you  say  good-bye," 
ran  the  words  of  the  popular  song  hit  of  days  gone  by 
when  George  M.  Cohan  first  began  building  musical 
comedies.  The  true  philosophy  behind  that  song  made  it 
a  go — it  drove  home  an  all-important  truth  to  the  public 
in  a  way  which  all  grasped  immediately;  the  great  value 
of  leaving  a  friend,  social  or  business,  in  the  best  of  good 
humor  when  it  came  time  to  leave  him.  It  taught  the 
great  value  of  last  impressions. 

A  large  eastern  dealer  fully  feels  the  force  of  this 
business  philosophy  in  relation  to  his  leave-takings  with 
his  customers.  He  emphasizes  his  position  by  placing  a 
placard  in  a  prominent  part  of  his  store  lettered  as  fol- 
lows: 

"We  are  cranks  about  the  way  a  customer  feels  when 
he  leaves  this  store. 

"It's  a  way  we  have,  and  everybody  around  here  feels 
I  he  same  about  it.  We  don't  care  anything  about  the 
price  or  the  nature  of  your  purchase,  or  how  hard  you  are 
to  please.  You  must  feel  just  right  when  you  leave  this 
store. ' ' 


FOUNTAIN    PENS  WHOLESALE-     ONLY  STYLOGRAPHIC    pens 

CONWAY,  STEWART  &  CO.,  LTD.,  of  33  PATERNOSTER  ROW,  LONDON,  ENG.,  being  the 
actual  manufacturers  of  all  kinds  of  FOUNTAIN  and  STYLO  Pens,  invite  enquiries  from  the 
wholesale  only. 

SPECIALTIES-" STEWART'S "   Self-Filling   Fountain   Pen  (Patented). 


Made  on  the  natural  principle  of  a  syringe.     Perfect  in  its   simplicity. 

'STEWART'S"  Self-Filling  STYLO   (Patented) 


The  first  and  ONLY   Self-filling   Stylo.    Retail,  $1.00. 


12 


IIDOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


The  name  MARCUS  WARD  has  been  a  guarantee  of  quality  for  50  years. 

Marcus  Ward's  Fountain  Pens 

Are  Guaranteed  Perfect 


11  varieties,  all  fitted  14  carat  gold  nibs,  iridium-tipped.  Export  prices  per  dozen: 
Everybody's  $4.50,  Lady  $5.60,  Ward  $6.00,  Reliable  $6.40,  Wrangler  $8.25,  Oriel 
$9.00,  Perfect  Feed  $10.50,  Marcus  Self-filler  $8.25,  Shakespeare  Self-filler  $8.25, 
Linenhall   Self-filler,  $14.25,   Vest   Pocket   $9.00. 

Dealer's  Own  Name  on  1  Gross  of  Any  Single  Pen 

Manufacturers:       McC4W,  STEVENSON  &  ORR,  LTD.,    BELFAST  Canadian  Representative, 

H.  Prenter,  334  Manning  Ave.,  Toronto 


THE  FACT 

that  we  are  supplying  the  two  largest 
cities  in  America  and  the  U.S.  Gov- 
ernment with  solid  crayons  is  evidence 
that  the  best  and  cheapest  are  made  by 


The  Standard  Crayon  Mfg.  Co. 

Danvers,  Mass. 


"  Modern  B  "  Pen  &  Pencil  Clips 


G  CENTS  EITHER  SIZE 


_Duryea-Hoge  Company    Inc.  Manufacturer. 

108  FULTON  STREET,  NEW  YORK  CITY 


IMPORTANT  NOTICE 


kind  ^Fountain ««rf  Z??,^9**  VluippBd  Faotory  In  England  for  the  manufacture  of  every 

O^urtf™^  enquiries  fror.  Wholesale  Houses' 

v  wwv,wriwi  vaiue,  and  our  prices  are  keen  enough  to  effect  a  tremendous  saving. 

will  wi)^m^an^%n«utlIinhZgh'  ^^  Canada  May  9th  for  about  a  month'  and  duri"S  thi*  time 
win  welcome  any  enquiries  addressed  to  him  at 

14  Craig  Street  West,  Montreal 

The  Wyvern  Fountain  &  Stylograph ic  Pen  Co. 


Head  Office  and  Works 


VICTORIA  PEN  WORKS 


LEICESTER,   ENGLAND 


'J 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


We  have  Selling-Helps 

for  every  dealer  in 

"SWAN"  FOUNT  PENS 

We  are  not  content  to  proclaim  the  superlative  goodness  of  "SWAN" 
PENS.  We  also  help  you  to  let  the  public  know,  and  assist  in  boosting 
your  sales  of  "Swans"  by  supplying  you  with  our  artistic  and  pulling  Show 
Card's,  Electric  Signs,  Velvet  Display  Pads,  and  other  novel  Publicity  De- 
vices. The  retailer  of  "Swan"  Pens  is  handling  a  pen  that  has  "made 
good"  in  every  civilized  country' — a  pen  whose  flow  is  perfect,  which  is  non- 
leakable,  and  which  has  a  gold  nib  adapted  to  every  style  of  hand-writing. 
A  Genuine  Profit  Producer.  Ask  for  details  of  our  proposition.  Write 
us. 

MABIE,  TODD  &  CO. 

124  YORK  STREET,  -  -  -  TORONTO 

Headquarters  :  79  and  80  High  Holborn,  London,  W.  C. 


ft  is  always  ready  for  use.  Twice  the  size  of  illustration. 
It  holds  up  to  W  lbs.  in  wall  or  woodwork.  Yourcustomers 
will  appreciate  its  many  good  features,  and  our  advertising 
will  give  the  necessary  assistance  to  make  it    a  good  setter 

ASK  YOUR  JOBBER  OR  WRITE 

THE  MANUFACTURERS  SALES  COMPANY 

(Canadian  Agents  for  August  Goertz  &  Co.,  Newark,  N.J.) 
F.  H.  REID  4-315  BIRKS  BLDG.,  MONTREAL 


"ROB  ROY" 


PENS 


Sold  by 

All  Stationers 

in  6d.,  1/-  and 
Gross  Boxes 


^>^ 


HINKS.  WELLS  &  CO., 


This 
series  of  Pens 
is  made  of  the 
same  material,  by  the 
same  tools,  by  the  same 
a'*  process  and  at  the  same 

works  as  the  series  of  '  Waver- 
ley'  Pens  which  Hinks, Wells  £- 
Co.  have  for  30  years  and  upwards 
(prior  to  Sept.,   1901),  manufactured  for 
and  supplied  to  the  Proprietors  thereof. 

BIRMINGHAM,  ENGLAND 


British  America  AssuranceCompany 

A. 

FIRE  &  MARINE 

Head  Office,  Toronto 

BOARD  OF  DIRECTOR8 

Hon.  Geo  A.  Cox,  President         W.  R.  Brock,  Vice-President 

Robert  Blckerdlke,  M.P.,  W.  B.  Melkle,   E.  W  Cox.  Geo.  A.  Morrow, 

D.  B.  Hanna,  Augustus  Myers,  John  Hoskln,  K.C.,  LL.D. 
Frederic  Nlcholls,  Alex.  Laird,  James  Kerr  Osborne,  Z.  A.  Lash,  K.C. 

SJr  Henry  M.  Pellatt,  E.  R.  wood. 
W.  S.  Melkle,  General  Manager/  P.  H.  Sim;  Secretary 

CAPITAL        -  ....  $1,400,000.00 

ASSETS 2,182,753.85 

LOSSES  PAID  SINCE  ORGANIZATION      29.833,820.08 


w 


ESTER1N 


Incorporated 
1831 


ASSURANCE 
COMPANY. 


FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 


Head  Office— TORONTO,  ONT. 

Assets  over  -      $3,570,000 

Income  lor  1906,  over     3,609,000 

HON.  GEO.  A.  OOX,  President, 

W.  R.  BROCK,  Vice  President 

W.  B.  MEIKLE,  General  Manager 

C.  C.  FOSTER,  Secretarv 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


"Made  in  Canada" 

A  completely  equipped  factory  is  now  in  operation  in  Montreal 
to  supply  the  ever  increasing  demands  for  Carter's"  Inks  and 
Adhesives  in  Canada. 

A  thoroughly  competent  force  has  been  at  work  some  time, 
first  however  having  been  schooled  in  the  home  factory. 
Dealers  can  therefore  rest  assured  that  exactly  the  same 
high  standard  that  has  always  characterized  these  products 
will  be  maintained  in 

Carter's   Inks  and  Adhesives 

which  are  MADE   IN   CANADA 

Carter's  Writing  Fluid  maintains  its  position  as  the  best  general  ink  for  office  and  home.     This 
and  all  other  Carter  staples  and  specialties  listed  in  New  Canadian  Price  List-      Copy  on  request. 


Boston 


THE  CARTER'S  INK  COMPANY 

MONTREAL,      CANADA 
New  York 


Chicago 


Artists'  Materials 


AND 


School  Supplies 


Colors,  Brushes, 

Papers, 

Drawing  Instruments,  etc. 

Catalogue  on  Application. 

THE    ART   METROPOLE,    Limited 

149  YONGE  STREET,  TORONTO 


ART  SUPPLIES 

v  Insor  &  Newton's  Oil  Colors 
*'  "     Wa'er  Colors 

"  "     Canvas 

"  •'      Papers 

"  "     Brushes 

"  "     Boxes 

All  kinds  of  goods  for  artists :  Crayons,  Oils,  Mediums,  Easels,  Studies,  So 

SEND    FOR    CATALOaUE 

A.  Ramsay  &  Son  Co., 

MONTREAL 

Agents  for  WINSOR  &  NEWTON,  London 


The 

5\e 


"  J.  P. » 


NON-LEAKABLE 
FOUNTAIN    PEN 


FITTED    WITH    14-CARAT    GOLD    NIB.       Can   be    carried   in    any   position    and  will   not  leak. 


Sole  Makers  :  JEWEL   PEN   COMPANY,    102,  Fenchurch   St.,   London,   England. 

Specialties  :    Pens   of   all   Kinds   and   Patterns   made   for  the    trade. 


15 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


ur7) 


ataloQue 

1910 


%eO>as.){%UioUGo. 

Philadelphia 


VontT(esitate! 


'ft// 

as  on  anjnnatters 
appertaininftohs- 
iness  in  our  line. 
Its  ajrteasurefor 
mtoendeu%rto 
proWe  Stationers 
mtj)v)pattpejii}ant. 
Vfjatsx$)atu)e're 
tjeretor. 

IJjou  fja\)'nt one 
of  our  quaint  Cat- 
alojfiie&nJriteforone 
Jmttfjatjpuvtont 

jet  cnr  line,  its 

w^  Cards, 
Calendars,  etc. 

lMe&asT(i^Uiott(o. 

JwrffPI)ilaaelpl)ia%. 
DAVID  FORREST 

129  Bloor  St.   East,  Toronto,  Canada 

Canadian    Representative. 


The  Topaz  Pencil 

As  good  as   any  at  any  price 
Better  than  any  at  the  same  price. 

HOa    H ,    with    rubber    tips, 

HB,H,2H,3H,4H,B,  2B 

without  rubbers. 

INDELIBLE  COPYING 

Medium  and  Hard. 

Write  for  Samples  to 

Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationary,  TORONTO. 


PAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK 


COLLECTIONS,    ETC. 


THE 
MERCHANTS  MERCANTILE    CO. 

260  St.  James  St.,  Montreal 
Mercantile  Reports  and  Collections 
Our  method  of  furnishing  commercial  reports 
to  our  subscribers  gives  prompt  and    reliable   in- 
Every  modern  facility  for  the 


formation  to  date, 
collection  of  claims. 


Tel.  M^n  19S=> 


HOTEL   DIRECTORY. 


THE    GRAND    UNION 


The  most  popular  hotel  in 
OTTAWA,    ONT. 


JAMES  K.  PAISLEY, 


Proprietor 


HALIFAX   HOTEL 

HALIFAX,  N.S. 


ACCOUNTANTS    AND    AUDITORS. 


JENKINS  &  HARDY 

Assignees,  Chartered  Accountants,  Estate  and 

Fire  Insurance  Agents. 

15J  Toronto  St.  52  Can.  Life  Bldg 

Toronto Montreal 


Keep  in  mind  the  domin- 
ant fact  that  mankind  from 
its  first  appearance  on  the 
earth  has  been  schooled  by 
nature  to  look  for  signs  ; 
for  invitations  to  taste;  for 
suggestions  as  to  what  to 
wear.  Tell  your  story 
briefly,  forcibly,  truthful- 
ly, and  address  it  through 
the  proper  media  and  you 
can  successfully  apply  ad- 
vertising as  a  means  to 
increased  distribution. 


The  ink  called  the  blotter  an  old 
soak,  then  the  fight  started.  The 
ruler  got  her  foot  into  it,  inch  by 
inch,  and  instead  of  helping  her  out, 
the  stamps  stuck  to  the  envelopes 
and  let  the  penholder.  The  keys 
were  in  a  bunch,  so  the  pencil  lead 
them  away  and  let' the  paper  weight. 
.  At  this  stage  of  the  battle  the 
paper  knife  stepped  in,  cut  out  the 
fight,  #nd  silence  reigned  supreme. — 
Judge. 

16 


irade  supplied  by  all  Leading  Wholesale 
Orug  Houses  in  the  Dominion. 

Received  Highest  Award  Medal  and  Dip'oma 
at  Centennial,  Philadelphia,  1876;  World's  Fair, 
Chicago,  1893,  and  Province  of  Quebec  Exposi- 
tion, Montreal,  1897 


Standard 
Commercial  Works 


Matte's  Interest  Tables 

at  4  to  io  per  cent Price,  $3.00 

Matte's  Interest  Tables 

at  3  per  cent Price,  $3.00 

Hughes'  Interest  Tables 

and  book  of  days  combined  at  3  to  8   per 
cent v Price,  $5.00 

Hughes'  Supplementary  Interest 

Tables         Price,  $2.00 

Hughes'  Interest  Tables 

at  6  and  7  per  cent.,  on  folded  card 

Price,  $1.00 

Hughes'  Savings   Bank   Interest 
Tables 

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card Price,  $1.00 

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PUBLISHERS 

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MISCELLANEOUS 


ABOOK-KFEP  NG  STAFF  IN  ITSELF,  doing 
the   work  with    machine  precis  on   and  accu- 
racy, the  National  Cash  Rcgi-ter.    Write   for 
demonstra  ion  literature.     National  Cash  Register 
Co.,  285  YongeSt.,  Toronto. 

ATTRACTIVE  FIXTURES  sell  your  goods. 
Walker  Bin  Fixtures  and  Show  Cases  prove 
invaluable  in  economising  store  space,  and 
by  compelling  custom,  assist  materially  in  ef  ect- 
ing  sales.  Send  for  citalog  hstimates  for  fix- 
tures submitted.  Walker  Bin  and  Store  Fixture 
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ANY  MAN  who  has  ever  lost  money  in  the  mails 
has  had  occasion  to  learn  by  painful  exper- 
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prompt  refund  is  arranged,  or  new  order  issued 
without  further  charse. 


BUSINESS  MEN,  PROFESSIONAL  MEN, 
merchants  and  church  workers,  find  innumer- 
able uses  for  Fulton  Sign  and  Price  Markers 
The  Fulton  Rubber  Type  Company  of  Elizabeth, 
N.J.,  are  maker;  of  Ink  Pads.  Dtters  and  Business 
Outfits  of  high  quality.  Sold  by  all  stationers. 
A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Toronto,  Canadian 
Agents. 


COPELAND-CHATTERSON  SYSTEMS  -  Short, 
simple.     Adapted  to  all   classes  of   business. 
Copeland-Chatterson-Crain,     Ltd  ,     Toronto 
and  Ottawa.  (tf) 

DOUBLE  your  floor  space.  An  Otis-Fensom 
hand-power  elevator  will  double  your  floor 
space,  enable  you  to  use  that  upper  floor  either  as 
stock  room  or  as  extra  selling  space,  at  the  same 
time  increasing  space  on  your  ground  floor.  Costs 
only  $70  Write  for  catalogue  "B."  The  Otls- 
Fensom  Elevator  Co.,  Traders  Bank  Building, 
Toronto.  (tf) 

EGRY  BUSINESS  SYSTEMS  are  devised  to 
suit  every  department  of  every  business. 
They  are  labor  and  time  savers.  Produce  re- 
sults up  to  the  requirements  of  merchants  and 
manufacturers.  Inquire  from  our  nearest  office. 
Egry  Register  Co..  Dayton,  Ohio;  1 '3  Bay  St., 
Toronto;  258^  Portage  Ave.,  Winnipeg;  308 
Richards  St.,  Vancouver.  (tf) 


ELIMINATE  FIRE  RISK,  save  insurance,  re- 
duce maintenance  costs  and  save  money  n 
yo ur  ac tual  bui Id ing  work  by  using  the  KAHN 
SYSTEM  of  Fireproof  Construction.  Used  in 
many  of  the  largest  business  premises  on  this 
Continent.  Write  for  catalogue.  Trussed  Con- 
crete Steel  Con.pany  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Walker  Rd., 
Walkerville.Ont.  (tf) 


ELLIOTT- FISHER     Standard    Writing-Adding 
Machines    make    toil    easier.     Elliott-Fisher 
Limited.  513.  No.  83  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal, 
and  Room  314  Stair  Building,  Toronto. 


ERRORS  AVOIDED,  LABOR  SAVED-Using 
the  Shouperior  Autographic  Register.  Three 
copies  issued  at  one  writing.  1st,  Invoice; 
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ed  for  filing.  No  handling  of  carbons.  High 
grade  printing  and  neat  invoices.  Make  full  in- 
quiry. Autographic  Register  Co.,  191-193  195 
Dorchester  St.  East,  Montreal.  (tf) 


^REINSURANCE.    INSURE  IN  THE  HART- 
FORD.   Agencies  everywhere  in  Canada. 


GET  THE  BUSINESS;  INCREASE  YOUR 
SALES.  Use  Multigr-ph  typewritten  letters. 
The  Multigraph  does  absolutely  every  form  of 
printing.  S>aves  you  25  p.c.  to  75  p.c.  of  your 
printing  bill.  Multigraph  your  office  forms, 
letterheads,  circular  letters.  Write  us.  American 
Multigraph  Sales  Co.,  Ltd.,  129  Bay  St.,  Toronto. 


IF  YOU  have  been  afflicted  with  one  of  those 
fountain  pens  that  won't  write  when  you  want 
it  to,  or  leaks  when  youdon't  want  it  to,  give  it 
away  to  one  of  your  poor  relations  and  buy  a 
Moore  Non-Leakab  e  Fountain  Pen  and  you  will 
be  happy.  Consult  your  stationer.  W.  J.  Gage 
&  Co.,  I  oront  i,  so'e  agents  for  Canada. 


TUST  NOW  we  are  holding  a  special  sale  of 
|  second-hand  typewriters.  All  makes  are  re- 
presened — Underwood.  Remingtons,  Olivers, 
Empires,  Smith  Premiers,  etc.  I  hey  have  been 
carefully  rebuilt  and  are  in  good  workable  wear- 
able condition.  The  Monarch  Typewriter  Co., 
Ltd.,  98  King  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont  (tf) 

T/EEP  ACCOUNTS  without  book-keeping.  A 
XV  century  ago  accounting  meant  keeping  books, 
To-day  you  can  keep  accounts  cheaper,  better, 
quicker  and  more  accurately  by  throwing  away  all 
books  and  installing  a  McCaskry  Ace  'unt  R  gister. 
Don't  be  skeptictl  —  investigation  costs  nothing. 
Write  us  to-day.  Dominion  Register  Co,  Ltd., 
100  Sradina  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


MODERN  FIREPROOF  CONSTRUCTION. 
Our  system  of  reinforced  concrete  work,  as 
succes>fully  used  in  many  of  Canada's  larg- 
est buildings,  gives  better  re«u:ts  at  lower  cost. 
"  A  strong  statement,"  you  will  «ay.  Write  us  and 
let  us  prove  our  claims.  That's  fair.  Leach  Con- 
crete Co.,  Ltd.,  100  King  St.  West,  Toronto,     (tf) 


DROBABLY  the  most  talked  about  machine  in 
*  Canada  is  the  Hainer  Book-keeping  Ma.hine. 
It  combines  in  one  machine  the  cash  and 
credit  register,  time  recorder  and  account  register. 
Representatives  wanted  everywhere.  Write  for 
our  proposition.  Book-keeping  Machines,  Ltd., 
424  Spadina  Ave.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


SAVE  50/„  OF  THE  COST  OF  HANDLING 
merchandise  by  installing  a  Beath  System  of 
Overhead  Carriers.  Saves  valuable  floor 
space  because  the  trackage  is  on  the  ceiling.  Sys- 
temsfor  all  kinds  of  businesses,  large  or  small. 
Write  us  for  illustrated  catalog.  W.  D  Beath  & 
Son.  193  Terauley  St.,  Toronto.  (tf) 


SHOW  CASES  AND    STORE    FIXTURES    for 
every  business.  Send  for  illustrated  catalogue. 
Jones  Bros.  &  Co.,  Limited,  30  32  Adelaide 
St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont.  (tf) 


^COTOH  PLAID  STATIONERY  is  the  latest 
O  creation  for  business  and  society  correspon- 
dence. Paper  and  envelopes  present  a  finish- 
ed linen  surface,  most  agreeable  to  the  pen  touch. 
Leading  stationers  have  it.  Write  for  samples. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 


THE  "KALAMAZOO"  Loo-e  L-af  Binder  is 
*  the  only  binder  that  will  I  o'd  just  as  many 
sheets  as  you  actually  require  and  no  more. 
The  back  is  flexible,  writing  >urface  flat,  align- 
ment perfect.  No  exposed  meti  parts  or  compli- 
cated mechanism.  Write  for  t»  oklet.  Warwick 
Bros.  &  Rutter.  Ltd.,  King  and  Spadina,  Toronto. 

THE'  METAL  REQUIRED  IN  A  MODERN 
1  CONCRETE  BUILDING.  Our  special 
facilities  enable  us  to  pioduce  at  minimum 
cost  Concrete  Reinforcements,  Fenettra  Steel 
Sash,  Automatic  Fire  Shutters  and  Steelcrete 
Metal  Lath.  Compete  stock;  quick  delivery. 
Before  deciding  write  us  for  catalogue  and  prices. 
Expanded  Metal  and  Fireproofing  Co.,  Ltd., 
Fraser  Ave.,  Toronto,  (tf) 

WAREHOUSE  and  Factory  Heating  Systems. 
Taylor-Forbes  Company,  Limited.  Supplied 
by  the  trade  throughout  Canada. 

WHEN   BUYING  BOf  KCASES  insist  on  hav- 
ing  the   best  in   the   market — 'Macey    Sec- 
tional Bookcases."     Carried  in  stock  by  all 
up-to-date   furniture   dealers.     Illustrated   booklet 
sent  free  on  tf  quest.     Canada   Furniture  Manufac- 
turers, Ltd. ;  General  offices,  Woodstock,  Ont.  (tf ) 

WANTED — A  splendid  opportunity  for  dealers 
to  handle  the  best  combination  Duplicating, 
Addressing  and  Office  Print  ng  Machine  on 
the  market.  Exclus  ve  territory.  Send  name  and 
address,  giving  occupation  and  references,  to  the 
Canadian  Writerpress  Company,  Ltd.,  33  John  St., 
Hamilton.  Unt. 

WHY  IMPORT  Loose-Leaf  Binders  and  Metal 
Parts  when  you  can  buy  ''  Systems  Quality" 
from  us?  We  make  the  best  binders  in  the 
world;  make  them  to  match,  too.  Ours  are  the 
Canadian  Loose-Leaf  Standaids.  Business  Sys- 
tems Limited,  Manufacturing  Stationers,  Toronto. 
(tf) 

YOU  need  the  best  possible  protection  from  fire  ! 
If  your  valuables  are  in  one  of  our  safes  you 
can  rest  at  ease;  no  fire  is  too  hot  for  our 
safes  and  vaults  to  withstand.  We  manufacture 
vaults  and  safes  to  meet  every  possible  require- 
ment. Write  for  catalogue  "S."  The  Goldie  & 
McCulloch  Co.,  Ltd.,  Gait,   Ont.  (tf) 

(£  buys  the   best   duplicating  machine   on  the 

vj)/ S  market.  ACME  will  print  arything  a  job 
'  "  printer  can  do.  Complete  outfit:  Acme 
Duplicating  Machine,  one  tubular  stand  fitted  with 
type  caves,  compartments  plainly  lettered  and 
arranged  like  universal  keyboard  of  the  standard 
make  of  typewriters,  one  drawer  for  accessories 
and  forms,  20  lb.  font  of  typewriter  type,  one 
chase,  one  Acme  ribbon  any  color  with  typewriter 
ribbon  to  match,  one  pair  tweezers,  two  quoins, 
one  key,  one  oil  can  and  one  set  of  reglets.  Sold 
with  a  guarantee.  Acme  Duplicator  Co.,  Balti- 
more, Md.,  U.S.A.  (tf) 


ARTICLE  FOR  SALE 


pASH     REGISTER,     Nickel-plated,     handsome 
\j     detail    adder,     regis  ers    one    cent    to     $20, 
perfect   condition.     Bargain   price,    $50.     R. 
O.  Fmith  Company.  Orillia 


PERIODICALS. 


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year.     Address  HARDWARE  AND  METAL,  Mont- 
real, Toronto  or  Winnipeg. 


WANTED 


A  COPY  of  "Soldiering  in  Canada,"  by  Deni- 
rv  son,  is  wanted  at  the  office  of  "Bookseller 
and  Stationer  "  at  once.  Any  person  having 
a  copy  of  this  book  may  dispose  of  it  by  communi- 
cating with  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER, 
10  Front  St.  East,  Toronto. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


FRANCES   DE  WOLFE    FENWICK 

A  Montreal  lady  who  has  written  a  clever  novel, — 
"  The  Arch-Satirist." 


Gossip  of  the  Month 

Another  luminary  has  arisen  in  the  literary  firma- 
ment to  brighten  that  particular  corner  of  the  sky  from 
which  our  Canadian  authors  shine.  Frances  de  Wolfe 
Fenwick,  whose  first  novel,  "The  Arch-Satirist,"  is  being 
published  simultaneously  in  the  United  States  and 
Canada  this  month,  is  the  latest  addition  to  the  ranks 
of  Canadian  novelists,  and,  judging  from  her  work,  she 
will  ably  sustain  the  reputation  of  the  company  into 
which  she  has  entered.  Miss  Fenwick  (who,  by  the  way, 
is  now  Mrs.  F.  B.  Williams  of  Hartford,  Conn.,  having 
been  married  last  spring)  comes  of  a  well-known  Mon- 
treal family.  Her  uncle,  Dr.  George  Fenwick,  was  for 
many  years  one  of  the  leading  surgeons  in  Canada  and 
,was  connected  with  McGill  University.  Her  father,  Mr. 
William  I.  Fenwick,  was  for  some  time  secretary  of  the 
Montreal  Stock  Exchange,  and  is  still  very  popular  in 
Montreal  society. '  Another  uncle  is  Archdeacon  Young 
of  London,  Ontario.  She  is  connected  on  her  mother's 
side  with  the  De  Wolfes,  one  of  the  well-known  families 
of  Nova  Scotia.  Mr.  De  Wolfe  of  De  Wolfe  &  Fiske  Co., 
the  Boston  publishers  and  booksellers,   is  her  uncle. 


"The  Arch-Satirist"  is  Miss  Fenwick's  first  book, 
but  she  has  had  considerable  experience  in  writing  short 
stories  for-  the  magazines,  and  was  also  for  a  time  sec- 
retary to  Dr.  Andrew  Macphail,  editor  of  the  University 
Magazine.  Dr.  Macphail,  who  is  himself  a  novelist  of 
repute,  praises  her  work  highly.  Miss  Fenwick  both 
studied  and  taught  elocution  some  years  ago  and  is  thus 
qualified  to  seize  and  elaborate  the  dramatic  possibili- 
ties of  any  situation. 

*     *     * 

A  tale  is  going  the  rounds  at  present,  which  cer- 
tainly tends  to  the  glorification  of  Robert  W.  Service, 
the  poet  of  the  Yukon.  Whether  it  is  absolutely  true  or 
not,  the  writer  is  not  prepared  to  state.  It  would  seem 
that  when  Sir  Ernest  Shackleton  set  out  on  his  memor- 


able journey  to  the  South  polar  regions,  he  made  up  a 
small  library  of  books  to  help  to  brighten  the  long  and 
monotonous  days,  when  there  would  be  need  for  some 
diversion  of  the  sort.  Poetry  was  for  the  most  part 
tabooed,  but  a  friend  handed  Shackleton  a  small  volume 
of  verse,  which  he  said  that  the  explorer  should  certainly 
have  with  him,  for  it  breathed  the  spirit  of  the  regions 
of  snow  and  ice.  Shackleton  took  the  book  and  it 
proved  to  be  all  that  his  friend  stated.  It  was  read 
many  times  during  the  course  of  the  journey  and  its 
stirring  verses  were  learned  by  heart.  The  book  was  of 
course  "The  Songs  of  a  Sourdough,"  and  when  he  re- 
turned Shackleton  showed  what  a  hold  it  had  on  him, 
by  repeating  verses  from  it  at  various  banquets  tendered 

to  him. 

•        •        • 

The  Yukon  has  been  an  inspiration  to  more  than 
Service,  and  there  is  a  literature  of  the  Yukon  springing 
up,  which  will  take  a  prominent  place  in  the  world  of 
letters  in  days  to  come.  Two  books  about  *hat  wild 
northern  country  are  to  be  published  this  summer  by  a 
Toronto  house,  mention  of  which  has  already  been  made 
in  these  columns, — "The  Stampeder"  and  "God's  Fron- 
tiersmen." These  books  are  now  in  course  of  prepara- 
tion. While  it  will  be  some  months  yet  before  they  will 
be  issued,  salesmen  have  been  taking  advance  orders 
from  the  booksellers  for  them  and,  if  these  sales  may  be 
taken  as  a  criterion,  the  success  of  the  books  is  assured. 
They  have  been  welcomed  everywhere,  simply  because 
there  is  a  genuine  demand  for  books  about  our  own 
country.  The  trade  know  how  well  these  Canadian  books 
sell  and  they  are  willing  to  take'a  risk  and  order  heavily 
in   advance  of  publication. 


The  practice  of  issuing  what  are  known  as  cheap  re- 
prints of  copyright  fiction  has  invaded  Canada  and  all 
our  Canadian  publishers  are  now  directing  their  atten- 
tion to  the  production  of  new  editions  of  books  which 
have  had  a  good  run  in  the  regular  $1.25  edition.  This 
is  a  move  which  should  be  appreciated  by  the  public,  for 
it  places  first-class  books  within  the  reach  of  the  average 
person.  Many  people  are  unable  to  pay  $1.25  for  a  book, 
but  find  it  quite  possible  to  spend  50  cts.  for  one.  The 
most     notable      books     to  be    brought   out  in  the  cheap 


AGNES  DEANS  CAMERON 


18 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


editions  this  season  are  Ralph  Connor's  earlier  successes 
and  Sir  Gilbert  Parker's  novels.  The  new  editions  are 
almost  as  good  as  the  first  editions  and  there  will 
doubtless  be  a  big  sale  for  them. 


Some  one  may  ask,  why  is  it  not  possible  to  produce 
these  novels  at  the  outset  in  the  cheaper  form  ?  It  is 
true  there  would  be  a  larger  sale,  which  might  make  up 
for  the  loss  on  individual  copies,  and  in  many  cases 
there  would  be  a  gain,  but  it  must  be  remembered  that 
one  good  book  must  often  be  made  to  offset  a  number 
of  failures.  It  would  be  practically  impossible  for  a 
publisher  to  produce  a  series  of  new  novels  at  fifty  cents, 
for,  while  one  or  two  might  bring  good  returns,  the  bal- 
ance might  be  failures.  Then  again,  the  demands  of 
authors  for  heavier  royalties,  is  a  factor  which  is  put- 
ting back  the  day  of  the  cheaper  novel. 


PROF.  W.  F.  OSBORNE 

Who   has  followed   his  book  of  essays  on  Shakespeare  with 
a  book  entitled  "The  Religion  of  a  Layman." 


Professor  Osborne,  whose  "Faith  of  a  Layman  "  has 
just  been  published,  is  a  graduate  in  Arts  of  Victoria 
and  Toronto  Universities,  but  has  since  his  graduation 
been  Professor  of  English  and  French  literature  at 
Wesley  College,  Winnipeg,  an  institution  which  shares 
the  arts  work  of  the  University  of  Manitoba.  Professor 
Osborne  is  a  most  successful  teacher.  He  is  known, 
however,  much  more  widely  as  a  public  speaker.  For 
some  years  his  addresses  on  literature  and  on  questions 
of  public  interest  have  been  in  great  demand,  and  he  has 
also  taken  an  active  part  in  politics.  But  his  deepest 
sympathies  have  been  in  the  moral  and  religious  realms, 
and  his  new  book  of  essays  will  be  found  to  emphasize 
this.  There  is  a  young  Canada,  both  east  and  west , 
which  will  feel  that  it  has  first  found  literary  expression 
in  the  pages  of  this  volume.  Professor  Osborne  has  al- 
ways peculiarly  had  the  ear  of  thoughtful  young  men. 


The  publication  of  Agnes  Deans  Cameron's  book  of 
travel,  "The  New  North,"  last  fall  has  brought  much 
fame  to  that  intrepid  explorer  and  vigorous  literary 
worker.  Miss  Cameron  is  now  engaged  in  journalistic, 
work  in  London,  but  she  is  still  true  to  Canada  and 
writes  about  its  mighty  west  whenever  she  has  an  op- 
portunity.     She   has   impressed   her   personality    on     the 


Londoners,  for  it  is  no  uncommon  thing  to  run  across 
articles  about  her  or  from  her  pen  in  the  English  news- 
papers and  magazines  which  reach  us  here  in  Canada. 
Miss  Cameron  was  originally  a  school  teacher,  but  she 
had  a  hankering  after  journalism  and  finally  burst  the 
trammels  of  school  life,  and  set  to  work  in  a  new  and 
wider  field.  She  took  Canada's  Wheat  Molt  as  her 
specialty  and  has  made  it  much  better  krtown  to  the 
world  than  it  would  have  otherwise  been.  The  daring 
voyage  she  made  down  the  Mackenzie  River  to  the 
Arctic  Ocean  gave  her  a  splendid  subject  for  her  book, 
"The  New  North,"  and  it  is  pleasant  to  know  that  it 
has   had   a   fine   large   sale. 


A  glance  at  the  following  pages  will  demonstrate 
that  Canadian  writers  are  far  from  idle  at  the  present 
time.  In  fact  it  is  astonishing  to  see  how  much  good 
sound  literary  work  is  in  hand.  And  our  record  is  by 
no  means  complete.  Many  another  writer  is  busily  en- 
gaged to-day  in  producing  books  which  will  see  the  light 
in  the  fall  or  perhaps  not  until  the  following  spring.  It 
is  noteworthy  to  observe  what  a  big  share  clergymen 
are  taking  in  this  literary  work.  A  count  would  show 
that  nearly  fifty  per  cent,  of  the  books  announced  are  by 
clerics.  And  why  should  this  not  be  the  case  ?  The 
average  Canadian  clergyman  has  sufficient  leisure  and 
sufficient  opportunities  of  observation  to  make  it  possi- 
ble for  him  to   spend  considerable  time  in   writing. 


This  months'  grist  of  new  books  includes  several 
important  titles.  We  have  Mr.  Gosling's  exhaustive  work 
on  Labrador,  which  will  take  its  place  as  the  most  com- 
prehensive volume  on  this  subject  yet  issued.  Then  there 
is  Charles  B.  Reed's  exceedingly  entertaining  biography 
of  "The  First  Great  Canadian."  Professor  Osborne's 
"Faith  of  a  Layman"  has  already  been  mentioned.  In 
fiction,  Dorothy  Dean  Tate's  "Story  of  Yuk.u,"  is  an 
achievement  of  which  that  young  lady  may  well  be 
proud,  while  in  Frances  De  Wolfe  Fenwick's  "Arch- 
Satirist  "  we  have  a  keen  and  shrewd  dissection  of  hu- 
man motives  and  morals. 


S.  A.  WHITE 

A   new   Canadian  novelist,   who   has  written   a  striking 
story  called   "The  Stampeder." 


19 


Canadian  Women  Writers  —  Have  They  Yet  Arrived? 

What  the  Members  of  the  Canadian  Press  Club  of  Women  are  Accomplishing  in 
the  Field  of  Letters  —  A  Remarkable  Array  of  Talent — Something  About  Them. 

By  Mary  Markwell. 


1_HE  Canadian  Press  Club  of  women  number  one 
hundred  and  nine  writers,  of  whom  perhaps  fifty 
depend  upon  the  pen  for  a  living.  Of  this  num- 
ber there  are  by  actual  count  only  twenty  who 
have  reached  the  dignity  of  authorship,  and  only  seven 
who  may  be  said  to  have  "arrived."  It  must  be  re- 
membered that  writers  and  authors  are  distinct  from 
each  other,  just  as  painter  and  artist  differs  :  compilers 
and  contributors  are  numerous,  but  the  inventor,  creator, 
stands  almost  alone.  It  were  a  difficult  matter  to 
decide  to-day  who  of  our  Canadian  women  are  shaping 
formative  influences  in  letters.  The  poor  laborers  of 
the  pen  whose  "Women's  Page"  demands  a  daily  grind 
of  words,  mere  words,  cannot  be  expected  to  erect  struc- 
tures of  thought,  ornamented  by  pillars  of  imagination  ; 
bat  these  faithful  toilers  throughout  the  land  are  doing 
their  little  best  in  gathering  together  the  materials, 
just  as  the  brickmaker  carries  the  clay,  shaping  it,  and 
making  ready  for  the  fires  the  blocks  which  shall  be 
used  in  construction  a  day  later. 

Others  again  are  heard  tuning  up  their  instruments, 
and  some  day  doubtless  we  shall  hear  that  much  de- 
layed but  long  wished  for  symphony,  and  when  it  comes 
it  shall  have  in  its  fullness  all  that  was  of  beauty  in 
the  past  and  all  that  is  of  hope  in  the  future. 

If  Canada  may  he  said  to  have  a  literature,  then, 
vested  in  its  women  writers,  first  in  order  of  excellence 
comes  Madame  Frechette  whose  work  has  a  finish,  and, 
as  a  literary  critic  said  of  it,  "has  the  wear  and  glow 
of  the  diamond."  Three  novels  stand  to  her  credit,  and 
Harper's,  Scribner's,  The  Century,  and  like  high-class 
magazines  ■  accept  her  work.  Next  Agnes  Laut,  whose 
work  comes  under  the  heading  of  research,  and  whose 
historical  writings  have  placed  her  a  leading  figure  in 
the  stately  march  of  Canadian  immortals,  is  the  best 
"known  woman  writer  Canada  claims.  •  She  is  the  highest 
paid  woman  writer  on  the  American  continent,  and  has 
attained  the  dignity  of  "Advisor"  on  four  leading  Amer- 
ican magazines  ;  this  may  be  taken  to  mean  she  con- 
trols the  literarv  rein  of  American  pacers.  She  is  the 
most  modest  of  -women,  and  wears  her  honors  with  a 
quiet  dignity  good  to  see. 

Agnes  Deans  Cameron,  who  is  a  British  Columbian, 
has  within  two  short  years  leaped  to  the  front  rank  in 
the  army  of.  Tnk  Amazons.  Her  work  is  virile  ;  she  has 
intuition  as  well  as  grasp,  and  her  first  book,  "The  New 
North,"  contains  everything  the  critic  might  desire.  It 
is  a  book  of  facts,  and  these  facts  are  set  forth  in  a 
charming  way  ;  and  the  woman  herself  permeates  every 
page.  She  bids  fair  to  do  great  things  for  Canada.  At 
present  she  occupies  the  important  position  of  Canadian 
editor  on   a  big   London,   Eng.,  daily  newspaper. 

Katherine  Hughes,  whose  work  represents  care  and 
labor  as  well  as  deep  thought,  has  taken  a  quite  unex- 
plored field  in  Canadian  literature  ;  she  is  the  first 
western  woman  biographer  of  the  day.  Miss  Hughes' 
work  is  quick  with  life  and  action  ;  and  shows  a  high 
sense  of  the  sacredness  and  purpose  of  the  pen.  In  her 
newspaper  work  on  the  Montreal  Star,  as  later  on  the 
Edmonton  Bulletin,  her  editorial  work  was  spoken  of  as 
"good  as  a  man's."  Miss  Hughes  was  recently  ap- 
pointed statistician  to  the  Alberta   Government. 


"Sowing  Seeds  In  Danny,"  brought  Mrs.  Nellie  Mc- 
Clung  to  the  fore.  A  second  book,  "The  Second  Chance" 
is  now  in  the  printer's  hands.  Mrs.  McClung's  strong 
point  in  writing  is  her  intensely  human  touch  ;  she  is 
the  best  child-painter  we  have — and  her  writing  reaches 
right  down  into  the  pocket,  of  your  heart.  She  lives 
with  her  little  family  away  out  on  the  plains  of  Mani- 
toba, and  it  is  there  she  found  the  types  she  has  given 
us  so  beautifully  true  to  life.  Mrs.  McClung  is  yet  a 
very  young  woman  ;  she  has  a  big  field  and  she  is  likely 
to   hold  it   as  it  is   her   pre-emption  in  all  truth. 

Lily  Lefevre  has  the  prestige  of  Grant  Allen  as 
kinsman  to  give  her  work  in  prose  and  verse  notice  ;  but 
this  lady  is  said  to  possess  great  orginality  of  thought. 
She  was  a  prize-winner  in  one  competition  at  least,  and 
in  1895  she  published  a  volume  of  poems  entitled  :  "The 
Lion's  Gate."  She  is  the  wife  of  a  distinguished  physi- 
cian in  British  Columbia. 

Mrs.  Julia  Henshaw's  name  is  familiar  as  a  writer 
of  Alpine  Climbing  in  the  Rocky  Mountains,  and  her 
work  embraces  almost  every  topic  you  might  mention. 
She  published  a  delightful  book  on  the  flora  of  British 
Columbia  ;  has  at  least  two  novels  to  her  credit,  and 
contributes  to  many  English  'magazines.  She  is  the 
most  versatile  of  our  western  Canadian  women  writers. 
Alice  Ashworth  Townley's  "Opinions  of  Mary,"  fol- 
lowing close  upon  "Just  A  Little  Girl"  and  "Just  A 
Little  Boy,"  shows  that  humor  and  dramatic  touch 
which  belongs  to  a  writer  who  possesses  the  child  heart. 
"The  Opinions  of  Mary,"  set  in  essay  form,  delight 
while   they   instruct. 

In  Mrs.  Isabel  Ecclestone  Mackay  we  find  promise  of 
future  high  work.  She  is  a  poet  by  nature  and  she 
sings  as  the  bird  sings,  out  of  pure  fulness  of  joy.  Her 
poem  "The  Homesteader,"  brings  her  pretty  close  to 
"Moira  O'Neil,"  whose  writings  on  the  prairie  west  are 
allowed  to  be  perfect  in  form.  Moira  O'Neil  (Mrs. 
Skrine),  cannot  be  called  a  Canadian  writer,  though  her 
subjects  are  largely  Canadian.  While  she  lived  in  Al- 
berta on  a  ranch  her  articles  in  Blackwood  attracted 
much  attention.  I  think  her  "Lady's  Life  on  a  Ranch," 
is  the  best  thing  that  was  ever  written  on  the  west. 

Mrs.  Claire  Fitzgibbon  ("Lally  Bernard"),  who  is 
equally  gifted  in  voice  and  pen,  has  certain  signs  of  the 
"Child  of  Fortune."  Her  early  life  was  spent  in  the 
atmosphere  of  polities',  where,  as  the  guest  of  her  aunt, 
Lady  Macdonald  at  Earn9cliff,  she  became  imbued  with 
such'  extreme  conservatism  that  she  never  forgot  it.  A 
charming  personality  and  of  good  common  sense,  she  is 
loved  by  other  women  ;  and  as  a  worker  she  excels.  Her 
writings  belong  particularly  to  the  Toronto  Globe, 
which  first  discovered  her,  but  all  the  large  English 
magazines  give  her  place.  She  is  an  enthusiastic  "Can- 
adian"— a  tariff  reformer  to  the  back  bone,  and  as  a 
public  speaker  is  well  known  at  home  and  abroad.  She 
is  at  present  writing  a  Canadian  novel,  the  first  chapters 
of  which  I  was  permitted  to  see,  and  when  it  comes  out 
the  prairie  land  will  applaud.  Mrs.  Fitzgibbon  is  a  step- 
■  daughter  of  the  late  D'Alton  McCarthy. 

Lady    Edgar's    "Life    of    General    Brock,"    and     "Ten 
Years  of  Upper  Canada,"   make  her  an  acceptable  mem- 
ber   of    the     craft.      Katherine    Hale's    "Canadian     Flag 
20 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Song,"   if  she   wrote  nothing-  else,   would  give  her   place 
in  ink-circles  ;  hear  the  ringing  words  : 

"Live  for  your  Flag,  0  Builders  of  the  North  ! 

Age  unto  age  shall  glorify  its  worth  ; 

Of  precious  blood  its  red  is  dyed, 

The  white  is  honor's  sign, 

Through   weal  or  ruth  its  Blue  is  truth, 

It's  might  the  Power  Divine." 
I  sometimes  wonder  why  this  fine  poem  has  not  been 
set  to  music  ? 

"Faith  Fenton"  seems  to  have  drifted  away  from  us. 
She  was  a  fine  writer  and  had  a  large  following  at  one 
time  ;  her  marriage  probably  removed  the  urgent  neces- 
sity for  work,  and  if  so,  'tis  pity. 

Sara  Jeanette  Duncan  has  long  ago  reached  the 
higher  levels.  To  my  mind  "His  Honor  and  a  Lady"  is 
her  best  work. 

"Kit"  of  the  Mail-Empire,  represents  all  that  is 
good  in  newspaper  writings.  She  may  be  said  to  be  a 
pioneer  in  the  work  ;  her  influence  is  wonderful,  and  she 
has  the  biggest  following  of  any  woman-pager  in  or  out 
of  Canada.  Kit  was  asked  by  Major  Pond  to  go  on  the 
public  platform  on  her  return  from  Cuba,  whither  she 
went  as  "War  Correspondent"  for  the  Mail-Empire  dur- 
ing the  Philippine  war.  Oddly  enough,  she  is  so  nervous 
she  cannot  speak  from  a  platform,  and  shakes  at  the 
knees  if  asked  to  address  half-a-dozen  fellow-women 
writers  ;  but  pen  in  hand  her  eloquence  is  as  the  flow- 
ing river.  Kit  has  beauty  as  well  as  brains,  and  is  a 
personality  of  rare  charm.  She  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  Cole- 
man,  of  Hamilton,   Ont. 

Valance  Patriarch  is  the  most  recent  writer  heard 
from.  Her  book  "The  Chien  Boule  Dog,"  took  like 
wildfire  in  the  west  where  she  is  known  as  the  shyest  of 
women.  She  has  just  closed  a  contract  with  her  pub- 
lisher for  the  next  five  years'  work,  and  a  second  book 
is  almost  completed.  She  is  a  charming  hostess  in  Fort 
Rouge,  Winnipeg,  and  her  ability  extends  to  house- 
keeping as  well  as  writing.  You  meet  her  occasionally 
in  social  life,  where  she  is  looked  upon  as  a  wit  and  a 
splendid  converser.    Valance  Patriarche  has   "arrived." 

"Francoise,"  Miss  Robertine  Barry,  of  Montreal, 
whose  death  was  recently  chronicled  had  the  distinction 
of  being-  the  only  woman  who  owned,  edited  and  con- 
ducted her  own  magazine.  "Le  Journal  de  Francoise" 
had  an  especial  place  in  Newspaper  Row.  and  its  bril- 
liant editress  wielded  a  certain  power  in  politics  as  well 
as  art.  A  lovable  woman  was  Francoise — and  her  place 
will  be  hard  to  fill.  She  was  made  the  President  of  the 
Canadian  Women's  Press  Club,  and  amongst  its  mem- 
bers she  was  known  as  "Our  Dear  Francoise."  She 
wrote  a  book  of  poems  in  the  French  language,  and 
many  brochures  on  varying  subjects.  She  died  at  Mon- 
treal  a  few  months  ago. 

"Peggy,"  Mrs.  Balmer  Watt,  sends  out  a  clear  note 
from  the  high  lands  of  the  North.  She  is  the  author  of 
"Town  and  Country,"  a  dainty  little  book  descriptive 
of  life  out  west.  "Peggy"  writes  brightly,  cleverly  and 
as  one  who  observes.  Her  husband  is  the  proprietor  of 
"The  News,"  in  Edmonton. 

Maria  Lawson,  of  the  Victoria  Colonist,  is  the  author 
of  a  "School  History  of  Canada."  She  colaborrated 
with  Rosalind  Young  in  a  geography-history  of  Canada. 
Miss  Lawson  is  a  woman-editor  who  writes  on  big  sub- 
jects, and  she  conducts  the  best  child-page  in  any  news- 
paper T  know. 

Mrs.  Harris,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Sir  James  Doug- 
lass, is  the  author  of  the  first  book  of  Indian  Legends 
written  in  Canada.  Kate  Simpson-Hayes  followed  with 
a   "Legend  of  the  West,"   and  T  have  seen  it  somewhere 

21 


stated  that  she  produced  the  first  book  of  short  tales  in 
the  Canadian  west. 

Evelyn  Gunne,  of  Kenora,  Ont.,  is  the  author  of  a 
book  of  poems  of  very  real  worth,  and  she  is  a  song- 
writer of  some  distinction.  Her  "Builders,"  which  came 
out  in  the  Canadian  Magazine,  was  copied  from  end  to 
end  of  Canada  ;  she  is  at  present  engaged  in  short  story 
writing.  She  resides  at  Kenora,  where  iter  husband 
practices  medicine. 

Pauline  Johnson,  best  known  of  all  Canadian  women 
writers,  has  lately  left  off  platform  work,  and  is  quietly 
housed  in  Vancouver,  B.C.  She  possesses  every  attri- 
bute of  the  artist  ;  her  poems  are  exquisite  drifting 
musical  notes,  and  the  divine  afflatus  dwells  within  her. 
Her  place  in  literature  is  unique.  Being  of  Mohawk  ori- 
gin, her  blood  intermingling  with  the  two  rivers,  there  is 
something  of  the  song  of  the  rapids  and  the  calmer 
ripple  of  the  flow  in  her  verse. 

Amelia  Paget  has  recently  contributed  to  book 
shelves  in  a  collection  of  Indian  folklore  and  legends. 
But  little  has  been  said  regarding  this  important  sub- 
ject and  Mrs.  Paget,  herself  a  daughter  of  the  plains, 
should  speak  with  authority.  In  this  volume,  intended 
as  a  reference-book,  there  is  lacking  nothing  in  subject, 
but  unfortunately  the  lady  seems  not  to  have  possessed 
the  "trick"  of  arranging  her  facts  so  as  to  make  them 
appear  to  the  best  advantage.  Had  Mrs.  Paget  colla- 
borated with  some  experienced  writer  her  book  would 
have  undoubtedly  been  the  rage.  "Some  one  had  blun- 
dered,"  it  is  evident. 

Grace  Dennison,  "Lady  Gay"  of  Toronto  Saturday 
Night,  whose  writing  shows  large  intuitive  perceptions, 
appears  to  be  too  confined  for  her  free  and  dashing  style 
of  composition.  I  imagine  "Lady  Gay"  capable  of 
greater  things  than  a  weekly  page  ;  but  "the  grind"  of 
duty  has  kept  this  delightful  essayist  rather  in  the  back- 
ground, I  fear.  She  is  a  delightful  converser,  a  fine 
French  scholar  and  her  grist  each  week  shows  hard 
work. 

Then  we  have  Maud  Regan  (prize  essayist)  ;  Marx- 
McKay  <Scntt,  the  founder  of  "The  Woman's  Journal"; 
Mrs.  S.  J.  Graham,  whose  "Etchings  From  a  Parsonage 
Veranda"  made  no  small  stir  ;  Anna  M.  Wilson,  winner 
of  a  thousand  dollar  prize  offered  by  the  Chicago  Post,' 
Mrs.  M.  Forysth  Grant,  who  writes  on  history.  We 
have  Helen  Gregory  Flesher,  a  critic  and  scholar  ;  Eva 
Brodlique,  Mary  B.  Sandford,  Annie  Robertson.  Mme. 
Duval,  a  true  poetess  ;  Mary  Morgan  with  two  books  of 
verse  to  her  name,  Madam  Dandurand,  the  only  comedy- 
writer  we  have  ;  Mile.  Beaupre,  in  scholarly  rhyme,  Mme. 
Thibeault,  and  "Felicite  Angers"  who  claims  the  dis- 
tinction of  writing  the  first  French-Canadian  novels  ; 
Annie  L.  Jack,  whose  "Book  of  Gardening"  delights  ; 
Eliza  S.  McLeod  in  patriotic  verse  ;  Jean  TJ.  E.  Nealis, 
of  St.  John,  N.B.,  whose  writings  I  recollect  so  long 
ago  as  five-and-twenty  years  ;  Annie  Rothwell  Christie. 
writer  of  four  story  books,  and  of  whom  Sir  Edwin  Ar- 
nold wrote  :  "The  best  war  songs  of  the  Canadian  re- 
bellion were  written  by  Annie  Rothwell"  ;  no  small 
praise  this.  Alice  M.  Ardagh  and  Amy  Parkinson,  both 
poetesses,  and  Emily  Weaver,  whose  "Canadian  History 
for  Boys  and   Girls"   is  well  known. 

You  will  find  on  library  shelves  a  small  volume  of 
verse  by  Pamelia  Vining  Yule,  dated  1881,  but  the  sweet 
singer  sleeps  the  sleep  that  knows  no  waking  ;  like  poor 
Isabel  Valancy  Crawford,  she  did  not  live  to  know  the 
worth  of  her  work. 

Marjory  MacMurchy,  and  Katherine  L.  Lawson  are 
both  well  known  names  in  Toronto  literary  circles.  Then 
we  have   Sarah   A.   Curzon,   whose   "Laura   Secord  "   set 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


her  in  front  ranks,  Lily  E.  F.  Barry,  of  Montreal  ; 
Anna  T.  iSadlier  in  translations  ;  Mary  Russel  Chesley, 
a  Quaker  controversalist,  and  also  Margaret  P.  Murray 
with  Maud  Ogilvy,  of  Montreal,  whose  work  is  along 
biographical  lines.  Agnes  Fitzgibbon,  a  grand  daughter 
of  Sussana  Moody,  herself  one  of  the  first  of  Canadian 
writers,  but  whose  work  "Roughing  it  in  The  Bush" 
nearly  "did"  for  Canada  as  a  homeland  for  the  emi- 
grant ;  Amy  Burlinguist,  a  prolific  magazine  contribu- 
tor ;  Emma  Wells  Dixon,  whose  "Miss  Dexie"  made  a 
continent  laugh;  Madge  Robertson,  too,  well  'known 
amongst  the  best,  and  last  but  not  least,  "Jean 
Blewett,"  sweet  singer  of  the  land  she  so  loves.  In  Jean 
Blewett  we  have  the  true  poet — and  when  the  long  line 
of  writers  of  the  young  nation  comes  to  be  looked  at 
from  a  perspective  of  time  and  memory,  first  in  the 
ranks   will  walk   .lean   Blewett. 

The  impressionist  school  sent  out  Helen  M.  Merril  ; 
Agnes  Ethelwyn  Wetherald  and  Irene  E.  Morton,  with 
Annie  Campbell  Huestis,  Lily  Dougall,  of  Montreal,  and, 
let     us     not      forget,    "Virna    Sheard."    whose    work    has 


and  it  would  be  of  real  interest  to  find  a  copy.  Dr. 
Morgan,  of  Ottawa,  whose  work  in  research  is  so  well 
known,  should  gather  data  of  this  woman's  work. 

1  doubt  if  this  completes  the  list  of  Canadian  writ- 
ers :  quite  a  few  women  take  "Ink,  consumption,"  and 
die  of  it  before  they  reach  maturity,  but  a  very  large 
number  are  doing  splendid  work  in  the  ranks-. 

"Hester  Hope,"  Mary  Wallace,  Constance  Fair- 
banks, Mrs.  Towne,  Mrs.  Sherk,  Cora  Hind,  "The  Ma- 
tinee Girl,"  Mary  Snyder,  Florence  Lediard,  Lilian 
Laurie,  "Sandy  Grant,"  the  latter,  whose  pawky  Scotch 
humor  delighted  her  prairie  readers  ;  with  a  number  of 
others  coming  rapidly  to  the  fore.  But  Jean  Mclll- 
wraith's  place  in  Canadian  letters  is  an  assured  one,  as 
is  the  Lizar  sisters.  The  latter  wrote  in  conjunction 
"The  Canada  Company,"  and  put  the  impress  of  genuis 
on  every  page.  Janet  Carnochen  of  Niagara  stands 
alone  a  specialist  in  "records,"  but  is  shy  about  claim- 
ing kinship  with  the  'historian.'  "Barbara  Ballantine"' 
is  the  latest  name  to  appear  in  the  writer's  dictionary, 
and   as  she  is   yet   scarcely  out  of  her  teens,   has   reached 


>E    KNOWN   OF   TWENTY    THOUSAND   DOLLARS   BEING   CLEANED   UP   ON   ONE    RACE." 


Illustration  from  "  The  Losing  Game,"  by  Will  Payne  (Coppl. 


Page  28. 


forced  a  pathway  by  sheer  merit.  Then  we  have  a  fine 
novel  writer  in  Joanna  Wood,  as  also  Mrs.  Harrison, 
"Seranus,"  whose  "Pine,  Rose  and  Fleur  de  Lis," 
haunts  the  reader.  Alice  Jones,  Halifax,  N.S.,  breathes 
freedom  and  storm  of  the  seagirt  shores,  and  from  the 
same  land  comes  "Beautiful  Joe,"  a  classic  in  itself,  the 
work   of   "Marshall    Saunders." 

Rosanna  Eleanor  Leprehon,  poet  and  novelist,  has  a 
place  in  our  "Canadian  gallery  as  in  our  hearts  ;  while 
from  "Merlin's  Cave"  comes  forth  Louise  Murray.  Jane 
Katzman's  name,  too,  stands  out  in  the  long  list,  and 
Madge  Robertson  speaks  in  gifted  numbers. 

Some  doubt  exists  as  to  whom  the  first  Canadian 
hovel  belongs  ;  but  Thomas  O'Hag'an,  whose  authority  is 
worth  recording,  says  :  "Mrs.  Frances  Brook,  wife  of  the 
Chaplain  of  the-  Garrison  at  Quebec,  published  (in  Lon- 
don, Eng.)  in  1784,  the  first  novel  written  in  Canada." 
Julia  Katherine  Beckwith  followed  in  1826  with  "St. 
Ursula's  Convent,  or  the  Nun  of  Canada."  Enquiry  at 
various  libraries  fails  to_  discover  any  relic  of  this  work, 


few  readers.  I  visited  this  gifted  lady  while  in  Victoria, 
B.C.,  and  found  her  deep  in  the  preparation  of  a  his- 
torical novel  which  seemed  to  me  to  be  fine  and  promis- 
ing. "Barbara  Ballantine"  is  a  fine  artist  as  well  as 
pen-woman  ;  her  pretty  home,  "Sans  Souci,"  stands  just 
above  Oak  Bay  in  the  straits  of  Juan  del  Fuca. 

Mrs.  Sadlier's  place  in  literature  will  be  acknowl- 
edged some  day  ;  but  her  "Blakes  and  Flannigans"  seems 
relegated  to  the  rear  with  the  Jane  Austin  books.  She 
wrote  largely  on  church  subjects,  and  her  work  was  well 
done. 

The  name  of  Sara  Mickle  almost  missed  my  mind, 
but  she  was  the  one  who  arranged  "The  Cabot  Calen- 
dar," and  she  was  assisted  by  Miss  Fitzgibbon  in  this. 

I  have  purposely  left  the  name  of  Agnes  Maule 
/•Machar  till  the  end  of  my  article.  "In  Lays  of  The  True 
North"  you  get  all  that  is  of  patriotic  splendor  with 
animated  and  artistic  skill.  Miss  Machar,  whose  pen 
name  "Fidelis."  is  a  household  word  throughout  Canada, 
sings  a  note  of  hope.  She  reaches  the  heights  and  the 
heart  at  once. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Information  about  Copyright  Fiction 

A  Record  of  the  Novels  which  have  Ap- 
peared  during  March— New  Titles  Being 
Arranged  for. 

Winston  Churchill's  "A  Modern  Chronicle,"  appeared 
early  in  the  month  and  was  of  course  well  received  in  all 
quarters.  According  to  the  publishers,  the  Macmillan  Co., 
it  promises  to  "Out-Churchill  Churchill." 

During  March,  the  Macmillan  Co.  published  the  fol- 
lowing titles,  "Litany  Lane,"  by  Mrs.  Baillie-Saunders, 
"The  Human  Cobweb,"  by  Putnam  Weale,  and  "Lost 
Face,"  by  Jack  London. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  added  to  their  series  of 
English  shilling  issues  "The  Elusive  Pimpernel,"  by 
Baroness  Orczy 

Towards  the  end  of   the  month  the   Copp,    Clark   Co. 
will  publish  the  second   volume  in  their  series  of  reprints 
of  Sir  Gilbert  Parker's  novels,  "The  Right  of  Way."    The 
first  to  appear  was  "The  Weavers." 

The  April  fiction  publications  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 
include  "The  Prodigal  Father,"  by  J.  Storer  Clouston 
(ready),  "The  Sky  Man,"  by  H.  K.  Webster  (April  15), 
and  "Petticoat  Government." 

The  Musson  Book  Co.,  have  arranged  for  a  Canadian 
edition  of  "The  Greatest  Wish  in  the  World,"  by  E.  Tem- 
ple Thurston,  author  of  "The  City  of  Beautiful  Non- 
sense." 

William  Briggs  has  added  to  his  spring  list  a  Can- 
adian edition  of  "The  Duke's  Price,"  by  Demetra  and  Ken- 
neth Brown.  It  is  a  story  somewhat  after  the  style  of 
"The  Shuttle." 

A  fifty  cent  edition  of  "David  Harum,"  is  now  on  the 
press"  with  William  Briggs.  It  will  form  one  of  his  series 
of  cheap  reprints. 

April  15  is  announced  by  McLeod  &  Allen  as  the  date 
of  publication  of  "The  Arch-Satirist,"  by  Frances  De 
Wolfe   Fenwiek. 

McLeod  &  Allen  have  just  ready  nine  of  their  spring 
novels  :— "Little  Knight  of  the  X  Bar  B,"  by  Mary  K. 
Maule,  "By  Inheritance,"  by  Octave  Thanet,  "The  Tam- 
ing of  the  Red  Butte  Western,"  by  Francis  Lynde,  "The 
Head  Coach,"  by  Ralph  D.  Paine,"  "The  Carleton  Case," 
by  Ellery  H.  Clark,  "The  Girl  From  His  Town,"  by 
Marie  Van  Vorst,  "The  Beauty,"  by  Mrs.  Wilson  Wood- 
row,  "Tess  of  the  Storm  Country,"  by  Grace  Millar 
White,   "Samuel  The  Seeker,"  by  Upton  Sinclair. 

The  Musson  Book  Oo.  have  recently  brought  out  "The 
Personal  Conduct  of  Belinda,"  by  Eleanor  Hoyt  Brainerd, 
"The  Red  House  on  Rowan  Street,"  by  Roman  Doubleday, 
"The  Awakening  of  Zojas,"  by  Miriam  Michelson,  "Caleb 
Trench,"  by  Mary  Imlay  Taylor  and  "Strictly  Business," 
by  0.  Henry. 

Cassell  &  Co.,  have  received  their  first  consignment 
<>f  spring  fiction,  and  they  are  to  <be  complimented  on 
the  attractive  appearance  of  the  books.  The  new  titles 
now  in  include  H.  Rider  Haggard's  "Morning  Star," 
Warwick  Deeping's  "The  Rust  of  Rome"  and  "Our  Flat," 
by   R.    Andom. 

The  Macmillan  Co.  expect  to  have  ready  during  the 
latter  part  of  the  month  "The  Undersirable  Governess," 
by  F.  Marion  Crawford,  and  "A  Life  for  a  Life,"  by 
Roger  Herrick. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  have  received  a  consignment 
from  Harpers  of  "Cavanagh,  Forest  Ranger,"  by  Ham- 
lin   Garland. 


English  exchanges  note  the  publication  in  England  of 
a  novel  entitled  "The  Ramparts  of  the  Empire,"  which 
is  the  work  of  Frank  Fox,  who  is  announced  to  be  a 
Canadian. 


Importations  by  Canadian  Publishers 

Books  of  General  Interest  Being  Brought 
in  for  the  Benefit  of  Canadian  Readers — 
Special    Editions. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  imported  "The  Literature 
of  the  Victorian  Era,"  by  Hugh  Walker,  LL.D.,  an  im- 
pertant  volume  by  a  writer  of  note.  The  volume  con- 
tains 1,000  pages  and  will  be  of  special  value  to  public 
and  high  school  libraries,  ($3  net). 

The  Macmillan  Co.,  of  Canada,  have  re-issued  in  their 
Library  of  Canadian  Travel,  three  of  General  Sir  Will- 
iam Butler's  books  of  exploration  in  Canada,  viz.,  "The 
Great  Lone  Land,"  "The  Wild  North  Land,"  and  "Red 
Cloud."  In  the  same  series  they  have  also  brought  out 
Milton  &  Cheadle's  "Northwest  Passage  by  Land." 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  have  brought  out  in  conjunc- 
tion with  Sampson  Law,  Marston  &  Co.,  London,  "Henry 
Fielding:  A  Memoir,"  by  G.  M.  Godden,  and  they  have 
also  received  a  well-illustrated  edition  of  Dickens' 
"Christmas  Books."  A  new  set  of  Louisa  M.  Alcott's 
best  known  books  figures  among  their  latest  importations. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  have  brought  in  a  supply  of 
••into  the  Fighting-line,"  by  the  Right  Rev.  Arthur  F. 
Wilmington  Ingram,  D.D..  Lord  Bishop  of  London. 

McClelland  &  Goodchild  have  now  in  stock  a  full  sup- 
ply of  "The  First  Great  Canadian,"  by  Charles  B.  Reed. 
McClelland  &  Goodchild  are  handling  Grenville 
Kleiser's  books  on  elocution  and  finding  a  good  sale  for 
them  in  Canada.  The  titles  are  "How  to  Speak  in  Pub- 
lic"; "How  to  Develop  Power  and  Personality,"  and 
"How  to  Hold  an  Audience."  Mr.  Kleiser  is  a  Canadian 
and  was  recently  instructor  in  elocution  in  Yale  Divinity 
School. 


Information  about  Cheap  Reprints 

Canadian  Publishers  Taking  up  this 
Proposition  Vigorously  —  Several 
Series  on  the  Market,  all  Attractive 
in  Appearance  and  Price. 

Henry  Frowde  (Oxford  University  Press)  is  meeting 
with  great  success  in  his  advance  sales  of  the  St.  Cuthherl 
Series  of  cheap  reprints.  These  are  one  of  the  most  at- 
tractive propositions  ever  offered  to  the  Canadian  trade. 
including  the  best  novels  of  Joseph  Hocking.  David  Lvall. 
Ian  Maclaren,  J.  M.  Barrie.  S.  R.  Crockett,  etc.,  in  ex- 
cellent  form.  , 

McLeod  &  Allen  have  published  a  paper  and  cloth 
edition  of  "Whispering  Smith,"  by  F.  H.  Spearman,  and 
"Lightning  Conductor,"  by  C.  N.  and  A.  M.  Williamson, 
and  have  in  preparation  similar  editions  of  "Princess 
Passes,"  by  the  Williamsons,  and  "The  Wheel  of  For- 
tune,"  by   Louis   Tracy. 

The  Macmillan  Co.  of  Canada  will  have  ready  this 
spring  more  than  thirty  titles  in  their  Library  of  Popular 
Novels.  This  series  will  embrace  some  exceptionally  popu- 
lar books,  such  as  "The  Virginian,"  by  Owen  Wister; 
"Dorothy  Vernon,"  by  Charles  Major;  "The  Sea  Wolf," 
by  Jack  London:  "The  Crossing,"  by  Winston  Churchill, 
etc. 


23 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Interesting   Items  About  Canadiana 

Books  of  Special  Interest  to  Canadians 

Appearing  in  the  Near    Future — New 

Titles  Noted. 

The  second  volume  of  Rev.  J.  E.  Sanderson's  "First 
Century  of  Methodism  in  Canada"  is  to  be  published  this 
year  by  William  Briggs. 

The  Baptist  Book  Room,  Toronto,  are  bringing  out 
a  devotional  book  entitled  "The  Harmonious  Life," 
by  the  Rev.  A.  M.  McDonald. 

A  small  paper-covered  book  of  "Toasts  and  Ballads 
Suitable  for  all  Occasions,"  has  been  compiled  by  McLeod 
&-  Allen,  Toronto.    The  price  is  15  cts. 

A  new  edition  of  W.  S.  Herrington 's  "Heroines  of 
Canadian  History,"  sepeially  adapted  for  school  use  is 
being  arranged  for.     It  will  be  bound  in  paper  covers. 

"The  Veteran  and  Other  Poems,"  by  Rev.  Hamilton 

Wigle,  pastor  of  Zion  Methodist  Church,  Winnipeg,  will 

be  ready   this  month.  It  is  being  published  by  William 
Briggs. 

A  new  edition  of  "The  Broken  Trail,"  by  G.  W. 
Kerby.  Calgary,  will  be  published  shortly.  It  will  be 
revised  and  enlarged  and  several  new  illustrations  will 
bo  added. 

In  our  notice  of  Father  Morice's  "History  of  the 
Catholic  Church  in  Western  Canada,"  in  our  March  num- 
ber, we  quoted  the  price  as  $4.00  per  set.  This  should 
have  been     $5.00. 

What  is  probably  the  first  book  of  family  worship  to 
be  published  in  Canada  is  announced  by  William  Briggs. 
It  has  been  compiled  by  Rev.  Wm.  D.  Lee,  a  Presbyterian 
minister  of  Waterloo. 

H.  Addington  Bruce  is  publishing  through  the  Mac- 
millans,  the  story  of  "Daniel  Boone  and  the  Wilderness 
Road,"  a  thrilihg  record  of  romance  and  adventure.  The 
book  is  now  in  the  press. 

"The  Empire  Club  Speeches,  1909,"  is  now  in  the 
press-of  William  Briggs.  The  book  contains  the  speeches 
delivered  before  the  club  last  year,  among  which  appear 
several  of '  exceptional  interest. 

'"Pioneer  Jack  and  Other  Canadian  Sketches,"  the  work 
of  F.  Sinclair  Dickinson,  a  member  of  the  staff  of  the 
Toronto  Globe,  is  now  in  the  hands  of  William  Briggs  and 
will  be  issued  during  the  summer. 

Henry  Holt  &  Co.  are  bringing  out  this  month.  "The 
Care  of  Trees  in  Lawn,  Street  and  Park."  by  B.  E.  Fer- 
now,  Professor  of  Forestry  in  the  University  of  Toronto. 
It  has  been  written  for  the  guidance  of  amateurs. 

William  Briggs  is  arranging  to  publish  early  in  May 
a  biography  of_  the  Rev.  John  Sanderson,  one  of  the 
pioneer  Methodist  preachers  of  Ontario.  It  is  the  work 
of  liis  daughter,  Miss  Camilla  Sanderson,  of  Toronto. 

The  Musson  Book  Co.  will  issue  in  the  course  of  a 
month  a  Canadian  edition  of  "Where  the  Fishers  Go," 
the  book  on  Labrador  by  the  Rev.  P..  W.  Browne,  origin- 
ally published  by  the  Cochrane  Publishing  Co.,  New  York 

Two  of  the  sixteen  chapters  of  ''The  (treat  Pacific 
Coast,"  by  C.  Reginald  Knock,  published  by  Grant 
Richards,  London,  deal  specifically  with  British  Columbia 
and  in  consequence  the  book  has  an  interest  for  Canadians. 

24 


I)r  William  Osier  has  published  through  the  Oxford 
University  Press  a  small  volume  on  the  life  of  "Michael 
Servetus*"  which  was  originally  delivered  as  a  lecture 
before  the  Johns  Hopkins  Medical  School  Historical  Club. 

The  .1.  B.  Lippincott  Co.,  Philadelphia,  announce  for 
early  publication  "A  Woman  in  Canada,"  by  Mrs.  George 
Cran,  an  account  of  a  British  woman's  journeys  through 
the  Dominion  from  Quebec  to  the  Pacific,   illustrated  by 

many  views. 

"The  Church  and  Men,"  the  work  of  Rev.  Dr.  W.  H. 
Smith,  M.A.,  B.D.,  a  Presbyterian  minister  in  Canada,  is 
announced  by  the  Broadway  Publishing  Co.,  835  Broad- 
way, New  York.  It  deals  with  the  problem  of  getting 
and  keeping  men  in  the  churches. 


A 


mil 


'ume   of  verse  by   the   Rev.   A.   M.    St.   John 


Mildmay,  M.A.  (Oxon.),  of  Arancouver.  B.C.,  is  to  be 
published  this  spring  by  William  Briggs.  It  will  be  en- 
titled  "Sea  Room"  and  will  deal  with  Canada  and  the 
immigration  question.    It  will  be  well  illustrated. 

The  University  Press,  Toronto  have  recently  brought 
out  Dr.  B.  E.  Fernow's  "History  of  Forestry"  in  an  im- 
posing volume.  Dr.  Fernow  is  dean  of  the  Faculty  of 
Forestry  in  the  University  of  Toronto  and  his  book  is 
the  most  important  work  of  its  kind  yet  published. 

Canada  as  the  scene  of  novels  is  being  utilized  exten- 
sively these  days.  The  latest  English  author  to  select 
Canadian  ground  for  his  work  is  Coningsby  W.  Dawson, 
who  has  written  a  story  entitled  "Murder  Point  :  A  Tale 
of  Keewatin,"  which  is  published  by  Dodder  &i  Stoughton. 

George  Allen  &  Sons,  the  British  publishers,  have  ar- 
ranged for  the  publication  of  a  series  of  volumes  dealing 
with  the  various  portions  of  the  empire,  to  be  known  as 
the  British  Empire  Ser;es.  The  initial  volume  will  deal 
with  Canada  and  is  written  by  His  Grace  the  Duke  of 
Argyll. 

"The  History  of  Kings  County,  Nova  Scotia,"  by  Ar- 
thur Wentworth  Hamilton  Eaton,  "giving  a  sketch  of  the 
French  and  their  expulsion,  and  a  history  of  the  New 
England  planters  who  came  in  their  stead,  with  many 
genealogies,"  is  soon  to  be  published  by  the  Salem, 
Mass.,  Press  Co. 

Houghton,  Mifflin  &  Co.,  Boston,  are  bringing  out  a 
series  of  small  volumes  dealing  with  modern  religious 
problems,  written  by  leading  scholars  of  the  day.  Among 
the  number  is  "The  Historical  and  Religious  Value  of  the 
Fourth  Gospel,"  by  Professor  E.  F.  Scott,  of  Queen's 
University,  Kingston. 

The  story  of  the  Northwest  Mounted  Police  is  told  by 
A.  I..  Haydon  in  a  book  which  Andrew  Melrose  &  Co. 
published  in  March.  Mr.  Haydon  visited  this  country  last 
year  in  order  to  collect  his  material.  His  book  is  called 
"The  Riders  of  the  Plains."  A  Canadian  edition  will  be 
issued  by  the  Musson  Book  Co. 

Another  book  dealing  with  life  in  the  west  by  Rev. 
John  McDougall,  D.D..  is  to  be  published  this  year  by 
William  Briggs.  Dr.  McDougall  has  already  published 
four  books  about  western  life  and  he  is  eminently  quali- 
fied to  write  on  the  subject.  He  is  a  son  of  the  great 
pioneer  missionary,  George  McDougall,  and  was  born  in 
the  west. 

,    The  Editor  Company,  Ridgewood,     New  Jersey,   have 
just  published      "Points    About     Poetry"    by  Donald     G 
French;  Principal  of  the  Canadian  Correspondence  College 
and  literary  editor  of  the  Toronto  World.    The  book  gives 
in  concise   form   information   on    the  study   and   writing  of 


BOOKSELLER      AND     STATIONER 


poetry    which   can   not   be   obtained   in    any   other     single 
book  published. 

"A  Summer  on  the  Canadian  Prairie,"  is  the  title  of 
a  book  by  Georgiana  Binnie-Clark,  giving  the  experiences 
of  two  ladies  who  joined  their  brother  in  developing  a 
free  grant  of  land  in  the  Northwest.  It  is  published  in 
England  by  Edward  Arnold  and  in  the  United  States  by 
Longmans,  Green  &  Co.  A  Canadian  edition  will  be  is- 
sued by  Musson  Book  Co. 


Some  Canadian  Books  of  the  Month 

Brief  Reviews  of  the  Work  of  Canadian 

Authors — A  Few  Titles  Worth  Attention 

by  Careful  Readers. 

Dr.   Fernow's  Work  on  Forestry. 

Some  time  ago  Dr.  Bernhard  E.  Fernow,  Dean  of  the 
P'aculty  of  Forestry  in  the  University  of  Toronto,  pub- 
lished "A  Brief  History  of  Forestry."  This  has  been 
followed  now  by  a  more  complete  work,  embodying  the 
previous  book,  but  with  additions  dealing  more  partic- 
ularly with  the  United  States  and  Canada.  After  the 
author's  illuminatory  preface,  he  considers  successively 
the  forests  of  the  ancients,  then  those  of  Germany, 
Austria,  Switzerland,  France,  Russia,  Scandinavia,  the 
Mediterranean  countries,  Great  Britain  and  her  colonies, 
Japan  and  the  United  States.  From  a  consideration  of 
forest  conditions  in  all  these  countries,  we  see  that  the 
greatest  forestry  development  is  to  be  found  in  Ger- 
many and  her  nearest  neighbors.  While  any  develop- 
ment must  differ  with  the  differing  social  and  industrial 
conditions  in  the  various  countries,  several  general  per- 
iods may  be  established,  and  this  should  be  clearly  ap- 
preciated in  this  time  of  agitation  in  America  with  re- 
gard to  the  conservation  of  our  natural  resources  in 
general  and  those  of  our  forests  in  particular. 
The  first  period  is  that  of  destruction,  the  settler  needing 
open  land  for  farming  and  pasture.  The  second  period 
is  that  of  protection;  the  settler  learns  the  need  of  pro- 
tecting his  forest  against  cattle  and  fire  and  reckless 
lumbering.  The  third  period  is  that  of  construction;  the 
settler  sees  the  value  of  fostering  natural  or  artificial 
regeneration.  The  fourth  period  is  that  of  economy;  the 
settler,  now  with  other  settlers  to  be  regarded  as  forming 
a  full-grown  nation,  organizes  forest  areas  and  a  sustained 
yield.— (The  University  Press,  Toronto.     Cloth,  $2.50.) 

v 

Miss  Fenwick's  Clever  Novel. 

For  a  first  book  by  a  young  writer,  who  has  confined 
her  attention  previously  to  magazine  stories  exclusively. 
the  "Arch-Satirist,"  by  Frances  De  Wolfe  Fen  wick 
(Toronto  :  McLeod  &  Allen.  Cloth,  $1.25),  is  an  achieve- 
ment of  which  she  may  well  be  proud.  A  first  reading  of 
the  book  impresses  one  with  the  skill  exhibited  in  the 
writing  itself.  There  is  a  confidence,  a  tone  and  a  pre- 
cision, which  mark  Miss  Fenwick  as  a  literary  craftsman 
of  no  mean  ability.  It  is  in  fact  a  finished  work  from 
the  technical  standpoint.  But  this,  in  itself,  is  small 
praise,  for  now-a-days  the  average  novel  is  remarkably  well 
written.  Where  the  book  does  excel,  however,  is  in  the 
clever  dialogue,  the  observation  on  human  life,  and  the 
epigrammatic   sentences  in   which  these  observations  are 


clothed.  The  theme  of  the  story  is  not  entirely  convinc- 
ing, but  it  possesses  considerable  dramatic  force.  It  pic- 
tures a  sister  of  fine  character,  compelled  by  a  foolish 
oath  to  a  dead  mother  to  conceal  her  relationship  to  a 
half-brother,  who  is  a  depraved  consumptive.  She  loves 
this  brother  passionately  and  practically  supports  him, 
but  naturally  her  intercourse  with  him  is  misunderstood. 
It  is  this  complication  which  provides  a  strong  climax 
for  the  story.  The  scene  is  laid  in  Montreal,  and  a 
good  picture  of  social  life  in  the  Canadian  metropolis  is 
given. 

A  Japanese  Story. 

To  touch  the  heart  strings  and  stir  the  emotions  as 
Miss  Dorothy  Dean  Tate  has  done  in  her  "Story  of 
Yuku"  (Toronto  :  William  Briggs),  is  surely  an  indica- 
tion of  strong  creative  power.  The  young  Torontonian 
has  produced  a  remarkable  piece  of  work,  disclosing  a 
depth  of  insight  into  life  and  a  skill  in  weaving  ro- 
mance, which  are  usually  associated  only  with  writers  of 
more  mature  years.  The  story  has  its  scene  in  Japan 
and  relates  the  romance  of  a  young  American  and  a 
dainty  little  Japanese  maiden.  There  are  two  or  three 
other  actors  in  the  drama,  but  their  parts  are  minor 
ones,  and  the  reader  follows  the  principals  with  the  keen- 
est attention.  Of  action  there  is  but  little.  It  is  more 
a  disclosure  of  the  workings  of  the  human  mind,  the 
joys  and  sorrows  which  surge  through  it  and  the 
tragedy  of  misunderstandings.  The  ending  is  an  inevit- 
able one,  and  while  it  is  a  sad  one,  still  it  but  serves 
to   impress  the   story  on  the   mind. 


Brief  Notices  of  Some  Recent  Books 

English  Novels  in  Colonial  Editions — Books 
of   General  Interest  —  Recent  American 
Publications. 

The  Thief  of  Virtue.    By  Eden  Phillpotts.    John  Lane  Co., 
New  York.     Cloth,  $1.50. 

The  author's  greatest  book,  strong  in  its  characteriza- 
tion, weird  in  its  nature  effects  and  sane  in  its  humanism. 
Nowhere  else  but  on  the  moors  of  Devonshire,  with  its 
wonderful  cloud  aspects,  its  tors  and  its  relics  of  bygone 
ages,  could  such  a  set  ting 'be  found  for  the  elemental,  tem- 
pestuous nature  of  Philip  Ouldsbroom.  the  man  who  dom- 
inates the  book.  In  striking  contrast  to  him  is  his  sup- 
posed son,  Martin  Ouldsbroom,  a  man  of  a  totally  different 
type,  cool,  calculating,  eminently  just,  but  without  senti- 
ment. Both  are  drawn  with  realistic  touch,  as  is  also 
Unity,  the  patient  and  clever  wife  and  mother,  and  Bar- 
bara Hect,  the  friend  and  counsellor  of  faulty,  large- 
hearted  Philip.  The  book  is  a  fascinating  study  of  those 
moral  and  psychological  problems  which  are  of  universal 
interest. 

American  Woman's  Cook  Book.     By  Ella  M.  Blackstone. 
■Chicago:  Laird  &  Lee.     Oilcloth  binding,  $1.50. 

The  latest  creation  in  cook-book  making.  The  recipes 
have  been  gathered  from  the  most  reliable  sources,  and 
are  simple,  practical  and  economical.  It  containe  menus 
for  each  month  and  for  special  dinners,  such  as  Christ- 
mas, Thanksgiving  and  Easter.  Food  suitable  for  the 
various  months,  the  sick  room  and  for  special  occasions, 
beverages,  candies,  ice  creams,  and  ices.  Approved  house- 
hold recipes  of  all  kinds. 


25 


BOURSE L  L E R     A  N  D     S  T A TIONER 


The  Canadian  Monthly  List  of  Books 

A  Record  of  all  Books  Bearing  the 
Imprint  of  a  Canadian  Publisher.  Is- 
sued in  March  and  Early  in  April. 

Alcott,   Louisa,   F.     Works.     8   Volumes.     New   Edition. 

Toronto:  Musson.    March.     Cloth,  $1, 
Andom,  R.    Our  Flat.    Toronto:  Cassell.    March.    Cloth,  $1. 

Troddles  and  his  friends,  having  become  tired  of  their  experiences 
of  furnished  lodgings  and  of  landladies,  determine  to  set  up  a  com- 
munal establishment  in  a  flat.  The  fun  begins  immediately  with  their 
.endeavor  to  discover  a  convenient  and  suitable  suite  of  rooms,  and  it 
waxe6  fast  and  furious  when  the  time  comes  to  furnish  and  provision 
it.  Their  subsequent  adventures  are  described  in  the  author's  best 
manner. 

Brainerd,     Eleanor    Hoyt.       The    Personal    Conduct    of 

Belinda.  Toronto:  Musson.  March.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
Belinda,  as  a  teacher  of  literature  in  a  fashionable  school,  is  forc- 
ed into  taking  a  party  to  Europe  alone.  Some  of  the  young  ladies, 
with  their  characteristic  enthusiasms  and  love  affairs,  are  of  the 
party.  A  couple  of  elderly  ladies  and  a  young  man,  who  having  by 
chance  seen  Belinda,  makes  up  his  mind  to  win  her  love.  That  he 
has  been  abroad  ten  times,  that  his  youth  is  a  surprise  to  her  who 
was  expecting  a  "doddering  old  gentleman,"  with  other  unexpected 
turns  of  the  tale  make  most  amusing  reading. 

Butler,  General  Sir  William.  The  Great  Lone  Land.  New 
edition  in  Macmillan's  Library  of  Canadian  Travel. 
Toronto:  Macmillan.  March.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
The  Wild  North  Land.  New  edition  in  Macmillan's 
Library  of  Canadian  Travel.  Toronto:  Macmillan. 
March.'  Cloth,  $1.25. 
Red  Cloud.  New  Edition.  Toronto:  Macmillan.  March. 
Cloth,  $1.25. 

Churchill,  Winston.    A  Modern  Chronicle.    Toronto :  Mac- 
millan.   April.    Cloth,  $1.50. 

Clark,  Ellery  H.     The  Carleton  Case.     Toronto:  McLeod 
&  Allen.     April.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

That  was  a  very  accomplished  hypocrite,  quite  the  boss 
hypocrite  of  the  whole  realm  of  fiction,  who  worked  so 
much  of  the  mischief  in  "The  Carleton  Case."  Not  only 
was  he  ultra-respectable  and  an  honor  and  a  blessing  to  the 
community,  but  also,  was  he  a  patron  and  a  godsend  to  struggling 
young  geniuses,  and  his  blameless  life  was  an  inspiration  to  men, 
women,  and  children  wherever  his  name  was  known.  And  all  the 
time  he  was — but  only  by  reading  the  book  is  it  possible  to  find  out 
all  that  he  really  was.  Even  the  author  seems  to  have  felt  that  this 
creation,  of  his  brain  was  a  very  horrible  sort  of  person  and  not  to 
be  trusted  any  farther  lest  he  might  succeed  finally  in  quite  ruining 
the  lives  of  some  of  the  innocent  people  who  believed  in  him.  And 
so  he  had  to  be  killed  off  suddenly,  although  not  until  he  had  come 
very  near  to    doing    damage    as    irreparable  as    ever    happens    in    that 

sort   of  a  romance. 

I 
Clouston,    J.    Storer.       The   Prodigal   Father.       Toronto: 

Copp,  Clark.     March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

A  fantastic  story,  with  plot  laid  in  Edinburgh.  James  Heriot 
Walkingshaw,  writer  to-the  signet,  a  thoroughly  upright,  respectable 
and  elderly  widower,  with  a  grown-up  family,  is  doctored  by  a 
quack,  with  the  result  that  after  a  severe  illness  in  which  he  almost 
dies,  he  suddenly  recovers  and  begins  to  grow  young  again.  His 
exuberant  nature  breaks  all  bounds  and  the  things  he  says  and  does 
shock  the  staid  people  of  his  acquaintance.  He  has  many  amusing 
experiences  and  having  made  several  young  people  happy  and  got  even 
with  his  eldest  son,  bids  the  reader  farewell  as  a  youth  again  at  a 
public  school. 

Curwood,    James    Oliver.      The   Danger   Trail.      Toronto: 

McLeod  &  Allen.      March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

The  scene  of  the  story  is  laid  in  the  Canadian  Northwest.  A 
young  railroad  civil  engineer  is  sent  from  Chicago  to  build  a  rail- 
road through  the  snows  to  Hudson  Bay.  On- the  night  of  his  arrival 
he  is  allured  into  ambush  by  a  young  woman,  and  from  beginning  to 
end    his    adventures   are   unceasing    and   thrilling. 

Dean,    Sara.      A   Disciple   of   Chance.       Toronto:     Copp, 
Clark.     March.     Cloth,  .$1.25. 

A  dashing  story  of  the  days  of  the  Restoration  in  England,  when 
gayety,      darimj     and   good  fellowship     characterized     the   times.    The 


Earl  of  Yerington,  a  warm-hearted,  generous  and  reckless  young  blade, 
takes  the  stage  in  the  first  chapter,  where  he  stakes  his  life  against 
the  loss  of  his  fortune,  and  from  then  on  to  the  end,  through  a  series 
of  exciting  adventures,  claims  the  reader's  interest  and  attention.  The 
spirit  of  the  times  has  been  well  caught  and  the  actors  and  scenes  in 
the  drama   are  admirably  portrayed. 

Deeping,  Warwick.  The  Rust  of  Rome.  Toronto:  Cassell. 
March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

"The  Rust  of  Rome,"  is  a  tale  of  the  regeneration  of  a  man 
whose  life  has  plunged  into  disaster.  Heriot,  released  from  prison, 
takes  to  a  wild  life  among  the  pinewoods  on  Mistmoor.  But  ere  long 
he  discovers  that  a  man  cannot  shut  himself  wholly  from  the  world, 
and  that  love  itself  will  force  him  into  the  light  of  day.  He  suffers 
anh  struggles  while  Roger  Burgoyne  makes  love  to  Eve  Thorkell. 
But  the  story  ends  in  happiness  for  those  who  have  won  the  reader's 
sympathy. 

Dickens,  Charles.  Christmas  Books.  New  Edition.  To- 
ronto: Musson.     March.     Cloth. 

Doubleday,  Roman.  The  Red  House  on  Rowan  Street. 
Toronto:  Musson.     March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

A  good  mystery  story.  The  hero,  Hugh  Burton,  comes  to  High 
Ridge,  a  small  town  in  the  middle  west,  to  urge  Leslie  Underwood  to 
reconsider  her  decision  not  to  marry  Philip  Overman.  He  finds  the 
Underwood  family  shrouded  in  a  mystery  and  various  members  of  it 
accused  of  a  number  of  criminal  acts.  He  proceeds  to  unravel  the 
mystery,  which  not  only  baffles  him  for  a  long  time  but  also  com- 
pletely deceives  the  reader.  Finally  he  clears  up  the  difficulty  and 
wins  happiness   for  himself. 

Fernow,  Bernhard  E.,  LL.D.    A  brief  History  of  Forestry 

in  Europe,  the  United   States,   and  Other  Countries. 

Toronto:  University  Press.     December.     Cloth,  $2.50. 
Godden,    G.   M.     Henry   Fielding:   A   Memoir.     London: 

Sampson,  Low  &  Marston.    Toronto:  Musson.  March. 

Cloth. 
Gosling,  W.  G.    Labrador:  Its  Discovery,  Exploration  and 

Development.     Toronto:  Musson.     March.  Cloth,  $5.00 

net. 
Haggard,    H.    Rider.      Morning   Star.      Toronto:    Cassell. 

April.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

In  his  latest  novel  Mr.  Rider  Haggard  has  drawn  aside  the  veil 
of  time  and  revealed  to  us  the  mysteries  and  black  magic  of  the  old 
Egyptians.  Tua,  or  Morning  Star,  daughter  of  Pharaoh,  is  the 
heroine.  She  is  a  girl  of  great  beauty,  and  the  story  of  her  love  for 
Rames,  and  the  perils  she  goes  through  for  his  sake,  is  one  of  the 
most  entrancing  Mr.  Rider  Haggard  has  written.  The  love  story  of 
'Morning  Star"  is   of  fascinating   interest. 

London,  Jack.  Lost  Face.  Toronto:  Macmillan.  March. 
Cloth,  $1.50. 

Loubheed,  Victor.  Vehicles  of  the  Air.  Toronto:  Copp. 
Clark.    March.     Cloth.    $2.50  net, 

Mario,  Auguste.  Easy  French  Cookery.  Toronto:  Cassell. 
March.     Cloth,  75  cents. 

Maxwell.  The  Rt.  Hon.  Sir  Herbert,  Bart.,  M.P.  The  Life 
of  Wellington :  The  Restoration  of  the  Martial  Power 
of  Great  Britain.  New  One  Volume  Edition.  To- 
ronto: Musson.     March.    - 

Michelson,  Miriam.  The  Awakening  of  Zojas.  Toronto: 
Musson.     March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

Miss  Michelson  is  the  author  of  "Anthony  Overman,"  "In  the 
Bishop's  Carriage,"  "The  Madigans,"  etc.  This  book  is  made  up 
of  four  stories — The  awakening  of  Zojas,  The  Cradle,  Peach  Blossoms, 
Tares.  The  first,  from  which  the  title  is  taken,  tells  of  a  convicted 
murderer  who  drinks  a  potion  which  puts  him  to  sleep  for  one  hun- 
dred years.  When  he  awakes  he  plunges  into  a  revolution  and  achieves 
power  and  fame. 

Milton  and  Cheadle.  The  North  West  Passage  by  Land. 
New  Edition  in  Macmillan's  Library  of  Canadian 
Travel.  Toronto:  Macmillan.   March.  'Cloth,  75  cents. 

**Nash,  Dr.  A.  C.  Ode  to  Canada  and  Other  Poems. 
,    Toronto.  Briggs.    March. 

Osborne,  William  Frederick,  M.A.  The  Faith  of  a  Lay- 
man.    Toronto:   Cassell.     April.     Cloth.  $1.25. 

Parker,  Sir  Gilbert.  The  Weavers.  New  Edition.  To- 
ronto: Copp,  Clark.     April,  50  cents. 


26 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Payne,  Will.  The  Losing  Game.  Toronto:  Copp,  Clark. 
March.  Cloth,  $1.50. 
A  realistic  story  of  a  sordid  side  of  American  life.  A  young  man 
and  woman  brought  together  in  the  office  of  a  telegraph  company  in 
Chicago,  where  New  York  stock  quotations  are  sent  out  to  brokers' 
offices  and  bucket  shops,  conceive  a  scheme  for  beating  the  latter  and 
start  out  on  a  career  of  crime,  which  in  time  brings  them  to  a  po- 
sition of  wealth  and  power.  At  a  critical  moment  in  their  fortunes, 
they  marry,  but  later  on  the  man  tires  of  the  woman  and  in  the 
end  divorces  her.  She  thereupon  determines  to  ruin  him,  and  in  this 
object  succeeds  in  a  clever  fashion.  It  is  a  story  of  ignoble  aims  and 
crooked  methods,  unredeemed   by  a  single    worthy   deed. 

Phillips,  David  Graham.  White  Magic.  Toronto:  Briggs. 
March.  Cloth,  $1.25. 
Here  is  an  American  painter,  educated  in  Paris,  who  comes  home, 
sets  up  his  easel  in  a  shack  in  the  woods,  and  makes  his  art  his  sole 
mistress.  One  day  in  a  storm  of  rain  a  pretty  girl  takes  refuge  in  the 
shack.  The  painter  finds  her  there  asleep  before  his  fire  (dainty  and 
touching  picture  !)  and  although  he  behaves  exactly  like  a  matinee 
idol  and  not  in  the  least  like  a  man.  the  very  next  morning — or  the 
next — the  same  pretty  girl  in  a  pretty  canoe  shoots  around  a  bend  in 
the  stream  beside  which  he  is  painting  dappled  sunlight  effects. 
Thus  a  charming   romance   begins. 

Saunders,  Margaret  Baillie.    Litany  Lane.    Toronto :  Mac- 

millan.    March.    Cloth,  $1.25. 
Secret  Remedies:  What  they  cost  and  what  they  contain. 

Based    on    Analyses,   made    for   the   British    Medical 

Association.    Toronto:  Musson.    Paper  -covers,  50  cts. 
Taylor,  Mary  Imlay.     Caleb    Trench.      Toronto:  Musson 

Book  Co.     March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

A  young  Northerner,  who  in  spite  of  Quaker  ancestry  has  fighting 
blood  in  his  veins,  goes  South,  and  there  takes  up  the  cause  of  re- 
form against  class  prejudice  and  political  corruption.  The  girl  he 
falls  in  love  with  comes  of  a  proud  old  family,  one  member  of  which 
opposes  Trench  at  every  turn.  The  tale  is  dramatic  and  vividly  de- 
picts the  struggle,  both  political  and  social,  which  the  hero  has  to 
go  through  before  he   triumphs. 

Thomas,  H.  H.     Gardening  Difficulties   Solved.    Toronto: 

Cassell.    March.     Cloth,  45cts.    Paper,  30  cts. 
Van  Vorst,  Marie.     The  Girl  From  His  Town.    Toronto: 

McLeod  &  Allen.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

A  multi-millionaire  from  Montana  arrives  in  England  at  the  age 
of  22.  Poor  duchesses  and  noble  dames  try  to  win  his  fortune.  At 
a  musical  play  he  recognizes  the  leading  lady  as  a  girl  from  his  town 
who  had  served  behind  the  counter  at  a  drug  store.  He  finds  her  good 
and  with  strong  common  sense.  He  finally  escapes  the  great  dames 
that  want  his   fortune   and   is   happy  with   the   girl  from   Montana. 

Vaughan,  Father  Bernard.  The  Sins  of  Society.  Words 
Spoken  by  Father  Bernard  Vanghan  of  the  Society 
of  Jesus.  Toronto :  Musson.  April.  Paper  covers. 
25  cents. 

Weale,  Putnam.  The  Human  Cobweb.  Toronto :  Mac- 
millan.     March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

White,  Fred  M.  The  Sundial.  Toronto:  Ward,  Lock. 
March.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

Woodrow,  Mrs.  Wilson.  The  Beauty.  Toronto:  McLeod 
&  Allen.     April.     Cloth,  $1.25. 

A  story  of  New  York  life  by  the  author  of  "The  silver  butterfly." 
The  husband  learns  to  know  his  wife's  worth  and  she  his  lovable 
character,  after  they  have  for  some  time  misunderstood  each  other 
in  ways  described    with   bright   humor. 


Under  the  Thatch.   By  Allen  Raine.     William  Briggs,  To- 
ronto.    $1.25. 

A  pretty  story  of  Welsh  rural  life.  The  interest  cen- 
tres around  Dr.  Michael  Lloyd,  the  clever  son  of  a  Welsh 
miller,  and  Barbara  Owen,  a  beautiful  girl  of  higher  social 
standing.  The  course  of  true  love  is  impeded  by  difficul- 
ties, in  which  a  pretty  peasant  girl  plays  a  part.  The 
heroine,  too,  becomes  involved  in  trouble  through  having 
practised  euthanasia  under  a  strong  impulse  of  love  and 
sympathy.  Eventually  things  right  themselves  and  all 
ends  happily.  The  book  is  a  posthumous  publication  of 
the  work  of  a  lady  writing  under  the  above  pseudonym. 


A  Page  of  News  for  Newsdealers 

Changes  in    the    Magazine    Field — 

New    Publications  —  The  Canadian 

Periodicals  —  Features    of     Current 

Numbers. 

A  Canadian  Edition.     , 

We  have  received  a  copy  of  a  special  edition  of  the 
Free  Press,  of  Aberdeen,  Scotland,  issued  on  March  1, 
in  which  12  pages  are  devoted  entirely  to  Canada.  Many 
Scottish-Canadian  writers  contribute  articles  on  the  op- 
portunities in  various  lines  which  Canada  offers  to  the 
Scottish  settler.  Among  the  contributors  are  W.  E. 
Hunt,  of  the  Montreal  Witness,  and  C.  A.  C.  Jennings, 
of  the  Toronto  Mail  &  Empire.  This  is  said  to  be  the 
first  time  a  Scotch  newspaper  has  issued  a  special  Can- 
adian edition,  and  as  the  Free  Press  has  a  large  circula- 
tion in  Scotland,  Canada  will  benefit  materially  by  the 
publicity  which  it  thus  receives. 

A  Fine  Number. 

"The  Art  of  Mr.  Albert  Goodwin,  R.W.S."  takes 
first  place  in  the  International  Studio  for  April.  The 
article  is  well  illustrated,  and  there  are  in  addition  to 
eleven  halftone  reproductions,  three  plates  in  color.  An- 
other interesting  article  deals  with  "Contemporary  Jap- 
anese Painting,"  and  there  is  a  concluding  paper  on,  "The 
Arts  and  Crafts  Societys'  Exhibition  at  the  New  Gallery," 
with  twenty-three  illustrations.  Other  articles  in  the  April 
number  are  "Some  Notable  Swedish  Etchers,"  "Old 
Aquatints  at  Walker's  Gallery,"  and  "Recent  Designs 
in  Domestic  Architecture." 

Periodical  Notes. 

Cassell  &  Co.  have  started  the  publication  in  serial 
parts  of  "The  Sea  and  its  Story."  The  work  will  appear 
ii:  24  fortnightly  parts,  and  will  contain  24  colored  plates 
and  hundreds  of  photographic  reproductions.  News- 
dealers should  push  this  attractive  series,  as  there 
is  good  money  in  it. 

The  Literary  Post  is  a  new  penny  weekly  newspaper 
devoted  to  the  manifold  interests  of  the  literary,  political 
mid  social  worlds.  It  is  published  at  36  King  St.,  Covent 
Garden,  London,  W.C. 

Busy  Man's  Magazine  announces  that  beginning  with 
its  May  issue,  it  will  be  enlarged  by  the  addition  of  32 
pages. 

The  Toronto  Star  Weekly  was  launched  on  April  9. 
Edited  by  Joseph  T.  Clark,  and  with  a  staff  of  writers  and 
artists  of  note,  the  new  publication  promises  to  be  a 
valuable' addition  to  the  ranks  of  Canadian  periodicals. 
It  will  contain  serial  fiction,  short  stories,  anecdotes  of 
public  men,  cartoons,  comics,  etc.,  making  up  a  16-page 
illustrated  paper.     It  will  sell  at  5  cents. 

The  cover  design  and  contents  of  Physical  Culture 
for  May  are  of  a  nature  somewhat  apart  from  the 
usual  offerings  of  this  publication.  The  May  number  has 
been  designed  to  appeal  particularly  to  the  fair  sex; 
and  the  portrait  of  the  beautiful  young  woman  on  its 
cover,  together  with  a  promise  to  reveal  her  "Secrets 
of  Health  and  Beauty,"  certainly  ought  to  catch  the  eyes 
of  women  magazine  readers.  It  will  be  remembered  that 
Bernarr  Macfadden,  Physical  Culture's  editor,  for  some 
years  published  a  women's  magazine  entitled  "Beauty 
and  Health,"  and  it  is  probable  that  Physical  Culture's 
policy  of  attempting  to  regain  the  former  readers  of 
"Beauty  and  Health,"  may  result  in  increased  news 
stand  sales  for  Macfadden 's  present  sheet. 


27 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Best   Sellers    During  March 

Reports  from  the  Leading  Centres 
of  Trade  in  Canada,  with  a  Summary 
Showing   the  Most  Popular     Books. 

Belleville. 

1.  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

2.  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.   M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

3.  Lord   Loveland    Discovers    America.    ('.    N.    &    A.    M. 

Williamson.    Musson. 

4.  White  Magic.    D.    G.    Phillips.     Briggs. 

5.  Old  Rose  and  Silver.     Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 

6.  Cab  44.     R.   F.   Foster.     Copp. 

Brantford. 

1.  Lord    Loveland    Discovers    America.  C.    N.    &    A.    M. 

Williamson.    Musson. 

2.  Passers  By.    A.    Partridge.    Musson. 

3.  Old  Rose   and   Silver.    Myrtle  Reed.     Putnam. 

4.  Miss   Selina  Lou.    M.   T.   Davies.    Bobbs. 

5.  Florentine  Frane.   Elizabeth   Robins.     Moffat. 

0.  Seventh  Noon.    Orin   Bartlett.    McLeod.    - 

Calgary. 

1.  White   Magic.  •  D.    G.    Phillips.    Briggs. 

2.  Son   of   the   Immortals.     Louis    Tracy.    McLeod. 

3.'  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 

4.  Thurston  of  Orchard  Valley.    H.  Bindloss.    McLeod. 

5.  Margarita's    Soul.     J.    D.   Bacon.    McLeod. 

6.  Furnace  of  Gold.     P.   V.   Mighels.    McLeod. 

Chatham. 

1.  Beechy.     B.  Van  Hutton.    Musson. 

2.  Hungry  Heart.     D.    G.    Phillips.    Briggs. 

3.  Bella  Donna.    R.   Hichens.     Copp. 

4.  Foreigner.    Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 

5.  Silver  Horde.    Rex  Beach.    Harper. 

6.  Ballads  of  a  Cheeehako.     R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 

Edmonton. 

1.  Kingdon  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 

2.  'Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.   M.   Montgomery.     Page. 

3.  Seventh  Noon.    Orin  Bartlett.    McLeod. 

4.  Biography  of  a  Boy.     J.   Daskan  Bacon.     Harper. 

5.  Silver   Horde.    Rex   Beach.    Harper. 

6.  Ballads  of  a  Cheeehako.    R.  W.  Service.    Briggs. 

Guelph. 

1.  A  Modern  Chronicle.  Winston  Churchill.  Macmillan. 

2.  Kingdom  of  Slender  "Swords,    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 

3.  Anne  of  .Green   Gables.    L.   M.   Montgomery.    Page. 

4.  Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.   Montgomery.     Page. 

5.  Berenice.    E.    P.    Oppenheium.    Ward. 

6.  Son  of  the  Immortals.     Louis  Tracy.     McLeod. 

Hamilton. 

1.  Margareta's   Soul.     J.  D.   Bacon.     McLeod. 

2.  Furnace  of  Gold.    P.   V.   Mighels.    McLeod. 

3.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.     H.   E.   Rives.     McLeod. 

4.  England  and  the  English.   Price  Collier.    McClelland. 

5.  Lord  Loveland  Discovers  America.       C.   N.    &  A.   M. 

Williamson.    Musson. 

6.  Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.     Westminster. 

Kingston. 

1.  Songs  of  a  Sourdough.    R.  W.   Service.     Briggs. 

2.  Ballads  of  a  Cheeehako.    R,.   W.    Service.    Briggs. 

3.  Attic  Guest.     R..  E.   Knowles.    Frowde. 

4.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    II.  E.   Rives.     McLeod. 

5.  Anne   Veronica.    H.    G.   Wells.    Copp. 

6.  Suitable    Child.    Norman    Duncan.     Frowde. 

38 


Moncton. 

1.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.     H.   E.  Rives.    McLeod. 

2.  Ballads   of   a  Cheeehako.    R.    W.    Service.    Briggs. 

3.  Anne  of  Green  Gables.   L.   M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

4.  Seventh  Noon.    Orin  Bartlett.    McLeod. 

5.  Songs  of  a   Sourdough.     R.   W.    Service.    Briggs. 

6.  Son  of  the   Immortals.    Louis  Tracy.    McLeod. 

Montreal. 

1.  Rosary.    Florence  Barclay.    Musson. 

2.  Tower   of   Ivory.     Gertrude   Atherton.     Macmillan. 

3.  Lord    Loveland    Discovers    America.    C.    N.    &    A.    M. 

Williamson.    Musson. 

4.  Prodigal  Father.     J.    S.    Clouston.     Copp. 

5.  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

6.  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.   M.   Montgomery.     Page. 

Peterborough. 

1.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.     H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 

2.  White  Magic.    D.  G.   Phillips.    Briggs. 

3.  Lord    Loveland    Discovers    America.    C.    N.    &    A.    M. 

Williamson.     Musson. 

4.  Foreigner.     Ralph    Connor.    Westminster. 

5.  Son  of  the  Immortals.     Louis   Tracy.    McLeod. 

6.  Anne  of  Avonlea.    L.  M.   Montgomery.    Page. 

Port  Arthur. 

1.  White  Magic.     D.   G.   Phillips.    Briggs. 

2.  Strictly    Business.     0.    Henry.    Musson. 

3.  Son  of  the  Immortals.     Louis  Tracy.     McLeod. 

4.  Danger   Trail.     J.    0.    Curwood.    McLeod. 

5.  Snare  of  Circumstance.    H.  E.  Buckley.     Musson. 

6.  Foreigner.     Ralph   Connor.    Westminster. 

Quebec. 

1.  Over  the  Quicksands.    A.  C.  Ray.     Musson. 

2.  Son  of  the  Immortals.     Louis  Tracy.    McLeod. 

3.  The  Rosary.    Florence  Barclay.    Musson. 

4.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.   Rives.    McLeod. 

5.  From  the  Bottom  Up.     Alexander  Irvine.    Musson. 

6.  Sparrow  Hawk.     Baroness  Orczy.     Briggs. 

St.  Catharines. 

1 .  Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.   M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

2.  Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.   M.  Montgomery.     Page. 

3.  Rosary.    Florence  Barclay.    Musson. 

4.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.     H.   E.   Rives.    McLeod. 

5.  Seventh  Noon.       Orin  Bartlett.    McLeod. 

6.  Stowaway.     Louis   Tracy.    McLeod. 

St.  John,   N.B. 

1.  Kingdom  of  Slender  Swords.    H.  E.  Rives.    McLeod. 

2.  Modern  Chronicle.    Winston   Churchill.    Macmillan. 

3.  When  a  Man  Marries.     Reinhardt.    McLeod. 

4.  Cavanagh.     Hamlin  Garland.    Harper. 

5.  Son  of  the   Immortals.     Louis  Tracy.    McLeod. 

6.  Man   Outside.    Wyndham   Martyn.    Briggs. 

Stratford. 

1.  Up  Grade.     Wilder  Goodwin.     Musson. 

2.  Passers  By.    A.   Partridge.   Musson. 

3.  Lord    Loveland    Discovers    America.    C.    N.    &    A.    M. 

Williamson.     Musson. 
1.     When   Billows   Roll. 
5.     Northern   Lights.     Sir  Gilbert   Parker.     Copp. 

Toronto. 

1.  White  Magic.     D.   G.   Phillips.     Briggs. 

2.  Thurston    of   Orchard    Valley.    Harold    Bindloss.    Mc- 
,  Leod. 

3.  Samuel  the    Seeker.     Upton   Sinclair.    McLeod. 
1.    Danger  Trail.     J.  0.  Curwood.    McLeod. 

5.  Losing    Game.    Will    Payne.     Copp. 

6.  Son  of  the  Immortals.     Louis  Tracy.    McLeod. 


BOOKSELLER     AND    STATIONER 


1. 
o. 

3. 

4. 

5. 
6. 


Canadian  Summary. 

I  'oints. 

Kingdom   of  Slender   Swords.    H.   E.    Hives    80 

Son  of  the  Immortals.     Louis  Tracy    L~> 

White  Magic.     D.  G.  Phillips   U 

Lord1  Loveland  Discovers  America.     C.  N.  and  A. 

M.    Williamson    42 

Anne  of  Green  Gables.     L.  M.  Montgomery   39 

Anne  of  Avonlea.     L.  M.  Montgomery  34 


Copyrights   Recorded  in  March 

A  List  of  Books  Entered  During  the 
Month  at  the  Copyright  Branch  ot  the 
Department  of  Agriculture,  Ottawa. 

22066.  A  New  and  Practical  Course  in  Touch  Type- 
writing. Part  I.  By  G.  M.  James,  B.A.,  LL.B.  (Book.) 
George  Moffatt   James,    Winnipeg,   23rd  February. 

22068.  Histoire  des  Seigneurs  de  la  Riviere  du  Sud. 
Publiee  dans  "La  Tribune,"  St.  Hyacinthe,  Que.  (Droit 
Temporaire  d'Auteur.)  Rev.  Azaire  Couillard  Despres, 
St.  Hughes,  Que.,  24  fevrier. 

22069.  Traite  de  la  Protection  des  Forets  contre  le 
Feu.  Par  VV.  C.  J.  Hall  et  B.  L.  O'Hara.  (Book.) 
William  Charles  John  Hall  and  Brian  Lynch  O'Hara, 
Quebec,   25th  February. 

22070.  In  Camp.  By  J.  B.  Hammond.  (Verses.) 
J.  B.  Hammond,  Nairn  Centre,  Ont.,  25th  February. 

22077.  The  Practical  Anatomy  of  the  Rabbit.  An 
Elementary  Laboratory  Text  Book  in  Mammalian  Ana- 
tomy. By  B.  A.  Bensley,  Ph.D.  (Book.)  R.  J.  Hamil- 
ton, Toronto,   1st  March. 

22081.  Conveyancing  and  Other  Forms.  Fourth 
Edition.  By  A.  H.  O'Brien,  M.A.  (Book.)  Arthur  Henry 
O'Brien,    Ottawa,    2nd    March. 

22092.  Annual  Digest  of  Canadian  Case  Law  of  All 
the  Cases  Reported  and  Noted  during  the  Year  1909.  To- 
gether with  a  Table  of  the  Cases  Digested  and  a  Table 
of  the  Cases  Affirmed,  Followed,  etc.,  in  the  Cases  Di- 
gested. Edited  by  Walter  E.  Lear.  (Book.)  The  Cars- 
well  Company,  Limited,  Toronto,  8th  March. 

22105.  Le  Poulailler  Modele  dans  la  Region  Nord-Est 
de  la  Province  de  Quebec.  Par  J.  B.  Plante,  Aviculteur. 
(Livre.)   J.  B.  Plante,   Stadacona,  Que.,  11  mars. 

22106.  Manual  of  Parker's  Arithmetic  Cabinet. 
(Book.)    Thomas  Parker,  Toronto,   11th  March. 

22126.  Ode  to  Canada  and  Other  Poems.  By  A.  C. 
Nash.  (Book.)  Arthur  Charles  Nash,  Peachland,  British 
Columbia,   17th  March. 


22128.  The  Coal  and  Iron  Industries  of  Nova  Scotia. 
By  C.  Ochiltree  Macdonald.  (Book.)  By  C.  Ochiltree 
Macdonald,   Halifax,  17th  March. 

22129.  Marriage  Manual.  A  Brief  Manual  of  Essential 
Information  for  Those  Entering  into  Marriage  Relation- 
ship. (Book.)  J.  Aspinall  C.  McCuaig,  Toronto,  18th 
March. 

22162.  Toasts  and  Ballads;  Witty,  Sad,  Gay,  Wise  and 
Otherwise.  (Book.)  McLeod  &  Allen,  Toronto,  26th 
March. 

22173.  By-Laws  for  Rural  Municipalities  in  the  Prov- 
ince of  Saskatchewan.  (Book.)  Henry  Lee  Wilson,  Win- 
nipeg,  29th  March. 

22181.  By  What  Authority.  By  Evangelist  II.  P. 
Morgan.     (Book.)    H.  P.  Morgan,  Ottawa,  30th  March. 

22144.  Madame  Janvier's  Church.  By  Mary  E.  Hick- 
son.  (Booklet.)  Mary  Elizabeth  Hickson,  Montreal, 
21st   March. 

22117.  Pratts  Things  You  Ought  to  Know  About 
Horses,  Cows  and  Hogs.  Edited  by  Dr.  Francis  Bridge 
and  Prof.  Thomas  Shaw.  (Book.)  Pratt  Food  Company, 
Limited,  Toronto,  21st  March. 

22150.  Five  Thousand  Facts  About  Canada,  1910. 
(Book.)    Frank    Yeigh,    Toronto,    22nd   March. 

22156.  The  Final  Rehearsal.  Musical  Sketch.  In  One 
Act.  By  Emma  Carter  Seymour.  (Book.)  Emma  Carter 
Seymour,   Niagara  Falls,  Ont. 

Interim  Copyright. 

1214.  Marriage  Manual.  A  Brief  Manual  of  Essen- 
tial Information  for  those  entering  into  Marriage  Re- 
lationship. (.Book.)  J.  Aspinall  C.  McCuaig,  Toronto, 
29th  January. 

1215.  The  Criminal  Code  of  Canada  and  the  Canada 
Evidence  Act  as  Amended  to  Date,  with  Commentaries, 
Annotations,  Forms,  etc.,  etc.,  and  An  Appendix.  By 
.  ames  Crankshaw,  B.C.L.,  K.C.  Third  Edition.  James 
Crankshaw,   Montreal,  3rd  February. 

1217.  The  Dominion  of  Canada.  A  General  History 
of  the  Constitutional,  Political,  Financial,  Educational 
and  Social  Browth  and  Development  of  the  Whole 
Country  From  Its  Discovery  to  the  Present  Time.  In 
Twelve  Volumes.  Illustrated.  Arthur  (!.  Doughty,  Ot- 
tawa, 11th  February. 

1218.  The  Union  Jack  Explained.  (Book.)  Henry 
Hill,   Montreal,    17th  February. 

1219.  Health  Lectures.  Based  on  the  Science  of 
Human  Electricity.  Part  I.  By  A.  J.  C.  (Pamphlet.) 
Arthur  J.  Crighton,  Niagara-on-the-Lake,  Ont.,  22nd 
February. 

1220.  Smoke  :  Its  Cost,  Cause  and  Consequences — 
How  Perfect  Combustion  is  Possible.  (Book.)  John  Liv- 
ingstone,   Montreal,    24th   February. 


5,000  Facts  About  Canada 

Compiled  by  Frank  Yeigh 

Great  success  of  the  1910  Edition,  Second  issue  already  called  for. 
More  repeat  orders  from  dealers  than  ever  before.  Are  YOU  sharing 
in  the  sale  ?  The  dealer  who  gives  it  a  good  display  secures 
corresponding  good  results. 

Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co.,  667  spadina  Ave.,  Toronto 

2Q 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

An  International  Gallery  of  Fine  Colour  Printing. 


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Canadians  connected  in  any  way  with  the  Printing  and  Stationery  Trades 
should  take  advantage  of  the  Fourth  International 

Printing 


STATIONERY 


AND  ALLIED 
TRADES 


EXHIBITION 


MAY  25  to 
JUNE  9 


IQIO 


MAY  25  to 
JUNE  9 


Boyal  AGRICULTURAL  HALL 

LONDON,  ENGLAND 


The  Exhibits  will  show,  by 

Machinery  at  Work  and  by 
Printed  Specimens,  the 
Progress  in  the  Graphic  Arts 

since  1904  and  1906 

The  largest  and  most  representative  Exhibition  of 
its  kind  ever  held. 


FREDERIC  W.  BRIDGES, 

Organizing  Manager 


ROBERT  HILTON, 

Hon.  Secretary 


EXHIBITION  OFFICES- 
110-125,  FINSBURY  PAVEMENT,  LONDON,  E.  C. 


Type-Casting  and  Type-Setting  Machines  at  Work. 


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30 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Dan  Merrithew 


By   LAWRENCE    PERRY 


If  you  like  a  spirited,  well-told 
story  of  young  love  and  young 
courage  on  the  high  seas  —THIS 
is  the  book  you  want. 

TWO  EDITIONS  BEFORE  PUBLICATION  BAY 

Illustrated  by  J.  V.  McFall 
A.  C.  McCLURC  &  CO.      -      PUBLISHERS 


Engraving  for  the  Trade. 

J.  C.  Skene  has  established  an  engraving  business  at 
23  Adelaide  St.  W.,  where  he  has  installed  a  complete 
plant  for  copperplate  and  steel  die  engraving.  Mr. 
Skene's  intention  is  to  cater  to  the  society  stationery 
trade  of  the  retail  stationer  and  he  is  prepared  to  handle 
all  wedding  announcements,  monogram  stamping,  etc. 
Mr.  Skene  has  had  large  experience  on  his  own  line, 
working  for  some  of  the  leading  engraving  and  emboss- 
ing firms  on  the  continent  and  his  work  should  give  ab- 
solute satisfaction. 


New  Ideas  in  Calendars. 

Amongst  the  many  new  propositions  offered  to  the 
trade  this  year  is  an  interesting  line  of  new  ideas  in 
calendars  and  other  kindred  novelties  produced  hy  The 
Chas  H.  Elliott  Co.,  Philadelphia.  They  are  putting  these 
goods  on  the  market  under  the  name  of  "Penn-craft" 
and  dealers  who  have  seen  advance  samples  speak  highly 
of  the  noveltv  of  the  line. 


Clarence  Mulford's  Big  Cowboy  Story 

HOPALONG 
C  A  SS I D Y 


Three  editions 
"before  publica- 
tion day  tell  the 
story  of  this  real 
cowboy  story  by 
the  author  of 
"  Bar  20  "  and 
"The  Orphan." 

Splendid  pictures 

in  color  by 
Maynard    Dixon. 


Witty,  rollicking, 
red-headed  "Hop- 
along"  —  you  can't 
help  loving  him 
any  more  than 
"  Meeker's  girl  " 
could. 


A.  C.  McCLURG  &  CO.,  Publishers 


f~J  f\(~\  I/'  ^Z  Out-of-print  books  supplied.     No  matter  what  subjec 

IjlllllV^H  Can  supply  any  book  ever  published.    We  have  50,000 

^"^  ^"^  ^^  *^  rare  books. 

BAKER'S  BOOKSHOP,  John  Bright  St.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 

A  Unique  Autobiography. 

From  the  Bottom  Up.  By  Alexander  Irvine.  The  Mussoti 
Book  Co.,  Toronto.  $1.50. 
An  autobiography  quite  unique  as  regards  the  ground 
which  it  covers  within  the  compass  of  one  man's  life 
and  in  the  vivid  manner  in  which  the  writer  has  transcrib- 
ed his  experiences  upon  the  pages  of  his  hook.  He  has 
penetrated  into  the  solidarity  of  the  submerged  masses 
in  cities,  in  mines,  and  where  the  system  of  peonage  pre- 
vails. He  has  made  himself  acquainted,  by  actual  par- 
ticipation, with  the  life  of  factories,  of  marine,  and  of 
military  service,  and  out  of  his  large  and  varied  experi- 
ence he  writes  with  convincing  emphasis  on  the  social 
problems  of  the  present  day,  and  some  of  their  solutions. 
He  recognizes  the  fact  that  these  are,  to  a  large  extent, 
economic,  hut  from  his  vantage  ground  of  a  New  York 
pastorate,  he  preaches  the  gospel  of  service  to  humanity 
and  the  spiritual  interpretation  of  life. 


Card  Writer's  Paint. 

Clark  Bros.,  Winnipeg,  are  showing  samples  of  the 
card  writers'  paint  put  up  by  the  Reliance  Ink  Company. 
The  paint  is  enclosed  in  a  lead  tube  and  can  be  con- 
veniently oozed  out  in  such  quantities  as  are  necessary. 
The  paint  is  a  dense  material  and  a  small  quantity  when 
mixed  in  water  by  a  brush  is  sufficient  for  a  considerable 
piece  of  work.  The  article  is  handy,  clean  and  admirably 
adapted  for  card  writing  in  the  retail  store,  and  is  be- 
coming popular  with  many  merchants. 

V  31 


British    Publisher    Here. 

Fred  J.  North,  general  manager  of  James  Clarke  & 
Co.,  publishers,  London,  England,  is  expected  in  Toronto 
about  the  middle  of  the  month,  and  will  call  upon  the 
Canadian  publishers.  He  will  be  located  at  the  King 
Edward  Hotel. 


The  Carter's  Ink  Company  are  opening  their  big  new 
factory  in  East  Cambridge  on  Thursday,  April  14  and 
are  holding  a  reception   in  celebration  of  the  event. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Cloth  Reprint  Gilbert  Parker 


Printed  on  good  paper,  handsomely  bound  in  green  cloth,  frontispiece  illustra- 
tion, attractive  wrapper.     Write  for  quantity  quotations. 


*1&  j 


. 


.*UWWvW-/</u 


WtA#t|j$Vj 


fifes  1 1 


The 
Weavers 


NOW 
READY 


The  Battle 
of  the  Strong 


The  Right 
of  Way 


Ready  about 
April  20th 


p$t&8&0Si$ti&8m*Bi 


The  Seats 

k^i*j;    of  the  Mighty 


|  :-~t|r^^»~w* 


Ready  about 
May  5th 


Ready  about 
May  20th 


1910  FICTION 


Cab  No.  44.     By  R  F.  Foster.      Cloth  $1.25.      A  Detective  and  Love  Story. 

The  Man  Who  Stole  the  Earth.     By  Holt  White.     Illustrated,  cloth  $1.25.     An 
up-to-date  Airship  Story. 

The  Losing  Game.     By    Will   Payne.      Illustrated,    cloth    $1.50.      Discloses   the 
Mechanism  of  a  big  Bucket-shop. 

A  Disciple  of  Chance.     By  Sarah  Dean.     Cloth  $1.25.     A  splendid  Romance  of 
the  Days  of  the  Georges. 

The  Prodigal  Father.     By  J.  Storer  Clouston,  author  of  "The  Lunatic  at  Large,'' 
etc.     Cloth  $1.25.     A  most  delightful  story. 

The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Limited 

TORONTO 


32 


STATIONERY     DEPARTMENT 


Does  Not  Affect  the  Trade. 

A  ehange  in  the  tariff  which  prevails  between  Can- 
ada and  the  United  Slates  was  one  of  the  results  of  the 
recent  tariff  conference  in.  Albany,  N.Y.  The  rate  of 
duty  was  lowered  on  some  articles,  among-  which  were, 
lithographed  and  process  printed  matter.  The  rate  on 
these  lines  was  reduced  from  25  per  cent,  to  22A  per  cent. 
This  reduction  will  not  affect  the  prices  this  year.  Nearly 
all  orders  were  placed  before  the  reduction  took  place 
and  these  orders  will  be  filled  at  the  price  for  which  they 
wen-  contracted.  Next  season  if  competition  is  very 
keen  the  2\  par  cent,  reduction  will  allow  the  wholesaler 
a  margin  to  work  on  if  lie  is  forced  to  cut  prices.  Unless 
this  competition  should  arise  there  is  no  likelihood  of  the 
wholesalers  dropping  the  price  of  their  own  accord. 

The  lithographers  made  application  to  have  the  tariff 
on  these  articles  raised  in  order  to  afford  them  more  pru- 
tection  and  the  lowering  of  their  tariff  more  than  before 
is  a  sad  disappointment  to  them. 


Mi 


Mr.  Jarvis  is  Successful. 
Jarvis'    initial    flip    as    organizer    for    the    Book- 


sellers' Association  was  attended  with  gratifying  suc- 
cess. He  visited  Hamilton,  St.  Catharines,  Niagara  Falls, 
Welland,  Brantford,  Tillsonburg,  Simcoe,  St.  Thomas, 
Chatham,  Windsor  and  London,  and  secured  practically 
every  dealer  in  these  places.  At  two  or  three  points, 
notably  London  and  Hamilton,  trade  suppers  were  held, 
which  were  well  attended.  Mr.  Jarvis  has  returned  to 
Ottawa    for    the    present,    but    will    resume    his     canvass 

shortly. 

***** 

Trade  Happenings. 

The  Booklovers'  Library,  Toronto,  has  been  sold  to 
the  W.  A.  Murray  Co.  and  will  be  run  by  that  store  as 
Murray's   Booklovers'    Library. 

The  second-hand  book  business  of  John  Britnell  for 
many  years  located  at  230  Yonge  Street  has  been  moved 
to  a  store  above  College  Street. 

The  Upper  Canada  Bible  Society  are  moving  from 
the  old  Bible  House,  102  Yonge  St.  to  temporary  prem- 
ises at  317  Yonge  St.,  pending:  the  erection  of  a  new 
building  on    College    St. 


Byron  Randall's  book  store  in  Port  Hope  was  slight- 
ly damaged  by  fire  on  Good  Friday   afternpon. 

Nisbet  &  Bacon,  Oakville,  have  sold  their  stationery 
and  school  supply  business  to  Wm.  Busby. 

R.  A.  J.  Little,  St.  Thomas,  recently  held  a   success 
ful  guessing   contest,    for   which    prizes    amounting-   to    $10 
worth  of  wall  paper  wore  awarded.     The  contestants  had 
to   guess   the   number   of   rolls   of   paper   received    in    a    re- 
cent consignment. 

Mr.  Bremner,  buyer  for  Carter  &  Co.,  Charlotte- 
town,  P.E.I. ,  was  on  his  annual  trip  to  Toronto  last 
month. 

D.  ('.  Nixon,  Moose  .Jaw,  who  recently  opened  a  branch 
store  in  Weyburn,  Sask.,  was  down  east  on  a  buying 
trip   last   month. 

Albert  M.  McLeod,  bookseller,  Sydney,  N.S.,  died 
recently  in  Halifax. 

E.  G.  Nelson  &  Co.,  St.  John,  are  now  settled  in 
their  new   store,   one  of  the  most   attractive   in  Canada. 

Mrs.  W.  C.  Irving,  stationer  and  fancy  goods  dealer. 
Pembroke,  has  offered  her   business  for  sale. 


Gage's  New  School  Blanks. 

Among  the  new  designs  shown  by  \Y.  J.  Gage  &  Co.. 
Toronto,  in  school  scribblers  and  exercise  books  for  the 
coming  season  mention  might  be  made  of  the  following: — 

The  "Drum  Major."  represents  a  fife  and  drum  band 
of  animals  led  by  a  dog  dressed  as  a  drum  major. 
"Happy  Times"  has  in  the  centre  the  smiling  face  of  a 
bright  school  boy  and  underneath  a  verse  about  the  bene- 
fits of  always  wearing  a  smile.  "The  Captive"  shows 
the  king-  of  animals,  the  lion,  looking  out  through  the 
bars  id'  a   cage. 

"Northern  Youngsters"  shows  what  our  farthest 
north  boy  looks  like,  and  his  home  and  surroundings. 
"Going  to  School''  shows  two  school  girls  going  to 
school  during  a  rain  storm.  "The  Young  Warrior"  is  a 
catchy  cover  that  will  appeal  to  the  younger  scholars. 
The  "Twentieth  Century"  pictures  a  submarine,  a  bat- 
tleship and  an  ocean  steamship  mi  tin  water  with  an 
aeroplane  floating  above.  "Going  Some"  depicts  a  race 
between  two  boys  in  auto  carts.  "Maple  Leaves"  shows 
a  beautiful  assortment  of  leaves  in  the  shades  of  autumn. 


Manufacturers  and  Wholesale  Dealers  in 


SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 


OF  EVERY 
KIND 


Write  for  Catalogue  and  Trade  Discounts 


1 


THE  GEO.  M.  HENDRY  CO.,  Limited, 

Call  in  and  see  our  new  Sample  Rooms.     They  will  surprise  you. 


215-219  VICTORIA  STREET 
TORONTO,  ONT. 


33 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


New  Exercise  Covers. 

E.  H,  Harcourt  Co.,  Ltd.,  255  Wellington  W.,  make  a 
specialty  of  exercise  books.  This  year  their  assortment 
of  covers  is  exceptionally  hue.  They  are  all  designed  and 
printed  in  their  own  plant.  For  the  fall  opening  they  are 
showing  a  range  of  over  50  covers,  14  of  which  have  never 
been  shown  before.  The  new  covers  include  the  Bobo- 
link, Oriole,  Cardinal  and  Bluebird,  the  Tabby,  the  Black 
Cat,  the  Collie,  the  Kitty,  the  Tower  and  the  Spaniel, 
the  Apple  Blossom  and  Pansy,  the  Annie  Laurie,  Bonnie 
Dundee  and  Tartan.  These  covers  are  all  printed  in  at 
least  four  colors,  some  even  more. 

English  Pen  Maker  Here. 

A.  Finburgh,  managing  director  of  the  Wyvern  Foun- 
tain Pen  Co.,  of  Leicester.  England,  is  now  traveling  in 
Canada  in  the  interests  of  his  concern.  The  Wyvern  Co. 
feel  that  they  are  in  a  position  to  offer  exceptional  value 
to  the  trade,  as  they  are  actual  manufacturers  through- 
out of  fountain  and  stylo  pens,  as  well  as  gold  nibs  of 
every  description.  One  of  their  late  patterns  is  the 
Wyvern  Non-leakable  Pen.  It  is  so  constructed  that  by 
screwing  on  the  cap  it  becomes  impossible  for  the  ink  to 
leak  no  matter  in  what  position  the  pen  is  carried.  It 
is  perfectly  safe  lying  flat  in  a  waistcoat  pocket  or  a 
lady's  satchel.  It  is  made  in  two  sizes,  "Gents"  and 
Ladies."  In  addition  to  the  black  vulcanite  barrels,  the 
Wyvern  Co.  offer  a  very  attractive  series  of  gold  and 
silver  mounted  pens,  salable  at  all  seasons  of  the  *year 
l'or  gift  purposes. 

New   Lines   at   Copp,    Clark's. 

"Eyesight"  blotting  paper  is  the  latest  hygienic  pro- 
duction in  stationery.  It  is  a  good  grade  of  blotting  and 
is  made  in  green  only,  as  this  is  the  best  color  for  the 
eyes,  there  being  no  reflection  from  it. 

The  "Photo  Mailer"  is  now  past  the  novelty  stage 
and  has  become  a  staple.  It  is  specially  made  to  accom- 
modate photographs,  preserves  the  cards  and  is  a  great 
help  to  any  one  in  a  hurry.  It  does  away  with  the 
necessity  of  cutting  cardboard  to  the  required  size.  Ten 
sizes. 

A  new  line  of  deed  boxes  has  been  received,  made  of 
ex.tra  strong  tinned  steel  plates,  fitted  with  strong  br^ss 
4-lever  lock  and  duplicate  keys.  It  is  reinforced  with 
extra  metal  panel  inside  to  prevent  injury  to  box  or  eon- 
tents  when  stored  and  affords  absolute  security  for  valu- 
able papers. 

A  booklet  of  tags  is  a  useful  article,  just  received. 
The  tags  come  twelve  in  a  packet,  each  perforated  so  as 
to  be  easily  detached.  A  strong  cord  and  blotter  is 
attached  to  each.  Householders  will  readily  recognize 
the  value  of  these  tags  as  they  are  of  frequent  use  in 
the  home. 

A  useful  metal  box  of  paper  fasteners,  assorted  sizes, 
is  another  office  and  household  convenience,  which  should 
have  a  ready  sale.  A  somewhat  similar  box  containing 
one  gross  of  useful  sizes  of  drawing  pens  is  another  use- 
ful article. 

"Perfect"  Fountain  Pen. 

McCaw,  Stevenson  &  Orr,  Ltd.,  of  Belfast,  who  will 
be  remembered  as  successors  to  Marcus  Ward  &  Co.,  have 
just   come   to   the   front  with   a  very  interesting  line   of 


fountain  and  stylographic  pens,  which  they  are  placing  on 
the  market  under  the  name  of  Marcus  Ward's  "Perfect" 
Pens.  The  pens  range  in  price  from  3s.  9d.  per  dozen  to 
57s.  pei-  dozen.  Among  these  are  two  very  excellent  lines 
of  self-filling  pens  at  33s.  The  makers  claim  that  these 
pens  are  the  acme  if  simplicity  and  durability,  and  there 
is  no  rubber  or  other  perishable  material  used  in  their 
manufacture.  With  two  exceptions,  these  pens  are  fitted 
with  14  carat  gold  nibs,  iridium  tipped,  and  every  pen 
is  guaranteed  perfect.  A  demonstration  made  in  the  Lon- 
don office  of  the  manufacturers  showed  that  every  claim 
was  more  than  justified.  A  recent  offer  made  to  their 
home  customers  was  a  complete  set  of  sixteen  pens  for 
34s.  9d..  working  out  at  about  2s.  2d.  each.  McCaw, 
Stevenson  &  Orr  inform  us  they  will  be  glad  to  furnish 
sets  to  the  Canadian  trade  on  very  advantageous  terms 
and  any  who  are  interested  should  place  themselves  in 
communication  with  Mr.  Prenter,  the  Canadian  repre- 
sentative. 

A  New  Factory  in  New  York. 

Last  week 's  New  York  real  estate  news  contained  an 
item  of  great  interest  to  the  stationery  trade.  The  ten- 
storey  fireproof  building  at  34-40  Fletcher  Street,  New 
\  ork,  has  been  sold  to  the  L.  E.  Waterman  Company  for 
use  as  a  factory  for  the  manufacture  of  Waterman's 
"Ideal"  fountain  pens.  The  structure,  which  is  of  re- 
inforced concrete,  was  built  some  five  years  ago  at  a  cost 
of  about  $200,000.  It  has  a  frontage  of  70  feet  and  a 
depth  of  about  72  feet. 

L.  E.  Waterman  Company  Win8. 

The  L.  E.  Waterman  Co.  have  won  another  victory 
over  competitors  using  a  similar  name  to  its  own  on 
fountain  pens.  Isaac  E.  Chapman  and  William  I.  Chap- 
man, who  compose  the  firm  of  A.  A.  Waterman  &  Com- 
pany recently  brought  an  action  against  the  L.  E.  Water- 
man £  'Company  to  restrain  the  L.  E.  Waterman  Company 
from  bringing  suits  against  customers  of  A.  A.  Water- 
man &  Co.,  and  to  restrain  the  L.  E.  Waterman  Company 
from  sending  out  copies  of  injunctions  which  had  been 
issued  against  customers  of  A.  A.  Waterman  &  Com- 
pany restraining  such  customers  from  substituting  pens 
of  the  make  of  A.  A.  Waterman  &  Company  for  those  of 
L.  E.  Waterman  Company's  make,  and  restraining  also 
the  use  of  the  name  "Waterman"  and  "A.  A.  Water- 
man" in  connection  with  the  sale  of  fountain  pens. 

A  motion  for  a  preliminary  injunction  was  brought  by 
A.  A.  Waterman  &  Company  before  Mr.  Justice  New- 
burger,  sitting  at  a  special-  term  in  the  Supreme  Court, 
New  York  County,  on  March  8th  and  March  15th.  Mr. 
Justice  New  burger  denied  the  motion  for  injunction  in 
the  following  decision: 

"Chapman  vs.  Waterman  Co. — The  present  plaintiffs 
were  not  parties  to  the  decree  in  the  action  of  Waterman 
vs.  Waterman  and  therfore  are  not  entitled  to  the  bene- 
fits accruing  thereunder.  The  prayer  in  this  action  seeks 
to  enjoin  the  defendant  from  interfering  with  plaintiffs 
in  the  use  of  the  name  A.  A.  Waterman,  claiming  the 
right  to  such  name  by  reasons  of  assignments  to  them  and 
by  reason  of  the  decree  hereinbefore  referred  to.  If  the 
plaintiffs  are  entitled  to  enforce  such  decree,  it  can  be 
'done  in  that  action  and  no  independent  action  need  be 
brought.  Plaintiffs  have  failed  to  make  out  such  a  case 
as  would  warrant  this  Court  in  granting  an  injuncti«n 
Pendente  lite.     The  motion  is  denied." 


34 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


YOUR 
RE-ORDERS 


NOW  is  the  time  to  hurry  in  your  re- 
orders for  the  patterns  in  Staunton 
wall  paper  that  are  selling  best  and  so  make 
sure  of  getting  all  you  need. 


WALLPAPER 


is  a  greater  success  this  season  even  than  we 
anticipated.     It  is  a  big  year. 

Be  sure  to  have  a  full  supply. 

STAUNTONS,  LIMITED 

WALL  PAPER  MANUFACTURERS 

933  YONGE  STREET      -      -     TORONTO 


E.  MORRIS  &  CO 

(Wholesale) 

STATIONERY 
SCHOOL  SUPPLIES 
POSTCARDS 


LOCAL   VIEW  POSTCARDS 

We  have  the  exclusive  handling  of  the  Products  of 
Three  of  the  leading  German  Postcard  Factories — 
Specialists   in   their  own    particular  style  of  card. 


CHROMOTYPE  BLACK  and  WHITE 

HAND-COLORED  SEPIA— BROWN 

MARINE— BLUE 

PRICES  from  $4.50  m. 

Write    for   samples,   which    will   convince    you  that 
we  are  showing  high-grade  cards